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Sample records for linacs

  1. Induction linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, D.

    1986-07-01

    The principle of linear induction acceleration is described, and examples are given of practical configurations for induction linacs. These examples include the Advanced Technology Accelerator, Long Pulse Induction Linac, Radial Line Accelerator (RADLAC), and Magnetically-Insulated Electron-Focussed Ion Linac. A related concept, the auto accelerator, is described in which the high-current electron-beam technology in the sub-10 MeV region is exploited to produce electron beams at energies perhaps as high as the 100 to 1000 MeV range. Induction linacs for ions are also discussed. The efficiency of induction linear acceleration is analyzed. (LEW)

  2. The RIA driver linac.

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, K. W.

    2002-09-23

    The driver linac for the U.S. RIA project will be a 1.4 GV superconducting linac capable of accelerating the full mass range of ions from 900 MeV protons to 400 MeV/u uranium, and delivering a cw beam of 400 kW shared by at least two targets simultaneously. Elements of the linac are being developed at several U.S. laboratories. The current status of linac design and development is reviewed with emphasis on changes in the baseline design since the last linac conference.

  3. Magnet innovations for linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Halbach, K.

    1986-06-01

    It is possible to produce large magnetic fields at the aperture of permanent magnet quadrupoles, even when the magnetic aperture is very small. That, combined with their compactness, makes permanent magnet quadrupoles very powerful components of small aperture linacs. Results will be presented about past and present work on both fixed and variable strength permanent magnets suitable for use in and around linacs.

  4. CSNS LINAC DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    FU, S.; FANG, S.; WEI, J.

    2006-08-21

    China Spallation Neutron Source has been approved in principle by the Chinese government. CSNS can provide a beam power of 100kW on the target in the first phase, and then 200kW in the second phase. The accelerator complex of CSNS consists of an H- linac of 81MeV and a rapid cycling synchrotron of 1.6GeV at 25Hz repetition rate. In the second phase, the linac energy will be upgraded to 132MeV and the average current will be doubled. The linac has been designed, and some R&D studies have started under the support from Chinese Academy of Sciences. The linac comprises a H- ion source, an RFQ and a conventional DTL with EMQs. This paper will present our major design results and some progresses in the R&D of the linac.

  5. Compendium of Scientific Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Clendenin, James E

    2003-05-16

    The International Committee supported the proposal of the Chairman of the XVIII International Linac Conference to issue a new Compendium of linear accelerators. The last one was published in 1976. The Local Organizing Committee of Linac96 decided to set up a sub-committee for this purpose. Contrary to the catalogues of the High Energy Accelerators which compile accelerators with energies above 1 GeV, we have not defined a specific limit in energy. Microtrons and cyclotrons are not in this compendium. Also data from thousands of medical and industrial linacs has not been collected. Therefore, only scientific linacs are listed in the present compendium. Each linac found in this research and involved in a physics context was considered. It could be used, for example, either as an injector for high energy accelerators, or in nuclear physics, materials physics, free electron lasers or synchrotron light machines. Linear accelerators are developed in three continents only: America, Asia, and Europe. This geographical distribution is kept as a basis. The compendium contains the parameters and status of scientific linacs. Most of these linacs are operational. However, many facilities under construction or design studies are also included. A special mention has been made at the end for the studies of future linear colliders.

  6. Special SLC linac developments

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, J.T.; Sheppard, J.C.

    1986-04-01

    The linac of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) is required to accelerate several intense electron and positron bunches to high energy while maintaining their small transverse dimensions and energy spectra. Many of the linac systems have been upgraded to the new stringent SLC design criteria. The remaining systems will be completed in the summer of 1986. Special instruments and controls have been developed to monitor and manipulate these small but potent beams. A brief review of the SLC requirements is given. A broad survey of the recent development is made encompassing longitudinal and transverse wakefield reductions, Landau damping, energy and position feedback systems, beam diagnostic and beam current fluctuations.

  7. The ISS protontherapy LINAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picardi, L.; Ronsivalle, C.; Vignati, A.

    1997-02-01

    The TERA foundation stimulated in the past years a comparative study of compact proton accelerators for therapy and at the end of 1995 the Italian National Institute of Health (Istituto Superiore di Sanità, ISS) decided for the construction of a proton linac for its TOP (Terapia Oncologica con Protoni) project. The TOP-LINAC will be composed of a 7 MeV RFQ+DTL injector followed by a 7-65 MeV section of the innovative 3 GHz SCDTL structure and a 65-200 MeV variable energy SCL 3 GHz structure. A 5-cavity model of the SCDTL has been built and measured on a RF test bench while a 11-cavities prototype (accelerating until 12.5 MeV) is under construction and will be assembled within few months. The TOP LINAC whose construction will start at the end of 1996, will be the first linear accelerator dedicated to proton therapy, and the first 3 GHz proton linac. In this paper the accelerator design and the construction schedule will be presented, and the SCDTL structure RF measurements will be discussed.

  8. The Fermilab Linac Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, R.J.

    1991-02-01

    The Fermilab Linac Upgrade is planned to increase the energy of the H- linac from 200 to 400 MeV. This is intended to reduce the incoherent space-charge tuneshift at injection into the 8 GeV Booster which can limit either the brightness or the total intensity of the beam. The Linac Upgrade will be achieved by replacing the last four 201.25 MHz drift-tube tanks which accelerate the beam from 116 to 200 MeV, with seven 805 MHz side-coupled cavity modules operating at an average axial field of abut 7.5 MV/m. This will allow acceleration to 400 MeV in the existing Linac enclosure. Each accelerator module will be driven with a klystron-based rf power supply. A prototype rf modulator has been built and tested at Fermilab, and a prototype 12 MW klystron is being fabricated by Litton Electron Devices. Fabrication of production accelerator modules is in progress. 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Electron Induction Linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caporaso, George J.; Chen, Yu-Jiuan

    Electron induction linacs have been used for over four decades for a variety of applications. As discussed in Chap. 8, these include basic studies in magnetically confined fusion, transport of intense electron beams in various gases, the generation of electromagnetic radiation from free electron lasers, radiation processing of materials and food, and flash X-ray radiography sources.

  10. Recirculated and Energy Recovered Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Geoffrey Krafft

    2003-05-01

    Linacs that are recirculated share many characteristics with ordinary linacs, including the ability to accelerate electron beams from an injector to high energy with relatively little (normalized) emittance growth and the ability to deliver ultrashort bunch duration pulses to users. When such linacs are energy recovered, the additional possibility of accelerating very high average beam current arises. Because this combination of beam properties is not possible from either a conventional linac, or from storage rings where emittance and pulse length are set by the equilibrium between radiation damping and quantum excitation of oscillations about the closed orbit, energy recovered linacs are being considered for an increasing variety of applications. These possibilities extend from high power free-electron lasers and recirculated linac light sources, to electron coolers for high energy colliders or actual electron-ion colliding- beam machines based on an energy recovered linac for the electrons.

  11. Linac quadrupole connections

    SciTech Connect

    Stiening, R.

    1984-07-12

    Linac type QC and QCH quadrupoles are mounted on the accelerator with their power connection side facing the injector. The connections are on the top of the magnet. The correct polarity for magnets is shown. The magnetic centers of all magnets are measured. If the magnetic center is above the geometric center, the distance delta y is positive. If the magnetic center is to the right of the geometric center, the distance delta x is positive.

  12. Superconducting energy recovery linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2016-10-01

    High-average-power and high-brightness electron beams from a combination of laser photocathode electron guns and a superconducting energy recovery linac (ERL) is an emerging accelerator science with applications in ERL light sources, high repetition rate free electron lasers , electron cooling, electron ion colliders and more. This paper reviews the accelerator physics issues of superconducting ERLs, discusses major subsystems and provides a few examples of superconducting ERLs.

  13. Compact, Integrated Photoelectron Linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, David

    2000-12-01

    The innovative compact high energy iniector which has been developed by DULY Research Inc., will have wide scientific industrial and medical applications. The new photoelectron injector integrates the photocathode directly into a multicell linear accelerator with no drift space between the injector and the linac. By focusing the beam with solenoid or permanent magnets, and producing high current with low emittance, extremely high brightness is achieved. In addition to providing a small footprint and improved beam quality in an integrated structure, the compact system considerably simplifies external subsystems required to operate the photoelectron linac, including rf power transport, beam focusing, vacuum and cooling. The photoelectron linac employs an innovative Plane-Wave-Transformer (PWT) design, which provides strong cell-to-cell coupling, relaxes manufacturing tolerance and facilitates the attachment of external ports to the compact structure with minimal field interference. DULY Research Inc. under the support of the DOE Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program, has developed, constructed and installed a 20-MeV, S-band compact electron source at UCLA. DULY Research is also presently engaged in the development of an X-band photoelectron linear accelerator in another SBIR project. The higher frequency structure when completed will be approximately three times smaller, and capable of a beam brightness ten times higher than the S-band structure.

  14. High current induction linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barletta, W.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Lee, E.

    1994-07-01

    Induction linacs are among the most powerful accelerators in existence. They have accelerated electron bunches of several kiloamperes, and are being investigated as drivers for heavy ion driven inertial confinement fusion (HIF), which requires peak beam currents of kiloamperes and average beam powers of some tens of megawatts. The requirement for waste transmutation with an 800 MeV proton or deuteron beam with an average current of 50 mA and an average power of 40 MW lies midway between the electron machines and the heavy ion machines in overall difficulty. Much of the technology and understanding of beam physics carries over from the previous machines to the new requirements. The induction linac allows use of a very large beam aperture, which may turn out to be crucial to reducing beam loss and machine activation from the beam halo. The major issues addressed here are transport of high intensity beams, availability of sources, efficiency of acceleration, and the state of the needed technology for the waste treatment application. Because of the transformer-like action of an induction core and the accompanying magnetizing current, induction linacs make the most economic sense and have the highest efficiencies with large beam currents. Based on present understanding of beam transport limits, induction core magnetizing current requirements, and pulse modulators, the efficiencies could be very high. The study of beam transport at high intensities has been the major activity of the HIF community. Beam transport and sources are limiting at low energies but are not significant constraints at the higher energies. As will be shown, the proton beams will be space-charge-dominated, for which the emittance has only a minor effect on the overall beam diameter but does determine the density falloff at the beam edge.

  15. Compact LINAC for deuterons

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, S S; O' Hara, J F; Rybarcyk, L J

    2008-01-01

    We are developing a compact deuteron-beam accelerator up to the deuteron energy of a few MeV based on room-temperature inter-digital H-mode (IH) accelerating structures with the transverse beam focusing using permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ). Combining electromagnetic 3-D modeling with beam dynamics simulations and thermal-stress analysis, we show that IHPMQ structures provide very efficient and practical accelerators for light-ion beams of considerable currents at the beam velocities around a few percent of the speed of light. IH-structures with PMQ focusing following a short RFQ can also be beneficial in the front end of ion linacs.

  16. New medical linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schonberg, R. G.; Mishin, A. V.

    1997-02-01

    X-band linacs designed and manufactured by Schonberg Research Corporation that are currently used by two spin-off companies for radiation therapy systems. Accuray employs a basic 6 MeV design with 300 R/min nominal dose rate at 80 cm from a tungsten target. The designed stereoscopic radiosurgery system is known as the Cyberknife. The Cyberknife combines a treatment planning, imaging and treatment delivery features. The treatment delivery system enclosure incorporates an accelerator head, RF components, pulse transformer and electronics mounted on a robotic arm. Intraop Medical, Inc. has introduced a system for intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) called Mobetron (Mobile Electron Beam Intraoperative Treatment System). Mobetron is based on a 12 MeV two section X-band linac also designed by Schonberg Research Corporation. The accelerator design permits smooth energy variation from 4 to 12 MeV, but will be used at 4 specific energies. A self-shielded concept is applied to the system design. It will be used in conventional operating rooms without added shielding.

  17. Optimization of SRF Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, Tom

    2013-09-01

    This work describes preliminary results of a new software tool that allows one to vary parameters and understand the effects on the optimized costs of construction plus 10 year operations of an SRF linac, the associated cryogenic facility, and controls, where operations includes the cost of the electrical utilities but not the labor or other costs. It derives from collaborative work done with staff from Accelerator Science and Technology Centre, Daresbury, UK several years ago while they were in the process of developing a conceptual design for the New Light Source project.[1] The initial goal was to convert a spread sheet format to a graphical interface to allow the ability to sweep different parameter sets. The tools also allow one to compare the cost of the different facets of the machine design and operations so as to better understand the tradeoffs. The work was first published in an ICFA Beam Dynamics News Letter.[2] More recent additions to the software include the ability to save and restore input parameters as well as to adjust the Qo versus E parameters in order to explore the potential costs savings associated with doing so. Additionally, program changes now allow one to model the costs associated with a linac that makes use of energy recovery mode of operation.

  18. Low-charge-state linac

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, K.W.; Kim, J.W.

    1995-08-01

    A design is being developed for a low-charge-state linac suitable for injecting ATLAS with a low-charge-state, radioactive beam. Initial work indicates that the existing ATLAS interdigital superconducting accelerating structures, together with the superconducting quadrupole transverse focussing element discussed above, provides a basis for a high-performance low-charge-state linac. The initial 2 or 3 MV of such a linac could be based on a normally-conducting, low-frequency RFQ, possibly combined with 24-MHz superconducting interdigital structures. Beam dynamics studies of the whole low-charge-state post-accelerator section were carried out in early FY 1995.

  19. Superconducting heavy ion injector linac

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, K.W.

    1985-01-01

    A conceptual design for a very low velocity (.007 < v/c < .07) superconducting heavy-ion linac is reviewed. This type of linac may have significant cost and performance advantages over room-temperature linacs, at least for applications requiring modest beam currents. Some general features of the design of very-low velocity superconducting accelerating structures are discussed and a design for a 48.5 MHz, v/c = .009 structure, together with the status of a niobium prototype, is discussed in detail. Preliminary results of a beam dynamics study indicate that the low velocity linac may be able to produce heavy-ion beams with time-energy spreads of a few keV-nsec. 11 refs, 4 figs.

  20. SLAC Linac Preparations for FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, R.; Bentson, L.; Kharakh, D.; Owens, A.; Schuh, P.; Seeman, J.; Sheppard, J.C.; Stanek, M.; Wittmer, W.; Yocky, G.; Wienands, U.; /SLAC

    2011-02-07

    The SLAC 3km linear electron accelerator has been cut at the two-thirds point to provide beams to two independent programs. The last third provides the electron beam for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), leaving the first two-thirds available for FACET, the new experimental facility for accelerator science and test beams. In this paper, we describe this separation and projects to prepare the linac for the FACET experimental program.

  1. Induction Linac Pulsers

    SciTech Connect

    Faltens, Andris

    2011-01-07

    The pulsers used in most of the induction linacs evolved from the very large body of work that was done in the U.S. and Great Britain during the development of the pulsed magnetron for radar. The radar modulators started at {approx}100 kW and reached >10 MW by 1945. A typical pulse length was 1 {mu}s at a repetition rate of 1,000 pps. A very comprehensive account of the modulator development is Pulse Generators by Lebacqz and Glasoe, one of the Radiation Laboratory Series. There are many permutations of possible modulators, two of the choices being tube type and line type. In earlier notes I wrote that technically the vacuum tube pulser met all of our induction linac needs, in the sense that a number of tubes, in series and parallel if required, could produce our pulses, regulate their voltage, be useable in feed-forward correctors, and provide a low source impedance. At a lower speed, an FET array is similar, and we have obtained and tested a large array capable of >10 MW switching. A modulator with an electronically controlled output only needs a capacitor for energy storage and in a switched mode can transfer the energy from the capacitor to the load at high efficiency. Driving a full size Astron induction core and a simulated resistive 'beam load' we achieved >50% efficiency. These electronically controlled output pulses can produce the pulses we desire but are not used because of their high cost. The second choice, the line type pulser, visually comprises a closing switch and a distributed or a lumped element transmission line. The typical switch cannot open or stop conducting after the desired pulse has been produced, and consequently all of the initially stored energy is dissipated. This approximately halves the efficiency, and the original cost estimating program LIACEP used this factor of two, even though our circuits are usually worse, and even though our inveterate optimists often omit it. The 'missing' energy is that which is reflected back into the

  2. Lattice Design for the LHEC Recirculating Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yipeng; Eide, Anders; Zimmermann, Frank; Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC

    2011-05-20

    In this paper, we present a lattice design for the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC) recirculating linac. The recirculating linac consists of one roughly 3-km long linac hosting superconducting RF (SRF) accelerating cavities, two arcs and one transfer line for the recirculation. In two passes through a pulsed SRF linac the electron beam can get a maximum energy of 140 GeV. Alternatively, in the Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) option the beam passes through a CW linac four times (two passes for acceleration and two for deceleration) for a maximum energy of 60 GeV.

  3. LINACS FOR FUTURE MUON FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Slawomir Bogacz, Rolland Johnson

    2008-10-01

    Future Muon Colliders (MC) and Neutrino Factories (NF) based on muon storage rings will require innovative linacs to: produce the muons, cool them, compress longi-tudinally and ‘shape’ them into a beam and finally to rap-idly accelerate them to multi-GeV (NF) and TeV (MC) energies. Each of these four linac applications has new requirements and opportunities that follow from the na-ture of the muon in that it has a short lifetime (τ = 2.2 μsec) in its own rest frame, it is produced in a tertiary process into a large emittance, and its electron, photon, and neutrino decay products can be more than an annoy-ance. As an example, for optimum performance, the linac repetition rates should scale inversely with the laboratory lifetime of the muon in its storage ring, something as high as 1 kHz for a 40 GeV Neutrino Factory or as low as 20 Hz for a 5 TeV Muon Collider. A superconducting 8 GeV Linac capable of CW operation is being studied as a ver-satile option for muon production [1] for colliders, facto-ries, and muon beams for diverse purposes. A linac filled with high pressure hydrogen gas and imbedded in strong magnetic fields has been proposed to rapidly cool muon beams [2]. Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA) are possible because muons do not generate significant syn-chrotron radiation even at extremely high energy and in strong magnetic fields. We will describe the present status of linacs for muon applications; in particular the longitu-dinal bunch compression in a single pass linac and multi-pass acceleration in the RLA, especially the optics and technical requirements for RLA designs, using supercon-ducting RF cavities capable of simultaneous acceleration of both μ+ and μ- species, with pulsed linac quadrupoles to allow the maximum number of passes. The design will include the optics for the multi-pass linac and droplet-shaped return arcs.

  4. Commissioning of the LCLS LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Loos, H.; Akre, R.; Brachmann, A.; Decker, F.-J.; Ding, Y.; Dowell, D.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Gilevich, S.; Hays, G.; Hering, Ph.; Huang, Z.; Iverson, R.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Miahnahri, A.; Molloy, S.; Nuhn, H.-D.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; White, W.; Wu, J.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.

    2010-06-11

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray free electron laser project is currently under construction at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). A new injector and upgrades to the existing accelerator were installed in two phases in 2006 and 2007. We report on the commissioning of the injector, the two new bunch compressors at 250MeV and 4.3 GeV, and transverse and longitudinal beam diagnostics up to the end of the existing linac at 13.6 GeV. The commissioning of the new transfer line from the end of the linac to the undulator is scheduled to start in November 2008 and for the undulator in March 2009 with first light to be expected in July 2009.

  5. Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System

    SciTech Connect

    Bollinger, L.M.

    1983-01-01

    Design considerations and operational experience for the existing heavy-ion accelerator consisting of a tandem injecting into a superconducting linac are summarized, with emphasis on the general features of the system. This introduction provides the basis for a discussion of the objectives and design of ATLAS, a larger tandem-linac system being formed by expanding the existing superconducting linac.

  6. Linac Energy Management for LCLS

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Chungming; Iverson, Richard; Krejcik, Patrick; Rogind, Deborah; White, Greg; Woodley, Mark; /SLAC

    2012-07-05

    Linac Energy Management (LEM) is a control system program that scales magnet field set-point settings following a change in beam energy. LEM is necessary because changes in the number, phase, and amplitude of the active klystrons change the beam's rigidity, and therefore, to maintain constant optics, one has to change focusing gradients and bend fields accordingly. This paper describes the basic process, the control system application programs we developed for LEM, and some of the implementation lessons learned at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS).

  7. The Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    White, William E.; Robert, Aymeric; Dunne, Mike

    2015-05-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory was the first hard X-ray free-electron laser (FEL) to operate as a user facility. After five years of operation, LCLS is now a mature FEL user facility. Our personal views about opportunities and challenges inherent to these unique light sources are discussed.

  8. The Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    White, William E.; Robert, Aymeric; Dunne, Mike

    2015-04-21

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory was the first hard X-ray free-electron laser (FEL) to operate as a user facility. After five years of operation, LCLS is now a mature FEL user facility. Our personal views about opportunities and challenges inherent to these unique light sources are discussed.

  9. PROGRESS IN DESIGN OF THE SNS LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    R. HARDEKOPF

    2000-11-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a six-laboratory collaboration to build an intense pulsed neutron facility at Oak Ridge, TN. The linac design has evolved from the conceptual design presented in 1997 to achieve higher initial performance and to incorporate desirable upgrade features. The linac will initially produce 2-MW beam power using a combination of radio-frequency quadruple (RFQ) linac, drift-tube linac (DTL), coupled-cavity linac (CCL), and superconducting-cavity linac (SCL). Designs of each of these elements support the high peak intensity and high quality beam required for injection into the SNS accumulator ring. This paper will trace the evolution of the linac design, the cost and performance factors that drove architecture decisions, and the progress made in the R&D program.

  10. Wakefields in SLAC linac collimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novokhatski, A.; Decker, F.-J.; Smith, H.; Sullivan, M.

    2014-12-01

    When a beam travels near collimator jaws, it gets an energy loss and a transverse kick due to the backreaction of the beam field diffracted from the jaws. The effect becomes very important for an intense short bunch when a tight collimation of the background beam halo is required. In the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC a collimation system is used to protect the undulators from radiation due to particles in the beam halo. The halo is most likely formed from gun dark current or dark current in some of the accelerating sections. However, collimators are also responsible for the generation of wake fields. The wake field effect from the collimators not only brings an additional energy jitter and change in the trajectory of the beam, but it also rotates the beam on the phase plane, which consequently leads to a degradation of the performance of the Free Electron Laser at the Linac Coherent Light Source. In this paper, we describe a model of the wake field radiation in the SLAC linac collimators. We use the results of a numerical simulation to illustrate the model. Based on the model, we derive simple formulas for the bunch energy loss and the average kick. We also present results from experimental measurements that confirm our model.

  11. LFSC - Linac Feedback Simulation Code

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Valentin; /Fermilab

    2008-05-01

    The computer program LFSC (<Linac Feedback Simulation Code>) is a numerical tool for simulation beam based feedback in high performance linacs. The code LFSC is based on the earlier version developed by a collective of authors at SLAC (L.Hendrickson, R. McEwen, T. Himel, H. Shoaee, S. Shah, P. Emma, P. Schultz) during 1990-2005. That code was successively used in simulation of SLC, TESLA, CLIC and NLC projects. It can simulate as pulse-to-pulse feedback on timescale corresponding to 5-100 Hz, as slower feedbacks, operating in the 0.1-1 Hz range in the Main Linac and Beam Delivery System. The code LFSC is running under Matlab for MS Windows operating system. It contains about 30,000 lines of source code in more than 260 subroutines. The code uses the LIAR ('Linear Accelerator Research code') for particle tracking under ground motion and technical noise perturbations. It uses the Guinea Pig code to simulate the luminosity performance. A set of input files includes the lattice description (XSIF format), and plane text files with numerical parameters, wake fields, ground motion data etc. The Matlab environment provides a flexible system for graphical output.

  12. Status of the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Galayda, John N.; /SLAC

    2011-11-04

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a free electron laser facility in construction at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. It is designed to operate in the wavelength range 0.15-1.5 nanometers. At the time of this conference, civil construction of new tunnels and buildings is complete, the necessary modifications to the SLAC linac are complete, and the undulator system and x-ray optics/diagnostics are being installed. The electron gun, 135 MeV injector linac and 250 MeV bunch compressor were commissioned in 2007. Accelerator commissioning activities are presently devoted to the achievement of performance goals for the completed 14 GeV linac.

  13. Dual-axis energy recovery linac.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.-x.; Noonan, J.; Lewellen, J.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we propose a new type of energy-recovery linac (ERL) for ERL applications. The envisioned dualaxis energy-recovery linac allows energy recovery of parallel beams, accelerating/decelerating along different axes, via the same dual-axis superconducting cavity. This new scheme offers many advantages over conventional ERLs in various applications. Preliminary feasibility considerations are presented.

  14. Induction linacs and pulsed power

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G.J.

    1995-07-11

    Progress in electronic power conversion technology is making possible a new class of induction linacs that can operate at extremely high repetition rates. Advances in insulator technology, pulse forming line design and switching may also lead to a new type of high current accelerator with accelerating gradients at least an order of magnitude greater than those attainable today. The evolution of the induction accelerator pulsed power system will be discussed along with some details of these emerging technologies which are at the frontiers of accelerator technology.

  15. Superconducting heavy-ion linac at Argonne

    SciTech Connect

    Aron, J.; Benaroya, R.; Bollinger, L.M.; Clifft, B.G.; Johnson, K.W.; Nixon, J.M.; Markovich, P.; Pardo, R.C.; Shepard, K.W.

    1981-01-01

    The design, status, and performance of the first operating superconducting heavy-ion accelerator, a linac used to boost the energies of beams from a 9-MV tandem, is summarized. When completed in 1981, the linac will consist of 24 independently-phased split-ring niobium resonators operating at 97 MHz. This linac is designed to provide 29 MV of acceleration. Because of the modular character of the system, the linac has been operable and useful since mid-1978, when a beam was accelerated through 2 units and the first nuclear-physics experiments were preformed. Now, 16 resonators are in use, and a beam has been accelerated for approx. 6000 h. Resonator performance has been remarkably stable, in spite of vacuum accidents, and the linac as a whole operates reliably without operators in attendance during nights and weekends. The ease and speed with which the beam energy can be changed is proving to be unexpectedly valuable to users.

  16. A cryomodule for the RIA driver linac.

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerst, J. D.; Shepard, K. W.

    2002-10-25

    We present a cryomodule design for the superconducting linacs for the proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator Facility (RIA). This paper discusses the design of a cryomodule for all the drift-tube-loaded superconducting cavities required for the machine. The same basic design will be used for the low and medium velocity sections of the driver linac and also for sections of the radioactive ion beam (RIB) linac. Fundamental design choices such as separate vs. common beam and insulating vacuum spaces are driven by the clean fabrication techniques required for optimum cavity performance. The design can be adapted to a variety of cavity geometries.

  17. Injector linac for the MESA facility

    SciTech Connect

    Heine, R.

    2013-11-07

    In this paper we present several possible configurations of an injector linac for the upcoming Mainz Energy-recovering Superconducting Accelerator (MESA) [1] and discuss their suitability for the project.

  18. Beam diagnostic suite for the SNS linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardekopf, R. A.; Kurennoy, S. S.; Power, J. F.; Shafer, R. E.; Stovall, J. E.

    2000-11-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is the next-generation pulsed neutron source to be built in the United States. The accelerator chosen to produce the 2 MW beam power on the neutron-producing target is an H- linear accelerator (linac) to 1 GeV, followed by a proton accumulator ring. The ring compresses the 1 ms long beam bunches from the linac to less than 1 μs. The linac is pulsed at 60 Hz with a 6% duty factor. Stringent control of the pulse structure and stability of the high-intensity H- beam is needed to minimize beam loss in the linac and to optimize injection into the accumulator ring. This requires a set of beam diagnostics that can operate at high peak currents (˜52 mA) with high sensitivity and minimum beam interception.

  19. Advanced Light Source Linac subharmonic buncher cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, C.C.; Taylor, B.; Lancaster, H.; Guigli, J.

    1989-03-01

    The Linear Accelerator (Linac) in the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is designed to provide either single or multiple bunches of 50 MeV electrons for the booster synchrotron. Three bunchers are used in the Linac. The 3 GHz S band buncher has been described elsewhere. This report deals with the two lower subharmonic bunchers. One operates at 124.914 MHz while the other operates at 499.654 MHz. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Scaling of Wakefield Effects in Recirculating Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    L. Merminga; G. R. Neil; B. C. Yunn; J. J. Bisognano

    2001-07-01

    Expressions for the induced energy spread and emittance degradation of a single bunch due to the longitudinal and transverse impedance of rf cavities at the end of a linac structure are presented. Scaling of the formulae with rf frequency is derived. Scaling of the threshold current for the multibunch, multipass beam breakup (BBU) instability in recirculating linacs with accelerator and beam parameters is also derived.

  1. Simulation of large acceptance LINAC for muons

    SciTech Connect

    Miyadera, H; Kurennoy, S; Jason, A J

    2010-01-01

    There has been a recent need for muon accelerators not only for future Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders but also for other applications in industry and medical use. We carried out simulations on a large-acceptance muon linac with a new concept 'mixed buncher/acceleration'. The linac can accept pions/muons from a production target with large acceptance and accelerate muon without any beam cooling which makes the initial section of muon-linac system very compact. The linac has a high impact on Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider (NF/MC) scenario since the 300-m injector section can be replaced by the muon linac of only 10-m length. The current design of the linac consists of the following components: independent 805-MHz cavity structure with 6- or 8-cm-radius aperture window; injection of a broad range of pion/muon energies, 10-100 MeV, and acceleration to 150 - 200 MeV. Further acceleration of the muon beam are relatively easy since the beam is already bunched.

  2. Linac4 H⁻ ion sources.

    PubMed

    Lettry, J; Aguglia, D; Alessi, J; Andersson, P; Bertolo, S; Briefi, S; Butterworth, A; Coutron, Y; Dallocchio, A; David, N; Chaudet, E; Faircloth, D; Fantz, U; Fink, D A; Garlasche, M; Grudiev, A; Guida, R; Hansen, J; Haase, M; Hatayama, A; Jones, A; Koszar, I; Lallement, J-B; Lombardi, A M; Machado, C; Mastrostefano, C; Mathot, S; Mattei, S; Moyret, P; Nisbet, D; Nishida, K; O'Neil, M; Paoluzzi, M; Scrivens, R; Shibata, T; Steyaert, D; Thaus, N; Voulgarakis, G

    2016-02-01

    CERN's 160 MeV H(-) linear accelerator (Linac4) is a key constituent of the injector chain upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider that is being installed and commissioned. A cesiated surface ion source prototype is being tested and has delivered a beam intensity of 45 mA within an emittance of 0.3 π ⋅ mm ⋅ mrad. The optimum ratio of the co-extracted electron- to ion-current is below 1 and the best production efficiency, defined as the ratio of the beam current to the 2 MHz RF-power transmitted to the plasma, reached 1.1 mA/kW. The H(-) source prototype and the first tests of the new ion source optics, electron-dump, and front end developed to minimize the beam emittance are presented. A temperature regulated magnetron H(-) source developed by the Brookhaven National Laboratory was built at CERN. The first tests of the magnetron operated at 0.8 Hz repetition rate are described. PMID:26932021

  3. Linac4 H- ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lettry, J.; Aguglia, D.; Alessi, J.; Andersson, P.; Bertolo, S.; Briefi, S.; Butterworth, A.; Coutron, Y.; Dallocchio, A.; David, N.; Chaudet, E.; Faircloth, D.; Fantz, U.; Fink, D. A.; Garlasche, M.; Grudiev, A.; Guida, R.; Hansen, J.; Haase, M.; Hatayama, A.; Jones, A.; Koszar, I.; Lallement, J.-B.; Lombardi, A. M.; Machado, C.; Mastrostefano, C.; Mathot, S.; Mattei, S.; Moyret, P.; Nisbet, D.; Nishida, K.; O'Neil, M.; Paoluzzi, M.; Scrivens, R.; Shibata, T.; Steyaert, D.; Thaus, N.; Voulgarakis, G.

    2016-02-01

    CERN's 160 MeV H- linear accelerator (Linac4) is a key constituent of the injector chain upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider that is being installed and commissioned. A cesiated surface ion source prototype is being tested and has delivered a beam intensity of 45 mA within an emittance of 0.3 π ṡ mm ṡ mrad. The optimum ratio of the co-extracted electron- to ion-current is below 1 and the best production efficiency, defined as the ratio of the beam current to the 2 MHz RF-power transmitted to the plasma, reached 1.1 mA/kW. The H- source prototype and the first tests of the new ion source optics, electron-dump, and front end developed to minimize the beam emittance are presented. A temperature regulated magnetron H- source developed by the Brookhaven National Laboratory was built at CERN. The first tests of the magnetron operated at 0.8 Hz repetition rate are described.

  4. RFI-Based Ion Linac Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, Donald A.

    A new company, Ion Linac Systems, Inc., has been formed to promote the development, manufacture, and marketing of intense, RFI-based, Ion Linac Systems. The Rf Focused Interdigital (RFI) linac structure was invented by the author while at Linac Systems, LLC. The first step, for the new company, will be to correct a flaw in an existing RFI-based linac system and to demonstrate "good transmission" through the system. The existing system, aimed at the BNCT medical application, is designed to produce a beam of 2.5 MeV protons with an average beam current of 20 mA. In conjunction with a lithium target, it will produce an intense beam of epithermal neutrons. This system is very efficient, requiring only 180 kW of rf power to produce a 50 kW proton beam. In addition to the BNCT medical application, the RFI-based systems should represent a powerful neutron generator for homeland security, defence applications, cargo container inspection, and contraband detection. The timescale to the demonstration of "good transmission" is early fall of this year. Our website is www.ionlinacs.com.

  5. Commissioning Experience for the SNS Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, A.; Assadi, S.; Campisi, I.; Chu, P.; Cousineau, S.; Danilov, V.; Dodson, B.G.; Galambos, J.; Jeon, D.; Henderson, S.; Holtkamp, N.; Kravchuk, L.; Kim, S.; Plum, M.; Tanke, E.; Stockli, M.

    2005-06-08

    The Spallation Neutron Source accelerator systems will deliver a 1 GeV, 1.44 MW proton beam to a liquid mercury target for neutron scattering research. The accelerator complex consists of an H- injector, capable of producing one-ms-long pulses at 60 Hz repetition rate with 38 mA peak current, a 1 GeV linear accelerator, an accumulator ring and associated transport lines. A 2.5 MeV beam from the Front End is accelerated to 86 MeV in a Drift Tube Linac, then to 185 MeV in a Coupled-Cavity Linac and then to 1 GeV in a Superconducting Linac. The staged beam commissioning of the accelerator complex is proceeding as component installation progresses. The Front End, Drift Tube Linac and part of the Coupled-Cavity Linac have been commissioned at ORNL. The primary design goals of peak current, transverse emittance and beam energy have been achieved. Results and status of the beam commissioning program will be presented.

  6. EXPERIENCE WITH THE SNS SC LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yan; Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Allen, Christopher K; Campisi, Isidoro E; Cousineau, Sarah M; Danilov, Viatcheslav; Galambos, John D; Holmes, Jeffrey A; Jeon, Dong-O; Kim, Sang-Ho; Pelaia II, Tom; Plum, Michael A; Shishlo, Andrei P

    2008-01-01

    The SNS superconducting linac (SCL) is designed to deliver 1 GeV, up to 1.56-MW pulsed H- beams for neutron production. Commissioning of the accelerator systems was completed in June 2006, and the maximum beam energy achieved was approximately 952 MeV. In 2007, the SCL was successfully tuned for 1.01-GeV beam during a test operation. In the linac tune-up, phase scan signature matching, drifting beam measurement, and linac radio frequency cavity phase scaling were applied. In this paper, we will introduce the experiences with the SCL, including the tune-up, beam loss, and beam activation, and briefly discuss beam parameter measurements

  7. BEAM TRANSVERSE ISSUES AT THE SNS LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yan; Allen, Christopher K; Holmes, Jeffrey A; Galambos, John D; Wang, Jian-Guang

    2010-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac system is designed to deliver 1 GeV pulsed H- beams up to 1.56 MW. As beam power was increased from 10 kW to 680 kW in less than three years, beam loss in the accelerator systems C particularly in the superconducting linac (SCL), became more critical. In the previous studies, beam loss in the SCL was mainly attributed to longitudinal problems. However, our most recent simulations have focused on the transverse issues. These include multipole components from magnet imperfections and from dipole corrector windings of the SNS linac quadrupoles. The effects of these multipoles coupled with other transverse errors and a new possible cause of beam loss will be discussed.

  8. Induced radioisotopes in a linac treatment hall.

    PubMed

    Vega-Carrillo, Héctor René; de Leon-Martinez, Héctor Asael; Rivera-Perez, Esteban; Luis Benites-Rengifo, Jorge; Gallego, Eduardo; Lorente, Alfredo

    2015-08-01

    When linacs operate above 8MV an undesirable neutron field is produced whose spectrum has three main components: the direct spectrum due to those neutrons leaking out from the linac head, the scattered spectrum due to neutrons produced in the head that collides with the nuclei in the head losing energy and the third spectrum due to room-return effect. The third category of spectrum has mainly epithermal and thermal neutrons being constant at any location in the treatment hall. These neutrons induce activation in the linac components, the concrete walls and in the patient body. Here the induced radioisotopes have been identified in concrete samples located in the hall and in one of the wedges. The identification has been carried out using a gamma-ray spectrometer.

  9. Coupled-cavity drift-tube linac

    DOEpatents

    Billen, J.H.

    1996-11-26

    A coupled-cavity drift-tube linac (CCDTL) combines features of the Alvarez drift-tube linac (DTL) and the {pi}-mode coupled-cavity linac (CCL). In one embodiment, each accelerating cavity is a two-cell, 0-mode DTL. The center-to-center distance between accelerating gaps is {beta}{lambda}, where {lambda} is the free-space wavelength of the resonant mode. Adjacent accelerating cavities have oppositely directed electric fields, alternating in phase by 180 degrees. The chain of cavities operates in a {pi}/2 structure mode so the coupling cavities are nominally unexcited. The CCDTL configuration provides an rf structure with high shunt impedance for intermediate velocity charged particles, i.e., particles with energies in the 20-200 MeV range. 5 figs.

  10. ARIEL e-LINAC: Commissioning and Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laxdal, R. E.; Zvyagintsev, V.

    2016-09-01

    A superconducting electron Linac (e-Linac) will be a part of the ARIEL facility for the production of radioactive ion beams (RIB) at TRIUMF. The e-Linac will consist of five 1.3GHz 9-cell cavities in three cryomodules delivering a 50MeV 10mA beam. The baseline operation will be single pass but a re-circulating ring is planned to allow either energy boost or energy recovery operation. The first stage of the accelerator which consists of two cryomodules has been successfully commissioned in 2014. The paper will discuss the superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) challenges of the accelerator. Cavities, crymodules and RF system design, preparation, and performance will be presented.

