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Sample records for linac automated beam

  1. Linac Coherent Light Source Electron Beam Collimation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Dowell, D.; Emma, P.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Schmerge, J.F.; /SLAC

    2007-04-27

    This paper describes the design and simulation of the electron beam collimation system in the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Dark current is expected from the gun and some of the accelerating cavities. Particle tracking of the expected dark current through the entire LCLS linac, from gun through FEL undulator, is used to estimate final particle extent in the undulator as well as expected beam loss at each collimator or aperture restriction. A table of collimators and aperture restrictions is listed along with halo particle loss results, which includes an estimate of average continuous beam power lost. In addition, the transverse wakefield alignment tolerances are calculated for each collimator.

  2. BEAM LOSS MECHANISMS IN HIGH INTENSITY LINACS

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    In the present operation of the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source, 60-Hz, 825-us H beam pulses are accelerated to 910 MeV, and then compressed to less than a microsecond in the storage ring, to deliver 1 MW of beam power to the spallation target. The beam loss in the superconducting portion of the linac is higher than expected, and it has shown a surprising counter-intuitive correlation with quadrupole magnetic fields, with a loss minimum occurring when the quadrupoles are set to approximately half their design values. This behavior can now be explained by a recent set of experiments that show the beam loss is primarily due to intra-beam stripping. Beam halo is another important beam loss contributor, and collimation in the 2.5 MeV Medium Energy Beam Transport has proven to be an effective mitigation strategy. In this presentation, we will summarize these and other beam loss mechanisms that are important for high intensity linacs.

  3. Beam commissioning for a superconducting proton linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-Jun; He, Yuan; Jia, Huan; Dou, Wei-ping; Chen, Wei-long; Zhang, X. L.; Liu, Shu-hui; Feng, Chi; Tao, Yue; Wang, Wang-sheng; Wu, Jian-qiang; Zhang, Sheng-hu; Zhao, Hong-Wei

    2016-12-01

    To develop the next generation of safe and cleaner nuclear energy, the accelerator-driven subcritical (ADS) system emerges as one of the most attractive technologies. It will be able to transmute the long-lived transuranic radionuclides produced in the reactors of today's nuclear power plants into shorter-lived ones, and also it will provide positive energy output at the same time. The prototype of the Chinese ADS (C-ADS) proton accelerator comprises two injectors and a 1.5 GeV, 10 mA continuous wave (CW) superconducting main linac. The injector scheme II at the C-ADS demo facility inside the Institute of Modern Physics is a 10 MeV CW superconducting linac with a designed beam current of 10 mA, which includes an ECR ion source, a low-energy beam transport line, a 162.5 MHz radio frequency quadrupole accelerator, a medium-energy beam transport line, and a superconducting half wave resonator accelerator section. This demo facility has been successfully operating with an 11 mA, 2.7 MeV CW beam and a 3.9 mA, 4.3 MeV CW beam at different times and conditions since June 2014. The beam power has reached 28 kW, which is the highest record for the same type of linear accelerators. In this paper, the parameters of the test injector II and the progress of the beam commissioning are reported.

  4. Error analysis in post linac to driver linac transport beam line of RAON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chanmi; Kim, Eun-San

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the effects of magnet errors in the beam transport line connecting the post linac to the driver linac (P2DT) in the Rare Isotope Accelerator in Korea (RAON). The P2DT beam line is bent by 180-degree to send the radioactive Isotope Separation On-line (ISOL) beams accelerated in Linac-3 to Linac-2. This beam line transports beams with multi-charge state 132Sn45,46,47. The P2DT beam line includes 42 quadrupole, 4 dipole and 10 sextupole magnets. We evaluate the effects of errors on the trajectory of the beam by using the TRACK code, which includes the translational and the rotational errors of the quadrupole, dipole and sextupole magnets in the beam line. The purpose of this error analysis is to reduce the rate of beam loss in the P2DT beam line. The distorted beam trajectories can be corrected by using six correctors and seven monitors.

  5. Beam-based Feedback for the NLC Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, L

    2004-07-21

    The NLC linac train-by-train feedback system is designed to stabilize the beam trajectory, but is also a valuable element in the strategy for emittance preservation. New simulations employ improved strategies [1], allowing beam steering to be performed significantly less often than without the feedback system. Additional simulations indicate that the linac feedback can contribute towards successful operation at noisier sites.

  6. MEIC Proton Beam Formation with a Low Energy Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yuhong

    2015-09-01

    The MEIC proton and ion beams are generated, accumulated, accelerated and cooled in a new green-field ion injector complex designed specifically to support its high luminosity goal. This injector consists of sources, a linac and a small booster ring. In this paper we explore feasibility of a short ion linac that injects low-energy protons and ions into the booster ring.

  7. Induction linac drivers for commercial heavy-ion beam fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, D.

    1987-11-01

    This paper discusses induction linac drivers necessary to accelerate heavy ions at inertial fusion targets. Topics discussed are: driver configurations, the current-amplifying induction linac, high current beam behavior and emittance growth, new considerations for driver design, the heavy ion fusion systems study, and future studies. 13 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab. (LSP)

  8. BEAM SIMULATIONS USING VIRTUAL DIAGNOSTICS FOR THE DRIVER LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    R. C. York; X. Wu; Q. Zhao

    2011-12-21

    End-to-end beam simulations for the driver linac have shown that the design meets the necessary performance requirements including having adequate transverse and longitudinal acceptances. However, to achieve reliable operational performance, the development of appropriate beam diagnostic systems and control room procedures are crucial. With limited R&D funding, beam simulations provide a cost effective tool to evaluate candidate beam diagnostic systems and to provide a critical basis for developing early commissioning and later operational activities. We propose to perform beam dynamic studies and engineering analyses to define the requisite diagnostic systems of the driver linac and through simulation to develop and test commissioning and operational procedures.

  9. Beam loading compensation for the NLC low frequency linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z.; Miller, R.; Farkas, D.; Raubenheimer, T.; Tang, H.; Yeremian, D.

    1997-03-01

    The NLC low rf linacs are heavily loaded by a beam of about 130 ns in macropulse length (90 bunches) and a current up to 2.75 Amps. Beam loading voltage generates a large energy spread along the bunch train. This energy spread is critical for lattice design and, if not properly compensated, induces emittance growth and in turn lowers the luminosity of the machine. In this paper, the authors study the {Delta}F and {Delta}T beam loading compensation techniques for the NLC low rf linacs. They will apply these methods to the NLC low rf linacs to demonstrate the efficacy of these methods. Finally, they discuss a hybrid {Delta}T + {Delta}F method to improve the efficiency of beam loading compensation.

  10. Multi-beam RFQ linac structure for heavy ion fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashizaki, Noriyosu; Ishibashi, Takuya; Ito, Taku; Hattori, Toshiyuki

    2009-07-01

    Both the RF linear accelerator (linac) and the linear induction accelerator have been considered as injectors in a driver system for heavy ion fusion (HIF). In order to relax beam defocusing by space charge effect in the low-energy region, the accelerating beams that were merged and had their beam currents increased by the funnel tree system are injected into storage rings. A multi-beam linac that accelerates multiple beams in an accelerator cavity has the advantages of cost reduction and downsizing of the system. We modeled the multi-beam Interdigital-H type radio frequency quadruple (IH-RFQ) cavities with the different beam numbers and evaluated the electromagnetic characteristics by simulation. As a result, the reasonable ranges of their configuration were indicated for a practical use.

  11. Linac4 low energy beam measurements with negative hydrogen ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scrivens, R.; Bellodi, G.; Crettiez, O.; Dimov, V.; Gerard, D.; Granemann Souza, E.; Guida, R.; Hansen, J.; Lallement, J.-B.; Lettry, J.; Lombardi, A.; Midttun, Ø.; Pasquino, C.; Raich, U.; Riffaud, B.; Roncarolo, F.; Valerio-Lizarraga, C. A.; Wallner, J.; Yarmohammadi Satri, M.; Zickler, T.

    2014-02-01

    Linac4, a 160 MeV normal-conducting H- linear accelerator, is the first step in the upgrade of the beam intensity available from the LHC proton injectors at CERN. The Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) line from the pulsed 2 MHz RF driven ion source, to the 352 MHz RFQ (Radiofrequency Quadrupole) has been built and installed at a test stand, and has been used to transport and match to the RFQ a pulsed 14 mA H- beam at 45 keV. A temporary slit-and-grid emittance measurement system has been put in place to characterize the beam delivered to the RFQ. In this paper a description of the LEBT and its beam diagnostics is given, and the results of beam emittance measurements and beam transmission measurements through the RFQ are compared with the expectation from simulations.

  12. Linac4 low energy beam measurements with negative hydrogen ions

    SciTech Connect

    Scrivens, R. Bellodi, G.; Crettiez, O.; Dimov, V.; Gerard, D.; Granemann Souza, E.; Guida, R.; Hansen, J.; Lallement, J.-B.; Lettry, J.; Lombardi, A.; Midttun, Ø.; Pasquino, C.; Raich, U.; Riffaud, B.; Roncarolo, F.; Valerio-Lizarraga, C. A.; Wallner, J.; Yarmohammadi Satri, M.; Zickler, T.

    2014-02-15

    Linac4, a 160 MeV normal-conducting H{sup −} linear accelerator, is the first step in the upgrade of the beam intensity available from the LHC proton injectors at CERN. The Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) line from the pulsed 2 MHz RF driven ion source, to the 352 MHz RFQ (Radiofrequency Quadrupole) has been built and installed at a test stand, and has been used to transport and match to the RFQ a pulsed 14 mA H{sup −} beam at 45 keV. A temporary slit-and-grid emittance measurement system has been put in place to characterize the beam delivered to the RFQ. In this paper a description of the LEBT and its beam diagnostics is given, and the results of beam emittance measurements and beam transmission measurements through the RFQ are compared with the expectation from simulations.

  13. H- AND PROTON BEAM LOSS COMPARISON AT SNS SUPERCONDUCTING LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Galambos, John D; Plum, Michael A; Shishlo, Andrei P

    2012-01-01

    A comparison of beam loss in the superconducting part (SCL) of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac for H- and protons is presented. During the experiment the nominal beam of negative hydrogen ions in the SCL was replaced by a proton beam created by insertion of a thin stripping carbon foil placed in the low energy section of the linac. The observed significant reduction in the beam loss for protons is explained by a domination of the intra beam stripping mechanism of the beam loss for H-. The details of the experiment are discussed, and a preliminary estimation of the cross section of the reaction H- + H- -> H- + H0 + e is presented. Earlier, a short description of these studies was presented in [1].

  14. Beam position monitor readout and control in the SLC linac

    SciTech Connect

    Bogart, J.; Phinney, N.; Ross, M.; Yaffe, D.

    1985-04-01

    A beam position monitoring system has been implemented in the first third of the SLC linac which provides a complete scan of the trajectory on a single beam pulse. The data is collected from the local micro-computers and viewed with an updating display at a console or passed on to application programs. The system must operate with interlaced beams so the scans are also interlaced, providing each user with the ability to select the beam, the update rate, and the attenuation level in the digitizing hardware. In addition each user calibrates the hardware for his beam. A description of the system architecture will be presented. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Experimental beam dynamics in the SLC (SLAC Linear Collier) linac

    SciTech Connect

    Steeman, J.T.; Campisi, I.E.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.; Lee, M.

    1987-01-01

    The component installation for the upgrade of the three-kilometer linac for the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) was completed in late summer 1986. The system status and measurements of beam properties made during commissioning are described in this paper. In summary, a low-emittance electron beam from a damping ring has been accelerated through the linac and injected into the north SLC Arc with negligible loss. The maximum bunch intensity is 2.9 x 10 electrons/pulse. A peak particle energy of 53 GeV has been reached. Operation at 47 GeV is now routine. The energy and energy spectrum of the electron beam can be rapidly measured nondestructively at high energy. These signals will be used in a fast feedback system nearing completion. The electron beam can be centered in the accelerator to about 200 m rms. Slow feedback of the injection position and angle into the linac and injection into the north Arc are operational. Longitudinal and transverse wakefields have been measured and appear to be near expectations. Transverse position measurements at the end of the linac show a 120 m horizontal and a 30 m vertical (rms) jitter from pulse to pulse. The spot shape, including the transverse tails, also shows some jitter. The transverse position and shape fluctuations have several sources involving launch instabilities, chromatic effects, RF deflections and lattice mismatches. Continued improvements are expected. These parameter jitters would not preclude collisions. The measured invariant transverse emittances of the beam at 47 GeV are 2 x 10 V rm vertically and 12-25 x 10 V rm horizontally at 1 x 10 e . The horizontal emittance increases with beam intensity. Damped positrons have been injected into the linac, and trajectory correction is underway.

  16. Analysis of Beam-Beam Kink Instability in a Linac-Ring Electron-Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    V. Lebedev; J. Bisognano; R. Li; B. Yunn

    2001-06-01

    A linac-ring collision scheme was considered in recent proposals of electron-gold colliders (eRHIC) and polarized-electron light-ion colliders (EPIC). The advantages of using an energy-recovered linac for the electron beam is that it avoids the limitation of beam-beam tune shift inherent in a storage ring, pertains good beam quality and easy manipulation of polarization. However, the interaction of the ion beam in the storage ring with the electron beam from the linac acts analogously to a transverse impedance, and can induce unstable behavior of the ion beam similar to the strong head-tail instability. In this paper, this beam-beam kink instability with head-tail effect is analyzed using the linearized Vlasov equation, and the threshold of transverse mode coupling instability is obtained.

  17. Intensity Effects of the FACET Beam in the SLAC Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, F.-J.; Lipkowitz, N.; Sheppard, J.; White, G.R.; Wienands, U.; Woodley, M.; Yocky, G.; /SLAC

    2012-07-03

    The beam for FACET (Facility for Advanced aCcelerator Experimental Tests) at SLAC requires an energy-time correlation ('chirp') along the linac, so it can be compressed in two chicanes, one at the midpoint in sector 10 and one W-shaped chicane just before the FACET experimental area. The induced correlation has the opposite sign to the typical used for BNS damping, and therefore any orbit variations away from the center kick the tail of the beam more than the head, causing a shear in the beam and emittance growth. Any dispersion created along the linac has similar effects due to the high (>1.2% rms) energy spread necessary for compression. The initial huge emittances could be reduced by a factor of 10, but were still bigger than expected by a factor of 2-3. Normalized emittance of 3 {micro}m-rad in Sector 2 blew up to 150 {micro}m-rad in Sector 11 but could be reduced to about 6-12 {micro}m-rad, for the vertical plane although the results were not very stable. Investigating possible root causes for this, we found locations where up to 10 mm dispersion was created along the linac, which were finally verified with strong steering and up to 7 mm settling of the linac accelerator at these locations.

  18. Beam-based alignment measurements of the LANSCE linac

    SciTech Connect

    McCrady, R. C.; Rybarcyk, L. J.

    2004-01-01

    We have made measurements of the alignment of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) Drift Tube linac (DTL) and Side Coupled linac (SCL) using beam position measurements and analyzing them with linear models. In the DTL, we varied the injection steering and focusing lattice strengths, measured the beam position after each DTL tank, and analyzed the data with a linear model using R-matrices that were either computed by the Trace-3D computer program or extracted from analysis of the data. The analysis model allowed for tank-to-tank misalignments. The measurements were made similarly in the SCL, where the analysis model allowed for misalignments of each quadrupole doublet lens. We present here the analysis techniques and the resulting beam-based alignment measurements.

  19. Electron Beam Focusing in the Linear Accelerator (linac)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauregui, Luis

    2015-10-01

    To produce consistent data with an electron accelerator, it is critical to have a well-focused beam. To keep the beam focused, quadrupoles (quads) are employed. Quads are magnets, which focus the beam in one direction (x or y) and defocus in the other. When two or more quads are used in series, a net focusing effect is achieved in both vertical and horizontal directions. At start up there is a 5% calibration error in the linac at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. This means that the momentum of particles passing through the quads isn't always what is expected, which affects the focusing of the beam. The objective is to find exactly how sensitive the focusing in the linac is to this 5% error. A linac was simulated, which contained 290 RF Cavities with random electric fields (to simulate the 5% calibration error), and a total momentum kick of 1090 MeV. National Science Foundation, Department of Energy, Jefferson Lab, Old Dominion University.

  20. BEAM POSITION AND PHASE MONITORS FOR THE LANSCE LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    McCrady, Rodney C.; Gilpatrick, John D.; Watkins, Heath A.

    2012-04-11

    New beam-position and phase monitors are under development for the linac at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE.) Transducers have been designed and are being installed. We are considering many options for the electronic instrumentation to process the signals and provide position and phase data with the necessary precision and flexibility to serve the various required functions. We'll present the various options under consideration for instrumentation along with the advantages and shortcomings of these options.

  1. Beam transport for an SRF recirculating-linac FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, D.; Douglas, D.; Li, Z.

    1995-12-31

    The beam transport system for the CEBAF UV Demo FEL includes a two-pan transport of the beam with acceleration from injector to wiggler, followed by energy recovery transport from wiggler to dump. From that contact we discuss the general problem of multi-pass energy-recovery beam transport for FELs. Tuneable, nearly-isochronous, large-momentum-acceptance import systems are required. The entire transport must preserve beam quality, particularly in the acceleration transport to the wiggler, and have low losses throughout the entire system. Issues such as injection and final energies, number of passes, linac focusing effects, beam separation, chronicity management, and stability constraints are critical. Various possible designs are discussed. Particle tracking results exploring the design options are also reported.

  2. INJECTOR LINAC FOR THE BNL SUPER NEUTRINO BEAM PROJECT.

    SciTech Connect

    RAPARIA, D.; ALESSI, J.; RUGGIERO, A.; WENG, W.T.

    2005-05-16

    BNL plans to upgrade the AGS proton beam power from the present 0.14 MW to higher than 1.0 MW and beyond for a neutrino facility. We have examined possible upgrade to the AGS accelerator complex that would meet the requirements of the proton beam of 1.0 MW for neutrino superbeam facility. The major contribution for the higher power is from the increase of the repetition rate of the AGS from 0.3 Hz to 2.5 Hz, with moderate increase from the intensity. To increase the AGS repetition rate we are proposing to replace booster with a 1.5 GeV linac. We will replace part of existing 200 MeV linac with coupled cavity structure from 116 MeV to 400 MeV and then add an additional 1.1 GeV superconducting linac to reach a final energy of 1.5 GeV for direct H{sup -} injection into the AGS. We will present possible choices for the upgrade and our choice and its design.

  3. A driver linac for the Advanced Exotic Beam Laboratory : physics design and beam dynamics simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Mustapha, B.; Nolen, J.; Physics

    2007-01-01

    The Advanced Exotic Beam Laboratory (AEBL) being developed at ANL consists of an 833 MV heavy-ion driver linac capable of producing uranium ions up to 200 MeV/u and protons to 580 MeV with 400 kW beam power. We have designed all accelerator components including a two charge state LEBT, an RFQ, a MEBT, a superconducting linac, a stripper station and chicane. We present the results of an optimized linac design and end-to-end simulations including machine errors and detailed beam loss analysis. The Advanced Exotic Beam Laboratory (AEBL) has been proposed at ANL as a reduced scale of the original Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) project with about half the cost but the same beam power. AEBL will address 90% or more of RIA physics but with reduced multi-users capabilities. The focus of this paper is the physics design and beam dynamics simulations of the AEBL driver linac. The reported results are for a multiple charge state U{sup 238} beam.

  4. Automated beam builder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muench, W. K.

    1980-01-01

    Requirements for the space fabrication of large space structures are considered with emphasis on the design, development, manufacture, and testing of a machine which automatically produces a basic building block aluminum beam. Particular problems discussed include those associated with beam cap forming; brace storage, dispensing, and transporting; beam component fastening; and beam cut-off. Various critical process tests conducted to develop technology for a machine to produce composite beams are also discussed.

  5. Tutorial on beam-based feedback systems for linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, L.; Allison, S.; Gromme, T.; Grossberg, P.; Himel, T.; Krauter, K.; MacKenzie, R.; Ross, M.; Sass, R.; Shoaee, H.

    1994-08-01

    A generalized fast feedback system stabilizes beams in the SLC. It performs measurements and modifies actuator settings to control beam states such as position, angle, energy and intensity on a pulse to pulse basis. An adaptive cascade feature allows communication between a series of linac loops, avoiding overcorrection problems. The system is based on the state space formalism of digital control theory. Due to the database-driven design, new loops are added without requiring software modifications. Recent enhancements support the monitoring and control of nonlinear states such as beam phase using excitation techniques. In over three years of operation, the feedback system has grown from its original eight loops to more than fifty loops, and it has been invaluable in stabilizing the machine.

  6. Beam-based Feedback for the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Fairley, D.; Allison, S.; Chevtsov, S.; Chu, P.; Decker, F.J.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Himel, T.; Kim, K.; Krejcik, P.; Loos, H.; Lahey, T.; Natampalli, P.; Peng, S.; Rogind, D.; Shoaee, H.; Straumann, T.; Williams, E.; White, G.; Wu, J.; Zelazney, M.; /SLAC

    2010-02-11

    Beam-based feedback control loops are required by the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) program in order to provide fast, single-pulse stabilization of beam parameters. Eight transverse feedback loops, a 6 x 6 longitudinal feedback loop, and a loop to maintain the electron bunch charge were successfully prototyped in MATLAB for the LCLS, and have been maintaining stability of the LCLS electron beam at beam rates up to 30Hz. In the final commissioning phase of LCLS the beam will be operating at up to 120Hz. In order to run the feedback loops at beam rate, the feedback loops will be implemented in EPICS IOCs with a dedicated ethernet multi-cast network. This paper will discuss the design of the beam-based Fast Feedback System for LCLS. Topics include MATLAB feedback prototyping, algorithm for 120Hz feedback, network design for fast data transport, actuator and sensor design for single-pulse control and sensor readback, and feedback configuration and runtime control.

  7. Beam-energy and laser beam-profile monitor at the BNL LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, R.; Briscoe, B.; Degen, C.; DeSanto, L.; Meng, W.; Minty, M.; Nayak, S.; Raparia, D.; Russo, T.

    2010-05-02

    We are developing a non-interceptive beam profile and energy monitor for H{sup -} beams in the high energy beam transport (HEBT) line at the Brookhaven National Lab linac. Electrons that are removed from the beam ions either by laser photodetachment or stripping by background gas are deflected into a Faraday cup. The beam profile is measured by stepping a narrow laser beam across the ion beam and measuring the electron charge vs. transverse laser position. There is a grid in front of the collector that can be biased up to 125kV. The beam energy spectrum is determined by measuring the electron charge vs. grid voltage. Beam electrons have the same velocity as the beam and so have an energy of 1/1836 of the beam protons. A 200MeV H{sup -} beam yields 109keV electrons. Energy measurements can be made with either laser-stripped or gas-stripped electrons.

  8. Effect of the transverse parasitic mode on beam performance for the ADS driver linac in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Peng; Pei, Shi-Lun; Wang, Jiu-Qing; Li, Zhi-Hui

    2015-05-01

    The ADS (Accelerator Driven subcritical System) driver linac in China is designed to run in CW (Continuous Wave) mode with 10 mA designed beam current. In this scenario, the beam-induced parasitic modes in the ADS driver linac may make the beam unstable or deteriorate the beam performance. To evaluate the parasitic mode effect on the beam dynamics systematically, simulation studies using the ROOT-based numerical code SMD have been conducted. The longitudinal beam instability induced by the HOMs (High Order Modes) and SOMs (Same Order Modes) has little effect on the longitudinal beam performance for the current ADS driver linac design based on the 10 MeV/325 MHz injector I from previous studies. Here the transverse parasitic mode (i.e., dipole HOM) effect on the transverse beam performance at the ADS driver linac exit is investigated. To more reasonably quantify the dipole mode effect, the multi-bunch effective emittance is introduced in this paper.

  9. SU-E-T-211: Comparison of Seven New TrueBeam Linacs with Enhanced Beam Data Conformance Using a Beam Comparison Software Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Grzetic, S; Hessler, J; Gupta, N; Woollard, J; DiCostanzo, D; Ayan, A; Carlson, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop an independent software tool to assist in commissioning linacs with enhanced beam conformance, as well as perform ongoing QA for dosimetrically equivalent linacs. Methods: Linac manufacturers offer enhanced beam conformance as an option to allow for clinics to complete commissioning efficiently, as well as implement dosimetrically equivalent linacs. The specification for enhanced conformance includes PDD as well as profiles within 80% FWHM. Recently, we commissioned seven Varian TrueBeam linacs with enhanced beam conformance. We developed a software tool in Visual Basic to allow us to load the reference beam data and compare our beam data during commissioning to evaluate enhanced beam conformance. This tool also allowed us to upload our beam data used for commissioning our dosimetrically equivalent beam models to compare and tweak each of our linac beams to match our modelled data in Varian’s Eclipse TPS. This tool will also be used during annual QA of the linacs to compare our beam data to our baseline data, as required by TG-142. Results: Our software tool was used to check beam conformance for seven TrueBeam linacs that we commissioned in the past six months. Using our tool we found that the factory conformed linacs showed up to 3.82% difference in their beam profile data upon installation. Using our beam comparison tool, we were able to adjust the energy and profiles of our beams to accomplish a better than 1.00% point by point data conformance. Conclusion: The availability of quantitative comparison tools is essential to accept and commission linacs with enhanced beam conformance, as well as to beam match multiple linacs. We further intend to use the same tool to ensure our beam data conforms to the commissioning beam data during our annual QA in keeping with the requirements of TG-142.

  10. Beam loss studies in high-intensity heavy-ion linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Aseev, V. N.; Mustapha, B.

    2004-09-01

    The proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) Facility, an innovative exotic-beam facility for the production of high-quality beams of short-lived isotopes, consists of a fully superconducting 1.4GV driver linac and a 140MV postaccelerator. To produce sufficient intensities of secondary beams the driver linac will provide 400kW primary beams of any ion from hydrogen to uranium. Because of the high intensity of the primary beams the beam losses must be minimized to avoid radioactivation of the accelerator equipment. To keep the power deposited by the particles lost on the accelerator structures below 1 W/m, the relative beam losses per unit length should be less than 10-5, especially along the high-energy section of the linac. A new beam dynamics simulation code TRACK has been developed and used for beam loss studies in the RIA driver linac. In the TRACK code, ions are tracked through the three-dimensional electromagnetic fields of every element of the linac starting from the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source to the production target. The simulation starts with a multicomponent dc ion beam extracted from the ECR. The space charge forces are included in the simulations. They are especially important in the front end of the driver linac. Beam losses are studied by tracking a large number of particles (up to 106) through the whole linac considering all sources of error such us element misalignments, rf field errors, and stripper thickness fluctuations. For each configuration of the linac, multiple sets of error values have been randomly generated and used in the calculations. The results are then combined to calculate important beam parameters, estimate beam losses, and characterize the corresponding linac configuration. To track a large number of particles for a comprehensive number of error sets (up to 500), the code TRACK was parallelized and run on the Jazz computer cluster at ANL.

  11. SU-E-T-48: Automated Quality Assurance for XML Controlled Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Valdes, G; Morin, O; Pouliot, J; Chuang, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To automate routine imaging QA procedures so that complying with TG 142 and TG 179 can be efficient and reliable. Methods: Two QA tests for a True Beam Linac were automatized. A Winston Lutz test as described by Lutz et al{sup 1} using the Winston Lutz test kit from BrainLab, Germany and a CBCT Image Quality test as described in TG 179 using the EMMA phantom, Siemens Medical Physics, Germany were performed in our True Beam. For each QA procedure tested, a 3 step paradigm was used. First, the data was automatically acquired using True Beam Developer Mode and XML scripting. Second, the data acquired in the first step was automatically processed using in-home grown Matlab GUIs. Third, Machine Learning algorithms were used to automatically classify the processed data and reports generated. Results: The Winston Luzt test could be performed by an experienced medical physicist in 29.0 ± 8.0 min. The same test, if automated using our paradigm, could be performed in 3.0 ± 0.1 min. In the same lieu, time could be substantially saved for image quality tests. In this case, the amount of time saved will depend on the phantoms used and the initial localization method. Additionally, machine learning algorithms could automatically identify the roots of the problems if any and possibly help reduce machine down time. Conclusion: Modern linear accelerators are equipped with advanced 2D and 3D imaging that are used for patient alignment substantially improving IGRT protocols. However, this extra complexity exponentially increases the number of QA tests needed. Using the new paradigm described above, not only bare minimum but best practice QA programs could be implemented with the same manpower. This work is supported by Varian, Palo Alto, CA.

  12. Capacitive beam position monitors for the low-β beam of the Chinese ADS proton linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Wu, Jun-Xia; Zhu, Guang-Yu; Jia, Huan; Xue, Zong-Heng; Zheng, Hai; Xie, Hong-Ming; Kang, Xin-Cai; He, Yuan; Li, Lin; Denard, Jean Claude

    2016-02-01

    Beam Position Monitors (BPMs) for the low-β beam of the Chinese Accelerator Driven Subcritical system (CADS) Proton linac are of the capacitive pick-up type. They provide higher output signals than that of the inductive type. This paper will describe the design and tests of the capacitive BPM system for the low-β proton linac, including the pick-ups, the test bench and the read-out electronics. The tests done with an actual proton beam show a good agreement between the measurements and the simulations in the time domain. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11405240) and “Western Light” Talents Training Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences

  13. Time-Resolved Emittance Characterization of an Induction Linac Beam using Optical Transition Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Le Sage, G P

    2002-11-05

    An induction linac is used by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to perform radiographic testing at the Flash X-ray Radiography facility. Emittance characterization is important since x-ray spot size impacts the resolution of shadow-graphs. Due to the long pulse length, high current, and beam energy, emittance measurement using Optical Transition Radiation is an attractive alternative for reasons that will be described in the text. The utility of OTR-based emittance measurement has been well demonstrated for both RF and induction linacs. We describe the time-resolved emittance characterization of an induction linac electron beam. We have refined the optical collection system for the induction linac application, and have demonstrated a new technique for probing the divergence of a subset of the beam profile. The experimental apparatus, data reduction, and conclusions will be presented. Additionally, a new scheme for characterizing the correlation between beam divergence and spatial coordinates within the beam profile will be described.

  14. INCREASED UNDERSTANDING OF BEAM LOSSES FROM THE SNS LINAC PROTON EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Shishlo, Andrei P; Plum, Michael A; Lebedev, Valerie; Laface, Emanuele; Galambos, John D

    2013-01-01

    Beam loss is a major concern for high power hadron accelerators such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). An unexpected beam loss in the SNS superconducting linac (SCL) was observed during the power ramp up and early operation. Intra-beam-stripping (IBS) loss, in which interactions between H- particles within the accelerated bunch strip the outermost electron, was recently identified as a possible cause of the beam loss. A set of experiments using proton beam acceleration in the SNS linac was conducted, which supports IBS as the primary beam loss mechanism in the SNS SCL.

  15. Transverse Beam Emittance Measurements of a 16 MeV Linac at the Idaho Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    S. Setiniyaz, T.A. Forest, K. Chouffani, Y. Kim, A. Freyberger

    2012-07-01

    A beam emittance measurement of the 16 MeV S-band High Repetition Rate Linac (HRRL) was performed at Idaho State University's Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC). The HRRL linac structure was upgraded beyond the capabilities of a typical medical linac so it can achieve a repetition rate of 1 kHz. Measurements of the HRRL transverse beam emittance are underway that will be used to optimize the production of positrons using HRRL's intense electron beam on a tungsten converter. In this paper, we describe a beam imaging system using on an OTR screen and a digital CCD camera, a MATLAB tool to extract beamsize and emittance, detailed measurement procedures, and the measured transverse emittances for an arbitrary beam energy of 15 MeV.

  16. A laser-wire beam-energy and beam-profile monitor at the BNL linac

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, R.; Degen, C.; DeSanto, L.; Meng, W.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Nayak, S.

    2011-03-28

    In 2009 a beam-energy monitor was installed in the high energy beam transport (HEBT) line at the Brookhaven National Lab linac. This device measures the energies of electrons stripped from the 40mA H{sup -} beam by background gas. Electrons are stripped by the 2.0x10{sup -7}torr residual gas at a rate of {approx}1.5x10{sup -8}/cm. Since beam electrons have the same velocities as beam protons, the beam proton energy is deduced by multiplying the electron energy by m{sub p}/m{sub e}=1836. A 183.6MeV H{sup -} beam produces 100keV electrons. In 2010 we installed an optics plates containing a laser and scanning optics to add beam-profile measurement capability via photodetachment. Our 100mJ/pulse, Q-switched laser neutralizes 70% of the beam during its 10ns pulse. This paper describes the upgrades to the detector and gives profile and energy measurements.

  17. Beam-Gas and Thermal Photon Scattering in the NLC Main Linac as a Source of Beam Halo (LCC-0051)

    SciTech Connect

    Tenenbaum, P

    2004-03-19

    Scattering of primary beam electrons off of residual gas molecules or blackbody radiation photons in the NLC main linac has been identified as a potential source of beam haloes which must be collimated in the beam delivery system. We consider the contributions from four scattering mechanisms: inelastic thermal-photon scattering, elastic beam-gas (Coulomb) scattering inelastic beam-gas (Bremsstrahlung) scattering, and atomic-electron scattering. In each case we develop the formalism necessary to estimate the backgrounds generated in the main linac, and determine the expected number of off-energy or large-amplitude particles from each process, assuming a main linac injection energy of 8 GeV and extraction energy of 500 GeV.

  18. Coherent Effects of High Current Beam in Project-X Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhanov, A.; Lunin, A.; Yakovlev, V.; Gonin, I.; Khabiboulline, T.; Saini, A.; Solyak, N.; Yostrikov, A.

    2012-09-01

    Resonance excitation of longitudinal high order modes in superconducting RF structures of Project-X continuous wave linac is studied. We analyze regimes of operation of the linac with high beam current, which can be used to provide an intense muon source for the future Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider, and also important for the Accelerator-Driven Subcritical systems. We calculate power loss and associated heat load to the cryogenic system. Longitudinal emittance growth is estimated. We consider an alternative design of the elliptical cavity for the high energy part of the linac, which is more suitable for high current operation.

  19. Coherent Effects of High Current Beam in Project-X Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhanov, Alexander; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav; Gonin, Ivan; Khabiboulline, Timergali; Lunin, Andrei; Saini, Arun; Solyak, Nikolay; Vostrikov, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    Resonance excitation of longitudinal high order modes in superconducting RF structures of Project-X continuous wave linac is studied. We analyze regimes of operation of the linac with high beam current, which can be used to provide an intense muon source for the future Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider, and also important for the Accelerator-Driven Subcritical systems. We calculate power loss and associated heat load to the cryogenic system. Longitudinal emittance growth is estimated. We consider an alternative design of the elliptical cavity for the high energy part of the linac, which is more suitable for high current operation.

  20. NOVEL METHODS FOR EXPERIMENTAL CHARACTERIZATION OF 3D SUPERCONDUCTING LINAC BEAM DYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Shishlo, Andrei P

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes an approach to measure initial Twiss parameters in transverse and longitudinal directions at the entrance of a linac with independent short accelerating cavities. For the transverse plane the usual technique of transverse profiles is used, and for the longitudinal direction a recently developed non-intercepting method is applied. The new method is based on a beam position monitor amplitudes analysis. The applicability of the methods are discussed and demonstrated on an example of the Spallation Neutron Source superconducting linac.

  1. A Faraday Cup with high frequency response for a 200 MeV LINAC proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Zucker, M.S.; Bittner, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this device, composed essentially of coaxial line elements, is monitoring, on a per micropulse basis, the beam intensity of a 200 MeV LINAC at the BNL Radiation Effects Facility. The center conductor of the coaxial line acts as a beam stop. The output pulses are suitable for fast timing. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Space charge compensation in the Linac4 low energy beam transport line with negative hydrogen ions.

    PubMed

    Valerio-Lizarraga, Cristhian A; Lallement, Jean-Baptiste; Leon-Monzon, Ildefonso; Lettry, Jacques; Midttun, Øystein; Scrivens, Richard

    2014-02-01

    The space charge effect of low energy, unbunched ion beams can be compensated by the trapping of ions or electrons into the beam potential. This has been studied for the 45 keV negative hydrogen ion beam in the CERN Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport using the package IBSimu [T. Kalvas et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02B703 (2010)], which allows the space charge calculation of the particle trajectories. The results of the beam simulations will be compared to emittance measurements of an H(-) beam at the CERN Linac4 3 MeV test stand, where the injection of hydrogen gas directly into the beam transport region has been used to modify the space charge compensation degree.

  3. Event-synchronized data acquisition system for the SPring-8 linac beam position monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, T.; Fukui, T.; Tanaka, R.; Taniuchi, T.; Yamashita, A.; Yanagida, K.

    2005-05-01

    By the summer of 2003, we had completed the installation of a new non-destructive beam position monitor (BPM) system to facilitate beam trajectory and energy correction for the SPring-8 linac. In all, 47 BPM sets were installed on the 1-GeV linac and three beam-transport lines. All of the BPM data acquisition system was required to operate synchronously with the electron beam acceleration cycle. We have developed an event-synchronized data acquisition system for the BPM data readout. We have succeeded in continuously taking all the BPMs data from six VME computers synchronized with the 10 pps operation of the linac to continuously acquire data. For each beam shot, the data points are indexed by event number and stored in a database. Using the real-time features of the Solaris operating system and distributed database technology, we currently have achieved about 99.9% efficiency in capturing and archiving all of the 10 Hz data. The linac BPM data is available for off-line analysis of the beam trajectory, but also for real-time control and automatic correction of the beam trajectory and energy.

  4. Beam physics of the 8-GeV H-minus linac

    SciTech Connect

    Carneiro, J.-P.; Mustapha, B.; Ostroumov, P.N.; /Argonne

    2008-11-01

    Fermilab is developing the concept and design of an 8-GeV superconducting H-minus linac with the primary mission of increasing the intensity of the Main Injector for the production of neutrino superbeams. The front-end of the linac up to 420 MeV operates at 325 MHz and accelerates beam from the ion source using a room temperature radio-frequency quadrupole followed by short CH type resonators and superconducting spoke resonators. In the high energy section, the acceleration is provided by the International Linear Collider (ILC)-style superconducting elliptical 1.3 GHz cavities. The beam physics for the linac is presented in this paper using two beam dynamics codes: TRACK and ASTRA.

  5. Beam position monitoring in the AGS Linac to Booster transfer line

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, T.J.; Brodowski, J.; Witkover, R.

    1991-12-31

    A beam position monitor system has been developed and used in the commissioning of Brookhaven`s Linac to Booster transfer line. This line transports a chopped, RF modulated H- beam from the 200 MeV Linac to the AGS Booster. Over a 15dB dynamic range in beam current, the position monitor system provides a real-time, normalized position signal with an analog bandwidth of about 20 MHz. Seven directional coupler style pickups are installed in the line with each pickup sensing both horizontal and vertical position. Analog processing electronics are located in the tunnel and incorporate the amplitude modulation to phase modulation normalization technique. To avoid interference from the 200 MHz linac RF system, processing is performed at 400 MHz. This paper will provide a system overview and report results from the commissioning experience.

  6. Beam position monitoring in the AGS Linac to Booster transfer line

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, T.J.; Brodowski, J.; Witkover, R.

    1991-01-01

    A beam position monitor system has been developed and used in the commissioning of Brookhaven's Linac to Booster transfer line. This line transports a chopped, RF modulated H- beam from the 200 MeV Linac to the AGS Booster. Over a 15dB dynamic range in beam current, the position monitor system provides a real-time, normalized position signal with an analog bandwidth of about 20 MHz. Seven directional coupler style pickups are installed in the line with each pickup sensing both horizontal and vertical position. Analog processing electronics are located in the tunnel and incorporate the amplitude modulation to phase modulation normalization technique. To avoid interference from the 200 MHz linac RF system, processing is performed at 400 MHz. This paper will provide a system overview and report results from the commissioning experience.

  7. The Australian MRI-Linac Program: measuring profiles and PDD in a horizontal beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begg, J.; George, A.; Alnaghy, S. J.; Causer, T.; Alharthi, T.; Glaubes, L.; Dong, B.; Goozee, G.; Liney, G.; Holloway, L.; Keall, P.

    2017-02-01

    The Australian MRI-Linac consists of a fixed horizontal photon beam combined with a MRI. Commissioning required PDD and profiles measured in a horizontal set-up using a combination of water tank measurements and gafchromic film. To validate the methodology, measurements were performed comparing PDD and profiles measured with the gantry angle set to 0 and 90° on a conventional linac. Results showed agreement to within 2.0% for PDD measured using both film and the water tank at gantry 90° relative to PDD acquired using gantry 0°. Profiles acquired using a water tank at both gantry 0 and 90° showed agreement in FWHM to within 1 mm. The agreement for both PDD and profiles measured at gantry 90° relative to gantry 0° curves indicates that the methodology described can be used to acquire the necessary beam data for horizontal beam lines and in particular, commissioning the Australian MRI-linac.

  8. Beam dynamics studies in the driver LINAC pre-Stripper section of the RIA facility.

    SciTech Connect

    Lessner, E. S.; Ostroumov, P. N.

    2003-07-10

    The RIA facility driver linac consists of about 400 superconducting (SC) independently phased rf cavities. The linac is designed to accelerate simultaneously several-charge-state beams to generate as much as 400 kW of uranium beam power. The linac beam dynamics is most sensitive to the focusing and accelerating-structure parameters of the prestripper section, where the uranium beam is accelerated from 0.17 keV/u to 9.4 MeV/u. This section is designed to accept and accelerate 2 charge states (28 and 29) of uranium beam from an ECR ion source. The prestripper section must be designed to minimize the beam emittance distortion of this two-charge-state beam. In particular, the inter-cryostat spaces must be minimized and beam parameters near transitions of the accelerating and focusing lattices must be matched carefully. Several sources of possible effective emittance growth are considered in the design of the prestripper section and a tolerance budget is established. Numerical beam dynamics studies include realistic electric and magnetic 3-dimensional field distributions in the SC rf cavities and SC solenoids. Error effects in the longitudinal beam parameters are studied.

  9. Emittance Reduction between EBIS LINAC and Booster by Electron Beam Cooling; Is Single Pass Cooling Possible?

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch,A.

    2008-04-01

    Electron beam cooling is examined as an option to reduce momentum of gold ions exiting the EBIS LINAC before injection into the booster. Electron beam parameters are based on experimental data (obtained at BNL) of electron beams extracted from a plasma cathode. Preliminary calculations indicate that single pass cooling is feasible; momentum spread can be reduced by more than an order of magnitude in less than one meter.

  10. Beam-dynamics driven design of the LHeC energy-recovery linac

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrini, Dario; Latina, Andrea; Schulte, Daniel; Bogacz, S. Alex

    2015-12-23

    The LHeC study is a possible upgrade of the LHC that aims at delivering an electron beam for collisions with the existing hadronic beams. The current baseline design for the electron facility consists of a multi-pass superconducting energy-recovery linac operating in a continuous wave mode. Here, we summarize the overall layout of such ERL complex located on the LHC site and introduce the most recent developments. We review of the lattice components, presenting their baseline design along with possible alternatives that aims at improving the overall machine performance. The detector bypass has been designed and integrated into the lattice. Tracking simulations allowed us to verify the high current (~150 mA in the linacs) beam operation required for the LHeC to serve as an Higgs Factory. The impact of single and multi-bunch wake-fields, synchrotron radiation and beam-beam effects has been assessed in this paper.

  11. Single pass electron beam cooling of gold ions between EBIS LINAC and booster is theoretically possible!

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch, A.

    2011-01-01

    Electron beam cooling is examined as an option to reduce momentum of gold ions exiting the EBIS LINAC before injection into the booster. Electron beam parameters are based on experimental data (obtained at BNL) of electron beams extracted from a plasma cathode. Many issues, regarding a low energy high current electron beam that is needed for electron beam cooling to reduce momentum of gold ions exiting the EBIS LINAC before injection into the booster, were examined. Computations and some experimental data indicate that none of these issues is a show stopper. Preliminary calculations indicate that single pass cooling is feasible; momentum spread can be reduced by more than an order of magnitude in about one meter. Hence, this option cooling deserves further more serious considerations.

  12. High Resolution Simulation of Beam Dynamics in Electron Linacs for Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, R.D.; Venturini, M.; Zholents, A.A.; Qiang, J.

    2009-01-05

    In this paper we report on large scale multi-physics simulation of beam dynamics in electron linacs for next generation free electron lasers (FELs). We describe key features of a parallel macroparticle simulation code including three-dimensional (3D) space-charge effects, short-range structure wake fields, longitudinal coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) wake fields, and treatment of radiofrequency (RF) accelerating cavities using maps obtained from axial field profiles. A macroparticle up-sampling scheme is described that reduces the shot noise from an initial distribution with a smaller number of macroparticles while maintaining the global properties of the original distribution. We present a study of the microbunching instability which is a critical issue for future FELs due to its impact on beam quality at the end of the linac. Using parameters of a planned FEL linac at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), we show that a large number of macroparticles (beyond 100 million) is needed to control numerical shot noise that drives the microbunching instability. We also explore the effect of the longitudinal grid on simulation results. We show that acceptable results are obtained with around 2048 longitudinal grid points, and we discuss this in view of the spectral growth rate predicted from linear theory. As an application, we present results from simulations using one billion macroparticles of the FEL linac under design at LBNL. We show that the final uncorrelated energy spread of the beam depends not only on the initial uncorrelated energy spread but also depends strongly on the shape of the initial current profile. By using a parabolic initial current profile, 5 keV initial uncorrelated energy spread at 40 MeV injection energy, and improved linac design, those simulations demonstrate that a reasonable beam quality can be achieved at the end of the linac, with the final distribution having about 100 keV energy spread, 2.4 GeV energy, and 1.2 kA peak

  13. Bunch Shape Measurement of 181 MeV Beam in J-PARC Linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Akihiko; Feschenko, Alexander V.; Mirzojan, Alexander N.; Miyao, Tomoaki; Ouchi, Nobuo; Maruta, Tomofumi; Liu, Yong; Oguri, Hidetomo; Ikegami, Masanori; Hasegawa, Kazuo

    In the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex linac, an energy upgrade project was started in 2009 using annular-ring coupled structure (ACS) linac cavities. We decided to use bunch shape monitors (BSM) for monitoring longitudinal beam width measurement to achieve longitudinal matching using two bunchers located upstream of the ACS cavities, where the radio frequency jumps from 324 to 972 MHz. Three BSMs were fabricated and installed in the original beam line. The BSMs were commissioned with the beam and their operability was demonstrated. In this study, we introduce the mechanism of the BSMs, its operability, measurement results with the 181 MeV beam, and consistency check with the respective cavity amplitude. Furthermore, we describe the operational vacuum conditions and outline the improvements to the BSMs' vacuum system.

  14. Optimization of the beam extraction systems for the Linac4 H{sup −} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, D. A.; Lettry, J.; Scrivens, R.; Steyaert, D.; Midttun, Ø.; Valerio-Lizarraga, C. A.

    2015-04-08

    The development of the Linac 4 and its integration into CERN’s acceleration complex is part of the foreseen luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The goal is to inject a 160 MeV H{sup −} beam into the CERN PS Booster (PSB) in order to increase the beam brightness by a factor of 2 compared to the 50 MeV proton linac, Linac 2, that is currently in operation. The requirements for the ion source are a 45 keV H{sup −} beam of 80 mA intensity, 2 Hz repetition rate and 0.5 ms pulse length within a normalized rms-emittance of 0.25 mm· mrad. The previously installed beam extraction system has been designed for an H{sup −} ion beam intensity of 20 mA produced by an RF-volume source with an electron to H{sup −} ratio of up to 50. For the required intensity upgrades of the Linac4 ion source, a new beam extraction system is being produced and tested; it is optimized for a cesiated surface RF-source with a nominal beam current of 40 mA and an electron to H{sup −} ratio of 4. The simulations, based on the IBSIMU code, are presented. At the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a peak beam current of more than 100 mA was demonstrated with a magnetron H{sup −} source at an energy of 35 keV and a repetition rate of 2 Hz. A new extraction system is required to operate at an energy of 45 keV; simulation of a two stage extraction system dedicated to the magnetron is presented.

  15. High beam current shut-off systems in the APS linac and low energy transfer line

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Knott, M.; Lumpkin, A.

    1994-11-01

    Two independent high beam current shut-off current monitoring systems (BESOCM) have been installed in the APS linac and the low energy transport line to provide personnel safety protection in the event of acceleration of excessive beam currents. Beam current is monitored by a fast current transformer (FCT) and fully redundant supervisory circuits connected to the Access Control Interlock System (ACIS) for beam intensity related shutdowns of the linac. One FCT is located at the end of the positron linac and the other in the low energy transport line, which directs beam to the positron accumulator ring (PAR). To ensure a high degree of reliability, both systems employ a continuous self-checking function, which injects a test pulse to a single-turn test winding after each ``real`` beam pulse to verify that the system is fully functional. The system is designed to be fail-safe for all possible system faults, such as loss of power, open or shorted signal or test cables, loss of external trigger, malfunction of gated integrator, etc. The system has been successfully commissioned and is now a reliable part of the total ACIS.

  16. High beam current shut-off systems in the APS linac and low energy transfer line

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Knott, M.; Lumpkin, A.

    1995-05-05

    Two independent high beam current shut-off current monitoring systems (BESOCM) have been installed in the APS linac and the low energy transport line to provide personnel safety protection in the event of acceleration of excessive beam currents. Beam current is monitored by a fast current transformer (FCT) and fully redundant supervisory circuits connected to the Access Control Interlock System (ACIS) for beam intensity related shutdowns of the linac. One FCT is located at the end of the positron linac and the other in the low energy transport line, which directs beam to the positron accumulator ring (PAR). To ensure a high degree of reliability, both systems employ a continuous self-checking function, which injects a test pulse to a single-turn test winding after each ``real`` beam pulse to verify that the system is fully functional. The system is designed to be fail-safe for all possible system faults, such as loss of power, open or shorted signal or test cables, loss of external trigger, malfunction of gated integrator, etc. The system has been successfully commissioned and is now a reliable part of the total ACIS. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  17. Beam shaping to improve the free-electron laser performance at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Y.; Bane, K. L. F.; Colocho, W.; Decker, F.-J.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Guetg, M. W.; Huang, Z.; Iverson, R.; Krzywinski, J.; Loos, H.; Lutman, A.; Maxwell, T. J.; Nuhn, H.-D.; Ratner, D.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; Zhou, F.

    2016-10-01

    A new operating mode has been developed for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) in which we shape the longitudinal phase space of the electron beam. This mode of operation is realized using a horizontal collimator located in the middle of the first bunch compressor to truncate the head and tail of the beam. With this method, the electron beam longitudinal phase space and current profile are reshaped, and improvement in lasing performance can be realized. We present experimental studies at the LCLS of the beam shaping effects on the free-electron laser performance.

  18. Sparking limits, cavity loading, and beam breakup instability associated with high-current rf linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Faehl, R.J.; Lemons, D.S.; Thode, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    The limitations on high-current rf linacs due to gap sparking, cavity loading, and the beam breakup instability are studied. It appears possible to achieve cavity accelerating gradients as high as 35 MV/m without sparking. Furthermore, a linear analysis, as well as self-consistent particle simulations of a multipulsed 10 kA beam, indicated that only a negligible small fraction of energy is radiated into nonfundamental cavity modes. Finally, the beam breakup instability is analyzed and found to be able to magnify initial radial perturbations by a factor of no more than about 20 during the beam transit time through a 1 GeV accelerator.

  19. Optimizing the average longitudinal phase of the beam in the SLC linac

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.L.F.

    1989-09-01

    The relation of the beam's average linac phase, {phi}{sub 0}, to the final energy spectrum in the SLC linac has been studied by many people over the years, with much of the work left unpublished. In this note we perform a somewhat thorough in vestigation of the problem. First we describe the calculation method, and discuss some common features of the energy spectrum. Then we calculate the value of {phi}{sub 0} that minimizes {delta}{sub rms} for the conceivable range of bunch population and bunch lengths of the SLC linac. This is followed by luminosity calculations, including the sensitivity of luminosity to variations in {phi}{sub 0}. Finally we suggest a practical method of implementing the proper phase setting on the real machine.

  20. A geometrical model for the Monte Carlo simulation of the TrueBeam linac.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, M; Sempau, J; Fogliata, A; Cozzi, L; Sauerwein, W; Brualla, L

    2015-06-07

    Monte Carlo simulation of linear accelerators (linacs) depends on the accurate geometrical description of the linac head. The geometry of the Varian TrueBeam linac is not available to researchers. Instead, the company distributes phase-space files of the flattening-filter-free (FFF) beams tallied at a plane located just upstream of the jaws. Yet, Monte Carlo simulations based on third-party tallied phase spaces are subject to limitations. In this work, an experimentally based geometry developed for the simulation of the FFF beams of the Varian TrueBeam linac is presented. The Monte Carlo geometrical model of the TrueBeam linac uses information provided by Varian that reveals large similarities between the TrueBeam machine and the Clinac 2100 downstream of the jaws. Thus, the upper part of the TrueBeam linac was modeled by introducing modifications to the Varian Clinac 2100 linac geometry. The most important of these modifications is the replacement of the standard flattening filters by ad hoc thin filters. These filters were modeled by comparing dose measurements and simulations. The experimental dose profiles for the 6 MV and 10 MV FFF beams were obtained from the Varian Golden Data Set and from in-house measurements performed with a diode detector for radiation fields ranging from 3  ×  3 to 40  ×  40 cm(2) at depths of maximum dose of 5 and 10 cm. Indicators of agreement between the experimental data and the simulation results obtained with the proposed geometrical model were the dose differences, the root-mean-square error and the gamma index. The same comparisons were performed for dose profiles obtained from Monte Carlo simulations using the phase-space files distributed by Varian for the TrueBeam linac as the sources of particles. Results of comparisons show a good agreement of the dose for the ansatz geometry similar to that obtained for the simulations with the TrueBeam phase-space files for all fields and depths considered, except for

  1. Beam Dynamics Study of X-Band Linac Driven X-Ray FELS

    SciTech Connect

    Adolphsen, C.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Wu, J.; Sun, Y.; /SLAC

    2011-12-13

    Several linac driven X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFELs) are being developed to provide high brightness photon beams with very short, tunable wavelengths. In this paper, three XFEL configurations are proposed that achieve LCLS-like performance using X-band linac drivers. These linacs are more versatile, efficient and compact than ones using S-band or C-band rf technology. For each of the designs, the overall accelerator layout and the shaping of the bunch longitudinal phase space are described briefly. During the last 40 years, the photon wavelengths from linac driven FELs have been pushed shorter by increasing the electron beam energy and adopting shorter period undulators. Recently, the wavelengths have reached the X-ray range, with FLASH (Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg) and LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source) successfully providing users with soft and hard X-rays, respectively. FLASH uses a 1.2 GeV L-band (1.3 GHz) superconducting linac driver and can deliver 10-70 fs FWHM long photon pulses in a wavelength range of 44 nm to 4.1 nm. LCLS uses the last third of the SLAC 3 km S-band (2.856 GHz) normal-conducting linac to produce 3.5 GeV to 15 GeV bunches to generate soft and hard X-rays with good spatial coherence at wavelengths from 2.2 nm to 0.12 nm. Newer XFELs (at Spring8 and PSI) use C-band (5.7 GHz) normal-conducting linac drivers, which can sustain higher acceleration gradients, and hence shorten the linac length, and are more efficient at converting rf energy to bunch energy. The X-band (11.4 GHz) rf technology developed for NLC/GLC offers even higher gradients and efficiencies, and the shorter rf wavelength allows more versatility in longitudinal bunch phase space compression and manipulation. In the following sections, three different configurations of X-band linac driven XFELs are described that operate from 6 to 14 GeV. The first (LOW CHARGE DESIGN) has an electron bunch charge of only 10 pC; the second (OPTICS LINEARIZATION DESIGN) is based on optics

  2. SU-E-T-781: Using An Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) for Correlating Linac Photon Beam Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Yaddanapudi, S; Cai, B; Sun, B; Noel, C; Goddu, S; Mutic, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have proven to be useful for measuring several parameters of interest in linear accelerator (linac) quality assurance (QA). The purpose of this project was to evaluate the feasibility of using EPIDs for determining linac photon beam energies. Methods: Two non-clinical Varian TrueBeam linacs (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) with 6MV and 10MV photon beams were used to perform the measurements. The linacs were equipped with an amorphous silicon based EPIDs (aSi1000) that were used for the measurements. We compared the use of flatness versus percent depth dose (PDD) for predicting changes in linac photon beam energy. PDD was measured in 1D water tank (Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne FL) and the profiles were measured using 2D ion-chamber array (IC-Profiler, Sun Nuclear) and the EPID. Energy changes were accomplished by varying the bending magnet current (BMC). The evaluated energies conformed with the AAPM TG142 tolerance of ±1% change in PDD. Results: BMC changes correlating with a ±1% change in PDD corresponded with a change in flatness of ∼1% to 2% from baseline values on the EPID. IC Profiler flatness values had the same correlation. We observed a similar trend for the 10MV beam energy changes. Our measurements indicated a strong correlation between changes in linac photon beam energy and changes in flatness. For all machines and energies, beam energy changes produced change in the uniformity (AAPM TG-142), varying from ∼1% to 2.5%. Conclusions: EPID image analysis of beam profiles can be used to determine linac photon beam energy changes. Flatness-based metrics or uniformity as defined by AAPM TG-142 were found to be more sensitive to linac photon beam energy changes than PDD. Research funding provided by Varian Medical Systems. Dr. Sasa Mutic receives compensation for providing patient safety training services from Varian Medical Systems, the sponsor of this study.

  3. SU-C-304-02: Robust and Efficient Process for Acceptance Testing of Varian TrueBeam Linacs Using An Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID)

    SciTech Connect

    Yaddanapudi, S; Cai, B; Sun, B; Li, H; Noel, C; Goddu, S; Mutic, S; Harry, T; Pawlicki, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this project was to develop a process that utilizes the onboard kV and MV electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) to perform rapid acceptance testing (AT) of linacs in order to improve efficiency and standardize AT equipment and processes. Methods: In this study a Varian TrueBeam linac equipped with an amorphous silicon based EPID (aSi1000) was used. The conventional set of AT tests and tolerances was used as a baseline guide, and a novel methodology was developed to perform as many tests as possible using EPID exclusively. The developer mode on Varian TrueBeam linac was used to automate the process. In the current AT process there are about 45 tests that call for customer demos. Many of the geometric tests such as jaw alignment and MLC positioning are performed with highly manual methods, such as using graph paper. The goal of the new methodology was to achieve quantitative testing while reducing variability in data acquisition, analysis and interpretation of the results. The developed process was validated on two machines at two different institutions. Results: At least 25 of the 45 (56%) tests which required customer demo can be streamlined and performed using EPIDs. More than half of the AT tests can be fully automated using the developer mode, while others still require some user interaction. Overall, the preliminary data shows that EPID-based linac AT can be performed in less than a day, compared to 2–3 days using conventional methods. Conclusions: Our preliminary results show that performance of onboard imagers is quite suitable for both geometric and dosimetric testing of TrueBeam systems. A standardized AT process can tremendously improve efficiency, and minimize the variability related to third party quality assurance (QA) equipment and the available onsite expertise. Research funding provided by Varian Medical Systems. Dr. Sasa Mutic receives compensation for providing patient safety training services from Varian Medical

  4. Beam-dynamics driven design of the LHeC energy-recovery linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, Dario; Latina, Andrea; Schulte, Daniel; Bogacz, S. Alex

    2015-12-01

    The LHeC is envisioned as a natural upgrade of the LHC that aims at delivering an electron beam for collisions with the existing hadronic beams. The current baseline design for the electron facility consists of a multipass superconducting energy-recovery linac (ERL) operating in a continuous wave mode. The unprecedently high energy of the multipass ERL combined with a stringent emittance dilution budget poses new challenges for the beam optics. Here, we investigate the performances of a novel arc architecture based on a flexible momentum compaction lattice that mitigates the effects of synchrotron radiation while containing the bunch lengthening. Extensive beam-dynamics investigations have been performed with placet2, a recently developed tracking code for recirculating machines. They include the first end-to-end tracking and a simulation of the machine operation with a continuous beam. This paper briefly describes the Conceptual Design Report lattice, with an emphasis on possible and proposed improvements that emerged from the beam-dynamics studies. The detector bypass section has been integrated in the lattice, and its design choices are presented here. The stable operation of the ERL with a current up to ˜150 mA in the linacs has been validated in the presence of single- and multibunch wakefields, synchrotron radiation, and beam-beam effects.

  5. Beam energy spread in FERMI@elettra gun and linac induced by intrabeam scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Zholents, Alexander A; Zholents, Alexander A; Zolotorev, Max S.; Penco, Giuseppe

    2008-07-11

    Intrabeam scattering (IBS) of electrons in the pre-cathode area in the electron guns know in the literature as Boersh effect is responsible for a growth of the electron beam energy spread there. Albeit most visible within the electron gun where the electron beam density is large and the energy spread is small, the IBS acts all along the entire electron beam pass through the Linac. In this report we calculate the energy spread induced by IBS in the FERMI@elettra electron gun.

  6. Upgrade of the Drive LINAC for the AWA Facility Dielectric Two-Beam Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Power, John; Conde, Manoel; Gai, Wei; Li, Zenghai; Mihalcea, Daniel; /Northern Illinois U.

    2012-07-02

    We report on the design of a seven-cell, standing-wave, 1.3-GHz rf cavity and the associated beam dynamics studies for the upgrade of the drive beamline LINAC at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility. The LINAC design is a compromise between single-bunch operation (100 nC {at} 75 MeV) and minimization of the energy droop along the bunch train during bunch-train operation. The 1.3-GHz drive bunch-train target parameters are 75 MeV, 10-20-ns macropulse duration, and 16 x 60 nC microbunches; this is equivalent to a macropulse current and beam power of 80 A and 6 GW, respectively. Each LINAC structure accelerates approximately 1000 nC in 10 ns by a voltage of 11 MV at an rf power of 10 MW. Due to the short bunch-train duration desired ({approx}10 ns) and the existing frequency (1.3 GHz), compensation of the energy droop along the bunch train is difficult to accomplish by means of the two standard techniques: time-domain or frequency-domain beam loading compensation. Therefore, to minimize the energy droop, our design is based on a large stored energy rf cavity. In this paper, we present our rf cavity optimization method, detailed rf cavity design, and beam dynamics studies of the drive beamline.

  7. Beam Simulation Studies of the LEBT for RIA Driver Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Q.; Wu, X.; Andreev, V.; Balabin, A.; Doleans, M.; Gorelov, D.; Grimm, T.L.; Hartung, W.; Marti, F.; Schriber, S.O.; York, R.C.; Leitner, D.; Lyneis, C.M.

    2005-03-15

    The low energy beam transport (LEBT) system in the front-end of the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) uses a 70 kV platform to pre-accelerate the ion beam from a 30 kV Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source, followed by an achromatic charge selection system. The selected beam is then pre-bunched and matched into the entrance of a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) with a multi-harmonic buncher. To meet the beam power requirements for heavy ions, high current (several mA), multi-species beams will be extracted from the ECR. Therefore, it is crucial to control space charge effects in order to obtain the low emittance beam required for RIA. The PARMELA code is used to perform the LEBT simulations for the multi-species beams with 3D space charge calculations. The results of the beam dynamics simulations are presented, and the key issues of emittance growth in the LEBT and its possible compensation are discussed.

  8. H- Beam Loss and Evidence for Intrabeam Stripping in the LANSCE Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Rybarcyk, Lawrence J.; Kelsey, Charles T. IV; McCrady, Rodney C.; Pang, Xiaoying

    2012-05-15

    The LANSCE accelerator complex is a multi-beam, multi-user facility that provides high-intensity H{sup +} and H{sup -} particle beams for a variety of user programs. At the heart of the facility is a room temperature linac that is comprised of 100-MeV drift tube and 800-MeV coupled cavity linac (CCL) structures. Although both beams are similar in intensity and emittance at 100 MeV, the beam-loss monitors along the CCL show a trend of increased loss for H{sup -} that is not present for H{sup +}. This difference is attributed to stripping mechanisms that affect H{sup -} and not H{sup +}. We present the results of an analysis of H{sup -} beam loss along the CCL that incorporates beam spill measurements, beam dynamics simulations, analytical models and radiation transport estimates using the MCNPX code. The results indicate a significant fraction of these additional losses result from intrabeam stripping.

