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Sample records for limited resource setting

  1. Sepsis Resuscitation in Resource-Limited Settings.

    PubMed

    Meier, Brian; Staton, Catherine

    2017-02-01

    Our evolving understanding of the physiologic processes that lead to sepsis has led to updated consensus guidelines outlining priorities in the recognition and treatment of septic patients. However, an enormous question remains when considering how to best implement these guidelines in settings with limited resources, which include rural US emergency departments and low- and middle-income countries. The core principles of sepsis management should be a priority in community emergency departments. Similarly, cost-effective interventions are key priorities in low- and middle-income countries; however, consideration must be given to the unique challenges associated with such settings.

  2. Establishing Medical Schools in Limited Resource Settings.

    PubMed

    Tsinuel, Girma; Tsedeke, Asaminew; Matthias, Siebeck; Fischer, Martin R; Jacobs, Fabian; Sebsibe, Desalegn; Yoseph, Mamo; Abraham, Haileamlak

    2016-05-01

    One urgent goal of countries in sub-Saharan Africa is to dynamically scale up the education and work force of medical doctors in the training institutions and health facilities, respectively. These countries face challenges related to the rapid scale up which is mostly done without proper strategic planning, without the basic elements of infrastructure development, educational as well as academic and administrative human resources. Medical education done in the context of limited resources is thus compromising the quality of graduates. In the future, a collaborative and need-based approach involving major stakeholders such as medical educators concerned, ministries, planners and policy makers is needed. This article identifies the challenges of establishing medical schools and sustaining the quality of education through rapid scale-up in Sub-Saharan Africa in the settings of limited resources. It also outlines the minimum requirements for establishing medical schools. A consensus building workshop was conducted in Bishoftu, Ethiopia, from Nov 8-12, 2013. Participants were professionals from 13 Ethiopian medical schools, and representatives of medical schools from South Sudan, Somaliland, Somalia, and Mozambique. Participants are listed in Appendix 1. The governments and stakeholders should jointly develop strategic plans and a roadmaps for opening or expanding medical schools to scale up educational resources. It is advisable that medical schools have autonomy regarding the number of student-intake, student selection, curriculum ownership, resource allocation including for infrastructure and staff development. Health science and medical curricula should be integrated within and harmonized nationally. An educational evaluation framework needs to be embedded in the curricula, and all medical schools should have Health Science Education Development Centers.

  3. Crossing the quality chasm in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Maru, Duncan Smith-Rohrberg; Andrews, Jason; Schwarz, Dan; Schwarz, Ryan; Acharya, Bibhav; Ramaiya, Astha; Karelas, Gregory; Rajbhandari, Ruma; Mate, Kedar; Shilpakar, Sona

    2012-11-30

    Over the last decade, extensive scientific and policy innovations have begun to reduce the "quality chasm"--the gulf between best practices and actual implementation that exists in resource-rich medical settings. While limited data exist, this chasm is likely to be equally acute and deadly in resource-limited areas. While health systems have begun to be scaled up in impoverished areas, scale-up is just the foundation necessary to deliver effective healthcare to the poor. This perspective piece describes a vision for a global quality improvement movement in resource-limited areas. The following action items are a first step toward achieving this vision: 1) revise global health investment mechanisms to value quality; 2) enhance human resources for improving health systems quality; 3) scale up data capacity; 4) deepen community accountability and engagement initiatives; 5) implement evidence-based quality improvement programs; 6) develop an implementation science research agenda.

  4. Crossing the quality chasm in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade, extensive scientific and policy innovations have begun to reduce the “quality chasm” - the gulf between best practices and actual implementation that exists in resource-rich medical settings. While limited data exist, this chasm is likely to be equally acute and deadly in resource-limited areas. While health systems have begun to be scaled up in impoverished areas, scale-up is just the foundation necessary to deliver effective healthcare to the poor. This perspective piece describes a vision for a global quality improvement movement in resource-limited areas. The following action items are a first step toward achieving this vision: 1) revise global health investment mechanisms to value quality; 2) enhance human resources for improving health systems quality; 3) scale up data capacity; 4) deepen community accountability and engagement initiatives; 5) implement evidence-based quality improvement programs; 6) develop an implementation science research agenda. PMID:23193968

  5. Improving Laboratory and Clinical Hematology Services in Resource Limited Settings.

    PubMed

    Allen, Angela; Allen, Stephen; Olivieri, Nancy

    2016-04-01

    The difficulties in establishing and delivering reliable clinical hematology and laboratory services in resource-limited settings are well recognized. However, much can be achieved by better use of existing resources through a concerted quality improvement approach. The recommendations of this article are based in part upon work in the thalassemias, inherited disorders of hemoglobin that are widely prevalent in Asia, which may serve as a model that is applicable to other common, chronic disorders in resource-poor settings. Available resources are highlighted and recommendations made regarding approaches to improving services. Over the last few years, a number of low and middle-income countries, obtaining support from appropriate governmental sources, have identified and overcome difficulties and significantly improved clinical services for patients with thalassemia.

  6. Diagnostics in Ebola Virus Disease in Resource-Rich and Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Shorten, Robert J; Brown, Colin S; Jacobs, Michael; Rattenbury, Simon; Simpson, Andrew J.; Mepham, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in West Africa was unprecedented in scale and location. Limited access to both diagnostic and supportive pathology assays in both resource-rich and resource-limited settings had a detrimental effect on the identification and isolation of cases as well as individual patient management. Limited access to such assays in resource-rich settings resulted in delays in differentiating EVD from other illnesses in returning travellers, in turn utilising valuable resources until a diagnosis could be made. This had a much greater impact in West Africa, where it contributed to the initial failure to contain the outbreak. This review explores diagnostic assays of use in EVD in both resource-rich and resource-limited settings, including their respective limitations, and some novel assays and approaches that may be of use in future outbreaks. PMID:27788135

  7. Perinatal pathology: practice suggestions for limited-resource settings.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Drucilla J

    2013-06-01

    The practice of perinatal pathology in much of the world suffers, as do all subspecialties of anatomic pathology, from inadequate resources (equipment, consumables, and both professional and technical personnel), from lack of education (not only of the pathologist but also of the clinicians responsible for sending the specimens, and the technicians processing the specimens), and from lack of appropriate government sector support. Perinatal pathology has significant public health-related utility and should be championing its service by providing maternal and fetal/infant mortality and morbidity data to governmental health ministries. It is with this pathologic data that informed decisions can be made on health-related courses of action and allocation of resources. These perinatal pathology data are needed to develop appropriate public health initiatives, specifically toward achieving the Millennium Developmental Goals as the best way to effectively decrease infant and maternal deaths and to determine causes of perinatal mortality and morbidity. The following overview will focus on the utility of perinatal pathology specifically as related to its public health function and will suggest methods to improve its service in resource-poor settings. This article is offered not as a critique of the current practice that most pathologists find themselves working in globally, but to provide suggestions for improving perinatal pathology services, which could be implemented with the limited available resources and manpower most pathology departments currently have. In addition, we offer suggestions for graded improvements ("ramping up") over time.

  8. Thyroid Surgery in a Resource-Limited Setting.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Aria; Campbell, David; Campbell, Bruce H; Ngoitsi, Henry Nono; Sisenda, Titus M; Denge, Makaya; James, Benjamin C; Cordes, Susan R

    2017-03-01

    Objective The present study reviews a series of patients who underwent thyroid surgery in Eldoret, Kenya, to demonstrate the feasibility of conducting long-term (>1 year) outcomes research in a resource-limited setting, impact on the quality of life of the recipient population, and inform future humanitarian collaborations. Study Design Case series with chart review. Setting Tertiary public referral hospital in Eldoret, Kenya. Subjects and Methods Twenty-one patients were enrolled during the study period. A retrospective chart review was performed for all adult patients who underwent thyroid surgery during humanitarian trips (2010-2015). Patients were contacted by mobile telephone. Medical history and physical examination, including laryngoscopy, were performed, and the SF-36 was administered (a quality-of-life questionnaire). Laboratory measurements of thyroid function and neck ultrasound were obtained. Results The mean follow-up was 33.6 ± 20.2 months after surgery: 37.5% of subtotal thyroidectomy patients and 15.4% of lobectomy patients were hypothyroid postoperatively according to serologic studies. There were no cases of goiter recurrence or malignancy. All patients reported postoperative symptomatic improvement and collectively showed positive pre- and postoperative score differences on the SF-36. Conclusion Although limited by a small sample size and the retrospective nature, our study demonstrates the feasibility of long-term surgical and quality-of-life outcomes research in a resource-limited setting. The low complication rates suggest minimal adverse effects of performing surgery in this context. Despite a considerable rate of postoperative hypothyroidism, it is in accordance with prior studies and emphasizes the need for individualized, longitudinal, and multidisciplinary care. Quality-of-life score improvements suggest benefit to the recipient population.

  9. Transmission of Tuberculosis in Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Kompala, Tejaswi; Shenoi, Sheela V.; Friedland, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Unrecognized transmission is a major contributor to ongoing TB epidemics in high-burden, resource-constrained settings. Limitations in diagnosis, treatment, and infection control in health-care and community settings allow for continued transmission of drug-sensitive and drug-resistant TB, particularly in regions of high HIV prevalence. Health-care facilities are common sites of TB transmission. Improved implementation of infection control practices appropriate for the local setting and in combination, has been associated with reduced transmission. Community settings account for the majority of TB transmission and deserve increased focus. Strengthening and intensifying existing high-yield strategies, including household contact tracing, can reduce onward TB transmission. Recent studies documenting high transmission risk community sites and strategies for community-based intensive case finding hold promise for feasible, effective transmission reduction. Infection control in community settings has been neglected and requires urgent attention. Developing and implementing improved strategies for decreasing transmission to children, within prisons and of drug-resistant TB are needed. PMID:23824469

  10. Caring for the injured child in settings of limited resource.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Jacob

    2016-02-01

    Children represent the most vulnerable members of our global society, a truth that is magnified when they are physically wounded. In much of the developed world, society has responded by offering protection in the form of law, injury prevention guidelines, and effective trauma systems to provide care for the injured child. Much of our world, though, remains afflicted by poverty and a lack of protective measures. As the globe becomes smaller by way of ease of travel and technology, surgeons are increasingly able to meet these children where they live and in doing so offer their hands and voices to care and protect these young ones. This article is intended as an overview of current issues in pediatric trauma care in the developing world as well as to offer some tips for the volunteer surgeon who may be involved in the care of the injured child in a setting of limited resource availability.

  11. Promotion and Reporting of Research from Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Siriwardhana, Chesmal

    2015-01-01

    Driven by global burden of disease and inequalities in health care, research activities in resource-poor settings have radically increased. However, a corresponding increase in reporting of research from these settings has not been observed. This article critically explores the importance of promoting and reporting of health research from resource-poor settings, current trends, and practices, and discusses the key challenges faced by researchers from such settings. These challenges include changing face of open-access (OA) and online publishing, the threat of predatory OA journals, authorship and international partnership ethics, attitudinal problems hindering research reporting, and a lack of alternative publishing spaces. A combined, decisive effort is needed to bridge the gap between research activity and reporting in resource-poor settings. PMID:26396528

  12. Healthcare Associated Infections in a Resource Limited Setting

    PubMed Central

    Doradla, Saikumar; Belgode, Harish Narasimha; Kumar, Harichandra; Swaminathan, Rathinam Palamalai

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Health Care associated Infections (HAI) are the most common complications affecting the hospitalized patients. HAI are more common in developing and under developed countries. However, there are no systematic surveillance programs in these countries. Aim To find out the burden, predisposing factors and multidrug resistant organisms causing HAI in a resource limited setting. Materials and Methods This prospective observational study was done at Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research (JIPMER). Patients aged 13 years or more with stay of more than 48 hours in a 16 bedded Medical Intensive Care Unit (MICU) between November 2011 and April 2013 were included in the study. Patients were prospectively followed up till discharge or death for the development of HAI. Device associated HAI like Ventilator Associated Pneumonia (VAP), Catheter Related-Blood Stream Infection (CR-BSI) and Catheter Associated-Urinary Tract Infections (CA-UTI) were studied. Standard laboratory methods were used for identification of microorganisms causing HAI and to test their antibiotic sensitivity. Results A total of 346 patients were included in the study with median age of 38 years. Common indications for admission to Medical Intensive Care Unit (MICU) were poisoning (31.5%); neurological illness (23.4%) like Guillian-Barre syndrome, tetanus, meningitis, encephalitis; respiratory illness (14.5%) like pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome and tropical infections (7.2%) like malaria, scrub typhus, leptospirosis. Fifty percent (174/346) patients developed one or more HAI with VAP being the most common. The rates of HAI per 1000 device days for VAP, CR-BSI, CA-UTI were 72.56, 3.98 and 12.4, respectively. Acinetobacter baumannii was the most common organism associated with HAI. Multidrug resistance was seen in 74% of the isolates. Conclusion The burden of HAI, especially with MDR organisms, in resource constrained setting like ours is alarming. There

  13. Rational prescribing in paediatrics in a resource-limited setting.

    PubMed

    Risk, Rachel; Naismith, Hamish; Burnett, Alexander; Moore, Sophie E; Cham, Mamady; Unger, Stefan

    2013-07-01

    There is evidence of inappropriate medication use, causing unnecessary costs for health systems, particularly those with limited resources. Overprescription is commonly reported and can lead to antibiotic resistance. Prescribing patterns differ between countries; little is known about paediatric prescribing practices in Africa. To investigate prescribing practices in children in The Gambia, West Africa. A retrospective survey of prescribing practices in children under 5 years of age based on WHO protocol DAP/93.1 was conducted. Twenty government-run health centres across all six regions in The Gambia were assessed. The first 10 encounters each month in 2010 were recorded. For each encounter, patient demographics, diagnoses and medications were recorded as per protocol. Two thousand and four hundred patient encounters were included. The mean number of medications per encounter was 2.2 (median 2.0, IQR 2.0-3.0). Across different geographical regions within The Gambia antibiotics were prescribed in 63.4% (IQR 62.8-65.8%) and micronutrients in 21.7% (IQR 15.3-27.1%) of patient encounters. There was evidence of high antibiotic prescription in children with cough and coryzal symptoms (54.5%; IQR 35.8-59.0%) and simple diarrhoea without dehydration (44.8%; IQR 36.7-61.3%). 74.8% (IQR 71.8-76.1%) of medications were prescribed generically. The study showed an overprescription of antibiotics and substantial usage of micronutrients despite a lack of international evidence-based guidelines. Cost-effective interventions to improve prescribing practices are called for and more studies with a focus on rational prescribing in paediatrics in low-income settings are urgently required to fill the gap in current knowledge.

  14. Molecular oncology testing in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Gulley, Margaret L; Morgan, Douglas R

    2014-11-01

    Cancer prevalence and mortality are high in developing nations, where resources for cancer control are inadequate. Nearly one-quarter of cancers in resource-limited nations are infection related, and molecular assays can capitalize on this relationship by detecting pertinent pathogen genomes and human gene variants to identify those at highest risk for progression to cancer, to classify lesions, to predict effective therapy, and to monitor tumor burden over time. Prime examples are human papillomavirus in cervical neoplasia, Helicobacter pylori and Epstein-Barr virus in gastric adenocarcinoma and lymphoma, and hepatitis B or C virus in hepatocellular cancer. Research is underway to engineer devices that overcome social, economic, and technical barriers limiting effective laboratory support. Additional challenges include an educated workforce, infrastructure for quality metrics and record keeping, and funds to sustain molecular test services. The combination of well-designed interfaces, novel and robust electrochemical technology, and telemedicine tools will promote adoption by frontline providers. Fast turnaround is crucial for surmounting loss to follow-up, although increased use of cell phones, even in rural areas, enhances options for patient education and engagement. Links to a broadband network facilitate consultation and centralized storage of medical data. Molecular technology shows promise to address gaps in health care through rapid, user-friendly, and cost-effective devices reflecting clinical priorities in resource-poor areas.

  15. Molecular Oncology Testing in Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Gulley, Margaret L.; Morgan, Douglas R.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer prevalence and mortality are high in developing nations, where resources for cancer control are inadequate. Nearly one-quarter of cancers in resource-limited nations are infection related, and molecular assays can capitalize on this relationship by detecting pertinent pathogen genomes and human gene variants to identify those at highest risk for progression to cancer, to classify lesions, to predict effective therapy, and to monitor tumor burden over time. Prime examples are human papillomavirus in cervical neoplasia, Helicobacter pylori and Epstein-Barr virus in gastric adenocarcinoma and lymphoma, and hepatitis B or C virus in hepatocellular cancer. Research is underway to engineer devices that overcome social, economic, and technical barriers limiting effective laboratory support. Additional challenges include an educated workforce, infrastructure for quality metrics and record keeping, and funds to sustain molecular test services. The combination of well-designed interfaces, novel and robust electrochemical technology, and telemedicine tools will promote adoption by frontline providers. Fast turnaround is crucial for surmounting loss to follow-up, although increased use of cell phones, even in rural areas, enhances options for patient education and engagement. Links to a broadband network facilitate consultation and centralized storage of medical data. Molecular technology shows promise to address gaps in health care through rapid, user-friendly, and cost-effective devices reflecting clinical priorities in resource-poor areas. PMID:25242061

  16. A Diagnostic Scoring Model for Leptospirosis in Resource Limited Settings.

    PubMed

    Rajapakse, Senaka; Weeratunga, Praveen; Niloofa, Roshan; Fernando, Narmada; de Silva, Nipun Lakshitha; Rodrigo, Chaturaka; Maduranga, Sachith; Nandasiri, Nuwanthi; Premawansa, Sunil; Karunanayake, Lilani; de Silva, H Janaka; Handunnetti, Shiroma

    2016-06-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonotic infection with significant morbidity and mortality. The clinical presentation of leptospirosis is known to mimic the clinical profile of other prevalent tropical fevers. Laboratory confirmation of leptospirosis is based on the reference standard microscopic agglutination test (MAT), direct demonstration of the organism, and isolation by culture and DNA detection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. However these methods of confirmation are not widely available in resource limited settings where the infection is prevalent, and reliance is placed on clinical features for provisional diagnosis. In this prospective study, we attempted to develop a model for diagnosis of leptospirosis, based on clinical features and standard laboratory test results. The diagnostic score was developed based on data from a prospective multicentre study in two hospitals in the Western Province of Sri Lanka. All patients presenting to these hospitals with a suspected diagnosis of leptospirosis, based on the WHO surveillance criteria, were recruited. Confirmed disease was defined as positive genus specific MAT (Leptospira biflexa). A derivation cohort and a validation cohort were randomly selected from available data. Clinical and laboratory manifestations associated with confirmed leptospirosis in the derivation cohort were selected for construction of a multivariate regression model with correlation matrices, and adjusted odds ratios were extracted for significant variables. The odds ratios thus derived were subsequently utilized in the criteria model, and sensitivity and specificity examined with ROC curves. A total of 592 patients were included in the final analysis with 450 (180 confirmed leptospirosis) in the derivation cohort and 142 (52 confirmed leptospirosis) in the validation cohort. The variables in the final model were: history of exposure to a possible source of leptospirosis (adjusted OR = 2.827; 95% CI = 1.517-5.435; p = 0.001) serum

  17. Management of severe paediatric malaria in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Maitland, Kathryn

    2015-03-03

    Over 90% of the world's severe and fatal Plasmodium falciparum malaria is estimated to affect young children in sub-Sahara Africa, where it remains a common cause of hospital admission and inpatient mortality. Few children will ever be managed on high dependency or intensive care units and, therefore, rely on simple supportive treatments and parenteral anti-malarials. There has been some progress on defining best practice for antimalarial treatment with the publication of the AQUAMAT trial in 2010, involving 5,425 children at 11 centres across 9 African countries, showing that in artesunate-treated children, the relative risk of death was 22.5% (95% confidence interval (CI) 8.1 to 36.9) lower than in those receiving quinine. Human trials of supportive therapies carried out on the basis of pathophysiology studies, have so far made little progress on reducing mortality; despite appearing to reduce morbidity endpoints, more often than not they have led to an excess of adverse outcomes. This review highlights the spectrum of complications in African children with severe malaria, the therapeutic challenges of managing these in resource-poor settings and examines in-depth the results from clinical trials with a view to identifying the treatment priorities and a future research agenda.

  18. Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Watson, Gabriella; Jallow, Bintou; Le Doare, Kirsty; Pushparajah, Kuberan; Anderson, Suzanne T

    2015-04-01

    Poststreptococcal complications, such as acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD), are common in resource-limited settings, with RHD recognised as the most common cause of paediatric heart disease worldwide. Managing these conditions in resource-limited settings can be challenging. We review the investigation and treatment options for ARF and RHD and, most importantly, prevention methods in an African setting.

  19. Monitoring antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings: balancing clinical care, technology, and human resources.

    PubMed

    Hosseinipour, Mina C; Schechter, Mauro

    2010-08-01

    Due to the rapid expansion of first-line antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings (RLS), increasing numbers of people are living with HIV for prolonged periods of time. Treatment programs must now decide how to balance monitoring costs necessary to maximize health benefits for those already on treatment with the continued demand to initiate more patients on first-line treatment. We review currently available evidence related to monitoring strategies in RLS and discuss their implications on timing of switching to second-line treatment, development of HIV resistance, and clinical outcome.

  20. When to Start Antiretroviral Therapy in Resource-limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Walensky, Rochelle P.; Wolf, Lindsey L.; Wood, Robin; Fofana, Mariam O.; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Martinson, Neil A.; Paltiel, A. David; Anglaret, Xavier; Weinstein, Milton C.; Losina, Elena

    2011-01-01

    Background Results of international clinical trials assessing when to initiate antiretroviral therapy (ART) will not be available for several years. Objective To inform HIV treatment decisions over the short- and long-term regarding the optimal CD4 threshold at which to initiate ART in South Africa, while awaiting “when to start” trial results. Design Cost-effectiveness analysis using a computer simulation model of HIV disease. Data Sources Published data from randomized trials and observational cohorts in South Africa. Target Population HIV-infected patients in South Africa. Time Horizon Five-year and lifetime. Perspective Modified societal. Interventions No treatment, initiate ART at CD4<250/μl, and initiate ART at CD4<350/μl. Outcome Measures Morbidity, mortality, life expectancy, medical costs, and cost-effectiveness. Results of Base-Case Analysis If 10-100% of HIV-infected patients are diagnosed and linked to care, initiating ART at CD4<350/μl would reduce severe opportunistic diseases by 22,000-221,000 and deaths by 25,000-253,000 during the next 5 years, compared to initiating ART at CD4<250/μl; cost increases would range from $142 million (10%) to $1.4 billion (100%). Either ART strategy increased long-term survival by at least 7.9 years, with a mean per person life expectancy of 3.8 years for no ART and 12.5 years for ART at <350/μl. Compared to initiating ART at <250/μl, initiating ART at <350/μl had an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $1,200/year of life saved. Results of Sensitivity Analysis Initiating ART at CD4<350/μl remained cost-effective over the next 5 years even if the probability that the trial would demonstrate superiority to earlier therapy is as low as 17%. Limitations This model does not consider the possible benefits of ART initiation at CD4>350/μl nor reduced HIV transmission. Conclusions Earlier ART initiation in South Africa will likely reduce morbidity and mortality, improve long-term survival, and be very cost

  1. Management of lower urinary retention in a limited resource setting.

    PubMed

    Ugare, U G; Bassey, Ima-Abasi; Udosen, E J; Essiet, Akanimo; Bassey, O O

    2014-10-01

    There is a projected increase in lower urinary tract obstruction by 2018, especially in the developing economies of Asia and Africa. However in many of these countries, the problems encountered both by the patients and the clinicians are not well documented. Our aims are, to prospectively analyse the management of urinary retention, the associated difficulties, and complications in our setting, where access to investigative modalities such as Computerize Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging are not available. The study was approved by the University Of Calabar Teaching Hospital ethical committee. A validated Proforma was used to collect data from all patients who were clinically diagnosed with urinary retention based on history, and physical examination, from July 2009 to June 2010. Data collected from the 1st of July 2009 to the 30th of June 2010, include demographics, findings on physical examination, previous medical history and co-morbid conditions. The results of investigations done such as: urinalysis, full blood count, electrolytes, urea and creatinine, intravenous urography, trans- abdominal ultrasonography, chest X-ray and histology of trans-rectal biopsies of the prostate . The total number of new patients seen, including those with urinary retention during the study was documented. The retentions were also classified into acute and chronic. All the patients were followed up throughout the study. The data was analysed using Epi-Info statistical program version 3.4 of 2007 to analyse the data, estimating averages, mean, median and percentages. The total number of new patients seen, including those with urinary retention was Seventy thousand, one hundred and thirty nine (70,139).Of this number, hundred and fifty nine (0.23%), presented with urinary retention; 145 (91.2%) were acute, and14 (8.8%) were chronic. The male: female ratio was 39:1.The patients ages ranged from 4 to 94 years, with a mean of 53.7±11.2. Seventy seven [48.4%] of them were in the

  2. Setting the research agenda in a resource-limited setting--viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Borok, Margaret Z; Busakhala, Naftali; Makadzange, Tariro; Hakim, James

    2014-01-01

    The phenomenon of disproportionately large allocations of global health research resources to relatively limited components of the global health burden is widely acknowledged. Factors contributing to this are explored. The development of a national or regional research agenda is a critical step toward attempting to redress this imbalance. Key areas to be considered are a broad vision, dialogue, and commitment from those stakeholders comprising the "health research triangle": national policy makers and decision makers, key personnel in both health research and health care, and community representatives. The interdependent roles of human, material, and community resources are further examined.

  3. Defining the anesthesia gap for reproductive health procedures in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Anderson, R Eleanor; Ahn, Roy; Nelson, Brett D; Chavez, Jean; de Redon, Emily; Burke, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    In resource-limited settings, severe shortages of anesthetists and anesthesiologists lead to surgical delays that increase maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity. To more clearly understand the individual components of the anesthesia gap pertaining to reproductive health surgeries and procedures in resource-limited settings. Medline, the Cochrane Library, CINAHL, Embase, and POPLINE were systematically searched for reports published before December 31, 2013. Search terms were related to obstetric surgery, resource-limited settings, and anesthesia. Studies that addressed the use of anesthesia in reproductive procedures in resource-limited settings were included. Reviewers independently evaluated the full text of identified studies, extracted information related to study objectives and conclusions, and identified the anesthesia gap. Overall, 14 publications met the inclusion criteria. A significant lack of infrastructure, equipment and supplies, and trained personnel were identified as key factors responsible for a lack of anesthesia services. A shortage of trained anesthesia providers, equipment, supplies, medications, and infrastructure, along with limitations in transportation in resource-limited settings have produced a wide gap between available anesthesia services and the demand for them for reproductive health surgeries and procedures. Safe, affordable, and scalable solutions to address the anesthesia gap are urgently needed. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Tuberculosis drug resistance testing by molecular methods: opportunities and challenges in resource limited settings.

    PubMed

    Abebe, Gemeda; Paasch, Fabienne; Apers, Ludwig; Rigouts, Leen; Colebunders, Robert

    2011-02-01

    One of the greatest threats to global tuberculosis (TB) control is the growing prevalence of drug-resistant bacilli. Correctly diagnosing drug-resistant TB patients is more problematic in resource-limited settings as there is no or limited infrastructure for drug susceptibility testing (DST) of TB bacilli. The conventional phenotypic DST method for TB takes weeks before declaring the results and initiating proper anti-TB treatment. Molecular DST offers advantages over the phenotypic methods mainly because of the short turnaround time. This review summarizes the different molecular DST methods for TB and discusses challenges and opportunities in implementing them in resource-limited settings.

  5. Diagnostic point-of-care tests in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Drain, Paul K; Hyle, Emily P; Noubary, Farzad; Freedberg, Kenneth A; Wilson, Douglas; Bishai, William R; Rodriguez, William; Bassett, Ingrid V

    2014-03-01

    The aim of diagnostic point-of-care testing is to minimise the time to obtain a test result, thereby allowing clinicians and patients to make a quick clinical decision. Because point-of-care tests are used in resource-limited settings, the benefits need to outweigh the costs. To optimise point-of-care testing in resource-limited settings, diagnostic tests need rigorous assessments focused on relevant clinical outcomes and operational costs, which differ from assessments of conventional diagnostic tests. We reviewed published studies on point-of-care testing in resource-limited settings, and found no clearly defined metric for the clinical usefulness of point-of-care testing. Therefore, we propose a framework for the assessment of point-of-care tests, and suggest and define the term test efficacy to describe the ability of a diagnostic test to support a clinical decision within its operational context. We also propose revised criteria for an ideal diagnostic point-of-care test in resource-limited settings. Through systematic assessments, comparisons between centralised testing and novel point-of-care technologies can be more formalised, and health officials can better establish which point-of-care technologies represent valuable additions to their clinical programmes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Building family medicine postgraduate training in Jamaica: overcoming challenges in a resource-limited setting.

    PubMed

    Standard-Goldson, A; Williams-Green, P; Smith, K; Segree, W; James, K; Eldemire-Shearer, D

    2015-01-01

    This paper recounts the development of family medicine postgraduate training in Jamaica, the challenges faced and lessons learned. A self-administered questionnaire was completed by past trainees exploring the perceived usefulness, strengths and weaknesses of the programme. The results of this study helped guide the strengthening of family medicine training in a resource-limited setting.

  7. Delivery of radiation therapy in resource-limited settings: A pilot quality assessment study.

    PubMed

    Power-Hays, Alexandra; Friedrich, Paola; Fernandez, Gretchen; Cruz, Naly A; Marcus, Karen; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; Collado, Luisa

    2017-02-22

    Progress has been made in resource-limited countries in treating acute lymphoblastic leukemia, but advances in solid malignancies have been slower. Multidisciplinary care coordination is challenging, assessing adherence to guidelines through quality improvement initiatives is essential. We characterized deviations from guidelines in the delivery of radiation in a middle-income country program as a pilot for evaluating adequacy of local control and as surrogate for integration of multidisciplinary care. One-third of patients for whom it was indicated did not receive radiation. Of the patients who received radiation, 95% had a deviation. This study underscores the importance of quality assessment in resource-limited settings.

  8. Developments in CD4 and Viral Load Monitoring in Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Rowley, Christopher F.

    2014-01-01

    CD4 counts and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) load testing are essential components of HIV care, and making these tests available in resource-limited settings is critical to the roll-out of HIV treatment globally. Until recently, the evidence supporting the importance of laboratory monitoring in resource-limited settings was lacking, but there is now a consensus emerging that testing should become routine to ensure the longevity of treatment programs. Low-cost, point-of-care testing offers the potential to fill this role as it potentially improves all aspects of HIV care, ranging from the diagnosis and staging of HIV infection in both infants and adults to monitoring for treatment failure once antiretroviral therapy has been initiated. It is imperative for low-cost solutions to become a reality, but it is equally imperative that close scrutiny be given to each new device that hits the market to ensure they perform optimally in all settings. PMID:24218101

  9. Developments in CD4 and viral load monitoring in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Christopher F

    2014-02-01

    CD4 counts and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) load testing are essential components of HIV care, and making these tests available in resource-limited settings is critical to the roll-out of HIV treatment globally. Until recently, the evidence supporting the importance of laboratory monitoring in resource-limited settings was lacking, but there is now a consensus emerging that testing should become routine to ensure the longevity of treatment programs. Low-cost, point-of-care testing offers the potential to fill this role as it potentially improves all aspects of HIV care, ranging from the diagnosis and staging of HIV infection in both infants and adults to monitoring for treatment failure once antiretroviral therapy has been initiated. It is imperative for low-cost solutions to become a reality, but it is equally imperative that close scrutiny be given to each new device that hits the market to ensure they perform optimally in all settings.

  10. Guidance on the diagnosis and management of asthma among adults in resource limited settings.

    PubMed

    Kirenga, Bruce J; Schwartz, Jeremy I; de Jong, Corina; van der Molen, Thys; Okot-Nwang, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Optimal management of asthma in resource limited settings is hindered by lack of resources, making it difficult for health providers to adhere to international guidelines. The purpose of this review is to identify steps for asthma diagnosis and management in resource limited settings. Review of international asthma guidelines and other published studies on diagnosis and management of asthma. We establish that clinical diagnosis of asthma can be made if recurrent respiratory symptoms especially current wheeze or wheeze in the last 12 months are present. Presence of a trigger, other allergic diseases, personal or family history of asthma; clinical improvement and increase in the peak flow and forced expiratory volume in one second of ≥12% after salbutamol administration increases the likelihood of asthma. At diagnosis severity grading, patient education, removal or reduction of trigger should be done. Follow up 2-6 weeks and assessment of control during therapy is essential. Therapy should be adjusted up or down depending on control levels. Patients should be instructed to increase the frequency of their bronchodilators and/or steroids therapy when they start to experience worsening symptoms. Good quality asthma care can be achieved in resource limited settings by use of clinical data and simple tests.

  11. Tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome: case definitions for use in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Meintjes, Graeme; Lawn, Stephen D; Scano, Fabio; Maartens, Gary; French, Martyn A; Worodria, William; Elliott, Julian H; Murdoch, David; Wilkinson, Robert J; Seyler, Catherine; John, Laurence; van der Loeff, Maarten Schim; Reiss, Peter; Lynen, Lut; Janoff, Edward N; Gilks, Charles; Colebunders, Robert

    2008-08-01

    The immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) has emerged as an important early complication of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in resource-limited settings, especially in patients with tuberculosis. However, there are no consensus case definitions for IRIS or tuberculosis-associated IRIS. Moreover, previously proposed case definitions are not readily applicable in settings where laboratory resources are limited. As a result, existing studies on tuberculosis-associated IRIS have used a variety of non-standardised general case definitions. To rectify this problem, around 100 researchers, including microbiologists, immunologists, clinicians, epidemiologists, clinical trialists, and public-health specialists from 16 countries met in Kampala, Uganda, in November, 2006. At this meeting, consensus case definitions for paradoxical tuberculosis-associated IRIS, ART-associated tuberculosis, and unmasking tuberculosis-associated IRIS were derived, which can be used in high-income and resource-limited settings. It is envisaged that these definitions could be used by clinicians and researchers in a variety of settings to promote standardisation and comparability of data.

  12. Tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome: case definitions for use in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    Meintjes, Graeme; Lawn, Stephen D; Scano, Fabio; Maartens, Gary; French, Martyn A; Worodria, William; Elliott, Julian H; Murdoch, David; Wilkinson, Robert J; Seyler, Catherine; John, Laurence; van der Loeff, Maarten Schim; Reiss, Peter; Lynen, Lut; Janoff, Edward N; Gilks, Charles; Colebunders, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) has emerged as an important early complication of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in resource-limited settings, especially in patients with tuberculosis. However, there are no consensus case definitions for IRIS or tuberculosis-associated IRIS. Moreover, previously proposed case definitions are not readily applicable in settings where laboratory resources are limited. As a result, existing studies on tuberculosis-associated IRIS have used a variety of non-standardised general case definitions. To rectify this problem, around 100 researchers, including microbiologists, immunologists, clinicians, epidemiologists, clinical trialists, and public-health specialists from 16 countries met in Kampala, Uganda, in November, 2006. At this meeting, consensus case definitions for paradoxical tuberculosis-associated IRIS, ART-associated tuberculosis, and unmasking tuberculosis-associated IRIS were derived, which can be used in high-income and resource-limited settings. It is envisaged that these definitions could be used by clinicians and researchers in a variety of settings to promote standardisation and comparability of data. PMID:18652998

  13. Discerning trends in multiplex immunoassay technology with potential for resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Julian; Michel, Gerd

    2012-04-01

    In the search for more powerful tools for diagnoses of endemic diseases in resource-limited settings, we have been analyzing technologies with potential applicability. Increasingly, the process focuses on readily accessible bodily fluids combined with increasingly powerful multiplex capabilities to unambiguously diagnose a condition without resorting to reliance on a sophisticated reference laboratory. Although these technological advances may well have important implications for the sensitive and specific detection of disease, to date their clinical utility has not been demonstrated, especially in resource-limited settings. Furthermore, many emerging technological developments are in fields of physics or engineering, which are not readily available to or intelligible to clinicians or clinical laboratory scientists. This review provides a look at technology trends that could have applicability to high-sensitivity multiplexed immunoassays in resource-limited settings. Various technologies are explained and assessed according to potential for reaching relevant limits of cost, sensitivity, and multiplex capability. Frequently, such work is reported in technical journals not normally read by clinical scientists, and the authors make enthusiastic claims for the potential of their technology while ignoring potential pitfalls. Thus it is important to draw attention to technical hurdles that authors may not be publicizing. Immunochromatographic assays, optical methods including those involving waveguides, electrochemical methods, magnetorestrictive methods, and field-effect transistor methods based on nanotubes, nanowires, and nanoribbons reveal possibilities as next-generation technologies.

  14. Global burden of Influenza: Contributions from Resource Limited and Low-Income Settings

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, William A.; Gong, Michelle; Bhagwanjee, Satish; Sevransky, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory infections (SARI), including influenza, are a leading cause of cardiopulmonary morbidity and mortality worldwide. Until recently the epidemiology of influenza was limited to resource-rich countries. Emerging epidemiological reports characterizing the 2009 H1N1 pandemic however suggest that influenza exerts an even greater toll in low-income resource constrained environments where it is the cause of 5–27% of all SARI. The increased burden of disease in this setting is multifactorial and likely is the results of higher rates of comorbidities such as HIV, decreased access to healthcare including vaccinations and antiviral medications, and limited healthcare infrastructure including oxygen therapy or critical care support. Improved global epidemiology of influenza is desperately needed in order to guide allocation of life saving resources including vaccines, antiviral medications, and direct the improvement of basic health care in order to mitigate the impact of influenza infection on the most vulnerable populations. PMID:25667184

  15. Novel techniques and future directions in molecular diagnosis of malaria in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Oriero, Eniyou Cheryll; Van Geertruyden, Jean-Pierre; Nwakanma, Davis C; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Jacobs, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Despite being preventable and treatable, malaria remains a global health concern with approximately 1.2 billion people at high risk of being infected, 90% of whom are in the resource-limited settings of sub-Saharan Africa. The continued decline in malaria cases globally has rekindled the possibility of elimination in certain regions. As humans constitute the main reservoir of malaria, prompt and accurate diagnosis by microscopy or rapid diagnostic tests is part not only of effective disease management but also of control measures. However, for malaria elimination, more sensitive diagnostic tools are needed to detect asymptomatic and sub-microscopic infections that contribute to transmission. Molecular techniques, which involve amplification of nucleic acids, are being developed and modified to suit this purpose. This report provides a summary of the nucleic acid amplification tests that are currently available for diagnosis of malaria, with current improvements and adaptations for use in resource-limited settings.

  16. Disclosure of HIV status to children in resource-limited settings: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Vreeman, Rachel C; Gramelspacher, Anna Maria; Gisore, Peter O; Scanlon, Michael L; Nyandiko, Winstone M

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Informing children of their own HIV status is an important aspect of long-term disease management, yet there is little evidence of how and when this type of disclosure takes place in resource-limited settings and its impact. Methods MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Databases were searched for the terms hiv AND disclos* AND (child* OR adolesc*). We reviewed 934 article citations and the references of relevant articles to find articles describing disclosure to children and adolescents in resource-limited settings. Data were extracted regarding prevalence of disclosure, factors influencing disclosure, process of disclosure and impact of disclosure on children and caregivers. Results Thirty-two articles met the inclusion criteria, with 16 reporting prevalence of disclosure. Of these 16 studies, proportions of disclosed children ranged from 0 to 69.2%. Important factors influencing disclosure included the child's age and perceived ability to understand the meaning of HIV infection and factors related to caregivers, such as education level, openness about their own HIV status and beliefs about children's capacities. Common barriers to disclosure were fear that the child would disclose HIV status to others, fear of stigma and concerns for children's emotional or physical health. Disclosure was mostly led by caregivers and conceptualized as a one-time event, while others described it as a gradual process. Few studies measured the impact of disclosure on children. Findings suggested adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) improved post-disclosure but the emotional and psychological effects of disclosure were variable. Conclusions Most studies show that a minority of HIV-infected children in resource-limited settings know his/her HIV status. While caregivers identify many factors that influence disclosure, studies suggest both positive and negative effects for children. More research is needed to implement age- and culture-appropriate disclosure in resource-limited

  17. Application of Ultrasonography in the Diagnosis of Infectious Diseases in Resource-Limited Settings.

    PubMed

    Brunetti, Enrico; Heller, Tom; Richter, Joachim; Kaminstein, Daniel; Youkee, Daniel; Giordani, Maria Teresa; Goblirsch, Samuel; Tamarozzi, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) has vast potential in the field of infectious diseases, especially so in resource-limited settings. Recent technological advances have increased availability and access to ultrasound in low-resource settings, where the burden of infectious diseases is greatest. This paper collates the evidence for the utilization of ultrasound and evaluates its effectiveness in the diagnosis and management of a range of infectious diseases. This paper explores the role of ultrasound in population-based screening for specific diseases as well as highlights its benefits for individual patient management. We describe the common diagnostic signs seen on US for common and neglected parasitic, bacterial, and viral diseases. We proceed to document the emerging field of chest US which is proving to be a superior imaging modality for the diagnosis of specific pulmonary conditions. We conclude by discussing the efforts needed to formalize and rigorously evaluate the role of ultrasound in infectious diseases.

  18. Nervous system disorders across the life course in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Birbeck, Gretchen L; Meyer, Ana-Claire; Ogunniyi, Adesola

    2015-11-19

    The resiliency of the adult nervous system is markedly affected by the environment and the circumstances during infant and child development. As such, adults in resource-limited settings who may have experienced early deprivation are particularly vulnerable to subsequent neurological disorders. Adult populations in countries with relatively recent advances in economic development may still have a higher susceptibility to neurological illness or injury that is reflective of the socioeconomic environment that was present during that population's infancy and childhood. Brain and peripheral nervous system research conducted over the past decade in resource-limited settings has led to an impressive and growing body of knowledge that informs our understanding of neurological function and dysfunction, independent of geography. Neurological conditions feature prominently in the burgeoning epidemic of non-communicable diseases facing low- and middle-income countries. Neurological research in these countries is needed to address this burden of disease. Although the burden of more prevalent and severe neurological disease poses public health and clinical challenges in settings with limited neurological expertise, the same factors, along with genetic heterogeneity and the relative absence of ingrained clinical care practices, offer circumstances well-suited for the conduct of crucial future research that is globally relevant.

  19. A systematic review of portable electronic technology for health education in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    McHenry, Megan S; Fischer, Lydia J; Chun, Yeona; Vreeman, Rachel C

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this study is to conduct a systematic review of the literature of how portable electronic technologies with offline functionality are perceived and used to provide health education in resource-limited settings. Three reviewers evaluated articles and performed a bibliography search to identify studies describing health education delivered by portable electronic device with offline functionality in low- or middle-income countries. Data extracted included: study population; study design and type of analysis; type of technology used; method of use; setting of technology use; impact on caregivers, patients, or overall health outcomes; and reported limitations. Searches yielded 5514 unique titles. Out of 75 critically reviewed full-text articles, 10 met inclusion criteria. Study locations included Botswana, Peru, Kenya, Thailand, Nigeria, India, Ghana, and Tanzania. Topics addressed included: development of healthcare worker training modules, clinical decision support tools, patient education tools, perceptions and usability of portable electronic technology, and comparisons of technologies and/or mobile applications. Studies primarily looked at the assessment of developed educational modules on trainee health knowledge, perceptions and usability of technology, and comparisons of technologies. Overall, studies reported positive results for portable electronic device-based health education, frequently reporting increased provider/patient knowledge, improved patient outcomes in both quality of care and management, increased provider comfort level with technology, and an environment characterized by increased levels of technology-based, informal learning situations. Negative assessments included high investment costs, lack of technical support, and fear of device theft. While the research is limited, portable electronic educational resources present promising avenues to increase access to effective health education in resource-limited settings, contingent

  20. The importance of nutritional care in HIV-infected children in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    McHenry, Megan S; Apondi, Edith; Vreeman, Rachel C

    2014-12-01

    Renewed efforts to provide proper nutritional care are essential for appropriate pediatric HIV management. Current studies support the use of vitamin A and macronutrients that increase caloric and protein intake. With additional research on key issues such as the needed composition and timing for nutritional supplementation, we can determine the best strategies to support the growth and development of HIV-infected children in resource-limited settings. Malnutrition among children is common in the resource-limited settings where HIV infection is most prevalent. While malnutrition is associated with higher morbidity and mortality for HIV-infected children, there is only limited evidence to guide the use of nutritional support for HIV-infected children. The best studied is vitamin A, which is associated with improved mortality and clinical outcomes. Zinc and multivitamin supplementation have not consistently been associated with clinical benefits. Limited research suggests macronutrient supplementation, which typically uses enriched formulas or foods, improves key anthropometrics for HIV-infected children, but the optimal composition of nutrients for supplementation has not been determined. More research is needed to understand the most efficient and sustainable ways to ensure adequate nutrition in this vulnerable population.

  1. The evolving landscape of HIV drug resistance diagnostics for expanding testing in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Inzaule, Seth C; Hamers, Raph L; Paredes, Roger; Yang, Chunfu; Schuurman, Rob; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F

    2017-02-09

    Global scale-up of antiretroviral treatment (ART) has dramatically changed the prospects of HIV/AIDS disease rendering life-long chronic care and treatment a reality for millions of HIV-infected patients. Affordable technologies to monitor ART are needed to ensure long-term durability of limited available drug regimens. HIV drug resistance tests can complement existing strategies in optimizing clinical decision-making for patients with treatment failure, in addition to facilitating population-based surveillance of HIV drug resistance. This review assesses the current landscape of HIV drug resistance technologies and discuss the strengths and limitations of existing assays available for expanding testing in resource limited settings (RLS). These include sequencing-based assays (Sanger sequencing assays and next-generation sequencing), point mutation assays and genotype-free data-based prediction systems. The Sanger assays are currently considered gold standard genotyping technology, though available at a limited number of RLS reference and regional laboratories, but high capital and test cost have limited their wide expansion. The point mutation assays present opportunities for simplified laboratory assays, but HIV genetic variability, extensive codon redundancy at or near the mutation target sites with limited multiplexing capability have restricted their utility. Next-generation sequencing (despite high cost) may have potential to reduce the testing cost significantly through multiplexing in high-throughput facilities, although the level of bioinformatics expertise required for data analysis is currently still complex and expensive and lacks standardization. Web-based genotype-free prediction systems may provide enhanced ART decision-making without the need for laboratory testing, but require further clinical field evaluation and implementation science research in resource-limited settings.

  2. Brief surgical procedure code lists for outcomes measurement and quality improvement in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Liu, Charles; Kayima, Peter; Riesel, Johanna; Situma, Martin; Chang, David; Firth, Paul

    2017-08-29

    The lack of a classification system for surgical procedures in resource-limited settings hinders outcomes measurement and reporting. Existing procedure coding systems are prohibitively large and expensive to implement. We describe the creation and prospective validation of 3 brief procedure code lists applicable in low-resource settings, based on analysis of surgical procedures performed at Mbarara Regional Referral Hospital, Uganda's second largest public hospital. We reviewed operating room logbooks to identify all surgical operations performed at Mbarara Regional Referral Hospital during 2014. Based on the documented indication for surgery and procedure(s) performed, we assigned each operation up to 4 procedure codes from the International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification. Coding of procedures was performed by 2 investigators, and a random 20% of procedures were coded by both investigators. These codes were aggregated to generate procedure code lists. During 2014, 6,464 surgical procedures were performed at Mbarara Regional Referral Hospital, to which we assigned 435 unique procedure codes. Substantial inter-rater reliability was achieved (κ = 0.7037). The 111 most common procedure codes accounted for 90% of all codes assigned, 180 accounted for 95%, and 278 accounted for 98%. We considered these sets of codes as 3 procedure code lists. In a prospective validation, we found that these lists described 83.2%, 89.2%, and 92.6% of surgical procedures performed at Mbarara Regional Referral Hospital during August to September of 2015, respectively. Empirically generated brief procedure code lists based on International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification can be used to classify almost all surgical procedures performed at a Ugandan referral hospital. Such a standardized procedure coding system may enable better surgical data collection for administration, research, and quality improvement in resource-limited

  3. Natural Conception May Be an Acceptable Option in HIV-Serodiscordant Couples in Resource Limited Settings.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lijun; Wang, Fang; Liu, An; Xin, Ruolei; Zhu, Yunxia; Li, Jianwei; Shao, Ying; Ye, Jiangzhu; Chen, Danqing; Li, Zaicun

    2015-01-01

    Many HIV serodiscordant couples have a strong desire to have their own biological children. Natural conception may be the only choice in some resource limited settings but data about natural conception is limited. Here, we reported our findings of natural conception in HIV serodiscordant couples. Between January 2008 and June 2014, we retrospectively collected data on 91 HIV serodiscordant couples presenting to Beijing Youan Hospital with childbearing desires. HIV counseling, effective ART on HIV infected partners, pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) in negative female partners and timed intercourse were used to maximally reduce the risk of HIV transmission. Of the 91 HIV serodiscordant couples, 43 were positive in male partners and 48 were positive in female partners. There were 196 unprotected vaginal intercourses, 100 natural conception and 97 newborns. There were no cases of HIV seroconversion in uninfected sexual partners. Natural conception may be an acceptable option in HIV-serodiscordant couples in resource limited settings if HIV-positive individuals have undetectable viremia on HAART, combined with HIV counseling, PrEP, PEP and timed intercourse.

  4. Spontaneous oesophageal rupture: a diagnostic challenge in resource-limited setting.

    PubMed

    Shao, Elichilia R; Joseph, Pantaleo M; Slootweg, Piet; Mkwizu, Elifuraha W; Kilonzo, Kajiru G; Mwasamwaja, Amos O

    2015-08-01

    Spontaneous oesophageal rupture after swallowing a bolus of food is a very rare condition. In resource-limited settings, it is very challenging to diagnose this condition especially when its presentation is atypical. Its prognosis is very poor when diagnosis is delayed due to risk of mediastinitis. We report a case of 37-year-old man who was admitted to our hospital complaining of sudden onset of chest tightness and pain after a meal 8 h prior to admission. Urgent chest radiograph revealed right hydropneumothorax with collapsed lung. Water-seal drainage was established gushing 1200 ml of food materials. Definitive diagnosis of oesophageal rupture was reached after post-mortem.

  5. HIV/AIDS and lipodystrophy: Implications for clinical management in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, Julia L; Gala, Pooja; Rochford, Rosemary; Glesby, Marshall J; Mehta, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Lipodystrophy is a term used to describe a metabolic complication of fat loss, fat gain, or a combination of fat loss and gain, which is associated with some antiretroviral (ARV) therapies given to HIV-infected individuals. There is limited research on lipodystrophy in low- and middle-income countries, despite accounting for more than 95% of the burden of HIV/AIDS. The objective of this review was to evaluate the prevalence, pathogenesis and prognosis of HIV-related lipoatrophy, lipohypertrophy and mixed syndrome, to inform clinical management in resource-limited settings. Methods We conducted a structured literature search using MEDLINE electronic databases. Relevant MeSH terms were used to identify published human studies on HIV and lipoatrophy, lipohypertrophy, or mixed syndrome in low-, low-middle- and upper-middle-income countries through 31 March 2014. The search resulted in 5296 articles; after 1599 studies were excluded (958 reviews, 641 non-human), 3697 studies were extracted for further review. After excluding studies conducted in high-income settings (n=2808), and studies that did not meet inclusion criteria (n=799), 90 studies were included in this review. Results and Discussion Of the 90 studies included in this review, only six were from low-income countries and eight were from lower middle-income economies. These studies focused on lipodystrophy prevalence, risk factors and side effects of antiretroviral therapy (ART). In most studies, lipodystrophy developed after the first six months of therapy, particularly with the use of stavudine. Lipodystrophy is associated with increased risk of cardiometabolic complications. This is disconcerting and anticipated to increase, given the rapid scale-up of ART worldwide, the increasing number and lifespan of HIV-infected patients on long-term therapy, and the emergence of obesity and non-communicable diseases in settings with extensive HIV burden. Conclusions Lipodystrophy is common in resource-limited

  6. Cost-effective Diagnostic Checklists for Meningitis in Resource Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Durski, Kara N.; Kuntz, Karen M.; Yasukawa, Kosuke; Virnig, Beth A.; Meya, David B.; Boulware, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Checklists can standardize patient care, reduce errors, and improve health outcomes. For meningitis in resource-limited settings, with high patient loads and limited financial resources, CNS diagnostic algorithms may be useful to guide diagnosis and treatment. However, the cost-effectiveness of such algorithms is unknown. Methods We used decision analysis methodology to evaluate the costs, diagnostic yield, and cost-effectiveness of diagnostic strategies for adults with suspected meningitis in resource limited settings with moderate/high HIV prevalence. We considered three strategies: 1) comprehensive “shotgun” approach of utilizing all routine tests; 2) “stepwise” strategy with tests performed in a specific order with additional TB diagnostics; 3) “minimalist” strategy of sequential ordering of high-yield tests only. Each strategy resulted in one of four meningitis diagnoses: bacterial (4%), cryptococcal (59%), TB (8%), or other (aseptic) meningitis (29%). In model development, we utilized prevalence data from two Ugandan sites and published data on test performance. We validated the strategies with data from Malawi, South Africa, and Zimbabwe. Results The current comprehensive testing strategy resulted in 93.3% correct meningitis diagnoses costing $32.00/patient. A stepwise strategy had 93.8% correct diagnoses costing an average of $9.72/patient, and a minimalist strategy had 91.1% correct diagnoses costing an average of $6.17/patient. The incremental cost effectiveness ratio was $133 per additional correct diagnosis for the stepwise over minimalist strategy. Conclusions Through strategically choosing the order and type of testing coupled with disease prevalence rates, algorithms can deliver more care more efficiently. The algorithms presented herein are generalizable to East Africa and Southern Africa. PMID:23466647

  7. Cost-effective diagnostic checklists for meningitis in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Durski, Kara N; Kuntz, Karen M; Yasukawa, Kosuke; Virnig, Beth A; Meya, David B; Boulware, David R

    2013-07-01

    Checklists can standardize patient care, reduce errors, and improve health outcomes. For meningitis in resource-limited settings, with high patient loads and limited financial resources, central nervous system diagnostic algorithms may be useful to guide diagnosis and treatment. However, the cost effectiveness of such algorithms is unknown. We used decision analysis methodology to evaluate the costs, diagnostic yield, and cost effectiveness of diagnostic strategies for adults with suspected meningitis in resource-limited settings with moderate/high HIV prevalence. We considered 3 strategies: (1) comprehensive "shotgun" approach of utilizing all routine tests; (2) "stepwise" strategy with tests performed in a specific order with additional tuberculosis (TB) diagnostics; (3) "minimalist" strategy of sequential ordering of high-yield tests only. Each strategy resulted in 1 of 4 meningitis diagnoses: bacterial (4%), cryptococcal (59%), TB (8%), or other (aseptic) meningitis (29%). In model development, we utilized prevalence data from 2 Ugandan sites and published data on test performance. We validated the strategies with data from Malawi, South Africa, and Zimbabwe. The current comprehensive testing strategy resulted in 93.3% correct meningitis diagnoses costing $32.00 per patient. A stepwise strategy had 93.8% correct diagnoses costing an average of $9.72 per patient, and a minimalist strategy had 91.1% correct diagnoses costing an average of $6.17 per patient. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was $133 per additional correct diagnosis for the stepwise over minimalist strategy. Through strategically choosing the order and type of testing coupled with disease prevalence rates, algorithms can deliver more care more efficiently. The algorithms presented herein are generalizable to East Africa and Southern Africa.

  8. The functioning of oxygen concentrators in resource-limited settings: a situation assessment in two countries.

    PubMed

    La Vincente, S F; Peel, D; Carai, S; Weber, M W; Enarson, P; Maganga, E; Soyolgerel, G; Duke, T

    2011-05-01

    The paediatric wards of hospitals in Malawi and Mongolia. To describe oxygen concentrator functioning in two countries with widespread, long-term use of concentrators as a primary source of oxygen for treating children. A systematic assessment of concentrators in the paediatric wards of 15 hospitals in Malawi and nine hospitals in Mongolia. Oxygen concentrators had been installed for a median of 48 months (interquartile range [IQR] 6-60) and 36 months (IQR 12-96), respectively, prior to the evaluation in Malawi and Mongolia. Concentrators were the primary source of oxygen. Three quarters of the concentrators assessed in Malawi (28/36) and half those assessed in Mongolia (13/25) were functional. Concentrators were found to remain functional with up to 30 000 h of use. However, several concentrators were functioning very poorly despite limited use. Concentrators from a number of different manufacturers were evaluated, and there was marked variation in performance between brands. Inadequate resources for maintenance were reported in both countries. Years after installation of oxygen concentrators, many machines were still functioning, indicating that widespread use can be sustained in resource-limited settings. However, concentrator performance varied substantially. Procurement of high-quality and appropriate equipment is critical, and resources should be made available for ongoing maintenance.

  9. Cryptococcal Meningitis Treatment Strategies in Resource-Limited Settings: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rajasingham, Radha; Rolfes, Melissa A.; Birkenkamp, Kate E.; Meya, David B.; Boulware, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Cryptococcal meningitis (CM) is the most common form of meningitis in Africa. World Health Organization guidelines recommend 14-d amphotericin-based induction therapy; however, this is impractical for many resource-limited settings due to cost and intensive monitoring needs. A cost-effectiveness analysis was performed to guide stakeholders with respect to optimal CM treatment within resource limitations. Methods and Findings: We conducted a decision analysis to estimate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of six CM induction regimens: fluconazole (800–1,200 mg/d) monotherapy, fluconazole + flucytosine (5FC), short-course amphotericin (7-d) + fluconazole, 14-d of amphotericin alone, amphotericin + fluconazole, and amphotericin + 5FC. We computed actual 2012 healthcare costs in Uganda for medications, supplies, and personnel, and average laboratory costs for three African countries. A systematic review of cryptococcal treatment trials in resource-limited areas summarized 10-wk survival outcomes. We modeled one-year survival based on South African, Ugandan, and Thai CM outcome data, and survival beyond one-year on Ugandan and Thai data. Quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were determined and used to calculate the cost-effectiveness ratio and ICER. The cost of hospital care ranged from $154 for fluconazole monotherapy to $467 for 14 d of amphotericin + 5FC. Based on 18 studies investigating outcomes for HIV-infected individuals with CM in resource-limited settings, the estimated mean one-year survival was lowest for fluconazole monotherapy, at 40%. The cost-effectiveness ratio ranged from $20 to $44 per QALY. Overall, amphotericin-based regimens had higher costs but better survival. Short-course amphotericin (1 mg/kg/d for 7 d) with fluconazole (1,200 mg/d for14 d) had the best one-year survival (66%) and the most favorable cost-effectiveness ratio, at $20.24/QALY, with an ICER of $15.11 per additional QALY over fluconazole monotherapy. The

  10. Screening for HIV-Associated Peripheral Neuropathy in Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Cettomai, Deanna; Kwasa, Judith K.; Birbeck, Gretchen L.; Price, Richard W.; Cohen, Craig R.; Bukusi, Elizabeth A.; (OB/Gyn), MMed; Kendi, Caroline; Meyer, Ana-Claire L.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Peripheral neuropathy is the most common neurological complication of HIV but is widely under-diagnosed in resource-limited settings. We investigated the utility of screening tools administered by non-physician health care workers (HCW) and quantitative sensory testing (QST) administered by trained individuals for identification of moderate/severe neuropathy. METHODS We enrolled 240 HIV-infected outpatients using two-stage cluster randomized sampling. HCWs administered the several screening tools. Trained study staff performed QST. Tools were validated against a clinical diagnosis of neuropathy. RESULTS Participants were 65% women, mean age 36.4 years, median CD4 324 cells/μL. 65% were taking antiretrovirals, and 18% had moderate/severe neuropathy. The screening tests were 76% sensitive in diagnosing moderate/severe neuropathy with negative predictive values of 84–92%. QST was less sensitive but more specific. DISCUSSION Screening tests administered by HCW have excellent negative predictive values and are promising tools for scale-up in resource-limited settings. QST shows promise for research use. PMID:24037693

  11. Special Needs of Young Women with Breast Cancer in Limited Resource Settings.

    PubMed

    Gálvez-Hernández, Carmen Lizette; González-Robledo, María Cecilia; Barragán-Carrillo, Regina; Villarreal-Garza, Cynthia

    2017-01-01

    Young women with breast cancer (YWBC) comprise a group of patients with unique biopsychosocial characteristics with a special perception of needs throughout their disease and survivorship. Contexts marked by restricted allocations and economic constraints might further aggravate the struggle of these patients living within limited resource settings and can demand added requirements for them and their families. To analytically explore the existing knowledge regarding the needs of YWBC in low- and middle- income countries (LMICs). We conducted a thorough literature review of scientific journal databases available in Spanish and English containing information on YWBC in LMICs. We did not find any publications exclusively assessing this topic in resource-limited settings. We looked for data on the different types of YW need from studies in the region that assessed the needs of breast cancer (BC) patients in general and described in their findings the particularities of young patients. Young BC patients described within the literature present a variety of needs. Those reported most frequently as unmet were related to information needs and psychological counseling, practical and physical assistance, and social and spiritual support. Published literature on the subject - particularly in Latin America - is extremely scarce. This offers an area of opportunity for conducting further research in this topic that would help improve health professional training and establish health policies in favor of YWBC.

  12. A point-of-care PCR test for HIV-1 detection in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Jangam, Sujit R; Agarwal, Abhishek K; Sur, Kunal; Kelso, David M

    2013-04-15

    A low-cost, fully integrated sample-to-answer, quantitative PCR (qPCR) system that can be used for detection of HIV-1 proviral DNA in infants at the point-of-care in resource-limited settings has been developed and tested. The system is based on a novel DNA extraction method, which uses a glass fiber membrane, a disposable assay card that includes on-board reagent storage, provisions for thermal cycling and fluorescence detection, and a battery-operated portable analyzer. The system is capable of automated PCR mix assembly using a novel reagent delivery system and performing qPCR. HIV-1 and internal control targets are detected using two spectrally separated fluorophores, FAM and Quasar 670. In this report, a proof-of-concept of the platform is demonstrated. Initial results with whole blood demonstrate that the test is capable of detecting HIV-1 in blood samples containing greater than 5000 copies of HIV-1. In resource-limited settings, a point-of-care HIV-1 qPCR test would greatly increase the number of test results that reach the infants caregivers, allowing them to pursue anti-retroviral therapy.

  13. Low-cost assays for monitoring HIV infected individuals in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Pachamuthu; Iqbal, Hussain Syed; Shanmugham, Saravanan; Mohanakrishnan, Janardhanan; Solomon, Sunil S.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Solomon, Suniti

    2011-01-01

    Use of a combination of CD4 counts and HIV viral load testing in the management of antiretroviral therapy (ART) provides higher prognostic estimation of the risk of disease progression than does the use of either test alone. The standard methods to monitor HIV infection are flow cytometry based for CD4+ T cell count and molecular assays to quantify plasma viral load of HIV. Commercial assays have been routinely used in developed countries to monitor ART. However, these assays require expensive equipment and reagents, well trained operators, and established laboratory infrastructure. These requirements restrict their use in resource-limited settings where people are most afflicted with the HIV-1 epidemic. With the advent of low-cost and/or low-tech alternatives, the possibility of implementing CD4 count and viral load testing in the management of ART in resource-limited settings is increasing. However, an appropriate validation should have been done before putting them to use for patient testing. PMID:22310816

  14. Diagnostic and Treatment Difficulties of Pyelonephritis in Pregnancy in Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    McGready, Rose; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Ashley, Elizabeth A.; Tan, Saw Oo; Pimanpanarak, Mupawjay; Viladpai-nguen, Samuel Jacher; Jesadapanpong, Wilarat; Blacksell, Stuart D.; Proux, Stephane; Day, Nicholas P.; Singhasivanon, Pratap; White, Nicholas J.; Nosten, François; Peacock, Sharon J.

    2010-01-01

    Limited microbiology services impede adequate diagnosis and treatment of common infections such as pyelonephritis in resource-limited settings. Febrile pregnant women attending antenatal clinics at Shoklo Malaria Research Unit were offered urine dipstick, sediment microscopy, urine culture, and a 5-mL blood culture. The incidence of pyelonephritis was 11/1,000 deliveries (N = 53 in 4,819 pregnancies) between January 7, 2004 and May 17, 2006. Pyelonephritis accounted for 20.2% (41/203) of fever cases in pregnancy. Escherichia coli was the most commonly isolated pathogen: 87.5% (28/32) of organisms cultured. Susceptibility of E. coli to ampicillin (14%), cotrimoxazole (21%), and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (48%) was very low. E. coli was susceptible to ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin. The rate of extended spectrum β-lactamase (4.2%; 95% confidence interval = 0.7–19.5) was low. The rate and causes of pyelonephritis in pregnant refugee and migrant women were comparable with those described in developed countries. Diagnostic innovation in microbiology that permits affordable access is a high priority for resource-poor settings. PMID:21118943

  15. Evaluating Diagnostic Point-of-Care Tests in Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Drain, Paul K; Hyle, Emily P; Noubary, Farzad; Freedberg, Kenneth A; Wilson, Douglas; Bishai, William; Rodriguez, William; Bassett, Ingrid V

    2014-01-01

    Diagnostic point-of-care (POC) testing is intended to minimize the time to obtain a test result, thereby allowing clinicians and patients to make an expeditious clinical decision. As POC tests expand into resource-limited settings (RLS), the benefits must outweigh the costs. To optimize POC testing in RLS, diagnostic POC tests need rigorous evaluations focused on relevant clinical outcomes and operational costs, which differ from evaluations of conventional diagnostic tests. Here, we reviewed published studies on POC testing in RLS, and found no clearly defined metric for the clinical utility of POC testing. Therefore, we propose a framework for evaluating POC tests, and suggest and define the term “test efficacy” to describe a diagnostic test’s capacity to support a clinical decision within its operational context. We also proposed revised criteria for an ideal diagnostic POC test in resource-limited settings. Through systematic evaluations, comparisons between centralized diagnostic testing and novel POC technologies can be more formalized, and health officials can better determine which POC technologies represent valuable additions to their clinical programs. PMID:24332389

  16. Flow-through, viral co-infection assay for resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Cretich, Marina; Torrisi, Marcello; Daminelli, Serena; Gagni, Paola; Plavisch, Lauren; Chiari, Marcella

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a new and rapid immunofiltration assay for simultaneous detection of HIV p24 and hepatitis B virus antigens. The assay platform is composed of a 13 mm nitrocellulose filter spotted with capturing bioprobes and inserted in a Swinnex(®) syringe filter holder. Samples and reagents are flown through the nitrocellulose filter by manual pressure on the syringe. A colorimetric detection allows for naked eye results interpretation. The assay provides sensitivity in the picomolar range in just 5 min, even using low volumes of sample in complex matrix. Probe deposition by spotting allows for flexible combinations of different capturing agents and multiple diagnoses; furthermore, the very simple and inexpensive set-up makes the syringe-based immunoassay on paper microarray a suitable diagnostic system for resource-limited settings.

  17. Advances in addressing technical challenges of point-of-care diagnostics in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Wang, ShuQi; Lifson, Mark A; Inci, Fatih; Liang, Li-Guo; Sheng, Ye-Feng; Demirci, Utkan

    2016-01-01

    The striking prevalence of HIV, TB and malaria, as well as outbreaks of emerging infectious diseases, such as influenza A (H7N9), Ebola and MERS, poses great challenges for patient care in resource-limited settings (RLS). However, advanced diagnostic technologies cannot be implemented in RLS largely due to economic constraints. Simple and inexpensive point-of-care (POC) diagnostics, which rely less on environmental context and operator training, have thus been extensively studied to achieve early diagnosis and treatment monitoring in non-laboratory settings. Despite great input from material science, biomedical engineering and nanotechnology for developing POC diagnostics, significant technical challenges are yet to be overcome. Summarized here are the technical challenges associated with POC diagnostics from a RLS perspective and the latest advances in addressing these challenges are reviewed.

  18. Advances in addressing technical challenges of point-of-care diagnostics in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    Wang, ShuQi; Lifson, Mark A.; Inci, Fatih; Liang, Li-Guo; Sheng, Ye-Feng; Demirci, Utkan

    2016-01-01

    The striking prevalence of HIV, TB and malaria, as well as outbreaks of emerging infectious diseases, such as influenza A (H7N9), Ebola and MERS, poses great challenges for patient care in resource-limited settings (RLS). However, advanced diagnostic technologies cannot be implemented in RLS largely due to economic constraints. Simple and inexpensive point-of-care (POC) diagnostics, which rely less on environmental context and operator training, have thus been extensively studied to achieve early diagnosis and treatment monitoring in non-laboratory settings. Despite great input from material science, biomedical engineering and nanotechnology for developing POC diagnostics, significant technical challenges are yet to be overcome. Summarized here are the technical challenges associated with POC diagnostics from a RLS perspective and the latest advances in addressing these challenges are reviewed. PMID:26777725

  19. Current strategies for improving access and adherence to antiretroviral therapies in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Scanlon, Michael L; Vreeman, Rachel C

    2013-01-01

    The rollout of antiretroviral therapy (ART) significantly reduced human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related morbidity and mortality, but good clinical outcomes depend on access and adherence to treatment. In resource-limited settings, where over 90% of the world's HIV-infected population resides, data on barriers to treatment are emerging that contribute to low rates of uptake in HIV testing, linkage to and retention in HIV care systems, and suboptimal adherence rates to therapy. A review of the literature reveals limited evidence to inform strategies to improve access and adherence with the majority of studies from sub-Saharan Africa. Data from observational studies and randomized controlled trials support home-based, mobile and antenatal care HIV testing, task-shifting from doctor-based to nurse-based and lower level provider care, and adherence support through education, counseling and mobile phone messaging services. Strategies with more limited evidence include targeted HIV testing for couples and family members of ART patients, decentralization of HIV care, including through home- and community-based ART programs, and adherence promotion through peer health workers, treatment supporters, and directly observed therapy. There is little evidence for improving access and adherence among vulnerable groups such as women, children and adolescents, and other high-risk populations and for addressing major barriers. Overall, studies are few in number and suffer from methodological issues. Recommendations for further research include health information technology, social-level factors like HIV stigma, and new research directions in cost-effectiveness, operations, and implementation. Findings from this review make a compelling case for more data to guide strategies to improve access and adherence to treatment in resource-limited settings.

  20. Current strategies for improving access and adherence to antiretroviral therapies in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    Scanlon, Michael L; Vreeman, Rachel C

    2013-01-01

    The rollout of antiretroviral therapy (ART) significantly reduced human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related morbidity and mortality, but good clinical outcomes depend on access and adherence to treatment. In resource-limited settings, where over 90% of the world’s HIV-infected population resides, data on barriers to treatment are emerging that contribute to low rates of uptake in HIV testing, linkage to and retention in HIV care systems, and suboptimal adherence rates to therapy. A review of the literature reveals limited evidence to inform strategies to improve access and adherence with the majority of studies from sub-Saharan Africa. Data from observational studies and randomized controlled trials support home-based, mobile and antenatal care HIV testing, task-shifting from doctor-based to nurse-based and lower level provider care, and adherence support through education, counseling and mobile phone messaging services. Strategies with more limited evidence include targeted HIV testing for couples and family members of ART patients, decentralization of HIV care, including through home- and community-based ART programs, and adherence promotion through peer health workers, treatment supporters, and directly observed therapy. There is little evidence for improving access and adherence among vulnerable groups such as women, children and adolescents, and other high-risk populations and for addressing major barriers. Overall, studies are few in number and suffer from methodological issues. Recommendations for further research include health information technology, social-level factors like HIV stigma, and new research directions in cost-effectiveness, operations, and implementation. Findings from this review make a compelling case for more data to guide strategies to improve access and adherence to treatment in resource-limited settings. PMID:23326204

  1. Haemodialysis practice in a resource-limited setting in the tropics.

    PubMed

    Okunola, Y; Ayodele, O; Akinwusi, P; Gbadegesin, B; Oluyombo, R

    2013-03-01

    To provide information on the challenges of haemodialysis in a resource limited setting in South-Western Nigeria. This is a 5 year audit of all haemodialysis sessions carried out at the renal unit of the Ladoke Akintola University Teaching Hospital (LAUTECH), Osogbo, Nigeria. A total of 225 patients were offered haemodialysis (HD) during this period with age range of 10 to 85 years (mean age of 49 years±16.25). There were 155 males and 70 females (male to female ratio of 2.2:1). Chronic kidney failure accounted for 180 (80%) of the cases while acute kidney injury (AKI) constituted 45 (20%) of the cases offered haemodialysis. The sessions of HD in both cases ranged from 1 to 27 with an average of 3 sessions. Hypotension is still the commonest intradialytic complication at our setting while diabetic nephropathy is rapidly emerging as a major cause of end stage renal disease at our setting requiring HD. As seen in other parts of the tropics sepsis, nephrotoxins and pregnancy related cases still accounted for a large percentage of AKI cases requiring haemodialysis. Only three patients were able to afford haemodialysis support for more than three months. Haemodialysis still remains a veritable option in renal replacement therapy. Problems encountered were similar to many other settings in the tropics. Intensive efforts should still be geared at preventing the risk factors for both acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease in our environment.

  2. Diagnosing acute respiratory distress syndrome in resource limited settings: the Kigali modification of the Berlin definition.

    PubMed

    Riviello, Elisabeth D; Buregeya, Egide; Twagirumugabe, Theogene

    2017-02-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was re-defined by a panel of experts in Berlin in 2012. Although the Berlin criteria improved upon the validity and reliability of the definition, it did not make diagnosis of ARDS in resource limited settings possible. Mechanical ventilation, arterial blood gas measurements, and chest radiographs are not feasible in many regions of the world. In 2014, we proposed and applied the Kigali modification of the Berlin definition in a hospital in Rwanda. This review synthesizes literature from the last 18 months relevant to the Kigali modification. In the last 18 months, the need for a universally applicable ARDS definition was reinforced by advances in supportive care that can be implemented in resource poor settings. Research demonstrating the variable impact of positive end expiratory pressure on hypoxemia, the validity of using pulse oximetry rather than arterial blood gas to categorize hypoxemia, and the accuracy of lung ultrasound support the use of the Kigali modification of the Berlin definition. Studies directly comparing the Berlin definition to the Kigali modification are needed. Ongoing clinical research on ARDS needs to include low-income countries.