  11. S-Band Loads for SLAC Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnykh, A.; Decker, F.-J.; LeClair, R.; /INTA Technologies, Santa Clara

    2012-08-28

    The S-Band loads on the current SLAC linac RF system were designed, in some cases, 40+ years ago to terminate 2-3 MW peak power into a thin layer of coated Kanthal material as the high power absorber [1]. The technology of the load design was based on a flame-sprayed Kanthal wire method onto a base material. During SLAC linac upgrades, the 24 MW peak klystrons were replaced by 5045 klystrons with 65+ MW peak output power. Additionally, SLED cavities were introduced and as a result, the peak power in the current RF setup has increased up to 240 MW peak. The problem of reliable RF peak power termination and RF load lifetime required a careful study and adequate solution. Results of our studies and three designs of S-Band RF load for the present SLAC RF linac system is discussed. These designs are based on the use of low conductivity materials.

  12. Diagnostics For Recirculating And Energy Recovered Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Geoffrey A. Krafft; Jean-Claude Denard

    2002-12-18

    In this paper, the electron beam diagnostics developed for recirculating electron accelerators will be reviewed. The main novelties in dealing with such accelerators are: to have sufficient information and control possibilities for the longitudinal phase space, to have means to accurately set the recirculation path length, and to have a means to distinguish the beam passes on measurements of position in the linac proper. The solutions to these problems obtained at Jefferson Laboratory and elsewhere will be discussed. In addition, more standard instrumentation (profiling and emittance measurements) will be reviewed in the context of recirculating linacs. Finally, and looking forward, electron beam diagnostics for applications to high current energy recovered linacs will be discussed.

  13. Energy Recovery Linacs for Commercial Radioisotope Production

    SciTech Connect

    Sy, Amy; Krafft, Geoffrey A.; Johnson, Rolland; Roberts, Tom; Boulware, Chase; Hollister, Jerry

    2015-09-01

    Photonuclear reactions with bremsstrahlung photon beams from electron linacs can generate radioisotopes of critical interest. An SRF Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) provides a path to a more diverse and reliable domestic supply of short-lived, high-value, high-demand isotopes in a more compact footprint and at a lower cost than those produced by conventional reactor or ion accelerator methods. Use of an ERL enables increased energy efficiency of the complex through energy recovery of the waste electron beam, high electron currents for high production yields, and reduced neutron production and shielding activation at beam dump components. Simulation studies using G4Beamline/GEANT4 and MCNP6 through MuSim, as well as other simulation codes, will design an ERL-based isotope production facility utilizing bremsstrahlung photon beams from an electron linac. Balancing the isotope production parameters versus energy recovery requirements will inform a choice of isotope production target for future experiments.

  14. A Superconducting Linac Proton Driver at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, G. William

    2004-05-01

    A proton driver has emerged as the leading candidate for Fermilab's next near-term accelerator project. The preferred technical solution is an 8 GeV superconducting linac based on technology developed for TESLA and the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). Its primary mission is to serve as a single-stage H- injector to prepare 2 MW "Super-Beams" for Neutrino experiments using the Fermilab Main Injector. The linac can also accelerate electrons, protons, and relativistic muons, permitting future applications such as a driver for an FEL, a long-pulse spallation source, the driver for an intense 8 GeV neutrino or kaon program, and potential applications to a neutrino factory or muon collider. The technical design of the 8 GeV linac, as well as the design of an alternative synchrotron based proton driver, will be described along with plans for project proposal and construction.

  15. Coupled-cavity drift-tube linac

    DOEpatents

    Billen, James H.

    1996-01-01

    A coupled-cavity drift-tube linac (CCDTL) combines features of the Alvarez drift-tube linac (DTL) and the .pi.-mode coupled-cavity linac (CCL). In one embodiment, each accelerating cavity is a two-cell, 0-mode DTL. The center-to-center distance between accelerating gaps is .beta..lambda., where .lambda. is the free-space wavelength of the resonant mode. Adjacent accelerating cavities have oppositely directed electric fields, alternating in phase by 180 degrees. The chain of cavities operates in a .pi./2 structure mode so the coupling cavities are nominally unexcited. The CCDTL configuration provides an rf structure with high shunt impedance for intermediate velocity charged particles, i.e., particles with energies in the 20-200 MeV range.

  16. LCLS LLRF Upgrades to the SLAC Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Akre, R.; Dowell, D.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Hong, B.; Kotturi, K.; Krejcik, P.; Wu, J.; Byrd, J.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2007-10-04

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC will be the brightest X-ray laser in the world when it comes on line. In order to achieve the brightness a 200fS length electron bunch is passed through an undulator. To create the 200fS, 3kA bunch, a 10pS electron bunch, created from a photo cathode in an RF gun, is run off crest on the RF to set up a position to energy correlation. The bunch is then compressed by chicanes. The stability of the RF system is critical in setting up the position to energy correlation. Specifications derived from simulations require the RF system to be stable to below 200fS in several critical injector stations and the last kilometer of linac. The SLAC linac RF system is being upgraded to meet these requirements.

  17. The Linac Cooherent Light Source (LCLS) Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Juhao; Emma, P.; /SLAC

    2007-03-21

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a SASE x-ray Free-Electron Laser (FEL) based on the final kilometer of the Stanford Linear Accelerator. Such an FEL requires a high energy, high brightness electron beam to drive the FEL instability to saturation. When fed by an RF-photocathode gun, and modified to include two bunch compressor chicanes, the SLAC linac will provide such a high quality beam at 14 GeV and 1-{micro}m normalized emittance. In this paper, we report on recent linac studies, including beam stability and tolerances, longitudinal and transverse feedback systems, conventional and time-resolved diagnostics, and beam collimation systems. Construction and installation of the injector through first bunch compressor will be completed by December 2006, and electron commissioning is scheduled to begin in January of 2007.

  18. Neutron sources based on medical Linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, M.; Durisi, E.; Monti, V.; Visca, L.; Zanini, A.; Giannini, G.

    2016-11-01

    The paper proposes the study of a novel photo-neutron source based on a medical high-energy electron Linac. Previous studies by the authors already demonstrated the possibility to obtain with this technique a thermal neutron flux of the order of 107 cm-2 s-1 . This paper shows possible Linac's setup and a new photo-converter design to reach a thermal neutron flux around 6×107 cm-2 s-1 , keeping a reasonable high quality of the beam with respect to fast neutron and gamma contaminations.

  19. Multipass Beam Breakup in Energy Recovery Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Eduard Pozdeyev; Christopher Tennant; Joseph Bisognano; M Sawamura; R. Hajima; T.I. Smith

    2005-03-19

    This paper is a compilation of several presentations on multipass beam breakup (BBU) in energy recovery linacs (ERL) given at the 32nd Advanced ICFA Beam Workshop on ERLs. The goal of this paper is to summarize the progress achieved in analytical, numerical, and experimental studies of the instability and outline available and proposed BBU mitigation techniques. In this paper, a simplified theory of multipass BBU in recirculating linacs is presented. Several BBU suppression techniques and their working principles are discussed. The paper presents an overview of available BBU codes. Results of experimental studies of multipass BBU at the Jefferson Laboratory (JLab) FEL Upgrade are described.

  20. Linac Coherent Light Source Electron Beam Collimation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Dowell, D.; Emma, P.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Schmerge, J.F.; /SLAC

    2007-04-27

    This paper describes the design and simulation of the electron beam collimation system in the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Dark current is expected from the gun and some of the accelerating cavities. Particle tracking of the expected dark current through the entire LCLS linac, from gun through FEL undulator, is used to estimate final particle extent in the undulator as well as expected beam loss at each collimator or aperture restriction. A table of collimators and aperture restrictions is listed along with halo particle loss results, which includes an estimate of average continuous beam power lost. In addition, the transverse wakefield alignment tolerances are calculated for each collimator.

  1. Proton linacs for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lennox, A.J. |

    1993-08-01

    Recent advances in the ability to deliver boron-containing drugs to brain tumors have generated interest in {approximately}4 MeV linacs as sources of epithermal neutrons for radiation therapy. In addition, fast neutron therapy facilities have been studying methods to moderate their beams to take advantage of the high cross section for epithermal neutrons on boron-10. This paper describes the technical issues involved in each approach and presents the motivation for undertaking such studies using the Fermilab linac. the problems which must be solved before therapy can begin are outlined. Status of preparatory work and results of preliminary measurements are presented.

  2. Error analysis in post linac to driver linac transport beam line of RAON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chanmi; Kim, Eun-San

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the effects of magnet errors in the beam transport line connecting the post linac to the driver linac (P2DT) in the Rare Isotope Accelerator in Korea (RAON). The P2DT beam line is bent by 180-degree to send the radioactive Isotope Separation On-line (ISOL) beams accelerated in Linac-3 to Linac-2. This beam line transports beams with multi-charge state 132Sn45,46,47. The P2DT beam line includes 42 quadrupole, 4 dipole and 10 sextupole magnets. We evaluate the effects of errors on the trajectory of the beam by using the TRACK code, which includes the translational and the rotational errors of the quadrupole, dipole and sextupole magnets in the beam line. The purpose of this error analysis is to reduce the rate of beam loss in the P2DT beam line. The distorted beam trajectories can be corrected by using six correctors and seven monitors.

  3. Cyclotron and linac production of Ac-225.

    PubMed

    Melville, Graeme; Allen, Barry J

    2009-04-01

    Radium needles that were once implanted into tumours as a cancer treatment are now obsolete and constitute a radioactive waste problem, as their half-life is 1600 years. The reduction of radium by photonuclear transmutation by bombarding Ra-226 with high-energy photons from a medical linear accelerator (linac) has been investigated. A linac dose of 2800 Gy produced about 2.4 MBq (64 microCi) of Ra-225, which decays to Ac-225 and can then be used for 'Targeted Alpha Therapy' (TAT) of cancer. This result, while consistent with theoretical calculations, is far too low to be of practical use unless much larger quantities of radium are irradiated. The increasing application of Ac-225 for cancer therapy indicates the potential need for its increased production and availability. This paper investigates the possibility of producing of Ac-225 in commercial quantities, which could potentially reduce obsolete radioactive material and displace the need for expensive importation of Ac-225 from the USA and Russia in the years ahead. Scaled up production of Ac-225 could theoretically be achieved by the use of a high current cyclotron or linac. Production specifications are determined for a linac in terms of current, pulse length and frequency, as well as an examination of other factors such as radiation issues and radionuclei separation. Yields are compared with those calculated for the Australian National Cyclotron in Sydney.

  4. A Stability of LCLS Linac Modulators

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, F.-J.; Krasnykh, A.; Morris, B.; Nguyen, M.; /SLAC

    2012-06-13

    Information concerning to a stability of LCLS RF linac modulators is allocated in this paper. In general a 'pulse-to-pulse' modulator stability (and RF phase as well) is acceptable for the LCLS commission and FEL programs. Further modulator stability improvements are possible and approaches are discussed based on our experimental results.

  5. Design of post linac to driver linac transport beam line in rare isotope accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chanmi; Kim, Eun-San

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the design of a beam transport line connecting the post linac to the driver linac (P2DT) in the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RAON). P2DT beam line is designed by 180° bending scheme to send the radioactive isotope separation on-line (ISOL) beams accelerated in the Linac-3 to Linac-2. The beam line is designed as a 180° bend for the transport of a multi-charge state 132Sn+45,+46,+47 beam. We used the TRACE 3-D, TRACK, and ORBIT codes to design the optics system, which also includes two bunchers and ten sextupole magnets for chromaticity compensation. The transverse emittance growth is minimized by adopting mirror symmetric optics and by correcting second-order aberrations using sextupoles. We report on the multi-charge state beam transport performance of the designed beam line. The main characteristics of the P2DT line are to minimize beam loss and the growth of emittance, and for charge stripping. Beam optics for P2DT is optimized for reducing beam loss and charge stripping. As Linac-3 may accelerate the stable beam and radioactive beam simultaneously, P2DT line also transports the stable beam and radioactive beam simultaneously. Thus, we need a RF switchyard to send the stable beam to the ISOL target and the radioactive beam to the high-energy experimental area in Linac-2 end.

  6. Design of post linac to driver linac transport beam line in rare isotope accelerator.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chanmi; Kim, Eun-San

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the design of a beam transport line connecting the post linac to the driver linac (P2DT) in the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RAON). P2DT beam line is designed by 180° bending scheme to send the radioactive isotope separation on-line (ISOL) beams accelerated in the Linac-3 to Linac-2. The beam line is designed as a 180° bend for the transport of a multi-charge state (132)Sn(+45,+46,+47) beam. We used the TRACE 3-D, TRACK, and ORBIT codes to design the optics system, which also includes two bunchers and ten sextupole magnets for chromaticity compensation. The transverse emittance growth is minimized by adopting mirror symmetric optics and by correcting second-order aberrations using sextupoles. We report on the multi-charge state beam transport performance of the designed beam line. The main characteristics of the P2DT line are to minimize beam loss and the growth of emittance, and for charge stripping. Beam optics for P2DT is optimized for reducing beam loss and charge stripping. As Linac-3 may accelerate the stable beam and radioactive beam simultaneously, P2DT line also transports the stable beam and radioactive beam simultaneously. Thus, we need a RF switchyard to send the stable beam to the ISOL target and the radioactive beam to the high-energy experimental area in Linac-2 end.

  7. Commissioning the Linac Coherent Light Source injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akre, R.; Dowell, D.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Gilevich, S.; Hays, G.; Hering, Ph.; Iverson, R.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Loos, H.; Miahnahri, A.; Schmerge, J.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; White, W.; Wu, J.

    2008-03-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source is a SASE x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) project presently under construction at SLAC [J. Arthur , SLAC-R-593, 2002.]. The injector section, from drive laser and rf photocathode gun through first bunch compressor chicane, was installed in the fall of 2006. The initial system commissioning with an electron beam was completed in August of 2007, with the goal of a 1.2-micron emittance in a 1-nC bunch demonstrated. The second phase of commissioning, including second bunch compressor and full linac, is planned for 2008, with FEL commissioning in 2009. We report experimental results and experience gained in the first phase of commissioning, including the photocathode drive laser, rf gun, photocathode, S-band and X-band rf systems, first bunch compressor, and the various beam diagnostics.

  8. High Current Energy Recovery Linac at BNL

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimir N. Litvinenko; Donald Barton; D. Beavis; Ilan Ben-Zvi; Michael Blaskiewicz; J.M. Brennan; A. Burrill; R. Calaga; P. Cameron; X. Chang; Roger Connolly; D. Gassner; H. Hahn; A. Hershcovitch; H.C. Hseuh; P. Johnson; D. Kayran; J. Kewisch; R. Lambiase; G. McIntyre; W. Meng; T. C. Nehring; A. Nicoletti; D. Pate; J. Rank; T. Roser; T. Russo; J. Scaduto; K. Smith; T. Srinivasan-Rao; N. Williams; K.-C. Wu; Vitaly Yakimenko; K. Yip; A. Zaltsman; Y. Zhao; H. Bluem; A. Burger; Mike Cole; A. Favale; D. Holmes; John Rathke; Tom Schultheiss; A. Todd; J. Delayen; W. Funk; L. Phillips; Joe Preble

    2004-08-01

    We present the design, the parameters of a small test Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) facility, which is under construction at Collider-Accelerator Department, BNL. This R&D facility has goals to demonstrate CW operation of ERL with average beam current in the range of 0.1 - 1 ampere, combined with very high efficiency of energy recovery. A possibility for future up-grade to a two-pass ERL is considered. The heart of the facility is a 5-cell 700 MHz super-conducting RF linac with HOM damping. Flexible lattice of ERL provides a test-bed for testing issues of transverse and longitudinal instabilities and diagnostics of intense CW e-beam. ERL is also perfectly suited for a far-IR FEL. We present the status and our plans for construction and commissioning of this facility.

  9. HIGH CURRENT ENERGY RECOVERY LINAC AT BNL.

    SciTech Connect

    LITVINENKO,V.N.; BEN-ZVI,I.; BARTON,D.S.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    We present the design and parameters of an energy recovery linac (ERL) facility, which is under construction in the Collider-Accelerator Department at BNL. This R&D facility has the goal of demonstrating CW operation of an ERL with an average beam current in the range of 0.1-1 ampere and with very high efficiency of energy recovery. The possibility of a future upgrade to a two-pass ERL is also being considered. The heart of the facility is a 5-cell 703.75 MHz super-conducting RF linac with strong Higher Order Mode (HOM) damping. The flexible lattice of the ERL provides a test-bed for exploring issues of transverse and longitudinal instabilities and diagnostics of intense CW electron beams. This ERL is also perfectly suited for a far-IR FEL. We present the status and plans for construction and commissioning of this facility.

  10. New high power linacs and beam physics

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Gray, E.R.; Nath, S.; Crandall, K.R.; Hasegawa, K.

    1997-08-01

    New high-power proton linacs must be designed to control beam loss, which can lead to radioactivation of the accelerator. The threat of beam loss is increased significantly by the formation of beam halo. Numerical simulation studies have identified the space-charge interactions, especially those that occur in rms mismatched beams, as a major concern for halo growth. The maximum-amplitude predictions of the simulation codes must be subjected to independent tests to confirm the validity of the results. Consequently, the authors compare predictions from the particle-core halo models with computer simulations to test their understanding of the halo mechanisms that are incorporated in the computer codes. They present and discuss scaling laws that provide guidance for high-power linac design.

  11. LLRF System Upgrade for the SLAC Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Bo; Akre, Ron; Pacak, Vojtech; /SLAC

    2012-07-06

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC is in full user operation and has met the stability goals for stable lasing. The 250pC bunch can be compressed to below 100fS before passing through an undulator. In a new mode of operation a 20pC bunch is compressed to about 10fS. Experimenters are regularly using this shorter X-ray pulse and getting pristine data. The 10fS bunch has timing jitter on the order of 100fS. Physicists are requesting that the RF system achieve better stability to reduce timing jitter. Drifts in the RF system require longitudinal feedbacks to work over large ranges and errors result in reduced performance of the LCLS. A new RF system is being designed to help diagnose and reduce jitter and drift in the SLAC linac.

  12. Wake Field Effects in the APT Linac.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurennoy, Sergey

    1998-04-01

    The 1.7-GeV 100-mA CW proton linac is now under design for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) Project. While wake-field effects are usually considered negligible in proton linacs, an analysis for the APT accelerator has been performed to exclude potential problems at such a high current leading to beam losses. Loss factors and resonance frequency spectra of various discontinuities of the vacuum chamber are investigated, both analytically and using 2-D and 3-D simulation codes with a single bunch as well as with many bunches. The only noticeable effect is the HOM heating of the 5-cell superconducting cavities. However, it has an acceptable level and will be further reduced by HOM couplers.

  13. High Brightness Beam Applications: Energy Recovered Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Geoffrey A. Krafft

    2005-09-01

    In the first part of the paper some general statements are made regarding applications suitable for utilizing energy recovered linacs (ERLs) by contrasting their potential performance to that of single pass linacs and storage rings. As a result of their potential for extremely good beam quality in combination with high average beam current, ERLs have been used and considered as drivers of both free electron laser and partially coherent photon sources, from THz through X-rays; as a suitable technology for high energy electron cooling; and as a continuous or semi-continuous electron beam source for high energy colliders. At present, beam requirements tend to be highly matched to end use requirements. By reviewing some of the many examples which have either been reduced to practice, or are being explored presently, one can develop an appreciation for the wide range of parameters being considered in ERL applications.

  14. LINAC for ADS application - accelerator technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Garnett, Robert W; Sheffreld, Richard L

    2009-01-01

    Sifnificant high-current, high-intensity accelerator research and development have been done in the recent past in the US, centered primarily at Los Alamos National Laboratory. These efforts have included designs for the Accelerator Production of Tritium Project, Accelerator Transmutation of Waste, and Accelerator Driven Systems, as well as many others. This past work and some specific design principles that were developed to optimie linac designs for ADS and other high-intensity applications will be discussed briefly.

  15. Linac Coherent Light Source Monte Carlo Simulation

    2006-03-15

    This suite consists of codes to generate an initial x-ray photon distribution and to propagate the photons through various objects. The suite is designed specifically for simulating the Linac Coherent Light Source, and x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) being built at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The purpose is to provide sufficiently detailed characteristics of the laser to engineers who are designing the laser diagnostics.

  16. Photocathodes for the energy recovery linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, T; Burrill, A; Chang, X Y; Smedley, J; Nishitani, T; Garcia, C Hernandez; Poelker, M; Seddon, E; Hannon, F E; Sinclair, C K; Lewellen, J; Feldman, D

    2005-03-19

    This paper presents an overview of existing and emerging technologies on electron sources that can service various Energy Recovering Linacs under consideration. Photocathodes that can deliver average currents from 1 mA to 1 A, the pros and cons associated with these cathodes are addressed. Status of emerging technologies such as secondary emitters, cesiated dispenser cathodes, field and photon assisted field emitters and super lattice photocathodes are also reviewed.

  17. PHOTOCATHODES FOR THE ENERGY RECOVERY LINACS.

    SciTech Connect

    RAO, T.; BURRILL, A.; CHANG, X.Y.; SMEDLEY, J.; ET AL.

    2005-03-19

    This paper presents an overview of existing and emerging technologies on electron sources that can service various Energy Recovering Linacs under consideration. Photocathodes that can deliver average currents from 1 mA to 1 A, the pros and cons associated with these cathodes are addressed. Status of emerging technologies such as secondary emitters, cesiated dispenser cathodes, field and photon assisted field emitters and super lattice photocathodes are also reviewed.

  18. Beam dynamics in heavy ion induction LINACS

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.

    1981-10-01

    Interest in the use of an induction linac to accelerate heavy ions for the purpose of providing the energy required to initiate an inertially confined fusion reaction has stimulated a theoretical effort to investigate various beam dynamical effects associated with high intensity heavy ion beams. This paper presents a summary of the work that has been done so far; transverse, longitudinal and coupled longitudinal transverse effects are discussed.

  19. Advanced RF power sources for linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1996-10-01

    In order to maintain a reasonable over-all length at high center-of-mass energy, the main linac of an electron-positron linear collider must operate at a high accelerating gradient. For copper (non-superconducting) accelerator structures, this implies a high peak power per unit length and a high peak power per RF source, assuming a limited number of discrete sources are used. To provide this power, a number of devices are currently under active development or conceptual consideration: conventional klystrons with multi-cavity output structures, gyroklystrons, magnicons, sheet-beam klystrons, multiple-beam klystrons and amplifiers based on the FEL principle. To enhance the peak power produced by an rf source, the SLED rf pulse compression scheme is currently in use on existing linacs, and new compression methods that produce a flatter output pulse are being considered for future linear colliders. This paper covers the present status and future outlook for the more important rf power sources and pulse compression systems. It should be noted that high gradient electron linacs have applications in addition to high-energy linear colliders; they can, for example, serve as compact injectors for FEL`s and storage rings.

  20. Prototype of linac BLM at NSRL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Ming; Li, Yuxiong; Gong, Guanghua; Li, Juexin; Shao, Beibei; Zhao, Zhengguo

    2007-08-01

    A prototype of the Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) System for the linac and transportation line has been built up in National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Different from the storage ring, the radiation field around linac and transportation line have a duty factor of 10 -6 and a dose rate of hundreds Gy/h. The Monte-Carlo calculation gave the dose, flux, energy and direction distributions of the radiation field. According to the simulation result, the proper type of detector was chosen and the installation positions were selected accordingly. The widely used ionization chamber is not suitable to give accurate and real-time information of beam loss due to its large dimension and slow respond speed. Several PIN silicon diode-based detectors were designed and tested, and a charge-balanced integrating amplifier circuit was applied to read out the charge. A distributed data acquisition system based on embedded Ethernet technology was implemented in the prototype, which can offer a web server from the microcontroller. From preliminary tests, this new prototype was proved to be sensitive to the change of the linac status, and is a useful tool for monitoring and adjusting machine parameters. Further analyses are required to achieve a more accurate measurement of the beam loss.

  1. Wake fields in SLAC Linac Collimators

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, Alexander; Decker, F. -J.; Smith, H.; Sullivan, M.

    2014-12-02

    When a beam travels near collimator jaws, it gets an energy loss and a transverse kick due to the backreaction of the beam field diffracted from the jaws. The effect becomes very important for an intense short bunch when a tight collimation of the background beam halo is required. In the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC a collimation system is used to protect the undulators from radiation due to particles in the beam halo. The halo is most likely formed from gun dark current or dark current in some of the accelerating sections. However, collimators are also responsible for the generation of wake fields. The wake field effect from the collimators not only brings an additional energy jitter and change in the trajectory of the beam, but it also rotates the beam on the phase plane, which consequently leads to a degradation of the performance of the Free Electron Laser at the Linac Coherent Light Source. In this paper, we describe a model of the wake field radiation in the SLAC linac collimators. We use the results of a numerical simulation to illustrate the model. Based on the model, we derive simple formulas for the bunch energy loss and the average kick. In addition, we also present results from experimental measurements that confirm our model.

  2. S-band linac-based X-ray source with π/2-mode electron linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Abhay; Araki, Sakae; Dixit, Tanuja; Fukuda, Masafumi; Krishnan, R.; Pethe, Sanjay; Sakaue, Kazuyuki; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; Urakawa, Junji; Washio, Masakazu

    2011-05-01

    The activities with the compact X-ray source are attracting more attention, particularly for the applications of the source in medical fields. We propose the fabrication of a compact X-ray source using the SAMEER electron linear accelerator and the KEK laser undulator X-ray source (LUCX) technologies. The linac developed at SAMEER is a standing wave side-coupled S-band linac operating in the π/2 mode. In the proposed system, a photocathode RF gun will inject bunches of electrons in the linac to accelerate and achieve a high-energy, low-emittance beam. This beam will then interact with the laser in the laser cavity to produce X-rays of a type well suited for various applications. The side-coupled structure will make the system more compact, and the π/2 mode of operation will enable a high repetition rate operation, which will help to increase the X-ray yield.

  3. A 2--4 nm Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) using the SLAC linac

    SciTech Connect

    Winick, H.; Bane, K.; Boyce, R.

    1993-05-01

    We describe the use of the SLAC linac to drive a unique, powerful. short wavelength Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Operating as an FEL, lasing would be achieved in a single pass of a high peak current electron beam through a long undulator by self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE). The main components are a high-brightness rf photocathode electron gun; pulse compressors; about 1/5 of the SLAC linac; and a long undulator with a FODO quadrupole focussing system. Using electrons below 8 GeV, the system would operate at wavelengths down to about 3 nm, producing {ge}10 GW peak power in sub-ps pulses. At a 120 Hz rate the average power is {approx} 1 W.

  4. SNS LINAC Wire Scanner System : Signal Levels and Accuracy.

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M. A.; Christensen, W.; Myer, R. E.; Rose, C. R.

    2002-01-01

    The linac wire scanner system for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge, TN, USA, calls for 5 units in the medium energy beam transport (MEBT), 5 in the drift tube linac (DTL), and 10 in the coupled cavity linac (CCL). In this paper we present expected signal levels and an analysis of the error in the beam size measurement as functions of wire position and electrical signal errors.

  5. Analysis on linac quadrupole misalignment in FACET commissioning 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yipeng; /SLAC

    2012-07-05

    In this note, the analysis on linac quadrupole misalignment is presented for the FACET linac section LI05-09 plus LI11-19. The effectiveness of the beam-based alignment technique is preliminarily confirmed by the measurement. Beam-based alignment technique was adopted at SLAC linac since SLC time. Here the beam-based alignment algorithms are further developed and applied in the FACET commissioning during 2012 run.

  6. Designs for a Linac-Ring LHeC

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, Frank; Bruning, Oliver; Ciapala, Edmond; Haug, Friedrich; Osborne, John; Schulte, Daniel; Sun, Yipeng; Tomas, Rogelio; Adolphsen, Chris; Calaga, Rama; Litvinenko, Vladimir; Chattopadhyay, Swapan; Dainton, John; Klein, Max; Eide, Anders; /Paris U., VI-VII

    2012-06-21

    We consider three scenarios for the recirculating electron linear accelerator (RLA) of a linac-ring type electron-proton collider based on the LHC (LHeC): (i) a pulsed linac with a final beam energy of 60 GeV ['p-60'], (ii) a higher luminosity configuration with two cw linacs and energy-recovery (ERL) also at 60 GeV ['erl'], and (iii) a high energy option using a pulsed linac with 140-GeV final energy ['p-140']. We discuss parameters, synchrotron radiation, footprints, and performance for the three scenarios.

  7. H- ion sources for CERN's Linac4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lettry, J.; Aguglia, D.; Coutron, Y.; Chaudet, E.; Dallocchio, A.; Gil Flores, J.; Hansen, J.; Mahner, E.; Mathot, S.; Mattei, S.; Midttun, O.; Moyret, P.; Nisbet, D.; O'Neil, M.; Paoluzzi, M.; Pasquino, C.; Pereira, H.; Arias, J. Sanchez; Schmitzer, C.; Scrivens, R.; Steyaert, D.

    2013-02-01

    The specifications set to the Linac4 ion source are: H- ion pulses of 0.5 ms duration, 80 mA intensity and 45 keV energy within a normalized emittance of 0.25 mmmrad RMS at a repetition rate of 2 Hz. In 2010, during the commissioning of a prototype based on H- production from the plasma volume, it was observed that the powerful co-extracted electron beam inherent to this type of ion source could destroy its electron beam dump well before reaching nominal parameters. However, the same source was able to provide 80 mA of protons mixed with a small fraction of H2+ and H3+ molecular ions. The commissioning of the radio frequency quadrupole accelerator (RFQ), beam chopper and H- beam diagnostics of the Linac4 are scheduled for 2012 and its final installation in the underground building is to start in 2013. Therefore, a crash program was launched in 2010 and reviewed in 2011 aiming at keeping the original Linac4 schedule with the following deliverables: Design and production of a volume ion source prototype suitable for 20-30 mA H- and 80 mA proton pulses at 45 keV by mid-2012. This first prototype will be dedicated to the commissioning of the low energy components of the Linac4. Design and production of a second prototype suitable for 40-50 mA H- based on an external RF solenoid plasma heating and cesiated-surface production mechanism in 2013 and a third prototype based on BNL's Magnetron aiming at reliable 2 Hz and 80 mA H- operations in 2014. In order to ease the future maintenance and allow operation with Ion sources based on three different production principles, an ion source "front end" providing alignment features, pulsed gas injection, pumping units, beam tuning capabilities and pulsed bipolar high voltage acceleration was designed and is being produced. This paper describes the progress of the Linac4 ion source program, the design of the Front end and first ion source prototype. Preliminary results of the summer 2012 commissioning are presented. The outlook on

  8. Interdigital H -mode drift-tube linac design with alternative phase focusing for muon linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otani, M.; Mibe, T.; Yoshida, M.; Hasegawa, K.; Kondo, Y.; Hayashizaki, N.; Iwashita, Y.; Iwata, Y.; Kitamura, R.; Saito, N.

    2016-04-01

    We have developed an interdigital H-mode (IH) drift-tube linac (DTL) design with an alternative phase focusing (APF) scheme for a muon linac, in order to measure the anomalous magnetic moment and electric dipole moment (EDM) of muons at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). The IH-DTL accelerates muons from β =v /c =0.08 to 0.28 at an operational frequency of 324 MHz. The output beam emittances are calculated as 0.315 π and 0.195 π mm mrad in the horizontal and vertical directions, respectively, which satisfies the experimental requirement.

  9. Optical emission spectroscopy of the Linac4 and superconducting proton Linac plasma generators

    SciTech Connect

    Lettry, J.; Kronberger, M.; Mahner, E.; Schmitzer, C.; Sanchez, J.; Scrivens, R.; Midttun, O.; O'Neil, M.; Pereira, H.; Paoluzzi, M.; Fantz, U.; Wuenderlich, D.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Komppula, J.; Myllyperkioe, P.; Tarvainen, O.

    2012-02-15

    CERN's superconducting proton Linac (SPL) study investigates a 50 Hz high-energy, high-power Linac for H{sup -} ions. The SPL plasma generator is an evolution of the DESY ion source plasma generator currently operated at CERN's Linac4 test stand. The plasma generator is a step towards a particle source for the SPL, it is designed to handle 100 kW peak RF-power at a 6% duty factor. While the acquisition of an integrated hydrogen plasma optical spectrum is straightforward, the measurement of a time-resolved spectrum requires dedicated amplification schemes. The experimental setup for visible light based on photomultipliers and narrow bandwidth filters and the UV spectrometer setup are described. The H{sub {alpha}}, H{sub {beta}}, and H{sub {gamma}} Balmer line intensities, the Lyman band and alpha transition were measured. A parametric study of the optical emission from the Linac4 ion source and the SPL plasma generator as a function of RF-power and gas pressure is presented. The potential of optical emission spectrometry coupled to RF-power coupling measurements for on-line monitoring of short RF heated hydrogen plasma pulses is discussed.

  10. Commercial Superconducting Electron Linac for Radioisotope Production

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, Terry Lee; Boulware, Charles H.; Hollister, Jerry L.; Jecks, Randall W.; Mamtimin, Mayir; Starovoitova, Valeriia

    2015-08-13

    The majority of radioisotopes used in the United States today come from foreign suppliers or are generated parasitically in large government accelerators and nuclear reactors. Both of these restrictions limit the availability of radioisotopes and discourage the development and evaluation of new isotopes and for nuclear medicine, science, and industry. Numerous studies have been recommending development of dedicated accelerators for production of radioisotopes for over 20 years (Institute of Medicine, 1995; Reba, et al, 2000; National Research Council, 2007; NSAC 2009). The 2015 NSAC Long Range Plan for Isotopes again identified electron accelerators as an area for continued research and development. Recommendation 1(c) from the 2015 NSAC Isotope report specifically identifies electron accelerators for continued funding for the purpose of producing medical and industrial radioisotopes. Recognizing the pressing need for new production methods of radioisotopes, the United States Congress passed the American Medical Isotope Production Act of 2012 to develop a domestic production of 99Mo and to eliminate the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in the production of 99Mo. One of the advantages of high power electron linear accelerators (linacs) is they can create both proton- and neutron-rich isotopes by generating high energy x-rays that knock out protons or neutrons from stable atoms or by fission of uranium. This allows for production of isotopes not possible in nuclear reactors. Recent advances in superconducting electron linacs have decreased the size and complexity of these systems such that they are economically competitive with nuclear reactors and large, high energy accelerators. Niowave, Inc. has been developing a radioisotope production facility based on a superconducting electron linac with liquid metal converters.

  11. Observation of Coherent Optical Transition Radiation in the LCLS Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Loosy, H.; Akre, R.; Brachmann, A.; Decker, F.-J.; Ding, Y.; Dowell, D.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Gilevich, S.; Hays, G.; Hering, Ph.; Huang, Z.; Iverson, R.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Miahnahri, A.; Molloy, S.; Nuhn, H.-D.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; White, W.; Wu, J.; /SLAC /Stanford

    2008-09-18

    The beam diagnostics in the linac for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray FEL project at SLAC includes optical transition radiation (OTR) screens for measurements of transverse and longitudinal beam properties. We report on observations of coherent light emission from the OTR screens (COTR) at visible wavelengths from the uncompressed and compressed electron beam at various stages in the accelerator.

  12. MEIC Proton Beam Formation with a Low Energy Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yuhong

    2015-09-01

    The MEIC proton and ion beams are generated, accumulated, accelerated and cooled in a new green-field ion injector complex designed specifically to support its high luminosity goal. This injector consists of sources, a linac and a small booster ring. In this paper we explore feasibility of a short ion linac that injects low-energy protons and ions into the booster ring.

  13. Conceptual design of a superconducting high-intensity proton linac

    SciTech Connect

    Dominic Chan, K.C.

    1996-09-01

    A SCRF (superconducting RF linac) has been developed for a high-intensity proton linac which will be used as the driver for neutron sources. This design is conservative, using current SCRF technologies. As well as lowering operating cost, the design offers performance advantages in availability, beam loss, and upgradability, which are important for the application as a neutron source.

  14. Laser system for a subpicosecond electron linac.

    SciTech Connect

    Crowell, R. A.

    1998-09-25

    At the Argonne Chemistry Division efforts are underway to develop a sub-picosecond electron beam pulse radiolysis facility for chemical studies. The target output of the accelerator is to generate electron pulses that can be adjusted from 3nC in .6ps to 100nC in 45ps. In conjunction with development of the accelerator a state-of-the-art ultrafast laser system is under construction that will drive the linac's photocathode and provide probe pulses that are tunable from the UV to IR spectral regions.

  15. High density harp for SSCL linac

    SciTech Connect

    Fritsche, C.T.; Krogh, M.L.; Crist, C.E.

    1993-05-01

    AlliedSignal Inc., Kansas City Division, and the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) are collaboratively developing a high density harp for the SSCL linac. This harp is designed using hybrid microcircuit (HMC) technology to obtain a higher wire density than previously available. The developed harp contains one hundred twenty-eight 33-micron-diameter carbon wires on 0.38-mm centers. The harp features an onboard broken wire detection circuit. Carbon wire preparation and attachment processes were developed. High density surface mount connectors were located. The status of high density harp development will be presented along with planned future activities.

  16. Fermilab Linac Upgrade: Module conditioning results

    SciTech Connect

    Kroc, T.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.

    1992-12-01

    The 805 MHz Side-coupled cavity modules for the Fermilab 400 MeV linac upgrade have been conditioned to accept full power. The sparking rate in the cavities and in the side-cells has been reduced to acceptable levels. It required approximately 40 [times] 10[sup 6] pulses for each module to achieve an adequately low sparking rate. This contribution outlines the commissioning procedure, presents the sparking rate improvements and the radiation level improvements through the commissioning process and disc the near-online commissioning plans for this accelerator.

  17. Fermilab Linac Upgrade: Module conditioning results

    SciTech Connect

    Kroc, T.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.

    1992-12-01

    The 805 MHz Side-coupled cavity modules for the Fermilab 400 MeV linac upgrade have been conditioned to accept full power. The sparking rate in the cavities and in the side-cells has been reduced to acceptable levels. It required approximately 40 {times} 10{sup 6} pulses for each module to achieve an adequately low sparking rate. This contribution outlines the commissioning procedure, presents the sparking rate improvements and the radiation level improvements through the commissioning process and disc the near-online commissioning plans for this accelerator.

  18. Numerical simulation of coupler cavities for linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, C.K.; Derutyer, H.; Ko, K.

    1993-04-01

    We present numerical procedures involved in the evaluation of the performance of coupler cavities for linacs. The MAFIA code is used to simulate an X-Band accelerator section in the time domain. The input/output coupler cavities for the structure arc of the symmetrical double-input design. We calculate the transmission properties of the coupler and compare the results with measurements. We compare the performance of the symmetrical double-input design with that of the conventional single-input type by evaluating the field amplitude and phase asymmetries. We also evaluate the peak field gradient in the computer.