  9. Higher order mode beams mitigate halos in high intensity proton linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Abhishek; Krishnagopal, Srinivas

    2017-01-01

    High intensity proton linacs (HIPLs) for applications such as Accelerator Driven Reactor Systems (ADRS) have serious beam dynamics issues related to beam halo formation. This can lead to particle loss and radioactivation of the surroundings which consequently limit the beam current. Beam halos are largely driven by the nonlinear space-charge force of the beam, which depends strongly on the beam distribution and also on the initial beam mismatch. We propose here the use of a higher order mode beam (HOMB), that has a weaker nonlinear force, to mitigate beam halos. We first show how the nonlinear space-charge force can itself be exploited in the presence of nonlinear solenoid fields, to produce a HOMB in the low energy beam transport (LEBT) line. We then study the transport of such a beam through a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ), and show that the HOMB has a significant advantage in terms of emittance blow-up, halo formation and beam loss, over a Gaussian beam, even with a finite initial mismatch. For example, for the transport of a 30 mA beam through the RFQ, with an initial beam mismatch of 45%, the Gaussian beam sees an emittance blow-up of 125%, while the HOMB sees a blow-up of only 35% (relative to the initial emittance of 0.2 π mm -mrad ). Similarly, the beam halo parameter and beam loss are 0.95 and 25% respectively for a Gaussian beam, but only 0.35 and 15% for a HOMB. The beam dynamics of the HOMB agrees quite well with the particle-core model, because of the more linear space-charge force, while for the Gaussian beam there are additional particle loss mechanisms arising from nonlinear resonances. Therefore, the HOMB suppresses emittance blow-up and halo formation, and can make high current ADRS systems more viable.

  10. High resolution simulation of beam dynamics in electron linacs for x-ray free electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, J.; Ryne, R. D.; Venturini, M.; Zholents, A. A.; Pogorelov, I. V.

    2009-10-01

    In this paper we report on large-scale high resolution simulations of beam dynamics in electron linacs for the next-generation x-ray free electron lasers (FELs). We describe key features of a parallel macroparticle simulation code including three-dimensional (3D) space-charge effects, short-range structure wakefields, coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) wakefields, and treatment of radio-frequency (rf) accelerating cavities using maps obtained from axial field profiles. We present a study of the microbunching instability causing severe electron beam fragmentation in the longitudinal phase space which is a critical issue for future FELs. Using parameters for a proposed FEL linac at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), we show that a large number of macroparticles (beyond 100 million) is generally needed to control the numerical macroparticle shot noise and avoid overestimating the microbunching instability. We explore the effect of the longitudinal grid on simulation results. We also study the effect of initial uncorrelated energy spread on the final uncorrelated energy spread of the beam for the FEL linac.

  11. Beam Line Design and Beam Physics Study of Energy Recovery Linac Free Electron Laser at Peking University

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Guimei

    2011-12-31

    Energy recovering linac (ERL) offers an attractive alternative for generating intense beams of charged particles by approaching the operational efficiency of a storage ring while maintaining the superior beam quality typical of a linear accelerator. In ERLs, the decelerated beam cancels the beam loading effects of the accelerated beam with high repetition rate. Therefore, ERLs can, in principle, accelerate very high average currents with only modest amounts of RF power. So the efficiency of RF power to beam is much higher. Furthermore, the energy of beam to dump is lower, so it will reduce dump radiation. With the successful experiments in large maximum-to-injection energy ratio up to 51:1 and high power FEL up to 14kW, the use of ERL, especially combining with superconducting RF technology, provides a potentially powerful new paradigm for generation of the charged particle beams used in MW FEL, synchrotron radiation sources, high-energy electron cooling devices and so on. The 3+1/2 DC-SC photo injector and two 9cell TESLA superconducting cavity for IR SASE FEL in PKU provides a good platform to achieve high average FEL with Energy Recovery. The work of this thesis is on Beam line design and Beam dynamics study of Energy Recovery Linac Free Electron Laser for Peking University. It is the upgrade of PKU facility, which is under construction. With ERL, this facility can work in CW mode, so it can operate high average beam current without RF power constraint in main linac and generate high average FEL power. Moreover, it provides a test facility to study the key technology in ERL. System parameters are optimized for PKU ERL-FEL. The oscillation FEL output power is studied with different bunch charge, transverse emittance, bunch length and energy spread. The theory of optimal RF power and Q{sub ext} with ERL and without ERL is analyzed and applied to PKU injector and linac including microphonic effect. pace charge effect in the injector and merger is studied for beam

  12. Cavity Alighment Using Beam Induced Higher Order Modes Signals in the TTF Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, M.; Frisch, J.; Hacker, K.E.; Jones, R.M.; McCormick, D.; O'Connell, C.; Smith, T.; Napoly, O.; Paparella, R.; Baboi, N.; Wendt, M.; /DESY

    2005-07-06

    Each nine cell superconducting (SC) accelerator cavity in the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) at DESY [1] has two higher order mode (HOM) couplers that efficiently remove the HOM power [2]. They can also provide useful diagnostic signals. The most interesting modes are in the first 2 cavity dipole passbands. They are easy to identify and their amplitude depends linearly on the beam offset from the cavity axis making them excellent beam position monitors (BPM). By steering the beam through an eight-cavity cryomodule, we can use the HOM signals to estimate internal residual alignment errors and minimize wakefield related beam emittance growth. We built and tested a time-domain based waveform recorder system that captures information from each mode in these two bands on each beam pulse. In this paper we present a preliminary experimental study of the single-bunch generated HOM signals at the TTF linac including estimates of cavity alignment precision and HOM BPM resolution.

  13. A wire scanner design for electron beam profile measurements in the Linac Coherent Light Source undulator.

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, J. L.; Yang, B. X.; Buffington, T. W.

    2005-01-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), currently under design, requires beam diagnostic instruments between the magnets in the beam undulator section. Ten wire scanners are planned as one of the primary instruments to characterize electron beam properties. The development of these wire scanners presents several design challenges due to the need for high accuracy and resolution of the wire motion (3-{micro}m tolerance, typical) and the high intensity of the beam (1 nC, 3400-A peak, over an area of 30-{micro}m rms radius at 120 Hz). In this paper, we present the technical specification and design criteria for the scanners. We will also present the mechanical design of the UHV-compatible drive and its engineering analysis. Lastly, we present the wire card design and discuss associated thermal and mechanical issues originating from the highly intense x-ray and electron beams.

  14. A study on beam homogeneity for a Siemens Primus linac.

    PubMed

    Cutanda Henriquez, F; Vargas-Castrillón, S T

    2007-06-01

    Asymmetric offset fields are an important tool for radiotherapy and their suitability for treatment should be assessed. Dose homogeneity for highly asymmetric fields has been studied for a Siemens PRIMUS clinical linear accelerator. Profiles and absolute dose have been measured in fields with two jaws at maximal position (20 cm) and the other two at maximal overtravel (10 cm), corresponding to 10 cm x 10 cm fields with extreme offset. Measured profiles have a marked decreasing gradient towards the beam edge, making these fields unsuitable for treatments. The flattening filter radius is smaller than the primary collimator aperture, and this creates beam inhomogeneities that affect large fields in areas far from the collimator axis, and asymmetric fields with large offset. The results presented assess the effect that the design of the primary collimator and flattening filter assembly has on beam homogeneity. This can have clinical consequences for treatments involving fields that include these inhomogeneous areas. Comparison with calculations from a treatment planning system, Philips Pinnacle v6.3, which computes under the hypotheses of a uniformly flattened beam, results in severe discrepancies.

  15. Beam-dynamics driven design of the LHeC energy-recovery linac

    DOE PAGES

    Pellegrini, Dario; Latina, Andrea; Schulte, Daniel; ...

    2015-12-23

    The LHeC study is a possible upgrade of the LHC that aims at delivering an electron beam for collisions with the existing hadronic beams. The current baseline design for the electron facility consists of a multi-pass superconducting energy-recovery linac operating in a continuous wave mode. Here, we summarize the overall layout of such ERL complex located on the LHC site and introduce the most recent developments. We review of the lattice components, presenting their baseline design along with possible alternatives that aims at improving the overall machine performance. The detector bypass has been designed and integrated into the lattice. Trackingmore » simulations allowed us to verify the high current (~150 mA in the linacs) beam operation required for the LHeC to serve as an Higgs Factory. The impact of single and multi-bunch wake-fields, synchrotron radiation and beam-beam effects has been assessed in this paper.« less

  16. Measuring linac photon beam energy through EPID image analysis of physically wedged fields

    SciTech Connect

    Dawoud, S. M. Weston, S. J.; Bond, I.; Ward, G. C.; Rixham, P. A.; Mason, J.; Huckle, A.; Sykes, J. R.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have proven to be useful tools for measuring several parameters of interest in linac quality assurance (QA). However, a method for measuring linac photon beam energy using EPIDs has not previously been reported. In this report, such a method is devised and tested, based on fitting a second order polynomial to the profiles of physically wedged beams, where the metric of interest is the second order coefficientα. The relationship between α and the beam quality index [percentage depth dose at 10 cm depth (PDD{sub 10})] is examined to produce a suitable calibration curve between these two parameters. Methods: Measurements were taken in a water-tank for beams with a range of energies representative of the local QA tolerances about the nominal value 6 MV. In each case, the beam quality was found in terms of PDD{sub 10} for 100 × 100 mm{sup 2} square fields. EPID images of 200 × 200 mm{sup 2} wedged fields were then taken for each beam and the wedge profile was fitted in MATLAB 2010b (The MathWorks, Inc., Natick, MA). α was then plotted against PDD{sub 10} and fitted with a linear relation to produce the calibration curve. The uncertainty in α was evaluated by taking five repeat EPID images of the wedged field for a beam of 6 MV nominal energy. The consistency of measuring α was found by taking repeat measurements on a single linac over a three month period. The method was also tested at 10 MV by repeating the water-tank crosscalibration for a range of energies centered approximately about a 10 MV nominal value. Finally, the calibration curve from the test linac and that from a separate clinical machine were compared to test consistency of the method across machines in a matched fleet. Results: The relationship betweenα and PDD{sub 10} was found to be strongly linear (R{sup 2} = 0.979) while the uncertainty in α was found to be negligible compared to that associated with measuring PDD{sub 10} in the water-tank (

  17. Chromaticity of the lattice and beam stability in energy-recovery linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.N.

    2011-12-23

    Energy recovery linacs (ERLs) are an emerging generation of accelerators promising to revolutionize the fields of high-energy physics and photon sciences. These accelerators combine the advantages of linear accelerators with that of storage rings, and hold the promise of delivering electron beams of unprecedented power and quality. Use of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities converts ERLs into nearly perfect 'perpetuum mobile' accelerators, wherein the beam is accelerated to a desirable energy, used, and then gives the energy back to the RF field. One potential weakness of these devices is transverse beam break-up instability that could severely limit the available beam current. In this paper, I present a method of suppressing these dangerous effects using a natural phenomenon in the accelerators, viz., the chromaticity of the transverse motion.

  18. Charge stripper effects on beam dynamics in the 180-degree bending section of the RISP linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Ji-Ho; Jin, Hyunchang; Song, Jeong Seog

    2016-09-01

    The RAON, a superconducting linear accelerator for RISP (Rare Isotope Science Project), will use a charge stripper in order to increase the charge states of the heavy ions for effective acceleration in the higher energy part of the linac. The charge stripper affects the beam distribution by scattering the heavy ions as they go through the charge stripper. Moreover we have to select and accelerate proper charge states between 77+ and 81+ for the case of a uranium beam in order to satisfy the beam-power requirement at an IF (inflight fragmentation) target. This work focuses on how the beam dynamics are affected by the charge stripper in the 180-dgree bending section.

  19. Pulsed power requirements for the Sandia recirculating electron beam linac

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, W.K.; Shope, S.L.; Hasti, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    Compact, high gradient, linear induction accelerators may be achieved by recirculating the electron beam in phase with a repeating accelerating voltage. A two-cavity recirculating accelerator has been designed and operated in a single-pass mode. The prototype accelerator uses a 2.5-MV, 20-kA, 25-ns duration injector and an accelerating cavity that will produce a total accelerating voltage of 5.3 MV for four passes. The design of this machine involved key areas of development in pulsed power, specifically, low-jitter spark gaps and vacuum-liquid interfaces for bipolar electric fields. The extension of this technology to multiple-pulse machines will require advances in liquid dielectric breakdown strength and switch surface flashover, as well as additional improvements in lower inductance switching and vacuum-liquid interface flashover. This paper will discuss the recirculation concept, pulsed-power design parameters, machine scaling relationships that are valid for state-of-the-art and near-term pulsed-power parameters, and summarize the pulsed-power and beam transport experiments.

  20. Use of off-axis injection as an alternative to geometrically merging beams in an energy-recovering linac

    DOEpatents

    Douglas, David R [York County, VA

    2012-01-10

    A method of using off-axis particle beam injection in energy-recovering linear accelerators that increases operational efficiency while eliminating the need to merge the high energy re-circulating beam with an injected low energy beam. In this arrangement, the high energy re-circulating beam and the low energy beam are manipulated such that they are within a predetermined distance from one another and then the two immerged beams are injected into the linac and propagated through the system. The configuration permits injection without geometric beam merging as well as decelerated beam extraction without the use of typical beamline elements.

  1. Design and Beam Dynamics Studies of a Multi-Ion Linac Injector for the JLEIC Ion Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Plastun, A. S.; Mustapha, B.; Conway, Z. A.

    2016-01-01

    The electron-ion collider (JLEIC) being proposed at JLab requires a new ion accelerator complex which includes a linac capable of delivering any ion beam from hydrogen to lead to the booster. We are currently developing a linac which consists of several ion sources, a normal conducting (NC) front end, up to 5 MeV/u, and a SC section for energies > 5 MeV/u. This design work is focused on the beam dynamics and electrodynamics studies performed to design efficient and cost-effective accelerating structures for both the NC and SC sections of the linac. Currently, we are considering two separate RFQs for the heavy-ion and light-ion beams including polarized beams, and different types of NC accelerating structures downstream of the RFQ. Quarter-wave and half-wave resonators can be effectively used in the SC section.

  2. Issues concerning high current lower energy electron beams required for ion cooling between EBIS LINAC and booster

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch,A.

    2009-03-01

    Some issues, regarding a low energy high current electron beam that will be needed for electron beam cooling to reduce momentum of gold ions exiting the EBIS LINAC before injection into the booster, are examined. Options for propagating such an electron beam, as well as the effect of neutralizing background plasma on electron and ion beam parameters are calculated. Computations and some experimental data indicate that none of these issues is a show stopper.

  3. Linac-integrated kV-cone beam CT: Technical features and first applications

    SciTech Connect

    Oelfke, Uwe . E-mail: u.oelfke@dkfz.de; Tuecking, Thomas M.Sc.; Nill, Simeon; Seeber, Annete; Hesse, Bernd; Huber, Peter; Thilmann, Christoph

    2006-04-01

    Abstract-: One of the most prominent imaging techniques in image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) is the acquisition of cone beam computed tomographies (CBCTs) at the linac with the patient in treatment position. CBCTs provide accurate 3-dimensional (3D) knowledge about the patient's anatomy for every treatment fraction and are therefore well suited for all adaptive corrections of errors related to interfractional uncertainties of the treatment process. In this paper, we first describe the technical development and implementation of this new imaging technique at our linac, i.e., the hardware components and their operating parameters are discussed in detail for a standard image acquisition of CBCTs. Then, an extension of this approach for the acquisition of complete images for extended field of views-the 'shifted detector' technique-is presented followed by a first investigation of how CBCTs can be reliably used for adaptive dose calculations. Finally, a first clinical application, the process of automatic patient positioning based on CBCT images, is discussed. From our investigations, we conclude that the technical development of linac-integrated CBCTs bears an enormous potential for the correction of interfractional treatment errors. However, image quality and reconstruction speed of the images leave room for improvement. The development of clinical strategies for the optimal application of this new image modality in a clinical environment is one the major tasks for the future.

  4. Effect of transients on the beam in the Superconducting Supercollider Coupled-Cavity Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Young, L.M.; Nath, S.

    1992-10-01

    Each module of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Coupled-Cavity Linac (CCL) consists of eight tanks (10 accelerating cells each) coupled with bridge couplers. The radio frequency (rf) power drive is in the center of the module at the bridge coupler between the fourth and fifth tanks. In this simulation of the beam dynamics, the rf power is turned on 10 {mu}s before the beam is turned on. This time lapse allows the fields to build up and stabilize before they are required by the beam. When the beam is turned on, the beam loading causes the fields to change. This transient state of the fields together with their effect on the beam is presented. A model has been developed to calculate field distribution throughout the module as a function of time. Beam dynamics simulations were run with the results of this model at several times during the beam pulse. An estimate of the effect of the transients is given by the results of these simulations.

  5. Effect of transients on the beam in the Superconducting Supercollider Coupled-Cavity Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Young, L.M.; Nath, S.

    1992-01-01

    Each module of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Coupled-Cavity Linac (CCL) consists of eight tanks (10 accelerating cells each) coupled with bridge couplers. The radio frequency (rf) power drive is in the center of the module at the bridge coupler between the fourth and fifth tanks. In this simulation of the beam dynamics, the rf power is turned on 10 {mu}s before the beam is turned on. This time lapse allows the fields to build up and stabilize before they are required by the beam. When the beam is turned on, the beam loading causes the fields to change. This transient state of the fields together with their effect on the beam is presented. A model has been developed to calculate field distribution throughout the module as a function of time. Beam dynamics simulations were run with the results of this model at several times during the beam pulse. An estimate of the effect of the transients is given by the results of these simulations.

  6. Transfer of the UK absorbed dose primary standard for photon beams from the research linac to the clinical linac at NPL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, J. A. D.; Shipley, D. R.; Duane, S.

    2011-10-01

    An Elekta Synergy clinical linac facility is now in routine use at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL). For the purpose of therapy-level dosimetry, this has replaced the NPL research linac, which is over 40 years old, and in which the NPL absorbed dose primary standard for high-energy photons was established. This standard has been disseminated to clinical beams by interpolation of the calibration factor as a function of tissue phantom ratio TPR20/10. In this work the absorbed dose standard has been commissioned in all the beams produced by the Elekta Synergy linac. Reference standard ionization chambers have been calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to graphite and this calibration has been converted to one in terms of absorbed dose to water. The results have been combined with the calibration in 60Co γ-rays to obtain measured values for the quality-dependent correction, kQ, for these reference standard chambers used in the Elekta beams. The resulting data are consistent with the interpolated kQ to within 0.4%, which is less than the combined standard uncertainty of kQ, 0.56%.

  7. Photon spectra calculation for an Elekta linac beam using experimental scatter measurements and Monte Carlo techniques.

    PubMed

    Juste, B; Miro, R; Campayo, J M; Diez, S; Verdu, G

    2008-01-01

    The present work is centered in reconstructing by means of a scatter analysis method the primary beam photon spectrum of a linear accelerator. This technique is based on irradiating the isocenter of a rectangular block made of methacrylate placed at 100 cm distance from surface and measuring scattered particles around the plastic at several specific positions with different scatter angles. The MCNP5 Monte Carlo code has been used to simulate the particles transport of mono-energetic beams to register the scatter measurement after contact the attenuator. Measured ionization values allow calculating the spectrum as the sum of mono-energetic individual energy bins using the Schiff Bremsstrahlung model. The measurements have been made in an Elekta Precise linac using a 6 MeV photon beam. Relative depth and profile dose curves calculated in a water phantom using the reconstructed spectrum agree with experimentally measured dose data to within 3%.

  8. First Operating Experiences of Beam Position Monitors in the TESLA Test Facility Linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, R.; Sachwitz, M.; Schreiber, H. J.; Tonisch, F.; Castellano, M.; Patteri, P.; Tazzioli, F.; Catani, L.

    1997-05-01

    Different types of monitors where installed in the TESLA Test Facility Linac to measure the beam position. At each superconducting quadrupole, the transverse beam position will be measured with a resolution of better than 10 μm, using a cylindrical cavity excited in the TM_110-mode by an off-center beam. In addition, two 'warm' cavities working at room temperature were built for the Injector I and the Bunch Compressor. The amplitude of the TM_110-mode and its phase are measured in a homodyne receiver. For the experimental area, stripline monitors having a resolution of better than 100 μm were built, tested and installed. The averaged position of the whole bunch train of Injector I is measured in a narrowband receiver using the amplitude-to-phase conversion. This paper summarizes the designs, cold tests and first operating experiences of both monitor types.

  9. Simulation of medical electron linac bremsstrahlung beam transport in typical shielding materials.

    PubMed

    Avila-Rodriguez, Miguel A; DeLuca, Paul M; Bohm, Tim D

    2005-01-01

    The Monte Carlo N-particle code MCNP version 4C3 was used to investigate the backscattering and transmission of high-energy photons in concrete, iron and lead at deep penetration. A typical bremsstrahlung beam from a 24 MV linac was used, and the transmission up to 15 mean-free paths was studied. Broad beam slab geometry was used. Estimates of the transmission in terms of absorbed dose to tissue ratio and air kerma ratio were performed for the primary and secondary components of the transmitted beam in the three materials. The tissue dose and air kerma buildup factors were calculated and fitted to Berger's equation. Finally, the differential dose albedo values for common reflected angles were determined.

  10. SU-E-T-468: Implementation of the TG-142 QA Process for Seven Linacs with Enhanced Beam Conformance

    SciTech Connect

    Woollard, J; Ayan, A; DiCostanzo, D; Grzetic, S; Hessler, J; Gupta, N

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a TG-142 compliant QA process for 7 Varian TrueBeam linear accelerators (linacs) with enhanced beam conformance and dosimetrically matched beam models. To ensure consistent performance of all 7 linacs, the QA process should include a common set of baseline values for use in routine QA on all linacs. Methods: The TG 142 report provides recommended tests, tolerances and frequencies for quality assurance of medical accelerators. Based on the guidance provided in the report, measurement tests were developed to evaluate each of the applicable parameters listed for daily, monthly and annual QA. These tests were then performed on each of our 7 new linacs as they came on line at our institution. Results: The tolerance values specified in TG-142 for each QA test are either absolute tolerances (i.e. ±2mm) or require a comparison to a baseline value. The results of our QA tests were first used to ensure that all 7 linacs were operating within the suggested tolerance values provided in TG −142 for those tests with absolute tolerances and that the performance of the linacs was adequately matched. The QA test results were then used to develop a set of common baseline values for those QA tests that require comparison to a baseline value at routine monthly and annual QA. The procedures and baseline values were incorporated into a spreadsheets for use in monthly and annual QA. Conclusion: We have developed a set of procedures for daily, monthly and annual QA of our linacs that are consistent with the TG-142 report. A common set of baseline values was developed for routine QA tests. The use of this common set of baseline values for comparison at monthly and annual QA will ensure consistent performance of all 7 linacs.

  11. Measurements and simulations of ultralow emittance and ultrashort electron beams in the linac coherent light source.

    PubMed

    Ding, Y; Brachmann, A; Decker, F-J; Dowell, D; Emma, P; Frisch, J; Gilevich, S; Hays, G; Hering, Ph; Huang, Z; Iverson, R; Loos, H; Miahnahri, A; Nuhn, H-D; Ratner, D; Turner, J; Welch, J; White, W; Wu, J

    2009-06-26

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is an x-ray free-electron laser project presently in a commissioning phase at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We report here on very low-emittance measurements made at low bunch charge, and a few femtosecond bunch length produced by the LCLS bunch compressors. Start-to-end simulations associated with these beam parameters show the possibilities of generating hundreds of GW at 1.5 A x-ray wavelength and nearly a single longitudinally coherent spike at 1.5 nm with 2-fs duration.

  12. Physical parameters of very small diameter 10 MV X-ray beams for linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sham, Edwin

    Physical aspects of very small diameter X-ray beams used for a linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery are presented in this thesis. A 10 MV linac was used as the radiation source. Very small 10 MV photon fields with diameters of 1.5 mm, 3 mm, and 5 mm are produced by special collimators attached to the treatment head of the linac. The radiation beam data were measured with a small field diode detector as well as radiographic and radiochromic films. Measured beam parameters were compared with the same parameters calculated with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. For very small photon fields with diameters on the order of the focal spot size, MC calculations show that both the percentage depth dose (PDD) distributions and dose profiles are sensitive to the focal spot size. A simple sliding slit technique was developed to measure the focal spot size and shape for accurate MC simulations of very small diameter beams. The measured focal spot of the 10 MV linac is elliptical in shape and fitted by a Gaussian distribution with full-widths-at-half-maximum (FWHMs) of 2.05 mm and 1.34 mm in the principal axes of the ellipse. A Gaussian circle equivalent in area to the experimentally determined focal spot ellipse was used in MC simulations. The resulting PDD and beam profile calculations are in good agreement with the measurements. Dynamic radiosurgery with very small diameter photon beams was carried out using the 10 MV linac. Radiosurgical isodose distributions were measured with radiographic films in a spherical head phantom and calculated with the MC technique. A good agreement between the measured and MC-calculated isodose distributions for very small diameter fields is achieved. The displacement of the center of the measured isodose distributions relative to the laser-defined isocenter was on the order of 0.7 mm. All these results show the potential of linac-based radiosurgery with very small diameter photon beams for clinical use.

  13. Photonuclear dose calculations for high-energy photon beams from Siemens and Varian linacs.

    PubMed

    Chibani, Omar; Ma, Chang-Ming Charlie

    2003-08-01

    The dose from photon-induced nuclear particles (neutrons, protons, and alpha particles) generated by high-energy photon beams from medical linacs is investigated. Monte Carlo calculations using the MCNPX code are performed for three different photon beams from two different machines: Siemens 18 MV, Varian 15 MV, and Varian 18 MV. The linac head components are simulated in detail. The dose distributions from photons, neutrons, protons, and alpha particles are calculated in a tissue-equivalent phantom. Neutrons are generated in both the linac head and the phantom. This study includes (a) field size effects, (b) off-axis dose profiles, (c) neutron contribution from the linac head, (d) dose contribution from capture gamma rays, (e) phantom heterogeneity effects, and (f) effects of primary electron energy shift. Results are presented in terms of absolute dose distributions and also in terms of DER (dose equivalent ratio). The DER is the maximum dose from the particle (neutron, proton, or alpha) divided by the maximum photon dose, multiplied by the particle quality factor and the modulation scaling factor. The total DER including neutrons, protons, and alphas is about 0.66 cSv/Gy for the Siemens 18 MV beam (10 cm x 10 cm). The neutron DER decreases with decreasing field size while the proton (or alpha) DER does not vary significantly except for the 1 cm x 1 cm field. Both Varian beams (15 and 18 MV) produce more neutrons, protons, and alphas particles than the Siemens 18 MV beam. This is mainly due to their higher primary electron energies: 15 and 18.3 MeV, respectively, vs 14 MeV for the Siemens 18 MV beam. For all beams, neutrons contribute more than 75% of the total DER, except for the 1 cm x 1 cm field (approximately 50%). The total DER is 1.52 and 2.86 cSv/Gy for the 15 and 18 MV Varian beams (10 cm x 10 cm), respectively. Media with relatively high-Z elements like bone may increase the dose from heavy charged particles by a factor 4. The total DER is sensitive to

  14. Beam dynamic design of a high intensity injector for proton linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Wei-Ping; Wang, Zhi-Jun; Jia, Fang-Jian; He, Yuan; Wang, Zhi; Lu, Yuan-Rong

    2016-08-01

    A compact room-temperature injector is designed to accelerate 100 mA proton beam from 45 keV to 4.06 MeV for the proposed high intensity proton linac at State Key Lab of Nuclear Physics and Technology in Peking university. The main feature is that the Radio Frequency Quadruple (RFQ) and the Drift Tube linac (DTL) sections are merged in one piece at the total length of 276 cm. The beam is matched in transverse directions with an compact internal doublet instead of an external matching section in between. The design has reached a high average accelerating gradient up to 1.55 MV/m with transmission efficiency of 95.9% at the consideration of high duty factor operation. The operation frequency is chose to be 200 MHz due to the already available RF power source. The injector combines a 150 cm long 4-vanes RFQ internal section from 45 keV to 618 keV with a 126 cm long H-type DTL section to 4.06 MeV. In general the design satisfy the challenges of the project requirements. And the details are presented in this paper.

  15. Charge neutralized low energy beam transport at Brookhaven 200 MeV linac

    SciTech Connect

    Raparia, D. Alessi, J.; Atoian, G.; Zelenski, A.

    2016-02-15

    The H{sup −} magnetron source provides about 100 mA H{sup −} beam to be match into the radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator. As H{sup −} beam traverses through low energy transport, it ionizes the residual gas and electrons are repelled and positive ions are trapped in the beam, due to negative potential of the beam, providing charge neutralization for the H{sup −} beam. The neutralization time for the critical density depends upon the background gas and its pressure. Critical density for xenon gas at 35 keV is about 43 times smaller than that of hydrogen and stripping cross section is only 5 times than that of hydrogen gas. We are using xenon gas to reduce neutralization time and to improve transmission through the 200 MeV linac. We are also using pulse nitrogen gas to improve transmission and stability of polarized H{sup −} beam from optically pumped polarized ion source.

  16. The beam energy feedback system for Beijing electron positron collider II linac.

    PubMed

    Wang, S; Iqbal, M; Chi, Y; Liu, R; Huang, X

    2017-03-01

    A beam-energy feedback system has been developed for the injection linac to meet the beam quality needed for the Beijing electron positron collider II storage ring. This paper describes the implementation and commissioning of this system in detail. The system consists of an energy measurement unit, application software, and an actuator unit. A non-intersecting beam energy monitor was developed to allow real-time online energy adjustment. The beam energy adjustment is achieved by adjusting the output microwave phase of the RF power source station. The phase control mechanism has also been modified, and a new control method taking the return difference of the phase shifter into account is used to improve the system's performance. This system achieves the design aim and can adjust the beam center energy with a rate of 2 Hz. With the energy feedback system, the stability of the injection rate is better; the fluctuation range is reduced from 20 mA/min to 10 mA/min, while the stability of the beam center energy is maintained within ±0.1%.

  17. Present status of the electron beam diagnostics system of the PLS-II linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jae-Young; Kim, Changbum; Kim, Mungyung; Kim, Dotae; Kim, Jae Myung; Lee, Eunhee; Kim, Ghyung Hwa; Shin, Seunghwan; Huang, Jung Yun

    2015-02-01

    The PLS-II, the upgraded PLS (Pohang Light Source), has been providing users with photon beams in the top-up mode since March 2013. The requirements for the PLS-II linac to achieve the top-up injection are very demanding because it is a full energy injector with a very limited energy margin. One of the requirements is to ensure high injection efficiency in order to minimize the beam loss at the storage ring injection point and the experimental hall during injection because loss leads to a high radiation level in the experimental hall. The energy stability and energy spread of the accelerated electron beam are fundamental parameters to monitor and manage for high injection efficiency. An energy feedback system consisting of a stripline-type beam position monitor and the last klystron was implemented. To diagnose the injected beam's energy and energy spread in real time during top-up mode injection, we installed an optical transition radiation (OTR) monitor system upstream of the beam transport line (BTL) after the first bending magnet. The energy and the energy spread ranges can be controlled with a horizontal slit installed after the OTR monitor. The vertical beam size of the accelerated beam must be decreased for efficient injection because the electron beam is injected into the storage ring with many in-vacuum undulators of small gaps. For this purpose, two vertical slits were installed in the BTL region. We will describe mainly those instruments closely related to top-up operation, though other beam diagnostic instruments have been used since PLS.

  18. Performance of a beam-multiplexing diamond crystal monochromator at the Linac Coherent Light Source.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Diling; Feng, Yiping; Stoupin, Stanislav; Terentyev, Sergey A; Lemke, Henrik T; Fritz, David M; Chollet, Matthieu; Glownia, J M; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; van Driel, Tim B; Williams, Garth J; Messerschmidt, Marc; Boutet, Sébastien; Blank, Vladimir D; Shvyd'ko, Yuri V; Robert, Aymeric

    2014-06-01

    A double-crystal diamond monochromator was recently implemented at the Linac Coherent Light Source. It enables splitting pulses generated by the free electron laser in the hard x-ray regime and thus allows the simultaneous operations of two instruments. Both monochromator crystals are High-Pressure High-Temperature grown type-IIa diamond crystal plates with the (111) orientation. The first crystal has a thickness of ~100 μm to allow high reflectivity within the Bragg bandwidth and good transmission for the other wavelengths for downstream use. The second crystal is about 300 μm thick and makes the exit beam of the monochromator parallel to the incoming beam with an offset of 600 mm. Here we present details on the monochromator design and its performance.

  19. A wire scanner system for characterizing the BNL energy recovery LINAC beam position monitor system

    SciTech Connect

    Michnoff R.; Biscardi, C.; Cerniglia, P.; Degen, C.; Gassner, D.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.

    2012-04-15

    A stepper motor controlled wire scanner system has recently been modified to support testing of the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Collider-Accelerator department's Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) beam position monitor (BPM) system. The ERL BPM consists of four 9.33 mm diameter buttons mounted at 90 degree spacing in a cube with 1.875 inch inside diameter. The buttons were designed by BNL and fabricated by Times Microwave Systems. Libera brilliance single pass BPM electronic modules with 700 MHz bandpass filter, manufactured by Instrumentation Technologies, will be used to measure the transverse beam positions at 14 locations around the ERL. The wire scanner assembly provides the ability to measure the BPM button response to a pulsed wire, and evaluate and calibrate the Libera position measurement electronics. A description of the wire scanner system and test result data will be presented.

  20. Determining Linac Beam Energy from C-11/O-15 Activity Ratios in Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardman, Ryan; Shepherd, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    A method for precisely measuring the beam energy of 20-25 MeV electron linear accelerator was developed. Polyoxymethylene (Delrin) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (acrylic) samples were irradiated with an electron linac at several energy settings of the accelerator simultaneously producing C-11 and O-15 via photonuclear reactions within each of the polymers. Using gamma-ray spectroscopy the activity ratios of C-11/O-15 were measured by analyzing the decay of activity vs. time. The C-11/O-15 ratio exhibits an energy dependence due to differences in the production cross section vs. energy. The observed dependence can be matched to predictions of the activity ratio vs. energy, developed from GEANT4 Monte Carlo models of an electromagnetic shower and knowledge of the cross sections, in order to determine the energy of the beam at a sub-MeV level of precision. National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduates.

  1. Performance of a beam-multiplexing diamond crystal monochromator at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Diling Feng, Yiping; Lemke, Henrik T.; Fritz, David M.; Chollet, Matthieu; Glownia, J. M.; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Williams, Garth J.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Boutet, Sébastien; Robert, Aymeric; Stoupin, Stanislav; Shvyd'ko, Yuri V.; Terentyev, Sergey A.; Blank, Vladimir D.; Driel, Tim B. van

    2014-06-15

    A double-crystal diamond monochromator was recently implemented at the Linac Coherent Light Source. It enables splitting pulses generated by the free electron laser in the hard x-ray regime and thus allows the simultaneous operations of two instruments. Both monochromator crystals are High-Pressure High-Temperature grown type-IIa diamond crystal plates with the (111) orientation. The first crystal has a thickness of ∼100 μm to allow high reflectivity within the Bragg bandwidth and good transmission for the other wavelengths for downstream use. The second crystal is about 300 μm thick and makes the exit beam of the monochromator parallel to the incoming beam with an offset of 600 mm. Here we present details on the monochromator design and its performance.

  2. 10MeV 25KW industrial electron LINAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamino, Y.

    1998-06-01

    A 10MeV 25KW plus class electron LINAC was developed for sterilisation of medical devices. The LINAC composed of a standing wave type single cavity prebuncher and a 2m electro-plated travelling wave guide uses a 5MW 2856MHz pulse klystron as an RF source and provides 25KW beam power at the Ti alloy beam window stably after the energy analysing magnet with 10MeV plus-minus 1 MeV energy slit. The practical maximum beam power reached 29 KW and this demonstrated the LINAC as one of the most powerful S-band electron LINACs in the world. The control of the LINAC is fully automated and the "One-Button Operation" is realised, which is valuable for easy operation as a plant system. 2 systems have been delivered and are being operated stably.

  3. Heavy-ion driver linac for the RIA facility and the feasibility of producing multi-megawatt beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Nolen, J. A.; Shepard, K. W.; Physics

    2005-01-01

    The Rare-Isotope Accelerator (RIA) facility is a top priority project in the U.S. RIA is a next generation facility for basic research with radioactive beams that utilizes both standard isotope-separator on-line and in-flight fragmentation methods with novel approaches to handle high primary-beam power and remove existing limitations in the extraction of short-lived isotopes. A versatile primary accelerator, a 1.4-GV, CW superconducting linac, will provide beams from protons at 1 GeV to uranium at 400 MeV/u at power levels of 400 kW. Novel features include the acceptance of two charge states of heavy ions from the ion source and the acceleration of five charge states following the stripper foils. To achieve these goals, comprehensive beam dynamics studies have been performed to optimize the design of the driver linac. Recently we have investigated the feasibility of increasing the currents of light ions to deliver megawatts of beam power. This option is entirely possible from the beam dynamics point of view. It would require higher power from the rf system, as well as, increased shielding at the beam loss points with respect to the existing baseline design. Preliminary indications of the limitations of beam power for this class of CW superconducting linac for light ion beams will be presented.

  4. Heavy-Ion Driver Linac for the RIA Facility and the Feasibility of Producing Multi-Megawatt Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P.N.; Nolen, J.A.; Shepard, K.W.

    2005-06-08

    The Rare-Isotope Accelerator (RIA) facility is a top priority project in the U.S. RIA is a next generation facility for basic research with radioactive beams that utilizes both standard isotope-separator on-line and in-flight fragmentation methods with novel approaches to handle high primary-beam power and remove existing limitations in the extraction of short-lived isotopes. A versatile primary accelerator, a 1.4-GV, CW superconducting linac, will provide beams from protons at 1 GeV to uranium at 400 MeV/u at power levels of 400 kW. Novel features include the acceptance of two charge states of heavy ions from the ion source and the acceleration of five charge states following the stripper foils. To achieve these goals, comprehensive beam dynamics studies have been performed to optimize the design of the driver linac. Recently we have investigated the feasibility of increasing the currents of light ions to deliver megawatts of beam power. This option is entirely possible from the beam dynamics point of view. It would require higher power from the rf system, as well as, increased shielding at the beam loss points with respect to the existing baseline design. Preliminary indications of the limitations of beam power for this class of CW superconducting linac for light ion beams will be presented.

  5. Part II/Addendum Electron Beam Cooling between EBIS LINAC and Booster; Is Single Pass Cooling Possible?

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch,A.

    2008-07-01

    Due to some miscommunication, incomplete data was erroneously used in examining electron beam cooling for reducing momentum of gold ions exiting the EBIS LINAC before injection into the booster. Corrected calculations still indicate that single pass cooling is, in principle, feasible; momentum spread can be reduced by an order of magnitude in about one meter. Preliminary results suggest that this cooling deserves further consideration.

  6. Proton beam studies with a 1.25 MeV, cw radio frequency quadrupole linac

    SciTech Connect

    Bolme, G.O.; Hardek, T.W.; Hansborough, L.D.

    1998-12-31

    A high-current, cw linear accelerator has been proposed as a spallation neutron source driver for tritium production. Key features of this accelerator are high current (100 mA), low emittance-growth beam propagation, cw operation, high efficiency, and minimal maintenance downtime. A 268 MHz, cw radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) LINAC section and klystrode based rf system were obtained from the Chalk River Laboratories and were previously installed at LANL to support systems development and advanced studies in support of cw, proton accelerators. A variation of the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) proton injector, modified to operate at 50 keV, was mated to the RFQ and was operated to support advance developments for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) program. High current, proton beam studies were completed which focused on the details of injector-RFQ integration, development of beam diagnostics, development of operations procedures, and personnel and equipment safety systems integration. This development led to acceleration of up to 100 mA proton beam.

  7. Beam dynamics studies of the 8 GeV Linac at FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P.N.; Mustapha, B.; Carneiro, J.-P.; /Fermilab

    2008-11-01

    The proposed 8-GeV proton driver (PD) linac at FNAL includes a front end up to {approx}420 MeV operating at 325 MHz and a high energy section at 1300 MHz. A normal conducting RFQ and short CH type resonators are being developed for the initial acceleration of the H-minus or proton beam up to 10 MeV. From 10 MeV to {approx}420 MeV, the voltage gain is provided by superconducting (SC) spoke-loaded cavities. In the high-energy section, the acceleration will be provided by the International Linear Collider (ILC)-style SC elliptical cell cavities. To employ existing, readily available klystrons, an RF power fan out from high-power klystrons to multiple cavities is being developed. The beam dynamics simulation code TRACK, available in both serial and parallel versions, has been updated to include all known H-minus stripping mechanisms to predict the exact location of beam losses. An iterative simulation procedure is being developed to interact with a transient beam loading model taking into account RF feedback and feedforward systems.

  8. Accelerator research on MBE-4, an experimental multi-beam induction linac

    SciTech Connect

    Meuth, H.; Fessenden, T.J.; Keefe, D.; Warwick, A.I.

    1988-06-01

    The multiple beam accelerator MBE-4 is a device for research toward a heavy ion driver for inertial confinement fusion, based on the induction linac concept. Its main goal is proof of the principle of current amplification by acceleration and controlled self-similar beam pulse compression. Into the 16-m long device four beams, each with an initial current of 10 mA are injected from a Marx-driven diode at 200 keV. The current amplification is up to nine-fold, with a final beam energy of about 800 keV in the middle of the bunch. Now that all the apparatus' accelerator sections have been completed, installed and aligned, and its unaccelerated transport properties have been studied, our experimental research has reached the crucial phase of implementing appropriate accelerator schedules that approximate self-similar current-pulse compression. These schedules are established through a close interplay of computations using a one-dimensional simulation code and a manual empirical tuning procedure. In a first approach, with a rather vigorous schedule that uses most of the accelerator modules to their voltage limits, we have determined the limits of our capability for controlled pulse compression, mainly due to waveform shaping of the driving pulse-forming networks. We shall report on these results. In the future, we will also aim for gentler schedules that would model more closely an inertial confinement fusion scenario. 8 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Stripping of H- beams by residual gas in the linac at the Los Alamos neutron science center

    SciTech Connect

    Mccrady, Rodney C; Ito, Takeyasu; Cooper, Martin D; Alexander, Saunders

    2010-09-07

    The linear accelerator at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerates both protons and H{sup -} ions using Cockroft-Walton-type injectors, a drift-tube linac and a coupled-cavity linac. The vacuum is maintained in the range of 10{sup -6} to 10{sup -7} Torr; the residual gas in the vacuum system results in some stripping of the electrons from the H{sup -} ions resulting in beam spill and the potential for unwanted proton beams delivered to experiments. We have measured the amount of fully-stripped H{sup -} beam (protons) that end up at approximately 800 MeV in the beam switchyard at LANSCE using image plates as very sensitive detectors. We present here the motivation for the measurement, the measurement technique and results.

  10. BEAM DYNAMICS STUDIES OF A HIGH-REPETITION RATE LINAC-DRIVER FOR A 4TH GENERATION LIGHT SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Ventturini, M.; Corlett, J.; Emma, P.; Papadopoulos, C.; Penn, G.; Placidi, M.; Qiang, J.; Reinsch, M.; Sannibale, F.; Steier, C.; Sun, C.; Wells, R.

    2012-05-18

    We present recent progress toward the design of a super-conducting linac driver for a high-repetition rate FEL-based soft x-ray light source. The machine is designed to accept beams generated by the APEX photo-cathode gun operating with MHz-range repetition rate and deliver them to an array of SASE and seeded FEL beamlines. We review the current baseline design and report results of beam dynamics studies.

  11. First acceleration of a proton beam in a side coupled drift tube linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronsivalle, C.; Picardi, L.; Ampollini, A.; Bazzano, G.; Marracino, F.; Nenzi, P.; Snels, C.; Surrenti, V.; Vadrucci, M.; Ambrosini, F.

    2015-07-01

    We report the first experiment aimed at the demonstration of low-energy protons acceleration by a high-efficiency S-band RF linear accelerator. The proton beam has been accelerated from 7 to 11.6 MeV by a 1 meter long SCDTL (Side Coupled Drift Tube Linac) module powered with 1.3 MW. The experiment has been done in the framework of the Italian TOP-IMPLART (Oncological Therapy with Protons-Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Linear Accelerator for Radio-Therapy) project devoted to the realization of a proton therapy centre based on a proton linear accelerator for intensity modulated cancer treatments to be installed at IRE-IFO, the largest oncological hospital in Rome. It is the first proton therapy facility employing a full linear accelerator scheme based on high-frequency technology.

  12. Beam stability investigation for a free electron lithographic laser based on an energy-recovery linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getmanov, Ya. V.; Vinokurov, N. A.; Shevchenko, O. A.; Davidyuk, I. V.

    2016-12-01

    According to leading producers of microelectronic devices, lithography based on free electron lasers (FEL) could become the main technology for the mass production of elements with a scale up to 5 nm in the near future. One of the main hindrances in this path is the absence of working FEL with the required parameters. A feasibility study devoted to the production of such an FEL based on a superconducting energyrecovery linac (ERL) has been carried out at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP). The ERL average current is limited by longitudinal and transverse instabilities, caused by the interaction of an electron beam with the fields induced by it in the superconducting cavities. The estimations of the threshold currents and parameters of the ERL required for the operation of FEL are obtained.

  13. Dark Currents and Their Effect on the Primary Beam in an X-band Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.L.F.; Dolgashev, V.A.; Raubenheimer, T.; Stupakov, G.V.; Wu, J.H.; /SLAC

    2005-05-27

    We numerically study properties of primary dark currents in an X-band accelerating structure. For the H60VG3 structure considered for the Next Linear Collider (NLC) we first perform a fairly complete (with some approximations) calculation of dark current trajectories. These results are used to study properties of the dark current leaving the structure. For example, at accelerating gradient of 65 MV/m, considering two very different assumptions about dark current emission around the irises, we find that the fraction of emitted current leaving the structure to be a consistent {approx} 1%. Considering that {approx} 1 mA outgoing dark current is seen in measurement, this implies that {approx} 100 mA (or 10 pC per period) is emitted within the structure itself. Using the formalism of the Lienard-Wiechert potentials, we then perform a systematic calculation of the transverse kick of dark currents on a primary linac bunch. The result is {approx} 1 V kick per mA (or per 0.1 pC per period) dark current emitted from an iris. For an entire structure we estimate the total kick on a primary bunch to be {approx} 15 V. For the NLC linac this translates to a ratio of (final) vertical beam offset to beam size of about 0.2. However, with the assumptions that needed to be made--particularly the number of emitters and their distribution within a structure--the accuracy of this result may be limited to the order of magnitude.

  14. A Monte Carlo simulation framework for electron beam dose calculations using Varian phase space files for TrueBeam Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, Anna; Yin, Fang-Fang; Wu, Qiuwen; Sawkey, Daren

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: To develop a framework for accurate electron Monte Carlo dose calculation. In this study, comprehensive validations of vendor provided electron beam phase space files for Varian TrueBeam Linacs against measurement data are presented. Methods: In this framework, the Monte Carlo generated phase space files were provided by the vendor and used as input to the downstream plan-specific simulations including jaws, electron applicators, and water phantom computed in the EGSnrc environment. The phase space files were generated based on open field commissioning data. A subset of electron energies of 6, 9, 12, 16, and 20 MeV and open and collimated field sizes 3 × 3, 4 × 4, 5 × 5, 6 × 6, 10 × 10, 15 × 15, 20 × 20, and 25 × 25 cm{sup 2} were evaluated. Measurements acquired with a CC13 cylindrical ionization chamber and electron diode detector and simulations from this framework were compared for a water phantom geometry. The evaluation metrics include percent depth dose, orthogonal and diagonal profiles at depths R{sub 100}, R{sub 50}, R{sub p}, and R{sub p+} for standard and extended source-to-surface distances (SSD), as well as cone and cut-out output factors. Results: Agreement for the percent depth dose and orthogonal profiles between measurement and Monte Carlo was generally within 2% or 1 mm. The largest discrepancies were observed within depths of 5 mm from phantom surface. Differences in field size, penumbra, and flatness for the orthogonal profiles at depths R{sub 100}, R{sub 50}, and R{sub p} were within 1 mm, 1 mm, and 2%, respectively. Orthogonal profiles at SSDs of 100 and 120 cm showed the same level of agreement. Cone and cut-out output factors agreed well with maximum differences within 2.5% for 6 MeV and 1% for all other energies. Cone output factors at extended SSDs of 105, 110, 115, and 120 cm exhibited similar levels of agreement. Conclusions: We have presented a Monte Carlo simulation framework for electron beam dose calculations for

  15. Study of Collective Beam Effects in Energy Recovery Linac Driven Free Electron Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Christpher C.

    Collective beam effects such as coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) and longitudinal space charge (LSC) can degrade the quality of high-energy electron beams used for applications such as free-electron lasers (FELs). The advent of energy recovery linac (ERL)-based FELs brings exciting possibilities for very high-average current FELs that can operate with greater efficiency. However, due to the structure of ERLs, they may be even more susceptible to CSR. It is therefore necessary that these collective beam effects be well understood if future ERL-based designs are to be successful. The Jefferson Laboratory ERL driven IR FEL provides an ideal test-bed for looking at how CSR impacts the electron beam. Due to its novel design we can easily test how CSR's impact on the beam varies as a function of compression within the machine. In this work we will look at measurements of both average energy loss and energy spectrum fragmentation as a function of bunch compression. These results are compared to particle tracking simulations including a 1D CSR model and, in general, good agreement is seen between simulation and measurement. Of particular interest is fragmentation of the energy spectrum that is observed due to CSR and LSC. We will also show how this fragmentation develops and how it can be mitigated through use of the sextupoles in the JLab FEL. Finally, a more complete 2D model is used to simulate CSR-beam interaction. Due to the parameters of the experiment it is expected that a 2D CSR model would yield different results than the 1D CSR model. However, excellent agreement is seen between the two CSR model results.

  16. Output beam energy measurement of a 100-MeV KOMAC drift tube linac by using a stripline beam position monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Han-Sung

    2015-10-01

    The 100-MeV proton linac at the KOMAC (Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex) is composed of a 50-keV proton injector, a 3-MeV RFQ (radio-frequency quadrupole) and a 100-MeV DTL (drift tube linac). The proton beam is accelerated from 3 MeV to 100 MeV through 11 DTL tanks. The precise measurement of the proton-beam's energy at the output of each DTL tank is important for the longitudinal beam dynamics and can be performed by using a time-of-flight method with a BPM (beam position monitor), which is installed between each DTL tank. The details of the output beam energy measurement of the KOMAC DTL with stripline-type BPM and BPM signal processing, along with a comparison with the simulation results, will be presented in this paper.

  17. Study of beam loading and its compensation in the Compact Ultrafast Terahertz Free-Electron Laser injector linac

    SciTech Connect

    Lal, Shankar Pant, K. K.

    2014-12-15

    The RF properties of an accelerating structure, and the pulse structure and charge per bunch in the electron beam propagating through it are important parameters that determine the impact of beam loading in the structure. The injector linac of the Compact Ultrafast Terahertz Free-Electron Laser (CUTE-FEL) has been operated with two different pulse structures during initial commissioning experiments and the effect of beam loading on the accelerated electron beam parameters has been studied analytically for these two pulse structures. This paper discusses the analytical study of beam loading in a Standing Wave, Plane Wave Transformer linac employed in the CUTE-FEL setup, and a possible technique for its compensation for the electron beam parameters of the CUTE-FEL. A parametric study has been performed to study beam loading for different beam currents and to optimize injection time of the electron beam to compensate beam loading. Results from the parametric study have also been used to explain previously observed results from acceleration experiments in the CUTE-FEL setup.

  18. Study of beam loading and its compensation in the Compact Ultrafast Terahertz Free-Electron Laser injector linac.

    PubMed

    Lal, Shankar; Pant, K K

    2014-12-01

    The RF properties of an accelerating structure, and the pulse structure and charge per bunch in the electron beam propagating through it are important parameters that determine the impact of beam loading in the structure. The injector linac of the Compact Ultrafast Terahertz Free-Electron Laser (CUTE-FEL) has been operated with two different pulse structures during initial commissioning experiments and the effect of beam loading on the accelerated electron beam parameters has been studied analytically for these two pulse structures. This paper discusses the analytical study of beam loading in a Standing Wave, Plane Wave Transformer linac employed in the CUTE-FEL setup, and a possible technique for its compensation for the electron beam parameters of the CUTE-FEL. A parametric study has been performed to study beam loading for different beam currents and to optimize injection time of the electron beam to compensate beam loading. Results from the parametric study have also been used to explain previously observed results from acceleration experiments in the CUTE-FEL setup.

  19. SU-E-T-406: Use of TrueBeam Developer Mode and API to Increase the Efficiency and Accuracy of Commissioning Measurements for the Varian EDGE Stereotactic Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, S; Gulam, M; Song, K; Li, H; Huang, Y; Zhao, B; Qin, Y; Snyder, K; Kim, J; Gordon, J; Chetty, I; Wen, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The Varian EDGE machine is a new stereotactic platform, combining Calypso and VisionRT localization systems with a stereotactic linac. The system includes TrueBeam DeveloperMode, making possible the use of XML-scripting for automation of linac-related tasks. This study details the use of DeveloperMode to automate commissioning tasks for Varian EDGE, thereby improving efficiency and measurement consistency. Methods: XML-scripting was used for various commissioning tasks,including couch model verification,beam-scanning,and isocenter verification. For couch measurements, point measurements were acquired for several field sizes (2×2,4×4,10×10cm{sup 2}) at 42 gantry angles for two couch-models. Measurements were acquired with variations in couch position(rails in/out,couch shifted in each of motion axes) compared to treatment planning system(TPS)-calculated values,which were logged automatically through advanced planning interface(API) scripting functionality. For beam scanning, XML-scripts were used to create custom MLC-apertures. For isocenter verification, XML-scripts were used to automate various Winston-Lutz-type tests. Results: For couch measurements, the time required for each set of angles was approximately 9 minutes. Without scripting, each set required approximately 12 minutes. Automated measurements required only one physicist, while manual measurements required at least two physicists to handle linac positions/beams and data recording. MLC apertures were generated outside of the TPS,and with the .xml file format, double-checking without use of TPS/operator console was possible. Similar time efficiency gains were found for isocenter verification measurements Conclusion: The use of XML scripting in TrueBeam DeveloperMode allows for efficient and accurate data acquisition during commissioning. The efficiency improvement is most pronounced for iterative measurements, exemplified by the time savings for couch modeling measurements(approximately 10

  20. Simulation of a 6 MV Elekta Precise Linac photon beam using GATE/GEANT4.

    PubMed

    Grevillot, L; Frisson, T; Maneval, D; Zahra, N; Badel, J-N; Sarrut, D

    2011-02-21

    The GEANT4-based GATE Monte Carlo (MC) platform was initially focused on PET and SPECT simulations. The new release v6.0 (February 2010) proposes new tools dedicated for radiation therapy simulations. In this work, we investigated some part of this extension and proposed a general methodology for Linac simulations. Details of the modeling of a 6 MV photon beam delivered by an Elekta Precise Linac, with radiation fields ranging from 5 × 5 to 30 × 30 cm(2) at the isocenter are presented. Comparisons were performed with measurements in water. The simulations were performed in two stages: first, the patient-independent part was simulated and a phase space (PhS) was built above the secondary collimator. Then, a multiple source model (MSM) derived from the PhS was proposed to simulate the photon fluence interacting with the patient-dependent part. The selective bremsstrahlung splitting (SBS) variance reduction technique proposed in GATE was used in order to speed up the accelerator head simulation. Further investigations showed that the SBS can be safely used without biasing the simulations. Additional comparisons with full simulations performed on the EGEE grid, in a single stage from the electron source to the water phantom, allowed the evaluation of the MSM. The proposed MSM allowed for calculating depth dose and transverse profiles in 48 hours on a single 2.8 GHz CPU, with a statistical uncertainty of 0.8% for a 10 × 10 cm(2) radiation field, using voxels of 5 × 5 × 5 mm(3). Good agreement between simulations and measurements in water was observed, with dose differences of about 1% and 2% for depth doses and dose profiles, respectively. Additional gamma index comparisons were performed; more than 90% of the points for all simulations passed the 3%/3 mm gamma criterion. To our knowledge, this feasibility study is the first one illustrating the potential of GATE for external radiotherapy applications.

  1. Simulation of a 6 MV Elekta Precise Linac photon beam using GATE/GEANT4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevillot, L.; Frisson, T.; Maneval, D.; Zahra, N.; Badel, J.-N.; Sarrut, D.

    2011-02-01

    The GEANT4-based GATE Monte Carlo (MC) platform was initially focused on PET and SPECT simulations. The new release v6.0 (February 2010) proposes new tools dedicated for radiation therapy simulations. In this work, we investigated some part of this extension and proposed a general methodology for Linac simulations. Details of the modeling of a 6 MV photon beam delivered by an Elekta Precise Linac, with radiation fields ranging from 5 × 5 to 30 × 30 cm2 at the isocenter are presented. Comparisons were performed with measurements in water. The simulations were performed in two stages: first, the patient-independent part was simulated and a phase space (PhS) was built above the secondary collimator. Then, a multiple source model (MSM) derived from the PhS was proposed to simulate the photon fluence interacting with the patient-dependent part. The selective bremsstrahlung splitting (SBS) variance reduction technique proposed in GATE was used in order to speed up the accelerator head simulation. Further investigations showed that the SBS can be safely used without biasing the simulations. Additional comparisons with full simulations performed on the EGEE grid, in a single stage from the electron source to the water phantom, allowed the evaluation of the MSM. The proposed MSM allowed for calculating depth dose and transverse profiles in 48 hours on a single 2.8 GHz CPU, with a statistical uncertainty of 0.8% for a 10 × 10 cm2 radiation field, using voxels of 5 × 5 × 5 mm3. Good agreement between simulations and measurements in water was observed, with dose differences of about 1% and 2% for depth doses and dose profiles, respectively. Additional gamma index comparisons were performed; more than 90% of the points for all simulations passed the 3%/3 mm gamma criterion. To our knowledge, this feasibility study is the first one illustrating the potential of GATE for external radiotherapy applications.

  2. The RIA driver linac.

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, K. W.

    2002-09-23

    The driver linac for the U.S. RIA project will be a 1.4 GV superconducting linac capable of accelerating the full mass range of ions from 900 MeV protons to 400 MeV/u uranium, and delivering a cw beam of 400 kW shared by at least two targets simultaneously. Elements of the linac are being developed at several U.S. laboratories. The current status of linac design and development is reviewed with emphasis on changes in the baseline design since the last linac conference.

  3. Some specific features of ionization chamber calibrations in linac x-ray beams at the LNE-LNHB.

    PubMed

    Delaunay, F; Ostrowsky, A

    2007-05-07

    The purpose of this note is to give some details about the modus operandi employed today to calibrate ionization chambers in radiotherapy linac photon beams at the Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel (LNE-LNHB). Some specific features are described: first the equipment (including the external monitoring ionization chambers), second the calculations of the profile or radial non-uniformity correction factors (up to 0.5% effect for commonly used ionization chambers) and finally the calculations to get the calibration coefficients for customer beam qualities.

  4. A very intense neutrino super beam experiment for leptonic CP violation discovery based on the European spallation source linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baussan, E.; Blennow, M.; Bogomilov, M.; Bouquerel, E.; Caretta, O.; Cederkäll, J.; Christiansen, P.; Coloma, P.; Cupial, P.; Danared, H.; Davenne, T.; Densham, C.; Dracos, M.; Ekelöf, T.; Eshraqi, M.; Fernandez Martinez, E.; Gaudiot, G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Koutchouk, J.-P.; Lindroos, M.; Loveridge, P.; Matev, R.; McGinnis, D.; Mezzetto, M.; Miyamoto, R.; Mosca, L.; Ohlsson, T.; Öhman, H.; Osswald, F.; Peggs, S.; Poussot, P.; Ruber, R.; Tang, J. Y.; Tsenov, R.; Vankova-Kirilova, G.; Vassilopoulos, N.; Wilcox, D.; Wildner, E.; Wurtz, J.

    2014-08-01

    Very intense neutrino beams and large neutrino detectors will be needed in order to enable the discovery of CP violation in the leptonic sector. We propose to use the proton linac of the European Spallation Source currently under construction in Lund, Sweden, to deliver, in parallel with the spallation neutron production, a very intense, cost effective and high performance neutrino beam. The baseline program for the European Spallation Source linac is that it will be fully operational at 5 MW average power by 2022, producing 2 GeV 2.86 ms long proton pulses at a rate of 14 Hz. Our proposal is to upgrade the linac to 10 MW average power and 28 Hz, producing 14 pulses/s for neutron production and 14 pulses/s for neutrino production. Furthermore, because of the high current required in the pulsed neutrino horn, the length of the pulses used for neutrino production needs to be compressed to a few μs with the aid of an accumulator ring. A long baseline experiment using this Super Beam and a megaton underground Water Cherenkov detector located in existing mines 300-600 km from Lund will make it possible to discover leptonic CP violation at 5 σ significance level in up to 50% of the leptonic Dirac CP-violating phase range. This experiment could also determine the neutrino mass hierarchy at a significance level of more than 3 σ if this issue will not already have been settled by other experiments by then. The mass hierarchy performance could be increased by combining the neutrino beam results with those obtained from atmospheric neutrinos detected by the same large volume detector. This detector will also be used to measure the proton lifetime, detect cosmological neutrinos and neutrinos from supernova explosions. Results on the sensitivity to leptonic CP violation and the neutrino mass hierarchy are presented.

  5. Upgrade to a programmable timing system for the KOMAC proton linac and multi-purpose beam lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Young-Gi

    2016-09-01

    The KOMAC facility consists of low-energy components, including a 50-keV ion source, a lowenergy beam transport (LEBT), a 3-MeV radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ), and a 20-MeV drift tube linac (DTL), as well as high-energy components, including seven DTL tanks for the 100-MeV proton beam. The KOMAC includes ten beam lines, five for 20-MeV beams and five for 100-MeV beams. The peak beam current and the maximum beam duty are 20 mA and 24% for the 20-MeV linac and 20 mA and 8% for the 100-MeV linac, respectively. Four high-voltage convertor modulators are used. Each modulator drives two or three klystrons. The peak output power is 5.8 MW, and the average power is 520 kW with a duty of 9%. The pulse width and repetition rate are 1.5 ms and 60 Hz, respectively. Each component of the pulsed operation mode has a timing trigger signal with precision synchronization. A timing system for beam extraction and for diagnostic components is required to provide precise pulse signals synchronized with a 300-MHz RF reference frequency. In addition, the timing parameters should be capable of real-time changes in accordance with the beam power. The KOMAC timing system has been upgraded to a programmable Micro Research Finland (MRF) event timing system that is synchronized with the RF, AC main frequency and with the global positioning system (GPS) 1-PPS signal. The event timing system consists of an event generator (EVG) and an event receiver (EVR). The event timing system is integrated with the KOMAC control system by using experimental physics and industrial control system (EPICS) software. For preliminary hardware and software testing, a long operation test with a synchronization of 300-MHz RF reference and 60-Hz AC has been completed successfully. In this paper, we will describe the software implementation, the testing, and the installation of the new timing system.

  6. Automated x-ray/light field congruence using the LINAC EPID panel

    SciTech Connect

    Polak, Wojciech; O'Doherty, Jim; Jones, Matt

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: X-ray/light field alignment is a test described in many guidelines for the routine quality control of clinical linear accelerators (LINAC). Currently, the gold standard method for measuring alignment is through utilization of radiographic film. However, many modern LINACs are equipped with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) that may be used to perform this test and thus subsequently reducing overall cost, processing, and analysis time, removing operator dependency and the requirement to sustain the departmental film processor. Methods: This work describes a novel method of utilizing the EPID together with a custom inhouse designed jig and automatic image processing software allowing measurement of the light field size, x-ray field size, and congruence between them. The authors present results of testing the method for aS1000 and aS500 Varian EPID detectors for six LINACs at a range of energies (6, 10, and 15 MV) in comparison with the results obtained from the use of radiographic film. Results: Reproducibility of the software in fully automatic operation under a range of operating conditions for a single image showed a congruence of 0.01 cm with a coefficient of variation of 0. Slight variation in congruence repeatability was noted through semiautomatic processing by four independent operators due to manual marking of positions on the jig. Testing of the methodology using the automatic method shows a high precision of 0.02 mm compared to a maximum of 0.06 mm determined by film processing. Intraindividual examination of operator measurements of congruence was shown to vary as much as 0.75 mm. Similar congruence measurements of 0.02 mm were also determined for a lower resolution EPID (aS500 model), after rescaling of the image to the aS1000 image size. Conclusions: The designed methodology was proven to be time efficient, cost effective, and at least as accurate as using the gold standard radiographic film. Additionally, congruence testing can be

  7. Multicomponent measurements of the Jefferson Lab energy recovery linac electron beam using optical transition and diffraction radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holloway, M. A.; Fiorito, R. B.; Shkvarunets, A. G.; O'Shea, P. G.; Benson, S. V.; Douglas, D.; Evtushenko, P.; Jordan, K.