  3. Differentiated Human Immunodeficiency Virus RNA Monitoring in Resource-Limited Settings: An Economic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Negoescu, Diana M; Zhang, Zhenhuan; Bucher, Heiner C; Bendavid, Eran

    2017-06-15

    Viral load (VL) monitoring for patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) is recommended worldwide. However, the costs of frequent monitoring are a barrier to implementation in resource-limited settings. The extent to which personalized monitoring frequencies may be cost-effective is unknown. We created a simulation model parameterized using person-level longitudinal data to assess the benefits of flexible monitoring frequencies. Our data-driven model tracked human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals for 10 years following ART initiation. We optimized the interval between viral load tests as a function of patients' age, gender, education, duration since ART initiation, adherence behavior, and the cost-effectiveness threshold. We compared the cost-effectiveness of the personalized monitoring strategies to fixed monitoring intervals every 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. Shorter fixed VL monitoring intervals yielded increasing benefits (6.034 to 6.221 discounted quality-adjusted life-years [QALYs] per patient with monitoring every 24 to 1 month over 10 years, respectively, standard error = 0.005 QALY), at increasing average costs: US$3445 (annual monitoring) to US$5393 (monthly monitoring) per patient, respectively (standard error = US$3.7). The adaptive policy optimized for low-income contexts achieved 6.142 average QALYs at a cost of US$3524, similar to the fixed 12-month policy (6.135 QALYs, US$3518). The adaptive policy optimized for middle-income resource settings yields 0.008 fewer QALYs per person, but saves US$204 compared to monitoring every 3 months. The benefits from implementing adaptive vs fixed VL monitoring policies increase with the availability of resources. In low- and middle-income countries, adaptive policies achieve similar outcomes to simpler, fixed-interval policies.

  4. Emerging technologies in point-of-care molecular diagnostics for resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Peeling, Rosanna W; McNerney, Ruth

    2014-06-01

    Emerging molecular technologies to diagnose infectious diseases at the point at which care is delivered have the potential to save many lives in developing countries where access to laboratories is poor. Molecular tests are needed to improve the specificity of syndromic management, monitor progress towards disease elimination and screen for asymptomatic infections with the goal of interrupting disease transmission and preventing long-term sequelae. In simplifying laboratory-based molecular assays for use at point-of-care, there are inevitable compromises between cost, ease of use and test performance. Despite significant technological advances, many challenges remain for the development of molecular diagnostics for resource-limited settings. There needs to be more advocacy for these technologies to be applied to infectious diseases, increased efforts to lower the barriers to market entry through streamlined and harmonized regulatory approaches, faster policy development for adoption of new technologies and novel financing mechanisms to enable countries to scale up implementation.

  5. Supporting research sites in resource-limited settings: Challenges in implementing IT infrastructure

    PubMed Central

    Whalen, Christopher; Donnell, Deborah; Tartakovsky, Michael

    2014-01-01

    As Information and Communication Technology infrastructure becomes more reliable, new methods of Electronic Data Capture (EDC), datamarts/Data warehouses, and mobile computing provide platforms for rapid coordination of international research projects and multisite studies. However, despite the increasing availability of internet connectivity and communication systems in remote regions of the world, there are still significant obstacles. Sites with poor infrastructure face serious challenges participating in modern clinical and basic research, particularly that relying on EDC and internet communication technologies. This report discusses our experiences in supporting research in resource-limited settings (RLS). We describe examples of the practical and ethical/regulatory challenges raised by use of these newer technologies for data collection in multisite clinical studies. PMID:24321986

  6. Spontaneous oesophageal rupture: a diagnostic challenge in resource-limited setting

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Elichilia R.; Joseph, Pantaleo M.; Slootweg, Piet; Mkwizu, Elifuraha W.; Kilonzo, Kajiru G.; Mwasamwaja, Amos O.

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous oesophageal rupture after swallowing a bolus of food is a very rare condition. In resource-limited settings, it is very challenging to diagnose this condition especially when its presentation is atypical. Its prognosis is very poor when diagnosis is delayed due to risk of mediastinitis. We report a case of 37-year-old man who was admitted to our hospital complaining of sudden onset of chest tightness and pain after a meal 8 h prior to admission. Urgent chest radiograph revealed right hydropneumothorax with collapsed lung. Water-seal drainage was established gushing 1200 ml of food materials. Definitive diagnosis of oesophageal rupture was reached after post-mortem. PMID:26421158

  7. Challenges in diagnosis and management of Cryptococcal immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) in resource limited settings.

    PubMed

    Musubire, A K; Meya, B D; Mayanja-Kizza, H; Lukande, R; Wiesner, L D; Bohjanen, P; R Boulware, R D

    2012-06-01

    In many resource-limited settings, cryptococcal meningitis (CM) contributes up to 20% of all deaths with further complications due to Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome (IRIS). We present a case report on a patient who developed CM-IRIS and then subsequent CM-relapse with a fluconazole-resistant organism and then later CM-IRIS once again, manifesting as cystic cryptococcomas, hydrocephalus, and sterile CSF. In this case we, demonstrate that CM-IRIS and persistent low level cryptococcal infection are not mutually exclusive phenomena. The management of IRIS with corticosteroids may increase the risk of culture positive CM-relapse which may further increase the risk of recurrent IRIS and resulting complications including death. We also highlight the role of imaging and fluconazole resistance testing in patients with recurrent meningitis and the importance of CSF cultures in guiding treatment decisions.

  8. A screening tool to identify surgical candidates with drug refractory epilepsy in a resource limited settings.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Varun; Chandra, Sarat P; Dash, Deepa; Garg, Ajay; Tripathi, Madhavi; Bal, C S; Tripathi, Manjari

    2016-03-01

    Access to epilepsy surgery remains a considerable challenge in contemporary healthcare systems. Given the limitations in resources and demand for Epilepsy Monitoring Unit (EMU) assessments, information that can be used to expedite the process is of great value. The purpose of this study was to identify variables prior to EMU admission that may be associated with candidacy for prospective epilepsy surgery. This was a prospective study conducted at the Department of Neurology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. We identified two subgroups of patients from 501 drug refractory epilepsy (DRE) patients admitted in EMU of Neurology Department, AIIMS from 2006 onwards following validation of proposed tool in 40 patients. They on subsequent investigations were either cleared or not cleared for epilepsy surgery. A tool consisting of variables likely to predict surgical candidacy in persons with DRE in Indian settings was developed for identification of patients who might benefit from an early epilepsy surgery evaluation. Statistical analysis revealed significant differences between the two groups for several variables. Non-surgical candidates had non-disabling seizures, seizures improved with a combination of drugs, had little/no AEDs side effects and had near normal or normal scalp EEG and MRI brain. Using the best available evidence, we developed a decision making tool which can provide a comprehensive quick guide for determining candidacy for epilepsy surgery evaluations in resource limited settings. Given the demand for EMU assessments, information that can be used to expedite the process is of value. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Monitoring HIV Viral Load in Resource Limited Settings: Still a Matter of Debate?

    PubMed Central

    Arnedo, Mireia; Alonso, Elena; Eisenberg, Nell; Ibáñez, Laura; Ferreyra, Cecilia; Jaén, Angels; Flevaud, Laurence; Khamadi, Samuel; Roddy, Paul; Gatell, Jose Maria; Dalmau, David

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Consequences of lack of viral monitoring in predicting the effects of development of HIV drug resistance mutations during HAART in resource-limited settings (RLS) is still a matter of debate. Design To assess, among HIV+ patients receiving their first-line HAART, prevalence of virological failure and genotypic resistance mutations pattern in a Médécins Sans Frontières/Ministry of Health programme in Busia District (Kenya). Methods Patients with HAART treatment for ≥12 months were eligible for the study and those with HIV-RNA ≥5000 copies/ml underwent genotypic study. Total HIV-1 RNA from Dried Blood Spots was extracted using Nuclisens method. Results 926 patients were included. Among 274 (29.6%) patients with detectable viral load, 55 (5.9%) experienced treatment failure (viral load >5.000 copies/ml); 61.8% were female and 10 (18.2%) had clinical failure. Median CD4 cell count was 116 cell/mm3 (IQR: 54–189). Median HIV-RNA was 32,000 copies/ml (IQR: 11000–68000). Eighteen out of 55 (33%) samples could be sequenced on PR and RT genes, with resistance associated mutations (RAMs) in 15 out of 18 samples (83%). Among patients carrying RAMs, 12/15 (81%) harboured RAMs associated to thymidine analogues (TAMs). All of them (100%) showed M184V resistance associated mutation to lamivudine as well as NNRTI's RAMS. Conclusions Virological failure rate in resource-limited settings are similar to those observed in developed countries. Resistance mutation patterns were concordant with HAART received by failing patients. Long term detectable viral load confers greater probability of developing resistance and as a consequence, making difficult to find out a cost-effective subsequent treatment regimen. PMID:23236346

  10. Lives Saved by Expanding HIV Treatment Availability in Resource-Limited Settings: The Example of Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Kimmel, April D.; Charles, Macarthur; Deschamps, Marie-Marcelle; Severe, Patrice; Edwards, Alison M.; Johnson, Warren D.; Fitzgerald, Daniel W.; Pape, Jean W.; Schackman, Bruce R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Guidelines recommend antiretroviral treatment (ART) initiation at CD4 <350/µL for HIV-infected individuals in resource-limited settings. However, funding for treatment expansion remains uncertain. We forecast the mortality impact of ART expansion alternatives in Haiti. Methods We used data from Haiti to develop a country-specific model of HIV disease. The model projects the mortality, total number of HIV-infected individuals, and number and coverage (% of those eligible) on ART by simulating cohorts of HIV-infected individuals over 10 years. We assessed 5 ART expansion scenarios, ranging from fully expanded ART (best case) to no new ART (worst case). Results By 2010, the model predicts 103,500 individuals living with HIV in Haiti, of whom 27,300 were estimated to receive ART. Continuing ART initiation at current rates requires increasing the number on ART to 43,300 by 2020 (56% coverage), with 89,700 deaths estimated between 2010 and 2020. The number on ART could increase by 7,400 (+17.1%, best case) or decrease by 25,600 (−59.1%, worst case), resulting in 19,500 deaths averted and 9,900 fewer in care awaiting ART (best versus worst case). Results are sensitive to untreated disease progression and pre-ART loss from care. Increased HIV testing, linkage to care, and retention in care can avert additional deaths and achieve nearly 80% ART coverage with optimal policy improvements. Conclusions In resource-limited settings, continued improvements in HIV treatment access will save lives. Efforts to efficiently expand ART access should remain a global priority. PMID:23535289

  11. Simple paper-based test for measuring blood hemoglobin concentration in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoxi; Piety, Nathaniel Z.; Vignes, Seth M.; Benton, Melody S.; Kanter, Julie; Shevkoplyas, Sergey S.

    2013-01-01

    Background The measurement of hemoglobin concentration ([Hb]) is performed routinely as a part of a complete blood cell count to evaluate the oxygen-carrying capacity of blood. Devices currently available to physicians and clinical laboratories for measuring [Hb] are accurate, operate on small samples and provide results rapidly, but may be prohibitively expensive for resource-limited settings. The unavailability of accurate but inexpensive diagnostic tools often precludes proper diagnosis of anemia in low-income developing countries. Therefore, we developed a simple paper-based assay for measuring [Hb]. Methods A 20-μL droplet of a mixture of blood and Drabkin’s reagent was deposited onto patterned chromatography paper. The resulting blood stain was digitized with a portable scanner and analyzed. The mean color intensity of the blood stain was used to quantify [Hb]. We compared the performance of the paper-based Hb assay with a hematology analyzer (comparison method) using blood samples from 54 subjects. Results The values of [Hb] measured using the paper-based assay and the comparison method were highly correlated (R2 = 0.9598); the standard deviation of the difference between the two measurements was 0.62 g/dL. The assay was accurate within 1 g/dL 90.7% of the time, overestimating [Hb] by ≥1 g/dL in 1.9% and underestimating [Hb] by ≥1 g/dL in 7.4% of the subjects. Conclusions This study demonstrates the feasibility of the paper-based Hb assay. This simple, low-cost test should be useful for diagnosing anemia in resource-limited settings, particularly in the context of care for malaria, HIV and sickle cell disease patients in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:23788584

  12. HIV Prevention in Resource Limited Settings: A Case Study of Challenges and Opportunities for Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Stephen; Chitalu, Ndashi

    2016-01-01

    Background Sub-Saharan Africa has the highest global prevalence of HIV, and the prevention of transmission between HIV-seropositive and -serodiscordant sexual partners is a critical component of HIV prevention efforts. Behavioral interventions that have demonstrated efficacy in reducing risk behaviors associated with HIV transmission and infection and have been translated, or adapted, to a variety of settings. Purpose This manuscript examined implementation of behavioral interventions within resource limited health care delivery settings, and their adoption and integration within service programs to achieve sustainability. Methods The CDC/Partner Program, an evidence-based risk reduction intervention, was implemented in Community Health Centers (CHCs) in Zambia using a staged technology transfer process, the Training the Trainers Model. Provincial workshops and training workshops on the provision of the intervention were used to establish a cadre of trainers to provide on-site intervention facilitators capable of ultimately providing coverage to over 300 CHCs. Results CHC staff provided the intervention to clinic attendees in four provinces over 4 years while also training new facilitators. The implementation process addressed multi-level issues within the context of training, consultants, decision making, administration, and evaluation as well as practical considerations surrounding travel, training, staff compensation and ongoing quality assurance. Conclusions The majority of challenges to implementation and maintenance were addressed and resolved, with the exception of structural limitations related to restricted resources for personnel and funding. Strengths of the program included its collaborative structure, active program leadership, commitment and support at the provincial level, the use of task shifting by existing clinic staff, the train the trainer model and ongoing quality control. Enhanced infrastructure is needed in for future implementation, such as

  13. Leapfrog diagnostics: Demonstration of a broad spectrum pathogen identification platform in a resource-limited setting

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Resource-limited tropical countries are home to numerous infectious pathogens of both human and zoonotic origin. A capability for early detection to allow rapid outbreak containment and prevent spread to non-endemic regions is severely impaired by inadequate diagnostic laboratory capacity, the absence of a “cold chain” and the lack of highly trained personnel. Building up detection capacity in these countries by direct replication of the systems existing in developed countries is not a feasible approach and instead requires “leapfrogging” to the deployment of the newest diagnostic systems that do not have the infrastructure requirements of systems used in developed countries. Methods A laboratory for molecular diagnostics of infectious agents was established in Bo, Sierra Leone with a hybrid solar/diesel/battery system to ensure stable power supply and a satellite modem to enable efficient communication. An array of room temperature stabilization and refrigeration technologies for reliable transport and storage of reagents and biological samples were also tested to ensure sustainable laboratory supplies for diagnostic assays. Results The laboratory demonstrated its operational proficiency by conducting an investigation of a suspected avian influenza outbreak at a commercial poultry farm at Bo using broad range resequencing microarrays and real time RT-PCR. The results of the investigation excluded influenza viruses as a possible cause of the outbreak and indicated a link between the outbreak and the presence of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Conclusions This study demonstrated that by application of a carefully selected set of technologies and sufficient personnel training, it is feasible to deploy and effectively use a broad-range infectious pathogen detection technology in a severely resource-limited setting. PMID:22759725

  14. Aspirin for secondary prevention after stroke of unknown etiology in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    Westover, M. Brandon; Bianchi, Matt T.; Chou, Sherry H-Y.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the potential impact of aspirin therapy for long-term secondary prevention after stroke of undetermined etiology in resource-limited settings without access to neuroimaging to distinguish ischemic stroke from intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Methods: We conducted a decision analysis using a Markov state transition model. Sensitivity analyses were performed across the worldwide reported range of the proportion of strokes due to ICH and the 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of aspirin-associated relative risks in patients with ICH. Results: For patients with stroke of undetermined etiology, long-term aspirin was the preferred treatment strategy across the worldwide reported range of the proportion of strokes due to ICH. At 34% of strokes due to ICH (the highest proportion reported in a large epidemiologic study), the benefit of aspirin remained beyond the upper bounds of the 95% CIs of aspirin-associated post-ICH relative risks most concerning to clinicians (ICH recurrence risk and mortality risk if ICH recurs on aspirin). Based on the estimated 11,590,204 strokes in low- and middle-income countries in 2010, our model predicts that aspirin therapy for secondary stroke prevention in all patients with stroke in these countries could lead to an estimated yearly decrease of 84,492 recurrent strokes and 4,056 stroke-related mortalities. Conclusions: The concern that the risks of aspirin in patients with stroke of unknown etiology could outweigh the benefits is not supported by our model, which predicts that aspirin for secondary prevention in patients with stroke of undetermined etiology in resource-limited settings could lead to decreased stroke-related mortality and stroke recurrence. PMID:25122202

  15. Hidden costs: The ethics of cost-effectiveness analyses for health interventions in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Rutstein, Sarah E; Price, Joan T; Rosenberg, Nora E; Rennie, Stuart M; Biddle, Andrea K; Miller, William C

    2017-10-01

    Cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) is an increasingly appealing tool for evaluating and comparing health-related interventions in resource-limited settings. The goal is to inform decision-makers regarding the health benefits and associated costs of alternative interventions, helping guide allocation of limited resources by prioritising interventions that offer the most health for the least money. Although only one component of a more complex decision-making process, CEAs influence the distribution of health-care resources, directly influencing morbidity and mortality for the world's most vulnerable populations. However, CEA-associated measures are frequently setting-specific valuations, and CEA outcomes may violate ethical principles of equity and distributive justice. We examine the assumptions and analytical tools used in CEAs that may conflict with societal values. We then evaluate contextual features unique to resource-limited settings, including the source of health-state utilities and disability weights, implications of CEA thresholds in light of economic uncertainty, and the role of external donors. Finally, we explore opportunities to help align interpretation of CEA outcomes with values and budgetary constraints in resource-limited settings. The ethical implications of CEAs in resource-limited settings are vast. It is imperative that CEA outcome summary measures and implementation thresholds adequately reflect societal values and ethical priorities in resource-limited settings.

  16. Feasibility of HIV point-of-care tests for resource-limited settings: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Wendy; Gous, Natasha; Ford, Nathan; Scott, Lesley E

    2014-09-08

    Improved access to anti-retroviral therapy increases the need for affordable monitoring using assays such as CD4 and/or viral load in resource-limited settings. Barriers to accessing treatment, high rates of loss to initiation and poor retention in care are prompting the need to find alternatives to conventional centralized laboratory testing in certain countries. Strong advocacy has led to a rapidly expanding repertoire of point-of-care tests for HIV. point-of-care testing is not without its challenges: poor regulatory control, lack of guidelines, absence of quality monitoring and lack of industry standards for connectivity, to name a few. The management of HIV increasingly requires a multidisciplinary testing approach involving hematology, chemistry, and tests associated with the management of non-communicable diseases, thus added expertise is needed. This is further complicated by additional human resource requirements and the need for continuous training, a sustainable supply chain, and reimbursement strategies. It is clear that to ensure appropriate national implementation either in a tiered laboratory model or a total decentralized model, clear country-specific assessments need to be conducted.

  17. Weight Estimation Tool for Children Aged 6 to 59 Months in Limited-Resource Settings

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Importance A simple, reliable anthropometric tool for rapid estimation of weight in children would be useful in limited-resource settings where current weight estimation tools are not uniformly reliable, nearly all global under-five mortality occurs, severe acute malnutrition is a significant contributor in approximately one-third of under-five mortality, and a weight scale may not be immediately available in emergencies to first-response providers. Objective To determine the accuracy and precision of mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) and height as weight estimation tools in children under five years of age in low-to-middle income countries. Design This was a retrospective observational study. Data were collected in 560 nutritional surveys during 1992–2006 using a modified Expanded Program of Immunization two-stage cluster sample design. Setting Locations with high prevalence of acute and chronic malnutrition. Participants A total of 453,990 children met inclusion criteria (age 6–59 months; weight ≤ 25 kg; MUAC 80–200 mm) and exclusion criteria (bilateral pitting edema; biologically implausible weight-for-height z-score (WHZ), weight-for-age z-score (WAZ), and height-for-age z-score (HAZ) values). Exposures Weight was estimated using Broselow Tape, Hong Kong formula, and database MUAC alone, height alone, and height and MUAC combined. Main Outcomes and Measures Mean percentage difference between true and estimated weight, proportion of estimates accurate to within ± 25% and ± 10% of true weight, weighted Kappa statistic, and Bland-Altman bias were reported as measures of tool accuracy. Standard deviation of mean percentage difference and Bland-Altman 95% limits of agreement were reported as measures of tool precision. Results Database height was a more accurate and precise predictor of weight compared to Broselow Tape 2007 [B], Broselow Tape 2011 [A], and MUAC. Mean percentage difference between true and estimated weight was +0.49% (SD = 10

  18. Identification of Barriers to Pediatric Care in Limited-Resource Settings: A Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Shilkofski, Nicole; Hunt, Elizabeth A

    2015-12-01

    Eighty percent of the 10 million annual deaths in children aged <5 years in developing countries are estimated to be avoidable, with improvements in education for pediatric emergency management being a key factor. Education must take into account cultural considerations to be effective. Study objectives were: (1) to use simulation to identify factors posing barriers to patient care in limited resource settings (LRS); and (2) to understand how simulations in LRS can affect communication and decision-making processes. A qualitative study was conducted at 17 different sites in 12 developing countries in Asia, Latin America, and Africa. Data from observations of 68 in situ simulated pediatric emergencies were coded for thematic analysis. Sixty-two different "key informants" were interviewed regarding perceived benefit of simulations. Coding of observations and interviews yielded common themes: impact of culture on team hierarchy, impact of communication and language barriers on situational awareness, systematic emergency procedures, role delineation, shared cognition and resource awareness through simulation, logistic barriers to patient care, and use of recognition-primed decision-making by experienced clinicians. Changes in clinical environments were implemented as a result of simulations. Ad hoc teams in LRS face challenges in caring safely for patients; these include language and cultural barriers, as well as environmental and resource constraints. Engaging teams in simulations may promote improved communication, identification of systems issues and latent threats to target for remediation. There may be a role for training novices in use of recognition-primed or algorithmic decision-making strategies to improve rapidity and efficiency of decisions in LRS. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  19. Protocol for a drugs exposure pregnancy registry for implementation in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The absence of robust evidence of safety of medicines in pregnancy, particularly those for major diseases provided by public health programmes in developing countries, has resulted in cautious recommendations on their use. We describe a protocol for a Pregnancy Registry adapted to resource-limited settings aimed at providing evidence on the safety of medicines in pregnancy. Methods/Design Sentinel health facilities are chosen where women come for prenatal care and are likely to come for delivery. Staff capacity is improved to provide better care during the pregnancy, to identify visible birth defects at delivery and refer infants with major anomalies for surgical or clinical evaluation and treatment. Consenting women are enrolled at their first antenatal visit and careful medical, obstetric and drug-exposure histories taken; medical record linkage is encouraged. Enrolled women are followed up prospectively and their histories are updated at each subsequent visit. The enrolled woman is encouraged to deliver at the facility, where she and her baby can be assessed. Discussion In addition to data pooling into a common WHO database, the WHO Pregnancy Registry has three important features: First is the inclusion of pregnant women coming for antenatal care, enabling comparison of birth outcomes of women who have been exposed to a medicine with those who have not. Second is its applicability to resource-poor settings regardless of drug or disease. Third is improvement of reproductive health care during pregnancies and at delivery. Facility delivery enables better health outcomes, timely evaluation and management of the newborn, and the collection of reliable clinical data. The Registry aims to improves maternal and neonatal care and also provide much needed information on the safety of medicines in pregnancy. PMID:22943425

  20. Teaching surgical skills using video internet communication in a resource-limited setting.

    PubMed

    Autry, Amy M; Knight, Sharon; Lester, Felicia; Dubowitz, Gerald; Byamugisha, Josaphat; Nsubuga, Yosam; Muyingo, Mark; Korn, Abner

    2013-07-01

    To study the feasibility and acceptability of using video Internet communication to teach and evaluate surgical skills in a low-resource setting. This case-controlled study used video Internet communication for surgical skills teaching and evaluation. We randomized intern physicians rotating in the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department at Mulago Hospital at Makerere University in Kampala, Uganda, to the control arm (usual practice) or intervention arm (three video teaching sessions with University of California, San Francisco faculty). We made preintervention and postintervention videos of all interns tying knots using a small video camera and uploaded the files to a file hosting service that offers cloud storage. A blinded faculty member graded all of the videos. Both groups completed a survey at the end of the study. We randomized 18 interns with complete data for eight in the intervention group and seven in the control group. We found score improvement of 50% or more in six of eight (75%) interns in the intervention group compared with one of seven (14%) in the control group (P=.04). Scores declined in five of the seven (71%) controls but in none in the intervention group. Both intervention and control groups used attendings, colleagues, and the Internet as sources for learning about knot-tying. The control group was less likely to practice knot-tying than the intervention group. The trainees and the instructors felt this method of training was enjoyable and helpful. Remote teaching in low-resource settings, where faculty time is limited and access to visiting faculty is sporadic, is feasible, effective, and well-accepted by both learner and teacher. II.

  1. A pilot study to expand treatment of chronic hepatitis C in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Poonam; Comstock, Emily; McSweegan, Edward; Mercer, Natalia; Kumar, Nongthombam Suraj; Kottilil, Shyamasundaran

    2017-09-18

    The past five years have seen a revolution in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C, as short duration oral regimens of direct-acting antiviral drugs (DAAs), with nearly 100% cure rates for all genotypes, have replaced longer courses of ribavirin and injected interferon. Although initially very expensive, these DAAs are now becoming available in generic equivalents in countries with large numbers of chronically infected people, such as India. However, a number of obstacles may hinder the delivery of these drugs in resource-limited settings, including lack of access to diagnostic testing and the restriction of treatment to a small number of medical specialists. New approaches are therefore needed to make DAAs available to the estimated 71 million infected people, many of whom disproportionately live in low- or middle-income countries. A recent pilot study (ASCEND) of hepatitis C management in a low-income population in Washington, D.C., demonstrated that trained nurse practitioners, primary care physicians and hepatologists were equally successful in diagnosing and treating patients, indicating that such an approach might be successful in resource-limited regions of the world. Members of the Global Virus Network have received funding to carry out a similar training project in a region of India with a high prevalence of hepatitis C. This paper reviews the challenges of delivering DAA therapy in low- and middle-income countries, describes plans for performing and evaluating the effectiveness of a training program in India, and discusses future needs for the eventual elimination of hepatitis C. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A pediatric epilepsy diagnostic tool for use in resource-limited settings: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Patel, Archana A; Ciccone, Ornella; Njau, Adrian; Shanungu, Sandra; Grollnek, Alice Kabwe; Fredrick, Francis; Hodgeman, Ryan; Sideridis, Georgios D; Kapur, Kush; Harini, Chellamani; Kija, Edward; Peters, Jurriaan M

    2016-06-01

    for focal epilepsy was 0.084 logits compared with -1.147 logits for generalized epilepsy, demonstrating a large effect size [F (1, 41)=13.490, p<0.001]. Our questionnaire provides a straightforward method to improve diagnostic accuracy, and could assist in bridging the diagnostic gap in pediatric epilepsy in resource-limited settings. This tool was specifically designed to be easily implemented by any healthcare provider. This pilot study prompts broader prospective validation in additional settings for further refinement, and for performance assessment of impact on provider's practice, ability to guide medication choices, and ultimately improve treatment outcomes in resource-limited regions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Turning off the spigot: reducing drug-resistant tuberculosis transmission in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Nardell, E; Dharmadhikari, A

    2010-10-01

    Ongoing transmission and re-infection, primarily in congregate settings, is a key factor fueling the global multidrug-resistant/extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR/XDR-TB) epidemic, especially in association with the human immunodeficiency virus. Even as efforts to broadly implement conventional TB transmission control measures begin, current strategies may be incompletely effective under the overcrowded conditions extant in high-burden, resource-limited settings. Longstanding evidence suggesting that TB patients on effective therapy rapidly become non-infectious and that unsuspected, untreated TB cases account for the most transmission makes a strong case for the implementation of rapid point-of-care diagnostics coupled with fully supervised effective treatment. Among the most important decisions affecting transmission, the choice of an MDR-TB treatment model that includes community-based treatment may offer important advantages over hospital or clinic-based care, not only in cost and effectiveness, but also in transmission control. In the community, too, rapid identification of infectious cases, especially drug-resistant cases, followed by effective, fully supervised treatment, is critical to stopping transmission. Among the conventional interventions available, we present a simple triage and separation strategy, point out that separation is intimately linked to the design and engineering of clinical space and call attention to the pros and cons of natural ventilation, simple mechanical ventilation systems, germicidal ultraviolet air disinfection, fit-tested respirators on health care workers and short-term use of masks on patients before treatment is initiated.

  4. Advances in developing HIV-1 viral load assays for resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Wang, ShuQi; Xu, Feng; Demirci, Utkan

    2010-01-01

    Commercial HIV-1 RNA viral load assays have been routinely used in developed countries to monitor antiretroviral treatment (ART). However, these assays require expensive equipment and reagents, well-trained operators, and established laboratory infrastructure. These requirements restrict their use in resource-limited settings where people are most afflicted with the HIV-1 epidemic. Inexpensive alternatives such as the Ultrasensitive p24 assay, the reverse transcriptase (RT) assay and in-house reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) have been developed. However, they are still time-consuming, technologically complex and inappropriate for decentralized laboratories as point-of-care (POC) tests. Recent advances in microfluidics and nanotechnology offer new strategies to develop low-cost, rapid, robust and simple HIV-1 viral load monitoring systems. We review state-of-the-art technologies used for HIV-1 viral load monitoring in both developed and developing settings. Emerging approaches based on microfluidics and nanotechnology, which have potential to be integrated into POC HIV-1 viral load assays, are also discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Turning off the spigot: reducing drug-resistant tuberculosis transmission in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    Nardell, E.; Dharmadhikari, A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Ongoing transmission and re-infection, primarily in congregate settings, is a key factor fueling the global multidrug-resistant/extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR/XDR-TB) epidemic, especially in association with the human immunodeficiency virus. Even as efforts to broadly implement conventional TB transmission control measures begin, current strategies may be incompletely effective under the overcrowded conditions extant in high-burden, resource-limited settings. Longstanding evidence suggesting that TB patients on effective therapy rapidly become non-infectious and that unsuspected, untreated TB cases account for the most transmission makes a strong case for the implementation of rapid point-of-care diagnostics coupled with fully supervised effective treatment. Among the most important decisions affecting transmission, the choice of an MDR-TB treatment model that includes community-based treatment may offer important advantages over hospital or clinic-based care, not only in cost and effectiveness, but also in transmission control. In the community, too, rapid identification of infectious cases, especially drug-resistant cases, followed by effective, fully supervised treatment, is critical to stopping transmission. Among the conventional interventions available, we present a simple triage and separation strategy, point out that separation is intimately linked to the design and engineering of clinical space and call attention to the pros and cons of natural ventilation, simple mechanical ventilation systems, germicidal ultraviolet air disinfection, fit-tested respirators on health care workers and short-term use of masks on patients before treatment is initiated. PMID:20843413

  6. An innovative system for 3D clinical photography in the resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS) is the most frequently occurring cancer in Mozambique among men and the second most frequently occurring cancer among women. Effective therapeutic treatments for KS are poorly understood in this area. There is an unmet need to develop a simple but accurate tool for improved monitoring and diagnosis in a resource-limited setting. Standardized clinical photographs have been considered to be an essential part of the evaluation. Methods When a therapeutic response is achieved, nodular KS often exhibits a reduction of the thickness without a change in the base area of the lesion. To evaluate the vertical space along with other characters of a KS lesion, we have created an innovative imaging system with a consumer light-field camera attached to a miniature “photography studio” adaptor. The image file can be further processed by computational methods for quantification. Results With this novel imaging system, each high-quality 3D image was consistently obtained with a single camera shot at bedside by minimally trained personnel. After computational processing, all-focused photos and measurable 3D parameters were obtained. More than 80 KS image sets were processed in a semi-automated fashion. Conclusions In this proof-of-concept study, the feasibility to use a simple, low-cost and user-friendly system has been established for future clinical study to monitor KS therapeutic response. This 3D imaging system can be also applied to obtain standardized clinical photographs for other diseases. PMID:24929434

  7. Management of acute infectious diarrhea for children living in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    O'Ryan G, Miguel; Ashkenazi-Hoffnung, Liat; O'Ryan-Soriano, Miguel A; Ashkenazi, Shai

    2014-05-01

    Acute infectious gastroenteritis continues to be a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children below 5 years of age, with the majority of deaths concentrated in 35 'low income' countries. In these countries the under five years of age mortality rates reach 100 per 1000 live births, of which a significant proportion are associated with acute diarrhea. Rotavirus, cryptosporidium, Shigella spp and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli are the main pathogens causing disease in these settings, although other bacteria and parasites can cause moderate to severe disease in different regions and situations. Treatment of children in these setting should be focused on appropriate rehydration, early hospitalization of severely malnourished children, zinc supplementation, and in specific situations, antimicrobials should be considered. The rationale for antimicrobial use should be based on the potential benefits based on published literature and the opportunity for use. This review provides a pathogen-specific update on the potential benefits of antimicrobials and suggests an empirical management approach for children suffering an acute watery or bloody diarrhea in a resource-limited region.

  8. Advances in Developing HIV-1 Viral Load Assays for Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Wang, ShuQi; Xu, Feng; Demirci, Utkan

    2010-01-01

    Commercial HIV-1 RNA viral load assays have been routinely used in developed countries to monitor antiretroviral treatment (ART). However, these assays require expensive equipment and reagents, well-trained operators, and established laboratory infrastructure. These requirements restrict their use in resource-limited settings where people are most afflicted with the HIV-1 epidemic. Inexpensive alternatives such as the Ultrasensitive p24 assay, the Reverse Transcriptase (RT) assay and in-house reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) have been developed. However, they are still time-consuming, technologically complex and inappropriate for decentralized laboratories as point-of-care (POC) tests. Recent advances in microfluidics and nanotechnology offer new strategies to develop low-cost, rapid, robust and simple HIV-1 viral load monitoring systems. We review state-of-the-art technologies used for HIV-1 viral load monitoring in both developed and developing settings. Emerging approaches based on microfluidics and nanotechnology, which have potential to be integrated into POC HIV-1 viral load assays, are also discussed. PMID:20600784

  9. Integration of Care in Management of CKD in Resource-Limited Settings.

    PubMed

    Okpechi, Ikechi G; Bello, Aminu K; Ameh, Oluwatoyin I; Swanepoel, Charles R

    2017-05-01

    The prevalence of noncommunicable diseases, including chronic kidney disease (CKD), continues to increase worldwide, and mortality from noncommunicable diseases is projected to surpass communicable disease-related mortality in developing countries. Although the treatment of CKD is expensive, unaffordable, and unavailable in many developing countries, the current structure of the health care system in such countries is not set up to deliver comprehensive care for patients with chronic conditions, including CKD. The World Health Organization Innovative Care for Chronic Conditions framework could be leveraged to improve the care of CKD patients worldwide, especially in resource-limited countries where high cost, low infrastructure, limited workforce, and a dearth of effective health policies exist. Some developing countries already are using established health systems for communicable disease control to tackle noncommunicable diseases such as hypertension and diabetes, therefore existing systems could be leveraged to integrate CKD care. Decision makers in developing countries must realize that to improve outcomes for patients with CKD, important factors should be considered, including enhancing CKD prevention programs in their communities, managing the political environment through involvement of the political class, involving patients and their families in CKD care delivery, and effective use of health care personnel. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Mobile learning for HIV/AIDS healthcare worker training in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background We present an innovative approach to healthcare worker (HCW) training using mobile phones as a personal learning environment. Twenty physicians used individual Smartphones (Nokia N95 and iPhone), each equipped with a portable solar charger. Doctors worked in urban and peri-urban HIV/AIDS clinics in Peru, where almost 70% of the nation's HIV patients in need are on treatment. A set of 3D learning scenarios simulating interactive clinical cases was developed and adapted to the Smartphones for a continuing medical education program lasting 3 months. A mobile educational platform supporting learning events tracked participant learning progress. A discussion forum accessible via mobile connected participants to a group of HIV specialists available for back-up of the medical information. Learning outcomes were verified through mobile quizzes using multiple choice questions at the end of each module. Methods In December 2009, a mid-term evaluation was conducted, targeting both technical feasibility and user satisfaction. It also highlighted user perception of the program and the technical challenges encountered using mobile devices for lifelong learning. Results With a response rate of 90% (18/20 questionnaires returned), the overall satisfaction of using mobile tools was generally greater for the iPhone. Access to Skype and Facebook, screen/keyboard size, and image quality were cited as more troublesome for the Nokia N95 compared to the iPhone. Conclusions Training, supervision and clinical mentoring of health workers are the cornerstone of the scaling up process of HIV/AIDS care in resource-limited settings (RLSs). Educational modules on mobile phones can give flexibility to HCWs for accessing learning content anywhere. However lack of softwares interoperability and the high investment cost for the Smartphones' purchase could represent a limitation to the wide spread use of such kind mLearning programs in RLSs. PMID:20825677

  11. Mobile learning for HIV/AIDS healthcare worker training in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Zolfo, Maria; Iglesias, David; Kiyan, Carlos; Echevarria, Juan; Fucay, Luis; Llacsahuanga, Ellar; de Waard, Inge; Suàrez, Victor; Llaque, Walter Castillo; Lynen, Lutgarde

    2010-09-08

    We present an innovative approach to healthcare worker (HCW) training using mobile phones as a personal learning environment.Twenty physicians used individual Smartphones (Nokia N95 and iPhone), each equipped with a portable solar charger. Doctors worked in urban and peri-urban HIV/AIDS clinics in Peru, where almost 70% of the nation's HIV patients in need are on treatment. A set of 3D learning scenarios simulating interactive clinical cases was developed and adapted to the Smartphones for a continuing medical education program lasting 3 months. A mobile educational platform supporting learning events tracked participant learning progress. A discussion forum accessible via mobile connected participants to a group of HIV specialists available for back-up of the medical information. Learning outcomes were verified through mobile quizzes using multiple choice questions at the end of each module. In December 2009, a mid-term evaluation was conducted, targeting both technical feasibility and user satisfaction. It also highlighted user perception of the program and the technical challenges encountered using mobile devices for lifelong learning. With a response rate of 90% (18/20 questionnaires returned), the overall satisfaction of using mobile tools was generally greater for the iPhone. Access to Skype and Facebook, screen/keyboard size, and image quality were cited as more troublesome for the Nokia N95 compared to the iPhone. Training, supervision and clinical mentoring of health workers are the cornerstone of the scaling up process of HIV/AIDS care in resource-limited settings (RLSs). Educational modules on mobile phones can give flexibility to HCWs for accessing learning content anywhere. However lack of softwares interoperability and the high investment cost for the Smartphones' purchase could represent a limitation to the wide spread use of such kind mLearning programs in RLSs.

  12. Focused cardiopulmonary ultrasound for assessment of dyspnea in a resource-limited setting.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sachita P; Shah, Sachin P; Fils-Aime, Reginald; Desir, Walkens; Joasil, Joanel; Venesy, David M; Muruganandan, Krithika Meera

    2016-12-01

    The diagnosis and management of acutely dyspneic patients in resource-limited developing world settings poses a particular challenge. Focused cardiopulmonary ultrasound (CPUS) may assist in the emergency diagnosis and management of patients with acute dyspnea by identifying left ventricular systolic dysfunction, pericardial effusion, interstitial pulmonary edema, and pleural effusion. We sought to assess the accuracy of emergency providers performing CPUS after a training intervention in a limited-resource setting; a secondary objective was to assess the ability of CPUS to affect change of clinician diagnostic assessment and acute management in patients presenting with undifferentiated dyspnea. After a training intervention for Haitian emergency providers, patients with dyspnea presenting urgently to a regional referral center in Haiti underwent a rapid CPUS examination by the treating physician. One hundred seventeen patients (median age of 36 years, 56 % female) were prospectively evaluated with a standardized CPUS exam. Blinded expert review of ultrasound images was performed by two board certified cardiologists and one ultrasound fellowship trained emergency physician. Inter-observer agreement was determined using an agreement coefficient (kappa). Sensitivity and Specificity with confidence intervals were calculated. Pre-test and post-test clinician impressions and management plans were compared to assess for a change. We enrolled 117 patients with undifferentiated dyspnea. Upon expert image review, prevalence of left ventricular systolic dysfunction was 40.2 %, and in those with systolic dysfunction, the average EF was 14 % (±9 %). The parasternal long axis (PLAX) single view was predictive of an overall abnormal echo with PPV of abnormal PLAX 95 % and NPV 93 % of normal PLAX. Weighted kappa for pericardial effusion between the Haitian physicians and two cardiology reviewers was 0.81 (95 % CI 0.75-0.87, p value <0.001) and for ejection fraction was 0

  13. Risk factors for mortality during antiretroviral therapy in older populations in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Daniel; Spelman, Tim; Greig, Jane; McMahon, James; Ssonko, Charles; Casas, Esther; Mesic, Anita; Du Cros, Philipp; Ford, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction An increasing proportion of adult patients initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) in resource-limited settings are aged >50 years. Older populations on ART appear to have heightened risk of death, but little is known about factors influencing mortality in this population. Methods We performed a retrospective observational multisite cohort study including all adult patients (≥15 years) initiating ART between 2003 and 2013 in programmes supported by Médecins Sans Frontières across 12 countries in Asia, Africa and Europe. Patients were stratified into two age groups, >50 years and 15 to 50 years. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to explore factors associated with mortality. Results The study included 41,088 patients: 2591 (6.3%) were aged >50 years and 38,497 (93.7%) were aged 15 to 50 years. The mortality rate was significantly higher in the age group >50 years [367 (14.2%) deaths; mortality rate 7.67 deaths per 100 person-years (95% confidence interval, CI: 6.93 to 8.50)] compared to the age group 15 to 50 years [3788 (9.8%) deaths; mortality rate 4.18 deaths per 100 person-years (95% CI: 4.05 to 4.31)], p<0.0001. Higher CD4 levels at baseline were associated with significantly reduced mortality rates in the 15 to 50 age group but this association was not seen in the >50 age group. WHO Stage 4 conditions were more strongly associated with increased mortality rates in the 15 to 50 age group compared to populations >50 years. WHO Stage 3 conditions were associated with an increased mortality rate in the 15 to 50 age group but not in the >50 age group. Programme region did not affect mortality rates in the >50 age group; however being in an Asian programme was associated with a 36% reduced mortality rate in populations aged 15 to 50 years compared to being in an African programme. There was a higher overall incidence of Stage 3 WHO conditions in people >50 years (12.8/100 person-years) compared to those 15 to 50 years (8.1/100 person

  14. Prioritising prevention strategies for patients in Antiretroviral Treatment Programmes in Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    SPAAR, A.; GRABER, C.; DABIS, F.; COUTSOUDIS, A; BACHMANN, L.; MCINTYRE, J.; SCHECHTER, M.; PROZESKY, H.W.; TUBOI, S.; DICKINSON, D.; KUMARASAMY, N.; PUJDADES-RODRIQUEZ, M.; SPRINZ, E.; SCHILTHUIS, H.J.; CAHN, P.; LOW, N.; EGGER, M.

    2010-01-01

    Expanded access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) offers opportunities to strengthen HIV prevention in resource-limited settings. We invited 27 ART programmes from urban settings in Africa, Asia and South America to participate in a survey, with the aim to examine what preventive services had been integrated in ART programmes. Twenty-two programmes participated; 8 (36%) from South Africa, 2 from Brazil, 2 from Zambia and 1 each from Argentina, India, Thailand, Botswana, Ivory Coast, Malawi, Morocco, Uganda and Zimbabwe. Twenty-one sites (96%) provided health education and social support, and 18 (82%) provided HIV testing and counselling. All sites encouraged disclosure of HIV infection to spouses and partners, but only 11 (50%) had a protocol for partner notification. Twenty-one sites (96%) supplied male condoms, 7 (32%) female condoms and 20 (91%) provided prophylactic ART for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission. Seven sites (33%) regularly screened for sexually transmitted infections (STI). Twelve sites (55%) were involved in activities aimed at women or adolescents, and 10 sites (46%) in activities aimed at serodiscordant couples. Stigma and discrimination, gender roles and funding constraints were perceived as the main obstacles to effective prevention in ART programmes. We conclude that preventive services in ART programmes in lower income countries focus on health education and the provision of social support and male condoms. Strategies that might be equally or more important in this setting, including partner notification, prompt diagnosis and treatment of STI, and reduction of stigma in the community, have not been implemented widely. PMID:20473792

  15. Prioritising prevention strategies for patients in antiretroviral treatment programmes in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Spaar, A; Graber, C; Dabis, F; Coutsoudis, A; Bachmann, L; McIntyre, J; Schechter, M; Prozesky, H W; Tuboi, S; Dickinson, D; Kumarasamy, N; Pujdades-Rodriquez, M; Sprinz, E; Schilthuis, H J; Cahn, P; Low, N; Egger, M

    2010-06-01

    Expanded access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) offers opportunities to strengthen HIV prevention in resource-limited settings. We invited 27 ART programmes from urban settings in Africa, Asia and South America to participate in a survey, with the aim to examine what preventive services had been integrated in ART programmes. Twenty-two programmes participated; eight (36%) from South Africa, two from Brazil, two from Zambia and one each from Argentina, India, Thailand, Botswana, Ivory Coast, Malawi, Morocco, Uganda and Zimbabwe and one occupational programme of a brewery company included five countries (Nigeria, Republic of Congo, Democratic Republic of Congo, Rwanda and Burundi). Twenty-one sites (96%) provided health education and social support, and 18 (82%) provided HIV testing and counselling. All sites encouraged disclosure of HIV infection to spouses and partners, but only 11 (50%) had a protocol for partner notification. Twenty-one sites (96%) supplied male condoms, seven (32%) female condoms and 20 (91%) provided prophylactic ART for the prevention of mother-to child transmission. Seven sites (33%) regularly screened for sexually transmitted infections (STI). Twelve sites (55%) were involved in activities aimed at women or adolescents, and 10 sites (46%) in activities aimed at serodiscordant couples. Stigma and discrimination, gender roles and funding constraints were perceived as the main obstacles to effective prevention in ART programmes. We conclude that preventive services in ART programmes in lower income countries focus on health education and the provision of social support and male condoms. Strategies that might be equally or more important in this setting, including partner notification, prompt diagnosis and treatment of STI and reduction of stigma in the community, have not been implemented widely.

  16. Enhancing HIV Treatment Access and Outcomes Amongst HIV Infected Children and Adolescents in Resource Limited Settings.

    PubMed

    Goga, Ameena Ebrahim; Singh, Yagespari; Singh, Michelle; Noveve, Nobuntu; Magasana, Vuyolwethu; Ramraj, Trisha; Abdullah, Fareed; Coovadia, Ashraf H; Bhardwaj, Sanjana; Sherman, Gayle G

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Increasing access to HIV-related care and treatment for children aged 0-18 years in resource-limited settings is an urgent global priority. In 2011-2012 the percentage increase in children accessing antiretroviral therapy was approximately half that of adults (11 vs. 21 %). We propose a model for increasing access to, and retention in, paediatric HIV care and treatment in resource-limited settings. Methods Following a rapid appraisal of recent literature seven main challenges in paediatric HIV-related care and treatment were identified: (1) lack of regular, integrated, ongoing HIV-related diagnosis; (2) weak facility-based systems for tracking and retention in care; (3) interrupted availability of dried blood spot cards (expiration/stock outs); (4) poor quality control of rapid HIV testing; (5) supply-related gaps at health facility-laboratory interface; (6) poor uptake of HIV testing, possibly relating to a fatalistic belief about HIV infection; (7) community-associated reasons e.g. non-disclosure and weak systems for social support, resulting in poor retention in care. Results To increase sustained access to paediatric HIV-related care and treatment, regular updating of Policies, review of inter-sectoral Plans (at facility and community levels) and evaluation of Programme implementation and impact (at national, subnational, facility and community levels) are non-negotiable critical elements. Additionally we recommend the intensified implementation of seven main interventions: (1) update or refresher messaging for health care staff and simple messaging for key staff at early childhood development centres and schools; (2) contact tracing, disclosure and retention monitoring; (3) paying particular attention to infant dried blood spot (DBS) stock control; (4) regular quality assurance of rapid HIV testing procedures; (5) workshops/meetings/dialogues between health facilities and laboratories to resolve transport-related gaps and to facilitate return of

  17. The introduction of syphilis point of care tests in resource limited settings.

    PubMed

    Marks, Michael; Mabey, David Cw

    2017-04-01

    Syphilis remains an important and preventable cause of stillbirth and neonatal mortality. About 1 million women with active syphilis become pregnant each year. Without treatment, 25% of them will deliver a stillborn baby and 33% a low birth weight baby with an increased chance of dying in the first month of life. Adverse pregnancy outcomes due to syphilis can be prevented by screening pregnant women, and treating those who test positive with a single dose of penicillin before 28 weeks' gestation. Areas covered: This manuscript covers the impact of syphilis on pregnancy outcome, the diagnosis of syphilis, with a special focus on point of care (POC) tests, and challenges to the introduction of POC tests, and their potential impact on the control and prevention of syphilis in resource limited settings. Expert commentary: POC tests for syphilis are available which meet the ASSURED criteria, and could make syphilis screening accessible to all women anywhere in the world who attend an antenatal clinic. High quality dual POC tests for HIV and syphilis could ensure that well-funded programmes for the prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV can contribute towards increased coverage of antenatal syphilis screening, and prevent more than 300,000 adverse pregnancy outcomes due to syphilis annually. Alongside investment to increase availability of syphilis POC tests, operational research is needed to understand how best to improve screening of pregnant women and to translate test availability into improved pregnancy outcomes.

  18. Challenges and opportunities for the implementation of virological testing in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Teri; Bygrave, Helen; Fajardo, Emmanuel; Ford, Nathan

    2012-10-09

    Though the advantages of routine virological monitoring for patients on anti-retroviral therapy have been established, cost and complexity limit its full implementation. Monitoring is important for diagnosing virological failure early on, before the development of drug resistance mutations, and to trigger early adherence interventions. Simple and cost-effective viral load tests that facilitate simplification and decentralization of testing and strategies, such as the use of dried blood spots and pooled sample testing, which further aid simplification, are becoming available. In addition, replacing immunological monitoring with virological monitoring in non-viremic patients in a phased manner will reduce the costs associated with dual immuno-virological monitoring. Going forward, the simplification of testing paired with price reducing strategies that will allow for healthy competition between multiple manufacturers will enable the implementation of viral load testing in resource-poor settings. It is important that future HIV and AIDS treatment guidelines provide clear recommendations for routine virological monitoring and that governments and donors fund the implementation of accurate and operationally proven testing platforms in a comprehensive manner.

  19. Challenges and opportunities for the implementation of virological testing in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Teri; Bygrave, Helen; Fajardo, Emmanuel; Ford, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    Though the advantages of routine virological monitoring for patients on anti-retroviral therapy have been established, cost and complexity limit its full implementation. Monitoring is important for diagnosing virological failure early on, before the development of drug resistance mutations, and to trigger early adherence interventions. Simple and cost-effective viral load tests that facilitate simplification and decentralization of testing and strategies, such as the use of dried blood spots and pooled sample testing, which further aid simplification, are becoming available. In addition, replacing immunological monitoring with virological monitoring in non-viremic patients in a phased manner will reduce the costs associated with dual immuno-virological monitoring. Going forward, the simplification of testing paired with price reducing strategies that will allow for healthy competition between multiple manufacturers will enable the implementation of viral load testing in resource-poor settings. It is important that future HIV and AIDS treatment guidelines provide clear recommendations for routine virological monitoring and that governments and donors fund the implementation of accurate and operationally proven testing platforms in a comprehensive manner. PMID:23078767

  20. Good clinical practice in resource-limited settings: translating theory into practice.

    PubMed

    Tinto, Halidou; Noor, Ramadhani A; Wanga, Charles L; Valea, Innocent; Mbaye, Maimouna Ndour; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Ravinetto, Raffaella M

    2013-04-01

    A Good Clinical Practices (GCPs) course, based on the combination of theoretical modules with a practical training in real-life conditions, was held in 2010 in Burkina Faso. It was attended by 15 trainees from nine African, Asian, and Latin American countries. There were some discrepancies between the average good results at the end of the theoretical phase and the GCP application during the first days of the practical phase, underlying the difficulties of translating theoretical knowledge into good practices. Most of the findings were not unexpected and reflected the challenges commonly faced by clinical investigators in resource-poor contexts (i.e., the high workload at peripheral health facilities, the need to conciliate routine clinical activities with clinical research, and the risk of creating a double standard among patients attending the same health facility [free care for recruited patients versus user fees for non-recruited patients with the same medical condition]). Even if limited in number and time, these observations suggest that a theoretical training alone may not be sufficient to prepare trainees for the challenges of medical research in real-life settings. Conversely, when a practical phase immediately follows a theoretical one, trainees can immediately experience what the research methodology implicates in terms of work organization and relationship with recruited and non-recruited patients. This initial experience shows the complexity of translating GCP into practice and suggests the need to rethink the current conception of GCP training.

  1. Improved tuberculosis smear detection in resource-limited settings: Combined bleach concentration and LED fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Reed, Sharon L; Mamo, Girmachew; Gossa, Elias; Jasura, Michele; Getahun, Muluwork; Lemma, Eshetu; Mathews, Christopher; McCutchan, J Allen

    2011-09-01

    Improved diagnostics for tuberculosis is a high priority in resource-limited settings (RLS). Sputum concentration and fluorescence microscopy (FM) are standard techniques in developed countries where appropriate biosafety precautions are possible. Recently, inexpensive fluorescent lenses using LED light sources have made auramine-based FM more feasible in RLS. Sterilization of sputum with bleach protects lab personnel and, combined with concentration, increases the sensitivity of microscopic detection. We compared the effect of both bleach concentration and FM with LED based lenses to culture for the detection of tuberculosis in military medical hospitals in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Three sputum specimens were obtained from 409 patients (1227 total). Standard Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN) or auramine staining were compared with direct or bleach-concentrated specimens. The prevalence by culture was 26%. Sensitivity of microscopic diagnosis was increased both by bleach concentration (14%) and auramine staining (5%). The overall yield of smear positivity varied from 21% for direct ZN to 27% for auramine after concentration (P<0.00001, Cochran test for matched proportions). Twenty-nine HIV+ patients were diagnosed with TB, but ten (34%), would have been missed with direct ZN staining. Bleach concentration and auramine staining with new LED fluorescent systems are cost-effective and safe methods to increase the diagnostic yield of smears, including in HIV-infected patients.

  2. A Review of Pediatric Critical Care in Resource-Limited Settings: A Look at Past, Present, and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Erin L.; Nielsen, Katie R.; Jamal, Shelina M.; von Saint André-von Arnim, Amelie; Musa, Ndidiamaka L.

    2016-01-01

    Fifteen years ago, United Nations world leaders defined millenium development goal 4 (MDG 4): to reduce under-5-year mortality rates by two-thirds by the year 2015. Unfortunately, only 27 of 138 developing countries are expected to achieve MDG 4. The majority of childhood deaths in these settings result from reversible causes, and developing effective pediatric emergency and critical care services could substantially reduce this mortality. The Ebola outbreak highlighted the fragility of health care systems in resource-limited settings and emphasized the urgent need for a paradigm shift in the global approach to healthcare delivery related to critical illness. This review provides an overview of pediatric critical care in resource-limited settings and outlines strategies to address challenges specific to these areas. Implementation of these tools has the potential to move us toward delivery of an adequate standard of critical care for all children globally, and ultimately decrease global child mortality in resource-limited settings. PMID:26925393

  3. How to improve the clinical diagnosis of acute appendicitis in resource limited settings.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    This article is a general review of the diagnostic tools that the clinician can use for the early diagnosis of acute appendicitis with emphasis on the Alvarado Score, and it is aimed principally to the medical practitioners in different parts of the world where the diagnostic facilities and technological resources are limited.

  4. The WHO public-health approach to antiretroviral treatment against HIV in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Gilks, Charles F; Crowley, Siobhan; Ekpini, René; Gove, Sandy; Perriens, Jos; Souteyrand, Yves; Sutherland, Don; Vitoria, Marco; Guerma, Teguest; De Cock, Kevin

    2006-08-05

    WHO has proposed a public-health approach to antiretroviral therapy (ART) to enable scaling-up access to treatment for HIV-positive people in developing countries, recognising that the western model of specialist physician management and advanced laboratory monitoring is not feasible in resource-poor settings. In this approach, standardised simplified treatment protocols and decentralised service delivery enable treatment to be delivered to large numbers of HIV-positive adults and children through the public and private sector. Simplified tools and approaches to clinical decision-making, centred on the "four Ss"--when to: start drug treatment; substitute for toxicity; switch after treatment failure; and stop--enable lower level health-care workers to deliver care. Simple limited formularies have driven large-scale production of fixed-dose combinations for first-line treatment for adults and lowered prices, but to ensure access to ART in the poorest countries, the care and drugs should be given free at point of service delivery. Population-based surveillance for acquired and transmitted resistance is needed to address concerns that switching regimens on the basis of clinical criteria for failure alone could lead to widespread emergence of drug-resistant virus strains. The integrated management of adult or childhood illness (IMAI/IMCI) facilitates decentralised implementation that is integrated within existing health systems. Simplified operational guidelines, tools, and training materials enable clinical teams in primary-care and second-level facilities to deliver HIV prevention, HIV care, and ART, and to use a standardised patient-tracking system.

  5. Mobile device for disease diagnosis and data tracking in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Chin, Curtis D; Cheung, Yuk Kee; Laksanasopin, Tassaneewan; Modena, Mario M; Chin, Sau Yin; Sridhara, Archana A; Steinmiller, David; Linder, Vincent; Mushingantahe, Jules; Umviligihozo, Gisele; Karita, Etienne; Mwambarangwe, Lambert; Braunstein, Sarah L; van de Wijgert, Janneke; Sahabo, Ruben; Justman, Jessica E; El-Sadr, Wafaa; Sia, Samuel K

    2013-04-01

    Collection of epidemiological data and care of patients are hampered by lack of access to laboratory diagnostic equipment and patients' health records in resource-limited settings. We engineered a low-cost mobile device that combines cell-phone and satellite communication technologies with fluid miniaturization techniques for performing all essential ELISA functions. We assessed the device's ability to perform HIV serodiagnostic testing in Rwanda and synchronize results in real time with electronic health records. We tested serum, plasma, and whole blood samples collected in Rwanda and on a commercially available sample panel made of mixed antibody titers. HIV testing on 167 Rwandan patients evaluated for HIV, viral hepatitis, and sexually transmitted infections yielded diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 99%, respectively. Testing on 40 Rwandan whole-blood samples-using 1 μL of sample per patient-resulted in diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 100%. The mobile device also successfully transmitted all whole-blood test results from a Rwandan clinic to a medical records database stored on the cloud. For all samples in the commercial panel, the device produced results in agreement with a leading ELISA test, including detection of weakly positive samples that were missed by existing rapid tests. The device operated autonomously with minimal user input, produced each result 10 times faster than benchtop ELISA, and consumed as little power as a mobile phone. A low-cost mobile device can perform a blood-based HIV serodiagnostic test with laboratory-level accuracy and real-time synchronization of patient health record data. © 2012 American Association for Clinical Chemistry

  6. Solar-thermal complex sample processing for nucleic acid based diagnostics in limited resource settings.

    PubMed

    Gumus, Abdurrahman; Ahsan, Syed; Dogan, Belgin; Jiang, Li; Snodgrass, Ryan; Gardner, Andrea; Lu, Zhengda; Simpson, Kenneth; Erickson, David

    2016-05-01

    The use of point-of-care (POC) devices in limited resource settings where access to commonly used infrastructure, such as water and electricity, can be restricted represents simultaneously one of the best application fits for POC systems as well as one of the most challenging places to deploy them. Of the many challenges involved in these systems, the preparation and processing of complex samples like stool, vomit, and biopsies are particularly difficult due to the high number and varied nature of mechanical and chemical interferents present in the sample. Previously we have demonstrated the ability to use solar-thermal energy to perform PCR based nucleic acid amplifications. In this work demonstrate how the technique, using similar infrastructure, can also be used to perform solar-thermal based sample processing system for extracting and isolating Vibrio Cholerae nucleic acids from fecal samples. The use of opto-thermal energy enables the use of sunlight to drive thermal lysing reactions in large volumes without the need for external electrical power. Using the system demonstrate the ability to reach a 95°C threshold in less than 5 minutes and maintain a stable sample temperature of +/- 2°C following the ramp up. The system is demonstrated to provide linear results between 10(4) and 10(8) CFU/mL when the released nucleic acids were quantified via traditional means. Additionally, we couple the sample processing unit with our previously demonstrated solar-thermal PCR and tablet based detection system to demonstrate very low power sample-in-answer-out detection.

  7. Preoperative Determinants of Outcomes of Infant Heart Surgery in a Limited-Resource Setting.

    PubMed

    Reddy, N Srinath; Kappanayil, Mahesh; Balachandran, Rakhi; Jenkins, Kathy J; Sudhakar, Abish; Sunil, G S; Raj, R Benedict; Kumar, R Krishna

    2015-01-01

    We studied the effect of preoperative determinants on early outcomes of 1028 consecutive infant heart operations in a limited-resource setting. Comprehensive data on pediatric heart surgery (January 2010-December 2012) were collected prospectively. Outcome measures included in-hospital mortality, prolonged ventilation (>48 hours), and bloodstream infection (BSI) after surgery. Preoperative variables that showed significant individual association with outcome measures were entered into a logistic regression model. Weight at birth was low in 224 infants (21.8%), and failure to thrive was common (mean-weight Z score at surgery was 2.72 ± 1.7). Preoperatively, 525 infants (51%) needed intensive care, 69 infants (6.7%) were ventilated, and 80 infants (7.8%) had BSI. In-hospital mortality (4.1%) was significantly associated with risk adjustment for congenital heart surgery-1 (RACHS-1) risk category (P < 0.001). Neonatal status, preoperative BSI, and requirement of preoperative intensive care and ventilation had significant individual association with adverse outcomes, whereas low birth weight, prematurity, and severe failure to thrive (weight Z score <-3) were not associated with adverse outcomes. On multivariable logistic regression analysis, preoperative sepsis (odds ratio = 2.86; 95% CI: 1.32-6.21; P = 0.008) was associated with mortality. Preoperative intensive care unit stay, ventilation, BSI, and RACHS-1 category were associated with prolonged postoperative ventilation and postoperative sepsis. Neonatal age group was additionally associated with postoperative sepsis. Although severe failure to thrive was common, it did not adversely affect outcomes. In conclusions, preoperative BSI, preoperative intensive care, and mechanical ventilation are strongly associated with adverse outcomes after infant cardiac surgery in this large single-center experience from a developing country. Failure to thrive and low birth weight do not appear to adversely affect surgical

  8. Solar-thermal complex sample processing for nucleic acid based diagnostics in limited resource settings

    PubMed Central

    Gumus, Abdurrahman; Ahsan, Syed; Dogan, Belgin; Jiang, Li; Snodgrass, Ryan; Gardner, Andrea; Lu, Zhengda; Simpson, Kenneth; Erickson, David

    2016-01-01

    The use of point-of-care (POC) devices in limited resource settings where access to commonly used infrastructure, such as water and electricity, can be restricted represents simultaneously one of the best application fits for POC systems as well as one of the most challenging places to deploy them. Of the many challenges involved in these systems, the preparation and processing of complex samples like stool, vomit, and biopsies are particularly difficult due to the high number and varied nature of mechanical and chemical interferents present in the sample. Previously we have demonstrated the ability to use solar-thermal energy to perform PCR based nucleic acid amplifications. In this work demonstrate how the technique, using similar infrastructure, can also be used to perform solar-thermal based sample processing system for extracting and isolating Vibrio Cholerae nucleic acids from fecal samples. The use of opto-thermal energy enables the use of sunlight to drive thermal lysing reactions in large volumes without the need for external electrical power. Using the system demonstrate the ability to reach a 95°C threshold in less than 5 minutes and maintain a stable sample temperature of +/− 2°C following the ramp up. The system is demonstrated to provide linear results between 104 and 108 CFU/mL when the released nucleic acids were quantified via traditional means. Additionally, we couple the sample processing unit with our previously demonstrated solar-thermal PCR and tablet based detection system to demonstrate very low power sample-in-answer-out detection. PMID:27231636

  9. Lung cancer management in limited resource settings: guidelines for appropriate good care.

    PubMed

    Macbeth, Fergus R; Abratt, Raymond P; Cho, Kwan H; Stephens, Richard J; Jeremic, Branislav

    2007-02-01

    Lung cancer is a major cause of cancer death worldwide and is becoming an increasing problem in developing countries. It is important that, in countries where health care resources are limited, these resources are used most effectively and cost-effectively. The authors, with the support of the International Atomic Energy Agency, drew on existing evidence-based clinical guidelines, published systematic reviews and meta-analyses, as well as recent research publications, to summarise the current evidence and to make broad recommendations on the non-surgical treatment of patients with lung cancer. Tables were constructed which summarise the different treatment options for specific groups of patients, the increase in resource use for and the likely additional clinical benefit from each option. These tables can be used to assess the cost-effectiveness and appropriateness of different interventions in a particular health care system and to develop local clinical guidelines.

  10. Neonatal hearing screening and intervention in resource-limited settings: an overview.

    PubMed

    Olusanya, Bolajoko O

    2012-07-01

    From a developmental perspective, optimal speech and language outcome is indisputably the primary motivation for neonatal hearing screening of infants with congenital or early-onset hearing loss (PCHL). This paper additionally outlines more broadly the potential value of early hearing detection and intervention in resource-poor countries against the backdrop of limitations of primary prevention of PCHL based on a review of literature from low-income and middle-income countries with per capita incomes of approximately US$6000 or less. It establishes the scientific and developmental foundation for priority consideration for neonatal hearing screening and intervention in any global initiatives for effective early childhood development programmes in resource-limited countries. It also highlights approaches to addressing the various challenges to implementing effective early hearing detection and intervention programmes, and concludes with a discussion on the pivotal role of paediatricians in facilitating timely referral for requisite tests and (re)habilitative services especially for infants with established risk factors.

  11. Hepatocellular carcinoma: clinicopathological profile and challenges of management in a resource-limited setting.

    PubMed

    Jaka, Hyasinta; Mshana, Stephen E; Rambau, Peter F; Masalu, Nestory; Chalya, Phillipo L; Kalluvya, Samuel E

    2014-08-02

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is one of the most common cancers worldwide and its incidence is reported to be increasing in resource-limited countries. There is a paucity of published data regarding hepatocellular carcinoma in Tanzania, and the study area in particular. This study describes the clinicopathological profile of hepatocellular carcinoma in our local setting and highlights the challenging problems in the management of this disease. This was a retrospective study of histopathologically confirmed cases of hepatocellular carcinoma seen at Bugando Medical Center between March 2009 and February 2013. A total of 142 patients (M: F = 2.2: 1) were studied representing 4.6% of all malignancies. The median age of patients was 45 years. Hepatitis B virus infection (66.2%) and heavy alcohol consumption (60.6%) were the most frequently identified risk factors for hepatocellular carcinoma. The majority of patients (88.0%) presented late with advanced stages. HBsAg was positive in 66.2% of the patients and Hepatitis C Virus antibody in 16.9%. Thirteen (9.2%) patients tested positive for HIV infection. Most patients (52.8%) had both right and left lobe involvement. The trabecular pattern (47.9%) was the most frequent histopathological type. None of patients had curative therapy because of the advanced nature of the disease. Coagulopathy (45.7%) was the most common complications. The overall mortality rate was 46.5% and it was significantly associated with comorbidity, HIV positivity, CD4+ count <200 cells/μl, high histological grade, advanced stage of the tumor, presence of distant metastases at the time of diagnosis, and associated complications (P < 0.001). The overall median duration of hospital stay was 14 days. The majority of patients (71.1%) were lost to follow-up at the end of the follow-up period. Hepatocellular carcinoma patients in this region are relatively young at diagnosis and the majority of them present late with an advanced stage and high rate

  12. Challenges in setting up pediatric and neonatal intensive care units in a resource-limited country.

    PubMed

    Basnet, Sangita; Adhikari, Neelam; Koirala, Janak

    2011-10-01

    In collaboration with a host country and international medical volunteers, a PICU and an NICU were conceptualized and realized in the developing country of Nepal. We present here the challenges that were encountered during and after the establishment of these units. The decision to develop an ICU with reasonable goals in a developing country has to be made with careful assessments of need of that patient population and ethical principles guiding appropriate use of limited resources. Considerations during unit design include space allocation, limited supply of electricity, oxygen source, and clean-water availability. Budgetary challenges might place overall sustainability at stake, which can also lead to attrition of trained manpower and affect the quality of care. Those working in the PICU in resource-poor nations perpetually face the challenges of lack of expert support (subspecialists), diagnostic facilities (laboratory and radiology), and appropriate medications and equipment. Increasing transfer of severely ill patients from other health facilities can lead to space constraints, and lack of appropriate transportation for these critically ill patients increases the severity of illness, which leads to increased mortality rates. The staff in these units must make difficult decisions on effective triage of admissions to the units on the basis of individual cases, futility of care, availability of resources, and financial ability of the family.

  13. A practical guide to self-sustaining point-of-care ultrasound education programs in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Henwood, Patricia C; Mackenzie, David C; Rempell, Joshua S; Murray, Alice F; Leo, Megan M; Dean, Anthony J; Liteplo, Andrew S; Noble, Vicki E

    2014-09-01

    The value of point-of-care ultrasound education in resource-limited settings is increasingly recognized, though little guidance exists on how to best construct a sustainable training program. Herein we offer a practical overview of core factors to consider when developing and implementing a point-of-care ultrasound education program in a resource-limited setting. Considerations include analysis of needs assessment findings, development of locally relevant curriculum, access to ultrasound machines and related technological and financial resources, quality assurance and follow-up plans, strategic partnerships, and outcomes measures. Well-planned education programs in these settings increase the potential for long-term influence on clinician skills and patient care. Copyright © 2014 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Car windshield fragments as cheap alternative glass beads for homogenization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis cultures in a resource-limited setting.

    PubMed

    Ochang, Ernest Afu; Collier, Dami; Bode-Sojobi, Ibidunni; Oladele, Rita; Oduyebo, Oyinlola O

    2014-03-01

    Tuberculosis is a global health problem which has been compounded by the emergence and rapid spread of drug resistant strains. Phenotypic drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis usually requires homogenization of cultures using 3-5mm glass beads. In resource limited settings, these important material may either not be readily available in the country as in our case requiring that one orders them from abroad or they may be too expensive. In both situations, this would impact on the usually lean budget. In our centre were we recently introduced tuberculosis culture and drug susceptibility testing using the Microscopic Observation Drug Susceptibility (MODS) technique, we successfully used glass fragments from a broken car windshield obtained from a mechanic workshop to homogenize solid cultures to prepare positive controls. All cultures homogenized with these local beads gave consistent MODS results. The challenge of the limited availability of resources for research in resource limited settings can be met by adapting available materials to achieve results.

  15. Strategies for overcoming challenges for decentralised diagnostics in resource-limited and catastrophe settings.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shikha; Crawley, Aoife; O'Kennedy, Richard

    2017-02-01

    Globally, both communicable and non-communicable diseases pose a serious threat to populations in developed as well as developing countries. Access to reliable diagnostic testing along with qualified health practitioners is severely limited in low resource and very remote areas and following natural catastrophes. Areas covered: This paper provides an overview of the challenges involved and suggests strategies to address them. The emergence of more robust, user-friendly, cost-effective and 'sample-to-result' point-of-care (POC) tools, along with the proliferation of mobile technologies, may provide a practical approach in addressing some of the challenges. Expert commentary: The successful implementation of POC testing requires the availability of versatile diagnostic technologies, improved platforms and back-up infrastructure, successful leveraging of human resources through training and, finally, engagement/coordination of associated stakeholders, including public health agencies, diagnostics companies, healthcare practitioners and local rural authorities.

  16. SAGES: A Suite of Freely-Available Software Tools for Electronic Disease Surveillance in Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Sheri L.; Feighner, Brian H.; Loschen, Wayne A.; Wojcik, Richard A.; Skora, Joseph F.; Coberly, Jacqueline S.; Blazes, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Public health surveillance is undergoing a revolution driven by advances in the field of information technology. Many countries have experienced vast improvements in the collection, ingestion, analysis, visualization, and dissemination of public health data. Resource-limited countries have lagged behind due to challenges in information technology infrastructure, public health resources, and the costs of proprietary software. The Suite for Automated Global Electronic bioSurveillance (SAGES) is a collection of modular, flexible, freely-available software tools for electronic disease surveillance in resource-limited settings. One or more SAGES tools may be used in concert with existing surveillance applications or the SAGES tools may be used en masse for an end-to-end biosurveillance capability. This flexibility allows for the development of an inexpensive, customized, and sustainable disease surveillance system. The ability to rapidly assess anomalous disease activity may lead to more efficient use of limited resources and better compliance with World Health Organization International Health Regulations. PMID:21572957

  17. SAGES: a suite of freely-available software tools for electronic disease surveillance in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Sheri L; Feighner, Brian H; Loschen, Wayne A; Wojcik, Richard A; Skora, Joseph F; Coberly, Jacqueline S; Blazes, David L

    2011-05-10

    Public health surveillance is undergoing a revolution driven by advances in the field of information technology. Many countries have experienced vast improvements in the collection, ingestion, analysis, visualization, and dissemination of public health data. Resource-limited countries have lagged behind due to challenges in information technology infrastructure, public health resources, and the costs of proprietary software. The Suite for Automated Global Electronic bioSurveillance (SAGES) is a collection of modular, flexible, freely-available software tools for electronic disease surveillance in resource-limited settings. One or more SAGES tools may be used in concert with existing surveillance applications or the SAGES tools may be used en masse for an end-to-end biosurveillance capability. This flexibility allows for the development of an inexpensive, customized, and sustainable disease surveillance system. The ability to rapidly assess anomalous disease activity may lead to more efficient use of limited resources and better compliance with World Health Organization International Health Regulations.