  19. Commissioning of the SPPS Linac Bunch Compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Krejcik, Patrick

    2003-05-21

    First results and beam measurements are presented for the recently installed linac bunch compressor chicane. The new bunch compressor produces ultra-short electron bunches for the Sub-Picosecond Photon Source (SPPS) and for test beams such as the E164 Plasma Wakefield experiment. This paper will give an overview of the first experiences with tuning and optimizing the compressor together with a description of the beam diagnostics and beam measurements. These measurements form the basis for further detailed study of emittance growth effects such as CSR and wakefields in a previously unmeasured regime of ultra-short bunch lengths.

  20. 10MeV 25KW industrial electron LINAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamino, Y.

    1998-06-01

    A 10MeV 25KW plus class electron LINAC was developed for sterilisation of medical devices. The LINAC composed of a standing wave type single cavity prebuncher and a 2m electro-plated travelling wave guide uses a 5MW 2856MHz pulse klystron as an RF source and provides 25KW beam power at the Ti alloy beam window stably after the energy analysing magnet with 10MeV plus-minus 1 MeV energy slit. The practical maximum beam power reached 29 KW and this demonstrated the LINAC as one of the most powerful S-band electron LINACs in the world. The control of the LINAC is fully automated and the "One-Button Operation" is realised, which is valuable for easy operation as a plant system. 2 systems have been delivered and are being operated stably.

  1. Physics design of front ends for superconducting ion linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P.N.; Carneiro, J.P.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    Superconducting (SC) technology is the only option for CW linacs and is also an attractive option for pulsed linacs. SC cavities are routinely used for proton and H{sup -} beam acceleration above 185 MeV. Successful development of SC cavities covering the lower velocity range (down to 0.03c) is a very strong basis for the application of SC structures in the front ends of high energy linacs. Lattice design and related high-intensity beam physics issues in a {approx}400 MeV linac that uses SC cavities will be presented in this talk. In particular, axially-symmetric focusing by SC solenoids provides strong control of beam space-charge and a compact focusing lattice. As an example, we discuss the SC front-end of the H{sup -} linac for the FNAL Proton Driver.

  2. Linac design for the LCLS project at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Bharadwaj, V.K.; Bane, K.; Clendenin, J.

    1997-05-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC is being designed to produce intense, coherent 0.15-nm x-rays. These x-rays will be produced by a single pass of a 15 GeV bunched electron beam through a long undulator. Nominally, the bunches have a charge of 1 nC, normalized transverse emittances of less than 1.5{pi} mm-mr and an rms bunch length of 20 {mu}m. The electron beam will be produced using the last third of the SLAC 3-km linac in a manner compatible with simultaneous operation of the remainder of the linac for PEP-II. The linac design necessary to produce an electron beam with the required brightness for LCLS is discussed, and the specific linac modifications are described.

  3. Features Of The J-PARC Linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Tetsuya

    2011-06-01

    Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) will be one of the highest intensity proton accelerators in the world aiming to realize 1 MW class of the beam power. The accelerator consists of a 400-MeV linac, a 3-GeV rapid-cycling synchrotron (RCS) and a main ring synchrotron (MR), and the accelerated beam is applied to several experimental facilities. The linac, which is the injector for the RCS, has about 50 cavity modules to accelerate the beam up to 400 MeV. The acceleration field error in all of them should be within ±1% in amplitude and ±1 degree in phase because the momentum spread of the RCS injection beam is required to be within 0.1%. For the cavity field stabilization, a high-stable optical signal distribution system is used as the RF reference, and sophisticated digital feedback and feed-forward system is working well in the low level RF control system. Consequently the providing beam to the RCS is very stable, and the beam commissioning and the experiments of the application facilities have been progressed steadily.

  4. Short wavelength FELs using the SLAC linac

    SciTech Connect

    Winick, H.; Bane, K.; Boyce, R.

    1993-08-01

    Recent technological developments have opened the possibility to construct a device which we call a Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS); a fourth generation light source, with brightness, coherence, and peak power far exceeding other sources. Operating on the principle of the free electron laser (FEL), the LCLS would extend the range of FEL operation to much aborter wavelength than the 240 mn that has so far been reached. We report the results of studies of the use of the SLAC linac to drive an LCLS at wavelengths from about 3-100 nm initially and possibly even shorter wavelengths in the future. Lasing would be achieved in a single pass of a low emittance, high peak current, high energy electron beam through a long undulator. Most present FELs use an optical cavity to build up the intensity of the light to achieve lasing action in a low gain oscillator configuration. By eliminating the optical cavity, which is difficult to make at short wavelengths, laser action can be extended to shorter wavelengths by Self-Amplified-Spontaneous-Emission (SASE), or by harmonic generation from a longer wavelength seed laser. Short wavelength, single pass lasers have been extensively studied at several laboratories and at recent workshops.

  5. BEAM LOSS MECHANISMS IN HIGH INTENSITY LINACS

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    In the present operation of the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source, 60-Hz, 825-us H beam pulses are accelerated to 910 MeV, and then compressed to less than a microsecond in the storage ring, to deliver 1 MW of beam power to the spallation target. The beam loss in the superconducting portion of the linac is higher than expected, and it has shown a surprising counter-intuitive correlation with quadrupole magnetic fields, with a loss minimum occurring when the quadrupoles are set to approximately half their design values. This behavior can now be explained by a recent set of experiments that show the beam loss is primarily due to intra-beam stripping. Beam halo is another important beam loss contributor, and collimation in the 2.5 MeV Medium Energy Beam Transport has proven to be an effective mitigation strategy. In this presentation, we will summarize these and other beam loss mechanisms that are important for high intensity linacs.

  6. RIA Superconducting Drift Tube Linac R & D

    SciTech Connect

    J. Popielarski; J. Bierwagen; S. Bricker; C. Compton; J. DeLauter; P. Glennon; T. Grimm; W. Hartung; D. Harvell; M. Hodek; M. Johnson; F. Marti; P. Miller; A. Moblo; D. Norton; L. Popielarski; J. Wlodarczak; R. C. York; A. Zeller

    2009-05-22

    Cavity and cryomodule development work for a superconducting ion linac has been underway for several years at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory. The original application of the work was the proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator. At present, the work is being continued for use with the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). The baseline linac for FRIB requires 4 types of superconducting cavities to cover the velocity range needed to accelerate an ion beam to 200 MeV/u: 2 types of quarter-wave resonator (QWR) and 2 types of half-wave resonator (HWR). Superconducting solenoids are used for focussing. Active and passive shielding is required to ensure that the solenoids’ field does not degrade the cavity performance. First prototypes of both QWR types and one HWR type have been fabricated and tested. A prototype solenoid has been procured and tested. A test cryomodule has been fabricated and tested. The test cryomodule contains one QWR, one HWR, one solenoid, and one super-ferric quadrupole. This report covers the design, fabrication, and testing of this cryomodule

  7. Linac Coherent Light Source - Status and Prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Galayda, John N.; /SLAC

    2005-11-09

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) Project will be an x-ray free-electron laser. It is intended to produce pulses of 800-8,000 eV photons. Each pulse, produced with a repetition frequency of up to 120 Hz, will provide >10{sup 12} photons within a duration of less than 200 femtoseconds. The project employs the last kilometer of the SLAC linac to provide a low-emittance electron beam in the energy range 4-14 GeV to a single undulator. Two experiment halls, located 100m and 350m from the undulator exit, will house six experiment stations for research in atomic/molecular physics, pump-probe dynamics of materials and chemical processes, x-ray imaging of clusters and complex molecules, and plasma physics. Engineering design activities began in 2003, and the project is to be completed in March 2009. The project design permits straightforward expansion of the LCLS to multiple undulators.

  8. Linac-driven spallation-neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Jason, A.J.

    1995-05-01

    Strong interest has arisen in accelerator-driven spallation-neutron sources that surpass existing facilities (such as ISIS at Rutherford or LANSCE at Los Alamos) by more than an order of magnitude in beam power delivered to the spallation target. The approach chosen by Los Alamos (as well as the European Spallation Source) provides the full beam energy by acceleration in a linac as opposed to primary acceleration in a synchrotron or other circular device. Two modes of neutron production are visualized for the source. A short-pulse mode produces 1 MW of beam power (at 60 pps) in pulses, of length less than 1 ms, by compression of the linac macropulse through multi-turn injection in an accumulator ring. A long-pulse mode produces a similar beam power with 1-ms-long pulses directly applied to a target. This latter mode rivals the performance of existing reactor facilities to very low neutron energies. Combination with the short-pulse mode addresses virtually all applications.

  9. WATER PURITY DEVELOPMENT FOR THE COUPLED CAVITY LINAC (CCL) AND DRIFT TUBE LINAC (DTL) STRUCTURES OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE (SNS) LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    D. KATONAK; J. BERNARDIN; S. HOPKINS

    2001-06-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a facility being designed for scientific and industrial research and development. SNS will generate and use neutrons as a diagnostic tool for medical purposes, material science, etc. The neutrons will be produced by bombarding a heavy metal target with a high-energy beam of protons, generated and accelerated with a linear particle accelerator, or linac. The low energy end of the linac consists of two room temperature copper structures, the drift tube linac (DTL), and the coupled cavity linac (CCL). Both of these accelerating structures use large amounts of electrical energy to accelerate the proton beam. Approximately 60-80% of the electrical energy is dissipated in the copper structure and must be removed. This is done using specifically designed water cooling passages within the linac's copper structure. Cooling water is supplied to these cooling passages by specially designed resonance control and water cooling systems. One of the primary components in the DTL and CCL water cooling systems, is a water purification system that is responsible for minimizing erosion, corrosion, scaling, biological growth, and hardware activation. The water purification system consists of filters, ion exchange resins, carbon beds, an oxygen scavenger, a UV source, and diagnostic instrumentation. This paper reviews related issues associated with water purification and describes the mechanical design of the SNS Linac water purification system.

  10. PHYSICS RESULTS OF THE NSLS-II LINAC FRONT END TEST STAND

    SciTech Connect

    Fliller R. P.; Gao, F.; Yang, X.; Rose, J.; Shaftan, T.; Piel, C

    2012-05-20

    The Linac Front End Test Stand (LFETS) was installed at the Source Development Laboratory (SDL) in the fall of 2011 in order to test the Linac Front End. The goal of these tests was to test the electron source against the specifications of the linac. In this report, we discuss the results of these measurements and the effect on linac performance.

  11. PERFORMANCE OF THE DIAGNOSTICS FOR NSLS-II LINAC COMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect

    Fliller III, R.; Padrazo, D.; Wang, G.M.; Heese, R.; Hseuh H.-C.; Johanson, M.; Kosciuk, B.N.; Pinayev, I.; Rose, J.; Shaftan, T.; Singh, O.

    2011-03-28

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a state of the art 3-GeV third generation light source currently under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The NSLS-II injection system consists of a 200 MeV linac, a 3-GeV booster synchrotron and associated transfer lines. The transfer lines not only provide a means to deliver the beam from one machine to another, they also provide a suite of diagnostics and utilities to measure the properties of the beam to be delivered. In this paper we discuss the suite of diagnostics that will be used to commission the NSLS-II linac and measure the beam properties. The linac to booster transfer line can measure the linac emittance with a three screens measurement or a quadrupole scan. Energy and energy spread are measured in a dispersive section. Total charge and charge uniformity are measured with wall current monitors in the linac and transformers in the transfer line. We show that the performance of the diagnostics in the transfer line will be sufficient to ensure the linac meets its specifications and provides a means of trouble shooting and studying the linac in future operation.

  12. R&D Energy Recovery Linac at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, Vladimir; Beavis, D.; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Burrill, Andrew; Calaga, Rama; Cameron, Peter; Chang, Xiangyun; Drees, K.A.; Ganetis, G.; Gamble, Michael; Hahn, H.; Hammons, L.R.; Hershcovitch, A.; Hseuh, H.C.; Jain, A.K.; Kayran, A.; Kewisch, Jorg; Lambiase, R.F.; Lederle, D.L.; Mahler, G.J.; McIntyre, G.; Meng, W.; Nehring, T.C.; Oerter, B.; Pai, C.; Pate, D.; Phillips, Daniel; Pozdeyev, Eduard; Rao, Triveni; Reich, J.; Roser, Thomas; Russo, T.; Smith, K.; Tuozzolo, Joseph; Weiss, D.; Williams, N.W.W.; Yip, Kin; Zaltsman, A.; Bluem, Hans; Cole, Michael; Favale, Anthony; Holmes, D.; Rathke, John; Schultheiss, Tom; Delayen, Jean; Funk, L.; Phillips, H.; Preble, Joseph

    2008-07-01

    Collider Accelerator Department at BNL is in the final stages of developing the 20-MeV R&D energy recovery linac with super-conducting 2.5 MeV RF gun and single-mode super-conducting 5-cell RF linac. This unique facility aims to address many outstanding questions relevant for high current (up to 0.5 A of average current), high brightness energy-recovery linacs with novel Zigzag-type merger. We present the performance of the R&D ERL elements and detailed commissioning plan.

  13. Using basic electromagnetism to introduce LINAC4 (CERN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cid-Vidal, Xabier; Cid, Ramon; Vretenar, Maurizio

    2016-07-01

    The LHC is the last element of CERN’s accelerator complex, which is a succession of machines with increasingly higher energies. Everything starts in the 50 MeV linear accelerator (LINAC2), but a new linear accelerator, the 160 MeV LINAC4, will replace LINAC2 in 2018, upgrading LHC injectors to higher intensity and eventually increasing the luminosity of LHC. The aim of this article is briefly introducing this new accelerator, and presenting a simple application of some fundamental laws of magnetism to be taken to the secondary school classrooms.

  14. High-Performance Beam Simulator for the LANSCE Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Xiaoying; Rybarcyk, Lawrence J.; Baily, Scott A.

    2012-05-14

    A high performance multiparticle tracking simulator is currently under development at Los Alamos. The heart of the simulator is based upon the beam dynamics simulation algorithms of the PARMILA code, but implemented in C++ on Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) hardware using NVIDIA's CUDA platform. Linac operating set points are provided to the simulator via the EPICS control system so that changes of the real time linac parameters are tracked and the simulation results updated automatically. This simulator will provide valuable insight into the beam dynamics along a linac in pseudo real-time, especially where direct measurements of the beam properties do not exist. Details regarding the approach, benefits and performance are presented.

  15. Energy Recovery Linacs for Light Source Applications

    SciTech Connect

    George Neil

    2011-04-01

    Energy Recovery Linacs are being considered for applications in present and future light sources. ERLs take advantage of the continuous operation of superconducting rf cavities to accelerate high average current beams with low losses. The electrons can be directed through bends, undulators, and wigglers for high brightness x ray production. They are then decelerated to low energy, recovering power so as to minimize the required rf drive and electrical draw. When this approach is coupled with advanced continuous wave injectors, very high power, ultra-short electron pulse trains of very high brightness can be achieved. This paper will review the status of worldwide programs and discuss the technology challenges to provide such beams for photon production.

  16. Radiation processing with the Messina electron linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auditore, L.; Barnà, R. C.; De Pasquale, D.; Emanuele, U.; Loria, D.; Morgana, E.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.

    2008-05-01

    In the last decades radiation processing has been more and more applied in several fields of industrial treatments and scientific research as a safe, reliable and economic technique. In order to improve existing industrial techniques and to develop new applications of this technology, at the Physics Department of Messina University a high power 5 MeV electron linac has been studied and set-up. The main features of the accelerating structure will be described together with the distinctive features of the delivered beam and several results obtained by electron beam irradiations, such as improvement of the characteristics of polymers and polymer composite materials, synthesis of new hydrogels for pharmaceutical and biomedical applications, reclaim of culture ground, sterilization of medical devices, development of new dosimeters for very high doses and dose rates required for monitoring of industrial irradiations.

  17. Neutron Spectra in a 15 MV LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Chu, Wei-Han; Tung, Chuan-Jong; Lan, Jen-Hong

    2010-12-07

    Neutron spectra were calculated inside the treatment hall of a 15 MV LINAC, calculations were carried out using Monte Carlo methods. With a Bonner sphere spectrometer with pairs of thermoluminiscent dosimeters the neutron spectrum at 100 cm from the isocenter was measured and compared with the calculated spectrum. All the spectra in the treatment hall show the presence of evaporation and knock-on neutrons; also the room-return due to the hall features is shown. In the maze the large contribution are due to epithermal and thermal neutrons. A good agreement between the calculated and measured spectrum at 100 cm was noticed, from this comparison the differences are attributed to the water content in the concrete of the hall.

  18. A Program for Optimizing SRF Linac Costs

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, Thomas J.

    2013-04-01

    Every well-designed machine goes through the process of cost optimization several times during its design, production and operation. The initial optimizations are done during the early proposal stage of the project when none of the systems have been engineered. When a superconducting radio frequency (SRF) linac is implemented as part of the design, it is often a difficult decision as to the frequency and gradient that will be used. Frequently, such choices are made based on existing designs, which invariably necessitate moderate to substantial modifications so that they can be used in the new accelerator. Thus the fallacy of using existing designs is that they will frequently provide a higher cost machine or a machine with sub-optimal beam physics parameters. This paper describes preliminary results of a new software tool that allows one to vary parameters and understand the effects on the optimized costs of construction plus 10 year operations of an SRF linac, the associated cryogenic facility, and controls, where operations includes the cost of the electrical utilities but not the labor or other costs. It derives from collaborative work done with staff from Accelerator Science and Technology Centre, Daresbury, UK [1] several years ago while they were in the process of developing a conceptual design for the New Light Source project. The initial goal was to convert a spread sheet format to a graphical interface to allow the ability to sweep different parameter sets. The tools also allow one to compare the cost of the different facets of the machine design and operations so as to better understand the tradeoffs.

  19. Commissioning of the LCLS Linac and Bunch Compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Akre, R.; Brachmann, A.; Decker, F.-J.; Ding, Y.; Dowell, D.; Emma#, P.; Frisch, J.; Gilevich, S.; Hays, G.; Hering, Ph.; Huang, Z.; Iverson, R.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Loos, H.; Molloy, S.; Miahnahri, A.; Nuhn, H.-D.; Ratner, D.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; White, W.; /SLAC

    2008-08-20

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a SASE x-ray Free-Electron Laser (FEL) project under construction at SLAC [1]. The injector section, from drive-laser and RF photocathode gun through the first bunch compressor, was commissioned in the spring and summer of 2007. The second phase of commissioning, including the second bunch compressor and various main linac modifications, was completed in January through August of 2008. We report here on experience gained during this second phase of machine commissioning, including the injector, the first and second bunch compressor stages, the linac up to 14 GeV, and beam stability measurements. The final commissioning phase, including the undulator and the long transport line from the linac, is set to begin in December 2008, with first light expected in July 2009.

  20. Design of the driver linac for the Rare Isotope Accelerator.

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Nolen, J. A.; Shepard, K. W.; Physics

    2006-01-01

    The proposed design of the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) driver linac is a cw, fully superconducting, 1.4 GV linac capable of accelerating uranium ions up to 400 MeV/u and protons to 1 GeV with 400 kW beam power. An extensive research and development effort has resolved many technical issues related to the construction of the driver linac and other systems of the RIA facility. In particular, record intensities of heavy ion beams have been demonstrated with the ECR ion source VENUS at LBNL, the driver front end systems including two-charge-state Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) and RFQ are being tested, and a set of SC accelerating structures to cover velocity range from 0.02c to 0.7c have been developed and prototyped. Newly developed high-performance SC cavities will provide the required voltage for the driver linac using 300 cavities designed for six different geometrical betas.

  1. A Radiation shielding study for the Fermilab Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhno, I.; Johnstone, C.; /Fermilab

    2006-02-01

    Radiation shielding calculations are performed for the Fermilab Linac enclosure and gallery. The predicted dose rates around the access labyrinth at normal operation and a comparison to measured dose rates are presented. An accident scenario is considered as well.

  2. High power operational experience with the LANSCE Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Rybarcyk, Lawrence J

    2008-01-01

    The heart of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is a pulsed linear accelerator that is used to simultaneously provide H+ and H- beams to several user facilities. This accelerator contains two Cockcroft-Walton style injectors, a 100-MeV drift tube linac and an 800-MeV coupled cavity linac. This presentation will touch on various aspects of the high power operation including performance, tune-up strategy, beam losses and machine protection.

  3. Effect of cooling water on stability of NLC linac components

    SciTech Connect

    F. Le Pimpec et al.

    2003-02-11

    Vertical vibration of linac components (accelerating structures, girders and quadrupoles) in the NLC has been studied experimentally and analytically. Effects such as structural resonances and vibration caused by cooling water both in accelerating structures and quadrupoles have been considered. Experimental data has been compared with analytical predictions and simulations using ANSYS. A design, incorporating the proper decoupling of structure vibrations from the linac quadrupoles, is being pursued.

  4. The 400 MeV Linac Upgrade at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, R.J.

    1992-12-01

    The Fermilab Linac Upgrade in planned to increase the energy of the H{sup {minus}} linac from 200 to 400 MeV. This is intended to reduce the incoherent space-charge tuneshift at injection into the 8 GeV Booster which limit either the brightness or the total intensity of the beam. The Linac Upgrade will be achieved by replacing the last four 201.25 MHs drift-tube linac (DTL) tanks which accelerate the beam from 116 to 200 MeV, with seven 805 MRs side-coupled cavity modules operating at an average axial field of about 7.5 MV/meter. This will allow acceleration to 400 MeV in the existing Linac enclosure. Each accelerator module will be driven with a 12 MW klystron-based rf power supply. Three of seven accelerator modules have been fabricated, power tested and installed in their temporary location adjacent to the existing DTL. All seven RF Modulators have been completed and klystron installation has begun. Waveguide runs have completed from the power supply gallery to the accelerator modules. The new linac will be powered in the temporary position without beam in order to verify overall system reliability until the laboratory operating schedule permits final conversion to 400 MeV operation.

  5. A novel electron gun for inline MRI-linac configurations

    PubMed Central

    Constantin, Dragoş E.; Holloway, Lois; Keall, Paul J.; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This work introduces a new electron gun geometry capable of robust functioning in the presence of a high strength external magnetic field for axisymmetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-linac configurations. This allows an inline MRI-linac to operate without the need to isolate the linear accelerator (linac) using a magnetic shield. This MRI-linac integration approach not only leaves the magnet homogeneity unchanged but also provides the linac flexibility to move along the magnet axis of symmetry if the source to target distance needs to be adjusted. Methods: Simple electron gun geometry modifications of a Varian 600C electron gun are considered and solved in the presence of an external magnetic field in order to determine a set of design principles for the new geometry. Based on these results, a new gun geometry is proposed and optimized in the fringe field of a 0.5 T open bore MRI magnet (GE Signa SP). A computer model for the 6 MeV Varian 600C linac is used to determine the capture efficiency of the new electron gun-linac system in the presence of the fringe field of the same MRI scanner. The behavior of the new electron gun plus the linac system is also studied in the fringe fields of two other magnets, a 1.0 T prototype open bore magnet and a 1.5 T GE Conquest scanner. Results: Simple geometrical modifications of the original electron gun geometry do not provide feasible solutions. However, these tests show that a smaller transverse cathode diameter with a flat surface and a slightly larger anode diameter could alleviate the current loss due to beam interactions with the anode in the presence of magnetic fields. Based on these findings, an initial geometry resembling a parallel plate capacitor with a hole in the anode is proposed. The optimization procedure finds a cathode-anode distance of 5 mm, a focusing electrode angle of 5°, and an anode drift tube length of 17.1 mm. Also, the linac can be displaced with ±15 cm along the axis of the 0.5 T

  6. A novel electron gun for inline MRI-linac configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Constantin, Dragoş E. Fahrig, Rebecca; Holloway, Lois; Keall, Paul J.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: This work introduces a new electron gun geometry capable of robust functioning in the presence of a high strength external magnetic field for axisymmetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-linac configurations. This allows an inline MRI-linac to operate without the need to isolate the linear accelerator (linac) using a magnetic shield. This MRI-linac integration approach not only leaves the magnet homogeneity unchanged but also provides the linac flexibility to move along the magnet axis of symmetry if the source to target distance needs to be adjusted. Methods: Simple electron gun geometry modifications of a Varian 600C electron gun are considered and solved in the presence of an external magnetic field in order to determine a set of design principles for the new geometry. Based on these results, a new gun geometry is proposed and optimized in the fringe field of a 0.5 T open bore MRI magnet (GE Signa SP). A computer model for the 6 MeV Varian 600C linac is used to determine the capture efficiency of the new electron gun-linac system in the presence of the fringe field of the same MRI scanner. The behavior of the new electron gun plus the linac system is also studied in the fringe fields of two other magnets, a 1.0 T prototype open bore magnet and a 1.5 T GE Conquest scanner. Results: Simple geometrical modifications of the original electron gun geometry do not provide feasible solutions. However, these tests show that a smaller transverse cathode diameter with a flat surface and a slightly larger anode diameter could alleviate the current loss due to beam interactions with the anode in the presence of magnetic fields. Based on these findings, an initial geometry resembling a parallel plate capacitor with a hole in the anode is proposed. The optimization procedure finds a cathode-anode distance of 5 mm, a focusing electrode angle of 5°, and an anode drift tube length of 17.1 mm. Also, the linac can be displaced with ±15 cm along the axis of the 0.5 T

  7. Induction linac drivers: Prospects for the future

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, D.

    1988-06-01

    This review is intended to place in perspective our current view of the parameter ranges for induction linac drivers that lead to attractive scenarios for civilian electrical power plants; there is a surprising degree of choice (a factor of two or so in most parameters) before any significant impact on the cost of energy results. The progress and goals of the US Heavy Ion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) program are reviewed. The step between the realization of the HIFAR goals and a full-scale driver is seen to be very large indeed and will require one or more significant intermediate steps which can be justified only by a commitment to advance the HIF method towards a true fusion goal. Historical anomalies in the way that fusion programs for both military and civilian applications are administered will need to be resolved; the absence of any presently perceived energy crisis results in little current sense of urgency to develop vigorous long-term energy solutions. 12 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Electron gun system for NSC KIPT linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zu-Sheng; He, Da-Yong; Chi, Yun-Long

    2014-06-01

    In the NSC KIPT linac, a neutron source based on a subcritical assembly driven by a 100 MeV/100 kW electron linear accelerator is under design and development. The linear accelerator needs a new high current electron gun. In this paper, the physical design, mechanical fabrication and beam test of this new electron gun are described. The emission current is designed to be higher than 2 A for the pulse width of 3 μs with repetition rate of 50 Hz. The gun will operate with a DC high voltage power supply that can provide a high voltage up to 150 kV. Computer simulations and optimizations have been carried out in the design stage, including the gun geometry and beam transport line. The test results of high voltage conditioning and beam test are presented. The operation status of the electron gun system is also included. The basic test results show that the design, manufacture, and operation of the new electron system are basically successful.

  9. Development of head docking device for linac-based radiosurgery with a Neptun 10 PC linac.

    PubMed

    Khoshbin Khoshnazar, Alireza; Bahreyni Toossi, Mohammad Taghi; Hashemian, Abdolreza; Salek, Roham

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is a method for focused irradiation of intracranial lesions. Linac-based radiosurgery is currently performed by two techniques: couch mounted and pedestal mounted. In the first technique a device is required to affix the patient's head to the couch and neoreover to translate it accurately. Structure of such a device constructed by the authors plus acceptance test performed for evaluation is described in the article. A head docking device has been designed and constructed according to geometry of linac's couch and also desired functions. The device is cornpletely made from aluminum and consists of four major components: attachment bar, lower structure with four moveing accuracy mechanical stability and isocentric accuracy were assessed in the frame of acceptance test. Translating accuracy, mechanical stability and isocentric accuracy were found to be respectively: 1 mm, 1.64 mm and 3.2 mm with accuracy of 95%. According to AAPM report no. 54, a head docking device should translate head with an accuracy of 1 mm; this recommendation has been met. Moreover, we have demonstrated that the isocentric accuracy and mechanical stability of the device are sufficient that the device on confidently be used in stereotactic treatment. PMID:17664152

  10. High-Power Proton Linac Technology at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerigk, Frank

    The construction of Linac4, a 160 MeV H- linac started in 2008 and is now in the beam commissioning phase. The RFQ and MEBT line have been successfully commissioned; and installation and beam measurements of the 50 MeV DTL have started in 2014. Linac4 was conceived as the normal conducting front-end for a Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL), providing 5 GeV protons for a future neutrino facility at CERN. In the last 2 years the CERN infrastructure for the construction, surface treatment and testing of superconducting cavities has been upgraded to be compatible with the prototyping of a 4-cavity SPL type cryomodule. The 704 MHz 5-cell Niobium cavities, presently being built and tested at CERN are of interest also for other potential future projects at CERN and therefore the SPL R&D effort is well supported over the coming years. This paper reviews the context and status of Linac4 and SPL and highlights some of the technological developments, which have been done at CERN and which are foreseen within the next years.

  11. Higher order beam jitter in the SLC linac

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, F.-J.; Adolphsen, C.E.; Podobedov, B.; Raimondi, P.

    1996-08-01

    The pulse-to-pulse behavior of the beams in the SLC linac is dominated by wakefields which can amplify any other sources of jitter. A strong focusing lattice combined with BNS damping controls the amplitude of oscillations which otherwise would grow exponentially. Measurements of oscillation amplitude along the linac show beam motion that is up to six times larger than that expected from injection jitter. A search for possible sources of jitter within the linac uncovered some problems such as structure jitter at 8 to 12 Hz, pump vibrations at 59 Hz and 1 Hz aliasing by the feedback systems. These account for only a small fraction of the observed jitter which is dominantly white noise. No source has yet been fully identified but possible candidates are dark current in the linac structures (not confirmed by experiment) or subtle correlations in injection jitter. An example would be a correlated x-z jitter with no net offset visible on the beam position monitors at injection. Such a correlation would cause jitter growth along the linac as wakefields from the head of the bunch deflect the core and tail of the bunch. Estimates of the magnitude of this effect and some possible sources are discussed in this paper.

  12. Concepts and Applications of Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs)

    SciTech Connect

    Gruner, Sol M.

    2004-05-12

    Energy Recovery Linacs are being explored as next generation synchrotron light sources. The fundamental x-ray beam properties from storage ring sources, such as the source size, brilliance, and pulse duration are limited by the dynamic equilibrium characteristic of the magnetic lattice that is the storage ring. Importantly, the characteristic equilibration time is long, involving thousands of orbits around the ring. Advances in laser-driven photoelectron sources allow the generation of electron bunches with superior properties for synchrotron radiation. ERLs preserve these properties by acceleration with a superconducting linac, followed by transport through a return loop hosting insertion devices, similar to that of a 3rd generation storage ring. The loop returns bunches to the linac 180 deg. out of accelerating phase for deceleration through the linac and disposal. Thus, the electron beam energy is recycled back into the linac RF field for acceleration of new bunches and the equilibrium degradation of bunches never occurs. The superior projected properties of ERLs beams include extraordinary brilliance and small source size, with concomitant high transverse coherence, x-ray pulse durations down to {approx}100 femtoseconds, and flexibility of operation. ERL projects are summarized. ERLs will be capable of hosting practically all experiments now being carried out at storage rings while also enabling new types of experiments.

  13. Thirty-five years of drift-tube linac experience

    SciTech Connect

    Knowles, H.B.

    1984-10-01

    The history of the drift-tube linear accelerator (linac) for the first 35 years of its existence is briefly reviewed. Both US and foreign experience is included. Particular attention is given to technological improvements, operational reliability, capital investment, and number of personnel committed to drift-tube linac (DTL) development. Preliminary data indicate that second- and third-generation (post-1960) DTLs have, in the US alone, operated for a combined total period of more than 75 machine-years and that very high reliability (>90%) has been achieved. Existing US drift-tube linacs represent a capital investment of at least $250 million (1983). Additional statistical evidence, derived from the proceedings of the last 11 linear accelerator conferences, supports the view that the DTL has achieved a mature technological base. The report concludes with a discussion of important recent advances in technology and their applications to the fourth generation of DTLs, many of which are now becoming operational.

  14. Alignment and steering scenarios for the APT linac

    SciTech Connect

    Stovall, J.E.; Gray, E.R.; Nath, S.; Takeda, H.; Wood, R.L.; Young, L.M.; Crandall, K.R.

    1996-09-01

    The Accelerator for the Production of Tritium (APT) requires a very high proton beam current (100 mA cw). Requirement for hands-on maintenance limits the beam spill to less than 0.2 nA/m along most of the linac. To achieve this, it is important to understand the effects of fabrication, installation and operational errors, establish realistic tolerances, and develop techniques for mitigating their consequences. A new code, PARTREX, statistically evaluates the effects of alignment, quadrupole field, and rf phase and amplitude errors in the linac. This paper reviews the effects of quadrupole misalignments and present two steering algorithms that minimize the potential for particle loss from the beam halo. These algorithms were tested on the 8-to-20 MeV portion of the APT linac.

  15. Solenoid-based focusing in a proton linac

    SciTech Connect

    Terechkine, I; DiMarco, J.; Schappert, W.; Sergatskov, d.; Tartaglia, M.; /Fermilab

    2010-09-01

    Development of solenoid-based focusing lenses for the transport channel of an R&D linac front end at FNAL (HINS linac) is in its final stage. Superconducting lenses for the room temperature RF section of the linac are assembled into individual cryostats and certified using a dedicated test stand. During this certification process, the optical axis of each lens relative to the cryogenic vessel is found in the warm and cold state. Lenses for the superconducting RF sections are ready for production, and development of a cryomodule (which contains multiple superconducting lenses and RF cavities) is in progress. Studies have been conducted to measure fringe magnetic field of a lens in the cryomodule, to investigate a laser-based method of alignment, and to evaluate the extent of beam quality degradation due to imperfections in lens construction and alignment. This report presents some results of these studies.

  16. Investigations of Slow Motions of the SLAC Linac Tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Seryi, Andrei

    2000-08-31

    Investigations of slow transverse motion of the linac tunnel of the Stanford Linear Collider have been performed over period of about one month in December 1999--January 2000. The linac laser alignment system, equipped with a quadrant photodetector, allowed submicron resolution measurement of the motion of the middle of the linac tunnel with respect to its ends. Measurements revealed two major sources responsible for the observed relative motion. Variation of the external atmospheric pressure was found to be the most significant cause of short wavelength transverse motion of the tunnel. The long wavelength component of the motion has been also observed to have a large contribution from tidal effects. The measured data are essential for determination of parameters for the Next Linear Collider.

  17. Collective electron driven linac for high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, J.T.

    1983-08-01

    A linac design is presented in which an intense ultrarelativistic electron bunch is used to excite fields in a series of cavities and accelerate charged particles. The intense electron bunch is generated in a simple storage ring to have the required transverse and longitudinal dimensions. The bunch is then transferred to the linac. The linac structure can be inexpensively constructed of spacers and washers. The fields in the cells resulting from the bunch passage are calculated using the program BCI. The results show that certain particles within the driving bunch and also trailing particles of any sign charge can be accelerated. With existing electron storage rings, accelerating gradients greater than 16 MV/m are possible. Examples of two accelerators are given: a 30 GeV electron/positron accelerator useful as an injector for a high energy storage ring and 2) a 110 GeV per beam electron-positron collider.

  18. Design considerations for high-current superconducting ion linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.; Micklich, B.J.; Roche, C.T.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1993-08-01

    Superconducting linacs may be a viable option for high-current applications such as fusion materials irradiation testing, spallation neutron source, transmutation of radioactive waste, tritium production, and energy production. These linacs must run reliably for many years and allow easy routine maintenance. Superconducting cavities operate efficiently with high cw gradients, properties which help to reduce operating and capital costs, respectively. However, cost-effectiveness is not the sole consideration in these applications. For example, beam impingement must be essentially eliminated to prevent unsafe radioactivation of the accelerating structures, and thus large apertures are needed through which to pass the beam. Because of their high efficiency, superconducting cavities can be designed with very large bore apertures, thereby reducing the effect of beam impingement. Key aspects of high-current cw superconducting linac designs are explored in this context.

  19. Heavy ion induction linac drivers for inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.P.; Hovingh, J.

    1988-10-01

    Intense beams of high energy heavy ions (e.g., 10 GeV Hg) are an attractive option for an ICF driver because of their favorable energy deposition characteristics. The accelerator systems to produce the beams at the required power level are a development from existing technologies of the induction linac, rf linac/storage ring, and synchrotron. The high repetition rate of the accelerator systems, and the high efficiency which can be realized at high current make this approach especially suitable for commercial ICF. The present report gives a summary of the main features of the induction linac driver system, which is the approach now pursued in the USA. The main subsystems, consisting of injector, multiple beam accelerator at low and high energy, transport and pulse compression lines, and final focus are described. Scale relations are given for the current limits and other features of these subsystems. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  20. R and D energy recovery LINAC at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko,V.N.; Beavis, D.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Burrill, A.; Calaga, R.; Cameron, P.; Chang, X.; Drees, A.; Ganetis, G.; Gassner, D.; Hahn, H.; Hammons, L.; Hershcovitch, A.; Hseuh, H-C.; Jain, A.; Kayran, D.; Kewisch, J.; Lambiase, R.; Lederle, D.; Mahler, G.; McIntyre, G.; Meng, W.; Nehring, T.; Oerter, B.; Pai, C.; Pate, D.; Phillips, D.; Pozdeyev, E.; Rao, T.; Reich, J.; Roser, T.; Russo, T.; Smith, K.; Tuozzolo, J.; Weiss, D.; Williams, N.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Favale, A.; Bluem, H.; Cole, M.; Holmes, D.; Rathke, J.; Schultheiss, T.; Todd, A.; Delayen, J.; Funk, L.; Phillips, L.; Preble, J.

    2008-06-23

    Collider Accelerator Department at BNL is in the final stages of developing the 20-MeV R and D energy recovery linac with super-conducting 2.5 MeV RF gun and single-mode super-conducting 5-cell RF linac. This unique facility aims to address many outstanding questions relevant for high current (up to 0.5 A of average current), high brightness energy-recovery linacs with novel ZigZag-type merger. Recent development in the R and D ERL plans include gun and 5-cell cavity (G5) test and possibility of using R and D ERL for proof-of-principle test of Coherent Electron Cooling at RHIC.

  1. A hot-spare injector for the APS linac.

    SciTech Connect

    Lewellen, J. W.

    1999-04-13

    Last year a second-generation SSRL-type thermionic cathode rf gun was installed in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) linac. This gun (referred to as ''gun2'') has been successfully commissioned and now serves as the main injector for the APS linac, essentially replacing the Koontz-type DC gun. To help ensure injector availability, particularly with the advent of top-up mode operation at the APS, a second thermionic-cathode rf gun will be installed in the APS linac to act as a hot-spare beam source. The hot-spare installation includes several unique design features, including a deep-orbit Panofsky-style alpha magnet. Details of the hot-spare beamline design and projected performance are presented, along with some plans for future performance upgrades.