    2008-08-01

    High brightness electron accelerators, such as energy recovery linacs (ERL), often have complex particle distributions that can create difficulties in beam transport as well as matching to devices such as wigglers used to generate radiation from the beam. Optical transition radiation (OTR), OTR interferometry (OTRI), and optical diffraction-transition radiation interferometry (ODTRI) have proven to be effective tools for diagnosing both the spatial and angular distributions of charged particle beams. OTRI and ODTRI have been used to measure rms divergences, and optical transverse phase space mapping has been demonstrated using OTRI. In this work we present the results of diagnostic experiments using OTR and optical diffraction radiation conducted at the Jefferson Laboratory’s 115 MeV ERL which show the presence of two separate components within the beam’s spatial and angular distributions. By assuming a correlation between the spatial and angular features, we estimate an rms emittance value for each of the two components.

  8. Measurements and Simulations of Ultra-Low Emittance and Ultra-Short Electron Beams in the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y.; Brachmann, A.; Decker, F.-J.; Dowell, D.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Gilevich, S.; Hays, G.; Hering, Ph.; Huang, Z.; Iverson, R.; Loos, H.; Miahnahri, A.; Nuhn, H.-D.; Ratner, D.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; White, W.; Wu, J.; /SLAC

    2009-02-03

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is an x-ray Free-Electron Laser (FEL) project presently in a commissioning phase at SLAC. We report here on very low emittance measurements made at low bunch charge, and a few femtosecond bunch length produced by the LCLS bunch compressors. Start-to-end simulations associated with these beam parameters show the possibilities of generating hundreds of GW at 1.5 {angstrom} x-ray wavelength and nearly a single longitudinally spike at 1.5 nm with 2-fs duration.

  9. Predictive time-series modeling using artificial neural networks for Linac beam symmetry: an empirical study.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiongge; Chan, Maria F

    2017-01-01

    Over half of cancer patients receive radiotherapy (RT) as partial or full cancer treatment. Daily quality assurance (QA) of RT in cancer treatment closely monitors the performance of the medical linear accelerator (Linac) and is critical for continuous improvement of patient safety and quality of care. Cumulative longitudinal QA measurements are valuable for understanding the behavior of the Linac and allow physicists to identify trends in the output and take preventive actions. In this study, artificial neural networks (ANNs) and autoregressive moving average (ARMA) time-series prediction modeling techniques were both applied to 5-year daily Linac QA data. Verification tests and other evaluations were then performed for all models. Preliminary results showed that ANN time-series predictive modeling has more advantages over ARMA techniques for accurate and effective applicability in the dosimetry and QA field.

  10. Automated beam steering using optimal control

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, C. K.

    2004-01-01

    We present a steering algorithm which, with the aid of a model, allows the user to specify beam behavior throughout a beamline, rather than just at specified beam position monitor (BPM) locations. The model is used primarily to compute the values of the beam phase vectors from BPM measurements, and to define cost functions that describe the steering objectives. The steering problem is formulated as constrained optimization problem; however, by applying optimal control theory we can reduce it to an unconstrained optimization whose dimension is the number of control signals.

  11. Effect of high current electron beam in a 30 MeV radio frequency linac for neutron-time-of-flight applications

    SciTech Connect

    Nayak, B. Acharya, S.; Rajawat, R. K.; DasGupta, K.

    2016-01-15

    A high power pulsed radio frequency electron linac is designed by BARC, India to accelerate 30 MeV, 10 A, 10 ns beam for neutron-time-of-flight applications. It will be used as a neutron generator and will produce ∼10{sup 12}–10{sup 13} n/s. It is essential to reduce the beam instability caused by space charge effect and the beam cavity interaction. In this paper, the wakefield losses in the accelerating section due to bunch of RMS (Root mean square) length 2 mm (at the gun exit) is analysed. Loss and kick factors are numerically calculated using CST wakefield solver. Both the longitudinal and transverse wake potentials are incorporated in beam dynamics code ELEGANT to find the transverse emittance growth of the beam propagating through the linac. Beam loading effect is examined by means of numerical computation carried out in ASTRA code. Beam break up start current has been estimated at the end of the linac which arises due to deflecting modes excited by the high current beam. At the end, transverse beam dynamics of such high current beam has been analysed.

  12. Effect of high current electron beam in a 30 MeV radio frequency linac for neutron-time-of-flight applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, B.; Acharya, S.; Rajawat, R. K.; DasGupta, K.

    2016-01-01

    A high power pulsed radio frequency electron linac is designed by BARC, India to accelerate 30 MeV, 10 A, 10 ns beam for neutron-time-of-flight applications. It will be used as a neutron generator and will produce ˜1012-1013 n/s. It is essential to reduce the beam instability caused by space charge effect and the beam cavity interaction. In this paper, the wakefield losses in the accelerating section due to bunch of RMS (Root mean square) length 2 mm (at the gun exit) is analysed. Loss and kick factors are numerically calculated using CST wakefield solver. Both the longitudinal and transverse wake potentials are incorporated in beam dynamics code ELEGANT to find the transverse emittance growth of the beam propagating through the linac. Beam loading effect is examined by means of numerical computation carried out in ASTRA code. Beam break up start current has been estimated at the end of the linac which arises due to deflecting modes excited by the high current beam. At the end, transverse beam dynamics of such high current beam has been analysed.

  13. BNS Profiles and Sensitivity of Beam Orbit of the NLC Linac(LCC-0012)

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G

    2004-04-22

    Using the computer program LIAR we simulate different BNS regimes in the main NLC linac. The energy overhead for each regime is determined, and both the orbit sensitivity for a small quadrupole offset, and ATL-type ground motion are calculated. A single bunch emittance growth caused by initial offset, slope and tilt of the bunch is also simulated.

  14. Designing self-matching linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, R.S.; Crandall, K.R.; Farrell, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The present trend in ion-linac design is to begin with a radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac followed by one or more drift-tube linac (DTL) tanks in which permanent-magnet quadrupoles are used for transverse focusing. The lack of adjustable elements (knobs) strongly suggests that one should seek linac designs with intertank matching solutions that are insensitive to beam currents and emittances, which can be accomplished if there are no sharp discontinuities in the focusing properties along the entire linac. Guidelines are presented for linac design and describe techniques for longitudinal as well as transverse matching between tanks. For a wide range of beam currents and emittances, a beam matched at the entrance to the RFQ should remain well matched throughout the entire linac.

  15. Applications of linac-mounted kilovoltage Cone-beam Computed Tomography in modern radiation therapy: A review

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Kavitha; Mohammadi, Mohammad; Shepherd, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Summary The use of Cone-beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) in radiotherapy is increasing due to the widespread implementation of kilovoltage systems on the currently available linear accelerators. Cone beam CT acts as an effective Image-Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT) tool for the verification of patient position. It also opens up the possibility of real-time re-optimization of treatment plans for Adaptive Radiotherapy (ART). This paper reviews the most prominent applications of CBCT (linac-mounted) in radiation therapy, focusing on CBCT-based planning and dose calculation studies. This is followed by a concise review of the main issues associated with CBCT, such as imaging artifacts, dose and image quality. It explores how medical physicists and oncologists can best apply CBCT for therapeutic applications. PMID:25006356

  16. MO-FG-303-01: FEATURED PRESENTATION and BEST IN PHYSICS (THERAPY): Automating LINAC QA: Design and Testing of An Image Acquisition and Processing System Utilizing a Combination of Radioluminescent Phosphors, Embedded X-Ray Markers and Optical Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, C; Naczynski, D; Yu, S; Xing, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The recent development of phosphors to visualize radiation beams from linear accelerators (LINAC) offers a unique opportunity for evaluating radiation fields within the context of the treatment space. The purpose of this study was to establish an automated, self-calibrating prototype system for performing quality assurance (QA) measurements. Methods: A thin layer of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Tb phosphor and fiducial markers were embedded on several planar faces of a custom-designed phantom. The phantom was arbitrarily placed near iso-center on the couch of a LINAC equipped with on-board megavoltage (MV) and kilovoltage (kV) imagers. A plan consisting of several beams and integrated image acquisitions was delivered. Images of the phantom were collected throughout the delivery. Salient features, such as fiducials, crosshairs and beam edges were then extracted from these images used to calibrate the system, adjust for variations in phantom placement, and perform measurements. Beam edges were visualized by imaging the light generated by the phosphor on the phantom enabling direct comparison with the light field and laser locations. Registration of MV, kV and optical image data was performed using the embedded fiducial markers, enabling comparison of imaging center locations. Measurements specified by TG-142 were calculated and compared with those obtained from a commercially available QA system. Results: The system was able to automatically extract the location of the fiducials, lasers, light field and radiation field from the acquired images regardless of phantom positioning. It was also able to automatically identify the locations of fiducial markers on kV and MV images. All collected measurements were within TG-142 guidelines. The difference between the prototype and commercially available system were less than 0.2 mm. Conclusion: The prototype system demonstrated the capability of accurately and autonomously evaluating various TG-142 parameters independent of

  17. Local compensation-rematch for major element failures in superconducting linacs with very high reliability and low beam loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Biao; Tang, Jingyu; Yan, Fang; Li, Zhihui; Meng, Cai; Pei, Shilun

    2015-06-01

    In order to achieve the extremely high reliability and availability in superconducting linacs required by some applications such as in accelerator-driven systems (ADS), a fault tolerance design is usually pursued. With the example of the China-ADS main linac, the failure effects of key elements such as RF cavities and focusing elements in different locations along the linac have been studied and the schemes of compensation by means of the local compensation-rematch method have been proposed. For cavity failures, by adjusting the settings of the neighboring cavities and focusing elements one can make sure that the Twiss parameters and beam energy are recovered to the nominal ones at the matching point. For solenoid failures in the low energy section, a novel method by using a neighbor cavity with reverse phase is used to maintain simultaneous acceleration and focusing in both the transverse and longitudinal phase planes. For quadrupole failures in the warm transitions in the high energy section, triplet focusing structure is adopted which can be converted locally into a doublet focusing in case of one quadrupole failure and the rematch method is proven very effective. With macro-particle simulations by TraceWin, it is found that the normalized rms emittance has no obvious growth and the halo emittance has modest growth after applying the local compensation-rematch in the cases mentioned above. In addition, a self-made code based on MATLAB has been developed to double check the simulations by TraceWin for the local compensation and rematch method.

  18. Beam dynamics and longitudinal instabilities in heavy ion fusion induction linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.P.

    1992-08-01

    An induction linac accelerating a high-current pulse of heavy ions at subrelativistic velocities is predicted to exhibit unstable growth of current fluctuations. An overview is given of the mode character, estimates of growth rates, and their application to an IFE driver. The present and projected effort to understand and ameliorate the instability is described. This includes particle-in-cell simulations, calculation and measurements of impedance, and design of feedback controls.

  19. Design flow automation for variable-shaped beam pattern generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloecker, Martin; Ballhorn, Gerd

    2002-07-01

    Raster scan pattern generators have been used in the photomask industry for many years. Methods and software tools for data preparation for these pattern generators are well established and have been integrated into design flows with a high degree of automation. But the growing requirements for pattern fidelity have lead to the introduction of 50 kV variable shaped beam pattern generators. Due to their different writing strategy these tools use proprietary data formats and in turn require an optimized data preparation. As a result the existing design flow has to be adopted to account for these requirements. Due to the fact that cycle times have grown severely over the last years the automation of this adopted design flow will not only enhance the design flow quality by avoiding errors during manual operations but will also help to reduce turn-around times. We developed and implemented an automated design flow for a variable shaped beam pattern generator which had to fulfill two conflicting requirements: Well established automated tools originally developed for raster scan pattern generators had to be retained with only slight modifications to avoid the (re)implementation and the concurrent usage of two systems while on the other hand data generation especially during fracturing had to be optimized for a variable shaped beam pattern generator.

  20. The Proposed NLC Linac LLRF System

    SciTech Connect

    Corredoura, Paul L.

    2000-07-07

    The proposed Next Linear Collider (NLC) contains linac systems operating at L,S,C, and X band. This paper describes a wideband modular low-level RF (LLRF) system applicable for all NLC pulsed RF systems. High speed digital IF techniques are used for both arbitrary klystron drive modulation and accurate RF vector detection. Measurement of relative beam to RF phase, beam loading compensation, and structure dipole modes for automated alignment are all handled by the system. Modern signal processing techniques are also described.

  1. Poster — Thur Eve — 55: An automated XML technique for isocentre verification on the Varian TrueBeam

    SciTech Connect

    Asiev, Krum; Mullins, Joel; DeBlois, François; Liang, Liheng; Syme, Alasdair

    2014-08-15

    Isocentre verification tests, such as the Winston-Lutz (WL) test, have gained popularity in the recent years as techniques such as stereotactic radiosurgery/radiotherapy (SRS/SRT) treatments are more commonly performed on radiotherapy linacs. These highly conformal treatments require frequent monitoring of the geometrical accuracy of the isocentre to ensure proper radiation delivery. At our clinic, the WL test is performed by acquiring with the EPID a collection of 8 images of a WL phantom fixed on the couch for various couch/gantry angles. This set of images is later analyzed to determine the isocentre size. The current work addresses the acquisition process. A manual WL test acquisition performed by and experienced physicist takes in average 25 minutes and is prone to user manipulation errors. We have automated this acquisition on a Varian TrueBeam STx linac (Varian, Palo Alto, USA). The Varian developer mode allows the execution of custom-made XML script files to control all aspects of the linac operation. We have created an XML-WL script that cycles through each couch/gantry combinations taking an EPID image at each position. This automated acquisition is done in less than 4 minutes. The reproducibility of the method was verified by repeating the execution of the XML file 5 times. The analysis of the images showed variation of the isocenter size less than 0.1 mm along the X, Y and Z axes and compares favorably to a manual acquisition for which we typically observe variations up to 0.5 mm.

  2. CSNS LINAC DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    FU, S.; FANG, S.; WEI, J.

    2006-08-21

    China Spallation Neutron Source has been approved in principle by the Chinese government. CSNS can provide a beam power of 100kW on the target in the first phase, and then 200kW in the second phase. The accelerator complex of CSNS consists of an H- linac of 81MeV and a rapid cycling synchrotron of 1.6GeV at 25Hz repetition rate. In the second phase, the linac energy will be upgraded to 132MeV and the average current will be doubled. The linac has been designed, and some R&D studies have started under the support from Chinese Academy of Sciences. The linac comprises a H- ion source, an RFQ and a conventional DTL with EMQs. This paper will present our major design results and some progresses in the R&D of the linac.

  3. Summary of Working Group 7, Part II: Linac protection and collimation of megawatt micron sized 250--500 GeV electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, J.

    1992-11-01

    The average beam powers and beam size anticipated for next generation linear colliders make them awesome tools of destruction. Systems for protection will be crucial. A scheme for linac structure protection by sacrificial collimators is presented in Section 3. No matter what precautionary measures are taken, the tails of the beam will be populated by hard coulomb collisions along the linac. To remove these halos before reaching the final focus system optics, where particle showers can blind the detector, it will be necessary to collimate these beams. Section 5 discusses the equations governing the parameters of a conventional collimation system. Wakefields determine gap sizes and lattice functions. Materials properties dictate minimum beam sizes at collimators so they can withstand occasionally mis-steered beams. Spoiler scattering and edge scattering effects mandate that the final doublet phase be collimated twice, and depending on the results of further tracking studies, it may be necessary to collimate each phase two times. Section 6 describes a nonlinear collimation system that can collimate beams to smaller apertures than the conventional system. The tolerances for such systems resemble final focus tolerances. Section T addresses the problem of repopulation of the tails after the collimation system. The main conclusions are that it appears possible to collimate the beams for these machines with conventional passively protected collimation systems. However the length of present designs, which collimate energy and both transverse planes and meet the requirements of complete tail scraping, exceed one kilometer per linac. A collimation system may also be desirable at the low energy end of the linac to minimize collimation of high energy particles.

  4. Automating the E-Beam Laser Laboratory.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-30

    system is set to a suitable acceleratin g voltage, and depression of a “fire ” button causes the Marx generator to erect and energetic electrons to...9002 JAN. 2,1979 TEST TIME 900 PAGE 1 E—BEAM PARAMETERS SW I TCH PRESSURES DIODE AREA • 10 BY 100 CM TRICATRON • 37.~~586 PSIA N2 A-K GAP — 2 CM MARX ...PRESS1JRES” ’TA8(1.5)~ ”0IODE AREA — “;H;” BY “;I.;” cM”1705 9” TRIGATRON — ‘,.fl.” PSIA N2”~ TAB (1e5) ”A—K GAP — “;H2 ; ” CM”1710 9” MARX

  5. Calculation of Nuclear Particles Production at High-Energy Photon Beams from a Linac Operating at 6, 10 and 15 MV.

    PubMed

    Marchesini, Renato; Bettega, Daniela; Calzolari, Paola; Pignoli, Emanuele

    2016-08-13

    Production of photonuclear particles in a tissue-equivalent medium has been calculated for linacs at 6, 10 and 15 MV from Varian TrueBeam. Based on the knowledge of bremsstrahlung fluence spectra and linac photon beam parameters, numerical integration was performed on the cross sections for photoparticle production of the constituent elements of tissue ((2)H,(12)C,(13)C,(16)O,(17)O,(18)O,(14)N,(15)N). At 15 MV, at the depth of photon maximum dose, the total absorbed dose due to neutrons, protons, alphas and residual nuclei from photon reactions in tissue (5.5E-05 Gy per Gy of photons) is comparable to that due to neutrons from accelerator head. Results reasonably agree with data reported in the literature using Monte Carlo models simulating linac head components. This work suggests a simple method to estimate the dose contributed by the photon-induced nuclear particles for high-energy photon beams produced by linacs in use, as it might be relevant for late stochastic effects.

  6. Lattice Design for the LHEC Recirculating Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yipeng; Eide, Anders; Zimmermann, Frank; Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC

    2011-05-20

    In this paper, we present a lattice design for the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC) recirculating linac. The recirculating linac consists of one roughly 3-km long linac hosting superconducting RF (SRF) accelerating cavities, two arcs and one transfer line for the recirculation. In two passes through a pulsed SRF linac the electron beam can get a maximum energy of 140 GeV. Alternatively, in the Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) option the beam passes through a CW linac four times (two passes for acceleration and two for deceleration) for a maximum energy of 60 GeV.

  7. Engineering of automated assembly of beam-shaping optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haag, Sebastian; Sinhoff, Volker; Müller, Tobias; Brecher, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Beam-shaping is essential for any kind of laser application. Assembly technologies for beam-shaping subassemblies are subject to intense research and development activities and their technical feasibility has been proven in recent years while economic viability requires more efficient engineering tools for process planning and production ramp up of complex assembly tasks for micro-optical systems. The work presented in this paper aims for significant reduction of process development and production ramp up times for the automated assembly of micro-optical subassemblies for beam-collimation and beam-tilting. The approach proposed bridges the gap between the product development phase and the realization of automation control through integration of established software tools such as optics simulation and CAD modeling as well as through introduction of novel software tools and methods to efficiently describe active alignment strategies. The focus of the paper is put on the methodological approach regarding the engineering of assembly processes for beam-shaping micro-optics and the formal representation of assembly objectives similar to representation in mechanical assemblies. Main topic of the paper is the engineering methodology for active alignment processes based on the classification of optical functions for beam-shaping optics and corresponding standardized measurement setups including adaptable alignment algorithms. The concepts are applied to industrial use-cases: (1) integrated collimation module for fast- and slow-axis and (2) beam-tilting subassembly consisting of a fast-axis collimator and micro-lens array. The paper concludes with an overview of current limitations as well as an outlook on the next development steps considering adhesive bonding processes.

  8. Special SLC linac developments

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, J.T.; Sheppard, J.C.

    1986-04-01

    The linac of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) is required to accelerate several intense electron and positron bunches to high energy while maintaining their small transverse dimensions and energy spectra. Many of the linac systems have been upgraded to the new stringent SLC design criteria. The remaining systems will be completed in the summer of 1986. Special instruments and controls have been developed to monitor and manipulate these small but potent beams. A brief review of the SLC requirements is given. A broad survey of the recent development is made encompassing longitudinal and transverse wakefield reductions, Landau damping, energy and position feedback systems, beam diagnostic and beam current fluctuations.

  9. Microwave Quadrupoles for Beam Break-Up Suppression in the NLC Main Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, Karl LF

    2001-10-03

    This is a preliminary study of the effect of using microwave quads (MQ's) instead of rf phase shifting to induce BNS damping in the main linac of the NLC collider. We consider MQ's running at X-band, and find that the total length of MQ's needed for the NLC is 6% of the total length of the accelerating structures. We show through simulations that, by using MQ's instead of phase shifting for BNS damping, the quad alignment tolerances can be relaxed but at the expense of shifting the tight tolerances to the MQ's; this can be advantageous if the MQ's can be better aligned than the quads. For the design final energy spread in the NLC of .3%, the quad tolerances are loosened by a factor of 2-3 when using MQ's. These tolerances can be loosened by an additional factor of 1.5, but at the cost of 1.7% in energy overhead.

  10. Automated planning of breast radiotherapy using cone beam CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Amit, Guy; Purdie, Thomas G.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Develop and clinically validate a methodology for using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging in an automated treatment planning framework for breast IMRT. Methods: A technique for intensity correction of CBCT images was developed and evaluated. The technique is based on histogram matching of CBCT image sets, using information from “similar” planning CT image sets from a database of paired CBCT and CT image sets (n = 38). Automated treatment plans were generated for a testing subset (n = 15) on the planning CT and the corrected CBCT. The plans generated on the corrected CBCT were compared to the CT-based plans in terms of beam parameters, dosimetric indices, and dose distributions. Results: The corrected CBCT images showed considerable similarity to their corresponding planning CTs (average mutual information 1.0±0.1, average sum of absolute differences 185 ± 38). The automated CBCT-based plans were clinically acceptable, as well as equivalent to the CT-based plans with average gantry angle difference of 0.99°±1.1°, target volume overlap index (Dice) of 0.89±0.04 although with slightly higher maximum target doses (4482±90 vs 4560±84, P < 0.05). Gamma index analysis (3%, 3 mm) showed that the CBCT-based plans had the same dose distribution as plans calculated with the same beams on the registered planning CTs (average gamma index 0.12±0.04, gamma <1 in 99.4%±0.3%). Conclusions: The proposed method demonstrates the potential for a clinically feasible and efficient online adaptive breast IMRT planning method based on CBCT imaging, integrating automation.

  11. Electron Cloud Effects in Intense, Ion Beam Linacs Theory and Experimental Planning for HIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molvik, A. W.; Cohen, R. H.; Lund, S. M.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Lee, E. P.

    2002-05-01

    Heavy-ion accelerators for HIF will operate at high aperture-fill factors with high beam current and long pulses. This will lead to beam ions impacting walls: liberating gas molecules and secondary electrons. Theory and particle-in-cell simulations suggest that electrons, from ionization of residual and desorbed gas and secondary electrons from vacuum walls, will be radially trapped in the approximately 4 kV ion beam potential. Diagnostics are being developed tto measure the energy and flux of electrons and gas evolved from walls, and the net charge and gas density within magnetic quadrupoles, as well as their effect on the ion beam.

  12. Simulation of the 6 MV Elekta Synergy Platform linac photon beam using Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission.

    PubMed

    Didi, Samir; Moussa, Abdelilah; Yahya, Tayalati; Mustafa, Zerfaoui

    2015-01-01

    The present work validates the Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission Monte Carlo software for the simulation of a 6 MV photon beam given by Elekta Synergy Platform medical linear accelerator treatment head. The simulation includes the major components of the linear accelerator (LINAC) with multi-leaf collimator and a homogeneous water phantom. Calculations were performed for the photon beam with several treatment field sizes ranging from 5 cm × 5 cm to 30 cm × 30 cm at 100 cm distance from the source. The simulation was successfully validated by comparison with experimental distributions. Good agreement between simulations and measurements was observed, with dose differences of about 0.02% and 2.5% for depth doses and lateral dose profiles, respectively. This agreement was also emphasized by the Kolmogorov-Smirnov goodness-of-fit test and by the gamma-index comparisons where more than 99% of the points for all simulations fulfill the quality assurance criteria of 2 mm/2%.

  13. Photo neutron dose equivalent rate in 15 MV X-ray beam from a Siemens Primus Linac.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, A; Pourfallah, T Allahverdi; Akbari, M R; Babapour, H; Shahidi, M

    2015-01-01

    Fast and thermal neutron fluence rates from a 15 MV X-ray beams of a Siemens Primus Linac were measured using bare and moderated BF3 proportional counter inside the treatment room at different locations. Fluence rate values were converted to dose equivalent rate (DER) utilizing conversion factors of American Association of Physicist in Medicine's (AAPM) report number 19. For thermal neutrons, maximum and minimum DERs were 3.46 × 10(-6) (3 m from isocenter in +Y direction, 0 × 0 field size) and 8.36 × 10(-8) Sv/min (in maze, 40 × 40 field size), respectively. For fast neutrons, maximum DERs using 9" and 3" moderators were 1.6 × 10(-5) and 1.74 × 10(-5) Sv/min (2 m from isocenter in +Y direction, 0 × 0 field size), respectively. By changing the field size, the variation in thermal neutron DER was more than the fast neutron DER and the changes in fast neutron DER were not significant in the bunker except inside the radiation field. This study showed that at all points and distances, by decreasing field size of the beam, thermal and fast neutron DER increases and the number of thermal neutrons is more than fast neutrons.

  14. Simulation of the 6 MV Elekta Synergy Platform linac photon beam using Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission

    PubMed Central

    Didi, Samir; Moussa, Abdelilah; Yahya, Tayalati; Mustafa, Zerfaoui

    2015-01-01

    The present work validates the Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission Monte Carlo software for the simulation of a 6 MV photon beam given by Elekta Synergy Platform medical linear accelerator treatment head. The simulation includes the major components of the linear accelerator (LINAC) with multi-leaf collimator and a homogeneous water phantom. Calculations were performed for the photon beam with several treatment field sizes ranging from 5 cm × 5 cm to 30 cm × 30 cm at 100 cm distance from the source. The simulation was successfully validated by comparison with experimental distributions. Good agreement between simulations and measurements was observed, with dose differences of about 0.02% and 2.5% for depth doses and lateral dose profiles, respectively. This agreement was also emphasized by the Kolmogorov–Smirnov goodness-of-fit test and by the gamma-index comparisons where more than 99% of the points for all simulations fulfill the quality assurance criteria of 2 mm/2%. PMID:26500399

  15. Control of energy sweep and transverse beam motion in induction linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, W. C.

    1991-05-01

    Recent interest in the electron induction accelerator has focussed on its application as a driver for high power radiation sources; free electron laser (FEL), relativistic klystron (RK) and cyclotron autoresonance maser (CARM). In the microwave regime where many successful experiments have been carried out, typical beam parameters are: beam energy 1 to 10 MeV, current 1 to 3 kA and pulse width 50 nsec. Radiation source applications impose conditions on electron beam quality, as characterized by three parameters; energy sweep, transverse beam motion and brightness. These conditions must be maintained for the full pulse duration to assure high efficiency conversion of beam power to radiation. The microwave FEL that has been analyzed in the greatest detail requires energy sweep less than (+ or -) 1 pct., transverse beam motion less than (+ or -) 1 mm and brightness approx. 1 x 10(exp 8)A/sq m sq rad. In the visible region the requirements on these parameters become roughly an order of magnitude more strigent. With the ETAII accelerator at LLNL the requirements were achieved for energy sweep, transverse beam motion and brightness. The recent data and the advances that have made the improved beam quality possible are discussed. The most important advances are: understanding of focussing magnetic field errors and improvements in alignment of the magnetic axis, a redesign of the high voltage pulse distribution system between the magnetic compression modulators and the accelerator cells, and exploitation of a beam tuning algorithm for minimizing transverse beam motion. The prospects are briefly described for increasing the pulse repetition frequency to the range of 5 kHz and a delayed feedback method of regulating beam energy over very long pulse bursts, thus making average power megawatt level microwave sources at 140 GHz and above a possibility.

  16. Automation of the electron-beam welding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koleva, E.; Dzharov, V.; Kardjiev, M.; Mladenov, G.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, the automatic control is considered of the vacuum and cooling systems of the located in the IE-BAS equipment for electron-beam welding, evaporation and surface modification. A project was elaborated for the control and management based on the development of an engineering support system using existing and additional technical means of automation. Optimization of the indicators, which are critical for the duration of reaching the working regime and stopping the operation of the installation, can be made using experimentally obtained transient characteristics. The automation of the available equipment aimed at improving its efficiency and the repeatability of the obtained results, as well as at stabilizing the process parameters, should be integrated in an Engineering Support System which, besides the operator supervision, consists of several subsystems for equipment control, data acquisition, information analysis, system management and decision-making support.

  17. Beam-Based Alignment of the NLC Main Linac, Part One: Single-Bunch Comparative Study of Three Algorithms(LCC-0013)

    SciTech Connect

    Tenenbaum, P

    2004-04-20

    We describe the results of a series of simulation studies of beam-based alignment of the NLC main linacs using the program LIAR. Three algorithms for alignment of quadrupoles and girders are considered: the algorithm used in the ZDR, the ZDR algorithm combined with a post-alignment MICADO operation, and an algorithm which requires no steering dipoles but requires twice as many alignment segments per linac as the ZDR algorithm. The third algorithm appears to be the most robust, based on convergence time, required quad mover step sizes, and variation in extracted beam emittance as a function of BNS profile. We also study the effect of structure BPM resolution and ATL misalignments during the alignment process.

  18. Measured and Monte Carlo simulated electron backscatter to the monitor chamber for the Varian TrueBeam Linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Samantha A. M.; Gagne, Isabelle M.; Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena; Zavgorodni, Sergei

    2016-12-01

    To accurately simulate therapeutic electron beams using Monte Carlo methods, backscatter from jaws into the monitor chamber must be accounted for via the backscatter factor, S b. Measured and simulated values of S b for the TrueBeam are investigated. Two approaches for measuring S b are presented. Both require service mode operation with the dose and pulse forming networking servos turned off in order to assess changes in dose rate with field size. The first approach samples an instantaneous dose rate, while the second approach times the delivery of a fixed number of monitor units to assess dose rate. Dose rates were measured for 6, 12 and 20 MeV electrons for jaw- or MLC-shaped apertures between 1× 1 and 40× 40 cm2. The measurement techniques resulted in values of S b that agreed within 0.21% for square and asymmetric fields collimated by the jaws. Measured values of S b were used to calculate the forward dose component in a virtual monitor chamber using BEAMnrc. Based on this forward component, simulated values of S b were calculated and compared to measurement and Varian’s VirtuaLinac simulations. BEAMnrc results for jaw-shaped fields agreed with measurements and with VirtuaLinac simulations within 0.2%. For MLC-shaped fields, the respective measurement techniques differed by as much as 0.41% and BEAMnrc results differed with measurement by as much as 0.4%, however, all measured and simulated values agreed within experimental uncertainty. Measurement sensitivity was not sufficient to capture the small backscatter effect due to the MLC, and Monte Carlo predicted backscatter from the MLC to be no more than 0.3%. Backscatter from the jaws changed the electron dose rate by up to 2.6%. This reinforces the importance of including a backscatter factor in simulations of electron fields shaped with secondary collimating jaws, but presents the option of ignoring it when jaws are retracted and collimation is done with the MLC.

  19. SU-E-T-624: Portal Dosimetry Commissioning of Multiple (6) Varian TrueBeam Linacs Equipped with PortalVision DMI MV Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Weldon, M; DiCostanzo, D; Grzetic, S; Hessler, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To show that a single model for Portal Domisetry (PD) can be established for beam-matched TrueBeam™ linacs that are equipped with the DMI imager (43×43cm effective area). Methods: Our department acquired 6 new TrueBeam™s, 4 “Slim” and 2 “Edge” models. The Slims were equipped with 6 and 10MV photons, and the Edges with 6MV. MLCs differed between the Slims and Edges (Millennium 120 vs HD-MLC respectively). PD model was created from data acquired using a single linac (Slim). This includes maximum field size profile, as well as output factors and acquired measured fluence using the DMI imager. All identical linacs were beam-matched, profiles were within 1% at maximum field size at a variety of depths. The profile correction file was generated from 40×40 profile acquired at 5cm depth, 95cm SSD, and was adjusted for deviation at the field edges and corners. The PD model and profile correction was applied to all six TrueBeam™s and imagers. A variety of jaw only and sliding window (SW) MLC test fields, as well as TG-119 and clinical SW and VMAT plans were run on each linac to validate the model. Results: For 6X and 10X, field by field comparison using 3mm/3% absolute gamma criteria passed 90% or better for all cases. This was also true for composite comparisons of TG-199 and clinical plans, matching our current department criteria. Conclusion: Using a single model per photon energy for PD for the TrueBeam™ equipped with a DMI imager can produce clinically acceptable results across multiple identical and matched linacs. It is also possible to use the same PD model despite different MLCs. This can save time during commissioning and software updates.

  20. Fully automated production of iodine-124 using a vertical beam.

    PubMed

    Nagatsu, Kotaro; Fukada, Masami; Minegishi, Katsuyuki; Suzuki, Hisashi; Fukumura, Toshimitsu; Yamazaki, Hiromichi; Suzuki, Kazutoshi

    2011-01-01

    A fully automated system for the production of iodine-124, based on techniques of vertical-beam irradiation and dry distillation, was developed. The system, coupled with a capsulated target, was able to irradiate the (124)TeO(2) target up to 29 μA for 1-4h, which yielded iodine-124 with an almost constant yield of 6.9 MBq/μAh at the end of bombardment. All procedures were performed automatically and repeatedly. The newly developed system would be suitable for routine, large-scale productions of iodine-124.

  1. A semianalytical method for the design of a linac x-ray beam flattening filter.

    PubMed

    Flock, S T; Shragge, P C

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to design an improved flattening filter for a Therac 20 medical linear accelerator. Profiles of the 18-MV x-ray beam produced by this accelerator measured along the diagonal of a 40 X 40 cm field at a depth of 5 cm were measured, and it was found that there were regions near the corners of the field where the dose was 109% of the central axis dose. An iterative algorithm for designing flattening filters was developed which required, as input, precise measurements of the following data: the unflattened primary beam profile, the fraction of the beam due to contamination radiation arising from interactions of primary photons with the flattening filter and the collimator assemblies, and the attenuation of the primary photons in water and lead as a function of angle from the central axis of the beam. A new flattening filter was designed and profiles of the beam were measured at a number of depths. These measurements showed that the beam was flattened to within +/- 1% out to 24 cm along the diagonal of a 40 X 40 cm field at a depth of 5 cm.

  2. Study on transient beam loading compensation for China ADS proton linac injector II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zheng; He, Yuan; Wang, Xian-Wu; Chang, Wei; Zhang, Rui-Feng; Zhu, Zheng-Long; Zhang, Sheng-Hu; Chen, Qi; Powers, Tom

    2016-05-01

    Significant transient beam loading effects were observed during beam commissioning tests of prototype II of the injector for the accelerator driven sub-critical (ADS) system, which took place at the Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, between October and December 2014. During these tests experiments were performed with continuous wave (CW) operation of the cavities with pulsed beam current, and the system was configured to make use of a prototype digital low level radio frequency (LLRF) controller. The system was originally operated in pulsed mode with a simple proportional plus integral and deviation (PID) feedback control algorithm, which was not able to maintain the desired gradient regulation during pulsed 10 mA beam operations. A unique simple transient beam loading compensation method which made use of a combination of proportional and integral (PI) feedback and feedforward control algorithm was implemented in order to significantly reduce the beam induced transient effect in the cavity gradients. The superconducting cavity field variation was reduced to less than 1.7% after turning on this control algorithm. The design and experimental results of this system are presented in this paper. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (91426303, 11525523)

  3. TH-E-BRE-09: TrueBeam Monte Carlo Absolute Dose Calculations Using Monitor Chamber Backscatter Simulations and Linac-Logged Target Current

    SciTech Connect

    A, Popescu I; Lobo, J; Sawkey, D; Svatos, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To simulate and measure radiation backscattered into the monitor chamber of a TrueBeam linac; establish a rigorous framework for absolute dose calculations for TrueBeam Monte Carlo (MC) simulations through a novel approach, taking into account the backscattered radiation and the actual machine output during beam delivery; improve agreement between measured and simulated relative output factors. Methods: The ‘monitor backscatter factor’ is an essential ingredient of a well-established MC absolute dose formalism (the MC equivalent of the TG-51 protocol). This quantity was determined for the 6 MV, 6X FFF, and 10X FFF beams by two independent Methods: (1) MC simulations in the monitor chamber of the TrueBeam linac; (2) linac-generated beam record data for target current, logged for each beam delivery. Upper head MC simulations used a freelyavailable manufacturer-provided interface to a cloud-based platform, allowing use of the same head model as that used to generate the publicly-available TrueBeam phase spaces, without revealing the upper head design. The MC absolute dose formalism was expanded to allow direct use of target current data. Results: The relation between backscatter, number of electrons incident on the target for one monitor unit, and MC absolute dose was analyzed for open fields, as well as a jaw-tracking VMAT plan. The agreement between the two methods was better than 0.15%. It was demonstrated that the agreement between measured and simulated relative output factors improves across all field sizes when backscatter is taken into account. Conclusion: For the first time, simulated monitor chamber dose and measured target current for an actual TrueBeam linac were incorporated in the MC absolute dose formalism. In conjunction with the use of MC inputs generated from post-delivery trajectory-log files, the present method allows accurate MC dose calculations, without resorting to any of the simplifying assumptions previously made in the TrueBeam

  4. Electron Cloud Effects in Intense, Ion Beam Linacs Theory and Experimental Planning for HIF

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A W; Cohen, R H; Lund, S M; Bieniosek, F M; Lee, E P; Prost, L R; Seidl, P A; Vay, P-A

    2002-05-23

    Heavy-ion accelerators for heavy-ion inertial fusion energy (HIF) will operate at high aperture-fill factors with high beam current and long durations. (Injected currents of order 1 A and 20 {micro}s at a few MeV for each of {approx}100 beams, will be compressed to the order of 100 A and 0.2 {micro}s, reaching GeV energies in a power plant driver.) This will be accompanied by beam ions impacting walls, liberating gas molecules and secondary electrons. Without special preparation, the {approx}10% electron population predicted for driver-scale experiments will affect beam transport; but wall conditioning and other mitigation techniques should result in substantial reduction. Theory and particle-in-cell simulations suggest that electrons, from ionization of residual and desorbed gas and secondary electrons from vacuum walls, will be radially trapped in the {approx}4 kV ion beam potential. Trapped electrons can modify the beam space charge, vacuum pressure, ion transport dynamics, and halo generation, and can potentially cause ion-electron instabilities. Within quadrupole (and dipole) magnets, the longitudinal electron velocity is limited to drift velocities (E x B and {del}B) and the electron density can vary azimuthally, radially, and longitudinally. These variations can cause centroid misalignment, emittance growth and halo growth. Diagnostics are being developed to measure the energy and flux of electrons and gas evolved from walls, and the net charge and gas density within magnetic quadrupoles. We will also measure the depth of trapping of electrons, their axial and radial transport, and the effects of electrons on the ion beam.

  5. Developmental Status of Beam Position and Phase Monitor for PEFP Proton Linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sungju; Park, Jangho; Yu, Inha; Kim, Dotae; Hwang, Jung-Yun; Nam, Sanghoon

    2004-11-01

    The PEFP (Proton Engineering Frontier Project) at the KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) is building a high-power proton linear accelerator aiming to generate 100-MeV proton beams with 20-mA peak current. (Pulse width and max. repetition rate of 1 ms and 120 Hz respectively.) We have developed the Beam Position and Phase Monitor (BPPM) for the machine that features the button-type PU, the full-analog processing electronics, and the EPICS-based control system. The beam responses of the button-type PU have been obtained using the MAGIC (Particle-In-Cell) code. The processing electronics has been developed in collaboration with Bergoz Instrumentation. In this article, we report the present status of the system developments except the control system.

  6. All-diamond optical assemblies for a beam-multiplexing X-ray monochromator at the Linac Coherent Light Source.

    PubMed

    Stoupin, S; Terentyev, S A; Blank, V D; Shvyd'ko, Yu V; Goetze, K; Assoufid, L; Polyakov, S N; Kuznetsov, M S; Kornilov, N V; Katsoudas, J; Alonso-Mori, R; Chollet, M; Feng, Y; Glownia, J M; Lemke, H; Robert, A; Sikorski, M; Song, S; Zhu, D

    2014-08-01

    A double-crystal diamond (111) monochromator recently implemented at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) enables splitting of the primary X-ray beam into a pink (transmitted) and a monochromatic (reflected) branch. The first monochromator crystal, with a thickness of ∼100 µm, provides sufficient X-ray transmittance to enable simultaneous operation of two beamlines. This article reports the design, fabrication and X-ray characterization of the first and second (300 µm-thick) crystals utilized in the monochromator and the optical assemblies holding these crystals. Each crystal plate has a region of about 5 × 2 mm with low defect concentration, sufficient for use in X-ray optics at the LCLS. The optical assemblies holding the crystals were designed to provide mounting on a rigid substrate and to minimize mounting-induced crystal strain. The induced strain was evaluated using double-crystal X-ray topography and was found to be small over the 5 × 2 mm working regions of the crystals.

  7. All-diamond optical assemblies for a beam-multiplexing X-ray monochromator at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Stoupin, S.; Terentyev, S. A.; Blank, V. D.; Shvyd’ko, Yu. V.; Goetze, K.; Assoufid, L.; Polyakov, S. N.; Kuznetsov, M. S.; Kornilov, N. V.; Katsoudas, J.; Alonso-Mori, R.; Chollet, M.; Feng, Y.; Glownia, J. M.; Lemke, H.; Robert, A.; Sikorski, M.; Song, S.; Zhu, D.

    2014-01-01

    A double-crystal diamond (111) monochromator recently implemented at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) enables splitting of the primary X-ray beam into a pink (transmitted) and a monochromatic (reflected) branch. The first monochromator crystal, with a thickness of ∼100 µm, provides sufficient X-ray transmittance to enable simultaneous operation of two beamlines. This article reports the design, fabrication and X-ray characterization of the first and second (300 µm-thick) crystals utilized in the monochromator and the optical assemblies holding these crystals. Each crystal plate has a region of about 5 × 2 mm with low defect concentration, sufficient for use in X-ray optics at the LCLS. The optical assemblies holding the crystals were designed to provide mounting on a rigid substrate and to minimize mounting-induced crystal strain. The induced strain was evaluated using double-crystal X-ray topography and was found to be small over the 5 × 2 mm working regions of the crystals. PMID:25242912

  8. Design report of the laser system for notching H- beam at booster injection RF frequency in the 750-keV Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xi; Ankenbrandt, Charles M.; /Fermilab

    2005-04-01

    With the requirement for more protons per hour from Booster, the radiation is a limiting factor. The most important periods in a Booster accelerating cycle are injection and transition crossing. The laser notching H{sup -} beam at the Booster injection RF frequency can make a bucket-to-bucket transfer from Linac to Booster possible, and this should remove most of the capture loss at injection and the early beam loss in the cycle. Besides that, the variation of the laser pulse length can change the notch length of the H{sup -} beam such that the bucket area filled by the beam can be controlled, and this can be applied to control the longitudinal emittance of the Booster beam.

  9. An overview of beam diagnostic and control systems for 50 MeV AREAL Linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsyan, A. A.; Amatuni, G. A.; Sahakyan, V. V.; Zanyan, G. S.; Martirosyan, N. W.; Vardanyan, V. V.; Grigoryan, B. A.

    2017-03-01

    Advanced Research Electron Accelerator Laboratory (AREAL) is an electron linear accelerator project with a laser driven RF gun being constructed at CANDLE Synchrotron Research Institute. After the successful operation of the gun section at 5 MeV, a program of facility energy enhancement up to 50 MeV is launched. In this paper the current status of existing diagnostic and control systems, as well as the results of electron beam parameter measurements are presented. The approaches of intended diagnostic and control systems for the upgrade program are also described.

  10. SRF test facility for the superconducting LINAC ``RAON'' — RRR property and e-beam welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Yoochul; Hyun, Myungook; Joo, Jongdae; Joung, Mijoung

    2015-02-01

    Equipment, such as a vacuum furnace, high pressure rinse (HPR), eddy current test (ECT) and buffered chemical polishing (BCP), are installed in the superconducting radio frequency (SRF) test facility. Three different sizes of cryostats (diameters of 600 mm for a quarter wave resonator (QWR), 900 mm for a half wave resonator (HWR), and 1200 mm for single spoke resonator 1&2 (SSR 1&2)) for vertical RF tests are installed for testing cavities. We confirmed that as-received niobium sheets (ASTM B393, RRR300) good electrical properties because they showed average residual resistance ratio (RRR) values higher than 300. However, serious RRR degradation occurred after joining two pieces of Nb by e-beam welding because the average RRR values of the samples were ˜179, which was only ˜60% of as-received RRR value. From various e-beam welding experiments in which the welding current and a speed at a fixed welding voltage were changed, we confirmed that good welding results were obtained at a 53 mA welding current and a 20-mm/s welding speed at a fixed welding voltage of 150 kV.

  11. Low-charge-state linac

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, K.W.; Kim, J.W.

    1995-08-01

    A design is being developed for a low-charge-state linac suitable for injecting ATLAS with a low-charge-state, radioactive beam. Initial work indicates that the existing ATLAS interdigital superconducting accelerating structures, together with the superconducting quadrupole transverse focussing element discussed above, provides a basis for a high-performance low-charge-state linac. The initial 2 or 3 MV of such a linac could be based on a normally-conducting, low-frequency RFQ, possibly combined with 24-MHz superconducting interdigital structures. Beam dynamics studies of the whole low-charge-state post-accelerator section were carried out in early FY 1995.

  12. SU-E-T-272: Direct Verification of a Treatment Planning System Megavoltage Linac Beam Photon Spectra Models, and Analysis of the Effects On Patient Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Leheta, D; Shvydka, D; Parsai, E

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: For the photon dose calculation Philips Pinnacle Treatment Planning System (TPS) uses collapsed cone convolution algorithm, which relies on energy spectrum of the beam in computing the scatter component. The spectrum is modeled based on Linac’s standard commissioning data and typically is not independently verified. We explored a methodology of using transmission measurements in combination with regularization data processing to unfold Linac spectra. The measured spectra were compared to those modeled by the TPS, and the effect on patient plans was evaluated. Methods: Transmission measurements were conducted in narrow-beam geometry using a standard Farmer ionization chamber. Two attenuating materials and two build -up caps, having different atomic numbers, served to enhance discrimination between absorption of low and high-energy portions of the spectra, thus improving the accuracy of the results. The data was analyzed using a regularization technique implemented through spreadsheet-based calculations. Results: The unfolded spectra were found to deviate from the TPS beam models. The effect of such deviations on treatment planning was evaluated for patient plans through dose distribution calculations with either TPS modeled or measured energy spectra. The differences were reviewed through comparison of isodose distributions, and quantified based on maximum dose values for critical structures. While in most cases no drastic differences in the calculated doses were observed, plans with deviations of 4 to 8% in the maximum dose values for critical structures were discovered. The anatomical sites with large scatter contributions are the most vulnerable to inaccuracies in the modeled spectrum. Conclusion: An independent check of the TPS model spectrum is highly desirable and should be included as part of commissioning of a new Linac. The effect is particularly important for dose calculations in high heterogeneity regions. The developed approach makes

  13. Determination of Initial Beam Parameters of Varian 2100 CD Linac for Various Therapeutic Electrons Using PRIMO.

    PubMed

    Maskani, Reza; Tahmasebibirgani, Mohammad Javad; Hoseini-Ghahfarokhi, Mojtaba; Fatahiasl, Jafar

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present research was to establish primary characteristics of electron beams for a Varian 2100C/D linear accelerator with recently developed PRIMO Monte Carlo software and to verify relations between electron energy and dose distribution. To maintain conformity of simulated and measured dose curves within 1%/1mm, mean energy, Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) of energy and focal spot FWHM of initial beam were changed iteratively. Mean and most probable energies were extracted from validated phase spaces and compared with related empirical equation results. To explain the importance of correct estimation of primary energy on a clinical case, computed tomography images of a thorax phantom were imported in PRIMO. Dose distributions and dose volume histogram (DVH) curves were compared between validated and artificial cases with overestimated energy. Initial mean energies were obtained of 6.68, 9.73, 13.2 and 16.4 MeV for 6, 9, 12 and 15 nominal energies, respectively. Energy FWHM reduced with increase in energy. Three mm focal spot FWHM for 9 MeV and 4 mm for other energies made proper matches of simulated and measured profiles. In addition, the maximum difference of calculated mean electrons energy at the phantom surface with empirical equation was 2.2 percent. Finally, clear differences in DVH curves of validated and artificial energy were observed as heterogeneity indexes were 0.15 for 7.21 MeV and 0.25 for 6.68 MeV. The Monte Carlo model presented in PRIMO for Varian 2100 CD was precisely validated. IAEA polynomial equations estimated mean energy more accurately than a known linear one. Small displacement of R50 changed DVH curves and homogeneity indexes. PRIMO is a user-friendly software which has suitable capabilities to calculate dose distribution in water phantoms or computerized tomographic volumes accurately.

  14. Evaluation of MegaVoltage Cone Beam CT image quality with an unmodified Elekta Precise Linac and EPID: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Markwell, Tim; Perera, Lakshal; Trapp, Jamie; Fielding, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    In order to increase the accuracy of patient positioning for complex radiotherapy treatments various 3D imaging techniques have been developed. MegaVoltage Cone Beam CT (MVCBCT) can utilise existing hardware to implement a 3D imaging modality to aid patient positioning. MVCBCT has been investigated using an unmodified Elekta Precise Linac and iView amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Two methods of delivery and acquisition have been investigated for imaging an anthropomorphic head phantom and quality assurance phantom. Phantom projections were successfully acquired and CT datasets reconstructed using both acquisition methods. Bone, tissue and air were clearly resolvable in both phantoms even with low dose (22 MU) scans. The feasibility of MVCBCT was investigated using a standard linac, amorphous silicon EPID and a combination of a free open source reconstruction toolkit as well as custom in-house software written in Matlab. The resultant image quality has been assessed and presented. Although bone, tissue and air were resolvable in all scans, artifacts are present and scan doses are increased when compared with standard portal imaging. The feasibility of MVCBCT with unmodified Elekta Precise Linac and EPID has been considered as well as the identification of possible areas for future development in artifact correction techniques to further improve image quality.

  15. PROGRESS IN DESIGN OF THE SNS LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    R. HARDEKOPF

    2000-11-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a six-laboratory collaboration to build an intense pulsed neutron facility at Oak Ridge, TN. The linac design has evolved from the conceptual design presented in 1997 to achieve higher initial performance and to incorporate desirable upgrade features. The linac will initially produce 2-MW beam power using a combination of radio-frequency quadruple (RFQ) linac, drift-tube linac (DTL), coupled-cavity linac (CCL), and superconducting-cavity linac (SCL). Designs of each of these elements support the high peak intensity and high quality beam required for injection into the SNS accumulator ring. This paper will trace the evolution of the linac design, the cost and performance factors that drove architecture decisions, and the progress made in the R&D program.

  16. RF CALIBRATION OF CEBAF LINAC CAVITIES THROUGH PHASE SHIFTS

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, Adam P.; Benesch, Jay F.; Slominski, Christopher J.

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes a new beam-based method of cavity energy gain calibration based on varying the cavity phase. This method can be fully automated and allows a larger range of momentum excursions during measurement than previous calibration approaches. Monte Carlo simulations suggest that a calibration precision of 2-3% could be realistically achieved using this method. During the commissioning of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility's (CEBAF) energy upgrade to 12 GeV, 876 measurements were performed on 375 of the 400 linac cavities in Fall 2015 and applied December 2015. Linac optics appears to be closer to design as a result. The resulting ensemble proved to be 2% over the value needed to get the desired energy in the arcs. Continued offline analysis of the data has allowed for error analysis and better understanding of the process.

  17. Progress in Induction Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G J

    2000-09-27

    This presentation will be a broad survey of progress in induction technology over the past four years. Much work has been done on accelerators for hydrodynamic test radiography and other applications. Solid-state pulsers have been developed which can provide unprecedented flexibility and precision in pulse format and accelerating voltage for both ion and electron induction machines. Induction linacs can now be built which can operate with MHz repetition rates. Solid-state technology has also made possible the development of fast kickers for precision control of high current beams. New insulator technology has been developed which will improve conventional induction linacs in addition to enabling a new class of high gradient induction linacs.

  18. SU-E-T-195: Commissioning the Neutron Production of a Varian TrueBeam Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Irazola, L; Brualla, L; Rosello, J; Terron, JA; Sanchez-Nieto, B; Bedogni, R; Sanchez-Doblado, F

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is the characterization of a new Varian TrueBeam™ facility in terms of neutron production, in order to estimate neutron equivalent dose in organs during radiotherapy treatments. Methods: The existing methodology [1] was used with the reference SRAMnd detector, calibrated in terms of thermal neutron fluence at the reference field operated by PTB (Physikalisch-Technische-Bundesanstalt) at the GeNF (Geesthacht-Neutron-Facility) with the GKSS reactor FRG-1 [2]. Thermal neutron fluence for the 5 available possibilities was evaluated: 15 MV and 10&6 MV with and without Flattening Filter (FF and FFF, respectively). Irradiation conditions are as described in [3]. In addition, three different collimator-MLC configurations were studied for 15 MV: (a) collimator of 10×10 cm{sup 2} and MLC fully retracted (reference), (b) field sizes of 20×20 cm{sup 2} and 10×10 cm{sup 2} for collimator and MLC respectively, and (c) collimator and MLC aperture of 10×10 cm{sup 2}. Results: Thermal fluence rate at the “reference point” [3], as a consequence of the neutron production, obtained for (a) conformation in 15 MV is (1.45±0.11) x10{sup 4} n•cm{sup 2}/MU. Configurations (b) and (c) gave fluences of 96.6% and 97.8% of the reference (a). Neutron production decreases up to 8.6% and 5.7% for the 10 MV FF and FFF beams, respectively. Finally, it decreases up to 2.8% and 0.1% for the 6 MV FF and FFF modes, respectively. Conclusion: This work evaluates thermal neutron production of Varian TrueBeam™ system for organ equivalent dose estimation. The small difference in collimator-MLC configuration shows the universality of the methodology [3]. A decrease in this production is shown when decreasing energy from 15 to 10 MV and an almost negligible production was found for 6 MV. Moreover, a lower neutron contribution is observed for the FFF modes.[1]Phys Med Biol,2012;57:6167–6191.[2]Radiat Meas,2010;45:1513–1517.[3]Med Phys,2015;42:276–281.

  19. The upgrade of the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP) and the BNL Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Mausner, L.F.; Alessi, J.G.

    1996-12-31

    An upgrade project was recently completed on the 200 MeV H{sup -} linac and the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP) in order to improve radioisotope production capacity and reliability. The average beam current has increased from 60 {mu}A to 150 {mu}A. The increased average current is the result of increases in peak current, from 25 mA to 37 mA, pulse repetition rate, from 5 to 7.5 Hz, and pulse width, from 500 to 530 ps. To achieve this performance the 35 keV, 750 keV and 200 MeV beam transport were improved, the RF transmission lines and RF power supplies replaced. Improvements to the linac control system, and the optics and vacuum system of the 200 MeV transport were implemented. A BLIP the target cooling system was upgraded to 35 kW and automated, the targets, and target mechanical systems replaced with a more robust design, and the control system upgraded. With these enhancements BLIP is ready to address the lack of availability of accelerator produced medical and research isotopes.

  20. A Monte Carlo approach to validation of FFF VMAT treatment plans for the TrueBeam linac

    SciTech Connect

    Gete, Ermias; Duzenli, Cheryl; Bergman, Alanah Mary; Milette, Marie-Pierre; Mestrovic, Ante; Hyde, Derek; Teke, Tony

    2013-02-15

    1%. It is of note that excellent agreement in output factors for all field sizes including highly asymmetric fields was achieved without accounting for backscatter into the beam monitor chamber. For the SBRT VMAT plans, the agreement between Monte Carlo and ion chamber point dose measurements was within 1%. Excellent agreement between Monte Carlo, treatment planning system and Gafchromic film dose distribution was observed with over 99% of the points in the high dose volume passing the 3%, 3 mm gamma test. Conclusions: The authors have presented a method for making the Varian IAEA compliant 6 MV FFF phase space file of the TrueBeam linac compatible with BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc. After benchmarking the modified phase space against measurement, they have demonstrated its potential for use in MC based quality assurance of complex delivery techniques.

  1. Testing Omega P’s 650 KW, 1.3 GHZ Low-Voltage Multi-Beam Klystron for the Project X Pulsed LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Fermi Research Alliance; Omega-P Inc.

    2014-08-10

    Omega-P Inc. had developed a multi beam 1.3 GHz klystron (MBK) for the Project X pulsed linac application. Testing of the klystron require a special hardware such as a modulator, RF components, control system, power supplies, etc, as well as associated infrastructure( electricity, water, safety). This is an expensive part of klystron development for which Omega-P does not have the required equipment. Fermilab will test the MBK at Fermilab site providing contribution to the project all the necessary facilities, infrastructure and manpower for MBK test performance and analysis.

  2. Thermal and resonance neutrons generated by various electron and X-ray therapeutic beams from medical linacs installed in polish oncological centers

    PubMed Central

    Konefał, Adam; Orlef, Andrzej; Łaciak, Marcin; Ciba, Aleksander; Szewczuk, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Background High-energy photon and electron therapeutic beams generated in medical linear accelerators can cause the electronuclear and photonuclear reactions in which neutrons with a broad energy spectrum are produced. A low-energy component of this neutron radiation induces simple capture reactions from which various radioisotopes originate and in which the radioactivity of a linac head and various objects in the treatment room appear. Aim The aim of this paper is to present the results of the thermal/resonance neutron fluence measurements during therapeutic beam emission and exemplary spectra of gamma radiation emitted by medical linac components activated in neutron reactions for four X-ray beams and for four electron beams generated by various manufacturers’ accelerators installed in typical concrete bunkers in Polish oncological centers. Materials and methods The measurements of neutron fluence were performed with the use of the induced activity method, whereas the spectra of gamma radiation from decays of the resulting radioisotopes were measured by means of a portable high-purity germanium detector set for field spectroscopy. Results The fluence of thermal neutrons as well as resonance neutrons connected with the emission of a 20 MV X-ray beam is ∼106 neutrons/cm2 per 1 Gy of a dose in water at a reference depth. It is about one order of magnitude greater than that for the 15 MV X-ray beams and about two orders of magnitude greater than for the 18–22 MeV electron beams regardless of the type of an accelerator. Conclusion The thermal as well as resonance neutron fluence depends strongly on the type and the nominal potential of a therapeutic beam. It is greater for X-ray beams than for electrons. The accelerator accessories and other large objects should not be stored in a treatment room during high-energy therapeutic beam emission to avoid their activation caused by thermal and resonance neutrons. Half-lives of the radioisotopes originating from

  3. Compact, Integrated Photoelectron Linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, David

    2000-12-01

    The innovative compact high energy iniector which has been developed by DULY Research Inc., will have wide scientific industrial and medical applications. The new photoelectron injector integrates the photocathode directly into a multicell linear accelerator with no drift space between the injector and the linac. By focusing the beam with solenoid or permanent magnets, and producing high current with low emittance, extremely high brightness is achieved. In addition to providing a small footprint and improved beam quality in an integrated structure, the compact system considerably simplifies external subsystems required to operate the photoelectron linac, including rf power transport, beam focusing, vacuum and cooling. The photoelectron linac employs an innovative Plane-Wave-Transformer (PWT) design, which provides strong cell-to-cell coupling, relaxes manufacturing tolerance and facilitates the attachment of external ports to the compact structure with minimal field interference. DULY Research Inc. under the support of the DOE Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program, has developed, constructed and installed a 20-MeV, S-band compact electron source at UCLA. DULY Research is also presently engaged in the development of an X-band photoelectron linear accelerator in another SBIR project. The higher frequency structure when completed will be approximately three times smaller, and capable of a beam brightness ten times higher than the S-band structure.

  4. Superconducting heavy-ion linac at Argonne

    SciTech Connect

    Aron, J.; Benaroya, R.; Bollinger, L.M.; Clifft, B.G.; Johnson, K.W.; Nixon, J.M.; Markovich, P.; Pardo, R.C.; Shepard, K.W.

    1981-01-01

    The design, status, and performance of the first operating superconducting heavy-ion accelerator, a linac used to boost the energies of beams from a 9-MV tandem, is summarized. When completed in 1981, the linac will consist of 24 independently-phased split-ring niobium resonators operating at 97 MHz. This linac is designed to provide 29 MV of acceleration. Because of the modular character of the system, the linac has been operable and useful since mid-1978, when a beam was accelerated through 2 units and the first nuclear-physics experiments were preformed. Now, 16 resonators are in use, and a beam has been accelerated for approx. 6000 h. Resonator performance has been remarkably stable, in spite of vacuum accidents, and the linac as a whole operates reliably without operators in attendance during nights and weekends. The ease and speed with which the beam energy can be changed is proving to be unexpectedly valuable to users.

  5. Superconducting energy recovery linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2016-10-01

    High-average-power and high-brightness electron beams from a combination of laser photocathode electron guns and a superconducting energy recovery linac (ERL) is an emerging accelerator science with applications in ERL light sources, high repetition rate free electron lasers , electron cooling, electron ion colliders and more. This paper reviews the accelerator physics issues of superconducting ERLs, discusses major subsystems and provides a few examples of superconducting ERLs.

  6. SU-E-I-72: First Experimental Study of On-Board CBCT Imaging Using 2.5MV Beam On a Radiotherapy Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Q; Li, R; Yang, Y; Xing, L

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Varian TrueBeam version 2.0 comes with a new inline 2.5MV beam modality for image guided patient setup. In this work we develop an iterative volumetric image reconstruction technique specific to the beam and investigate the possibility of obtaining metal artifact free CBCT images using the new imaging modality. Methods: An iterative reconstruction algorithm with a sparse representation constraint based on dictionary learning is developed, in which both sparse projection and low dose rate (10 MU/min) are considered. Two CBCT experiments were conducted using the newly available 2.5MV beam on a Varian TrueBeam linac. First, a Rando anthropomorphic head phantom with and without a copper bar inserted in the center was scanned using both 2.5MV and kV (100kVp) beams. In a second experiment, an MRI phantom with many coils was scanned using 2.5MV, 6MV, and kV (100kVp) beams. Imaging dose and the resultant image quality is studied. Results: Qualitative assessment suggests that there were no visually detectable metal artifacts in MV CBCT images, compared with significant metal artifacts in kV CBCT images, especially in the MRI phantom. For a region near the metal object in the head phantom, the 2.5MV CBCT gave a more accurate quantification of the electron density compared with kV CBCT, with a ∼50% reduction in mean HU error. As expected, the contrast between bone and soft-tissue in 2.5MV CBCT decreased compared with kV CBCT. Conclusion: On-board CBCT imaging with the new 2.5MV beam can effectively reduce metal artifacts, although with a reduced softtissue contrast. Combination of kV and MV scanning may lead to metal artifact free CBCT images with uncompromised soft-tissue contrast.

  7. Linac Energy Management for LCLS

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Chungming; Iverson, Richard; Krejcik, Patrick; Rogind, Deborah; White, Greg; Woodley, Mark; /SLAC

    2012-07-05

    Linac Energy Management (LEM) is a control system program that scales magnet field set-point settings following a change in beam energy. LEM is necessary because changes in the number, phase, and amplitude of the active klystrons change the beam's rigidity, and therefore, to maintain constant optics, one has to change focusing gradients and bend fields accordingly. This paper describes the basic process, the control system application programs we developed for LEM, and some of the implementation lessons learned at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS).

  8. Automated Calculation of DIII-D Neutral Beam Availability

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.C.; Hong, R.M.; Scoville, B.G.

    1999-11-01

    The neutral beam systems for the DIII-D tokamak are an extremely reliable source of auxiliary plasma heating, capable of supplying up to 20 MW of injected power, from eight separate beam sources into each tokamak discharge. The high availability of these systems for tokamak operations is sustained by careful monitoring of performance and following up on failures. One of the metrics for this performance is the requested injected power profile as compared to the power profile delivered for a particular pulse. Calculating this was a relatively straightforward task, however innovations such as the ability to modulate the beams and more recently the ability to substitute an idle beam for one which has failed during a plasma discharge, have made the task very complex. For example, with this latest advance it is possible for one or more beams to have failed, yet the delivered power profile may appear perfect. Availability used to be manually calculated. This paper presents the methods and algorithms used to produce a system which performs the calculations based on information concerning the neutral beam and plasma current waveforms, along with post-discharge information from the Plasma Control System, which has the ability to issue commands for beams in real time. Plots representing both the requested and actual power profiles, along with statistics, are automatically displayed and updated each shot, on a web-based interface viewable both at DIII-D and by our remote collaborators using no-cost software.