  18. Overcoming limits set by scarce resources - role of local food production and food imports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porkka, Miina; Guillaume, Joseph H. A.; Schaphoff, Sibyll; Siebert, Stefan; Gerten, Dieter; Kummu, Matti

    2017-04-01

    There is a fundamental tension between population growth and carrying capacity, i.e. the population that could potentially be supported using the resources and technologies available at a given time. This makes the assessments of resource use and agricultural productivity central to the debate on future food security. Local carrying capacity can be increased by expanding (e.g. through land conversion and irrigation infrastructure) or intensifying (e.g. through technologies and practices that increase efficiency) the resource use in agriculture. Food imports can be considered another way of overcoming current local limits and continuing growth beyond the local human-carrying capacity. Focusing on water as the key limiting resource, we performed a global assessment of the capacity for food self-sufficiency at sub-national and national scale for 1961-2009, taking into account the availability of both green and blue water as well as technology and management practices affecting water productivity at a given time, and using the hydrology and agriculture model LPJmL as our primary tool. Furthermore, we examined the use of food imports as a strategy to increase carrying capacity in regions where the potential for food self-sufficiency was limited by water availability and productivity. We found that the capacity for food self-sufficiency reduced notably during the study period due to the rapid population growth that outpaced the substantial improvements in water productivity. In 2009 more than a third (2.2 billion people) of the world's population lived in areas where sufficient food production to meet the needs of the population was not possible, and some 800 million people more were approaching this threshold. Food imports have nearly universally been used to overcome these local limits to growth, though the success of this strategy has been highly dependent on economic purchasing power. In the unsuccessful cases, increases in imports and local productivity have not

  19. The Impact of Systematic Point-of-Care Ultrasound on Management of Patients in a Resource-Limited Setting.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Alastair; Wajanga, Bahati M K; Jaka, Hyasinta; Purcell, Rachael; Byrne, Lauren; Williams, Felicity; Rypien, Candace; Sharpe, Abigail; Laws, Patrick; Faustine, Lucas; Leeme, Tshepo; Mwabutwa, Emmanuel; Peck, Robert; Stephens, Matthew; Kaminstein, Daniel

    2017-02-08

    Although target point-of-care (POC) ultrasonography has been shown to benefit patients in resource-limited settings, it is not clear whether a systematic POC ultrasound assessment in these settings can also lead to similar changes in patient management. A predefined systematic set of POC ultrasound scans were performed on inpatients at a tertiary referral hospital in Tanzania to see if this resulted in changes to patient management. Of the 55 patients scanned, an abnormality was detected in 75% (N = 41), and a change in patient management was recommended or implemented on the basis of POC ultrasound findings in 53% (N = 29). The main impact was earlier initiation of treatment due to more rapid and accurate diagnosis. Further research is warranted to determine whether systematic POC ultrasonography would result in improved patient outcomes in resource-limited settings.

  20. The plateau in mnemonic resolution across large set sizes indicates discrete resource limits in visual working memory.

    PubMed

    Anderson, David E; Awh, Edward

    2012-07-01

    The precision of visual working memory (WM) representations declines monotonically with increasing storage load. Two distinct models of WM capacity predict different shapes for this precision-by-set-size function. Flexible-resource models, which assert a continuous allocation of resources across an unlimited number of items, predict a monotonic decline in precision across a large range of set sizes. Conversely, discrete-resource models, which assert a relatively small item limit for WM storage, predict that precision will plateau once this item limit is exceeded. Recent work has demonstrated such a plateau in mnemonic precision. Moreover, the set size at which mnemonic precision reached asymptote has been strongly predicted by estimated item limits in WM. In the present work, we extend this evidence in three ways. First, we show that this empirical pattern generalizes beyond orientation memory to color memory. Second, we rule out encoding limits as the source of discrete limits by demonstrating equivalent performance across simultaneous and sequential presentations of the memoranda. Finally, we demonstrate that the analytic approach commonly used to estimate precision yields flawed parameter estimates when the range of stimulus space is narrowed (e.g., a 180º rather than a 360º orientation space) and typical numbers of observations are collected. Such errors in parameter estimation reconcile an apparent conflict between our findings and others based on different stimuli. These findings provide further support for discrete-resource models of WM capacity.

  1. Challenges to improving case management of childhood pneumonia at health facilities in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Graham, Stephen M; English, Mike; Hazir, Tabish; Enarson, Penny; Duke, Trevor

    2008-05-01

    Effective case management is an important strategy to reduce pneumonia-related morbidity and mortality in children. Guidelines based on sound evidence are available but are used variably. This review outlines current guidelines for childhood pneumonia management in the setting where most child pneumonia deaths occur and identifies challenges for improved management in a variety of settings and different "at-risk" groups. These include appropriate choice of antibiotic, clinical overlap with other conditions, prompt and appropriate referral for inpatient care, and management of treatment failure. Management of neonates, and of HIV-infected or severely malnourished children is more complicated. The influence of co-morbidities on pneumonia outcome means that pneumonia case management must be integrated within strategies to improve overall paediatric care. The greatest potential for reducing pneumonia-related deaths in health facilities is wider implementation of the current guidelines built around a few core activities: training, antibiotics and oxygen. This requires investment in human resources and in equipment for the optimal management of hypoxaemia. It is important to provide data from a variety of epidemiological settings for formal cost-effectiveness analyses. Improvements in the quality of case management of pneumonia can be a vehicle for overall improvements in child health-care practices.

  2. Developing open source, self-contained disease surveillance software applications for use in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Emerging public health threats often originate in resource-limited countries. In recognition of this fact, the World Health Organization issued revised International Health Regulations in 2005, which call for significantly increased reporting and response capabilities for all signatory nations. Electronic biosurveillance systems can improve the timeliness of public health data collection, aid in the early detection of and response to disease outbreaks, and enhance situational awareness. Methods As components of its Suite for Automated Global bioSurveillance (SAGES) program, The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory developed two open-source, electronic biosurveillance systems for use in resource-limited settings. OpenESSENCE provides web-based data entry, analysis, and reporting. ESSENCE Desktop Edition provides similar capabilities for settings without internet access. Both systems may be configured to collect data using locally available cell phone technologies. Results ESSENCE Desktop Edition has been deployed for two years in the Republic of the Philippines. Local health clinics have rapidly adopted the new technology to provide daily reporting, thus eliminating the two-to-three week data lag of the previous paper-based system. Conclusions OpenESSENCE and ESSENCE Desktop Edition are two open-source software products with the capability of significantly improving disease surveillance in a wide range of resource-limited settings. These products, and other emerging surveillance technologies, can assist resource-limited countries compliance with the revised International Health Regulations. PMID:22950686

  3. New nucleic acid testing devices to diagnose infectious diseases in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Maffert, P; Reverchon, S; Nasser, W; Rozand, C; Abaibou, H

    2017-06-01

    Point-of-care diagnosis based on nucleic acid testing aims to incorporate all the analytical steps, from sample preparation to nucleic acid amplification and detection, in a single device. This device needs to provide a low-cost, robust, sensitive, specific, and easily readable analysis. Microfluidics has great potential for handling small volumes of fluids on a single platform. Microfluidic technology has recently been applied to paper, which is already used in low-cost lateral flow tests. Nucleic acid extraction from a biological specimen usually requires cell filtration and lysis on specific membranes, while affinity matrices, such as chitosan or polydiacetylene, are well suited to concentrating nucleic acids for subsequent amplification. Access to electricity is often difficult in resource-limited areas, so the amplification step needs to be equipment-free. Consequently, the reaction has to be isothermal to alleviate the need for a thermocycler. LAMP, NASBA, HDA, and RPA are examples of the technologies available. Nucleic acid detection techniques are currently based on fluorescence, colorimetry, or chemiluminescence. For point-of-care diagnostics, the results should be readable with the naked eye. Nowadays, interpretation and communication of results to health professionals could rely on a smartphone, used as a telemedicine device. The major challenge of creating an "all-in-one" diagnostic test involves the design of an optimal solution and a sequence for each analytical step, as well as combining the execution of all these steps on a single device. This review provides an overview of available materials and technologies which seem to be adapted to point-of-care nucleic acid-based diagnosis, in low-resource areas.

  4. The Costs of Delivering Integrated HIV and Sexual Reproductive Health Services in Limited Resource Settings.

    PubMed

    Obure, Carol Dayo; Sweeney, Sedona; Darsamo, Vanessa; Michaels-Igbokwe, Christine; Guinness, Lorna; Terris-Prestholt, Fern; Muketo, Esther; Nhlabatsi, Zelda; Warren, Charlotte E; Mayhew, Susannah; Watts, Charlotte; Vassall, Anna

    2015-01-01

    To present evidence on the total costs and unit costs of delivering six integrated sexual reproductive health and HIV services in a high and medium HIV prevalence setting, in order to support policy makers and planners scaling up these essential services. A retrospective facility based costing study conducted in 40 non-government organization and public health facilities in Kenya and Swaziland. Economic and financial costs were collected retrospectively for the year 2010/11, from each study site with an aim to estimate the cost per visit of six integrated HIV and SRH services. A full cost analysis using a combination of bottom-up and step-down costing methods was conducted from the health provider's perspective. The main unit of analysis is the economic unit cost per visit for each service. Costs are converted to 2013 International dollars. The mean cost per visit for the HIV/SRH services ranged from $Int 14.23 (PNC visit) to $Int 74.21 (HIV treatment visit). We found considerable variation in the unit costs per visit across settings with family planning services exhibiting the least variation ($Int 6.71-52.24) and STI treatment and HIV treatment visits exhibiting the highest variation in unit cost ranging from ($Int 5.44-281.85) and ($Int 0.83-314.95), respectively. Unit costs of visits were driven by fixed costs while variability in visit costs across facilities was explained mainly by technology used and service maturity. For all services, variability in unit costs and cost components suggest that potential exists to reduce costs through better use of both human and capital resources, despite the high proportion of expenditure on drugs and medical supplies. Further work is required to explore the key drivers of efficiency and interventions that may facilitate efficiency improvements.

  5. The Costs of Delivering Integrated HIV and Sexual Reproductive Health Services in Limited Resource Settings

    PubMed Central

    Obure, Carol Dayo; Sweeney, Sedona; Darsamo, Vanessa; Michaels-Igbokwe, Christine; Guinness, Lorna; Terris-Prestholt, Fern; Muketo, Esther; Nhlabatsi, Zelda; Warren, Charlotte E.; Mayhew, Susannah; Watts, Charlotte; Vassall, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Objective To present evidence on the total costs and unit costs of delivering six integrated sexual reproductive health and HIV services in a high and medium HIV prevalence setting, in order to support policy makers and planners scaling up these essential services. Design A retrospective facility based costing study conducted in 40 non-government organization and public health facilities in Kenya and Swaziland. Methods Economic and financial costs were collected retrospectively for the year 2010/11, from each study site with an aim to estimate the cost per visit of six integrated HIV and SRH services. A full cost analysis using a combination of bottom-up and step-down costing methods was conducted from the health provider’s perspective. The main unit of analysis is the economic unit cost per visit for each service. Costs are converted to 2013 International dollars. Results The mean cost per visit for the HIV/SRH services ranged from $Int 14.23 (PNC visit) to $Int 74.21 (HIV treatment visit). We found considerable variation in the unit costs per visit across settings with family planning services exhibiting the least variation ($Int 6.71-52.24) and STI treatment and HIV treatment visits exhibiting the highest variation in unit cost ranging from ($Int 5.44-281.85) and ($Int 0.83-314.95), respectively. Unit costs of visits were driven by fixed costs while variability in visit costs across facilities was explained mainly by technology used and service maturity. Conclusion For all services, variability in unit costs and cost components suggest that potential exists to reduce costs through better use of both human and capital resources, despite the high proportion of expenditure on drugs and medical supplies. Further work is required to explore the key drivers of efficiency and interventions that may facilitate efficiency improvements. PMID:25933414

  6. Cervical cancer data and data systems in limited-resource settings: Challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Jennifer L; Were, Martin C; Arrossi, Silvina; Wools-Kaloustian, Kara

    2017-07-01

    Appropriate collection and use of health information is critical to the planning, scaling up, and improvement of cervical cancer programs. The health information systems implementation landscape is unique to each country; however, systems serving cervical cancer programs in low-resource settings share characteristics that present common challenges. In response, many programs have taken innovative approaches to generating the quality information needed for decision making. Recent advances in health information technology also provide feasible solutions to challenges. This article draws from the experiences of the authors and from current literature to describe outstanding challenges and promising practices in the implementation of cervical cancer data systems, and to make recommendations for next steps. Recommendations include engaging all stakeholders-including providers, program managers, implementing partners, and donors-in promoting national, district, and community information systems; building on existing systems and processes, as well as introducing new technologies; and evolving data collection and data systems as programs advance. © 2017 The Authors. International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  7. Delivering pediatric HIV care in resource-limited settings: cost considerations in an expanded response.

    PubMed

    Tolle, Michael A; Phelps, B Ryan; Desmond, Chris; Sugandhi, Nandita; Omeogu, Chinyere; Jamieson, David; Ahmed, Saeed; Reuben, Elan; Muhe, Lulu; Kellerman, Scott E

    2013-11-01

    If children are to be protected from HIV, the expansion of PMTCT programs must be complemented by increased provision of paediatric treatment. This is expensive, yet there are humanitarian, equity and children's rights arguments to justify the prioritization of treating HIV-infected children. In the context of limited budgets, inefficiencies cost lives, either through lower coverage or less effective services. With the goal of informing the design and expansion of efficient paediatric treatment programs able to utilize to greatest effect the available resources allocated to the treatment of HIV-infected children, this article reviews what is known about cost drivers in paediatric HIV interventions, and makes suggestions for improving efficiency in paediatric HIV programming. High-impact interventions known to deliver disproportional returns on investment are highlighted and targeted for immediate scale-up. Progress will carry a cost - increased funding, as well as additional data on intervention costs and outcomes, will be required if universal access of HIV-infected children to treatment is to be achieved and sustained.

  8. Challenges in using mobile phones for collection of antiretroviral therapy adherence data in a resource-limited setting.

    PubMed

    Haberer, Jessica E; Kiwanuka, Julius; Nansera, Denis; Wilson, Ira B; Bangsberg, David R

    2010-12-01

    Frequent antiretroviral therapy adherence monitoring could detect incomplete adherence before viral rebound develops and thus potentially prevent treatment failure. Mobile phone technologies make frequent, brief adherence interviews possible in resource-limited settings; however, feasibility and acceptability are unknown. Interactive voice response (IVR) and short message service (SMS) text messaging were used to collect adherence data from 19 caregivers of HIV-infected children in Uganda. IVR calls or SMS quantifying missed doses were sent in the local language once weekly for 3-4 weeks. Qualitative interviews were conducted to assess participant impressions of the technologies. Participant interest and participation rates were high; however, weekly completion rates for adherence queries were low (0-33%), most commonly due to misunderstanding of personal identification numbers. Despite near ubiquity of mobile phone technology in resource-limited settings, individual level collection of healthcare data presents challenges. Further research is needed for effective training and incentive methods.

  9. Features of human scabies in resource-limited settings: the Cameroon case.

    PubMed

    Kouotou, Emmanuel Armand; Nansseu, Jobert Richie N; Sieleunou, Isidore; Defo, Defo; Bissek, Anne-Cécile Zoung-Kanyi; Ndam, Elie Claude Ndjitoyap

    2015-07-23

    The persistent high prevalence of human scabies, especially in low- and middle-income countries prompted us to research the sociodemographic profile of patients suffering from it, and its spreading factors in Cameroon, a resource-poor setting. We conducted a cross-sectional survey from October 2011 to September 2012 in three hospitals located in Yaoundé, Cameroon, and enrolled patients diagnosed with human scabies during dermatologists' consultations who volunteered to take part in the study. We included 255 patients of whom 158 (62 %) were male. Age ranged from 0 to 80 years old with a median of 18 (Inter quartile range: 3-29) years. One to eight persons of our patients' entourage exhibited pruritus (mean = 2.1 ± 1.8). The number of persons per bed/room varied from 1 to 5 (mean = 2.1 ± 0.8). The first dermatologist's consultation occurred 4 to 720 days after the onset of symptoms (mean = 77.1 ± 63.7). The post-scabies pruritus (10.2 % of cases) was unrelated to the complications observed before correct treatment (all p values > 0.05), mainly impetiginization (7.1 %) and eczematization (5.9 %). Human scabies remains preponderant in our milieu. Populations should be educated on preventive measures in order to avoid this disease, and clinicians' knowledges must be strengthened for its proper diagnosis and management.

  10. Gastroenterology training in a resource-limited setting: Zambia, Southern Africa

    PubMed Central

    Asombang, Akwi W; Turner-Moss, Eleanor; Seetharam, Anil; Kelly, Paul

    2013-01-01

    as a mechanism to improve disease awareness in areas where resources are limited. PMID:23840144

  11. Newborn Resuscitation Training in Resource-Limited Settings: A Systematic Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Reisman, Jonathan; Arlington, Lauren; Jensen, Lloyd; Louis, Henry; Suarez-Rebling, Daniela; Nelson, Brett D

    2016-08-01

    Birth asphyxia contributes substantially to neonatal mortality in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The effects of training birth attendants in neonatal resuscitation (NR) on mortality are limited by falloff of skills and knowledge over time and transference of learned skills into clinical practice. This review examined acquisition and retention of NR knowledge and skills by birth attendants in LMICs and the effectiveness of interventions to improve them. Medline, Cochrane, Embase, CINAHL, Bireme, and African Index Medicus databases were searched. We reviewed Web pages and reports from non-peer-reviewed (or "gray") literature sources addressing NR training in LMICs. Articles on acquisition and retention of NR knowledge and skills, and interventions to improve them, were limited to LMICs. The initial search identified 767 articles, of which 45 met all inclusion criteria. Of these, 31 articles analyzed acquisition of knowledge and skills, and 19 analyzed retention. Most studies found high acquisition rates, although birth attendants struggled to learn bag-mask ventilation. Although significant falloff of knowledge and skills occurred after training, refresher training seemed to improve retention. Results of the gray literature analysis suggest that formal, structured practice sessions improve retention. This review did not analyze training's direct impact on mortality. Knowledge and skills falloff is a significant barrier to the success of NR training programs and possibly to reducing newborn mortality in LMICs. Refresher training and structured practice show significant promise. Additional research is needed to implement and assess retention improvement strategies in classroom and clinical settings. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  12. Challenges in the implementation of an electronic surveillance system in a resource-limited setting: Alerta, in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Giselle; Araujo-Castillo, Roger V; Neyra, Joan; Fernandez, Miguel; Leturia, Carlos; Mundaca, Carmen C; Blazes, David L

    2008-01-01

    Background Infectious disease surveillance is a primary public health function in resource-limited settings. In 2003, an electronic disease surveillance system (Alerta) was established in the Peruvian Navy with support from the U.S. Naval Medical Research Center Detachment (NMRCD). Many challenges arose during the implementation process, and a variety of solutions were applied. The purpose of this paper is to identify and discuss these issues. Methods This is a retrospective description of the Alerta implementation. After a thoughtful evaluation according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines, the main challenges to implementation were identified and solutions were devised in the context of a resource-limited setting, Peru. Results After four years of operation, we have identified a number of challenges in implementing and operating this electronic disease surveillance system. These can be divided into the following categories: (1) issues with personnel and stakeholders; (2) issues with resources in a developing setting; (3) issues with processes involved in the collection of data and operation of the system; and (4) issues with organization at the central hub. Some of the challenges are unique to resource-limited settings, but many are applicable for any surveillance system. For each of these challenges, we developed feasible solutions that are discussed. Conclusion There are many challenges to overcome when implementing an electronic disease surveillance system, not only related to technology issues. A comprehensive approach is required for success, including: technical support, personnel management, effective training, and cultural sensitivity in order to assure the effective deployment of an electronic disease surveillance system. PMID:19025681

  13. Proposing evidence-based strategies to strengthen implementation of healthcare reform in resource-limited settings: a summative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Manyazewal, Tsegahun; Oosthuizen, Martha J; Matlakala, Mokgadi C

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Many resource-limited countries have adopted and implemented healthcare reform to improve the quality of healthcare, but few have had much impact and strategies in support of these efforts remain limited. We aimed to explore and propose evidence-based strategies to strengthen implementation of healthcare reform in resource-limited settings. Design Descriptive and exploratory designs in two phases. Phase I involved assessing the effectiveness of the healthcare reform implemented in Ethiopia in the form of business process reengineering, with evidence compiled from healthcare professionals through a self-administered questionnaire; and phase II involved proposing strategies and seeking consensus from experts using Delphi method. Setting Public hospitals in central Ethiopia. Participants 406 healthcare professionals and 10 senior health policy experts. Findings The healthcare reform that we evaluated was able to restructure hospital departments into case teams, with the goal of adopting a ‘one-stop shopping’ approach. However, shortages of critical infrastructure, furniture and supplies and job dissatisfaction continued to hamper the system. The most important predictors that influenced implementation of the reform were financial resources, top management commitment and support, collaborative working environment and information technology (IT). Five strategies with 14 operational objectives and 67 potential interventions that could strengthen the reform are proposed based on their strategic priority, which are as follows: reinforce patient-centred quality of care services; foster a healthy and respectful workforce environment; efficient and accountable leadership and governance; efficient use of hospital financing and maximise innovations and the use of health technologies. Conclusions Effective implementation of healthcare reform remained a challenge for governments in resource-limited settings. Resilient operational, clinical and governance functions

  14. Development of an intensive care unit resource assessment survey for the care of critically ill patients in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Leligdowicz, Aleksandra; Bhagwanjee, Satish; Diaz, Janet V; Xiong, Wei; Marshall, John C; Fowler, Robert A; Adhikari, Neill Kj

    2017-04-01

    Capacity to provide critical care in resource-limited settings is poorly understood because of lack of data about resources available to manage critically ill patients. Our objective was to develop a survey to address this issue. We developed and piloted a cross-sectional self-administered survey in 9 resource-limited countries. The survey consisted of 8 domains; specific items within domains were modified from previously developed survey tools. We distributed the survey by e-mail to a convenience sample of health care providers responsible for providing care to critically ill patients. We assessed clinical sensibility and test-retest reliability. Nine of 15 health care providers responded to the survey on 2 separate occasions, separated by 2 to 4 weeks. Clinical sensibility was high (3.9-4.9/5 on assessment tool). Test-retest reliability for questions related to resource availability was acceptable (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.94; 95% confidence interval, 0.75-0.99; mean (SD) of weighted κ values = 0.67 [0.19]). The mean (SD) time for survey completion survey was 21 (16) minutes. A reliable cross-sectional survey of available resources to manage critically ill patients can be feasibly administered to health care providers in resource-limited settings. The survey will inform future research focusing on access to critical care where it is poorly described but urgently needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Impact of a structured ICU training programme in resource-limited settings in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Lubell, Yoel; Cooper, Ben S.; Mohanty, Sanjib; Alam, Shamsul; Karki, Arjun; Pattnaik, Rajya; Maswood, Ahmed; Haque, R.; Pangeni, Raju; Schultz, Marcus J.; Dondorp, Arjen M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To assess the impact on ICU performance of a modular training program in three resource-limited general adult ICUs in India, Bangladesh, and Nepal. Method A modular ICU training programme was evaluated using performance indicators from June 2009 to June 2012 using an interrupted time series design with an 8 to 15 month pre-intervention and 18 to 24 month post-intervention period. ICU physicians and nurses trained in Europe and the USA provided training for ICU doctors and nurses. The training program consisted of six modules on basic intensive care practices of 2–3 weeks each over 20 months. The performance indicators consisting of ICU mortality, time to ICU discharge, rate at which patients were discharged alive from the ICU, discontinuation of mechanical ventilation or vasoactive drugs and duration of antibiotic use were extracted. Stepwise changes and changes in trends associated with the intervention were analysed. Results Pre-Training ICU mortality in Rourkela (India), and Patan (Nepal) Chittagong (Bangladesh), was 28%, 41% and 62%, respectively, compared to 30%, 18% and 51% post-intervention. The intervention was associated with a stepwise reduction in cumulative incidence of in-ICU mortality in Chittagong (adjusted subdistribution hazard ratio [aSHR] (95% CI): 0.62 (0.40, 0.97), p = 0.03) and Patan (aSHR 0.16 (0.06, 0.41), p<0.001), but not in Rourkela (aSHR: 1.17 (0.75, 1.82), p = 0.49). The intervention was associated with earlier discontinuation of vasoactive drugs at Rourkela (adjusted hazard ratio for weekly change [aHR] 1.08 (1.03, 1.14), earlier discontinuation of mechanical ventilation in Chittagong (aHR 2.97 (1.24, 7.14), p = 0.02), and earlier ICU discharge in Patan (aHR 1.87 (1.02, 3.43), p = 0.04). Conclusion This structured training program was associated with a decrease in ICU mortality in two of three sites and improvement of other performance indicators. A larger cluster randomised study assessing process outcomes and longer

  16. Critical determinants of the epilepsy treatment gap: a cross-national analysis in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Ana-Claire L.; Dua, Tarun; Boscardin, John; Escarce, José J.; Saxena, Shekhar; Birbeck, Gretchen L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Epilepsy is one of the most common serious neurological disorders worldwide. Our objective was to determine which economic, healthcare, neurology and epilepsy specific resources were associated with untreated epilepsy in resource-constrained settings. Methods A systematic review of the literature identified community-based studies in resource-constrained settings that calculated the epilepsy treatment gap, the proportion with untreated epilepsy, from prevalent active epilepsy cases. Economic, healthcare, neurology and epilepsy specific resources were taken from existing datasets. Poisson regression models with jackknifed standard errors were used to create bivariate and multivariate models comparing the association between treatment status and economic and health resource indicators. Relative risks were reported. Key Findings Forty-seven studies of 8285 individuals from 24 countries met inclusion criteria. Bivariate analysis demonstrated that individuals residing in rural locations had significantly higher risks of untreated epilepsy [Relative Risk(RR)=1.63; 95% confidence interval(CI):1.26,2.11]. Significantly lower risks of untreated epilepsy were observed for higher physician density [RR=0.65, 95% CI:0.55,0.78], presence of a lay [RR=0.74, 95%CI:0.60,0.91] or professional association for epilepsy [RR=0.73, 95%CI:0.59,0.91], or post-graduate neurology training program [RR=0.67, 95%CI:0.55, 0.82]. In multivariate models, higher physician density maintained significant effects [RR=0.67; 95%CI:0.52,0.88]. Significance Even among resource-limited regions, people with epilepsy in countries with fewer economic, healthcare, neurology and epilepsy specific resources are more likely to have untreated epilepsy. Community-based epilepsy care programs have improved access to treatment but in order to decrease the epilepsy treatment gap, poverty and inequalities of healthcare, neurological and epilepsy resources must be dealt with at the local, national, and global

  17. Oxygen and pulse oximetry in childhood pneumonia: a survey of healthcare providers in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, Amy Sarah; Van Cleve, William C; Thompson, Mary I W; English, Mike

    2012-10-01

    Globally, pneumonia is the leading cause of death in children <5 years of age. Hypoxemia, a frequent complication of pneumonia, is a risk factor for death. To better understand the availability of oxygen and pulse oximetry, barriers to use and provider perceptions and practices regarding their role in childhood pneumonia, we conducted a survey using a convenience sampling strategy targeting clinicians working in resource-limited countries. Most respondents were physicians from public district and provincial hospitals with access to oxygen and pulse oximetry; however, reported therapeutic use for childhood pneumonia was low. Common barriers included insufficient supply, competition for use, lack of policies, guidelines and training and perceived high cost. Despite the frequency of hypoxemia, the inaccuracy of clinical predictors, the poor outcome hypoxemia portends and the effectiveness of pulse oximetry and oxygen in childhood pneumonia, our data indicate that these tools may be underused in resource-limited settings.

  18. An accurate and inexpensive color-based assay for detecting severe anemia in a limited-resource setting.

    PubMed

    McGann, Patrick T; Tyburski, Erika A; de Oliveira, Vysolela; Santos, Brigida; Ware, Russell E; Lam, Wilbur A

    2015-12-01

    Severe anemia is an important cause of morbidity and mortality among children in resource-poor settings, but laboratory diagnostics are often limited in these locations. To address this need, we developed a simple, inexpensive, and color-based point-of-care (POC) assay to detect severe anemia. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of this novel POC assay to detect moderate and severe anemia in a limited-resource setting. The study was a cross-sectional study conducted on children with sickle cell anemia in Luanda, Angola. The hemoglobin concentrations obtained by the POC assay were compared to reference values measured by a calibrated automated hematology analyzer. A total of 86 samples were analyzed (mean hemoglobin concentration 6.6 g/dL). There was a strong correlation between the hemoglobin concentrations obtained by the POC assay and reference values obtained from an automated hematology analyzer (r=0.88, P<0.0001). The POC assay demonstrated excellent reproducibility (r=0.93, P<0.0001) and the reagents appeared to be durable in a tropical setting (r=0.93, P<0.0001). For the detection of severe anemia that may require blood transfusion (hemoglobin <5 g/dL), the POC assay had sensitivity of 88.9% and specificity of 98.7%. These data demonstrate that an inexpensive (<$0.25 USD) POC assay accurately estimates low hemoglobin concentrations and has the potential to become a transformational diagnostic tool for severe anemia in limited-resource settings. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. An accurate and inexpensive color-based assay for detecting severe anemia in a limited-resource setting

    PubMed Central

    McGann, Patrick T.; Tyburski, Erika A.; de Oliveira, Vysolela; Santos, Brigida; Ware, Russell E.; Lam, Wilbur A.

    2016-01-01

    Severe anemia is an important cause of morbidity and mortality among children in resource-poor settings, but laboratory diagnostics are often limited in these locations. To address this need, we developed a simple, inexpensive, and color-based point-of-care (POC) assay to detect severe anemia. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of this novel POC assay to detect moderate and severe anemia in a limited-resource setting. The study was a cross-sectional study conducted on children with sickle cell anemia in Luanda, Angola. The hemoglobin concentrations obtained by the POC assay were compared to reference values measured by a calibrated automated hematology analyzer. A total of 86 samples were analyzed (mean hemoglobin concentration 6.6 g/dL). There was a strong correlation between the hemoglobin concentrations obtained by the POC assay and reference values obtained from an automated hematology analyzer (r=0.88, P<0.0001). The POC assay demonstrated excellent reproducibility (r=0.93, P<0.0001) and the reagents appeared to be durable in a tropical setting (r=0.93, P<0.0001). For the detection of severe anemia that may require blood transfusion (hemoglobin <5 g/dL), the POC assay had sensitivity of 88.9% and specificity of 98.7%. These data demonstrate that an inexpensive (<$0.25 USD) POC assay accurately estimates low hemoglobin concentrations and has the potential to become a transformational diagnostic tool for severe anemia in limited-resource settings. PMID:26317494

  20. Infection control best practices in clinical research in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, Catherine; Schouten, Jeffrey T

    2014-01-01

    Infection control activities in the international research setting include the development of meaningful and effective policies on specific topics such as hand and respiratory hygiene. Prevention of infection in health care workers and management of occupational exposure to transmissible agents are important aspects of the role of an infection control practitioner. Hand hygiene reduces health care associated infections and practices may be implemented in the research setting.

  1. Sleep Disordered Breathing in Four Resource-Limited Settings in Peru: Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Association with Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Noah G.; Rattner, Adi; Schwartz, Alan R.; Mokhlesi, Babak; Gilman, Robert H.; Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio; Miranda, J. Jaime; Checkley, William

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) is a highly prevalent condition in high-income countries, with major consequences for cardiopulmonary health, public safety, healthcare utilization, and mortality. However, its prevalence and effect in low- and middle-income countries are less well known. We sought to determine the prevalence, risk factors, and comorbidities of SDB symptoms in four resource-limited settings. Design: Cross-sectional analysis of the CRONICAS Cohort, a population-based age- and sex-stratified sample. Setting: Four resource-limited settings in Peru varying in altitude, urbanization, and air pollution. Participants: There were 2,682 adults aged 35 to 92 y. Measurements and Results: Self-reported SDB symptoms (habitual snoring, observed apneas, Epworth Sleepiness Scale), sociodemographics, medical history, anthropometrics, spirometry, blood biomarkers were reported. We found a high prevalence of habitual snoring (30.2%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 28.5–32.0%), observed apneas (20.9%, 95% CI 19.4–22.5%) and excessive daytime sleepiness (18.6%, 95% CI 17.1–20.1%). SDB symptoms varied across sites; prevalence and adjusted odds for habitual snoring were greatest at sea level, whereas those for observed apneas were greatest at high altitude. In multivariable analysis, habitual snoring was associated with older age, male sex, body mass index (BMI), and higher socioeconomic status; observed apneas were associated with BMI; and excessive daytime sleepiness was associated with older age, female sex, and medium socioeconomic status. Adjusted odds of cardiovascular disease, depression, and hypertension and total chronic disease burden increased progressively with the number of SDB symptoms. A threefold increase in the odds of having an additional chronic comorbid disease (adjusted odds ratio 3.57, 95% CI 2.18–5.84) was observed in those with all three versus no SDB symptoms. Conclusions: Sleep disordered breathing symptoms were highly

  2. Validation of a pediatric early warning system for hospitalized pediatric oncology patients in a resource-limited setting.

    PubMed

    Agulnik, Asya; Méndez Aceituno, Alejandra; Mora Robles, Lupe Nataly; Forbes, Peter W; Soberanis Vasquez, Dora Judith; Mack, Ricardo; Antillon-Klussmann, Federico; Kleinman, Monica; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos

    2017-09-07

    Pediatric oncology patients are at high risk of clinical deterioration, particularly in hospitals with resource limitations. The performance of pediatric early warning systems (PEWS) to identify deterioration has not been assessed in these settings. This study evaluates the validity of PEWS to predict the need for unplanned transfer to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) among pediatric oncology patients in a resource-limited hospital. A retrospective case-control study comparing the highest documented and corrected PEWS score before unplanned PICU transfer in pediatric oncology patients (129 cases) with matched controls (those not requiring PICU care) was performed. Documented and corrected PEWS scores were found to be highly correlated with the need for PICU transfer (area under the receiver operating characteristic, 0.940 and 0.930, respectively). PEWS scores increased 24 hours prior to unplanned transfer (P = .0006). In cases, organ dysfunction at the time of PICU admission correlated with maximum PEWS score (correlation coefficient, 0.26; P = .003), patients with PEWS results ≥4 had a higher Pediatric Index of Mortality 2 (PIM2) (P = .028), and PEWS results were higher in patients with septic shock (P = .01). The PICU mortality rate was 17.1%; nonsurvivors had higher mean PEWS scores before PICU transfer (P = .0009). A single-point increase in the PEWS score increased the odds of mechanical ventilation or vasopressors within the first 24 hours and during PICU admission (odds ratio 1.3-1.4). PEWS accurately predicted the need for unplanned PICU transfer in pediatric oncology patients in this resource-limited setting, with abnormal results beginning 24 hours before PICU admission and higher scores predicting the severity of illness at the time of PICU admission, need for PICU interventions, and mortality. These results demonstrate that PEWS aid in the identification of clinical deterioration in this high-risk population, regardless of a hospital

  3. Sankofa pediatric HIV disclosure intervention cyber data management: building capacity in a resource-limited setting and ensuring data quality.

    PubMed

    Catlin, Ann Christine; Fernando, Sumudinie; Gamage, Ruwan; Renner, Lorna; Antwi, Sampson; Tettey, Jonas Kusah; Amisah, Kofi Aikins; Kyriakides, Tassos; Cong, Xiangyu; Reynolds, Nancy R; Paintsil, Elijah

    2015-01-01

    Prevalence of pediatric HIV disclosure is low in resource-limited settings. Innovative, culturally sensitive, and patient-centered disclosure approaches are needed. Conducting such studies in resource-limited settings is not trivial considering the challenges of capturing, cleaning, and storing clinical research data. To overcome some of these challenges, the Sankofa pediatric disclosure intervention adopted an interactive cyber infrastructure for data capture and analysis. The Sankofa Project database system is built on the HUBzero cyber infrastructure ( https://hubzero.org ), an open source software platform. The hub database components support: (1) data management - the "databases" component creates, configures, and manages database access, backup, repositories, applications, and access control; (2) data collection - the "forms" component is used to build customized web case report forms that incorporate common data elements and include tailored form submit processing to handle error checking, data validation, and data linkage as the data are stored to the database; and (3) data exploration - the "dataviewer" component provides powerful methods for users to view, search, sort, navigate, explore, map, graph, visualize, aggregate, drill-down, compute, and export data from the database. The Sankofa cyber data management tool supports a user-friendly, secure, and systematic collection of all data. We have screened more than 400 child-caregiver dyads and enrolled nearly 300 dyads, with tens of thousands of data elements. The dataviews have successfully supported all data exploration and analysis needs of the Sankofa Project. Moreover, the ability of the sites to query and view data summaries has proven to be an incentive for collecting complete and accurate data. The data system has all the desirable attributes of an electronic data capture tool. It also provides an added advantage of building data management capacity in resource-limited settings due to its

  4. Sleep Disordered Breathing in Four Resource-Limited Settings in Peru: Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Association with Chronic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Noah G; Rattner, Adi; Schwartz, Alan R; Mokhlesi, Babak; Gilman, Robert H; Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio; Miranda, J Jaime; Checkley, William

    2015-09-01

    Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) is a highly prevalent condition in high-income countries, with major consequences for cardiopulmonary health, public safety, healthcare utilization, and mortality. However, its prevalence and effect in low- and middle-income countries are less well known. We sought to determine the prevalence, risk factors, and comorbidities of SDB symptoms in four resource-limited settings. Cross-sectional analysis of the CRONICAS Cohort, a population-based age- and sex-stratified sample. Four resource-limited settings in Peru varying in altitude, urbanization, and air pollution. There were 2,682 adults aged 35 to 92 y. Self-reported SDB symptoms (habitual snoring, observed apneas, Epworth Sleepiness Scale), sociodemographics, medical history, anthropometrics, spirometry, blood biomarkers were reported. We found a high prevalence of habitual snoring (30.2%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 28.5-32.0%), observed apneas (20.9%, 95% CI 19.4-22.5%) and excessive daytime sleepiness (18.6%, 95% CI 17.1-20.1%). SDB symptoms varied across sites; prevalence and adjusted odds for habitual snoring were greatest at sea level, whereas those for observed apneas were greatest at high altitude. In multivariable analysis, habitual snoring was associated with older age, male sex, body mass index (BMI), and higher socioeconomic status; observed apneas were associated with BMI; and excessive daytime sleepiness was associated with older age, female sex, and medium socioeconomic status. Adjusted odds of cardiovascular disease, depression, and hypertension and total chronic disease burden increased progressively with the number of SDB symptoms. A threefold increase in the odds of having an additional chronic comorbid disease (adjusted odds ratio 3.57, 95% CI 2.18-5.84) was observed in those with all three versus no SDB symptoms. Sleep disordered breathing symptoms were highly prevalent, varied widely across four resource-limited settings in Peru, and exhibited strong

  5. Emergency and urgent care capacity in a resource-limited setting: an assessment of health facilities in western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Thomas F; Hines, Rosemary; Ahn, Roy; Walters, Michelle; Young, David; Anderson, Rachel Eleanor; Tom, Sabrina M; Clark, Rachel; Obita, Walter; Nelson, Brett D

    2014-01-01

    Objective Injuries, trauma and non-communicable diseases are responsible for a rising proportion of death and disability in low-income and middle-income countries. Delivering effective emergency and urgent healthcare for these and other conditions in resource-limited settings is challenging. In this study, we sought to examine and characterise emergency and urgent care capacity in a resource-limited setting. Methods We conducted an assessment within all 30 primary and secondary hospitals and within a stratified random sampling of 30 dispensaries and health centres in western Kenya. The key informants were the most senior facility healthcare provider and manager available. Emergency physician researchers utilised a semistructured assessment tool, and data were analysed using descriptive statistics and thematic coding. Results No lower level facilities and 30% of higher level facilities reported having a defined, organised approach to trauma. 43% of higher level facilities had access to an anaesthetist. The majority of lower level facilities had suture and wound care supplies and gloves but typically lacked other basic trauma supplies. For cardiac care, 50% of higher level facilities had morphine, but a minority had functioning ECG, sublingual nitroglycerine or a defibrillator. Only 20% of lower level facilities had glucometers, and only 33% of higher level facilities could care for diabetic emergencies. No facilities had sepsis clinical guidelines. Conclusions Large gaps in essential emergency care capabilities were identified at all facility levels in western Kenya. There are great opportunities for a universally deployed basic emergency care package, an advanced emergency care package and facility designation scheme, and a reliable prehospital care transportation and communications system in resource-limited settings. PMID:25260371

  6. Sankofa pediatric HIV disclosure intervention cyber data management: building capacity in a resource-limited setting and ensuring data quality

    PubMed Central

    Catlin, Ann Christine; Fernando, Sumudinie; Gamage, Ruwan; Renner, Lorna; Antwi, Sampson; Tettey, Jonas Kusah; Amisah, Kofi Aikins; Kyriakides, Tassos; Cong, Xiangyu; Reynolds, Nancy R.; Paintsil, Elijah

    2015-01-01

    Prevalence of pediatric HIV disclosure is low in resource-limited settings. Innovative, culturally sensitive, and patient-centered disclosure approaches are needed. Conducting such studies in resource-limited settings is not trivial considering the challenges of capturing, cleaning, and storing clinical research data. To overcome some of these challenges, the Sankofa pediatric disclosure intervention adopted an interactive cyber infrastructure for data capture and analysis. The Sankofa Project database system is built on the HUBzero cyber infrastructure (https://hubzero.org), an open source software platform. The hub database components support: (1) data management – the “databases” component creates, configures, and manages database access, backup, repositories, applications, and access control; (2) data collection – the “forms” component is used to build customized web case report forms that incorporate common data elements and include tailored form submit processing to handle error checking, data validation, and data linkage as the data are stored to the database; and (3) data exploration – the “dataviewer” component provides powerful methods for users to view, search, sort, navigate, explore, map, graph, visualize, aggregate, drill-down, compute, and export data from the database. The Sankofa cyber data management tool supports a user-friendly, secure, and systematic collection of all data. We have screened more than 400 child–caregiver dyads and enrolled nearly 300 dyads, with tens of thousands of data elements. The dataviews have successfully supported all data exploration and analysis needs of the Sankofa Project. Moreover, the ability of the sites to query and view data summaries has proven to be an incentive for collecting complete and accurate data. The data system has all the desirable attributes of an electronic data capture tool. It also provides an added advantage of building data management capacity in resource-limited settings

  7. Modelling the Medication Management System for Resource Limited Settings: A Formal Representation of the Prescribing and Dispensing Phases.

    PubMed

    Ogallo, William; Kanter, Andrew S

    2015-01-01

    We propose a conceptual data model for relational databases targeting the prescribing and dispensing phases of the medication management system. The model was developed using recommendations from existing standards and guidelines, with necessary modifications made to suit adoption in resource-limited settings. We present the model as an entity-relationship diagram with 10 entities, 12 relationships and 48 attributes. It is our hope that this work will help mitigate barriers in the implementation of electronic prescribing and dispensing standards in the developing world.

  8. Mobile device for disease diagnosis and data tracking in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tiffany W; Laksanasopin, Tassaneewan; Sridhara, Archana A; Nayak, Samiksha; Sia, Samuel K

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe a low-cost mobile device that combines cell-phone and satellite communication technologies with fluid miniaturization techniques for performing all essential functions of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Disease-specific antigens are immobilized on the microfluidic surface, and disease specific antibodies are captured on the surface and visualized with silver-gold amplification. The diagnostic result is automatically determined by the device by measuring the absorbance through the silver-gold amplification in the microchannel. The results are displayed for the user and are synchronized to a remote patient record. The overall system aims to be portable, robust, low-power, and fully utilize the ability of mobile devices for bringing better health care to resource poor areas.

  9. The impact of antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings and current HIV therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Kumarasamy, N

    2016-04-01

    Four million people of the global total of 35 million with HIV infection are from South-East Asia. ART is currently utilized by 15 million people and has led to a dramatic decline in the mortality rate, including those in low- and middle-income countries. A reduction in sexually transmitted HIV and in comorbidities including tuberculosis has also followed. Current recommendations for the initiation of antiretroviral therapy in people who are HIV+ are essentially to initiate ART irrespective of CD4 cell count and clinical stage. The frequency of HIV testing should be culturally specific and based on the HIV incidence in different key populations but phasing in viral load technology in LMIC is an urgent priority and this needs resources and capacity. With the availability of simplified potent ART regimens, persons with HIV now live longer. The recent WHO treatment guidelines recommending routine HIV testing and earlier initiation of treatment should be the stepping stone for ending the AIDS epidemic and to meet the UNAIDS mission of 90*90*90.

  10. Facility-based constraints to exchange transfusions for neonatal hyperbilirubinemia in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    Mabogunje, Cecilia A; Olaifa, Sarah M; Olusanya, Bolajoko O

    2016-01-01

    Several clinical guidelines for the management of infants with severe neonatal hyperbilirubinemia recommend immediate exchange transfusion (ET) when the risk or presence of acute bilirubin encephalopathy is established in order to prevent chronic bilirubin encephalopathy or kernicterus. However, the literature is sparse concerning the interval between the time the decision for ET is made and the actual initiation of ET, especially in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) with significant resource constraints but high rates of ET. This paper explores the various stages and potential delays during this interval in complying with the requirement for immediate ET for the affected infants, based on the available evidence from LMICs. The vital role of intensive phototherapy, efficient laboratory and logistical support, and clinical expertise for ET are highlighted. The challenges in securing informed parental consent, especially on religious grounds, and meeting the financial burden of this emergency procedure to facilitate timely ET are examined. Secondary delays arising from post-treatment bilirubin rebound with intensive phototherapy or ET are also discussed. These potential delays can compromise the effectiveness of ET and should provide additional impetus to curtail avoidable ET in LMICs. PMID:27170928

  11. Management of an Obstructed Tracheostomy in a Limited-Resource Setting

    PubMed Central

    Chiaravalli, Julie; Lufesi, Norman; Shawa, Elwin; Nkhoma, Vitumbiko; Sigalet, Elaine

    2017-01-01

    Obstruction of a tracheostomy tube is a common cause of respiratory compromise in adults and pediatric patients, which can lead to a life-threatening emergency if it is not properly managed. Compromised airway patency has many potential etiologies; however, the scenario described in this technical report focuses specifically on the management of tracheostomy obstruction through the presence of a mucus plug, blood clot, or highly viscous secretions. The simulation described in this technical report was written to be conducted as an in-situ simulation within the intensive care unit (ICU) at Mzuzu Central Hospital, Malawi. The novel aspect of this report is that it depicts the integration of low-tech simulation with a deteriorating patient scenario educational methodology. This integration enables the use of affordable and sustainable simulation materials in Malawi context to deliver learning objectives that are otherwise not achievable. It was designed to train nurses, clinical officers, and nursing students from the ICU and male/female surgical wards. It can be utilized to train similar learners in other resource-poor regions of the world, as well as remote areas of the more developed countries. PMID:28616369

  12. The development and implementation of a newborn medicine program in a resource-limited setting.

    PubMed

    Hansen, A; Magge, H; Labrecque, M; Munyaneza, R B M; Nahimana, E; Nyishime, M; Mwali, A

    2015-03-21

    The reduction in global neonatal mortality rates remains a challenge. Internationally recognized protocols for hospital care of sick and small newborns are limited, although this specialized area lends itself to standardization. An interdisciplinary team including international and local clinical experts worked with the Rwandan Ministry of Health and Rwandan professional associations to develop and implement a neonatal care program in a rural Rwandan district hospital that was ultimately accepted as the national standard for newborn medicine. Successful features and challenges are discussed. It is realistic to develop, implement and disseminate neonatal protocols for sick newborns.

  13. The development and implementation of a newborn medicine program in a resource-limited setting

    PubMed Central

    Magge, H.; Labrecque, M.; Munyaneza, R. B. M.; Nahimana, E.; Nyishime, M.; Mwali, A.

    2015-01-01

    The reduction in global neonatal mortality rates remains a challenge. Internationally recognized protocols for hospital care of sick and small newborns are limited, although this specialized area lends itself to standardization. An interdisciplinary team including international and local clinical experts worked with the Rwandan Ministry of Health and Rwandan professional associations to develop and implement a neonatal care program in a rural Rwandan district hospital that was ultimately accepted as the national standard for newborn medicine. Successful features and challenges are discussed. It is realistic to develop, implement and disseminate neonatal protocols for sick newborns. PMID:26400597

  14. Impact of the introduction of ultrasound services in a limited resource setting: rural Rwanda 2008

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Over the last decade, utilization of ultrasound technology by non-radiologist physicians has grown. Recent advances in affordability, durability, and portability have brought ultrasound to the forefront as a sustainable and high impact technology for use in developing world clinical settings as well. However, ultrasound's impact on patient management plans, program sustainability, and which ultrasound applications are useful in this setting has not been well studied. Methods Ultrasound services were introduced at two rural Rwandan district hospitals affiliated with Partners in Health, a US nongovernmental organization. Data sheets for each ultrasound scan performed during routine clinical care were collected and analyzed to determine patient demographics, which ultrasound applications were most frequently used, and whether the use of the ultrasound changed patient management plans. Ultrasound scans performed by the local physicians during the post-training period were reviewed for accuracy of interpretation and image quality by an ultrasound fellowship trained emergency medicine physician from the United States who was blinded to the original interpretation. Results Adult women appeared to benefit most from the presence of ultrasound services. Of the 345 scans performed during the study period, obstetrical scanning was the most frequently used application. Evaluation of gestational age, fetal head position, and placental positioning were the most common findings. However, other applications used included abdominal, cardiac, renal, pleural, procedural guidance, and vascular ultrasounds. Ultrasound changed patient management plans in 43% of total patients scanned. The most common change was to plan a surgical procedure. The ultrasound program appears sustainable; local staff performed 245 ultrasound scans in the 11 weeks after the departure of the ultrasound instructor. Post-training scan review showed the concordance rate of interpretation between the

  15. Improving antiretroviral therapy adherence in resource-limited settings at scale: a discussion of interventions and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Haberer, Jessica E; Sabin, Lora; Amico, K Rivet; Orrell, Catherine; Galárraga, Omar; Tsai, Alexander C; Vreeman, Rachel C; Wilson, Ira; Sam-Agudu, Nadia A; Blaschke, Terrence F; Vrijens, Bernard; Mellins, Claude A; Remien, Robert H; Weiser, Sheri D; Lowenthal, Elizabeth; Stirratt, Michael J; Sow, Papa Salif; Thomas, Bruce; Ford, Nathan; Mills, Edward; Lester, Richard; Nachega, Jean B; Bwana, Bosco Mwebesa; Ssewamala, Fred; Mbuagbaw, Lawrence; Munderi, Paula; Geng, Elvin; Bangsberg, David R

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Successful population-level antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence will be necessary to realize both the clinical and prevention benefits of antiretroviral scale-up and, ultimately, the end of AIDS. Although many people living with HIV are adhering well, others struggle and most are likely to experience challenges in adherence that may threaten virologic suppression at some point during lifelong therapy. Despite the importance of ART adherence, supportive interventions have generally not been implemented at scale. The objective of this review is to summarize the recommendations of clinical, research, and public health experts for scalable ART adherence interventions in resource-limited settings. Methods: In July 2015, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation convened a meeting to discuss the most promising ART adherence interventions for use at scale in resource-limited settings. This article summarizes that discussion with recent updates. It is not a systematic review, but rather provides practical considerations for programme implementation based on evidence from individual studies, systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and the World Health Organization Consolidated Guidelines for HIV, which include evidence from randomized controlled trials in low- and middle-income countries. Interventions are categorized broadly as education and counselling; information and communication technology-enhanced solutions; healthcare delivery restructuring; and economic incentives and social protection interventions. Each category is discussed, including descriptions of interventions, current evidence for effectiveness, and what appears promising for the near future. Approaches to intervention implementation and impact assessment are then described. Results and discussion: The evidence base is promising for currently available, effective, and scalable ART adherence interventions for resource-limited settings. Numerous interventions build on existing health care

  16. Improving antiretroviral therapy adherence in resource-limited settings at scale: a discussion of interventions and recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Haberer, Jessica E.; Sabin, Lora; Amico, K. Rivet; Orrell, Catherine; Galárraga, Omar; Tsai, Alexander C.; Vreeman, Rachel C.; Wilson, Ira; Sam-Agudu, Nadia A.; Blaschke, Terrence F.; Vrijens, Bernard; Mellins, Claude A.; Remien, Robert H.; Weiser, Sheri D.; Lowenthal, Elizabeth; Stirratt, Michael J.; Sow, Papa Salif; Thomas, Bruce; Ford, Nathan; Mills, Edward; Lester, Richard; Nachega, Jean B.; Bwana, Bosco Mwebesa; Ssewamala, Fred; Mbuagbaw, Lawrence; Munderi, Paula; Geng, Elvin; Bangsberg, David R.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Successful population-level antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence will be necessary to realize both the clinical and prevention benefits of antiretroviral scale-up and, ultimately, the end of AIDS. Although many people living with HIV are adhering well, others struggle and most are likely to experience challenges in adherence that may threaten virologic suppression at some point during lifelong therapy. Despite the importance of ART adherence, supportive interventions have generally not been implemented at scale. The objective of this review is to summarize the recommendations of clinical, research, and public health experts for scalable ART adherence interventions in resource-limited settings. Methods: In July 2015, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation convened a meeting to discuss the most promising ART adherence interventions for use at scale in resource-limited settings. This article summarizes that discussion with recent updates. It is not a systematic review, but rather provides practical considerations for programme implementation based on evidence from individual studies, systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and the World Health Organization Consolidated Guidelines for HIV, which include evidence from randomized controlled trials in low- and middle-income countries. Interventions are categorized broadly as education and counselling; information and communication technology-enhanced solutions; healthcare delivery restructuring; and economic incentives and social protection interventions. Each category is discussed, including descriptions of interventions, current evidence for effectiveness, and what appears promising for the near future. Approaches to intervention implementation and impact assessment are then described. Results and discussion: The evidence base is promising for currently available, effective, and scalable ART adherence interventions for resource-limited settings. Numerous interventions build on existing health care

  17. Patient needs and point-of-care requirements for HIV load testing in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Usdin, Martine; Guillerm, Martine; Calmy, Alexandra

    2010-04-15

    Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) is an international, independent medical nongovernmental organization. One way in which MSF acts to improve patient care is to assist in the identification and development of adapted and appropriate tools for use in resource-limited settings. One strategy to achieve this goal is through active collaborations with scientists and developers, to make some of the field needs known and to help define the medical strategy behind the implementation of new diagnostic tests. Tests used in the field need to be effective in often extreme conditions and must also deliver high-quality, reliable results that can be used in the local context. In this article, we discuss some patient and health care provider needs for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) load measurement in resource-limited settings. This is just one of the areas in which effective, quality tools are desperately needed, not only by MSF and other international nongovernmental organizations, but also by many other health service providers. We hope that, by clearly defining the needs of patients in MSF clinics-as well as we can assess this-and by explaining why these tools are needed, how they should perform, and how their results can be integrated into a program, we will encourage the development of such tools and hasten their implementation in areas where they are so urgently needed.

  18. Laboratory monitoring to guide switching antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings: clinical benefits and cost-effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, April D; Weinstein, Milton C; Anglaret, Xavier; Goldie, Sue J; Losina, Elena; Yazdanpanah, Yazdan; Messou, Eugène; Cotich, Kara L; Walensky, Rochelle P; Freedberg, Kenneth A

    2010-07-01

    As second-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) availability increases in resource-limited settings, questions about the value of laboratory monitoring remain. We assessed the outcomes and cost-effectiveness (CE) of laboratory monitoring to guide switching ART. We used a computer model to project life expectancy and costs of different strategies to guide ART switching in patients in Côte d'Ivoire. Strategies included clinical assessment, CD4 count, and HIV RNA testing. Data were from clinical trials and cohort studies from Côte d'Ivoire and the literature. Outcomes were compared using the incremental CE ratio. We conducted multiple sensitivity analyses to assess uncertainty in model parameters. Compared with first-line ART only, second-line ART increased life expectancy by 24% with clinical monitoring only, 46% with CD4 monitoring, and 61% with HIV RNA monitoring. The incremental CE ratio of switching based on clinical monitoring was $1670 per year of life gained (YLS) compared with first-line ART only; biannual CD4 monitoring was $2120 per YLS. The CE ratio of biannual HIV RNA testing ranged from $2920 ($87/test) to $1990 per YLS ($25/test). If second-line ART costs were reduced, the CE of HIV RNA monitoring improved. In resource-limited settings, CD4 count and HIV RNA monitoring to guide switching to second-line ART improve survival and, under most conditions, are cost-effective.

  19. Innovative strategies for transforming internal medicine residency training in resource-limited settings: the Mozambique experience.

    PubMed

    Mocumbi, Ana Olga; Carrilho, Carla; Aronoff-Spencer, Eliah; Funzamo, Carlos; Patel, Sam; Preziosi, Michael; Lederer, Philip; Tilghman, Winston; Benson, Constance A; Badaró, Roberto; Nguenha, A; Schooley, Robert T; Noormahomed, Emília V

    2014-08-01

    With approximately 4 physicians per 100,000 inhabitants, Mozambique faces one of the most severe health care provider shortages in Sub-Saharan Africa. The lack of sufficient well-trained medical school faculty is one of Mozambique's major barrier to producing new physicians annually. A partnership between the Universidade Eduardo Mondlane and the University of California, San Diego, has addressed this challenge with support from the Medical Education Partnership Initiative. After an initial needs assessment involving questionnaires and focus groups of residents, and working with key members from the Ministry of Health, the Medical Council, and Maputo Central Hospital, a set of interventions was designed. The hospital's internal medicine residency program was chosen as the focus for the plan. Interventions included curriculum design, new teaching methodologies, investment in an informatics infrastructure for access to digital references, building capacity to support clinical research, and providing financial incentives to retain junior faculty. The number of candidates entering the internal medicine residency program has increased, and detailed monitoring and evaluation is measuring the impact of these changes on the quality of training. These changes are expected to improve the long-term quality of postgraduate training in general through dissemination to other departments. They also have the potential to facilitate equitable distribution of specialists nationwide by expanding postgraduate training to other hospitals and universities.

  20. A Comprehensive Needs Assessment Tool for Planning RHD Control Programs in Limited Resource Settings.

    PubMed

    Zühlke, Liesl J; Watkins, David A; Perkins, Susan; Wyber, Rosemary; Mwangi, Jeremiah; Markbreiter, Joanna; Moloi, Hlengiwe S; Engel, Mark E; Shato, Thembikile; Hermanus, Tayla; DeVries, Jantina; Read, Clancy

    2017-03-01

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is an important cause of disability and death in low- and middle-income countries. However, evidence-based interventions have not been implemented systematically in many countries. We present a RHD Needs Assessment Tool (NAT) that can be used at country or regional levels to systematically develop and plan comprehensive RHD control programs and to provide baseline data for program monitoring and evaluation. The RHD NAT follows a mixed-methods approach using quantitative and qualitative data collection instruments. Evidence is mapped to a conceptual model that follows a patient through the natural history of RHD. The NAT has 4 phases: 1) situational assessment; 2) facility-based assessment of epidemiology and health system capacity; 3) patient and provider experience of RHD using ethnographic methods; and 4) intervention planning, including stakeholder mapping and development of a monitoring and evaluation framework. The RHD NAT is designed to paint a comprehensive picture of RHD care in an endemic setting and to identify the major gaps to disseminating and implementing evidence-based interventions. Copyright © 2016 World Heart Federation (Geneva). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Innovative Strategies for Transforming Internal Medicine Residency Training in Resource-Limited Settings: The Mozambique Experience

    PubMed Central

    Mocumbi, Ana Olga; Carrilho, Carla; Aronoff-Spencer, Eliah; Funzamo, Carlos; Patel, Sam; Preziosi, Michael; Lederer, Philip; Tilghman, Winston; Benson, Constance A.; Badaró, Roberto; Nguenha, A.; Schooley, Robert T.; Noormahomed, Emília V

    2014-01-01

    With approximately four physicians per 100,000 inhabitants, Mozambique faces one of the most severe health care provider shortages in Sub-Saharan Africa. The lack of sufficient wel-trained medical school faculty is Mozambique’s major barrier to producing new physicians annually. A partnership between the Universidade Eduardo Mondlane and the University of California, San Diego, has addressed this challenge with support from the Medical Education Partnership Initiative. Following an initial needs assessment involving questionnaires and focus groups of residents, and working with key members from the Ministry of Health, the Medical Council, and Maputo Central Hospital, a set of interventions was designed. The hospital’s Internal Medicine Residency Program was chosen as the focus for the plan. Interventions included curriculum design, new teaching methodologies, investment in an informatics infrastructure for access to digital references, building capacity to support clinical research, and providing financial incentives to retain junior faculty. The number of candidates entering the Internal Medicine (IM) residency program has increased, and detailed monitoring and evaluation is measuring the impact of these changes on the quality of training. These changes are expected to improve the long-term quality of postgraduate training in general through dissemination to other departments. They also have the potential to facilitate equitable distribution of specialists nationwide by expanding postgraduate training to other hospitals and universities. PMID:25072585

  2. Use of 90% ethanol to decontaminate stethoscopes in resource limited settings.

    PubMed

    Raghubanshi, Bijendra Raj; Sapkota, Supriya; Adhikari, Arjab; Dutta, Aman; Bhattarai, Utsuk; Bhandari, Rastriyata

    2017-01-01

    In developing countries like Nepal, 90% ethanol is cheap and is available in most hospitals. The unavailability of isopropyl alcohol (IPA) in these settings led us to compare the efficacy between 90% ethanol and isopropyl alcohol pads in reducing the bacterial contamination of diaphragm of stethoscope. A randomized blinded experimental study was carried out to determine the difference between cleaning stethoscopes with 90% ethanol and IPA. Cultures of diaphragm were taken before and after cleaning with one of the cleaning agent. Colony forming units (CFU) count and organism identification was done by a blinded investigator. CFU before and after cleaning were compared using Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Mann Whitney U test was used to compare the decrease in CFU count between the cleaning agents. About 30% of the stethoscopes harbored potential pathogens. Significant reduction in CFU was observed with both IPA (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, P value <0.001) and 90% ethanol (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, P value <0.001). Comparing median decrease in CFU between cleaning with IPA and with 90% ethanol, no significant difference was found (Mann Whitney U test; U = 1357, P value >0.05). Both 90% ethanol and IPA are equally effective in decontaminating the diaphragm of stethoscope. Selection of agent should be done on the basis of cost and availability.

  3. Transplantation in resource-limited setting: using HIV-positive donors for HIV-positive patients

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Elmi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Background: A HIV positive-to-positive program was started in South Africa in 2008. The program was started because dialysis is not freely available to everyone, but severely limited and only available to a selected group of patients. Patients and Methods: Between September 2008 and March 2015, 29 patients were transplanted from HIV-positive brain-dead donors at Groote Schuur Hospital transplant team. Donors were either naïve to anti-retroviral therapy or on first line therapy. The recipients were selected to have undetectable plasma HIV type 1 RNA levels and be on a stable antiretroviral regimen. CD4+ T-cell counts of at least 200/mm3 in last 6 months prior to transplant, with no previous serious opportunistic infections. Results: Survivors in the study were followed for a median of 2.4 years. The rate of patient survival was 84% at 1 year and 74% at 5 years. The corresponding graft survival rate was 93% and 84%. Conclusion: Using HIV-positive donors might resolve some of the problems we are experiencing in getting enough donors for our patients wit ESRD. In the USA the HOPE act was accepted in 2014 and this might now also impact on the use of HIV positive donors elsewhere in the world.

  4. Patterns of fruit and seed set within inflorescences of Pancratium maritimum (Amaryllidaceae): nonuniform pollination, resource limitation, or architectural effects?

    PubMed

    Medrano, M; Guitián, P; Guitián, J

    2000-04-01

    We investigated patterns of fruit and seed production on inflorescences of a population of Pancratium maritimum in northwest Spain over a 2-yr period. Initial findings showed that the earliest opening flowers on an inflorescence are more likely to set fruit and produce more seeds than later opening flowers and that this pattern is maintained throughout the flowering season. Supplementary pollination and flower-removal experiments were performed to investigate whether the observed pattern is attributable (a) to variation in pollen receipt, (b) to sequestration of resources by the earliest flowers on an inflorescence, and/or (c) to "architectural" limitations on the fruit/seed production of later flowers. Supplementary pollination did not improve fruit or seed production by late flowers in either of the 2 yr of study. In flower-removal experiments, the remaining flowers showed improved fruit set and mean number of seeds per flower, by comparison with flowers in the same position on control inflorescences. When all flowers except the latest third were removed, these showed fruit set and seed production similar to those of early flowers on control inflorescences. These results strongly suggest that the observed within-inflorescence patterns of fruit and seed production in P. maritimum are mainly attributable to competition for resources (i.e., explanation b), though other adaptive explanations cannot be ruled out.

  5. Cost-Effectiveness of Prevention and Management of Diabetic Foot Ulcer and Amputation in a Health Resource-limited Setting.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bin; Wan, Xu; Ma, Jing

    2017-10-04

    To estimate the lifetime health and economic effects of different strategies of caring the diabetic foot in the Chinese setting. A mathematical model was developed to simulate the onset and progression of diabetic foot disease in patients with type 2 diabetes managed with optimal care and usual care. Clinical and utility data were obtained from the published literature. Direct medical costs and resource utilization in the Chinese health care setting were considered. Sensitivity analyses were undertaken to test the impact of a range of variables and assumptions on the results. Heath benefits and costs were the outcome measures assessed. Compared with usual care, optimal care was a cost-saving option that exhibited lower costs with improved health benefits, including greater quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and reduced incidence of foot complications. The lifetime saving costs per additional QALY gained by optimal care was US $2,015. The model outcome was most sensitive to the risk ratio of foot ulcers and amputation for optimal care over usual care. Implementing the guideline-based optimal care for diabetic foot is likely to be cost-effective in a health resource-limited setting. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Offering an American graduate medical HIV course to health care workers in resource-limited settings via the Internet.

    PubMed

    Chung, Michael H; Severynen, Anneleen O; Hals, Matthew P; Harrington, Robert D; Spach, David H; Kim, H Nina

    2012-01-01

    Western accredited medical universities can offer graduate-level academic courses to health care workers (HCWs) in resource-limited settings through the Internet. It is not known whether HCWs are interested in these online courses, whether they can perform as well as matriculated students, or whether such courses are educationally or practically relevant. In 2011, the University of Washington (UW) Schools of Medicine and Nursing offered the graduate course, "Clinical Management of HIV", to HCWs that included a demographic survey, knowledge assessment, and course evaluation. UW faculty delivered HIV clinical topics through ten 2-hour weekly sessions from the perspectives of practicing HIV medicine in developed and developing settings. HCWs viewed lectures through Adobe Acrobat Connect Pro (Adobe Systems, San Jose, CA), and completed online homework on HIV Web Study (http://depts.washington.edu/hivaids/) and online quizzes. HCWs, who met the same passing requirements as UW students by attending 80% lectures, completing ≥90% homework, and achieving a cumulative ≥70% grade on quizzes, were awarded a certificate. 369 HCWs at 33 sites in 21 countries joined the course in 2011, a >15-fold increase since the course was first offered in 2007. The majority of HCWs came from Africa (72%), and most were physicians (41%), nurses (22%), or midlevel practitioners (20%). 298 HCWs (81%) passed all requirements and earned a certificate. In a paired analysis of pre- and post-course HIV knowledge assessments, 56% of HCWs improved their post-course score (p<0.0001) with 27% improving by at least 30%. In the course evaluation, most HCWs rated the course as excellent (53%) or very good (39%). This online HIV course demonstrated that opening a Western graduate medical and nursing curriculum to HCWs in resource-limited settings is feasible, popular, and valuable, and may address logistic and economic barriers to the provision of high quality education in these settings.

  7. Offering an American Graduate Medical HIV Course to Health Care Workers in Resource-Limited Settings via the Internet

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Michael H.; Severynen, Anneleen O.; Hals, Matthew P.; Harrington, Robert D.; Spach, David H.; Kim, H. Nina

    2012-01-01

    Background Western accredited medical universities can offer graduate-level academic courses to health care workers (HCWs) in resource-limited settings through the internet. It is not known whether HCWs are interested in these online courses, whether they can perform as well as matriculated students, or whether such courses are educationally or practically relevant. Methods and Findings In 2011, the University of Washington (UW) Schools of Medicine and Nursing offered the graduate course, “Clinical Management of HIV”, to HCWs that included a demographic survey, knowledge assessment, and course evaluation. UW faculty delivered HIV clinical topics through ten 2-hour weekly sessions from the perspectives of practicing HIV medicine in developed and developing settings. HCWs viewed lectures through Adobe Acrobat Connect Pro (Adobe Systems, San Jose, CA), and completed online homework on HIV Web Study (http://depts.washington.edu/hivaids/) and online quizzes. HCWs, who met the same passing requirements as UW students by attending 80% lectures, completing ≥90% homework, and achieving a cumulative ≥70% grade on quizzes, were awarded a certificate. 369 HCWs at 33 sites in 21 countries joined the course in 2011, a >15-fold increase since the course was first offered in 2007. The majority of HCWs came from Africa (72%), and most were physicians (41%), nurses (22%), or midlevel practitioners (20%). 298 HCWs (81%) passed all requirements and earned a certificate. In a paired analysis of pre- and post-course HIV knowledge assessments, 56% of HCWs improved their post-course score (p<0.0001) with 27% improving by at least 30%. In the course evaluation, most HCWs rated the course as excellent (53%) or very good (39%). Conclusions This online HIV course demonstrated that opening a Western graduate medical and nursing curriculum to HCWs in resource-limited settings is feasible, popular, and valuable, and may address logistic and economic barriers to the provision of high

  8. Applying rapid 'de-facto' HTA in resource-limited settings: experience from Romania.

    PubMed

    Lopert, Ruth; Ruiz, Francis; Chalkidou, Kalipso

    2013-10-01

    In attempting to constrain healthcare expenditure growth, health technology assessment (HTA) can enable policy-makers to look beyond budget impact and facilitate more rational decision-making. However lack of technical capacity and poor governance can limit use in some countries. Undertaking de facto HTA by adapting decisions taken in countries with established processes is a method that may be applied while building domestic HTA capacity. We explored the potential for applying this approach in Romania. As part of a review of the basic health benefits available to insured Romanians we examined the listing process and content of the Romanian drug reimbursement formulary. We assessed value for money indirectly by drawing on appraisals by UK's NICE, and for products considered cost effective in the UK, adjusting prices by the ratio of Romanian per capita GDP to UK per capita GDP. We found more than 30 of the top 50 medicines on the Romanian formulary unlikely to be cost-effective, suggesting that existing external reference pricing mechanisms may not be delivering good value for money. While not taking into account local costs or treatment patterns, absent local considerations of value for money, this method offers a guide for both drug selection and pricing. Until robust local HTA processes are established this approach could support further analysis of existing prices and pricing mechanisms. Applied more generally, it is arguably preferable to external reference pricing, product delisting or arbitrary price cuts, and may support the future development of more rigorous, evidence-based decision-making. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Access to Medicines in Resource-limited Settings: The End of a Golden Decade?

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Nathan; Arkinstall, James

    2012-01-01

    Strong international mobilization and political will drove a golden decade for global health. Key initiatives over the last decade include setting of health-related Millennium Development Goals; the Commission on Macroeconomics and Health; the creation of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria; the Doha Declaration on the TRIPS Agreement and Public Health affirming countries' rights to protect public health when implementing patent rules; and the creation of product development partnerships to address neglected areas of research and development. Significant progress was made in reducing the incidence of and morbidity and mortality from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), tuberculosis (TB), and malaria, with a major impact made through increased access to medicines. Antiretroviral treatment for HIV was expanded to 6.6 million people, and medication prices were reduced significantly through generic competition. However, donor support has started to decline at a time when many patients still wait for treatment and the prices of needed newer medicines are on the increase due to patent protection. TB incidence has started to decrease, but progress in diagnosis and treatment of multi-drug-resistant TB has been slow due to complexity of treatment and high drug costs. Promising new TB drugs in development need to be introduced rapidly and appropriately while treatment is being expanded. The introduction of more affordable artemisinin combination therapies for malaria contributed to significantly reducing malaria incidence and mortality, but challenges remain in ensuring that the latest recommendations for treating severe malaria are implemented. Looking to the next decade, there is a worrisome mismatch between additional health priorities accompanied by shifting burdens of disease that need to be addressed and dwindling political attention and financial support. Difficulties in producing and guaranteeing access to affordable medicines are expected from a

  10. Increasing the uptake of prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV services in a resource-limited setting.