  2. An energy recovery electron linac-on-ring collider

    SciTech Connect

    Merminga, L.; Krafft, G.A.; Lebedev, V.A.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    2000-09-14

    We present the design of high-luminosity electron-proton/ion colliders in which the electrons are produced by an Energy Recovering Linac (ERL). Electron-proton/ion colliders with center of mass energies between 14 GeV and 100 GeV (protons) or 63 GeV/A (ions) and luminosities at the 10{sup 33}(per nucleon) level have been proposed recently as a means for studying hadronic structure. The linac-on-ring option presents significant advantages with respect to: (1) spin manipulations (2) reduction of the synchrotron radiation load in the detectors (3) a wide range of continuous energy variability. Rf power and beam dump considerations require that the electron linac recover the beam energy. Based on extrapolations from actual measurements and calculations, energy recovery is expected to be feasible at currents of a few hundred mA and multi-GeV energies. Luminosity projections for the linac-ring scenario based on fundamental limitations are presented. The feasibility of an energy recovery electron linac-on-proton ring collider is investigated and four conceptual point designs are shown corresponding to electron to proton energies of: 3 GeV on 15 GeV, 5 GeV on 50 GeV and 10 GeV on 250 GeV, and for gold ions with 100 GeV/A. The last two designs assume that the protons or ions are stored in the existing RHIC accelerator. Accelerator physics issues relevant to proton rings and energy recovery linacs are discussed and a list of required R and D for the realization of such a design is presented.

  3. Billion particle linac simulations for future light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, R. D.; Venturini, M.; Zholents, A. A.; Qiang, J.

    2008-09-25

    In this paper we report on multi-physics, multi-billion macroparticle simulation of beam transport in a free electron laser (FEL) linac for future light source applications. The simulation includes a self-consistent calculation of 3D space-charge effects, short-range geometry wakefields, longitudinal coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) wakefields, and detailed modeling of RF acceleration and focusing. We discuss the need for and the challenges associated with such large-scale simulation. Applications to the study of the microbunching instability in an FEL linac are also presented.

  4. BEAM SIMULATIONS USING VIRTUAL DIAGNOSTICS FOR THE DRIVER LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    R. C. York; X. Wu; Q. Zhao

    2011-12-21

    End-to-end beam simulations for the driver linac have shown that the design meets the necessary performance requirements including having adequate transverse and longitudinal acceptances. However, to achieve reliable operational performance, the development of appropriate beam diagnostic systems and control room procedures are crucial. With limited R&D funding, beam simulations provide a cost effective tool to evaluate candidate beam diagnostic systems and to provide a critical basis for developing early commissioning and later operational activities. We propose to perform beam dynamic studies and engineering analyses to define the requisite diagnostic systems of the driver linac and through simulation to develop and test commissioning and operational procedures.

  5. Equivalent circuit for postcoupler stabilization in a drift tube linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grespan, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Postcouplers (PCs) are devices used in order to reduce the effect of perturbations on the operating mode of a drift tube linac (DTL), using the resonant coupling stabilization method. In this article an equivalent circuit for a DTL equipped with PCs is presented, together with a 3D simulation analysis, which can explain the principle of postcoupler stabilization and define a new tuning strategy for DTL cavities. The PC tuning procedure based on the equivalent circuit and on frequency measurements has been tested and validated with measurements on the Linac4 DTL aluminum model, present at CERN.

  6. Phase transfer measurements at the Jefferson Lab recirculated linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krafft, G. A.; Bowling, B. A.; Crofford, M. T.; Hovater, J. C.

    2006-02-01

    Bunch length or longitudinal phase space distribution measurements are often used to evaluate if the electron beam meets RF criteria for a recirculated linac. Unfortunately, in many instances when the beam fails to meet the needed criteria, such measurements provide little guidance as to which machine element is problematic. All of the Jefferson Lab recirculated linacs have employed longitudinal phase transfer measurement systems to provide both useful information on the initial understanding of the dynamics of the longitudinal phase space in these accelerators, and much more useful diagnosis of out-of-specification performance of machine RF elements. These systems can provide precision transfer function measurements in time scales convenient for machine operations.

  7. LINAC BEAM DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS WITH PY-ORBIT

    SciTech Connect

    Shishlo, Andrei P

    2012-01-01

    Linac dynamics simulation capabilities of the PyORBIT code are discussed. PyORBIT is an open source code and a further development of the original ORBIT code that was created and used for design, studies, and commissioning of the SNS ring. The PyORBIT code, like the original one, has a two-layer structure. C++ is used to perform time-consuming computations, and the program flow is controlled from a Python language shell. The flexible structure makes it possible to use PyORBIT also for linac dynamics simulations. A benchmark of PyORBIT with Parmila and the XAL Online model is presented.

  8. SRF cavities for CW option of Project X Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N.; Gonin, I.; Khabiboulline, T.; Lunin, A.; Perunov, N.; Yakovlev, V.; /Fermilab

    2009-09-01

    Alternative option of Project X is based on the CW SC 2GeV Linac with the average current 1mA. Possible option of the CW Linac considered in the paper includes low energy part consisted of a few families SC Spoke cavities (from 2.5 MeV to 466 MeV) and high energy part consisted of 2 types of elliptical cavities (v/c=0.81 and v/c=1). Requirements and designed parameters of cavities are considered.

  9. Tranverse beam break up in a periodic linac

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, G.; Wang, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    The problem of cumulative beam break up in a periodic linac for a general impedance is discussed, with the effects of acceleration included. The transverse equations of motion for a set of identical point like bunches moving along the length of the linac are cast into a simple form using a smooth approximation. This results in a working formula that is used to analyze beam breakup. Explicit expressions for the transverse motion in the case of a single resonance impedance are found using saddle point integration. This is done first with no external focusing, and again in the strong focusing limit.

  10. Neutron distribution and induced activity inside a Linac treatment room.

    PubMed

    Juste, B; Miró, R; Verdú, G; Díez, S; Campayo, J M

    2015-01-01

    Induced radioactivity and photoneutron contamination inside a radiation therapy bunker of a medical linear accelerator (Linac) is investigated in this work. The Linac studied is an Elekta Precise electron accelerator which maximum treatment photon energy is 15 MeV. This energy exceeds the photonuclear reaction threshold (around 7 MeV for high atomic number metals). The Monte Carlo code MCNP6 has been used for quantifying the neutron contamination inside the treatment room for different gantry rotation configuration. Walls activation processes have also been simulated. The approach described in this paper is useful to prevent the overexposure of patients and medical staff. PMID:26737878

  11. Design and construction of the main linac module for the superconducting energy recovery linac project at Cornell

    SciTech Connect

    Eichhorn, R.; Bullock, B.; He, Y.; Hoffstaetter, G.; Liepe, M.; O'Connell, T.; Quigley, P.; Sabol, D.; Sears, J.; Smith, E.; Veshcherevich, V.

    2014-01-29

    Cornell University has been designing and building superconducting accelerators for various applications for more than 50 years. Currently, an energy-recovery linac (ERL) based synchrotron-light facility is proposed making use of the existing CESR facility. As part of the phase 1 R and D program funded by the NSF, critical challenges in the design were addressed, one of them being a full linac cryo-module. It houses 6 superconducting cavities- operated at 1.8 K in continuous wave (CW) mode - with individual HOM absorbers and one magnet/ BPM section. Pushing the limits, a high quality factor of the cavities (2⋅10{sup 10}) and high beam currents (100 mA accelerated plus 100 mA decelerated) are targeted. We will present the design of the main linac cryo-module (MLC) being finalized recently, its cryogenic features and report on the status of the fabrication which started in late 2012.

  12. PERFORMANCE OF THE SNS FRONT END AND WARM LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Allen, Christopher K; Cousineau, Sarah M; Danilov, Viatcheslav; Galambos, John D; Holmes, Jeffrey A; Jeon, Dong-O; Pelaia II, Tom; Plum, Michael A; Shishlo, Andrei P; Stockli, Martin P; Zhang, Yan

    2008-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source accelerator systems will deliver a 1.0 GeV, 1.4 MW proton beam to a liquid mercury target for neutron scattering research. The accelerator complex consists of an H{sup -} injector, capable of producing one-ms-long pulses at 60 Hz repetition rate with 38 mA peak current, a 1 GeV linear accelerator, an accumulator ring and associated transport lines. The 2.5 MeV beam from the Front End is accelerated to 87 MeV in the Drift Tube Linac, then to 186 MeV in a Coupled-Cavity Linac and finally to 1 GeV in the Superconducting Linac. With the completion of beam commissioning, the accelerator complex began operation in June 2006 and beam power is being gradually ramped up toward the design goal. Operational experience with the injector and linac will be presented including chopper performance, longitudinal beam dynamics study, and the results of a beam loss study.

  13. A Cure for Multipass Beam Breakup in Recirculating Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Byung C. Yunn

    2004-07-02

    We investigate a method to control the multipass dipole beam breakup instability in a recirculating linac including energy recovery. Effectiveness of an external feedback system for such a goal is shown clearly in a simplified model. We also verify the theoretical result with a simulation study.

  14. Intensity Effects of the FACET Beam in the SLAC Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, F.-J.; Lipkowitz, N.; Sheppard, J.; White, G.R.; Wienands, U.; Woodley, M.; Yocky, G.; /SLAC

    2012-07-03

    The beam for FACET (Facility for Advanced aCcelerator Experimental Tests) at SLAC requires an energy-time correlation ('chirp') along the linac, so it can be compressed in two chicanes, one at the midpoint in sector 10 and one W-shaped chicane just before the FACET experimental area. The induced correlation has the opposite sign to the typical used for BNS damping, and therefore any orbit variations away from the center kick the tail of the beam more than the head, causing a shear in the beam and emittance growth. Any dispersion created along the linac has similar effects due to the high (>1.2% rms) energy spread necessary for compression. The initial huge emittances could be reduced by a factor of 10, but were still bigger than expected by a factor of 2-3. Normalized emittance of 3 {micro}m-rad in Sector 2 blew up to 150 {micro}m-rad in Sector 11 but could be reduced to about 6-12 {micro}m-rad, for the vertical plane although the results were not very stable. Investigating possible root causes for this, we found locations where up to 10 mm dispersion was created along the linac, which were finally verified with strong steering and up to 7 mm settling of the linac accelerator at these locations.

  15. Optimization of steering elements in the RIA driver linac.

    SciTech Connect

    Lessner, E. S.; Aseev, V. S.; Ostroumov, P. N.; Physics

    2005-01-01

    The driver linac of the projected RIA facility is a versatile accelerator, a 1.4-GV, CW superconducting (SC) linac designed to simultaneously accelerate several heavy-ion charge states, providing beams from proton to uranium at 400 MeV/u at power levels at a minimum of 100 kW and up to 400 kW for most beams. Acceleration of multiple-charge-state uranium beams places stringent requirements on the linac design. A steering algorithm was derived that fulfilled the driver's real estate requirements, such as placement of steering dipole coils on SC solenoids and of beam position monitors outside cryostats, and beam-dynamics requirements, such as coupling effects induced by the focusing solenoids. The algorithm has been fully integrated into the tracking code TRACK and it is used to study and optimize the number and position of steering elements that minimize the multiple-beam centroid oscillations and preserve the beam emittance under misalignments of accelerating and transverse focusing elements in the driver linac.

  16. Status of the Project-X CW Linac Design

    SciTech Connect

    Ostiguy, J-F.; Solyak, N.; Berrutti, P.; Carneiro, J.P.; Lebedev, V.; Nagaitsev, S.; Saini, A.; Stheynas, B.; Yakovlev, V.P.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Project-X is a proposed proton accelerator complex at Fermilab that would provide particle beams to support a diversified experimental program at the intensity frontier. As currently envisioned, the complex would employ a CW superconducting linac to accelerate a 1 mA average, 5 mA peak H{sup -} beam from 2.1 MeV to 3 GeV. A second superconducting linac, operating in pulsed mode would ultimately accelerate a small fraction of this beam up to 8 GeV. The CW linac is based on five families of resonators operating at three frequencies: half-wave (1 family at 162.5 MHz), spoke (2 families at 325 MHz) and elliptical (2 families at 650 MHz). Accelerating and focusing elements are assembled in cryomodules separated by short warm sections. A long open region ({approx} 15 m) allows beam extraction at 1 GeV in support of a nuclear experimental program. In this paper, we present the latest iteration of the CW linac baseline lattice. We also briefly compare it to an alternative where the 162.5 half-wave resonators are replaced with 325 MHz spoke resonators.

  17. A METHOD TO CONTROL MULTIPASS BEAM BREAKUP IN RECIRCULATING LINACS

    SciTech Connect

    Byung Yunn

    2003-05-01

    We investigate a method to control the multipass dipole beam breakup instability in a recirculating linac including energy recovery. Effectiveness of an external feedback system for such a goal is shown clearly in a simplified model. We also verify the theoretical result with a simulation study.

  18. Beam Loss Studies for Rare Isotope Driver Linacs Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T P; Kurennoy, S S; Billen, J H; Crandall, K R; Qiang, J; Ryne, R D; Mustapha, B; Ostroumov, P; Zhao, Q; York, and R. C.

    2008-03-26

    The Fortran 90 RIAPMTQ/IMPACT code package is a pair of linked beam-dynamics simulation codes that have been developed for end-to-end computer simulations of multiple-charge-state heavy-ion linacs for future exotic-beam facilities. These codes have multiple charge-state capability, and include space-charge forces. The simulations can extend from the low-energy beam-transport line after an ECR ion source to the end of the linac. The work has been performed by a collaboration including LANL, LBNL, ANL, and MSU. The code RIAPMTQ simulates the linac front-end beam dynamics including the LEBT, RFQ, and MEBT. The code IMPACT simulates the beam dynamics of the main superconducting linac. The codes have been benchmarked for rms beam properties against previously existing codes at ANL and MSU. The codes allow high-statistics runs on parallel supercomputing platforms, particularly at NERSC at LBNL, for studies of beam losses. The codes also run on desktop PC computers for low-statistics work. The code package is described in more detail in a recent publication [1] in the Proceedings of PAC07 (2007 US Particle Accelerator Conference). In this report we describe the main activities for the FY07 beam-loss studies project using this code package.

  19. Heavy ion linac as a high current proton beam injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Winfried; Adonin, Aleksey; Appel, Sabrina; Gerhard, Peter; Heilmann, Manuel; Heymach, Frank; Hollinger, Ralph; Vinzenz, Wolfgang; Vormann, Hartmut; Yaramyshev, Stepan

    2015-05-01

    A significant part of the experimental program at Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) is dedicated to pbar physics requiring a high number of cooled pbars per hour. The primary proton beam has to be provided by a 70 MeV proton linac followed by two synchrotrons. The new FAIR proton linac will deliver a pulsed proton beam of up to 35 mA of 36 μ s duration at a repetition rate of 4 Hz (maximum). The GSI heavy ion linac (UNILAC) is able to deliver world record uranium beam intensities for injection into the synchrotrons, but it is not suitable for FAIR relevant proton beam operation. In an advanced machine investigation program it could be shown that the UNILAC is able to provide for sufficient high intensities of CH3 beam, cracked (and stripped) in a supersonic nitrogen gas jet into protons and carbon ions. This advanced operational approach will result in up to 3 mA of proton intensity at a maximum beam energy of 20 MeV, 1 0 0 μ s pulse duration and a repetition rate of up to 2.7 Hz delivered to the synchrotron SIS18. Recent linac beam measurements will be presented, showing that the UNILAC is able to serve as a proton FAIR injector for the first time, while the performance is limited to 25% of the FAIR requirements.

  20. An Energy Recovery Electron Linac On Ring Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolitsa Merminga; Geoffrey Krafft; Valeri Lebedev; Ilan Ben-Zvi

    2001-09-01

    Electron-proton/ion colliders with center of mass energies between 14 GeV and 100 GeV (protons) or 63 GeV/A (ions) and luminosities at the 10{sup 33} (per nucleon) level have been proposed recently as a means for studying hadronic structure. Electron beam polarization appears to be crucial for many of the experiments. Two accelerator design scenarios have been examined in detail: colliding rings and recirculating linac-on-ring. Although the linac-on-ring scenario is not as well developed as the ring-ring scenario, comparable luminosities appear feasible. The linac-on-ring option presents significant advantages with respect to: (1) spin manipulations; (2) reduction of the synchrotron radiation load in the detectors; (3) a wide range of continuous energy variability. Rf power and beam dump considerations require that the electron linac recover the beam energy. This technology has been demonstrated at Jefferson Lab's IR FEL with cw current up to 5 mA and beam energy up to 50 MeV. Based on extrapolations from actual measurements and calculations, energy recovery is expected to be feasible at higher currents (a few hundred mA) and higher energies (a few GeV) as well. The report begins with a brief overview of Jefferson Lab's experience with energy recovery and summarize its benefits. Luminosity projections for the linac-ring scenario based on fundamental limitations are presented next. The feasibility of an energy recovery electron linac-on-proton ring collider is investigated and four conceptual point designs are shown corresponding to electron to proton energies of: 3 GeV on 15 GeV, 5 GeV on 50 GeV and 10 GeV on 250 GeV, and for gold ions with 100 GeV/A. The last two designs assume that the protons or ions are stored in the existing RHIC accelerator. Accelerator physics issues relevant to proton rings and energy recovery linacs are discussed next and a list of required R and D for the realization of such a design is presented.

  1. Recent developments for high-intensity proton linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Garnett, R.W.; Gray, E.R.; Nath, S.

    1996-04-01

    High-intensity proton linacs are being proposed for new projects around the world, especially for tritium production, and for pulsed spallation neutron sources. Typical requirements for these linacs include peak beam current of about 100 mA, and final energies of 1 GeV and higher, APT, a tritium production linac, requires cw operation to obtain sufficient average tritium production linac, requires cw operation to obtain sufficient average beam power, and H{sup +} ion sources appear capable of providing the required current and emittances. The pulsed spallation neutron source requires a linac as an injector to one or more accumulator rings, and favors the use of an H{sup minus} beam to allow charge-exchange injection into the rings. For both applications high availability is demanded; the fraction of scheduled beam time for actual production must be 75% or more. Such a high availability requires low beam-loss to avoid radioactivation of the accelerator, and to allow hands-on maintenance that will keep the mean repair and maintenance times short. To keep the accelerator activation sufficiently low, the beam loss should not exceed about 0.1 to 1.0 nA/m, except perhaps for a few localized places, where special design adaptations could be made. The requirement of such small beam losses at such a high intensity presents a new beam physics challenge. This challenge will require greater understanding of the beam distribution, including the low- density beam halo, which is believed to be responsible for most of the beam losses. Furthermore, it will be necessary to choose the apertures so the beam losses will be acceptably low, and because large aperture size is generally accompanied by an economic penalty resulting from reduced power efficiency, an optimized choice of the aperture will be desirable.

  2. Design of a post linac for an energy upgrade of a heavy-ion injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Y.; Noda, K.

    2014-07-01

    A post linac is being designed for an energy upgrade of a heavy-ion injector. This post linac is to be installed downstream of the formerly developed compact injector, consisting of an Electron-Cyclotron-Resonance Ion-Source (ECRIS), the Radio-Frequency-Quadrupole (RFQ) linac and the Alternating-Phase-Focused Interdigital H-mode Drift-Tube-Linac (APF IH-DTL). It is aimed to increase the output energy of a heavy-ion injector. Carbon ions are initially accelerated with the compact injector to 4 MeV/u, and further accelerated with the post linac up to 8 MeV/u. The three linacs have the same operating frequency of 200 MHz. For beam focusing of the post linac, the APF method is used. Iterative simulations of beam dynamics were performed to determine the optimum array of synchronous phases in each gap. The results of the simulations provided that the calculated efficiency of beam transmission through the post linac is as high as 98.4%. The total length of this APF post linac is estimated to be approximately 3 m. A design overview of the injector system including the post linac is presented.

  3. Investigation of alternating-phase focusing for superconducting linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Sagalovsky, L.; Delayen, J.R.

    1992-10-01

    The paper describes a new model of alternating-phase focusing (APF) dynamics applicable to ion linacs with short independently controlled superconducting cavities. The equations of motion are derived for a cylindrically symmetric electric field represented by a traveling wave with continuous periodic phase modulation. solutions are obtained and analyzed for both the linear and nonlinear particle motion. Problems of linear stability and overall longitudinal acceptance are solved using standard mathematical techniques for periodic systems; analytical results are obtained. It is shown that the main beam dynamical aspects of APF are adequately described by four parameters: equilibrium synchronous phase, phase modulation amplitude, length of APF period, and incremental energy gain. The model can be applied to study the feasibility of realizing APF in a low-{beta} section of a proton linac.

  4. Investigation of alternating-phase focusing for superconducting linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Sagalovsky, L.; Delayen, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    The paper describes a new model of alternating-phase focusing (APF) dynamics applicable to ion linacs with short independently controlled superconducting cavities. The equations of motion are derived for a cylindrically symmetric electric field represented by a traveling wave with continuous periodic phase modulation. solutions are obtained and analyzed for both the linear and nonlinear particle motion. Problems of linear stability and overall longitudinal acceptance are solved using standard mathematical techniques for periodic systems; analytical results are obtained. It is shown that the main beam dynamical aspects of APF are adequately described by four parameters: equilibrium synchronous phase, phase modulation amplitude, length of APF period, and incremental energy gain. The model can be applied to study the feasibility of realizing APF in a low-{beta} section of a proton linac.

  5. H- AND PROTON BEAM LOSS COMPARISON AT SNS SUPERCONDUCTING LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Galambos, John D; Plum, Michael A; Shishlo, Andrei P

    2012-01-01

    A comparison of beam loss in the superconducting part (SCL) of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac for H- and protons is presented. During the experiment the nominal beam of negative hydrogen ions in the SCL was replaced by a proton beam created by insertion of a thin stripping carbon foil placed in the low energy section of the linac. The observed significant reduction in the beam loss for protons is explained by a domination of the intra beam stripping mechanism of the beam loss for H-. The details of the experiment are discussed, and a preliminary estimation of the cross section of the reaction H- + H- -> H- + H0 + e is presented. Earlier, a short description of these studies was presented in [1].

  6. MODEL BENCHMARK WITH EXPERIMENT AT THE SNS LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Shishlo, Andrei P; Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Liu, Yun; Plum, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    The history of attempts to perform a transverse match-ing in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) superconduct-ing linac (SCL) is discussed. The SCL has 9 laser wire (LW) stations to perform non-destructive measurements of the transverse beam profiles. Any matching starts with the measurement of the initial Twiss parameters, which in the SNS case was done by using the first four LW stations at the beginning of the superconducting linac. For years the consistency between data from all LW stations could not be achieved. This problem was resolved only after significant improvements in accuracy of the phase scans of the SCL cavities, more precise analysis of all available scan data, better optics planning, and the initial longitudi-nal Twiss parameter measurements. The presented paper discusses in detail these developed procedures.

  7. Status of the Linac based positron source at Saclay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, J.-M.; Coulloux, G.; Debu, P.; Dzitko, H.; Hardy, P.; Liszkay, L.; Lotrus, P.; Muranaka, T.; Noel, C.; Pérez, P.; Pierret, O.; Ruiz, N.; Sacquin, Y.

    2013-06-01

    Low energy positron beams are of major interest for fundamental science and materials science. IRFU has developed and built a slow positron source based on a compact, low energy (4.3 MeV) electron linac. The linac-based source will provide positrons for a magnetic storage trap and represents the first step of the GBAR experiment (Gravitational Behavior of Antimatter in Rest) recently approved by CERN for an installation in the Antiproton Decelerator hall. The installation built in Saclay will be described with its main characteristics. The ultimate target of the GBAR experiment will be briefly presented as well as the foreseen development of an industrial positron source dedicated for materials science laboratories.

  8. Assessment of Alternative RF Linac Structures for APT

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-26

    The APT program has been examining both normal and superconducting variants of the APT linac for the past two years. A decision on which of the two will be the selected technology will depend upon several considerations including the results of ongoing feasibility experiments, the performance and overall attractiveness of each of the design concepts, and an assessment of the system-level features of both alternatives. The primary objective of the Assessment of Alternative RF Linac Structures for APT study reported herein was to assess and compare, at the system-level, the performance, capital and life cycle costs, reliability/availability/maintainability (RAM) and manufacturing schedules of APT RF linear accelerators based upon both superconducting and normal conducting technologies. A secondary objective was to perform trade studies to explore opportunities for system optimization, technology substitution and alternative growth pathways and to identify sensitivities to design uncertainties.

  9. Focusing solenoids for the HINS Linac front end

    SciTech Connect

    Terechkine, I.; Appollinari, G.; Di-Marco, J.; Huang, Y.; Orris, D.; Page, T.; Rabehl, R.; Tartaglia, M.; Tompkins, J.; /Fermilab

    2008-10-01

    The low energy part of a linac for the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) project at Fermilab will use superconducting solenoids as beam focusing elements (lenses). While the lenses for the conventional DTL-type accelerating section of the front end require individual cryostats, in the superconducting accelerating sections solenoids will be installed inside RF cryomodules. Some of the lenses in the conventional and in the superconducting sections are equipped with horizontal and vertical steering dipoles. Lenses for the DTL section are in the stage of production with certification activities ongoing at Fermilab. For the superconducting sections of the linac, a prototype lens has been built and tested. Each lens will be installed in the transport channel of the accelerator so that its magnetic axis is on the beamline. Corresponding technique has been developed at Fermilab and is used during the certification process. This report summarizes design features, parameters, and test results of the focusing lenses.

  10. Design of a Marx-Topology Modulator for FNAL Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, T. A.; Garcia, F. G.; Kufer, M. R.; Pfeffer, H.; Wolff, D.

    2015-04-28

    The Fermilab Proton Improvement Plan (PIP) was formed in late 2011 to address important and necessary upgrades to the Proton Source machines (Injector line, Linac and Booster). The goal is to increase the proton flux by doubling the Booster beam cycle rate while maintaining the same intensity per cycle, the same uptime, and the same residual activation in the enclosure. For the Linac, the main focus within PIP is to address reliability. One of the main tasks is to replace the present hard-tube modulator used on the 200 MHz RF system. Plans to replace this high power system with a Marx-topology modulator, capable of providing the required waveform shaping to stabilize the accelerating gradient and compensate for beam loading, will be presented, along with development data from the prototype unit.

  11. PROSPECTS FOR A VERY HIGH POWER CW SRF LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Rimmer

    2010-06-01

    Steady development in SRF accelerator technology combined with the success of large scale installations such as CEBAF at Jefferson Laboratory and the SNS Linac at ORNL gives credibility to the concept of very high average power CW machines for light sources or Proton drivers. Such machines would be powerful tools for discovery science in themselves but could also pave the way to reliable cost effective drivers for such applications as neutrino factories, an energy-frontier muon collider, nuclear waste transmutation or accelerator driven subcritical reactors for energy production. In contrast to machines such as ILC that need maximum accelerating gradient, the challenges in these machines are mainly in efficiency, reliability, beam stability, beam loss and of course cost. In this paper the present state of the art is briefly reviewed and options for a multi-GeV, multi-MW CW linac are discussed.

  12. Spectral fluence of neutrons generated by radiotherapeutic linacs.

    PubMed

    Králík, Miloslav; Šolc, Jaroslav; Vondráček, Vladimir; Šmoldasová, Jana; Farkašová, Estera; Tichá, Ivana

    2015-02-01

    Spectral fluences of neutrons generated in the heads of the radiotherapeutic linacs Varian Clinac 2100 C/D and Siemens ARTISTE were measured by means of the Bonner spheres spectrometer whose active detector of thermal neutrons was replaced by an activation detector, i.e. a tablet made of pure manganese. Measurements with different collimator settings reveal an interesting dependence of neutron fluence on the area defined by the collimator jaws. The determined neutron spectral fluences were used to derive ambient dose equivalent rate along the treatment coach. To clarify at which components of the linac neutrons are mainly created, the measurements were complemented with MCNPX calculations based on a realistic model of the Varian Clinac.

  13. Cavities and Cryomodules for the RIA Driver Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerst, J.D.; Shepard, K.W.; Kedzie, M.; Kelly, M.P.

    2004-06-23

    We describe cavities, cryomodules, and associated subsystem concepts for the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) driver linac baseline design. Some alternative concepts are also presented. Beams from protons to uranium are accelerated with superconducting RF cavities operating from 57.5 MHz to 805 MHz. Substantial cost reduction over the baseline design may be achieved by replacing three classes of elliptical cell structures operating at 2 K by two classes of three-spoke drift tube structures. Cavity count and tunnel length are reduced while efficient cooling at 4.5 K for all linac structures may be possible. Issues include RF power requirements, microphonics, clean handling techniques, separate cavity and insulating vacuum systems, and heat load.

  14. Linac4 low energy beam measurements with negative hydrogen ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scrivens, R.; Bellodi, G.; Crettiez, O.; Dimov, V.; Gerard, D.; Granemann Souza, E.; Guida, R.; Hansen, J.; Lallement, J.-B.; Lettry, J.; Lombardi, A.; Midttun, Ø.; Pasquino, C.; Raich, U.; Riffaud, B.; Roncarolo, F.; Valerio-Lizarraga, C. A.; Wallner, J.; Yarmohammadi Satri, M.; Zickler, T.

    2014-02-01

    Linac4, a 160 MeV normal-conducting H- linear accelerator, is the first step in the upgrade of the beam intensity available from the LHC proton injectors at CERN. The Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) line from the pulsed 2 MHz RF driven ion source, to the 352 MHz RFQ (Radiofrequency Quadrupole) has been built and installed at a test stand, and has been used to transport and match to the RFQ a pulsed 14 mA H- beam at 45 keV. A temporary slit-and-grid emittance measurement system has been put in place to characterize the beam delivered to the RFQ. In this paper a description of the LEBT and its beam diagnostics is given, and the results of beam emittance measurements and beam transmission measurements through the RFQ are compared with the expectation from simulations.

  15. Multi-beam RFQ linac structure for heavy ion fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashizaki, Noriyosu; Ishibashi, Takuya; Ito, Taku; Hattori, Toshiyuki

    2009-07-01

    Both the RF linear accelerator (linac) and the linear induction accelerator have been considered as injectors in a driver system for heavy ion fusion (HIF). In order to relax beam defocusing by space charge effect in the low-energy region, the accelerating beams that were merged and had their beam currents increased by the funnel tree system are injected into storage rings. A multi-beam linac that accelerates multiple beams in an accelerator cavity has the advantages of cost reduction and downsizing of the system. We modeled the multi-beam Interdigital-H type radio frequency quadruple (IH-RFQ) cavities with the different beam numbers and evaluated the electromagnetic characteristics by simulation. As a result, the reasonable ranges of their configuration were indicated for a practical use.

  16. Maximizing Number of Passes in Recirculating Energy Recovery Linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogacz, S. Alex

    2016-03-01

    The next generation of high energy recirculating linear accelerators (RLAs) will rely on the energy recovery (ER) process for their extreme high current operation. Here, we discuss optimum design of multi-pass linac optics for an RLA based on a large scale superconducting linac. Initial strategy used in the design of 60 GeV, 6 pass RLA for the LHeC, has been extended to 10 passes for the proposed CEBAF ER experiment. The presented optimization scheme addresses overall beam transport performance, as well as specific beam dynamics issues, such as, beam stability due to collective effects. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics under contract DE-AC05-06OR23177.

  17. Beam-based alignment measurements of the LANSCE linac

    SciTech Connect

    McCrady, R. C.; Rybarcyk, L. J.

    2004-01-01

    We have made measurements of the alignment of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) Drift Tube linac (DTL) and Side Coupled linac (SCL) using beam position measurements and analyzing them with linear models. In the DTL, we varied the injection steering and focusing lattice strengths, measured the beam position after each DTL tank, and analyzed the data with a linear model using R-matrices that were either computed by the Trace-3D computer program or extracted from analysis of the data. The analysis model allowed for tank-to-tank misalignments. The measurements were made similarly in the SCL, where the analysis model allowed for misalignments of each quadrupole doublet lens. We present here the analysis techniques and the resulting beam-based alignment measurements.

  18. Accelerator control system at KEKB and the linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Atsuyoshi; Furukawa, Kazuro; Kadokura, Eiichi; Kurashina, Miho; Mikawa, Katsuhiko; Nakamura, Tatsuro; Odagiri, Jun-ichi; Satoh, Masanori; Suwada, Tsuyoshi

    2013-03-01

    KEKB has completed all of the technical milestones and has offered important insights into the flavor structure of elementary particles, especially CP violation. The accelerator control system at KEKB and the injector linac was initiated by a combination of scripting languages at the operation layer and EPICS (experimental physics and industrial control system) at the equipment layer. During the project, many features were implemented to achieve extreme performance from the machine. In particular, the online linkage to the accelerator simulation played an essential role. In order to further improve the reliability and flexibility, two major concepts were additionally introduced later in the project, namely, channel access everywhere and dual-tier controls. Based on the improved control system, a virtual accelerator concept was realized, allowing the single injector linac to serve as three separate injectors to KEKB's high-energy ring, low-energy ring, and Photon Factory, respectively. These control technologies are indispensable for future particle accelerators.

  19. Linac4 low energy beam measurements with negative hydrogen ions

    SciTech Connect

    Scrivens, R. Bellodi, G.; Crettiez, O.; Dimov, V.; Gerard, D.; Granemann Souza, E.; Guida, R.; Hansen, J.; Lallement, J.-B.; Lettry, J.; Lombardi, A.; Midttun, Ø.; Pasquino, C.; Raich, U.; Riffaud, B.; Roncarolo, F.; Valerio-Lizarraga, C. A.; Wallner, J.; Yarmohammadi Satri, M.; Zickler, T.

    2014-02-15

    Linac4, a 160 MeV normal-conducting H{sup −} linear accelerator, is the first step in the upgrade of the beam intensity available from the LHC proton injectors at CERN. The Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) line from the pulsed 2 MHz RF driven ion source, to the 352 MHz RFQ (Radiofrequency Quadrupole) has been built and installed at a test stand, and has been used to transport and match to the RFQ a pulsed 14 mA H{sup −} beam at 45 keV. A temporary slit-and-grid emittance measurement system has been put in place to characterize the beam delivered to the RFQ. In this paper a description of the LEBT and its beam diagnostics is given, and the results of beam emittance measurements and beam transmission measurements through the RFQ are compared with the expectation from simulations.

  20. Linac4 low energy beam measurements with negative hydrogen ions.

    PubMed

    Scrivens, R; Bellodi, G; Crettiez, O; Dimov, V; Gerard, D; Granemann Souza, E; Guida, R; Hansen, J; Lallement, J-B; Lettry, J; Lombardi, A; Midttun, Ø; Pasquino, C; Raich, U; Riffaud, B; Roncarolo, F; Valerio-Lizarraga, C A; Wallner, J; Yarmohammadi Satri, M; Zickler, T

    2014-02-01

    Linac4, a 160 MeV normal-conducting H(-) linear accelerator, is the first step in the upgrade of the beam intensity available from the LHC proton injectors at CERN. The Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) line from the pulsed 2 MHz RF driven ion source, to the 352 MHz RFQ (Radiofrequency Quadrupole) has been built and installed at a test stand, and has been used to transport and match to the RFQ a pulsed 14 mA H(-) beam at 45 keV. A temporary slit-and-grid emittance measurement system has been put in place to characterize the beam delivered to the RFQ. In this paper a description of the LEBT and its beam diagnostics is given, and the results of beam emittance measurements and beam transmission measurements through the RFQ are compared with the expectation from simulations.

  1. Waveguide-coupled cavities for energy recovery linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurennoy, S. S.; Nguyen, D. C.; Young, L. M.

    2004-08-01

    A novel scheme for energy recovery linacs used as FEL drivers is proposed. It consists of two parallel beam lines, one for electron beam acceleration and the other for the used beam that is bent after passing through a wiggler. The used beam is decelerated by the structure and feeds the cavity fields. The main feature of the scheme is that RF cavities are coupled with waveguides between these two linacs. The waveguide cut through the two beam pipes provides an efficient mechanism for energy transfer. The superconducting RF cavities in the two accelerators can be shaped differently, with an operating mode at the same frequency. This provides HOM detuning and therefore reduces the beam break-up effects. Another advantage of the proposed two-beam scheme is easy tuning of the cavity coupling by changing the waveguide length.

  2. Vacuum requirements for heavy ion recirculating induction linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, J.J.; Yu, S.S. ); Faltens, A. )

    1990-12-01

    We examine the requirements of the vacuum system for the LLNL/LBL recirculating induction linac concept. We reexamine processes, including beam stripping, background gas ionization, intra-beam charge exchange and desorption of gas molecules from the wall due to the incident ionized gas molecules and stripped ions, in the context of the proposed recirculator. We discuss implications for the vacuum system layout and estimate the cost of such a system. 18 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. High duty factor plasma generator for CERN's Superconducting Proton Linac.

    PubMed

    Lettry, J; Kronberger, M; Scrivens, R; Chaudet, E; Faircloth, D; Favre, G; Geisser, J-M; Küchler, D; Mathot, S; Midttun, O; Paoluzzi, M; Schmitzer, C; Steyaert, D

    2010-02-01

    CERN's Linac4 is a 160 MeV linear accelerator currently under construction. It will inject negatively charged hydrogen ions into CERN's PS-Booster. Its ion source is a noncesiated rf driven H(-) volume source directly inspired from the one of DESY and is aimed to deliver pulses of 80 mA of H(-) during 0.4 ms at a 2 Hz repetition rate. The Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) project is part of the luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider. It consists of an extension of Linac4 up to 5 GeV and is foreseen to deliver protons to a future 50 GeV synchrotron (PS2). For the SPL high power option (HP-SPL), the ion source would deliver pulses of 80 mA of H(-) during 1.2 ms and operate at a 50 Hz repetition rate. This significant upgrade motivates the design of the new water cooled plasma generator presented in this paper. Its engineering is based on the results of a finite element thermal study of the Linac4 H(-) plasma generator that identified critical components and thermal barriers. A cooling system is proposed which achieves the required heat dissipation and maintains the original functionality. Materials with higher thermal conductivity are selected and, wherever possible, thermal barriers resulting from low pressure contacts are removed by brazing metals on insulators. The AlN plasma chamber cooling circuit is inspired from the approach chosen for the cesiated high duty factor rf H(-) source operating at SNS. PMID:20192392

  4. Beam based alignment of sector-1 of the SLC linac

    SciTech Connect

    Emma, P.