  9. EXPERIENCE WITH THE SNS SC LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yan; Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Allen, Christopher K; Campisi, Isidoro E; Cousineau, Sarah M; Danilov, Viatcheslav; Galambos, John D; Holmes, Jeffrey A; Jeon, Dong-O; Kim, Sang-Ho; Pelaia II, Tom; Plum, Michael A; Shishlo, Andrei P

    2008-01-01

    The SNS superconducting linac (SCL) is designed to deliver 1 GeV, up to 1.56-MW pulsed H- beams for neutron production. Commissioning of the accelerator systems was completed in June 2006, and the maximum beam energy achieved was approximately 952 MeV. In 2007, the SCL was successfully tuned for 1.01-GeV beam during a test operation. In the linac tune-up, phase scan signature matching, drifting beam measurement, and linac radio frequency cavity phase scaling were applied. In this paper, we will introduce the experiences with the SCL, including the tune-up, beam loss, and beam activation, and briefly discuss beam parameter measurements

  10. A cryomodule for the RIA driver linac.

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerst, J. D.; Shepard, K. W.

    2002-10-25

    We present a cryomodule design for the superconducting linacs for the proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator Facility (RIA). This paper discusses the design of a cryomodule for all the drift-tube-loaded superconducting cavities required for the machine. The same basic design will be used for the low and medium velocity sections of the driver linac and also for sections of the radioactive ion beam (RIB) linac. Fundamental design choices such as separate vs. common beam and insulating vacuum spaces are driven by the clean fabrication techniques required for optimum cavity performance. The design can be adapted to a variety of cavity geometries.

  11. LINACS FOR FUTURE MUON FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Slawomir Bogacz, Rolland Johnson

    2008-10-01

    Future Muon Colliders (MC) and Neutrino Factories (NF) based on muon storage rings will require innovative linacs to: produce the muons, cool them, compress longi-tudinally and ‘shape’ them into a beam and finally to rap-idly accelerate them to multi-GeV (NF) and TeV (MC) energies. Each of these four linac applications has new requirements and opportunities that follow from the na-ture of the muon in that it has a short lifetime (τ = 2.2 μsec) in its own rest frame, it is produced in a tertiary process into a large emittance, and its electron, photon, and neutrino decay products can be more than an annoy-ance. As an example, for optimum performance, the linac repetition rates should scale inversely with the laboratory lifetime of the muon in its storage ring, something as high as 1 kHz for a 40 GeV Neutrino Factory or as low as 20 Hz for a 5 TeV Muon Collider. A superconducting 8 GeV Linac capable of CW operation is being studied as a ver-satile option for muon production [1] for colliders, facto-ries, and muon beams for diverse purposes. A linac filled with high pressure hydrogen gas and imbedded in strong magnetic fields has been proposed to rapidly cool muon beams [2]. Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA) are possible because muons do not generate significant syn-chrotron radiation even at extremely high energy and in strong magnetic fields. We will describe the present status of linacs for muon applications; in particular the longitu-dinal bunch compression in a single pass linac and multi-pass acceleration in the RLA, especially the optics and technical requirements for RLA designs, using supercon-ducting RF cavities capable of simultaneous acceleration of both μ+ and μ- species, with pulsed linac quadrupoles to allow the maximum number of passes. The design will include the optics for the multi-pass linac and droplet-shaped return arcs.

  12. High energy photon reference for radiation protection: technical design of the LINAC beam and ionization chambers; and calculation of monoenergetic conversion coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusciac, D.; Bordy, J.-M.; Daures, J.; Blideanu, V.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we present the results of the first part of a research project aimed at offering a complete response to dosimeters providers and nuclear physicists' demands for high-energy (6 - 9 MeV) photon beams for radiation protection purposes. Classical facilities allowing the production of high-energy photonic radiation (proton accelerators, nuclear reactors) are very rare and need large investment for development and use. A novel solution is proposed, consisting in the use of a medical linear accelerator, allowing a significant decrease of all costs.Using Monte Carlo simulations (MCNP5 and PENELOPE codes), a specifically designed electron-photon conversion target allowing for obtaining a high energy photon beam (with an average energy weighted by fluence of about 6 MeV) has been built for radiation protection purposes. Due to the specific design of the target, this "realistic" radiation protection high-energy photon beam presents a uniform distribution of air kerma rate at a distance of 1 m, over a 30 × 30 cm2 surface. Two graphite cavity ionizing chambers for ionometric measurements have been built. For one of these chambers, the charge collection volume has been measured allowing for its use as a primary standard. The second ionizing chamber is used as a transfer standard; as such it has been calibrated in a 60Co beam, and in the high energy photon beam for radiation protection.The measurements with these ionizing chambers allowed for an evaluation of the air kerma rate in the LINAC based high-energy photon beam for radiation protection: the values cover a range between 36 mGy/h and 210 mGy/h, compatible with radiation protection purposes.Finally, using Monte Carlo simulations, conversion coefficients from air kerma to dose equivalent quantities have been calculated in the range between 10 keV and 22.4 MeV, for the spectral distribution of the fluence corresponding to the beam produced by the linear accelerator of the LNE-LNHB.

  13. Automating linear accelerator quality assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Eckhause, Tobias; Thorwarth, Ryan; Moran, Jean M.; Al-Hallaq, Hania; Farrey, Karl; Ritter, Timothy; DeMarco, John; Pawlicki, Todd; Kim, Gwe-Ya; Popple, Richard; Sharma, Vijeshwar; Park, SungYong; Perez, Mario; Booth, Jeremy T.

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was 2-fold. One purpose was to develop an automated, streamlined quality assurance (QA) program for use by multiple centers. The second purpose was to evaluate machine performance over time for multiple centers using linear accelerator (Linac) log files and electronic portal images. The authors sought to evaluate variations in Linac performance to establish as a reference for other centers. Methods: The authors developed analytical software tools for a QA program using both log files and electronic portal imaging device (EPID) measurements. The first tool is a general analysis tool which can read and visually represent data in the log file. This tool, which can be used to automatically analyze patient treatment or QA log files, examines the files for Linac deviations which exceed thresholds. The second set of tools consists of a test suite of QA fields, a standard phantom, and software to collect information from the log files on deviations from the expected values. The test suite was designed to focus on the mechanical tests of the Linac to include jaw, MLC, and collimator positions during static, IMRT, and volumetric modulated arc therapy delivery. A consortium of eight institutions delivered the test suite at monthly or weekly intervals on each Linac using a standard phantom. The behavior of various components was analyzed for eight TrueBeam Linacs. Results: For the EPID and trajectory log file analysis, all observed deviations which exceeded established thresholds for Linac behavior resulted in a beam hold off. In the absence of an interlock-triggering event, the maximum observed log file deviations between the expected and actual component positions (such as MLC leaves) varied from less than 1% to 26% of published tolerance thresholds. The maximum and standard deviations of the variations due to gantry sag, collimator angle, jaw position, and MLC positions are presented. Gantry sag among Linacs was 0.336 ± 0.072 mm. The

  14. SNS LINAC Wire Scanner System : Signal Levels and Accuracy.

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M. A.; Christensen, W.; Myer, R. E.; Rose, C. R.

    2002-01-01

    The linac wire scanner system for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge, TN, USA, calls for 5 units in the medium energy beam transport (MEBT), 5 in the drift tube linac (DTL), and 10 in the coupled cavity linac (CCL). In this paper we present expected signal levels and an analysis of the error in the beam size measurement as functions of wire position and electrical signal errors.

  15. Commissioning of the LCLS LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Loos, H.; Akre, R.; Brachmann, A.; Decker, F.-J.; Ding, Y.; Dowell, D.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Gilevich, S.; Hays, G.; Hering, Ph.; Huang, Z.; Iverson, R.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Miahnahri, A.; Molloy, S.; Nuhn, H.-D.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; White, W.; Wu, J.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.

    2010-06-11

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray free electron laser project is currently under construction at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). A new injector and upgrades to the existing accelerator were installed in two phases in 2006 and 2007. We report on the commissioning of the injector, the two new bunch compressors at 250MeV and 4.3 GeV, and transverse and longitudinal beam diagnostics up to the end of the existing linac at 13.6 GeV. The commissioning of the new transfer line from the end of the linac to the undulator is scheduled to start in November 2008 and for the undulator in March 2009 with first light to be expected in July 2009.

  16. Electron cloud effects in intense, ion beam linacs theory and experimental planning for heavy-ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A.W.; Cohen, R.H.; Lund, S.M.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Lee, E.P.; Prost, L.R.; Seidl, P.A.; Vay, Jean-Luc

    2002-05-21

    Heavy-ion accelerators for HIF will operate at high aperture-fill factors with high beam current and long pulses. This will lead to beam ions impacting walls: liberating gas molecules and secondary electrons. Without special preparation a large fractional electron population ({approx}>1%) is predicted in the High-Current Experiment (HCX), but wall conditioning and other mitigation techniques should result in substantial reduction. Theory and particle-in-cell simulations suggest that electrons, from ionization of residual and desorbed gas and secondary electrons from vacuum walls, will be radially trapped in the {approx}4 kV ion beam potential. Trapped electrons can modify the beam space charge, vacuum pressure, ion transport dynamics, and halo generation, and can potentially cause ion-electron instabilities. Within quadrupole (and dipole) magnets, the longitudinal electron flow is limited to drift velocities (E x B and {del}B) and the electron density can vary azimuthally, radially, and longitudinally. These variations can cause centroid misalignment, emittance growth and halo growth. Diagnostics are being developed to measure the energy and flux of electrons and gas evolved from walls, and the net charge and gas density within magnetic quadrupoles, as well as the their effect on the ion beam.

  17. Solenoid assembly with beam focusing and radiation shielding functions for the 9/6 MeV dual energy linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Sungsu; Kim, Yujong; Ju, Jinsik; Joo, Youngwoo; Lee, Byeong-No; Lee, Soo Min; Kim, Jae Hyun; Buaphad, Pikad; Lee, Byung Cheol; Cha, Hyungki; Ha, Jang Ho; Park, Hyung Dal; Song, Ki Beak; Lee, Seung Hyun; Kim, Heesoo

    2016-09-01

    The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been developing a Container Inspection System (CIS) by using a dual-energy (9/6 MeV) S-band (= 2856 MHz) electron linear accelerator. The key components of the CIS are the electron linear accelerator (including an electron gun, an accelerating structure, an RF power source, cooling chillers, vacuum pumps, magnet power supplies, and two solenoid magnets with beam focusing and shielding functions), a tungsten target for X-ray generation, an X-ray collimator, a detector array, and a container moving system. Generally, in accelerators, beam focusing is mainly done by solenoids operating in the region of a few MeV to keep the shape of transverse beam symmetrically round so as to reduce the loss of electrons, which increases the beam current and the beam power. In addition, a specially-designed component is needed to protect against the radiation due to the lost electrons. In this paper, we describe the design, fabrication, and optimization of two specially- designed solenoids with focusing and radiation shielding functions for a dual-energy S-band electron linear accelerator for a CIS.

  18. High Frequency Linacs for Hadrontherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaldi, Ugo; Braccini, Saverio; Puggioni, Paolo

    The use of radiofrequency linacs for hadrontherapy was proposed about 20 years ago, but only recently has it been understood that the high repetition rate together with the possibility of very rapid energy variations offers an optimal solution to the present challenge of hadrontherapy: "paint" a moving tumor target in three dimensions with a pencil beam. Moreover, the fact that the energy, and thus the particle range, can be electronically adjusted implies that no absorber-based energy selection system is needed, which, in the case of cyclotron-based centers, is the cause of material activation. On the other side, a linac consumes less power than a synchrotron. The first part of this article describes the main advantages of high frequency linacs in hadrontherapy, the early design studies, and the construction and test of the first high-gradient prototype which accelerated protons. The second part illustrates some technical issues relevant to the design of copper standing wave accelerators, the present developments, and two designs of linac-based proton and carbon ion facilities. Superconductive linacs are not discussed, since nanoampere currents are sufficient for therapy. In the last two sections, a comparison with circular accelerators and an overview of future projects are presented.

  19. Beam-Based Alignment of the NLC Main Linac, Part Two: Dispersion-Free Steering and Dispersion Bumps(LCC-0071)

    SciTech Connect

    Tenenbaum, P

    2003-11-06

    The standard prescription for NLC main linac steering assumes that the RMS offset between a quad's magnetic center and the corresponding BPM's electrical center can be determined at the level of a micron. This is a fearsome requirement, and will be particularly difficult to achieve if hybrid iron/permanent magnet quads are used in the main linac. As an alternative, the Dispersion Free Steering (DFS) [1] algorithm is adapted to the NLC main linac environment; the DFS algorithm does not require knowledge of the quad-BPM offsets. The results of simulation studies of this adaptation are presented. In addition, the use of closed orbit bumps to globally correct dispersive emittance growth is considered. The studies indicate that DFS can be used successfully in the NLC main linac environment, and that dispersion bumps are a useful addition to the linac steering ''toolbox,'' regardless of the main algorithm selected.

  20. Measurement and simulation of the impact of coherent synchrotron radiation on the Jefferson Laboratory energy recovery linac electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, C C.; Biedron, S G.; Edelen, A L.; Milton, S V.; Benson, S; Douglas, D; Li, R; Tennant, C D.; Carlsten, B E.

    2015-03-09

    In an experiment conducted on the Jefferson Laboratory IR free-electron laser driver, the effects of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on beam quality were studied. The primary goal of this work was to explore CSR output and effect on the beam with variation of the bunch compression in the IR recirculator. Here we examine the impact of CSR on the average energy loss as a function of bunch compression as well as the impact of CSR on the energy spectrum of the bunch. Simulation of beam dynamics in the machine, including the one-dimensional CSR model, shows very good agreement with the measured effect of CSR on the average energy loss as a function of compression. Finally, a well-defined structure is observed in the energy spectrum with a feature in the spectrum that varies as a function of the compression. This effect is examined in simulations, as well, and a simple explanation for the variation is proposed.

  1. Measurement and simulation of the impact of coherent synchrotron radiation on the Jefferson Laboratory energy recovery linac electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, C. C.; Biedron, S. G.; Edelen, A. L.; Milton, S. V.; Benson, S.; Douglas, D.; Li, R.; Tennant, C. D.; Carlsten, B. E.

    2015-03-01

    In an experiment conducted on the Jefferson Laboratory IR free-electron laser driver, the effects of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on beam quality were studied. The primary goal of this work was to explore CSR output and effect on the beam with variation of the bunch compression in the IR recirculator. Here we examine the impact of CSR on the average energy loss as a function of bunch compression as well as the impact of CSR on the energy spectrum of the bunch. Simulation of beam dynamics in the machine, including the one-dimensional CSR model, shows very good agreement with the measured effect of CSR on the average energy loss as a function of compression. Finally, a well-defined structure is observed in the energy spectrum with a feature in the spectrum that varies as a function of the compression. This effect is examined in simulations, as well, and a simple explanation for the variation is proposed.

  2. Study of the NLC Linac Optics Compatible with a Low Energy Scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Nosochkov, Yuri

    2002-02-27

    We explore the NLC linac optics compatible with a low energy scenario where initially only part of the full linac is installed. Optics modification suitable for a low energy beam running and upgrade to the nominal energy is discussed. Linac parameters and beam tolerances in the modified lattice are compared to the nominal design.

  3. SU-E-T-409: Evaluation of Tissue Composition Effect On Dose Distribution in Radiotherapy with 6 MV Photon Beam of a Medical Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Ghorbani, M; Tabatabaei, Z; Noghreiyan, A Vejdani; Meigooni, A Soleimani

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate soft tissue composition effect on dose distribution for various soft tissues and various depths in radiotherapy with 6 MV photon beam of a medical linac. Methods: A phantom and Siemens Primus linear accelerator were simulated using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. In a homogeneous cubic phantom, six types of soft tissue and three types of tissue-equivalent materials were defined separately. The soft tissues were muscle (skeletal), adipose tissue, blood (whole), breast tissue, soft tissue (9-component) and soft tissue (4-component). The tissue-equivalent materials included: water, A-150 tissue-equivalent plastic and perspex. Photon dose relative to dose in 9-component soft tissue at various depths on the beam’s central axis was determined for the 6 MV photon beam. The relative dose was also calculated and compared for various MCNPX tallies including,F8, F6 and,F4. Results: The results of the relative photon dose in various materials relative to dose in 9-component soft tissue and using different tallies are reported in the form of tabulated data. Minor differences between dose distributions in various soft tissues and tissue-equivalent materials were observed. The results from F6 and F4 were practically the same but different with,F8 tally. Conclusion: Based on the calculations performed, the differences in dose distributions in various soft tissues and tissue-equivalent materials are minor but they could be corrected in radiotherapy calculations to upgrade the accuracy of the dosimetric calculations.

  4. Measurement and simulation of the impact of coherent synchrotron radiation on the Jefferson Laboratory energy recovery linac electron beam

    DOE PAGES

    Hall, C C.; Biedron, S G.; Edelen, A L.; ...

    2015-03-09

    In an experiment conducted on the Jefferson Laboratory IR free-electron laser driver, the effects of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on beam quality were studied. The primary goal of this work was to explore CSR output and effect on the beam with variation of the bunch compression in the IR recirculator. Here we examine the impact of CSR on the average energy loss as a function of bunch compression as well as the impact of CSR on the energy spectrum of the bunch. Simulation of beam dynamics in the machine, including the one-dimensional CSR model, shows very good agreement with themore » measured effect of CSR on the average energy loss as a function of compression. Finally, a well-defined structure is observed in the energy spectrum with a feature in the spectrum that varies as a function of the compression. This effect is examined in simulations, as well, and a simple explanation for the variation is proposed.« less

  5. Operating experience with the ALS linac

    SciTech Connect

    Selph, F.; Massoletti, D.

    1991-05-01

    The linac injector for the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at LBL was recently put into operation. Energy is 50 MeV, frequency 3 GHz. The electron gun delivers up to 6nC in a 3.0-ns bunch at 120 kV. A train of bunches is injected into a 1-Hz booster and accelerated to 1.5 GHz for storage ring injection. A magnetic analysis system is used for optimizing the linac. Measured beam properties from the gun and after acceleration in the linac are described. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Energy Recovery Linacs for Commercial Radioisotope Production

    SciTech Connect

    Sy, Amy; Krafft, Geoffrey A.; Johnson, Rolland; Roberts, Tom; Boulware, Chase; Hollister, Jerry

    2015-09-01

    Photonuclear reactions with bremsstrahlung photon beams from electron linacs can generate radioisotopes of critical interest. An SRF Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) provides a path to a more diverse and reliable domestic supply of short-lived, high-value, high-demand isotopes in a more compact footprint and at a lower cost than those produced by conventional reactor or ion accelerator methods. Use of an ERL enables increased energy efficiency of the complex through energy recovery of the waste electron beam, high electron currents for high production yields, and reduced neutron production and shielding activation at beam dump components. Simulation studies using G4Beamline/GEANT4 and MCNP6 through MuSim, as well as other simulation codes, will design an ERL-based isotope production facility utilizing bremsstrahlung photon beams from an electron linac. Balancing the isotope production parameters versus energy recovery requirements will inform a choice of isotope production target for future experiments.

  7. Optimization of SRF Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, Tom

    2013-09-01

    This work describes preliminary results of a new software tool that allows one to vary parameters and understand the effects on the optimized costs of construction plus 10 year operations of an SRF linac, the associated cryogenic facility, and controls, where operations includes the cost of the electrical utilities but not the labor or other costs. It derives from collaborative work done with staff from Accelerator Science and Technology Centre, Daresbury, UK several years ago while they were in the process of developing a conceptual design for the New Light Source project.[1] The initial goal was to convert a spread sheet format to a graphical interface to allow the ability to sweep different parameter sets. The tools also allow one to compare the cost of the different facets of the machine design and operations so as to better understand the tradeoffs. The work was first published in an ICFA Beam Dynamics News Letter.[2] More recent additions to the software include the ability to save and restore input parameters as well as to adjust the Qo versus E parameters in order to explore the potential costs savings associated with doing so. Additionally, program changes now allow one to model the costs associated with a linac that makes use of energy recovery mode of operation.

  8. New medical linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schonberg, R. G.; Mishin, A. V.

    1997-02-01

    X-band linacs designed and manufactured by Schonberg Research Corporation that are currently used by two spin-off companies for radiation therapy systems. Accuray employs a basic 6 MeV design with 300 R/min nominal dose rate at 80 cm from a tungsten target. The designed stereoscopic radiosurgery system is known as the Cyberknife. The Cyberknife combines a treatment planning, imaging and treatment delivery features. The treatment delivery system enclosure incorporates an accelerator head, RF components, pulse transformer and electronics mounted on a robotic arm. Intraop Medical, Inc. has introduced a system for intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) called Mobetron (Mobile Electron Beam Intraoperative Treatment System). Mobetron is based on a 12 MeV two section X-band linac also designed by Schonberg Research Corporation. The accelerator design permits smooth energy variation from 4 to 12 MeV, but will be used at 4 specific energies. A self-shielded concept is applied to the system design. It will be used in conventional operating rooms without added shielding.

  9. Commissioning Experience for the SNS Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, A.; Assadi, S.; Campisi, I.; Chu, P.; Cousineau, S.; Danilov, V.; Dodson, B.G.; Galambos, J.; Jeon, D.; Henderson, S.; Holtkamp, N.; Kravchuk, L.; Kim, S.; Plum, M.; Tanke, E.; Stockli, M.

    2005-06-08

    The Spallation Neutron Source accelerator systems will deliver a 1 GeV, 1.44 MW proton beam to a liquid mercury target for neutron scattering research. The accelerator complex consists of an H- injector, capable of producing one-ms-long pulses at 60 Hz repetition rate with 38 mA peak current, a 1 GeV linear accelerator, an accumulator ring and associated transport lines. A 2.5 MeV beam from the Front End is accelerated to 86 MeV in a Drift Tube Linac, then to 185 MeV in a Coupled-Cavity Linac and then to 1 GeV in a Superconducting Linac. The staged beam commissioning of the accelerator complex is proceeding as component installation progresses. The Front End, Drift Tube Linac and part of the Coupled-Cavity Linac have been commissioned at ORNL. The primary design goals of peak current, transverse emittance and beam energy have been achieved. Results and status of the beam commissioning program will be presented.

  10. Beam tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo, R.C.; Zinkann, G.P.

    1995-08-01

    A program for configuring the linac, based on previously run configurations for any desired beam was used during the past year. This program uses only a small number of empirical tunes to scale resonator fields to properly accelerate a beam with a different charge-to-mass (q/A) ratio from the original tune configuration. The program worked very well for the PII linac section where we can easily match a new beam`s arrival phase and velocity to the tuned value. It was also fairly successful for the Booster and ATLAS sections of the linac, but not as successful as for the PII linac. Most of the problems are associated with setting the beam arrival time correctly for each major linac section. This problem is being addressed with the development of the capacitive pickup beam phase monitor discussed above. During the next year we expect to improve our ability to quickly configure the linac for new beams and reduce the time required for linac tuning. Already the time required for linac tuning as a percentage of research hours has decreased from 22% in FY 1993 to 15% in the first quarter of FY 1995.

  11. A novel technique for VMAT QA with EPID in cine mode on a Varian TrueBeam linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Adamson, Justus; Rodrigues, Anna; Zhou, Fugen; Yin, Fang-fang; Wu, Qiuwen

    2013-10-01

    Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is a relatively new treatment modality for dynamic photon radiation therapy. Pre-treatment quality assurance (QA) is necessary and many efforts have been made to apply electronic portal imaging device (EPID)-based IMRT QA methods to VMAT. It is important to verify the gantry rotation speed during delivery as this is a new variable that is also modulated in VMAT. In this paper, we present a new technique to perform VMAT QA using an EPID. The method utilizes EPID cine mode and was tested on Varian TrueBeam in research mode. The cine images were acquired during delivery and converted to dose matrices after profile correction and dose calibration. A sub-arc corresponding to each cine image was extracted from the original plan and its portal image prediction was calculated. Several analyses were performed including 3D γ analysis (2D images + gantry angle axis), 2D γ analysis, and other statistical analyses. The method was applied to 21 VMAT photon plans of 3 photon energies. The accuracy of the cine image information was investigated. Furthermore, this method's sensitivity to machine delivery errors was studied. The pass rate (92.8 ± 1.4%) for 3D γ analysis was comparable to those from Delta4 system (99.9 ± 0.1%) under similar criteria (3%, 3 mm, 5% threshold and 2° angle to agreement) at 6 MV. The recorded gantry angle and start/stop MUs were found to have sufficient accuracy for clinical QA. Machine delivery errors can be detected through combined analyses of 3D γ, gantry angle, and percentage dose difference. In summary, we have developed and validated a QA technique that can simultaneously verify the gantry angle and delivered MLC fluence for VMAT treatment.This technique is efficient and its accuracy is comparable to other QA methods.

  12. RFI-Based Ion Linac Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, Donald A.

    A new company, Ion Linac Systems, Inc., has been formed to promote the development, manufacture, and marketing of intense, RFI-based, Ion Linac Systems. The Rf Focused Interdigital (RFI) linac structure was invented by the author while at Linac Systems, LLC. The first step, for the new company, will be to correct a flaw in an existing RFI-based linac system and to demonstrate "good transmission" through the system. The existing system, aimed at the BNCT medical application, is designed to produce a beam of 2.5 MeV protons with an average beam current of 20 mA. In conjunction with a lithium target, it will produce an intense beam of epithermal neutrons. This system is very efficient, requiring only 180 kW of rf power to produce a 50 kW proton beam. In addition to the BNCT medical application, the RFI-based systems should represent a powerful neutron generator for homeland security, defence applications, cargo container inspection, and contraband detection. The timescale to the demonstration of "good transmission" is early fall of this year. Our website is www.ionlinacs.com.

  13. Error studies for SNS Linac. Part 1: Transverse errors

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, K.R.

    1998-12-31

    The SNS linac consist of a radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ), a drift-tube linac (DTL), a coupled-cavity drift-tube linac (CCDTL) and a coupled-cavity linac (CCL). The RFQ and DTL are operated at 402.5 MHz; the CCDTL and CCL are operated at 805 MHz. Between the RFQ and DTL is a medium-energy beam-transport system (MEBT). This error study is concerned with the DTL, CCDTL and CCL, and each will be analyzed separately. In fact, the CCL is divided into two sections, and each of these will be analyzed separately. The types of errors considered here are those that affect the transverse characteristics of the beam. The errors that cause the beam center to be displaced from the linac axis are quad displacements and quad tilts. The errors that cause mismatches are quad gradient errors and quad rotations (roll).

  14. Physics design of front ends for superconducting ion linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P.N.; Carneiro, J.-P.; /Fermilab

    2008-09-01

    Superconducting (SC) technology is the only option for CW linacs and is also an attractive option for pulsed linacs. SC cavities are routinely used for proton and H{sup -} beam acceleration above 185 MeV. Successful development of SC cavities covering the lower velocity range (down to 0.03c) is a very strong basis for the application of SC structures in the front ends of high energy linacs. Lattice design and related high-intensity beam physics issues in a {approx}400 MeV linac that uses SC cavities will be presented in this talk. In particular, axially-symmetric focusing by SC solenoids provides strong control of beam space charge and a compact focusing lattice. As an example, we discuss the SC front end of the H{sup -} linac for the FNAL Proton Driver.

  15. Physics design of front ends for superconducting ion linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P.N.; Carneiro, J.P.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    Superconducting (SC) technology is the only option for CW linacs and is also an attractive option for pulsed linacs. SC cavities are routinely used for proton and H{sup -} beam acceleration above 185 MeV. Successful development of SC cavities covering the lower velocity range (down to 0.03c) is a very strong basis for the application of SC structures in the front ends of high energy linacs. Lattice design and related high-intensity beam physics issues in a {approx}400 MeV linac that uses SC cavities will be presented in this talk. In particular, axially-symmetric focusing by SC solenoids provides strong control of beam space-charge and a compact focusing lattice. As an example, we discuss the SC front-end of the H{sup -} linac for the FNAL Proton Driver.

  16. LFSC - Linac Feedback Simulation Code

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Valentin; /Fermilab

    2008-05-01

    The computer program LFSC (<Linac Feedback Simulation Code>) is a numerical tool for simulation beam based feedback in high performance linacs. The code LFSC is based on the earlier version developed by a collective of authors at SLAC (L.Hendrickson, R. McEwen, T. Himel, H. Shoaee, S. Shah, P. Emma, P. Schultz) during 1990-2005. That code was successively used in simulation of SLC, TESLA, CLIC and NLC projects. It can simulate as pulse-to-pulse feedback on timescale corresponding to 5-100 Hz, as slower feedbacks, operating in the 0.1-1 Hz range in the Main Linac and Beam Delivery System. The code LFSC is running under Matlab for MS Windows operating system. It contains about 30,000 lines of source code in more than 260 subroutines. The code uses the LIAR ('Linear Accelerator Research code') for particle tracking under ground motion and technical noise perturbations. It uses the Guinea Pig code to simulate the luminosity performance. A set of input files includes the lattice description (XSIF format), and plane text files with numerical parameters, wake fields, ground motion data etc. The Matlab environment provides a flexible system for graphical output.

  17. Automated volume of interest delineation and rendering of cone beam CT images in interventional cardiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Cristian; Schäfer, Dirk; Eshuis, Peter; Carroll, John; Grass, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Interventional C-arm systems allow the efficient acquisition of 3D cone beam CT images. They can be used for intervention planning, navigation, and outcome assessment. We present a fast and completely automated volume of interest (VOI) delineation for cardiac interventions, covering the whole visceral cavity including mediastinum and lungs but leaving out rib-cage and spine. The problem is addressed in a model based approach. The procedure has been evaluated on 22 patient cases and achieves an average surface error below 2mm. The method is able to cope with varying image intensities, varying truncations due to the limited reconstruction volume, and partially with heavy metal and motion artifacts.

  18. Automated beam placement for breast radiotherapy using a support vector machine based algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Xuan; Kong, Dewen; Jozsef, Gabor; Chang, Jenghwa; Wong, Edward K.; Formenti, Silvia C.; Wang Yao

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: To develop an automated beam placement technique for whole breast radiotherapy using tangential beams. We seek to find optimal parameters for tangential beams to cover the whole ipsilateral breast (WB) and minimize the dose to the organs at risk (OARs). Methods: A support vector machine (SVM) based method is proposed to determine the optimal posterior plane of the tangential beams. Relative significances of including/avoiding the volumes of interests are incorporated into the cost function of the SVM. After finding the optimal 3-D plane that separates the whole breast (WB) and the included clinical target volumes (CTVs) from the OARs, the gantry angle, collimator angle, and posterior jaw size of the tangential beams are derived from the separating plane equation. Dosimetric measures of the treatment plans determined by the automated method are compared with those obtained by applying manual beam placement by the physicians. The method can be further extended to use multileaf collimator (MLC) blocking by optimizing posterior MLC positions. Results: The plans for 36 patients (23 prone- and 13 supine-treated) with left breast cancer were analyzed. Our algorithm reduced the volume of the heart that receives >500 cGy dose (V5) from 2.7 to 1.7 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.058) on average and the volume of the ipsilateral lung that receives >1000 cGy dose (V10) from 55.2 to 40.7 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.0013). The dose coverage as measured by volume receiving >95% of the prescription dose (V95%) of the WB without a 5 mm superficial layer decreases by only 0.74% (p = 0.0002) and the V95% for the tumor bed with 1.5 cm margin remains unchanged. Conclusions: This study has demonstrated the feasibility of using a SVM-based algorithm to determine optimal beam placement without a physician's intervention. The proposed method reduced the dose to OARs, especially for supine treated patients, without any relevant degradation of dose homogeneity and coverage in general.

  19. Modeling of the ALS linac

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.H.

    1996-08-01

    The ALS injector linac is used for the Beam Test Facility (BTF) and the Damping Experiments when it is available in between the ALS filings. These experiments usually require higher quality beams and a better characterization than is normally required for ALS operations. This paper focuses on the beam emittance, energy tilt, and especially the longitudinal variation of the beam parameters. For instance, the authors want to avoid longitudinal variations at the low beta section of the BTF. On the other hand, a large energy tilt is required for post-acceleration compression of the bunch using an alpha magnet. The PARMELA code was modified to calculate and display longitudinal variations of the emittance ellipse. Using the Microsoft Development Studio under Windows NT environment the code can handle a much larger number of particles than was previously possible.

  20. Optics Simulations for the NLC Main Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Woodley, Mark D

    2001-06-15

    Focusing in the NLC main linac will be provided mainly by hybrid permanent magnet quadrupoles which have limited variability in strength. When the energy profile of the linac changes, due to normal cycling of rf sources, mismatches in the beam optics can be generated if the quadrupole strengths are not rescaled to the new energy profile. These mismatches can lead to emittance dilution. In addition, betatron phase advance changes caused by the mismatch can adversely affect the beam trajectory, leading to emittance dilution from dispersion and wakefields. This paper describes the results of simulations of these processes, undertaken in an attempt to determine whether or not rescaling of the quadrupoles will be necessary in the NLC main linac.

  1. Possible use of the AGS linac for proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Alessi, J.G.; Chanana, A.; Dilmanian, F.A.; Lee, Y.Y.; Raparia, D.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wielopolski, L.

    1995-12-31

    The BNL 200 MeV linac presently provides beam for the AGS high energy physics program and for isotope production at the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP) facility. There is now a proposal to develop a proton therapy facility which would also use the linac beam. Approximately 1% of the current in each linac beam pulse would be diverted from BLIP, down an existing transport line, to the proposed new facility. This paper focuses on the basic design of the facility, particularly the accelerator issues. The planned transport line layout is presented, along with a description of the energy and intensity control, and beam delivery systems. In the initial phase, we are planning one 360{degrees} vertical gantry and one horizontal treatment room.

  2. The Eindhoven linac-racetrack microtron combination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theuws, W. H. C.; Botman, J. I. M.; Hagedoorn, H. L.; Timmermans, C. J.

    1998-04-01

    The Eindhoven linac-race track microtron (RTM) combination has been designed to serve as injector for an electron storage ring. The linac is a 10 MeV travelling-wave linac (type M.E.L. SL75/10). In the RTM a 5 MeV standing-wave cavity, which is synchronized with the linac, accelerates the electron beam 13 times, such that the extraction energy is 75 MeV. The RTM end magnets are two-sector magnets tilted in their median planes, to provide strong focusing forces for optimal electron-optical properties. Closed-orbit conditions are fulfilled with the help of small correction dipoles located in the RTM drift space; the magnetic-field strengths of these correction dipoles are adjusted on the basis of beam-position measurements. Isochronous acceleration is accomplished by position- and phase-measurements. A low-cost elaborate diagnostic system will be used for efficient commissioning of the combination of the 10 MeV linac and the 10-75 MeV RTM.

  3. High power operational experience with the LANSCE Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Rybarcyk, Lawrence J

    2008-01-01

    The heart of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is a pulsed linear accelerator that is used to simultaneously provide H+ and H- beams to several user facilities. This accelerator contains two Cockcroft-Walton style injectors, a 100-MeV drift tube linac and an 800-MeV coupled cavity linac. This presentation will touch on various aspects of the high power operation including performance, tune-up strategy, beam losses and machine protection.

  4. Instability issues for the ESS linac and rings

    SciTech Connect

    Rees, G. H.

    1999-12-03

    Comments are made on beam instability issues in the ESS linac and rings. The topics of interest in the linac are halo generation in the absence and presence of machine imperfections, and also the stability of the momentum ramping of the output beam. In the case of the rings, the main concern is for fast coherent transverse instabilities due to the combined effect of coupled electron-proton oscillations and interaction with the wall impedances.

  5. Focused ion-beam system for automated MEMS prototyping and processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athas, Gregory J.; Noll, Kathryn E.; Mello, Russell; Hill, Raymond; Yansen, Don E.; Wenners, Frank F.; Nadeau, James P.; Ngo, Tuan; Siebers, Michael

    1997-09-01

    We have developed a focused ion beam (FIB) system for automated MEMS processing. This product, the Micrion MicroMill, has been successfully used in production and prototype milling of over three million thin film heads (TFH) used in hard disk drives. The FIB column consists of a liquid gallium (Ga+) ion source, running at 50 kV, producing beam currents up to 50 nA. The milling rates achieved in the TFH application have been 0.5 - 4 micrometer3/sec with spot sizes ranging from 150 - 800 nm. This tool is designed to easily integrate into current FAB facilities and supports a wide range of navigational requirements. Different milling scenarios can be easily created or modified using the integrate CAD-like design tools, allowing for quick production line design modifications or rapid prototyping of new designs. The milling strategy can 'adapt' to dimensional changes caused by upstream process variations. On a real-time basis, the FIB system's pattern recognition/inspection software measures the individual part and precisely places the desired milling pattern. The flexible vector scan beam control can position the FIB, within sub-tenth micron dimensional control, to generate an endless variety of geometric milling patterns. This presentation will discuss the work currently done on inductive and magnetoresistive TFH devices as well as other potential MEMS processing applications.

  6. Magnet innovations for linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Halbach, K.

    1986-06-01

    It is possible to produce large magnetic fields at the aperture of permanent magnet quadrupoles, even when the magnetic aperture is very small. That, combined with their compactness, makes permanent magnet quadrupoles very powerful components of small aperture linacs. Results will be presented about past and present work on both fixed and variable strength permanent magnets suitable for use in and around linacs.

  7. Proton linacs for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lennox, A.J. |

    1993-08-01

    Recent advances in the ability to deliver boron-containing drugs to brain tumors have generated interest in {approximately}4 MeV linacs as sources of epithermal neutrons for radiation therapy. In addition, fast neutron therapy facilities have been studying methods to moderate their beams to take advantage of the high cross section for epithermal neutrons on boron-10. This paper describes the technical issues involved in each approach and presents the motivation for undertaking such studies using the Fermilab linac. the problems which must be solved before therapy can begin are outlined. Status of preparatory work and results of preliminary measurements are presented.

  8. Neutron sources based on medical Linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, M.; Durisi, E.; Monti, V.; Visca, L.; Zanini, A.; Giannini, G.

    2016-11-01

    The paper proposes the study of a novel photo-neutron source based on a medical high-energy electron Linac. Previous studies by the authors already demonstrated the possibility to obtain with this technique a thermal neutron flux of the order of 107 cm-2 s-1 . This paper shows possible Linac's setup and a new photo-converter design to reach a thermal neutron flux around 6×107 cm-2 s-1 , keeping a reasonable high quality of the beam with respect to fast neutron and gamma contaminations.

  9. Wake fields in SLAC Linac Collimators

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, Alexander; Decker, F. -J.; Smith, H.; Sullivan, M.

    2014-12-02

    When a beam travels near collimator jaws, it gets an energy loss and a transverse kick due to the backreaction of the beam field diffracted from the jaws. The effect becomes very important for an intense short bunch when a tight collimation of the background beam halo is required. In the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC a collimation system is used to protect the undulators from radiation due to particles in the beam halo. The halo is most likely formed from gun dark current or dark current in some of the accelerating sections. However, collimators are also responsible for the generation of wake fields. The wake field effect from the collimators not only brings an additional energy jitter and change in the trajectory of the beam, but it also rotates the beam on the phase plane, which consequently leads to a degradation of the performance of the Free Electron Laser at the Linac Coherent Light Source. In this paper, we describe a model of the wake field radiation in the SLAC linac collimators. We use the results of a numerical simulation to illustrate the model. Based on the model, we derive simple formulas for the bunch energy loss and the average kick. In addition, we also present results from experimental measurements that confirm our model.

  10. Design of the driver linac for the Rare Isotope Accelerator.

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Nolen, J. A.; Shepard, K. W.; Physics

    2006-01-01

    The proposed design of the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) driver linac is a cw, fully superconducting, 1.4 GV linac capable of accelerating uranium ions up to 400 MeV/u and protons to 1 GeV with 400 kW beam power. An extensive research and development effort has resolved many technical issues related to the construction of the driver linac and other systems of the RIA facility. In particular, record intensities of heavy ion beams have been demonstrated with the ECR ion source VENUS at LBNL, the driver front end systems including two-charge-state Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) and RFQ are being tested, and a set of SC accelerating structures to cover velocity range from 0.02c to 0.7c have been developed and prototyped. Newly developed high-performance SC cavities will provide the required voltage for the driver linac using 300 cavities designed for six different geometrical betas.

  11. Automated defect cross-sectioning with an in-line DualBeam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc-Coquand, Stephanie; Hinschberger, Benoit; Rouchouze, Eric; Sicurani, Emmanuel; Castagna, Marc; Weschler, Matthew; Dworkin, Larry; Renard, Didier; Panyasak, Atsavinn

    2004-05-01

    Shrinking design rules and the introduction of new materials and processes in the formation of Cu interconnects in damascene modules have given rise to new and previously unknown killer defect mechanisms. These failure mechanisms are very challenging to detect, identify, and eliminate. The ability to characterize buried defects, such as defective vias, previous layer defects, or integration issues detected by optical defect inspection tools as well as electron-beam inspection tools has become mandatory. Out of the several cross-section tools available to the lab, the one that best addresses the in-line applications requirements is known as the DualBeam (FIB/SEM). The ion beam allows cross-sectioning while a coincident electron beam allows for high resolution imaging of the cross-section. Using the FEI Defect Analyzer 300 DualBeam system, this process has been automated for in-line usage. Defects can be navigated to using defect files generated by the inspection tools. The wafer production line is now enabled to easily mill cross sections in-line and determine root causes, something that is often not possible from top down information alone. For volume in-line use on defects, additional requirements must also be met: compatibility with clean room environment, navigation on full wafers to relocate the defects detected by the inspection tools, throughput, ease of use, low impact on wafers so that they can be returned to the line. All of this must allow the gathering of data at numerous cross-sections on buried defects in order to perform the same type of Pareto analysis as is traditionally done after defect review of top-down visible defects. Example use cases will be presented to demonstrate how this methodology is being developed in a manufacturing environment to help understand previously unexplained yield losses and to deliver results with a rapid response time. Applications on defects detected with electron beam inspection in copper or tungsten interconnects

  12. Electron linac for medical isotope production with improved energy efficiency and isotope recovery

    DOEpatents

    Noonan, John; Walters, Dean; Virgo, Matt; Lewellen, John

    2015-09-08

    A method and isotope linac system are provided for producing radio-isotopes and for recovering isotopes. The isotope linac is an energy recovery linac (ERL) with an electron beam being transmitted through an isotope-producing target. The electron beam energy is recollected and re-injected into an accelerating structure. The ERL provides improved efficiency with reduced power requirements and provides improved thermal management of an isotope target and an electron-to-x-ray converter.

  13. Induction Linac Pulsers

    SciTech Connect

    Faltens, Andris

    2011-01-07

    The pulsers used in most of the induction linacs evolved from the very large body of work that was done in the U.S. and Great Britain during the development of the pulsed magnetron for radar. The radar modulators started at {approx}100 kW and reached >10 MW by 1945. A typical pulse length was 1 {mu}s at a repetition rate of 1,000 pps. A very comprehensive account of the modulator development is Pulse Generators by Lebacqz and Glasoe, one of the Radiation Laboratory Series. There are many permutations of possible modulators, two of the choices being tube type and line type. In earlier notes I wrote that technically the vacuum tube pulser met all of our induction linac needs, in the sense that a number of tubes, in series and parallel if required, could produce our pulses, regulate their voltage, be useable in feed-forward correctors, and provide a low source impedance. At a lower speed, an FET array is similar, and we have obtained and tested a large array capable of >10 MW switching. A modulator with an electronically controlled output only needs a capacitor for energy storage and in a switched mode can transfer the energy from the capacitor to the load at high efficiency. Driving a full size Astron induction core and a simulated resistive 'beam load' we achieved >50% efficiency. These electronically controlled output pulses can produce the pulses we desire but are not used because of their high cost. The second choice, the line type pulser, visually comprises a closing switch and a distributed or a lumped element transmission line. The typical switch cannot open or stop conducting after the desired pulse has been produced, and consequently all of the initially stored energy is dissipated. This approximately halves the efficiency, and the original cost estimating program LIACEP used this factor of two, even though our circuits are usually worse, and even though our inveterate optimists often omit it. The 'missing' energy is that which is reflected back into the

  14. Studies of Energy Recovery Linacs at Jefferson Laboratory: 1 GeV Demonstration of Energy Recovery at CEBAF and Studies of the Multibunch, Multipass Beam Breakup Instability in the 10 kW FEL Upgrade Driver

    SciTech Connect

    Tennant, Christopher D.

    2006-10-01

    An energy recovering linac (ERL) offers an attractive alternative for generating intense beams of charged particles by approaching the operational efficiency of a storage ring while maintaining the superior beam quality typical of a linear accelerator. Two primary physics challenges exist in pushing the frontier of ERL performance. The first is energy recovering a high energy beam while demonstrating operational control of two coupled beams in a common transport channel. The second is controlling the high average current effects in ERLs, specifically a type of beam instability called multipass beam breakup (BBU). This work addresses both of these issues. A successful 1 GeV energy recovery demonstration with a maximum-to-injection energy ratio of 51:1 was carried out on the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility at Jefferson Laboratory in an effort to address issues related to beam quality preservation in a large scale system. With a 1.3 km recirculation length and containing 312 superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities, this experiment has demonstrated energy recovery on the largest scale, and through the largest SRF environment, to date. The BBU instability imposes a potentially severe limitation to the average current that can be accelerated in an ERL. Simulation results for Jefferson Laboratory's 10 kW free electron laser (FEL) Upgrade Driver predict the occurrence of BBU below the nominal operating current. Measurements of the threshold current are described and shown to agree to within 10% of predictions from BBU simulation codes. This represents the first time the codes have been benchmarked with experimental data. With BBU limiting the beam current, several suppression schemes were developed. These include direct damping of the higher-order mode using two different cavity-based feedbacks and modifying the electron beam optics to reduce the coupling between the beam and mode. Specifically the effect of implementing (1) point-to-point focusing (2

  15. PERFORMANCE OF THE DIAGNOSTICS FOR NSLS-II LINAC COMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect

    Fliller III, R.; Padrazo, D.; Wang, G.M.; Heese, R.; Hseuh H.-C.; Johanson, M.; Kosciuk, B.N.; Pinayev, I.; Rose, J.; Shaftan, T.; Singh, O.

    2011-03-28

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a state of the art 3-GeV third generation light source currently under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The NSLS-II injection system consists of a 200 MeV linac, a 3-GeV booster synchrotron and associated transfer lines. The transfer lines not only provide a means to deliver the beam from one machine to another, they also provide a suite of diagnostics and utilities to measure the properties of the beam to be delivered. In this paper we discuss the suite of diagnostics that will be used to commission the NSLS-II linac and measure the beam properties. The linac to booster transfer line can measure the linac emittance with a three screens measurement or a quadrupole scan. Energy and energy spread are measured in a dispersive section. Total charge and charge uniformity are measured with wall current monitors in the linac and transformers in the transfer line. We show that the performance of the diagnostics in the transfer line will be sufficient to ensure the linac meets its specifications and provides a means of trouble shooting and studying the linac in future operation.

  16. Title I Design Report: Fermilab Linac Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Fermilab,

    1990-02-01

    The Fermilab Linac Upgrade Project is motivated by the requirement to increase Collider luminosity which will increase the physics discovery potential of the Tevatron Collider. The Linac Upgrade is one of several steps which will increase the Collider luminosity. The basic accelerator physics motivation for the project is the following chain of logic. The existing Main Ring Accelerator has a fixed, relatively small admittance for 8 GeV protons injected from the Booster Accelerator. While it is demonstrably p088ible to increase the number of protons accelerated in the Booster, space charge effects at injection into the Booster from the Linac increase the emittance of the beam delivered from the Booster to the Main Ring beyond the available admittance of the Main Ring. An increase in the energy of the protons injected into the Booster, however, will reduce the emittance growth due to the space charge effects at injection. Therefore, for a given admittance into the Main Ring, a greater number of protons will be accelerated in the Booster with a matching emittance if the injection energy is raised. The goal of the Linac Upgrade is to double the output energy of the Linac from 200MeV to 400MeV.

  17. Linear Accelerator (LINAC)

    MedlinePlus

    ... equipment? How is safety ensured? What is this equipment used for? A linear accelerator (LINAC) is the ... Therapy (SBRT) . top of page How does the equipment work? The linear accelerator uses microwave technology (similar ...

  18. Automated patient setup and gating using cone beam computed tomography projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Hanlin; Bertholet, Jenny; Ge, Jiajia; Poulsen, Per; Parikh, Parag

    2016-03-01

    In radiation therapy, fiducial markers are often implanted near tumors and used for patient positioning and respiratory gating purposes. These markers are then used to manually align the patients by matching the markers in the cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) reconstruction to those in the planning CT. This step is time-intensive and user-dependent, and often results in a suboptimal patient setup. We propose a fully automated, robust method based on dynamic programming (DP) for segmenting radiopaque fiducial markers in CBCT projection images, which are then used to automatically optimize the treatment couch position and/or gating window bounds. The mean of the absolute 2D segmentation error of our DP algorithm is 1.3+/- 1.0 mm for 87 markers on 39 patients. Intrafraction images were acquired every 3 s during treatment at two different institutions. For gated patients from Institution A (8 patients, 40 fractions), the DP algorithm increased the delivery accuracy (96+/- 6% versus 91+/- 11% , p  <  0.01) compared to the manual setup using kV fluoroscopy. For non-gated patients from Institution B (6 patients, 16 fractions), the DP algorithm performed similarly (1.5+/- 0.8 mm versus 1.6+/- 0.9 mm, p  =  0.48) compared to the manual setup matching the fiducial markers in the CBCT to the mean position. Our proposed automated patient setup algorithm only takes 1-2 s to run, requires no user intervention, and performs as well as or better than the current clinical setup.

  19. Operation and expected performance of the NLC main linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Assmann, R.W.; Raubenheimer, T.O.

    1996-11-01

    The main linacs for the proposed Next Linear Collider (NLC) provide acceleration of up to 500 GeV per beam. The linacs operate in a regime where unavoidable imperfections and even natural ground motion cause significant emittance dilutions. In order to achieve the NLC luminosity goals, small emittance beams must be transported with an emittance growth of less than about 175% for the 1 TeV center-of-mass version of the NLC. In this paper the authors discuss the operation and the expected performance of the NLC main linacs. Under the assumption that the specified device tolerances are met, it is shown from detailed simulations that the linac emittance transport fulfills the NLC requirements.

  20. An induction linac injector for scaled experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Rutkowski, H.L.; Faltens, A.; Pike, C.; Brodzik, D.; Johnson, R.M.; Vanecek, D. ); Hewett, D.W. )

    1991-04-01

    An injector is being developed at LBL that would serve as the front end of a scaled induction linac accelerator technology experiment for heavy ion fusion. The ion mass being used is in the range 10--18. It is a multi-beam device intended to accelerate up to 2 MeV with 500 mA in each beam. The first half of the accelerating column has been built and experiments with one carbon beam are underway at the 1 MeV level. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  1. Automated detection and analysis of particle beams in laser-plasma accelerator simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ushizima, Daniela Mayumi; Geddes, C.G.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Bethel, E. Wes; Jacobsen, J.; Prabhat, ,; R.ubel, O.; Weber, G,; Hamann, B.

    2010-05-21

    Numerical simulations of laser-plasma wakefield (particle) accelerators model the acceleration of electrons trapped in plasma oscillations (wakes) left behind when an intense laser pulse propagates through the plasma. The goal of these simulations is to better understand the process involved in plasma wake generation and how electrons are trapped and accelerated by the wake. Understanding of such accelerators, and their development, offer high accelerating gradients, potentially reducing size and cost of new accelerators. One operating regime of interest is where a trapped subset of electrons loads the wake and forms an isolated group of accelerated particles with low spread in momentum and position, desirable characteristics for many applications. The electrons trapped in the wake may be accelerated to high energies, the plasma gradient in the wake reaching up to a gigaelectronvolt per centimeter. High-energy electron accelerators power intense X-ray radiation to terahertz sources, and are used in many applications including medical radiotherapy and imaging. To extract information from the simulation about the quality of the beam, a typical approach is to examine plots of the entire dataset, visually determining the adequate parameters necessary to select a subset of particles, which is then further analyzed. This procedure requires laborious examination of massive data sets over many time steps using several plots, a routine that is unfeasible for large data collections. Demand for automated analysis is growing along with the volume and size of simulations. Current 2D LWFA simulation datasets are typically between 1GB and 100GB in size, but simulations in 3D are of the order of TBs. The increase in the number of datasets and dataset sizes leads to a need for automatic routines to recognize particle patterns as particle bunches (beam of electrons) for subsequent analysis. Because of the growth in dataset size, the application of machine learning techniques for

  2. Interdigital H -mode drift-tube linac design with alternative phase focusing for muon linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otani, M.; Mibe, T.; Yoshida, M.; Hasegawa, K.; Kondo, Y.; Hayashizaki, N.; Iwashita, Y.; Iwata, Y.; Kitamura, R.; Saito, N.

    2016-04-01

    We have developed an interdigital H-mode (IH) drift-tube linac (DTL) design with an alternative phase focusing (APF) scheme for a muon linac, in order to measure the anomalous magnetic moment and electric dipole moment (EDM) of muons at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). The IH-DTL accelerates muons from β =v /c =0.08 to 0.28 at an operational frequency of 324 MHz. The output beam emittances are calculated as 0.315 π and 0.195 π mm mrad in the horizontal and vertical directions, respectively, which satisfies the experimental requirement.

  3. WATER PURITY DEVELOPMENT FOR THE COUPLED CAVITY LINAC (CCL) AND DRIFT TUBE LINAC (DTL) STRUCTURES OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE (SNS) LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    D. KATONAK; J. BERNARDIN; S. HOPKINS

    2001-06-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a facility being designed for scientific and industrial research and development. SNS will generate and use neutrons as a diagnostic tool for medical purposes, material science, etc. The neutrons will be produced by bombarding a heavy metal target with a high-energy beam of protons, generated and accelerated with a linear particle accelerator, or linac. The low energy end of the linac consists of two room temperature copper structures, the drift tube linac (DTL), and the coupled cavity linac (CCL). Both of these accelerating structures use large amounts of electrical energy to accelerate the proton beam. Approximately 60-80% of the electrical energy is dissipated in the copper structure and must be removed. This is done using specifically designed water cooling passages within the linac's copper structure. Cooling water is supplied to these cooling passages by specially designed resonance control and water cooling systems. One of the primary components in the DTL and CCL water cooling systems, is a water purification system that is responsible for minimizing erosion, corrosion, scaling, biological growth, and hardware activation. The water purification system consists of filters, ion exchange resins, carbon beds, an oxygen scavenger, a UV source, and diagnostic instrumentation. This paper reviews related issues associated with water purification and describes the mechanical design of the SNS Linac water purification system.

  4. The 400 MeV Linac Upgrade at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, R.J.

    1992-12-01

    The Fermilab Linac Upgrade in planned to increase the energy of the H{sup {minus}} linac from 200 to 400 MeV. This is intended to reduce the incoherent space-charge tuneshift at injection into the 8 GeV Booster which limit either the brightness or the total intensity of the beam. The Linac Upgrade will be achieved by replacing the last four 201.25 MHs drift-tube linac (DTL) tanks which accelerate the beam from 116 to 200 MeV, with seven 805 MRs side-coupled cavity modules operating at an average axial field of about 7.5 MV/meter. This will allow acceleration to 400 MeV in the existing Linac enclosure. Each accelerator module will be driven with a 12 MW klystron-based rf power supply. Three of seven accelerator modules have been fabricated, power tested and installed in their temporary location adjacent to the existing DTL. All seven RF Modulators have been completed and klystron installation has begun. Waveguide runs have completed from the power supply gallery to the accelerator modules. The new linac will be powered in the temporary position without beam in order to verify overall system reliability until the laboratory operating schedule permits final conversion to 400 MeV operation.

  5. Operational experience with the Fermilab Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, L.J.; Lennox, A.J.; Schmidt, C.W.

    1992-12-01

    The Fermilab 200-MeV Linac has been in operation for nearly 22 years as a proton injector to the Booster synchrotron. It presently accelerates H{sup {minus}} ions to 200 MeV for charge-exchange injection into the Booster and to 66 MeV for the production of neutrons at the Neutron Therapy Facility. The beam intensity is typically 35 mA with pulse widths of 30 {mu}sec for the Booster for high energy physics and 57 {mu}sec for NTF at a maximum of 15 pulses per sec. During a typical physics run of nine to twelve months, beam is available for greater than 98% of the scheduled time. The Linac history, operation, tuning, stability and reliability will be discussed.

  6. A 2--4 nm Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) using the SLAC linac

    SciTech Connect

    Winick, H.; Bane, K.; Boyce, R.

    1993-05-01

    We describe the use of the SLAC linac to drive a unique, powerful. short wavelength Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Operating as an FEL, lasing would be achieved in a single pass of a high peak current electron beam through a long undulator by self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE). The main components are a high-brightness rf photocathode electron gun; pulse compressors; about 1/5 of the SLAC linac; and a long undulator with a FODO quadrupole focussing system. Using electrons below 8 GeV, the system would operate at wavelengths down to about 3 nm, producing {ge}10 GW peak power in sub-ps pulses. At a 120 Hz rate the average power is {approx} 1 W.

  7. Integration and evaluation of automated Monte Carlo simulations in the clinical practice of scanned proton and carbon ion beam therapy.

    PubMed

    Bauer, J; Sommerer, F; Mairani, A; Unholtz, D; Farook, R; Handrack, J; Frey, K; Marcelos, T; Tessonnier, T; Ecker, S; Ackermann, B; Ellerbrock, M; Debus, J; Parodi, K

    2014-08-21

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of beam interaction and transport in matter are increasingly considered as essential tools to support several aspects of radiation therapy. Despite the vast application of MC to photon therapy and scattered proton therapy, clinical experience in scanned ion beam therapy is still scarce. This is especially the case for ions heavier than protons, which pose additional issues like nuclear fragmentation and varying biological effectiveness. In this work, we present the evaluation of a dedicated framework which has been developed at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center to provide automated FLUKA MC simulations of clinical patient treatments with scanned proton and carbon ion beams. Investigations on the number of transported primaries and the dimension of the geometry and scoring grids have been performed for a representative class of patient cases in order to provide recommendations on the simulation settings, showing that recommendations derived from the experience in proton therapy cannot be directly translated to the case of carbon ion beams. The MC results with the optimized settings have been compared to the calculations of the analytical treatment planning system (TPS), showing that regardless of the consistency of the two systems (in terms of beam model in water and range calculation in different materials) relevant differences can be found in dosimetric quantities and range, especially in the case of heterogeneous and deep seated treatment sites depending on the ion beam species and energies, homogeneity of the traversed tissue and size of the treated volume. The analysis of typical TPS speed-up approximations highlighted effects which deserve accurate treatment, in contrast to adequate beam model simplifications for scanned ion beam therapy. In terms of biological dose calculations, the investigation of the mixed field components in realistic anatomical situations confirmed the findings of previous groups so far reported only in

  8. Linac-accelerator-radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Sturm, V; Schlegel, W; Pastyr, O; Treuer, H; Voges, J; Müller, R P; Lorenz, W J

    1993-01-01

    A survey is given of the actual possibilities and limitations of the use of linear accelerators (Linac radiosurgery systems) for intra = cranial radiosurgery. Depending on the collimator size, spherical fields from 5-54 mm in diameter can be irradiated with dose gradients from 10% (large fields) to 20% (small fields) per millimeter distance between surface and treatment volume. This is comparable to the possibilities of Gamma-Knife and Proton-irradiation. Optimal mechanical adjustment of gantry and linac table are necessary for the required stability of the isocenter. Mechanical inaccuracy should be smaller than 0.8 mm. Advanced computerized 3D-treatment planning systems are indispensable prerequisites for accurate treatment and use of the flexibility of the linac system. Future developments are outlined.

  9. Comparison of accelerating structures for the first cavity of the main part of the INR linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybakov, I. V.; Kalinin, Y. Z.; Leontev, V. N.; Naboka, A. N.; Paramonov, V. V.; Serov, V. L.; Feschenko, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    For the beam power improvement of the hydrogen-ion INR linac replacement of the first four-section cavity in the main part of linac is required. Existent cavity is realized using DAW structure on 991 MHz operating frequency. The new cavity should at least not lose in parameters to the current structure and essential changes in other linac systems are not wish able. Parameters of accelerating structures possible for such application are compared.

  10. Alternative Main Linac BNS Configuration for Reduced IP Energy Spread (LCC-0139)

    SciTech Connect

    Tenenbaum, P

    2004-05-24

    We present a series of alternate BNS phase configurations for the 500 GeV CM NLC main linac in which the energy spread at the end of the linac is reduced from its nominal 0.25% value. The energy spectrum, achievable IP beam energy, energy bias, and linac stability are evaluated for the alternate cases. We conclude that the RMS energy spread and energy bias in the NLC can easily be reduced but that modest reductions in CM energy are required.

  11. Parametic Study of the current limit within a single driver-scaletransport beam line of an induction Linac for Heavy Ion Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, Lionel Robert

    2004-01-01

    The High Current Experiment (HCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is part of the US program that explores heavy-ion beam as the driver option for fusion energy production in an Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) plant. The HCX is a beam transport experiment at a scale representative of the low-energy end of an induction linear accelerator driver. The primary mission of this experiment is to investigate aperture fill factors acceptable for the transport of space-charge-dominated heavy-ion beams at high intensity (line charge density ~0.2 μC/m) over long pulse durations (4 μs) in alternating gradient focusing lattices of electrostatic or magnetic quadrupoles. This experiment is testing transport issues resulting from nonlinear space-charge effects and collective modes, beam centroid alignment and steering, envelope matching, image charges and focusing field nonlinearities, halo and, electron and gas cloud effects. We present the results for a coasting 1 MeV K+ ion beam transported through ten electrostatic quadrupoles. The measurements cover two different fill factor studies (60% and 80% of the clear aperture radius) for which the transverse phase-space of the beam was characterized in detail, along with beam energy measurements and the first halo measurements. Electrostatic quadrupole transport at high beam fill factor (~80%) is achieved with acceptable emittance growth and beam loss. We achieved good envelope control, and re-matching may only be needed every ten lattice periods (at 80% fill factor) in a longer lattice of similar design. We also show that understanding and controlling the time dependence of the envelope parameters is critical to achieving high fill factors, notably because of the injector and matching section dynamics.

  12. Optimization of steering elements in the RIA driver linac.

    SciTech Connect

    Lessner, E. S.; Aseev, V. S.; Ostroumov, P. N.; Physics

    2005-01-01

    The driver linac of the projected RIA facility is a versatile accelerator, a 1.4-GV, CW superconducting (SC) linac designed to simultaneously accelerate several heavy-ion charge states, providing beams from proton to uranium at 400 MeV/u at power levels at a minimum of 100 kW and up to 400 kW for most beams. Acceleration of multiple-charge-state uranium beams places stringent requirements on the linac design. A steering algorithm was derived that fulfilled the driver's real estate requirements, such as placement of steering dipole coils on SC solenoids and of beam position monitors outside cryostats, and beam-dynamics requirements, such as coupling effects induced by the focusing solenoids. The algorithm has been fully integrated into the tracking code TRACK and it is used to study and optimize the number and position of steering elements that minimize the multiple-beam centroid oscillations and preserve the beam emittance under misalignments of accelerating and transverse focusing elements in the driver linac.

  13. Features Of The J-PARC Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Tetsuya

    2011-06-01

    Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) will be one of the highest intensity proton accelerators in the world aiming to realize 1 MW class of the beam power. The accelerator consists of a 400-MeV linac, a 3-GeV rapid-cycling synchrotron (RCS) and a main ring synchrotron (MR), and the accelerated beam is applied to several experimental facilities. The linac, which is the injector for the RCS, has about 50 cavity modules to accelerate the beam up to 400 MeV. The acceleration field error in all of them should be within {+-}1% in amplitude and {+-}1 degree in phase because the momentum spread of the RCS injection beam is required to be within 0.1%. For the cavity field stabilization, a high-stable optical signal distribution system is used as the RF reference, and sophisticated digital feedback and feed-forward system is working well in the low level RF control system. Consequently the providing beam to the RCS is very stable, and the beam commissioning and the experiments of the application facilities have been progressed steadily.

  14. Multiple-measurement beam probe

    SciTech Connect

    Gilpatrick, J.D.; Grant, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    Particle accelerators are becoming smaller and are producing more intense beams; therefore, it is critical that beam-diagnostic instrumentation provide accelerator operators and automated control systems with a complete set of beam information. Traditionally, these beam data were collected and processed using limited-bandwidth interceptive techniques. For the new-generation accelerators, we are developing a multiple-measurement microstrip probe to obtain broadband beam data from inside a drift tube without perturbing the beam. The cylindrical probe's dimensions are 6-cm OD by 1.0 m long, and the probe is mounted inside a drift tube. The probe (and its associated electronics) monitors bunched-beam current, energy, and transverse position by sensing the beam's electromagnetic fields through the annular opening in the drift tube. The electrical impedance is tightly controlled through the full length of the probe and transmission lines to maintain beam-induced signal fidelity. The probe's small, cylindrical structure is matched to beam-bunch characteristics at specific beamline locations so that signal-to-noise ratios are optimized. Surrounding the probe, a mechanical structure attaches to the drift-tube interior and the quadrupole magnets; thus, the entire assembly's mechanical and electrical centers can be aligned and calibrated with respect to the rest of the linac.