    PubMed

    Torpey, Kwasi; Kabaso, Mushota; Kasonde, Prisca; Dirks, Rebecca; Bweupe, Maxmillian; Thompson, Catherine; Mukadi, Ya Diul

    2010-01-28

    As in other resource limited settings, the Ministry of Health in Zambia is challenged to make affordable and acceptable PMTCT interventions accessible and available. With a 14.3% HIV prevalence, the MOH estimates over one million people are HIV positive in Zambia. Approximately 500,000 children are born annually in Zambia and 40,000 acquire the infection vertically each year if no intervention is offered. This study sought to review uptake of prevention of mother-to-child (PMTCT) services in a resource-limited setting following the introduction of context-specific interventions. Interventions to improve PMTCT uptake were introduced into 38 sites providing PMTCT services in Zambia in July 2005. Baseline and follow up service data were collected on a monthly basis through September 2008. Data was checked for internal and external consistency using logic built into databases used for data management. Data audits were conducted to determine accuracy and reliability. Trends were analyzed pre- and post- intervention. Uptake among pregnant women increased across the 13 quarters (39 months) of observation, particularly in the case of acceptance of counseling and HIV testing from 45% to 90% (p value = 0.00) in the first year and 99% by year 3 (p value = 0.00). Receipt of complete course of antiretroviral (ARV) prophylaxis increased from 29% to 66% (p = 0.00) in the first year and 97% by year 3 (p value = 0.00). There was also significant improvement in the percentage of HIV positive pregnant women referred for clinical care. Uptake of PMTCT services in resource-limited settings can be improved by utilizing innovative alternatives to mitigate the effects of human resource shortage such as by providing technical assistance and mentorship beyond regular training courses, integrating PMTCT services into existing maternal and child health structures, addressing information gaps, mobilizing traditional and opinion leaders and building strong relationships with the government

  11. Increasing the uptake of prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV services in a resource-limited setting

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background As in other resource limited settings, the Ministry of Health in Zambia is challenged to make affordable and acceptable PMTCT interventions accessible and available. With a 14.3% HIV prevalence, the MOH estimates over one million people are HIV positive in Zambia. Approximately 500,000 children are born annually in Zambia and 40,000 acquire the infection vertically each year if no intervention is offered. This study sought to review uptake of prevention of mother-to-child (PMTCT) services in a resource-limited setting following the introduction of context-specific interventions. Methods Interventions to improve PMTCT uptake were introduced into 38 sites providing PMTCT services in Zambia in July 2005. Baseline and follow up service data were collected on a monthly basis through September 2008. Data was checked for internal and external consistency using logic built into databases used for data management. Data audits were conducted to determine accuracy and reliability. Trends were analyzed pre- and post- intervention. Results Uptake among pregnant women increased across the 13 quarters (39 months) of observation, particularly in the case of acceptance of counseling and HIV testing from 45% to 90% (p value = 0.00) in the first year and 99% by year 3 (p value = 0.00). Receipt of complete course of antiretroviral (ARV) prophylaxis increased from 29% to 66% (p = 0.00) in the first year and 97% by year 3 (p value = 0.00). There was also significant improvement in the percentage of HIV positive pregnant women referred for clinical care. Conclusions Uptake of PMTCT services in resource-limited settings can be improved by utilizing innovative alternatives to mitigate the effects of human resource shortage such as by providing technical assistance and mentorship beyond regular training courses, integrating PMTCT services into existing maternal and child health structures, addressing information gaps, mobilizing traditional and opinion leaders and building strong

  12. Economic evaluation of monitoring virologic responses to antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected children in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Karen; Puthanakit, Thanyawee; Kerr, Stephen; Law, Matthew G; Cooper, David A; Donovan, Basil; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Sirisanthana, Virat; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Ohata, June; Wilson, David P

    2011-06-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) management for HIV-infected children is critical in many resource-constrained countries. We investigated the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of different frequencies of monitoring plasma viral load among HIV-positive children initiating ART in a resource-limited setting. A stochastic agent-based simulation model was built and directly informed by a cohort of 304 HIV-infected children starting ART in Thailand between 2001 and 2009. The model simulated the expected costs and clinical outcomes over time according to different viral load monitoring frequencies and initiation of second-line therapies when appropriate. The optimal frequency of viral load monitoring was found to be annual, after a single screening at 6 months. Associated costs of viral load monitoring and appropriate ART would approximately triple current treatment costs. Compared with current conditions, a single screening during the first year of ART led to a 58.4% reduction in the total person-years of virological failure with annual monitoring leading to a 76.6% reduction. The incremental cost per quality adjusted life year gained from the optimal monitoring frequency was estimated as US$ 68,084 when including costs of ART and US$ 7224 without ART costs. The estimated cost attributed to preventing 1 year of virological failure was US$ 3393 with ART costs and US$ 359 without ART costs. Even infrequent viral load monitoring is likely to provide substantial clinical benefit to HIV-infected children on ART. Viral load monitoring can be considered cost-effective in many resource-limited settings. However, the costs associated with second-line therapies could be a barrier to its economic feasibility.

  13. Treatment of acute cryptococcal meningitis in HIV infected adults, with an emphasis on resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Derek; Dlamini, Sipho; Paul, Navin; Dedicoat, Martin

    2008-10-08

    Despite the advent and increasingly wide availability of antiretroviral therapy, cryptococcal meningitis (CM) remains a significant cause of mortality and morbidity amongst individuals with HIV infection in resource-limited settings. The ideal management of CM remains unclear. The aim of this review is to assess the evidence for deciding on which antifungal regimen to use as well as other modalities of management to utilise especially resource poor settings in order to achieve the best possible outcome and enable an individual with CM to survive their acute illness and benefit from antiretroviral therapy. To determine the most effective initial and consolidation treatment strategy for CM in HIV infected adults. The Cochrane HIV/AIDS group search strategy was used. Key words in the search included, meningitis, cryptococcus neoformans, treatment, trial, human immunodeficiency virus, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, antifungal agents, amphotericin, flucytosine, fluconazole, azole, lumbar puncture, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure and acetazolamide. Randomised of HIV-infected adults with a first episode of CM diagnosed on CSF examination, by India ink staining, CSF culture or cryptococcal antigen testing. Data were extracted using standardised forms and analysed using Rev Man 4.2.7 software. Six studies are included in the review. Five of the studies compared antifungal treatments and one study addressed lowering intracranial pressure. This study was stopped early due to excess adverse effects. The results of the other five studies as summarised as follows.Mayanja-Kizza 1998 compared fluconazole to fluconazole with 5 flucytosine. The dose of fluconazole used 200mg initially is lower than the recommended initial dose of 400mg. No survival advantage was found with the use of 5 flucytosine in addition to fluconazole.Two studies Brouwer 2004 and van der Horst 1997 compared Amphotericin (AmB) to AmB with 5 flucytosine. Both drugs were given at currently recommended

  14. Evaluating the Auto-MODS assay, a novel tool for tuberculosis diagnosis for use in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linwei; Mohammad, Sohaib H; Chaiyasirinroje, Boonchai; Li, Qiaozhi; Rienthong, Somsak; Rienthong, Dhanida; Nedsuwan, Supalert; Mahasirimongkol, Surakameth; Yasui, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need for simple, rapid, and affordable diagnostic tests for tuberculosis (TB) to combat the great burden of the disease in developing countries. The microscopic observation drug susceptibility assay (MODS) is a promising tool to fill this need, but it is not widely used due to concerns regarding its biosafety and efficiency. This study evaluated the automated MODS (Auto-MODS), which operates on principles similar to those of MODS but with several key modifications, making it an appealing alternative to MODS in resource-limited settings. In the operational setting of Chiang Rai, Thailand, we compared the performance of Auto-MODS with the gold standard liquid culture method in Thailand, mycobacterial growth indicator tube (MGIT) 960 plus the SD Bioline TB Ag MPT64 test, in terms of accuracy and efficiency in differentiating TB and non-TB samples as well as distinguishing TB and multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB samples. Sputum samples from clinically diagnosed TB and non-TB subjects across 17 hospitals in Chiang Rai were consecutively collected from May 2011 to September 2012. A total of 360 samples were available for evaluation, of which 221 (61.4%) were positive and 139 (38.6%) were negative for mycobacterial cultures according to MGIT 960. Of the 221 true-positive samples, Auto-MODS identified 212 as positive and 9 as negative (sensitivity, 95.9%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 92.4% to 98.1%). Of the 139 true-negative samples, Auto-MODS identified 135 as negative and 4 as positive (specificity, 97.1%; 95% CI, 92.8% to 99.2%). The median time to culture positivity was 10 days, with an interquartile range of 8 to 13 days for Auto-MODS. Auto-MODS is an effective and cost-sensitive alternative diagnostic tool for TB diagnosis in resource-limited settings. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Decentralization of CD4 testing in resource-limited settings: 7 years of experience in six African countries.

    PubMed

    Marinucci, F; Medina-Moreno, S; Paterniti, A D; Wattleworth, M; Redfield, R R

    2011-05-01

    Improving access to CD4 testing in resource-limited settings can be achieved through both centralized and decentralized testing networks. Decentralized testing models are more suitable for countries where the HIV epidemic affects a large portion of rural populations. Timely access to accurate CD4 results is crucial at the primary level of the health system. For the past 7 years, the Institute of Human Virology of the University of Maryland School of Medicine has implemented a flexible and sustainable three-phase model: (1) site assessment and improvement, (2) appropriate technology selection with capacity building through practical training and laboratory mentoring, and (3) quality management system strengthening and monitoring, to support accessibility to reliable CD4 counting at the point of service. CD4 testing capacity was established in 122 of 229 (53%) laboratories supported in Nigeria, Uganda, Kenya, Zambia, Tanzania, and Rwanda. Among those in rural settings, 46% (69/151) had CD4 testing available at site level, with a functioning flow cytometer installed at 28% (8/29) and 50% (61/122) of level 1 and level 2 sites, respectively. To strengthen local capacity, a total of 1,152 laboratory technicians were trained through 188 training sessions provided both on-site and at central locations. The overall quality of CD4 total testing procedure was assessed at 76% (92/121) of the laboratories, with 25% (23/92), 34% (31/92), and 33% (30/92) of them reporting excellent, good, and satisfactory performance. Balancing country-specific factors with the location of the clinic, number of patients, and the expected workload, was crucial in adapting this flexible model for decentralizing CD4 testing. The close collaboration with local governments and private vendors was key to successfully expanding access to CD4 testing within the framework of HIV care and treatment programs and for the sustainability of medical laboratories in resource-limited settings.

  16. Evaluating the Auto-MODS Assay, a Novel Tool for Tuberculosis Diagnosis for Use in Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Linwei; Mohammad, Sohaib H.; Li, Qiaozhi; Rienthong, Somsak; Rienthong, Dhanida; Nedsuwan, Supalert; Mahasirimongkol, Surakameth; Yasui, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    There is an urgent need for simple, rapid, and affordable diagnostic tests for tuberculosis (TB) to combat the great burden of the disease in developing countries. The microscopic observation drug susceptibility assay (MODS) is a promising tool to fill this need, but it is not widely used due to concerns regarding its biosafety and efficiency. This study evaluated the automated MODS (Auto-MODS), which operates on principles similar to those of MODS but with several key modifications, making it an appealing alternative to MODS in resource-limited settings. In the operational setting of Chiang Rai, Thailand, we compared the performance of Auto-MODS with the gold standard liquid culture method in Thailand, mycobacterial growth indicator tube (MGIT) 960 plus the SD Bioline TB Ag MPT64 test, in terms of accuracy and efficiency in differentiating TB and non-TB samples as well as distinguishing TB and multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB samples. Sputum samples from clinically diagnosed TB and non-TB subjects across 17 hospitals in Chiang Rai were consecutively collected from May 2011 to September 2012. A total of 360 samples were available for evaluation, of which 221 (61.4%) were positive and 139 (38.6%) were negative for mycobacterial cultures according to MGIT 960. Of the 221 true-positive samples, Auto-MODS identified 212 as positive and 9 as negative (sensitivity, 95.9%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 92.4% to 98.1%). Of the 139 true-negative samples, Auto-MODS identified 135 as negative and 4 as positive (specificity, 97.1%; 95% CI, 92.8% to 99.2%). The median time to culture positivity was 10 days, with an interquartile range of 8 to 13 days for Auto-MODS. Auto-MODS is an effective and cost-sensitive alternative diagnostic tool for TB diagnosis in resource-limited settings. PMID:25378569

  17. Emergence of HIV Drug Resistance During First- and Second-Line Antiretroviral Therapy in Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Gupta, Ravindra K; Van Zyl, Gert; Eron, Joseph J.; Nachega, Jean B.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Antiretroviral therapy (ART) in resource-limited settings has expanded in the last decade, reaching >8 million individuals and reducing AIDS mortality and morbidity. Continued success of ART programs will require understanding the emergence of HIV drug resistance patterns among individuals in whom treatment has failed and managing ART from both an individual and public health perspective. We review data on the emergence of HIV drug resistance among individuals in whom first-line therapy has failed and clinical and resistance outcomes of those receiving second-line therapy in resource-limited settings. Results Resistance surveys among patients initiating first-line nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)–based therapy suggest that 76%–90% of living patients achieve HIV RNA suppression by 12 months after ART initiation. Among patients with detectable HIV RNA at 12 months, HIV drug resistance, primarily due to M184V and NNRTI mutations, has been identified in 60%–72%, although the antiretroviral activity of proposed second-line regimens has been preserved. Complex mutation patterns, including thymidine-analog mutations, K65R, and multinucleoside mutations, are prevalent among cases of treatment failure identified by clinical or immunologic methods. Approximately 22% of patients receiving second-line therapy do not achieve HIV RNA suppression by 6 months, with poor adherence, rather than HIV drug resistance, driving most failures. Major protease inhibitor resistance at the time of second-line failure ranges from 0% to 50%, but studies are limited. Conclusions Resistance of HIV to first-line therapy is predictable at 12 months when evaluated by means of HIV RNA monitoring and, when detected, largely preserves second-line therapy options. Optimizing adherence, performing resistance surveillance, and improving treatment monitoring are critical for long-term prevention of drug resistance. PMID:23687289

  18. International Neurocognitive Normative Study: Neurocognitive Comparison Data in Diverse Resource Limited Settings: AIDS Clinical Trials Group A5271

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, K; Jiang, H; Evans, SR; Marra, CM; Berzins, B; Hakim, J; Sacktor, N; Silva, M Tulius; Campbell, TB; Nair, A; Schouten, J; Kumwenda, J; Supparatpinyo, K; Tripathy, S.; Kumarasamy, N; La Rosa, A; Montano, S; Mwafongo, A; Firnhaber, C; Sanne, I; Naini, L.; Amod, F; Walawander, A

    2016-01-01

    Summary ACTG A5271 collected neurocognitive normative comparison test data in 2400 at-risk HIV seronegative participants from Brazil, India, Malawi, Peru, South Africa, Thailand and Zimbabwe. The participants were enrolled in strata by site (10 levels), age (2 levels), education (2 levels), and gender (2 levels). These data provide necessary normative data infrastructure for future clinical research and care in these diverse resource limited settings. Infrastructure for conducting neurological research in resource limited settings (RLS) is limited. The lack of neurological and neuropsychological (NP) assessment, and normative data needed for clinical interpretation impede research and clinical care. Here we report on ACTG 5271, which provided neurological training of clinical site personnel, and collected neurocognitive normative comparison data in diverse settings. At 10 sites in seven RLS countries, we provided training for NP assessments. We collected normative comparison data on HIV- participants from Brazil (n=240), India (n=480), Malawi (n=481), Peru (n=239), South Africa (480), Thailand (n=240) and Zimbabwe (n=240). Participants had a negative HIV test within 30 days before standardized NP exams were administered at baseline, and 770 at six-months. Participants were enrolled in 8 strata, gender (female and male), education (<10 years and ≥ 10 years), and age (<35 years and ≥35 years). Of 2400 enrolled, 770 completed the six-month follow up. As expected, significant between-country differences were evident in all the neurocognitive test scores (p<.0001). There was variation between the age, gender and education strata on the neurocognitive tests. Age and education were important variables for all tests; older participants had poorer performance and those with higher education had better performance. Women had better performance on verbal learning/memory and speed of processing tests, while men performed better on motor tests. This study provides the

  19. Human resources for health strategies adopted by providers in resource-limited settings to sustain long-term delivery of ART: a mixed-methods study from Uganda.

    PubMed

    Zakumumpa, Henry; Taiwo, Modupe Oladunni; Muganzi, Alex; Ssengooba, Freddie

    2016-10-19

    Human resources for health (HRH) constraints are a major barrier to the sustainability of antiretroviral therapy (ART) scale-up programs in Sub-Saharan Africa. Many prior approaches to HRH constraints have taken a top-down trend of generalized global strategies and policy guidelines. The objective of the study was to examine the human resources for health strategies adopted by front-line providers in Uganda to sustain ART delivery beyond the initial ART scale-up phase between 2004 and 2009. A two-phase mixed-methods approach was adopted. In the first phase, a survey of a nationally representative sample of health facilities (n = 195) across Uganda was conducted. The second phase involved in-depth interviews (n = 36) with ART clinic managers and staff of 6 of the 195 health facilities purposively selected from the first study phase. Quantitative data was analysed based on descriptive statistics, and qualitative data was analysed by coding and thematic analysis. The identified strategies were categorized into five themes: (1) providing monetary and non-monetary incentives to health workers on busy ART clinic days; (2) workload reduction through spacing ART clinic appointments; (3) adopting training workshops in ART management as a motivation strategy for health workers; (4) adopting non-physician-centred staffing models; and (5) devising ART program leadership styles that enhanced health worker commitment. Facility-level strategies for responding to HRH constraints are feasible and can contribute to efforts to increase country ownership of HIV programs in resource-limited settings. Consideration of the human resources for health strategies identified in the study by ART program planners and managers could enhance the long-term sustainment of ART programs by providers in resource-limited settings.

  20. Best practices in developing a national palliative care policy in resource limited settings: lessons from five African countries.

    PubMed

    Luyirika, Emmanuel Bk; Namisango, Eve; Garanganga, Eunice; Monjane, Lidia; Ginindza, Ntombi; Madonsela, Gugulethu; Kiyange, Fatia

    2016-01-01

    Given the high unmet need for palliative care in Africa and other resource limited settings, it is important that countries embrace the public health approach to increasing access through its integration within existing healthcare systems. To give this approach a strong foundation that would ensure sustainability, the World Health Organisation urges member states to ensure that policy environments are suitable for this intervention. The development, strengthening, and implementation of national palliative care policies is a priority. Given the lack of a critical mass of palliative care professionals in the region and deficiency in documenting and sharing best practices as part of information critical for regional development, policy development becomes a complex process. This article shares experiences with regard to best practices when advocating the national palliative care policies. It also tells about policy development process, the important considerations, and cites examples of policy content outlines in Africa.

  1. Maximizing the benefit of health workforce secondment in Botswana: an approach for strengthening health systems in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Grignon, Jessica S; Ledikwe, Jenny H; Makati, Ditsapelo; Nyangah, Robert; Sento, Baraedi W; Semo, Bazghina-Werq

    2014-01-01

    To address health systems challenges in limited-resource settings, global health initiatives, particularly the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, have seconded health workers to the public sector. Implementation considerations for secondment as a health workforce development strategy are not well documented. The purpose of this article is to present outcomes, best practices, and lessons learned from a President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief-funded secondment program in Botswana. Outcomes are documented across four World Health Organization health systems' building blocks. Best practices include documentation of joint stakeholder expectations, collaborative recruitment, and early identification of counterparts. Lessons learned include inadequate ownership, a two-tier employment system, and ill-defined position duration. These findings can inform program and policy development to maximize the benefit of health workforce secondment. Secondment requires substantial investment, and emphasis should be placed on high-level technical positions responsible for building systems, developing health workers, and strengthening government to translate policy into programs.

  2. Sickle cell disease and HIV: a case highlighting management challenges for children in a resource-limited setting.

    PubMed

    Odera, Esther Brenda; Kwobah, Charles; Stone, Geren; Some, Faraj; Vreeman, Rachel Christine

    2014-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a genetic disorder resulting from a mutation in the hemoglobin (Hb) gene. Sickle cell disease results in chronic anemia and a variety of acute and chronic complications that can lead to early mortality. A child with both SCD and HIV presents a management challenge, particularly in a resource-limited setting. In this case report, we describe the case of an 18-month-old Kenyan girl with SCD and HIV who developed a severe hypersensitivity reaction to first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART). Selecting an appropriate drug substitute for a child with SCD and HIV presents a management dilemma when the available options have problematic side effect profiles or are inaccessible or inappropriate according to national guidelines. The challenges in choosing an appropriate ART regimen for a child with SCD and HIV highlight the lack of data and scarcity of treatment options for pediatric patients.

  3. Internal Medicine Residency Program in Guyana: A Collaborative Model for Sustainable Graduate Medical Education in Resource-Limited Settings.

    PubMed

    Persaud, Dev; Cole, Joanna; Jainarine, Ramdeo; Khalid, Zahira

    2017-01-01

    The Georgetown Public Hospital Corporation (GPHC) started the Internal Medicine/Infectious Diseases residency program in 2013. It was a collaborative initiative between GPHC and University of Maryland. Since that time the program has gone through many trials and developed new partnerships and collaboration and emerged as a young successful program with close international links that have worked and persevered in developing the successful academic and professional careers of its residents. International collaborations have resulted in applying innovative methods of teaching to deliver the curriculum in a sustainable manner in a resource-limited setting. The article discusses in detail the history of the program and the roles that the collaborative partners have played in the evolution of the program.

  4. Best practices in developing a national palliative care policy in resource limited settings: lessons from five African countries

    PubMed Central

    Luyirika, Emmanuel BK; Namisango, Eve; Garanganga, Eunice; Monjane, Lidia; Ginindza, Ntombi; Madonsela, Gugulethu; Kiyange, Fatia

    2016-01-01

    Given the high unmet need for palliative care in Africa and other resource limited settings, it is important that countries embrace the public health approach to increasing access through its integration within existing healthcare systems. To give this approach a strong foundation that would ensure sustainability, the World Health Organisation urges member states to ensure that policy environments are suitable for this intervention. The development, strengthening, and implementation of national palliative care policies is a priority. Given the lack of a critical mass of palliative care professionals in the region and deficiency in documenting and sharing best practices as part of information critical for regional development, policy development becomes a complex process. This article shares experiences with regard to best practices when advocating the national palliative care policies. It also tells about policy development process, the important considerations, and cites examples of policy content outlines in Africa. PMID:27563347

  5. Laboratory Monitoring to Guide Switching Antiretroviral Therapy in Resource-Limited Settings: Clinical Benefits and Cost-Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Kimmel, April D.; Weinstein, Milton C.; Anglaret, Xavier; Goldie, Sue J.; Losina, Elena; Yazdanpanah, Yazdan; Messou, Eugène; Cotich, Kara L.; Walensky, Rochelle P.; Freedberg, Kenneth A.

    2011-01-01

    Background As 2nd-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) availability increases in resource-limited settings, questions about the value of laboratory monitoring remain. We assessed the outcomes and cost-effectiveness (CE) of laboratory monitoring to guide switching ART. Methods We used a computer model to project life expectancy and costs of different strategies to guide ART switching in patients in Côte d'Ivoire. Strategies included clinical assessment, CD4 count, and HIV RNA testing. Data were from clinical trials and cohort studies from Côte d'Ivoire and the literature. Outcomes were compared using the incremental CE ratio. We conducted multiple sensitivity analyses to assess uncertainty in model parameters. Results Compared with 1st-line ART only, 2nd-line ART increased life expectancy by 24% with clinical monitoring only, 46% with CD4 monitoring, and 61% with HIV RNA monitoring. The incremental CE ratio of switching based on clinical monitoring was $1,670/year of life gained (YLS) compared to 1st-line ART only; biannual CD4 monitoring was $2,120/YLS. The CE ratio of biannual HIV RNA testing ranged from $2,920 ($87/test) to $1,990/YLS ($25/test). If 2nd-line ART costs were reduced, the CE of HIV RNA monitoring improved. Conclusions In resource-limited settings, CD4 count and HIV RNA monitoring to guide switching to 2nd-line ART improve survival and under most conditions are cost-effective. PMID:20404739

  6. Demonstrating the Efficacy of the FoneAstra Pasteurization Monitor for Human Milk Pasteurization in Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Coutsoudis, Anna; Israel-Ballard, Kiersten; Chaudhri, Rohit; Perin, Noah; Mlisana, Koleka

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Human milk provides crucial nutrition and immunologic protection for infants. When a mother's own milk is unavailable, donated human milk, pasteurized to destroy bacteria and viruses, is a lifesaving replacement. Flash-heat pasteurization is a simple, low-cost, and commonly used method to make milk safe, but currently there is no system to monitor milk temperature, which challenges quality control. FoneAstra, a smartphone-based mobile pasteurization monitor, removes this barrier by guiding users through pasteurization and documenting consistent and safe practice. This study evaluated FoneAstra's efficacy as a quality control system, particularly in resource-limited settings, by comparing bacterial growth in donor milk flash-heated with and without the device at a neonatal intensive care unit in Durban, South Africa. Materials and Methods: For 100 samples of donor milk, one aliquot each of prepasteurized milk, milk flash-heated without FoneAstra, and milk pasteurized with FoneAstra was cultured on routine agar for bacterial growth. Isolated bacteria were identified and enumerated. Results: In total, 300 samples (three from each donor sample) were analyzed. Bacterial growth was found in 86 of the 100 samples before any pasteurization and one of the 100 postpasteurized samples without FoneAstra. None of the samples pasteurized using FoneAstra showed bacterial growth. Conclusions: Both pasteurization methods were safe and effective. FoneAstra, however, provides the additional benefits of user-guided temperature monitoring and data tracking. By improving quality assurance and standardizing the pasteurization process, FoneAstra can support wide-scale implementation of human milk banks in resource-limited settings, increasing access and saving lives. PMID:25668396

  7. Demonstrating the efficacy of the FoneAstra pasteurization monitor for human milk pasteurization in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Naicker, Mageshree; Coutsoudis, Anna; Israel-Ballard, Kiersten; Chaudhri, Rohit; Perin, Noah; Mlisana, Koleka

    2015-03-01

    Human milk provides crucial nutrition and immunologic protection for infants. When a mother's own milk is unavailable, donated human milk, pasteurized to destroy bacteria and viruses, is a lifesaving replacement. Flash-heat pasteurization is a simple, low-cost, and commonly used method to make milk safe, but currently there is no system to monitor milk temperature, which challenges quality control. FoneAstra, a smartphone-based mobile pasteurization monitor, removes this barrier by guiding users through pasteurization and documenting consistent and safe practice. This study evaluated FoneAstra's efficacy as a quality control system, particularly in resource-limited settings, by comparing bacterial growth in donor milk flash-heated with and without the device at a neonatal intensive care unit in Durban, South Africa. For 100 samples of donor milk, one aliquot each of prepasteurized milk, milk flash-heated without FoneAstra, and milk pasteurized with FoneAstra was cultured on routine agar for bacterial growth. Isolated bacteria were identified and enumerated. In total, 300 samples (three from each donor sample) were analyzed. Bacterial growth was found in 86 of the 100 samples before any pasteurization and one of the 100 postpasteurized samples without FoneAstra. None of the samples pasteurized using FoneAstra showed bacterial growth. Both pasteurization methods were safe and effective. FoneAstra, however, provides the additional benefits of user-guided temperature monitoring and data tracking. By improving quality assurance and standardizing the pasteurization process, FoneAstra can support wide-scale implementation of human milk banks in resource-limited settings, increasing access and saving lives.

  8. Performance of a Mathematical Model to Forecast Lives Saved from HIV Treatment Expansion in Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Kimmel, April D.; Fitzgerald, Daniel W.; Pape, Jean W.; Schackman, Bruce R.

    2014-01-01

    Background International guidelines recommend HIV treatment expansion in resource-limited settings, but funding availability is uncertain. We evaluated performance of a model that forecasts lives saved through continued HIV treatment expansion in Haiti. Methods We developed a computer-based, mathematical model of HIV disease and used incidence density analysis of patient-level Haitian data to derive model parameters for HIV disease progression. We assessed internal validity of model predictions and internally calibrated model inputs when model predictions did not fit the patient-level data. We then derived uncertain model inputs related to diagnosis and linkage to care, pre-treatment retention, and enrollment on HIV treatment through an external calibration process that selected input values by comparing model predictions to Haitian population-level data. Model performance was measured by fit to event-free survival (patient-level) and number receiving HIV treatment over time (population-level). Results For a cohort of newly HIV-infected individuals with no access to HIV treatment, the model predicts median AIDS-free survival of 9.0 years pre-calibration and 6.6 years post-calibration versus 5.8 years (95% CI 5.1, 7.0) from the patient-level data. After internal validation and calibration, 16 of 17 event-free survival measures (94%) had a mean percentage deviation between model predictions and the empiric data of <6%. After external calibration, the percentage deviation between model predictions and population-level data on the number on HIV treatment was <1% over time. Conclusions Validation and calibration resulted in a good-fitting model appropriate for health policy decision making. Using local data in a policy model-building process is feasible in resource-limited settings. PMID:25331914

  9. Dry Blood Spots a Reliable Method for Measurement of Hepatitis B Viral Load in Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Stene-Johansen, Kathrine; Yaqoob, Nadeem; Overbo, Joakim; Aberra, Hanna; Desalegn, Hailemichael; Berhe, Nega; Johannessen, Asgeir

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Hepatitis B virus (HBV) quantification is essential in the management of chronic hepatitis B, both to determine treatment eligibility and in the monitoring of treatment effect. This test, however, is rarely available in resource-limited settings due to high costs and stringent requirements for shipment and storage of plasma. Dried Blood Spots (DBS) can be a convenient alternative to plasma, but its use for HBV monitoring has not been investigated under real-life conditions in Africa. Methods The performance of DBS in HBV quantification was investigated using a modified commercial test (Abbott RealTime HBV assay). Paired DBS and plasma samples were collected from an HBV positive cohort in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. DBS were stored at ambient temperature for 4–39 days before shipment to the laboratory. Results Twenty-six paired samples were selected covering the total range of quantification, from 2.14 log IU/ml to >7 log IU/ml. HBV was detected in 21 of 21 (100%) DBS from patients with a corresponding plasma viral load above 2.70 log IU/ml. The mean difference between plasma and DBS was 0.59 log IU/ml, and the correlation was strong (R2 = 0.92). In stability studies there was no significant change in DBS viral load after storage at room temperature for up to 12 weeks. Conclusions This study suggests that DBS can be a feasible and reliable alternative to plasma for quantification of HBV in resource-limited settings. DBS can expand access to antiviral treatment for patients in low- and middle-income countries. PMID:27820845

  10. International neurocognitive normative study: neurocognitive comparison data in diverse resource-limited settings: AIDS Clinical Trials Group A5271.

    PubMed

    Robertson, K; Jiang, H; Evans, S R; Marra, C M; Berzins, B; Hakim, J; Sacktor, N; Silva, M Tulius; Campbell, T B; Nair, A; Schouten, J; Kumwenda, J; Supparatpinyo, K; Tripathy, S; Kumarasamy, N; la Rosa, A; Montano, S; Mwafongo, A; Firnhaber, C; Sanne, I; Naini, L; Amod, F; Walawander, A

    2016-08-01

    Infrastructure for conducting neurological research in resource-limited settings (RLS) is limited. The lack of neurological and neuropsychological (NP) assessment and normative data needed for clinical interpretation impedes research and clinical care. Here, we report on ACTG 5271, which provided neurological training of clinical site personnel and collected neurocognitive normative comparison data in diverse settings. At ten sites in seven RLS countries, we provided training for NP assessments. We collected normative comparison data on HIV- participants from Brazil (n = 240), India (n = 480), Malawi (n = 481), Peru (n = 239), South Africa (480), Thailand (n = 240), and Zimbabwe (n = 240). Participants had a negative HIV test within 30 days before standardized NP exams were administered at baseline and 770 at 6 months. Participants were enrolled in eight strata, gender (female and male), education (<10 and ≥10 years), and age (<35 and ≥35 years). Of 2400 enrolled, 770 completed the 6-month follow-up. As expected, significant between-country differences were evident in all the neurocognitive test scores (p < 0.0001). There was variation between the age, gender, and education strata on the neurocognitive tests. Age and education were important variables for all tests; older participants had poorer performance, and those with higher education had better performance. Women had better performance on verbal learning/memory and speed of processing tests, while men performed better on motor tests. This study provides the necessary neurocognitive normative data needed to build infrastructure for future neurological and neurocognitive studies in diverse RLS. These normative data are a much-needed resource for both clinicians and researchers.

  11. [Blood transfusion safety in a limited resources setting: the elaboration of a rational National Blood Policy in Togo].

    PubMed

    Sodahlon, Yao K; Segbena, Akoeté Y; Prince-David, Mireille; Gbo, Kossivi A; Fargier, Marie-Paule; North, Marie-Louise; Malvy, Denis Jean-Marie

    2004-01-01

    The demand for blood transfusion is high in subSaharan Africa because of the high prevalence of the anemia especially due to malaria and obstetrical damage. Providing a safe and confident system of transfusion requires more and more resources when, in developing countries, these are in fact limited. With a double view to improve the coverage in blood transfusion and ensure the security of blood products, the Ministry of Health of Togo launched in 1999 a series of operations for setting up a rational National Blood Transfusion Policy. The following steps were undertaken. A two-week situation analysis of the blood transfusion sector highlighted the lack of sector regulation, the multiplicity of blood unit production centres (n = 33 for a country of 56,000 km(2)) that could endanger the security of the products especially in limited resources conditions, the inadequacy in quality management in all areas of blood transfusion (insufficiency of human resources, equipment and supply, lack of procedures, etc.) and the lack of an information system on blood transfusion for retrospective survey and planning. The draft of the National Blood Transfusion Policy was then written in a week by two national consultants in accordance with the findings of the situation analysis. It was validated during a three-day multidisciplinary workshop and an ultimate validation was made by an international consultant in order to assess the adequacy of the options considered to the country's specific setting. The options retained for developing the Togolese blood transfusion sector development and which are consigned in the National Blood Transfusion Policy are as follows: development and implementation of blood transfusion regulations; reorganisation of the National Transfusion System by reducing it to 3 blood unit production centres: one in Lomé (the capital town), one in the centre of the country (Sokodé, 480 km from Lomé), and one in the Northern part (Dapaong, 870 km from Lomé); setting

  12. Evaluation of a Smartphone Decision-Support Tool for Diarrheal Disease Management in a Resource-Limited Setting

    PubMed Central

    Khatun, Selina; Ahmed, Mujaddeed; Kache, Saraswati; Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Sarker, Shafiqul Alam; Maples, Stace D.; Pieri, Dane; Vardhan Korrapati, Teja; Sarnquist, Clea; Federspiel, Nancy; Rahman, Muhammad Waliur; Andrews, Jason R.; Rahman, Mahmudur; Nelson, Eric Jorge

    2017-01-01

    The emergence of mobile technology offers new opportunities to improve clinical guideline adherence in resource-limited settings. We conducted a clinical pilot study in rural Bangladesh to evaluate the impact of a smartphone adaptation of the World Health Organization (WHO) diarrheal disease management guidelines, including a modality for age-based weight estimation. Software development was guided by end-user input and evaluated in a resource-limited district and sub-district hospital during the fall 2015 cholera season; both hospitals lacked scales which necessitated weight estimation. The study consisted of a 6 week pre-intervention and 6 week intervention period with a 10-day post-discharge follow-up. Standard of care was maintained throughout the study with the exception that admitting clinicians used the tool during the intervention. Inclusion criteria were patients two months of age and older with uncomplicated diarrheal disease. The primary outcome was adherence to guidelines for prescriptions of intravenous (IV) fluids, antibiotics and zinc. A total of 841 patients were enrolled (325 pre-intervention; 516 intervention). During the intervention, the proportion of prescriptions for IV fluids decreased at the district and sub-district hospitals (both p < 0.001) with risk ratios (RRs) of 0.5 and 0.2, respectively. However, when IV fluids were prescribed, the volume better adhered to recommendations. The proportion of prescriptions for the recommended antibiotic azithromycin increased (p < 0.001 district; p = 0.035 sub-district) with RRs of 6.9 (district) and 1.6 (sub-district) while prescriptions for other antibiotics decreased; zinc adherence increased. Limitations included an absence of a concurrent control group and no independent dehydration assessment during the pre-intervention. Despite limitations, opportunities were identified to improve clinical care, including better assessment, weight estimation, and fluid/ antibiotic selection. These findings

  13. Evaluation of a Smartphone Decision-Support Tool for Diarrheal Disease Management in a Resource-Limited Setting.

    PubMed

    Haque, Farhana; Ball, Robyn L; Khatun, Selina; Ahmed, Mujaddeed; Kache, Saraswati; Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Sarker, Shafiqul Alam; Maples, Stace D; Pieri, Dane; Vardhan Korrapati, Teja; Sarnquist, Clea; Federspiel, Nancy; Rahman, Muhammad Waliur; Andrews, Jason R; Rahman, Mahmudur; Nelson, Eric Jorge

    2017-01-01

    The emergence of mobile technology offers new opportunities to improve clinical guideline adherence in resource-limited settings. We conducted a clinical pilot study in rural Bangladesh to evaluate the impact of a smartphone adaptation of the World Health Organization (WHO) diarrheal disease management guidelines, including a modality for age-based weight estimation. Software development was guided by end-user input and evaluated in a resource-limited district and sub-district hospital during the fall 2015 cholera season; both hospitals lacked scales which necessitated weight estimation. The study consisted of a 6 week pre-intervention and 6 week intervention period with a 10-day post-discharge follow-up. Standard of care was maintained throughout the study with the exception that admitting clinicians used the tool during the intervention. Inclusion criteria were patients two months of age and older with uncomplicated diarrheal disease. The primary outcome was adherence to guidelines for prescriptions of intravenous (IV) fluids, antibiotics and zinc. A total of 841 patients were enrolled (325 pre-intervention; 516 intervention). During the intervention, the proportion of prescriptions for IV fluids decreased at the district and sub-district hospitals (both p < 0.001) with risk ratios (RRs) of 0.5 and 0.2, respectively. However, when IV fluids were prescribed, the volume better adhered to recommendations. The proportion of prescriptions for the recommended antibiotic azithromycin increased (p < 0.001 district; p = 0.035 sub-district) with RRs of 6.9 (district) and 1.6 (sub-district) while prescriptions for other antibiotics decreased; zinc adherence increased. Limitations included an absence of a concurrent control group and no independent dehydration assessment during the pre-intervention. Despite limitations, opportunities were identified to improve clinical care, including better assessment, weight estimation, and fluid/ antibiotic selection. These findings

  14. Xpert MTB/RIF testing in a low tuberculosis incidence, high-resource setting: limitations in accuracy and clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Hojoon; Aero, Abebech D; Menzies, Dick; Behr, Marcel; Schwartzman, Kevin; Alvarez, Gonzalo G; Dan, Andrei; McIntosh, Fiona; Pai, Madhukar; Denkinger, Claudia M

    2014-04-01

    Xpert MTB/RIF, the first automated molecular test for tuberculosis, is transforming the diagnostic landscape in low-income countries. However, little information is available on its performance in low-incidence, high-resource countries. We evaluated the accuracy of Xpert in a university hospital tuberculosis clinic in Montreal, Canada, for the detection of pulmonary tuberculosis on induced sputum samples, using mycobacterial cultures as the reference standard. We also assessed the potential reduction in time to diagnosis and treatment initiation. We enrolled 502 consecutive patients who presented for evaluation of possible active tuberculosis (most with abnormal chest radiographs, only 18% symptomatic). Twenty-five subjects were identified to have active tuberculosis by culture. Xpert had a sensitivity of 46% (95% confidence interval [CI], 26%-67%) and specificity of 100% (95% CI, 99%-100%) for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Sensitivity was 86% (95% CI, 42%-100%) in the 7 subjects with smear-positive results, and 28% (95% CI, 10%-56%) in the remaining subjects with smear-negative, culture-positive results; in this latter group, positive Xpert results were obtained a median 12 days before culture results. Subjects with positive cultures but negative Xpert results had minimal disease: 11 of 13 had no symptoms on presentation, and mean time to positive liquid culture results was 28 days (95% CI, 25-47 days) compared with 14 days (95% CI, 8-21 days) in Xpert/culture-positive cases. Our findings suggest limited potential impact of Xpert testing in high-resource, low-incidence ambulatory settings due to lower sensitivity in the context of less extensive disease, and limited potential to expedite diagnosis beyond what is achieved with the existing, well-performing diagnostic algorithm.

  15. The 'My five moments for hand hygiene' concept for the overcrowded setting in resource-limited healthcare systems.

    PubMed

    Salmon, S; Pittet, D; Sax, H; McLaws, M L

    2015-10-01

    Hand hygiene is a core activity of patient safety for the prevention of healthcare-associated infections (HCAIs). To standardize hand hygiene practices globally the World Health Organization (WHO) released Guidelines on Hand Hygiene in Health Care and introduced the 'My five moments for hand hygiene' concept to define indications for hand hygiene rooted in an evidence-based model for transmission of micro-organisms by healthcare workers' (HCWs) hands. Central to the concept is the division of the healthcare environment into two geographical care zones, the patient zone and the healthcare zone, that requires the HCW to comply with specific hand hygiene moments. In resource-limited, overcrowded healthcare settings inadequate or no spatial separation between beds occurs frequently. These conditions challenge the HCW's ability to visualize and delineate patient zones. The 'My five moments for hand hygiene' concept has been adapted for these conditions with the aim of assisting hand hygiene educators, auditors, and HCWs to minimize ambiguity regarding shared patient zones and achieve the ultimate goal set by the WHO Guidelines--the reduction of infectious risks.

  16. Challenges and priorities in the management of HIV/HBV and HIV/HCV coinfection in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Easterbrook, Philippa; Sands, Anita; Harmanci, Hande

    2012-05-01

    Liver disease due to chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is now emerging as an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality in human immunodeficiency virus- (HIV-) infected persons in resource-limited settings (RLS). Existing management guidelines have generally focused on care in tertiary level facilities in developed countries. Less than half of low-income countries have guidance, and in those that do, there are important omissions or disparities in recommendations. There are multiple challenges to delivery of effective hepatitis care in RLS, but the most important remains the limited access to antiviral drugs and diagnostic tests. In 2010, the World Health Assembly adopted a resolution calling for a comprehensive approach for the prevention, control, and management of viral hepatitis. We describe activities at the World Health Organization (WHO) in three key areas: the establishment of a global hepatitis Program and interim strategy; steps toward the development of global guidance on management of coinfection for RLS; and the WHO prequalification program of HBV and HCV diagnostic assays. We highlight key research gaps and the importance of applying the lessons learned from the public health scale-up of ART to hepatitis care. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  17. Design of a Novel Low Cost Point of Care Tampon (POCkeT) Colposcope for Use in Resource Limited Settings.

    PubMed

    Lam, Christopher T; Krieger, Marlee S; Gallagher, Jennifer E; Asma, Betsy; Muasher, Lisa C; Schmitt, John W; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2015-01-01

    Current guidelines by WHO for cervical cancer screening in low- and middle-income countries involves visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) of the cervix, followed by treatment during the same visit or a subsequent visit with cryotherapy if a suspicious lesion is found. Implementation of these guidelines is hampered by a lack of: trained health workers, reliable technology, and access to screening facilities. A low cost ultra-portable Point of Care Tampon based digital colposcope (POCkeT Colposcope) for use at the community level setting, which has the unique form factor of a tampon, can be inserted into the vagina to capture images of the cervix, which are on par with that of a state of the art colposcope, at a fraction of the cost. A repository of images to be compiled that can be used to empower front line workers to become more effective through virtual dynamic training. By task shifting to the community setting, this technology could potentially provide significantly greater cervical screening access to where the most vulnerable women live. The POCkeT Colposcope's concentric LED ring provides comparable white and green field illumination at a fraction of the electrical power required in commercial colposcopes. Evaluation with standard optical imaging targets to assess the POCkeT Colposcope against the state of the art digital colposcope and other VIAM technologies. Our POCkeT Colposcope has comparable resolving power, color reproduction accuracy, minimal lens distortion, and illumination when compared to commercially available colposcopes. In vitro and pilot in vivo imaging results are promising with our POCkeT Colposcope capturing comparable quality images to commercial systems. The POCkeT Colposcope is capable of capturing images suitable for cervical lesion analysis. Our portable low cost system could potentially increase access to cervical cancer screening in limited resource settings through task shifting to community health workers.

  18. Design of a Novel Low Cost Point of Care Tampon (POCkeT) Colposcope for Use in Resource Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Christopher T.; Krieger, Marlee S.; Gallagher, Jennifer E.; Asma, Betsy; Muasher, Lisa C.; Schmitt, John W.; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Current guidelines by WHO for cervical cancer screening in low- and middle-income countries involves visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) of the cervix, followed by treatment during the same visit or a subsequent visit with cryotherapy if a suspicious lesion is found. Implementation of these guidelines is hampered by a lack of: trained health workers, reliable technology, and access to screening facilities. A low cost ultra-portable Point of Care Tampon based digital colposcope (POCkeT Colposcope) for use at the community level setting, which has the unique form factor of a tampon, can be inserted into the vagina to capture images of the cervix, which are on par with that of a state of the art colposcope, at a fraction of the cost. A repository of images to be compiled that can be used to empower front line workers to become more effective through virtual dynamic training. By task shifting to the community setting, this technology could potentially provide significantly greater cervical screening access to where the most vulnerable women live. The POCkeT Colposcope’s concentric LED ring provides comparable white and green field illumination at a fraction of the electrical power required in commercial colposcopes. Evaluation with standard optical imaging targets to assess the POCkeT Colposcope against the state of the art digital colposcope and other VIAM technologies. Results Our POCkeT Colposcope has comparable resolving power, color reproduction accuracy, minimal lens distortion, and illumination when compared to commercially available colposcopes. In vitro and pilot in vivo imaging results are promising with our POCkeT Colposcope capturing comparable quality images to commercial systems. Conclusion The POCkeT Colposcope is capable of capturing images suitable for cervical lesion analysis. Our portable low cost system could potentially increase access to cervical cancer screening in limited resource settings through task shifting to community

  19. SAMBA HIV semiquantitative test, a new point-of-care viral-load-monitoring assay for resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Allyson V; Ushiro-Lumb, Ines; Edemaga, Daniel; Joshi, Hrishikesh A; De Ruiter, Annemiek; Szumilin, Elisabeth; Jendrulek, Isabelle; McGuire, Megan; Goel, Neha; Sharma, Pia I; Allain, Jean-Pierre; Lee, Helen H

    2014-09-01

    Routine viral-load (VL) testing of HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy (ART) is used to monitor treatment efficacy. However, due to logistical challenges, implementation of VL has been difficult in resource-limited settings. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of the SAMBA semi-Q (simple amplification-based assay semiquantitative test for HIV-1) in London, Malawi, and Uganda. The SAMBA semi-Q can distinguish between patients with VLs above and below 1,000 copies/ml. The SAMBA semi-Q was validated with diluted clinical samples and blinded plasma samples collected from HIV-1-positive individuals. SAMBA semi-Q results were compared with results from the Roche COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan HIV-1 test, v2.0. Testing of 96 2- to 10-fold dilutions of four samples containing HIV-1 subtype C as well as 488 samples from patients in the United Kingdom, Malawi, and Uganda yielded an overall accuracy for the SAMBA semi-Q of 99% (95% confidence interval [CI], 93.8 to 99.9%) and 96.9% (95% CI 94.9 to 98.3%), respectively, compared to to the Roche test. Analysis of VL data from patients in Malawi and Uganda showed that the SAMBA cutoff of 1,000 copies/ml appropriately distinguished treated from untreated individuals. Furthermore, analysis of the viral loads of 232 patients on ART in Malawi and Uganda revealed similar patterns for virological control, defined as either <1,000 copies/ml (SAMBA cutoff) or <5,000 copies/ml (WHO 2010 criterion; WHO, Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV Infection in Adults and Adolescents: Recommendations for a Public Health Approach, 2010). This study suggests that the SAMBA semi-Q has adequate concurrency with the gold standard measurements for viral load. This test can allow VL monitoring of patients on ART at the point of care in resource-limited settings.

  20. Safety and effectiveness of oral misoprostol for induction of labour in a resource-limited setting: a dose escalation study.

    PubMed

    Morris, Marilyn; Bolnga, John W; Verave, Ovoi; Aipit, Jimmy; Rero, Allanie; Laman, Moses

    2017-09-08

    Oral misoprostol as an induction of labour (IOL) agent is rapidly gaining popularity in resource-limited settings because it is cheap, stable at ambient temperatures, and logistically easier to administer compared to dinoprostone and oxytocin. We aim to investigate the safety and effectiveness of a regimen of oral misoprostol in Papua New Guinean women undergoing IOL. As part of a prospective dose escalation study conducted at Modilon Hospital in Papua New Guinea, women with a singleton pregnancy in cephalic presentation and an unfavourable cervix who gave written informed consent were administered oral misoprostol, commencing at 25mcg once every 2 h for 4 doses and increased to 50mcg once every 2 h for 8 doses within 24 h. The primary outcomes studied were i) the proportion of women delivering within 24 h of oral misoprostol administration, and ii) rates of maternal and perinatal severe adverse events. Of 6167 labour ward screened admissions, 209 women (3%) fulfilled the study inclusion criteria and underwent IOL. Overall, 74% (155/209 [95% confidence interval 67.6-79.9]) delivered within 24 h. Most women (90%; 188/209; 95% CI [84.9-93.5]) delivered vaginally with 86% (180/209) having a good outcome for both the mother and baby. Of the 10% (21/209) who failed IOL and underwent caesarean section, a significant proportion of their babies were admitted to special-care nursery compared to babies delivered vaginally (20/21 [95%] versus 8/188 [4%]; Fisher Exact test P < 0.001), but their perinatal mortality rate was not significantly higher (1/21 [5%] versus 2/188 [1%]; P = 0.30). The only maternal death was not study related and occurred in a patient with post-partum haemorrhage, 15 h post-delivery. The oral misoprostol regimen for IOL described in the present study is safe, effective and logistically feasible to administer in a resource-limited setting.

  1. Management of HIV-associated tuberculosis in resource-limited settings: a state-of-the-art review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The HIV-associated tuberculosis (TB) epidemic remains a huge challenge to public health in resource-limited settings. Reducing the nearly 0.5 million deaths that result each year has been identified as a key priority. Major progress has been made over the past 10 years in defining appropriate strategies and policy guidelines for early diagnosis and effective case management. Ascertainment of cases has been improved through a twofold strategy of provider-initiated HIV testing and counseling in TB patients and intensified TB case finding among those living with HIV. Outcomes of rifampicin-based TB treatment are greatly enhanced by concurrent co-trimoxazole prophylaxis and antiretroviral therapy (ART). ART reduces mortality across a spectrum of CD4 counts and randomized controlled trials have defined the optimum time to start ART. Good outcomes can be achieved when combining TB treatment with first-line ART, but use with second-line ART remains challenging due to pharmacokinetic drug interactions and cotoxicity. We review the frequency and spectrum of adverse drug reactions and immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) resulting from combined treatment, and highlight the challenges of managing HIV-associated drug-resistant TB. PMID:24295487

  2. Cell Phone-Based and Adherence Device Technologies for HIV Care and Treatment in Resource-Limited Settings: Recent Advances.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jeffrey I; Haberer, Jessica E

    2015-12-01

    Numerous cell phone-based and adherence monitoring technologies have been developed to address barriers to effective HIV prevention, testing, and treatment. Because most people living with HIV and AIDS reside in resource-limited settings (RLS), it is important to understand the development and use of these technologies in RLS. Recent research on cell phone-based technologies has focused on HIV education, linkage to and retention in care, disease tracking, and antiretroviral therapy adherence reminders. Advances in adherence devices have focused on real-time adherence monitors, which have been used for both antiretroviral therapy and pre-exposure prophylaxis. Real-time monitoring has recently been combined with cell phone-based technologies to create real-time adherence interventions using short message service (SMS). New developments in adherence technologies are exploring ingestion monitoring and metabolite detection to confirm adherence. This article provides an overview of recent advances in these two families of technologies and includes research on their acceptability and cost-effectiveness when available. It additionally outlines key challenges and needed research as use of these technologies continues to expand and evolve.

  3. Management of HIV-associated tuberculosis in resource-limited settings: a state-of-the-art review.

    PubMed

    Lawn, Stephen D; Meintjes, Graeme; McIlleron, Helen; Harries, Anthony D; Wood, Robin

    2013-12-02

    The HIV-associated tuberculosis (TB) epidemic remains a huge challenge to public health in resource-limited settings. Reducing the nearly 0.5 million deaths that result each year has been identified as a key priority. Major progress has been made over the past 10 years in defining appropriate strategies and policy guidelines for early diagnosis and effective case management. Ascertainment of cases has been improved through a twofold strategy of provider-initiated HIV testing and counseling in TB patients and intensified TB case finding among those living with HIV. Outcomes of rifampicin-based TB treatment are greatly enhanced by concurrent co-trimoxazole prophylaxis and antiretroviral therapy (ART). ART reduces mortality across a spectrum of CD4 counts and randomized controlled trials have defined the optimum time to start ART. Good outcomes can be achieved when combining TB treatment with first-line ART, but use with second-line ART remains challenging due to pharmacokinetic drug interactions and cotoxicity. We review the frequency and spectrum of adverse drug reactions and immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) resulting from combined treatment, and highlight the challenges of managing HIV-associated drug-resistant TB.

  4. Use of CHROMagar Candida for the presumptive identification of Candida species directly from clinical specimens in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    Nadeem, Sayyada Ghufrana; Hakim, Shazia Tabassum; Kazmi, Shahana Urooj

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Identification of yeast isolated from clinical specimens to the species level has become increasingly important. Ever-increasing numbers of immuno-suppressed patients, a widening range of recognized pathogens, and the discovery of resistance to antifungal drugs are contributing factors to this necessity. Material and methods A total of 487 yeast strains were studied for the primary isolation and presumptive identification, directly from clinical specimen. Efficacy of CHROMagar Candida has been evaluated with conventional methods including morphology on Corn meal–tween 80 agar and biochemical methods by using API 20 C AUX. Results The result of this study shows that CHROMagar Candida can easily identify three species of Candida on the basis of colonial color and morphology, and accurately differentiate between them i.e. Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, and Candida krusei. The specificity and sensitivity of CHROMagar Candida for C. albicans calculated as 99%, for C. tropicalis calculated as 98%, and C. krusei it is 100%. Conclusion The data presented supports the use of CHROMagar Candida for the rapid identification of Candida species directly from clinical specimens in resource-limited settings, which could be very helpful in developing appropriate therapeutic strategy and management of patients. PMID:21483597

  5. A quality improvement project using statistical process control methods for type 2 diabetes control in a resource-limited setting.

    PubMed

    Flood, David; Douglas, Kate; Goldberg, Vera; Martinez, Boris; Garcia, Pablo; Arbour, MaryCatherine; Rohloff, Peter

    2017-05-09

    Quality improvement (QI) is a key strategy for improving diabetes care in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). This study reports on a diabetes QI project in rural Guatemala whose primary aim was to improve glycemic control of a panel of adult diabetes patients. Formative research suggested multiple areas for programmatic improvement in ambulatory diabetes care. This project utilized the Model for Improvement and Agile Global Health, our organization's complementary healthcare implementation framework. A bundle of improvement activities were implemented at the home, clinic and institutional level. Control charts of mean hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) and proportion of patients meeting target HbA1C showed improvement as special cause variation was identified 3 months after the intervention began. Control charts for secondary process measures offered insights into the value of different components of the intervention. Intensity of home-based diabetes education emerged as an important driver of panel glycemic control. Diabetes QI work is feasible in resource-limited settings in LMICs and can improve glycemic control. Statistical process control charts are a promising methodology for use with panels or registries of diabetes patients.

  6. Clinical audit of diabetes management can improve the quality of care in a resource-limited primary care setting.

    PubMed

    Govender, Indira; Ehrlich, Rodney; Van Vuuren, Unita; De Vries, Elma; Namane, Mosedi; De Sa, Angela; Murie, Katy; Schlemmer, Arina; Govender, Strini; Isaacs, Abdul; Martell, Rob

    2012-12-01

    To determine whether clinical audit improved the performance of diabetic clinical processes in the health district in which it was implemented. Patient folders were systematically sampled annually for review. Primary health-care facilities in the Metro health district of the Western Cape Province in South Africa. Health-care workers involved in diabetes management. Clinical audit and feedback. The Skillings-Mack test was applied to median values of pooled audit results for nine diabetic clinical processes to measure whether there were statistically significant differences between annual audits performed in 2005, 2007, 2008 and 2009. Descriptive statistics were used to illustrate the order of values per process. A total of 40 community health centres participated in the baseline audit of 2005 that decreased to 30 in 2009. Except for two routine processes, baseline medians for six out of nine processes were below 50%. Pooled audit results showed statistically significant improvements in seven out of nine clinical processes. The findings indicate an association between the application of clinical audit and quality improvement in resource-limited settings. Co-interventions introduced after the baseline audit are likely to have contributed to improved outcomes. In addition, support from the relevant government health programmes and commitment of managers and frontline staff contributed to the audit's success.

  7. HIV/AIDS Clinical Manifestations and their Implication for Patient Clinical Staging in Resource Limited Settings in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Boniphace, Idindili; Omari, Minzi; Susan Fred, Rumisha; Ferdinand, Mugusi; Marcel, Tanner

    2011-01-01

    Tanzania HIV/AIDS management follows WHO clinical staging which requires CD4 counts as complement. Lacking CD4 counts facilities in rural health facilities remains a challenge. Simplified and sensitive clinical staging based on local clinical patterns is useful to ensure effective care without CD4 counts. To assess whether local HIV clinical manifestations can be used to guide HIV management in settings with limited access to CD4 counts in Tanzania. A Cross-sectional study conducted at Tumbi and Chalinze health facilities documented clinical manifestations and CD4 counts in 360 HIV/AIDS patients. Simplified management groups comprised of severe and moderate disease were formed based on clinical manifestations and CD4 counts results. Symptoms with high frequency were used to predict severe disease. A Weight loss (48.3%) and chronic cough (40.8 %) were the most reported manifestations in the study population. More than 50% of patients presented with CD4≤200. Most symptoms were found to be highly sensitive (71% to 93%) in predicting severe immunosuppression using CD4<200 cut-off point as a 'Gold standard'. Chronic diarrhoea presented in 10.6%, and predicted well severe immunosuppression either alone (OR 1.95, 95%CI, 0.95-4.22) or in combination (OR 4.21, 95%CI 0.92-19.33) with other symptoms. Basing strictly on WHO clinical staging 30.8% of patients were detected to be severely immunosuppressed (Stage 4). While using our proposed management categories of severe and moderate immunosuppression 70% of patients were put into the severe immunosuppression group, consistent with CD4 cut-off count of≤350. HIV/AIDS clinics managing large cohorts should develop validated site specific guidelines based on local experiences. Simplified guidelines are useful for resource constrained settings without CD4 counting facilities.

  8. Evaluation and Acceptability of a Simplified Test of Visual Function at Birth in a Limited-Resource Setting.

    PubMed

    Carrara, Verena I; Darakomon, Mue Chae; Thin, Nant War War; Paw, Naw Ta Kaw; Wah, Naw; Wah, Hser Gay; Helen, Naw; Keereecharoen, Suporn; Paw, Naw Ta Mlar; Jittamala, Podjanee; Nosten, François H; Ricci, Daniela; McGready, Rose

    2016-01-01

    Neurological examination, including visual fixation and tracking of a target, is routinely performed in the Shoklo Malaria Research Unit postnatal care units on the Thailand-Myanmar border. We aimed to evaluate a simple visual newborn test developed in Italy and performed by non-specialized personnel working in neonatal care units. An intensive training of local health staff in Thailand was conducted prior to performing assessments at 24, 48 and 72 hours of life in healthy, low-risk term singletons. The 48 and 72 hours results were then compared to values obtained to those from Italy. Parents and staff administering the test reported on acceptability. One hundred and seventy nine newborns, between June 2011 and October 2012, participated in the study. The test was rapidly completed if the infant remained in an optimal behavioral stage (7 ± 2 minutes) but the test duration increased significantly (12 ± 4 minutes, p < 0.001) if its behavior changed. Infants were able to fix a target and to discriminate a colored face at 24 hours of life. Horizontal tracking of a target was achieved by 96% (152/159) of the infants at 48 hours. Circular tracking, stripe discrimination and attention to distance significantly improved between each 24-hour test period. The test was easily performed by non-specialized local staff and well accepted by the parents. Healthy term singletons in this limited-resource setting have a visual response similar to that obtained to gestational age matched newborns in Italy. It is possible to use these results as a reference set of values for the visual assessment in Karen and Burmese infants in the first 72 hours of life. The utility of the 24 hours test should be pursued.

  9. Evaluation and Acceptability of a Simplified Test of Visual Function at Birth in a Limited-Resource Setting

    PubMed Central

    Carrara, Verena I.; Darakomon, Mue Chae; Thin, Nant War War; Paw, Naw Ta Kaw; Wah, Naw; Wah, Hser Gay; Helen, Naw; Keereecharoen, Suporn; Paw, Naw Ta Mlar; Jittamala, Podjanee; Nosten, François H.; Ricci, Daniela; McGready, Rose

    2016-01-01

    Neurological examination, including visual fixation and tracking of a target, is routinely performed in the Shoklo Malaria Research Unit postnatal care units on the Thailand-Myanmar border. We aimed to evaluate a simple visual newborn test developed in Italy and performed by non-specialized personnel working in neonatal care units. An intensive training of local health staff in Thailand was conducted prior to performing assessments at 24, 48 and 72 hours of life in healthy, low-risk term singletons. The 48 and 72 hours results were then compared to values obtained to those from Italy. Parents and staff administering the test reported on acceptability. One hundred and seventy nine newborns, between June 2011 and October 2012, participated in the study. The test was rapidly completed if the infant remained in an optimal behavioral stage (7 ± 2 minutes) but the test duration increased significantly (12 ± 4 minutes, p < 0.001) if its behavior changed. Infants were able to fix a target and to discriminate a colored face at 24 hours of life. Horizontal tracking of a target was achieved by 96% (152/159) of the infants at 48 hours. Circular tracking, stripe discrimination and attention to distance significantly improved between each 24-hour test period. The test was easily performed by non-specialized local staff and well accepted by the parents. Healthy term singletons in this limited-resource setting have a visual response similar to that obtained to gestational age matched newborns in Italy. It is possible to use these results as a reference set of values for the visual assessment in Karen and Burmese infants in the first 72 hours of life. The utility of the 24 hours test should be pursued. PMID:27300137

  10. Comparison of nucleic acid extraction platforms for detection of select biothreat agents for use in clinical resource limited settings.

    PubMed

    Shipley, Michelle A; Koehler, Jeffrey W; Kulesh, David A; Minogue, Timothy D

    2012-10-01

    High-quality nucleic acids are critical for optimal PCR-based diagnostics and pathogen detection. Rapid sample processing time is important for the earliest administration of therapeutic and containment measures, especially in the case of biothreat agents. In this context, we compared the Fujifilm QuickGene-Mini80 to Qiagen's QIAamp Mini Purification kits for extraction of DNA and RNA for potential use in austere settings. Qiagen (QIAamp) column-based extraction is the currently recommended purification platform by United States Army Medical Research Institute for Infectious Diseases for both DNA and RNA extraction. However, this sample processing system requires dedicated laboratory equipment including a centrifuge. In this study, we investigated the QuickGene-Mini80, which does not require centrifugation, as a suitable platform for nucleic acid extraction for use in resource-limited locations. Quality of the sample extraction was evaluated using pathogen-specific, real-time PCR assays for nucleic acids extracted from viable and γ-irradiated Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, vaccinia virus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, or B. anthracis spores in buffer or human whole blood. QuickGene-Mini80 and QIAamp performed similarly for DNA extraction regardless of organism viability. It was noteworthy that γ-irradiation did not have a significant impact on real-time PCR for organism detection. Comparison with QIAamp showed a less than adequate performance of the Fujifilm instrument for RNA extraction. However, QuickGene-Mini80 remains a viable alternative to QIAamp for DNA extraction for use in remote settings due to extraction quality, time efficiency, reduced instrument requirements, and ease of use. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Evaluating a novel neonatal-care assessment tool among trained delivery attendants in a resource-limited setting.

    PubMed

    Kassick, Megan E; Chinbuah, Margaret A; Serpa, Magdalena; Mazia, Goldy; Tang, Alice M; Sagoe-Moses, Isabella; Taylor, Mira; Dwomo-Fokuo, Adoma; Salifu, Nihad; Arhinful, Daniel K; Engmann, Cyril; Burke, Thomas F; Cofie, Patience; Nelson, Brett D

    2016-12-01

    To validate a novel objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) tool for assessing neonatal care skills among delivery attendants trained as part of the Essential Care for Every Baby (ECEB) program and to assess ECEB training effectiveness. Between August 1 and September 30, 2015, a cross-sectional study enrolled ECEB-trained healthcare providers who attended deliveries from the Brong Ahafo and Eastern regions of Ghana. Participants completed a previously developed 21-item OSCE tool that assessed neonatal-care competency. Participant performance was scored independently by regional trainers and national master trainers. The inter-rater scoring reliability was assessed using the Cohen kappa coefficient and performance was compared across participant characteristics. The study enrolled 57 trained delivery attendants from 12 district hospitals. Inter-rater agreement was perfect (kappa 1.00) or almost perfect (kappa 0.81-0.99) for nine OSCE items, substantial (kappa 0.61-0.80) or moderate (kappa 0.41-0.60) for 11 items, and fair (kappa 0.21-0.40) for one item. Differences in OSCE-item performance were recorded based on participants' regions, facility type, age, and education level (P<0.05). In a resource-limited setting, the OSCE tool demonstrated substantial reliability and ECEB-trained healthcare practitioners exhibited satisfactory performance. The OSCE tool could be useful in similar settings and could have potential for up-scaled use in assessing neonatal-management skills. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Cell Isolation and Recovery Using Hollow Glass Microspheres Coated with Nanolayered Films for Applications in Resource-Limited Settings.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ziye; Ahrens, Caroline C; Yu, Dan; Ding, Zhenya; Lim, HyunTaek; Li, Wei

    2017-05-10

    Established cell isolation and purification techniques such as fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), isolation through magnetic micro/nanoparticles, and recovery via microfluidic devices have limited application as disposable technologies appropriate for point-of-care use in remote areas where lab equipment as well as electrical, magnetic, and optical sources are restricted. We report a simple yet effective method for cell isolation and recovery that requires neither specialized lab equipment nor any form of power source. Specifically, self-floating hollow glass microspheres were coated with an enzymatically degradable nanolayered film and conjugated with antibodies to allow both fast capture and release of subpopulations of cells from a cell mixture. Targeted cells were captured by the microspheres and allowed to float to the top of the hosting liquid, thereby isolating targeted cells. To minimize nonspecific adhesion of untargeted cells and to enhance the purity of the isolated cell population, an antifouling polymer brush layer was grafted onto the nanolayered film. Using the EpCAM-expressing cancer cell line PC-3 in blood as a model system, we have demonstrated the isolation and recovery of cancer cells without compromising cell viability or proliferative potential. The whole process takes less than 1 h. To support the rational extension of this platform technology, we introduce extensive characterization of the critical design parameters: film formation and degradation, grafting with a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) sheath, and introducing functional antibodies. Our approach is expected to overcome practical hurdles and provide viable targeted cells for downstream analyses in resource-limited settings.

  13. Accuracy of Inferior Vena Cava Ultrasound for Predicting Dehydration in Children with Acute Diarrhea in Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Payal; Glavis-Bloom, Justin; Nasrin, Sabiha; Guy, Allysia; Rege, Soham; Noble, Vicki E.; Alam, Nur H.; Levine, Adam C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although dehydration from diarrhea is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children under five, existing methods of assessing dehydration status in children have limited accuracy. Objective To assess the accuracy of point-of-care ultrasound measurement of the aorta-to-IVC ratio as a predictor of dehydration in children. Methods A prospective cohort study of children under five years with acute diarrhea was conducted in the rehydration unit of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b). Ultrasound measurements of aorta-to-IVC ratio and dehydrated weight were obtained on patient arrival. Percent weight change was monitored during rehydration to classify children as having “some dehydration” with weight change 3–9% or “severe dehydration” with weight change > 9%. Logistic regression analysis and Receiver-Operator Characteristic (ROC) curves were used to evaluate the accuracy of aorta-to-IVC ratio as a predictor of dehydration severity. Results 850 children were enrolled, of which 771 were included in the final analysis. Aorta to IVC ratio was a significant predictor of the percent dehydration in children with acute diarrhea, with each 1-point increase in the aorta to IVC ratio predicting a 1.1% increase in the percent dehydration of the child. However, the area under the ROC curve (0.60), sensitivity (67%), and specificity (49%), for predicting severe dehydration were all poor. Conclusions Point-of-care ultrasound of the aorta-to-IVC ratio was statistically associated with volume status, but was not accurate enough to be used as an independent screening tool for dehydration in children under five years presenting with acute diarrhea in a resource-limited setting. PMID:26766306

  14. Characterization of HIV-1 antiretroviral drug resistance after second-line treatment failure in Mali, a limited-resources setting

    PubMed Central

    Maiga, Almoustapha Issiaka; Fofana, Djeneba Bocar; Cisse, Mamadou; Diallo, Fodié; Maiga, Moussa Youssoufa; Traore, Hamar Alassane; Maiga, Issouf Alassane; Sylla, Aliou; Fofana, Dionke; Taiwo, Babafemi; Murphy, Robert; Katlama, Christine; Tounkara, Anatole; Calvez, Vincent; Marcelin, Anne-Geneviève

    2012-01-01

    Objectives We describe the outcomes of second-line drug resistance profiles and predict the efficacy of drugs for third-line therapy in patients monitored without the benefit of plasma HIV-1 RNA viral load (VL) or resistance testing. Methods We recruited 106 HIV-1-infected patients after second-line treatment failure in Mali. VL was determined by the Abbott RealTime system and the resistance by the ViroSeq HIV-1 genotyping system. The resistance testing was interpreted using the latest version of the Stanford algorithm. Results Among the 106 patients, 93 had isolates successfully sequenced. The median age, VL and CD4 cells were respectively 35 years, 72 000 copies/mL and 146 cells/mm3. Patients were exposed to a median of 4 years of treatment and to six antiretrovirals. We found 20% of wild-type viruses. Resistance to etravirine was noted in 38%, to lopinavir in 25% and to darunavir in 12%. The duration of prior nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitor exposure was associated with resistance to abacavir (P < 0.0001) and tenofovir (P = 0.0001), and duration of prior protease inhibitor treatment with resistance to lopinavir (P < 0.0001) and darunavir (P = 0.06). Conclusion Long duration of therapy prior to failure was associated with high levels of resistance and is directly related to limited access to VL monitoring and delayed switches to second-line treatment, precluding efficacy of drugs for third-line therapy. This study underlines the need for governments and public health organizations to recommend the use of VL monitoring and also the availability of darunavir and raltegravir for third-line therapies in the context of limited-resource settings. PMID:22888273

  15. Practical Management of HIV-Associated Anemia in Resource-Limited Settings: Prospective Observational Evaluation of a New Mozambican Guideline.

    PubMed

    Brentlinger, Paula E; Silva, Wilson P; Vermund, Sten H; Valverde, Emilio; Buene, Manuel; Moon, Troy D

    2016-01-01

    Mozambique's updated guideline for management of HIV-associated anemia prompts clinicians to consider opportunistic conditions, adverse drug reactions, and untreated immunosuppression in addition to iron deficiency, intestinal helminthes, and malaria. We prospectively evaluated this guideline in rural Zambézia Province. Likely cause(s) of anemia were determined through prespecified history, physical examination, and laboratory testing. Diagnoses were "etiologic" if laboratory confirmed (sputum microscopy, blood culture, Plasmodium falciparum malaria rapid test) or "syndromic" if not. To assess hemoglobin response, we used serial point-of-care measurements. We studied 324 ambulatory, anemic (hemoglobin <10 g/dl) HIV-infected adults. Study clinicians treated nearly all [315 (97.2%)] for suspected iron deficiency and/or helminthes; 56 (17.3%) had laboratory-confirmed malaria. Other assigned diagnoses included tuberculosis [30 (9.3%)], adverse drug reactions [26 (8.0%)], and bacteremia [13 (4.1%)]. Etiologic diagnosis was achieved in 79 (24.4%). Of 169 (52.2%) subjects who improved (hemoglobin increase of ≥1 g/dl without indications for hospitalization), only 65 (38.5%) received conventional management (iron supplementation, deworming, and/or antimalarials) alone. Thirty (9.3%) died and/or were hospitalized, and 125 (38.6%) were lost to follow-up. Multivariable linear and logistic regression models described better hemoglobin responses and/or outcomes in subjects with higher CD4(+) T-lymphocyte counts, pre-enrollment antiretroviral therapy and/or co-trimoxazole prophylaxis, discontinuation of zidovudine for suspected adverse reaction, and smear-positive tuberculosis. Adverse outcomes were associated with fever, low body mass index, bacteremia, esophageal candidiasis, and low or missing CD4(+) T cell counts. In this severely resource-limited setting, successful anemia management often required interventions other than conventional presumptive treatment, thus

  16. Applicability of first-trimester combined screening for fetal trisomy 21 in a resource-limited setting in mainland China.

    PubMed

    Li, B; Sahota, D S; Lao, T T; Xu, J; Hu, S Q; Zhang, L; Liu, Q Y; Sun, Q; Tang, D; Ma, R M

    2016-09-01

    To assess the feasibility and performance of the first-trimester combined screening test for trisomy 21 in a resource-limited setting in mainland China. Prospective observational cohort study. First Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, China. Ten thousand four hundred and forty-two pregnant women requesting first-trimester screening. The combined screening test was performed from May 2012 to December 2014. Women with a high-risk result (≥1:600) were offered further confirmatory tests after counselling. The threshold for high risk was determined by Monte Carlo simulation to achieve a 5% false-positive rate according to the local age distribution. Pregnancy outcome and screening results were recorded for all women and monthly audits were conducted. Sensitivity, screen positive rate, cost per case of Down syndrome detected. Six hundred and ten women (5.8% of the total screened) had a high-risk screening test, of whom 274 (44.9%) underwent a diagnostic test and 169 (27.7%) opted for a noninvasive prenatal screening test (NIPT); 160 (26.2%) declined further testing after counselling. The pregnancy outcome was available for 10 174 (97.4%) of the women. The observed incidence of Down syndrome was 0.13% (1/750). All 14 women with a trisomy 21 pregnancy had a high-risk screening test result. The cost per Down syndrome detected was RMB596 686 compared with RMB1.79 million if all had been screened by NIPT. The combined screening test appears to be a more cost-effective strategy in mainland China. Screening performance in China would be improved by adopting Chinese-specific models, external quality control and assurance, and establishing risk thresholds appropriate for the age distribution of the population. Combined first-trimester Downs screening in China was improved by adopting Chinese-specific models and external QC. © 2016 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  17. Practical Management of HIV-Associated Anemia in Resource-Limited Settings: Prospective Observational Evaluation of a New Mozambican Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Wilson P.; Vermund, Sten H.; Valverde, Emilio; Buene, Manuel; Moon, Troy D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Mozambique's updated guideline for management of HIV-associated anemia prompts clinicians to consider opportunistic conditions, adverse drug reactions, and untreated immunosuppression in addition to iron deficiency, intestinal helminthes, and malaria. We prospectively evaluated this guideline in rural Zambézia Province. Likely cause(s) of anemia were determined through prespecified history, physical examination, and laboratory testing. Diagnoses were “etiologic” if laboratory confirmed (sputum microscopy, blood culture, Plasmodium falciparum malaria rapid test) or “syndromic” if not. To assess hemoglobin response, we used serial point-of-care measurements. We studied 324 ambulatory, anemic (hemoglobin <10 g/dl) HIV-infected adults. Study clinicians treated nearly all [315 (97.2%)] for suspected iron deficiency and/or helminthes; 56 (17.3%) had laboratory-confirmed malaria. Other assigned diagnoses included tuberculosis [30 (9.3%)], adverse drug reactions [26 (8.0%)], and bacteremia [13 (4.1%)]. Etiologic diagnosis was achieved in 79 (24.4%). Of 169 (52.2%) subjects who improved (hemoglobin increase of ≥1 g/dl without indications for hospitalization), only 65 (38.5%) received conventional management (iron supplementation, deworming, and/or antimalarials) alone. Thirty (9.3%) died and/or were hospitalized, and 125 (38.6%) were lost to follow-up. Multivariable linear and logistic regression models described better hemoglobin responses and/or outcomes in subjects with higher CD4+ T-lymphocyte counts, pre-enrollment antiretroviral therapy and/or co-trimoxazole prophylaxis, discontinuation of zidovudine for suspected adverse reaction, and smear-positive tuberculosis. Adverse outcomes were associated with fever, low body mass index, bacteremia, esophageal candidiasis, and low or missing CD4+ T cell counts. In this severely resource-limited setting, successful anemia management often required interventions other than conventional presumptive

  18. Optimizing Infant HIV Diagnosis in Resource-Limited Settings: Modeling the Impact of HIV DNA PCR Testing at Birth

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Alexander; Modi, Surbhi; Rivadeneira, Emilia D.; Koumans, Emilia H.