    1992-03-01

    A technique is described which uses the beam to simultaneously measure quadrupole magnet and beam position monitor (BPM) transverse misalignments. The technique is applied to sector-1 of the SLC linac where simultaneous acceleration of electron and positron beams with minimal steering elements and BPMs makes quadrupole alignment critical for high transmission of the large transverse emittance positron beam. Simulation results as well as measurements are presented.

  5. High duty factor plasma generator for CERN's Superconducting Proton Linac.

    PubMed

    Lettry, J; Kronberger, M; Scrivens, R; Chaudet, E; Faircloth, D; Favre, G; Geisser, J-M; Küchler, D; Mathot, S; Midttun, O; Paoluzzi, M; Schmitzer, C; Steyaert, D

    2010-02-01

    CERN's Linac4 is a 160 MeV linear accelerator currently under construction. It will inject negatively charged hydrogen ions into CERN's PS-Booster. Its ion source is a noncesiated rf driven H(-) volume source directly inspired from the one of DESY and is aimed to deliver pulses of 80 mA of H(-) during 0.4 ms at a 2 Hz repetition rate. The Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) project is part of the luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider. It consists of an extension of Linac4 up to 5 GeV and is foreseen to deliver protons to a future 50 GeV synchrotron (PS2). For the SPL high power option (HP-SPL), the ion source would deliver pulses of 80 mA of H(-) during 1.2 ms and operate at a 50 Hz repetition rate. This significant upgrade motivates the design of the new water cooled plasma generator presented in this paper. Its engineering is based on the results of a finite element thermal study of the Linac4 H(-) plasma generator that identified critical components and thermal barriers. A cooling system is proposed which achieves the required heat dissipation and maintains the original functionality. Materials with higher thermal conductivity are selected and, wherever possible, thermal barriers resulting from low pressure contacts are removed by brazing metals on insulators. The AlN plasma chamber cooling circuit is inspired from the approach chosen for the cesiated high duty factor rf H(-) source operating at SNS.

  6. Literature Review on LINACs and FFAGs for Hadron Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdú-Andrés, Silvia; Amaldi, Ugo; Faus-Golfe, Ángeles

    The document summarizes the recent papers, presentations and other public information on Radio-Frequency (RF) Linear Accelerators (linacs) and Fixed-Field Alternating-Gradient (FFAG) accelerators for hadron therapy. The main focus is on technical aspects of these accelerators. This report intends to provide a general overview of the state-of-the-art in those accelerators which could be used in short and middle-term for treating cancer.

  7. CERN's Linac4 H- sources: Status and operational results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lettry, J.; Aguglia, D.; Alessi, J.; Andersson, P.; Bertolo, S.; Butterworth, A.; Coutron, Y.; Dallocchio, A.; David, N.; Chaudet, E.; Fink, D.; Gil-Flores, J.; Garlasche, M.; Grudiev, A.; Guida, R.; Hansen, J.; Haase, M.; Hatayama, A.; Jones, A.; Koszar, I.; Lehn, T.; Machado, C.; Mastrostefano, C.; Mathot, S.; Mattei, S.; Midttun, Ø.; Moyret, P.; Nisbet, D.; Nishida, K.; O'Neil, M.; Paoluzzi, M.; Sanchez Alvarez, J.; Scrivens, R.; Shibata, T.; Steyaert, D.; Thaus, N.; Zelenski, A.

    2015-04-01

    Two volume sources equipped with DESY and CERN plasma generators and a low voltage electron dump were operated at 45 kV in the Linac4 tunnel and on a dedicated test stand. These volume sources delivered approximately 20 mA and ensured the commissioning of the Radio Frequency Quadrupole accelerator and of the first section of the Drift Tube Linac. CERN's prototype of a cesiated surface source equipped with this electron dump was operated continuously from November 2013 to April 2014 on the ion source test stand and is being commissioned in the Linac4 tunnel. Before cesiation, the prototype conditioned in volume mode provided up to 30 mA H- beam. Short cesiations, of the order of 10 mg effectively reduced the intensity of co-extracted electrons down to 2 - 8 times the H- current; this cesiated surface operation mode delivered up to 60 mA H- beam. An H- beam of the order of 40 mA was sustained up to four weeks operation with 500 μs pulses at 1.2s spacing. A new extraction was designed to match these beam properties. A copy of BNL's magnetron produced at CERN was tested at BNL and delivered at 40 kV H- beam exceeding Linac4's nominal intensity of 80 mA. In this contribution, the performances, dynamic response to cesiation, stability and availability of these prototypes are described. The needed optimization of the emittance of H- beam above 40 mA is presented, which requires an evolution of the front end that encompasses implementation of a large ceramic insulator.

  8. Simulation of waveguide FEL oscillator using RF linac

    SciTech Connect

    Kuruma, S.; Asakawa, M.; Imasaki, K.

    1995-12-31

    One dimensional multifrequency simulation code for waveguide mode FEL has been developed. Using this simulation code, we analyzed the spontaneous emission from electron micropulse from RF Linac. It is found that some parameters both high and low frequency waveguide modes are growing simultaneously, so the two radiation pulses are generated and amplified. And the experimental data for cavity length detuning of the radiation power are analyzed.

  9. LANSCE linac RF performance for a long pulse spallation source

    SciTech Connect

    Lyles, J.; Regan, A.; Bolme, G.

    1996-09-01

    The present LANL Long Pulse Spallation Source (LPSS) design consists of a 1 MW neutron spallation target fed by a pulsed proton beam from the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE, formerly LAMPF) accelerator. This proton beam would have a repetition rate of 60 Hz and a pulse length of 1 ms for a duty factor of 6%. An average/peak currentof 1.25 mA/21 mA would be required foran 800 MeV beam to provide this power at this duty factor. The spallation target would reside in Area A and use the H+ beam. The LANSCE accelerator would also be required to simultaneoulsy deliver H- beams to the Manual Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (MLNSC) and Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility. Presently LANSCE delivers 16.5 mA peak of H+ beam at 120 Hz, with a 625 {mu}S beam pulsewidth; H- beams are also accelerated for MLNSC and WNR. In Nov. 1995, linac operation shifted to LPSS pulse parameters, except for the peak curent which remained at 16.5 mA. In addition to delivering 800 kW H+ proton beam to physics production targets, H- beams were simultaneously delivered to customers for the PSR feeding MLNSC and to researchers using WNR. Performance of the RF powerplants for the 201.25 MHz drift tube linac 805 MHz side coupled linac, and associated electronics is described. Conclusion of the experiment is that the LANSCE linac can be upgraded through modest improvements to drive a 1 MW LPSS.

  10. Ion sources for induction linac driven heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Rutkowski, H.L.; Eylon, S.; Chupp, W.W.

    1993-08-01

    The use of ion sources in induction linacs for heavy ion fusion is fundamentally different from their use in the rf linac-storage rings approach. Induction linacs require very high current, short pulse extraction usually with large apertures which are dictated by the injector design. One is faced with the problem of extracting beams in a pulsed fashion while maintaining high beam quality during the pulse (low-emittance). Four types of sources have been studied for this application. The vacuum arc and the rf cusp field source are the plasma types and the porous plug and hot alumino-silicate surface source are the thermal types. The hot alumino-silicate potassium source has proved to be the best candidate for the next generation of scaled experiments. The porous plug for potassium is somewhat more difficult to use. The vacuum arc suffers from noise and lifetime problems and the rf cusp field source is difficult to use with very short pulses. Operational experience with all of these types of sources is presented.

  11. Status and operation of the Linac4 ion source prototypes

    SciTech Connect

    Lettry, J. Aguglia, D.; Andersson, P.; Bertolo, S.; Butterworth, A.; Coutron, Y.; Dallocchio, A.; Chaudet, E.; Gil-Flores, J.; Guida, R.; Hansen, J.; Koszar, I.; Mahner, E.; Mastrostefano, C.; Mathot, S.; Mattei, S.; Midttun, Ø.; Moyret, P.; Nisbet, D.; O’Neil, M.; and others

    2014-02-15

    CERN's Linac4 45 kV H{sup −} ion sources prototypes are installed at a dedicated ion source test stand and in the Linac4 tunnel. The operation of the pulsed hydrogen injection, RF sustained plasma, and pulsed high voltages are described. The first experimental results of two prototypes relying on 2 MHz RF-plasma heating are presented. The plasma is ignited via capacitive coupling, and sustained by inductive coupling. The light emitted from the plasma is collected by viewports pointing to the plasma chamber wall in the middle of the RF solenoid and to the plasma chamber axis. Preliminary measurements of optical emission spectroscopy and photometry of the plasma have been performed. The design of a cesiated ion source is presented. The volume source has produced a 45 keV H{sup −} beam of 16–22 mA which has successfully been used for the commissioning of the Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT), Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and chopper of Linac4.

  12. Commissioning the FELI linac and UV-FEL facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tomimasu, T.; Saeki, K.; Miyauchi, Y.

    1995-12-31

    The FELI 165-MeV linac and UV-FEL facility are in the commissioning, stage. A thermionic triode gun of the 6-MeV injector emits 500-ps pulses of 2.3A at 22.3125MHz. These pulses are compressed to 60AX 7ps by a 714-MHz prebuncher and a 2856-MHz buncher and seven ETL type accelerating waveguides with a length of 2.93m. The length of the linac including bending sections of two S-type BT systems for two undulators used for IR-FEL oscillations is 46m. The buncher and these accelerating waveguides are powered by two klystrons (E3729, 2856MHz, total 48MW, 24-{mu}s flat top long pulses). The flatness of our klystron modulator pulses is 0.067% at 24-{mu}s duration. An rf-ageing for new four accelerating waveguides will be started in May. An S-type BT line for 165-MeV beam from the linac will be installed in the end of April. A 2.68-m undulator ({lambda}u=4.0cm, N=67, Kmax gap length {ge}16mm) and an optical cavity (Lc=6.72m) will be installed early in July. The beam conditionings for UV-FEL experiments will be started in July.

  13. High-brightness beam diagnostics for the APS linac.

    SciTech Connect

    Lumpkin, A. H.

    1999-04-20

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) injector includes an S-band linac with the capability to accelerate beams to 650 MeV. The linac has recently been upgraded with the installation of an rf thermionic gun in addition to the standard DC thermionic gun. The rf gun is predicted to have lower emittance (5{pi}mm mrad) and may be used to support the APS self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) experiments. The critical characterization of this gun's beam has begun with a beam diagnostics station at the end of the linac that can address beam transverse size, emittance, and bunch length (peak current). This station uses both an optical transition radiation (OTR) screen at 45{degree} to the beam direction and a Ce-doped YAG single crystal normal to the beam with a 45{degree} mirror behind it. The visible light images are detected by a Vicon CCD camera and a Hamamatsu C5680 synchroscan streak camera. Spatial resolution of about 30 {micro}m ({sigma}) and temporal resolution of 1 ps ({sigma}) have been demonstrated. Examples of rf gun beam characterization at 220 MeV are reported.

  14. Design development of the SCDTL structure for the TOP linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picardi, L.; Ronsivalle, C.; Spataro, B.

    1999-04-01

    The Side Coupled Drift Tube Linac (SCDTL) is an attractive 3 GHz accelerating structure composed of short DTL tanks coupled together by side coupling cavities, in the course of development of the 200 MeV proton linear accelerator for proton therapy planned for the Terapia Oncologica con Protoni (TOP) program of the Italian National Institute of Health (Istituto Superiore di Sanità, ISS). The TOP Linac will be used to boost to 70 MeV the 7 MeV proton beam from a linac injector. Our main concern is to investigate in detail the characteristics of the structure in terms of RF properties of the accelerating mode, like longitudinal and transverse shunt impedance and quality factor, and of the other modes that cause the origin of the tank dispersion curve, in order to stabilize the behaviour under operating conditions. Calculations performed with the computer three-dimensional (3D) codes MAFIA and SOPRANO on the smallest unit of the system (a single DTL tank without coupling cavities) and experimental measurements made on a prototype have shown good agreement. Two possible supporting stem configurations (single stem and two stems 180° apart for each drift tube) were examined and a comparison of the results in both cases are discussed.

  15. Recent improvements to software used for optimization of SRF linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, Tom J.

    2014-12-01

    This work describes a software tool that allows one to vary parameters and understand the effects on the optimized costs of construction plus 10 year operations of an SRF linac, where operation costs includes the cost of the electrical utilities but not the labor or other costs. The program includes estimates for the associated cryogenic facility, and controls hardware. The software interface provides the ability to vary the cost of the different aspects of the machine as well as to change the cryomodule and cavity types. Additionally, this work will describe the recent improvements to the software that allow one to estimate the costs of energy-recovery based linacs and to enter arbitrary values of the low field Q0 and Q0 slope. The initial goal when developing the software was to convert a spreadsheet format to a graphical interface and to allow the ability to sweep different parameter sets. The tools also allow one to compare the cost of the different facets of the machine design and operations so as to better understand tradeoffs. An example of how it was used to independently investigate cost optimization tradeoffs for the LCLS-II linac will also be presented.

  16. Reliability and availability studies in the RIA driver linac.

    SciTech Connect

    Lessner, E. S.; Ostroumov, P. N.; Physics

    2005-01-01

    The Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) facility will include various complex systems and must provide radioactive beams to many users simultaneously. The availability of radioactive beams for most experiments at the fully-commissioned facility should be as high as possible within design cost limitations. To make a realistic estimate of the achievable reliability a detailed analysis is required. The RIA driver linac is a complex machine containing a large number of superconducting (SC) resonators and capable of accelerating multiple-charge-state beams [1]. At the pre-CDR stage of the design it is essential to identify critical facility subsystem failures that can prevent the driver linac from operating. The reliability and availability of the driver linac were studied using expert information and data from operating machines such as ATLAS, APS, JLab, and LANL. Availability studies are performed with a Monte-Carlo simulation code previously applied to availability assessments of the NLC facility [2] and the results used to identify subsystem failures that most affect the availability and reliability of the RIA driver, and guide design iterations and component specifications to address identified problems.

  17. Status and operation of the Linac4 ion source prototypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lettry, J.; Aguglia, D.; Andersson, P.; Bertolo, S.; Butterworth, A.; Coutron, Y.; Dallocchio, A.; Chaudet, E.; Gil-Flores, J.; Guida, R.; Hansen, J.; Hatayama, A.; Koszar, I.; Mahner, E.; Mastrostefano, C.; Mathot, S.; Mattei, S.; Midttun, Ø.; Moyret, P.; Nisbet, D.; Nishida, K.; O'Neil, M.; Ohta, M.; Paoluzzi, M.; Pasquino, C.; Pereira, H.; Rochez, J.; Sanchez Alvarez, J.; Sanchez Arias, J.; Scrivens, R.; Shibata, T.; Steyaert, D.; Thaus, N.; Yamamoto, T.

    2014-02-01

    CERN's Linac4 45 kV H- ion sources prototypes are installed at a dedicated ion source test stand and in the Linac4 tunnel. The operation of the pulsed hydrogen injection, RF sustained plasma, and pulsed high voltages are described. The first experimental results of two prototypes relying on 2 MHz RF-plasma heating are presented. The plasma is ignited via capacitive coupling, and sustained by inductive coupling. The light emitted from the plasma is collected by viewports pointing to the plasma chamber wall in the middle of the RF solenoid and to the plasma chamber axis. Preliminary measurements of optical emission spectroscopy and photometry of the plasma have been performed. The design of a cesiated ion source is presented. The volume source has produced a 45 keV H- beam of 16-22 mA which has successfully been used for the commissioning of the Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT), Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and chopper of Linac4.

  18. Electron Beam Focusing in the Linear Accelerator (linac)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauregui, Luis

    2015-10-01

    To produce consistent data with an electron accelerator, it is critical to have a well-focused beam. To keep the beam focused, quadrupoles (quads) are employed. Quads are magnets, which focus the beam in one direction (x or y) and defocus in the other. When two or more quads are used in series, a net focusing effect is achieved in both vertical and horizontal directions. At start up there is a 5% calibration error in the linac at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. This means that the momentum of particles passing through the quads isn't always what is expected, which affects the focusing of the beam. The objective is to find exactly how sensitive the focusing in the linac is to this 5% error. A linac was simulated, which contained 290 RF Cavities with random electric fields (to simulate the 5% calibration error), and a total momentum kick of 1090 MeV. National Science Foundation, Department of Energy, Jefferson Lab, Old Dominion University.

  19. A High Intensity Linac for the National Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jason, A.; Bhatia, T.; Billen, J.; Schrage, D.; Kurennoy, S.; Krawczyk, F.; Lynch, M.; Nath, S.; Shafer, R.; Takeda, H.; Tallerico, P.; Wangler, T.; Wood, R.; Young, L.; Grand, P.; McKenzie-Wilson, R.

    1997-05-01

    The National Spallation Neutron Source to be constructed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, requires a linac capable of delivering up to 5 MW of beam power to an accumulator ring with a nominal 6.2% duty factor and an energy of 1 GeV. Los Alamos, responsible for the linac design, has developed an appropriate room-temperature linac that consists of a drift-tube section from 2.5 to 20 MeV, a coupled-cavity drift-tube section to 100 MeV, and a coupled-cavity section to 1 GeV. The initial scenario requires an average 1.1-mA beam current with a corresponding 28 mA peak current and a 1.2-Mhz chopped time structure corresponding to the ring period. Upgrade to a 4.4 mA average current requires funneling with a peak current of 112 mA in the high-energy sections. Further parameters are presented along with beam dynamics and structure choices and mechanical and rf engineering considerations.

  20. Multiple-linac approach for tritium production and other applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, A.G.

    1995-01-10

    This report describes an approach to tritium production based on the use of multiple proton linear accelerators. Features of a single APTT Linac as proposed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory are presented and discussed. An alternative approach to the attainment of the same total proton beam power of 200 MW with several lower-performance superconducting Linacs is proposed and discussed. Although each of these accelerators are considerable extrapolations of present technology, the latter can nevertheless be built at less technical risk when compared to the single high-current APT Linac, particularly concerning the design and the performance of the low-energy front-end. The use of superconducting cavities is also proposed as a way of optimizing the accelerating gradient, the overall length, and the operational costs. The superconducting technology has already been successfully demonstrated in a number of large-size projects and should be seriously considered for the acceleration of intense low-energy beams of protons. Finally, each linear accelerator would represent an ideal source of very intense beams of protons for a variety of applications, such as: weapons and waste actinide transmutation processes, isotopes for medical application, spallation neutron sources, and the generation of intense beams of neutrinos and muons for nuclear and high-energy physics research. The research community at large has obviously an interest in providing expertise for, and in having access to, the demonstration, the construction, the operation, and the exploitation of these top-performance accelerators.

  1. ACCELERATORS: Emittance coupling driven by space charge in the CSNS linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xue-Jun; Fu, Shi-Nian; Peng, Jun

    2009-09-01

    In the conventional design of RF linacs, the bunched beams are not in thermal equilibrium. The space charge forces couple the particle motions between the transverse and the longitudinal directions. Furthermore it will cause the equipartitioning process which leads to emittance growth and halo formation. In the design of the China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) linac, three cases are investigated using the Hofmann stability charts. In this paper, we present the equipartitioning beam study of the CSNS Alvarez DTL linac.

  2. Numerical simulations of stripping effects in high-intensity hydrogen ion linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Carneiro, J.-P.; Mustapha, B.; Ostroumov, P.N.; /Argonne

    2008-12-01

    Numerical simulations of H{sup -} stripping losses from blackbody radiation, electromagnetic fields, and residual gas have been implemented into the beam dynamics code TRACK. Estimates of the stripping losses along two high-intensity H{sup -} linacs are presented: the Spallation Neutron Source linac currently being operated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and an 8 GeV superconducting linac currently being designed at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory.

  3. Comparison of accelerating structures for the first cavity of the main part of the INR linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybakov, I. V.; Kalinin, Y. Z.; Leontev, V. N.; Naboka, A. N.; Paramonov, V. V.; Serov, V. L.; Feschenko, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    For the beam power improvement of the hydrogen-ion INR linac replacement of the first four-section cavity in the main part of linac is required. Existent cavity is realized using DAW structure on 991 MHz operating frequency. The new cavity should at least not lose in parameters to the current structure and essential changes in other linac systems are not wish able. Parameters of accelerating structures possible for such application are compared.

  4. High-Power Linac for the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rej, D. J.

    2002-04-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will be the world’s most intense source of neutrons for fundamental science and industrial applications. Design and construction of this facility, located at Oak Ridge, is a joint venture between six DOE laboratories. Construction began in 1999 and is currently ahead of the scheduled 2006 completion date. Injecting a high-power, pulsed proton beam into a mercury target produces neutrons. In this talk, we review the physics requirements, design, and status of the construction of the 1-GeV, 1.4-MW average power RF linac for SNS. The accelerator consists of a drift tube linac (DTL), a coupled-cavity linac (CCL), and a superconducting rf (SRF) linac. The phase and quadrupole settings are set to avoid structure and parametric resonances, with coherent resonances posing minimal risk for emittance growth. The DTL is 37 m long and accelerates the ions to 87 MeV. The CCL is 55 m long and accelerates the ions to 186 MeV. The rf structure design and stability for both the DTL and CCL have been validated with scale models. The SRF linac has a modular design to accelerate ions to 1000 MeV, with a straightforward upgrade to 1.3 GeV at a later date. 3D particle-in-cell simulations of beam dynamics are performed to validate performance. The accelerator utilizes 93 MW of pulsed power operating continuously at 60-Hz with an 8factor. Approximately one hundred 402.5 or 805-MHz klystrons, with outputs between 0.55 and 5 MW, are used. The klystrons are powered by a novel converter-modulator that takes advantage of recent advances in IGBT switch plate assemblies and low-loss material cores for boost transformer. Beam diagnostics include position, phase, profile, and current monitors. They are designed to enable accurate beam steering and matching, and to minimize beam loss that would lead to activation and prevent hands-on maintenance.

  5. TU-C-BRE-03: Aggregation of Linac Measurement Data

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, J; Alvarez, P; Followill, D; Lowenstein, J; Molineu, A; Summers, P; Kry, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Accurate data of linear accelerator radiation characteristics is important for treatment planning system commissioning as well as regular quality assurance of the machine. The RPC has performed site visits of numerous machines . Data gathered from Varian machines from the past 15 years are presented. The data collected can be used as a secondary check or when commissioning a new machine to verify that values are reasonable. Methods: Data from the past 15 years of RPC site visits was compiled and analyzed. Data was composed from measurements from approximately 400 Varian machines. Each dataset consists of several point measurements at various locations in a water phantom to measure percentage depth dose, output factors, including small MLC fields, off-axis factors, and wedge factors if applicable. Common statistical values are presented for each machine type. Where applicable, data was compared to other reference data given by the vendor or a select number of previous researchers. Results: Data is separated by energy and parameter and then analyzed by machine class. Data distributions of the parameter data were normal except occasionally at the tails. Distributions of the data for each class and parameter are tabulated to give not simply a singular reference value, but metrics about the distribution: 5th and 95th percentile values and the standard deviation as well as the median. Conclusion: The RPC has collected numerous data on Varian linacs and presented the finding of the past 15 years. The data can be used as a reference data set for physicists to compare against. A linac that deviates from the values does not necessarily indicate there is a problem as long as the treatment planning system correlates to the machine. Comparison of linac and treatment planning system data to external reference data can prevent serious treatment errors.

  6. Large dynamic range diagnostics for high current electron LINACs

    SciTech Connect

    Evtushenko, P.

    2013-11-07

    The Jefferson Lab FEL driver accelerator - Energy Recovery Linac has provided a beam with average current of up to 9 mA and beam energy of 135 MeV. The high power beam operations have allowed developing and testing methods and approaches required to set up and tune such a facility simultaneously for the high beam power and high beam quality required for high performance FEL operations. In this contribution we briefly review this experience and outline problems that are specific to high current - high power non-equilibrium linac beams. While the original strategy for beam diagnostics and tuning have proven to be quite successful, some shortcomings and unresolved issues were also observed. The most important issues are the non-equilibrium (non-Gaussian) nature of the linac beam and the presence of small intensity - large amplitude fraction of the beam a.k.a. beam halo. Thus we also present a list of the possible beam halo sources and discuss possible mitigations means. We argue that for proper understanding and management of the beam halo large dynamic range (>10{sup 6}) transverse and longitudinal beam diagnostics can be used. We also present results of transverse beam profile measurements with the dynamic range approaching 10{sup 5} and demonstrate the effect the increased dynamic range has on the beam characterization, i.e., emittance and Twiss parameters measurements. We also discuss near future work planned in this field and where the JLab FEL facility will be used for beam tests of the developed of new diagnostics.

  7. Large dynamic range diagnostics for high current electron LINACs

    SciTech Connect

    Evtushenko, Pavel

    2013-11-01

    The Jefferson Lab FEL driver accelerator - Energy Recovery Linac has provided a beam with average current of up to 9 mA and beam energy of 135 MeV. The high power beam operations have allowed developing and testing methods and approaches required to set up and tune such a facility simultaneously for the high beam power and high beam quality required for high performance FEL operations. In this contribution we briefly review this experience and outline problems that are specific to high current - high power non-equilibrium linac beams. While the original strategy for beam diagnostics and tuning have proven to be quite successful, some shortcomings and unresolved issues were also observed. The most important issues are the non-equilibrium (non-Gaussian) nature of the linac beam and the presence of small intensity - large amplitude fraction of the beam a.k.a. beam halo. Thus we also present a list of the possible beam halo sources and discuss possible mitigations means. We argue that for proper understanding and management of the beam halo large dynamic range (>10{sup 6}) transverse and longitudinal beam diagnostics can be used. We also present results of transverse beam profile measurements with the dynamic range approaching 10{sup 5} and demonstrate the effect the increased dynamic range has on the beam characterization, i.e., emittance and Twiss parameters measurements. We also discuss near future work planned in this field and where the JLab FEL facility will be used for beam tests of the developed of new diagnostics.

  8. Status of the Kansas State University superconducting linac project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Tom J.

    1986-05-01

    Funding for the construction of the superconducting linac at Kansas State University was approved by the Department of Energy on May 15, 1985. The project is funded out of the Division of Chemical Sciences, USDOE. Initial design and staff technical training was initiated during 1984-85 with laboratory personnel working at both Florida State University and Argonne National Laboratory. The linac under construction is based upon the Nb split-ring resonator technology developed at Argonne National Laboratory for ATLAS. The linac at Kansas State University will have 14 superconducting resonators with nine low-β (β=0.06) and five high-β (β=0.105) units operating at 97 MHz. Work has progressed on both of the single-resonator cryostats for time bunching and energy rebunching, respectively, with the major cryostat components presently under construction by C. E. Raymond Enterprise Manufacturing, a division of Combustion Engineering, with scheduled delivery of the single resonator cryostat vacuum housings, LN2-cooled heat shields, and LHe Dewars on January 17, 1986. Orders for all Nb-clad Cu resonators have been placed with Argonne National Laboratory and two low-β units are currently under construction. Requests for quotations for a 300-W LHe refrigerator (expandable to 500 W) 1000-l storage Dewar and LHe distribution system have been issued. The building addition which includes a new accelerator/experimental hall (˜6000 ft2 basement structure) and ground-level laboratory support space including additional experimental setup space, additional machine shop space, and mechanical equipment space, is currently under construction with a completion date scheduled for May 1986. Additional personnel training on LHe refrigeration systems is scheduled for January 1986, at the Texas Accelerator Center and at Florida State University.

  9. WE-D-BRD-01: Innovation in Radiation Therapy Delivery: Advanced Digital Linac Features

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, L; Wong, J; Li, R

    2014-06-15

    Last few years has witnessed significant advances in linac technology and therapeutic dose delivery method. Digital linacs equipped with high dose rate FFF beams have been clinically implemented in a number of hospitals. Gated VMAT is becoming increasingly popular in treating tumors affected by respiratory motion. This session is devoted to update the audience with these technical advances and to present our experience in clinically implementing the new linacs and dose delivery methods. Topics to be covered include, technical features of new generation of linacs from different vendors, dosimetric characteristics and clinical need for FFF-beam based IMRT and VMAT, respiration-gated VMAT, the concept and implementation of station parameter optimized radiation therapy (SPORT), beam level imaging and onboard image guidance tools. Emphasis will be on providing fundamental understanding of the new treatment delivery and image guidance strategies, control systems, and the associated dosimetric characteristics. Commissioning and acceptance experience on these new treatment delivery technologies will be reported. Clinical experience and challenges encountered during the process of implementation of the new treatment techniques and future applications of the systems will also be highlighted. Learning Objectives: Present background knowledge of emerging digital linacs and summarize their key geometric and dosimetric features. SPORT as an emerging radiation therapy modality specifically designed to take advantage of digital linacs. Discuss issues related to the acceptance and commissioning of the digital linacs and FFF beams. Describe clinical utility of the new generation of digital linacs and their future applications.

  10. Dedicated Linac for Radioneurosurgery at the National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celis-López, Miguel A.; Lárraga-Gutiérrez, José M.

    2003-09-01

    The objective is to present a description and the main clinical applications of this dedicated Linac for benign and malignant tumors in the central nervous system. The Novalis (BrainLab, Germany) is a 6 MV dedicated linac for a single high dose Radiosurgery (RS) and for fractionated doses in Stereotactic Radiotherapy with a high level of precision at the isocenter.

  11. Neutron Spectra and H*(10) in a 15 MV Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Benites, J.; Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Hernandez-Davila, V. M.; Rivera, T.; Carrillo, A.; Mondragon, R.

    2010-12-07

    Neutron spectra and the ambient dose equivalent were calculated inside the bunker of a 15 MV Varian linac model CLINAC iX. Calculations were carried out using Monte Carlo methods. Neutron spectra in the vicinity of isocentre show the presence of evaporation and knock-on neutrons produced by the source term, while epithermal and thermal neutron remain constant regardless the distance respect to isocentre, due to room return. Along the maze neutron spectra becomes softer as the detector moves along the maze. The ambient dose equivalent is decreased but do not follow the 1/r{sup 2} rule due to changes in the neutron spectra.

  12. Rf breakdown studies in copper electron linac structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.; Loew, G.A.

    1989-03-01

    This paper presents a summary of rf breakdown-limited electric fields observed in experimental linac structures at SLAC and a discussion of how these experiments can be interpreted against the background of existing, yet incomplete, theories. The motivation of these studies, begun in 1984, is to determine the maximum accelerating field gradients that might be used safely in future e/sup /+-// colliders, to contribute to the basic understanding of the rf breakdown mechanism, and to discover if a special surface treatment might make it possible to supersede the field limits presently reachable in room temperature copper structures. 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. AMPERE AVERAGE CURRENT PHOTOINJECTOR AND ENERGY RECOVERY LINAC.

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI,I.; BURRILL,A.; CALAGA,R.; ET AL.

    2004-08-17

    High-power Free-Electron Lasers were made possible by advances in superconducting linac operated in an energy-recovery mode. In order to get to much higher power levels, say a fraction of a megawatt average power, many technological barriers are yet to be broken. We describe work on CW, high-current and high-brightness electron beams. This will include a description of a superconducting, laser-photocathode RF gun employing a new secondary-emission multiplying cathode, an accelerator cavity, both capable of producing of the order of one ampere average current and plans for an ERL based on these units.

  14. Optical laser systems at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE PAGES

    Minitti, Michael P.; Robinson, Joseph S.; Coffee, Ryan N.; Edstrom, Steve; Gilevich, Sasha; Glownia, James M.; Granados, Eduardo; Hering, Philippe; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Miahnahri, Alan; et al

    2015-04-22

    Ultrafast optical lasers play an essential role in exploiting the unique capabilities of recently commissioned X-ray free-electron laser facilities such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Pump–probe experimental techniques reveal ultrafast dynamics in atomic and molecular processes and reveal new insights in chemistry, biology, material science and high-energy-density physics. This manuscript describes the laser systems and experimental methods that enable cutting-edge optical laser/X-ray pump–probe experiments to be performed at LCLS.

  15. Development and operation of the JAERI superconducting energy recovery linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minehara, Eisuke J.

    2006-02-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute free-electron laser (JAERI FEL) group at Tokai, Ibaraki, Japan has successfully developed one of the most advanced and newest accelerator technologies named "superconducting energy recovery linacs (ERLs)" and some applications in near future using the ERLs. In the text, the current operation and high power JAERI ERL-FEL 10 kW upgrading program, ERL-light source design studies, prevention of the stainless-steel cold-worked stress-corrosion cracking failures and decommissioning of nuclear power plants in nuclear energy industries were reported and discussed briefly as a typical application of the ERL-FEL.

  16. The Development of the Linac Coherent Light Source RF Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, David H.; Jongewaard, Erik; Lewandowski, James; Limborg-Deprey, Cecile; Li, Zenghai; Schmerge, John; Vlieks, Arnold; Wang, Juwen; Xiao, Liling; /SLAC

    2008-09-24

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is the first x-ray laser user facility based upon a free electron laser (FEL) requiring extraordinary beam quality to saturate at 1.5 angstroms within a 100 meter undulator.[1] This new type of light source is using the last kilometer of the three kilometer linac at SLAC to accelerate the beam to an energy as high as 13.6 GeV and required a new electron gun and injector to produce a very bright beam for acceleration. At the outset of the project it was recognized that existing RF guns had the potential to produce the desired beam but none had demonstrated it. Therefore a new RF gun or at least the modification of an existing gun was necessary. The parameters listed in Table 1 illustrate the unique characteristics of LCLS which drive the requirements for the electron gun as given in Table 2. The gun beam quality needs to accommodate emittance growth as the beam is travels through approximately one kilometer of linac and two bunch compressors before reaching the undulator. These beam requirements were demonstrated during the recent commissioning runs of the LCLS injector and linac [2] due to the successful design, fabrication, testing and operation of the LCLS gun. The goal of this paper is to relate the technical background of how the gun was able to achieve and in some cases exceed these requirements by understanding and correcting the deficiencies of the prototype s-band RF photocathode gun, the BNL/SLAC/UCLA Gun III. This paper begins with a brief history and technical description of Gun III and the Gun Test Facility (GTF) at SLAC, and studies of the gun's RF and emittance compensation solenoid. The work at the GTF identified the gun and solenoid deficiencies, and helped to define the specifications for the LCLS gun. Section 1.1.5 describes the modeling used to compute and correct the gun RF fields and Section 1.1.6 describes the use of these fields in the electron beam simulations. The magnetic design and measurements of

  17. OPERATIONAL ASPECTS OF HIGH POWER ENERGY RECOVERY LINACS

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Benson; David Douglas; Pavel Evtushenko; Kevin Jordan; George Neil; Paul Powers

    2006-08-21

    We have been operating a high-power energy-recovery linac (ERL) at Jefferson Lab for several years. In the process we have learned quite a bit about both technical and physics limitations in high power ERLs. Several groups are now considering new ERLs that greatly increase either the energy, the current or both. We will present some of our findings on what to consider when designing, building, and operating a high power ERL. Our remarks for this paper are limited to lattice design and setup, magnets, vacuum chamber design, diagnostics, and beam stability.

  18. Optical laser systems at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Minitti, Michael P.; Robinson, Joseph S.; Coffee, Ryan N.; Edstrom, Steve; Gilevich, Sasha; Glownia, James M.; Granados, Eduardo; Hering, Philippe; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Miahnahri, Alan; Milathianaki, Despina; Polzin, Wayne; Ratner, Daniel; Tavella, Franz; Vetter, Sharon; Welch, Marc; White, William E.; Fry, Alan R.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast optical lasers play an essential role in exploiting the unique capabilities of recently commissioned X-ray free-electron laser facilities such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Pump–probe experimental techniques reveal ultrafast dynamics in atomic and molecular processes and reveal new insights in chemistry, biology, material science and high-energy-density physics. This manuscript describes the laser systems and experimental methods that enable cutting-edge optical laser/X-ray pump–probe experiments to be performed at LCLS. PMID:25931064

  19. Neutron Spectra and H*(10) in a 15 MV Linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benites, J.; Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Hernandez-Davila, V. M.; Rivera, T.; Carrillo, A.; Mondragon, R.

    2010-12-01

    Neutron spectra and the ambient dose equivalent were calculated inside the bunker of a 15 MV Varian linac model CLINAC iX. Calculations were carried out using Monte Carlo methods. Neutron spectra in the vicinity of isocentre show the presence of evaporation and knock-on neutrons produced by the source term, while epithermal and thermal neutron remain constant regardless the distance respect to isocentre, due to room return. Along the maze neutron spectra becomes softer as the detector moves along the maze. The ambient dose equivalent is decreased but do not follow the 1/r2 rule due to changes in the neutron spectra.

  20. Stability Study of ATF 80MeV Injector Linac

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, Douglas

    2003-06-09

    A beam stability test was carried out at ATF 80 MeV injector linac. The test was performed by taking data of each monitor in pulse to pulse base. A data acquisition system which consists of a PC and a GPIB network was used for the test. In order to analyze the data, ''Correlation Plot'' method is used which is effective to find out some source of the observed beam fluctuation. This paper describes the result of the stability measurement and the comparison between ATF injector and SLC injector.

  1. A microwave power driver for linac colliders: Gigatron

    SciTech Connect

    Bizek, H.M.; Elliott, S.M.; McIntyre, P.M.; Nassiri, A.; Popovic, M.B.; Raparia, D.; Gray, H.F. . Dept. of Physics; Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC )

    1988-11-18

    The gigatron is a new rf amplifier tube designed for linac collider applications. Three design features permit extension of the lasertron concept to very high frequencies. First, a gated field-emitter array is employed for the modulated cathode. Second, a ribbon beam geometry mitigates space charge depression and facilitates efficient output coupling. Third, a traveling wave output coupler is used to obtain optimum coupling to the ribbon beam. This paper describes recent developments in the gigatron design, and progress towards experimental tests. 9 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Analysis of beam loss mechanism in the Project X linac

    SciTech Connect

    Carneiro, J.-P.; Lebedev, V.; Nagaitsev, S.; Ostiguy, J.-F.; Solyak, N.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Minimization of the beam losses in a multi-MW H{sup -} linac such as ProjectX to a level below 1 W/m is a challenging task. The impact of different mechanism of beam stripping, including stripping in electric and magnetic fields, residual gas, blackbody radiation and intra-beam stripping, is analyzed. Other sources of beam losses are misalignements of beamline elements and errors in RF fields and phases. We present in this paper requirements for dynamic errors and correction schemes to keep beam losses under control.

  3. Optical laser systems at the Linac Coherent Light Source.

    PubMed

    Minitti, Michael P; Robinson, Joseph S; Coffee, Ryan N; Edstrom, Steve; Gilevich, Sasha; Glownia, James M; Granados, Eduardo; Hering, Philippe; Hoffmann, Matthias C; Miahnahri, Alan; Milathianaki, Despina; Polzin, Wayne; Ratner, Daniel; Tavella, Franz; Vetter, Sharon; Welch, Marc; White, William E; Fry, Alan R

    2015-05-01

    Ultrafast optical lasers play an essential role in exploiting the unique capabilities of recently commissioned X-ray free-electron laser facilities such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Pump-probe experimental techniques reveal ultrafast dynamics in atomic and molecular processes and reveal new insights in chemistry, biology, material science and high-energy-density physics. This manuscript describes the laser systems and experimental methods that enable cutting-edge optical laser/X-ray pump-probe experiments to be performed at LCLS.