  15. Heavy-ion acceleration with a superconducting linac

    SciTech Connect

    Bollinger, L.M.

    1988-01-01

    This year, 1988, is the tenth anniversary of the first use of RF superconductivity to accelerate heavy ions. In June 1978, the first two superconducting resonators of the Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) were used to boost the energy of a /sup 19/F beam from the tandem, and by September 1978 a 5-resonator linac provided an /sup 16/O beam for a nuclear-physics experiment. Since then, the superconducting linac has grown steadily in size and capability until now there are 42 accelerating structures and 4 bunchers. Throughout this period, the system was used routinely for physics research, and by now the total time with beam on target is 35,000 hours. Lessons learned from this long running experience and some key technical developments that made it possible are reviewed in this paper. 19 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. H- ion sources for CERN's Linac4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lettry, J.; Aguglia, D.; Coutron, Y.; Chaudet, E.; Dallocchio, A.; Gil Flores, J.; Hansen, J.; Mahner, E.; Mathot, S.; Mattei, S.; Midttun, O.; Moyret, P.; Nisbet, D.; O'Neil, M.; Paoluzzi, M.; Pasquino, C.; Pereira, H.; Arias, J. Sanchez; Schmitzer, C.; Scrivens, R.; Steyaert, D.

    2013-02-01

    The specifications set to the Linac4 ion source are: H- ion pulses of 0.5 ms duration, 80 mA intensity and 45 keV energy within a normalized emittance of 0.25 mmmrad RMS at a repetition rate of 2 Hz. In 2010, during the commissioning of a prototype based on H- production from the plasma volume, it was observed that the powerful co-extracted electron beam inherent to this type of ion source could destroy its electron beam dump well before reaching nominal parameters. However, the same source was able to provide 80 mA of protons mixed with a small fraction of H2+ and H3+ molecular ions. The commissioning of the radio frequency quadrupole accelerator (RFQ), beam chopper and H- beam diagnostics of the Linac4 are scheduled for 2012 and its final installation in the underground building is to start in 2013. Therefore, a crash program was launched in 2010 and reviewed in 2011 aiming at keeping the original Linac4 schedule with the following deliverables: Design and production of a volume ion source prototype suitable for 20-30 mA H- and 80 mA proton pulses at 45 keV by mid-2012. This first prototype will be dedicated to the commissioning of the low energy components of the Linac4. Design and production of a second prototype suitable for 40-50 mA H- based on an external RF solenoid plasma heating and cesiated-surface production mechanism in 2013 and a third prototype based on BNL's Magnetron aiming at reliable 2 Hz and 80 mA H- operations in 2014. In order to ease the future maintenance and allow operation with Ion sources based on three different production principles, an ion source "front end" providing alignment features, pulsed gas injection, pumping units, beam tuning capabilities and pulsed bipolar high voltage acceleration was designed and is being produced. This paper describes the progress of the Linac4 ion source program, the design of the Front end and first ion source prototype. Preliminary results of the summer 2012 commissioning are presented. The outlook on

  17. Superconducting radiofrequency linac development at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Stephen D.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    As the Fermilab Tevatron Collider program draws to a close, a strategy has emerged of an experimental program built around the high intensity frontier. The centerpiece of this program is a superconducting H- linac that will support world leading programs in long baseline neutrino experimentation and the study of rare processes. Based on technology shared with the International Linear Collider, Project X will provide multi-MW beams at 60-120 GeV from the Main Injector, simultaneous with very high intensity beams at lower energies. Project X also supports development of a Muon Collider as a future facility at the energy frontier.

  18. Commissioning of the LCLS Linac and Bunch Compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Akre, R.; Brachmann, A.; Decker, F.-J.; Ding, Y.; Dowell, D.; Emma#, P.; Frisch, J.; Gilevich, S.; Hays, G.; Hering, Ph.; Huang, Z.; Iverson, R.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Loos, H.; Molloy, S.; Miahnahri, A.; Nuhn, H.-D.; Ratner, D.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; White, W.; /SLAC

    2008-08-20

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a SASE x-ray Free-Electron Laser (FEL) project under construction at SLAC [1]. The injector section, from drive-laser and RF photocathode gun through the first bunch compressor, was commissioned in the spring and summer of 2007. The second phase of commissioning, including the second bunch compressor and various main linac modifications, was completed in January through August of 2008. We report here on experience gained during this second phase of machine commissioning, including the injector, the first and second bunch compressor stages, the linac up to 14 GeV, and beam stability measurements. The final commissioning phase, including the undulator and the long transport line from the linac, is set to begin in December 2008, with first light expected in July 2009.

  19. The ISS protontherapy LINAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picardi, L.; Ronsivalle, C.; Vignati, A.

    1997-02-01

    The TERA foundation stimulated in the past years a comparative study of compact proton accelerators for therapy and at the end of 1995 the Italian National Institute of Health (Istituto Superiore di Sanità, ISS) decided for the construction of a proton linac for its TOP (Terapia Oncologica con Protoni) project. The TOP-LINAC will be composed of a 7 MeV RFQ+DTL injector followed by a 7-65 MeV section of the innovative 3 GHz SCDTL structure and a 65-200 MeV variable energy SCL 3 GHz structure. A 5-cavity model of the SCDTL has been built and measured on a RF test bench while a 11-cavities prototype (accelerating until 12.5 MeV) is under construction and will be assembled within few months. The TOP LINAC whose construction will start at the end of 1996, will be the first linear accelerator dedicated to proton therapy, and the first 3 GHz proton linac. In this paper the accelerator design and the construction schedule will be presented, and the SCDTL structure RF measurements will be discussed.

  20. PERFORMANCE OF THE SNS FRONT END AND WARM LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Allen, Christopher K; Cousineau, Sarah M; Danilov, Viatcheslav; Galambos, John D; Holmes, Jeffrey A; Jeon, Dong-O; Pelaia II, Tom; Plum, Michael A; Shishlo, Andrei P; Stockli, Martin P; Zhang, Yan

    2008-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source accelerator systems will deliver a 1.0 GeV, 1.4 MW proton beam to a liquid mercury target for neutron scattering research. The accelerator complex consists of an H{sup -} injector, capable of producing one-ms-long pulses at 60 Hz repetition rate with 38 mA peak current, a 1 GeV linear accelerator, an accumulator ring and associated transport lines. The 2.5 MeV beam from the Front End is accelerated to 87 MeV in the Drift Tube Linac, then to 186 MeV in a Coupled-Cavity Linac and finally to 1 GeV in the Superconducting Linac. With the completion of beam commissioning, the accelerator complex began operation in June 2006 and beam power is being gradually ramped up toward the design goal. Operational experience with the injector and linac will be presented including chopper performance, longitudinal beam dynamics study, and the results of a beam loss study.

  1. WE-D-BRD-01: Innovation in Radiation Therapy Delivery: Advanced Digital Linac Features

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, L; Wong, J; Li, R

    2014-06-15

    Last few years has witnessed significant advances in linac technology and therapeutic dose delivery method. Digital linacs equipped with high dose rate FFF beams have been clinically implemented in a number of hospitals. Gated VMAT is becoming increasingly popular in treating tumors affected by respiratory motion. This session is devoted to update the audience with these technical advances and to present our experience in clinically implementing the new linacs and dose delivery methods. Topics to be covered include, technical features of new generation of linacs from different vendors, dosimetric characteristics and clinical need for FFF-beam based IMRT and VMAT, respiration-gated VMAT, the concept and implementation of station parameter optimized radiation therapy (SPORT), beam level imaging and onboard image guidance tools. Emphasis will be on providing fundamental understanding of the new treatment delivery and image guidance strategies, control systems, and the associated dosimetric characteristics. Commissioning and acceptance experience on these new treatment delivery technologies will be reported. Clinical experience and challenges encountered during the process of implementation of the new treatment techniques and future applications of the systems will also be highlighted. Learning Objectives: Present background knowledge of emerging digital linacs and summarize their key geometric and dosimetric features. SPORT as an emerging radiation therapy modality specifically designed to take advantage of digital linacs. Discuss issues related to the acceptance and commissioning of the digital linacs and FFF beams. Describe clinical utility of the new generation of digital linacs and their future applications.

  2. Experiments and prospects for induction linac drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, D.

    1986-12-01

    In the last three years, the US program in Heavy Ion Fusion has concentrated on understanding the induction linac approach to a power-plant driver. In this method it is important that the beam current be maximized throughout the accelerator. Consequently, it is crucial to understand the space-charge limit in the AG transport system in the linac and, also, to achieve current amplification during acceleration to keep pace with the kinematical increase of this limit with energy. Experimental results on both these matters and also on the use of multiple beams (inside the same accelerating structure) will be described. A new examination of the most attractive properties of the induction linac for a fusion driver has clearly pointed to the advantage of using heavy ions with a charge-state greater than unity - perhaps q = 3 may be an optimum. This development places even greater importance on understanding space-charge limits and mechanisms for emittance growth; also, it will require a new emphasis on the development of a suitable ion source.

  3. Advanced RF power sources for linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1996-10-01

    In order to maintain a reasonable over-all length at high center-of-mass energy, the main linac of an electron-positron linear collider must operate at a high accelerating gradient. For copper (non-superconducting) accelerator structures, this implies a high peak power per unit length and a high peak power per RF source, assuming a limited number of discrete sources are used. To provide this power, a number of devices are currently under active development or conceptual consideration: conventional klystrons with multi-cavity output structures, gyroklystrons, magnicons, sheet-beam klystrons, multiple-beam klystrons and amplifiers based on the FEL principle. To enhance the peak power produced by an rf source, the SLED rf pulse compression scheme is currently in use on existing linacs, and new compression methods that produce a flatter output pulse are being considered for future linear colliders. This paper covers the present status and future outlook for the more important rf power sources and pulse compression systems. It should be noted that high gradient electron linacs have applications in addition to high-energy linear colliders; they can, for example, serve as compact injectors for FEL`s and storage rings.

  4. Experiments and prospects for induction linac drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe D.

    1986-05-01

    In the last three years, the US program in Heavy Ion Fusion has concentrated on understanding the induction linac approach to a power-plant driver. In this method it is important that the beam current be maximized throughout the accelerator. Consequently, it is crucial to understand the space-charge limit in the AG transport system in the linac and, also, to achieve current amplification during acceleration to keep pace with the kinematical increase of this limit with energy. Experimental results on both these matters and also on the use of multiple beams (inside the same accelerating structure) will be described. A new examination of the most attractive properties of the induction linac for a fusion driver has clearly pointed to the advantage of using heavy ions with a charge-state greater than unity - perhaps q = 3 may be an optimum. This development places even greater importance on understanding space-charge limits and mechanisms for emittance growth; also, it will require a new emphasis on the development of a suitable ion source.

  5. Analysis of the LSC microbunching instability in MaRIE linac reference design

    SciTech Connect

    Yampolsky, Nikolai

    2016-09-22

    In this report we estimate the effect of the microbunching instability in the MaRIE XFEL linac. The reference design for the linac is described in a separate report. The parameters of the L1, L2, and L3 linacs as well as BC1 and BC2 bunch compressors were the same as in the referenced report. The beam dynamics was assumed to be linear along the accelerator (which is a reasonable assumption for estimating the effect of the microbunching instability). The parameters of the bunch also match the parameters described in the referenced report. Additionally, it was assumed that the beam radius is equal to R = 100 m and does not change along linac. This assumption needs to be revisited at later studies. The beam dynamics during acceleration was accounted in the matrix formalism using a Matlab code. The input parameters for the linacs are: RF peak gradient, RF frequency, RF phase, linac length, and initial beam energy. The energy gain and the imposed chirp are calculated based on the RF parameters self-consistently. The bunch compressors are accounted in the matrix formalism as well. Each chicane is characterized by the beam energy and the R56 matrix element. It was confirmed that the linac and beam parameters described previously provide two-stage bunch compression with compression ratios of 10 and 20 resulting in the bunch of 3kA peak current.

  6. Undesirable nuclear reactions and induced radioactivity as a result of the use of the high-energy therapeutic beams generated by medical linacs.

    PubMed

    Konefal, Adam; Polaczek-Grelik, Kinga; Zipper, Wiktor

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of undesirable photonuclear, electronuclear and neutron capture reactions taking place in the treatment room during emission of the typical high-energy therapeutic beams from two different medical accelerators, i.e. Primus Siemens and Varian Clinac-2300, is presented. The radioisotopes (187)W, (56)Mn, (28)Al, (57)Ni, (38)Cl, (57)Co and (19)Au and the neutron activation of (1)H were identified as a consequence of these reactions. Moreover, the increased photon fluence rate behind the door of the accelerator bunker in the operator console room was observed during emission of the 20 MV X-rays from the Varian Clinac-2300 as well as in the case of the 15 MV X-ray beam from the Primus Siemens. No increased radiation was observed during the 6 MV X-ray beam emission. The performed measurements produced evidences on the presence of neutrons in the operator console room during emission of the 15 MV X-ray beam from the Primus Siemens as well as the 20 MV X-rays and the 22 MeV electrons from the Varian Clinac-2300 accelerator.

  7. A novel electron gun for inline MRI-linac configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Constantin, Dragoş E. Fahrig, Rebecca; Holloway, Lois; Keall, Paul J.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: This work introduces a new electron gun geometry capable of robust functioning in the presence of a high strength external magnetic field for axisymmetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-linac configurations. This allows an inline MRI-linac to operate without the need to isolate the linear accelerator (linac) using a magnetic shield. This MRI-linac integration approach not only leaves the magnet homogeneity unchanged but also provides the linac flexibility to move along the magnet axis of symmetry if the source to target distance needs to be adjusted. Methods: Simple electron gun geometry modifications of a Varian 600C electron gun are considered and solved in the presence of an external magnetic field in order to determine a set of design principles for the new geometry. Based on these results, a new gun geometry is proposed and optimized in the fringe field of a 0.5 T open bore MRI magnet (GE Signa SP). A computer model for the 6 MeV Varian 600C linac is used to determine the capture efficiency of the new electron gun-linac system in the presence of the fringe field of the same MRI scanner. The behavior of the new electron gun plus the linac system is also studied in the fringe fields of two other magnets, a 1.0 T prototype open bore magnet and a 1.5 T GE Conquest scanner. Results: Simple geometrical modifications of the original electron gun geometry do not provide feasible solutions. However, these tests show that a smaller transverse cathode diameter with a flat surface and a slightly larger anode diameter could alleviate the current loss due to beam interactions with the anode in the presence of magnetic fields. Based on these findings, an initial geometry resembling a parallel plate capacitor with a hole in the anode is proposed. The optimization procedure finds a cathode-anode distance of 5 mm, a focusing electrode angle of 5°, and an anode drift tube length of 17.1 mm. Also, the linac can be displaced with ±15 cm along the axis of the 0.5 T

  8. A new trajectory correction technique for linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Raubenheimer, T.O.; Ruth, R.D.

    1990-06-01

    In this paper, we describe a new trajectory correction technique for high energy linear accelerators. Current correction techniques force the beam trajectory to follow misalignments of the Beam Position Monitors. Since the particle bunch has a finite energy spread and particles with different energies are deflected differently, this causes chromatic'' dilution of the transverse beam emittance. The algorithm, which we describe in this paper, reduces the chromatic error by minimizing the energy dependence of the trajectory. To test the method we compare the effectiveness of our algorithm with a standard correction technique in simulations on a design linac for a Next Linear Collider. The simulations indicate that chromatic dilution would be debilitating in a future linear collider because of the very small beam sizes required to achieve the necessary luminosity. Thus, we feel that this technique will prove essential for future linear colliders. 3 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Experimental validation of a Monte Carlo-based kV x-ray projection model for the Varian linac-mounted cone-beam CT imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazos, Dimitrios; Pokhrel, Damodar; Su, Zhong; Lu, Jun; Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    2008-03-01

    Fast and accurate modeling of cone-beam CT (CBCT) x-ray projection data can improve CBCT image quality either by linearizing projection data for each patient prior to image reconstruction (thereby mitigating detector blur/lag, spectral hardening, and scatter artifacts) or indirectly by supporting rigorous comparative simulation studies of competing image reconstruction and processing algorithms. In this study, we compare Monte Carlo-computed x-ray projections with projections experimentally acquired from our Varian Trilogy CBCT imaging system for phantoms of known design. Our recently developed Monte Carlo photon-transport code, PTRAN, was used to compute primary and scatter projections for cylindrical phantom of known diameter (NA model 76-410) with and without bow-tie filter and antiscatter grid for both full- and half-fan geometries. These simulations were based upon measured 120 kVp spectra, beam profiles, and flat-panel detector (4030CB) point-spread function. Compound Poisson- process noise was simulated based upon measured beam output. Computed projections were compared to flat- and dark-field corrected 4030CB images where scatter profiles were estimated by subtracting narrow axial-from full axial width 4030CB profiles. In agreement with the literature, the difference between simulated and measured projection data is of the order of 6-8%. The measurement of the scatter profiles is affected by the long tails of the detector PSF. Higher accuracy can be achieved mainly by improving the beam modeling and correcting the non linearities induced by the detector PSF.

  10. Optimizing LINAC-based stereotactic radiotherapy of uveal melanomas: 7 years' clinical experience

    SciTech Connect

    Dieckmann, Karin . E-mail: Karin.Dieckmann@akhwien.at; Georg, Dietmar; Bogner, Joachim; Zehetmayer, Martin; Petersch, Bernhard; Chorvat, Martin; Weitmann, Hajo; Poetter, Richard

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To report on the clinical outcome of LINAC-based stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) of uveal melanomas. Additionally, a new prototype (hardware and software) for automated eye monitoring and gated SRT using a noninvasive eye fixation technique is described. Patients and Methods: Between June 1997 and March 2004, 158 patients suffering from uveal melanoma were treated at a LINAC with 6 MV (5 x 14 Gy; 5 x 12 Gy prescribed to 80% isodose) photon beams. To guarantee identical patient setup during treatment planning (CT and MRI) and treatment delivery, patients were immobilized with a BrainLAB thermoplastic mask. Eye immobilization was achieved by instructing the patient to fixate on a light source integrated into the mask system. A mini-video camera was used to provide on-line information about the eye and pupil position, respectively. A new CT and magnetic resonance (MR) compatible prototype, based on head-and-neck fixation and the infrared tracking system ExacTrac, has been developed and evaluated since 2002. This system records maximum temporal and angular deviations during treatment and, based on tolerance limits, a feedback signal to the LINAC enables gated SRT. Results: After a median follow-up of 33.4 months (range, 3-85 months), local control was achieved in 98%. Fifteen patients (9.0%) developed metastases. Secondary enucleation was performed in 23 patients (13.8%). Long-term side effects were retinopathy (n = 70; 44%), cataract (n = 30; 23%), optic neuropathy (n = 65; 41%), and secondary neovascular glaucoma (n = 23; 13.8%). Typical situations when preset deviation criteria were exceeded were slow drifts (fatigue), large sudden eye movements (irritation), or eye closing (fatigue). In these cases, radiation was reliably interrupted by the gating system. In our clinical setup, the novel system for computer-controlled gated SRT of uveal melanoma was well tolerated by about 30 of the patients treated with this system so far. Conclusion: LINAC-based SRT of

  11. Configuring the SLC linac for injection into PEP

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.L.F.

    1989-12-15

    From time to time the normal SLC physics program is to be interrupted so that beam can be delivered to PEP. In order that the switch to PEP injection (and the switch back again) can be accomplished quickly and easily, the gun, the damping rings, the linac phase ramp, the energy profile of the linac klystrons for the scavenger bunch, and the entire positron production system are to be kept the same as in the SLC configuration. What mainly remains to be changed is the linac klystron profile for the leading two bunches - those going to PEP. The new klystron profile must be such that it leaves these two beams (1) with final energies that match that of the storage ring and (2) with final energy spectra that fit within the energy aperture of the PEP transfer line. The conditions that need to be met in order to achieve these two goals are discussed in this note. 1 ref., 2 figs.

  12. The SLAC linac as used in the SLC collider

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, J.T.; Abrams, G.; Adolphsen, C.; Atwood, W.; Bane, K.L.F.; Iverson, R.; Jacobsen, R.; Himel, T.M.; Jobe, R.K.; Lavine, T.L.

    1989-06-01

    The linac of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) must accelerate three high intensity bunches on each linac pulse from 1.2 GeV to 50 GeV with minimal increase of the small transverse emittance. The procedures and adjustments used to obtain this goal are outlined. Some of the accelerator parameters and components which interact are the beam energy, transverse position, component alignment, RF manipulation, feedback systems, quadrupole lattice, BNS damping, energy spectra, phase space matching, collimation, instrumentation and modelling. The method to bring these interdependent parameters collectively into specification has evolved over several years. This review is ordered in the sequence which is used to turn on the linac from a cold start and produce acceptable beams for the final focus and collisions. Approximate time estimates for the various activities are given. 21 refs.

  13. Superconducting linacs: some recent developments

    SciTech Connect

    Bollinger, L.M.

    1985-01-01

    The paper is a review of superconducting linacs that are of interest for heavy-ion acceleration. Most of the paper is concerned with energy boosters for projectiles from tandem electrostatic accelerators, the only application for which superconducting linacs are now used for heavy-ion acceleration. There is also a brief discussion of the concept of a superconducting injector linac being developed as a replacement of the tandem in a multi-stage acceleration system. Throughout, the emphasis is on the technology of the superconducting linac, including some attention to the relationships between resonator design parameters and accelerator performance characteristics. 21 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Proposal for the use of the AGS linac for proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Alessi, J.G.; Chanana, A.; Dilmanian, F.A.; Lee, Y.Y.; Raparia, D.; Wielopolski, L.

    1994-10-01

    The BNL 200 MeV linac presently provides beam for the AGS high energy physics program and for isotope production at the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP,) facility. There is now a proposal to develop a proton therapy facility which would also use the linac beam. Approximately 1% of the current in each linac beam pulse would be diverted from BLIP, down an existing transport line, to the proposed new facility. This paper focuses on the basic design of the facility, particularly the accelerator issues. The planned transport line layout is presented, along with a description of the energy and intensity control, and beam delivery systems. In the initial phase, we are planning one 360{degrees} vertical gantry and one horizontal treatment room.

  15. [Linac based radiosurgery; a technical report].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, H; Asaga, A; Sakudoh, M; Hoshino, S; Katsuta, S; Akine, Y

    1992-07-01

    A method for highly dose-localized irradiation using a linear accelerator (linac) for a brain tumor has been developed. The method requires a linac, a computed tomography (CT) system, a CT simulator, and a treatment planning system for radiotherapy, with which most major radiotherapy centers are equipped. To immobilize a patient during irradiation, a custom-made device made of synthetic material which became flexible with heating was used. With the CT system and the CT simulator the target was identified and geometrical data for positioning the tumor at a point to which x-ray beams were directed (an isocenter of the linac) were obtained. By rotating a treatment couch it was made possible for the x-ray source to rotate around the isocenter on multiple planes. Dose distribution obtained with this method was compared to that of the gamma unit and found comparable. Since the method requires no invasive procedure, it appears suitable for treatment, with fractionated irradiation, of malignant tumors.

  16. SU-F-BRB-16: A Spreadsheet Based Automatic Trajectory GEnerator (SAGE): An Open Source Tool for Automatic Creation of TrueBeam Developer Mode Robotic Trajectories

    SciTech Connect

    Etmektzoglou, A; Mishra, P; Svatos, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To automate creation and delivery of robotic linac trajectories with TrueBeam Developer Mode, an open source spreadsheet-based trajectory generation tool has been developed, tested and made freely available. The computing power inherent in a spreadsheet environment plus additional functions programmed into the tool insulate users from the underlying schema tedium and allow easy calculation, parameterization, graphical visualization, validation and finally automatic generation of Developer Mode XML scripts which are directly loadable on a TrueBeam linac. Methods: The robotic control system platform that allows total coordination of potentially all linac moving axes with beam (continuous, step-and-shoot, or combination thereof) becomes available in TrueBeam Developer Mode. Many complex trajectories are either geometric or can be described in analytical form, making the computational power, graphing and programmability available in a spreadsheet environment an easy and ideal vehicle for automatic trajectory generation. The spreadsheet environment allows also for parameterization of trajectories thus enabling the creation of entire families of trajectories using only a few variables. Standard spreadsheet functionality has been extended for powerful movie-like dynamic graphic visualization of the gantry, table, MLC, room, lasers, 3D observer placement and beam centerline all as a function of MU or time, for analysis of the motions before requiring actual linac time. Results: We used the tool to generate and deliver extended SAD “virtual isocenter” trajectories of various shapes such as parameterized circles and ellipses. We also demonstrated use of the tool in generating linac couch motions that simulate respiratory motion using analytical parameterized functions. Conclusion: The SAGE tool is a valuable resource to experiment with families of complex geometric trajectories for a TrueBeam Linac. It makes Developer Mode more accessible as a vehicle to quickly

  17. Status of the Project-X CW Linac Design

    SciTech Connect

    Ostiguy, J-F.; Solyak, N.; Berrutti, P.; Carneiro, J.P.; Lebedev, V.; Nagaitsev, S.; Saini, A.; Stheynas, B.; Yakovlev, V.P.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Project-X is a proposed proton accelerator complex at Fermilab that would provide particle beams to support a diversified experimental program at the intensity frontier. As currently envisioned, the complex would employ a CW superconducting linac to accelerate a 1 mA average, 5 mA peak H{sup -} beam from 2.1 MeV to 3 GeV. A second superconducting linac, operating in pulsed mode would ultimately accelerate a small fraction of this beam up to 8 GeV. The CW linac is based on five families of resonators operating at three frequencies: half-wave (1 family at 162.5 MHz), spoke (2 families at 325 MHz) and elliptical (2 families at 650 MHz). Accelerating and focusing elements are assembled in cryomodules separated by short warm sections. A long open region ({approx} 15 m) allows beam extraction at 1 GeV in support of a nuclear experimental program. In this paper, we present the latest iteration of the CW linac baseline lattice. We also briefly compare it to an alternative where the 162.5 half-wave resonators are replaced with 325 MHz spoke resonators.

  18. HOM Consideration of 704 MHz and 2.1 GHz Cavities for LEReC Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Binping; Belomestnykh, Sergey; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Brennan, Joseph; Brutus, Jean Clifford; Fedotov, Alexei; Hahn, Harald; McIntyre, Gary; Pai, Chien; Smith, Kevin; Tuozzolo, Joseph; Veshcherevich, Vadim; Wu, Qiong; Xin, Tianmu; Xu, Wencan; Zaltsman, Alex

    2016-06-01

    To improve RHIC luminosity for heavy ion beam energies below 10 GeV/nucleon, the Low Energy RHIC electron Cooler (LEReC) is currently under development at BNL. The Linac of LEReC is designed to deliver 2 MV to 5 MV electron beam, with rms dp/p less than 5·10⁻⁴. The HOM in this Linac is carefully studied to ensure this specification.

  19. Status of the fluorescent screens and image processing for the APS linac

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, W.; Ko, K.

    1993-11-01

    Ten fluorescent screens and cameras determine the relative position and image profile of the beam in both the electron and positron linacs at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The timing techniques used to capture the beam image allow direct synchronization to the electron gun trigger to minimize timing uncertainties. This paper discusses the design and status of the APS linac fluorescent screen assemblies and imaging system.

  20. Conceptual Design for Replacement of the DTL and CCL with Superconducting RF Cavities in the Spallation Neutron Source Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Champion, Mark S; Doleans, Marc; Kim, Sang-Ho

    2013-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source Linac utilizes normal conducting RF cavities in the low energy section from 2.5 MeV to 186 MeV. Six Drift Tube Linac (DTL) structures accelerate the beam to 87 MeV, and four Coupled Cavity Linac (CCL) structures provide further acceleration to 186 MeV. The remainder of the Linac is comprised of 81 superconducting cavities packaged in 23 cryomodules to provide final beam energy of approximately 1 GeV. The superconducting Linac has proven to be substantially more reliable than the normal conducting Linac despite the greater number of stations and the complexity associated with the cryogenic plant and distribution. A conceptual design has been initiated on a replacement of the DTL and CCL with superconducting RF cavities. The motivation, constraints, and conceptual design are presented.

  1. Computer optimization of a linac injector trajectory

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, C.; Detch, J.L. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    One can determine a computer prediction of the beam radius as a function of axial distance for a linac beam by providing a set of inputs to the computer code, ZFIELD. The trajectory may be improved by varying the magnet current values in the code, but repeated trails may still not attain the best trajectory. Starting with a set of points containing the desired trajectory, one may work the problem backwards and obtain the necessary magnet currents required by the trajectory. In the examples given, a portion of the trajectory is chosen to be parabolic. The trajectory information is used with a differential equation involving beam radius and its derivatives to yield the magnetic field as a function of axial position. Matrix methods are used to obtain the magnet currents from the magnetic field. 4 references, 6 figures.

  2. Laser system for a subpicosecond electron linac.

    SciTech Connect

    Crowell, R. A.

    1998-09-25

    At the Argonne Chemistry Division efforts are underway to develop a sub-picosecond electron beam pulse radiolysis facility for chemical studies. The target output of the accelerator is to generate electron pulses that can be adjusted from 3nC in .6ps to 100nC in 45ps. In conjunction with development of the accelerator a state-of-the-art ultrafast laser system is under construction that will drive the linac's photocathode and provide probe pulses that are tunable from the UV to IR spectral regions.

  3. High energy beam lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetto, M.; Laxdal, R. E.

    2014-01-01

    The ISAC post accelerator comprises an RFQ, DTL and SC-linac. The high energy beam lines connect the linear accelerators as well as deliver the accelerated beams to two different experimental areas. The medium energy beam transport (MEBT) line connects the RFQ to the DTL. The high energy beam transport (HEBT) line connects the DTL to the ISAC-I experimental stations (DRAGON, TUDA-I, GPS). The DTL to superconducting beam (DSB) transport line connects the ISAC-I and ISAC-II linacs. The superconducting energy beam transport (SEBT) line connects the SC linac to the ISAC-II experimental station (TUDA-II, HERACLES, TIGRESS, EMMA and GPS). All these lines have the function of transporting and matching the beams to the downstream sections by manipulating the transverse and longitudinal phase space. They also contain diagnostic devices to measure the beam properties.

  4. Resonance effects of longitudinal HOMS in Project X linac

    SciTech Connect

    Yakovlev, V.; Vostrikov, A.; Gonin, I.; Khabiboulline, T.; Lunin, A.; Solyak, N.; Saini, a.; Sukhanov, A.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Results of analysis of losses due to excitation of longitudinal high order modes (HOMs) in the accelerating RF system of the CW proton linac of the Project X facility are presented. The necessity of HOM dampers in the superconducting (SC) cavities of the linac is discussed. Project X is a multi-MW proton source which is under development at Fermilab. The facility is based on a 3 GeV CW linac. The main fraction of H{sup -} beam from the linac is split into three parts for Mu2e experiment, kaon experiments, and another which is not yet decided. The layout of the linac is shown in Figure 1. It includes three sections based on 325 MHz single-spoke cavities, and a low-energy and a high-energy sections of 650 MHz elliptical cavities with geometrical beta of 0.61 and 0.9, respectively. The linac provides a beam with an average current of 1 mA and time structure (shown in Figure 2) devised to satisfy specific requirements of the experiments. Each bunch contains 9 {center_dot} 10{sup 7} H{sup -} ions. The bunch sequence frequency for the Mu2e experiment is 162.5 MHz with a total pulse duration of 100 ns and pulse repetition rate of 1 MHz. The bunch sequence frequency for Kaon and other experiments is 27.08 MHz. Figure 3 shows the idealized beam current spectrum, which contains harmonics of multiplies of 27.08 MHz and harmonics of multiplies of 1 MHz. The 5-cell 650 MHz cavities for Project X are currently under development. A critical design decision is to define the necessity of HOM dampers for these types of cavities.

  5. Preliminary Analysis on Linac Oscillation Data LI05-19 and Wake Field Energy Loss in FACET Commissioning 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yipeng; /SLAC

    2012-07-23

    In this note, preliminary analysis on linac ocsillation data in FACET linac LI05-09 plus LI11-19 is presented. Several quadrupoles are identified to possibly have different strength, compared with their designed strength in the MAD optics model. The beam energy loss due to longitudinal wake fields in the S-band linac is also analytically calculated, also by LITRACK numerical simulations.

  6. ZDR - Simulation Studies of the NLC Main Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Assmann, R.

    2005-01-26

    This study was published as part of the Next Linear Collider (NLC) Zeroth order Design Report (ZDR) [1]. It addresses the problems of transporting very small emittance beams in the main linacs of the NLC. Several mechanisms of emittance dilution and correction are calculated in detail. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the NLC main linac design under the assumption that the specified device tolerances are met. The full text of the ZDR is available on the WWW under http://www.slac.stanford.edu/accel/nlc/zdr/.

  7. MBE-4: an induction linac experiment for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Fessenden, T.J.; Avery, R.T.; Brodzik, D.A.; Faltens, A.; Gough, D.E.; Henderson, T.F.; Judd, D.L.; Keefe, D.; Kim, C.; Laslett, L.J.

    1986-06-01

    The multiple-beam induction linac approach to a heavy ion fusion driver features continuous current amplification along the accelerator and a minimum of transverse beam manipulation from source to pellet. Current amplification and bunch length control require careful shaping of the accelerating voltages. This driver approach exploits developments in electron induction linac technology that have occurred within the last 15 years at LBL, LLNL and NBS. MBE-4 is a four beam induction linac that models much of the accelerator physics of the electrostatically focused section of a considerably longer induction accelerator. Four parallel Cs/sup +/ beams are electrostatically focussed and will be accelerated from 200 keV to approximately one MeV when the experiment is complete in the spring of 1987. The current in each of the four beams will increase from 10 to 40 mA due to both increase in beam speed and shortening of the bunch length. Results of experiments with the injector and first eight accelerating gaps are presented.

  8. Automated Patient Positioning Guided by Cone-Beam CT for Prostate Radiotherapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    phantom consisting of bladder, prostate, rectum and bony structures. The study was detailed in the previous annual progress report. We have further...developed and clinically implemented an automated patient positioning strategy and tested with phantom experiments; (2) developed image-to-projection...used. Figure 1 shows an example of uch a plot for the periodically moving phantom . The projections re phase-tagged according to the resultant sinusoidal

  9. Acceleration units for the Induction Linac Systems Experiment (ILSE)

    SciTech Connect

    Faltens, A.; Brady, V.; Brodzik, D.; Hansen, L.; Laslett, L.J.; Mukherjee, S.; Bubp, D.; Ravenscroft, D.; Reginato, L.

    1989-03-01

    The design of a high current heavy ion induction linac driver for inertial confinement fusion is optimized by adjusting the acceleration units along the length of the accelerator to match the beam current, energy, and pulse duration at any location. At the low energy end of the machine the optimum is a large number of electrostatically focused parallel beamlets, whereas at higher energies the optimum is a smaller number of magnetically focused beams. ILSE parallels this strategy by using 16 electrostatically focused beamlets at the low end followed by 4 magnetically focused beams after beam combining. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  10. SU-E-T-142: Automatic Linac Log File: Analysis and Reporting

    SciTech Connect

    Gainey, M; Rothe, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: End to end QA for IMRT/VMAT is time consuming. Automated linac log file analysis and recalculation of daily recorded fluence, and hence dose, distribution bring this closer. Methods: Matlab (R2014b, Mathworks) software was written to read in and analyse IMRT/VMAT trajectory log files (TrueBeam 1.5, Varian Medical Systems) overnight, and are archived on a backed-up network drive (figure). A summary report (PDF) is sent by email to the duty linac physicist. A structured summary report (PDF) for each patient is automatically updated for embedding into the R&V system (Mosaiq 2.5, Elekta AG). The report contains cross-referenced hyperlinks to ease navigation between treatment fractions. Gamma analysis can be performed on planned (DICOM RTPlan) and treated (trajectory log) fluence distributions. Trajectory log files can be converted into RTPlan files for dose distribution calculation (Eclipse, AAA10.0.28, VMS). Results: All leaf positions are within +/−0.10mm: 57% within +/−0.01mm; 89% within 0.05mm. Mean leaf position deviation is 0.02mm. Gantry angle variations lie in the range −0.1 to 0.3 degrees, mean 0.04 degrees. Fluence verification shows excellent agreement between planned and treated fluence. Agreement between planned and treated dose distribution, the derived from log files, is very good. Conclusion: Automated log file analysis is a valuable tool for the busy physicist, enabling potential treated fluence distribution errors to be quickly identified. In the near future we will correlate trajectory log analysis with routine IMRT/VMAT QA analysis. This has the potential to reduce, but not eliminate, the QA workload.

  11. An automated system for studying the power distribution of electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Filarowski, C.A.

    1994-12-01

    Precise welds with an electron beam welder are difficult to reproduce because the factors effecting the electron beam current density distribution are not easily controlled. One method for measuring the power density distribution in EB welds uses computer tomography to reconstruct an image of the current density distribution. This technique uses many separate pieces of hardware and software packages to obtain the data and then reconstruct it consequently, transferring this technology between different machines and operators is difficult. Consolidating all of the hardware and software into one machine to execute the same tasks will allow for real-time measurement of the EB power density distribution and will provide a facilitated means for transferring various welding procedure between different machines and operators, thereby enhancing reproducibility of electron beam welds.

  12. A hot-spare injector for the APS linac.

    SciTech Connect

    Lewellen, J. W.

    1999-04-13

    Last year a second-generation SSRL-type thermionic cathode rf gun was installed in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) linac. This gun (referred to as ''gun2'') has been successfully commissioned and now serves as the main injector for the APS linac, essentially replacing the Koontz-type DC gun. To help ensure injector availability, particularly with the advent of top-up mode operation at the APS, a second thermionic-cathode rf gun will be installed in the APS linac to act as a hot-spare beam source. The hot-spare installation includes several unique design features, including a deep-orbit Panofsky-style alpha magnet. Details of the hot-spare beamline design and projected performance are presented, along with some plans for future performance upgrades.

  13. Solenoid-based focusing in a proton linac

    SciTech Connect

    Terechkine, I; DiMarco, J.; Schappert, W.; Sergatskov, d.; Tartaglia, M.; /Fermilab

    2010-09-01

    Development of solenoid-based focusing lenses for the transport channel of an R&D linac front end at FNAL (HINS linac) is in its final stage. Superconducting lenses for the room temperature RF section of the linac are assembled into individual cryostats and certified using a dedicated test stand. During this certification process, the optical axis of each lens relative to the cryogenic vessel is found in the warm and cold state. Lenses for the superconducting RF sections are ready for production, and development of a cryomodule (which contains multiple superconducting lenses and RF cavities) is in progress. Studies have been conducted to measure fringe magnetic field of a lens in the cryomodule, to investigate a laser-based method of alignment, and to evaluate the extent of beam quality degradation due to imperfections in lens construction and alignment. This report presents some results of these studies.

  14. RIA Superconducting Drift Tube Linac R & D

    SciTech Connect

    J. Popielarski; J. Bierwagen; S. Bricker; C. Compton; J. DeLauter; P. Glennon; T. Grimm; W. Hartung; D. Harvell; M. Hodek; M. Johnson; F. Marti; P. Miller; A. Moblo; D. Norton; L. Popielarski; J. Wlodarczak; R. C. York; A. Zeller

    2009-05-22

    Cavity and cryomodule development work for a superconducting ion linac has been underway for several years at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory. The original application of the work was the proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator. At present, the work is being continued for use with the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). The baseline linac for FRIB requires 4 types of superconducting cavities to cover the velocity range needed to accelerate an ion beam to 200 MeV/u: 2 types of quarter-wave resonator (QWR) and 2 types of half-wave resonator (HWR). Superconducting solenoids are used for focussing. Active and passive shielding is required to ensure that the solenoids’ field does not degrade the cavity performance. First prototypes of both QWR types and one HWR type have been fabricated and tested. A prototype solenoid has been procured and tested. A test cryomodule has been fabricated and tested. The test cryomodule contains one QWR, one HWR, one solenoid, and one super-ferric quadrupole. This report covers the design, fabrication, and testing of this cryomodule

  15. An energy recovery electron linac-on-ring collider

    SciTech Connect

    Merminga, L.; Krafft, G.A.; Lebedev, V.A.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    2000-09-14

    We present the design of high-luminosity electron-proton/ion colliders in which the electrons are produced by an Energy Recovering Linac (ERL). Electron-proton/ion colliders with center of mass energies between 14 GeV and 100 GeV (protons) or 63 GeV/A (ions) and luminosities at the 10{sup 33}(per nucleon) level have been proposed recently as a means for studying hadronic structure. The linac-on-ring option presents significant advantages with respect to: (1) spin manipulations (2) reduction of the synchrotron radiation load in the detectors (3) a wide range of continuous energy variability. Rf power and beam dump considerations require that the electron linac recover the beam energy. Based on extrapolations from actual measurements and calculations, energy recovery is expected to be feasible at currents of a few hundred mA and multi-GeV energies. Luminosity projections for the linac-ring scenario based on fundamental limitations are presented. The feasibility of an energy recovery electron linac-on-proton ring collider is investigated and four conceptual point designs are shown corresponding to electron to proton energies of: 3 GeV on 15 GeV, 5 GeV on 50 GeV and 10 GeV on 250 GeV, and for gold ions with 100 GeV/A. The last two designs assume that the protons or ions are stored in the existing RHIC accelerator. Accelerator physics issues relevant to proton rings and energy recovery linacs are discussed and a list of required R and D for the realization of such a design is presented.

  16. Beam diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Bogaty, J.; Clifft, B.E.; Zinkann, G.P.; Pardo, R.C.

    1995-08-01

    The ECR-PII injector beam line is operated at a fixed ion velocity. The platform high voltage is chosen so that all ions have a velocity of 0.0085c at the PII entrance. If a previous tune configuration for the linac is to be used, the beam arrival time must be matched to the previous tune as well. A nondestructive beam-phase pickup detector was developed and installed at the entrance to the PII linac. This device provides continuous phase and beam current information and allows quick optimization of the beam injected into PII. Bunches traverse a short tubular electrode thereby inducing displacement currents. These currents are brought outside the vacuum interface where a lumped inductance resonates electrode capacitance at one of the bunching harmonic frequencies. This configuration yields a basic sensitivity of a few hundred millivolts signal per microampere of beam current. Beam-induced radiofrequency signals are summed against an offset frequency generated by our master oscillator. The resulting kilohertz difference frequency conveys beam intensity and bunch phase information which is sent to separate processing channels. One channel utilizes a phase locked loop which stabilizes phase readings if beam is unstable. The other channel uses a linear full wave active rectifier circuit which converts kilohertz sine wave signal amplitude to a D.C. voltage representing beam current. A prototype set of electronics is now in use with the detector and we began to use the system in operation to set the arrival beam phase. A permanent version of the electronics system for the phase detector is now under construction. Additional nondestructive beam intensity and phase monitors at the {open_quotes}Booster{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}ATLAS{close_quotes} linac sections are planned as well as on some of the high-energy beam lines. Such a monitor will be particularly useful for FMA experiments where the primary beam hits one of the electric deflector plates.

  17. Design and construction of the main linac module for the superconducting energy recovery linac project at Cornell

    SciTech Connect

    Eichhorn, R.; Bullock, B.; He, Y.; Hoffstaetter, G.; Liepe, M.; O'Connell, T.; Quigley, P.; Sabol, D.; Sears, J.; Smith, E.; Veshcherevich, V.

    2014-01-29

    Cornell University has been designing and building superconducting accelerators for various applications for more than 50 years. Currently, an energy-recovery linac (ERL) based synchrotron-light facility is proposed making use of the existing CESR facility. As part of the phase 1 R and D program funded by the NSF, critical challenges in the design were addressed, one of them being a full linac cryo-module. It houses 6 superconducting cavities- operated at 1.8 K in continuous wave (CW) mode - with individual HOM absorbers and one magnet/ BPM section. Pushing the limits, a high quality factor of the cavities (2⋅10{sup 10}) and high beam currents (100 mA accelerated plus 100 mA decelerated) are targeted. We will present the design of the main linac cryo-module (MLC) being finalized recently, its cryogenic features and report on the status of the fabrication which started in late 2012.

  18. A quality assurance framework for the fully automated and objective evaluation of image quality in cone-beam computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Steiding, Christian; Kolditz, Daniel; Kalender, Willi A.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Thousands of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanners for vascular, maxillofacial, neurological, and body imaging are in clinical use today, but there is no consensus on uniform acceptance and constancy testing for image quality (IQ) and dose yet. The authors developed a quality assurance (QA) framework for fully automated and time-efficient performance evaluation of these systems. In addition, the dependence of objective Fourier-based IQ metrics on direction and position in 3D volumes was investigated for CBCT. Methods: The authors designed a dedicated QA phantom 10 cm in length consisting of five compartments, each with a diameter of 10 cm, and an optional extension ring 16 cm in diameter. A homogeneous section of water-equivalent material allows measuring CT value accuracy, image noise and uniformity, and multidimensional global and local noise power spectra (NPS). For the quantitative determination of 3D high-contrast spatial resolution, the modulation transfer function (MTF) of centrally and peripherally positioned aluminum spheres was computed from edge profiles. Additional in-plane and axial resolution patterns were used to assess resolution qualitatively. The characterization of low-contrast detectability as well as CT value linearity and artifact behavior was tested by utilizing sections with soft-tissue-equivalent and metallic inserts. For an automated QA procedure, a phantom detection algorithm was implemented. All tests used in the dedicated QA program were initially verified in simulation studies and experimentally confirmed on a clinical dental CBCT system. Results: The automated IQ evaluation of volume data sets of the dental CBCT system was achieved with the proposed phantom requiring only one scan for the determination of all desired parameters. Typically, less than 5 min were needed for phantom set-up, scanning, and data analysis. Quantitative evaluation of system performance over time by comparison to previous examinations was also

  19. Energy Recovery Linacs for Light Source Applications

    SciTech Connect

    George Neil

    2011-04-01

    Energy Recovery Linacs are being considered for applications in present and future light sources. ERLs take advantage of the continuous operation of superconducting rf cavities to accelerate high average current beams with low losses. The electrons can be directed through bends, undulators, and wigglers for high brightness x ray production. They are then decelerated to low energy, recovering power so as to minimize the required rf drive and electrical draw. When this approach is coupled with advanced continuous wave injectors, very high power, ultra-short electron pulse trains of very high brightness can be achieved. This paper will review the status of worldwide programs and discuss the technology challenges to provide such beams for photon production.

  20. PLIAC: A Pion Linac facility for 1-GEV pion physics at LAMPF

    SciTech Connect

    Spalek, G.; Thiessen, H.A.

    1991-01-01

    A design study for a Pion Linac (PILAC) at LAMPF is underway at Los Alamos. We present here a reference design for a system of pion source, linac, and high-resolution beam line and spectrometer that will provide 10{sup 9} pions per second on target and 200-keV resolution for the ({pi}{sup +}, K{sup +}) reaction at 0.92 GeV. A general-purpose beam line that delivers both positive and negative pions in the energy range 0.4--1.1 GeV is included, thus opening up the possibility of a broad experimental program as is discussed in this report. A kicker-based beam sharing system allows delivery of beam to both beamlines simultaneously with independent sign and energy control. Because the pion linac acts like an rf particle separator, all beams produced by PILAC will be free of electron (or positron) and proton contamination.

  1. PLIAC: A Pion Linac facility for 1-GEV pion physics at LAMPF

    SciTech Connect

    Spalek, G.; Thiessen, H.A.

    1991-12-31

    A design study for a Pion Linac (PILAC) at LAMPF is underway at Los Alamos. We present here a reference design for a system of pion source, linac, and high-resolution beam line and spectrometer that will provide 10{sup 9} pions per second on target and 200-keV resolution for the ({pi}{sup +}, K{sup +}) reaction at 0.92 GeV. A general-purpose beam line that delivers both positive and negative pions in the energy range 0.4--1.1 GeV is included, thus opening up the possibility of a broad experimental program as is discussed in this report. A kicker-based beam sharing system allows delivery of beam to both beamlines simultaneously with independent sign and energy control. Because the pion linac acts like an rf particle separator, all beams produced by PILAC will be free of electron (or positron) and proton contamination.

  2. An Energy Recovery Electron Linac On Ring Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolitsa Merminga; Geoffrey Krafft; Valeri Lebedev; Ilan Ben-Zvi

    2001-09-01

    Electron-proton/ion colliders with center of mass energies between 14 GeV and 100 GeV (protons) or 63 GeV/A (ions) and luminosities at the 10{sup 33} (per nucleon) level have been proposed recently as a means for studying hadronic structure. Electron beam polarization appears to be crucial for many of the experiments. Two accelerator design scenarios have been examined in detail: colliding rings and recirculating linac-on-ring. Although the linac-on-ring scenario is not as well developed as the ring-ring scenario, comparable luminosities appear feasible. The linac-on-ring option presents significant advantages with respect to: (1) spin manipulations; (2) reduction of the synchrotron radiation load in the detectors; (3) a wide range of continuous energy variability. Rf power and beam dump considerations require that the electron linac recover the beam energy. This technology has been demonstrated at Jefferson Lab's IR FEL with cw current up to 5 mA and beam energy up to 50 MeV. Based on extrapolations from actual measurements and calculations, energy recovery is expected to be feasible at higher currents (a few hundred mA) and higher energies (a few GeV) as well. The report begins with a brief overview of Jefferson Lab's experience with energy recovery and summarize its benefits. Luminosity projections for the linac-ring scenario based on fundamental limitations are presented next. The feasibility of an energy recovery electron linac-on-proton ring collider is investigated and four conceptual point designs are shown corresponding to electron to proton energies of: 3 GeV on 15 GeV, 5 GeV on 50 GeV and 10 GeV on 250 GeV, and for gold ions with 100 GeV/A. The last two designs assume that the protons or ions are stored in the existing RHIC accelerator. Accelerator physics issues relevant to proton rings and energy recovery linacs are discussed next and a list of required R and D for the realization of such a design is presented.

  3. Superconducting resonator used as a phase and energy detector for linac setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanov, Nikolai R.

    2016-07-01

    Booster linacs for tandem accelerators and positive ion superconducting injectors have matured into standard features of many accelerator laboratories. Both types of linac are formed as an array of independently-phased resonators operating at room temperature or in a superconducting state. Each accelerating resonator needs to be individually set in phase and amplitude for optimum acceleration efficiency. The modularity of the linac allows the velocity profile along the structure to be tailored to accommodate a wide range charge to mass ratio. The linac setup procedure, described in this paper, utilizes a superconducting resonator operating in a beam bunch phase detection mode. The main objective was to derive the full set of phase distributions for quick and efficient tuning of the entire accelerator. The phase detector was operated in overcoupling mode in order to minimize de-tuning effects of microphonic background. A mathematical expression was derived to set a limit on resonator maximum accelerating field during the crossover search to enable extracting unambiguous beam phase data. A set of equations was obtained to calculate the values of beam phase advance and energy gain produced by accelerating resonators. An extensive range of linac setting up configurations was conducted to validate experimental procedures and analytical models. The main application of a superconducting phase detector is for fast tuning for beams of ultralow intensities, in particular in the straight section of linac facilities.

  4. Demonstration of electronic design automation flow for massively parallel e-beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Pieter; Belledent, Jérôme; Tranquillin, Céline; Figueiro, Thiago; Meunier, Stéfanie; Bayle, Sébastien; Fay, Aurélien; Milléquant, Matthieu; Icard, Beatrice; Wieland, Marco

    2014-07-01

    For proximity effect correction in 5 keV e-beam lithography, three elementary building blocks exist: dose modulation, geometry (size) modulation, and background dose addition. Combinations of these three methods are quantitatively compared in terms of throughput impact and process window (PW). In addition, overexposure in combination with negative bias results in PW enhancement at the cost of throughput. In proximity effect correction by over exposure (PEC-OE), the entire layout is set to fixed dose and geometry sizes are adjusted. In PEC-dose to size (DTS) both dose and geometry sizes are locally optimized. In PEC-background (BG), a background is added to correct the long-range part of the point spread function. In single e-beam tools (Gaussian or Shaped-beam), throughput heavily depends on the number of shots. In raster scan tools such as MAPPER Lithography's FLX 1200 (MATRIX platform) this is not the case and instead of pattern density, the maximum local dose on the wafer is limiting throughput. The smallest considered half-pitch is 28 nm, which may be considered the 14-nm node for Metal-1 and the 10-nm node for the Via-1 layer, achieved in a single exposure with e-beam lithography. For typical 28-nm-hp Metal-1 layouts, it was shown that dose latitudes (size of process window) of around 10% are realizable with available PEC methods. For 28-nm-hp Via-1 layouts this is even higher at 14% and up. When the layouts do not reach the highest densities (up to 10∶1 in this study), PEC-BG and PEC-OE provide the capability to trade throughput for dose latitude. At the highest densities, PEC-DTS is required for proximity correction, as this method adjusts both geometry edges and doses and will reduce the dose at the densest areas. For 28-nm-hp lines critical dimension (CD), hole&dot (CD) and line ends (edge placement error), the data path errors are typically 0.9, 1.0 and 0.7 nm (3σ) and below, respectively. There is not a clear data path performance difference between

  5. Calculation of acceptance of high intensity superconducting proton linac for Project X

    SciTech Connect

    Saini, A.; Ranjan, K.; Solyak, N.; Mishra, S.; Yakovlev, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Project-X is the proposed high intensity proton facility to be built at Fermilab, US. Its Superconducting Linac, to be used at first stage of acceleration, will be operated in continuous wave (CW) mode. The Linac is divided into three sections on the basis of operating frequencies & six sections on the basis of family of RF cavities to be used for the acceleration of beam from 2.5 MeV to 3 GeV. The transition from one section to another can limit the acceptance of the Linac if these are not matched properly. We performed a study to calculate the acceptance of the Linac in both longitudinal and transverse plane. Investigation of most sensitive area which limits longitudinal acceptance and study of influence of failure of beam line elements at critical position, on acceptance are also performed.

  6. Automated 2D-3D registration of a radiograph and a cone beam CT using line-segment enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Munbodh, Reshma; Jaffray, David A.; Moseley, Douglas J.; Chen Zhe; Knisely, Jonathan P.S.; Cathier, Pascal; Duncan, James S.

    2006-05-15

    The objective of this study was to develop a fully automated two-dimensional (2D)-three-dimensional (3D) registration framework to quantify setup deviations in prostate radiation therapy from cone beam CT (CBCT) data and a single AP radiograph. A kilovoltage CBCT image and kilovoltage AP radiograph of an anthropomorphic phantom of the pelvis were acquired at 14 accurately known positions. The shifts in the phantom position were subsequently estimated by registering digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) from the 3D CBCT scan to the AP radiographs through the correlation of enhanced linear image features mainly representing bony ridges. Linear features were enhanced by filtering the images with ''sticks,'' short line segments which are varied in orientation to achieve the maximum projection value at every pixel in the image. The mean (and standard deviations) of the absolute errors in estimating translations along the three orthogonal axes in millimeters were 0.134 (0.096) AP(out-of-plane), 0.021 (0.023) ML and 0.020 (0.020) SI. The corresponding errors for rotations in degrees were 0.011 (0.009) AP, 0.029 (0.016) ML (out-of-plane), and 0.030 (0.028) SI (out-of-plane). Preliminary results with megavoltage patient data have also been reported. The results suggest that it may be possible to enhance anatomic features that are common to DRRs from a CBCT image and a single AP radiography of the pelvis for use in a completely automated and accurate 2D-3D registration framework for setup verification in prostate radiotherapy. This technique is theoretically applicable to other rigid bony structures such as the cranial vault or skull base and piecewise rigid structures such as the spine.

  7. Design of a 10 MeV normal conducting CW proton linac based on equidistant multi-gap CH cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-Hui

    2015-09-01

    Continuous wave (CW) high current proton linacs have wide applications as the front end of high power proton machines. The low energy part of such a linac is the most difficult and there is currently no widely accepted solution. Based on the analysis of the focusing properties of the CW low energy proton linac, a 10 MeV low energy normal conducting proton linac based on equidistant seven-gap Cross-bar H-type (CH) cavities is proposed. The linac is composed of ten 7-gap CH cavities and the transverse focusing is maintained by quadrupole doublets located between the cavities. The total length of the linac is less than 6 meters and the average acceleration gradient is about 1.2 MeV/m. The electromagnetic properties of the cavities are investigated by Microwave Studio. At the nominal acceleration gradient the maximum surface electric field in the cavities is less than 1.3 times the Kilpatrick limit, and the Ohmic loss of each cavity is less than 35 kW. Multi-particle beam dynamics simulations are performed with Tracewin code, and the results show that the beam dynamics of the linac are quite stable, the linac has the capability to accelerate up to 30 mA beam with acceptable dynamics behavior. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11375122, 91126003)

  8. Minimizing the magnetic field effect in MR-linac specific QA-tests: the use of electron dense materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zijp, H. M.; van Asselen, B.; Wolthaus, J. W. H.; Kok, J. M. G.; de Vries, J. H. W.; Ishakoglu, K.; Beld, E.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.

    2016-02-01

    To address the quality assurance (QA) of a MR-linac which is an MRI combined with a linear accelerator (linac), the traditional linac QA-tests need to be redesigned, since the presence of the static magnetic field in the MR-linac alters the electron trajectory. The latter causes the asymmetry in the dose kernel which is introduced by the magnetic field and hinders accurate geometrical QA-tests for the MR-linac. We introduced the use of electron dense materials (e.g. copper) to reduce the size of the dose kernel and thereby the magnetic field effect on the dose deposition. Two examples of QA-tests are presented in which the geometrical accuracy of the MR-linac was addressed; beam profile and star-shot measurements. The introduced setup was compared with a reference setup and both were tested on a conventional and the MR-linac. The results showed that the symmetry of the recorded beam profile was restored in presence of the copper material and that the isocenter size of the MR-linac can be determined accurately with the introduced star-shot setup. The use of electron dense materials is not limited to the presented QA-tests but has a broad application for beam-specific QA-tests in presence of a magnetic field.

  9. Minimizing the magnetic field effect in MR-linac specific QA-tests: the use of electron dense materials.

    PubMed

    van Zijp, H M; van Asselen, B; Wolthaus, J W H; Kok, J M G; de Vries, J H W; Ishakoglu, K; Beld, E; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W

    2016-02-07

    To address the quality assurance (QA) of a MR-linac which is an MRI combined with a linear accelerator (linac), the traditional linac QA-tests need to be redesigned, since the presence of the static magnetic field in the MR-linac alters the electron trajectory. The latter causes the asymmetry in the dose kernel which is introduced by the magnetic field and hinders accurate geometrical QA-tests for the MR-linac. We introduced the use of electron dense materials (e.g. copper) to reduce the size of the dose kernel and thereby the magnetic field effect on the dose deposition. Two examples of QA-tests are presented in which the geometrical accuracy of the MR-linac was addressed; beam profile and star-shot measurements. The introduced setup was compared with a reference setup and both were tested on a conventional and the MR-linac. The results showed that the symmetry of the recorded beam profile was restored in presence of the copper material and that the isocenter size of the MR-linac can be determined accurately with the introduced star-shot setup. The use of electron dense materials is not limited to the presented QA-tests but has a broad application for beam-specific QA-tests in presence of a magnetic field.

  10. SUPERCONDUCTING LINAC UPGRADE PLAN FOR THE SECOND TARGET STATION PROJECT AT SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sang-Ho; Doleans, Marc; Galambos, John D; Howell, Matthew P; Mammosser, John

    2015-01-01

    The beam power of the Linac for the Second Target Station (STS) at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will be doubled to 2.8 MW. For the energy upgrade, seven additional cryomodules will be installed in the reserved space at the end of the linac tunnel to produce linac output energy of 1.3 GeV. The cryomodules for STS will have the same physical length but will incorporate some design changes based on the lessons learned from operational experience over the last 10 years and from the high beta spare cryomodule developed in house. The average macro-pulse beam current for the STS will be 38 mA which is about a 40 % increase from the present beam current for 1.4 MW operation. Plans for the new cryomodules and for the existing cryomodules to support higher beam current for the STS are presented in this paper.

  11. Fluorescent screens and image processing for the APS linac test stand

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, W.; Ko, K.

    1992-12-01

    A fluorescent screen was used to monitor relative beam position and spot size of a 56-MeV electron beam in the linac test stand. A chromium doped alumina ceramic screen inserted into the beam was monitored by a video camera. The resulting image was captured using a frame grabber and stored into memory. Reconstruction and analysis of the stored image was performed using PV-WAVE. This paper will discuss the hardware and software implementation of the fluorescent screen and imaging system. Proposed improvements for the APS linac fluorescent screens and image processing will also be discussed.

  12. Design of a Marx-Topology Modulator for FNAL Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, T. A.; Garcia, F. G.; Kufer, M. R.; Pfeffer, H.; Wolff, D.

    2015-04-28

    The Fermilab Proton Improvement Plan (PIP) was formed in late 2011 to address important and necessary upgrades to the Proton Source machines (Injector line, Linac and Booster). The goal is to increase the proton flux by doubling the Booster beam cycle rate while maintaining the same intensity per cycle, the same uptime, and the same residual activation in the enclosure. For the Linac, the main focus within PIP is to address reliability. One of the main tasks is to replace the present hard-tube modulator used on the 200 MHz RF system. Plans to replace this high power system with a Marx-topology modulator, capable of providing the required waveform shaping to stabilize the accelerating gradient and compensate for beam loading, will be presented, along with development data from the prototype unit.

  13. PROSPECTS FOR A VERY HIGH POWER CW SRF LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Rimmer

    2010-06-01

    Steady development in SRF accelerator technology combined with the success of large scale installations such as CEBAF at Jefferson Laboratory and the SNS Linac at ORNL gives credibility to the concept of very high average power CW machines for light sources or Proton drivers. Such machines would be powerful tools for discovery science in themselves but could also pave the way to reliable cost effective drivers for such applications as neutrino factories, an energy-frontier muon collider, nuclear waste transmutation or accelerator driven subcritical reactors for energy production. In contrast to machines such as ILC that need maximum accelerating gradient, the challenges in these machines are mainly in efficiency, reliability, beam stability, beam loss and of course cost. In this paper the present state of the art is briefly reviewed and options for a multi-GeV, multi-MW CW linac are discussed.

  14. Poster — Thur Eve — 12: Implementation of a Clinical Lung Tumour High Dose Containment Verification Procedure using Respiratory Cone-Beam CT (4DCBCT) on a Varian TrueBeam Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Beaudry, J.; Bergman, A.

    2014-08-15

    Lung tumours move due to respiratory motion. This is managed during planning by acquiring a 4DCT and capturing the excursion of the GTV (gross tumour volume) throughout the breathing cycle within an IGTV (Internal Gross Tumour Volume) contour. Patients undergo a verification cone-beam CT (CBCT) scan immediately prior to treatment. 3D reconstructed images do not consider tumour motion, resulting in image artefacts, such as blurring. This may lead to difficulty in identifying the tumour on reconstructed images. It would be valuable to create a 4DCBCT reconstruction of the tumour motion to confirm that does indeed remain within the planned IGTV. CBCT projections of a Quasar Respiratory Motion Phantom are acquired in Treatment mode (half-fan scan) on a Varian TrueBeam accelerator. This phantom contains a mobile, low-density lung insert with an embedded 3cm diameter tumour object. It is programmed to create a 15s periodic, 2cm (sup/inf) displacement. A Varian Real-time Position Management (RPM) tracking-box is placed on the phantom breathing platform. Breathing phase information is automatically integrated into the projection image files. Using in-house Matlab programs and RTK (Reconstruction Tool Kit) open-source toolboxes, the projections are re-binned into 10 phases and a 4DCBCT scan reconstructed. The planning IGTV is registered to the 4DCBCT and the tumour excursion is verified to remain within the planned contour. This technique successfully reconstructs 4DCBCT images using clinical modes for a breathing phantom. UBC-BCCA ethics approval has been obtained to perform 4DCBCT reconstructions on lung patients (REB#H12-00192). Clinical images will be accrued starting April 2014.

  15. New Insights into the Composition and Texture of Lunar Regolith Using Ultrafast Automated Electron-Beam Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Doug; Wentworth, Susan J.; Schrader, Christian M.; Stoeser, Doug; Botha, Pieter WSK; Butcher, Alan R.; Horsch, Hanna E.; Benedictus, Aukje; Gottlieb, Paul; McKay, David

    2008-01-01

    Sieved grain mounts of Apollo 16 drive tube samples have been examined using QEMSCAN - an innovative electron beam technology. By combining multiple energy-dispersive X-ray detectors, fully automated control, and off-line image processing, to produce digital mineral maps of particles exposed on polished surfaces, the result is an unprecedented quantity of mineralogical and petrographic data, on a particle-by-particle basis. Experimental analysis of four size fractions (500-250 microns, 150-90 microns, 75-45 microns and < 20 microns), prepared from two samples (64002,374 and 64002,262), has produced a robust and uniform dataset which allows for the quantification of mineralogy; texture; particle shape, size and density; and the digital classification of distinct particle types in each measured sample. These preliminary data show that there is a decrease in plagioclase modal content and an opposing increase in glass modal content, with decreasing particle size. These findings, together with data on trace phases (metals, sulphides, phosphates, and oxides), provide not only new insights into the make-up of lunar regolith at the Apollo 16 landing site, but also key physical parameters which can be used to design lunar simulants, and compute Figures of Merit for each material produced.