    2017-01-01

    Background Early antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation in HIV-infected infants significantly improves survival but is often delayed in resource-limited settings. Adding HIV testing of infants at birth to the current recommendation of testing at age 4–6 weeks may improve testing rates and decrease time to ART initiation. We modeled the benefit of adding HIV testing at birth to the current 6-week testing algorithm. Methods Microsoft Excel was used to create a decision-tree model of the care continuum for the estimated 1,400,000 HIV-infected women and their infants in sub-Saharan Africa in 2012. The model assumed average published rates for facility births (42.9%), prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission utilization (63%), mother-to-child-transmission rates based on prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission regimen (5%–40%), return of test results (41%), enrollment in HIV care (52%), and ART initiation (54%). We conducted sensitivity analyses to model the impact of key variables and applied the model to specific country examples. Results Adding HIV testing at birth would increase the number of infants on ART by 204% by age 18 months. The greatest increase is seen in early ART initiations (543% by age 3 months). The increase would lead to a corresponding increase in survival at 12 months of age, with 5108 fewer infant deaths (44,550, versus 49,658). Conclusion Adding HIV testing at birth has the potential to improve the number and timing of ART initiation of HIV-infected infants, leading to a decrease in infant mortality. Using this model, countries should investigate a combination of HIV testing at birth and during the early infant period. PMID:27792684

  19. Mean CD4 cell count changes in patients failing a first-line antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Changes in CD4 cell counts are poorly documented in individuals with low or moderate-level viremia while on antiretroviral treatment (ART) in resource-limited settings. We assessed the impact of on-going HIV-RNA replication on CD4 cell count slopes in patients treated with a first-line combination ART. Method Naïve patients on a first-line ART regimen with at least two measures of HIV-RNA available after ART initiation were included in the study. The relationships between mean CD4 cell count change and HIV-RNA at 6 and 12 months after ART initiation (M6 and M12) were assessed by linear mixed models adjusted for gender, age, clinical stage and year of starting ART. Results 3,338 patients were included (14 cohorts, 64% female) and the group had the following characteristics: a median follow-up time of 1.6 years, a median age of 34 years, and a median CD4 cell count at ART initiation of 107 cells/μL. All patients with suppressed HIV-RNA at M12 had a continuous increase in CD4 cell count up to 18 months after treatment initiation. By contrast, any degree of HIV-RNA replication both at M6 and M12 was associated with a flat or a decreasing CD4 cell count slope. Multivariable analysis using HIV-RNA thresholds of 10,000 and 5,000 copies confirmed the significant effect of HIV-RNA on CD4 cell counts both at M6 and M12. Conclusion In routinely monitored patients on an NNRTI-based first-line ART, on-going low-level HIV-RNA replication was associated with a poor immune outcome in patients who had detectable levels of the virus after one year of ART. PMID:22742573

  20. Role of nutrition in HIV infection: review of evidence for more effective programming in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    de Pee, Saskia; Semba, Richard D

    2010-12-01

    HIV infection and malnutrition negatively reinforce each other. For program guidance, to review evidence on the relationship of HIV infection and malnutrition in adults in resource-limited settings. Adequate nutritional status supports immunity and physical performance. Weight loss, caused by low dietary intake (loss of appetite, mouth ulcers, food insecurity), malabsorption, and altered metabolism, is common in HIV infection. Regaining weight, particularly muscle mass, requires antiretroviral therapy (ART), treatment of opportunistic infections, consumption of a balanced diet, physical activity, mitigation of side effects, and perhaps appetite stimulants and growth hormone. Correcting nutritional status becomes more difficult as infection progresses. Studies document widespread micronutrient deficiencies among HIV-infected people. However, supplement composition, patient characteristics, and treatments vary widely across intervention studies. Therefore, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends ensuring intake of 1 Recommended Nutrient Intake (RNI) of each required micronutrient, which may require taking micronutrient supplements. Few studies have assessed the impact of food supplements. Because the mortality risk in patients receiving ART increases with lower body mass index (BMI), improving the BMI seems important. Whether this requires provision of food supplements depends on the patient's diet and food security. It appears that starting ART improves BMI and that ready-to-use fortified spreads and fortified-blended foods further increase BMI (the effect is somewhat less with fortified-blended foods). The studies are too small to assess effects on mortality. Once ART has been established and malnutrition treated, the nutritional quality of the diet remains important, also because of ART's long-term metabolic effects (dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, obesity). Food insecurity should also be addressed if it prevents adequate energy intake and reduces

  1. Modified Papanicolaou staining protocol with minimum alcohol use: a cost-cutting measure for resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S; Chachra, K L; Bhadola, P; Sodhani, P

    2010-08-01

    To devise a simple, cost-effective protocol for Papanicolaou (Pap) staining of cervicovaginal smears. Five hundred coded paired cervical smears were collected from women as part of routine cervical cancer screening. One set of smears was stained by conventional Pap staining protocol (CP) and the other by a modified protocol (MP) in which alcohol was replaced by 1% acetic acid in all the steps except during fixation and prior to mounting; in addition, one alcohol-based counterstain, OG, was omitted. The smears were examined blindly by the pathologists and then decoded. Each pair of smears was compared and the two protocols were analysed for staining quality and diagnoses by McNemar and chi-square tests. The staining quality in the MP was satisfactory. The nuclear and cytoplasmic features were comparable to the CP. Cytoplasmic transparency was maintained in the MP and the differential staining of blue/green and pink was acceptable to the pathologists and technicians. The diagnoses agreed in all cases and there was no compromise in interpreting the smears. With MP it took only 3-4 minutes to stain a batch of 50 slides. in contrast to the 20 minutes taken by CP. The MP used almost one-seventh of the amount of alcohol compared with CP, which translated into a significant cost reduction per smear. The improvised Pap staining protocol with minimum alcohol use is a simple, cost-effective and technician-friendly procedure that can be easily adopted in high-volume, resource-limited laboratories for mass cervical cancer screening.

  2. Non-AIDS-defining events among HIV-1-infected adults receiving combination antiretroviral therapy in resource-replete versus resource-limited urban setting

    PubMed Central

    Wester, C. William; Koethe, John R.; Shepherd, Bryan E.; Stinnette, Samuel E.; Rebeiro, Peter F.; Kipp, Aaron M.; Hong, Hwanhee; Bussmann, Hermann; Gaolathe, Tendani; McGowan, Catherine C.; Sterling, Timothy R.; Marlink, Richard G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To compare incidence and distribution of non-AIDS-defining events (NADEs) among HIV-1-infected adults receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in urban sub-Saharan African versus United States settings. Design Retrospective cohort analysis of clinical trial and observational data. Methods Compared crude and standardized (to US cohort by age and sex) NADE rates from two urban adult HIV-infected cART-initiating populations: a clinical trial cohort in Gaborone, Botswana (Botswana) and an observational cohort in Nashville, Tennessee (USA). Results Crude NADE incidence rates were similar: 10.0 [95% confidence interval 6.3–15.9] per 1000 person-years in Botswana versus 12.4 [8.4–18.4] per 1000 person-years in the United States. However, after standardizing to an older, predominantly male US population, the overall NADE incidence rates were higher in Botswana [18.7 (8.3–33.1) per 1000 person-years]. Standardized rates differed most for cardiovascular events (8.4 versus 5.0 per 1000 person-years) and non-AIDS-defining malignancies (8.0 versus 0.5 per 1000 person-years) – both higher in Botswana. Conversely, hepatic NADE rates were higher in the United States (4.0 versus 0.0 per 1000 person-years), whereas renal NADE rates [3.0 per 1000 person-years (United States) versus 2.4 per 1000 person-years (Botswana)] were comparable. Conclusion Crude NADE incidence rates were similar between cART-treated patients in a US observational cohort and a sub-Saharan African clinical trial. However, when standardized to the US cohort, overall NADE rates were higher in Botswana. NADEs appear to be a significant problem in our sub-Saharan African setting, and the monitoring, prevention, and treatment of NADEs should be a critical component of care in resource-limited settings. PMID:21572309

  3. On the front line of HIV virological monitoring: barriers and facilitators from a provider perspective in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Rutstein, S E; Golin, C E; Wheeler, S B; Kamwendo, D; Hosseinipour, M C; Weinberger, M; Miller, W C; Biddle, A K; Soko, A; Mkandawire, M; Mwenda, R; Sarr, A; Gupta, S; Mataya, R

    2016-01-01

    Scale-up of viral load (VL) monitoring for HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a priority in many resource-limited settings, and ART providers are critical to effective program implementation. We explored provider-perceived barriers and facilitators of VL monitoring. We interviewed all providers (n = 17) engaged in a public health evaluation of dried blood spots for VL monitoring at five ART clinics in Malawi. All ART clinics were housed within district hospitals. We grouped themes at patient, provider, facility, system, and policy levels. Providers emphasized their desire for improved ART monitoring strategies, and frustration in response to restrictive policies for determining which patients were eligible to receive VL monitoring. Although many providers pled for expansion of monitoring to include all persons on ART, regardless of time on ART, the most salient provider-perceived barrier to VL monitoring implementation was the pressure of work associated with monitoring activities. The work burden was exacerbated by inefficient data management systems, highlighting a critical interaction between provider-, facility-, and system-level factors. Lack of integration between laboratory and clinical systems complicated the process for alerting providers when results were available, and these communication gaps were intensified by poor facility connectivity. Centralized second-line ART distribution was also noted as a barrier: providers reported that the time and expenses required for patients to collect second-line ART frequently obstructed referral. However, provider empowerment emerged as an unexpected facilitator of VL monitoring. For many providers, this was the first time they used an objective marker of ART response to guide clinical management. Providers' knowledge of a patient's virological status increased confidence in adherence counseling and clinical decision-making. Results from our study provide unique insight into provider

  4. Baseline severe anaemia should not preclude use of zidovudine in antiretroviral-eligible patients in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Stavudine is no longer recommended as part of first-line therapy for patients initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Uganda. Most patients are currently initiated on zidovudine-containing regimens, which can induce anaemia. We investigated the risk factors for early severe anaemia in the first six months of ART initiation. Methods We defined baseline (ART initiation) anaemia as haemoglobin (Hb) ≤9.5 g/dL, baseline severe anaemia as Hb ≤8 g/dL, and early severe anaemia as Hb ≤8 g/dL within six months of ART initiation. Risk factors for the development of early severe anaemia were analyzed using a multivariable logistic regression model. Results In total, 5494 patients initiated ART, 821 (15%) had baseline anaemia, and 296 (5%) had baseline severe anaemia. Early severe anaemia occurred in 109 (4%) of 3105 patients who had at least one Hb measurement in the first six months on ART. Patients with baseline anaemia had a larger increase in Hb (median g/dL [IQR]) within the first six months compared with non-anaemic patients (2.9 [1.7, 4.6] vs. 0.7 [-0.2, 1.7], p < 0.0001). Having a new tuberculosis episode OR 3.69 (95% CI 1.64 - 8.32), MCV <80fL OR 1.60 (95% CI 1.01- 2.52) and baseline severe anaemia OR 5.27 (95% CI 3.00 - 9.26) were associated with early severe anaemia. Initiation on a zidovudine-based regimen was not associated with an increased risk of early severe anaemia. Conclusions Among patients in an urban HIV clinic in Uganda, severe anaemia is modestly prevalent at ART initiation and improves with ART in the majority of patients. These data suggest that baseline severe anaemia should not be used as a criterion for avoiding the use of zidovudine in patients initiating ART in resource-limited settings. PMID:21047391

  5. Pharmacy refill adherence outperforms self-reported methods in predicting HIV therapy outcome in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Sangeda, Raphael Z; Mosha, Fausta; Prosperi, Mattia; Aboud, Said; Vercauteren, Jurgen; Camacho, Ricardo J; Lyamuya, Eligius F; Van Wijngaerden, Eric; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke

    2014-10-04

    Optimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy is critical to prevent HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) epidemic. The objective of the study was to investigate the best performing adherence assessment method for predicting virological failure in resource-limited settings (RLS). This study was a single-centre prospective cohort, enrolling 220 HIV-infected adult patients attending an HIV/AIDS Care and Treatment Centre in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, in 2010. Pharmacy refill, self-report (via visual analog scale [VAS] and the Swiss HIV Cohort study-adherence questionnaire), pill count, and appointment keeping adherence measurements were taken. Univariate logistic regression (LR) was done to explore a cut-off that gives a better trade-off between sensitivity and specificity, and a higher area under the curve (AUC) based on receiver operating characteristic curve in predicting virological failure. Additionally, the adherence models were evaluated by fitting multivariate LR with stepwise functions, decision trees, and random forests models, assessing 10-fold multiple cross validation (MCV). Patient factors associated with virological failure were determined using LR. Viral load measurements at baseline and one year after recruitment were available for 162 patients, of whom 55 (34%) had detectable viral load and 17 (10.5%) had immunological failure at one year after recruitment. The optimal cut-off points significantly predictive of virological failure were 95%, 80%, 95% and 90% for VAS, appointment keeping, pharmacy refill, and pill count adherence respectively. The AUC for these methods ranged from 0.52 to 0.61, with pharmacy refill giving the best performance at AUC 0.61. Multivariate logistic regression with boost stepwise MCV had higher AUC (0.64) compared to all univariate adherence models, except pharmacy refill adherence univariate model, which was comparable to the multivariate model (AUC = 0.64). Decision trees and random forests models were inferior to boost stepwise model

  6. Allocating limited resources in a time of fiscal constraints: a priority setting case study from Dalhousie University Faculty of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Mitton, Craig; Levy, Adrian; Gorsky, Diane; MacNeil, Christina; Dionne, Francois; Marrie, Tom

    2013-07-01

    Facing a projected $1.4M deficit on a $35M operating budget for fiscal year 2011/2012, members of the Dalhousie University Faculty of Medicine developed and implemented an explicit, transparent, criteria-based priority setting process for resource reallocation. A task group that included representatives from across the Faculty of Medicine used a program budgeting and marginal analysis (PBMA) framework, which provided an alternative to the typical public-sector approaches to addressing a budget deficit of across-the-board spending cuts and political negotiation. Key steps to the PBMA process included training staff members and department heads on priority setting and resource reallocation, establishing process guidelines to meet immediate and longer-term fiscal needs, developing a reporting structure and forming key working groups, creating assessment criteria to guide resource reallocation decisions, assessing disinvestment proposals from all departments, and providing proposal implementation recommendations to the dean. All departments were required to submit proposals for consideration. The task group approved 27 service reduction proposals and 28 efficiency gains proposals, totaling approximately $2.7M in savings across two years. During this process, the task group faced a number of challenges, including a tight timeline for development and implementation (January to April 2011), a culture that historically supported decentralized planning, at times competing interests (e.g., research versus teaching objectives), and reductions in overall health care and postsecondary education government funding. Overall, faculty and staff preferred the PBMA approach to previous practices. Other institutions should use this example to set priorities in times of fiscal constraints.

  7. Setting up home-based palliative care in countries with limited resources: a model from Sarawak, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Devi, B. C. R.; Corbex, M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The provision of palliative care (PC) and opioids is difficult to ensure in remote areas in low- and middle-income countries. We describe here the set up of a home-care program in Sarawak (the Malaysian part of the Borneo Island), where half the population lives in villages that are difficult to access. Methods: The establishment of this program, initiated in 1994 by the Department of Radiotherapy of Sarawak General Hospital, consisted of training, empowering nurses, simplifying referral, facilitating access to medication, and increasing awareness among public and health professionals about PC. Results: The program has been sustainable and cost efficient, serving 936 patients in 2006. The total morphine usage in the program increased from <200 g in 1993 to >1400 g in 2006. The results show that pain medication can be provided even in remote areas with effective organization and empowerment of nurses, who were the most important determinants for the set up of this program. Education of family was also a key aspect. Conclusion: The authors believe that the experience gained in Sarawak may help other regions with low or middle resources in the set up of their PC program especially for their remote rural population. PMID:18641007

  8. Setting up home-based palliative care in countries with limited resources: a model from Sarawak, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Devi, B C R; Tang, T S; Corbex, M

    2008-12-01

    The provision of palliative care (PC) and opioids is difficult to ensure in remote areas in low- and middle-income countries. We describe here the set up of a home-care program in Sarawak (the Malaysian part of the Borneo Island), where half the population lives in villages that are difficult to access. The establishment of this program, initiated in 1994 by the Department of Radiotherapy of Sarawak General Hospital, consisted of training, empowering nurses, simplifying referral, facilitating access to medication, and increasing awareness among public and health professionals about PC. The program has been sustainable and cost efficient, serving 936 patients in 2006. The total morphine usage in the program increased from <200 g in 1993 to >1400 g in 2006. The results show that pain medication can be provided even in remote areas with effective organization and empowerment of nurses, who were the most important determinants for the set up of this program. Education of family was also a key aspect. The authors believe that the experience gained in Sarawak may help other regions with low or middle resources in the set up of their PC program especially for their remote rural population.

  9. Evaluation of an educational program for essential newborn care in resource-limited settings: Essential Care for Every Baby.

    PubMed

    Thukral, Anu; Lockyer, Jocelyn; Bucher, Sherri L; Berkelhamer, Sara; Bose, Carl; Deorari, Ashok; Esamai, Fabian; Faremo, Sonia; Keenan, William J; McMillan, Douglas; Niermeyer, Susan; Singhal, Nalini

    2015-06-24

    Essential Care for Every Baby (ECEB) is an evidence-based educational program designed to increase cognitive knowledge and develop skills of health care professionals in essential newborn care in low-resource areas. The course focuses on the immediate care of the newborn after birth and during the first day or until discharge from the health facility. This study assessed the overall design of the course; the ability of facilitators to teach the course; and the knowledge and skills acquired by the learners. Testing occurred at 2 global sites. Data from a facilitator evaluation survey, a learner satisfaction survey, a multiple choice question (MCQ) examination, performance on two objective structured clinical evaluations (OSCE), and pre- and post-course confidence assessments were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Pre-post course differences were examined. Comments on the evaluation form and post-course group discussions were analyzed to identify potential program improvements. Using ECEB course material, master trainers taught 12 facilitators in India and 11 in Kenya who subsequently taught 62 providers of newborn care in India and 64 in Kenya. Facilitators and learners were satisfied with their ability to teach and learn from the program. Confidence (3.5 to 5) and MCQ scores (India: pre 19.4, post 24.8; Kenya: pre 20.8, post 25.0) improved (p < 0.001). Most participants demonstrated satisfactory skills on the OSCEs. Qualitative data suggested the course was effective, but also identified areas for course improvement. These included additional time for hands-on practice, including practice in a clinical setting, the addition of video learning aids and the adaptation of content to conform to locally recommended practices. ECEB program was highly acceptable, demonstrated improved confidence, improved knowledge and developed skills. ECEB may improve newborn care in low resource settings if it is part of an overall implementation plan that addresses local needs and

  10. Nucleating the development of telemedicine to support healthcare workers in resource-limited settings: a new approach.

    PubMed

    Wootton, Richard; Wu, Wei-I; Bonnardot, Laurent

    2013-10-01

    Collegium Telemedicus (CT) offers a new approach to the problem of starting a store-and-forward telemedicine network for use in low resource settings. The CT organization provides a no-cost template to allow groups to start a network without delay, together with a peer-support environment for those operating the networks. A new group needs only to supply a Guarantor (who accepts responsibility for the work of the network) and a Coordinator (who operates the telemedicine network, allocating cases and ensuring that they are responded to). Communication takes place via secure messaging, which has several advantages over plain email, e.g. all the data are stored centrally, which means that they can be read from a hand-held device such as a smart phone, but do not need to be stored on that device. Users can access the system with a standard web browser. In the first three months, seven networks were established on the CT system by university groups in the US, the UK, Australia and New Zealand, and by a large, multinational humanitarian organisation. In the most active network, there were 86 telemedicine cases in the first three months, i.e. an average submission rate of 7 cases/week. The CT system appears to fulfil its aim of assisting doctors who wish to help colleagues in other countries by improving their access to specialist opinions, while allowing them to maintain control over the new network's use and development. The long term aim of the CT organization is to provide a means of improving the quality of health care at the point of delivery in low resource settings.

  11. Intrapartum management for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV in resource-limited settings: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Liu, K Cherry; Chibwesha, Carla J

    2013-12-01

    Prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV guidelines in resource-limited settings focus on antenatal and postnatal management. In this review of the literature, we present findings from select studies, highlight best practices, and present evidence-based guidelines for intrapartum PMTCT management that are applicable to resource-limited settings. We discuss the roles of intrapartum HIV testing, intrapartum antiretroviral medications, mode of delivery in settings with and without HIV RNA testing, other delivery practices, and infant care in the immediate postnatal period. With the advent of Option B+, which recommends all HIV-infected pregnant women commence lifelong combination antiretroviral therapy (ART), the potential impact for intrapartum interventions will be greatest for those women who recently have seroconverted and those with unknown HIV status. Research on intrapartum PMTCT interventions should focus on these populations.

  12. Challenges in modeling complexity of neglected tropical diseases: a review of dynamics of visceral leishmaniasis in resource limited settings.

    PubMed

    DebRoy, Swati; Prosper, Olivia; Mishoe, Austin; Mubayi, Anuj

    2017-01-01

    Neglected tropical diseases (NTD), account for a large proportion of the global disease burden, and their control faces several challenges including diminishing human and financial resources for those distressed from such diseases. Visceral leishmaniasis (VL), the second-largest parasitic killer (after malaria) and an NTD affects poor populations and causes considerable cost to the affected individuals. Mathematical models can serve as a critical and cost-effective tool for understanding VL dynamics, however, complex array of socio-economic factors affecting its dynamics need to be identified and appropriately incorporated within a dynamical modeling framework. This study reviews literature on vector-borne diseases and collects challenges and successes related to the modeling of transmission dynamics of VL. Possible ways of creating a comprehensive mathematical model is also discussed. Published literature in three categories are reviewed: (i) identifying non-traditional but critical mechanisms for VL transmission in resource limited regions, (ii) mathematical models used for dynamics of Leishmaniasis and other related vector borne infectious diseases and (iii) examples of modeling that have the potential to capture identified mechanisms of VL to study its dynamics. This review suggests that VL elimination have not been achieved yet because existing transmission dynamics models for VL fails to capture relevant local socio-economic risk factors. This study identifies critical risk factors of VL and distribute them in six categories (atmosphere, access, availability, awareness, adherence, and accedence). The study also suggests novel quantitative models, parts of it are borrowed from other non-neglected diseases, for incorporating these factors and using them to understand VL dynamics and evaluating control programs for achieving VL elimination in a resource-limited environment. Controlling VL is expensive for local communities in endemic countries where individuals

  13. Exacerbations and health care resource utilization in patients with airflow limitation diseases attending a primary care setting: the PUMA study.

    PubMed

    Montes de Oca, Maria; Aguirre, Carlos; Lopez Varela, Maria Victorina; Laucho-Contreras, Maria E; Casas, Alejandro; Surmont, Filip

    2016-01-01

    COPD, asthma, and asthma-COPD overlap increase health care resource consumption, predominantly because of hospitalization for exacerbations and also increased visits to general practitioners (GPs) or specialists. Little information is available regarding this in the primary care setting. To describe the prevalence and number of GP and specialist visits for any cause or due to exacerbations in patients with COPD, asthma, and asthma-COPD overlap. COPD was defined as post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) ratio <0.70; asthma was defined as prior medical diagnosis, wheezing in the last 12 months, or wheezing plus reversibility (post-bronchodilator FEV1 or FVC increase ≥200 mL and ≥12%); asthma-COPD overlap was defined as post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC <0.70 plus prior asthma diagnosis. Health care utilization was evaluated as GP and/or specialist visits in the previous year. Among the 1,743 individuals who completed the questionnaire, 1,540 performed acceptable spirometry. COPD patients had a higher prevalence of any medical visits to any physician versus those without COPD (37.2% vs 21.8%, respectively) and exacerbations doubled the number of visits. The prevalence of any medical visits to any physician was also higher in asthma patients versus those without asthma (wheezing: 47.2% vs 22.7%; medical diagnosis: 54.6% vs 21.6%; wheezing plus reversibility: 46.2% vs 23.8%, respectively). Asthma patients with exacerbations had twice the number of visits versus those without an exacerbation. The number of visits was higher (2.8 times) in asthma-COPD overlap, asthma (1.9 times), or COPD (1.4 times) patients versus those without these respiratory diseases; the number of visits due to exacerbation was also higher (4.9 times) in asthma-COPD overlap, asthma (3.5 times), and COPD (3.8 times) patients. COPD, asthma, and asthma-COPD overlap increase the prevalence of medical visits and, therefore, health care resource

  14. Exacerbations and health care resource utilization in patients with airflow limitation diseases attending a primary care setting: the PUMA study

    PubMed Central

    Montes de Oca, Maria; Aguirre, Carlos; Lopez Varela, Maria Victorina; Laucho-Contreras, Maria E; Casas, Alejandro; Surmont, Filip

    2016-01-01

    Background COPD, asthma, and asthma–COPD overlap increase health care resource consumption, predominantly because of hospitalization for exacerbations and also increased visits to general practitioners (GPs) or specialists. Little information is available regarding this in the primary care setting. Objectives To describe the prevalence and number of GP and specialist visits for any cause or due to exacerbations in patients with COPD, asthma, and asthma–COPD overlap. Methods COPD was defined as post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) ratio <0.70; asthma was defined as prior medical diagnosis, wheezing in the last 12 months, or wheezing plus reversibility (post-bronchodilator FEV1 or FVC increase ≥200 mL and ≥12%); asthma–COPD overlap was defined as post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC <0.70 plus prior asthma diagnosis. Health care utilization was evaluated as GP and/or specialist visits in the previous year. Results Among the 1,743 individuals who completed the questionnaire, 1,540 performed acceptable spirometry. COPD patients had a higher prevalence of any medical visits to any physician versus those without COPD (37.2% vs 21.8%, respectively) and exacerbations doubled the number of visits. The prevalence of any medical visits to any physician was also higher in asthma patients versus those without asthma (wheezing: 47.2% vs 22.7%; medical diagnosis: 54.6% vs 21.6%; wheezing plus reversibility: 46.2% vs 23.8%, respectively). Asthma patients with exacerbations had twice the number of visits versus those without an exacerbation. The number of visits was higher (2.8 times) in asthma–COPD overlap, asthma (1.9 times), or COPD (1.4 times) patients versus those without these respiratory diseases; the number of visits due to exacerbation was also higher (4.9 times) in asthma–COPD overlap, asthma (3.5 times), and COPD (3.8 times) patients. Conclusion COPD, asthma, and asthma–COPD overlap increase the prevalence of

  15. Development of a technical assistance framework for building organizational capacity of health programs in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Reyes, E Michael; Sharma, Anjali; Thomas, Kate K; Kuehn, Chuck; Morales, José Rafael

    2014-09-17

    Little information exists on the technical assistance needs of local indigenous organizations charged with managing HIV care and treatment programs funded by the US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR). This paper describes the methods used to adapt the Primary Care Assessment Tool (PCAT) framework, which has successfully strengthened HIV primary care services in the US, into one that could strengthen the capacity of local partners to deliver priority health programs in resource-constrained settings by identifying their specific technical assistance needs. Qualitative methods and inductive reasoning approaches were used to conceptualize and adapt the new Clinical Assessment for Systems Strengthening (ClASS) framework. Stakeholder interviews, comparisons of existing assessment tools, and a pilot test helped determine the overall ClASS framework for use in low-resource settings. The framework was further refined one year post-ClASS implementation. Stakeholder interviews, assessment of existing tools, a pilot process and the one-year post- implementation assessment informed the adaptation of the ClASS framework for assessing and strengthening technical and managerial capacities of health programs at three levels: international partner, local indigenous partner, and local partner treatment facility. The PCAT focus on organizational strengths and systems strengthening was retained and implemented in the ClASS framework and approach. A modular format was chosen to allow the use of administrative, fiscal and clinical modules in any combination and to insert new modules as needed by programs. The pilot led to refined pre-visit planning, informed review team composition, increased visit duration, and restructured modules. A web-based toolkit was developed to capture three years of experiential learning; this kit can also be used for independent implementation of the ClASS framework. A systematic adaptation process has produced a qualitative framework that can

  16. Using a geographic information system to enhance patient access to point-of-care diagnostics in a limited-resource setting.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, William J; Kemp, Karen; Kost, Gerald

    2016-03-01

    Rapid and accurate diagnosis drives evidence-based care in health. Point-of-care testing (POCT) aids diagnosis by bringing advanced technologies closer to patients. Health small-world networks are constrained by natural connectivity in the interactions between geography of resources and social forces. Using a geographic information system (GIS) we can understand how populations utilize their health networks, visualize their inefficiencies, and compare alternatives. This project focuses on cardiac care resource in rural Isaan, Thailand. A health care access analysis was created using ArcGIS Network Analyst 10.1 from data representing aggregated population, roads, health resource facilities, and diagnostic technologies. The analysis quantified cardiac health care access and identified ways to improve it using both widespread and resource-limited strategies. Results indicated that having diagnostic technologies closer to populations streamlines critical care paths. GIS allowed us to compare the effectiveness of the implementation strategies and put into perspective the benefits of adopting rapid POCT within health networks. Geospatial analyses derive high impact by improving alternative diagnostic placement strategies in limited-resource settings and by revealing deficiencies in health care access pathways. Additionally, the GIS provides a platform for comparing relative costs, assessing benefits, and improving outcomes. This approach can be implemented effectively by health ministries seeking to enhance cardiac care despite limited resources.

  17. Ethical challenges in integrating patient-care with clinical research in a resource-limited setting: perspectives from Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In resource-limited settings where healthcare services are limited and poverty is common, it is difficult to ethically conduct clinical research without providing patient-care. Therefore, integration of patient-care with clinical research appears as an attractive way of conducting research while providing patient-care. In this article, we discuss the ethical implications of such approach with perspectives from Papua New Guinea. Discussion Considering the difficulties of providing basic healthcare services in developing countries, it may be argued that integration of clinical research with patient-care is an effective, rational and ethical way of conducting research. However, blending patient-care with clinical research may increase the risk of subordinating patient-care in favour of scientific gains; therapeutic misconception and inappropriate inducement; and the risk of causing health system failures due to limited capacity in developing countries to sustain the level of healthcare services sponsored by the research. Nevertheless, these ethical and administrative implications can be minimised if patient-care takes precedence over research; the input of local ethics committees and institutions are considered; and funding agencies acknowledge their ethical obligation when sponsoring research in resource-limited settings. Summary Although integration of patient-care with clinical research in developing countries appears as an attractive way of conducting research when resources are limited, careful planning and consideration on the ethical implications of such approach must be considered. PMID:23885908

  18. Evaluation of in-house polymerase chain reaction assay sensitivity, can it be utilized in limited-resources settings?

    PubMed

    Dorudinia, Atosa; Shamaei, Masoud; Karimi, Shirin; Javadi, Alireza; Mohammadi Ziazi, Leila; Pourabdollah, Mihan

    2014-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay has widely used for the detection of tuberculosis (TB). This study tried to compare in-house PCR with some well-known commercial PCR kits for detection of TB agent. Clinical samples obtained from 620 TB suspected patients were analyzed for the diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) by in-house PCR. All samples were obtained through pulmonary specimens consisted of 384 sputum, 148 bronchial aspirates and 88 pleural effusions. Considering culture as a golden criterion, in which its diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of PCR assay were 87.7% and 85.6%, respectively. The findings of this study also indicate 22.1% (137/620) of the specimens were detected as MTC by PCR. Both PCR and culture confirmed presence of MTC in 57 of the samples. In comparison to culture, the diagnostic sensitivity of PCR for sputum was 87.5% (42/48), bronchial aspirates 100% (12/12), and 60% (3/5) for pleural effusions. The sensitivity of in-house PCR method is comparable with the sensitivity of Amplicor and Cobas TaqMan for MTC. The study illustrates the in-house PCR assay for detection of MTC has high sensitivity and specificity versus approved commercial kits. This could be reliable test in the diagnosis of MTC in resource-limited countries.

  19. The use of Minilabs to improve the testing capacity of regulatory authorities in resource limited settings: Tanzanian experience.

    PubMed

    Risha, Peter Gasper; Msuya, Zera; Clark, Malcolm; Johnson, Keith; Ndomondo-Sigonda, Margareth; Layloff, Thomas

    2008-08-01

    The Tanzania Food and Drugs Authority piloted the use of Minilab kits, a thin-layer-chromatographic based drug quality testing technique, in a two-tier quality assurance program. The program is intended to improve testing capacity with timely screening of the quality of medicines as they enter the market. After 1 week training of inspectors on Minilab screening techniques, they were stationed at key Ports-of-Entry (POE) to screen the quality of imported medicines. In addition, three non-Ports-of-Entry centres were established to screen samples collected during Post-Marketing-Surveillance. Standard operating procedures (SOPs) were developed to structure and standardize the implementation process. Over 1200 samples were tested using the Minilab outside the central quality control laboratory (QCL), almost doubling the previous testing capacity. The program contributed to increased regulatory reach and visibility of the Authority throughout the country, serving as a deterrent against entry of substandard medicines into market. The use of Minilab for quality screening was inexpensive and provided a high sample throughput. However, it suffers from the limitation that it can reliably detect only grossly substandard or wrong drug samples and therefore, it should not be used as an independent testing resource but in conjunction with a full-service quality control laboratory capable of auditing reported substandard results.

  20. Sample preparation: a challenge in the development of point-of-care nucleic acid-based assays for resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Dineva, Magda Anastassova; MahiLum-Tapay, Lourdes; Lee, Helen

    2007-12-01

    Currently available nucleic acid testing (NAT)-based assays are complex and time-consuming, and they require expensive instrumentation and dedicated laboratory spaces for sample preparation as well as for amplification and detection of the nucleic acid target. Reagents required for these tests are also expensive and must be transported and stored refrigerated or frozen. These characteristics have limited the use of such assays for point-of-care (POC) testing, especially in resource-poor settings. Efforts to develop simple and rapid NAT-based assays have focused predominantly on the amplification and detection steps, with sample preparation and nucleic acid extraction remaining the bottleneck in the development of NAT systems suitable for POC applications or resource-limited settings. A review of NAT platforms and technologies currently under development and validation for rapid field testing revealed that, in addition to requiring expensive and complex instrumentation, many of these systems also require off-line sample preparation and reagent handling. In their current format, they are therefore not appropriate for POC testing in resource-limited settings. We evaluated several commercially available technologies and procedures for the isolation of nucleic acid with the extraction of HIV-1 RNA from human plasma as a model system. Our results indicate that solid-phase extraction with silica or glass in the presence of a chaotropic salt provides the highest extraction efficiency. However, none of the existing methods and technologies is readily adaptable to a POC system. The integration of sample preparation procedures well suited to NAT-based assays in resource-limited settings therefore remains a challenge.

  1. A partnership model for implementing electronic health records in resource-limited primary care settings: experiences from two nurse-managed health centers

    PubMed Central

    Dennehy, Patricia; White, Mary P; Hamilton, Andrew; Pohl, Joanne M; Tanner, Clare; Onifade, Tiffiani J

    2011-01-01

    Objective To present a partnership-based and community-oriented approach designed to ease provider anxiety and facilitate the implementation of electronic health records (EHR) in resource-limited primary care settings. Materials and Methods The approach, referred to as partnership model, was developed and iteratively refined through the research team's previous work on implementing health information technology (HIT) in over 30 safety net practices. This paper uses two case studies to illustrate how the model was applied to help two nurse-managed health centers (NMHC), a particularly vulnerable primary care setting, implement EHR and get prepared to meet the meaningful use criteria. Results The strong focus of the model on continuous quality improvement led to eventual implementation success at both sites, despite difficulties encountered during the initial stages of the project. Discussion There has been a lack of research, particularly in resource-limited primary care settings, on strategies for abating provider anxiety and preparing them to manage complex changes associated with EHR uptake. The partnership model described in this paper may provide useful insights into the work shepherded by HIT regional extension centers dedicated to supporting resource-limited communities disproportionally affected by EHR adoption barriers. Conclusion NMHC, similar to other primary care settings, are often poorly resourced, understaffed, and lack the necessary expertise to deploy EHR and integrate its use into their day-to-day practice. This study demonstrates that implementation of EHR, a prerequisite to meaningful use, can be successfully achieved in this setting, and partnership efforts extending far beyond the initial software deployment stage may be the key. PMID:21828225

  2. Micro-economic impact of congenital heart surgery: results of a prospective study from a limited-resource setting.

    PubMed

    Raj, Manu; Paul, Mary; Sudhakar, Abish; Varghese, Anu Alphonse; Haridas, Aareesh Chittulliparamb; Kabali, Conrad; Kumar, Raman Krishna

    2015-01-01

    The microeconomic impact of surgery for congenital heart disease is unexplored, particularly in resource limited environments. We sought to understand the direct and indirect costs related to congenital heart surgery and its impact on Indian households from a family perspective. Baseline and first follow-up data of 644 consecutive children admitted for surgery for congenital heart disease (March 2013 - July 2014) in a tertiary referral hospital in Central Kerala, South India was collected prospectivelyfrom parents through questionnaires using a semi-structured interview schedule. The median age was 8.2 months (IQR: 3.0- 36.0 months). Most families belonged to upper middle (43.0%) and lower middle (35.7%) socioeconomic class. Only 3.9% of families had some form of health insurance. The median expense for the admission and surgery was INR 201898 (IQR: 163287-266139) [I$ 11989 (IQR: 9696-15804)], which was 0.93 (IQR: 0.52-1.49) times the annual family income of affected patients. Median loss of man-days was 35 (IQR: 24-50) and job-days was 15 (IQR: 11-24). Surgical risk category and hospital stay duration significantly predicted higher costs. One in two families reported overwhelming to high financial stress during admission period for surgery. Approximately half of the families borrowed money during the follow up period after surgery. Surgery for congenital heart disease results in significant financial burden for majority of families studied. Efforts should be directed at further reductions in treatment costs without compromising the quality of care together with generating financial support for affected families.

  3. Usability and navigability of an HIV/AIDS internet intervention for adolescents in a resource-limited setting.

    PubMed

    Ybarra, Michele L; Biringi, Ruth; Prescott, Tonya; Bull, Sheana S

    2012-11-01

    Use of the Internet is growing in Sub-Saharan Africa. Evidence of computer and Internet effectiveness for reduction in risk behaviors associated with HIV shown in US settings has yet to be replicated in Africa. We describe the development, usability, and navigability testing of an Internet-based HIV prevention program for secondary school students in Uganda, called CyberSenga. For this work, we used four data collection activities, including observation of (a) computer skills and (b) navigation, (c) focus group discussions, and (d) field assessments to document comprehension and usability of program content. We document limited skills among students, but youth with basic computer skills were able to navigate the program after instruction. Youth were most interested in activities with more interaction. Field testing illustrated the importance of using a stand-alone electrical source during program delivery. This work suggests that delivery of Internet-based health promotion content in Africa requires attention to user preparedness and literacy, bandwidth, Internet connection, and electricity.

  4. Usability and Navigability of an HIV/AIDS Internet Intervention for Adolescents in a Resource Limited Setting

    PubMed Central

    Ybarra, Michele; Biringi, Ruth; Prescott, Tonya; Bull, Sheana S.

    2012-01-01

    Use of Internet is growing in Sub Saharan Africa. Evidence of computer and Internet effectiveness for reduction in risk behaviors associated with HIV shown in U.S. settings has yet to be replicated in Africa. We describe the development, usability and navigability testing of an Internet-based HIV prevention program for secondary school students in Uganda, called CyberSenga. For this work, we used four data collection activities, including observation of (a) computer skills and (b) navigation, (c) focus group discussions, and (d) field assessments to document comprehension and usability of program content. We document limited skills among students, but youth with basic computers skills were able to navigate the program after instruction. Youth were most interested in activities with more interaction. Field-testing illustrated the importance of using a stand-alone electrical source during program delivery. This work suggests delivery of Internet-based health promotion content in Africa requires attention to user preparedness and literacy, bandwidth, Internet connection, and electricity. PMID:22918136

  5. Food composition tables in resource-poor settings: exploring current limitations and opportunities, with a focus on animal-source foods in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    de Bruyn, Julia; Ferguson, Elaine; Allman-Farinelli, Margaret; Darnton-Hill, Ian; Maulaga, Wende; Msuya, John; Alders, Robyn

    2016-11-08

    Animal-source foods (ASF) have the potential to enhance the nutritional adequacy of cereal-based diets in low- and middle-income countries, through the provision of high-quality protein and bioavailable micronutrients. The development of guidelines for including ASF in local diets requires an understanding of the nutrient content of available resources. This article reviews food composition tables (FCT) used in sub-Saharan Africa, examining the spectrum of ASF reported and exploring data sources for each reference. Compositional data are shown to be derived from a small number of existing data sets from analyses conducted largely in high-income nations, often many decades previously. There are limitations in using such values, which represent the products of intensively raised animals of commercial breeds, as a reference in resource-poor settings where indigenous breed livestock are commonly reared in low-input production systems, on mineral-deficient soils and not receiving nutritionally balanced feed. The FCT examined also revealed a lack of data on the full spectrum of ASF, including offal and wild foods, which correspond to local food preferences and represent valuable dietary resources in food-deficient settings. Using poultry products as an example, comparisons are made between compositional data from three high-income nations, and potential implications of differences in the published values for micronutrients of public health significance, including Fe, folate and vitamin A, are discussed. It is important that those working on nutritional interventions and on developing dietary recommendations for resource-poor settings understand the limitations of current food composition data and that opportunities to improve existing resources are more actively explored and supported.

  6. Simplification of antiretroviral therapy: a necessary step in the public health response to HIV/AIDS in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Vitoria, Marco; Ford, Nathan; Doherty, Meg; Flexner, Charles

    2014-01-01

    The global scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) over the past decade represents one of the great public health and human rights achievements of recent times. Moving from an individualized treatment approach to a simplified and standardized public health approach has been critical to ART scale-up, simplifying both prescribing practices and supply chain management. In terms of the latter, the risk of stock-outs can be reduced and simplified prescribing practices support task shifting of care to nursing and other non-physician clinicians; this strategy is critical to increase access to ART care in settings where physicians are limited in number. In order to support such simplification, successive World Health Organization guidelines for ART in resource-limited settings have aimed to reduce the number of recommended options for first-line ART in such settings. Future drug and regimen choices for resource-limited settings will likely be guided by the same principles that have led to the recommendation of a single preferred regimen and will favour drugs that have the following characteristics: minimal risk of failure, efficacy and tolerability, robustness and forgiveness, no overlapping resistance in treatment sequencing, convenience, affordability, and compatibility with anti-TB and anti-hepatitis treatments.

  7. Introducing a structured prescription form improves the quality of handwritten prescriptions in limited resource setting of developing countries.

    PubMed

    Raza, Usman Ahmad; Latif, Sana; Naseer, Anum; Saad, Maryam; Zeeshan, Muhammad Fazal; Qazi, Umair

    2016-10-01

    Incomplete or illegible prescriptions can lead to serious errors in administration of the prescribed medication, which can become hazardous. Our aim is to determine if a structured prescription form can improve the quality of handwritten prescription in terms of completeness and legibility. We conducted a prospective, non-randomized, time series study of quality of written prescriptions of general practitioners at a tertiary teaching hospital in Peshawar, Pakistan. The study involved an intervention, composed of the introduction of a pre-printed structured prescription form. The data were collected within 4 weeks including a 2-week pre-intervention phase and 2-week post-intervention phase. Completeness, quality of prescriptions and legibility were compared before and after the intervention of the pre-printed structured prescription form. A total of 463 prescriptions were obtained (260 in the pre-intervention phase and 203 in the post-intervention phase). Between pre-intervention phase and post-intervention phase, the Pakistan Medical and Dental Council registration number presence in prescriptions improved from 73.1% to 100% (P < 0.0005). The presence of prescriber's signature improved from 92.7% to 99% (P = 0.001). Drug duration was not missing in 99.5% in post-intervention phase as compared with 90.4% in pre-intervention phase (P < 0.0005). Prescriptions with no legibility problems improved from 76.2% to 94.1% (P < 0.0005). Although not statistically significant, prescriptions in which drug dosage was not missing improved from 85% to 90.6% (P = 0.07). We have a limited single-center study. A larger study in multiple settings is needed to develop adequate evidence for such interventions. Subjective nature of prescription legibility can also be considered as a limitation. Structuring a prescription form alone may improve certain aspects of quality of written prescription in terms of completeness and legibility. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Towards a field-compatible optical spectroscopic device for cervical cancer screening in resource-limited settings: effects of calibration and pressure.

    PubMed

    Chang, Vivide Tuan-Chyan; Merisier, Delson; Yu, Bing; Walmer, David K; Ramanujam, Nirmala

    2011-09-12

    Quantitative optical spectroscopy has the potential to provide an effective low cost, and portable solution for cervical pre-cancer screening in resource-limited communities. However, clinical studies to validate the use of this technology in resource-limited settings require low power consumption and good quality control that is minimally influenced by the operator or variable environmental conditions in the field. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of two sources of potential error: calibration and pressure on the extraction of absorption and scattering properties of normal cervical tissues in a resource-limited setting in Leogane, Haiti. Our results show that self-calibrated measurements improved scattering measurements through real-time correction of system drift, in addition to minimizing the time required for post-calibration. Variations in pressure (tested without the potential confounding effects of calibration error) caused local changes in vasculature and scatterer density that significantly impacted the tissue absorption and scattering properties Future spectroscopic systems intended for clinical use, particularly where operator training is not viable and environmental conditions unpredictable, should incorporate a real-time self-calibration channel and collect diffuse reflectance spectra at a consistent pressure to maximize data integrity.

  9. The design and evaluation of a system for improved surveillance and prevention programmes in resource-limited settings using a hospital-based burn injury questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Peck, Michael; Falk, Henry; Meddings, David; Sugerman, David; Mehta, Sumi; Sage, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Limited and fragmented data collection systems exist for burn injury. A global registry may lead to better injury estimates and identify risk factors. A collaborative effort involving the WHO, the Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves, the CDC and the International Society for Burn Injuries was undertaken to simplify and standardise inpatient burn data collection. An expert panel of epidemiologists and burn care practitioners advised on the development of a new Global Burn Registry (GBR) form and online data entry system that can be expected to be used in resource-abundant or resource-limited settings. Methods International burn organisations, the CDC and the WHO solicited burn centre participation to pilot test the GBR system. The WHO and the CDC led a webinar tutorial for system implementation. Results During an 8-month period, 52 hospitals in 30 countries enrolled in the pilot and were provided the GBR instrument, guidance and a data visualisation tool. Evaluations were received from 29 hospitals (56%). Key findings Median time to upload completed forms was <10 min; physicians most commonly entered data (64%), followed by nurses (25%); layout, clarity, accuracy and relevance were all rated high; and a vast majority (85%) considered the GBR ‘highly valuable’ for prioritising, developing and monitoring burn prevention programmes. Conclusions The GBR was shown to be simple, flexible and acceptable to users. Enhanced regional and global understanding of burn epidemiology may help prioritise the selection, development and testing of primary prevention interventions for burns in resource-limited settings. PMID:27044496

  10. Addressing Antiretroviral Therapy-Associated Drug-Drug Interactions in Patients Requiring Treatment for Opportunistic Infections in Low-Income and Resource-Limited Settings.

    PubMed

    Chastain, Daniel B; Franco-Paredes, Carlos; Stover, Kayla R

    2017-09-08

    An increasing number of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients are achieving virologic suppression on antiretroviral therapy (ART) limiting the use of primary and secondary antimicrobial prophylaxis. However, in low-income and resource-limited settings, half of those infected with HIV are unaware of their diagnosis, and fewer than 50% of patients on ART achieve virologic suppression. Management of comorbidities and opportunistic infections among patients on ART may lead to inevitable drug-drug interactions (DDIs) and even toxicities. Elderly patients, individuals with multiple comorbidities, those receiving complex ART, and patients living in low-income settings experience higher rates of DDIs. Management of these cytochrome P450-mediated, nonmediated, and drug transport system DDIs is critical in HIV-infected patients, particularly those in resource-limited settings with few options for ART. This article critically analyzes and provides recommendations to manage significant DDIs and drug toxicities in HIV-infected patients receiving ART. © 2017, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  11. How to meet the demand for good quality renal dialysis as part of universal health coverage in resource-limited settings?

    PubMed

    Teerawattananon, Yot; Luz, Alia; Pilasant, Songyot; Tangsathitkulchai, Suteenoot; Chootipongchaivat, Sarocha; Tritasavit, Nattha; Yamabhai, Inthira; Tantivess, Sripen

    2016-03-18

    It is very challenging for resource-limited settings to introduce universal health coverage (UHC), particularly regarding the inclusion of high-cost renal dialysis as part of the UHC benefit package. This paper addresses three issues: (1) whether a setting commits to include renal dialysis in its UHC benefit package and if so, why and how; (2) how to ensure quality of renal dialysis services; and (3) how to improve the quality of life of patients using psychosocial and community interventions. This article reviews experiences of renal dialysis programs in seven settings based on presentations and discussions during the International Forum on Peritoneal Dialysis as a Priority Health Policy in Asia. A literature review was conducted to verify and validate the data as well as to fill information gaps presented in the forum. Five out of the seven settings implemented renal dialysis as part of their benefits package, while the other two have pilots or programs in their nascent stage. Renal replacement therapy has become part of the universal access package because these governments recognize the rising number of chronic kidney disease (CKD) cases, the catastrophically high costs of treatment, and that this is the only life-saving treatment available to patients. The recommendations are as follows: Governments should have a holistic approach to CKD interventions, including primary prevention as well as psychosocial interventions. Governments should consider subsidizing CKD treatment costs depending on their resources. Multi-stakeholder cooperation should be facilitated to enact these policies and conduct research and development for all aspects of interventions. International collaboration should be initiated to share experiences, good practices, and joint activities (e.g. capacity building and multinational procurement of medical supplies). This study provides practical recommendations to country governments as well as the international community on how to meet the

  12. SAGES: A Suite of Freely-Available Software Tools for Electronic Disease Surveillance in Resource-Limited Settings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-10

    health resources, and the costs of proprietary software. The Suite for Automated Global Electronic bioSurveillance (SAGES) is a collection of modular...concert with existing surveillance applications or the SAGES tools may be used en masse for an end-to-end biosurveillance capability. This flexibility...the scope of reportable conditions and are intended to help prevent and respond to global public health threats. SAGES, an electronic biosurveillance

  13. Approaches for scaling up human immunodeficiency virus testing and counseling in prevention of mother-to-child human immunodeficiency virus transmission settings in resource-limited countries.

    PubMed

    Bolu, Omotayo O; Allread, Virginia; Creek, Tracy; Stringer, Elizabeth; Forna, Fatu; Bulterys, Marc; Shaffer, Nathan

    2007-09-01

    Prevention of mother-to-child human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission (PMTCT) programs have nearly eliminated mother-to-child transmission of HIV in developed countries, but progress in resource-limited countries has been slow. A key factor limiting the scale-up of PMTCT programs is lack of knowledge of HIV serostatus. Increasing the availability and acceptability of HIV testing and counseling services will encourage more women to learn their status, providing a gateway to PMTCT interventions. Key factors contributing to the scale-up of testing and counseling include a policy of provider-initiated testing and counseling with right to refuse (opt-out); group pretest counseling; rapid HIV testing; innovative staffing strategies; and community and male involvement. Integration of testing and counseling within the community and all maternal and child health settings are critical for scaling-up and for linking women and their families to care and treatment services. This paper will review best practices needed for expansion of testing and counseling in PMTCT settings in resource-limited countries.

  14. Quantification of print, radio and television exposure among previous blood donors in Kenya: an opportunity for encouraging repeat donation in a resource-limited setting?

    PubMed

    Basavaraju, S V; Mwangi, J; Kellogg, T A; Odawo, L; Marum, L H

    2010-10-01

    Blood services in sub-Saharan Africa experience blood shortages and low retention of voluntary, non-remunerated donors. To boost collections by encouraging repeat donations, the Kenya National Blood Transfusion Service is exploring the likelihood of reaching previous donors through targeted print, radio and television advertising. We analysed data from a national AIDS Indicator Survey to determine whether previous donors have significant exposure to media. Respondents reporting history of blood donation had significantly higher exposure to print, radio and television media than those without history of blood donation. Targeted media campaigns encouraging repeat donation are likely to reach previous donors even in resource-limited settings.

  15. Protocol for the systematic review of the prevention, treatment and public health management of impetigo, scabies and fungal skin infections in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    May, Philippa; Bowen, Asha; Tong, Steven; Steer, Andrew; Prince, Sam; Andrews, Ross; Currie, Bart; Carapetis, Jonathan

    2016-09-23

    Impetigo, scabies, and fungal skin infections disproportionately affect populations in resource-limited settings. Evidence for standard treatment of skin infections predominantly stem from hospital-based studies in high-income countries. The evidence for treatment in resource-limited settings is less clear, as studies in these populations may lack randomisation and control groups for cultural, ethical or economic reasons. Likewise, a synthesis of the evidence for public health control within endemic populations is also lacking. We propose a systematic review of the evidence for the prevention, treatment and public health management of skin infections in resource-limited settings, to inform the development of guidelines for the standardised and streamlined clinical and public health management of skin infections in endemic populations. The protocol has been designed in line with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Protocols statement. All trial designs and analytical observational study designs will be eligible for inclusion. A systematic search of the peer-reviewed literature will include PubMed, Excertpa Medica and Global Health. Grey literature databases will also be systematically searched, and clinical trials registries scanned for future relevant studies. The primary outcome of interest will be the clinical cure or decrease in prevalence of impetigo, scabies, crusted scabies, tinea capitis, tinea corporis or tinea unguium. Two independent reviewers will perform eligibility assessment and data extraction using standardised electronic forms. Risk of bias assessment will be undertaken by two independent reviewers according to the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. Data will be tabulated and narratively synthesised. We expect there will be insufficient data to conduct meta-analysis. The final body of evidence will be reported against the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation grading system. The evidence

  16. Reconciling surveillance systems with limited resources: an evaluation of passive surveillance for rabies in an endemic setting.

    PubMed

    Craighead, Laura; Gilbert, William; Subasinghe, Dynatra; Häsler, Barbara

    2015-10-01

    Surveillance systems for rabies in endemic regions are often subject to severe constraints in terms of resources. The World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) and the World Health Organisation (WHO) propose the use of an active surveillance system to substantiate claims of disease freedom, including rabies. However, many countries do not have the resources to establish active surveillance systems for rabies and the testing of dead dogs poses logistical challenges. This paper explores the potential of using a scenario tree model parameterised with data collected via questionnaires and interviews to estimate the sensitivity of passive surveillance, assessing its potential as a viable low-cost alternative to active surveillance systems. The results of this explorative study illustrated that given a large enough sample size, in this case the entire population of Colombo City, the sensitivity of passive surveillance can be 100% even at a low disease prevalence (0.1%), despite the low sensitivity of individual surveillance components (mean values in the range 4.077×10(-5)-1.834×10(-3) at 1% prevalence). In addition, logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with increased recognition of rabies in dogs and reporting of rabies suspect dogs. Increased recognition was observed amongst dog owners (OR 3.8 (CI, 1.3-10.8)), people previously bitten by dogs (OR 5.9 (CI, 2.2-15.9)) and people who believed they had seen suspect dogs in the past (OR 4.7 (CI, 1.8-12.9)). Increased likelihood of reporting suspect dogs was observed amongst dog owners (OR 5.3 (CI, 1.1-25)). Further work is required to validate the data collection tool and the assumptions made in the model with respect to sample size in order to develop a robust methodology for evaluating passive rabies surveillance.

  17. Thoracic ultrasound: An adjunctive and valuable imaging tool in emergency, resource-limited settings and for a sustainable monitoring of patients.

    PubMed

    Trovato, Francesca M; Catalano, Daniela; Trovato, Guglielmo M

    2016-09-28

    Imaging workup of patients referred for elective assessment of chest disease requires an articulated approach: Imaging is asked for achieving timely diagnosis. The concurrent or subsequent use of thoracic ultrasound (TUS) with conventional (chest X-rays-) and more advanced imaging procedures (computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging) implies advantages, limitations and actual problems. Indeed, despite TUS may provide useful imaging of pleura, lung and heart disease, emergency scenarios are currently the most warranted field of application of TUS: Pleural effusion, pneumothorax, lung consolidation. This stems from its role in limited resources subsets; actually, ultrasound is an excellent risk reducing tool, which acts by: (1) increasing diagnostic certainty; (2) shortening time to definitive therapy; and (3) decreasing problems from blind procedures that carry an inherent level of complications. In addition, paediatric and newborn disease are particularly suitable for TUS investigation, aimed at the detection of congenital or acquired chest disease avoiding, limiting or postponing radiological exposure. TUS improves the effectiveness of elective medical practice, in resource-limited settings, in small point of care facilities and particularly in poorer countries. Quality and information provided by the procedure are increased avoiding whenever possible artefacts that can prevent or mislead the achievement of the correct diagnosis. Reliable monitoring of patients is possible, taking into consideration that appropriate expertise, knowledge, skills, training, and even adequate equipment's suitability are not always and everywhere affordable or accessible. TUS is complementary imaging procedure for the radiologist and an excellent basic diagnostic tool suitable to be shared with pneumologists, cardiologists and emergency physicians.

  18. Urbanisation but not biomass fuel smoke exposure is associated with asthma prevalence in four resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    Gaviola, Chelsea; Miele, Catherine H; Wise, Robert A; Gilman, Robert H; Jaganath, Devan; Miranda, J Jaime; Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio; Hansel, Nadia N; Checkley, William

    2017-01-01

    Background Urbanisation is an important contributor to the prevalence of asthma worldwide, and the burden of this effect in low-income and middle-income countries undergoing rapid industrialisation appears to be growing. We sought to characterise adult asthma prevalence across four geographically diverse settings in Peru and identify both individual and environmental risk factors associated with adult asthma. Methods We collected sociodemographics, clinical history and spirometry in adults aged ≥35 years. We defined asthma as meeting one of the three criteria: physician diagnosis, self-report of wheezing attack or use of asthma medications. We used multivariable logistic regression to assess individual and environmental factors associated with adult asthma. Results We analysed data from 2953 participants (mean age 55 years; 49% male). Overall asthma prevalence was 7.1%, which varied with urbanisation: highest in Lima (14.5%), followed by urban Puno (4.0%), semiurban Tumbes (3.8%) and rural Puno (1.8%). In multivariable analysis, being male (OR=0.60, 95% CI 0.39 to 0.93) and living at high altitude (OR=0.26, 95% CI 0.16 to 0.42) were associated with lower odds of having asthma, whereas living in an urban setting (OR=4.72, 95% CI 3.15 to 7.23) and family history of asthma (OR=1.83, 95% CI 1.19 to 2.73) were associated with higher odds. Current daily exposure to biomass fuel smoke (OR=1.18, 95% CI 0.70 to 1.91) and smoking (OR=0.99, 95% CI 0.73 to 1.22) were not associated with asthma. Conclusions These findings confirm that urbanisation is an environmental risk factor of asthma, questions biomass fuel smoke exposure as an important risk factor and proposes high altitude as possibly protective against the development of asthma. PMID:26699762

  19. Obesity in Preschool-Aged Children with Sickle Cell Anemia: Emerging Nutritional Challenge in a Resource Limited Setting.

    PubMed

    Bismarck Eke, Christopher; Onyeka Edelu, Benedict; Nnaemeka Ikefuna, Anthony; Josephine Emodi, Ifeoma; Chidozie Ibe, Bede

    2015-01-01

    The burden of childhood obesity is increasing in most developing countries particularly in the urban areas owing to globalization; and children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) in such environment do not live in isolation. The study is aimed at determining the prevalence of obesity in younger children with SCA. A consecutive recruitment of 58 children with SCA aged between 1 year and 5 years 4 months (subjects) and their age and sex matched controls selected using multistage sampling technique were carried out. The weight and height of the children were obtained using standard equipment. The WHO Anthro and Anthro-Plus software were used for analyzing the nutritional status of the children based on standard deviation (z-scores). The data were analyzed using SPSS version 19.0 while the level of significance was set at p < 0.05. The mean BMI for the subjects was 15.38 ± 1.93 (range from 11.50-20.80) and 17.10 ± 2.28 (range from 13.4-23.20) in the controls. Overweight (z-score > + 1 ≤ 2) and obesity (z score >+2) were recorded in 10 (17.2%) and 2 (3.4%) of the subjects while in the controls overweight and obesity were observed in 16 (27.6%) and 13 (22.4%), respectively (p = 0.000). Obesity and overweight is becoming prevalent among children with SCA and so awareness and preventive health education about obesity should be created among caregivers of children with sickle cell anemia in our setting to avert its possible complications.

  20. Childhood intussusceptions at a tertiary care hospital in northwestern Tanzania: a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge in resource-limited setting.

    PubMed

    Chalya, Phillipo L; Kayange, Neema M; Chandika, Alphonce B

    2014-03-11

    Intussusception remains a common cause of bowel obstruction in children and results in significant morbidity and mortality if not promptly treated. There is a paucity of prospective studies regarding childhood intussusception in Tanzania and particularly the study area. This study describes the pattern, clinical presentations and management outcomes of childhood intussusception in our setting and highlights the challenging problems in the management of this disease. This was a prospective descriptive study of patients aged < 10 years operated for intussusception at Bugando Medical Centre. Ethical approval to conduct the study was obtained from relevant authorities. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 17.0. A total of 56 patients were studied. The male to female ratio was 3.3: 1. The median age was 6 months. Three-quarter of patients were < 1 year. Etiology was mainly idiopathic in 91.1% of cases. The classic triad of bloody stool, vomiting and abdominal distention/abdominal pain was found in 24 (42.5%) patients. The diagnosis of intussusception was mainly clinically in 71.4% of cases. All patients were treated surgically. Ileo-colic was the most frequent type of intussusception (67.9%). Twenty-six (46.4%) patients required bowel resection. The rate of bowel resection was significantly associated with late presentation > 24 hour (p = 0.001). Complication rate was 32.1% and surgical site infection (37.5%) was the most frequent complication. The median length of hospital stay was 7 days. Patients who had bowel resection and those who developed complications stayed longer in the hospital and this was statistically significant (p < 0.001). Mortality rate was 14.3%. Age < 1 year, delayed presentation, associated peritonitis, bowel resection and surgical site infection were the main predictors of mortality (p < 0.001). The follow up of patients was generally poor Intussusception in our setting is characterized by late presentation, lack of specialized facilities and

  1. Childhood intussusceptions at a tertiary care hospital in northwestern Tanzania: a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge in resource-limited setting

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Intussusception remains a common cause of bowel obstruction in children and results in significant morbidity and mortality if not promptly treated. There is a paucity of prospective studies regarding childhood intussusception in Tanzania and particularly the study area. This study describes the pattern, clinical presentations and management outcomes of childhood intussusception in our setting and highlights the challenging problems in the management of this disease. Methods This was a prospective descriptive study of patients aged < 10 years operated for intussusception at Bugando Medical Centre. Ethical approval to conduct the study was obtained from relevant authorities. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 17.0. Results A total of 56 patients were studied. The male to female ratio was 3.3: 1. The median age was 6 months. Three-quarter of patients were < 1 year. Etiology was mainly idiopathic in 91.1% of cases. The classic triad of bloody stool, vomiting and abdominal distention/abdominal pain was found in 24 (42.5%) patients. The diagnosis of intussusception was mainly clinically in 71.4% of cases. All patients were treated surgically. Ileo-colic was the most frequent type of intussusception (67.9%). Twenty-six (46.4%) patients required bowel resection. The rate of bowel resection was significantly associated with late presentation > 24 hour (p = 0.001). Complication rate was 32.1% and surgical site infection (37.5%) was the most frequent complication. The median length of hospital stay was 7 days. Patients who had bowel resection and those who developed complications stayed longer in the hospital and this was statistically significant (p < 0.001). Mortality rate was 14.3%. Age < 1 year, delayed presentation, associated peritonitis, bowel resection and surgical site infection were the main predictors of mortality (p < 0.001). The follow up of patients was generally poor Conclusion Intussusception in our setting is characterized by late presentation

  2. Prevalence and risk factors for allergic rhinitis in two resource-limited settings in Peru with disparate degrees of urbanization

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, L. M.; Romero, K. M.; Robinson, C. L.; Hansel, N. N.; Gilman, R. H.; Hamilton, R. G.; Lima, J. J.; Wise, R. A.; Checkley, W.

    2017-01-01

    being overweight and 7% for an elevated total serum IgE. Conclusion and Clinical Relevance Allergic rhinitis was prevalent in both settings, and important risk factors include elevated exhaled nitric oxide, allergic sensitization to common household aeroallergens, parental rhinitis, being overweight and high total serum IgE. When considering subject-specific factors, the difference in prevalence between the urban and rural settings became non-important. PMID:25059756

  3. Open-source point-of-care electronic medical records for use in resource-limited settings: systematic review and questionnaire surveys.

    PubMed

    Millard, Peter S; Bru, Juan; Berger, Christopher A

    2012-01-01

    Point-of-care electronic medical records (EMRs) are a key tool to manage chronic illness. Several EMRs have been developed for use in treating HIV and tuberculosis, but their applicability to primary care, technical requirements and clinical functionalities are largely unknown. This study aimed to address the needs of clinicians from resource-limited settings without reliable internet access who are considering adopting an open-source EMR. Open-source point-of-care EMRs suitable for use in areas without reliable internet access. The authors conducted a comprehensive search of all open-source EMRs suitable for sites without reliable internet access. The authors surveyed clinician users and technical implementers from a single site and technical developers of each software product. The authors evaluated availability, cost and technical requirements. The hardware and software for all six systems is easily available, but they vary considerably in proprietary components, installation requirements and customisability. This study relied solely on self-report from informants who developed and who actively use the included products. Clinical functionalities vary greatly among the systems, and none of the systems yet meet minimum requirements for effective implementation in a primary care resource-limited setting. The safe prescribing of medications is a particular concern with current tools. The dearth of fully functional EMR systems indicates a need for a greater emphasis by global funding agencies to move beyond disease-specific EMR systems and develop a universal open-source health informatics platform.

  4. Severe malnutrition and metabolic complications of HIV-infected children in the antiretroviral era: clinical care and management in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Musoke, Philippa M; Fergusson, Pamela

    2011-12-01

    More than 2 million children globally are living with HIV infection and >90% of these reside in sub-Saharan Africa. Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) remains a major problem for HIV-infected children who live in resource-limited settings (RLS), and SAM is an important risk factor for mortality. SAM in HIV-infected children is associated with complications including electrolyte disorders, micronutrient deficiencies, and severe infections, which contribute to the high mortality. Access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) has significantly improved the survival of HIV-infected children, although the response to ART of children with SAM remains undocumented in the literature. Immune and virologic responses to ART in RLS are similar to those of infected children in resource-rich settings, but delays in initiation of therapy have led to a high early mortality. Antiretroviral drug toxicities have been described in children who receive therapy and may affect their quality of life and long-term survival. Metabolic complications of ART include lipodystrophy, dyslipidemia, lactic acidosis, insulin resistance, and osteopenia. These complications have been well described in adults and children from developed countries, but data from RLS are limited, and these complications may be compounded by SAM. In this article we review the epidemiology, clinical presentation, and complications of SAM in HIV-infected children and the metabolic complications of HIV-infected children in the era of ART, and discuss future research priorities for RLS.

  5. Nursing intensive care skills training: a nurse led, short, structured, and practical training program, developed and tested in a resource-limited setting.

    PubMed

    De Silva, A Pubudu; Stephens, Tim; Welch, John; Sigera, Chathurani; De Alwis, Sunil; Athapattu, Priyantha; Dharmagunawardene, Dilantha; Olupeliyawa, Asela; de Abrew, Ashwini; Peiris, Lalitha; Siriwardana, Somalatha; Karunathilake, Indika; Dondorp, Arjen; Haniffa, Rashan

    2015-04-01

    To assess the impact of a nurse-led, short, structured training program for intensive care unit (ICU) nurses in a resource-limited setting. A training program using a structured approach to patient assessment and management for ICU nurses was designed and delivered by local nurse tutors in partnership with overseas nurse trainers. The impact of the course was assessed using the following: pre-course and post-course self-assessment, a pre-course and post-course Multiple Choice Questionnaire (MCQ), a post-course Objective Structured Clinical Assessment station, 2 post-course Short Oral Exam (SOE) stations, and post-course feedback questionnaires. In total, 117 ICU nurses were trained. Post-MCQ scores were significantly higher when compared with pre-MCQ (P < .0001). More than 95% passed the post-course Objective Structured Clinical Assessment (patient assessment) and SOE 1 (arterial blood gas analysis), whereas 76.9% passed SOE 2 (3-lead electrocardiogram analysis). The course was highly rated by participants, with 98% believing that this was a useful experience. Nursing Intensive Care Skills Training was highly rated by participants and was effective in improving the knowledge of the participants. This sustainable short course model may be adaptable to other resource-limited settings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparison of Various Equations for Estimating GFR in Malawi: How to Determine Renal Function in Resource Limited Settings?

    PubMed Central

    Phiri, Sam; Rothenbacher, Dietrich; Neuhann, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a probably underrated public health problem in Sub-Saharan-Africa, in particular in combination with HIV-infection. Knowledge about the CKD prevalence is scarce and in the available literature different methods to classify CKD are used impeding comparison and general prevalence estimates. Methods This study assessed different serum-creatinine based equations for glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) and compared them to a cystatin C based equation. The study was conducted in Lilongwe, Malawi enrolling a population of 363 adults of which 32% were HIV-positive. Results Comparison of formulae based on Bland-Altman-plots and accuracy revealed best performance for the CKD-EPI equation without the correction factor for black Americans. Analyzing the differences between HIV-positive and –negative individuals CKD-EPI systematically overestimated eGFR in comparison to cystatin C and therefore lead to underestimation of CKD in HIV-positives. Conclusions Our findings underline the importance for standardization of eGFR calculation in a Sub-Saharan African setting, to further investigate the differences with regard to HIV status and to develop potential correction factors as established for age and sex. PMID:26083345

  7. Impact of long-term treatment with neurotoxic dideoxynucleoside antiretrovirals: implications for clinical care in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    Hung, CF; Gibson, SA; Letendre, SL; Lonergan, JT; Marquie-Beck, JA; Vaida, F; Ellis, RJ

    2011-01-01

    Objectives A minority of HIV-infected patients taking an antiretroviral (ARV) regimen containing dideoxynucleosides (d-drugs) such as stavudine (d4T) and didanosine (DDI) experiences dose-limiting neuropathic pain and paraesthesias, usually within weeks of starting these drugs. Because d-drugs are among the few affordable options available in developing countries, continuing d-drug therapy would be a desirable strategy for many HIV-infected individuals. Therefore, we evaluated the safety of continuing d-drug therapy. Methods In a US cohort, we compared the rates of worsening neuropathic symptoms and signs in HIV-infected individuals on stable ARV regimens that did (n = 252) or did not (n = 250) include d-drugs. Rates of worsening were compared using proportional hazards model and the log-rank test. Results The risk ratios (RR) were not significantly larger for worsening neuropathy signs [0.94; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.84–1.07] or symptoms (0.99; 95% CI 0.88–1.14) in patients taking d-drugs continuously compared to those not taking d-drugs. Conclusions Continued d-drug exposure among patients tolerating an initial trial did not increase the risk of worsening neuropathy compared to non-d-drug-containing regimens. If applicable in developing countries, these findings suggest that in most patients d-drugs can be continued safely in the long term without increasing the risk of worsening neuropathy. PMID:18651859

  8. Mentorship needs at academic institutions in resource-limited settings: a survey at Makerere University College of Health Sciences.