  4. Beam dynamics verification in linacs of linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, J.T.

    1989-01-01

    The SLAC two-mile linac has been upgraded to accelerate high current, low emittance electron and positron beams to be used in the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC). After the upgrade was completed, extensive beam studies were made to verify that the design criteria have been met. These tests involved the measurement of emittance, beam phase space orientation, energy dispersion, trajectory oscillations, bunch length, energy spectrum and wakefields. The methods, the systems and the data cross checks are compared for the various measurements. Implications for the next linear collider are discussed. 12 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Acceleration units for the Induction Linac Systems Experiment (ILSE)

    SciTech Connect

    Faltens, A.; Brady, V.; Brodzik, D.; Hansen, L.; Laslett, L.J.; Mukherjee, S.; Bubp, D.; Ravenscroft, D.; Reginato, L.

    1989-03-01

    The design of a high current heavy ion induction linac driver for inertial confinement fusion is optimized by adjusting the acceleration units along the length of the accelerator to match the beam current, energy, and pulse duration at any location. At the low energy end of the machine the optimum is a large number of electrostatically focused parallel beamlets, whereas at higher energies the optimum is a smaller number of magnetically focused beams. ILSE parallels this strategy by using 16 electrostatically focused beamlets at the low end followed by 4 magnetically focused beams after beam combining. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Overview and Status Update of the Fermilab HINS Linac R&D Program

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, R.C.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    The Fermilab High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) Linac R&D program is continuing efforts to construct a first-of-a-kind superconducting H{sup -} linac. The goal of the HINS linac is to demonstrate, for the first time, acceleration of high intensity beam with superconducting spoke cavities, control of beam halo growth by use of solenoidal focusing optics throughout, and operation of many cavities from a single high-power RF source for acceleration of non-relativistic particles. The HINS effort is relevant to any future high brightness, high intensity linac and, in particular, to the linac proposed as part of Fermilab Project X to serve the next generation of neutrino physics and future muon storage ring/collider experiments. This paper updates the technical status of the various components being developed, built, and commissioned as a part of HINS and presents the outlook for the HINS program.

  7. Time-resolved imaging for the APS linac beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Lumpkin, A. H.

    1998-09-29

    The particle-beam imaging diagnostics for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) injector lime have been enhanced by the installation of optical transition radiation (OTR) screens and the use of Ce-doped YAG crystals as beam profile monitors. Both converters have improved spatial resolution and time responses compared to the standard Chromox (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Cr) screens used elsewhere in the linac. These enhancements allow us to address the smaller beam sizes (< 100 {micro}m) and the critical micropulse bunch length of higher brightness gun sources For the Linac macropulse of 30-ns duration composed of 86 micropulses at S-band frequency intervals, only the OTR mechanism is prompt enough to separate individual micropulses and to allow streak camera measurements of the micropulse averaged bunch length. Tests have been performed at 400 to 625 MeV using the gated DC thermionic gun source. Beam sizes less than {sigma}{sub x} = 30 {micro}m have been observed with a micropulse bunch length of {sigma} = 2-3 ps using OTR. First results on the lower-emittance rf thermionic gun are briefly discussed.

  8. Remarks on the concept of dispersion in a curved linac

    SciTech Connect

    Ostiguy, Jean-Francois; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    A next-generation linear collider is expected to span tens of kilometers in length. For various reasons, it may be desirable to house such an accelerator in a tunnel that follows the earth's curvature rather that in a 'laser-straight' tunnel. One side effect of opting for a curved linac is the introduction of vertical dispersion. In recent years, much work has been dedicated to understand and evaluate the impact of the presence of dispersion on emittance preservation. While performing simulations with our in-house code (CHEF) we observed a discrepancy between the dispersion function it produces and that computed using other codes in use within the accelerator community. Understanding the origin and the meaning of this discrepancy required a re-examination of the meaning of the concept of dispersion in the context of a linac. The object of this note is to document our findings. We establish that the default dispersion algorithm used by CHEF corresponds to a different, and ultimately more appropriate, definition of the dispersion in presence of acceleration. Not surprisingly, a consistent definition of dispersion restores agreement between codes.

  9. Neutron multiplicity measurements during LINAC interrogation of safeguards accountable material

    SciTech Connect

    Brunson, G.S.; Coop, K.L.

    1988-07-01

    The authors used a LINAC to interrogate some arbitrary sample arrays to learn if enriched uranium can be detected when it is embedded in depleted uranium and /sup 6/LiD. Whether the interrogation is by bremsstrahlung or photoneutrons, the interrogating pulse causes fission in any uranium present, leaving delayed neutron precursors embedded wherever fissions have occurred. In the interval between LINAC pulses, we detected neutron multiplicities arising from /sup 235/U fissions caused by delayed neutrons. Because almost all delayed neutrons have energies below the fission threshold of /sup 238/U, a negligible number of fissions occur if /sup 235/U is not present in quantity. We are able to detect a 1-kg cylinder of enriched uranium metal behind approx. 2.3 cm of depleted uranium metal and approx. 2.9 cm of /sup 6/LiD. For this configuration, the threshold for detecting /sup 235/U is approx. 1/3 kg. The results are sensitive to the shape of the uranium sample.

  10. CABOTO, a high-gradient linac for hadrontherapy

    PubMed Central

    Verdú-Andrés, Silvia; Amaldi, Ugo; Faus-Golfe, Ángeles

    2013-01-01

    The field of hadrontherapy has grown rapidly in recent years. At present the therapeutic beam is provided by a cyclotron or a synchrotron, but neither cyclotrons nor synchrotrons present the best performances for hadrontherapy. The new generation of accelerators for hadrontherapy should allow fast active energy modulation and have a high repetition rate, so that moving organs can be appropriately treated in a reasonable time. In addition, a reduction of the dimensions and cost of the accelerators for hadrontherapy would make the acquisition and operation of a hadrontherapy facility more affordable, which would translate into great benefits for the potential hadrontherapy patients. The ‘cyclinac’, an accelerator concept that combines a cyclotron with a high-frequency linear accelerator (linac), is a fast-cycling machine specifically conceived to allow for fast active energy modulation. The present paper focuses on CABOTO (CArbon BOoster for Therapy in Oncology), a compact, efficient high-frequency linac that can accelerate C6+ ions and H2 molecules from 150–410 MeV/u in ∼24 m. The paper presents the latest design of CABOTO and discusses its performances. PMID:23824121

  11. RF system considerations for large high-duty-factor linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, M.T.; Ziomek, C.D.; Tallerico, P.J.; Regan, A.H.; Eaton, L.; Lawrence, G.

    1994-09-01

    RF systems are often a major cost item for linacs, but this is especially true for large high-duty-factor linacs (up to and including CW) such as the Accelerator for Production of Tritium (APT) or the Accelerator for Transmutation of nuclear Waste (ATW). In addition, the high energy and high average beam current of these machines (approximately 1 GeV, 100--200 mA) leads to a need for excellent control of the accelerating fields in order to minimize the possibility of beam loss in the accelerator and the resulting activation. This paper will address the key considerations and limitations in the design of the RF system. These considerations impact the design of both the high power RF components and the RF controls. As might be expected, the two concerns sometimes lead to conflicting design requirements. For example minimum RF operating costs lead to a desire for operation near saturation of the high power RF generators in order to maximize the operating efficiency. Optimal control of the RF fields leads to a desire for maximum overdrive capability in those same generators in order to respond quickly to disturbances of the accelerator fields.

  12. 400 MeV upgrade for the Fermilab linac

    SciTech Connect

    MacLachlan, J.A.

    1989-03-24

    Fermilab has plans for a comprehensive accelerator upgrade to open new possibilities for both the fixed target and collider experimental programs. An early step in this program is to increase the energy of the linac from 200 to 400 MeV by replacing the last four of its nine 201 MHz Alvarez tanks with twenty-eight 805 MHz side-coupled cavity chains operating at about 8 MV/m average axial field. The principal purpose is to reduce the incoherent spacecharge tuneshift at injection into the Booster which currently limits both the brightness of the beam, an important determinant of collider luminosity, and total intensity to produce both the antiprotons for the collider and the beams to fixed target experimental areas. Other consequences of higher Booster injection energy expected to contribute to some degree of higher intensity limits and improved operational characteristics include improved quality of the guide field at injection, reduced frequency swing for the rf systems, and smaller emittance for the injected beam. The linac upgrade project has moved from a 1986 study through a development project including structure models and numerical studies to a full-feature module prototyping starting this year.

  13. Linac cryogenic distribution system maintenance and upgrades at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Kelly D.; Wright, Mathew C.; Ganni, Venkatarao

    2014-01-01

    The Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) distribution system to the CEBAF and FEL linacs at Jefferson Lab (JLab) experienced a planned warm up during the late summer and fall of 2012 for the first time after its commissioning in 1991. Various maintenance and modifications were performed to support high beam availability to the experimental users, meet 10 CFR 851 requirements for pressure systems, address operational issues, and prepare the cryogenic interfaces for the high-gradient cryomodules needed for the 12 GeV upgrade. Cryogenic maintenance and installation work had to be coordinated with other activities in the linacs and compete for manpower from other department installation activities. With less than a quarter of the gas storage capacity available to handle the boil-off from the more than 40 cryomodules, 35,000 Nm{sup 3} of helium was re-liquefied and shipped to a vendor via a liquid tanker trailer. Nearly 200 u-tubes had to be removed and stored while seals were replaced on related equipment such as vacuum pump outs, bayonet isolation and process valves.

  14. Linac cryogenic distribution system maintenance and upgrades at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, K.; Wright, M.; Ganni, V.

    2014-01-29

    The Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) distribution system to the CEBAF and FEL linacs at Jefferson Lab (JLab) experienced a planned warm up during the late summer and fall of 2012 for the first time after its commissioning in 1991. Various maintenance and modifications were performed to support high beam availability to the experimental users, meet 10 CFR 851 requirements for pressure systems, address operational issues, and prepare the cryogenic interfaces for the high-gradient cryomodules needed for the 12 GeV upgrade. Cryogenic maintenance and installation work had to be coordinated with other activities in the linacs and compete for manpower from other department installation activities. With less than a quarter of the gas storage capacity available to handle the boil-off from the more than 40 cryomodules, 35,000 Nm{sup 3} of helium was re-liquefied and shipped to a vendor via a liquid tanker trailer. Nearly 200 u-tubes had to be removed and stored while seals were replaced on related equipment such as vacuum pump outs, bayonet isolation and process valves.

  15. Linac Alignment Algorithm: Analysis on 1-to-1 Steering

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yipeng; Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC

    2011-08-19

    In a linear accelerator, it is important to achieve a good alignment between all of its components (such as quadrupoles, RF cavities, beam position monitors et al.), in order to better preserve the beam quality during acceleration. After the survey of the main linac components, there are several beam-based alignment (BBA) techniques to be applied, to further optimize the beam trajectory and calculate the corresponding steering magnets strength. Among these techniques the most simple and straightforward one is the one-to-one (1-to-1) steering technique, which steers the beam from quad center to center, and removes the betatron oscillation from quad focusing. For a future linear collider such as the International Linear Collider (ILC), the initial beam emittance is very small in the vertical plane (flat beam with {gamma}{epsilon}{sub y} = 20-40nm), which means the alignment requirement is very tight. In this note, we evaluate the emittance growth with one-to-one correction algorithm employed, both analytically and numerically. Then the ILC main linac accelerator is taken as an example to compare the vertical emittance growth after 1-to-1 steering, both from analytical formulae and multi-particle tracking simulation. It is demonstrated that the estimated emittance growth from the derived formulae agrees well with the results from numerical simulation, with and without acceleration, respectively.

  16. A Mini Linac Based Positron Source at CEA-Saclay

    SciTech Connect

    Debu, P.; Perez, P.; Rey, J.-M.; Sacquin, Y.; Blideanu, V.; Curtoni, A.; Delferriere, O.; Dupre, P.; Muranaka, T.; Ruiz, N.

    2009-09-02

    We are installing at CEA-Saclay a demonstration setup for an intense positron source. It is based on a compact 5.5 MeV electron linac used to produce positrons via pair production on a tungsten target. A relatively high current of 0.15 mA compensates for low positron efficiencies at low energy, which is below the neutron activation threshold. The expected production rate is 5centre dot10{sup 11} fast positrons per second. A set of coils is arranged to select the fast positrons from the diffracted electron beam in order to study the possibility of using a rare gas cryogenic moderator away from the main flux of particles. The commissioning of the linac is under way. This setup is part of a project to demonstrate the feasibility of an experiment to produce the H{sup +} ions for a free fall measurement of neutral antihydrogen (H). Its small size and cost could be of interest for material science applications, after adaptation of the time structure.

  17. Recirculating Linac Acceleration - End-to-End Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Alex Bogacz

    2010-03-01

    A conceptual design of a high-pass-number Recirculating Linear Accelerator (RLA) for muons is presented. The scheme involves three superconducting linacs (201 MHz): a single pass linear Pre-accelerator followed by a pair multi-pass (4.5-pass) 'Dogbone' RLAs. Acceleration starts after ionization cooling at 220 MeV/c and proceeds to 12.6 GeV. The Pre-accelerator captures a large muon phase space and accelerates muons to relativistic energies, while adiabatically decreasing the phase-space volume, so that effective acceleration in the RLA is possible. The RLA further compresses and shapes up the longitudinal and transverse phase-spaces, while increasing the energy. Appropriate choice of multi-pass linac optics based on FODO focusing assures large number of passes in the RLA. The proposed 'Dogbone' configuration facilitates simultaneous acceleration of both mu± species through the requirement of mirror symmetric optics of the return 'droplet' arcs. Finally, presented end-to-end simulation validates the efficiency and acceptance of the accelerator system.

  18. Vacuum simulation and characterization for the Linac4 H- source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquino, C.; Chiggiato, P.; Michet, A.; Hansen, J.; Lettry, J.

    2013-02-01

    At CERN, the 160 MeV H- Linac4 will soon replace the 50 MeV proton Linac2. In the H- source two major sources of gas are identified. The first is the pulsed injection at about 0.1 mbar in the plasma chamber. The second is the constant H2 injection up to 10-5 mbar in the LEBT for beam space charge compensation. In addition, the outgassing of materials exposed to vacuum can play an important role in contamination control and global gas balance. To evaluate the time dependent partial pressure profiles in the H- ion source and the RFQ, electrical network - vacuum analogy and test particle Monte Carlo simulation have been used. The simulation outcome indicates that the pressure requirements are in the reach of the proposed vacuum pumping system. Preliminary results show good agreement between the experimental and the simulated pressure profiles; a calibration campaign is in progress to fully benchmark the implemented calculations. Systematic outgassing rate measurements are on-going for critical components in the ion source and RFQ. Amongst them those for the Cu-coated SmCo magnet located in the vacuum system of the biased electron dump electrode, show results lower to stainless steel at room temperature.

  19. Design of two-beam-type IH-RFQ linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, Takuya; Hayashizaki, Noriyosu; Hattori, Toshiyuki

    2009-07-01

    In order to obtain high-intensity ion beams from a linear accelerator (linac) in a stable manner, it is necessary to suppress the defocusing force due to the space charge effect. The defocusing force is extremely strong in low-energy and high-intensity beams. Therefore, high-intensity ion beam acceleration in the low-energy region is one of the most difficult conditions to achieve. One solution is to suppress the defocusing force by dividing the high-intensity beam into several beams. Thus, a multibeam Interdigital-H (IH)-type Radio Frequency Quadrupole (IH-RFQ) linac has been proposed for a heavy ion inertial fusion (HIF) injector system. In particular, we have been developing a two-beam-type IH-RFQ cavity as a prototype of the multibeam-type IH-RFQ. This prototype has the capability of accelerating charged particles to a mass ratio ( q/ A) greater than {1}/{6} from 5 up to 60 keV/u. In the design, the expected total output current is about 87 mA for the total input beam current of 120 mA.

  20. Superconducting RF Linac Technology for ERL Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Tennant, Chris

    2005-08-01

    Energy Recovering Linacs (ERLs) offer an attractive alternative as drivers for light sources as they combine the desirable characteristics of both storage rings (high efficiency) and linear accelerators (superior beam quality). Using superconducting RF technology allows ERLs to operate more efficiently because of the inherent characteristics of SRF linacs, namely that they are high gradient-low impedance structures and their ability to operate in the long pulse or CW regime. We present an overview of the physics challenges encountered in the design and operation of ERL based light sources with particular emphasis on those issues related to SRF technology. These challenges include maximizing a cavity's Qo to increase cryogenic efficiency, maintaining control of the cavity field in the presence of the highest feasible loaded Q and providing adequate damping of the higher-order modes (HOMs). If not sufficiently damped, dipole HOMs can drive the multipass beam breakup (BBU) instability which ERLs are particularly susceptible to. Another challenge involves efficiently extracting the potentially large amounts of HOM power that are generated when a bunch traverses the SRF cavities and which may extend over a high range of frequencies. We present experimental data from the Jefferson Lab FEL Upgrade, a 10 mA ERL light source presently in operation, aimed at addressing some of these issues. We conclude with an outlook towards the future of ERL based light sources.

  1. Control of beam dynamics in high energy induction linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G.J.

    1986-07-29

    The Advent of laser-ion-guiding in the Advanced test Accelerator along with the development of accelerator cavities optimized with respect to beam breakup coupling impedence now make it possible to consider a new class of high current, high emergy linear induction accelerators. The control of the beam breakup and other instabilities by laser guiding and by various magnetic focusing schemes will be discussed along with the scaling laws for the design of such machines to minimize the growth of the beam breakup instability. Many linacs, particularly induction linacs are limited in performance by the beam breakup (BBU) instability. The instability is found in two forms. In the first form the accelerating cavities communicate with one another through interaction with the beam and through propagation of cavity fields through the accelerator structure. In the second form which is the more virulent of the two, the cavities couple to each other only through their interactions with the beam. It is this second form of PPU that will be discussed in this paper.

  2. High-Current Energy-Recovering Electron Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolitsa Merminga; David Douglas; Geoffrey Krafft

    2003-12-01

    The use of energy recovery provides a potentially powerful new paradigm for generation of the charged particle beams used in synchrotron radiation sources, high-energy electron cooling devices, electron-ion colliders, and other applications in photon science and nuclear and high-energy physics. Energy-recovering electron linear accelerators (called energy-recovering linacs, or ERLs) share many characteristics with ordinary linacs, as their six-dimensional beam phase space is largely determined by electron source properties. However, in common with classic storage rings, ERLs possess a high average-current-carrying capability enabled by the energy recovery process, and thus promise similar efficiencies. The authors discuss the concept of energy recovery and its technical challenges and describe the Jefferson Lab (JLab) Infrared Demonstration Free-Electron Laser (IR Demo FEL), originally driven by a 3548-MeV, 5-mA superconducting radiofrequency (srf) ERL, which provided the most substantial demonstration of energy recovery to date: a beam of 250 kW average power. They present an overview of envisioned ERL applications and a development path to achieving the required performance. They use experimental data obtained at the JLab IR Demo FEL and recent experimental results from CEBAF-ERL GeV-scale, comparatively low-current energy-recovery demonstration at JLab to evaluate the feasibility of the new applications of high-current ERLs, as well as ERLs' limitations and ultimate performance.

  3. Dosimetric algorithm to reproduce isodose curves obtained from a LINAC.

    PubMed

    Estrada Espinosa, Julio Cesar; Martínez Ovalle, Segundo Agustín; Pereira Benavides, Cinthia Kotzian

    2014-01-01

    In this work isodose curves are obtained by the use of a new dosimetric algorithm using numerical data from percentage depth dose (PDD) and the maximum absorbed dose profile, calculated by Monte Carlo in a 18 MV LINAC. The software allows reproducing the absorbed dose percentage in the whole irradiated volume quickly and with a good approximation. To validate results an 18 MV LINAC with a whole geometry and a water phantom were constructed. On this construction, the distinct simulations were processed by the MCNPX code and then obtained the PDD and profiles for the whole depths of the radiation beam. The results data were used by the code to produce the dose percentages in any point of the irradiated volume. The absorbed dose for any voxel's size was also reproduced at any point of the irradiated volume, even when the voxels are considered to be of a pixel's size. The dosimetric algorithm is able to reproduce the absorbed dose induced by a radiation beam over a water phantom, considering PDD and profiles, whose maximum percent value is in the build-up region. Calculation time for the algorithm is only a few seconds, compared with the days taken when it is carried out by Monte Carlo. PMID:25045398

  4. Beam Position-Phase Monitors for SNS Linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurennoy, Sergey

    Electromagnetic modeling with MAFIA of the combined beam position-phase monitors (BPPMs) for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac has been performed. Time-domain 3-D simulations are used to compute the signal amplitudes and phases on the BPPM electrodes for a given processing frequency, 402.5 MHz or 805 MHz, as functions of the beam transverse position. Working with a summed signal from all the BPPM electrodes provides a good way to measure accurately the beam phase. While for an off-axis beam the signal phases on the individual electrodes can differ from those for a centered beam by a few degrees, the phase of the summed signal is found to be independent of the beam transverse position inside the device. Based on the analysis results, an optimal BPPM design with 4 one-end-shorted 60-degree electrodes has been chosen. It provides a good linearity and sufficient signal power for both position and phase measurements, while satisfying the linac geometrical constrains and mechanical requirements.

  5. Dosimetric Algorithm to Reproduce Isodose Curves Obtained from a LINAC

    PubMed Central

    Estrada Espinosa, Julio Cesar; Martínez Ovalle, Segundo Agustín; Pereira Benavides, Cinthia Kotzian

    2014-01-01

    In this work isodose curves are obtained by the use of a new dosimetric algorithm using numerical data from percentage depth dose (PDD) and the maximum absorbed dose profile, calculated by Monte Carlo in a 18 MV LINAC. The software allows reproducing the absorbed dose percentage in the whole irradiated volume quickly and with a good approximation. To validate results an 18 MV LINAC with a whole geometry and a water phantom were constructed. On this construction, the distinct simulations were processed by the MCNPX code and then obtained the PDD and profiles for the whole depths of the radiation beam. The results data were used by the code to produce the dose percentages in any point of the irradiated volume. The absorbed dose for any voxel's size was also reproduced at any point of the irradiated volume, even when the voxels are considered to be of a pixel's size. The dosimetric algorithm is able to reproduce the absorbed dose induced by a radiation beam over a water phantom, considering PDD and profiles, whose maximum percent value is in the build-up region. Calculation time for the algorithm is only a few seconds, compared with the days taken when it is carried out by Monte Carlo. PMID:25045398

  6. Alternate Tunings for the Linac Coherent Light Source Photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Limborg-Deprey, C.; Emma, P.; /SLAC

    2006-03-17

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is an x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) project based on the SLAC linac. The LCLS Photoinjector beamline has been designed to deliver 10-ps long electron bunches of 1 nC with a normalized projected transverse emittance smaller than 1.2 mm-mrad at 135 MeV. Tolerances and regulation requirements are tight for this tuning. Half of the total emittance at the end of the injector comes from the ''cathode emittance'' which is 0.7 mm-mrad for our nominal 1nC tuning. As the ''cathode emittance'' scales linearly with laser spot radius, the emittance will be dramatically reduced for smaller radius, but this is only possible at lower charge. In particular, for a 0.2 nC charge, we believe we can achieve an emittance closer to 0.4 mm-mrad. This working point will be easier to tune and the beam quality should be much easier to maintain than for the 1 nC case. In the second half of this paper, we discuss optimum laser pulse shapes. We demonstrate that the benefits of the ellipsoidal shapes seem to be important enough so that serious investigations should be carried out in the production of such pulses.

  7. An Overview of the MaRIE X-FEL and Electron Radiography LINAC RF Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, Joseph Thomas III; Rees, Daniel Earl; Scheinker, Alexander; Sheffield, Richard L.

    2015-05-04

    The purpose of the Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes (MaRIE) facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory is to investigate the performance limits of materials in extreme environments. The MaRIE facility will utilize a 12 GeV linac to drive an X-ray Free-Electron Laser (FEL). Most of the same linac will also be used to perform electron radiography. The main linac is driven by two shorter linacs; one short linac optimized for X-FEL pulses and one for electron radiography. The RF systems have historically been the one of the largest single component costs of a linac. We will describe the details of the different types of RF systems required by each part of the linacs. Starting with the High Power RF system, we will present our methodology for the choice of RF system peak power and pulselength with respect to klystron parameters, modulator parameters, performance requirements and relative costs. We will also present an overview of the Low Level RF systems that are proposed for MaRIE and briefly describe their use with some proposed control schemes.

  8. Development of a medium-energy superconducting heavy-ion linac.

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Physics

    2002-03-01

    The Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) facility project includes a cw 1.4 GeV driver linac and a 100 MV postaccelerator both based on superconducting (SC) cavities operating at frequencies from 48 to 805 MHz. In these linacs more than 99% of the total voltage is provided by SC cavities. An initial acceleration is provided by room temperature radio frequency quadrupoles. The driver linac is designed for acceleration of any ion species, from protons up to 900 MeV to uranium up to 400 MeV/u. The novel feature of the driver linac is an acceleration of multiple charge-state heavy-ion beams in order to achieve 400 kW beam power. This paper presents design features of a medium-energy SC heavy-ion linac taking the RIA driver linac as an example. The dynamics of single and multiple charge-state beams are detailed, including the effects of possible errors in rf field parameters and misalignments of transverse focusing elements. The important design considerations of such linac are presented. Several new conceptual solutions in beam dynamics in SC accelerating structures for heavy-ion applications are discussed.

  9. Beam loss studies in high-intensity heavy-ion linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Aseev, V. N.; Mustapha, B.

    2004-09-01

    The proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) Facility, an innovative exotic-beam facility for the production of high-quality beams of short-lived isotopes, consists of a fully superconducting 1.4GV driver linac and a 140MV postaccelerator. To produce sufficient intensities of secondary beams the driver linac will provide 400kW primary beams of any ion from hydrogen to uranium. Because of the high intensity of the primary beams the beam losses must be minimized to avoid radioactivation of the accelerator equipment. To keep the power deposited by the particles lost on the accelerator structures below 1 W/m, the relative beam losses per unit length should be less than 10-5, especially along the high-energy section of the linac. A new beam dynamics simulation code TRACK has been developed and used for beam loss studies in the RIA driver linac. In the TRACK code, ions are tracked through the three-dimensional electromagnetic fields of every element of the linac starting from the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source to the production target. The simulation starts with a multicomponent dc ion beam extracted from the ECR. The space charge forces are included in the simulations. They are especially important in the front end of the driver linac. Beam losses are studied by tracking a large number of particles (up to 106) through the whole linac considering all sources of error such us element misalignments, rf field errors, and stripper thickness fluctuations. For each configuration of the linac, multiple sets of error values have been randomly generated and used in the calculations. The results are then combined to calculate important beam parameters, estimate beam losses, and characterize the corresponding linac configuration. To track a large number of particles for a comprehensive number of error sets (up to 500), the code TRACK was parallelized and run on the Jazz computer cluster at ANL.

  10. PULSED-FOCUSING RECIRCULATING LINACS FOR MUON ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland PAUL

    2014-12-31

    Since the muon has a short lifetime, fast acceleration is essential for high-energy applications such as muon colliders, Higgs factories, or neutrino factories. The best one can do is to make a linear accelerator with the highest possible accelerating gradient to make the accelerating time as short as possible. However, the cost of such a single linear accelerator is prohibitively large due to expensive power sources, cavities, tunnels, and related infrastructure. As was demonstrated in the Thomas Jefferson Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), an elegant solution to reduce cost is to use magnetic return arcs to recirculate the beam through the accelerating RF cavities many times, where they gain energy on each pass. In such a Recirculating Linear Accelerator (RLA), the magnetic focusing strength diminishes as the beam energy increases in a conventional linac that has constant strength quadrupoles. After some number of passes the focusing strength is insufficient to keep the beam from going unstable and being lost. In this project, the use of fast pulsed quadrupoles in the linac sections was considered for stronger focusing as a function of time to allow more successive passes of a muon beam in a recirculating linear accelerator. In one simulation, it was shown that the number of passes could be increased from 8 to 12 using pulsed magnet designs that have been developed and tested. This could reduce the cost of linac sections of a muon RLA by 8/12, where more improvement is still possible. The expense of a greater number of passes and corresponding number of return arcs was also addressed in this project by exploring the use of ramped or FFAG-style magnets in the return arcs. A better solution, invented in this project, is to use combined-function dipole-quadrupole magnets to simultaneously transport two beams of different energies through one magnet string to reduce costs of return arcs by almost a factor of

  11. Basis for low beam loss in the high-current APT linac

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Gray, E.R.; Krawczyk, F.L.; Kurennoy, S.S.; Lawrence, G.P.; Ryne, R.D.; Crandall, K.R.

    1998-12-31

    The present evidence that the APT proton linac design will meet its goal of low beam loss operation. The conclusion has three main bases: (1) extrapolation from the understanding of the performance of the 800-MeV LANSCE proton linac at Los Alamos, (2) the theoretical understanding of the dominant halo-forming mechanism in the APT accelerator from physics models and multiparticle simulations, and (3) the conservative approach and key principles underlying the design of the APT linac, which are aimed at minimizing beam halo and providing large apertures to reduce beam loss to a very low value.

  12. Single Spoke Cavities for Low-energy Part of CW Linac of Project X.

    SciTech Connect

    Gonin, Ivan; Champion, Mark; Khabiboulline, Timergali; Lunin, Andrei; Perunov, Nikolay; Solyak, Nikolay; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    In the low-energy part of the Project X H-linac three families of 325 MHz SC single spoke cavities will be used, having {beta} = 0.11, 0.21 and 0.4. Single spoke cavity was selected for the linac because of higher r/Q. Results of optimization of all cavities are presented. Results of the beam dynamics optimization for initial stage of the linac with beta=0.11 single spoke cavity are presented at poster MOPEC082 (this conference).

  13. STATUS OF R AND D ENERGY RECOVERY LINAC AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    SciTech Connect

    LITVINENKO,V.; BEN-ZVI, I.; ALDUINO, J.M.; BARTON, D.S.; BEAVIS, D.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    In this paper we present status and plans for the 20-MeV R&D energy recovery linac (ERL), which is under construction at Collider Accelerator Department at BNL. The facility is based on high current (up to 0.5 A of average current) super-conducting 2.5 MeV RF gun, single-mode super-conducting 5-cell RF linac and about 20-m long return loop with very flexible lattice. The R&D ERL, which is planned for commissioning in early 2009, aims to address many outstanding questions relevant for high current, high brightness energy recovery linacs.

  14. Coherent Effects of High Current Beam in Project-X Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhanov, A.; Lunin, A.; Yakovlev, V.; Gonin, I.; Khabiboulline, T.; Saini, A.; Solyak, N.; Yostrikov, A.

    2012-09-01

    Resonance excitation of longitudinal high order modes in superconducting RF structures of Project-X continuous wave linac is studied. We analyze regimes of operation of the linac with high beam current, which can be used to provide an intense muon source for the future Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider, and also important for the Accelerator-Driven Subcritical systems. We calculate power loss and associated heat load to the cryogenic system. Longitudinal emittance growth is estimated. We consider an alternative design of the elliptical cavity for the high energy part of the linac, which is more suitable for high current operation.

  15. Coherent Effects of High Current Beam in Project-X Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhanov, Alexander; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav; Gonin, Ivan; Khabiboulline, Timergali; Lunin, Andrei; Saini, Arun; Solyak, Nikolay; Vostrikov, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    Resonance excitation of longitudinal high order modes in superconducting RF structures of Project-X continuous wave linac is studied. We analyze regimes of operation of the linac with high beam current, which can be used to provide an intense muon source for the future Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider, and also important for the Accelerator-Driven Subcritical systems. We calculate power loss and associated heat load to the cryogenic system. Longitudinal emittance growth is estimated. We consider an alternative design of the elliptical cavity for the high energy part of the linac, which is more suitable for high current operation.

  16. Improved temperature regulation of APS linac RF components.

    SciTech Connect

    Dortwegt, R.

    1998-09-21

    The temperature of the APS S-Band linac's high-power rf components is regulated by water from individual closed-loop deionized (DI) water systems. The rf components are all made of oxygen-free high-conductivity copper and respond quickly to temperature changes. The SLED cavities are especially temperature-sensitive and cause beam energy instabilities when the temperature is not well regulated. Temperature regulation better than {+-} 0.1 F is required to achieve good energy stability. Improvements in the closed-loop water systems have enabled them to achieve a regulation of {+-} 0.05 F over long periods. Regulation philosophy and equipment are discussed and numerical results are presented.

  17. Design study of the SSC-LINAC re-buncher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lie-Peng; Zhao, Hong-Wei; Sun, Zhou-Ping; He, Yuan; Shi, Ai-Min; Xiao, Chen; Du, Xiao-Nan; Zhang, Cong; Zhang, Zhou-Li

    2013-02-01

    A re-buncher with spiral arms for a heavy ion linear accelerator named as SSC-LINAC at HIRFL (the heavy ion research facility of Lanzhou) has been constructed. The re-buncher, which is used for beam longitudinal modulation and matching between the RFQ and DTL, is designed to be operated in continuous wave (CW) mode at the Medium-Energy Beam-Transport (MEBT) line to maintain the beam intensity and quality. Because of the longitudinal space limitation, the re-buncher has to be very compact and will be built with four gaps. We determined the key parameters of the re-buncher cavity from the simulations using Microwave Studio software, such as the resonant frequency, the quality factor Q and the shunt impedance. The detailed design of a 53.667 MHz spiral cavity and measurement results of its prototype will be presented.

  18. Thermal analysis of DTL in the SSC-LINAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xi; Yuan, Ping; He, Yuan; Ma, Li-Zhen; Zhang, Xiao-Qi; Wu, Wei; Yang, Ya-Qing

    2011-10-01

    A linear accelerator as a new injector for the Separated Sector Cyclotron at the Heavy Ion Research Facility of LAN Zhou is being designed. The Drift-Tube-Linac (DTL) has been designed to accelerate 238U34+ from 0.140 MeV/u to 0.97 MeV/u [1]. The 3D finite element analysis of thermal behavior is presented in this paper. During operation, the cavity will produce Joule heat. The cavity will not work normally due to the high temperature and thermal deformation will lead to frequency drift. So it is necessary to perform thermal analysis to ensure the correct working temperature is used. The result of the analysis shows that after the water cooling system is put into the cavity the temperature rise is about 20 degrees and the frequency drift is about 0.15%.

  19. Linac Coherent Light Source: The first five years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostedt, Christoph; Boutet, Sébastien; Fritz, David M.; Huang, Zhirong; Lee, Hae Ja; Lemke, Henrik T.; Robert, Aymeric; Schlotter, William F.; Turner, Joshua J.; Williams, Garth J.

    2016-01-01

    A new scientific frontier opened in 2009 with the start of operations of the world's first x-ray free-electron laser (FEL), the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. LCLS provides femtosecond pulses of x rays (270 eV to 11.2 keV) with very high peak brightness to access new domains of ultrafast x-ray science. This article presents the fundamental FEL physics and outlines the LCLS source characteristics along with the experimental challenges, strategies, and instrumentation that accompany this novel type of x-ray source. The main part of the article reviews the scientific achievements since the inception of LCLS in the five primary areas it serves: atomic, molecular, and optical physics; condensed matter physics; matter in extreme conditions; chemistry and soft matter, and biology.

  20. Beam transport for an SRF recirculating-linac FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, D.; Douglas, D.; Li, Z.

    1995-12-31

    The beam transport system for the CEBAF UV Demo FEL includes a two-pan transport of the beam with acceleration from injector to wiggler, followed by energy recovery transport from wiggler to dump. From that contact we discuss the general problem of multi-pass energy-recovery beam transport for FELs. Tuneable, nearly-isochronous, large-momentum-acceptance import systems are required. The entire transport must preserve beam quality, particularly in the acceleration transport to the wiggler, and have low losses throughout the entire system. Issues such as injection and final energies, number of passes, linac focusing effects, beam separation, chronicity management, and stability constraints are critical. Various possible designs are discussed. Particle tracking results exploring the design options are also reported.

  1. Energy recovery linacs in high-energy and nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect

    I. Ben-Zvi; Ya. Derbenev; V. Litvinenko; L. Merminga

    2005-03-01

    Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL) have significant potential uses in High Energy Physics and Nuclear Physics. We describe some of the potential applications which are under development by our laboratories in this area and the technology issues that are associated with these applications. The applications that we discuss are electron cooling of high-energy hadron beams and electron-nucleon colliders. The common issues for some of these applications are high currents of polarized electrons, high-charge and high-current electron beams and the associated issues of High-Order Modes. The advantages of ERLs for these applications are numerous and will be outlined in the text. It is worth noting that some of these advantages are the high-brightness of the ERL beams and their relative immunity to beam-beam disturbances.

  2. Ampere Average Current Photoinjector and Energy Recovery Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Ilan Ben-Zvi; A. Burrill; R. Calaga; P. Cameron; X. Chang; D. Gassner; H. Hahn; A. Hershcovitch; H.C. Hseuh; P. Johnson; D. Kayran; J. Kewisch; R. Lambiase; Vladimir N. Litvinenko; G. McIntyre; A. Nicoletti; J. Rank; T. Roser; J. Scaduto; K. Smith; T. Srinivasan-Rao; K.-C. Wu; A. Zaltsman; Y. Zhao; H. Bluem; A. Burger; Mike Cole; A. Favale; D. Holmes; John Rathke; Tom Schultheiss; A. Todd; J. Delayen; W. Funk; L. Phillips; Joe Preble

    2004-08-01

    High-power Free-Electron Lasers were made possible by advances in superconducting linac operated in an energy-recovery mode, as demonstrated by the spectacular success of the Jefferson Laboratory IR-Demo. In order to get to much higher power levels, say a fraction of a megawatt average power, many technological barriers are yet to be broken. BNL's Collider-Accelerator Department is pursuing some of these technologies for a different application, that of electron cooling of high-energy hadron beams. I will describe work on CW, high-current and high-brightness electron beams. This will include a description of a superconducting, laser-photocathode RF gun employing a new secondary-emission multiplying cathode and an accelerator cavity, both capable of producing of the order of one ampere average current.

  3. Design study of a medical proton linac for neutron therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, S.; Raparia, D.