  16. Frequency choice of eRHIC SRF linac

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, W.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Roser, T.; Ptitsyn, V.

    2016-01-05

    eRHIC is a FFAG lattice based multipass ERL [1]. The eRHIC SRF linac has been decided to change from 422 MHz 5-cell cavity to 647 MHz 5-cell cavity. There are several considerations affecting the frequency choice for a high current multipass-ERL: the beam structure, bunch length, energy spread, beam-break-up (BBU) threshold, SRF loss considerations. Beyond the physics considerations, cost and complexity or risk is an important consideration for the frequency choice, especially when we are designing a machine to be built in a few years. Although there are some benefits of using a 422 MHz cavity for eRHIC ERL, however, there are some very critical drawbacks, including lack of facilities to fabricate a 422 MHz 5-cell cavity, very few facilities to process such a cavity and no existing facility to test the cavity anywhere. As the cavity size is big and its weight is large, it is difficult to handle it during fabrication, processing and testing and no one has experience in this area. As the cavity size is large, the cryomodule becomes big as well. All of these considerations drive the risk of building eRHIC ERL with 422 MHz cavities to a very high level. Therefore, a decision was made to change the frequency of main linac to be 647 MHz 5-cell cavities. This note will compare these two linacs: 422MHz 5-cell cavity linac and 647Mz 5-cell cavity SRF linac, from both practical point of view and physics point of view.

  17. HIGH DYNAMIC-RANGE HIGH SPEED LINAC CURRENT MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Deibele, Craig Edmond; Curry, Douglas E; Dickson, Richard W

    2012-01-01

    It is desired to measure the linac current of a charged particle beam with a consistent accuracy over a dynamic range of over 120 dB. Conventional current transformers suffer from droop, can be susceptible to electromagnetic interference (EMI), and can be bandwidth limited. A novel detector and electronics were designed to maximize dynamic range of about 120 dB and measure rise-times on the order of 10 nanoseconds.

  18. Attempted RIAPMTQ Benchmarking Study of the ANL RIA Low-Beta LinacDesign

    SciTech Connect

    Billen, J.; Qiang, J.; Wangler, T.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this work is to compare the simulation results of the RIAPMTQ code with those of the ANL simulation code for the low-beta section of an ANL RIA Driver Linac design. However, the approach taken is not precisely that of a direct comparison of the two simulations of the same linac section, which is what one would normally expect to do. The reason is that the RFQ design approach used by the ANL codes and the LANL codes are approximately but not exactly the same, particularly at the ends of the RFQ, and it did not appear to be easy to make the two RFQ designs exactly identical. The effects on the beam of the different RFQ design approaches are not expected to be large, as long as the beam is properly matched at the transitions. What was done in the RIAPMTQ input file to compensate for the RFQ design difference was to use TRACE3D to adjust the four solenoid strengths and the two matching rf cavities in the MEBT (the beam transport system between the end of the RFQ and the beginning of the superconducting linac) to obtain the same match (Courant-Snyder parameters) into the superconducting linac as was obtained from the ANL code. We also matched the beam into the RFQ. The result is that we generate a RIAPMTQ input file for the low-beta section of the linac, which is not exactly identical to, but should be near to that of the ANL design. Then, what we wish to compare from the two codes are the rms emittances at the beginning of the superconducting linac, and the beam losses in the first or prestripper section of the superconducting (SC) linac. In this report, we describe the procedure and present the results. Section 2 gives the procedures and results, and Section 3 gives the summary.

  19. Reliability and availability studies in the RIA driver linac.

    SciTech Connect

    Lessner, E. S.; Ostroumov, P. N.; Physics

    2005-01-01

    The Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) facility will include various complex systems and must provide radioactive beams to many users simultaneously. The availability of radioactive beams for most experiments at the fully-commissioned facility should be as high as possible within design cost limitations. To make a realistic estimate of the achievable reliability a detailed analysis is required. The RIA driver linac is a complex machine containing a large number of superconducting (SC) resonators and capable of accelerating multiple-charge-state beams [1]. At the pre-CDR stage of the design it is essential to identify critical facility subsystem failures that can prevent the driver linac from operating. The reliability and availability of the driver linac were studied using expert information and data from operating machines such as ATLAS, APS, JLab, and LANL. Availability studies are performed with a Monte-Carlo simulation code previously applied to availability assessments of the NLC facility [2] and the results used to identify subsystem failures that most affect the availability and reliability of the RIA driver, and guide design iterations and component specifications to address identified problems.

  20. Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System

    SciTech Connect

    Bollinger, L.M.

    1983-01-01

    Design considerations and operational experience for the existing heavy-ion accelerator consisting of a tandem injecting into a superconducting linac are summarized, with emphasis on the general features of the system. This introduction provides the basis for a discussion of the objectives and design of ATLAS, a larger tandem-linac system being formed by expanding the existing superconducting linac.

  1. Automating quality assurance of digital linear accelerators using a radioluminescent phosphor coated phantom and optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Cesare H.; Naczynski, Dominik J.; Yu, Shu-Jung S.; Yang, Yong; Xing, Lei

    2016-09-01

    Performing mechanical and geometric quality assurance (QA) tests for medical linear accelerators (LINAC) is a predominantly manual process that consumes significant time and resources. In order to alleviate this burden this study proposes a novel strategy to automate the process of performing these tests. The autonomous QA system consists of three parts: (1) a customized phantom coated with radioluminescent material; (2) an optical imaging system capable of visualizing the incidence of the radiation beam, light field or lasers on the phantom; and (3) software to process the captured signals. The radioluminescent phantom, which enables visualization of the radiation beam on the same surface as the light field and lasers, is placed on the couch and imaged while a predefined treatment plan is delivered from the LINAC. The captured images are then processed to self-calibrate the system and perform measurements for evaluating light field/radiation coincidence, jaw position indicators, cross-hair centering, treatment couch position indicators and localizing laser alignment. System accuracy is probed by intentionally introducing errors and by comparing with current clinical methods. The accuracy of self-calibration is evaluated by examining measurement repeatability under fixed and variable phantom setups. The integrated system was able to automatically collect, analyze and report the results for the mechanical alignment tests specified by TG-142. The average difference between introduced and measured errors was 0.13 mm. The system was shown to be consistent with current techniques. Measurement variability increased slightly from 0.1 mm to 0.2 mm when the phantom setup was varied, but no significant difference in the mean measurement value was detected. Total measurement time was less than 10 minutes for all tests as a result of automation. The system’s unique features of a phosphor-coated phantom and fully automated, operator independent self-calibration offer the

  2. Klystron-linac combination

    DOEpatents

    Stein, W.E.

    1980-04-24

    A combination klystron-linear accelerator which utilizes anti-bunch electrons generated in the klystron section as a source of electrons to be accelerated in the accelerator section. Electron beam current is controlled by second harmonic bunching, constrictor aperture size and magnetic focusing. Rf coupling is achieved by internal and external coupling.

  3. Alternating phase focused linacs

    DOEpatents

    Swenson, Donald A.

    1980-01-01

    A heavy particle linear accelerator employing rf fields for transverse and ongitudinal focusing as well as acceleration. Drift tube length and gap positions in a standing wave drift tube loaded structure are arranged so that particles are subject to acceleration and succession of focusing and defocusing forces which contain the beam without additional magnetic or electric focusing fields.

  4. Heavy-ion linac development for the U.S. RIA project.

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P. N.

    2002-01-29

    The Nuclear Science Community in the Unites States has unanimously concluded that developments in both nuclear science and its supporting technologies make building a world-leading Rare-Isotope Accelerator (RIA) facility for production of radioactive beams the top priority. The RIA development effort involves several US Laboratories (ANL, JLAB, LBNL, MSU, ORNL). The RIA Facility includes a CW 1.4 GeV driver linac and a 100 MV post-accelerator both based on superconducting (SC) cavities operating at frequencies from 48 MHz to 805 MHz. An initial acceleration in both linacs is provided by room temperature RFQs. The driver linac is designed for acceleration of any ion species; from protons up to 900 MeV to uranium up to 400 MeV/u. The novel feature of the driver linac is an acceleration of multiple charge-state heavy-ion beams in order to achieve 400 kW beam power. Basic design concepts of the driver linac are given. Several new conceptual solutions in beam dynamics, room temperature and SC accelerating structures for heavy ion accelerator applications are discussed.

  5. An electron front end for the Fermilab multi-species 8 GeV SCRF linac

    SciTech Connect

    Philippe R.-G. Piot; G W Foster

    2004-07-08

    Fermilab is considering a 8 GeV superconducting linac whose primary mission is to serve as an intense H{sup -} injector for the main injector. This accelerator is also planned to be used for accelerating various other species (e.g. electrons, protons and muons). In the present paper we investigate the possibility of such a linac to accelerate high-brightness electron beam up to {approx} 7 GeV. We propose a design for the electron front end based on a photoinjector and consider the electron beam dynamics along the linac. Start-to-end simulations of the full accelerator for electrons are presented. Finally the potential applications of such an electron beam are outlined.

  6. Design of the NSLS-II Linac Front End Test Stand

    SciTech Connect

    Fliller III, R.; Johanson, M.; Lucas, M.; Rose, J.; Shaftan, T.

    2011-03-28

    The NSLS-II operational parameters place very stringent requirements on the injection system. Among these are the charge per bunch train at low emittance that is required from the linac along with the uniformity of the charge per bunch along the train. The NSLS-II linac is a 200 MeV linac produced by Research Instruments Gmbh. Part of the strategy for understanding to operation of the injectors is to test the front end of the linac prior to its installation in the facility. The linac front end consists of a 100 kV electron gun, 500 MHz subharmonic prebuncher, focusing solenoids and a suite of diagnostics. The diagnostics in the front end need to be supplemented with an additional suite of diagnostics to fully characterize the beam. In this paper we discuss the design of a test stand to measure the various properties of the beam generated from this section. In particular, the test stand will measure the charge, transverse emittance, energy, energy spread, and bunching performance of the linac front end under all operating conditions of the front end.

  7. WE-D-9A-02: Automated Landmark-Guided CT to Cone-Beam CT Deformable Image Registration

    SciTech Connect

    Kearney, V; Gu, X; Chen, S; Jiang, L; Liu, H; Chiu, T; Yordy, J; Nedzi, L; Mao, W

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The anatomical changes that occur between the simulation CT and daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) are investigated using an automated landmark-guided deformable image registration (LDIR) algorithm with simultaneous intensity correction. LDIR was designed to be accurate in the presence of tissue intensity mismatch and heavy noise contamination. Method: An auto-landmark generation algorithm was used in conjunction with a local small volume (LSV) gradient matching search engine to map corresponding landmarks between the CBCT and planning CT. The LSVs offsets were used to perform an initial deformation, generate landmarks, and correct local intensity mismatch. The landmarks act as stabilizing controlpoints in the Demons objective function. The accuracy of the LDIR algorithm was evaluated on one synthetic case with ground truth and data of ten head and neck cancer patients. The deformation vector field (DVF) accuracy was accessed using a synthetic case. The Root mean square error of the 3D canny edge (RMSECE), mutual information (MI), and feature similarity index metric (FSIM) were used to access the accuracy of LDIR on the patient data. The quality of the corresponding deformed contours was verified by an attending physician. Results: The resulting 90 percentile DVF error for the synthetic case was within 5.63mm for the original demons algorithm, 2.84mm for intensity correction alone, 2.45mm using controlpoints without intensity correction, and 1.48 mm for the LDIR algorithm. For the five patients the mean RMSECE of the original CT, Demons deformed CT, intensity corrected Demons CT, control-point stabilized deformed CT, and LDIR CT was 0.24, 0.26, 0.20, 0.20, and 0.16 respectively. Conclusion: LDIR is accurate in the presence of multimodal intensity mismatch and CBCT noise contamination. Since LDIR is GPU based it can be implemented with minimal additional strain on clinical resources. This project has been supported by a CPRIT individual investigator award RP11032.

  8. High-Power Linac for the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rej, D. J.

    2002-04-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will be the world’s most intense source of neutrons for fundamental science and industrial applications. Design and construction of this facility, located at Oak Ridge, is a joint venture between six DOE laboratories. Construction began in 1999 and is currently ahead of the scheduled 2006 completion date. Injecting a high-power, pulsed proton beam into a mercury target produces neutrons. In this talk, we review the physics requirements, design, and status of the construction of the 1-GeV, 1.4-MW average power RF linac for SNS. The accelerator consists of a drift tube linac (DTL), a coupled-cavity linac (CCL), and a superconducting rf (SRF) linac. The phase and quadrupole settings are set to avoid structure and parametric resonances, with coherent resonances posing minimal risk for emittance growth. The DTL is 37 m long and accelerates the ions to 87 MeV. The CCL is 55 m long and accelerates the ions to 186 MeV. The rf structure design and stability for both the DTL and CCL have been validated with scale models. The SRF linac has a modular design to accelerate ions to 1000 MeV, with a straightforward upgrade to 1.3 GeV at a later date. 3D particle-in-cell simulations of beam dynamics are performed to validate performance. The accelerator utilizes 93 MW of pulsed power operating continuously at 60-Hz with an 8factor. Approximately one hundred 402.5 or 805-MHz klystrons, with outputs between 0.55 and 5 MW, are used. The klystrons are powered by a novel converter-modulator that takes advantage of recent advances in IGBT switch plate assemblies and low-loss material cores for boost transformer. Beam diagnostics include position, phase, profile, and current monitors. They are designed to enable accurate beam steering and matching, and to minimize beam loss that would lead to activation and prevent hands-on maintenance.

  9. The Development of the Linac Coherent Light Source RF Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, David H.; Jongewaard, Erik; Lewandowski, James; Limborg-Deprey, Cecile; Li, Zenghai; Schmerge, John; Vlieks, Arnold; Wang, Juwen; Xiao, Liling; /SLAC

    2008-09-24

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is the first x-ray laser user facility based upon a free electron laser (FEL) requiring extraordinary beam quality to saturate at 1.5 angstroms within a 100 meter undulator.[1] This new type of light source is using the last kilometer of the three kilometer linac at SLAC to accelerate the beam to an energy as high as 13.6 GeV and required a new electron gun and injector to produce a very bright beam for acceleration. At the outset of the project it was recognized that existing RF guns had the potential to produce the desired beam but none had demonstrated it. Therefore a new RF gun or at least the modification of an existing gun was necessary. The parameters listed in Table 1 illustrate the unique characteristics of LCLS which drive the requirements for the electron gun as given in Table 2. The gun beam quality needs to accommodate emittance growth as the beam is travels through approximately one kilometer of linac and two bunch compressors before reaching the undulator. These beam requirements were demonstrated during the recent commissioning runs of the LCLS injector and linac [2] due to the successful design, fabrication, testing and operation of the LCLS gun. The goal of this paper is to relate the technical background of how the gun was able to achieve and in some cases exceed these requirements by understanding and correcting the deficiencies of the prototype s-band RF photocathode gun, the BNL/SLAC/UCLA Gun III. This paper begins with a brief history and technical description of Gun III and the Gun Test Facility (GTF) at SLAC, and studies of the gun's RF and emittance compensation solenoid. The work at the GTF identified the gun and solenoid deficiencies, and helped to define the specifications for the LCLS gun. Section 1.1.5 describes the modeling used to compute and correct the gun RF fields and Section 1.1.6 describes the use of these fields in the electron beam simulations. The magnetic design and measurements of

  10. Proton linac for hospital-based fast neutron therapy and radioisotope production

    SciTech Connect

    Lennox, A.J.; Hendrickson, F.R.; Swenson, D.A.; Winje, R.A.; Young, D.E.; Rush Univ., Chicago, IL; Science Applications International Corp., Princeton, NJ; Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL )

    1989-09-01

    Recent developments in linac technology have led to the design of a hospital-based proton linac for fast neutron therapy. The 180 microamp average current allows beam to be diverted for radioisotope production during treatments while maintaining an acceptable dose rate. During dedicated operation, dose rates greater than 280 neutron rads per minute are achievable at depth, DMAX = 1.6 cm with source to axis distance, SAD = 190 cm. Maximum machine energy is 70 MeV and several intermediate energies are available for optimizing production of isotopes for Positron Emission Tomography and other medical applications. The linac can be used to produce a horizontal or a gantry can be added to the downstream end of the linac for conventional patient positioning. The 70 MeV protons can also be used for proton therapy for ocular melanomas. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. X-band Linac for a 6 MeV dual-head radiation therapy gantry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung Hyun; Shin, Seung-Wook; Lee, Jongchul; Kim, Hui-Su; Lee, Byeong-No; Lee, Byung-Chul; Park, Hyung-dal; Song, Ki-back; Song, Ho-seung; Mun, Sangchul; Ha, Donghyup; Chai, Jong-Seo

    2017-04-01

    We developed a design for a 6 MeV X-band linear accelerator for radiation therapy in a dual-head gantry layout. The dual-head gantry has two linacs that can be operated independently. Each X-band linac accelerates electron bunches using high-power RF and generates X-rays for radiation therapy. It requires a versatile RF system and pulse sequence to accomplish various radiation therapy procedures. The RF system consists of 9.3 GHz, 2 MW X-band magnetron and associated RF transmission components. A test linac was assembled and operated to characterize its RF performance without beam. This paper presents these results along with a description of the gantry linacs and their operational requirements.

  12. The Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE PAGES

    White, William E.; Robert, Aymeric; Dunne, Mike

    2015-05-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory was the first hard X-ray free-electron laser (FEL) to operate as a user facility. After five years of operation, LCLS is now a mature FEL user facility. Our personal views about opportunities and challenges inherent to these unique light sources are discussed.

  13. The Linac Coherent Light Source

    PubMed Central

    White, William E.; Robert, Aymeric; Dunne, Mike

    2015-01-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory was the first hard X-ray free-electron laser (FEL) to operate as a user facility. After five years of operation, LCLS is now a mature FEL user facility. Our personal views about opportunities and challenges inherent to these unique light sources are discussed. PMID:25931055

  14. The main linac cavity for Cornell's energy recovery linac: Cavity design through horizontal cryomodule prototype test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valles, N.; Liepe, M.; Furuta, F.; Gi, M.; Gonnella, D.; He, Y.; Ho, K.; Hoffstaetter, G.; Klein, D. S.; O'Connell, T.; Posen, S.; Quigley, P.; Sears, J.; Stedman, G. Q.; Tigner, M.; Veshcherevich, V.

    2014-01-01

    Future particle accelerators will require continuous wave operation of SRF cavities capable of supporting high beam currents. An example of this is the Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) at Cornell University, a next generation light source designed to run high currents (100 mA) with a high bunch repetition rate (1.3 GHz). Obtaining the beam emittance necessary to meet design specification requires strong damping of higher-order modes that can lead to beam breakup. We discuss the optimization and verification of the accelerating cavity. Next we show that an ERL constructed from the optimized cavity geometry - including realistic shape errors - can support beam currents in excess of 300 mA while still maintaining beam stability. A niobium prototype 7-cell cavity was fabricated and tested in a horizontal cryomodule. We show that the prototype cavity exceeds quality factor and gradient specifications of 2 ×1010 at 16.2 MV/m at 1.8 K by 50%, reaching Q =(3.0 ± 0.3) ×1010. The prototype cavity also satisfies all design constraints and has a higher order mode spectrum consistent with the optimized shape geometry. At 1.6 K, the cavity set a record for quality factor of a multicell cavity installed in a horizontal cryomodule reaching Q =(6.1 ± 0.6) ×1010.

  15. AGS UPGRADE TO 1-MW WITH A SUPER CONDUCTING LINAC INJECTOR.

    SciTech Connect

    RUGGIERO,A.GALESSI,J.RAPARIA,D.ROSER,T.WENG,W.

    2003-05-12

    It has been proposed to upgrade the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) accelerator complex at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to provide an average proton beam power of 1 MW at the energy of 28 GeV. The facility is to be primarily used as a proton driver for the production of intense neutrino beams [l]. This paper reports on the feasibility study of a proton Super-Conducting Linac (SCL) as a new injector to the AGS. The Linac beam energy is 1.3 GeV. The beam intensity is adjusted to provide the required average beam power of 1 MW at 28 GeV. The repetition rate of the SCL-AGS facility is 2.5 beam pulses per second.

  16. A Dynamic Feedback Model for High Repetition Rate LINAC-Driven FELS

    SciTech Connect

    Mellado Munoz, M.; Doolittle, L.; Emma, P.; Huang, G.; Ratti, A.; Serrano, C.; Byrd, J. M.

    2012-05-20

    One of the concepts for the next generation of linacdriven FELs is a CW superconducting linac driving an electron beam with MHz repetition rates. One of the challenges for next generation FELs is improve the stability of the xray pulses by improving the shot-to-shot stability of the energy, charge, peak current, and timing jitter of the electron beam. A high repetition rate FEL with a CW linac presents an opportunity to use a variety of broadband feedbacks to stabilize the beam parameters. To understand the performance of such a feedback system, we are developing a dynamic model of the machine with a focus on the longitudinal beam properties. The model is being developed as an extension of the LITrack code and includes the dynamics of the beam-cavity interaction, RF feedback, beam-based feedback, and multibunch effects. In this paper, we present a detailed description of this model.

  17. Status and operation of the Linac4 ion source prototypes.

    PubMed

    Lettry, J; Aguglia, D; Andersson, P; Bertolo, S; Butterworth, A; Coutron, Y; Dallocchio, A; Chaudet, E; Gil-Flores, J; Guida, R; Hansen, J; Hatayama, A; Koszar, I; Mahner, E; Mastrostefano, C; Mathot, S; Mattei, S; Midttun, Ø; Moyret, P; Nisbet, D; Nishida, K; O'Neil, M; Ohta, M; Paoluzzi, M; Pasquino, C; Pereira, H; Rochez, J; Sanchez Alvarez, J; Sanchez Arias, J; Scrivens, R; Shibata, T; Steyaert, D; Thaus, N; Yamamoto, T

    2014-02-01

    CERN's Linac4 45 kV H(-) ion sources prototypes are installed at a dedicated ion source test stand and in the Linac4 tunnel. The operation of the pulsed hydrogen injection, RF sustained plasma, and pulsed high voltages are described. The first experimental results of two prototypes relying on 2 MHz RF-plasma heating are presented. The plasma is ignited via capacitive coupling, and sustained by inductive coupling. The light emitted from the plasma is collected by viewports pointing to the plasma chamber wall in the middle of the RF solenoid and to the plasma chamber axis. Preliminary measurements of optical emission spectroscopy and photometry of the plasma have been performed. The design of a cesiated ion source is presented. The volume source has produced a 45 keV H(-) beam of 16-22 mA which has successfully been used for the commissioning of the Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT), Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and chopper of Linac4.

  18. Ion sources for induction linac driven heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Rutkowski, H.L.; Eylon, S.; Chupp, W.W.

    1993-08-01

    The use of ion sources in induction linacs for heavy ion fusion is fundamentally different from their use in the rf linac-storage rings approach. Induction linacs require very high current, short pulse extraction usually with large apertures which are dictated by the injector design. One is faced with the problem of extracting beams in a pulsed fashion while maintaining high beam quality during the pulse (low-emittance). Four types of sources have been studied for this application. The vacuum arc and the rf cusp field source are the plasma types and the porous plug and hot alumino-silicate surface source are the thermal types. The hot alumino-silicate potassium source has proved to be the best candidate for the next generation of scaled experiments. The porous plug for potassium is somewhat more difficult to use. The vacuum arc suffers from noise and lifetime problems and the rf cusp field source is difficult to use with very short pulses. Operational experience with all of these types of sources is presented.

  19. Commissioning the FELI linac and UV-FEL facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tomimasu, T.; Saeki, K.; Miyauchi, Y.

    1995-12-31

    The FELI 165-MeV linac and UV-FEL facility are in the commissioning, stage. A thermionic triode gun of the 6-MeV injector emits 500-ps pulses of 2.3A at 22.3125MHz. These pulses are compressed to 60AX 7ps by a 714-MHz prebuncher and a 2856-MHz buncher and seven ETL type accelerating waveguides with a length of 2.93m. The length of the linac including bending sections of two S-type BT systems for two undulators used for IR-FEL oscillations is 46m. The buncher and these accelerating waveguides are powered by two klystrons (E3729, 2856MHz, total 48MW, 24-{mu}s flat top long pulses). The flatness of our klystron modulator pulses is 0.067% at 24-{mu}s duration. An rf-ageing for new four accelerating waveguides will be started in May. An S-type BT line for 165-MeV beam from the linac will be installed in the end of April. A 2.68-m undulator ({lambda}u=4.0cm, N=67, Kmax gap length {ge}16mm) and an optical cavity (Lc=6.72m) will be installed early in July. The beam conditionings for UV-FEL experiments will be started in July.

  20. MODEL BENCHMARK WITH EXPERIMENT AT THE SNS LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Shishlo, Andrei P; Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Liu, Yun; Plum, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    The history of attempts to perform a transverse match-ing in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) superconduct-ing linac (SCL) is discussed. The SCL has 9 laser wire (LW) stations to perform non-destructive measurements of the transverse beam profiles. Any matching starts with the measurement of the initial Twiss parameters, which in the SNS case was done by using the first four LW stations at the beginning of the superconducting linac. For years the consistency between data from all LW stations could not be achieved. This problem was resolved only after significant improvements in accuracy of the phase scans of the SCL cavities, more precise analysis of all available scan data, better optics planning, and the initial longitudi-nal Twiss parameter measurements. The presented paper discusses in detail these developed procedures.

  1. Focusing solenoids for the HINS Linac front end

    SciTech Connect

    Terechkine, I.; Appollinari, G.; Di-Marco, J.; Huang, Y.; Orris, D.; Page, T.; Rabehl, R.; Tartaglia, M.; Tompkins, J.; /Fermilab

    2008-10-01

    The low energy part of a linac for the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) project at Fermilab will use superconducting solenoids as beam focusing elements (lenses). While the lenses for the conventional DTL-type accelerating section of the front end require individual cryostats, in the superconducting accelerating sections solenoids will be installed inside RF cryomodules. Some of the lenses in the conventional and in the superconducting sections are equipped with horizontal and vertical steering dipoles. Lenses for the DTL section are in the stage of production with certification activities ongoing at Fermilab. For the superconducting sections of the linac, a prototype lens has been built and tested. Each lens will be installed in the transport channel of the accelerator so that its magnetic axis is on the beamline. Corresponding technique has been developed at Fermilab and is used during the certification process. This report summarizes design features, parameters, and test results of the focusing lenses.

  2. Cavities and Cryomodules for the RIA Driver Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerst, J.D.; Shepard, K.W.; Kedzie, M.; Kelly, M.P.

    2004-06-23

    We describe cavities, cryomodules, and associated subsystem concepts for the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) driver linac baseline design. Some alternative concepts are also presented. Beams from protons to uranium are accelerated with superconducting RF cavities operating from 57.5 MHz to 805 MHz. Substantial cost reduction over the baseline design may be achieved by replacing three classes of elliptical cell structures operating at 2 K by two classes of three-spoke drift tube structures. Cavity count and tunnel length are reduced while efficient cooling at 4.5 K for all linac structures may be possible. Issues include RF power requirements, microphonics, clean handling techniques, separate cavity and insulating vacuum systems, and heat load.

  3. A Program for Optimizing SRF Linac Costs

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, Thomas J.

    2013-04-01

    Every well-designed machine goes through the process of cost optimization several times during its design, production and operation. The initial optimizations are done during the early proposal stage of the project when none of the systems have been engineered. When a superconducting radio frequency (SRF) linac is implemented as part of the design, it is often a difficult decision as to the frequency and gradient that will be used. Frequently, such choices are made based on existing designs, which invariably necessitate moderate to substantial modifications so that they can be used in the new accelerator. Thus the fallacy of using existing designs is that they will frequently provide a higher cost machine or a machine with sub-optimal beam physics parameters. This paper describes preliminary results of a new software tool that allows one to vary parameters and understand the effects on the optimized costs of construction plus 10 year operations of an SRF linac, the associated cryogenic facility, and controls, where operations includes the cost of the electrical utilities but not the labor or other costs. It derives from collaborative work done with staff from Accelerator Science and Technology Centre, Daresbury, UK [1] several years ago while they were in the process of developing a conceptual design for the New Light Source project. The initial goal was to convert a spread sheet format to a graphical interface to allow the ability to sweep different parameter sets. The tools also allow one to compare the cost of the different facets of the machine design and operations so as to better understand the tradeoffs.

  4. Unfolding linac photon spectra and incident electron energies from experimental transmission data, with direct independent validation

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, E. S. M.; McEwen, M. R.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: In a recent computational study, an improved physics-based approach was proposed for unfolding linac photon spectra and incident electron energies from transmission data. In this approach, energy differentiation is improved by simultaneously using transmission data for multiple attenuators and detectors, and the unfolding robustness is improved by using a four-parameter functional form to describe the photon spectrum. The purpose of the current study is to validate this approach experimentally, and to demonstrate its application on a typical clinical linac. Methods: The validation makes use of the recent transmission measurements performed on the Vickers research linac of National Research Council Canada. For this linac, the photon spectra were previously measured using a NaI detector, and the incident electron parameters are independently known. The transmission data are for eight beams in the range 10-30 MV using thick Be, Al and Pb bremsstrahlung targets. To demonstrate the approach on a typical clinical linac, new measurements are performed on an Elekta Precise linac for 6, 10 and 25 MV beams. The different experimental setups are modeled using EGSnrc, with the newly added photonuclear attenuation included. Results: For the validation on the research linac, the 95% confidence bounds of the unfolded spectra fall within the noise of the NaI data. The unfolded spectra agree with the EGSnrc spectra (calculated using independently known electron parameters) with RMS energy fluence deviations of 4.5%. The accuracy of unfolding the incident electron energy is shown to be {approx}3%. A transmission cutoff of only 10% is suitable for accurate unfolding, provided that the other components of the proposed approach are implemented. For the demonstration on a clinical linac, the unfolded incident electron energies and their 68% confidence bounds for the 6, 10 and 25 MV beams are 6.1 {+-} 0.1, 9.3 {+-} 0.1, and 19.3 {+-} 0.2 MeV, respectively. The unfolded spectra

  5. Energy-Recovery Linacs for Commercial Radioisotope Production

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland Paul

    2016-11-19

    Most radioisotopes are produced by nuclear reactors or positive ion accelerators, which are expensive to construct and to operate. Photonuclear reactions using bremsstrahlung photon beams from less-expensive electron linacs can generate isotopes of critical interest, but much of the beam energy in a conventional electron linac is dumped at high energy, making unwanted radioactivation. The largest part of this radioactivation may be completely eliminated by applying energy recovery linac technology to the problem with an additional benefit that the energy cost to produce a given amount of isotope is reduced. Consequently a Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is a path to a more diverse and reliable domestic supply of short-lived, high-value, high-demand isotopes at a cost lower than that of isotopes produced by reactors or positive-ion accelerators. A Jefferson Lab approach to this problem involves a thin photon production radiator, which allows the electron beam to recirculate through rf cavities so the beam energy can be recovered while the spent electrons are extracted and absorbed at a low enough energy to minimize unwanted radioactivation. The thicker isotope photoproduction target is not in the beam. MuPlus, with Jefferson Lab and Niowave, proposed to extend this ERL technology to the commercial world of radioisotope production. In Phase I we demonstrated that 1) the ERL advantage for producing radioisotopes is at high energies (~100 MeV), 2) the range of acceptable radiator thickness is narrow (too thin and there is no advantage relative to other methods and too thick means energy recovery is too difficult), 3) using optics techniques developed under an earlier STTR for collider low beta designs greatly improves the fraction of beam energy that can be recovered (patent pending), 4) many potentially useful radioisotopes can be made with this ERL technique that have never before been available in significant commercial quantities

  6. Experimental results of the laserwire emittance scanner for LINAC4 at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Thomas; Boorman, Gary E.; Bosco, Alessio; Bravin, Enrico; Gibson, Stephen M.; Kruchinin, Konstantin O.; Raich, Uli; Roncarolo, Federico; Zocca, Francesca

    2016-09-01

    Within the framework of the LHC Injector Upgrade (LIU), the new LINAC4 is currently being commissioned to replace the existing LINAC2 proton source at CERN. After the expected completion at the end of 2016, the LINAC4 will accelerate H- ions to 160 MeV. To measure the transverse emittance of the H- beam, a method based on photo-detachment is proposed. This system will operate using a pulsed laser with light delivered via an optical fibre and subsequently focused onto the H- beam. The laser photons have sufficient energy to detach the outer electron and create H0/e- pairs. In a downstream dipole, the created H0 particles are separated from the unstripped H- ions and their distribution is measured with a dedicated detector. By scanning the focused laser beam across the H- beam, the transverse emittance of the H- beam can be reconstructed. This paper will first discuss the concept, design and simulations of the laser emittance scanner and then present results from a prototype system used during the 12 MeV commissioning of the LINAC4.

  7. Design and experiments of RF transverse focusing in S-Band, 1 MeV standing wave linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, J.; Chandan, Shiv; Parashar, S.; Bhattacharjee, D.; Tillu, A. R.; Tiwari, R.; Jayapraksh, D.; Yadav, V.; Banerjee, S.; Choudhury, N.; Ghodke, S. R.; Dixit, K. P.; Nimje, V. T.

    2015-09-01

    S-Band standing wave (SW) linacs in the range of 1-10 MeV have many potential industrial applications world wide. In order to mitigate the industrial requirement it is required to reduce the overall size and weight of the system. On this context a 2856 M Hz, 1 Me V, bi-periodic on axis coupled self transverse focused SW linac has been designed and tested. The RF phase focusing is achieved by introducing an asymmetric field distribution in the first cell of the 1 MeV linac. The pulsed electron beam of 40 keV, 650 mA and 5 μs duration is injected from a LaB6 thermionic gun. This paper presents the structure design, beam dynamics simulation, fabrication and experimental results of the 1 MeV auto-focusing SW linac.

  8. PIC Simulations in Low Energy Part of PIP-II Proton Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, Gennady

    2014-07-01

    The front end of PIP-II linac is composed of a 30 keV ion source, low energy beam transport line (LEBT), 2.1 MeV radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ), and medium energy beam transport line (MEBT). This configuration is currently being assembled at Fermilab to support a complete systems test. The front end represents the primary technical risk with PIP-II, and so this step will validate the concept and demonstrate that the hardware can meet the specified requirements. SC accelerating cavities right after MEBT require high quality and well defined beam after RFQ to avoid excessive particle losses. In this paper we will present recent progress of beam dynamic study, using CST PIC simulation code, to investigate partial neutralization effect in LEBT, halo and tail formation in RFQ, total emittance growth and beam losses along low energy part of the linac.

  9. Optimal focusing for a linac-based hard x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Krafft, G.; Talman, R.

    2011-03-28

    In spite of having a small average beam current limit, a linac can have features that make it attractive as an x-ray source: high energy, ultralow emittance and energy spread, and flexible beamline optics. Unlike a storage ring, in which an (undulator) radiation source is necessarily short and positioned at an electron beam waist, in a linac the undulator can be long and the electron beam can be adjusted to have a (virtual) waist far downstream toward the x-ray target. Using a planned CEBAF beamline as an example, this paper shows that a factor of 2000 in beam current can be overcome to produce a monochromatic hard x-ray source comparable with, or even exceeding, the performance of an x-ray line at a third generation storage ring. Optimal electron beam focusing conditions for x-ray flux density and brilliance are derived, and are verified by simulations using the SRW code.

  10. Delivery efficiency of an Elekta linac under gated operation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guoqiang; Housley, David J; Chen, Fan; Mehta, Vivek K; Shepard, David M

    2014-09-08

    In this study, we have characterized the efficiency of an Elekta linac in the delivery of gated radiotherapy. We have explored techniques to reduce the beam-on delay and to improve the delivery efficiency, and have investigated the impact of frequent beam interruptions on the dosimetric accuracy of gated deliveries. A newly available gating interface was installed on an Elekta Synergy. Gating signals were generated using a surface mapping system in conjunction with a respiratory motion phantom. A series of gated deliveries were performed using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment plans previously generated for lung cancer patients treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy. Baseline values were determined for the delivery times. The machine was then tuned in an effort to minimize beam-on delays and improve delivery efficiency. After that process was completed, the dosimetric accuracy of the gated deliveries was evaluated by comparing the measured and the planned coronal dose distributions using gamma index analyses. Comparison of the gated and the non-gated deliveries were also performed. The results demonstrated that, with the optimal machine settings, the average beam-on delay was reduced to less than 0.22 s. High dosimetric accuracy was demonstrated with gamma index passing rates no lower than 99.0% for all tests (3%/3 mm criteria). Consequently, Elekta linacs can provide a practical solution for gated VMAT treatments with high dosimetric accuracy and only a moderate increase in the overall delivery time.

  11. F-18 production with the TOP linac injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cianfarani, Cesidio; Cisbani, Evaristo; Orlandi, Gianluca; Frullani, Salvatore; Picardi, Luigi; Ronsivalle, Concetta

    2006-06-01

    ENEA and ISS (Italian National Institute of Health), are collaborating to develop a dedicated proton medical accelerator, TOP (Oncological Therapy with Protons) linac, consisting of a sequence of three pulsed linear accelerators. The 7 MeV injector can be used in three operating modes: Protontherapy and Radiobiology Mode—injecting low current proton beam into the TOP linac accelerating sections; Radioisotope Mode—generating an intense proton beam (8-10 mA, 50-100 μs, 30-100 Hz) to produce the positron-emitting radionuclide F18 for PET analyses. In the high current mode, at the exit of the injector the beam is guided through a magnetic quadrupoles channel to a target composed by a thin chamber (0.5 mm thick and 1 in. diameter) containing water enriched with O18. Production yield as well as total activity similar to these achieved with higher energy cyclotrons have been obtained. Environmental doses measured give indications on the shielding required for operation under current radioprotection regulations. Improvements are foreseen to optimize the production yield, the useful beam current and to better characterize gamma and neutron dose rates in the different operational modes.

  12. A hospital-based proton linac for neutron therapy and radioisotope production

    SciTech Connect

    Lennox, A.J.

    1988-10-01

    Fermilab's Alvarez proton linac has been used routinely for neutron therapy since 1976. The Neutron Therapy Facility (NTF) operates in a mode parasitic to the laboratory's high energy physics program, which uses the linac as an injector for a synchrotron. Parasitic operation is possible because the linac delivers /approximately/1.2 /times/ 10/sup 13/ protons per pulse at a 15 Hz rate, while the high energy physics program requires beam at a rate not greater than 0.5 Hz. Protons not needed for physics experiments strike a beryllium target to produce neutrons for neutron therapy. Encouraging clinical results from NTF have led to a study of the issues involved in providing hospitals with a neutron beam of the type available at Fermilab. This paper describes the issues addressed by that study. 12 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  13. An automated system to mount cryo-cooled protein crystals on a synchrotron beam line, using compact sample cassettes and a small-scale robot

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Aina E.; Ellis, Paul J.; Miller, Mitchell D.; Deacon, Ashley M.; Phizackerley, R. Paul

    2014-01-01

    An automated system for mounting and dismounting pre-frozen crystals has been implemented at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL). It is based on a small industrial robot and compact cylindrical cassettes, each holding up to 96 crystals mounted on Hampton Research sample pins. For easy shipping and storage, the cassette fits inside several popular dry-shippers and long-term storage Dewars. A dispensing Dewar holds up to three cassettes in liquid nitrogen adjacent to the beam line goniometer. The robot uses a permanent magnet tool to extract samples from, and insert samples into a cassette, and a cryo-tong tool to transfer them to and from the beam line goniometer. The system is simple, with few moving parts, reliable in operation and convenient to use. PMID:24899734

  14. THE LINAC LASER NOTCHER FOR THE FERMILAB BOOSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, David E,; Duel, Kevin; Gardner, Matthew; Johnson, Todd; Slimmer, David; Patil, Screenvias; Tafoya, Jason

    2016-09-27

    In synchrotron machines, the beam extraction is accomplished by a combination of septa and kicker magnets which deflect the beam from an accelerator into another. Ideally the kicker field must rise/fall in between the beam bunches. However, in reality, an intentional beam-free time region (aka "notch") is created on the beam pulse to assure that the beam can be extracted with minimal losses. In the case of the Fermilab Booster, the notch is created in the ring near injection energy by the use of fast kickers which deposit the beam in a shielded collimation region within the accelerator tunnel. With increasing beam power it is desirable to create this notch at the lowest possible energy to minimize activation. The Fermilab Proton Improvement Plan (PIP) initiated an R&D project to build a laser system to create the notch within a linac beam pulse at 750 keV. This talk will describe the concept for the laser notcher and discuss our current status, commissioning results, and future plans.

  15. Status of the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Galayda, John N.; /SLAC

    2011-11-04

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a free electron laser facility in construction at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. It is designed to operate in the wavelength range 0.15-1.5 nanometers. At the time of this conference, civil construction of new tunnels and buildings is complete, the necessary modifications to the SLAC linac are complete, and the undulator system and x-ray optics/diagnostics are being installed. The electron gun, 135 MeV injector linac and 250 MeV bunch compressor were commissioned in 2007. Accelerator commissioning activities are presently devoted to the achievement of performance goals for the completed 14 GeV linac.

  16. Operational Performance of LCLS Beam Instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Loos, Henrik; Akre, R.; Brachmann, A.; Coffee, R.; Decker, F.-J.; Ding, Y.; Dowell, D.; Edstrom, S.; Emma, P.; Fisher, A.; Frisch, J.; Gilevich, S.; Hays, G.; Hering, Ph.; Huang, Z.; Iverson, R.; Messerschmidt, M.; Miahnahri, A.; Moeller, S.; Nuhn, H.-D.; Ratner, D.; /SLAC /LLNL, Livermore

    2010-06-15

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray FEL utilizing the last km of the SLAC linac has been operational since April 2009 and finished its first successful user run last December. The various diagnostics for electron beam properties including beam position monitors, wire scanners, beam profile monitors, and bunch length diagnostics are presented as well as diagnostics for the X-ray beam. The low emittance and ultra-short electron beam required for X-ray FEL operation has implications on the transverse and longitudinal diagnostics. The coherence effects of the beam profile monitors and the challenges of measuring fs long bunches are discussed.

  17. Design development of the SCDTL structure for the TOP linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picardi, L.; Ronsivalle, C.; Spataro, B.

    1999-04-01

    The Side Coupled Drift Tube Linac (SCDTL) is an attractive 3 GHz accelerating structure composed of short DTL tanks coupled together by side coupling cavities, in the course of development of the 200 MeV proton linear accelerator for proton therapy planned for the Terapia Oncologica con Protoni (TOP) program of the Italian National Institute of Health (Istituto Superiore di Sanità, ISS). The TOP Linac will be used to boost to 70 MeV the 7 MeV proton beam from a linac injector. Our main concern is to investigate in detail the characteristics of the structure in terms of RF properties of the accelerating mode, like longitudinal and transverse shunt impedance and quality factor, and of the other modes that cause the origin of the tank dispersion curve, in order to stabilize the behaviour under operating conditions. Calculations performed with the computer three-dimensional (3D) codes MAFIA and SOPRANO on the smallest unit of the system (a single DTL tank without coupling cavities) and experimental measurements made on a prototype have shown good agreement. Two possible supporting stem configurations (single stem and two stems 180° apart for each drift tube) were examined and a comparison of the results in both cases are discussed.

  18. Effects of collimator backscatter in an Elekta linac by Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Kairn, T; Crowe, S B; Poole, C M; Fielding, A L

    2009-09-01

    The effects of radiation backscattered from the secondary collimators into the monitor chamber in an Elekta linac (producing 6 and 10 MV photon beams) are investigated using BEAMnrc Monte Carlo simulations. The degree and effects of this backscattered radiation are assessed by evaluating the changes to the calculated dose in the monitor chamber, and by determining a correction factor for those changes. Additionally, the fluence and energy characteristics of particles entering the monitor chamber from the downstream direction are evaluated by examining BEAMnrc phase-space data. It is shown that the proportion of particles backscattered into the monitor chamber is small (< 0.35%), for all field sizes studied. However, when the backscatter plate is removed from the model linac, these backscattered particles generate a noticeable increase in dose to the monitor chamber (up to approximately 2.4% for the 6 MV beam and up to 4.4% for the 10 MV beam). With its backscatter plate in place, the Elekta linac (operating at 6 and 10 MV) is subject to negligible variation of monitor chamber dose with field size. At these energies, output variations in photon beams produced by the clinical Elekta linear accelerator can be attributed to head scatter alone. Corrections for field-size-dependence of monitor chamber dose are not necessary when running Monte Carlo simulations of the Elekta linac operating at 6 and 10 MV.

  19. Modulated Electron Radiation Therapy: An Investigation On Fast Beam Models and Radiation-Tolerant Solutions For Automated Motion Control Of A Few Leaf Electron Collimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaconstadopoulos, Paul

    The purpose of this study was to address two specific issues related with the clinical application of Modulated Electron Radiation Therapy (MERT). The first was to investigate radiation-tolerant solutions for automated motion control of a Few Leaf Electron Collimator. Secondly, we implemented a fast, Monte Carlo-based, parameterized beam model for characterization of the electron beam in modulated deliveries. Two approaches were investigated for the implementation of a radiation-tolerant position feedback system: (i) the use of CMOS-based optical encoders protected by a prototype shield and (ii) the use of an analog device, such as a potentiometer, whose radiation tolerance is significantly higher. The two approaches were implemented and their performance tested. Results indicated that the optical encoders could not be safely used under radiation even with the presence of a shield. The analog position feedback system showed to be a viable solution. Future work will be focused towards the direction of implementing an analog position feedback system suitable for clinical use. The MC-based, parameterized beam model is based on the idea of deriving the scattered electron beam characteristics directly on the exit plane of the linear accelerator by the use of source scatter fluence kernels. Primary beam characteristics are derived by fast Monte Carlo simulations. The novelty of the method is that arbitrary rectangular fields can be recreated fast by superposition of the appropriate source kernels directly on the output plane. Depth, profile dose distributions and dose output, were derived for three field sizes (8 x 8, 2 x 2 and 2 x 8 cm 2) and energies of 6 MeV and 20 MeV electron beams by the beam model and compared with full Monte Carlo simulations. The primary beam showed excellent agreement in all cases. Scattered particles agreed well for the larger field sizes of 8 x 8 and 2 x 8 cm2, while discrepancies were encountered for scattered particles for the smaller field

  20. Design study of a medical proton linac for neutron therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, S.; Raparia, D.

    1988-08-26

    This paper describes a design study which establishes the physical parameters of the low energy beam transport, radiofrequency quadrupole, and linac, using computer programs available at Fermilab. Beam dynamics studies verify that the desired beam parameters can be achieved. The machine described here meets the aforementioned requirements and can be built using existing technology. Also discussed are other technically feasible options which could be attractive to clinicians, though they would complicate the design of the machine and increase construction costs. One of these options would allow the machine to deliver 2.3 MeV protons to produce epithermal neutrons for treating brain tumors. A second option would provide 15 MeV protons for isotope production. 21 refs., 33 figs.

  1. Ion optics of the Linac--LEB transfer line

    SciTech Connect

    Bhandari, R.K.; Penner, S.

    1990-12-01

    This report describes the ion optical properties of a proposed transfer line to inject a nominal 25 mA H{sup {minus}} beam at 600 MeV from the Linac into the Low Energy Booster (LEB) synchrotron. Ion optical investigations have been carried out in detail using the TRANSPORT, TURTLE and TRACE 3-D codes. The calculations take account of linear space charge effects of up to 50 mA average beam current. These effects have been found to be quite appreciable, especially on the longitudinal phase space. Procedure for their evaluation and optimization are described. Effects of some imperfections in the beam line magnets have been studied. 6 refs., 19 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. High-Current Energy-Recovering Electron Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolitsa Merminga; David Douglas; Geoffrey Krafft

    2003-12-01

    The use of energy recovery provides a potentially powerful new paradigm for generation of the charged particle beams used in synchrotron radiation sources, high-energy electron cooling devices, electron-ion colliders, and other applications in photon science and nuclear and high-energy physics. Energy-recovering electron linear accelerators (called energy-recovering linacs, or ERLs) share many characteristics with ordinary linacs, as their six-dimensional beam phase space is largely determined by electron source properties. However, in common with classic storage rings, ERLs possess a high average-current-carrying capability enabled by the energy recovery process, and thus promise similar efficiencies. The authors discuss the concept of energy recovery and its technical challenges and describe the Jefferson Lab (JLab) Infrared Demonstration Free-Electron Laser (IR Demo FEL), originally driven by a 3548-MeV, 5-mA superconducting radiofrequency (srf) ERL, which provided the most substantial demonstration of energy recovery to date: a beam of 250 kW average power. They present an overview of envisioned ERL applications and a development path to achieving the required performance. They use experimental data obtained at the JLab IR Demo FEL and recent experimental results from CEBAF-ERL GeV-scale, comparatively low-current energy-recovery demonstration at JLab to evaluate the feasibility of the new applications of high-current ERLs, as well as ERLs' limitations and ultimate performance.

  3. Induction Linac Systems Experiments for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Bangerter, R.O.

    1994-06-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory propose to build at LBL the Induction Linac Systems Experiments (ILSE), the next logical step toward the eventual goal of a heavy ion induction accelerator powerful enough to implode or drive inertial confinement fusion targets. Though much smaller than a driver, ILSE will be at full driver scale in several important parameters. Nearly all accelerator components and beam manipulations required for a driver will be tested. It is expected that ILSE will be built in stages as funds and technical progress allow. The first stage, called Elise will include all of the electrostatic quadrupole focused parts of ILSE.

  4. AMPERE AVERAGE CURRENT PHOTOINJECTOR AND ENERGY RECOVERY LINAC.

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI,I.; BURRILL,A.; CALAGA,R.; ET AL.

    2004-08-17

    High-power Free-Electron Lasers were made possible by advances in superconducting linac operated in an energy-recovery mode. In order to get to much higher power levels, say a fraction of a megawatt average power, many technological barriers are yet to be broken. We describe work on CW, high-current and high-brightness electron beams. This will include a description of a superconducting, laser-photocathode RF gun employing a new secondary-emission multiplying cathode, an accelerator cavity, both capable of producing of the order of one ampere average current and plans for an ERL based on these units.

  5. Improved Overhead Accounting in the NLC Main Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Tenenbaum, P.

    2004-06-10

    The NLC main linac contains 1,116 RF power units, of which 5% are considered ''spares'' for replacement of failed power units, make-up of the energy gain during an RF breakdown, and energy feedback. A more careful accounting for the effects of beam loading indicates that the NLC can operate with less BNS overhead and a smaller mean phase offset than was originally specified, and that as a consequence the total number of spares is actually about 7.9% of the total.

  6. Pulsed-focusing recirculating linacs for muon acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland

    2014-12-31

    Since the muon has a short lifetime, fast acceleration is essential for high-energy applications such as muon colliders, Higgs factories, or neutrino factories. The best one can do is to make a linear accelerator with the highest possible accelerating gradient to make the accelerating time as short as possible. However, the cost of such a single linear accelerator is prohibitively large due to expensive power sources, cavities, tunnels, and related infrastructure. As was demonstrated in the Thomas Jefferson Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), an elegant solution to reduce cost is to use magnetic return arcs to recirculate the beam through the accelerating RF cavities many times, where they gain energy on each pass. In such a Recirculating Linear Accelerator (RLA), the magnetic focusing strength diminishes as the beam energy increases in a conventional linac that has constant strength quadrupoles. After some number of passes the focusing strength is insufficient to keep the beam from going unstable and being lost. In this project, the use of fast pulsed quadrupoles in the linac sections was considered for stronger focusing as a function of time to allow more successive passes of a muon beam in a recirculating linear accelerator. In one simulation, it was shown that the number of passes could be increased from 8 to 12 using pulsed magnet designs that have been developed and tested. This could reduce the cost of linac sections of a muon RLA by 8/12, where more improvement is still possible. The expense of a greater number of passes and corresponding number of return arcs was also addressed in this project by exploring the use of ramped or FFAG-style magnets in the return arcs. A better solution, invented in this project, is to use combined-function dipole-quadrupole magnets to simultaneously transport two beams of different energies through one magnet string to reduce costs of return arcs by almost a factor of

  7. Induction linacs and pulsed power

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G.J.

    1995-07-11

    Progress in electronic power conversion technology is making possible a new class of induction linacs that can operate at extremely high repetition rates. Advances in insulator technology, pulse forming line design and switching may also lead to a new type of high current accelerator with accelerating gradients at least an order of magnitude greater than those attainable today. The evolution of the induction accelerator pulsed power system will be discussed along with some details of these emerging technologies which are at the frontiers of accelerator technology.

  8. Tuning of RF amplitude and phase for the separate-type drift tube linac in J-PARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Guobao; Ikegami, Masanori

    2009-01-01

    It is important to accurately adjust the amplitude and the phase of RF power sources for a high intensity proton linac. J-PARC (Japan proton accelerator research complex) linac is one of those high-intensity linacs. J-PARC linac has 30 SDTL (separate-type drift tube linac) tanks to accelerate the negative hydrogen ions from 50 to 181 MeV. Two neighboring SDTL tanks are driven by one klystron, where the phase and the amplitude of these two tanks are controlled in terms of the vector sum. The target-value of the vector sum control should be determined with a beam-based tuning for each klystron. During the beam commissioning, the RF tuning has been performed with a phase scan method introducing a concept of phase signature matching. In the tuning, the output beam energy from the SDTL module is monitored while scanning the RF phase. Comparing the obtained phase dependence of the output beam energy with those from a numerical model, the target-values for the low-level RF control system has been tuned within the required accuracy of 1° in phase and 1% in amplitude. The same tuning procedure has successfully been applied to the RF tuning of buncher and debuncher cavities.

  9. The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS)*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winick, Herman

    2002-04-01

    Advances in technology make it possible to use the SLAC linac to drive the LCLS (1), a coherent x-ray source which will deliver sub-picosecond pulses at wavelengths down to 1.5 Angstroms with an instantaneous (peak) power up to 10 GW, corresponding to a brightness 10 orders of magnitude greater than x-ray beams from the most advanced synchrotron light sources. The LCLS operates on the principle of Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission-SASE (2); i.e., coherent emission is achieved without an optical cavity by inducing a bunch-density modulation at the scale of the optical wavelength in a single pass of a high peak current, low emittance, 15 GeV electron beam through a 100m undulator. The LCLS, and a similar project planned at DESY in Hamburg, exploit recent technological developments; high-brightness rf photocathode electron guns, emittance preservation during acceleration and compression, precision undulator magnets, and high power x-ray optics. The unique properties of LCLS radiation enable new scientific opportunities in femtochemistry, nanoscale dynamics in condensed matter, atomic physics, biological imaging, plasma physics, and warm condensed matter. A collaboration including 4 US national labs (Argonne, Brookhaven, Lawrence Livermore, and Los Alamos) along with SLAC and UCLA is conducting r&d aiming for an LCLS construction start in 2004. 1. P.Emma; Proc. Part. Accel. Conf.(PAC2001); June 18-22, 2001. 2. R.Bonifacio, C.Pellegrini, L.Narducci; Optics Comm. 50,373(1984) *Supported by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, US Dept. of Energy.

  10. Update on RF System Studies and VCX Fast Tuner Work for the RIA Drive Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Rusnak, B; Shen, S

    2003-05-06

    The limited cavity beam loading conditions anticipated for the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) create a situation where microphonic-induced cavity detuning dominates radio frequency (RF) coupling and RF system architecture choices in the linac design process. Where most superconducting electron and proton linacs have beam-loaded bandwidths that are comparable to or greater than typical microphonic detuning bandwidths on the cavities, the beam-loaded bandwidths for many heavy-ion species in the RIA driver linac can be as much as a factor of 10 less than the projected 80-150 Hz microphonic control window for the RF structures along the driver, making RF control problematic. While simply overcoupling the coupler to the cavity can mitigate this problem to some degree, system studies indicate that for the low-{beta} driver linac alone, this approach may cost 50% or more than an RF system employing a voltage controlled reactance (VCX) fast tuner. An update of these system cost studies, along with the status of the VCX work being done at Lawrence Livermore National Lab is presented here.

  11. LIGHT SOURCE: Physical design of a 10 MeV LINAC for polymer radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Guang-Yao; Pei, Yuan-Ji; Wang, Lin; Zhang, Shan-Cai; Wu, Cong-Feng; Jin, Kai; Li, Wei-Min

    2009-06-01

    In China, polymer radiation processing has become one of the most important processing industries. The radiation processing source may be an electron beam accelerator or a radioactive source. Physical design of an electron beam facility applied for radiation crosslinking is introduced in this paper because of it's much higher dose rate and efficiency. Main part of this facility is a 10 MeV travelling wave electron linac with constant impedance accelerating structure. A start to end simulation concerning the linac is reported in this paper. The codes Opera-3d, Poisson-superfish and Parmela are used to describe electromagnetic elements of the accelerator and track particle distribution from the cathode to the end of the linac. After beam dynamic optimization, wave phase velocities in the structure have been chosen to be 0.56, 0.9 and 0.999 respectively. Physical parameters about the main elements such as DC electron gun, iris-loaded periodic structure, solenoids, etc, are presented. Simulation results proves that it can satisfy the industrial requirement. The linac is under construction. Some components have been finished. Measurements proved that they are in a good agreement with the design values.

  12. A novel electron accelerator for MRI-Linac radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Whelan, Brendan; Gierman, Stephen; Holloway, Lois; Schmerge, John; Keall, Paul; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: MRI guided radiotherapy is a rapidly growing field; however, current electron accelerators are not designed to operate in the magnetic fringe fields of MRI scanners. As such, current MRI-Linac systems require magnetic shielding, which can degrade MR image quality and limit system flexibility. The purpose of this work was to develop and test a novel medical electron accelerator concept which is inherently robust to operation within magnetic fields for in-line MRI-Linac systems. Methods: Computational simulations were utilized to model the accelerator, including the thermionic emission process, the electromagnetic fields within the accelerating structure, and resulting particle trajectories through these fields. The spatial and energy characteristics of the electron beam were quantified at the accelerator target and compared to published data for conventional accelerators. The model was then coupled to the fields from a simulated 1 T superconducting magnet and solved for cathode to isocenter distances between 1.0 and 2.4 m; the impact on the electron beam was quantified. Results: For the zero field solution, the average current at the target was 146.3 mA, with a median energy of 5.8 MeV (interquartile spread of 0.1 MeV), and a spot size diameter of 1.5 mm full-width-tenth-maximum. Such an electron beam is suitable for therapy, comparing favorably to published data for conventional systems. The simulated accelerator showed increased robustness to operation in in-line magnetic fields, with a maximum current loss of 3% compared to 85% for a conventional system in the same magnetic fields. Conclusions: Computational simulations suggest that replacing conventional DC electron sources with a RF based source could be used to develop medical electron accelerators which are robust to operation in in-line magnetic fields. This would enable the development of MRI-Linac systems with no magnetic shielding around the Linac and reduce the requirements for optimization of

  13. WE-AB-BRB-09: Real Time In Vivo Scintillating Fiber Array Detector for Medical LINACS

    SciTech Connect

    Knewtson, T; Pokhrel, S; Hernandez-Morales, D; Loyalka, S; Rangaraj, D; Izaguirre, E; Price, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: An in vivo transmission scintillation fiber detector was developed to monitor patient treatment in real time for the enhancement of patient safety and treatment accuracy. The detector system is capable of monitoring each pulse from a medical LINAC during treatment to determine the dose delivered as treatment progresses. Methods: The detector system consists of 60 parallel scintillating fibers coupled to fast data processing optoelectronics that can monitor the beam fluence in real time. Each 2.5mm{sup 2} square fiber is aligned with an MLC leaf pair and is long enough to capture a 40cm field. The fibers are embedded within a water equivalent polymer substrate that is secured in the LINAC accessory tray. The fibers are coupled to high speed photosensors and front end amplifiers that filter noise and pass each pulse to a high speed analog-to-digital converter. The system components are capable of detecting pulse repetition times shorter than what is delivered by a medical LINAC to ensure true real time data acquisition. Results: The system was able to capture and record the signal from each linac pulse and display the information in real time with no pulse pile up. It was found that the fiber array attenuates 2.65% of the beam which can easily be compensated for in treatment planning. The fibers responded linearly with dose, are independent of clinical beam energies, and are independent of dose rate. Calibration of the system was performed as a function of beam energy, beam size, dose rate, and monitor units to optimize beam fluence error detection. Conclusion: The detector system presented provides true real time in vivo beam monitoring to enhance patient safety and treatment delivery accuracy. Furthermore, the detector can be used for current patient specific QA.

  14. LUX - A recirculating linac-based ultrafast X-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Corlett, J.N.; Barletta, W.A.; DeSantis, S.; Doolittle, L.; Fawley, W.M.; Green, M.A.; Heimann, P.; Leone, S.R.; Lidia, S.; Li, D.; Parmigiani, F.; Ratti, A.; Robinson, K.; Schoenlein, R.; Staples, J.; Wan, W.; Wells, R.; Wilcox, R.; Wolski, A.; Zholents, A.

    2003-08-01

    We describe the design of a proposed source of ultra-fast synchrotron radiation x-ray pulses based on a recirculating superconducting linac, with an integrated array of ultrafast laser systems. The source produces x-ray pulses with duration of 10-50 fs at a 10 kHz repetition rate, with tunability from EUV to hard x-ray regimes, and optimized for the study of ultra-fast dynamics. A high-brightness rf photocathode provides electron bunches. An injector linac accelerates the beam to the 100 MeV range, and is followed by four passes through a 700 MeV recirculating linac. Ultrafast hard x-ray pulses are obtained by a combination of electron bunch manipulation, transverse temporal correlation of the electrons, and x-ray pulse compression. EUV and soft x-ray pulses as short as 10 fs are generated in a harmonic-cascade free electron laser scheme.

  15. Resonance Excitation of Longitudinal High Order Modes in Project X Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Khabiboulline, T.N.; Sukhanov, A.AUTHOR = Awida, M.; Gonin, I.; Lunin, A.AUTHOR = Solyak, N.; Yakovlev, V.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Results of simulation of power loss due to excitation of longitudinal high order modes (HOMs) in the accelerating superconducting RF system of CW linac of Project X are presented. Beam structures corresponding to the various modes of Project X operation are considered: CW regime for 3 GeV physics program; pulsed mode for neutrino experiments; and pulsed regime, when Project X linac operates as a driver for Neutrino Factory/Muon Collider. Power loss and associated heat load due to resonance excitation of longitudinal HOMs are shown to be small in all modes of operation. Conclusion is made that HOM couplers can be removed from the design of superconducting RF cavities of Project X linac.

  16. Multi-cell disk-and-ring tapered structure for compact RF linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. V.; Boucher, S.; Kutsaev, S.; Hartzell, J.; Savin, E.

    2016-09-01

    A tubular disk-and-ring, tapered accelerating structure for small electron linacs and MicroLinacs is considered. It consists of metal and dielectric elements inserted into a metallic tube to eliminate multi-cell, multi-step brazing. The structure enables a wide range of phase velocities (including non-relativistic), a wide bandwidth allowing large number of cells (for standing wave mode) or short filling time (for traveling wave mode), combination of compensated and purely π-mode cells, alternative periodic focusing built-in to the RF structure (the disks), and combining of RF and vacuum windows. RF and accelerating performance of such a long structure having up to four dozens cells is analyzed. Some of beam dynamics, thermal, and vacuum aspects of the structure and MicroLinac performance are considered as well.

  17. Laser materials processing of complex components: from reverse engineering via automated beam path generation to short process development cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görgl, Richard; Brandstätter, Elmar

    2017-01-01

    The article presents an overview of what is possible nowadays in the field of laser materials processing. The state of the art in the complete process chain is shown, starting with the generation of a specific components CAD data and continuing with the automated motion path generation for the laser head carried by a CNC or robot system. Application examples from laser cladding and laser-based additive manufacturing are given.

  18. Laser materials processing of complex components. From reverse engineering via automated beam path generation to short process development cycles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görgl, R.; Brandstätter, E.

    2016-03-01

    The article presents an overview of what is possible nowadays in the field of laser materials processing. The state of the art in the complete process chain is shown, starting with the generation of a specific components CAD data and continuing with the automated motion path generation for the laser head carried by a CNC or robot system. Application examples from laser welding, laser cladding and additive laser manufacturing are given.