    PubMed

    Nakanjako, Damalie; Byakika-Kibwika, Pauline; Kintu, Kenneth; Aizire, Jim; Nakwagala, Fred; Luzige, Simon; Namisi, Charles; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Kamya, Moses R

    2011-07-29

    Mentoring is a core component of medical education and career success. There is increasing global emphasis on mentorship of young scientists in order to train and develop the next leaders in global health. However, mentoring efforts are challenged by the high clinical, research and administrative demands. We evaluated the status and nature of mentoring practices at Makerere University College of Health Sciences (MAKCHS). Pre-tested, self-administered questionnaires were sent by email to all Fogarty alumni at the MAKCHS (mentors) and each of them was requested to complete and email back the questionnaire. In addition to training level and number of mentors, the questionnaires had open-ended questions covering themes such as; status of mentorship, challenges faced by mentors and strategies to improve and sustain mentorship within MAKCHS. Similarly, open-ended questionnaires were sent and received by email from all graduate students (mentees) registered with the Uganda Society for Health Scientists (USHS). Qualitative data from mentors and mentees was analyzed manually according to the pre-determined themes. Twenty- two out of 100 mentors responded (14 email and 8 hard copy responses). Up to 77% (17/22) of mentors had Master's-level training and only 18% (4/22) had doctorate-level training. About 40% of the mentors had ≥ two mentees while 27% had none. Qualitative results showed that mentors needed support in terms of training in mentoring skills and logistical/financial support to carry out successful mentorship. Junior scientists and students reported that mentorship is not yet institutionalized and it is currently occurring in an adhoc manner. There was lack of awareness of roles of mentors and mentees. The mentors mentioned the limited number of practicing mentors at the college and thus the need for training courses and guidelines for faculty members in regard to mentorship at academic institutions. Both mentors and mentees were willing to improve mentorship

  9. Translating vaccine policy into action: a report from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Consultation on the prevention of maternal and early infant influenza in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Justin R; Neuzil, Kathleen M; Ahonkhai, Vincent I; Gellin, Bruce G; Salisbury, David M; Read, Jennifer S; Adegbola, Richard A; Abramson, Jon S

    2012-11-26

    Immunization of pregnant women against influenza is a promising strategy to protect the mother, fetus, and young infant from influenza-related diseases. The burden of influenza during pregnancy, the vaccine immunogenicity during this period, and the robust influenza vaccine safety database underpin recommendations that all pregnant women receive the vaccine to decrease complications of influenza disease during their pregnancies. Recent data also support maternal immunization for the additional purpose of preventing disease in the infant during the first six months of life. In April 2012, the WHO Strategic Advisory Group of Experts (SAGE) on Immunization recommended revisions to the WHO position paper on influenza vaccines. For the first time, SAGE recommended pregnant women should be made the highest priority for inactivated seasonal influenza vaccination. However, the variable maternal influenza vaccination coverage in countries with pre-existing maternal influenza vaccine recommendations underscores the need to understand and to address the discrepancy between recommendations and implementation success. We present the outcome of a multi-stakeholder expert consultation on inactivated influenza vaccination in pregnancy. The creation and implementation of vaccine policies and regulations require substantial resources and capacity. As with all public health interventions, the existence of perceived and real risks of vaccination will necessitate effective and transparent risk communication. Potential risk allocation and sharing mechanisms should be addressed by governments, vaccine manufacturers, and other stakeholders. In resource-limited settings, vaccine-related issues concerning supply, formulation, regulation, evidence evaluation, distribution, cost-utility, and post-marketing safety surveillance need to be addressed. Lessons can be learned from the Maternal and Neonatal Tetanus Elimination Initiative as well as efforts to increase vaccine coverage among pregnant

  10. Computational models can predict response to HIV therapy without a genotype and may reduce treatment failure in different resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Revell, A D; Wang, D; Wood, R; Morrow, C; Tempelman, H; Hamers, R L; Alvarez-Uria, G; Streinu-Cercel, A; Ene, L; Wensing, A M J; DeWolf, F; Nelson, M; Montaner, J S; Lane, H C; Larder, B A

    2013-06-01

    Genotypic HIV drug-resistance testing is typically 60%-65% predictive of response to combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) and is valuable for guiding treatment changes. Genotyping is unavailable in many resource-limited settings (RLSs). We aimed to develop models that can predict response to ART without a genotype and evaluated their potential as a treatment support tool in RLSs. Random forest models were trained to predict the probability of response to ART (≤400 copies HIV RNA/mL) using the following data from 14 891 treatment change episodes (TCEs) after virological failure, from well-resourced countries: viral load and CD4 count prior to treatment change, treatment history, drugs in the new regimen, time to follow-up and follow-up viral load. Models were assessed by cross-validation during development, with an independent set of 800 cases from well-resourced countries, plus 231 cases from Southern Africa, 206 from India and 375 from Romania. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was the main outcome measure. The models achieved an AUC of 0.74-0.81 during cross-validation and 0.76-0.77 with the 800 test TCEs. They achieved AUCs of 0.58-0.65 (Southern Africa), 0.63 (India) and 0.70 (Romania). Models were more accurate for data from the well-resourced countries than for cases from Southern Africa and India (P < 0.001), but not Romania. The models identified alternative, available drug regimens predicted to result in virological response for 94% of virological failures in Southern Africa, 99% of those in India and 93% of those in Romania. We developed computational models that predict virological response to ART without a genotype with comparable accuracy to genotyping with rule-based interpretation. These models have the potential to help optimize antiretroviral therapy for patients in RLSs where genotyping is not generally available.

  11. Open-source point-of-care electronic medical records for use in resource-limited settings: systematic review and questionnaire surveys

    PubMed Central

    Bru, Juan; Berger, Christopher A

    2012-01-01

    Background Point-of-care electronic medical records (EMRs) are a key tool to manage chronic illness. Several EMRs have been developed for use in treating HIV and tuberculosis, but their applicability to primary care, technical requirements and clinical functionalities are largely unknown. Objectives This study aimed to address the needs of clinicians from resource-limited settings without reliable internet access who are considering adopting an open-source EMR. Study eligibility criteria Open-source point-of-care EMRs suitable for use in areas without reliable internet access. Study appraisal and synthesis methods The authors conducted a comprehensive search of all open-source EMRs suitable for sites without reliable internet access. The authors surveyed clinician users and technical implementers from a single site and technical developers of each software product. The authors evaluated availability, cost and technical requirements. Results The hardware and software for all six systems is easily available, but they vary considerably in proprietary components, installation requirements and customisability. Limitations This study relied solely on self-report from informants who developed and who actively use the included products. Conclusions and implications of key findings Clinical functionalities vary greatly among the systems, and none of the systems yet meet minimum requirements for effective implementation in a primary care resource-limited setting. The safe prescribing of medications is a particular concern with current tools. The dearth of fully functional EMR systems indicates a need for a greater emphasis by global funding agencies to move beyond disease-specific EMR systems and develop a universal open-source health informatics platform. PMID:22763661

  12. Sustainability and long-term effectiveness of the WHO surgical safety checklist combined with pulse oximetry in a resource-limited setting: two-year update from Moldova.

    PubMed

    Kim, Rebecca Y; Kwakye, Gifty; Kwok, Alvin C; Baltaga, Ruslan; Ciobanu, Gheorghe; Merry, Alan F; Funk, Luke M; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Gawande, Atul A; Berry, William R; Haynes, Alex B

    2015-05-01

    Little is known about the sustainability and long-term effect of surgical safety checklists when implemented in resource-limited settings. A previous study demonstrated the marked, short-term effect of a structured hospital-wide implementation of a surgical safety checklist in Moldova, a lower-middle-income country, as have studies in other low-resource settings. To assess the long-term reduction in perioperative harm following the introduction of a checklist-based surgical quality improvement program in a resource-limited setting and to understand the long-term effects of such programs. Twenty months after the initial implementation of a surgical safety checklist and the provision of pulse oximetry at a referral hospital in Moldova, a lower-middle-income, resource-limited country in Eastern Europe, we conducted a prospective study of perioperative care and outcomes of 637 consecutive patients undergoing noncardiac surgery (the long-term follow-up group), and we compared the findings with those from 2106 patients who underwent surgery shortly after implementation (the short-term follow-up group). Preintervention data were collected from March to July 2010. Data collection during the short-term follow-up period was performed from October 2010 to January 2011, beginning 1 month after the implementation of the launch period. Data collection during the long-term follow-up period took place from May 25 to July 6, 2012, beginning 20 months after the initial intervention. The primary end points of interest were surgical morbidity (ie, the complication rate), adherence to safety process measures, and frequency of hypoxemia. Between the short- and long-term follow-up groups, the complication rate decreased 30.7% (P = .03). Surgical site infections decreased 40.4% (P = .05). The mean (SD) rate of completion of the checklist items increased from 88% (14%) in the short-term follow-up group to 92% (11%) in the long-term follow-up group (P < .001). The rate of

  13. Feasibility intervention trial of two types of improved cookstoves in three resource-limited settings: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Exposure to biomass fuel smoke is one of the leading risk factors for disease burden worldwide. International campaigns are currently promoting the widespread adoption of improved cookstoves in resource-limited settings, yet little is known about the cultural and social barriers to successful improved cookstove adoption and how these barriers affect environmental exposures and health outcomes. Design We plan to conduct a one-year crossover, feasibility intervention trial in three resource-limited settings (Kenya, Nepal and Peru). We will enroll 40 to 46 female primary cooks aged 20 to 49 years in each site (total 120 to 138). Methods At baseline, we will collect information on sociodemographic characteristics and cooking practices, and measure respiratory health and blood pressure for all participating women. An initial observational period of four months while households use their traditional, open-fire design cookstoves will take place prior to randomization. All participants will then be randomized to receive one of two types of improved, ventilated cookstoves with a chimney: a commercially-constructed cookstove (Envirofit G3300/G3355) or a locally-constructed cookstove. After four months of observation, participants will crossover and receive the other improved cookstove design and be followed for another four months. During each of the three four-month study periods, we will collect monthly information on self-reported respiratory symptoms, cooking practices, compliance with cookstove use (intervention periods only), and measure peak expiratory flow, forced expiratory volume at 1 second, exhaled carbon monoxide and blood pressure. We will also measure pulmonary function testing in the women participants and 24-hour kitchen particulate matter and carbon monoxide levels at least once per period. Discussion Findings from this study will help us better understand the behavioral, biological, and environmental changes that occur with a cookstove

  14. Thoracic ultrasound: An adjunctive and valuable imaging tool in emergency, resource-limited settings and for a sustainable monitoring of patients

    PubMed Central

    Trovato, Francesca M; Catalano, Daniela; Trovato, Guglielmo M

    2016-01-01

    Imaging workup of patients referred for elective assessment of chest disease requires an articulated approach: Imaging is asked for achieving timely diagnosis. The concurrent or subsequent use of thoracic ultrasound (TUS) with conventional (chest X-rays-) and more advanced imaging procedures (computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging) implies advantages, limitations and actual problems. Indeed, despite TUS may provide useful imaging of pleura, lung and heart disease, emergency scenarios are currently the most warranted field of application of TUS: Pleural effusion, pneumothorax, lung consolidation. This stems from its role in limited resources subsets; actually, ultrasound is an excellent risk reducing tool, which acts by: (1) increasing diagnostic certainty; (2) shortening time to definitive therapy; and (3) decreasing problems from blind procedures that carry an inherent level of complications. In addition, paediatric and newborn disease are particularly suitable for TUS investigation, aimed at the detection of congenital or acquired chest disease avoiding, limiting or postponing radiological exposure. TUS improves the effectiveness of elective medical practice, in resource-limited settings, in small point of care facilities and particularly in poorer countries. Quality and information provided by the procedure are increased avoiding whenever possible artefacts that can prevent or mislead the achievement of the correct diagnosis. Reliable monitoring of patients is possible, taking into consideration that appropriate expertise, knowledge, skills, training, and even adequate equipment’s suitability are not always and everywhere affordable or accessible. TUS is complementary imaging procedure for the radiologist and an excellent basic diagnostic tool suitable to be shared with pneumologists, cardiologists and emergency physicians. PMID:27721940

  15. Setting Time Limits on Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.

    2011-01-01

    It is shown how the time limit on a test can be set to control the probability of a test taker running out of time before completing it. The probability is derived from the item parameters in the lognormal model for response times. Examples of curves representing the probability of running out of time on a test with given parameters as a function…

  16. Improved Neuropsychological and Neurological Functioning Across Three Antiretroviral Regimens in Diverse Resource-Limited Settings: AIDS Clinical Trials Group Study A5199, the International Neurological Study

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, K.; Jiang, H.; Kumwenda, J.; Supparatpinyo, K.; Evans, S.; Campbell, T. B.; Price, R.; Tripathy, S.; Kumarasamy, N.; La Rosa, A.; Santos, B.; Silva, M. T.; Montano, S.; Kanyama, C.; Faesen, S.; Murphy, R.; Hall, C.; Marra, C. M.; Marcus, C.; Berzins, B.; Allen, R.; Housseinipour, M.; Amod, F.; Sanne, I.; Hakim, J.; Walawander, A.; Nair, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background. AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) A5199 compared the neurological and neuropsychological (NP) effects of 3 antiretroviral regimens in participants infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in resource-limited settings. Methods. Participants from Brazil, India, Malawi, Peru, South Africa, Thailand, and Zimbabwe were randomized to 3 antiretroviral treatment arms: A (lamivudine-zidovudine plus efavirenz, n = 289), B (atazanavir, emtricitabine, and didanosine-EC, n = 293), and C (emtricitabine-tenofovir-disoproxil fumarate plus efavirenz, n = 278) as part of the ACTG PEARLS study (A5175). Standardized neurological and neuropsychological (NP) screening examinations (grooved pegboard, timed gait, semantic verbal fluency, and finger tapping) were administered every 24 weeks from February 2006 to May 2010. Associations with neurological and neuropsychological function were estimated from linear and logistic regression models using generalized estimating equations. Results. The median weeks on study was 168 (Q1 = 96, Q3 = 192) for the 860 participants. NP test scores improved (P < .05) with the exception of semantic verbal fluency. No differences in neurological and neuropsychological functioning between treatment regimens were detected (P > .10). Significant country effects were noted on all NP tests and neurological outcomes (P < .01). Conclusions. The study detected no significant differences in neuropsychological and neurological outcomes between randomized ART regimens. Significant improvement occurred in neurocognitive and neurological functioning over time after initiation of ARTs. The etiology of these improvements is likely multifactorial, reflecting reduced central nervous system HIV infection, better general health, and practice effects. This study suggests that treatment with either of the World Health Organization –recommended first-line antiretroviral regimens in resource-limited settings will improve

  17. Genotype assays and third-line ART in resource-limited settings: A simulation and cost-effectiveness analysis of a planned clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzana, Sarah B.; Hughes, Michael D.; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Collier, Ann C.; Luz, Paula Mendes; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Wood, Robin; Levison, Julie H.; Mugyenyi, Peter N.; Salata, Robert; Wallis, Carole L.; Weinstein, Milton C.; Schooley, Robert T.; Walensky, Rochelle P.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To project the clinical and economic outcomes of a genotype assay for selection of third-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) in resource-limited settings, as per the planned international A5288 trial (MULTI-OCTAVE). Methods We used the Cost-effectiveness of Preventing AIDS Complications (CEPAC)-International Model to compare three strategies for subjects who have failed second-line ART in South Africa: (1) Sustained second-line: no genotype assay, all subjects remain on second-line ART; (2) A5288: genotype to determine the resistance profile and assign an appropriate regimen; or (3) Population-based third-line: no genotype, all subjects switch to a potent third-line regimen. Model inputs are from published data in South Africa. Resistance profiles, ART regimens, and efficacy data were those used for trial planning. Results Projected life expectancy for sustained second-line, A5288, and population-based third-line are 61.1, 103.8, and 104.2 months. Compared to sustained second-line ($12,460), per person lifetime costs increase for the A5288 ($39,250) and population-based ($44,120) strategies. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of A5288, compared to sustained second-line, is $7,500/year of life saved (YLS), and for population-based third-line, compared to A5288, is $154,500/YLS. In the A5288 strategy, very late presentation to care, coupled with lengthy delays to obtain the genotype, dramatically reduces 5-yr survival, making the population-based third-line strategy more attractive. Conclusions We project that, while the public health approach to third-line therapy is unaffordable, genotype assays and third-line ART in resource-limited settings will increase survival and be cost-effective compared to the population-based approach, supporting the value of an efficacy study. PMID:22343964

  18. Smartphone-based diagnostic for preeclampsia: an mHealth solution for administering the Congo Red Dot (CRD) test in settings with limited resources.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Stephan Michael; Deserno, Thomas Martin; Buhimschi, Catalin Sorin; Makin, Jennifer; Choma, Michael Andrew; Buhimschi, Irina Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality due to preeclampsia in settings with limited resources often results from delayed diagnosis. The Congo Red Dot (CRD) test, a simple modality to assess the presence of misfolded proteins in urine, shows promise as a diagnostic and prognostic tool for preeclampsia. We propose an innovative mobile health (mHealth) solution that enables the quantification of the CRD test as a batch laboratory test, with minimal cost and equipment. A smartphone application that guides the user through seven easy steps, and that can be used successfully by non-specialized personnel, was developed. After image acquisition, a robust analysis runs on a smartphone, quantifying the CRD test response without the need for an internet connection or additional hardware. In the first stage, the basic image processing algorithms and supporting test standardizations were developed using urine samples from 218 patients. In the second stage, the standardized procedure was evaluated on 328 urine specimens from 273 women. In the third stage, the application was tested for robustness using four different operators and 94 altered samples. In the first stage, the image processing chain was set up with high correlation to manual analysis (z-test P < 0.001). In the second stage, a high agreement between manual and automated processing was calculated (Lin's concordance coefficient ρc = 0.968). In the last stage, sources of error were identified and remedies were developed accordingly. Altered samples resulted in an acceptable concordance with the manual gold-standard (Lin's ρc = 0.914). Combining smartphone-based image analysis with molecular-specific disease features represents a cost-effective application of mHealth that has the potential to fill gaps in access to health care solutions that are critical to reducing adverse events in resource-poor settings. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights

  19. Evidence-based medicine for all: what we can learn from a programme providing free access to an online clinical resource to health workers in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    Valtis, Yannis K; Rosenberg, Julie; Bhandari, Sudip; Wachter, Keri; Teichman, Marie; Beauvais, Sophie; Weintraub, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    The rapidly changing landscape of medical knowledge and guidelines requires health professionals to have immediate access to current, reliable clinical resources. Access to evidence is instrumental in reducing diagnostic errors and generating better health outcomes. UpToDate, a leading evidence-based clinical resource is used extensively in the USA and other regions of the world and has been linked to lower mortality and length of stay in US hospitals. In 2009, the Global Health Delivery Project collaborated with UpToDate to provide free subscriptions to qualifying health workers in resource-limited settings. We evaluated the provision of UpToDate access to health workers by analysing their usage patterns. Since 2009, ∼2000 individual physicians and healthcare institutions from 116 countries have received free access to UpToDate through our programme. During 2013–2014, users logged into UpToDate ∼150 000 times; 61% of users logged in at least weekly; users in Africa were responsible for 54% of the total usage. Search patterns reflected local epidemiology with ‘clinical manifestations of malaria’ as the top search in Africa, and ‘management of hepatitis B’ as the top search in Asia. Our programme demonstrates that there are barriers to evidence-based clinical knowledge in resource-limited settings we can help remove. Some assumed barriers to its expansion (poor internet connectivity, lack of training and infrastructure) might pose less of a burden than subscription fees. PMID:28588926

  20. Are Treponema pallidum Specific Rapid and Point-of-Care Tests for Syphilis Accurate Enough for Screening in Resource Limited Settings? Evidence from a Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, Yalda; Peeling, Rosanna W.; Shivkumar, Sushmita; Claessens, Christiane; Joseph, Lawrence; Pai, Nitika Pant

    2013-01-01

    Background Rapid and point-of-care (POC) tests for syphilis are an invaluable screening tool, yet inadequate evaluation of their diagnostic accuracy against best reference standards limits their widespread global uptake. To fill this gap, a systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of rapid and POC tests in blood and serum samples against Treponema pallidum (TP) specific reference standards. Methods Five electronic databases (1980–2012) were searched, data was extracted from 33 articles, and Bayesian hierarchical models were fit. Results In serum samples, against a TP specific reference standard point estimates with 95% credible intervals (CrI) for the sensitivities of popular tests were: i) Determine, 90.04% (80.45, 95.21), ii) SD Bioline, 87.06% (75.67, 94.50), iii) VisiTect, 85.13% (72.83, 92.57), and iv) Syphicheck, 74.48% (56.85, 88.44), while specificities were: i) Syphicheck, 99.14% (96.37, 100), ii) Visitect, 96.45% (91.92, 99.29), iii) SD Bioline, 95.85% (89.89, 99.53), and iv) Determine, 94.15% (89.26, 97.66). In whole blood samples, sensitivities were: i) Determine, 86.32% (77.26, 91.70), ii) SD Bioline, 84.50% (78.81, 92.61), iii) Syphicheck, 74.47% (63.94, 82.13), and iv) VisiTect, 74.26% (53.62, 83.68), while specificities were: i) Syphicheck, 99.58% (98.91, 99.96), ii) VisiTect, 99.43% (98.22, 99.98), iii) SD Bioline, 97.95%(92.54, 99.33), and iv) Determine, 95.85% (92.42, 97.74). Conclusions Rapid and POC treponemal tests reported sensitivity and specificity estimates comparable to laboratory-based treponemal tests. In resource limited settings, where access to screening is limited and where risk of patients lost to follow up is high, the introduction of these tests has already been shown to improve access to screening and treatment to prevent stillbirths and neonatal mortality due to congenital syphilis. Based on the evidence, it is concluded that rapid and POC tests are useful in resource

  1. Are Treponema pallidum specific rapid and point-of-care tests for syphilis accurate enough for screening in resource limited settings? Evidence from a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Yalda; Peeling, Rosanna W; Shivkumar, Sushmita; Claessens, Christiane; Joseph, Lawrence; Pai, Nitika Pant

    2013-01-01

    Rapid and point-of-care (POC) tests for syphilis are an invaluable screening tool, yet inadequate evaluation of their diagnostic accuracy against best reference standards limits their widespread global uptake. To fill this gap, a systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of rapid and POC tests in blood and serum samples against Treponema pallidum (TP) specific reference standards. Five electronic databases (1980-2012) were searched, data was extracted from 33 articles, and Bayesian hierarchical models were fit. In serum samples, against a TP specific reference standard point estimates with 95% credible intervals (CrI) for the sensitivities of popular tests were: i) Determine, 90.04% (80.45, 95.21), ii) SD Bioline, 87.06% (75.67, 94.50), iii) VisiTect, 85.13% (72.83, 92.57), and iv) Syphicheck, 74.48% (56.85, 88.44), while specificities were: i) Syphicheck, 99.14% (96.37, 100), ii) Visitect, 96.45% (91.92, 99.29), iii) SD Bioline, 95.85% (89.89, 99.53), and iv) Determine, 94.15% (89.26, 97.66). In whole blood samples, sensitivities were: i) Determine, 86.32% (77.26, 91.70), ii) SD Bioline, 84.50% (78.81, 92.61), iii) Syphicheck, 74.47% (63.94, 82.13), and iv) VisiTect, 74.26% (53.62, 83.68), while specificities were: i) Syphicheck, 99.58% (98.91, 99.96), ii) VisiTect, 99.43% (98.22, 99.98), iii) SD Bioline, 97.95%(92.54, 99.33), and iv) Determine, 95.85% (92.42, 97.74). Rapid and POC treponemal tests reported sensitivity and specificity estimates comparable to laboratory-based treponemal tests. In resource limited settings, where access to screening is limited and where risk of patients lost to follow up is high, the introduction of these tests has already been shown to improve access to screening and treatment to prevent stillbirths and neonatal mortality due to congenital syphilis. Based on the evidence, it is concluded that rapid and POC tests are useful in resource limited settings with poor access to

  2. The Clinical and Economic Impact of Point-of-Care CD4 Testing in Mozambique and Other Resource-Limited Settings: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hyle, Emily P.; Jani, Ilesh V.; Lehe, Jonathan; Su, Amanda E.; Wood, Robin; Quevedo, Jorge; Losina, Elena; Bassett, Ingrid V.; Pei, Pamela P.; Paltiel, A. David; Resch, Stephen; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Peter, Trevor; Walensky, Rochelle P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Point-of-care CD4 tests at HIV diagnosis could improve linkage to care in resource-limited settings. Our objective is to evaluate the clinical and economic impact of point-of-care CD4 tests compared to laboratory-based tests in Mozambique. Methods and Findings We use a validated model of HIV testing, linkage, and treatment (CEPAC-International) to examine two strategies of immunological staging in Mozambique: (1) laboratory-based CD4 testing (LAB-CD4) and (2) point-of-care CD4 testing (POC-CD4). Model outcomes include 5-y survival, life expectancy, lifetime costs, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs). Input parameters include linkage to care (LAB-CD4, 34%; POC-CD4, 61%), probability of correctly detecting antiretroviral therapy (ART) eligibility (sensitivity: LAB-CD4, 100%; POC-CD4, 90%) or ART ineligibility (specificity: LAB-CD4, 100%; POC-CD4, 85%), and test cost (LAB-CD4, US$10; POC-CD4, US$24). In sensitivity analyses, we vary POC-CD4-specific parameters, as well as cohort and setting parameters to reflect a range of scenarios in sub-Saharan Africa. We consider ICERs less than three times the per capita gross domestic product in Mozambique (US$570) to be cost-effective, and ICERs less than one times the per capita gross domestic product in Mozambique to be very cost-effective. Projected 5-y survival in HIV-infected persons with LAB-CD4 is 60.9% (95% CI, 60.9%–61.0%), increasing to 65.0% (95% CI, 64.9%–65.1%) with POC-CD4. Discounted life expectancy and per person lifetime costs with LAB-CD4 are 9.6 y (95% CI, 9.6–9.6 y) and US$2,440 (95% CI, US$2,440–US$2,450) and increase with POC-CD4 to 10.3 y (95% CI, 10.3–10.3 y) and US$2,800 (95% CI, US$2,790–US$2,800); the ICER of POC-CD4 compared to LAB-CD4 is US$500/year of life saved (YLS) (95% CI, US$480–US$520/YLS). POC-CD4 improves clinical outcomes and remains near the very cost-effective threshold in sensitivity analyses, even if point-of-care CD4 tests have lower sensitivity

  3. The clinical and economic impact of point-of-care CD4 testing in mozambique and other resource-limited settings: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Hyle, Emily P; Jani, Ilesh V; Lehe, Jonathan; Su, Amanda E; Wood, Robin; Quevedo, Jorge; Losina, Elena; Bassett, Ingrid V; Pei, Pamela P; Paltiel, A David; Resch, Stephen; Freedberg, Kenneth A; Peter, Trevor; Walensky, Rochelle P

    2014-09-01

    Point-of-care CD4 tests at HIV diagnosis could improve linkage to care in resource-limited settings. Our objective is to evaluate the clinical and economic impact of point-of-care CD4 tests compared to laboratory-based tests in Mozambique. We use a validated model of HIV testing, linkage, and treatment (CEPAC-International) to examine two strategies of immunological staging in Mozambique: (1) laboratory-based CD4 testing (LAB-CD4) and (2) point-of-care CD4 testing (POC-CD4). Model outcomes include 5-y survival, life expectancy, lifetime costs, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs). Input parameters include linkage to care (LAB-CD4, 34%; POC-CD4, 61%), probability of correctly detecting antiretroviral therapy (ART) eligibility (sensitivity: LAB-CD4, 100%; POC-CD4, 90%) or ART ineligibility (specificity: LAB-CD4, 100%; POC-CD4, 85%), and test cost (LAB-CD4, US$10; POC-CD4, US$24). In sensitivity analyses, we vary POC-CD4-specific parameters, as well as cohort and setting parameters to reflect a range of scenarios in sub-Saharan Africa. We consider ICERs less than three times the per capita gross domestic product in Mozambique (US$570) to be cost-effective, and ICERs less than one times the per capita gross domestic product in Mozambique to be very cost-effective. Projected 5-y survival in HIV-infected persons with LAB-CD4 is 60.9% (95% CI, 60.9%-61.0%), increasing to 65.0% (95% CI, 64.9%-65.1%) with POC-CD4. Discounted life expectancy and per person lifetime costs with LAB-CD4 are 9.6 y (95% CI, 9.6-9.6 y) and US$2,440 (95% CI, US$2,440-US$2,450) and increase with POC-CD4 to 10.3 y (95% CI, 10.3-10.3 y) and US$2,800 (95% CI, US$2,790-US$2,800); the ICER of POC-CD4 compared to LAB-CD4 is US$500/year of life saved (YLS) (95% CI, US$480-US$520/YLS). POC-CD4 improves clinical outcomes and remains near the very cost-effective threshold in sensitivity analyses, even if point-of-care CD4 tests have lower sensitivity/specificity and higher cost than published

  4. Melt-and-mold fabrication (MnM-Fab) of reconfigurable low-cost devices for use in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Tevis, Ian D; Oyola-Reynoso, Stephanie; Newcomb, Lucas B; Halbertsma-Black, Julian; Bloch, Jean-Francis; Thuo, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Interest in low-cost analytical devices (especially for diagnostics) has recently increased; however, concomitant translation to the field has been slow, in part due to personnel and supply-chain challenges in resource-limited settings. Overcoming some of these challenges require the development of a method that takes advantage of locally available resources and/or skills. We report a Melt-and-mold fabrication (MnM Fab) approach to low-cost and simple devices that has the potential to be adapted locally since it requires a single material that is recyclable and simple skills to access multiple devices. We demonstrated this potential by fabricating entry level bio-analytical devices using an affordable low-melting metal alloy, Field's metal, with molds produced from known materials such as plastic (acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS)), glass, and paper. We fabricated optical gratings then 4×4 well plates using the same recycled piece of metal. We then reconfigured the well plates into rapid prototype microfluidic devices with which we demonstrated laminar flow, droplet generation, and bubble formation from T-shaped channels. We conclude that this MnM-Fab method is capable of addressing some challenges typically encountered with device translation, such as technical know-how or material supply, and that it can be applied to other devices, as needed in the field, using a single moldable material.

  5. The accountability for reasonableness approach to guide priority setting in health systems within limited resources--findings from action research at district level in Kenya, Tanzania, and Zambia.

    PubMed

    Byskov, Jens; Marchal, Bruno; Maluka, Stephen; Zulu, Joseph M; Bukachi, Salome A; Hurtig, Anna-Karin; Blystad, Astrid; Kamuzora, Peter; Michelo, Charles; Nyandieka, Lillian N; Ndawi, Benedict; Bloch, Paul; Olsen, Oystein E

    2014-08-20

    Priority-setting decisions are based on an important, but not sufficient set of values and thus lead to disagreement on priorities. Accountability for Reasonableness (AFR) is an ethics-based approach to a legitimate and fair priority-setting process that builds upon four conditions: relevance, publicity, appeals, and enforcement, which facilitate agreement on priority-setting decisions and gain support for their implementation. This paper focuses on the assessment of AFR within the project REsponse to ACcountable priority setting for Trust in health systems (REACT). This intervention study applied an action research methodology to assess implementation of AFR in one district in Kenya, Tanzania, and Zambia, respectively. The assessments focused on selected disease, program, and managerial areas. An implementing action research team of core health team members and supporting researchers was formed to implement, and continually assess and improve the application of the four conditions. Researchers evaluated the intervention using qualitative and quantitative data collection and analysis methods. The values underlying the AFR approach were in all three districts well-aligned with general values expressed by both service providers and community representatives. There was some variation in the interpretations and actual use of the AFR in the decision-making processes in the three districts, and its effect ranged from an increase in awareness of the importance of fairness to a broadened engagement of health team members and other stakeholders in priority setting and other decision-making processes. District stakeholders were able to take greater charge of closing the gap between nationally set planning and the local realities and demands of the served communities within the limited resources at hand. This study thus indicates that the operationalization of the four broadly defined and linked conditions is both possible and seems to be responding to an actual demand. This

  6. The accountability for reasonableness approach to guide priority setting in health systems within limited resources – findings from action research at district level in Kenya, Tanzania, and Zambia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Priority-setting decisions are based on an important, but not sufficient set of values and thus lead to disagreement on priorities. Accountability for Reasonableness (AFR) is an ethics-based approach to a legitimate and fair priority-setting process that builds upon four conditions: relevance, publicity, appeals, and enforcement, which facilitate agreement on priority-setting decisions and gain support for their implementation. This paper focuses on the assessment of AFR within the project REsponse to ACcountable priority setting for Trust in health systems (REACT). Methods This intervention study applied an action research methodology to assess implementation of AFR in one district in Kenya, Tanzania, and Zambia, respectively. The assessments focused on selected disease, program, and managerial areas. An implementing action research team of core health team members and supporting researchers was formed to implement, and continually assess and improve the application of the four conditions. Researchers evaluated the intervention using qualitative and quantitative data collection and analysis methods. Results The values underlying the AFR approach were in all three districts well-aligned with general values expressed by both service providers and community representatives. There was some variation in the interpretations and actual use of the AFR in the decision-making processes in the three districts, and its effect ranged from an increase in awareness of the importance of fairness to a broadened engagement of health team members and other stakeholders in priority setting and other decision-making processes. Conclusions District stakeholders were able to take greater charge of closing the gap between nationally set planning and the local realities and demands of the served communities within the limited resources at hand. This study thus indicates that the operationalization of the four broadly defined and linked conditions is both possible and seems to

  7. How Can We Improve Outcomes for Patients and Families Under Palliative Care? Implementing Clinical Audit for Quality Improvement in Resource Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Selman, Lucy; Harding, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Palliative care in India has made enormous advances in providing better care for patients and families living with progressive disease, and many clinical services are well placed to begin quality improvement initiatives, including clinical audit. Clinical audit is recognized globally to be essential in all healthcare, as a way of monitoring and improving quality of care. However, it is not common in developing country settings, including India. Clinical audit is a cyclical activity involving: identification of areas of care in need of improvement, through data collection and analysis utilizing an appropriate questionnaire; setting measurable quality of care targets in specific areas; designing and implementing service improvement strategies; and then re-evaluating quality of care to assess progress towards meeting the targets. Outcome measurement is an important component of clinical audit that has additional advantages; for example, establishing an evidence base for the effectiveness of services. In resource limited contexts, outcome measurement in clinical audit is particularly important as it enables service development to be evidence-based and ensures resources are allocated effectively. Key success factors in conducting clinical audit are identified (shared ownership, training, managerial support, inclusion of all members of staff and a positive approach). The choice of outcome measurement tool is discussed, including the need for a culturally appropriate and validated measure which is brief and simple enough to incorporate into clinical practice and reflects the holistic nature of palliative care. Support for clinical audit is needed at a national level, and development and validation of an outcome measurement tool in the Indian context is a crucial next step. PMID:20859465

  8. Effectiveness of flow inflating device in providing Continuous Positive Airway Pressure for critically ill children in limited-resource settings: A prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Anitha, G. Fatima Shirly; Velmurugan, Lakshmi; Sangareddi, Shanthi; Nedunchelian, Krishnamurthy; Selvaraj, Vinoth

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) is an emerging popular concept, which includes bi-level positive airway pressure or continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). In settings with scarce resources for NIV machines, CPAP can be provided through various indigenous means and one such mode is flow inflating device - Jackson-Rees circuit (JR)/Bain circuit. The study analyses the epidemiology, various clinical indications, predictors of CPAP failure, and stresses the usefulness of flow inflating device as an indigenous way of providing CPAP. Methods: A prospective observational study was undertaken in the critical care unit of a Government Tertiary Care Hospital, from November 2013 to September 2014. All children who required CPAP in the age group 1 month to 12 years of both sexes were included in this study. They were started on indigenous CPAP through flow inflating device on clinical grounds based on the pediatric assessment triangle, and the duration and outcome were analyzed. Results: This study population included 214 children. CPAP through flow inflating device was successful in 89.7% of cases, of which bronchiolitis accounted for 98.3%. A prolonged duration of CPAP support of >96 h was required in pneumonia. CPAP failure was noted in 10.3% of cases, the major risk factors being children <1 year and pneumonia with septic shock. Conclusion: We conclude that flow inflating devices - JR/Bain circuit are effective as an indigenous CPAP in limited resource settings. Despite its benefits, CPAP is not a substitute for invasive ventilation, as when the need for intubation arises timely intervention is needed. PMID:27630454

  9. Dilution testing using rapid diagnostic tests in a HIV diagnostic algorithm: a novel alternative for confirmation testing in resource limited settings.

    PubMed

    Shanks, Leslie; Siddiqui, M Ruby; Abebe, Almaz; Piriou, Erwan; Pearce, Neil; Ariti, Cono; Masiga, Johnson; Muluneh, Libsework; Wazome, Joseph; Ritmeijer, Koert; Klarkowski, Derryck

    2015-05-14

    Current WHO testing guidelines for resource limited settings diagnose HIV on the basis of screening tests without a confirmation test due to cost constraints. This leads to a potential risk of false positive HIV diagnosis. In this paper, we evaluate the dilution test, a novel method for confirmation testing, which is simple, rapid, and low cost. The principle of the dilution test is to alter the sensitivity of a rapid diagnostic test (RDT) by dilution of the sample, in order to screen out the cross reacting antibodies responsible for falsely positive RDT results. Participants were recruited from two testing centres in Ethiopia where a tiebreaker algorithm using 3 different RDTs in series is used to diagnose HIV. All samples positive on the initial screening RDT and every 10th negative sample underwent testing with the gold standard and dilution test. Dilution testing was performed using Determine™ rapid diagnostic test at 6 different dilutions. Results were compared to the gold standard of Western Blot; where Western Blot was indeterminate, PCR testing determined the final result. 2895 samples were recruited to the study. 247 were positive for a prevalence of 8.5 % (247/2895). A total of 495 samples underwent dilution testing. The RDT diagnostic algorithm misclassified 18 samples as positive. Dilution at the level of 1/160 was able to correctly identify all these 18 false positives, but at a cost of a single false negative result (sensitivity 99.6 %, 95 % CI 97.8-100; specificity 100 %, 95 % CI: 98.5-100). Concordance between the gold standard and the 1/160 dilution strength was 99.8 %. This study provides proof of concept for a new, low cost method of confirming HIV diagnosis in resource-limited settings. It has potential for use as a supplementary test in a confirmatory algorithm, whereby double positive RDT results undergo dilution testing, with positive results confirming HIV infection. Negative results require nucleic acid testing to rule out false

  10. A simple algorithmic approach using histology and immunohistochemistry for the current classification of adult diffuse glioma in a resource-limited set-up.

    PubMed

    Rajeswarie, R T; Rao, Shilpa; Nandeesh, Bevinahalli N; Yasha, T Chickabasaviah; Santosh, Vani

    2017-08-11

    The WHO 2016 classification of diffuse gliomas combines histological and molecular parameters for diagnosis. However, in view of cost constraints for molecular testing, an economical working formula is essential to reach a meaningful diagnosis in a resource-limited setting. The aim of this study was to establish a practical algorithmic approach using histology and immunohistochemistry (IHC) in the classification of diffuse gliomas in such a set-up. Diffuse gliomas of WHO grade II and III diagnosed in our institute in the year 2016 were analysed for histological and IHC features, using the markers isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1R132H) and α thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked gene (ATRX). Fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) for 1p/19q co-deletion was performed when requested. 449 diffuse gliomas (grades II/III) were included in the study. Integrating histology and IHC features, as per the WHO 2016 guidelines, we derived the following groups: Astrocytoma, IDH-mutant (A,IDH-mt, 37.2%); astrocytoma, not otherwise specified (A,NOS, 12.7%); oligoastrocytoma, NOS (OA,NOS, 4.5%); and oligodendroglioma, NOS (ODG,NOS, 45.6%). FISH was performed in a subset of ODG,NOS, OA,NOS and A,NOS gliomas. This revealed 1p/19q co-deletion in all cases of ODG,NOS, 15.8% of OA,NOS and 37.5% of A,NOS. Sequencing for rare IDH 1/2 mutations was not carried out in this study. In a resource-limited set-up, histology with IHC (IDH1(R132H) and ATRX) form the baseline to reasonably derive four histomolecular subgroups of diffuse glioma. Of these, we recommend, OA,NOS and IDH1(R132H)-non-mt ODG,NOS to be our priority for performing 1p/19q co-deletion studies in comparison to IDH-mt ODG,NOS, and it would not be mandatory for astrocytoma. Sequencing for rare IDH mutations is advised for A,NOS and OA,NOS groups, but not for the IDH1(R132H)-non-mutant diffuse gliomas with 1p/19q co-deletion. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the

  11. Short Communication: A Low-Cost Method for Analyzing Nevirapine Levels in Hair as a Marker of Adherence in Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qiyun; Bacchetti, Peter; Huang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The measurement of antiretroviral concentrations in hair is emerging as an important technology to objectively quantify adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy. Hair levels of antiretrovirals are the strongest independent predictor of virologic success in large prospective cohorts of HIV-infected patients and surpass self-report in predicting outcomes. Hair is easy to collect and store, but validated methods to analyze antiretroviral levels in hair using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) are expensive. We report here on the development of a thin-layer chromatography (TLC) assay for the semiquantitative analysis of nevirapine in hair. TLC assay results from 11 samples were consistent with results using LC-MS/MS [Spearman correlation coefficient 0.99 (95% CI 0.95–0.996)]. This simple, low-cost method of analyzing nevirapine concentrations in hair may provide a novel monitoring tool for antiretroviral adherence in resource-limited settings and merits further study in clinical settings. PMID:24164410

  12. Multicountry Validation of SAMBA - A Novel Molecular Point-of-Care Test for HIV-1 Detection in Resource-Limited Setting.

    PubMed

    Ondiek, Johnson; Namukaya, Zikulah; Mtapuri-Zinyowera, Sekesai; Balkan, Suna; Elbireer, Ali; Ushiro Lumb, Ines; Kiyaga, Charles; Goel, Neha; Ritchie, Allyson; Ncube, Patience; Omuomu, Kenneth; Ndiege, Kenneth; Kekitiinwa, Adeodata; Mangwanya, Douglas; Fowler, Mary G; Nadala, Lou; Lee, Helen

    2017-10-01

    Early diagnosis of HIV-1 infection and the prompt initiation of antiretroviral therapy are critical to achieving a reduction in the morbidity and mortality of infected infants. The Simple AMplification-Based Assay (SAMBA) HIV-1 Qual Whole Blood Test was developed specifically for early infant diagnosis and prevention of mother-to-child transmission programs implemented at the point-of-care in resource-limited settings. We have evaluated the performance of this test run on the SAMBA I semiautomated platform with fresh whole blood specimens collected from 202 adults and 745 infants in Kenya, Uganda, and Zimbabwe. Results were compared with those obtained with the Roche COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan (CAP/CTM) HIV-1 assay as performed with fresh whole blood or dried blood spots of the same subjects, and discrepancies were resolved with alternative assays. The performance of the SAMBA and CAP/CTM assays evaluated at 5 laboratories in the 3 countries was similar for both adult and infant samples. The clinical sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for the SAMBA test were 100%, 99.2%, 98.7%, and 100%, respectively, with adult samples, and 98.5%, 99.8%, 99.7%, and 98.8%, respectively, with infant samples. Our data suggest that the SAMBA HIV-1 Qual Whole Blood Test would be effective for early diagnosis of HIV-1 infection in infants at point-of-care settings in sub-Saharan Africa.

  13. Carriage of antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli among healthy children and home-raised chickens: a household study in a resource-limited setting.

    PubMed

    Riccobono, Eleonora; Pallecchi, Lucia; Mantella, Antonia; Bartalesi, Filippo; Zeballos, Ignacio Chavez; Trigoso, Christian; Villagran, Ana Liz; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2012-02-01

    We have previously observed high rates of acquired antibiotic resistance in commensal Escherichia coli from healthy children living in urban areas of Bolivia and Peru, including resistance to tetracycline and quinolones, which are not routinely used in childhood. In this work we investigated acquired resistance in commensal E. coli from healthy children and home-raised chickens in 12 households from one of the previously surveyed urban area in Bolivia, to ascertain the possibility of human-animal exchange of resistant strains in similar settings. The resistance rates to ampicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, and trimethoprim-sulphametoxazole were overall high (≥50%) and comparable between children and chickens, whereas those to quinolones were significantly higher in chickens (81% vs. 29% for nalidixic acid; 43% vs. 10% for ciprofloxacin). Molecular characterization of tetracycline- and quinolone-resistant isolates (n = 66) from children and chickens of three selected households revealed a remarkable clonal diversity and, in some cases, the presence of the same resistant strains among children or among chickens living in the same household, but not between children and chickens. Several resistance plasmids were characterized, but inter-clonal plasmid dissemination was not detected. Overall, the results from the present study suggested that cross-transmission between children and home-raised chickens could not represent a major spreading mechanism for resistant E. coli in households of resource-limited settings with high human-animal promiscuity.

  14. Cost-effectiveness of point-of-care viral load monitoring of ART in resource-limited settings: Mathematical modelling study

    PubMed Central

    ESTILL, Janne; EGGER, Matthias; BLASER, Nello; VIZCAYA, Luisa SALAZAR; GARONE, Daniela; WOOD, Robin; CAMPBELL, Jennifer; HALLETT, Timothy B.; KEISER, Olivia

    2013-01-01

    Background Monitoring of HIV viral load in patients on combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) is not generally available in resource-limited settings. We examined the cost-effectiveness of qualitative point-of-care viral load tests (POC-VL) in sub-Saharan Africa. Design Mathematical model based on longitudinal data from the Gugulethu and Khayelitsha township ART programmes in Cape Town, South Africa. Methods Cohorts of patients on ART monitored by POC-VL, CD4 cell count or clinically were simulated. Scenario A considered the more accurate detection of treatment failure with POC-VL only, Scenario B also considered the effect on HIV transmission. Scenario C further assumed that the risk of virologic failure is halved with POC-VL due to improved adherence. We estimated the change in costs per quality-adjusted life-year gained (incremental cost-effectiveness ratios, ICER) of POC-VL compared to CD4 and clinical monitoring. Results POC-VL tests with detection limits <1000 copies/ml increased costs due to unnecessary switches to second-line ART, without improving survival. Assuming POC-VL unit costs between US$5–US$20 and detection limits between 1000 and 10000 copies/ml, the ICER of POC-VL was US$4010–US$9230 compared to clinical and US$5960–US$25540 compared to CD4 monitoring. In Scenario B the corresponding ICERs were US$2450–US$5830 and US$2230–US$10380. In Scenario C the ICER ranged between US$960–US$2500 compared to clinical monitoring and between cost-saving and US$2460 compared to CD4 monitoring. Conclusions The cost-effectiveness of POC-VL for monitoring ART is improved by a higher detection limit, by taking the reduction in new HIV infections into account and when assuming that failure of first-line ART is reduced due to targeted adherence counselling. PMID:23462219

  15. Cost-effectiveness of point-of-care viral load monitoring of antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings: mathematical modelling study.

    PubMed

    Estill, Janne; Egger, Matthias; Blaser, Nello; Vizcaya, Luisa Salazar; Garone, Daniela; Wood, Robin; Campbell, Jennifer; Hallett, Timothy B; Keiser, Olivia

    2013-06-01

    Monitoring of HIV viral load in patients on combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) is not generally available in resource-limited settings. We examined the cost-effectiveness of qualitative point-of-care viral load tests (POC-VL) in sub-Saharan Africa. Mathematical model based on longitudinal data from the Gugulethu and Khayelitsha township ART programmes in Cape Town, South Africa. Cohorts of patients on ART monitored by POC-VL, CD4 cell count or clinically were simulated. Scenario A considered the more accurate detection of treatment failure with POC-VL only, and scenario B also considered the effect on HIV transmission. Scenario C further assumed that the risk of virologic failure is halved with POC-VL due to improved adherence. We estimated the change in costs per quality-adjusted life-year gained (incremental cost-effectiveness ratios, ICERs) of POC-VL compared with CD4 and clinical monitoring. POC-VL tests with detection limits less than 1000 copies/ml increased costs due to unnecessary switches to second-line ART, without improving survival. Assuming POC-VL unit costs between US$5 and US$20 and detection limits between 1000 and 10,000 copies/ml, the ICER of POC-VL was US$4010-US$9230 compared with clinical and US$5960-US$25540 compared with CD4 cell count monitoring. In Scenario B, the corresponding ICERs were US$2450-US$5830 and US$2230-US$10380. In Scenario C, the ICER ranged between US$960 and US$2500 compared with clinical monitoring and between cost-saving and US$2460 compared with CD4 monitoring. The cost-effectiveness of POC-VL for monitoring ART is improved by a higher detection limit, by taking the reduction in new HIV infections into account and assuming that failure of first-line ART is reduced due to targeted adherence counselling.

  16. Diagnosis of cancer in rural Rwanda: early outcomes of a phased approach to implement anatomic pathology services in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Mpunga, Tharcisse; Tapela, Neo; Hedt-Gauthier, Bethany L; Milner, Dan; Nshimiyimana, Irénée; Muvugabigwi, Gaspard; Moore, Molly; Shulman, David S; Pepoon, James R; Shulman, Lawrence N

    2014-10-01

    Adequate pathology services are a prerequisite to accurate cancer diagnoses and tailoring appropriate treatment. Limitations in skilled personnel and infrastructure are among the challenges faced by developing countries. We describe a stepwise implementation of anatomic pathology laboratory services at Butaro District Hospital, designated as a Cancer Center of Excellence in rural Rwanda. The phased approach to developing pathology services up to December 2012 is described. A retrospective review of specimens submitted to Butaro District Hospital between July 1, 2012, and December 31, 2012, was conducted. Patient clinical characteristics and sociodemographics are also described. During the study period, a total of 437 tissue specimens were submitted. Among these, 143 (32.7%) were from male patients, 244 (55.8%) were confirmed as malignant, 163 (37.3%) were benign, 28 (6.4%) were inconclusive, and two (0.5%) results were not available at the time of analysis. The median time from specimen receipt at Butaro to final reporting was 32 days (range, 7-193 days; interquartile range, 23-44 days). Our experience demonstrates that anatomic pathology services can be established in resource-limited settings and local capacity can be built to support accurate diagnoses. Our approach included leveraging partnerships, volunteer experts, and task shifting and will be expanded to include telepathology. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology.

  17. Risk charts to guide targeted HIV-1 viral load monitoring of ART: development and validation in patients from resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    Koller, Manuel; Fatti, Geoffrey; Chi, Benjamin H; Keiser, Olivia; Hoffmann, Christopher J; Wood, Robin; Prozesky, Hans; Stinson, Kathryn; Giddy, Janet; Mutevedzi, Portia; Fox, Matthew; Law, Matthew; Boulle, Andrew; Egger, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Background HIV-1 RNA viral load (VL) testing is recommended to monitor antiretroviral therapy (ART) but not available in many resource-limited settings. We developed and validated CD4-based risk charts to guide targeted VL testing. Methods We modeled the probability of virologic failure up to 5 years of ART based on current and baseline CD4 counts, developed decision rules for targeted VL testing of 10%, 20% or 40% of patients in seven cohorts of patients starting ART in South Africa, and plotted cut-offs for VL testing on colour-coded risk charts. We assessed the accuracy of risk chart-guided VL testing to detect virologic failure in validation cohorts from South Africa, Zambia and the Asia-Pacific. Findings 31,450 adult patients were included in the derivation and 25,294 patients in the validation cohorts. Positive predictive values increased with the percentage of patients tested: from 79% (10% tested) to 98% (40% tested) in the South African, from 64% to 93% in the Zambian and from 73% to 96% in the Asia-Pacific cohorts. Corresponding increases in sensitivity were from 35% to 68% in South Africa, from 55% to 82% in Zambia and from 37% to 71% in Asia-Pacific. The area under the receiver-operating curve increased from 0.75 to 0.91 in South Africa, from 0.76 to 0.91 in Zambia and from 0.77 to 0.92 in Asia Pacific. Interpretation CD4-based risk charts with optimal cut-offs for targeted VL testing may be useful to monitor ART in settings where VL capacity is limited. PMID:26470034

  18. Understanding the barriers to setting up a healthcare quality improvement process in resource-limited settings: a situational analysis at the Medical Department of Kamuzu Central Hospital in Lilongwe, Malawi.

    PubMed

    Agyeman-Duah, Josephine Nana Afrakoma; Theurer, Antje; Munthali, Charles; Alide, Noor; Neuhann, Florian

    2014-01-02

    Knowledge regarding the best approaches to improving the quality of healthcare and their implementation is lacking in many resource-limited settings. The Medical Department of Kamuzu Central Hospital in Malawi set out to improve the quality of care provided to its patients and establish itself as a recognized centre in teaching, operations research and supervision of district hospitals. Efforts in the past to achieve these objectives were short-lived, and largely unsuccessful. Against this background, a situational analysis was performed to aid the Medical Department to define and prioritize its quality improvement activities. A mix of quantitative and qualitative methods was applied using checklists for observed practice, review of registers, key informant interviews and structured patient interviews. The mixed methods comprised triangulation by including the perspectives of the clients, healthcare providers from within and outside the department, and the field researcher's perspectives by means of document review and participatory observation. Human resource shortages, staff attitudes and shortage of equipment were identified as major constraints to patient care, and the running of the Medical Department. Processes, including documentation in registers and files and communication within and across cadres of staff were also found to be insufficient and thus undermining the effort of staff and management in establishing a sustained high quality culture. Depending on their past experience and knowledge, the stakeholder interviewees revealed different perspectives and expectations of quality healthcare and the intended quality improvement process. Establishing a quality improvement process in resource-limited settings is an enormous task, considering the host of challenges that these facilities face. The steps towards changing the status quo for improved quality care require critical self-assessment, the willingness to change as well as determined commitment and

  19. Understanding the barriers to setting up a healthcare quality improvement process in resource-limited settings: a situational analysis at the Medical Department of Kamuzu Central Hospital in Lilongwe, Malawi

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Knowledge regarding the best approaches to improving the quality of healthcare and their implementation is lacking in many resource-limited settings. The Medical Department of Kamuzu Central Hospital in Malawi set out to improve the quality of care provided to its patients and establish itself as a recognized centre in teaching, operations research and supervision of district hospitals. Efforts in the past to achieve these objectives were short-lived, and largely unsuccessful. Against this background, a situational analysis was performed to aid the Medical Department to define and prioritize its quality improvement activities. Methods A mix of quantitative and qualitative methods was applied using checklists for observed practice, review of registers, key informant interviews and structured patient interviews. The mixed methods comprised triangulation by including the perspectives of the clients, healthcare providers from within and outside the department, and the field researcher’s perspectives by means of document review and participatory observation. Results Human resource shortages, staff attitudes and shortage of equipment were identified as major constraints to patient care, and the running of the Medical Department. Processes, including documentation in registers and files and communication within and across cadres of staff were also found to be insufficient and thus undermining the effort of staff and management in establishing a sustained high quality culture. Depending on their past experience and knowledge, the stakeholder interviewees revealed different perspectives and expectations of quality healthcare and the intended quality improvement process. Conclusions Establishing a quality improvement process in resource-limited settings is an enormous task, considering the host of challenges that these facilities face. The steps towards changing the status quo for improved quality care require critical self-assessment, the willingness to change

  20. Characterizing breast conditions at an open-access breast clinic in South Africa: a model that is more than cancer care for a resource-limited setting.

    PubMed

    Rayne, Sarah; Lince-Deroche, Naomi; Hendrickson, Cheryl; Shearer, Kate; Moyo, Faith; Michelow, Pam; Rubin, Grace; Benn, Carol; Firnhaber, Cynthia

    2017-01-21

    While most breast-related research focuses on cancer, presentation of symptomatic persons in non-screened environments requires understanding the spectrum of breast diseases so as to plan services in resource-constrained settings. This study presents the variety of breast disease managed at a government, open-access breast clinic in South Africa. We performed a retrospective file review using a systematic random sample of patients 18 years and above presenting for breast care over a 14-month period. We collected demographics, clinical characteristics, management and final diagnoses from the first visit and twelve subsequent months. The final sample contained 365 individuals (97 · 5% women). Most were black, unmarried and South African citizens with a median age of 43 years (IQR 31-55) . Of those reporting their status (24 · 1%) 38 · 6% were HIV-positive. A mass (57 · 0%) and/or pain (28 · 5%) were the most common symptoms. Imaging and breast biopsies were required in 78 and 25% of individuals, respectively. Nearly half of biopsies identified breast cancer (44 · 1% of women ≤40 and 57 · 3% for women >40). Benign conditions (47 · 7%) and no abnormality (18 · 2%) were common final classifications among women. There was no difference between the final classifications of patients who self-referred versus those who were formally referred from another health care provider. Nearly half of the participants (46 · 6%) travelled 20 km or more to attend the clinic. Benign breast conditions far outweighed cancer diagnoses. As breast cancer awareness increases in resource-limited countries, facilities offering breast care require administrative and clinical preparation to manage a range of non-cancer related conditions.

  1. Dried tube specimens: a simple and cost-effective method for preparation of HIV proficiency testing panels and quality control materials for use in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Bharat S; Anyanwu, Juliana; Patel, Hetal; Downer, Marie; Kalou, Mireille; Gichimu, Catherine; Keipkerich, Bera Steven; Clement, Nelly; Omondi, Michael; Mayer, Oren; Ou, Chin-Yih; Nkengasong, John N

    2010-02-01

    HIV testing has rapidly expanded worldwide, but proficiency testing (PT) programs to monitor and improve the quality of testing are often lacking in resource-limited settings (RLS). Traditional PT programs and quality control reagents use serum or plasma specimens requiring stringent conditions for storage and transportation. A novel, simple and easy to use approach, based on dried tube specimens (DTS), was developed that can help monitor the quality of HIV antibody testing in RLS. DTS were prepared by drying 20 microl of specimen overnight at room temperature. The addition of a green dye (0.1%) made the DTS pellets visible without affecting the test results. Before testing, the DTS were rehydrated with 200 microl of PBS-Tween buffer. A panel of 303 DTS samples (135 HIV positive and 168 HIV negative) was evaluated with two rapid tests. Sensitivity and specificity with the Determine HIV-1/2 test were 99.3% and 99.4%, respectively, and with OraQuick were 98.5% and 100%, respectively. Stability studies showed that HIV-specific antibodies in the DTS specimens were stable at 4 degrees C and 25 degrees C for 4 weeks, with only marginal decline at 37 degrees C and 45 degrees C over 4 weeks. The DTS-based PT program was piloted successfully in 24 testing sites in Kenya. Results demonstrate that the DTS is a simple to use, practical method to prepare and distribute PT panels and quality control specimens to monitor HIV testing practices in RLS.

  2. Efficacy of loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay for the laboratory identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in a resource limited setting.

    PubMed

    Geojith, G; Dhanasekaran, S; Chandran, Salesh P; Kenneth, John

    2011-01-01

    Current methods of TB diagnosis are time consuming and less suited for developing countries. The LAMP (loop mediated isothermal amplification) is a rapid method more suitable for diagnosis in resource limited settings and has been proposed as a viable test requiring further evaluation for use as a laboratory method as well. We evaluated two LAMP assays, using culture lysates of clinical sputum samples (from Southern India) and compared it to a proprietary multiplex PCR reverse-hybridization line probe assay ('GenoType MTBC' from HAIN Lifescience GmbH, Germany). The LAMP procedure was modified to suit the local conditions. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis specific LAMP assay ('MTB LAMP') showed sensitivity and specificity, of 44.7% and 94.4% respectively in a 60 min format, 85.7% and 93.9% respectively in a 90 min format and 91.7%, and 90.9% respectively in a 120 min format. The Mycobacteria universal LAMP assay ('Muniv LAMP') showed a sensitivity of 99.1%. The LAMP was shown to be a rapid and accessible assay for the laboratory identification of M. tuberculosis isolates. Initial denaturation of template was shown to be essential for amplification in unpurified/dilute samples and longer incubation was shown to increase the sensitivity. The need for modification of protocols to yield better efficacy in this scenario needs to be addressed in subsequent studies. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Factors Associated with Immunological Discordance in HIV-Infected Patients Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy with Complete Viral Suppression in a Resource-Limited Setting.

    PubMed

    Mingbunjerdsuk, Pornpimol; Asdamongkol, Nakhon; Sungkanuparph, Somnuek

    2015-01-01

    "Immunological discordance," i.e., immunological failure despite complete viral suppression in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART), is associated with increased risk of AIDS or death. To evaluate risk factors for immunological discordance in a resource-limited setting in which patients usually present late with low CD4 cell counts, we conducted a case-control study among HIV-infected patients receiving ART and having undetectable HIV RNA. The study included patients with immunological discordance (cases), which was defined as CD4 cell count < 30% above baseline and absolute CD4 cell count < 200 cells/mm(3) at the first 12 months of undetectable HIV RNA (<50 copies/mL). Patients without immunological discordance were included as controls. Of 142 patients (44 cases; 98 controls), the mean age was 38.6 ± 9.4 years and 67.6% were men; 65.5% had history of opportunistic infections. In multivariate analysis, only baseline CD4 cell count < 100 cells/mm(3) (odd ratio [OR], 2.53; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04-6.14; P = 0.040) and history of lost to follow-up (OR, 11.04; 95% CI, 2.87-42.46; P < 0.001) were significantly associated with immunological discordance. Early initiation of ART and intervention to improve regular clinic visit compliance and adherence to ART are crucial to prevent immunological discordance among HIV-infected patients.

  4. The role of point-of-care tests in antibiotic stewardship for urinary tract infections in a resource-limited setting on the Thailand-Myanmar border.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Lauren; Cross, Jessica; Chu, Cindy S; Phyo, Aung Pyae; Trip, Margreet; Ling, Clare; Carrara, Verena; Watthanaworawit, Wanitda; Keereecharoen, Lily; Hanboonkunupakarn, Borimas; Nosten, François; McGready, Rose

    2015-10-01

    Published literature from resource-limited settings is infrequent, although urinary tract infections (UTI) are a common cause of outpatient presentation and antibiotic use. Point-of-care test (POCT) interpretation relates to antibiotic use and antibiotic resistance. We aimed to assess the diagnostic accuracy of POCT and their role in UTI antibiotic stewardship. One-year retrospective analysis in three clinics on the Thailand-Myanmar border of non-pregnant adults presenting with urinary symptoms. POCT (urine dipstick and microscopy) were compared to culture with significant growth classified as pure growth of a single organism >10(5)  CFU/ml. In 247 patients, 82.6% female, the most common symptoms were dysuria (81.2%), suprapubic pain (67.8%) and urinary frequency (53.7%). After excluding contaminated samples, UTI was diagnosed in 52.4% (97/185); 71.1% (69/97) had a significant growth on culture, and >80% of these were Escherichia coli (20.9% produced extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)). Positive urine dipstick (leucocyte esterase ≥1 and/or nitrate positive) compared against positive microscopy (white blood cell >10/HPF, bacteria ≥1/HPF, epithelial cells <5/HPF) had a higher sensitivity (99% vs. 57%) but a lower specificity (47% vs. 89%), respectively. Combined POCT resulted in the best sensitivity (98%) and specificity (81%). Nearly one in ten patients received an antimicrobial to which the organism was not fully sensitive. One rapid, cost-effective POCT was too inaccurate to be used alone by healthcare workers, impeding antibiotic stewardship in a high ESBL setting. Appropriate prescribing is improved with concurrent use and concordant results of urine dipstick and microscopy. © 2015 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Developing the Botswana Primary Care Guideline: an integrated, symptom-based primary care guideline for the adult patient in a resource-limited setting

    PubMed Central

    Tsima, Billy M; Setlhare, Vincent; Nkomazana, Oathokwa

    2016-01-01

    Background Botswana’s health care system is based on a primary care model. Various national guidelines exist for specific diseases. However, most of the guidelines address management at a tertiary level and often appear nonapplicable for the limited resources in primary care facilities. An integrated symptom-based guideline was developed so as to translate the Botswana national guidelines to those applicable in primary care. The Botswana Primary Care Guideline (BPCG) integrates the care of communicable diseases, including HIV/AIDS and noncommunicable diseases, by frontline primary health care workers. Methods The Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Botswana, together with guideline developers from the Knowledge Translation Unit (University of Cape Town) collaborated with the Ministry of Health to develop the guideline. Stakeholder groups were set up to review specific content of the guideline to ensure compliance with Botswana government policy and the essential drug list. Results Participants included clinicians, academics, patient advocacy groups, and policymakers from different disciplines, both private and public. Drug-related issues were identified as necessary for implementing recommendations of the guideline. There was consensus by working groups for updating the essential drug list for primary care and expansion of prescribing rights of trained nurse prescribers in primary care within their scope of practice. An integrated guideline incorporating common symptoms of diseases seen in the Botswana primary care setting was developed. Conclusion The development of the BPCG took a broad consultative approach with buy in from relevant stakeholders. It is anticipated that implementation of the BPCG will translate into better patient outcomes as similar projects elsewhere have done. PMID:27570457

  6. Radiographic signs and symptoms in children treated for tuberculosis: possible implications for symptom-based screening in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Marais, Ben J; Gie, Robert P; Hesseling, Anneke C; Schaaf, H Simon; Enarson, Donald A; Beyers, Nulda

    2006-03-01

    The World Health Organization advises active tracing of children younger than 5 years old in household contact with a sputum smear-positive tuberculosis index case. This study compared radiographic disease manifestations in 2 groups of children treated for tuberculosis in an endemic setting: those who presented with suspicious symptoms; and those actively traced as household contacts of an adult index case. We conducted a prospective descriptive study from February 2003 through October 2004 at 5 primary health care clinics in Cape Town South Africa, including all children (younger than 5 years old) treated for tuberculosis (TB). A total of 326 children (younger than 5 years old) received antituberculosis treatment; 190 (58.3%) presented with suspicious symptoms, and 136 (41.7%) were actively traced contacts. Children were categorized as; "not TB" 71 (22%), intrathoracic tuberculosis 230 (70%) and extrathoracic tuberculosis 25 (8%). Significantly more actively traced contacts were categorized as "not TB" (odds ratio, 7.4; 95% confidence interval, 3.8-14.3), or demonstrated elements of the primary complex only on the chest radiograph (odds ratio, 26.2; 95% confidence interval, 8.6-89.2), compared with children who presented with suspicious symptoms. Of all children diagnosed with intrathoracic tuberculosis, 20 of 230 (9%) reported no symptoms, all of whom demonstrated elements of the primary complex only. The majority of actively traced contacts had minimal disease. Symptom-based screening would have identified all but 9% of children diagnosed with intrathoracic tuberculosis, all of whom demonstrated elements of the primary complex only. Further investigation is required to establish whether symptom-based screening can be justified to improve access to preventive chemotherapy in resource-limited endemic settings.

  7. Diagnostic accuracy of two multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction assays for the diagnosis of meningitis in children in a resource-limited setting

    PubMed Central

    Khumalo, Jermaine; Nicol, Mark; Hardie, Diana; Muloiwa, Rudzani; Mteshana, Phindile

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Accurate etiological diagnosis of meningitis is important, but difficult in resource-limited settings due to prior administration of antibiotics and lack of viral diagnostics. We aimed to develop and validate 2 real-time multiplex PCR (RT-PCR) assays for the detection of common causes of community-acquired bacterial and viral meningitis in South African children. Methods We developed 2 multiplex RT- PCRs for detection of S. pneumoniae, N. meningitidis, H. influenzae, enteroviruses, mumps virus and herpes simplex virus. We tested residual CSF samples from children presenting to a local paediatric hospital over a one-year period, whose CSF showed an abnormal cell count. Results were compared with routine diagnostic tests and the final discharge diagnosis. We calculated accuracy of the bacterial RT-PCR assay compared to CSF culture and using World Health Organisation definitions of laboratory-confirmed bacterial meningitis. Results From 292 samples, bacterial DNA was detected in 12 (4.1%) and viral nucleic acids in 94 (32%). Compared to CSF culture, the sensitivity and specificity of the bacterial RT-PCR was 100% and 97.2% with complete agreement in organism identification. None of the cases positive by viral RT-PCR had a bacterial cause confirmed on CSF culture. Only 9/90 (10%) of patients diagnosed clinically as bacterial meningitis or partially treated bacterial meningitis tested positive with the bacterial RT-PCR. Discussion In this population the use of 2 multiplex RT-PCRs targeting 6 common pathogens gave promising results. If introduced into routine diagnostic testing, these multiplex RT-PCR assays would supplement other diagnostic tests, and have the potential to limit unnecessary antibiotic therapy and hospitalisation. PMID:28346504

  8. Mobile phone technologies improve adherence to antiretroviral treatment in a resource-limited setting: a randomized controlled trial of text message reminders

    PubMed Central

    Pop-Eleches, Cristian; Thirumurthy, Harsha; Habyarimana, James P.; Zivin, Joshua G.; Goldstein, Markus P.; de Walque, Damien; MacKeen, Leslie; Haberer, Jessica; Kimaiyo, Sylvester; Sidle, John; Ngare, Duncan; Bangsberg, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective There is limited evidence on whether growing mobile phone availability in sub-Saharan Africa can be used to promote high adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). This study tested the efficacy of short message service (SMS) reminders on adherence to ART among patients attending a rural clinic in Kenya. Design A randomized controlled trial of four SMS reminder interventions with 48 weeks of follow-up. Methods Four hundred and thirty-one adult patients who had initiated ART within 3 months were enrolled and randomly assigned to a control group or one of the four intervention groups. Participants in the intervention groups received SMS reminders that were either short or long and sent at a daily or weekly frequency. Adherence was measured using the medication event monitoring system. The primary outcome was whether adherence exceeded 90% during each 12-week period of analysis and the 48-week study period. The secondary outcome was whether there were treatment interruptions lasting at least 48 h. Results In intention-to-treat analysis, 53% of participants receiving weekly SMS reminders achieved adherence of at least 90% during the 48 weeks of the study, compared with 40% of participants in the control group (P=0.03). Participants in groups receiving weekly reminders were also significantly less likely to experience treatment interruptions exceeding 48 h during the 48-week follow-up period than participants in the control group (81 vs. 90%, P = 0.03). Conclusion These results suggest that SMS reminders may be an important tool to achieve optimal treatment response in resource-limited settings. PMID:21252632

  9. Feasibility of establishing a biosafety level 3 tuberculosis culture laboratory of acceptable quality standards in a resource-limited setting: an experience from Uganda.

    PubMed

    Ssengooba, Willy; Gelderbloem, Sebastian J; Mboowa, Gerald; Wajja, Anne; Namaganda, Carolyn; Musoke, Philippa; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Joloba, Moses Lutaakome

    2015-01-15

    performance standards in resource-limited countries. With the demonstrated quality of work, the laboratory attracted more research groups and post-pioneer funding, which helped to ensure sustainability. The high skilled experts in this research laboratory also continue to provide an excellent resource for the needed national discussion of the laboratory and quality management systems.

  10. Raltegravir in second-line antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings (SELECT): a randomised, phase 3, non-inferiority study.

    PubMed

    La Rosa, Alberto M; Harrison, Linda J; Taiwo, Babafemi; Wallis, Carole L; Zheng, Lu; Kim, Peter; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Hosseinipour, Mina C; Jarocki, Bernadette; Mellors, John W; Collier, Ann C

    2016-06-01

    For second-line antiretroviral therapy, WHO recommends a boosted protease inhibitor plus nucleoside or nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs). However, concerns about toxicity and cross-resistance motivated a search for regimens that do not contain NRTIs. We aimed to assess whether boosted lopinavir plus raltegravir would be non-inferior to boosted lopinavir plus NRTIs for virological suppression in resource-limited settings. A5273 was a randomised, open-label, phase 3, non-inferiority study at 15 AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) research sites in nine resource-limited countries (three sites each in India and South Africa, two each in Malawi and Peru, and one each in Brazil, Kenya, Tanzania, Thailand, and Zimbabwe). Adults with plasma HIV-1 RNA concentrations of at least 1000 copies per mL after at least 24 weeks on a regimen based on a non-NRTI inhibitor were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive oral ritonavir-boosted lopinavir (100 mg ritonavir, 400 mg lopinavir) plus 400 mg raltegravir twice a day (raltegravir group) or to ritonavir-boosted lopinavir plus two or three NRTIs selected from an algorithm (eg, zidovudine after failure with tenofovir and vice versa; NRTI group). Randomised group assignment was done with a computer algorithm concealed to site personnel, and stratified by HIV-1 RNA viral load, CD4 cell count, and intention to use zidovudine, with the groups balanced by each site. The primary endpoint was time to confirmed virological failure (two measurements of HIV-1 RNA viral load >400 copies per mL) at or after week 24 in the intention-to-treat population. Non-inferiority (10% margin) was assessed by comparing the cumulative probability of virological failure by 48 weeks. This trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01352715. Between March 13, 2012, and Oct 2, 2013, we randomly assigned 515 participants: 260 to the raltegravir group and 255 to the NRTI group; two participants in the raltegravir group and one in the NRTI group

  11. Raltegravir in second-line antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings (SELECT): a randomised, phase 3, non-inferiority study

    PubMed Central

    La Rosa, Alberto M; Harrison, Linda J; Taiwo, Babafemi; Wallis, Carole L; Zheng, Lu; Kim, Peter; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Hosseinipour, Mina C; Jarocki, Bernadette; Mellors, John W; Collier, Ann C

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background For second-line antiretroviral therapy, WHO recommends a boosted protease inhibitor plus nucleoside or nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs). However, concerns about toxicity and cross-resistance motivated a search for regimens that do not contain NRTIs. We aimed to assess whether boosted lopinavir plus raltegravir would be non-inferior to boosted lopinavir plus NRTIs for virological suppression in resource-limited settings. Methods A5273 was a randomised, open-label, phase 3, non-inferiority study at 15 AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) research sites in nine resource-limited countries (three sites each in India and South Africa, two each in Malawi and Peru, and one each in Brazil, Kenya, Tanzania, Thailand, and Zimbabwe). Adults with plasma HIV-1 RNA concentrations of at least 1000 copies per mL after at least 24 weeks on a regimen based on a non-NRTI inhibitor were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive oral ritonavir-boosted lopinavir (100 mg ritonavir, 400 mg lopinavir) plus 400 mg raltegravir twice a day (raltegravir group) or to ritonavir-boosted lopinavir plus two or three NRTIs selected from an algorithm (eg, zidovudine after failure with tenofovir and vice versa; NRTI group). Randomised group assignment was done with a computer algorithm concealed to site personnel, and stratified by HIV-1 RNA viral load, CD4 cell count, and intention to use zidovudine, with the groups balanced by each site. The primary endpoint was time to confirmed virological failure (two measurements of HIV-1 RNA viral load >400 copies per mL) at or after week 24 in the intention-to-treat population. Non-inferiority (10% margin) was assessed by comparing the cumulative probability of virological failure by 48 weeks. This trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01352715. Findings Between March 13, 2012, and Oct 2, 2013, we randomly assigned 515 participants: 260 to the raltegravir group and 255 to the NRTI group; two participants in the raltegravir

  12. Factors influencing use of long-acting versus short-acting contraceptive methods among reproductive-age women in a resource-limited setting.