    1988-08-26

    This paper describes a design study which establishes the physical parameters of the low energy beam transport, radiofrequency quadrupole, and linac, using computer programs available at Fermilab. Beam dynamics studies verify that the desired beam parameters can be achieved. The machine described here meets the aforementioned requirements and can be built using existing technology. Also discussed are other technically feasible options which could be attractive to clinicians, though they would complicate the design of the machine and increase construction costs. One of these options would allow the machine to deliver 2.3 MeV protons to produce epithermal neutrons for treating brain tumors. A second option would provide 15 MeV protons for isotope production. 21 refs., 33 figs.

  4. Nuclear structure and depletion of nuclear isomers using electron linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, J. J.; Litz, M. S.; Henriquez, S. L.; Burns, D. A.; Netherton, K. A.; Pereira, N. R.; Karamian, S. A.

    2013-04-19

    Long-lived nuclear excited states (isomers) have proven important to understanding nuclear structure. With some isomers having half-lives of decades or longer, and intrinsic energy densities reaching 10{sup 12} J/kg, they have also been suggested for a wide range of applications. The ability to effectively transfer a population of nuclei from an isomer to shorter-lived levels will determine the feasibility of any applications. Here is described a first demonstration of the induced depletion of a population of the 438 year isomer of {sup 108}Ag to its 2.38 min ground state, using 6 MeV bremsstrahlung from a modified medical electron linac. The experiment suggests refinements to be implemented in the future and how a similar approach might be applied to study induced depletion of the 1200 year isomer of {sup 166}Ho.

  5. Ion optics of the Linac--LEB transfer line

    SciTech Connect

    Bhandari, R.K.; Penner, S.

    1990-12-01

    This report describes the ion optical properties of a proposed transfer line to inject a nominal 25 mA H{sup {minus}} beam at 600 MeV from the Linac into the Low Energy Booster (LEB) synchrotron. Ion optical investigations have been carried out in detail using the TRANSPORT, TURTLE and TRACE 3-D codes. The calculations take account of linear space charge effects of up to 50 mA average beam current. These effects have been found to be quite appreciable, especially on the longitudinal phase space. Procedure for their evaluation and optimization are described. Effects of some imperfections in the beam line magnets have been studied. 6 refs., 19 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Phase Noise Measurement in PEP II and the Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Getaneh, Mesfin

    2003-09-05

    The Goal of this project is to provide a measurement of the phase of the radio frequency (RF) relative to electron beam traveling down the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Because the Main Drive Line (MDL) supplies the RF drive and phase reference for the entire accelerator system, the phase accuracy and amount of phase noise present in the MDL are very critical to the functionality of the accelerator. Therefore, a Phase Noise Measurement System was built to measure the phase noise in the liner accelerator (Linac) and PEP II. The system was used to determine the stability of the PEP II RF reference system. In this project a low noise Phase Locked Loop system (PLL) was built to measure timing jitter about sub picoseconds level. The phase noise measured in Master Oscillator using PLL indicates that phase noise is low enough for PEP II to run.

  7. The linac coherent light source single particle imaging road map

    PubMed Central

    Aquila, A.; Barty, A.; Bostedt, C.; Boutet, S.; Carini, G.; dePonte, D.; Drell, P.; Doniach, S.; Downing, K. H.; Earnest, T.; Elmlund, H.; Elser, V.; Gühr, M.; Hajdu, J.; Hastings, J.; Hau-Riege, S. P.; Huang, Z.; Lattman, E. E.; Maia, F. R. N. C.; Marchesini, S.; Ourmazd, A.; Pellegrini, C.; Santra, R.; Schlichting, I.; Schroer, C.; Spence, J. C. H.; Vartanyants, I. A.; Wakatsuki, S.; Weis, W. I.; Williams, G. J.

    2015-01-01

    Intense femtosecond x-ray pulses from free-electron laser sources allow the imaging of individual particles in a single shot. Early experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) have led to rapid progress in the field and, so far, coherent diffractive images have been recorded from biological specimens, aerosols, and quantum systems with a few-tens-of-nanometers resolution. In March 2014, LCLS held a workshop to discuss the scientific and technical challenges for reaching the ultimate goal of atomic resolution with single-shot coherent diffractive imaging. This paper summarizes the workshop findings and presents the roadmap toward reaching atomic resolution, 3D imaging at free-electron laser sources. PMID:26798801

  8. X-ray detectors at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Blaj, Gabriel; Caragiulo, Pietro; Carini, Gabriella; Carron, Sebastian; Dragone, Angelo; Freytag, Dietrich; Haller, Gunther; Hart, Philip; Hasi, Jasmine; Herbst, Ryan; Herrmann, Sven; Kenney, Chris; Markovic, Bojan; Nishimura, Kurtis; Osier, Shawn; Pines, Jack; Reese, Benjamin; Segal, Julie; Tomada, Astrid; Weaver, Matt

    2015-04-21

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) present new challenges for camera development compared with conventional light sources. At SLAC a variety of technologies are being used to match the demands of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and to support a wide range of scientific applications. In this paper an overview of X-ray detector design requirements at FELs is presented and the various cameras in use at SLAC are described for the benefit of users planning experiments or analysts looking at data. Features and operation of the CSPAD camera, which is currently deployed at LCLS, are discussed, and the ePix family, a new generation of cameras under development at SLAC, is introduced.

  9. A 300-nm compact mm-wave linac FEL design

    SciTech Connect

    Nassiri, A.; Kustom, R.L.; Kang, Y.W.

    1995-12-31

    Microfabrication technology offers an alternative method for fabricating precision, miniature-size components suitable for use in accelerator physics and commercial applications. The original R&D work at Argonne, in collaboration with the University of Illinois at Chicago, has produced encouraging results in the area of rf accelerating structure design, optical and x-ray masks production, deep x-ray lithography (LIGA exposures), and precision structural alignments. In this paper we will present a design study for a compact single pass mm-linac FEL to produce short wavelength radiation. This system will consists of a photocathode rf gun operated at 30 GHz, a 50-MeV superconducting constant gradient structure operated at 60 GHz, and a microundulator with 1-mm period. Initial experimental results on a scale model rf gun and microundulator will be presented.

  10. Klystron modulator operation and upgrades for the APS linac

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, T.J.; Cours, A.

    1995-07-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) linac requires five 100-MW modulators to achieve its required energy. In-house construction of these modulators was under an extremely compressed time schedule and, while the original design was successful, it had a few shortcomings. The operation of the modulators was hindered by excessively sensitive controls and overheating during the hot summer months. The system underwent minor changes that resulted in major improvements. Additionally, improvements have been made to the high voltage circuits to improve the rise time of the output pulse shape. reduce the initial ringing of the pulse, and enhance the reliability of the system. This paper will outline the changes and explain the results of the improvements.

  11. The linac coherent light source single particle imaging road map

    SciTech Connect

    Aquila, A.; Barty, A.; Bostedt, C.; Boutet, S.; Carini, G.; dePonte, D.; Drell, P.; Doniach, S.; Downing, K. H.; Earnest, T.; Elmlund, H.; Elser, V.; Gühr, M.; Hajdu, J.; Hastings, J.; Hau-Riege, S. P.; Huang, Z.; Lattman, E. E.; Maia, F. R.N.C.; Marchesini, S.; Ourmazd, A.; Pellegrini, C.; Schlichting, I.; Schroer, C.; Spence, J. C. H.; Vartanyants, I. A.; Wakatsuki, S.; Weis, W. I.; Williams, G. J.

    2015-07-01

    Intense femtosecond x-ray pulses from free-electron laser sources allow the imaging of individual particles in a single shot. Early experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) have led to rapid progress in the field and, so far, coherent diffractive images have been recorded from biological specimens, aerosols, and quantum systems with a few-tens-of-nanometers resolution. In March 2014, LCLS held a workshop to discuss the scientific and technical challenges for reaching the ultimate goal of atomic resolution with single-shot coherent diffractive imaging. This paper summarizes the workshop findings and presents the roadmap toward reaching atomic resolution, 3D imaging at free-electron laser sources.

  12. The linac coherent light source single particle imaging road map

    DOE PAGES

    Aquila, A.; Barty, A.; Bostedt, C.; Boutet, S.; Carini, G.; dePonte, D.; Drell, P.; Doniach, S.; Downing, K. H.; Earnest, T.; et al

    2015-07-01

    Intense femtosecond x-ray pulses from free-electron laser sources allow the imaging of individual particles in a single shot. Early experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) have led to rapid progress in the field and, so far, coherent diffractive images have been recorded from biological specimens, aerosols, and quantum systems with a few-tens-of-nanometers resolution. In March 2014, LCLS held a workshop to discuss the scientific and technical challenges for reaching the ultimate goal of atomic resolution with single-shot coherent diffractive imaging. This paper summarizes the workshop findings and presents the roadmap toward reaching atomic resolution, 3D imaging at free-electronmore » laser sources.« less

  13. THE SNS VACUUM CONTROL SYSTEM UPGRADE FOR THE SUPERCONDUCTING LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Derrick C

    2009-01-01

    The superconducting linac of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has 23 cryomodules whose vacuum system is monitored and controlled by custom built hardware. The original control hardware was provided by Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) and contained a variety of custom boards utilizing integrated circuits to perform logic. The need for control logic changes, a desire to increase maintainability, and a desire to increase flexibility to adapt for the future has led to a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) based upgrade. This paper provides an overview of the commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) hardware being used in the superconducting vacuum control system. Details of the design and challenges to convert a control system during small windows of maintenance periods without disrupting beam operation will be covered in this paper.

  14. X-ray detectors at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Blaj, Gabriel; Caragiulo, Pietro; Carini, Gabriella; Carron, Sebastian; Dragone, Angelo; Freytag, Dietrich; Haller, Gunther; Hart, Philip; Hasi, Jasmine; Herbst, Ryan; Herrmann, Sven; Kenney, Chris; Markovic, Bojan; Nishimura, Kurtis; Osier, Shawn; Pines, Jack; Reese, Benjamin; Segal, Julie; Tomada, Astrid; Weaver, Matt

    2015-01-01

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) present new challenges for camera development compared with conventional light sources. At SLAC a variety of technologies are being used to match the demands of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and to support a wide range of scientific applications. In this paper an overview of X-ray detector design requirements at FELs is presented and the various cameras in use at SLAC are described for the benefit of users planning experiments or analysts looking at data. Features and operation of the CSPAD camera, which is currently deployed at LCLS, are discussed, and the ePix family, a new generation of cameras under development at SLAC, is introduced. PMID:25931071

  15. Performance characteristics of a 425 MHz RFQ linac

    SciTech Connect

    Stovall, J.E.; Crandall, K.R.; Hamm, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    A radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) focused proton linac has been developed and successfully tested at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) for the purpose of evaluating its performance and applicability as a low-beta accelerator. The geometry of the structure was designed to accept a 100-keV beam, focus, bunch, and accelerate it to 640 keV in 1.1 m with a high-capture efficiency and minimum emittance growth. The accelerator test facility includes an injector, low-energy transport section for transverse matching, and a high-energy transport section for analysis of the beam properties. The accelerator cavity is exited through a manifold powered by a 450-MHz klystron. Diagnostic instrumentation was prepared to facilitate operation of the accelerator and to analyze its performance. Measurements of the beam properties are presented and compared with the expected properties resulting from numerical calculations of the beam dynamics.

  16. Dose quality assurance for industrial irradiation with an electron linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, B. F.; Lawrence, C. B.; Lee-Whiting, G. E.; Lord, S.; Mason, V. A.; Smyth, D. L.; Ungrin, J.

    1989-04-01

    In the development of the IMPELA family of electron linacs for industrial radiation processing, the needs for on-line monitoring of exposure dose have been recognized. The diverse applications under consideration demand a broad range of control-system performance and delivered-dose assurance measures appropriate to the sensitivities of the processes. The AAMI Guideline for Electron Beam Radiation Sterilization of Medical Devices points to a probable upper bound to the complexity of such requirements. ASTM and IAEA standards and guidelines for radiation dosimetry define the methods available for off-line verification of absorbed dose. The impact of the requirements for on-line measurements and the limitations inherent to the IMPELA design, are reviewed. The interdependencies of off-line product dosimetry and analyses with the on-line monitoring of process parameters are explored in search of criteria for optimization of cost-effective, flexible industrial irradiators.

  17. Energy stability in recirculating, energy-recovering linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Merminga, L.; Bisognano, J.J.; Delayen, J.R.

    1996-07-01

    Recirculating, energy-recovering linacs can be used as driver accelerators for high power FELs. Instabilities which arise from fluctuations of the cavity fields are investigated. Energy changes can cause beam loss on apertures, or, when coupled to M{sub 56}, phase oscillations. Both effects change the beam induced voltage in the cavities and can lead to unstable variations of the accelerating field. Stability analysis for small perturbations from equilibrium is performed and threshold currents are determined. Furthermore, the analytical model is extended to include amplitude and phase feedback, with the transfer function in the feedback path presently modeled as a low-pass filter. The feedback gain and bandwidth required for stability are calculated for the high power UV FEL proposed for construction at CEBAF. 4 refs.

  18. SRF and RF systems for LEReC Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Brutus, J. C.; Fedotov, A.; McIntyre, G.; Polizzo, S.; Smith, K.; Than, R.; Tuozzolo, J.; Veshcherevich, V.; Wu, Q.; Xiao, B.; Xu, W.; Zaltsman, A.

    2015-05-03

    The Low Energy RHIC electron Cooling (LEReC) is under development at BNL to improve RHIC luminosity at low energies. It will consist of a short electron linac and two cooling sections, one for blue and one for yellow rings. For the first stage of the project, LEReC-I, we will install a 704 MHz superconducting RF cavity and three normal conducting cavities operating at 9 MHz, 704 MHz and 2.1 GHz. The SRF cavity will boost the electron beam energy up to 2 MeV. The warm cavities will be used to correct the energy spread introduced in the SRF cavity. The paper describes layouts of the SRF and RF systems, their parameters and status.

  19. X-ray detectors at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE PAGES

    Blaj, Gabriel; Caragiulo, Pietro; Carini, Gabriella; Carron, Sebastian; Dragone, Angelo; Freytag, Dietrich; Haller, Gunther; Hart, Philip; Hasi, Jasmine; Herbst, Ryan; et al

    2015-04-21

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) present new challenges for camera development compared with conventional light sources. At SLAC a variety of technologies are being used to match the demands of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and to support a wide range of scientific applications. In this paper an overview of X-ray detector design requirements at FELs is presented and the various cameras in use at SLAC are described for the benefit of users planning experiments or analysts looking at data. Features and operation of the CSPAD camera, which is currently deployed at LCLS, are discussed, and the ePix family, a newmore » generation of cameras under development at SLAC, is introduced.« less

  20. Beam Diagnostics for the BNL Energy Recovery Linac Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, Peter; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Brennan, Michael; Connolly, Roger; Dawson, William; Degen, Chris; DellaPenna, Al; Gassner, David; Kesselman, Martin; Kewish, Jorg; Litvinenko, Vladimir; Mead, Joseph; Oerter, Brian; Russo, Tom; Vetter, Kurt; Yakimenko, Vitaly

    2004-11-10

    An Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) test facility is presently under construction at BNL. The goals of this test facility are first to demonstrate stable intense CW electron beam with parameters typical for the RHIC e-cooling project (and potentially for eRHIC), second to test novel elements of the ERL (high current CW photo-cathode, superconducting RF cavity with HOM dampers, and feedback systems), and finally to test lattice dependence of stability criteria. Planned diagnostics include position monitors, loss monitors, transverse profile monitors (both optical and wires), scrapers/halo monitors, a high resolution differential current monitor, phase monitors, an energy spread monitor, and a fast transverse monitor (for beam break-up studies and the energy feedback system). We discuss diagnostics challenges that are unique to this project, and present preliminary system specifications. In addition, we include a brief discussion of the timing system.

  1. The linac coherent light source single particle imaging road map.

    PubMed

    Aquila, A; Barty, A; Bostedt, C; Boutet, S; Carini, G; dePonte, D; Drell, P; Doniach, S; Downing, K H; Earnest, T; Elmlund, H; Elser, V; Gühr, M; Hajdu, J; Hastings, J; Hau-Riege, S P; Huang, Z; Lattman, E E; Maia, F R N C; Marchesini, S; Ourmazd, A; Pellegrini, C; Santra, R; Schlichting, I; Schroer, C; Spence, J C H; Vartanyants, I A; Wakatsuki, S; Weis, W I; Williams, G J

    2015-07-01

    Intense femtosecond x-ray pulses from free-electron laser sources allow the imaging of individual particles in a single shot. Early experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) have led to rapid progress in the field and, so far, coherent diffractive images have been recorded from biological specimens, aerosols, and quantum systems with a few-tens-of-nanometers resolution. In March 2014, LCLS held a workshop to discuss the scientific and technical challenges for reaching the ultimate goal of atomic resolution with single-shot coherent diffractive imaging. This paper summarizes the workshop findings and presents the roadmap toward reaching atomic resolution, 3D imaging at free-electron laser sources.

  2. The linac coherent light source single particle imaging road map.

    PubMed

    Aquila, A; Barty, A; Bostedt, C; Boutet, S; Carini, G; dePonte, D; Drell, P; Doniach, S; Downing, K H; Earnest, T; Elmlund, H; Elser, V; Gühr, M; Hajdu, J; Hastings, J; Hau-Riege, S P; Huang, Z; Lattman, E E; Maia, F R N C; Marchesini, S; Ourmazd, A; Pellegrini, C; Santra, R; Schlichting, I; Schroer, C; Spence, J C H; Vartanyants, I A; Wakatsuki, S; Weis, W I; Williams, G J

    2015-07-01

    Intense femtosecond x-ray pulses from free-electron laser sources allow the imaging of individual particles in a single shot. Early experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) have led to rapid progress in the field and, so far, coherent diffractive images have been recorded from biological specimens, aerosols, and quantum systems with a few-tens-of-nanometers resolution. In March 2014, LCLS held a workshop to discuss the scientific and technical challenges for reaching the ultimate goal of atomic resolution with single-shot coherent diffractive imaging. This paper summarizes the workshop findings and presents the roadmap toward reaching atomic resolution, 3D imaging at free-electron laser sources. PMID:26798801

  3. Digitally Controlled Four Harmonic Buncher for FSU LINAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moerland, Daniel S.; Wiedenhoever, Ingo; Baby, Lagy T.; Caussyn, David; Spingler, David

    2012-03-01

    Florida State University's John D. Fox Superconducting Accelerator Laboratory is operating a Tandem-Linac system for heavy ion beams at energies of 5-10 MeV/u. Recently, the accelerator has been used as the driver for the radioactive beam facility RESOLUT, which poses new demands on its high-intensity performance and time-resolution. These demands motivated us to optimize the RF bunching system and to switch the bunch frequency from 48.5 to 12.125 MHz. We installed a four-harmonic resonant transformer to create 3-4 kV potential oscillations across a pair of wire-mesh grids. This setup is modulating the energy of the beam injected into the tandem accelerator, with the aim to create short bunches of beam particles. Asawtooth-like wave-form is created using the Fourier series method, by combining the basis sinusoidal wave of 12.125MHz and its 3 higher order harmonics, in a manner similar to the systems used at ATLAS [1] and other RF-accelerators. A new aspect of our setup is the use of a digital 1GHz function generator, which allows us to optimize and stabilize the synthesized waveform. The control system was realized using labview and integrated into the recently updated controls of the accelerator. We characterize the bunching quality achievedand discuss the optimization of the bunching wave-form. The bunching system has been successfully used in a number of Linac-experiments performed during 2011.[4pt][1] S. Sharamentov, J. Bogaty, B.E. Clifft, R. Pardo, UPGRADE OF THE ATLAS POSITIVE ION INJECTOR BUNCHING SYSTEM, Proceedings of 2005 Particle Accelerator Conference, Knoxville, Tennessee

  4. Parallel Beam Dynamics Simulation Tools for Future Light SourceLinac Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji; Pogorelov, Ilya v.; Ryne, Robert D.

    2007-06-25

    Large-scale modeling on parallel computers is playing an increasingly important role in the design of future light sources. Such modeling provides a means to accurately and efficiently explore issues such as limits to beam brightness, emittance preservation, the growth of instabilities, etc. Recently the IMPACT codes suite was enhanced to be applicable to future light source design. Simulations with IMPACT-Z were performed using up to one billion simulation particles for the main linac of a future light source to study the microbunching instability. Combined with the time domain code IMPACT-T, it is now possible to perform large-scale start-to-end linac simulations for future light sources, including the injector, main linac, chicanes, and transfer lines. In this paper we provide an overview of the IMPACT code suite, its key capabilities, and recent enhancements pertinent to accelerator modeling for future linac-based light sources.

  5. Time-Resolved Emittance Characterization of an Induction Linac Beam using Optical Transition Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Le Sage, G P

    2002-11-05

    An induction linac is used by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to perform radiographic testing at the Flash X-ray Radiography facility. Emittance characterization is important since x-ray spot size impacts the resolution of shadow-graphs. Due to the long pulse length, high current, and beam energy, emittance measurement using Optical Transition Radiation is an attractive alternative for reasons that will be described in the text. The utility of OTR-based emittance measurement has been well demonstrated for both RF and induction linacs. We describe the time-resolved emittance characterization of an induction linac electron beam. We have refined the optical collection system for the induction linac application, and have demonstrated a new technique for probing the divergence of a subset of the beam profile. The experimental apparatus, data reduction, and conclusions will be presented. Additionally, a new scheme for characterizing the correlation between beam divergence and spatial coordinates within the beam profile will be described.

  6. Overview of the High Intensity Neutrino Source Linac R&D program at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, R.C.; Appollinari, G.; Carneiro, J.P.; Gonin, I.; Hanna, B.; Hays, S.; Khabiboulline, T.; Lanfranco, G.; Madrak, R.L.; Moretti, A.; Nicol, T.; /Fermilab /Argonne

    2008-09-01

    The Fermilab High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) Linac R&D program is building a first-of-a-kind 60 MeV superconducting H- linac. The HINS Linac incorporates superconducting solenoids for transverse focusing, high power RF vector modulators for independent control of multiple cavities powered from a single klystron, and superconducting spoke-type accelerating cavities starting at 10 MeV. This will be the first application and demonstration of any of these technologies in a low-energy, high-intensity proton/H- linear accelerator. The HINS effort is relevant to a high intensity, superconducting H- linac that might serve the next generation of neutrino physics and muon storage ring/collider experiments. An overview of the HINS program, machine design, status, and outlook is presented.

  7. Summary of sessions B and F: High intensity linacs and frontend & proton drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Ferdinand, R.; Chou, W.; Galambos, J.; /Oak Ridge

    2005-01-01

    This paper summarizes the sessions B&F of the 33rd ICFA Advanced Beam Dynamics Workshop on High Intensity & High Brightness Hadron Beams held in Bensheim, Germany. It covers high intensity linacs, front ends and proton driver topics.

  8. Calculation of acceptance of high intensity superconducting proton linac for Project X

    SciTech Connect

    Saini, A.; Ranjan, K.; Solyak, N.; Mishra, S.; Yakovlev, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Project-X is the proposed high intensity proton facility to be built at Fermilab, US. Its Superconducting Linac, to be used at first stage of acceleration, will be operated in continuous wave (CW) mode. The Linac is divided into three sections on the basis of operating frequencies & six sections on the basis of family of RF cavities to be used for the acceleration of beam from 2.5 MeV to 3 GeV. The transition from one section to another can limit the acceptance of the Linac if these are not matched properly. We performed a study to calculate the acceptance of the Linac in both longitudinal and transverse plane. Investigation of most sensitive area which limits longitudinal acceptance and study of influence of failure of beam line elements at critical position, on acceptance are also performed.

  9. Commissioning and first operational experience of the 400 MeV Linac at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Junck, K.; Allen, L.; Kroc, T.; MacLachlan, J.; McCrory, E.; Moretti, A.; Noble, R.; Popovic, M.; Schmidt, C.

    1994-07-01

    Commissioning of the Fermilab High Energy Linac during September and October of 1993 has increased the energy of the H- linac from 200 to 400 MeV. The Linac Upgrade is one portion of the Fermilab Upgrad and is intended to reduce the incoherent space-charge tuneshift at injection into the 8 GeV Booster. To accomplish this increase in energy within the existing enclosure, four 201.25 MHz drift-tube linac tankshave been replaced by seven 805 MHz side-coupled cavity modules to accelerate the beam from 116 MeV to 400 MeV. Each module is driven with a klystron amplifier delivering 10 MW of peak power for 60 {mu}sec with a maximum pulse repetition rate of 15 Hz. Nominal beam current is 35 mA with a pulselength of 40 {mu}sec. Results from commissioning and operational experience during Fermilab Collider Run 1B are presented.

  10. First Considerations Concerning an Optimized Cavity Design for the Main Linac of BERLinPro

    SciTech Connect

    B. Riemann, T. Weis, W. Anders, J. Knobloch, A. Neumann, H.-W. Glock, C. Potratz, U. van Rienen, F. Marhauser

    2011-09-01

    The Berlin Energy Recovery Linac Project (BERLinPro) is designed to develop and demonstrate CW linac technology and expertise required to drive next-generation Energy Recovery Linacs. Strongly HOM-damped multicell 1.3 GHz cavities are required for the main linac. The optimization of the cavities presented here is primarily based on the CEBAF 1.5 GHz 5-cell high-current cavity design, including HOM waveguide couplers. The cavity was scaled to 1.3 GHz and extended to 7 cells. Modifications to the end group design have also been studied. An effort was also made to reduce the ratio Epk/Eacc while still permitting HOMs to propagate.

  11. Special design problems and solutions for high powered continuous duty linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Liska, D.; Carlisle, L.; McCauley, G. ); Ellis, S.; Ilg, T.; Smith, P. )

    1993-01-01

    Several high powered linac designs are being considered for various purposes including radioactive waste treatment, tritium production, and neutron factories for materials studies. Since the fractional beam losses must be in the 10[sup [minus

  12. Proton linac for hospital-based fast neutron therapy and radioisotope production

    SciTech Connect

    Lennox, A.J.; Hendrickson, F.R.; Swenson, D.A.; Winje, R.A.; Young, D.E.; Rush Univ., Chicago, IL; Science Applications International Corp., Princeton, NJ; Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL )

    1989-09-01

    Recent developments in linac technology have led to the design of a hospital-based proton linac for fast neutron therapy. The 180 microamp average current allows beam to be diverted for radioisotope production during treatments while maintaining an acceptable dose rate. During dedicated operation, dose rates greater than 280 neutron rads per minute are achievable at depth, DMAX = 1.6 cm with source to axis distance, SAD = 190 cm. Maximum machine energy is 70 MeV and several intermediate energies are available for optimizing production of isotopes for Positron Emission Tomography and other medical applications. The linac can be used to produce a horizontal or a gantry can be added to the downstream end of the linac for conventional patient positioning. The 70 MeV protons can also be used for proton therapy for ocular melanomas. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  13. Effect of the transverse parasitic mode on beam performance for the ADS driver linac in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Peng; Pei, Shi-Lun; Wang, Jiu-Qing; Li, Zhi-Hui

    2015-05-01

    The ADS (Accelerator Driven subcritical System) driver linac in China is designed to run in CW (Continuous Wave) mode with 10 mA designed beam current. In this scenario, the beam-induced parasitic modes in the ADS driver linac may make the beam unstable or deteriorate the beam performance. To evaluate the parasitic mode effect on the beam dynamics systematically, simulation studies using the ROOT-based numerical code SMD have been conducted. The longitudinal beam instability induced by the HOMs (High Order Modes) and SOMs (Same Order Modes) has little effect on the longitudinal beam performance for the current ADS driver linac design based on the 10 MeV/325 MHz injector I from previous studies. Here the transverse parasitic mode (i.e., dipole HOM) effect on the transverse beam performance at the ADS driver linac exit is investigated. To more reasonably quantify the dipole mode effect, the multi-bunch effective emittance is introduced in this paper.

  14. Formation of electron bunches with tailored current profiles using multi-frequency linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, P.; Behrens, C.; Gerth, C.; Lemery, F.; Mihalcea, D.; Stoltz, P.

    2012-12-21

    Tailoring an electron bunch with specific current profile can provide substantial enhancement of the transformer ratio in beam-driven acceleration methods. We present a method relying on the use of a linac with accelerating sections operating at different frequencies followed by a magnetic bunch compressor. The experimental verfification of the technique in a two-frequency linac is presented. The compatibility of the proposed technique with the formation and acceleration of a drive and witness bunches is numerically demonstrated.

  15. Design of the NSLS-II Linac Front End Test Stand

    SciTech Connect

    Fliller III, R.; Johanson, M.; Lucas, M.; Rose, J.; Shaftan, T.

    2011-03-28

    The NSLS-II operational parameters place very stringent requirements on the injection system. Among these are the charge per bunch train at low emittance that is required from the linac along with the uniformity of the charge per bunch along the train. The NSLS-II linac is a 200 MeV linac produced by Research Instruments Gmbh. Part of the strategy for understanding to operation of the injectors is to test the front end of the linac prior to its installation in the facility. The linac front end consists of a 100 kV electron gun, 500 MHz subharmonic prebuncher, focusing solenoids and a suite of diagnostics. The diagnostics in the front end need to be supplemented with an additional suite of diagnostics to fully characterize the beam. In this paper we discuss the design of a test stand to measure the various properties of the beam generated from this section. In particular, the test stand will measure the charge, transverse emittance, energy, energy spread, and bunching performance of the linac front end under all operating conditions of the front end.

  16. Superconducting resonator used as a phase and energy detector for linac setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanov, Nikolai R.

    2016-07-01

    Booster linacs for tandem accelerators and positive ion superconducting injectors have matured into standard features of many accelerator laboratories. Both types of linac are formed as an array of independently-phased resonators operating at room temperature or in a superconducting state. Each accelerating resonator needs to be individually set in phase and amplitude for optimum acceleration efficiency. The modularity of the linac allows the velocity profile along the structure to be tailored to accommodate a wide range charge to mass ratio. The linac setup procedure, described in this paper, utilizes a superconducting resonator operating in a beam bunch phase detection mode. The main objective was to derive the full set of phase distributions for quick and efficient tuning of the entire accelerator. The phase detector was operated in overcoupling mode in order to minimize de-tuning effects of microphonic background. A mathematical expression was derived to set a limit on resonator maximum accelerating field during the crossover search to enable extracting unambiguous beam phase data. A set of equations was obtained to calculate the values of beam phase advance and energy gain produced by accelerating resonators. An extensive range of linac setting up configurations was conducted to validate experimental procedures and analytical models. The main application of a superconducting phase detector is for fast tuning for beams of ultralow intensities, in particular in the straight section of linac facilities.

  17. Conceptual Design for Replacement of the DTL and CCL with Superconducting RF Cavities in the Spallation Neutron Source Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Champion, Mark S; Doleans, Marc; Kim, Sang-Ho

    2013-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source Linac utilizes normal conducting RF cavities in the low energy section from 2.5 MeV to 186 MeV. Six Drift Tube Linac (DTL) structures accelerate the beam to 87 MeV, and four Coupled Cavity Linac (CCL) structures provide further acceleration to 186 MeV. The remainder of the Linac is comprised of 81 superconducting cavities packaged in 23 cryomodules to provide final beam energy of approximately 1 GeV. The superconducting Linac has proven to be substantially more reliable than the normal conducting Linac despite the greater number of stations and the complexity associated with the cryogenic plant and distribution. A conceptual design has been initiated on a replacement of the DTL and CCL with superconducting RF cavities. The motivation, constraints, and conceptual design are presented.

  18. Unfolding linac photon spectra and incident electron energies from experimental transmission data, with direct independent validation

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, E. S. M.; McEwen, M. R.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: In a recent computational study, an improved physics-based approach was proposed for unfolding linac photon spectra and incident electron energies from transmission data. In this approach, energy differentiation is improved by simultaneously using transmission data for multiple attenuators and detectors, and the unfolding robustness is improved by using a four-parameter functional form to describe the photon spectrum. The purpose of the current study is to validate this approach experimentally, and to demonstrate its application on a typical clinical linac. Methods: The validation makes use of the recent transmission measurements performed on the Vickers research linac of National Research Council Canada. For this linac, the photon spectra were previously measured using a NaI detector, and the incident electron parameters are independently known. The transmission data are for eight beams in the range 10-30 MV using thick Be, Al and Pb bremsstrahlung targets. To demonstrate the approach on a typical clinical linac, new measurements are performed on an Elekta Precise linac for 6, 10 and 25 MV beams. The different experimental setups are modeled using EGSnrc, with the newly added photonuclear attenuation included. Results: For the validation on the research linac, the 95% confidence bounds of the unfolded spectra fall within the noise of the NaI data. The unfolded spectra agree with the EGSnrc spectra (calculated using independently known electron parameters) with RMS energy fluence deviations of 4.5%. The accuracy of unfolding the incident electron energy is shown to be {approx}3%. A transmission cutoff of only 10% is suitable for accurate unfolding, provided that the other components of the proposed approach are implemented. For the demonstration on a clinical linac, the unfolded incident electron energies and their 68% confidence bounds for the 6, 10 and 25 MV beams are 6.1 {+-} 0.1, 9.3 {+-} 0.1, and 19.3 {+-} 0.2 MeV, respectively. The unfolded spectra

  19. First MR images obtained during megavoltage photon irradiation from a prototype integrated linac-MR system

    SciTech Connect

    Fallone, B. G.; Murray, B.; Rathee, S.; Stanescu, T.; Steciw, S.; Vidakovic, S.; Blosser, E.; Tymofichuk, D.

    2009-06-15

    The authors report the first magnetic resonance (MR) images produced by their prototype MR system integrated with a radiation therapy source. The prototype consists of a 6 MV linac mounted onto the open end of a biplanar 0.2 T permanent MR system which has 27.9 cm pole-to-pole opening with flat gradients (40 mT/m) running under a TMX NRC console. The distance from the magnet isocenter to the linac target is 80 cm. The authors' design has resolved the mutual interferences between the two devices such that the MR magnetic field does not interfere with the trajectory of the electron in the linac waveguide, and the radiofrequency (RF) signals from each system do not interfere with the operation of the other system. Magnetic and RF shielding calculations were performed and confirmed with appropriate measurements. The prototype is currently on a fixed gantry; however, in the very near future, the linac and MR magnet will rotate in unison such that the linac is always aimed through the opening in the biplanar magnet. MR imaging was found to be fully operational during linac irradiation and proven by imaging a phantom with conventional gradient echo sequences. Except for small changes in SNR, MR images produced during irradiation were visually and quantitatively very similar to those taken with the linac turned off. This prototype system provides proof of concept that the design has decreased the mutual interferences sufficiently to allow the development of real-time MR-guided radiotherapy. Low field-strength systems (0.2-0.5 T) have been used clinically as diagnostic tools. The task of the linac-MR system is, however, to provide MR guidance to the radiotherapy beam. Therefore, the 0.2 T field strength would provide adequate image quality for this purpose and, with the addition of fast imaging techniques, has the potential to provide 4D soft-tissue visualization not presently available in image-guided radiotherapy systems. The authors' initial design incorporates a

  20. Preliminary Analysis on Linac Oscillation Data LI05-19 and Wake Field Energy Loss in FACET Commissioning 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yipeng; /SLAC

    2012-07-23

    In this note, preliminary analysis on linac ocsillation data in FACET linac LI05-09 plus LI11-19 is presented. Several quadrupoles are identified to possibly have different strength, compared with their designed strength in the MAD optics model. The beam energy loss due to longitudinal wake fields in the S-band linac is also analytically calculated, also by LITRACK numerical simulations.

  1. Design of the beryllium window for Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer

    SciTech Connect

    Nayak, S.; Mapes, M.; Raparia, D.

    2015-11-01

    In the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP) beam line, there were two Beryllium (Be) windows with an air gap to separate the high vacuum upstream side from low vacuum downstream side. There had been frequent window failures in the past which affected the machine productivity and increased the radiation dose received by workers due to unplanned maintenance. To improve the window life, design of Be window is reexamined. Detailed structural and thermal simulations are carried out on Be window for different design parameters and loading conditions to come up with better design to improve the window life. The new design removed the air gap and connect the both beam lines with a Be window in-between. The new design has multiple advantages such as 1) reduces the beam energy loss (because of one window with no air gap), 2) reduces air activation due to nuclear radiation and 3) increased the machine reliability as there is no direct pressure load during operation. For quick replacement of this window, an aluminum bellow coupled with load binder was designed. There hasn’t been a single window failure since the new design was implemented in 2012.

  2. Studying compressed matter physics at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenzer, Siegfried; Fletcher, Luke; HED science, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Team; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Team; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Team

    2015-03-01

    With the advent of the Matter in Extreme Conditions instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source a world-unique experimental capability has become available to study the physics of dynamically compressed solids. Our new high-energy-density science program at SLAC is aimed to take advantage of x-ray pulses with the highest peak brightness available today. In a single shot, the x-ray beam delivers 1012 x-ray photons in 50 fs focused to a spot of order 1 μm. This capability allows us to measure plasmons and to visualize the density and pressure evolution across melt lines by resolving correlations at distances comparable to atomic scales. Our data allow direct determination of pressure for validating theoretical models for the thermodynamics at high pressure. We will show how LCLS data test our theoretical models of compressed matter and will discuss future plans for the study of hot and dense matter. This work was supported by DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Science under FWP 100182.

  3. Overview of linac applications at future radioactive beam facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Nolen, J.A.

    1996-11-01

    There is considerable interest worldwide in the research which could be done at a next generation, advanced radioactive beam facility. To generate high quality, intense beams of accelerated radionuclides via the {open_quotes}isotope separator on-line{close_quotes} (ISOL) method requires two major accelerator components: a high power (100 kW) driver device to produce radionuclides in a production target/ion source complex, and a secondary beam accelerator to produce beams of radioactive ions up to energies on the order of 10 MeV per nucleon over a broad mass range. In reviewing the technological challenges of such a facility, several types of modem linear accelerators appear well suited. This paper reviews the properties of the linacs currently under construction and those proposed for future facilities for use either as the driver device or the radioactive beam post-accelerator. Other choices of accelerators, such as cyclotrons, for either the driver or secondary beam devices of a radioactive beam complex will also be compared. Issues to be addressed for the production accelerator include the choice of ion beam types to be used for cost-effective production of radionuclides. For the post-accelerator the choice of ion source technology is critical and dictates the charge-to-mass requirements at the injection stage.

  4. Front end design of the RIA driver LINAC.

    SciTech Connect

    Kolomiets, A. A.; Asseev, V. N.; Ostroumov, P. N.; Pardo, R. C.; Physics; ITEP

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the front end design for the RIA driver linac which is able to select, separate and accelerate in the RFQ the required ion species of one- or two-charge states. The front end consists of an ECR ion source located on a 100 kV platform, LEBT, RFQ and MEBT. The first section of the LEBT is an achromatic bending system for charge-to-mass analysis and selection. For the heaviest ions with masses above 180, the transport system is able to deliver to the entrance of the first buncher a two-charge-state beam with similar Twiss parameters for both charge states. In order to match two-charge-state ions with different mass to charge ratios, the straight section of the LEBT upstream of the RFQ will be placed on a high-voltage platform. A voltage /spl sim/30 kV is required in order to match velocities of ions with mass to charge ratio less than the design value and to maintain the possibility accelerating two charge states simultaneously. Several beam matching schemes in the transitions LEBT-RFQ and RFQ-MEBT have been studied.