  19. Accuracy of software designed for automated localization of the inferior alveolar nerve canal on cone beam CT images

    PubMed Central

    Zamani, Ali; Kashkouli, Sadegh; Soltanimehr, Elham; Ghofrani Jahromi, Mohsen; Sanaeian Pourshirazi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to design and evaluate a new method for automated localization of the inferior alveolar nerve canal on CBCT images. Methods: The proposed method is based on traversing both panoramic and cross-sectional slices. For the panoramic slices, morphological skeletonization is imposed, and a modified Hough transform is used while traversing the cross-sectional slices. A total of 40 CBCT images were randomly selected. Two experts twice located the inferior alveolar nerve canal during two examinations set 6 weeks apart. Agreement between experts was achieved, and the result of this manual technique was considered the gold standard for our study. The distances for the automated method and those determined using the gold standard method were calculated and recorded. The mean time required for the automated detection was also recorded. Results: The average mean distance error from the baseline was 0.75 ± 0.34 mm. In all, 86% of the detected points had a mean error of <1 mm compared with those determined by the manual gold standard method. Conclusions: The proposed method is far more accurate and faster than previous methods. It also provides more accuracy than human annotation within a shorter time. PMID:26652929

  20. Dosimetric algorithm to reproduce isodose curves obtained from a LINAC.

    PubMed

    Estrada Espinosa, Julio Cesar; Martínez Ovalle, Segundo Agustín; Pereira Benavides, Cinthia Kotzian

    2014-01-01

    In this work isodose curves are obtained by the use of a new dosimetric algorithm using numerical data from percentage depth dose (PDD) and the maximum absorbed dose profile, calculated by Monte Carlo in a 18 MV LINAC. The software allows reproducing the absorbed dose percentage in the whole irradiated volume quickly and with a good approximation. To validate results an 18 MV LINAC with a whole geometry and a water phantom were constructed. On this construction, the distinct simulations were processed by the MCNPX code and then obtained the PDD and profiles for the whole depths of the radiation beam. The results data were used by the code to produce the dose percentages in any point of the irradiated volume. The absorbed dose for any voxel's size was also reproduced at any point of the irradiated volume, even when the voxels are considered to be of a pixel's size. The dosimetric algorithm is able to reproduce the absorbed dose induced by a radiation beam over a water phantom, considering PDD and profiles, whose maximum percent value is in the build-up region. Calculation time for the algorithm is only a few seconds, compared with the days taken when it is carried out by Monte Carlo.

  1. Dosimetric Algorithm to Reproduce Isodose Curves Obtained from a LINAC

    PubMed Central

    Estrada Espinosa, Julio Cesar; Martínez Ovalle, Segundo Agustín; Pereira Benavides, Cinthia Kotzian

    2014-01-01

    In this work isodose curves are obtained by the use of a new dosimetric algorithm using numerical data from percentage depth dose (PDD) and the maximum absorbed dose profile, calculated by Monte Carlo in a 18 MV LINAC. The software allows reproducing the absorbed dose percentage in the whole irradiated volume quickly and with a good approximation. To validate results an 18 MV LINAC with a whole geometry and a water phantom were constructed. On this construction, the distinct simulations were processed by the MCNPX code and then obtained the PDD and profiles for the whole depths of the radiation beam. The results data were used by the code to produce the dose percentages in any point of the irradiated volume. The absorbed dose for any voxel's size was also reproduced at any point of the irradiated volume, even when the voxels are considered to be of a pixel's size. The dosimetric algorithm is able to reproduce the absorbed dose induced by a radiation beam over a water phantom, considering PDD and profiles, whose maximum percent value is in the build-up region. Calculation time for the algorithm is only a few seconds, compared with the days taken when it is carried out by Monte Carlo. PMID:25045398

  2. RF system considerations for large high-duty-factor linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, M.T.; Ziomek, C.D.; Tallerico, P.J.; Regan, A.H.; Eaton, L.; Lawrence, G.

    1994-09-01

    RF systems are often a major cost item for linacs, but this is especially true for large high-duty-factor linacs (up to and including CW) such as the Accelerator for Production of Tritium (APT) or the Accelerator for Transmutation of nuclear Waste (ATW). In addition, the high energy and high average beam current of these machines (approximately 1 GeV, 100--200 mA) leads to a need for excellent control of the accelerating fields in order to minimize the possibility of beam loss in the accelerator and the resulting activation. This paper will address the key considerations and limitations in the design of the RF system. These considerations impact the design of both the high power RF components and the RF controls. As might be expected, the two concerns sometimes lead to conflicting design requirements. For example minimum RF operating costs lead to a desire for operation near saturation of the high power RF generators in order to maximize the operating efficiency. Optimal control of the RF fields leads to a desire for maximum overdrive capability in those same generators in order to respond quickly to disturbances of the accelerator fields.

  3. Superconducting RF Linac Technology for ERL Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Tennant, Chris

    2005-08-01

    Energy Recovering Linacs (ERLs) offer an attractive alternative as drivers for light sources as they combine the desirable characteristics of both storage rings (high efficiency) and linear accelerators (superior beam quality). Using superconducting RF technology allows ERLs to operate more efficiently because of the inherent characteristics of SRF linacs, namely that they are high gradient-low impedance structures and their ability to operate in the long pulse or CW regime. We present an overview of the physics challenges encountered in the design and operation of ERL based light sources with particular emphasis on those issues related to SRF technology. These challenges include maximizing a cavity's Qo to increase cryogenic efficiency, maintaining control of the cavity field in the presence of the highest feasible loaded Q and providing adequate damping of the higher-order modes (HOMs). If not sufficiently damped, dipole HOMs can drive the multipass beam breakup (BBU) instability which ERLs are particularly susceptible to. Another challenge involves efficiently extracting the potentially large amounts of HOM power that are generated when a bunch traverses the SRF cavities and which may extend over a high range of frequencies. We present experimental data from the Jefferson Lab FEL Upgrade, a 10 mA ERL light source presently in operation, aimed at addressing some of these issues. We conclude with an outlook towards the future of ERL based light sources.

  4. Installation and Commissioning of the Super Conducting RF Linac Cryomodules for the Erlp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulden, A. R.; Bate, R.; Buckley, R. K.; Pattalwar, S. M.

    2008-03-01

    An Energy Recovery Linac Prototype (ERLP) is currently being constructed at Daresbury Laboratory, (UK) to promote the necessary skills in science & technology, particularly in photocathode electron gun and Superconducting RF (SRF), to enable the construction of a fourth generation light source, based on energy recovery linacs-4GLS [1]. The ERLP uses two identical cryomodules, one as a booster Linac used to accelerate the beam to 8.5 MeV, the other as an Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) module with an energy gain of 26.5 MeV. Each module consists of two 9- cell cavities operating at a frequency of 1.3 GHz and a temperature of 2 K. As there is no energy recovery in the booster it requires a peak power of 53 kW; whereas the linac module only requires 8 kW. The RF power is supplied by Inductive Output Tube (IOT) amplifiers. The maximum heat load (or the cooling power) required in the SRF system is 180 W at 2 K and is achieved in two stages: a LN2 pre-cooled Linde TCF50 liquefier produces liquid helium at 4.5 K, followed by a 2 K cold box consisting of a JT valve, recuperator and an external room temperature vacuum pumping system. This presentation reports the experience gained during, installation, commissioning and the initial operation of the cryomodules.

  5. Progress update on cryogenic system for ARIEL E-linac at TRIUMF

    SciTech Connect

    Koveshnikov, A.; Bylinskii, I.; Hodgson, G.; Yosifov, D.

    2014-01-29

    TRIUMF is involved in a major upgrade. The Advanced Rare IsotopeE Laboratory (ARIEL) has become a fully funded project in July 2010. A 10 mA 50 MeV SRF electron linac (e-linac) operating CW at 1.3 GHz is the key component of this initiative. This machine will serve as a second independent photo-fission driver for Rare Isotope Beams (RIB) production at TRIUMF's Isotope Separator and Accelerator (ISAC) facility. The cryogens delivery system requirements are driven by the electron accelerator cryomodule design [1, 2]. Since commencement of the project in 2010 the cryogenic system of e-linac has moved from the conceptual design phase into engineering design and procurement stage. The present document summarizes the progress in cryogenic system development and construction. Current status of e-linac cryogenic system including details of LN{sub 2} storage and delivery systems, and helium subatmospheric (SA) system is presented. The first phase of e-linac consisting of two cryomodules, cryogens storage, delivery, and distribution systems, and a 600 W class liquid helium cryoplant is scheduled for installation and commissioning by year 2014.

  6. Synchronous heating of two local regions of a biological tissue phantom using automated targeting of phase conjugate ultrasound beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krutyansky, L. M.; Brysev, A. P.; Klopotov, R. V.

    2015-01-01

    Synchronous heating of two local regions of an absorbing medium by phase conjugate ultrasound beams focused on them has been experimentally demonstrated. A polymeric biological tissue phantom with two small air cavities scattering sound has been used as the medium irradiated by a 5-MHz "probe" ultrasound beam. The scattered field is incident on a parametric device for ultrasonic wave phase conjugation. The conjugate and amplified field is self-adaptive focused on scatterers and heats the medium owing to the absorption of the ultrasonic energy. In this case, these regions are heated by about 5°C in 70 s. Only an insignificant increase in the temperature owing to the heat conduction effect is observed in the remaining volume of the phantom. The implemented effect can be used in medical applications of phase conjugate ultrasound beams.

  7. Overview of superconducting RF technology and its application to high-current linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.

    1994-08-01

    Superconducting linacs may be a viable option for high-current applications such as copious neutron production like that needed for transmutation of radioactive waste. These linacs must run reliably for many years and allow easy routine maintenance. superconducting cavities operate efficiently with high cw gradients, properties which help to reduce operating and capital costs. However, cost effectiveness is not the sole consideration in these applications. For example, beam impingement must be essentially eliminated to prevent unsafe radioactivation of the accelerating structures, and thus large apertures are needed through which to pass the beam. Because of their high efficiency, superconducting cavities can be designed with very large bore apertures, thereby reducing the effect of beam impingement.

  8. Ampere Average Current Photoinjector and Energy Recovery Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Ilan Ben-Zvi; A. Burrill; R. Calaga; P. Cameron; X. Chang; D. Gassner; H. Hahn; A. Hershcovitch; H.C. Hseuh; P. Johnson; D. Kayran; J. Kewisch; R. Lambiase; Vladimir N. Litvinenko; G. McIntyre; A. Nicoletti; J. Rank; T. Roser; J. Scaduto; K. Smith; T. Srinivasan-Rao; K.-C. Wu; A. Zaltsman; Y. Zhao; H. Bluem; A. Burger; Mike Cole; A. Favale; D. Holmes; John Rathke; Tom Schultheiss; A. Todd; J. Delayen; W. Funk; L. Phillips; Joe Preble

    2004-08-01

    High-power Free-Electron Lasers were made possible by advances in superconducting linac operated in an energy-recovery mode, as demonstrated by the spectacular success of the Jefferson Laboratory IR-Demo. In order to get to much higher power levels, say a fraction of a megawatt average power, many technological barriers are yet to be broken. BNL's Collider-Accelerator Department is pursuing some of these technologies for a different application, that of electron cooling of high-energy hadron beams. I will describe work on CW, high-current and high-brightness electron beams. This will include a description of a superconducting, laser-photocathode RF gun employing a new secondary-emission multiplying cathode and an accelerator cavity, both capable of producing of the order of one ampere average current.

  9. Physics design of rod type proton Radio Frequency Quadrupole linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, C.; Dechoudhury, S.; Pandey, H. K.; Naik, V.; Chakrabarti, A.

    2017-02-01

    A Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) linac delivering 800 keV, 5 mA protons has been designed. It is envisaged as first injector of the proton driver that will be used for production of proton-rich radioactive beams in the proposed ANURIB facility. The option of rod-type structure at frequency of 80 MHz has been chosen owing to ease of mechanical fabrications and to avoid detrimental nearby dipole modes present in vane type structure. Optimization of parameters has been carried out for a viable length and power of RFQ in order to avoid any infrastructural complexity. Conventional method of keeping focusing factor and vane voltage constant along the length of RFQ has been adopted. Results of detailed beam dynamics and RF structure design, space charge induced effects and corroborative particle tracking with realistic 3D fields of modulated vane has been presented.

  10. A Fuzzy Logic Based Controller for the Automated Alignment of a Laser-beam-smoothing Spatial Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krasowski, M. J.; Dickens, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    A fuzzy logic based controller for a laser-beam-smoothing spatial filter is described. It is demonstrated that a human operator's alignment actions can easily be described by a system of fuzzy rules of inference. The final configuration uses inexpensive, off-the-shelf hardware and allows for a compact, readily implemented embedded control system.

  11. CERN’s Linac4 H{sup −} sources: Status and operational results

    SciTech Connect

    Lettry, J. Aguglia, D.; Andersson, P.; Bertolo, S.; Butterworth, A.; Coutron, Y.; Dallocchio, A.; David, N.; Chaudet, E.; Fink, D.; Gil-Flores, J.; Garlasche, M.; Grudiev, A.; Guida, R.; Hansen, J.; Haase, M.; Jones, A.; Koszar, I.; Machado, C.; Mastrostefano, C.; and others

    2015-04-08

    Two volume sources equipped with DESY and CERN plasma generators and a low voltage electron dump were operated at 45 kV in the Linac4 tunnel and on a dedicated test stand. These volume sources delivered approximately 20 mA and ensured the commissioning of the Radio Frequency Quadrupole accelerator and of the first section of the Drift Tube Linac. CERN’s prototype of a cesiated surface source equipped with this electron dump was operated continuously from November 2013 to April 2014 on the ion source test stand and is being commissioned in the Linac4 tunnel. Before cesiation, the prototype conditioned in volume mode provided up to 30 mA H{sup −} beam. Short cesiations, of the order of 10 mg effectively reduced the intensity of co-extracted electrons down to 2 - 8 times the H{sup −} current; this cesiated surface operation mode delivered up to 60 mA H{sup −} beam. An H{sup −} beam of the order of 40 mA was sustained up to four weeks operation with 500 μs pulses at 1.2s spacing. A new extraction was designed to match these beam properties. A copy of BNL’s magnetron produced at CERN was tested at BNL and delivered at 40 kV H{sup −} beam exceeding Linac4’s nominal intensity of 80 mA. In this contribution, the performances, dynamic response to cesiation, stability and availability of these prototypes are described. The needed optimization of the emittance of H{sup −} beam above 40 mA is presented, which requires an evolution of the front end that encompasses implementation of a large ceramic insulator.

  12. Low-Z linac targets for low-MV gold nanoparticle radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tsiamas, P.; Mishra, P.; Berbeco, R. I.; Marcus, K.; Zygmanski, P. E-mail: Erno-Sajo@uml.edu; Cifter, F.; Sajo, E. E-mail: Erno-Sajo@uml.edu

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To investigate the potential of low-Z/low-MV (low-Z) linac targets for gold nanoparticle radiotherapy (GNPT) and to determine the microscopic dose enhancement ratio (DER) due to GNP for the alternative beamlines. In addition, to evaluate the degradation of dose enhancement arising from the increased attenuation of x rays and larger skin dose in water for the low-MV beams compared to the standard linac. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were used to compute dose and DER for various flattening-filter-free beams (2.5, 4, 6.5 MV). Target materials were beryllium, diamond, and tungsten-copper high-Z target. Target thicknesses were selected based on 20%, 60%, 70%, and 80% of the continuous slowing down approximation electron ranges for a given target material and energy. Evaluation of the microscopic DER was carried out for 100 nm GNP including the degradation factors due to beam attenuation. Results: The greatest increase in DER compared to the standard 6.5 MV linac was for a 2.5 MV Be-target (factor of ∼2). Skin dose ranged from ∼10% (Be, 6.5 MV-80%) to ∼85% (Be, 2.5 MV-20%) depending on the target case. Attenuation of 2.5 MV beams at 22 cm was higher by ∼75% compared with the standard beam. Taking into account the attenuation at 22 cm depth, the effective dose enhancement was up to ∼60% above the DER of the high-Z target. For these cases the effective DER ranged between ∼1.6 and 6 compared with the standard linac. Conclusions: Low-Z (2.5 MV) GNPT is possible even after accounting for greater beam attenuation for deep-seated tumors (22 cm) and the increased skin dose. Further, it can lead to significant sparing of normal tissue while simultaneously escalating the dose in the tumor cells.

  13. Real-Time Dosimetry for Radiobiology Experiments Using 25 MeV LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Mestari, Mohammed A.; Naeem, Syed F.; Wells, Douglas P.; Hunt, Alan; DeVeaux, Linda C.

    2009-03-10

    The next generation of radiobiology research requires increasingly more complex radiation sources to address questions ranging from the effects of space-based radiation to the influence of dose rate on biological systems. The Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC) has developed a radiobiology research facility to address some of these questions. The irradiation challenge is to deliver stable and reproducible conditions of high dose rate with well-controlled beam uniformity, dose, and dose rate under controlled temperature. In this work, we used a 25 MeV modified medical grade linear accelerator (LINAC) to obtain a high and adjustable electron dose rate. To overcome electron beam drift we used a collimator that both assisted the LINAC operator to steer the beam and ensured that regardless of beam drift, only the fixed collimated beam would irradiate the specimens. In addition, we utilized a beam flattener to keep the beam variation as low as 3% at 2.5 cm from the beam's center, and 1% variation between the simultaneously irradiated sample tubes. We also demonstrated that a segmented Faraday 'cup'(FC) array provides a useful real-time beam scanning and monitoring system, and is promising for implementing real-time dosimetry and control.

  14. Conceptual design of the Project-X 1.3 GHz 3-8 GeV pulsed linac

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N.; Eidelman, Y.; Nagaitsev, S.; Ostiguy, J.-F.; Vostrikov, A.; Yakovlev, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Project-X, a multi-MW proton source, is under development at Fermilab. It enables a Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment via a new beam line pointed to DUSEL in Lead, South Dakota, and a broad suite of rare decay experiments. The initial acceleration is provided by a 3-GeV 1-mA CW superconducting linac. In a second stage, about 5% of the H{sup -} beam is accelerated up to 8 GeV in a 1.3 GHz SRF pulsed linac and injected into the Recycler/Main Injector complex. In order to mitigate problems with stripping foil heating during injection, higher current pulses are accelerated in the CW linac in conjunction with the 1 mA beam which is separated and further accelerated in the pulsed linac. The optimal current in the pulsed linac is discussed as well as the constraints that led to its selection. A conceptual design which covers optics and RF stability analysis is presented. Finally, the need for HOM damping is discussed.

  15. Digitally Controlled Four Harmonic Buncher for FSU LINAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moerland, Daniel S.; Wiedenhoever, Ingo; Baby, Lagy T.; Caussyn, David; Spingler, David

    2012-03-01

    Florida State University's John D. Fox Superconducting Accelerator Laboratory is operating a Tandem-Linac system for heavy ion beams at energies of 5-10 MeV/u. Recently, the accelerator has been used as the driver for the radioactive beam facility RESOLUT, which poses new demands on its high-intensity performance and time-resolution. These demands motivated us to optimize the RF bunching system and to switch the bunch frequency from 48.5 to 12.125 MHz. We installed a four-harmonic resonant transformer to create 3-4 kV potential oscillations across a pair of wire-mesh grids. This setup is modulating the energy of the beam injected into the tandem accelerator, with the aim to create short bunches of beam particles. Asawtooth-like wave-form is created using the Fourier series method, by combining the basis sinusoidal wave of 12.125MHz and its 3 higher order harmonics, in a manner similar to the systems used at ATLAS [1] and other RF-accelerators. A new aspect of our setup is the use of a digital 1GHz function generator, which allows us to optimize and stabilize the synthesized waveform. The control system was realized using labview and integrated into the recently updated controls of the accelerator. We characterize the bunching quality achievedand discuss the optimization of the bunching wave-form. The bunching system has been successfully used in a number of Linac-experiments performed during 2011.[4pt][1] S. Sharamentov, J. Bogaty, B.E. Clifft, R. Pardo, UPGRADE OF THE ATLAS POSITIVE ION INJECTOR BUNCHING SYSTEM, Proceedings of 2005 Particle Accelerator Conference, Knoxville, Tennessee

  16. Injector linac for the MESA facility

    SciTech Connect

    Heine, R.

    2013-11-07

    In this paper we present several possible configurations of an injector linac for the upcoming Mainz Energy-recovering Superconducting Accelerator (MESA) [1] and discuss their suitability for the project.

  17. SU-E-J-202: Performance of the Patient QA Systems in a Hybrid MRI-Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Houweling, A; Vries, W de; Wolthaus, J; Woodings, S; Asselen, B van; Kok, J; Lagendijk, J; Raaymakers, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The first clinical MR-linac will soon become operational, therefore patient plan QA procedures and equipment have to become MRcompatible. Reference dosimetry is affected by the magnetic field, however, relative dosimetry using patient QA systems haven’t been investigated extensively. The purpose of this study was to examine the performance characteristics of the MR-compatible ArcCHECK and Delta4 systems in a transverse 1.5 T magnetic field. Methods: Recently MR-compatible versions of both ArcCheck (Sun Nuclear) and Delta4 (Scandidos) have been developed. To examine the performance characteristics within the magnetic field, the reproducibility, dose linearity, dose rate dependence, field size and angular dependence were evaluated on the MR-linac (8 MV FFF beam, SAD of 142 cm) and a conventional linac (Elekta, 6MV). To allow comparison of the measurements with and without magnetic field, the measurement setup for the conventional linac is adapted to mimic the setup at the MR-linac if possible (e.g. SAD, dose rate). The results from the MR-linac were benchmarked to the results from the conventional linac as being the clinical reference. Results: At the moment of writing, measurements for the Delta4 are still running. Therefore, only the results of the ArcCheck are presented in this abstract. No significant difference was observed in the reproducibility of the ArcCheck (<0.06%) between both linacs. The maximum dose response difference when measuring the dose linearity was less than 0.4% and the varying dose rate resulted in maximal dose differences of 1.0% for both linacs. Response variation for varying field sizes was <2.6% at the conventional linac, and <1.0% at the MR-linac. Angular response was similar for both linacs. Conclusion: The reproducibility, dose linearity, dose rate dependence, field size and angular dependence of the MR compatible ArcCheck were not influenced by the presence of a transverse 1.5 T magnetic field. The results for the Delta4 are

  18. Dark current model for ILC main linac

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N.; Romanov, G.; Mokhov, N.V.; Eidelman, Y.; Tam, Wai-Ming; /Indiana U.

    2008-06-01

    In the ILC Main Linac, the dark current electrons, generated in SRF cavity can be accelerated to hundreds of MeV before being kicked out by quadrupoles and thus will originate electromagnetic cascade showers in the surrounding materials. Some of the shower secondaries can return back into vacuum and be re-accelerated again. The preliminary results of simulation of the dark current generation in ILC cavity, its dynamics in linac are discussing in this paper.

  19. Compact heavy ion RFQ preaccelerator for use at the CERN Linac I

    SciTech Connect

    Gough, R.A.; Staples, J.; Caylor, R.; Howard, D.; MacGill, R.; Tanabe, J.

    1985-05-01

    This paper describes the LBL contribution to a project designed to provide fully-stripped oxygen beams for acceleration in the CERN PS complex. A preaccelerator for Linac I, consisting of an ECR ion source, an RFQ linac, and rf matching cavities, is being assembled as part of a collaborative arrangement among LBL, GSI, and CERN. The RFQ, designed and built at LBL, will accept analyzed oxygen +6 beam from the ECR at 5.6 keV/amu, and accelerate it to 139.5 keV/amu, the injection energy required for 2 ..beta..lambda operation of Linac I. Stripping to +8 will be done with a foil stripper at 12.5 MeV/amu at the exit of Linac I. The RFQ operates at 202.56 MHz and is 0.86 meters in length. The structure is stabilized with vane coupling rings, and uses a single drive loop and a single tuning loop. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  20. WE-G-17A-09: Novel Magnetic Shielding Design for Inline and Perpendicular Integrated 6 MV Linac and 1.0 T MRI Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X; Ma, B; Kuang, Y; Diao, X

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The influence of fringe magnetic fields delivered by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on the beam generation and transportation in Linac is still a major challenge for the integration of linear accelerator and MRI (Linac-MRI). In this study, we investigated an optimal magnetic shielding design for Linac-MRI and further characterized the beam trajectory in electron gun. Methods: Both inline and perpendicular configurations were analyzed in this study. The configurations, comprising a Linac-MRI with a 100cm SAD and an open 1.0 T superconductive magnet, were simulated by the 3D finite element method (FEM). The steel shielding around the Linac was included in the 3D model, the thickness of which was varied from 1mm to 20mm, and magnetic field maps were acquired with and without additional shielding. The treatment beam trajectory in electron gun was evaluated using OPERA 3d SCALA with and without shielding cases. Results: When Linac was not shielded, the uniformity of diameter sphere volume (DSV) (30cm) was about 5 parts per million (ppm) and the fringe magnetic fields in electron gun were more than 0.3 T. With shielding, the magnetic fields in electron gun were reduced to less than 0.01 T. For the inline configuration, the radial magnetic fields in the Linac were about 0.02T. A cylinder steel shield used (5mm thick) altered the uniformity of DSV to 1000 ppm. For the perpendicular configuration, the Linac transverse magnetic fields were more than 0.3T, which altered the beam trajectory significantly. A 8mm-thick cylinder steel shield surrounding the Linac was used to compensate the output losses of Linac, which shifted the magnetic fields' uniformity of DSV to 400 ppm. Conclusion: For both configurations, the Linac shielding was used to ensure normal operation of the Linac. The effect of magnetic fields on the uniformity of DSV could be modulated by the shimming technique of the MRI magnet. NIH/NIGMS grant U54 GM104944, Lincy Endowed Assistant Professorship.

  1. Functional forms for photon spectra of clinical linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, E. S. M.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2012-01-01

    Specifying photon spectra of clinical linacs using a functional form is useful for many applications, including virtual source modelling and spectral unfolding from dosimetric measurements such as transmission data or depth-dose curves. In this study, 11 functional forms from the literature are compiled and quantitatively compared. A new function is proposed which offers improvements over existing ones. The proposed function is simple, physics-based and has four free parameters, one of which is the mean incident electron kinetic energy. A comprehensive benchmark set of validated, high-precision Monte Carlo spectra is generated and used to evaluate the strengths and limitations of different functions. The benchmark set has 65 spectra (3.5-30 MV) from Varian, Elekta, Siemens, Tomotherapy, Cyberknife and research linacs. The set includes spectra on- and off-axis from linacs with and without a flattening filter, and in treatment and imaging modes. The proposed function gives the lowest spectral deviations among all functions. It reproduces the energy fluence values in each bin for the benchmark set with a normalized root-mean-square deviation of 1.7%. The mean incident electron kinetic energy, maximum photon energy, most-probable energy and average energy are reproduced, on average, within 1.4%, 4.3%, 3.9% and 0.6% of their true values, respectively. The proposed function is well behaved when used for spectral unfolding from dosimetric data. The contribution of the 511 keV annihilation peak and the energy spread of the incident electron beam can be added as additional free parameters.

  2. Medical Application of the SARAF-Proton/Deuteron 40 MeV Superconducting Linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halfon, Shlomi

    2007-11-01

    The Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF) is based on a superconducting linear accelerator currently being built at the Soreq research center (Israel). The SARAF is planned to generate a 2 mA 4 MeV proton beam during its first year of operation and up to 40 MeV proton or deuteron beam in 2012. The high intensity beam, together with the linac ability to adjust the ion energy provides opportunities for medical research, such as Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) and the production of medical radioisotopes, for instance 103Pd for prostate brachytherapy.

  3. Measurement of photoneutron dose produced by wedge filters of a high energy linac using polycarbonate films.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Seyed Mehdi; Hashemi-Malayeri, Bijan; Raisali, Gholamreza; Shokrani, Parvaneh; Sharafi, Ali Akbar; Torkzadeh, Falamarz

    2008-05-01

    Radiotherapy represents the most widely spread technique to control and treat cancer. To increase the treatment efficiency, high energy linacs are used. However, applying high energy photon beams leads to a non-negligible dose of neutrons contaminating therapeutic beams. In addition, using conventional linacs necessitates applying wedge filters in some clinical conditions. However, there is not enough information on the effect of these filters on the photoneutrons produced. The aim of this study was to investigate the change of photoneutron dose equivalent due to the use of linac wedge filters. A high energy (18 MV) linear accelerator (Elekta SL 75/25) was studied. Polycarbonate films were used to measure the dose equivalent of photoneutrons. After electrochemical etching of the films, the neutron dose equivalent was calculated using Hp(10) factor, and its variation on the patient plane at 0, 5, 10, 50 and 100 cm from the center of the X-ray beam was determined. By increasing the distance from the center of the X-ray beam towards the periphery, the photoneutron dose equivalent decreased rapidly for the open and wedged fields. Increasing of the field size increased the photoneutron dose equivalent. The use of wedge filter increased the proportion of the neutron dose equivalent. The increase can be accounted for by the selective absorption of the high energy photons by the wedge filter.

  4. Updating the CSNS injector linac to 250 MeV with superconducting double-spoke cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-Hui; Fu, Shi-Nian

    2015-03-01

    In order to update the beam power from 100 kW to 500 kW in the China Spallation neutron source (CSNS) Phase II, one of the important measures is to replace the 80 m long beam transport line between the present 80 MeV linac injector and the rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) to another kind of acceleration structure. In this paper, we proposed a scheme based on 324 MHz double-spoke superconducting cavities. Unlike the superconducting elliptical cavity and normal conducting coupled cavity linac (CCL) structure, the double-spoke cavity belongs to the TE mode structure and has a smaller transverse dimension compared with that of the TH mode one. It can work at base frequency as the drift tube Linac (DTL) section, so that the cost and complexity of the RF system will be much decreased, and the behaviors of the beam dynamics are also improved significantly because of the low charge density and larger longitudinal acceptance. Furthermore, because of the relatively longer interactive length between the charged particle and the electromagnetic field per cell, it needs relatively less cell numbers and it has larger velocity acceptance compared with the double frequency TH structures. The superconducting section consists of 14 periods, each of which includes 3 superconducting cavities encapsulated in one cryomodule and a doublet in room temperate. The general considerations on cavity and beam dynamics design are discussed and the main results are presented. Supported by National Nature Sciences Foundation of China (11375122, 91126003) and China ADS Project

  5. Cone beam CT with zonal filters for simultaneous dose reduction, improved target contrast and automated set-up in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Moore, C J; Marchant, T E; Amer, A M

    2006-05-07

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) using a zonal filter is introduced. The aims are reduced concomitant imaging dose to the patient, simultaneous control of body scatter for improved image quality in the tumour target zone and preserved set-up detail for radiotherapy. Aluminium transmission diaphragms added to the CBCT x-ray tube of the Elekta Synergytrade mark linear accelerator produced an unattenuated beam for a central "target zone" and a partially attenuated beam for an outer "set-up zone". Imaging doses and contrast noise ratios (CNR) were measured in a test phantom for transmission diaphragms 12 and 24 mm thick, for 5 and 10 cm long target zones. The effect on automatic registration of zonal CBCT to conventional CT was assessed relative to full-field and lead-collimated images of an anthropomorphic phantom. Doses along the axis of rotation were reduced by up to 50% in both target and set-up zones, and weighted dose (two thirds surface dose plus one third central dose) was reduced by 10-20% for a 10 cm long target zone. CNR increased by up to 15% in zonally filtered CBCT images compared to full-field images. Automatic image registration remained as robust as that with full-field images and was superior to CBCT coned down using lead-collimation. Zonal CBCT significantly reduces imaging dose and is expected to benefit radiotherapy through improved target contrast, required to assess target coverage, and wide-field edge detail, needed for robust automatic measurement of patient set-up error.

  6. SU-E-T-119: Dosimetric and Mechanical Characteristics of Elekta Infinity LINAC with Agility MLC

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J; Xu, Q; Xue, J; Zhai, Y; An, L; Chen, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Elekta Infinity is the one of the latest generation LINAC with unique features. Two Infinity LINACs are recently commissioned at our institution. The dosimetric and mechanical characteristics of the machines are presented. Methods: Both Infinity LINACs with Agility MLC (160 leaves with 0.5 cm leaf width) are configured with five electron energies (6, 9, 12, 15, and 18 MeV) and two photon energies (6 and 15 MV). One machine has additional photon energy (10 MV). The commissioning was performed by following the manufacturer's specifications and AAPM TG recommendations. Beam data of both electron and photon beams are measured with scanning ion chambers and linear diode array. Machines are adjusted to have the dosimetrically equivalent characteristics. Results: The commissioning of mechanical and imaging system meets the tolerances by TG recommendations. The PDD{sub 10} of various field sizes for 6 and 15 MV shows < 0.5% difference between two machines. For each electron beams, R{sub 80} matches with < 0.4 mm difference. The symmetry and flatness agree within 0.8% and 0.9% differences for photon beams, respectively. For electron beams, the differences of the symmetry and flatness are within 1.2% and 0.8%, respectively. The mean inline penumbras for 6, 10, and 15 MV are respectively 5.1±0.24, 5.6±0.07, and 5.9±0.10 mm for 10x10 cm at 10 cm depth. The crossline penumbras are larger than inline penumbras by 2.2, 1.4, and 1.0 mm, respectively. The MLC transmission factor with interleaf leakage is 0.5 % for all photon energies. Conclusion: The dosimetric and mechanical characteristics of two Infinity LINACs show good agreements between them. Although the Elekta Infinity has been used in many institutions, the detailed characteristics of the machine have not been reported. This study provides invaluable information to understand the Infinity LINAC and to compare the quality of commissioning data for other LINACs.

  7. Progress in bright ion beams for industry, medicine and fusion at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, Joe W.

    2002-05-31

    Recent progresses at LBNL in developing ion beams for industry, radiation therapy and inertial fusion applications were discussed. The highlights include ion beam lithography, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), and heavy ion fusion (HIF) drivers using multiple linacs.

  8. Locoregional Control of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in Relation to Automated Early Assessment of Tumor Regression on Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Brink, Carsten; Bernchou, Uffe; Bertelsen, Anders; Hansen, Olfred; Schytte, Tine; Bentzen, Soren M.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Large interindividual variations in volume regression of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are observable on standard cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) during fractionated radiation therapy. Here, a method for automated assessment of tumor volume regression is presented and its potential use in response adapted personalized radiation therapy is evaluated empirically. Methods and Materials: Automated deformable registration with calculation of the Jacobian determinant was applied to serial CBCT scans in a series of 99 patients with NSCLC. Tumor volume at the end of treatment was estimated on the basis of the first one third and two thirds of the scans. The concordance between estimated and actual relative volume at the end of radiation therapy was quantified by Pearson's correlation coefficient. On the basis of the estimated relative volume, the patients were stratified into 2 groups having volume regressions below or above the population median value. Kaplan-Meier plots of locoregional disease-free rate and overall survival in the 2 groups were used to evaluate the predictive value of tumor regression during treatment. Cox proportional hazards model was used to adjust for other clinical characteristics. Results: Automatic measurement of the tumor regression from standard CBCT images was feasible. Pearson's correlation coefficient between manual and automatic measurement was 0.86 in a sample of 9 patients. Most patients experienced tumor volume regression, and this could be quantified early into the treatment course. Interestingly, patients with pronounced volume regression had worse locoregional tumor control and overall survival. This was significant on patient with non-adenocarcinoma histology. Conclusions: Evaluation of routinely acquired CBCT images during radiation therapy provides biological information on the specific tumor. This could potentially form the basis for personalized response adaptive therapy.

  9. Secondary neutron spectra from modern Varian, Siemens, and Elekta linacs with multileaf collimators.

    PubMed

    Howell, Rebecca M; Kry, Stephen F; Burgett, Eric; Hertel, Nolan E; Followill, David S

    2009-09-01

    Neutrons are a by-product of high-energy x-ray radiation therapy (threshold for [gamma,n] reactions in high-Z material -7 MeV). Neutron production varies depending on photon beam energy as well as on the manufacturer of the accelerator. Neutron production from modern linear accelerators (linacs) has not been extensively compared, particularly in terms of the differences in the strategies that various manufacturers have used to implement multileaf collimators (MLCs) into their linac designs. However, such information is necessary to determine neutron dose equivalents for different linacs and to calculate vault shielding requirements. The purpose of the current study, therefore, was to measure the neutron spectra from the most up-to-date linacs from three manufacturers: Varian 21EX operating at 15, 18, and 20 MV, Siemens ONCOR operating at 15 and 18 MV, and Elekta Precise operating at 15 and 18 MV. Neutron production was measured by means of gold foil activation in Bonner spheres. Based on the measurements, the authors determined neutron spectra and calculated the average energy, total neutron fluence, ambient dose equivalent, and neutron source strength. The shapes of the neutron spectra did not change significantly between accelerators or even as a function of treatment energy. However, the neutron fluence, and therefore the ambient dose equivalent, did vary, increasing with increasing treatment energy. For a given nominal treatment energy, these values were always highest for the Varian linac. The current study thus offers medical physicists extensive information about the neutron production of MLC-equipped linacs currently in operation and provides them information vital for accurate comparison and prediction of neutron dose equivalents and calculation of vault shielding requirements.

  10. Project for the development of the linac based NCT facility in University of Tsukuba.

    PubMed

    Kumada, H; Matsumura, A; Sakurai, H; Sakae, T; Yoshioka, M; Kobayashi, H; Matsumoto, H; Kiyanagi, Y; Shibata, T; Nakashima, H

    2014-06-01

    A project team headed by University of Tsukuba launched the development of a new accelerator based BNCT facility. In the project, we have adopted Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ)+Drift Tube Linac (DTL) type linac as proton accelerators. Proton energy generated from the linac was set to 8MeV and average current was 10mA. The linac tube has been constructed by Mitsubishi Heavy Industry Co. For neutron generator device, beryllium is selected as neutron target material; high intensity neutrons are generated by the reaction with beryllium and the 80kW proton beam. Our team chose beryllium as the neutron target material. At present beryllium target system is being designed with Monte-Carlo estimations and heat analysis with ANSYS. The neutron generator consists of moderator, collimator and shielding. It is being designed together with the beryllium target system. We also acquired a building in Tokai village; the building has been renovated for use as BNCT treatment facility. It is noteworthy that the linac tube had been installed in the facility in September 2012. In BNCT procedure, several medical devices are required for BNCT treatment such as treatment planning system, patient positioning device and radiation monitors. Thus these are being developed together with the linac based neutron source. For treatment planning system, we are now developing a new multi-modal Monte-Carlo treatment planning system based on JCDS. The system allows us to perform dose estimation for BNCT as well as particle radiotherapy and X-ray therapy. And the patient positioning device can navigate a patient to irradiation position quickly and properly. Furthermore the device is able to monitor movement of the patient׳s position during irradiation.

  11. Availability and Failure Effects of NLC Main Linac Mechanical Movers(LCC-0141)

    SciTech Connect

    Himel, T

    2004-05-24

    We analyze the probability of failure and the failure effects of the quadrupole and RF girder translation stages (''movers'') in the 500 GeV CM NLC Main Linac. In order to achieve its alignment tolerances, the NLC main linac will require a large installation of remote controlled translation stages with multiple degrees of freedom. In particular, each of the 591 quads in each 250 GeV main linac will be mounted on a magnet mover with 3 degrees of freedom (x, y, roll); each of the 2304 RF structure girders in each linac will be mounted on a girder mover with 5 degrees of freedom (x, y, roll, pitch, yaw). Simulation studies of main linac operation typically assume that all movers are operational at all times, in order to limit the complexity of the simulation. This is obviously not a realistic expectation for a system with so many components, especially when the number of sub-elements of each mover (stepper motors, rotary encoders, position transducers, cabling, control electronics, database, operator) are considered. The unavailability risk of the mover system is of particular concern for the NLC, since very few accelerators have ever been built with such a large fraction of its beamline hardware on remote-controlled translation stages. In order to predict the availability of the movers, it is necessary to estimate a few quantities, specifically: how often will a mover break (mean time between failures, or MTBF); how long will it take to repair a mover (mean time to repair, or MTTR); what is the performance ''hit'' which accrues when movers are broken? To answer the first two questions we used historical failure data from the two large mover systems at SLAC, in the arcs of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) and in the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB). For the final question, we can get some estimate from simulation studies of the NLC main linac in normal operation.

  12. LOW LOSS DESIGN OF THE LINAC AND ACCUMULATOR RING FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect

    RAPARIA,D.

    2003-02-03

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a second generation pulsed neutron source and is presently in the fourth year of a seven-year construction cycle at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A collaboration of six national laboratories (ANL, BNL, LANL, LBNL, ORNL, TJNAF) is responsible for the design and construction of the various subsystems. The operation of the facility will begin in 2006 and deliver a 1.0 GeV, 1.4 MW proton beam with pulse length of 650 nanosecond at a repetition rate of 60 Hz, on a liquid mercury target. It consists of an RF volume H{sup -} source of 50 mA peak current at 6% duty; an all electrostatic Low-Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) which also serves as a first stage beam chopper with {+-} 25 ns rise/fall time; a 402.5 MHz, 4-vane Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) for acceleration up to 2.5 MeV; a Medium Energy Beam Transport (MEBT) housing a second stage chopper (<{+-} 10ns rise/fall), an adjustable beam halo scraper, and diagnostics devices; a 6-tank Drift Tube Linac (DTL) with permanent magnet quadrupoles up to 87 MeV; an 805 MHz, 4-module, Side Coupled Cavity Linac (CCL) up to 186 MeV; an 805 MHz, superconducting RF (SRF) linac with eleven medium beta ({beta} = 0.61) cryo-modules and twelve high beta ({beta} = 0.81) cryo-modules accelerating the beam to the full energy; a High Energy Beam transport (HEBT) for diagnostics, transverse and longitudinal collimation, energy correction, painting and matching; an accumulator ring compressing the 1 GeV, 1 ms pulse to 650 ns for delivery onto the target through a Ring to Target Beam Transport (RTBT) with transverse collimators.

  13. Spiral 2 Cryogenic System for The Superconducting LINAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghribi, A.; Bernaudin, P.-E.; Bert, Y.; Commeaux, C.; Houeto, M.; Lescalié, G.

    2017-02-01

    SPIRAL 21 is a rare isotope accelerator dedicated to the production of high intensity beams (E = 40 MeV, I = 5 mA). The driver is a linear accelerator (LINAC) that uses bulk Niobium made quarter wave RF cavities. 19 cryomodules inclose one or two cavities respectively for the low and the high energy sections. To supply the 1300 W at 4.2 K required to cool down the LINAC, a cryogenic system has been set up. The heart of the latter is a 3 turbines geared HELIAL®LF (ALAT2) cold box that delivers both the liquid helium for the cavities and the 60 K Helium gaz for the thermal screens. 19 valve-boxes insure cryogenic fluid distribution and management. Key issues like cool down speed or cavity RF frequency stability are closely linked to the cryogenic system management. To overcome these issues, modelling and simulation efforts are being undertaken prior to the first cool down trials. In this paper, we present a status update of the Spiral 2 cryogenic system and the cool down strategy considered for its commissioning.

  14. Alternate Tunings for the Linac Coherent Light Source Photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Limborg-Deprey, C.; Emma, P.; /SLAC

    2006-03-17

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is an x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) project based on the SLAC linac. The LCLS Photoinjector beamline has been designed to deliver 10-ps long electron bunches of 1 nC with a normalized projected transverse emittance smaller than 1.2 mm-mrad at 135 MeV. Tolerances and regulation requirements are tight for this tuning. Half of the total emittance at the end of the injector comes from the ''cathode emittance'' which is 0.7 mm-mrad for our nominal 1nC tuning. As the ''cathode emittance'' scales linearly with laser spot radius, the emittance will be dramatically reduced for smaller radius, but this is only possible at lower charge. In particular, for a 0.2 nC charge, we believe we can achieve an emittance closer to 0.4 mm-mrad. This working point will be easier to tune and the beam quality should be much easier to maintain than for the 1 nC case. In the second half of this paper, we discuss optimum laser pulse shapes. We demonstrate that the benefits of the ellipsoidal shapes seem to be important enough so that serious investigations should be carried out in the production of such pulses.

  15. Linac cryogenic distribution system maintenance and upgrades at JLab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, K.; Wright, M.; Ganni, V.

    2014-01-01

    The Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) distribution system to the CEBAF and FEL linacs at Jefferson Lab (JLab) experienced a planned warm up during the late summer and fall of 2012 for the first time after its commissioning in 1991. Various maintenance and modifications were performed to support high beam availability to the experimental users, meet 10 CFR 851 requirements for pressure systems, address operational issues, and prepare the cryogenic interfaces for the high-gradient cryomodules needed for the 12 GeV upgrade. Cryogenic maintenance and installation work had to be coordinated with other activities in the linacs and compete for manpower from other department installation activities. With less than a quarter of the gas storage capacity available to handle the boil-off from the more than 40 cryomodules, 35,000 Nm3 of helium was re-liquefied and shipped to a vendor via a liquid tanker trailer. Nearly 200 u-tubes had to be removed and stored while seals were replaced on related equipment such as vacuum pump outs, bayonet isolation and process valves.

  16. Analysis of an induction linac driver system for inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hovingh, J.; Brady, V.O.; Faltens, A.; Keefe, D.; Lee, E.P.

    1987-07-01

    A linear induction accelerator that produces a beam of energetic (5 to 20 GeV) heavy (130 to 210 amu) ions is a prime candidate as a driver for inertial fusion. Continuing developments in sources for ions with charge state greater than unity allow a potentially large reduction in the driver cost and an increase in the driver efficiency. The use of high undepressed tunes (sigma/sub 0/ approx. = 85/sup 0/) and low depressed tunes (sigma approx. = 8.5/sup 0/) also contributes to a potentially large reduction in the driver cost. The efficiency and cost of the induction linac system are discussed as a function of output energy and pulse repetition frequency for several ion masses and charge states. The cost optimization code LIACEP, including accelerating module alternatives, transport modules, and scaling laws, is presented. Items with large cost-leverage are identified as a guide to future research activities and development of technology that can yield substantial reductions in the accelerator system cost and improvement in the accelerator system efficiency. Finally, a cost-effective strategy using heavy ion induction linacs in a development scenario for inertial fusion is presented. 34 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

  17. Linac cryogenic distribution system maintenance and upgrades at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Kelly D.; Wright, Mathew C.; Ganni, Venkatarao

    2014-01-01

    The Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) distribution system to the CEBAF and FEL linacs at Jefferson Lab (JLab) experienced a planned warm up during the late summer and fall of 2012 for the first time after its commissioning in 1991. Various maintenance and modifications were performed to support high beam availability to the experimental users, meet 10 CFR 851 requirements for pressure systems, address operational issues, and prepare the cryogenic interfaces for the high-gradient cryomodules needed for the 12 GeV upgrade. Cryogenic maintenance and installation work had to be coordinated with other activities in the linacs and compete for manpower from other department installation activities. With less than a quarter of the gas storage capacity available to handle the boil-off from the more than 40 cryomodules, 35,000 Nm{sup 3} of helium was re-liquefied and shipped to a vendor via a liquid tanker trailer. Nearly 200 u-tubes had to be removed and stored while seals were replaced on related equipment such as vacuum pump outs, bayonet isolation and process valves.

  18. Linac cryogenic distribution system maintenance and upgrades at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, K.; Wright, M.; Ganni, V.

    2014-01-29

    The Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) distribution system to the CEBAF and FEL linacs at Jefferson Lab (JLab) experienced a planned warm up during the late summer and fall of 2012 for the first time after its commissioning in 1991. Various maintenance and modifications were performed to support high beam availability to the experimental users, meet 10 CFR 851 requirements for pressure systems, address operational issues, and prepare the cryogenic interfaces for the high-gradient cryomodules needed for the 12 GeV upgrade. Cryogenic maintenance and installation work had to be coordinated with other activities in the linacs and compete for manpower from other department installation activities. With less than a quarter of the gas storage capacity available to handle the boil-off from the more than 40 cryomodules, 35,000 Nm{sup 3} of helium was re-liquefied and shipped to a vendor via a liquid tanker trailer. Nearly 200 u-tubes had to be removed and stored while seals were replaced on related equipment such as vacuum pump outs, bayonet isolation and process valves.

  19. CABOTO, a high-gradient linac for hadrontherapy.

    PubMed

    Verdú-Andrés, Silvia; Amaldi, Ugo; Faus-Golfe, Angeles

    2013-07-01

    The field of hadrontherapy has grown rapidly in recent years. At present the therapeutic beam is provided by a cyclotron or a synchrotron, but neither cyclotrons nor synchrotrons present the best performances for hadrontherapy. The new generation of accelerators for hadrontherapy should allow fast active energy modulation and have a high repetition rate, so that moving organs can be appropriately treated in a reasonable time. In addition, a reduction of the dimensions and cost of the accelerators for hadrontherapy would make the acquisition and operation of a hadrontherapy facility more affordable, which would translate into great benefits for the potential hadrontherapy patients. The 'cyclinac', an accelerator concept that combines a cyclotron with a high-frequency linear accelerator (linac), is a fast-cycling machine specifically conceived to allow for fast active energy modulation. The present paper focuses on CABOTO (CArbon BOoster for Therapy in Oncology), a compact, efficient high-frequency linac that can accelerate C(6+) ions and H2 molecules from 150-410 MeV/u in ∼24 m. The paper presents the latest design of CABOTO and discusses its performances.

  20. CABOTO, a high-gradient linac for hadrontherapy

    PubMed Central

    Verdú-Andrés, Silvia; Amaldi, Ugo; Faus-Golfe, Ángeles

    2013-01-01

    The field of hadrontherapy has grown rapidly in recent years. At present the therapeutic beam is provided by a cyclotron or a synchrotron, but neither cyclotrons nor synchrotrons present the best performances for hadrontherapy. The new generation of accelerators for hadrontherapy should allow fast active energy modulation and have a high repetition rate, so that moving organs can be appropriately treated in a reasonable time. In addition, a reduction of the dimensions and cost of the accelerators for hadrontherapy would make the acquisition and operation of a hadrontherapy facility more affordable, which would translate into great benefits for the potential hadrontherapy patients. The ‘cyclinac’, an accelerator concept that combines a cyclotron with a high-frequency linear accelerator (linac), is a fast-cycling machine specifically conceived to allow for fast active energy modulation. The present paper focuses on CABOTO (CArbon BOoster for Therapy in Oncology), a compact, efficient high-frequency linac that can accelerate C6+ ions and H2 molecules from 150–410 MeV/u in ∼24 m. The paper presents the latest design of CABOTO and discusses its performances. PMID:23824121

  1. Electron Linac design to drive bright Compton back-scattering gamma-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacci, A.; Alesini, D.; Antici, P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Boni, R.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Curatolo, C.; Di Pirro, G.; Esposito, A.; Ferrario, M.; Gallo, A.; Gatti, G.; Ghigo, A.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Petrillo, V.; Pompili, R.; Ronsivalle, C.; Rossi, A. R.; Serafini, L.; Spataro, B.; Tomassini, P.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2013-05-01

    The technological development in the field of high brightness linear accelerators and high energy/high quality lasers enables today designing high brilliance Compton-X and Gamma-photon beams suitable for a wide range of applications in the innovative field of nuclear photonics. The challenging requirements of this kind of source comprise: tunable energy (1-20 MeV), very narrow bandwidth (0.3%), and high spectral density (104 photons/s/eV). We present here a study focused on the design and the optimization of an electron Linac aimed to meet the source specifications of the European Extreme Light Infrastructure—Nuclear Physics project, currently funded and seeking for an innovative machine design in order to outperform state-of-the-art facilities. We show that the phase space density of the electron beam, at the collision point against the laser pulse, is the main quality factor characterizing the Linac.

  2. The introduction of trajectory oscillations to reduce emittance growth in the SLC linac

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, J.T.; Decker, F.J. ); Hsu, I. . Inst. of Nuclear Science)

    1992-08-01

    Emittance growth of accelerated beams in the 50 GeV linear accelerator of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) arises from the effects of transverse wakefields and momentum dispersion. These effects are caused by small misalignments of the beam position monitors, lattice quadrupoles, and accelerating structure and by the energy spectrum of the beam which changes along the accelerator. The introduction of strategically placed trajectory oscillations over finite lengths of the linac has been used to generate beam errors which cancel the emittance accumulation from these small unknown, random alignment errors. Induced oscillations early in the linac cancel effects which filament along the accelerator affecting mostly the beam core. Induced oscillations located at the center of the accelerator or beyond cancel wakefield and dispersion errors which do not completely filament but cause the beams to have, in addition, an apparent betatron mismatch and transverse tails. The required induced oscillations of a few hundred microns are reasonably stable over a period of several weeks. Of course, the optimum induced oscillations depend upon the beam charge. Emittance reductions of 30 to 50% have been obtained.

  3. Preliminary shielding assessment for the 100 MeV proton linac (KOMAC).

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Ouk; Cho, Y S; Chang, J

    2005-01-01

    The Proton Engineering Frontier Project is building the Korea Multipurpose Accelerator Complex facilities from 2002 to 2012, which consists of a high-current 100 MeV proton linear accelerator and various beam-lines. This paper provides a preliminary estimate of the shielding required for the 20 mA proton linac and the beam-dump. For an accurate information on secondary neutron production from the guiding magnet and primary heat sink of the beam dump, proton-induced 63Cu and 65Cu cross section data were evaluated and applied to shielding calculations. The required thickness of the concrete was assessed by a simple line-of-sight model for the lateral shielding of the beam-line and the full shielding of the beam dump. Monte Carlo simulations were also performed using the MCNPX code to obtain the source term and attenuation coefficients for the three-dimensional lateral shielding model of the beam-line.

  4. Analysis of High Order Modes in 1.3 GHZ CW SRF Electron Linac for a Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhanov, A.; Vostrikov, A.; Yakovlev, V.

    2013-01-01

    Design of a Light Source (LS) based on the continuous wave superconducting RF (CW SRF) electron linac is currently underway. This facility will provide soft coherent X-ray radiation for a braod spectrum of basic research applications. Quality of the X-ray laser radiation is affected by the electron beam parameters such as the stability of the transverse beam position and longitudinal and transverse beam emittances. High order modes (HOMs) excited in the SRF structures by a passing beam may deteriorate the beam quality and affect the beam stability. Deposition of HOM energy in the walls of SRF cavities adds to the heat load of he cryogenic system and leads to the increased cost of building and operation of the linac. In this paper we evaluate effects of HOMs in an LS CW SRF linac based on Tesla-type 9-cell 1.3 GHz cavities. We analyze non-coherent losses and resonance excitation of HOMs. We estimate heat load due to the very high frequency HOMs. We study influence of the HOMs on the transverse beam dynamics.

  5. Use of TrueBeam developer mode for imaging QA.

    PubMed

    Valdes, Gilmer; Morin, Olivier; Valenciaga, Yanisley; Kirby, Niel; Pouliot, Jean; Chuang, Cynthia

    2015-07-08

    The purpose of this study was to automate regular Imaging QA procedures to become more efficient and accurate. Daily and monthly imaging QA for SRS and SBRT protocols were fully automated on a Varian linac. A three-step paradigm where the data are automatically acquired, processed, and analyzed was defined. XML scripts were written and used in developer mode in a TrueBeam linac to automatically acquire data. MATLAB R013B was used to develop an interface that could allow the data to be processed and analyzed. Hardware was developed that allowed the localization of several phantoms simultaneously on the couch. 14 KV CBCTs from the Emma phantom were obtained using a TrueBeam onboard imager as example of data acquisition and analysis. The images were acquired during two months. Artifacts were artificially introduced in the images during the reconstruction process using iTool reconstructor. Support vector machine algorithms to automatically identify each artifact were written using the Machine Learning MATLAB R2011 Toolbox. A daily imaging QA test could be performed by an experienced medical physicist in 14.3 ± 2.4 min. The same test, if automated using our paradigm, could be performed in 4.2 ± 0.7 min. In the same manner, a monthly imaging QA could be performed by a physicist in 70.7 ± 8.0 min and, if fully automated, in 21.8 ± 0.6 min. Additionally, quantitative data analysis could be automatically performed by Machine Learning Algorithms that could remove the subjectivity of data interpretation in the QA process. For instance, support vector machine algorithms could correctly identify beam hardening, rings and scatter artifacts. Traditional metrics, as well as metrics that describe texture, are needed for the classification. Modern linear accelerators are equipped with advanced 2D and 3D imaging capabilities that are used for patient alignment, substantially improving IGRT treatment accuracy. However, this extra complexity exponentially increases the number of QA

  6. The use of induction linacs with nonlinear magnetic drive as high average power accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birx, D. L.; Cook, E. G.; Hawkins, S. A.; Newton, M. A.; Poor, S. E.; Reginato, L. L.; Schmidt, J. A.; Smith, M. W.

    1985-05-01

    The marriage of induction linac technology with Nonlinear Magnetic Modulators has produced some unique capabilities. It appears possible to produce electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, at gradients exceeding 1 MeV/m, and with power efficiencies approaching 50%. A 2 MeV, 5 kA electron accelerator is under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to allow us to demonstrate some of these concepts. Progress on this project is reported here.

  7. Studies of a Linac Driver for a High Repetition Rate X-Ray FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Venturini, M.; Corlett, J.; Doolittle, L.; Filippetto, D.; Papadopoulos, C.; Penn, G.; Prosnitz, D.; Qiang, J.; Reinsch, M.; Ryne, R.; Sannibale, F.; Staples, J.; Wells, R.; Wurtele, J.; Zolotorev, M.; Zholents, A.

    2011-06-01

    We report on on-going studies of a superconducting CW linac driver intended to support a high repetition rate FEL operating in the soft x-rays spectrum. We present a pointdesign for a 1.8 GeV machine tuned for 300 pC bunches and delivering low-emittance, low-energy spread beams as needed for the SASE and seeded beamlines.

  8. Review of a Spoke-Cavity Design Option for the RIA Driver Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Petr Ostroumov; Kenneth Shepard; Jean Delayen

    2005-05-16

    A design option for the 1.4 GV, multiple-charge-state driver linac required for the U. S. Rare Isotope Accelerator Project based on 345 MHz, 3-cell spoke-loaded cavities has been previously discussed [1]. This paper updates consideration of design options for the RIA driver, including recent results from numerically-modeling the multi-charge-state beam dynamics and also cold test results for prototype superconducting niobium 3-cell spoke-loaded cavities.

  9. Review of a spoke-cavity design option for the RIA driver linac.

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Shepard, K. W.; Delayen, J. R.; Physics; Thomas Jefferson National Accel. Facility

    2005-01-01

    A design option for the 1.4 GV, multiple-charge-state driver linac required for the U.S. Rare Isotope Accelerator Project based on 345 MHz, 3-cell spoke-loaded cavities has been previously discussed [1]. This paper updates consideration of design options for the RIA driver, including recent results from numerically-modeling the multi-charge-state beam dynamics and also cold test results for prototype superconducting niobium three-spoke-loaded cavities.

  10. Investigation of the mechanical performance of Siemens linacs components during arc: gantry, MLC, and electronic portal imaging device

    PubMed Central

    Rowshanfarzad, Pejman; Häring, Peter; Riis, Hans L; Zimmermann, Sune J; Ebert, Martin A

    2015-01-01

    Background In radiotherapy treatments, it is crucial to monitor the performance of linac components including gantry, collimation system, and electronic portal imaging device (EPID) during arc deliveries. In this study, a simple EPID-based measurement method is suggested in conjunction with an algorithm to investigate the stability of these systems at various gantry angles with the aim of evaluating machine-related errors in treatments. Methods The EPID sag, gantry sag, changes in source-to-detector distance (SDD), EPID and collimator skewness, EPID tilt, and the sag in leaf bank assembly due to linac rotation were separately investigated by acquisition of 37 EPID images of a simple phantom with five ball bearings at various gantry angles. A fast and robust software package was developed for automated analysis of image data. Three Siemens linacs were investigated. Results The average EPID sag was within 1 mm for all tested linacs. Two machines showed >1 mm gantry sag. Changes in the SDD values were within 7.5 mm. EPID skewness and tilt values were <1° in all machines. The maximum sag in leaf bank assembly was <1 mm. Conclusion The method and software developed in this study provide a simple tool for effective investigation of the behavior of Siemens linac components with gantry rotation. Such a comprehensive study has been performed for the first time on Siemens machines. PMID:26604840

  11. Validation of a novel semi-automated method for three-dimensional surface rendering of condyles using cone beam computed tomography data.

    PubMed

    Xi, T; van Loon, B; Fudalej, P; Bergé, S; Swennen, G; Maal, T

    2013-08-01

    Morphological changes of the condyles are often observed following orthognathic surgery. In addition to clinical assessment, radiographic evaluation of the condyles is required to distinguish the physiological condylar remodelling from pathological condylar resorption. The low contrast resolution and distortion of greyscale values in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans have impeded an accurate three-dimensional (3D) rendering of the condyles. The current study proposes a novel semi-automated method for 3D rendering of condyles using CBCT datasets, and provides a clinical validation of this method. Ten patients were scanned using a standard CBCT scanning protocol. After defining the volume of interest, a greyscale cut-off value was selected to allow an automatic reconstruction of the condylar outline. The condylar contour was further enhanced manually by two independent observers to correct for the under- and over-contoured voxels. Volumetric measurements and surface distance maps of the condyles were computed. The mean within-observer and between-observer differences in condylar volume were 8.62 mm(3) and 6.13 mm(3), respectively. The mean discrepancy between intra- and inter-observer distance maps of the condylar surface was 0.22 mm and 0.13 mm, respectively. This novel method provides a reproducible tool for the 3D rendering of condyles, allowing longitudinal follow-up and quantitative analysis of condylar changes following orthognathic surgery.

  12. Performance of the SLC polarized electron source and injector with the SLAC 3 km linac configured for fixed target experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Yeremian, A.D.; Alley, R.K.; Clendenin, J.E.

    1993-03-01

    The SLC polarized electron source (PES) can be modified to produce {mu}sec-long pulses for injection into the un-SLEDed SLAC 3 km linac, with a duty factor considerably higher than for SLC. Such beams are desirable for fixed target experiments at SLAC requiring polarized electron beams of up to 50 mA within an energy spread of 0.5%, at energies of up to 26 GeV. During the fall of 1992, the SLAC linac was operated continuously for two months unSLEDed with the PES dye laser (715 nm) modified to produce a 1{mu}ec pulse at 120Hz. An AlGaAs photocathode was installed in the electron gun to achieve 40% polarization, and a prebuncher was added to the SLC injector to improve capture for long pulse beams. We discuss the performance eo the polarized electron beam for long pulse operation.

  13. Application of RF Superconductivity to High Current Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Chan K.C.D.

    1998-09-13

    In 1997, the authors initiated a development program in Los Alamos for high-current superconducting proton-linac technology to build prototypes components of this linac to demonstrate the feasibility. The authors are building 700-MHz niobium cavities with elliptical shapes, as well as power couplers to transfer high RF power to these cavities. The cavities and power couplers will be integrated in cryostats as linac cryomodules. In this paper, they describe the linac design and the status of the development program.

  14. S-Band Loads for SLAC Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnykh, A.; Decker, F.-J.; LeClair, R.; /INTA Technologies, Santa Clara

    2012-08-28

    The S-Band loads on the current SLAC linac RF system were designed, in some cases, 40+ years ago to terminate 2-3 MW peak power into a thin layer of coated Kanthal material as the high power absorber [1]. The technology of the load design was based on a flame-sprayed Kanthal wire method onto a base material. During SLAC linac upgrades, the 24 MW peak klystrons were replaced by 5045 klystrons with 65+ MW peak output power. Additionally, SLED cavities were introduced and as a result, the peak power in the current RF setup has increased up to 240 MW peak. The problem of reliable RF peak power termination and RF load lifetime required a careful study and adequate solution. Results of our studies and three designs of S-Band RF load for the present SLAC RF linac system is discussed. These designs are based on the use of low conductivity materials.

  15. Neutron and photon spectra in LINACs.

    PubMed

    Vega-Carrillo, H R; Martínez-Ovalle, S A; Lallena, A M; Mercado, G A; Benites-Rengifo, J L

    2012-12-01

    A Monte Carlo calculation, using the MCNPX code, was carried out in order to estimate the photon and neutron spectra in two locations of two linacs operating at 15 and 18 MV. Detailed models of both linac heads were used in the calculations. Spectra were estimated below the flattening filter and at the isocenter. Neutron spectra show two components due to evaporation and knock-on neutrons. Lethargy spectra under the filter were compared to the spectra calculated from the function quoted by Tosi et al. that describes reasonably well neutron spectra beyond 1 MeV, though tends to underestimate the energy region between 10(-6) and 1 MeV. Neutron and the Bremsstrahlung spectra show the same features regardless of the linac voltage.

  16. Induced radioisotopes in a linac treatment hall.

    PubMed

    Vega-Carrillo, Héctor René; de Leon-Martinez, Héctor Asael; Rivera-Perez, Esteban; Luis Benites-Rengifo, Jorge; Gallego, Eduardo; Lorente, Alfredo

    2015-08-01

    When linacs operate above 8MV an undesirable neutron field is produced whose spectrum has three main components: the direct spectrum due to those neutrons leaking out from the linac head, the scattered spectrum due to neutrons produced in the head that collides with the nuclei in the head losing energy and the third spectrum due to room-return effect. The third category of spectrum has mainly epithermal and thermal neutrons being constant at any location in the treatment hall. These neutrons induce activation in the linac components, the concrete walls and in the patient body. Here the induced radioisotopes have been identified in concrete samples located in the hall and in one of the wedges. The identification has been carried out using a gamma-ray spectrometer.