    PubMed

    Tibaijuka, Leevan; Odongo, Robert; Welikhe, Emma; Mukisa, Wilber; Kugonza, Lilian; Busingye, Imelda; Nabukalu, Phelomena; Ngonzi, Joseph; Asiimwe, Stephen B; Bajunirwe, Francis

    2017-04-04

    Unplanned pregnancy remains a common problem in many resource-limited settings, mostly due to limited access to modern family planning (FP) services. In particular, use of the more effective long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) methods (i.e., intrauterine devices and hormonal implants) remains low compared to the short-acting methods (i.e., condoms, hormonal pills, injectable hormones, and spermicides). Among reproductive-age women attending FP and antenatal care clinics in Uganda, we assessed perceptions and practices regarding the use of modern contraceptive methods. We specifically aimed to evaluate factors influencing method selection. We performed a mixed-methods cross-sectional study, in which we administered structured interviews to 180 clients, and conducted 4 focus group discussions (FGDs) with 36 clients and 8 in-depth personal qualitative interviews with health service providers. We summarized quantitative data and performed latent content analysis on transcripts from the FGDs and qualitative interviews. The prevalence of ever use for LARC methods was 23%. Method characteristics (e.g., client control) appeared to drive method selection more often than structural factors (such as method availability) or individual client characteristics (such as knowledge and perceptions). The most common reasons for choosing LARC methods were: longer protection; better child-spacing; and effectiveness. The most common reasons for not choosing LARC methods included requiring a client-controlled method and desiring to conceive in the near future. The most common reasons for choosing short-acting methods were ease of access; lower cost; privacy; perceived fewer side effects; and freedom to stop using a method without involving the health provider. The personal characteristics of clients, which appeared to be important were client knowledge and number of children. The structural factor which appeared to be important was method availability. Our results suggest that

  13. The cost-effectiveness of monitoring strategies for antiretroviral therapy of HIV infected patients in resource-limited settings: software tool.

    PubMed

    Estill, Janne; Salazar-Vizcaya, Luisa; Blaser, Nello; Egger, Matthias; Keiser, Olivia

    2015-01-01

    The cost-effectiveness of routine viral load (VL) monitoring of HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) depends on various factors that differ between settings and across time. Low-cost point-of-care (POC) tests for VL are in development and may make routine VL monitoring affordable in resource-limited settings. We developed a software tool to study the cost-effectiveness of switching to second-line ART with different monitoring strategies, and focused on POC-VL monitoring. We used a mathematical model to simulate cohorts of patients from start of ART until death. We modeled 13 strategies (no 2nd-line, clinical, CD4 (with or without targeted VL), POC-VL, and laboratory-based VL monitoring, with different frequencies). We included a scenario with identical failure rates across strategies, and one in which routine VL monitoring reduces the risk of failure. We compared lifetime costs and averted disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs). We calculated incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER). We developed an Excel tool to update the results of the model for varying unit costs and cohort characteristics, and conducted several sensitivity analyses varying the input costs. Introducing 2nd-line ART had an ICER of US$1651-1766/DALY averted. Compared with clinical monitoring, the ICER of CD4 monitoring was US$1896-US$5488/DALY averted and VL monitoring US$951-US$5813/DALY averted. We found no difference between POC- and laboratory-based VL monitoring, except for the highest measurement frequency (every 6 months), where laboratory-based testing was more effective. Targeted VL monitoring was on the cost-effectiveness frontier only if the difference between 1st- and 2nd-line costs remained large, and if we assumed that routine VL monitoring does not prevent failure. Compared with the less expensive strategies, the cost-effectiveness of routine VL monitoring essentially depends on the cost of 2nd-line ART. Our Excel tool is useful for determining optimal

  14. Cost-effective HIV-1 virological monitoring in resource-limited settings using a modified commercially available qPCR RNA assay.

    PubMed

    Boobalan, Jayaseelan; Torti, Andrea; Dinesha, Thongadi Ramesh; Solomon, Sunil Suhas; Balakrishnan, Pachamuthu; Saravanan, Shanmugam

    2017-10-01

    Virological monitoring through plasma viral load (PVL) quantification is essential for clinical management of HIV patients undergoing antiretroviral treatment (ART), and for detecting treatment failure. Quantitative PCR (qPCR)-based tests are the gold standard for measuring PVL. Largely because of their high cost, however, implementation of these tests in low- and middle-income countries fails to cover the testing demand. In this study, we aimed at reducing the running cost of the commercially available Abbott RealTime™ HIV-1 assay by minimizing the reagent consumption. To this end, a modified version of the assay was obtained by reducing the assay's reagents volume to about a half, and validated using a panel of 104 plasma samples. Compared to the standard version, the modified Abbott assay allowed for a 50% reduction in running costs. At the same time, it showed a 100% concordance in identifying samples with detectable viral load, strong correlation (Pearson's r=0.983, P<0.0001), and a high agreement between PVL values (mean percent difference between PVL values±standard deviation=0.76±3.18%). In detecting viral failure (PVL>1000copiesmL(-1)), the modified assay showed a sensitivity of 94.6%, a specificity of 93.8%, and a negative and positive predictive values of 93.8% and 94.6%, respectively. The modified assay therefore reliably quantifies PVL, predicts viral failure, and allows for a ca. 50% reduction in the assay's running costs. It may thus be implemented as an ART monitoring tool in resource-limited settings and for research purposes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Change in Vitamin D Levels Occurs Early after Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation and Depends on Treatment Regimen in Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Havers, Fiona P.; Detrick, Barbara; Cardoso, Sandra W.; Berendes, Sima; Lama, Javier R.; Sugandhavesa, Patcharaphan; Mwelase, Noluthando H.; Campbell, Thomas B.; Gupta, Amita

    2014-01-01

    Study Background Vitamin D has wide-ranging effects on the immune system, and studies suggest that low serum vitamin D levels are associated with worse clinical outcomes in HIV. Recent studies have identified an interaction between antiretrovirals used to treat HIV and reduced serum vitamin D levels, but these studies have been done in North American and European populations. Methods Using a prospective cohort study design nested in a multinational clinical trial, we examined the effect of three combination antiretroviral (cART) regimens on serum vitamin D levels in 270 cART-naïve, HIV-infected adults in nine diverse countries, (Brazil, Haiti, Peru, Thailand, India, Malawi, South Africa, Zimbabwe and the United States). We evaluated the change between baseline serum vitamin D levels and vitamin D levels 24 and 48 weeks after cART initiation. Results Serum vitamin D levels decreased significantly from baseline to 24 weeks among those randomized to efavirenz/lamivudine/zidovudine (mean change: −7.94 [95% Confidence Interval (CI) −10.42, −5.54] ng/ml) and efavirenz/emtricitabine/tenofovir-DF (mean change: −6.66 [95% CI −9.40, −3.92] ng/ml) when compared to those randomized to atazanavir/emtricitabine/didanosine-EC (mean change: −2.29 [95% CI –4.83, 0.25] ng/ml). Vitamin D levels did not change significantly between week 24 and 48. Other factors that significantly affected serum vitamin D change included country (p<0.001), season (p<0.001) and baseline vitamin D level (p<0.001). Conclusion Efavirenz-containing cART regimens adversely affected vitamin D levels in patients from economically, geographically and racially diverse resource-limited settings. This effect was most pronounced early after cART initiation. Research is needed to define the role of Vitamin D supplementation in HIV care. PMID:24752177

  16. Change in vitamin d levels occurs early after antiretroviral therapy initiation and depends on treatment regimen in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Havers, Fiona P; Detrick, Barbara; Cardoso, Sandra W; Berendes, Sima; Lama, Javier R; Sugandhavesa, Patcharaphan; Mwelase, Noluthando H; Campbell, Thomas B; Gupta, Amita

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D has wide-ranging effects on the immune system, and studies suggest that low serum vitamin D levels are associated with worse clinical outcomes in HIV. Recent studies have identified an interaction between antiretrovirals used to treat HIV and reduced serum vitamin D levels, but these studies have been done in North American and European populations. Using a prospective cohort study design nested in a multinational clinical trial, we examined the effect of three combination antiretroviral (cART) regimens on serum vitamin D levels in 270 cART-naïve, HIV-infected adults in nine diverse countries, (Brazil, Haiti, Peru, Thailand, India, Malawi, South Africa, Zimbabwe and the United States). We evaluated the change between baseline serum vitamin D levels and vitamin D levels 24 and 48 weeks after cART initiation. Serum vitamin D levels decreased significantly from baseline to 24 weeks among those randomized to efavirenz/lamivudine/zidovudine (mean change: -7.94 [95% Confidence Interval (CI) -10.42, -5.54] ng/ml) and efavirenz/emtricitabine/tenofovir-DF (mean change: -6.66 [95% CI -9.40, -3.92] ng/ml) when compared to those randomized to atazanavir/emtricitabine/didanosine-EC (mean change: -2.29 [95% CI -4.83, 0.25] ng/ml). Vitamin D levels did not change significantly between week 24 and 48. Other factors that significantly affected serum vitamin D change included country (p<0.001), season (p<0.001) and baseline vitamin D level (p<0.001). Efavirenz-containing cART regimens adversely affected vitamin D levels in patients from economically, geographically and racially diverse resource-limited settings. This effect was most pronounced early after cART initiation. Research is needed to define the role of Vitamin D supplementation in HIV care.

  17. Pregnancy outcome and predictive factors for adverse pregnancy outcomes of cephalopelvic disproportion pregnancies in a resource-limited setting with an efficient referral system.

    PubMed

    Nuchpramool, Prachratana; Hanprasertpong, Tharangrut

    2014-11-01

    Small local hospitals with inexperiencedpersonnel often have adverse incidence that could be prevented. A good referral system could reduce this unnecessary death rate. The present study was conducted to determine the pregnancy outcomes of cephalopelvic disproportion (CPD) cases that were referred for cesarean section at a tertiary center and presented the predictivefactorsfor adverse pregnancy outcomes. A retrospective study that descriptively presented the adverse pregnancy outcome in referred CPD pregnancies and analyzed for predictive factor of overall adverse pregnancy outcome. One hundred ninety five referred CPD pregnancies were included in this study. The mean duration ± SD from CPD diagnosis to childbirth was 232.32±103.75 minutes. Pregnancy additional complication was found in 42/195 (21.5%) cases, but there were no maternal or neonatal mortalities. The NICU admission and postpartum hemorrhage rates were 21.5% and 12.3%, respectively. Obesity BMI was associated with an increased risk of overall adverse maternal outcomes (OR 3.12). Previously complicated pregnancy and cervical dilatation at CPD diagnosis were significant predictors for overall neonatal adverse outcomes. The highest risk wasforpregnant women who were cesarean delivered at 10 cm cervical dilatation (OR 2.84 vs. cervical dilatation ≤5 cm, p-value 0.002). A referral system is one of the modalities to avoid maternal and neonatal mortality for CPD pregnant women in a resource-limited setting. We suggest that early referral before advanced progression of cervical dilatation, especially in obese pregnant women and in complicated pregnancies, may improve the pregnancy outcomes.

  18. Typhoid intestinal perforations at a University teaching hospital in Northwestern Tanzania: A surgical experience of 104 cases in a resource-limited setting

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Typhoid intestinal perforation is still prevalent in many developing countries. Despite the advances in the management, the outcome in these patients in resource limited countries is still very poor. This study was to review our experiences on the surgical management of typhoid intestinal perforation and to determine the prognostic factors for mortality in our local setting. Methods This was a combined retrospective and prospective study of patients who were operated for typhoid intestinal perforation at Bugando Medical Centre between August 2006 and September 2011. Data collected were analyzed using SPSS computer software version 15. Results A total of 104 patients were studied representing 8.7% of typhoid fever cases. Males were affected twice more than the females (2.6:1). Their ages ranged from 8 to 76 years with a median age of 18.5 years. The peak age incidence was in the 11-20 years age group. Fever and abdominal pain were the most common presenting symptoms and majority of the patients (80.8%) perforated between within 14 days of illness. Chest and abdominal radiographs revealed pneumoperitonium in 74.7% of cases. Ultrasound showed free peritoneal collection in 85.7% of cases. Nine (10.2%) patients were HIV positive with a median CD4+ count of 261 cells/μl. The perforation-surgery interval was more than 72 hours in 90(86.5%) patients. The majority of patients (84.6%) had single perforations and ileum was the most common part of the bowel affected occurring in 86.2% of cases. Simple closure of the perforations was the most commonly performed procedure accounting for 78.8% of cases. Postoperative complication rate was 39.4% and surgical site infection was the most frequent complication in 55.5% of cases. Mortality rate was 23.1% and it was statistically significantly associated with delayed presentation, inadequate antibiotic treatment prior to admission, shock on admission, HIV positivity, low CD4 count (< 200 cells/μl), high ASA classes (III

  19. Estimating Gestational Age in Late Presenters to Antenatal Care in a Resource-Limited Setting on the Thai-Myanmar Border

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Kerryn A.; Simpson, Julie A.; Thomas, Kyla H.; Rijken, Marcus J.; White, Lisa J.; Lu Moo Dwell, Saw; Paw, Moo Kho; Wiladphaingern, Jacher; Pukrittayakamee, Sasithon; Nosten, François; Fowkes, Freya J. I.; McGready, Rose

    2015-01-01

    Estimating gestational age in resource-limited settings is prone to considerable inaccuracy because crown-rump length measured by ultrasound before 14 weeks gestation, the recommended method for estimating gestational age, is often unavailable. Judgements regarding provision of appropriate obstetric and neonatal care are dependent on accurate estimation of gestational age. We determined the accuracy of the Dubowitz Gestational Age Assessment, a population-specific symphysis-fundal height formula, and ultrasound biometry performed between 16 and 40 weeks gestation in estimating gestational age using pre-existing data from antenatal clinics of the Shoklo Malaria Research Unit on the Thai-Myanmar border, where malaria is endemic. Two cohorts of women who gave birth to live singletons were analysed: 1) 250 women who attended antenatal care between July 2001 and May 2006 and had both ultrasound crown-rump length (reference) and a Dubowitz Gestational Age Assessment; 2) 975 women attending antenatal care between April 2007 and October 2010 who had ultrasound crown-rump length, symphysis-fundal measurements, and an additional study ultrasound (biparietal diameter and head circumference) randomly scheduled between 16 and 40 weeks gestation. Mean difference in estimated newborn gestational age between methods and 95% limits of agreement (LOA) were determined from linear mixed-effects models. The Dubowitz method and the symphysis-fundal height formula performed well in term newborns, but overestimated gestational age of preterms by 2.57 weeks (95% LOA: 0.49, 4.65) and 3.94 weeks (95% LOA: 2.50, 5.38), respectively. Biparietal diameter overestimated gestational age by 0.83 weeks (95% LOA: -0.93, 2.58). Head circumference underestimated gestational age by 0.39 weeks (95% LOA: -2.60, 1.82), especially if measured after 24 weeks gestation. The results of this study can be used to quantify biases associated with alternative methods for estimating gestational age in the absence of

  20. Optimization of a Low Cost and Broadly Sensitive Genotyping Assay for HIV-1 Drug Resistance Surveillance and Monitoring in Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhiyong; Wagar, Nick; DeVos, Joshua R.; Rottinghaus, Erin; Diallo, Karidia; Nguyen, Duc B.; Bassey, Orji; Ugbena, Richard; Wadonda-Kabondo, Nellie; McConnell, Michelle S.; Zulu, Isaac; Chilima, Benson; Nkengasong, John; Yang, Chunfu

    2011-01-01

    Commercially available HIV-1 drug resistance (HIVDR) genotyping assays are expensive and have limitations in detecting non-B subtypes and circulating recombinant forms that are co-circulating in resource-limited settings (RLS). This study aimed to optimize a low cost and broadly sensitive in-house assay in detecting HIVDR mutations in the protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) regions of pol gene. The overall plasma genotyping sensitivity was 95.8% (N = 96). Compared to the original in-house assay and two commercially available genotyping systems, TRUGENE® and ViroSeq®, the optimized in-house assay showed a nucleotide sequence concordance of 99.3%, 99.6% and 99.1%, respectively. The optimized in-house assay was more sensitive in detecting mixture bases than the original in-house (N = 87, P<0.001) and TRUGENE® and ViroSeq® assays. When the optimized in-house assay was applied to genotype samples collected for HIVDR surveys (N = 230), all 72 (100%) plasma and 69 (95.8%) of the matched dried blood spots (DBS) in the Vietnam transmitted HIVDR survey were genotyped and nucleotide sequence concordance was 98.8%; Testing of treatment-experienced patient plasmas with viral load (VL) ≥ and <3 log10 copies/ml from the Nigeria and Malawi surveys yielded 100% (N = 46) and 78.6% (N = 14) genotyping rates, respectively. Furthermore, all 18 matched DBS stored at room temperature from the Nigeria survey were genotyped. Phylogenetic analysis of the 236 sequences revealed that 43.6% were CRF01_AE, 25.9% subtype C, 13.1% CRF02_AG, 5.1% subtype G, 4.2% subtype B, 2.5% subtype A, 2.1% each subtype F and unclassifiable, 0.4% each CRF06_CPX, CRF07_BC and CRF09_CPX. Conclusions The optimized in-house assay is broadly sensitive in genotyping HIV-1 group M viral strains and more sensitive than the original in-house, TRUGENE® and ViroSeq® in detecting mixed viral populations. The broad sensitivity and substantial reagent cost saving make this assay more

  1. Global health leadership training in resource-limited settings: a collaborative approach by academic institutions and local health care programs in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Nakanjako, Damalie; Namagala, Elizabeth; Semeere, Aggrey; Kigozi, Joanitor; Sempa, Joseph; Ddamulira, John Bosco; Katamba, Achilles; Biraro, Sam; Naikoba, Sarah; Mashalla, Yohana; Farquhar, Carey; Sewankambo, Nelson

    2015-11-18

    Due to a limited health workforce, many health care providers in Africa must take on health leadership roles with minimal formal training in leadership. Hence, the need to equip health care providers with practical skills required to lead high-impact health care programs. In Uganda, the Afya Bora Global Health Leadership Fellowship is implemented through the Makerere University College of Health Sciences (MakCHS) and her partner institutions. Lessons learned from the program, presented in this paper, may guide development of in-service training opportunities to enhance leadership skills of health workers in resource-limited settings. The Afya Bora Consortium, a consortium of four African and four U.S. academic institutions, offers 1-year global health leadership-training opportunities for nurses and doctors. Applications are received and vetted internationally by members of the consortium institutions in Botswana, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, and the USA. Fellows have 3 months of didactic modules and 9 months of mentored field attachment with 80% time dedicated to fellowship activities. Fellows' projects and experiences, documented during weekly mentor-fellow meetings and monthly mentoring team meetings, were compiled and analyzed manually using pre-determined themes to assess the effect of the program on fellows' daily leadership opportunities. Between January 2011 and January 2015, 15 Ugandan fellows (nine doctors and six nurses) participated in the program. Each fellow received 8 weeks of didactic modules held at one of the African partner institutions and three online modules to enhance fellows' foundation in leadership, communication, monitoring and evaluation, health informatics, research methodology, grant writing, implementation science, and responsible conduct of research. In addition, fellows embarked on innovative projects that covered a wide spectrum of global health challenges including critical analysis of policy formulation and review processes

  2. Should viral load thresholds be lowered?: Revisiting the WHO definition for virologic failure in patients on antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Labhardt, Niklaus D; Bader, Joëlle; Lejone, Thabo Ishmael; Ringera, Isaac; Hobbins, Michael A; Fritz, Christiane; Ehmer, Jochen; Cerutti, Bernard; Puga, Daniel; Klimkait, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines on antiretroviral therapy (ART) define treatment failure as 2 consecutive viral loads (VLs) ≥1000 copies/mL. There is, however, little evidence supporting 1000 copies as an optimal threshold to define treatment failure. Objective of this study was to assess the correlation of the WHO definition with the presence of drug-resistance mutations in patients who present with 2 consecutive unsuppressed VL in a resource-limited setting.In 10 nurse-led clinics in rural Lesotho children and adults on first-line ART for ≥6 months received a first routine VL. Those with plasma VL ≥80 copies/mL were enrolled in a prospective study, receiving enhanced adherence counseling (EAC) and a follow-up VL after 3 months. After a second unsuppressed VL genotypic resistance testing was performed. Viruses with major mutations against ≥2 drugs of the current regimen were classified as "resistant".A total of 1563 adults and 191 children received a first routine VL. Of the 138 adults and 53 children with unsuppressed VL (≥80 copies/mL), 165 (116 adults; 49 children) had a follow-up VL after EAC; 108 (74 adults; 34 children) remained unsuppressed and resistance testing was successful. Ninety of them fulfilled the WHO definition of treatment failure (both VL ≥1000 copies/mL); for another 18 both VL were unsuppressed but with <1000 copies/mL. The positive predictive value (PPV) for the WHO failure definition was 81.1% (73/90) for the presence of resistant virus. Among the 18 with VL levels between 80 and 1000 copies/mL, thereby classified as "non-failures", 17 (94.4%) harbored resistant viruses. Lowering the VL threshold from 1000 copies/mL to 80 copies/mL at both determinations had no negative influence on the PPV (83.3%; 90/108).The current WHO-definition misclassifies patients who harbor resistant virus at VL below 1000 c/mL as "nonfailing." Lowering the threshold to VL ≥80 copies/mL identifies a significantly

  3. Impact of two interventions on timeliness and data quality of an electronic disease surveillance system in a resource limited setting (Peru): a prospective evaluation.

    PubMed

    Huaman, Moises A; Araujo-Castillo, Roger V; Soto, Giselle; Neyra, Joan M; Quispe, Jose A; Fernandez, Miguel F; Mundaca, Carmen C; Blazes, David L

    2009-03-10

    A timely detection of outbreaks through surveillance is needed in order to prevent future pandemics. However, current surveillance systems may not be prepared to accomplish this goal, especially in resource limited settings. As data quality and timeliness are attributes that improve outbreak detection capacity, we assessed the effect of two interventions on such attributes in Alerta, an electronic disease surveillance system in the Peruvian Navy. 40 Alerta reporting units (18 clinics and 22 ships) were included in a 12-week prospective evaluation project. After a short refresher course on the notification process, units were randomly assigned to either a phone, visit or control group. Phone group sites were called three hours before the biweekly reporting deadline if they had not sent their report. Visit group sites received supervision visits on weeks 4 & 8, but no phone calls. The control group sites were not contacted by phone or visited. Timeliness and data quality were assessed by calculating the percentage of reports sent on time and percentage of errors per total number of reports, respectively. Timeliness improved in the phone group from 64.6% to 84% in clinics (+19.4 [95% CI, +10.3 to +28.6]; p < 0.001) and from 46.9% to 77.3% on ships (+30.4 [95% CI, +16.9 to +43.8]; p < 0.001). Visit and control groups did not show significant changes in timeliness. Error rates decreased in the visit group from 7.1% to 2% in clinics (-5.1 [95% CI, -8.7 to -1.4]; p = 0.007), but only from 7.3% to 6.7% on ships (-0.6 [95% CI, -2.4 to +1.1]; p = 0.445). Phone and control groups did not show significant improvement in data quality. Regular phone reminders significantly improved timeliness of reports in clinics and ships, whereas supervision visits led to improved data quality only among clinics. Further investigations are needed to establish the cost-effectiveness and optimal use of each of these strategies.

  4. Prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and variation in risk factors across four geographically diverse resource-limited settings in Peru.

    PubMed

    Jaganath, Devan; Miranda, J Jaime; Gilman, Robert H; Wise, Robert A; Diette, Gregory B; Miele, Catherine H; Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio; Checkley, William

    2015-03-18

    It is unclear how geographic and social diversity affects the prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We sought to characterize the prevalence of COPD and identify risk factors across four settings in Peru with varying degrees of urbanization, altitude, and biomass fuel use. We collected sociodemographics, clinical history, and post-bronchodilator spirometry in a randomly selected, age-, sex- and site-stratified, population-based sample of 2,957 adults aged ≥35 years (median age was 54.8 years and 49.3% were men) from four resource-poor settings: Lima, Tumbes, urban and rural Puno. We defined COPD as a post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC < 70%. Overall prevalence of COPD was 6.0% (95% CI 5.1%-6.8%) but with marked variation across sites: 3.6% in semi-urban Tumbes, 6.1% in urban Puno, 6.2% in Lima, and 9.9% in rural Puno (p < 0.001). Population attributable risks (PARs) of COPD due to smoking ≥10 pack-years were less than 10% for all sites, consistent with a low prevalence of daily smoking (3.3%). Rather, we found that PARs of COPD varied by setting. In Lima, for example, the highest PARs were attributed to post-treatment tuberculosis (16% and 22% for men and women, respectively). In rural Puno, daily biomass fuel for cooking among women was associated with COPD (prevalence ratio 2.22, 95% CI 1.02-4.81) and the PAR of COPD due to daily exposure to biomass fuel smoke was 55%. The burden of COPD in Peru was not uniform and, unlike other settings, was not predominantly explained by tobacco smoking. This study emphasizes the role of biomass fuel use, and highlights pulmonary tuberculosis as an often neglected risk factor in endemic areas.

  5. Utility of the urine reagent strip leucocyte esterase assay for the diagnosis of meningitis in resource-limited settings: meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bortcosh, William; Siedner, Mark; Carroll, Ryan W

    2017-09-01

    Diagnosis of bacterial meningitis often requires cytometry, chemistry and/or microbiologic culture capabilities. Unfortunately, laboratory resources in low-resource settings (LRS) often lack the capacity to perform these studies. We sought to determine whether the presence of white blood cells in CSF detected by commercially available urine reagent strips could aid in the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. We searched PubMed for studies published between 1980 and 2016 that investigated the use of urine reagent strips to identify cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pleocytosis. We assessed studies in any language that enrolled subjects who underwent lumbar puncture and had cerebrospinal fluid testing by both standard laboratory assays and urine reagent strips. We abstracted true-positive, false-negative, false-positive and true-negative counts for each study using a diagnostic threshold of ≥10 white blood cells per microlitre for suspected bacterial meningitis and performed mixed regression modelling with random effects to estimate pooled diagnostic accuracy across studies. Our search returned 13 studies including 2235 participants. Urine reagent strips detected CSF pleocytosis with a pooled sensitivity of 92% (95% CI: 84-96), a pooled specificity of 98% (95% CI: 94-99) and a negative predictive value of 99% when the bacterial meningitis prevalence is 10%. Urine reagent strips could provide a rapid and accurate tool to detect CSF pleocytosis, which, if negative, can be used to exclude diagnosis of bacterial meningitis in settings without laboratory infrastructure. Further investigation of the diagnostic value of using protein, glucose and bacteria components of these strips is warranted. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Prospective Optimization with Limited Resources

    PubMed Central

    Snider, Joseph; Lee, Dongpyo; Poizner, Howard; Gepshtein, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    The future is uncertain because some forthcoming events are unpredictable and also because our ability to foresee the myriad consequences of our own actions is limited. Here we studied how humans select actions under such extrinsic and intrinsic uncertainty, in view of an exponentially expanding number of prospects on a branching multivalued visual stimulus. A triangular grid of disks of different sizes scrolled down a touchscreen at a variable speed. The larger disks represented larger rewards. The task was to maximize the cumulative reward by touching one disk at a time in a rapid sequence, forming an upward path across the grid, while every step along the path constrained the part of the grid accessible in the future. This task captured some of the complexity of natural behavior in the risky and dynamic world, where ongoing decisions alter the landscape of future rewards. By comparing human behavior with behavior of ideal actors, we identified the strategies used by humans in terms of how far into the future they looked (their “depth of computation”) and how often they attempted to incorporate new information about the future rewards (their “recalculation period”). We found that, for a given task difficulty, humans traded off their depth of computation for the recalculation period. The form of this tradeoff was consistent with a complete, brute-force exploration of all possible paths up to a resource-limited finite depth. A step-by-step analysis of the human behavior revealed that participants took into account very fine distinctions between the future rewards and that they abstained from some simple heuristics in assessment of the alternative paths, such as seeking only the largest disks or avoiding the smaller disks. The participants preferred to reduce their depth of computation or increase the recalculation period rather than sacrifice the precision of computation. PMID:26367309

  7. Prospective Optimization with Limited Resources.

    PubMed

    Snider, Joseph; Lee, Dongpyo; Poizner, Howard; Gepshtein, Sergei

    2015-09-01

    The future is uncertain because some forthcoming events are unpredictable and also because our ability to foresee the myriad consequences of our own actions is limited. Here we studied how humans select actions under such extrinsic and intrinsic uncertainty, in view of an exponentially expanding number of prospects on a branching multivalued visual stimulus. A triangular grid of disks of different sizes scrolled down a touchscreen at a variable speed. The larger disks represented larger rewards. The task was to maximize the cumulative reward by touching one disk at a time in a rapid sequence, forming an upward path across the grid, while every step along the path constrained the part of the grid accessible in the future. This task captured some of the complexity of natural behavior in the risky and dynamic world, where ongoing decisions alter the landscape of future rewards. By comparing human behavior with behavior of ideal actors, we identified the strategies used by humans in terms of how far into the future they looked (their "depth of computation") and how often they attempted to incorporate new information about the future rewards (their "recalculation period"). We found that, for a given task difficulty, humans traded off their depth of computation for the recalculation period. The form of this tradeoff was consistent with a complete, brute-force exploration of all possible paths up to a resource-limited finite depth. A step-by-step analysis of the human behavior revealed that participants took into account very fine distinctions between the future rewards and that they abstained from some simple heuristics in assessment of the alternative paths, such as seeking only the largest disks or avoiding the smaller disks. The participants preferred to reduce their depth of computation or increase the recalculation period rather than sacrifice the precision of computation.

  8. Evaluation in Cameroon of a Novel, Simplified Methodology to Assist Molecular Microbiological Analysis of V. cholerae in Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Debes, Amanda K.; Ateudjieu, Jerome; Guenou, Etiene; Lopez, Anna Lena; Bugayong, Mark Philip; Retiban, Pearl Joy; Garrine, Marcelino; Mandomando, Inacio; Li, Shan; Stine, O. Colin; Sack, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Vibrio cholerae is endemic in South Asia and Africa where outbreaks of cholera occur widely and are particularly associated with poverty and poor sanitation. Knowledge of the genetic diversity of toxigenic V. cholerae isolates, particularly in Africa, remains scarce. The constraints in improving this understanding is not only the lack of regular cholera disease surveillance, but also the lack of laboratory capabilities in endemic countries to preserve, store and ship isolates in a timely manner. We evaluated the use of simplified sample preservation methods for molecular characterization using multi-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) for differentiation of Vibrio cholerae genotypes. Methods and Findings Forty-seven V. cholerae isolates and 18 enriched clinical specimens (e.g. stool specimens after enrichment in broth) from cholera outbreaks in Cameroon were preserved on Whatman filter paper for DNA extraction. The samples were collected from two geographically distinct outbreaks in the Far North of Cameroon (FNC) in June 2014 and October 2014. In addition, a convenience sample of 14 isolates from the Philippines and 8 from Mozambique were analyzed. All 87 DNAs were successfully analyzed including 16 paired samples, one a cultured isolate and the other the enriched specimen from which the isolate was collected. Genotypic results were identical between 15 enriched specimens and their culture isolates and the other pair differed at single locus. Two closely related, but distinct clonal complexes were identified among the Cameroonian specimens from 2014. Conclusions Collecting V. cholerae using simplified laboratory methods in remote and low-resource settings allows for subsequent advanced molecular characterization of V. cholerae O1. These simplified DNA preservation methods identify V. cholerae and make possible timely information regarding the genetic diversity of V. cholerae; our results set the stage for continued molecular

  9. Evaluation in Cameroon of a Novel, Simplified Methodology to Assist Molecular Microbiological Analysis of V. cholerae in Resource-Limited Settings.

    PubMed

    Debes, Amanda K; Ateudjieu, Jerome; Guenou, Etienne; Guenou, Etiene; Lopez, Anna Lena; Bugayong, Mark Philip; Retiban, Pearl Joy; Garrine, Marcelino; Mandomando, Inacio; Li, Shan; Stine, O Colin; Sack, David A

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is endemic in South Asia and Africa where outbreaks of cholera occur widely and are particularly associated with poverty and poor sanitation. Knowledge of the genetic diversity of toxigenic V. cholerae isolates, particularly in Africa, remains scarce. The constraints in improving this understanding is not only the lack of regular cholera disease surveillance, but also the lack of laboratory capabilities in endemic countries to preserve, store and ship isolates in a timely manner. We evaluated the use of simplified sample preservation methods for molecular characterization using multi-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) for differentiation of Vibrio cholerae genotypes. Forty-seven V. cholerae isolates and 18 enriched clinical specimens (e.g. stool specimens after enrichment in broth) from cholera outbreaks in Cameroon were preserved on Whatman filter paper for DNA extraction. The samples were collected from two geographically distinct outbreaks in the Far North of Cameroon (FNC) in June 2014 and October 2014. In addition, a convenience sample of 14 isolates from the Philippines and 8 from Mozambique were analyzed. All 87 DNAs were successfully analyzed including 16 paired samples, one a cultured isolate and the other the enriched specimen from which the isolate was collected. Genotypic results were identical between 15 enriched specimens and their culture isolates and the other pair differed at single locus. Two closely related, but distinct clonal complexes were identified among the Cameroonian specimens from 2014. Collecting V. cholerae using simplified laboratory methods in remote and low-resource settings allows for subsequent advanced molecular characterization of V. cholerae O1. These simplified DNA preservation methods identify V. cholerae and make possible timely information regarding the genetic diversity of V. cholerae; our results set the stage for continued molecular epidemiological research to better understand the

  10. Visual inspection of cervix with acetic acid: a good alternative to pap smear for cervical cancer screening in resource-limited setting.

    PubMed

    Khan, Momna; Sultana, Syeda Seema; Jabeen, Nigar; Arain, Uzma; Khans, Salma

    2015-02-01

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy of visual inspection of cervix using 3% acetic acid as a screening test for early detection of cervical cancer taking histopathology as the gold standard. The cross-sectional study was conducted at Civil Hospital Karachi from July 1 to December 31, 2012 and comprised all sexually active women aged 19-60 years. During speculum examination 3% acetic acid was applied over the cervix with the help of cotton swab. The observations were noted as positive or negative on visual inspection of the cervix after acetic acid application according to acetowhite changes. Colposcopy-guided cervical biopsy was done in patients with positive or abnormal looking cervix. Colposcopic-directed biopsy was taken as the gold standard to assess visual inspection readings. SPSS 17 was used for statistical analysis. There were 500 subjects with a mean age of 35.74 ± 9.64 years. Sensitivity, specifically, positive predicted value, negative predicted value of visual inspection of the cervix after acetic acid application was 93.5%, 95.8%, 76.3%, 99%, and the diagnostic accuracy was 95.6%. Visual inspection of the cervix after acetic acid application is an effective method of detecting pre-invasive phase of cervical cancer and a good alternative to cytological screening for cervical cancer in resource-poor setting like Pakistan and can reduce maternal morbidity and mortality.

  11. Excessive early mortality in the first year of treatment in HIV type 1-infected patients initiating antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Marazzi, Maria Cristina; Liotta, Giuseppe; Germano, Paola; Guidotti, Giovanni; Altan, A Doro; Ceffa, Susanna; Lio, Massimo Magnano San; Nielsen-Saines, Karin; Palombi, Leonardo

    2008-04-01

    The response to treatment and risk factors for early mortality following initiation of combination antiretrovirals(ARVs) in a cohort of African patients are described in a retrospective cohort design. Medical history, laboratory parameters, and mortality data were reviewed for patients initiating ARVs in 12 clinical centers in Mozambique, Tanzania, and Malawi. Among 3456 HIV-1-infected patients who received ARVs for more than 6 months, at baseline 72% had WHO clinical stages 3/4, 7% had a viral load 400 copies/ml, and 38% had a CD4 cell count >200/microl. One year later, 78% had undetectable virus loads and 79% had CD4 cell counts >200 cells/mm3. In the first year of HAART 260 deaths occurred (97 per 1000 person/years) with mortality peaking in the first 3 months. The highest mortality was observed in patients with low BMI, low hemoglobin levels, and CD4 values <200 cells/microl at baseline. Mortality rates following initiation of HAART are higher in patients in resource-limited areas, particularly in the first 90 days following treatment initiation.HAART initiated at higher CD4 cell count levels, especially among malnourished and/or anemic patients, will carry significant public health impact.

  12. The strategic role of competency based medical education in health care reform: a case report from a small scale, resource limited, Caribbean setting.

    PubMed

    Busari, Jamiu O; Duits, Ashley J

    2015-01-21

    Curaçao is a Dutch Caribbean island with a relatively high aging population, a high prevalence of chronic diseases and a health care system that is driven by cost-containment. In 2009 the development of a new value-based health care (VBHC) system was initiated on the island, and a key role was identified for the St. Elisabeth Hospital as a (model) platform for implementing this initiative. We therefore decided to investigate for the requirements needed to build a health care environment that is conducive for change and capable of facilitating the smooth migration of existent services into an effective and sustainable VBHC system. Our findings revealed that our chosen approach was well accepted by the stakeholders. We discovered that in order to achieve a new value based health care system based on a reliable and well-organized system, the competencies of health care providers and the quality of the health care system needs to be assured. For this, extra focus needs to be given to improving service and manpower development both during and after formal training. In order to achieve a VBHC system in a resource-limited environment, the standard of physicians' competencies and of the health care system need to be guaranteed. The quality of the educational process needs to be maintained and safeguarded within an integrated health care delivery system that offers support to all care delivery and teaching institutions within the community. Finally, collaborative efforts with international medical institutions are recommended.

  13. Limit setting: a useful strategy in rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Sharrock, Julie; Rickard, Nonie

    2002-01-01

    Limit setting is a concept familiar to most mental health clinicians, but much less familiar to staff not specifically trained in mental health care. This paper presents guidelines developed for rehabilitation staff on the strategy of limit setting. The aim of these guidelines was to provide a starting point for ongoing education on limit setting and behavioural management for staff working in a non-psychiatric rehabilitation environment. Limit setting is presented, not only as a response to challenging behaviour, but also as fundamental to all patient care within the rehabilitation context. The guidelines draw on the concepts of limit setting, acting out, therapeutic relationships and therapeutic milieu as described in the psychiatric literature. A humanistic framework for helping people underpins the guidelines. Principles for selecting and enforcing limits are described. Finally, a list of clarification prompts is provided for clinicians to use when faced with challenging patient behaviour.

  14. Evaluating the utility of provider-recorded clinical status in the medical records of HIV-positive adults in a limited-resource setting

    PubMed Central

    Stonbraker, Samantha; Befus, Montina; Nadal, Leonel Lerebours; Halpern, Mina; Larson, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    Provider-reported summaries of clinical status may assist with clinical management of HIV in resource poor settings if they reflect underlying biological processes associated with HIV disease progression. However, their ability to do so is rarely evaluated. Therefore, we aimed to assess the relationship between a provider-recorded summary of clinical status and indicators of HIV progression. Data were abstracted from 201 randomly selected medical records at a large HIV clinic in the Dominican Republic. Multivariable logistic regressions were used to examine the relationship between provider-assigned clinical status and demographic (gender, age, nationality, education) and clinical factors (reported medication adherence, CD4 cell count, viral load). The mean age of patients was 41.2 (SD = ±10.9) years and most were female (n = 115, 57%). None of the examined characteristics were significantly associated with provider-recorded clinical status. Higher CD4 cell counts were more likely for females (OR = 2.2 CI: 1.12–4.31) and less likely for those with higher viral loads (OR = 0.33 CI: 0.15–0.72). Poorer adherence and lower CD4 cell counts were significantly associated with higher viral loads (OR = 4.46 CI: 1.11–20.29 and 6.84 CI: 1.47–37.23, respectively). Clinics using provider-reported summaries of clinical status should evaluate the performance of these assessments to ensure they are associated with biologic indicators of disease progression. PMID:27495146

  15. Inter-rater reliability of the PIPES tool: validation of a surgical capacity index for use in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Markin, Abraham; Barbero, Roxana; Leow, Jeffrey J; Groen, Reinou S; Perlman, Greg; Habermann, Elizabeth B; Apelgren, Keith N; Kushner, Adam L; Nwomeh, Benedict C

    2014-09-01

    In response to the need for simple, rapid means of quantifying surgical capacity in low resource settings, Surgeons OverSeas (SOS) developed the personnel, infrastructure, procedures, equipment and supplies (PIPES) tool. The present investigation assessed the inter-rater reliability of the PIPES tool. As part of a government assessment of surgical services in Santa Cruz, Bolivia, the PIPES tool was translated into Spanish and applied in interviews with physicians at 31 public hospitals. An additional interview was conducted with nurses at a convenience sample of 25 of these hospitals. Physician and nurse responses were then compared to generate an estimate of reliability. For dichotomous survey items, inter-rater reliability between physicians and nurses was assessed using the Cohen's kappa statistic and percent agreement. The Pearson correlation coefficient was used to assess agreement for continuous items. Cohen's kappa was 0.46 for infrastructure, 0.43 for procedures, 0.26 for equipment, and 0 for supplies sections. The median correlation coefficient was 0.91 for continuous items. Correlation was 0.79 for the PIPES index, and ranged from 0.32 to 0.98 for continuous response items. Reliability of the PIPES tool was moderate for the infrastructure and procedures sections, fair for the equipment section, and poor for supplies section when comparing surgeons' responses to nurses' responses-an extremely rigorous test of reliability. These results indicate that the PIPES tool is an effective measure of surgical capacity but that the equipment and supplies sections may need to be revised.

  16. Evolutionarily stable range limits set by interspecific competition.

    PubMed

    Price, Trevor D; Kirkpatrick, Mark

    2009-04-22

    A combination of abiotic and biotic factors probably restricts the range of many species. Recent evolutionary models and tests of those models have asked how a gradual change in environmental conditions can set the range limit, with a prominent idea being that gene flow disrupts local adaptation. We investigate how biotic factors, explicitly competition for limited resources, result in evolutionarily stable range limits even in the absence of the disruptive effect of gene flow. We model two competing species occupying different segments of the resource spectrum. If one segment of the resource spectrum declines across space, a species that specializes on that segment can be driven to extinction, even though in the absence of competition it would evolve to exploit other abundant resources and so be saved. The result is that a species range limit is set in both evolutionary and ecological time, as the resources associated with its niche decline. Factors promoting this outcome include: (i) inherent gaps in the resource distribution, (ii) relatively high fitness of the species when in its own niche, and low fitness in the alternative niche, even when resource abundances are similar in each niche, (iii) strong interspecific competition, and (iv) asymmetric interspecific competition. We suggest that these features are likely to be common in multispecies communities, thereby setting evolutionarily stable range limits.

  17. Evaluation of an Electricity-free, Culture-based Approach for Detecting Typhoidal Salmonella Bacteremia during Enteric Fever in a High Burden, Resource-limited Setting

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Jason R.; Prajapati, Krishna G.; Eypper, Elizabeth; Shrestha, Poojan; Shakya, Mila; Pathak, Kamal R.; Joshi, Niva; Tiwari, Priyanka; Risal, Manisha; Koirala, Samir; Karkey, Abhilasha; Dongol, Sabina; Wen, Shawn; Smith, Amy B.; Maru, Duncan; Basnyat, Buddha; Baker, Stephen; Farrar, Jeremy; Ryan, Edward T.; Hohmann, Elizabeth; Arjyal, Amit

    2013-01-01

    Background In many rural areas at risk for enteric fever, there are few data on Salmonella enterica serotypes Typhi (S. Typhi) and Paratyphi (S. Paratyphi) incidence, due to limited laboratory capacity for microbiologic culture. Here, we describe an approach that permits recovery of the causative agents of enteric fever in such settings. This approach involves the use of an electricity-free incubator based upon use of phase-change materials. We compared this against conventional blood culture for detection of typhoidal Salmonella. Methodology/Principal Findings Three hundred and four patients with undifferentiated fever attending the outpatient and emergency departments of a public hospital in the Kathmandu Valley of Nepal were recruited. Conventional blood culture was compared against an electricity-free culture approach. Blood from 66 (21.7%) patients tested positive for a Gram-negative bacterium by at least one of the two methods. Sixty-five (21.4%) patients tested blood culture positive for S. Typhi (30; 9.9%) or S. Paratyphi A (35; 11.5%). From the 65 individuals with culture-confirmed enteric fever, 55 (84.6%) were identified by the conventional blood culture and 60 (92.3%) were identified by the experimental method. Median time-to-positivity was 2 days for both procedures. The experimental approach was falsely positive due to probable skin contaminants in 2 of 239 individuals (0.8%). The percentages of positive and negative agreement for diagnosis of enteric fever were 90.9% (95% CI: 80.0%–97.0%) and 96.0% (92.7%–98.1%), respectively. After initial incubation, Salmonella isolates could be readily recovered from blood culture bottles maintained at room temperature for six months. Conclusions/Significance A simple culture approach based upon a phase-change incubator can be used to isolate agents of enteric fever. This approach could be used as a surveillance tool to assess incidence and drug resistance of the etiologic agents of enteric fever in settings

  18. Intra-Facility Linkage of HIV-Positive Mothers and HIV-Exposed Babies into HIV Chronic Care: Rural and Urban Experience in a Resource Limited Setting

    PubMed Central

    Mugasha, Christine; Kigozi, Joanita; Kiragga, Agnes; Muganzi, Alex; Sewankambo, Nelson; Coutinho, Alex; Nakanjako, Damalie

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Linkage of HIV-infected pregnant women to HIV care remains critical for improvement of maternal and child outcomes through prevention of maternal-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) and subsequent chronic HIV care. This study determined proportions and factors associated with intra-facility linkage to HIV care and Early Infant Diagnosis care (EID) to inform strategic scale up of PMTCT programs. Methods A cross-sectional review of records was done at 2 urban and 3 rural public health care facilities supported by the Infectious Diseases Institute (IDI). HIV-infected pregnant mothers, identified through routine antenatal care (ANC) and HIV-exposed babies were evaluated for enrollment in HIV clinics by 6 weeks post-delivery. Results Overall, 1,025 HIV-infected pregnant mothers were identified during ANC between January and June, 2012; 267/1,025 (26%) in rural and 743/1,025 (74%) in urban facilities. Of these 375/1,025 (37%) were linked to HIV clinics [67/267(25%) rural and 308/758(41%) urban]. Of 636 HIV-exposed babies, 193 (30%) were linked to EID. Linkage of mother-baby pairs to HIV chronic care and EID was 16% (101/636); 8/179 (4.5%)] in rural and 93/457(20.3%) in urban health facilities. Within rural facilities, ANC registration <28 weeks-of-gestation was associated with mothers' linkage to HIV chronic care [AoR, 2.0 95% CI, 1.1–3.7, p = 0.019] and mothers' multi-parity was associated with baby's linkage to EID; AoR 4.4 (1.3–15.1), p = 0.023. Stigma, long distance to health facilities and vertical PMTCT services affected linkage in rural facilities, while peer mothers, infant feeding services, long patient queues and limited privacy hindered linkage to HIV care in urban settings. Conclusion Post-natal linkage of HIV-infected mothers to chronic HIV care and HIV-exposed babies to EID programs was low. Barriers to linkage to HIV care vary in urban and rural settings. We recommend targeted interventions to rapidly improve linkage to

  19. Determinants and development of a web-based child mortality prediction model in resource-limited settings: A data mining approach.

    PubMed

    Tesfaye, Brook; Atique, Suleman; Elias, Noah; Dibaba, Legesse; Shabbir, Syed-Abdul; Kebede, Mihiretu

    2017-03-01

    , nearly accurate results were obtained by employing decision tree and rule induction techniques. Determinants are identified and a web-based child mortality prediction model in Ethiopian local language is developed. Thus, the result obtained could support child health intervention programs in Ethiopia where trained human resource for health is limited. Advanced classification algorithms need to be tested to come up with optimal models. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Neonatal anesthesia with limited resources.

    PubMed

    Bösenberg, Adrian T

    2014-01-01

    Neonates are the most vulnerable age group in terms of anesthetic risk and perioperative mortality, especially in the developing world. Prematurity, malnutrition, delays in presentation, and sepsis contribute to this risk. Lack of healthcare workers, poorly maintained equipment, limited drug supplies, absence of postoperative intensive care, unreliable water supplies, or electricity are further contributory factors. Trained anesthesiologists with the skills required for pediatric and neonatal anesthesia as well as basic monitoring equipment such as pulse oximetry will go a long way to improve the unacceptably high anesthetic mortality. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Social determinants of health: Social forces that shape women and men's knowledge of reproductive health in a resource-limited setting.

    PubMed

    Namasasu, Jane; Chivers, Sarah; Costello, Leesa

    2016-10-01

    Social forces shape people's reproductive health in many ways. We examined people's knowledge about reproductive health using focus group data collected from 93 participants in rural districts of Malawi. Participants' perspectives were contextualized by explaining the socioeconomic, cultural, and gender factors that determine reproductive health for rural Malawians. Strategies to improve reproductive health care in environments lacking in health infrastructure, staff, and economic resources are then provided. We call for a reproductive health agenda to target preventive care by providing information about anatomy and biology, communicating information in culturally competent ways, and educating men and women over the life course.

  2. An antiretroviral regimen containing 6 months of stavudine followed by long-term zidovudine for first-line HIV therapy is optimal in resource-limited settings: a prospective, multicenter study in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Taisheng; Guo, Fuping; Li, Yijia; Zhang, Chengda; Han, Yang; Lye, Wei; He, Yun; Lu, Hongzhou; Xie, Jing; Huang, Aiqiong; Li, Yanling; Tang, Xiaoping; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Tong; Gao, Guiju; Lei, Junkang; Zhang, Xiaoying; Wu, Xinhua; Sun, Yongtao; Bai, Jinsong; Luo, Ling; Wang, Huanling

    2014-01-01

    An zidovudine (AZT)-substitution regimen containing 24-week stavudine (d4T) followed by long-term AZT for HIV therapy is potential to trade off short-term AZT-related anemia and long-term risks associated with d4T in resource-limited settings. However, evidence is scarce. This study aims to assess the efficacy and safety of AZT-substitution regimen, aiming to find a regimen with better efficacy, less adverse events, and more affordability in resource-limited settings. This prospective, multicenter study enrolled 499 (190 on d4T regimen, 172 on AZT regimen, and 137 on AZT-substitution regimen) HIV-1-infected subjects who initiated combined antiretroviral therapy and attended follow-up visits over 96 weeks from 2009 to 2011. Lamivudine (3TC) and either nevirapine (NVP) or efavirenz (EFV) were the other two drugs in the antiretroviral regimens. Virologic and immunologic responses and adverse events were monitored at baseline and at weeks 4, 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72, 84, and 96. In terms of hematological adverse effects, AZT-substitution group had similar safety profiles to d4T group and was superior to AZT group. In comparison with AZT-substitution group, AZT group was associated with higher risk of developing anemia (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) for anemia ≥ grade II, 8.44, 95% CI 1.81-39.46) and neutropenia (aHR for neutropenia ≥ grade II, 1.86, 95% CI 1.19-2.93). The prevalence of lipodystrophy in d4T group was 19.5%, while that in AZT-substitution group was zero. As to antiretroviral efficacy, these three groups showed no differences. AZT-substitution regimen provides a relatively safe and effective first-line antiretroviral strategy in resource-limited settings.

  3. Technical communication: inhaled anesthetic agent-vaporizer mismatch: management in settings with limited resources: don't try this at home.

    PubMed

    Adler, Adam C; Connelly, Neil Roy; Ankam, Abistanand; Raghunathan, Karthik

    2013-06-01

    Agent-specific vaporizers minimize opportunities for error and evidence our specialty's commitment to patient safety as a general principle. End-tidal anesthetic gas concentration monitoring is a useful adjunct whenever inhaled anesthetics are used in operating rooms. Due to their expense and required maintenance, end-tidal anesthetic gas monitors are not commonly used in developing nations. Unfortunately, in resource-constrained environments, situations may arise in which inhaled anesthetic agent-vaporizer mismatch may be necessary in the absence of end-tidal anesthetic gas monitoring. Rather than merely censure such practice as a threat to safety, we believe that certain anesthetic agent-vaporizer mismatch situations can be safely managed providing patients with predictable inspired anesthetic gas concentrations while minimizing errors. We present an approach based on mathematical models and tested in an artificial lung model. Mismatching of inhaled agent and vaporizer is a dangerous practice and should not be performed unless it is absolutely necessary. Such situations may arise in remote locations where neither end-tidal anesthetic gas monitoring nor vaporizer-specific agent is available. We hope our article provides guidance in such situations.

  4. Direct observation therapy-highly active antiretroviral therapy in a resource-limited setting: the use of community treatment support can be effective.

    PubMed

    Idoko, J A; Agbaji, O; Agaba, P; Akolo, C; Inuwa, B; Hassan, Zuweira; Akintunde, L; Badung, B; Muazu, M; Danang, M; Imade, G; Sankale, J Louis; Kanki, Phyllis

    2007-11-01

    This study examines the use of various direct observation therapy-HAART treatment support modalities in Jos, Nigeria. A 12-month observational study enrolling 175 antiretroviral naïve patients into four arms of direct observation therapy-HAART (highly active antiretroviral therapy); daily observed therapy (DOT), twice weekly observed therapy (TWOT), weekly observed therapy (WOT) and self-administered therapy (SAT), examined community treatment support using family and community members. Treatment outcomes were much better in the treatment-supported groups compared with the control self-therapy group. CD4 cell increases were 218/microL (DOT), 267/microL (TWOT), 205/microL (WOT) versus 224/microL (SAT), whereas plasma HIV-1 RNA reached undetectable levels (<400 copies/mL) in 91%, 88%, 84% versus 79% of patients in the DOT, TWOT, WOT versus SAT groups, respectively, at 48 weeks. We, therefore, strongly support the use of treatment support in our settings.

  5. Effects of mothers' socio-economic status on the management of febrile conditions in their under five children in a resource limited setting

    PubMed Central

    Olaogun, Adenike AE; Adebayo, Abayomi A; Ayandiran, Olufemi E; Olasode, Olayinka A

    2006-01-01

    Background Public health research is shifting focus to the role of socioeconomic indicators in the promotion of health. As such an understanding of the roles that socio-economic factors play in improving health and health-seeking behaviour is important for public health policy. This is because the share of resources devoted to different policy options should depend on their relative effectiveness. Objective To measure the effect of socio-economic status (age, education, occupation, income, religion and family structure) of mothers on the management of febrile conditions in under-fives children Method Two hundred mothers who brought their febrile under-five children to a health facility were interviewed on the treatment they gave to their children before reporting at health facility. Data collected were entered and analyzed using the SPSS software. Binary logistic regression was adopted for the quantitative analysis of the effect of socio-economic variables on the mothers' actions prior to utilizing the health facility. Results Results showed that while mothers' age was negatively correlated (-0.13), occupation was positively correlated (0.17) with under-fives mothers' action. Education, religion, income and family structure were however insignificant at 5% level Conclusion This poses a lot of challenges to policy makers in the developing nations where women's education and earning capacity is low. There is therefore a need to increase the number of women benefiting from micro credit. This will ensure that more women are engaged in a form of occupation that is profitable and can sustain the economic and health needs of the family. PMID:16426450

  6. Unmet needs in asthma treatment in a resource-limited setting: findings from the survey of adult asthma patients and their physicians in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Desalu, Olufemi Olumuyiwa; Onyedum, Cajetan Chigozie; Adeoti, Adekunle Olatayo; Ozoh, Obianuju Beatrice; Fadare, Joseph Olusesan; Salawu, Fatai Kunle; Danburam, Ali; Fawibe, Ademola Emmanuel; Adewole, Olanisun Olufemi

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of asthma in our society is rising and there is need for better understanding of the asthma patients' perception and treatment practice of physicians. The study was aimed at determining asthma attitudes and treatment practices among adult physicians and patients in Nigeria, with the goal of identifying barriers to optimal management. To assess asthma attitudes, treatment practices and limitations among adult physicians and patients in Nigeria, a questionnaire survey was conducted among 150 patients and 70 physicians. Majority (66.7%) of the patients reported their asthma as moderate to severe, 42.7% had emergency room visit and 32% had admission due to asthma in the previous 12 months. Physicians and patients perceptions significantly differed in the time devoted to educational issues (31.4% vs.18.7%) and its contents: individual management plan (64.3% vs.33.3%), correct inhaler technique (84.0% vs.71.0%), medication side effects (80.0% vs.60.0%) and compliance 100% of time (5.7% vs. 18.7%). Patients reported that non-compliance with medication causes increased symptoms (67.0%), exacerbations (60.0%), bronchodilator use (56.0%), urgent physician visit (52.0%) and hospitalizations /ER visits (38.7%). Asthma medication in patients caused short term (10.7%) and long term side effects (20.0%). Due to side effects, 28.0% skipped and stopped their medications. Most physicians (85.7%) and patients (56.0%) agreed on the need for new medication options. The need for new medication in patients was strongly related to asthma severity, limitation of activities, side effects, cost and lack of satisfaction with current medication. With the exception of pulmonologists, physicians did not readily prescribe ICS and their prescriptions were not in line with treatment guidelines. This study has highlighted the gaps and barriers to asthma treatment which need to be addressed to improve the quality of care in Nigeria.

  7. Target Product Profile for a Diagnostic Assay to Differentiate between Bacterial and Non-Bacterial Infections and Reduce Antimicrobial Overuse in Resource-Limited Settings: An Expert Consensus

    PubMed Central

    Dittrich, Sabine; Tadesse, Birkneh Tilahun; Moussy, Francis; Chua, Arlene; Zorzet, Anna; Tängdén, Thomas; Dolinger, David L.; Page, Anne-Laure; Crump, John A.; D’Acremont, Valerie; Bassat, Quique; Lubell, Yoel; Newton, Paul N.; Heinrich, Norbert; Rodwell, Timothy J.; González, Iveth J.

    2016-01-01

    Acute fever is one of the most common presenting symptoms globally. In order to reduce the empiric use of antimicrobial drugs and improve outcomes, it is essential to improve diagnostic capabilities. In the absence of microbiology facilities in low-income settings, an assay to distinguish bacterial from non-bacterial causes would be a critical first step. To ensure that patient and market needs are met, the requirements of such a test should be specified in a target product profile (TPP). To identify minimal/optimal characteristics for a bacterial vs. non-bacterial fever test, experts from academia and international organizations with expertise in infectious diseases, diagnostic test development, laboratory medicine, global health, and health economics were convened. Proposed TPPs were reviewed by this working group, and consensus characteristics were defined. The working group defined non-severely ill, non-malaria infected children as the target population for the desired assay. To provide access to the most patients, the test should be deployable to community health centers and informal health settings, and staff should require <2 days of training to perform the assay. Further, given that the aim is to reduce inappropriate antimicrobial use as well as to deliver appropriate treatment for patients with bacterial infections, the group agreed on minimal diagnostic performance requirements of >90% and >80% for sensitivity and specificity, respectively. Other key characteristics, to account for the challenging environment at which the test is targeted, included: i) time-to-result <10 min (but maximally <2 hrs); ii) storage conditions at 0–40°C, ≤90% non-condensing humidity with a minimal shelf life of 12 months; iii) operational conditions of 5–40°C, ≤90% non-condensing humidity; and iv) minimal sample collection needs (50–100μL, capillary blood). This expert approach to define assay requirements for a bacterial vs. non-bacterial assay should guide

  8. Target Product Profile for a Diagnostic Assay to Differentiate between Bacterial and Non-Bacterial Infections and Reduce Antimicrobial Overuse in Resource-Limited Settings: An Expert Consensus.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, Sabine; Tadesse, Birkneh Tilahun; Moussy, Francis; Chua, Arlene; Zorzet, Anna; Tängdén, Thomas; Dolinger, David L; Page, Anne-Laure; Crump, John A; D'Acremont, Valerie; Bassat, Quique; Lubell, Yoel; Newton, Paul N; Heinrich, Norbert; Rodwell, Timothy J; González, Iveth J

    2016-01-01

    Acute fever is one of the most common presenting symptoms globally. In order to reduce the empiric use of antimicrobial drugs and improve outcomes, it is essential to improve diagnostic capabilities. In the absence of microbiology facilities in low-income settings, an assay to distinguish bacterial from non-bacterial causes would be a critical first step. To ensure that patient and market needs are met, the requirements of such a test should be specified in a target product profile (TPP). To identify minimal/optimal characteristics for a bacterial vs. non-bacterial fever test, experts from academia and international organizations with expertise in infectious diseases, diagnostic test development, laboratory medicine, global health, and health economics were convened. Proposed TPPs were reviewed by this working group, and consensus characteristics were defined. The working group defined non-severely ill, non-malaria infected children as the target population for the desired assay. To provide access to the most patients, the test should be deployable to community health centers and informal health settings, and staff should require <2 days of training to perform the assay. Further, given that the aim is to reduce inappropriate antimicrobial use as well as to deliver appropriate treatment for patients with bacterial infections, the group agreed on minimal diagnostic performance requirements of >90% and >80% for sensitivity and specificity, respectively. Other key characteristics, to account for the challenging environment at which the test is targeted, included: i) time-to-result <10 min (but maximally <2 hrs); ii) storage conditions at 0-40°C, ≤90% non-condensing humidity with a minimal shelf life of 12 months; iii) operational conditions of 5-40°C, ≤90% non-condensing humidity; and iv) minimal sample collection needs (50-100μL, capillary blood). This expert approach to define assay requirements for a bacterial vs. non-bacterial assay should guide product

  9. Relentless increase of resistance to fluoroquinolones and expanded-spectrum cephalosporins in Escherichia coli: 20 years of surveillance in resource-limited settings from Latin America.

    PubMed

    Bartoloni, A; Pallecchi, L; Riccobono, E; Mantella, A; Magnelli, D; Di Maggio, T; Villagran, A L; Lara, Y; Saavedra, C; Strohmeyer, M; Bartalesi, F; Trigoso, C; Rossolini, G M

    2013-04-01

    Previous studies on commensal Escherichia coli from healthy children in the Bolivian Chaco have shown remarkable resistance rates to the old antibiotics since the early 1990s, and the emergence of resistance to newer drugs (fluoroquinolones and expanded-spectrum cephalosporins) in the 2000s. Here we report the results of a new survey conducted in 2011 in the same setting. Rectal swabs were obtained from 482 healthy children (aged 6-72 months) from three urban areas of the Bolivian Chaco. Screening for antibiotic-resistant E. coli was performed by a direct plating method, as in the previous studies. The blaCTX-M genes were investigated by PCR/sequencing, and CTX-M-producing isolates were subjected to genotyping and detection of several plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance mechanisms. Results showed high rates of resistance to nalidixic acid (76%), ciprofloxacin (44%) and expanded-spectrum cephalosporins (12.4%), demonstrating a relentless increase of resistance to those drugs over the past two decades. CTX-M-type extended-spectrum beta-lactamases were found to be widespread (12%, 97% of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producers). Compared with the previous studies, CTX-M-producing E. coli underwent a dramatic dissemination (120-fold increase since early 2000s) and a radical change of dominant CTX-M groups (CTX-M-1 and CTX-M-9 groups versus CTX-M-2 group). Most CTX-M producers were not susceptible to quinolones (91%), and 55% carried plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes (different combinations of aac(6')-Ib-cr, qnrB and qepA). This study shows the rapid and remarkable increasing trend for resistance to fluoroquinolones and expanded-spectrum cephalosporins in one of the poorest regions of Latin America, and underscores the need for urgent control strategies aimed at preserving the efficacy of those drugs in similar settings. © 2012 The Authors. Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2012 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  10. High Rates of Hepatitis B and C and HIV Infections among Blood Donors in Cameroon: A Proposed Blood Screening Algorithm for Blood Donors in Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Fouelifack Ymele, Florent; Keugoung, Basile; Fouedjio, Jeanne Hortense; Kouam, Nadege; Mendibi, Sandrine; Dongtsa Mabou, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    Background. Infections with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are currently major public health problems. Methods. A retrospective study was conducted from January to June 2008 at the Blood Bank of the Central Hospital, Yaoundé (Cameroon). The objective was to study the prevalence of HIV, HBV, and HCV and their coinfections among blood donors. Results. A total of 4650 donors were identified, and the sex ratio (male/female) was 14/1. The median age of donors was 28 years (range: 16 to 69 years). Among blood donors, HBV, HIV, and HCV infection prevalences were 12.14%  (n = 565) , 4.44%  (n = 206), and 1.44%  (n = 67), respectively. Coinfection with HIV and HBV was observed among 0.77% donors, followed by hepatitis B and C co-infection (0.21%) and HIV and HCV coinfection (0.06%). Co-infection with HIV-HBV-HCV was encountered in 2 donors. The HIV, HBV, and HCV infections lead to a destruction of one out of six sets of blood collected. Conclusion. There is a need to review policies for blood collection from donors, by modifying the algorithm of blood donors testing. Pretesting potential donors using rapid tests could help to avoid collection and destruction of (infected) blood. PMID:24066258

  11. Using the Lives Saved Tool (LiST) to Model mHealth Impact on Neonatal Survival in Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Youngji; Labrique, Alain B.; Lefevre, Amnesty E.; Mehl, Garrett; Pfaff, Teresa; Walker, Neff; Friberg, Ingrid K.

    2014-01-01

    While the importance of mHealth scale-up has been broadly emphasized in the mHealth community, it is necessary to guide scale up efforts and investment in ways to help achieve the mortality reduction targets set by global calls to action such as the Millennium Development Goals, not merely to expand programs. We used the Lives Saved Tool (LiST)–an evidence-based modeling software–to identify priority areas for maternal and neonatal health services, by formulating six individual and combined interventions scenarios for two countries, Bangladesh and Uganda. Our findings show that skilled birth attendance and increased facility delivery as targets for mHealth strategies are likely to provide the biggest mortality impact relative to other intervention scenarios. Although further validation of this model is desirable, tools such as LiST can help us leverage the benefit of mHealth by articulating the most appropriate delivery points in the continuum of care to save lives. PMID:25014008

  12. Yield of HIV-associated tuberculosis during intensified case finding in resource-limited settings: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kranzer, Katharina; Houben, Rein MGJ; Glynn, Judith R; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Wood, Robin; Lawn, Stephen D

    2010-01-01

    Summary Intensified case finding is the regular screening for evidence of tuberculosis in people infected with HIV, at high risk of HIV, or living in congregate settings. We systematically reviewed studies of intensified case finding published between January, 1994, and April, 2009. In 78 eligible studies, the number of people with tuberculosis detected during intensified case finding varied substantially between countries and target groups of patients. Median prevalence of newly diagnosed tuberculosis was 0·7% in population-based surveys, 2·2% in contact-tracing studies, 2·3% in mines, 2·3% in programmes preventing mother-to-child transmission of HIV, 2·5% in prisons, 8·2% in medical and antiretroviral treatment clinics, and 8·5% in voluntary counselling and testing services. Metaregression analysis of studies that included only people with HIV showed that for each increment in national prevalence of tuberculosis of 100 cases per 100 000 population, intensified case finding identified an additional one case per 100 screened individuals (p=0·03). Microbiological sputum examination of all individuals without prior selection by symptom screening yielded an additional four cases per 100 individuals screened (p=0·05). Data on the use of serial screening, treatment outcomes in actively identified cases of tuberculosis, and cost-effectiveness, however, were lacking. Concerted action is needed to develop intensified case finding as an important method for control of tuberculosis. PMID:20113978

  13. Surgical skills needed for humanitarian missions in resource-limited settings: common operative procedures performed at Médecins Sans Frontières facilities.

    PubMed

    Wong, Evan G; Trelles, Miguel; Dominguez, Lynette; Gupta, Shailvi; Burnham, Gilbert; Kushner, Adam L

    2014-09-01

    Surgeons in high-income countries increasingly are expressing interest in global surgery and participating in humanitarian missions. Knowledge of the surgical skills required to adequately respond to humanitarian emergencies is essential to prepare such surgeons and plan for interventions. A retrospective review of all surgical procedures performed at Médecins Sans Frontières Brussels facilities from June 2008 to December 2012 was performed. Individual data points included country of project; patient age and sex; and surgical indication and surgical procedure. Between June 2008 and December 2012, a total of 93,385 procedures were performed on 83,911 patients in 21 different countries. The most common surgical indication was for fetal-maternal pathologies, accounting for 25,548 of 65,373 (39.1%) of all cases. The most common procedure was a Cesarean delivery, accounting for a total of 24,182 or 25.9% of all procedures. Herniorrhaphies (9,873/93,385, 10.6%) and minor surgeries (11,332/93,385, 12.1%), including wound debridement, abscess drainage and circumcision, were also common. A basic skill set that includes the ability to provide surgical care for a wide variety of surgical morbidities is urgently needed to cope with the surgical need of humanitarian emergencies. This review of Médecins Sans Frontières's operative procedures provides valuable insight into the types of operations with which an aspiring volunteer surgeon should be familiar. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Using the lives saved tool (LiST) to model mHealth impact on neonatal survival in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Jo, Youngji; Labrique, Alain B; Lefevre, Amnesty E; Mehl, Garrett; Pfaff, Teresa; Walker, Neff; Friberg, Ingrid K

    2014-01-01

    While the importance of mHealth scale-up has been broadly emphasized in the mHealth community, it is necessary to guide scale up efforts and investment in ways to help achieve the mortality reduction targets set by global calls to action such as the Millennium Development Goals, not merely to expand programs. We used the Lives Saved Tool (LiST)--an evidence-based modeling software--to identify priority areas for maternal and neonatal health services, by formulating six individual and combined interventions scenarios for two countries, Bangladesh and Uganda. Our findings show that skilled birth attendance and increased facility delivery as targets for mHealth strategies are likely to provide the biggest mortality impact relative to other intervention scenarios. Although further validation of this model is desirable, tools such as LiST can help us leverage the benefit of mHealth by articulating the most appropriate delivery points in the continuum of care to save lives.

  15. Economic evaluation of first-line treatments for metastatic renal cell carcinoma: a cost-effectiveness analysis in a health resource-limited setting.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bin; Dong, Baijun; Xu, Yuejuan; Zhang, Qiang; Shen, Jinfang; Chen, Huafeng; Xue, Wei

    2012-01-01

    To estimate, from the perspective of the Chinese healthcare system, the economic outcomes of five different first-line strategies among patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). A decision-analytic model was developed to simulate the lifetime disease course associated with renal cell carcinoma. The health and economic outcomes of five first-line strategies (interferon-alfa, interleukin-2, interleukin-2 plus interferon-alfa, sunitinib and bevacizumab plus interferon-alfa) were estimated and assessed by indirect comparison. The clinical and utility data were taken from published studies. The cost data were estimated from local charge data and current Chinese practices. Sensitivity analyses were used to explore the impact of uncertainty regarding the results. The impact of the sunitinib patient assistant program (SPAP) was evaluated via scenario analysis. The base-case analysis showed that the sunitinib strategy yielded the maximum health benefits: 2.71 life years and 1.40 quality-adjusted life-years (QALY). The marginal cost-effectiveness (cost per additional QALY) gained via the sunitinib strategy compared with the conventional strategy was $220,384 (without SPAP, interleukin-2 plus interferon-alfa and bevacizumab plus interferon-alfa were dominated) and $16,993 (with SPAP, interferon-alfa, interleukin-2 plus interferon-alfa and bevacizumab plus interferon-alfa were dominated). In general, the results were sensitive to the hazard ratio of progression-free survival. The probabilistic sensitivity analysis demonstrated that the sunitinib strategy with SPAP was the most cost-effective approach when the willingness-to-pay threshold was over $16,000. Our analysis suggests that traditional cytokine therapy is the cost-effective option in the Chinese healthcare setting. In some relatively developed regions, sunitinib with SPAP may be a favorable cost-effective alternative for mRCC.

  16. Local innovation for improving primary care cardiology in resource-limited African settings: an insight on the Cardio Pad(®) project in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Noubiap, Jean Jacques N; Jingi, Ahmadou M; Kengne, André Pascal

    2014-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is an emerging threat to the health of populations in Africa. With the inadequate health infrastructures, understaffed and underfunded health systems, African countries are ill-prepared to cope with the increasing demand for care for CVD, particularly for populations in remote and underserved rural areas, where 60% of the population currently reside. Task shifting and telehealth have been suggested as strategies to overcome the current health workforce shortage in African countries, and to increase access to prevention and curative services for emerging CVD. However, strategies for promoting their incorporation into the existing health systems, have yet to be developed. The Cardio Pad(®) initiative (originating from Cameroon) seeks to provide appropriate solutions to improve the application of telemedicine for CVD prevention and control in remote African settings. The Cardio Pad(®) is a tele-cardiology device which provides a number of advantages in terms of cost, ease of use, autonomy and reduced technology requirements. It is a fully touch screen medical device which enables cardiac tests such as electrocardiograms (ECG) to be performed in remote underserved areas (rural areas for instance), while the test results are transferred wirelessly via mobile phone connection, to specialist physicians who can interpret them and provide assistance with case management. While most of the current telemedicine clinical services on the African continent receive most expertise from developed countries, the Cardio Pad(®), a local invention by a 26-year-old Cameroon-trained engineer demonstrates how much innovative solutions to combat CVD and other health issues could and should be developed locally in Africa.

  17. Local innovation for improving primary care cardiology in resource-limited African settings: an insight on the Cardio Pad® project in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Jingi, Ahmadou M.; Kengne, André Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is an emerging threat to the health of populations in Africa. With the inadequate health infrastructures, understaffed and underfunded health systems, African countries are ill-prepared to cope with the increasing demand for care for CVD, particularly for populations in remote and underserved rural areas, where 60% of the population currently reside. Task shifting and telehealth have been suggested as strategies to overcome the current health workforce shortage in African countries, and to increase access to prevention and curative services for emerging CVD. However, strategies for promoting their incorporation into the existing health systems, have yet to be developed. The Cardio Pad® initiative (originating from Cameroon) seeks to provide appropriate solutions to improve the application of telemedicine for CVD prevention and control in remote African settings. The Cardio Pad® is a tele-cardiology device which provides a number of advantages in terms of cost, ease of use, autonomy and reduced technology requirements. It is a fully touch screen medical device which enables cardiac tests such as electrocardiograms (ECG) to be performed in remote underserved areas (rural areas for instance), while the test results are transferred wirelessly via mobile phone connection, to specialist physicians who can interpret them and provide assistance with case management. While most of the current telemedicine clinical services on the African continent receive most expertise from developed countries, the Cardio Pad®, a local invention by a 26-year-old Cameroon-trained engineer demonstrates how much innovative solutions to combat CVD and other health issues could and should be developed locally in Africa. PMID:25414826

  18. Impact of a predefined hospital mass casualty response plan in a limited resource setting with no pre-hospital care system.

    PubMed

    Shah, Adil Aijaz; Rehman, Abdul; Sayyed, Raza Hasnain; Haider, Adil Hussain; Bawa, Amber; Zafar, Syed Nabeel; Zia-Ur-Rehman; Ali, Kamran; Zafar, Hasnain

    2015-01-01

    Pre-hospital triage is an intricate part of any mass casualty response system. However, in settings where no such system exists, it is not known if hospital-based disaster response efforts are beneficial. This study describes in-hospital disaster response management and patient outcomes following a mass casualty event (MCE) involving 200 victims in a lower-middle income country in South Asia. We performed a single-center, retrospective review of bombing victims presenting to a trauma center in the spring of 2013, after a high energy car bomb leveled a residential building. Descriptive analysis was utilized to present demographic variables and physical injuries. A disaster plan was devised based on the canons of North-American trauma care; some adaptations to the local environment were incorporated. Relevant medical and surgical specialties were mobilized to the ED awaiting a massive influx of patients. ED waiting room served as the triage area. Operating rooms, ICU and blood bank were alerted. Seventy patients presented to the ED. Most victims (88%) were brought directly without prehospital triage or resuscitation. Four were pronounced dead on arrival. The mean age of victims was 27 (±14) years with a male preponderance (78%). Penetrating shrapnel injury was the most common mechanism of injury (71%). Most had a systolic blood pressure (SBP) >90 with a mean of 120.3 (±14.8). Mean pulse was 90.2 (±21.6) and most patients had full GCS. Extremities were the most common body region involved (64%) with orthopedics service being consulted most frequently. Surgery was performed on 36 patients, including 4 damage control surgeries. All patients survived. This overwhelming single mass-casualty incident was met with a swift multidisciplinary response. In countries with no prehospital triage system, implementing a pre-existing disaster plan with pre-defined interdisciplinary responsibilities can streamline in-hospital management of casualties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd

  19. Experience of stigma and discrimination and the implications for healthcare seeking behavior among people living with HIV/AIDS in resource-limited setting.

    PubMed

    Alemu, Taddese; Biadgilign, Sibhatu; Deribe, Kebede; Escudero, Horacio Ruiseñor

    2013-03-01

    Stigma and discrimination can limit access to care and treatment services. Stigma hides HIV from the public, resulting in reduced pressure for behavioral change. For effective behavior change, empirically grounded and theory-based behavioral change approaches are fundamental as a prevention interventions directed on decreasing stigma and discrimination. The objective of the study was to assess the experience of stigma and discrimination on the psychosocial and health care seeking behavior of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV) in Arba Minch, Ethiopia. This study uses qualitative methods involving focus-group discussions and in-depth interviews conducted in Arba Minch town and nearby Kebeles. Our sample consisted of PLHIV and other key informants who were purposively selected. Data were analyzed manually using thematic content analysis framework. It appears that the magnitude of stigma and discrimination in the area has decreased to a considerably lower level, however, the problem's severity is still being influenced by various factors including: current residence, disclosure status and level of community's awareness about HIV/AIDS. Care and support services provided to PLHIV were well accepted by the respondents and the majority of them were willing to make use of any service available. Health information messages that have been disseminated to the public through mass media since the start of the epidemic in 1984 and AIDS cases in 1986 have played a significant role regarding the current prevailing problem of stigma and discrimination of PLHIV. Stigma and discrimination have come to a level that can be tolerated by most PLHIV that live in this region, especially those who have disclosed their HIV status and were living in urban areas. This calls for a strategy that improves the rates of serostatus disclosure after HIV counseling and testing and strengthens and integrates activities in the task of expanding care and support activities.

  20. Outcomes of non-tunneled non-cuffed hemodialysis catheters in patients on chronic hemodialysis in a resource limited sub-Saharan Africa setting.

    PubMed

    Kaze, Francois Folefack; Ashuntantang, Gloria; Halle, Marie Patrice; Kengne, Andre-Pascal

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the adverse outcomes of non-tunneled hemodialysis catheters and determinants in chronic hemodialysis patients receiving care at the Yaoundé General Hospital hemodialysis center, Cameroon. This was a prospective study of 11 months duration (February-December 2008) involving 81 non-tunneled non-cuffed catheters (63 femoral, 18 internal jugular) placed in 72 adults (47 men, 65.3%) on chronic hemodialysis. Baseline clinical and laboratory parameters associated with catheter-related complications during follow-up were investigated. The difference between variables was assessed using the χ(2) test and equivalents. Sixty-five (80.2%) catheters were inserted for emergency dialysis, 11 (13.6%) for a failed native arteriovenous fistula and five (6.2%) for a failed prior catheter. The mean time-to-catheter removal was 35 ± 28 days. Catheter-related complications accounted for a third of catheter removals. The main catheter-related complications were infections (17/27, 62.9%) and bleeding (6/27, 22.2%), which were associated with unemployment (P = 0.0002) and longer duration of catheter (P = 0.004). The catheter-related infections were sepsis (11.8%), exit-site (29.4%) and both (58.8%); leading to death in 11/17 (64.7%) cases. Fever (94.1%), pain (88.2%) and pus (70.6%) were the main infectious signs with Staphylococcus aureus involved in 70.6%. Unemployment was significantly frequent in patients with infectious complications (76.5% vs. 26.6%, P = 0.0004). Non-tunneled hemodialysis catheters are mainly used for emergency dialysis through the femoral vein in this setting. Catheter-related infections due to Staphylococci are the leading complications associated with unemployment and longer utilization. Efforts are needed to improve early transfer of patients to nephrologists for better preparation for renal replacement therapy. © 2014 The Authors. Therapeutic Apheresis and Dialysis © 2014 International Society for Apheresis.

  1. Cardiac rehabilitation delivery model for low-resource settings.

    PubMed

    Grace, Sherry L; Turk-Adawi, Karam I; Contractor, Aashish; Atrey, Alison; Campbell, Norm; Derman, Wayne; Melo Ghisi, Gabriela L; Oldridge, Neil; Sarkar, Bidyut K; Yeo, Tee Joo; Lopez-Jimenez, Francisco; Mendis, Shanthi; Oh, Paul; Hu, Dayi; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal

    2016-09-15

    Cardiovascular disease is a global epidemic, which is largely preventable. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is demonstrated to be cost-effective and efficacious in high-income countries. CR could represent an important approach to mitigate the epidemic of cardiovascular disease in lower-resource settings. The purpose of this consensus statement was to review low-cost approaches to delivering the core components of CR, to propose a testable model of CR which could feasibly be delivered in middle-income countries. A literature review regarding delivery of each core CR component, namely: (1) lifestyle risk factor management (ie, physical activity, diet, tobacco and mental health), (2) medical risk factor management (eg, lipid control, blood pressure control), (3) education for self-management and (4) return to work, in low-resource settings was undertaken. Recommendations were developed based on identified articles, using a modified GRADE approach where evidence in a low-resource setting was available, or consensus where evidence was not. Available data on cost of CR delivery in low-resource settings suggests it is not feasible to deliver CR in low-resource settings as is delivered in high-resource ones. Strategies which can be implemented to deliver all of the core CR components in low-resource settings were summarised in practice recommendations, and approaches to patient assessment proffered. It is suggested that CR be adapted by delivery by non-physician healthcare workers, in non-clinical settings. Advocacy to achieve political commitment for broad delivery of adapted CR services in low-resource settings is needed. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  2. The REVAMP trial to evaluate HIV resistance testing in sub-Saharan Africa: a case study in clinical trial design in resource limited settings to optimize effectiveness and cost effectiveness estimates.

    PubMed

    Siedner, Mark J; Bwana, Mwebesa B; Moosa, Mahomed-Yunus S; Paul, Michelle; Pillay, Selvan; McCluskey, Suzanne; Aturinda, Isaac; Ard, Kevin; Muyindike, Winnie; Moodley, Pravikrishnen; Brijkumar, Jaysingh; Rautenberg, Tamlyn; George, Gavin; Johnson, Brent; Gandhi, Rajesh T; Sunpath, Henry; Marconi, Vincent C

    2017-07-01

    In sub-Saharan Africa, rates of sustained HIV virologic suppression remain below international goals. HIV resistance testing, while common in resource-rich settings, has not gained traction due to concerns about cost and sustainability. We designed a randomized clinical trial to determine the feasibility, effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness of routine HIV resistance testing in sub-Saharan Africa. We describe challenges common to intervention studies in resource-limited settings, and strategies used to address them, including: (1) optimizing generalizability and cost-effectiveness estimates to promote transition from study results to policy; (2) minimizing bias due to patient attrition; and (3) addressing ethical issues related to enrollment of pregnant women. The study randomizes people in Uganda and South Africa with virologic failure on first-line therapy to standard of care virologic monitoring or immediate resistance testing. To strengthen external validity, study procedures are conducted within publicly supported laboratory and clinical facilities using local staff. To optimize cost estimates, we collect primary data on quality of life and medical resource utilization. To minimize losses from observation, we collect locally relevant contact information, including Whatsapp account details, for field-based tracking of missing participants. Finally, pregnant women are followed with an adapted protocol which includes an increased visit frequency to minimize risk to them and their fetuses. REVAMP is a pragammatic randomized clinical trial designed to test the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of HIV resistance testing versus standard of care in sub-Saharan Africa. We anticipate the results will directly inform HIV policy in sub-Saharan Africa to optimize care for HIV-infected patients.

  3. Efavirenz-based antiretroviral therapy versus nevirapine-including regimens for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV option B plus in resource-limited settings: is there anything missing?

    PubMed

    De Nardo, Pasquale; Gentilotti, Elisa; Nguhuni, Boniface; Vairo, Francesco; Chaula, Zainab; Nicastri, Emanuele; Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, an estimated 1.5 million HIV-positive pregnant women gave birth, with 240,000 children worldwide acquiring HIV. More than 90% of new pediatric infections occurred in Sub-Saharan Africa. The latest WHO guidelines recommended efavirenz (EFV)-based antiretroviral therapy as the first-line regimen for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT). On the other hand, some data suggest that nevirapine (NVP), a well-known antiretroviral, could still play a relevant role in PMTCT, especially in resource-limited settings (RLSs) where the fertility rate is dramatically high compared to developed countries. Given the lack of an unanimous consensus and definitive opinions, this paper goes through the reasons for WHO decisions and aims at refreshing the debate about NVP and EFV pros and cons for PMTCT in RLSs.

  4. A randomised controlled trial of high vs low volume initiation and rapid vs slow advancement of milk feeds in infants with birthweights ≤ 1000 g in a resource-limited setting.

    PubMed

    Raban, Shukri; Santhakumaran, Shalini; Keraan, Quanitah; Joolay, Yaseen; Uthaya, Sabita; Horn, Alan; Modi, Neena; Harrison, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Optimal feeding regimens for infants ≤ 1000 g have not been established and are a global healthcare concern. A controlled trial to establish the safety and efficacy of high vs low volume initiation and rapid vs slow advancement of milk feeds in a resource-limited setting was undertaken. Infants ≤ 1000 g birthweight were randomised to one of four arms, either low (4 ml/kg/day) or high (24 ml/kg/day) initiation and either slow (24 ml/kg/day) or rapid (36 ml/kg/day) advancement of exclusive feeds of human milk (mother's or donor) until a weight of 1200 g was reached. After this point, formula was used to supplement insufficient mother's milk. The primary outcome was time to reach 1500 g. infants were recruited (51: low/slow; 47: low/rapid; 52: high/slow; 50: high/rapid). Infants on rapid advancement regimens reached 1500 g most rapidly (hazard ratio 1.48, 95% CI 1.05-2.09, P=0.03). The rapid advancement groups also regained birthweight more rapidly (hazard ratio 1.77, 95% CI 1.26-2.50, P=0.001). There was no apparent effect of high vs low initiation volumes but there was some evidence of interaction between interventions. There were no significant differences in other secondary outcomes, including necrotising enterocolitis, feed intolerance and late-onset sepsis. In this small pilot study, higher initiation feed volumes and larger daily increments appeared to be well tolerated and resulted in more rapid early weight gain. These data provide justification for a larger study in resource-limited settings to address mortality, necrotising enterocolitis and other important outcomes.

  5. Food Cravings Consume Limited Cognitive Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemps, Eva; Tiggemann, Marika; Grigg, Megan

    2008-01-01

    Using Tiffany's (1990) cognitive model of drug use and craving as a theoretical basis, the present experiments investigated whether cravings for food expend limited cognitive resources. Cognitive performance was assessed by simple reaction time (Experiment 1) and an established measure of working memory capacity, the operation span task…

  6. Food Cravings Consume Limited Cognitive Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemps, Eva; Tiggemann, Marika; Grigg, Megan

    2008-01-01

    Using Tiffany's (1990) cognitive model of drug use and craving as a theoretical basis, the present experiments investigated whether cravings for food expend limited cognitive resources. Cognitive performance was assessed by simple reaction time (Experiment 1) and an established measure of working memory capacity, the operation span task…

  7. Pitfalls of practicing cancer epidemiology in resource-limited settings: the case of survival and loss to follow-up after a diagnosis of Kaposi's sarcoma in five countries across sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Esther; Semeere, Aggrey; Wenger, Megan; Bwana, Mwebesa; Asirwa, F Chite; Busakhala, Naftali; Oga, Emmanuel; Jedy-Agba, Elima; Kwaghe, Vivian; Iregbu, Kenneth; Jaquet, Antoine; Dabis, Francois; Yumo, Habakkuk Azinyui; Dusingize, Jean Claude; Bangsberg, David; Anastos, Kathryn; Phiri, Sam; Bohlius, Julia; Egger, Matthias; Yiannoutsos, Constantin; Wools-Kaloustian, Kara; Martin, Jeffrey

    2016-02-06

    Survival after diagnosis is a fundamental concern in cancer epidemiology. In resource-rich settings, ambient clinical databases, municipal data and cancer registries make survival estimation in real-world populations relatively straightforward. In resource-poor settings, given the deficiencies in a variety of health-related data systems, it is less clear how well we can determine cancer survival from ambient data. We addressed this issue in sub-Saharan Africa for Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), a cancer for which incidence has exploded with the HIV epidemic but for which survival in the region may be changing with the recent advent of antiretroviral therapy (ART). From 33 primary care HIV Clinics in Kenya, Uganda, Malawi, Nigeria and Cameroon participating in the International Epidemiologic Databases to Evaluate AIDS (IeDEA) Consortia in 2009-2012, we identified 1328 adults with newly diagnosed KS. Patients were evaluated from KS diagnosis until death, transfer to another facility or database closure. Nominally, 22% of patients were estimated to be dead by 2 years, but this estimate was clouded by 45% cumulative lost to follow-up with unknown vital status by 2 years. After adjustment for site and CD4 count, age <30 years and male sex were independently associated with becoming lost. In this community-based sample of patients diagnosed with KS in sub-Saharan Africa, almost half became lost to follow-up by 2 years. This precluded accurate estimation of survival. Until we either generally strengthen data systems or implement cancer-specific enhancements (e.g., tracking of the lost) in the region, insights from cancer epidemiology will be limited.

  8. Prevalence of HIV and hepatitis B virus co-infection in sub-Saharan Africa and the potential impact and program feasibility of hepatitis B surface antigen screening in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Stabinski, Lara; OʼConnor, Siobhan; Barnhart, Matthew; Kahn, Rebecca J; Hamm, Tiffany E

    2015-04-15

    Screening people living with HIV for hepatitis B virus (HBV) co-infection is recommended in resource-rich settings to optimize HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) and mitigate HBV-related liver disease. This review examines the need, feasibility, and impact of screening for HBV in resource-limited settings (RLS). We searched 6 databases to identify peer-reviewed publications between 2007 and 2013 addressing (1) HIV/HBV co-infection frequency in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA); (2) performance of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) rapid strip assays (RSAs) in RLS; (3) impact of HBV co-infection on morbidity, mortality, or liver disease progression; and/or (4) impact of HBV-suppressive antiretroviral medications as part of ART on at least one of 5 outcomes (mortality, morbidity, HIV transmission, retention in HIV care, or quality of life). We rated the quality of individual articles and summarized the body of evidence and expected impact of each intervention per outcome addressed. Of 3940 identified studies, 85 were included in the review: 55 addressed HIV/HBV co-infection frequency; 6 described HBsAg RSA performance; and 24 addressed the impact of HIV/HBV co-infection and ART. HIV/HBV frequency in sub-Saharan Africa varied from 0% to >28.4%. RSA performance in RLS showed good, although variable, sensitivity and specificity. Quality of studies ranged from strong to weak. Overall quality of evidence for the impact of HIV/HBV co-infection and ART on morbidity and mortality was fair and good to fair, respectively. Combined, the body of evidence reviewed suggests that HBsAg screening among people living with HIV could have substantial impact on preventing morbidity and mortality among HIV/HBV co-infected individuals in RLS.

  9. Is diabetes and hypertension screening worthwhile in resource-limited settings? An economic evaluation based on a pilot of a Package of Essential Non-communicable disease interventions in Bhutan.

    PubMed

    Dukpa, Wangchuk; Teerawattananon, Yot; Rattanavipapong, Waranya; Srinonprasert, Varalak; Tongsri, Watsamon; Kingkaew, Pritaporn; Yothasamut, Jomkwan; Wangchuk, Dorji; Dorji, Tandin; Wangmo, Kinzang

    2015-10-01

    In response to a lack of cost-effective data on screening and early treatment of diabetes and hypertension in resource-limited settings, a model-based economic evaluation was performed on the World Health Organization (WHO)'s Package of Essential Non-communicable (PEN) disease interventions for primary health care in Bhutan. Both local and international data were applied in the model in order to derive lifetime costs and outcomes resulting from the early treatment of diabetes and hypertension. The results indicate that the current screening option (where people who are overweight, obese or aged 40 years or older who visit primary care facilities are screened for diabetes and hypertension) represents good value for money compared to 'no screening'. The study findings also indicate that expanding opportunistic screening (70% coverage of the target population) to universal screening (where 100% of the target population are screened), is likely to be even more cost-effective. From the sensitivity analysis, the value of the screening options remains the same when disease prevalence varies. Therefore, applying this model to other healthcare settings is warranted, since disease prevalence is one of the major factors in affecting the cost-effectiveness results of screening programs.

  10. Prevalence of HIV type 1 drug resistance mutations in treatment-naïve and experienced patients from resource-limited settings with universal access to antiretroviral therapy: a survey in two small Brazilian cities.

    PubMed

    Eyer-Silva, Walter A; Couto-Fernandez, José Carlos; Silva-de-Jesus, Carlos; Morgado, Mariza G

    2008-03-01

    Concerns have been raised that universal availability of antiretroviral agents in resource-limited settings might lead to the emergence and spread of resistant strains. We present the largest survey on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) resistance among treatment-naïve and experienced patients followed in small, relatively underprivileged cities in Brazil with universal availability to standard of care antiretroviral combinations. Samples were collected between 2004 and 2006 from 95 patients followed in the cities of Saquarema and Santo Antonio de Pádua, state of Rio de Janeiro. A proviral fragment encompassing protease and reverse transcriptase (RT) regions was generated and drug susceptibility level was inferred. Among 50 strains from drug-naïve subjects, one (2%) had intermediate-level resistance to RT inhibitors. Among 38 patients on therapy as of sampling, 28 (73.7%) had plasma viral load (PVL) below detection limit (26 of whom without evidence of resistance mutations) and 11 (28.9%) harbored strains with reduced susceptibility. Only two strains harbored both protease and RT inhibitor mutations. Among seven patients who were off-treatment as of sampling, two (28.5%) harbored strains with reduced susceptibility to RT inhibitors. The relatively high frequency of undetectable PVL among patients on treatment and the overall low prevalence of resistance-associated mutations are reassuring. Continued surveillance, however, is necessary.

  11. Food cravings consume limited cognitive resources.

    PubMed

    Kemps, Eva; Tiggemann, Marika; Grigg, Megan

    2008-09-01

    Using Tiffany's (1990) cognitive model of drug use and craving as a theoretical basis, the present experiments investigated whether cravings for food expend limited cognitive resources. Cognitive performance was assessed by simple reaction time (Experiment 1) and an established measure of working memory capacity, the operation span task (Experiment 2). In each experiment, female undergraduate students were randomly assigned to a craving or control condition. Participants in the craving condition abstained from eating chocolate for 24 hours prior to testing and performed the cognitive task in the presence of chocolate, a manipulation that successfully elicited chocolate cravings. In both experiments, there was no main effect of craving condition on cognition, but there was a significant interaction between condition and trait chocolate craving. In support of Tiffany's model, our results show that habitual food cravers direct limited cognitive resources to craving-related cues, at the cost of competing cognitive demands.

  12. Transfer and Evaluation of an Automated, Low-Cost Real-Time Reverse Transcription-PCR Test for Diagnosis and Monitoring of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection in a West African Resource-Limited Setting

    PubMed Central

    Rouet, Francois; Ekouevi, Didier K.; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Burgard, Marianne; Inwoley, Andre; Tony, Thomas D'Aquin; Danel, Christine; Anglaret, Xavier; Leroy, Valeriane; Msellati, Philippe; Dabis, Francois; Rouzioux, Christine

    2005-01-01

    There is an urgent need for low-cost human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) viral load (VL) monitoring technologies in resource-limited settings. An automated TaqMan real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) assay was transferred to the laboratory of the Centre de Diagnostic et de Recherches sur le SIDA, Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire, and assessed for HIV-1 RNA VL testing in 806 plasma samples collected within four ANRS research programs. The detection threshold and reproducibility of the assay were first determined. The quantitative results obtained with this assay were compared with two commercial HIV-1 RNA kits (the Versant version 3.0 and Monitor version 1.5 assays) in specimens harboring mainly the circulating recombinant form 02 strain (CRF02). The clinical evaluation of this test was done in different situations including the early diagnosis of pediatric infection and the monitoring of antiretroviral-treated patients. The quantification limit of our method was 300 copies/ml. The HIV-1 RNA values obtained by real-time PCR assay were highly correlated with those obtained by the Versant kit (r = 0.901; P < 0.001) and the Monitor test (r = 0.856; P < 0.001) and homogeneously distributed according to HIV-1 genotypes. For the early diagnosis of pediatric HIV-1 infection, the sensitivity and specificity of the real-time PCR assay were both 100% (95% confidence intervals of 93.7 to 100.0 and 98.3 to 100.0, respectively), compared to the Versant results. Following initiation of antiretroviral treatment, the kinetics of HIV-1 RNA levels were very comparable, with a similar proportion of adults and children below the detection limit during follow-up with our technique and the Versant assay. The TaqMan real-time PCR ($12 per test) is now routinely used to monitor HIV-1 infection in our laboratory. This technology should be further evaluated in limited-resource countries where strains other than CRF02 are prevalent. PMID:15956387

  13. Economic evaluation of ARTs in resource-limited countries

    PubMed Central

    Loubiere, S; Meiners, C; Sloan, C; Freedberg, KA; Yazdanpanah, Y

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review In the face of increasing economic constraints, it is critically important to evaluate how best to utilize available resources. In this article, we review the growing number of cost-effectiveness analyses of HIV treatment with antiretroviral therapy (ART) in resource-limited settings. We focus on studies that evaluate when to start therapy, what therapy to start with and what to switch to based on what criteria. Recent findings Recent findings show that earlier ART initiation based on CD4 count criteria (CD4 counts <350/mm3) can be cost-effective in most resource-limited settings. They also suggest that initiating ART with tenofovir as a component of the first-line regimen is an efficient use of resources compared with initiating ART with stavudine. Finally, they show that HIV RNA monitoring combined with CD4 monitoring is more effective than CD4 count monitoring alone, although this strategy was not found to be cost-effective in all studies. Nearly all studies show, however, that the cost-effectiveness of HIV RNA monitoring will become more attractive as the cost of HIV RNA tests and second-line ART regimens decrease. Summary Substantial research shows that antiretroviral therapy for HIV disease in resource-limited settings is cost-effective. Improved initial regimens and increased laboratory monitoring both provide clinical benefit and good value for money. PMID:20539078

  14. Linking resources with demography to understand resource limitation for bears

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds-Hogland, M. J.; Pacifici, L.B.; Mitchell, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    1. Identifying the resources that limit growth of animal populations is essential for effective conservation; however, resource limitation is difficult to quantify. Recent advances in geographical information systems (GIS) and resource modelling can be combined with demographic modelling to yield insights into resource limitation. 2. Using long-term data on a population of black bears Ursus americanus, we evaluated competing hypotheses about whether availability of hard mast (acorns and nuts) or soft mast (fleshy fruits) limited bears in the southern Appalachians, USA, during 1981-2002. The effects of clearcutting on habitat quality were also evaluated. Annual survival, recruitment and population growth rate were estimated using capture-recapture data from 101 females. The availability of hard mast, soft mast and clearcuts was estimated with a GIS, as each changed through time as a result of harvest and succession, and then availabilities were incorporated as covariates for each demographic parameter. 3. The model with the additive availability of hard mast and soft mast across the landscape predicted survival and population growth rate. Availability of young clearcuts predicted recruitment, but not population growth or survival. 4. Availability of hard mast stands across the landscape and availability of soft mast across the landscape were more important than hard mast production and availability of soft mast in young clearcuts, respectively. 5. Synthesis and applications. Our results indicate that older stands, which support high levels of hard mast and moderate levels of soft mast, should be maintained to sustain population growth of bears in the southern Appalachians. Simultaneously, the acreage of intermediate aged stands (10-25 years), which support very low levels of both hard mast and soft mast, should be minimized. The approach used in this study has broad application for wildlife management and conservation. State and federal wildlife agencies often

  15. The Significance of HIV ‘Blips’ in Resource-Limited Settings: Is It the Same? Analysis of the Treat Asia HIV Observational Database (TAHOD) and the Australian HIV Observational Database (AHOD)

    PubMed Central

    Kanapathipillai, Rupa; McManus, Hamish; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Lim, Poh Lian; Templeton, David J.; Law, Matthew; Woolley, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Magnitude and frequency of HIV viral load blips in resource-limited settings, has not previously been assessed. This study was undertaken in a cohort from a high income country (Australia) known as AHOD (Australian HIV Observational Database) and another cohort from a mixture of Asian countries of varying national income per capita, TAHOD (TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database). Methods Blips were defined as detectable VL (≥ 50 copies/mL) preceded and followed by undetectable VL (<50 copies/mL). Virological failure (VF) was defined as two consecutive VL ≥50 copies/ml. Cox proportional hazard models of time to first VF after entry, were developed. Results 5040 patients (AHOD n = 2597 and TAHOD n = 2521) were included; 910 (18%) of patients experienced blips. 744 (21%) and 166 (11%) of high- and middle/low-income participants, respectively, experienced blips ever. 711 (14%) experienced blips prior to virological failure. 559 (16%) and 152 (10%) of high- and middle/low-income participants, respectively, experienced blips prior to virological failure. VL testing occurred at a median frequency of 175 and 91 days in middle/low- and high-income sites, respectively. Longer time to VF occurred in middle/low income sites, compared with high-income sites (adjusted hazards ratio (AHR) 0.41; p<0.001), adjusted for year of first cART, Hepatitis C co-infection, cART regimen, and prior blips. Prior blips were not a significant predictor of VF in univariate analysis (AHR 0.97, p = 0.82). Differing magnitudes of blips were not significant in univariate analyses as predictors of virological failure (p = 0.360 for blip 50–≤1000, p = 0.309 for blip 50–≤400 and p = 0.300 for blip 50–≤200). 209 of 866 (24%) patients were switched to an alternate regimen in the setting of a blip. Conclusion Despite a lower proportion of blips occurring in low/middle-income settings, no significant difference was found between settings. Nonetheless, a

  16. The significance of HIV 'blips' in resource-limited settings: is it the same? analysis of the treat Asia HIV Observational Database (TAHOD) and the Australian HIV Observational Database (AHOD).

    PubMed

    Kanapathipillai, Rupa; McManus, Hamish; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Lim, Poh Lian; Templeton, David J; Law, Matthew; Woolley, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Magnitude and frequency of HIV viral load blips in resource-limited settings, has not previously been assessed. This study was undertaken in a cohort from a high income country (Australia) known as AHOD (Australian HIV Observational Database) and another cohort from a mixture of Asian countries of varying national income per capita, TAHOD (TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database). Blips were defined as detectable VL (≥ 50 copies/mL) preceded and followed by undetectable VL (<50 copies/mL). Virological failure (VF) was defined as two consecutive VL ≥50 copies/ml. Cox proportional hazard models of time to first VF after entry, were developed. 5040 patients (AHOD n = 2597 and TAHOD n = 2521) were included; 910 (18%) of patients experienced blips. 744 (21%) and 166 (11%) of high- and middle/low-income participants, respectively, experienced blips ever. 711 (14%) experienced blips prior to virological failure. 559 (16%) and 152 (10%) of high- and middle/low-income participants, respectively, experienced blips prior to virological failure. VL testing occurred at a median frequency of 175 and 91 days in middle/low- and high-income sites, respectively. Longer time to VF occurred in middle/low income sites, compared with high-income sites (adjusted hazards ratio (AHR) 0.41; p<0.001), adjusted for year of first cART, Hepatitis C co-infection, cART regimen, and prior blips. Prior blips were not a significant predictor of VF in univariate analysis (AHR 0.97, p = 0.82). Differing magnitudes of blips were not significant in univariate analyses as predictors of virological failure (p = 0.360 for blip 50-≤1000, p = 0.309 for blip 50-≤400 and p = 0.300 for blip 50-≤200). 209 of 866 (24%) patients were switched to an alternate regimen in the setting of a blip. Despite a lower proportion of blips occurring in low/middle-income settings, no significant difference was found between settings. Nonetheless, a substantial number of participants were switched

  17. To what extent could performance-based schemes help increase the effectiveness of prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) programs in resource-limited settings? a summary of the published evidence

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In resource-limited settings, HIV/AIDS remains a serious threat to the social and physical well-being of women of childbearing age, pregnant women, mothers and infants. Discussion In sub-Saharan African countries with high prevalence rates, pediatric HIV/AIDS acquired through mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) can in largely be prevented by using well-established biomedical interventions. Logistical and socio-cultural barriers continue, however, to undermine the successful prevention of MTCT (PMTCT). In this paper, we review reports on maternal, neonatal and child health, as well as HIV care and treatment services that look at program incentives. Summary These studies suggest that comprehensive PMTCT strategies aiming to maximize health-worker motivation in developing countries must involve a mix of both financial and non-financial incentives. The establishment of robust ethical and regulatory standards in public-sector HIV care centers could reduce barriers to PMTCT service provision in sub-Saharan Africa and help them in achieving universal PMTCT targets. PMID:21080926

  18. Universal antiretroviral therapy for pregnant and breast-feeding HIV-1-infected women: towards the elimination of mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1 in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    Becquet, Renaud; Ekouevi, Didier Koumavi; Arrivé, Elise; Stringer, Jeffrey Sa; Meda, Nicolas; Chaix, Marie Laure; Tréluyer, Jean-Marc; Leroy, Valériane; Rouzioux, Christine; Blanche, Stéphane; Dabis, François

    2009-01-01

    Prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1 (MTCT) remains a challenge in most resource-limited settings, particularly in Africa. Single-dose and short-course antiretroviral (ARV) regimens are only partially effective and have failed to achieve wide coverage despite their apparent simplicity. More potent ARV combinations are restricted to pregnant women who need treatment for themselves but are also infrequently used. Furthermore, postnatal transmission via breastfeeding is a serious additional threat. Modifications of infant feeding practices aim to reduce breast-milk HIV transmission: replacement feeding is neither affordable nor safe for the majority of African women, and early breastfeeding cessation (e.g. prior to 6 months of life) requires substantial care and nutritional counselling to be practised safely. The recent roll out of ARV treatment has changed the paradigm of prevention of MTCT. To date, postnatal ARV interventions that have been evaluated target either maternal ARV treatment to selected breastfeeding women, with good efficacy, or single-drug post-exposure prophylaxis for short periods of time to their neonates, with a partial efficacy and at the expense of acquisition of drug-related viral resistance. We hypothesize that a viable solution to eliminate paediatric AIDS lies in the universal provision of fully suppressive ARV regimens to all HIV-infected women through pregnancy, delivery, and covering the entire breastfeeding period. Based on the available evidence, we suggest translating into practice the recently available evidence on this matter without any further delay. PMID:19916796

  19. Effect of a nutrition education programme on clinical status and dietary behaviours of adults with type 2 diabetes in a resource-limited setting in South Africa: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Muchiri, Jane W; Gericke, Gerda J; Rheeder, Paul

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of a participant-customised nutrition education programme on glycated Hb (HbA(1c)), blood lipids, blood pressure, BMI and dietary behaviours in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. A randomised controlled trial. The control group (n 41) received education materials. The intervention group (n 41) received the same education materials and participated in eight weekly (2-2·5 h) group nutrition education sessions and follow-up sessions. Outcomes were assessed at 6 and 12 months. An intention-to-treat analysis was conducted. ANCOVA compared the groups (adjustments for baseline values, age, sex and clinic). Two community health centres, Moretele sub-district (North West Province), South Africa. Adults (aged 40-70 years) with type 2 diabetes, HbA(1c) ≥8 %. Differences in HbA(1c) (primary outcome) were -0·64 % (P=0·15) at 6 months and -0·63 % (P=0·16) at 12 months in favour of the intervention group. Starchy-food intake was significantly lower in the intervention group, 9·3 v. 10·8 servings/d (P=0·005) at 6 months and 9·9 v. 11·9 servings/d (P=0·017) at 12 months. Median energy intake was significantly lower in the intervention group at 12 months (5988 v. 6946 kJ/d, P=0·017). No significant group differences in BMI, lipid profile, blood pressure and intakes of macronutrients, vegetables and fruits were observed. Nutrition education was not efficacious on HbA(1c); however, it improved specific dietary behaviours. Group education and hands-on activities appeared to contribute to the improvement. Optimal goal setting and self-efficacy training/assessment could benefit future nutrition education programmes for people with type 2 diabetes mellitus in resource-limited settings.

  20. Effect on transmission of HIV-1 resistance of timing of implementation of viral load monitoring to determine switches from first to second-line antiretroviral regimens in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Andrew N; Pillay, Deenan; Garnett, Geoff; Bennett, Diane; Vitoria, Marco; Cambiano, Valentina; Lundgren, Jens

    2011-03-27

    There is concern that antiretroviral therapy (ART) use with only clinical monitoring for failure will result in high rates of transmission of virus with resistance to drugs currently in use. A stochastic simulation model of transmission of HIV, natural history and the effect of ART, was developed and used to predict the proportion of new infections with resistance according to whether and when viral load monitoring is introduced. In our base model, there was predicted to be 12.4% of new HIV infections with primary antiretroviral resistance in 2020 if clinical monitoring is used throughout, compared with 5.4 and 6.1% if viral load-guided switching (based on viral load measured every 6 months, with switch determined by a value >500 copies/ml) was introduced in 2010 or 2015, respectively. The death rate for those on ART was lowest when viral load monitoring was used, but the overall death rate in all infected people was higher if viral load monitoring was introduced at the expense of scale-up in HIV diagnosis and ART initiation beyond their 2010 coverage levels (4.7 compared with 3.1 per 100 person-years). To preserve current first-line drugs for the long term there is an eventual need for some form of cheap and practical viral load monitoring in resource-limited settings. However, a delay in introduction of 5 years has limited consequences for resistance transmission so the current priority for countries' ART programmes is to increase HIV testing and provide treatment for all those in need of ART.

  1. Subdissociative intranasal ketamine plus standard pain therapy versus standard pain therapy in the treatment of paediatric sickle cell disease vaso-occlusive crises in resource-limited settings: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Sawe, Hendry Robert; Mfinanga, Juma A; Nshom, Ernest; Helm, Ethan; Moore, Charity G; Runyon, Michael S; Reynolds, Stacy L

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Pediatric sickle cell disease, highly prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa, carries great morbidity and mortality risk. Limited resources and monitoring make management of acute vaso-occlusive crises challenging. This study aims to evaluate the efficacy and safety of subdissociative intranasal ketamine as a cheap, readily available and easily administered adjunct to standard pain therapy. We hypothesise that subdissociative, intranasal ketamine may significantly augment current approaches to pain management in resource-limited settings in a safe and cost-effective manner. Methods and analysis This is a multicentred, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial enrolling children 4–16 years of age with sickle cell disease and painful vaso-occlusive pain crises. Study sites include two sub-Saharan teaching and referral hospitals with acute intake areas. All patients receive standard analgesic therapy during evaluation. Patients randomised to the treatment arm receive 1 mg/kg intranasal ketamine at onset of therapy, while placebo arm participants receive volume-matched intranasal normal saline. All participants and clinical staff are blinded to the treatment allocation. Data will be analysed on an intention-to-treat basis. Primary endpoints are changes in self-report pain scales (Faces Pain Scale-Revised) at 30, 60 and 120 minutes and rates of adverse events. Secondary endpoints include hospital length of stay, total analgesia use and quality of life assessment 2–3 weeks postintervention. Ethics and dissemination The research methods for this study have been approved by the Cameroon Baptist Convention Health Board Institutional Review Board (IRB2015-07), the Tanzanian National Institute for Medical Research (NIMR/HQ/R.8a/Vol. IX/2299), Muhimbili National Hospital IRB (MNH/IRB/I/2015/14) and the Tanzanian Food and Drugs Authority (TFDA0015/CTR/0015/9). Data reports will be provided to the Data and Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB) periodically throughout

  2. Molecular diagnostics for low resource settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigl, Bernhard H.

    2010-03-01

    As traditional high quality diagnostic laboratories are not widely available or affordable in developing country health care settings, microfluidics-based point-of-care diagnostics may be able to address the need to perform complex assays in under-resourced areas. Many instrument-based as well as non-instrumented microfluidic prototype diagnostics are currently being developed. In addition to various engineering challenges, the greatest remaining issue is the search for truly low-cost disposable manufacturing methods. Diagnostics for global health, and specifically microfluidics and molecular-based low resource diagnostics, have become a very active research area over the last five years, thanks in part to new funding that became available from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, and other sources. This has led to a number of interesting prototype devices that are now in advanced development or clinical validation. These devices include disposables and instruments that perform multiplexed PCR-based lab-on-a-chips for enteric, febrile, and vaginal diseases, as well as immunoassays for diseases such as malaria, HIV, and various sexually transmitted diseases. More recently, instrument-free diagnostic disposables based on isothermal nucleic acid amplification have been developed as well. Regardless of platform, however, the search for truly low-cost manufacturing methods that would result in cost of goods per disposable of around US1/unit at volume remains a big challenge. This talk will give an overview over existing platform development efforts as well as present some original research in this area at PATH.

  3. Achievable standard of care in low-resource settings.

    PubMed

    Luo, C

    2000-11-01

    The gap between rich and resource-poor countries has continued to grow as reproductive care providers integrate interventions to limit mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV in a manner consistent with existing information. There are two major reasons for this difference: access to prophylactic antiretroviral therapy (ARV) for HIV-infected pregnant mothers and availability of alternative feeding for babies. In resource-poor settings, these options are beyond reach for the majority of the women. Infant and under-five mortality rates from other infections are high in these settings and breastfeeding remains the norm. Answering the question, What is an achievable standard of care in resource-poor settings? still remains a major challenge today. Dialogue has begun in most resource-poor settings to address the key elements in the package of interventions to reduce MTCT of HIV. These elements include the following: (1) overall prevention of HIV in mothers and fathers; (2) provision of good-quality voluntary testing and counseling (VCT) in antenatal clinics; (3) a comprehensive package of interventions during pregnancy, during labor, and after delivery, including screening for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), family planning, and--where possible--ARVs; (4) provision of infant and maternal nutrition within the socioeconomic realities; (5) advocacy and program communication; and (6) other supportive measures, including community mobilization to address issues such as stigmatization of and violence against HIV-infected women. This paper discusses the challenges faced by most resource-poor settings in integrating some of these activities into reproductive care services.

  4. Microfluidic diagnostics for low-resource settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Kenneth R.; Weigl, Bernhard H.

    2010-02-01

    Diagnostics for low-resource settings need to be foremost inexpensive, but also accurate, reliable, rugged and suited to the contexts of the developing world. Diagnostics for global health, based on minimally-instrumented, microfluidicsbased platforms employing low-cost disposables, has become a very active research area recently-thanks, in part, to new funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, and other sources. This has led to a number of interesting prototype devices that are now in advanced development or clinical validation. These devices include disposables and instruments that perform multiplexed PCR-based assays for enteric, febrile, and vaginal diseases, as well as immunoassays for diseases such as malaria, HIV, and various sexually transmitted diseases. More recently, instrument-free diagnostic disposables based on isothermal nucleic-acid amplification have been developed. Regardless of platform, however, the search for truly low-cost manufacturing methods that would enable affordable systems (at volume, in the appropriate context) remains a significant challenge. Here we give an overview of existing platform development efforts, present some original research in this area at PATH, and reiterate a call to action for more.

  5. Management of multiple myeloma in resource-constrained settings.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Lalit; Kumar Sahoo, Ranjit

    2016-12-01

    The prognosis of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) has improved significantly in the past two decades. This is attributed to use of novel agents for induction, high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT), maintenance therapy, and improved supportive care. Currently, evidence-based management guidelines/recommendations developed by International societies/groups are being followed partially in low-resource settings. Lack of quality diagnostics (eg, cytogenetics/fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), serum free light chains), novel therapeutics, and trained manpower, and limited financial resources are key challanges. An optimal utilization of available resources with continued educational activities of treating physicians focused on improving knowledge in the management of such patients may be a way forward to improve the outcome of myeloma patients in these countries. Our current approach to the management of this disease is presented here through a discussion of clinical vignettes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Addition of multiple limiting resources reduces grassland diversity.

    PubMed

    Harpole, W Stanley; Sullivan, Lauren L; Lind, Eric M; Firn, Jennifer; Adler, Peter B; Borer, Elizabeth T; Chase, Jonathan; Fay, Philip A; Hautier, Yann; Hillebrand, Helmut; MacDougall, Andrew S; Seabloom, Eric W; Williams, Ryan; Bakker, Jonathan D; Cadotte, Marc W; Chaneton, Enrique J; Chu, Chengjin; Cleland, Elsa E; D'Antonio, Carla; Davies, Kendi F; Gruner, Daniel S; Hagenah, Nicole; Kirkman, Kevin; Knops, Johannes M H; La Pierre, Kimberly J; McCulley, Rebecca L; Moore, Joslin L; Morgan, John W; Prober, Suzanne M; Risch, Anita C; Schuetz, Martin; Stevens, Carly J; Wragg, Peter D

    2016-09-01

    Niche dimensionality provides a general theoretical explanation for biodiversity-more niches, defined by more limiting factors, allow for more ways that species can coexist. Because plant species compete for the same set of limiting resources, theory predicts that addition of a limiting resource eliminates potential trade-offs, reducing the number of species that can coexist. Multiple nutrient limitation of plant production is common and therefore fertilization may reduce diversity by reducing the number or dimensionality of belowground limiting factors. At the same time, nutrient addition, by increasing biomass, should ultimately shift competition from belowground nutrients towards a one-dimensional competitive trade-off for light. Here we show that plant species diversity decreased when a greater number of limiting nutrients were added across 45 grassland sites from a multi-continent experimental network. The number of added nutrients predicted diversity loss, even after controlling for effects of plant biomass, and even where biomass production was not nutrient-limited. We found that elevated resource supply reduced niche dimensionality and diversity and increased both productivity and compositional turnover. Our results point to the importance of understanding dimensionality in ecological systems that are undergoing diversity loss in response to multiple global change factors.

  7. Global trends in antiretroviral resistance in treatment-naive individuals with HIV after rollout of antiretroviral treatment in resource-limited settings: a global collaborative study and meta-regression analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ravindra K; Jordan, Michael R; Sultan, Binta J; Hill, Andrew; Davis, Daniel HJ; Gregson, John; Sawyer, Anthony W; Hamers, Raph L; Ndembi, Nicaise; Pillay, Deenan; Bertagnolio, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background The emergence and spread of high levels of HIV-1 drug resistance in resource-limited settings where combination antiretroviral treatment has been scaled up could compromise the effectiveness of national HIV treatment programmes. We aimed to estimate changes in the prevalence of HIV-1 drug resistance in treatment-naive individuals with HIV since initiation of rollout in resource-limited settings. Methods We did a systematic search for studies and conference abstracts published between January, 2001, and July, 2011, and included additional data from the WHO HIV drug resistance surveillance programme. We assessed the prevalence of drug-resistance mutations in untreated individuals with respect to time since rollout in a series of random-effects meta-regression models. Findings Study-level data were available for 26 102 patients from sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, and Latin America. We recorded no difference between chronic and recent infection on the prevalence of one or more drug-resistance mutations for any region. East Africa had the highest estimated rate of increase at 29% per year (95% CI 15 to 45; p=0·0001) since rollout, with an estimated prevalence of HIV-1 drug resistance at 8 years after rollout of 7·4% (4·3 to 12·7). We recorded an annual increase of 14% (0% to 29%; p=0·054) in southern Africa and a non-significant increase of 3% (–0·9 to 16; p=0·618) in west and central Africa. There was no change in resistance over time in Latin America, and because of much country-level heterogeneity the meta-regression analysis was not appropriate for Asia. With respect to class of antiretroviral, there were substantial increases in resistance to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) in east Africa (36% per year [21 to 52]; p<0·0001) and southern Africa (23% per year [7 to 42]; p=0·0049). No increase was noted for the other drug classes in any region. Interpretation Our findings suggest a significant increase in prevalence

  8. Global trends in antiretroviral resistance in treatment-naive individuals with HIV after rollout of antiretroviral treatment in resource-limited settings: a global collaborative study and meta-regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ravindra K; Jordan, Michael R; Sultan, Binta J; Hill, Andrew; Davis, Daniel H J; Gregson, John; Sawyer, Anthony W; Hamers, Raph L; Ndembi, Nicaise; Pillay, Deenan; Bertagnolio, Silvia

    2012-10-06

    The emergence and spread of high levels of HIV-1 drug resistance in resource-limited settings where combination antiretroviral treatment has been scaled up could compromise the effectiveness of national HIV treatment programmes. We aimed to estimate changes in the prevalence of HIV-1 drug resistance in treatment-naive individuals with HIV since initiation of rollout in resource-limited settings. We did a systematic search for studies and conference abstracts published between January, 2001, and July, 2011, and included additional data from the WHO HIV drug resistance surveillance programme. We assessed the prevalence of drug-resistance mutations in untreated individuals with respect to time since rollout in a series of random-effects meta-regression models. Study-level data were available for 26,102 patients from sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, and Latin America. We recorded no difference between chronic and recent infection on the prevalence of one or more drug-resistance mutations for any region. East Africa had the highest estimated rate of increase at 29% per year (95% CI 15 to 45; p=0·0001) since rollout, with an estimated prevalence of HIV-1 drug resistance at 8 years after rollout of 7·4% (4·3 to 12·7). We recorded an annual increase of 14% (0% to 29%; p=0·054) in southern Africa and a non-significant increase of 3% (-0·9 to 16; p=0·618) in west and central Africa. There was no change in resistance over time in Latin America, and because of much country-level heterogeneity the meta-regression analysis was not appropriate for Asia. With respect to class of antiretroviral, there were substantial increases in resistance to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) in east Africa (36% per year [21 to 52]; p<0·0001) and southern Africa (23% per year [7 to 42]; p=0·0049). No increase was noted for the other drug classes in any region. Our findings suggest a significant increase in prevalence of drug resistance over time since antiretroviral

  9. Long-term effectiveness of initiating non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor- versus ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy: implications for first-line therapy choice in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Viviane D; Hull, Mark; McVea, David; Chau, William; Harrigan, P Richard; Montaner, Julio SG

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In many resource-limited settings, combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) failure is diagnosed clinically or immunologically. As such, there is a high likelihood that patients may stay on a virologically failing regimen for a substantial period of time. Here, we compared the long-term impact of initiating non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)- versus boosted protease inhibitor (bPI)-based cART in British Columbia (BC), Canada. Methods We followed prospectively 3925 ART-naïve patients who started NNRTIs (N=1963, 50%) or bPIs (N=1962; 50%) from 1 January 2000 until 30 June 2013 in BC. At six months, we assessed whether patients virologically failed therapy (a plasma viral load (pVL) >50 copies/mL), and we stratified them based on the pVL at the time of failure ≤500 versus >500 copies/mL. We then followed these patients for another six months and calculated their probability of achieving subsequent viral suppression (pVL <50 copies/mL twice consecutively) and of developing drug resistance. These probabilities were adjusted for fixed and time-varying factors, including cART adherence. Results At six months, virologic failure rates were 9.5 and 14.3 cases per 100 person-months for NNRTI and bPI initiators, respectively. NNRTI initiators who failed with a pVL ≤500 copies/mL had a 16% higher probability of achieving subsequent suppression at 12 months than bPI initiators (0.81 (25th–75th percentile 0.75–0.83) vs. 0.72 (0.61–0.75)). However, if failing NNRTI initiators had a pVL >500 copies/mL, they had a 20% lower probability of suppressing at 12 months than pVL-matched bPI initiators (0.37 (0.29–0.45) vs. 0.46 (0.38–0.54)). In terms of evolving HIV drug resistance, those who failed on NNRTI performed worse than bPI in all scenarios, especially if they failed with a viral load >500 copies/mL. Conclusions Our results show that patients who virologically failed at six months on NNRTI and continued on the same regimen had a

  10. Universal antiretroviral therapy for pregnant and breast-feeding HIV-1-infected women: towards the elimination of mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1 in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Becquet, Renaud; Ekouevi, Didier K; Arrive, Elise; Stringer, Jeffrey S A; Meda, Nicolas; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Treluyer, Jean-Marc; Leroy, Valériane; Rouzioux, Christine; Blanche, Stéphane; Dabis, François

    2009-12-15

    Prevention of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) remains a challenge in most resource-limited settings, particularly in Africa. Single-dose and short-course antiretroviral (ARV) regimens are only partially effective and have failed to achieve wide coverage despite their apparent simplicity. More potent ARV combinations are restricted to pregnant women who need treatment for themselves and are also infrequently used. Furthermore, postnatal transmission via breast-feeding is a serious additional threat. Modifications of infant feeding practices aim to reduce HIV-1 transmission through breast milk; replacement feeding is neither affordable nor safe for the majority of African women, and early breast-feeding cessation (eg, prior to 6 months of life) requires substantial care and nutritional counseling to be practiced safely. The recent roll out of ARV treatment has changed the paradigm of prevention of MTCT. To date, postnatal ARV interventions that have been evaluated target either maternal ARV treatment to selected breast-feeding women, with good efficacy, or single-drug postexposure prophylaxis for short periods of time to their neonates, with a partial efficacy and at the expense of acquisition of drug-related viral resistance. We hypothesize that a viable solution to eliminate pediatric AIDS lies in the universal provision of fully suppressive ARV regimens to all HIV-1-infected women through pregnancy, delivery, and the entire breast-feeding period. On the basis of available evidence, we suggest translating into practice the recently available evidence on this matter without any further delay.

  11. Guideline-based COPD management in a resource-limited setting - physicians' understanding, adherence and barriers: a cross-sectional survey of internal and family medicine hospital-based physicians in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Desalu, Olufemi Olumuyiwa; Onyedum, Cajetan C; Adeoti, Adekunle O; Gundiri, Laguhyel B; Fadare, Joseph O; Adekeye, Kehinde A; Onyeri, Kelechi D; Fawibe, Ademola E

    2013-03-01

    Few data exist on the understanding and adherence to the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) guidelines in resource-limited settings, which are mostly in sub-Saharan Africa. To assess physicians' understanding, adherence, and barriers to implementation of GOLD guidelines in Nigeria. A questionnaire based on the recommendations of the guidelines was self-administered by 156 physicians in departments of internal and family medicine in selected hospitals to assess physician understanding of the GOLD guidelines and barriers to its implementation. The medical records of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were also reviewed to assess adherence to the guideline recommendations. The performance score of all physicians was 22.37±0.39 (range 0-38). Pulmonologists had the highest score (37.00±0.00) while medical officers had the lowest score (19.93±4.98) (F=10.16, df=5, p<0.001). Forty one percent of physicians knew the spirometric criteria for diagnosing COPD and 26.9% could assess the severity. In clinical practice, 32% of patients had brief smoking counselling despite 70% being smokers, 24% had spirometry and 18% had assessment of severity. Almost 60% of patients were on oral aminophylline, 72% were on an inhaled long-acting β2-agonist and corticosteroid combination, 2% had pulmonary rehabilitation and no patients were vaccinated. Self-reported adherence to the COPD guidelines was 23.7%. Lack of familiarity (39.8%) was cited as the most common barrier to adherence to the guidelines. The understanding of GOLD guidelines is satisfactory among Nigerian doctors managing patients with COPD but the level of adherence is poor. Educational interventions are needed to improve the implementation of guideline-based management.

  12. Addition of multiple limiting resources reduces grassland diversity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Niche dimensionality is the most general theoretical explanation for biodiversity: more niches allow for more ecological tradeoffs between species and thus greater opportunities for coexistence. Resource competition theory predicts that removing resource limitations, by increasing resource availabil...

  13. 20 CFR 416.1205 - Limitation on resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Limitation on resources. 416.1205 Section 416..., BLIND, AND DISABLED Resources and Exclusions § 416.1205 Limitation on resources. (a) Individual with no... XVI of the Act if his or her nonexcludable resources do not exceed $1,500 prior to January 1,...

  14. 20 CFR 416.1205 - Limitation on resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Limitation on resources. 416.1205 Section 416..., BLIND, AND DISABLED Resources and Exclusions § 416.1205 Limitation on resources. (a) Individual with no... XVI of the Act if his or her nonexcludable resources do not exceed $1,500 prior to January 1,...

  15. 20 CFR 416.1205 - Limitation on resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Limitation on resources. 416.1205 Section 416..., BLIND, AND DISABLED Resources and Exclusions § 416.1205 Limitation on resources. (a) Individual with no... XVI of the Act if his or her nonexcludable resources do not exceed $1,500 prior to January 1,...

  16. 20 CFR 416.1205 - Limitation on resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Limitation on resources. 416.1205 Section 416..., BLIND, AND DISABLED Resources and Exclusions § 416.1205 Limitation on resources. (a) Individual with no... XVI of the Act if his or her nonexcludable resources do not exceed $1,500 prior to January 1,...

  17. 20 CFR 416.1205 - Limitation on resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Limitation on resources. 416.1205 Section 416..., BLIND, AND DISABLED Resources and Exclusions § 416.1205 Limitation on resources. (a) Individual with no... XVI of the Act if his or her nonexcludable resources do not exceed $1,500 prior to January 1,...

  18. Pharmacogenetics of unboosted atazanavir in HIV-infected individuals in resource-limited settings: a sub-study of the AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) PEARLS study (NWCS 342)

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Mancilla, Jose R.; Aquilante, Christina L.; Wempe, Michael F.; Smeaton, Laura M.; Firnhaber, Cynthia; LaRosa, Alberto M.; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Andrade, Adriana; Baheti, Gautam; Fletcher, Courtney V.; Campbell, Thomas B.; Haas, David W.; MaWhinney, Samantha; Anderson, Peter L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The multinational PEARLS (ACTG A5175) study, conducted mainly in resource-limited settings, identified an increased treatment failure rate among HIV-infected individuals randomized to once-daily unboosted atazanavir, didanosine-EC, and emtricitabine compared with efavirenz-based regimens. We evaluated associations between selected human genetic polymorphisms and atazanavir pharmacokinetics in PEARLS. Methods Polymorphisms in CYP3A5, ABCB1, SLCO1B1 and NR1I2 were genotyped in PEARLS participants randomized to atazanavir plus didanosine-EC plus emtricitabine in Peru, South Africa and the USA, who also consented to genetic analysis. Non-linear mixed-effects population pharmacokinetic modelling was used to predict atazanavir oral clearance (CL/F) and concentration at 24 h (C24). Atazanavir mono-oxidation metabolites M1 and M2 were quantified from the same single-point plasma sample used to quantify the parent drug. Data were log10 transformed for statistical analysis using unpaired t-tests and one-way ANOVA and are presented as geometric mean (95% CI). Results Eighty-four HIV-infected participants were genotyped, including 44 Black Africans or African Americans and 28 women. Median age was 34 years. We identified 56 CYP3A5 expressers and 28 non-expressers. Atazanavir CL/F and C24 did not differ between CYP3A5 expressers and non-expressers: 13.2 (12.1–14.4) versus 12.7 L/h (11.7–13.9), P = 0.61, and 75.3 (46.1–123.0) versus 130.9 ng/mL (86.9–197.2), P = 0.14, respectively. M1/atazanavir and M2/atazanavir ratios were higher in expressers than in non-expressers: 0.0083 (0.0074–0.0094) versus 0.0063 (0.0053–0.0075), P = 0.008, and 0.0065 (0.0057–0.0073) versus 0.0050 (0.0042–0.0061), P = 0.02, respectively. Conclusions Expression of CYP3A5 appears to be associated with increased M1 and M2 atazanavir metabolite formation, without significantly affecting parent compound pharmacokinetics. PMID:26892777

  19. A Pragmatic Approach to HIV-1 Drug Resistance Determination in Resource-Limited Settings by Use of a Novel Genotyping Assay Targeting the Reverse Transcriptase-Encoding Region Only

    PubMed Central

    Bronze, Michelle; Wallis, Carole L.; Stuyver, Lieven; Steegen, Kim; Balinda, Sheila; Kityo, Cissy; Stevens, Wendy; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.; Schuurman, Rob

    2013-01-01

    In resource-limited settings (RLS), reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors form the backbone of first-line treatment regimens. We have developed a simplified HIV-1 drug resistance genotyping assay targeting the region of RT harboring all major RT inhibitor resistance mutation positions, thus providing all relevant susceptibility data for first-line failures, coupled with minimal cost and labor. The assay comprises a one-step RT-PCR amplification reaction, followed by sequencing using one forward and one reverse primer, generating double-stranded coverage of RT amino acids (aa) 41 to 238. The assay was optimized for all major HIV-1 group M subtypes in plasma and dried blood spot (DBS) samples using a panel of reference viruses for HIV-1 subtypes A to D, F to H, and circulating recombinant form 01_AE (CRF01_AE) and applied to 212 clinical plasma samples and 25 DBS samples from HIV-1-infected individuals from Africa and Europe. The assay was subsequently transferred to Uganda and applied locally on clinical plasma samples. All major HIV-1 subtypes could be detected with an analytical sensitivity of 5.00E+3 RNA copies/ml for plasma and DBS. Application of the assay on 212 clinical samples from African subjects comprising subtypes A to D, F to H (rare), CRF01_AE, and CRF02_AG at a viral load (VL) range of 6.71E+2 to 1.00E+7 (median, 1.48E+5) RNA copies/ml was 94.8% (n = 201) successful. Application on clinical samples in Uganda demonstrated a comparable success rate. Genotyping of clinical DBS samples, all subtype C with a VL range of 1.02E+3 to 4.49E+5 (median, 1.42E+4) RNA copies/ml, was 84.0% successful. The described assay greatly reduces hands-on time and the costs required for genotyping and is ideal for use in RLS, as demonstrated in a reference laboratory in Uganda and its successful application on DBS samples. PMID:23536405

  20. Pharmacogenetics of unboosted atazanavir in HIV-infected individuals in resource-limited settings: a sub-study of the AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) PEARLS study (NWCS 342).

    PubMed

    Castillo-Mancilla, Jose R; Aquilante, Christina L; Wempe, Michael F; Smeaton, Laura M; Firnhaber, Cynthia; LaRosa, Alberto M; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Andrade, Adriana; Baheti, Gautam; Fletcher, Courtney V; Campbell, Thomas B; Haas, David W; MaWhinney, Samantha; Anderson, Peter L

    2016-06-01

    The multinational PEARLS (ACTG A5175) study, conducted mainly in resource-limited settings, identified an increased treatment failure rate among HIV-infected individuals randomized to once-daily unboosted atazanavir, didanosine-EC, and emtricitabine compared with efavirenz-based regimens. We evaluated associations between selected human genetic polymorphisms and atazanavir pharmacokinetics in PEARLS. Polymorphisms in CYP3A5, ABCB1, SLCO1B1 and NR1I2 were genotyped in PEARLS participants randomized to atazanavir plus didanosine-EC plus emtricitabine in Peru, South Africa and the USA, who also consented to genetic analysis. Non-linear mixed-effects population pharmacokinetic modelling was used to predict atazanavir oral clearance (CL/F) and concentration at 24 h (C24). Atazanavir mono-oxidation metabolites M1 and M2 were quantified from the same single-point plasma sample used to quantify the parent drug. Data were log10 transformed for statistical analysis using unpaired t-tests and one-way ANOVA and are presented as geometric mean (95% CI). Eighty-four HIV-infected participants were genotyped, including 44 Black Africans or African Americans and 28 women. Median age was 34 years. We identified 56 CYP3A5 expressers and 28 non-expressers. Atazanavir CL/F and C24 did not differ between CYP3A5 expressers and non-expressers: 13.2 (12.1-14.4) versus 12.7 L/h (11.7-13.9), P = 0.61, and 75.3 (46.1-123.0) versus 130.9 ng/mL (86.9-197.2), P = 0.14, respectively. M1/atazanavir and M2/atazanavir ratios were higher in expressers than in non-expressers: 0.0083 (0.0074-0.0094) versus 0.0063 (0.0053-0.0075), P = 0.008, and 0.0065 (0.0057-0.0073) versus 0.0050 (0.0042-0.0061), P = 0.02, respectively. Expression of CYP3A5 appears to be associated with increased M1 and M2 atazanavir metabolite formation, without significantly affecting parent compound pharmacokinetics. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for

  1. Setting Limits: Tips for Parents of Young Children. Project Enlightenment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Lynne; And Others

    This pamphlet presents guidelines and tips for parents on setting limits for the behavior of young children. The need for limits and the goal of teaching children self-control are explained. Some general guidelines for limit setting are provided which include making the limits age-appropriate, recognizing the child's need for practice and…

  2. Thermal protection of the newborn in resource-limited environments.

    PubMed

    Lunze, K; Hamer, D H

    2012-05-01

    Appropriate thermal protection of the newborn prevents hypothermia and its associated burden of morbidity and mortality. Yet, current global birth practices tend to not adequately address this challenge. Here, we discuss the pathophysiology of hypothermia in the newborn, its prevention and therapeutic options with particular attention to resource-limited environments. Newborns are equipped with sophisticated mechanisms of body temperature regulation. Neonatal thermoregulation is a critical function for newborn survival, regulated in the hypothalamus and mediated by endocrine pathways. Hypothermia activates cellular metabolism through shivering and non-shivering thermogenesis. In newborns, optimal temperature ranges are narrow and thermoregulatory mechanisms easily overwhelmed, particularly in premature and low-birth weight infants. Hyperthermia most commonly is associated with dehydration and potentially sepsis. The lack of thermal protection promptly leads to hypothermia, which is associated with detrimental metabolic and other pathophysiological processes. Simple thermal protection strategies are feasible at community and institutional levels in resource-limited environments. Appropriate interventions include skin-to-skin care, breastfeeding and protective clothing or devices. Due to poor provider training and limited awareness of the problem, appropriate thermal care of the newborn is often neglected in many settings. Education and appropriate devices might foster improved hypothermia management through mothers, birth attendants and health care workers. Integration of relatively simple thermal protection interventions into existing mother and child health programs can effectively prevent newborn hypothermia even in resource-limited environments.

  3. Managing severe infection in infancy in resource poor settings.

    PubMed

    Seale, Anna C; Berkley, James A

    2012-12-01

    Reducing childhood mortality in resource-poor regions depends on effective interventions to decrease neonatal mortality from severe infection, which contributes up to a half of all neonatal deaths. There are key differences in resource-poor, compared to resource-rich, countries in terms of diagnosis, supportive care and treatment. In resource-poor settings, diagnosis is based on identifying clinical syndromes from international guidelines; microbiological investigations are restricted to a few research facilities. Low levels of staffing and equipment limit the provision of basic supportive care, and most facilities cannot provide respiratory support. Empiric antibiotic treatment guidelines are based on few aetiological and antimicrobial susceptibility data. Research on improving health care systems to provide effective supportive care, and implementation of simple pragmatic interventions, such as low-cost respiratory support, are essential, together with improved surveillance to monitor emerging drug resistance and treatment failures. Reductions in mortality will also be achieved through prevention of infection; including emerging vaccination and anti-sepsis strategies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Obstetric anaesthesia in low-resource settings.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Robert A; Reed, Anthony R; James, Michael F

    2010-06-01

    Close co-operation between obstetricians and obstetric anaesthesia providers is crucial for the safety and comfort of parturients, particularly in low-resource environments. Maternal and foetal mortality is unacceptably high, and the practice of obstetric anaesthesia has an important influence on outcome. Well-conducted national audits have identified the contributing factors to anaesthesia-related deaths. Spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section is the method of choice in the absence of contraindications, but is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Minimum requirements for safe practice are adequate skills, anaesthesia monitors, disposables and drugs and relevant management protocols for each level of care. The importance of current outreach initiatives is emphasised, and educational resources and the available financial sources discussed. The difficulties of efficient procurement of equipment and drugs are outlined. Guiding principles for the practice of analgesia for labour, anaesthesia for caesarean section and the management of obstetric emergencies, where the anaesthetist also has a central role, are suggested.

  5. Habitat, not resource availability, limits consumer production in lake ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Craig, Nicola; Jones, Stuart E.; Weidel, Brian C.; Solomon, Christopher T.

    2015-01-01

    Food web productivity in lakes can be limited by dissolved organic carbon (DOC), which reduces fish production by limiting the abundance of their zoobenthic prey. We demonstrate that in a set of 10 small, north temperate lakes spanning a wide DOC gradient, these negative effects of high DOC concentrations on zoobenthos production are driven primarily by availability of warm, well-oxygenated habitat, rather than by light limitation of benthic primary production as previously proposed. There was no significant effect of benthic primary production on zoobenthos production after controlling for oxygen, even though stable isotope analysis indicated that zoobenthos do use this resource. Mean whole-lake zoobenthos production was lower in high-DOC lakes with reduced availability of oxygenated habitat, as was fish biomass. These insights improve understanding of lake food webs and inform management in the face of spatial variability and ongoing temporal change in lake DOC concentrations.

  6. Evaluating intercepts from demographic models to understand resource limitation and resource thresholds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds-Hogland, M. J.; Hogland, J.S.; Mitchell, M.S.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding resource limitation is critical to effective management and conservation of wild populations, however resource limitation is difficult to quantify partly because resource limitation is a dynamic process. Specifically, a resource that is limiting at one time may become non-limiting at another time, depending upon changes in its availability and changes in the availability of other resources. Methods for understanding resource limitation, therefore, must consider the dynamic effects of resources on demography. We present approaches for interpreting results of demographic modeling beyond analyzing model rankings, model weights, slope estimates, and model averaging. We demonstrate how interpretation of y-intercepts, odds ratios, and rates of change can yield insights into resource limitation as a dynamic process, assuming logistic regression is used to link estimates of resources with estimates of demography. In addition, we show how x-intercepts can be evaluated with respect to odds ratios to understand resource thresholds. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Asthma Care in Resource-Poor Settings

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Asthma prevalence in low-to middle-income countries is at least the same or higher than in rich countries, but with increased severity. Lack of control in these settings is due to various factors such as low accessibility to effective medications, multiple and uncoordinated weak infrastructures of medical services for the management of chronic diseases such as asthma, poor compliance with prescribed therapy, lack of asthma education, and social and cultural factors. There is an urgent requirement for the implementation of better ways to treat asthma in underserved populations, enhancing the access to preventive medications and educational approaches with modern technological methods. PMID:23282401

  8. Modeling multiple resource limitation in tropical dry forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvigy, D.; Xu, X.; Zarakas, C.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical dry forests (TDFs) are characterized by a long dry season when little rain falls. At the same time, many neotropical soils are highly weathered and relatively nutrient poor. Because TDFs are often subject to both water and nutrient constraints, the question of how they will respond to environmental perturbations is both complex and highly interesting. Models, our basic tools for projecting ecosystem responses to global change, can be used to address this question. However, few models have been specifically parameterized for TDFs. Here, we present a new version of the Ecosystem Demography 2 (ED2) model that includes a new parameterization of TDFs. In particular, we focus on the model's framework for representing limitation by multiple resources (carbon, water, nitrogen, and phosphorus). Plant functional types are represented in terms of a dichotomy between "acquisitive" and "conservative" resource acquisition strategies. Depending on their resource acquisition strategy and basic stoichiometry, plants can dynamically adjust their allocation to organs (leaves, stem, roots), symbionts (e.g. N2-fixing bacteria), and mycorrhizal fungi. Several case studies are used to investigate how resource acquisition strategies affect ecosystem responses to environmental perturbations. Results are described in terms of the basic setting (e.g., rich vs. poor soils; longer vs. shorter dry season), and well as the type and magnitude of environmental perturbation (e.g., changes in precipitation or temperature; changes in nitrogen deposition). Implications for ecosystem structure and functioning are discussed.

  9. Development of a reverse transcription-loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for detection of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus as a novel molecular method for diagnosis of pandemic influenza in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Toru; Agoh, Masanobu; Mai, Le Q; Fukushima, Kiyoyasu; Nishimura, Hidekazu; Yamaguchi, Akinori; Hirano, Manabu; Yoshikawa, Akira; Hasebe, Futoshi; Kohno, Shigeru; Morita, Kouichi

    2010-03-01

    This paper reports on the development of a one-step, real-time reverse transcription-loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay targeting the hemagglutinin (HA) gene for the rapid molecular-based detection of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus. The detection limit of the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus HA-specific RT-LAMP assay was same as that of the currently used real-time reverse transcription-PCR method. The assay detected the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus HA gene in 136 RNA samples extracted from nasopharyngeal swab specimens from Japanese and Vietnamese patients. No cross-reactive amplification with the RNA of other seasonal influenza viruses was observed, and the detection of specific viral genome targets in clinical specimens was achieved in less than 40 min. The sensitivity and specificity of the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus HA-specific RT-LAMP assay obtained in this study were 97.8% and 100%, respectively. Use of the (H1N1) 2009 virus HA-specific RT-LAMP assay will enable the faster and easier diagnosis of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus infection, especially in resource-limited situations in developing countries.

  10. Frugal innovation in medicine for low resource settings.

    PubMed

    Tran, Viet-Thi; Ravaud, Philippe

    2016-07-07

    Whilst it is clear that technology is crucial to advance healthcare: innovation in medicine is not just about high-tech tools, new procedures or genome discoveries. In constrained environments, healthcare providers often create unexpected solutions to provide adequate healthcare to patients. These inexpensive but effective frugal innovations may be imperfect, but they have the power to ensure that health is within reach of everyone. Frugal innovations are not limited to low-resource settings: ingenuous ideas can be adapted to offer simpler and disruptive alternatives to usual care all around the world, representing the concept of "reverse innovation". In this article, we discuss the different types of frugal innovations, illustrated with examples from the literature, and argue for the need to give voice to this neglected type of innovation in medicine.

  11. Pollen source and resource limitation to fruit production in the rare species Eremosparton songoricum (Fabaceae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Eremosparton songoricum (Litv.) Vass. is a rare, central Asian desert species which shows lower fruit set and seed set (<16%) than most hermaphroditic species. We hypothesized that fruit production was limited by pollen and resources. To evaluate potential fruit abortion due to pollen limitation, su...

  12. Cardiac rehabilitation delivery model for low-resource settings

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Sherry L; Turk-Adawi, Karam I; Contractor, Aashish; Atrey, Alison; Campbell, Norm; Derman, Wayne; Melo Ghisi, Gabriela L; Oldridge, Neil; Sarkar, Bidyut K; Yeo, Tee Joo; Lopez-Jimenez, Francisco; Mendis, Shanthi; Oh, Paul; Hu, Dayi; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal

    2016-01-01

    Objective Cardiovascular disease is a global epidemic, which is largely preventable. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is demonstrated to be cost-effective and efficacious in high-income countries. CR could represent an important approach to mitigate the epidemic of cardiovascular disease in lower-resource settings. The purpose of this consensus statement was to review low-cost approaches to delivering the core components of CR, to propose a testable model of CR which could feasibly be delivered in middle-income countries. Methods A literature review regarding delivery of each core CR component, namely: (1) lifestyle risk factor management (ie, physical activity, diet, tobacco and mental health), (2) medical risk factor management (eg, lipid control, blood pressure control), (3) education for self-management and (4) return to work, in low-resource settings was undertaken. Recommendations were developed based on identified articles, using a modified GRADE approach where evidence in a low-resource setting was available, or consensus where evidence was not. Results Available data on cost of CR delivery in low-resource settings suggests it is not feasible to deliver CR in low-resource settings as is delivered in high-resource ones. Strategies which can be implemented to deliver all of the core CR components in low-resource settings were summarised in practice recommendations, and approaches to patient assessment proffered. It is suggested that CR be adapted by delivery by non-physician healthcare workers, in non-clinical settings. Conclusions Advocacy to achieve political commitment for broad delivery of adapted CR services in low-resource settings is needed. PMID:27181874

  13. Exploring nurses' and patients' perspectives of limit setting in a forensic mental health setting.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Tessa; Daffern, Michael; Martin, Trish

    2014-04-01

    Limit setting is an intervention that is frequently used by mental health nurses. However, limit setting is poorly conceptualized, its purpose is unclear, and there are few evidence-based guidelines to assist nurses to set limits in a safe and effective manner. What is known is that the manner in which nurses set limits influences patients' perceptions of the interactions and their emotional and behavioural responses. In this qualitative study, 12 nurses and 12 patients participated in personal, semistructured interviews that aimed to explore limit setting and to propose principles to guide practice. The findings suggested that: (i) limit setting is important to safety in mental health hospitals; (ii) engaging patients in an empathic manner is necessary when setting limits (when nurses engage in an empathic manner, the therapeutic relationship is more likely to be preserved and the risk of aggressive responses is reduced); and (iii) an authoritative (fair, respectful, consistent, and knowledgeable), rather than authoritarian (controlling and indifferent), limit-setting style enhances positive outcomes with regards to adherence, reduced likelihood of aggression, and preservation of the therapeutic relationship. In conclusion, a limit-setting style characterized by empathic responding and an authoritative, rather than authoritarian interpersonal, style is recommended. Elucidating the components of this style is critical for effective training and best practice of mental health nurses, and to reduce aggressive responses from limit setting. © 2013 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  14. Innovative newborn health technology for resource-limited environment