  17. Coupled-cavity drift-tube linac

    DOEpatents

    Billen, James H.

    1996-01-01

    A coupled-cavity drift-tube linac (CCDTL) combines features of the Alvarez drift-tube linac (DTL) and the .pi.-mode coupled-cavity linac (CCL). In one embodiment, each accelerating cavity is a two-cell, 0-mode DTL. The center-to-center distance between accelerating gaps is .beta..lambda., where .lambda. is the free-space wavelength of the resonant mode. Adjacent accelerating cavities have oppositely directed electric fields, alternating in phase by 180 degrees. The chain of cavities operates in a .pi./2 structure mode so the coupling cavities are nominally unexcited. The CCDTL configuration provides an rf structure with high shunt impedance for intermediate velocity charged particles, i.e., particles with energies in the 20-200 MeV range.

  18. Coupled-cavity drift-tube linac

    DOEpatents

    Billen, J.H.

    1996-11-26

    A coupled-cavity drift-tube linac (CCDTL) combines features of the Alvarez drift-tube linac (DTL) and the {pi}-mode coupled-cavity linac (CCL). In one embodiment, each accelerating cavity is a two-cell, 0-mode DTL. The center-to-center distance between accelerating gaps is {beta}{lambda}, where {lambda} is the free-space wavelength of the resonant mode. Adjacent accelerating cavities have oppositely directed electric fields, alternating in phase by 180 degrees. The chain of cavities operates in a {pi}/2 structure mode so the coupling cavities are nominally unexcited. The CCDTL configuration provides an rf structure with high shunt impedance for intermediate velocity charged particles, i.e., particles with energies in the 20-200 MeV range. 5 figs.

  19. Phase Noise Measurement in PEP II and the Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Getaneh, Mesfin

    2003-09-05

    The Goal of this project is to provide a measurement of the phase of the radio frequency (RF) relative to electron beam traveling down the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Because the Main Drive Line (MDL) supplies the RF drive and phase reference for the entire accelerator system, the phase accuracy and amount of phase noise present in the MDL are very critical to the functionality of the accelerator. Therefore, a Phase Noise Measurement System was built to measure the phase noise in the liner accelerator (Linac) and PEP II. The system was used to determine the stability of the PEP II RF reference system. In this project a low noise Phase Locked Loop system (PLL) was built to measure timing jitter about sub picoseconds level. The phase noise measured in Master Oscillator using PLL indicates that phase noise is low enough for PEP II to run.

  20. SRF and RF systems for LEReC Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Brutus, J. C.; Fedotov, A.; McIntyre, G.; Polizzo, S.; Smith, K.; Than, R.; Tuozzolo, J.; Veshcherevich, V.; Wu, Q.; Xiao, B.; Xu, W.; Zaltsman, A.

    2015-05-03

    The Low Energy RHIC electron Cooling (LEReC) is under development at BNL to improve RHIC luminosity at low energies. It will consist of a short electron linac and two cooling sections, one for blue and one for yellow rings. For the first stage of the project, LEReC-I, we will install a 704 MHz superconducting RF cavity and three normal conducting cavities operating at 9 MHz, 704 MHz and 2.1 GHz. The SRF cavity will boost the electron beam energy up to 2 MeV. The warm cavities will be used to correct the energy spread introduced in the SRF cavity. The paper describes layouts of the SRF and RF systems, their parameters and status.

  1. Improved temperature regulation of APS linac RF components.

    SciTech Connect

    Dortwegt, R.

    1998-09-21

    The temperature of the APS S-Band linac's high-power rf components is regulated by water from individual closed-loop deionized (DI) water systems. The rf components are all made of oxygen-free high-conductivity copper and respond quickly to temperature changes. The SLED cavities are especially temperature-sensitive and cause beam energy instabilities when the temperature is not well regulated. Temperature regulation better than {+-} 0.1 F is required to achieve good energy stability. Improvements in the closed-loop water systems have enabled them to achieve a regulation of {+-} 0.05 F over long periods. Regulation philosophy and equipment are discussed and numerical results are presented.

  2. Effect of transverse magnetic fields on a simulated in-line 6 MV linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. Aubin, J.; Steciw, S.; Fallone, B. G.

    2010-08-01

    The effects of a transverse magnetic field on an in-line side-coupled 6 MV linear accelerator are given. The results are directly applicable to a linac-MR system used for real-time image guided adaptive radiotherapy. Our previously designed end-to-end linac simulation incorporated the results from the axisymmetric 2D electron gun program EGN2w. However, since the magnetic fields being investigated are non-axisymmetric in nature for the work presented here, the electron gun simulation was performed using OPERA-3d/SCALA. The simulation results from OPERA-3d/SCALA showed excellent agreement with previous results. Upon the addition of external magnetic fields to our fully 3D linac simulation, it was found that a transverse magnetic field of 6 G resulted in a 45 ± 1% beam loss, and by 14 G, no electrons were incident on the target. Transverse magnetic fields on the linac simulation produced a highly asymmetric focal spot at the target, which translated into a 13% profile asymmetry at 6 G. Upon translating the focal spot with respect to the target coordinates, profile symmetry was regained at the expense of a lateral shift in the dose profiles. It was found that all points in the penumbra failed a 1%/1 mm acceptance criterion for fields between 4 and 6 G. However, it was also found that the lateral profile shifts were corrected by adjusting the jaw positions asymmetrically.

  3. RF system developments for CW and/or long pulse linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, M.

    1998-12-31

    High Power Proton Linacs are under development or proposed for development at Los Alamos and elsewhere. By current standards these linacs all require very large amounts of RF power. The Accelerator for Production of Tritium (APT) is a CW accelerator with an output current and energy of 100 mA and 1,700 MeV, respectively. The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), in its ultimate configuration, is a pulsed accelerator with an average output power of 4 MW of beam. Other accelerators such as those that address transmutation and upgrades to LANSCE have similar requirements. For these high average power applications, the RF systems represent approximately half of the total cost of the linac and are thus key elements in the design and configuration of the accelerator. Los Alamos is fortunate to be actively working on both APT and SNS. For these programs the author is pursuing a number of component developments which are aimed at one or more of the key issues for large RF systems: technical performance, capital cost, reliability, and operating efficiency. This paper briefly describes some of the linac applications and then provides updates on the key RF developments being pursued.

  4. Interlock system for machine protection of the KOMAC 100-MeV proton linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Young-Gi

    2015-02-01

    The 100-MeV proton linear accelerator of the Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex (KOMAC) has been developed. The beam service started this year after performing the beam commissioning. If the very sensitive and essential equipment is to be protected during machine operation, a machine interlock system is required, and the interlock system has been implemented. The purpose of the interlock system is to shut off the beam when the radio-frequency (RF) and ion source are unstable or a beam loss occurs. The interlock signal of the KOMAC linac includes a variety of sources, such as the beam loss, RF and high-voltage converter modulator faults, and fast closing valves of the vacuum window at the beam lines and so on. This system consists of a hardware-based interlock system using analog circuits and a software-based interlock system using an industrial programmable logic controller (PLC). The hardware-based interlock system has been fabricated, and the requirement has been satisfied with the results being within 10 µs. The software logic interlock system using the PLC has been connected to the framework of with the experimental physics and industrial control system (EPICS) to integrate a variety of interlock signals and to control the machine components when an interlock occurs. This paper will describe the design and the construction of the machine interlock system for the KOMAC 100-MeV linac.

  5. Cobalt-60 Machines and Medical Linear Accelerators: Competing Technologies for External Beam Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Healy, B J; van der Merwe, D; Christaki, K E; Meghzifene, A

    2017-02-01

    Medical linear accelerators (linacs) and cobalt-60 machines are both mature technologies for external beam radiotherapy. A comparison is made between these two technologies in terms of infrastructure and maintenance, dosimetry, shielding requirements, staffing, costs, security, patient throughput and clinical use. Infrastructure and maintenance are more demanding for linacs due to the complex electric componentry. In dosimetry, a higher beam energy, modulated dose rate and smaller focal spot size mean that it is easier to create an optimised treatment with a linac for conformal dose coverage of the tumour while sparing healthy organs at risk. In shielding, the requirements for a concrete bunker are similar for cobalt-60 machines and linacs but extra shielding and protection from neutrons are required for linacs. Staffing levels can be higher for linacs and more staff training is required for linacs. Life cycle costs are higher for linacs, especially multi-energy linacs. Security is more complex for cobalt-60 machines because of the high activity radioactive source. Patient throughput can be affected by source decay for cobalt-60 machines but poor maintenance and breakdowns can severely affect patient throughput for linacs. In clinical use, more complex treatment techniques are easier to achieve with linacs, and the availability of electron beams on high-energy linacs can be useful for certain treatments. In summary, there is no simple answer to the question of the choice of either cobalt-60 machines or linacs for radiotherapy in low- and middle-income countries. In fact a radiotherapy department with a combination of technologies, including orthovoltage X-ray units, may be an option. Local needs, conditions and resources will have to be factored into any decision on technology taking into account the characteristics of both forms of teletherapy, with the primary goal being the sustainability of the radiotherapy service over the useful lifetime of the equipment.

  6. SU-F-BRE-09: Linac Isocenter Quality Assurance: A Stereotactic Approach

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, B; Li, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A quantitative method was designed to independently determine the couch/collimator/gantry isocenters, as well as the overall LINAC mechanical isocenter in 3D. Methods: Performed on both a Varian TrueBeam™ STx and Trilogy with the gold standard front pointer positioned at 100 cm SAD, and a Radionics XKnife™ (RX) attached to the couch. At gantry and couch 0°, the RX laser alignment attachment (RXLAA) was centered to the front pointer using the micrometers (0.1-mm precision) on the RX. The 3D coordinates of the micrometers were recorded. The collimator was rotated to 90° and 270°. At each collimator rotation, the RXLAA was re-centered to the front pointer and the micrometer coordinates recorded. At collimator and gantry 0°, the process was repeated for couch angles 0°/90°/270°. Finally, at collimator and couch 0°, the steps were repeated for gantry rotations 0°/90°/180°/270°. The centers/radii of the smallest bounding spheres for the collimator, couch and gantry walkout were calculated (using MatLab™). The smallest bounding sphere containing the collimator, couch and gantry walkout spheres was then calculated. The center of this all-encompassing sphere is the overall mechanical isocenter of the LINAC. This position was dialed in on the RX. LINAC mechanical and radiation isocenter coincidence was determined by performing Winston- Lutz test at four cardinal gantry angles. Results: TrueBeam and Trilogy mechanical isocenters had overall walkout radii of 0.8 mm and 1.5 mm, respectively. For the TrueBeam and Trilogy 6-MV beams, the radii of radiation isocenter were 0.3 mm and 0.4 mm, respectively, with distances between LINAC mechanical and radiation isocenters of 0.5 mm and 0.9 mm, respectively. Conclusion: This efficient and simple method allows for an independent and reliable quantitative assessment of LINAC isocenter in 3D with equipment typically available in a radiation oncology clinic. It can easily be performed for LINAC commissioning and

  7. Development of new S-band SLED for PAL-XFEL Linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Youngdo; Park, Yongjung; Heo, Hoon; Heo, Jinyul; Park, Sung-Soo; Kim, Sang-Hee; Kim, Kwang-Hoon; Kang, Heung-Sik; Lee, Heung-Soo; Noh, Sungju; Oh, Kyoungmin

    2017-01-01

    In order to achieve beam acceleration to the beam energy of 10 GeV at the end of its 716 m-long linear accelerator (Linac), the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory X-ray Free Electron Laser (PAL-XFEL) is going to operate the Stanford Linear Accelerator Energy Doubler (SLED) at the maximum klystron output peak power of 80 MW, with a pulse length of 4 μs, and at a repetition rate of 60 Hz. The original SLED that had been used in Pohang Light Source-II (PLS-II) can no longer sustain such a high-power operation because excessive radiation caused by RF breakdown has been frequently detected even at the lower klystron peak power during the PLS-II operation. Therefore, a new SLED is designed by modifying both the 3-dB power hybrid and the waveguide-cavity coupling structure of the original SLED where the excessive radiation has been mainly detected. The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation in the CST Microwave Studio shows that the new SLED has a peak electric field and a surface current lower than those of the original SLED at the same level of the RF input peak power, which would secure stable high-power operation. All of the 42 SLEDs in the PAL-XFEL Linac are newly fabricated and installed. During the RF conditioning of the PAL-XFEL Linac, no significant vacuum and radiation issue was found in the new SLEDs. Finally, the accelerated electron beam energy of 10 GeV obtained at the end of the PAL-XFEL Linac verified that the RF performance of the new SLED is stable.

  8. Radiation Protection Aspects of the Linac Coherent Light Source Front End Enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Vollaire, J.; Fasso, A.; Liu, J.C.; Mao, X.S.; Prinz, A.; Rokni, S.H.; Leitner, M.Santana; /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    The Front End Enclosure (FEE) of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a shielding housing located between the electron dump area and the first experimental hutch. The upstream part of the FEE hosts the commissioning diagnostics for the FEL beam. In the downstream part of the FEE, two sets of grazing incidence mirror and several collimators are used to direct the beam to one of the experimental stations and reduce the bremsstrahlung background and the hard component of the spontaneous radiation spectrum. This paper addresses the beam loss assumptions and radiation sources entering the FEE used for the design of the FEE shielding using the Monte-Carlo code FLUKA. The beam containment system prevents abnormal levels of radiations inside the FEE and ensures that the beam remains in its intended path is also described.

  9. Emittance growth from electron beam modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.

    2009-12-01

    In linac ring colliders like MeRHIC and eRHIC a modulation of the electron bunch can lead to a modulation of the beam beam tune shift and steering errors. These modulations can lead to emittance growth. This note presents simple formulas to estimate these effects which generalize some previous results.

  10. Identifying Longitudinal Jitter Sources in the LCLS Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, Franz-Josef; Akre, Ron; Brachmann, Axel; Craft, Jim; Ding, Yuantao; Dowell, David; Emma, Paul; Frisch, Josef; Huang, Zhirong; Iverson, Richard; Krasnykh, Anatoly; Loos, Henrik; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Ratner, Daniel; Smith, Tonee; Turner, James; Welch, James; White, William; Wu, Juhao; /SLAC

    2012-07-06

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC is an x-ray Free Electron Laser (FEL) with wavelengths of 0.15 nm to 1.5 nm. The electron beam stability is important for good lasing. While the transverse jitter of the beam is about 10-20% of the rms beam sizes, the jitter in the longitudinal phase space is a multiple of the energy spread and bunch length. At the lower energy of 4.3 GeV (corresponding to the longest wavelength of 1.5 nm) the relative energy jitter can be 0.125%, while the rms energy spread is with 0.025% five times smaller. An even bigger ratio exists for the arrival time jitter of 50 fs and the bunch duration of about 5 fs (rms) in the low charge (20 pC) operating mode. Although the impact to the experiments is reduced by providing pulse-by-pulse data of the measured energy and arrival time, it would be nice to understand and mitigate the root causes of this jitter. The thyratron of the high power supply of the RF klystrons is one of the main contributors. Another suspect is the multi-pacting in the RF loads. Phase measurements down to 0.01 degree (equals 10 fs) along the RF pulse were achieved, giving hints to the impact of the different sources.

  11. Linac4 H{sup −} ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Lettry, J. Aguglia, D.; Andersson, P.; Bertolo, S.; Butterworth, A.; Coutron, Y.; Dallocchio, A.; David, N.; Chaudet, E.; Fink, D. A.; Garlasche, M.; Grudiev, A.; Guida, R.; Hansen, J.; Haase, M.; Jones, A.; Koszar, I.; Lallement, J.-B.; Lombardi, A. M.; Machado, C.; and others

    2016-02-15

    CERN’s 160 MeV H{sup −} linear accelerator (Linac4) is a key constituent of the injector chain upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider that is being installed and commissioned. A cesiated surface ion source prototype is being tested and has delivered a beam intensity of 45 mA within an emittance of 0.3 π ⋅ mm ⋅ mrad. The optimum ratio of the co-extracted electron- to ion-current is below 1 and the best production efficiency, defined as the ratio of the beam current to the 2 MHz RF-power transmitted to the plasma, reached 1.1 mA/kW. The H{sup −} source prototype and the first tests of the new ion source optics, electron-dump, and front end developed to minimize the beam emittance are presented. A temperature regulated magnetron H{sup −} source developed by the Brookhaven National Laboratory was built at CERN. The first tests of the magnetron operated at 0.8 Hz repetition rate are described.

  12. Design of the beryllium window for Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer

    SciTech Connect

    Nayak, S.; Mapes, M.; Raparia, D.

    2015-11-01

    In the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP) beam line, there were two Beryllium (Be) windows with an air gap to separate the high vacuum upstream side from low vacuum downstream side. There had been frequent window failures in the past which affected the machine productivity and increased the radiation dose received by workers due to unplanned maintenance. To improve the window life, design of Be window is reexamined. Detailed structural and thermal simulations are carried out on Be window for different design parameters and loading conditions to come up with better design to improve the window life. The new design removed the air gap and connect the both beam lines with a Be window in-between. The new design has multiple advantages such as 1) reduces the beam energy loss (because of one window with no air gap), 2) reduces air activation due to nuclear radiation and 3) increased the machine reliability as there is no direct pressure load during operation. For quick replacement of this window, an aluminum bellow coupled with load binder was designed. There hasn’t been a single window failure since the new design was implemented in 2012.

  13. A Stability of LCLS Linac Modulators

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, F.-J.; Krasnykh, A.; Morris, B.; Nguyen, M.; /SLAC

    2012-06-13

    Information concerning to a stability of LCLS RF linac modulators is allocated in this paper. In general a 'pulse-to-pulse' modulator stability (and RF phase as well) is acceptable for the LCLS commission and FEL programs. Further modulator stability improvements are possible and approaches are discussed based on our experimental results.

  14. Vibrational Stability of NLC Linac accelerating structure

    SciTech Connect

    Le Pimpec, Frederic

    2002-09-25

    The vibration of components of the NLC linac, such as accelerating structures and girders, is being studied both experimentally and analytically. Various effects are being considered including structural resonances and vibration caused by cooling water in the accelerating structure. This paper reports the status of ongoing work.

  15. Beam Profile Measurement in MTA Beam Line for High Pressure RF Cavity Beam Test

    SciTech Connect

    Jana, M.R.; Bross, A.; Chung, M.; Greer, S.; Johnstone, C.; Kobilarcik, T.; Koizumi, G.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.; Schwartz, T.; /Fermilab /IIT, Chicago /PDT, Torino

    2012-05-15

    Recent High Pressure RF (HPRF) cavity experiment at MuCool Test Area (MTA) has used 400 MeV Linac proton beam to study the beam loading effect. When the energetic proton beam passes through the cavity, it ionizes the inside gas and produces the electrons. These electrons consume RF power inside the cavity. Number of electrons produced per cm inside the cavity (at 950 psi Hydrogen gas) per incident proton is {approx} 1200. The measurement of beam position and profile are necessary. MTA is flammable gas (Hydrogen) hazard zone so we have developed a passive beam diagnostic instrument using Chromox-6 scintillation screen and CCD camera. This paper presents quantitative information about beam position and beam profile. Neutral density filter was used to avoid saturation of CCD camera. Image data is filtered and fitted with Gaussian function to compute the beam size. The beam profile obtained from scintillation screen shall be compared with multi-wire beam profile.

  16. Portable 1,5 MeV X-Band Linac For Non-destructive Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saversky, A. J.; Rodionov, A. E.; Shaltyrev, A. P.; Shchedrin, I. S.

    1997-05-01

    Portable linear electron accelerator Y-34 developed in Small Accelerator Laboratory of MEPhI for non-destructive industrial radiography. This Linac is a fully self-contained device with the exception of external electric power 220Vx50Gz, 1 phase, 5 kVA. Full mass of Linac Y-34 - less than 300 kg. The Radiographic parameters: Nominal Energy - 1,5 MeV; Energy Range - 0,7...1,8 MeV; Maximum pulse current - 100 mA; Maximum Intensity - 15 R/min@m; Focal spot size - less than 2 mm. The Linac is comprised of 4 subassemblies. The X-ray head with weight less than 100 kg, dimensions: 0,7x0,7x1,0 m contains the traveling-wave accelerating structure with lens 0,4 m, electron gun, vacuum pump, tungsten target and RF-system with 500-kW magnetron. The permanent magnets focusing system provides focal spot less than 2 mm. The high voltage power unit consist of a line-type magnetron/electron gun modulator 2 kW power supply, the weight is equal 70 kg. The self-contained cooling water supply provides temperature controlled water for accelerator structure and magnetron. The control console allows convenient monitoring of critical system and Linac parameters by manual or remote computer. Portable X-band Linac Y-34 is the effective X - ray and/or electron beam source for such applications as non-destructive examination of nuclear reactor systems, solid rocket motors, technology research.

  17. Basic dosimetric verification in water of the anisotropic analytical algorithm for Varian, Elekta and Siemens linacs.

    PubMed

    Cozzi, Luca; Nicolini, Giorgia; Vanetti, Eugenio; Clivio, Alessandro; Glashörster, Marco; Schiefer, Hans; Fogliata, Antonella

    2008-01-01

    Since early 2007 a new version of the Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA) for photon dose calculations was released by Varian Medical Systems for clinical usage on Elekta linacs and also, with some restrictions, for Siemens linacs. Basic validation studies were performed and reported for three beams. 4,6 and 15 MV for an Elekta Synergy, 6 and 15 MV for a Siemens Primus and, as a reference, for 6 and 15 MV from a Varian Clinac 2100C/D. Generally AAA calculations reproduced well measured data and small deviations were observed for open and wedged fields. PDD curves showed in average differences between calculation and measurement smaller than 1% or 1.2 mm for Elekta beams, 1% or 1.8 mm for Siemens beams and 1% or 1 mm for Varian beams. Profiles in the flattened region matched measurements with deviations smaller than 1% for Elekta and Varian beams, 2% for Siemens. Percentage differences in Output Factors were observed as small as 1% in average.

  18. Low power-high energy linacs for irradiation in polymeric systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, D.; Fiti, M.; Radu, A.; Dragusin, M.; Cojocaru, G.; Margarirescu, A.; Indreas, I.

    1995-04-01

    Electron beam applications in the chemistry of polymers are given, such as the production of acrylamide polymers which are of great interest in the treatment of waste industrial waters. These products have unique properties: the required dose is smaller by a factor of 10 to 100 as compared to the dose requirement for other polymeric materials and they are used in aqueous solutions in a concentration of one or two magnitude orders smaller than conventional anorganic flocculants. The acrylamide polymer technologies were first developed on a semi-industrial scale with γ-ray sources and then transferred to the linacs built in the Accelerator Laboratory in the Institute of Atomic Physics. An original feature was included in order to make our linear accelerators using an electron gun of the diode type to render them suitable to obtain programmed beam single shots and pulse trains. It is particularly useful for automatic control of irradiation processing in order to provide the maximum efficiency of the electron beam application. The preliminary results obtained using our electron beam sources make the assumption that the low output power linacs are economically attractive for commercial production of acrylamide type polymers: about 2000 kg per beam kWh.

  19. Matching the laser generated p bunch into a crossbar-H drift tube linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almomani, A.; Droba, M.; Ratzinger, U.; Hofmann, I.

    2012-05-01

    Proton bunches with energies up to 30 MeV have been measured at the PHELIX laser. Because of the laser-plasma interactions at a power density of about 4×1019W/cm2, a total yield of 1.5×1013protons was produced. For the reference energy of 10 MeV, the yield within ±0.5MeV was exceeding 1010protons. The important topic for a further acceleration of the laser generated bunch is the matching into the acceptance of an rf accelerator stage. With respect to the high space charge forces and the transit energy range, only drift tube linacs seem adequate for this purpose. A crossbar H-type (CH) cavity was chosen as the linac structure. Optimum emittance values for the linac injection are compared with the available laser generated beam parameters. Options for beam matching into a CH structure by a pulsed magnetic solenoid and by using the simulation codes LASIN and LORASR are presented.

  20. X-ray Sources by Energy Recovered Linacs and Their Needed R&D

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, Stephen; Douglas, David; Dowell, David; Hernandez-Garcia, Carlos; Kayran, D; Krafft, Geoffrey; Legg, Robert; Moog, E; Obina, T; Rimmer, Robert; Yakimenko, V

    2011-05-01

    In this paper we review the current state of research on energy recovered linacs as drivers for future X-ray sources. For many types of user experiments, such sources may have substantial advantages compared to the workhorse sources of the present: high energy storage rings. Energy recovered linacs need to be improved beyond present experience in both energy and average current to support this application. To build an energy recovered linac based X-ray user facility presents many interesting challenges. We present summaries on the Research and Development (R&D) topics needed for full development of such a source, including the discussion at the Future Light Sources Workshop held in Gaithersburg, Maryland on September 15- 17, 2009. A rst iteration of an R&D plan is presented that is founded on the notion of building a set of succeedingly larger test accelerators exploring cathode physics, high average current injector physics, and beam recirculation and beam energy recovery at high average current. Our basic conclusion is that a reviewable design of such a source can be developed after an R&D period of ve to ten years.

  1. Neutron production from flattening filter free high energy medical linac: A Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najem, M. A.; Abolaban, F. A.; Podolyák, Z.; Spyrou, N. M.

    2015-11-01

    One of the problems arising from using a conventional linac at high energy (>8 MV) is the production of neutrons. One way to reduce neutron production is to remove the flattening filter (FF). The main purpose of this work was to study the effect of FF removal on neutron fluence and neutron dose equivalent inside the treatment room at different photon beam energies. Several simulations based on Monte Carlo techniques were carried out in order to calculate the neutron fluence at different locations in the treatment room from different linac energies with and without a FF. In addition, a step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiotherapy (SnS IMRT) for prostate cancer was modelled using the 15 MV photon beam with and without a FF on a water phantom to calculate the neutron dose received in a full treatment. The results obtained show a significant drop-off in neutrons fluence and dose equivalent when the FF was removed. For example, the neutron fluence was decreased by 54%, 76% and 75% for 10, 15 and 18 MV, respectively. This can decrease the neutron dose to the patient as well as reduce the shielding cost of the treatment room. The neutron dose equivalent of the SnS IMRT for prostate cancer was reduced significantly by 71.3% when the FF was removed. It can be concluded that the flattening filter removal from the head of the linac could reduce the risk of causing secondary cancers and the shielding cost of radiotherapy treatment rooms.

  2. Design of Coherent Femto-Second THz Radiation Source Using 60-MeV Electron Linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, H. S.; Lim, C. M.; Kang, T. H.; Choi, J.; Ko, I. S.

    2007-01-01

    A coherent femto-second THz radiation source using 60-MeV electron linac is under construction at PAL. The linac consists of an S-band photocathode RF-gun, two S-band accelerating structures (AC1 and AC2), two chicane bunch compressors (Chicane-1 and Chicane-2), and a 1-m long planar undulator. Chicane 1 will be located between AC1 and AC2, and Chicane-2 after AC2. Two kinds of radiation sources will be prepared: optical transition radiation (OTR) after Chicane-2, and undulator radiation at the end of linac. The PARMELA code simulation result shows that the beam with 0.2 nC charge can be compressed down to a few tens of femto-second by Chicane-2 for OTR and also by Chicane-1 for undulator radiation. Beam dynamics design was also done for higher charge of 0.5nC, and the bunch length is expected to be about one hundred femto-seconds.

  3. Use of an INR-style bunch-length detector in the Fermilab Linac

    SciTech Connect

    McCrory, E.S.; Schmidt, C.W.; Feschenko, A.V.

    1993-08-01

    device to accurately measure the phase extent of a linac beam is being developed for use in the Fermilab 400 MeV Linac Upgrade. Prototypes have been and are being tested. We have attempted to improve the original design from the Institute for Nuclear Research in Moscow (INR) to increase the resolution for adequate operation at 805 MHz. The device incorporating a new arrangement of lens and deflector, reported previously, cannot achieve the desired resolution. This paper describes the operation and the strengths and weaknesses of the three types of bunch-length detectors (BLDs) and the measurements made at this time. The differences among these devices is delineated by the relative position of the rf deflector and the electrostatic einsel lens, as follows: INR--Lens before deflector; Fermilab--Lens after deflector; H- beam; and FNAL/INR--Lens and deflector combined. To satisfy the goals of commissioning the new linac, a resolution of about 5 picoseconds (1{degree} at 805 MHz) is desired.

  4. Development of a novel optimization tool for electron linacs inspired by artificial intelligence techniques in video games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, E.; Biedron, S. G.; LeBlanc, G.; Morgan, M. J.

    2011-03-01

    This paper reports the results of an advanced algorithm for the optimization of electron beam parameters in Free Electron Laser (FEL) Linacs. In the novel approach presented in this paper, the system uses state of the art developments in video games to mimic an operator's decisions to perform an optimization task when no prior knowledge, other than constraints on the actuators is available. The system was tested for the simultaneous optimization of the energy spread and the transmission of the Australian Synchrotron Linac. The proposed system successfully increased the transmission of the machine from 90% to 97% and decreased the energy spread of the beam from 1.04% to 0.91%. Results of a control experiment performed at the new FERMI@Elettra FEL is also reported, suggesting the adaptability of the scheme for beam-based control.

  5. Comparison of electric and magnetic quadrupole focusing for the low energy end of an induction-linac-ICF (Inertial-Confinement-Fusion) driver

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.H.

    1987-04-01

    This report compares two physics designs of the low energy end of an induction linac-ICF driver: one using electric quadrupole focusing of many parallel beams followed by transverse combining; the other using magnetic quadrupole focusing of fewer beams without beam combining. Because of larger head-to-tail velocity spread and a consequent rapid current amplification in a magnetic focusing channel, the overall accelerator size of the design using magnetic focusing is comparable to that using electric focusing.

  6. A comprehensive study of the mechanical performance of gantry, EPID and the MLC assembly in Elekta linacs during gantry rotation

    PubMed Central

    Riis, H L; Zimmermann, S J; Ebert, M A

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In radiotherapy treatments, it is crucial to monitor the performance of linear accelerator (linac) components, including gantry, collimation system and electronic portal imaging device (EPID) during arc deliveries. In this study, a simple EPID-based measurement method is suggested in conjunction with an algorithm to investigate the stability of these systems at various gantry angles with the aim of evaluating machine-related errors in treatments. Methods: The EPID sag, gantry sag, changes in source-to-detector distance (SDD), EPID and collimator skewness, EPID tilt and the sag in leaf bank assembly owing to linac rotation were separately investigated by acquisition of 37 EPID images of a simple phantom with 5 ball bearings at various gantry angles. A fast and robust software package was developed for automated analysis of the image data. Nine Elekta AB (Stockholm, Sweden) linacs of different models and number of years in service were investigated. Results: The average EPID sag was within 2 mm for all tested linacs. Some machines showed >1-mm gantry sag. Changes in the SDD values were within 1.3 cm. EPID skewness and tilt values were <1° in all machines. The maximum sag in multileaf collimator leaf bank assemblies was around 1 mm. A meaningful correlation was found between the age of the linacs and their mechanical performance. Conclusions and Advances in knowledge: The method and software developed in this study provide a simple tool for effective investigation of the behaviour of Elekta linac components with gantry rotation. Such a comprehensive study has been performed for the first time on Elekta machines. PMID:25906294

  7. Monitoring external beam radiotherapy using real-time beam visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, Cesare H.; Naczynski, Dominik J.; Yu, Shu-Jung S.; Xing, Lei

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: To characterize the performance of a novel radiation therapy monitoring technique that utilizes a flexible scintillating film, common optical detectors, and image processing algorithms for real-time beam visualization (RT-BV). Methods: Scintillating films were formed by mixing Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Tb (GOS) with silicone and casting the mixture at room temperature. The films were placed in the path of therapeutic beams generated by medical linear accelerators (LINAC). The emitted light was subsequently captured using a CMOS digital camera. Image processing algorithms were used to extract the intensity, shape, and location of the radiation field at various beam energies, dose rates, and collimator locations. The measurement results were compared with known collimator settings to validate the performance of the imaging system. Results: The RT-BV system achieved a sufficient contrast-to-noise ratio to enable real-time monitoring of the LINAC beam at 20 fps with normal ambient lighting in the LINAC room. The RT-BV system successfully identified collimator movements with sub-millimeter resolution. Conclusions: The RT-BV system is capable of localizing radiation therapy beams with sub-millimeter precision and tracking beam movement at video-rate exposure.

  8. SU-F-BRD-04: Development of a Secondary MU Calculation Tool for An Integrated MR-LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G; Li, X

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a fast secondary MU calculation tool for an integrated MR-Linac, an emerging technology for delivering image-guided on-line adaptive therapy. Methods: A software tool was developed to implement a modified Clarkson integration algorithm for point-dose calculation, considering the dosimtric effect of a magnetic field. A research planning system, considering the presence of a perpendicular 1.5 T magnetic field, was used to extract the beam data (e.g., depth doses and beam profiles) required for the MU calculation in homogeneous phantom of 60×60×40 cm3 for a prototype of MR-Linac integrating a 1.5 T MR scanner with 6MV photon beams. These dosimetric data may be replaced with those to be collected during the commissioning measurement of the MR-Linac. Results: The presence of the magnetic field resulted in noticeable changes including (1) shifts in beam profiles for small fields (< 2×2 cm2), and (2) changes in central-axis doses when one of field edges is < 2 cm away from the central axis. For example, the maximum change in central-axis dose was up to 8% for one of the field borders with a distance away from the central axis of <1 cm. These changes are relevant for the MU calculation particularly for IMRT and VMAT, where most of segments are small. These magnetic field affected beam profiles and depth doses were included in the software tool. The MU calculations from the software tool for selective representative plans were found to agree with those from the research planning system within 10%. Conclusion: The presence of a perpendicular magnetic field results in noticeable changes in beam profiles and depth doses for small fields. These changes are included in the secondary MU calc{sup 33}u{sup 3}lation to be used as a redundancy check for an integrated MR-Linac.

  9. High-power proton linac for transmuting the long-lived fission products in nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, G.P.

    1991-01-01

    High power proton linacs are being considered at Los Alamos as drivers for high-flux spallation neutron sources that can be used to transmute the troublesome long-lived fission products in defense nuclear waste. The transmutation scheme being studied provides a high flux (> 10{sup 16}/cm{sup 2}{minus}s) of thermal neutrons, which efficiently converts fission products to stable or short-lived isotopes. A medium-energy proton linac with an average beam power of about 110 MW can burn the accumulated Tc99 and I129 inventory at the DOE's Hanford Site within 30 years. Preliminary concepts for this machine are described. 3 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Automating checks of plan check automation.

    PubMed

    Halabi, Tarek; Lu, Hsiao-Ming

    2014-07-08

    While a few physicists have designed new plan check automation solutions for their clinics, fewer, if any, managed to adapt existing solutions. As complex and varied as the systems they check, these programs must gain the full confidence of those who would run them on countless patient plans. The present automation effort, planCheck, therefore focuses on versatility and ease of implementation and verification. To demonstrate this, we apply planCheck to proton gantry, stereotactic proton gantry, stereotactic proton fixed beam (STAR), and IMRT treatments.

  11. Development of C6+ laser ion source and RFQ linac for carbon ion radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sako, T.; Yamaguchi, A.; Sato, K.; Goto, A.; Iwai, T.; Nayuki, T.; Nemoto, K.; Kayama, T.; Takeuchi, T.

    2016-02-01

    A prototype C6+ injector using a laser ion source has been developed for a compact synchrotron dedicated to carbon ion radiotherapy. The injector consists of a laser ion source and a 4-vane radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac. Ion beams are extracted from plasma and directly injected into the RFQ. A solenoid guides the low-energy beams into the RFQ. The RFQ is designed to accelerate high-intensity pulsed beams. A structure of monolithic vanes and cavities is adopted to reduce its power consumption. In beam acceleration tests, a solenoidal magnetic field set between the laser ion source and the RFQ helped increase both the peak currents before and after the RFQ by a factor of 4.

  12. Development of C⁶⁺ laser ion source and RFQ linac for carbon ion radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sako, T; Yamaguchi, A; Sato, K; Goto, A; Iwai, T; Nayuki, T; Nemoto, K; Kayama, T; Takeuchi, T

    2016-02-01

    A prototype C(6+) injector using a laser ion source has been developed for a compact synchrotron dedicated to carbon ion radiotherapy. The injector consists of a laser ion source and a 4-vane radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac. Ion beams are extracted from plasma and directly injected into the RFQ. A solenoid guides the low-energy beams into the RFQ. The RFQ is designed to accelerate high-intensity pulsed beams. A structure of monolithic vanes and cavities is adopted to reduce its power consumption. In beam acceleration tests, a solenoidal magnetic field set between the laser ion source and the RFQ helped increase both the peak currents before and after the RFQ by a factor of 4.

  13. Demonstration of simultaneous experiments using thin crystal multiplexing at the Linac Coherent Light Source.

    PubMed

    Feng, Y; Alonso-Mori, R; Barends, T R M; Blank, V D; Botha, S; Chollet, M; Damiani, D S; Doak, R B; Glownia, J M; Koglin, J M; Lemke, H T; Messerschmidt, M; Nass, K; Nelson, S; Schlichting, I; Shoeman, R L; Shvyd'ko, Yu V; Sikorski, M; Song, S; Stoupin, S; Terentyev, S; Williams, G J; Zhu, D; Robert, A; Boutet, S

    2015-05-01

    Multiplexing of the Linac Coherent Light Source beam was demonstrated for hard X-rays by spectral division using a near-perfect diamond thin-crystal monochromator operating in the Bragg geometry. The wavefront and coherence properties of both the reflected and transmitted beams were well preserved, thus allowing simultaneous measurements at two separate instruments. In this report, the structure determination of a prototypical protein was performed using serial femtosecond crystallography simultaneously with a femtosecond time-resolved XANES studies of photoexcited spin transition dynamics in an iron spin-crossover system. The results of both experiments using the multiplexed beams are similar to those obtained separately, using a dedicated beam, with no significant differences in quality.

  14. Performance Achievements and Challenges for FELs based on Energy Recovered Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Geoffrey Krafft

    2006-08-27

    During the past decade several groups have assembled free electron lasers based on energy recovered linacs (ERLs). Such arrangements have been built to obtain high average power electron and photon beams, by using high repetition rate beam pulses driving FEL oscillators. In this paper the performance of many existing and several proposed facilities from around the world are reviewed. Going forward, many questions must be addressed to achieve still better performance including: higher average current injectors, better optimized accelerating cavities, higher energy acceptance and lower loss beam recirculation systems, and better optical cavity designs for dealing with the optical beam power circulating in the ERL FELs. This paper presents some of the current thinking on each of these issues.

  15. Cost/performance analysis of an induction linac driver system for inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hovingh, J.; Brady, V.O.; Faltens, A.; Hoyer, E.H.; Lee, E.P.

    1985-11-01

    A linear induction accelerator that produces a beam of energetic (approx. =10 GeV) heavy (CAapprox.200) ions is a prime candidate as a driver for inertial fusion. Continuing developments in amorphous iron for use in accelerating modules represent a potentially large reduction in the driver cost and an increase in the driver efficiency. Additional insulator developments may also represent a potentially large reduction in the driver cost. The efficiency and cost of the induction linac system is discussed as a function of output energy and pulse repetition frequency for several beam charge states, numbers of beams and beam particle species. Accelerating modules and transport modules will be described. Large cost leverage items will be identified as a guide to future research activities and technology of development that can yield further substantial reductions in the accelerator system cost and improvement in the accelerator system efficiency. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Design study for a 500 MeV proton synchrotron with CSNS linac as an injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Liang-Sheng; Ji, Hong-Fei; Wang, Sheng

    2016-09-01

    Using the China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) linac as the injector, a 500 MeV proton synchrotron is proposed for multidisciplinary applications, such as biology, material science and proton therapy. The synchrotron will deliver proton beam with energy from 80 MeV to 500 MeV. A compact lattice design has been worked out, and all the important beam dynamics issues have been investigated. The 80 MeV H- beam is stripped and injected into the synchrotron by using multi-turn injection. In order to continuously extraction the proton with small beam loss, an achromatic structure is proposed and a slow extraction method with RF knock-out is adopted and optimized.

  17. Development of C{sup 6+} laser ion source and RFQ linac for carbon ion radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sako, T. Yamaguchi, A.; Sato, K.; Goto, A.; Iwai, T.; Nayuki, T.; Nemoto, K.; Kayama, T.; Takeuchi, T.

    2016-02-15

    A prototype C{sup 6+} injector using a laser ion source has been developed for a compact synchrotron dedicated to carbon ion radiotherapy. The injector consists of a laser ion source and a 4-vane radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac. Ion beams are extracted from plasma and directly injected into the RFQ. A solenoid guides the low-energy beams into the RFQ. The RFQ is designed to accelerate high-intensity pulsed beams. A structure of monolithic vanes and cavities is adopted to reduce its power consumption. In beam acceleration tests, a solenoidal magnetic field set between the laser ion source and the RFQ helped increase both the peak currents before and after the RFQ by a factor of 4.

  18. Status of the RF-driven H⁻ ion source for J-PARC linac.

    PubMed

    Oguri, H; Ohkoshi, K; Ikegami, K; Takagi, A; Asano, H; Ueno, A; Shibata, T

    2016-02-01

    For the upgrade of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex linac beam current, a cesiated RF-driven negative hydrogen ion source was installed during the 2014 summer shutdown period, with subsequent operations commencing on September 29, 2014. The ion source has been successfully operating with a beam current and duty factor of 33 mA and 1.25% (500 μs and 25 Hz), respectively. The result of recent beam operation has demonstrated that the ion source is capable of continuous operation for approximately 1100 h. The spark rate at the beam extractor was observed to be at a frequency of less than once a day, which is an acceptable level for user operation. Although an antenna failure occurred during operation on October 26, 2014, no subsequent serious issues have occurred since then.

  19. A review on photoneutrons characteristics in radiation therapy with high-energy photon beams.

    PubMed

    Naseri, Alireza; Mesbahi, Asghar

    2010-09-22

    In radiation therapy with high-energy photon beams (E > 10 MeV) neutrons are generated mainly in linacs head thorough (γ,n) interactions of photons with nuclei of high atomic number materials that constitute the linac head and the beam collimation system. These neutrons affect the shielding requirements in radiation therapy rooms and also increase the out-of-field radiation dose of patients undergoing radiation therapy with high-energy photon beams. In the current review, the authors describe the factors influencing the neutron production for different medical linacs based on the performed measurements and Monte Carlo studies in the literature.

  20. A Single-Shot Method for Measuring Femtosecond Bunch Length in Linac-Based Free-Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.; Bane, K.; Ding, Y.; Emma, P.; /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    There is growing interest in the generation and characterization of femtosecond and subfemtosecond pulses from linac-based free-electron lasers (FELs). In this report, following the method of Ricci and Smith [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 3, 032801 (2000)], we investigate the measurement of the longitudinal bunch profile of an ultrashort electron bunch produced by these FELs. We show that this method can be applied in a straightforward manner at x-ray FEL facilities such as the Linac Coherent Light Source by slightly adjusting the second bunch compressor followed by running the bunch on an rf zero-crossing phase of the final linac. We find that the linac wakefield strongly perturbs the measurement, and through analysis show that it can be compensated in a simple way. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this method and wakefield compensation through numerical simulations, including effects of coherent synchrotron radiation and longitudinal space charge. When used in conjunction with a high-resolution electron spectrometer, this method potentially reveals the temporal profile of the electron beam down to the femtosecond and subfemotsecond scale.

  1. Beam distribution function after filamentation

    SciTech Connect

    Raubenheimer, T.O.; Decker, F.J.; Seeman, J.T.

    1995-05-01

    In this paper, the authors calculate the beam distribution function after filamentation (phase-mixing) of a focusing mismatch. This distribution is relevant when interpreting beam measurements and sources of emittance dilution in linear colliders. It is also important when considering methods of diluting the phase space density, which may be required for the machine protection system in future linear colliders, and it is important when studying effects of trapped ions which filament in the electron beam potential. Finally, the resulting distribution is compared with measured beam distributions from the SLAC linac.

  2. SU-E-T-395: Evaluation of Multiple Brain Metastases Stereotactic Treatment Planning in Cyberknife Versus Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Vikraman, S; Rajesh, Thiyagarajan; Karrthick, Kp; Sambasivaselli, R; Senniandavar, V; Ramu, M; Maragathaveni, S; Dhivya, N; Tejinder, K; Manigandan, D; Muthukumaran, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate multiple brain metastases stereotactic treatment planning of Cyberknife versus linac using dose volume based indices. Methods: Fifteen multiple brain metastases patients were taken for this study from Cyberknife Multiplan TPSv4.6.0. All these patients underwent stereotactic treatment in Cyberknife. For each patient VMAT stereotactic treatment plan was generated in MONACO TPSv5.0 using Elekta beam modulator MLC and matched the delivered plan. A median dose of 8.5Gy(range 7–12Gy) per fraction was prescribed. Tumor volume was in the range of 0.06–4.33cc. Treatment plan quality was critically evaluated by comparing DVH indices such as D98, D95, CI, and HI for target volumes. Maximum point doses and volume doses were evaluated for critical organs. Results: For each case, target coverage of D98 was achieved with 100% prescription dose with SD of 0.29% and 0.41% in Linac and Cyberknife respectively. The average conformity index(CI) of 1.26±0.0796 SD for Cyberknife and 1.92±0.60SD for linac were observed. Better homogeneity Index (HI) of 1.17±0.09SD was observed in linac as compared to Cyberknife HI of 1.24±0.05SD.All the critical organ doses were well within tolerance limit in both linac and Cyberknife plans. There is no significant difference of maximum point doses for brainstem and optic chiasm. Treatment time and number of monitor units are more in Cyberknife compared to linac. The average volume receiving 12Gy in whole brain was 6% and 12% for Cyberknife and linac respectively. 1000cc of whole brain received 60% lesser dose in Linac compared to Cyberknife in all cases. Conclusion: The study shows that dosimetrically comparable plans are achievable Cyberknife and Linac. However, a better conformity, target coverage, lesser OAR dose is achieved with Cyberknife due to greater degrees of freedom with robotic gantry and smaller collimator for multiple targets.

  3. Proton Driver Linac for the Frankfurt Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Wiesner, C.; Chau, L. P.; Dinter, H.; Droba, M.; Heilmann, M.; Joshi, N.; Maeder, D.; Metz, A.; Meusel, O.; Noll, D.; Podlech, H.; Ratzinger, U.; Reichau, H.; Schempp, A.; Schmidt, S.; Schweizer, W.; Volk, K.; Wagner, C.; Mueller, I.

    2010-08-04

    The Frankfurt Neutron Source at the Stern-Gerlach-Zentrum (FRANZ) will deliver high neutron fluxes in the energy range of 1 to 500 keV. The Activation Mode provides a high averaged neutron flux created by a cw proton beam of up to 5 mA, while in the Compressor Mode intense neutron pulses of 1 ns length are formed with a repetition rate of up to 250 kHz. The Compressor Mode is well-suited for energy-dependent neutron capture measurements using the Time-of-Flight method in combination with a 4{pi} BaF{sub 2} detector array. The design of the proton driver linac for both operation modes is presented. This includes the volume type ion source, the ExB chopper located in the low energy section, the RFQ-IH combination for beam acceleration and the bunch compressor. Finally, the neutron production at the lithium-7 target and the resulting energy spectrum is described.

  4. Prospects for very-high-gradient linac-colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1981-02-01

    The energy realistically attainable by an electron-positron storage ring is limited by the RF voltage and power requirements imposed by synchrotron radiation to about 100 GeV. To reach energies of 300 x 300 GeV and higher in a colliding beam machine of reasonable dimensions, we must look to the linac-collider operating at an energy gradient on the order of 100 MV/m. Proper choice of an RF structure or such a collider can minimize the total RF power requirement and the effects of longitudinal and transverse single-bunch beam loading. For an operating frequency in the range 4 to 6 GHz, the total RF power requirement for a 300 x 300 GeV collider with a luminosity of 10/sup 32/ cm/sup -2/s/sup -1/ accelerating 10/sup 11/ particles per bunch is on the order of 50 MW. To drive this collider, RF power sources are needed having a peak output power in the range 1-2 GW. Possibilities for attaining these peak power levels by direct generation and by energy storage and fast switching are discussed.

  5. MARS15 Simulation of Radiation Environment at the ESS Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, N. V.; Eidelman, Yu. I.; Rakhno, I. L.; Tchelidze, L.; Tropin, I. S.

    2016-12-01

    Comprehensive studies with the MARS15(2016) Monte-Carlo code are described on evaluation of prompt and residual radiation levels induced by nominal and accidental beam losses in the 5-MW, 2-GeV European Spallation Source (ESS) Linac. These are to provide a basis for radiation shielding design verification through the accelerator complex. The calculation model is based on the latest engineering design and includes a sophisticated algorithm for particle tracking in the machine RF cavities as well as a well-established model of the beam loss. Substantial efforts were put in solving the deep-penetration problem for the thick shielding around the tunnel with numerous complex penetrations. It allowed us to study in detail not only the prompt dose, but also component and air activation, radiation loads on the soil outside the tunnel, and skyshine studies for the complicated 3-D surface above the machine. Among the other things, the newest features in MARS15 (2016), such as a ROOT-based beamline builder and a TENDL-based event generator for nuclear interactions below 100 MeV, were very useful in this challenging application

  6. Front end design of the RIA driver LINAC.

    SciTech Connect

    Kolomiets, A. A.; Asseev, V. N.; Ostroumov, P. N.; Pardo, R. C.; Physics; ITEP

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the front end design for the RIA driver linac which is able to select, separate and accelerate in the RFQ the required ion species of one- or two-charge states. The front end consists of an ECR ion source located on a 100 kV platform, LEBT, RFQ and MEBT. The first section of the LEBT is an achromatic bending system for charge-to-mass analysis and selection. For the heaviest ions with masses above 180, the transport system is able to deliver to the entrance of the first buncher a two-charge-state beam with similar Twiss parameters for both charge states. In order to match two-charge-state ions with different mass to charge ratios, the straight section of the LEBT upstream of the RFQ will be placed on a high-voltage platform. A voltage /spl sim/30 kV is required in order to match velocities of ions with mass to charge ratio less than the design value and to maintain the possibility accelerating two charge states simultaneously. Several beam matching schemes in the transitions LEBT-RFQ and RFQ-MEBT have been studied.

  7. Low energy beam transport for facility for rare isotope beams driver linear particle accelerator.

    PubMed

    Sun, L T; Leitner, D; Machicoane, G; Pozdeyev, E; Smirnov, V; Vorozhtsov, S B; Winklehner, D; Zhao, Q

    2012-02-01

    The driver linac for the facility for rare isotope beams (FRIB) will provide a wide range of primary ion beams for nuclear physics research. The linac will be capable of accelerating a uranium beam to an energy of up to 200 Mev∕u and delivering it to a fragmentation target with a maximum power of 400 kW. Stable ion beams will be produced by a high performance electron cyclotron resonance ion source operating at 28 GHz. The ion source will be located on a high voltage platform to reach an initial beam energy of 12 keV∕u. After extraction, the ion beam will be transported vertically down to the linac tunnel in a low energy beam transport (LEBT) system and injected into a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) operating at a frequency of 80.5 MHz. To meet the beam power requirements, simultaneous acceleration of two-charge states will be used for heavier ions (≥Xe). This paper presents the layout of the FRIB LEBT and the beam dynamics in the LEBT. In particular, simulation and design of the beam line section before charge state selection will be detailed. The need to use an achromatic design for the charge state selection system and the advantage of an ion beam collimation system to limit the emittance of the beam injected into the RFQ will be discussed in this paper.

  8. High current beam transport with multiple beam arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.H.

    1985-05-01

    Highlights of recent experimental and theoretical research progress on the high current beam transport of single and multiple beams by the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) group at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) are presented. In the single beam transport experiment (SBTE), stability boundaries and the emittance growth of a space charge dominated beam in a long quadrupole transport channel were measured and compared with theory and computer simulations. Also, a multiple beam ion induction linac (MBE-4) is being constructed at LBL which will permit study of multiple beam transport arrays, and acceleration and bunch length compression of individually focused beamlets. Various design considerations of MBE-4 regarding scaling laws, nonlinear effects, misalignments, and transverse and longitudinal space charge effects are summarized. Some aspects of longitudinal beam dynamics including schemes to generate the accelerating voltage waveforms and to amplify beam current are also discussed.

  9. Radiation Safety Aspects of the Linac Coherent Light Source Project At SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Rokni, S.H.; Fasso, A.; Mao, S.; Vincke, H.; /SLAC /LCLS

    2005-07-06

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission based Free Electron Laser (FEL) that is being designed and built at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) by a multilaboratory collaboration. This facility will provide ultra-short pulses of coherent x-ray radiation with the fundamental harmonic energy tunable over the energy range of 0.82 to 8.2 keV. One-third of the existing SLAC LINAC will compress and accelerate the electron beam to energies ranging from 4.5 GeV to 14.35 GeV. The beam will then be transported through a 130-meter long undulator, emit FEL and spontaneous radiation. After passing through the undulator, the electron beam is bent to the main electron dump. The LCLS will have two experiment halls as well as x-ray optics and infrastructure necessary to make use of the FEL for research and development in a variety of scientific fields. The facility design will incorporate features that would make it possible to expand in future such that up to 6 independent undulators can be used. While some of the radiation protection issues for the LCLS are similar to those encountered at both high-energy electron linacs and synchrotron radiation facilities, LCLS poses new challenges as well. Some of these new issues include: the length of the facility and of the undulator, the experimental floor in line with the electron beam and the occupancy near zero degrees, and the very high instantaneous intensity of the FEL. The shielding design criteria, methodology, and results from Monte Carlo and analytical calculations are presented.

  10. BEAM TRANSPORT LINES FOR THE BSNS.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI, J.

    2006-06-26

    This paper presents the design of two beam transport lines at the BSNS: one is the injection line from the Linac to the RCS and the other is the target line from the RCS to the target station. In the injection beam line, space charge effects, transverse halo collimation, momentum tail collimation and debunching are the main concerned topics. A new method of using triplet cells and stripping foils is used to collimate transverse halo. A long straight section is reserved for the future upgrading linac and debuncher. In the target beam line, large halo emittance, beam stability at the target due to kicker failures and beam jitters, shielding of back-scattering neutrons from the target are main concerned topics. Special bi-gap magnets will be used to reduce beam losses in the collimators in front of the target.

  11. PHOTOCATHODES FOR THE ENERGY RECOVERY LINACS.

    SciTech Connect

    RAO, T.; BURRILL, A.; CHANG, X.Y.; SMEDLEY, J.; ET AL.

    2005-03-19

    This paper presents an overview of existing and emerging technologies on electron sources that can service various Energy Recovering Linacs under consideration. Photocathodes that can deliver average currents from 1 mA to 1 A, the pros and cons associated with these cathodes are addressed. Status of emerging technologies such as secondary emitters, cesiated dispenser cathodes, field and photon assisted field emitters and super lattice photocathodes are also reviewed.

  12. Photocathodes for the energy recovery linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, T; Burrill, A; Chang, X Y; Smedley, J; Nishitani, T; Garcia, C Hernandez; Poelker, M; Seddon, E; Hannon, F E; Sinclair, C K; Lewellen, J; Feldman, D

    2005-03-19

    This paper presents an overview of existing and emerging technologies on electron sources that can service various Energy Recovering Linacs under consideration. Photocathodes that can deliver average currents from 1 mA to 1 A, the pros and cons associated with these cathodes are addressed. Status of emerging technologies such as secondary emitters, cesiated dispenser cathodes, field and photon assisted field emitters and super lattice photocathodes are also reviewed.

  13. LANSCE 201.25 MHz drift tube linac RF power status

    SciTech Connect

    Lyles, J.T.M.; Friedrichs, C.C., Jr.

    1996-09-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center linac provides high power proton beams for neutron science, tritium target development, nuclear physics, material science, isotope production, and weapons research. Number of simultaneous beam users places heavy demands on the RF powerplant, espcially the 201.25 MHz power amplifiers (PA) driving four drift tube linac cavities. Designed nearly 30 years ago, these amplifiers have operated at up to 3 Megawatts with duty factors of 12%. The number of power tubes, age of cooling and control subsystems, tube manufacturing problems, and operation near maximum PA tube ratings have all affected system reliability. By monitoring final power amplifier plate dissipation and tube vcauum, improved operating procedures have raised RF system reliability above 95% for operation periods in 1993-95. Higher beam current for a proposed Long Pulse Spallation Source (LPSS) cannot be delivered simultaneously with other beams at high duty factor, however. Plans are underway to develop a new final power amplifier which can use low-level RF modulations for amplitude control. With only a few power tubes, the system will deliver high peak power and duty factor, with improved DC to RF efficiency, and a simplified cooling system.

  14. Simulations of Jitter Coupling due to Wakefields in the FACET Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Molloy, Stephen

    2009-10-30

    Facilities for Accelerator Science and Experimental Test Beams (FACET) is a proposed facility at SLAC that would use the initial two-thirds of the linac to transport e{sup +} and e{sup -} beams to an experimental region. A principal use of this facility is to identify the optimum method for accelerating positrons in a beam driven plasma wakefield accelerator. To study this, a positron bunch, followed an RF-cycle later by an electron bunch, will be accelerated to an asymmetric chicane designed to move the positrons behind the electrons, and then on to the plasma wakefield test stand. A major focus of study was the coupling of jitter of the positron bunch to the electron bunch via linac wakes. Lucretia is a Matlab toolbox for the simulation of electron beam transport systems, capable of multi-bunch tracking and wakefield calculations. With the exception of the lack of support for tracking of electrons and positrons within a single bunch train, it was well suited to the jitter coupling studies. This paper describes the jitter studies, including modifications made to Lucretia to correctly simulate tracking of mixed-species bunch trains through a lattice of magnetic elements and EM wakes.

  15. Automatic determination of primary electron beam parameters in Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Pena, Javier; Gonzalez-Castano, Diego M.; Gomez, Faustino; Sanchez-Doblado, Francisco; Hartmann, Guenther H.

    2007-03-15

    In order to obtain realistic and reliable Monte Carlo simulations of medical linac photon beams, an accurate determination of the parameters that define the primary electron beam that hits the target is a fundamental step. In this work we propose a new methodology to commission photon beams in Monte Carlo simulations that ensures the reproducibility of a wide range of clinically useful fields. For such purpose accelerated Monte Carlo simulations of 2x2, 10x10, and 20x20 cm{sup 2} fields at SSD=100 cm are carried out for several combinations of the primary electron beam mean energy and radial FWHM. Then, by performing a simultaneous comparison with the correspondent measurements for these same fields, the best combination is selected. This methodology has been employed to determine the characteristics of the primary electron beams that best reproduce a Siemens PRIMUS and a Varian 2100 CD machine in the Monte Carlo simulations. Excellent agreements were obtained between simulations and measurements for a wide range of field sizes. Because precalculated profiles are stored in databases, the whole commissioning process can be fully automated, avoiding manual fine-tunings. These databases can also be used to characterize any accelerators of the same model from different sites.

  16. SU-E-T-54: A New Method for Optimizing Radiation Isocenter for Linac-Based SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Hancock, S; Hyer, D; Nixon, E

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a new method to minimize deviation of linac x-ray beams from the centroid of the volumetric radiation isocenter for all combinations of gantry and table angle. Methods: A set of ball-bearing (Winston-Lutz) images was used to determine the gantry radiation isocenter as the midrange of deviation values. Deviations in the cross-plane direction were minimized by calibration of MLC leaf position offset, and by adjusting beam position steering for each energy. Special attention was also paid to matching the absolute position of isocenter across all energies by adjusting position steering in the gun-target axis. Displacement of table axis from the gantry isocenter, and recommended table axis adjustment for contemporary Elekta linacs, was also determined. Eight images were used to characterize the volumetric isocenter for the full range of gantry and table rotations available. Tabulation of deviation for each beam was used to test compliance with isocenter tolerance. Results: Four contemporary Elekta linacs were evaluated and the radius in the gun-target axis of the radiation isocenter was 0.5 to 0.7 mm. After beam steering adjustment, the radius in the cross-plane direction was typically 0.2 to 0.4 mm. Position matching between energies can be reduced to 0.28 mm. Maximum total deviation was 0.68 to 1.07 mm, depending primarily on the effect of systematic table axis wobble with rotation. Conclusion: This new method effectively facilitates minimization of deviation between beam center and target position. The test, which requires a few minutes to perform, can be easily incorporated into a routine machine QA program. A tighter radiation isocenter for contemporary Elekta linacs would require reducing the effect of gantry arm flex and/or table axis wobble that are the two main components of deviation from the designated isocenter point.

  17. Integrating a Machine Protection System for High-Current Free Electron Lasers and Energy Recovery Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Trent Allison; James Coleman; Richard Evans; Al Grippo; Kevin Jordan

    2002-09-01

    A fully integrated Machine Protection System (MPS) is critical to efficient commissioning and safe operation of all high-current accelerators. The MPS needs to monitor the status of all devices that could enter the beam path, the beam loss monitors (BLMs), magnet settings, beam dump status, etc. This information is then presented to the electron source controller, which must limit the beam power or shut down the beam completely. The MPS for the energy recovery linac (ERL) at the Jefferson Lab Free Electron Laser [1] generates eight different power limits, or beam modes, which are passed to the drive laser pulse controller (DLPC) (photocathode source controller). These range from no beam to nearly 2 megawatts of electron beam power. Automatic masking is used for the BLMs during low-power modes when one might be using beam viewers. The system also reviews the setup for the two different beamlines, the IR path or the UV path, and will allow or disallow operations based on magnet settings and valve positions. This paper will describe the approach taken for the JLab 10-kW FEL. Additional details can be found on our website http://laser.jlab.org [2].

  18. Development of a QA phantom and automated analysis tool for geometric quality assurance of on-board MV and kV x-ray imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Mao, Weihua; Lee, Louis; Xing, Lei

    2008-04-01

    The medical linear accelerator (linac) integrated with a kilovoltage (kV) flat-panel imager has been emerging as an important piece of equipment for image-guided radiation therapy. Due to the sagging of the linac head and the flexing of the robotic arms that mount the x-ray tube and flat-panel detector, geometric nonidealities generally exist in the imaging geometry no matter whether it is for the two-dimensional projection image or three-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography. Normally, the geometric parameters are established during the commissioning and incorporated in correction software in respective image formation or reconstruction. A prudent use of an on-board imaging system necessitates a routine surveillance of the geometric accuracy of the system like the position of the x-ray source, imager position and orientation, isocenter, rotation trajectory, and source-to-imager distance. Here we describe a purposely built phantom and a data analysis software for monitoring these important parameters of the system in an efficient and automated way. The developed tool works equally well for the megavoltage (MV) electronic portal imaging device and hence allows us to measure the coincidence of the isocenters of the MV and kV beams of the linac. This QA tool can detect an angular uncertainty of 0.1 degrees of the x-ray source. For spatial uncertainties, such as the source position, the imager position, or the kV/MV isocenter misalignment, the demonstrated accuracy of this tool was better than 1.6 mm. The developed tool provides us with a simple, robust, and objective way to probe and monitor the geometric status of an imaging system in a fully automatic process and facilitate routine QA workflow in a clinic.

  19. A Simple beam line for the MuCool test area

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Ankenbrandt et al.

    2004-05-03

    This note describes a simple beam line to transport H{sup -} beam from the end of the Fermilab 400 MeV Linac to the MuCool Test Area (MTA). The design uses existing dipoles and quadrupoles and other equipment now available at Fermilab. Deflection of single 15 Hz beam pulses from the Linac to the MTA is accomplished using pulsed magnets that are essentially Main Injector trim dipoles with thinner laminations. The beam size is kept small to control beam losses and allow the use of existing surplus or spare equipment. An upgrade of the beam line to illuminate larger objects at high intensity is described.

  20. Simulation of Tunable Infra-Red Free-Electron Laser Based on Test Linac of Pohang Accelerator Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyoung Suk; Hahn, Sang June; Lee, Jae Koo

    1993-07-01

    We have investigated the possibility of tunable Infrared Free-Electron Laser with Test Linac of Pohang Accelerator Laboratory through one dimensional simulation which includes energy spread and space charge effects and 3-D particle simulation that ignores space charge force but takes into account the energy spread and the emittance of the electron beam and the diffraction of the electromagnetic wave. The enhanced current density of the Test Linac makes it feasible to amplify the 4.2 kW signal of 10.6 μm radiation to 200 MW level. Extending the design parameters, electron beam energy (20˜60 MeV), wiggler field strength (around 3 kG), and radiation wavelength (10˜90 μm), we have revealed the requisites for the design of the tunable radiation source and the expected gains in that frequency range. It is shown to generate more than 100 MW in the tunable range.