  5. Beam-based Feedback for the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Fairley, D.; Allison, S.; Chevtsov, S.; Chu, P.; Decker, F.J.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Himel, T.; Kim, K.; Krejcik, P.; Loos, H.; Lahey, T.; Natampalli, P.; Peng, S.; Rogind, D.; Shoaee, H.; Straumann, T.; Williams, E.; White, G.; Wu, J.; Zelazney, M.; /SLAC

    2010-02-11

    Beam-based feedback control loops are required by the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) program in order to provide fast, single-pulse stabilization of beam parameters. Eight transverse feedback loops, a 6 x 6 longitudinal feedback loop, and a loop to maintain the electron bunch charge were successfully prototyped in MATLAB for the LCLS, and have been maintaining stability of the LCLS electron beam at beam rates up to 30Hz. In the final commissioning phase of LCLS the beam will be operating at up to 120Hz. In order to run the feedback loops at beam rate, the feedback loops will be implemented in EPICS IOCs with a dedicated ethernet multi-cast network. This paper will discuss the design of the beam-based Fast Feedback System for LCLS. Topics include MATLAB feedback prototyping, algorithm for 120Hz feedback, network design for fast data transport, actuator and sensor design for single-pulse control and sensor readback, and feedback configuration and runtime control.

  6. Feasibility studies of a compact mm-wave linac FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Nassiri, A.; Kustom, R.L.; Kang, Y.W.; Song, J.

    1995-12-31

    Short wavelength FELs impose stringent requirements on the quality of the electron beams. The key factor in obtaining a single-pass UV or x-ray FEL is the generation of small emittance electron beams with ultra-high brightness. The pioneering work at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the last decade has resulted in a dramatic improvement in the production of high electron beam brightness and small beam emittance using rf photocathode gun. The lower bound on the emittance of a 1-nC bunch without any emittance compensation is on the order of 3 {pi} mm-mrad. This is well within the emittance requirement being considered here. Although the original R&D work at Argonne, in collaboration with the University of Illinois at Chicago and University of Wisconsin-Madison, has produced encouraging results in the area of rf structure design, x-ray mask fabrication, and LIGA processing (Lithography, Electroforming, and Molding), the goal to prove feasibility has not yet been achieved. In this paper, we will present feasibility studies for a compact single-pass mm-linac FEL based on LIGA technology. This system will consist of a photocathode rf gun operated at 30 GHz, a 50-MeV superconducting constant gradient structure operated at 60 GHz, and a microundulator with 1-mm period.

  7. Prospects for very-high-gradient linac-colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1981-02-01

    The energy realistically attainable by an electron-positron storage ring is limited by the RF voltage and power requirements imposed by synchrotron radiation to about 100 GeV. To reach energies of 300 x 300 GeV and higher in a colliding beam machine of reasonable dimensions, we must look to the linac-collider operating at an energy gradient on the order of 100 MV/m. Proper choice of an RF structure or such a collider can minimize the total RF power requirement and the effects of longitudinal and transverse single-bunch beam loading. For an operating frequency in the range 4 to 6 GHz, the total RF power requirement for a 300 x 300 GeV collider with a luminosity of 10/sup 32/ cm/sup -2/s/sup -1/ accelerating 10/sup 11/ particles per bunch is on the order of 50 MW. To drive this collider, RF power sources are needed having a peak output power in the range 1-2 GW. Possibilities for attaining these peak power levels by direct generation and by energy storage and fast switching are discussed.

  8. LANSCE Drift Tube Linac Water Control System Refurbishment

    SciTech Connect

    Marroquin, Pilar S.

    2011-01-01

    There are several refurbishment projects underway at the Los Alamos National Laboratory LANSCE linear accelerator. Systems involved are: RF, water cooling, networks, diagnostics, timing, controls, etc. The Drift Tube Linac (DTL) portion of the accelerator consists of four DTL tanks, each with three independent water control systems. The systems are about 40 years old, use outdated and non-replaceable equipment and NIM bin control modules, are beyond their design life and provide unstable temperature control. Insufficient instrumentation and documentation further complicate efforts at maintaining system performance. Detailed design of the replacement cooling systems is currently in progress. Previous design experience on the SNS accelerator water cooling systems will be leveraged, see the SNS DTL FDR. Plans call for replacement of water piping, manifolds, pumps, valves, mix tanks, instrumentation (flow, pressure and temperature) and control system hardware and software. This presentation will focus on the control system design with specific attention on planned use of the National Instruments Compact RIO platform with the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control system (EPICS) software toolkit.

  9. Identifying Longitudinal Jitter Sources in the LCLS Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, Franz-Josef; Akre, Ron; Brachmann, Axel; Craft, Jim; Ding, Yuantao; Dowell, David; Emma, Paul; Frisch, Josef; Huang, Zhirong; Iverson, Richard; Krasnykh, Anatoly; Loos, Henrik; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Ratner, Daniel; Smith, Tonee; Turner, James; Welch, James; White, William; Wu, Juhao; /SLAC

    2012-07-06

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC is an x-ray Free Electron Laser (FEL) with wavelengths of 0.15 nm to 1.5 nm. The electron beam stability is important for good lasing. While the transverse jitter of the beam is about 10-20% of the rms beam sizes, the jitter in the longitudinal phase space is a multiple of the energy spread and bunch length. At the lower energy of 4.3 GeV (corresponding to the longest wavelength of 1.5 nm) the relative energy jitter can be 0.125%, while the rms energy spread is with 0.025% five times smaller. An even bigger ratio exists for the arrival time jitter of 50 fs and the bunch duration of about 5 fs (rms) in the low charge (20 pC) operating mode. Although the impact to the experiments is reduced by providing pulse-by-pulse data of the measured energy and arrival time, it would be nice to understand and mitigate the root causes of this jitter. The thyratron of the high power supply of the RF klystrons is one of the main contributors. Another suspect is the multi-pacting in the RF loads. Phase measurements down to 0.01 degree (equals 10 fs) along the RF pulse were achieved, giving hints to the impact of the different sources.

  10. Proton Driver Linac for the Frankfurt Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Wiesner, C.; Chau, L. P.; Dinter, H.; Droba, M.; Heilmann, M.; Joshi, N.; Maeder, D.; Metz, A.; Meusel, O.; Noll, D.; Podlech, H.; Ratzinger, U.; Reichau, H.; Schempp, A.; Schmidt, S.; Schweizer, W.; Volk, K.; Wagner, C.; Mueller, I.

    2010-08-04

    The Frankfurt Neutron Source at the Stern-Gerlach-Zentrum (FRANZ) will deliver high neutron fluxes in the energy range of 1 to 500 keV. The Activation Mode provides a high averaged neutron flux created by a cw proton beam of up to 5 mA, while in the Compressor Mode intense neutron pulses of 1 ns length are formed with a repetition rate of up to 250 kHz. The Compressor Mode is well-suited for energy-dependent neutron capture measurements using the Time-of-Flight method in combination with a 4{pi} BaF{sub 2} detector array. The design of the proton driver linac for both operation modes is presented. This includes the volume type ion source, the ExB chopper located in the low energy section, the RFQ-IH combination for beam acceleration and the bunch compressor. Finally, the neutron production at the lithium-7 target and the resulting energy spectrum is described.

  11. Conceptional design of a heavy ion linac injector for HIRFL-CSRm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-Hu; Yuan, You-Jin; Xia, Jia-Wen; Yin, Xue-Jun; Du, Heng; Li, Zhong-Shan

    2014-10-01

    A room temperature heavy ion linac has been proposed as a new injector of the main Cooler Storage Ring (CSRm) at the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL), which is expected to improve the performance of HIRFL. The linac injector can supply heavy ions with a maximum mass to charge ratio of 7 and an injection kinetic energy of 7.272 MeV/u for CSRm; the pulsed beam intensity is 3 emA with the duty factor of 3%. Compared with the present cyclotron injector, the Sector Focusing Cyclotron (SFC), the beam current from linac can be improved by 10-100 times. As the pre-accelerator of the linac, the 108.48 MHz 4-rod Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerates the ion beam from 4 keV/u to 300 keV/u, which achieves the transmission efficiency of 95.3% with a 3.07 m long vane. The phase advance has been taken into account in the analysis of the error tolerance, and parametric resonances have been carefully avoided by adjusting the structure parameters. Kombinierte Null Grad Struktur Interdigital H-mode Drift Tube Linacs (KONUS IH-DTLs), which follow the RFQ, accelerate ions up to the energy of 7.272 MeV/u for CSRm. The resonance frequency is 108.48 MHz for the first two cavities and 216.96 MHz for the last 5 Drift Tube Linacs (DTLs). The maximum accelerating gradient can reach 4.95 MV/m in a DTL section with the length of 17.066 m, and the total pulsed RF power is 2.8 MW. A new strategy, for the determination of resonance frequency, RFQ vane voltage and DTL effective accelerating voltage, is described in detail. The beam dynamics design of the linac will be presented in this paper.

  12. Attempted RIAPMTQ Benchmarking Study of the ANL RIA Low-Beta LinacDesign

    SciTech Connect

    Billen, J.; Qiang, J.; Wangler, T.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this work is to compare the simulation results of the RIAPMTQ code with those of the ANL simulation code for the low-beta section of an ANL RIA Driver Linac design. However, the approach taken is not precisely that of a direct comparison of the two simulations of the same linac section, which is what one would normally expect to do. The reason is that the RFQ design approach used by the ANL codes and the LANL codes are approximately but not exactly the same, particularly at the ends of the RFQ, and it did not appear to be easy to make the two RFQ designs exactly identical. The effects on the beam of the different RFQ design approaches are not expected to be large, as long as the beam is properly matched at the transitions. What was done in the RIAPMTQ input file to compensate for the RFQ design difference was to use TRACE3D to adjust the four solenoid strengths and the two matching rf cavities in the MEBT (the beam transport system between the end of the RFQ and the beginning of the superconducting linac) to obtain the same match (Courant-Snyder parameters) into the superconducting linac as was obtained from the ANL code. We also matched the beam into the RFQ. The result is that we generate a RIAPMTQ input file for the low-beta section of the linac, which is not exactly identical to, but should be near to that of the ANL design. Then, what we wish to compare from the two codes are the rms emittances at the beginning of the superconducting linac, and the beam losses in the first or prestripper section of the superconducting (SC) linac. In this report, we describe the procedure and present the results. Section 2 gives the procedures and results, and Section 3 gives the summary.

  13. Comparative analyses of linac and Gamma Knife radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, L.; Kwok, Y.; Chin, L. S.; Yu, C.; Regine, W. F.

    2005-11-01

    Dedicated linac-based radiosurgery has been reported for trigeminal neuralgia treatments. In this study, we investigated the dose fall-off characteristics and setup error tolerance of linac-based radiosurgery as compared with standard Gamma Knife radiosurgery. In order to minimize the errors from different treatment planning calculations, consistent imaging registration, dose calculation and dose volume analysis methods were developed and implemented for both Gamma Knife and linac-based treatments. Intra-arc setup errors were incorporated into the treatment planning process of linac-based deliveries. The effects of intra-arc setup errors with increasing number of arcs were studied and benchmarked against Gamma Knife deliveries with and without plugging patterns. Our studies found equivalent dose fall-off properties between Gamma Knife and linac-based radiosurgery given a sufficient number of arcs (>7) and small intra-arc errors (<0.5 mm) were satisfied for linac-based deliveries. Increasing the number of arcs significantly decreased the variations in the dose fall-off curve at the low isodose region (e.g. from 40% to 10%) and also improved dose uniformity at the high isodose region (e.g. from 70% to 90%). As the number of arcs increased, the effects of intra-arc setup errors on the dose fall-off curves decreased. Increasing the number of arcs also reduced the integral dose to the distal normal brain tissues. In conclusion, linac-based radiosurgery produces equivalent dose fall-off characteristics to Gamma Knife radiosurgery with a high number of arcs. However, one must note the increased treatment time for a large number of arcs and isocentre accuracies.

  14. Progress update on cryogenic system for ARIEL E-linac at TRIUMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koveshnikov, A.; Bylinskii, I.; Hodgson, G.; Yosifov, D.

    2014-01-01

    TRIUMF is involved in a major upgrade. The Advanced Rare IsotopeE Laboratory (ARIEL) has become a fully funded project in July 2010. A 10 mA 50 MeV SRF electron linac (e-linac) operating CW at 1.3 GHz is the key component of this initiative. This machine will serve as a second independent photo-fission driver for Rare Isotope Beams (RIB) production at TRIUMF's Isotope Separator and Accelerator (ISAC) facility. The cryogens delivery system requirements are driven by the electron accelerator cryomodule design [1, 2]. Since commencement of the project in 2010 the cryogenic system of e-linac has moved from the conceptual design phase into engineering design and procurement stage. The present document summarizes the progress in cryogenic system development and construction. Current status of e-linac cryogenic system including details of LN2 storage and delivery systems, and helium subatmospheric (SA) system is presented. The first phase of e-linac consisting of two cryomodules, cryogens storage, delivery, and distribution systems, and a 600 W class liquid helium cryoplant is scheduled for installation and commissioning by year 2014.

  15. Progress update on cryogenic system for ARIEL E-linac at TRIUMF

    SciTech Connect

    Koveshnikov, A.; Bylinskii, I.; Hodgson, G.; Yosifov, D.

    2014-01-29

    TRIUMF is involved in a major upgrade. The Advanced Rare IsotopeE Laboratory (ARIEL) has become a fully funded project in July 2010. A 10 mA 50 MeV SRF electron linac (e-linac) operating CW at 1.3 GHz is the key component of this initiative. This machine will serve as a second independent photo-fission driver for Rare Isotope Beams (RIB) production at TRIUMF's Isotope Separator and Accelerator (ISAC) facility. The cryogens delivery system requirements are driven by the electron accelerator cryomodule design [1, 2]. Since commencement of the project in 2010 the cryogenic system of e-linac has moved from the conceptual design phase into engineering design and procurement stage. The present document summarizes the progress in cryogenic system development and construction. Current status of e-linac cryogenic system including details of LN{sub 2} storage and delivery systems, and helium subatmospheric (SA) system is presented. The first phase of e-linac consisting of two cryomodules, cryogens storage, delivery, and distribution systems, and a 600 W class liquid helium cryoplant is scheduled for installation and commissioning by year 2014.

  16. Installation and Commissioning of the Super Conducting RF Linac Cryomodules for the Erlp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulden, A. R.; Bate, R.; Buckley, R. K.; Pattalwar, S. M.

    2008-03-01

    An Energy Recovery Linac Prototype (ERLP) is currently being constructed at Daresbury Laboratory, (UK) to promote the necessary skills in science & technology, particularly in photocathode electron gun and Superconducting RF (SRF), to enable the construction of a fourth generation light source, based on energy recovery linacs-4GLS [1]. The ERLP uses two identical cryomodules, one as a booster Linac used to accelerate the beam to 8.5 MeV, the other as an Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) module with an energy gain of 26.5 MeV. Each module consists of two 9- cell cavities operating at a frequency of 1.3 GHz and a temperature of 2 K. As there is no energy recovery in the booster it requires a peak power of 53 kW; whereas the linac module only requires 8 kW. The RF power is supplied by Inductive Output Tube (IOT) amplifiers. The maximum heat load (or the cooling power) required in the SRF system is 180 W at 2 K and is achieved in two stages: a LN2 pre-cooled Linde TCF50 liquefier produces liquid helium at 4.5 K, followed by a 2 K cold box consisting of a JT valve, recuperator and an external room temperature vacuum pumping system. This presentation reports the experience gained during, installation, commissioning and the initial operation of the cryomodules.

  17. Heavy-ion linac development for the U.S. RIA project.

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P. N.

    2002-01-29

    The Nuclear Science Community in the Unites States has unanimously concluded that developments in both nuclear science and its supporting technologies make building a world-leading Rare-Isotope Accelerator (RIA) facility for production of radioactive beams the top priority. The RIA development effort involves several US Laboratories (ANL, JLAB, LBNL, MSU, ORNL). The RIA Facility includes a CW 1.4 GeV driver linac and a 100 MV post-accelerator both based on superconducting (SC) cavities operating at frequencies from 48 MHz to 805 MHz. An initial acceleration in both linacs is provided by room temperature RFQs. The driver linac is designed for acceleration of any ion species; from protons up to 900 MeV to uranium up to 400 MeV/u. The novel feature of the driver linac is an acceleration of multiple charge-state heavy-ion beams in order to achieve 400 kW beam power. Basic design concepts of the driver linac are given. Several new conceptual solutions in beam dynamics, room temperature and SC accelerating structures for heavy ion accelerator applications are discussed.

  18. A PROCEDURE TO SET PHASE AND AMPLITUDE OF THE RF IN THE SNS LINAC'S SUPERCONDUCTING CAVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    L.M. YOUNG

    2001-06-01

    This paper describes a procedure to set the phase and amplitude of the RF fields in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac's superconducting cavities. The linac uses superconducting cavities to accelerate the H{sup -} ion beam from the normal conducting linac at 185 MeV to a final energy of {approx}1 GeV. There are two types of cavities in the linac, 33 cavities with a geometric beta of 0.61 and 48 cavities with a geometric beta of 0.81. The correct phase setting of any single superconducting cavity depends on the RF phase and amplitude of all the preceding superconducting cavities. For the beam to be properly accelerated it must arrive at each cavity with a relative phase ({phi}{sub s}), called the synchronous phase, of about -20 degrees. That is, it must arrive early with respect to the phase at which it would gain the maximum energy by 20 degrees. This timing provides the longitudinal focusing. Beam particles arriving slightly later gain more energy and move faster relative to the synchronous beam particle. The problem is to set the phase and amplitude of each cavity in the linac so that the synchronous particle arrives at each cavity with the correct phase. The amplitude of each superconducting cavity will be adjusted as high as possible constrained only by the available RF power and the breakdown field of the cavity.

  19. Upgrade of the H^--injection system at the DESY proton Linac III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleffner, C.-M.; Holtkamp, N.; Jacobs, G.; Nagl, M.; Deitinghoff, H.; Paramonov, V.

    1997-05-01

    In the near future an upgrade of the injection system of the proton linac at DESY is foreseen. Two different types of H^--sources are operated at DESY. The new rf-driven volume source is cesium free. On a long-term basis this source is planned to replace the operating magnetron source. For reasons of reliability of the proton linac and further developments of sources parallel operation of two sources should be possible at the the Alvarez linac. Each source has a separate RFQ to accelerate the ions to an energy of 750 keV. A new transport line with one dipole, 8 quadrupoles and one intermediate buncher was designed to match the beam between both RFQs and the Alvarez linac. The codes COPPOC and TRANSPORT were used for determining the length of the transport line and the parameters of the dipole and the buncher. Because of the high currents of more than 20 mA the estimate of the space charge forces is of special interest. The macro-particle-code PARMTRA takes into account the particle-to-particle electric forces among all particles. The properties of the beam line have been studied in connection with the effects of the final beam quality after acceleration with the 50 MeV Alvarez linac.

  20. MODEL AND BEAM BASED SETUP PROCEDURES FOR A HIGH POWER HADRON SUPERCONDUCTING LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Shishlo, Andrei P

    2014-01-01

    This presentation will review methods for experimental determination of optimal operational set points in a multi-cavity superconducting high power hadron linac. A typical tuning process is based on comparison between measured data and the results of simulations from envelope and single-particle models. Presence of significant space charge effects requires simulation and measurement of bunch dynamics in 3 dimensions to ensure low loss beam transport. This is especially difficult in a superconducting linac where use of interceptive diagnostics is usually restricted because of the risk of SRF cavity surface contamination. The procedures discussed here are based on non-interceptive diagnostics such as beam position monitors and laser wires, and conventional diagnostics devices such as wire scanners and bunch shape monitors installed outside the superconducting linac. The longitudinal Twiss analysis based on the BPM signals will be described. The superconducting SNS linac tuning experience will be used to demonstrate problems and their solution for real world linac tune-up procedures

  1. Towards adaptive IMRT sequencing for the MR-linac.

    PubMed

    Kontaxis, C; Bol, G H; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W

    2015-03-21

    The MRI linear accelerator (MR-linac) that is currently being installed in the University Medical Center Utrecht (Utrecht, The Netherlands), will be able to track the patient's target(s) and Organ(s) At Risk during radiation delivery. In this paper, we present a treatment planning system for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). It is capable of Adaptive Radiotherapy and consists of a GPU Monte Carlo dose engine, an inverse dose optimization algorithm and a novel adaptive sequencing algorithm. The system is able to compensate for patient anatomy changes and enables radiation delivery immediately from the first calculated segment. IMRT plans meeting all clinical constraints were generated for two breast cases, one spinal bone metastasis case, two prostate cases with integrated boost regions and one head and neck case. These plans were generated by the segment weighted version of our algorithm, in a 0 T environment in order to test the feasibility of the new sequencing strategy in current clinical conditions, yielding very small differences between the fluence and sequenced distributions. All plans went through stringent experimental quality assurance on Delta4 and passed all clinical tests currently performed in our institute. A new inter-fraction adaptation scheme built on top of this algorithm is also proposed that enables convergence to the ideal dose distribution without the need of a final segment weight optimization. The first results of this method confirm that convergence is achieved within the first fractions of the treatment. These features combined will lead to a fully adaptive intra-fraction planning system able to take into account patient anatomy updates during treatment. PMID:25749856

  2. Towards adaptive IMRT sequencing for the MR-linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontaxis, C.; Bol, G. H.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.

    2015-03-01

    The MRI linear accelerator (MR-linac) that is currently being installed in the University Medical Center Utrecht (Utrecht, The Netherlands), will be able to track the patient’s target(s) and Organ(s) At Risk during radiation delivery. In this paper, we present a treatment planning system for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). It is capable of Adaptive Radiotherapy and consists of a GPU Monte Carlo dose engine, an inverse dose optimization algorithm and a novel adaptive sequencing algorithm. The system is able to compensate for patient anatomy changes and enables radiation delivery immediately from the first calculated segment. IMRT plans meeting all clinical constraints were generated for two breast cases, one spinal bone metastasis case, two prostate cases with integrated boost regions and one head and neck case. These plans were generated by the segment weighted version of our algorithm, in a 0 T environment in order to test the feasibility of the new sequencing strategy in current clinical conditions, yielding very small differences between the fluence and sequenced distributions. All plans went through stringent experimental quality assurance on Delta4 and passed all clinical tests currently performed in our institute. A new inter-fraction adaptation scheme built on top of this algorithm is also proposed that enables convergence to the ideal dose distribution without the need of a final segment weight optimization. The first results of this method confirm that convergence is achieved within the first fractions of the treatment. These features combined will lead to a fully adaptive intra-fraction planning system able to take into account patient anatomy updates during treatment.

  3. Minimizing the magnetic field effect in MR-linac specific QA-tests: the use of electron dense materials.

    PubMed

    van Zijp, H M; van Asselen, B; Wolthaus, J W H; Kok, J M G; de Vries, J H W; Ishakoglu, K; Beld, E; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W

    2016-02-01

    To address the quality assurance (QA) of a MR-linac which is an MRI combined with a linear accelerator (linac), the traditional linac QA-tests need to be redesigned, since the presence of the static magnetic field in the MR-linac alters the electron trajectory. The latter causes the asymmetry in the dose kernel which is introduced by the magnetic field and hinders accurate geometrical QA-tests for the MR-linac. We introduced the use of electron dense materials (e.g. copper) to reduce the size of the dose kernel and thereby the magnetic field effect on the dose deposition. Two examples of QA-tests are presented in which the geometrical accuracy of the MR-linac was addressed; beam profile and star-shot measurements. The introduced setup was compared with a reference setup and both were tested on a conventional and the MR-linac. The results showed that the symmetry of the recorded beam profile was restored in presence of the copper material and that the isocenter size of the MR-linac can be determined accurately with the introduced star-shot setup. The use of electron dense materials is not limited to the presented QA-tests but has a broad application for beam-specific QA-tests in presence of a magnetic field. PMID:26758570

  4. Minimizing the magnetic field effect in MR-linac specific QA-tests: the use of electron dense materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zijp, H. M.; van Asselen, B.; Wolthaus, J. W. H.; Kok, J. M. G.; de Vries, J. H. W.; Ishakoglu, K.; Beld, E.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.

    2016-02-01

    To address the quality assurance (QA) of a MR-linac which is an MRI combined with a linear accelerator (linac), the traditional linac QA-tests need to be redesigned, since the presence of the static magnetic field in the MR-linac alters the electron trajectory. The latter causes the asymmetry in the dose kernel which is introduced by the magnetic field and hinders accurate geometrical QA-tests for the MR-linac. We introduced the use of electron dense materials (e.g. copper) to reduce the size of the dose kernel and thereby the magnetic field effect on the dose deposition. Two examples of QA-tests are presented in which the geometrical accuracy of the MR-linac was addressed; beam profile and star-shot measurements. The introduced setup was compared with a reference setup and both were tested on a conventional and the MR-linac. The results showed that the symmetry of the recorded beam profile was restored in presence of the copper material and that the isocenter size of the MR-linac can be determined accurately with the introduced star-shot setup. The use of electron dense materials is not limited to the presented QA-tests but has a broad application for beam-specific QA-tests in presence of a magnetic field.

  5. ARIEL e-linac. Electron linear accelerator for photo-fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koscielniak, Shane

    2014-01-01

    The design and implementation of a 1/2 MW beam power electron linear accelerator (e-linac) for the production of rare isotope beams (RIB) via photo-fission in the context of the Advanced Rare IsotopE Laboratory, ARIEL (Koscielniak et al. 2008; Merminga et al. 2011; Dilling et al., Hyperfine Interact, 2013), is described. The 100 % duty factor e-linac is based on super-conducting radiofrequency (SRF) technology at 1.3 GHz and has a nominal energy of 50 MeV. This paper provides an overview of the accelerator major components including the gun, cryomodules and cryoplant, high power RF sources, and machine layout including beam lines. Design features to facilitate operation of the linac as a Recirculating Linear Accelerator (RLA) for various applications, including Free Electron Lasers, are also noted.

  6. A Particle-in-cell scheme of the RFQ in the SSC-Linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Chen; He, Yuan; Lu, Yuan-Rong; Yuri, Batygin; Yin, Ling; Wang, Zhi-Jun; Yuan, You-Jin; Liu, Yong; Chang, Wei; Du, Xiao-Nan; Wang, Zhi; Xia, Jia-Wen

    2010-11-01

    A 52 MHz Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) linear accelerator (linac) is designed to serve as an initial structure for the SSC-Linac system (injector into Separated Sector Cyclotron). The designed injection and output energy are 3.5 keV/u and 143 keV/u, respectively. The beam dynamics in this RFQ have been studied using a three-dimensional Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code BEAMPATH. Simulation results show that this RFQ structure is characterized by stable values of beam transmission efficiency (at least 95%) for both zero-current mode and the space charge dominated regime. The beam accelerated in the RFQ has good quality in both transverse and longitudinal directions, and could easily be accepted by Drift Tube Linac (DTL). The effect of the vane error and that of the space charge on the beam parameters have been studied as well to define the engineering tolerance for RFQ vane machining and alignment.

  7. Linac code benchmarking of HALODYN and PARMILA based on beam experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, X.; Bayer, W.; Hofmann, I.

    2016-01-01

    As part of the 'High Intensity Pulsed Proton Injector' (HIPPI) project in the European Framework Programme, a program for the comparison and benchmarking of 3D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) linac codes with experiment has been implemented. HALODYN and PARMILA are two of the codes involved in this program. In this study, the initial Twiss parameters were obtained from the results of beam experiments that were conducted using the GSI UNILAC in low-beam-current. Furthermore, beam dynamics simulations of the Alvarez Drift Tube Linac (DTL) section were performed by HALODYN and PARMILA codes and benchmarked for the same beam experiments. These simulation results exhibit some agreements with the experimental results for the low-beam-current case. The similarities and differences between the experimental and simulated results were analyzed quantitatively. In addition, various physical aspects of the simulation codes and the linac design strategy are also discussed.

  8. Beam position monitoring in the AGS Linac to Booster transfer line

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, T.J.; Brodowski, J.; Witkover, R.

    1991-12-31

    A beam position monitor system has been developed and used in the commissioning of Brookhaven`s Linac to Booster transfer line. This line transports a chopped, RF modulated H- beam from the 200 MeV Linac to the AGS Booster. Over a 15dB dynamic range in beam current, the position monitor system provides a real-time, normalized position signal with an analog bandwidth of about 20 MHz. Seven directional coupler style pickups are installed in the line with each pickup sensing both horizontal and vertical position. Analog processing electronics are located in the tunnel and incorporate the amplitude modulation to phase modulation normalization technique. To avoid interference from the 200 MHz linac RF system, processing is performed at 400 MHz. This paper will provide a system overview and report results from the commissioning experience.

  9. Beam position monitoring in the AGS Linac to Booster transfer line

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, T.J.; Brodowski, J.; Witkover, R.

    1991-01-01

    A beam position monitor system has been developed and used in the commissioning of Brookhaven's Linac to Booster transfer line. This line transports a chopped, RF modulated H- beam from the 200 MeV Linac to the AGS Booster. Over a 15dB dynamic range in beam current, the position monitor system provides a real-time, normalized position signal with an analog bandwidth of about 20 MHz. Seven directional coupler style pickups are installed in the line with each pickup sensing both horizontal and vertical position. Analog processing electronics are located in the tunnel and incorporate the amplitude modulation to phase modulation normalization technique. To avoid interference from the 200 MHz linac RF system, processing is performed at 400 MHz. This paper will provide a system overview and report results from the commissioning experience.

  10. Beam Dynamics Study of X-Band Linac Driven X-Ray FELS

    SciTech Connect

    Adolphsen, C.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Wu, J.; Sun, Y.; /SLAC

    2011-12-13

    Several linac driven X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFELs) are being developed to provide high brightness photon beams with very short, tunable wavelengths. In this paper, three XFEL configurations are proposed that achieve LCLS-like performance using X-band linac drivers. These linacs are more versatile, efficient and compact than ones using S-band or C-band rf technology. For each of the designs, the overall accelerator layout and the shaping of the bunch longitudinal phase space are described briefly. During the last 40 years, the photon wavelengths from linac driven FELs have been pushed shorter by increasing the electron beam energy and adopting shorter period undulators. Recently, the wavelengths have reached the X-ray range, with FLASH (Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg) and LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source) successfully providing users with soft and hard X-rays, respectively. FLASH uses a 1.2 GeV L-band (1.3 GHz) superconducting linac driver and can deliver 10-70 fs FWHM long photon pulses in a wavelength range of 44 nm to 4.1 nm. LCLS uses the last third of the SLAC 3 km S-band (2.856 GHz) normal-conducting linac to produce 3.5 GeV to 15 GeV bunches to generate soft and hard X-rays with good spatial coherence at wavelengths from 2.2 nm to 0.12 nm. Newer XFELs (at Spring8 and PSI) use C-band (5.7 GHz) normal-conducting linac drivers, which can sustain higher acceleration gradients, and hence shorten the linac length, and are more efficient at converting rf energy to bunch energy. The X-band (11.4 GHz) rf technology developed for NLC/GLC offers even higher gradients and efficiencies, and the shorter rf wavelength allows more versatility in longitudinal bunch phase space compression and manipulation. In the following sections, three different configurations of X-band linac driven XFELs are described that operate from 6 to 14 GeV. The first (LOW CHARGE DESIGN) has an electron bunch charge of only 10 pC; the second (OPTICS LINEARIZATION DESIGN) is based on optics

  11. A CONCEPTUAL 3-GEV LANSCE LINAC UPGRADE FOR ENHANCED PROTON RADIOGRAPHY

    SciTech Connect

    Garnett, Robert W; Rybarcyk, Lawrence J.; Merrill, Frank E.; O'Hara, James F.; Rees, Daniel E.; Walstrom, Peter L.

    2012-05-14

    A conceptual design of a 3-GeV linac upgrade that would enable enhanced proton radiography at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is presented. The upgrade is based on the use of superconducting accelerating cavities to increase the present LANSCE linac output energy from 800 MeV to 3 GeV. The LANSCE linac currently provides negative hydrogen ion (H{sup -}) and proton (H{sup +}) beams to several user facilities that support Isotope Production, NNSA Stockpile Stewardship, and Basic Energy Science programs. Required changes to the front-end, the accelerating structures, and to the RF systems to meet the new performance goals, and changes to the existing beam switchyard to maintain operations for a robust user program are also described.

  12. A combined approach of variance-reduction techniques for the efficient Monte Carlo simulation of linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, M.; Sempau, J.; Brualla, L.

    2012-05-01

    A method based on a combination of the variance-reduction techniques of particle splitting and Russian roulette is presented. This method improves the efficiency of radiation transport through linear accelerator geometries simulated with the Monte Carlo method. The method named as ‘splitting-roulette’ was implemented on the Monte Carlo code \\scriptsize{{PENELOPE}} and tested on an Elekta linac, although it is general enough to be implemented on any other general-purpose Monte Carlo radiation transport code and linac geometry. Splitting-roulette uses any of the following two modes of splitting: simple splitting and ‘selective splitting’. Selective splitting is a new splitting mode based on the angular distribution of bremsstrahlung photons implemented in the Monte Carlo code \\scriptsize{{PENELOPE}}. Splitting-roulette improves the simulation efficiency of an Elekta SL25 linac by a factor of 45.

  13. Resonance Excitation of Longitudinal High Order Modes in Project X Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Khabiboulline, T.N.; Sukhanov, A.AUTHOR = Awida, M.; Gonin, I.; Lunin, A.AUTHOR = Solyak, N.; Yakovlev, V.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Results of simulation of power loss due to excitation of longitudinal high order modes (HOMs) in the accelerating superconducting RF system of CW linac of Project X are presented. Beam structures corresponding to the various modes of Project X operation are considered: CW regime for 3 GeV physics program; pulsed mode for neutrino experiments; and pulsed regime, when Project X linac operates as a driver for Neutrino Factory/Muon Collider. Power loss and associated heat load due to resonance excitation of longitudinal HOMs are shown to be small in all modes of operation. Conclusion is made that HOM couplers can be removed from the design of superconducting RF cavities of Project X linac.

  14. The linac and booster RF systems for a dedicated injector for SPEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, J.N.; Baird, S., Baltay, M.; Borland, M.; Nuhn, H.D.; Safranek, J.; Chavis, C.; Emery, L.; Genin, R.D.; Hettel, R.; Morales, H.; Sebek, J.; Voss, J.; Wang, H.; Wiedemann, H.; Youngmann, B. . Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab.); Miller, R.H. )

    1991-05-01

    A 120 MeV, 2856 MHz, TW linac, with a microwave gun, alpha magnet, and chopper, has been built at SSRL as a preinjector for and along with a 3 GeV booster synchrotron ring. The resulting injector will be available on demand to fill SPEAR, which is a storage ring now dedicated to synchrotron light production. The linac sections were purchased from China, the XK-5 klystrons were obtained surplus from SLAC, the modulators are a variation on those at SLAC and were built by SSRL, the alpha magnet and chopper were designed and built at SSRL and the microwave gun was designed and built in collaboration with Varian Associates. The rf system for the booster ring is similar to those at SPEAR and PEP and was built by SSRL. Some of the interesting mechanical and electrical details are discussed and the operating characteristics of the linac and ring rf system are highlighted. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Transverse Beam Emittance Measurements of a 16 MeV Linac at the Idaho Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    S. Setiniyaz, T.A. Forest, K. Chouffani, Y. Kim, A. Freyberger

    2012-07-01

    A beam emittance measurement of the 16 MeV S-band High Repetition Rate Linac (HRRL) was performed at Idaho State University's Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC). The HRRL linac structure was upgraded beyond the capabilities of a typical medical linac so it can achieve a repetition rate of 1 kHz. Measurements of the HRRL transverse beam emittance are underway that will be used to optimize the production of positrons using HRRL's intense electron beam on a tungsten converter. In this paper, we describe a beam imaging system using on an OTR screen and a digital CCD camera, a MATLAB tool to extract beamsize and emittance, detailed measurement procedures, and the measured transverse emittances for an arbitrary beam energy of 15 MeV.

  16. Beam-based analysis of day-night performance variations at the SLC linac

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, F.J.; Akre, R.; Assmann, R.; Bane, K.L.F.; Minty, M.G.; Phinney, N.; Spence, W.L.

    1998-07-01

    Diurnal temperature variations in the linac gallery of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) can affect the amplitude and phase of the rf used to accelerate the beam. The SLC employs many techniques for stabilization and compensation of these effects, but residual uncorrected changes still affect the quality of the delivered beam. This paper presents methods developed to monitor and investigate these errors through the beam response. Variations resulting from errors in the rf amplitude or phase can be distinguished by studying six different beam observables: betatron phase advance, oscillation amplitude growth, rms jitter along the linac, measurements of the beam phase with respect to the rf, changes in the required injection phase, and the global energy correction factor. By quantifying the beam response, an uncorrected variation of 14{sup o} (S-band) during 28 F temperature swings was found in the main rf drive line system between the front and end of the linac.

  17. Beam physics of the 8-GeV H-minus linac

    SciTech Connect

    Carneiro, J.-P.; Mustapha, B.; Ostroumov, P.N.; /Argonne

    2008-11-01

    Fermilab is developing the concept and design of an 8-GeV superconducting H-minus linac with the primary mission of increasing the intensity of the Main Injector for the production of neutrino superbeams. The front-end of the linac up to 420 MeV operates at 325 MHz and accelerates beam from the ion source using a room temperature radio-frequency quadrupole followed by short CH type resonators and superconducting spoke resonators. In the high energy section, the acceleration is provided by the International Linear Collider (ILC)-style superconducting elliptical 1.3 GHz cavities. The beam physics for the linac is presented in this paper using two beam dynamics codes: TRACK and ASTRA.

  18. SUPERCONDUCTING LINAC UPGRADE PLAN FOR THE SECOND TARGET STATION PROJECT AT SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sang-Ho; Doleans, Marc; Galambos, John D; Howell, Matthew P; Mammosser, John

    2015-01-01

    The beam power of the Linac for the Second Target Station (STS) at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will be doubled to 2.8 MW. For the energy upgrade, seven additional cryomodules will be installed in the reserved space at the end of the linac tunnel to produce linac output energy of 1.3 GeV. The cryomodules for STS will have the same physical length but will incorporate some design changes based on the lessons learned from operational experience over the last 10 years and from the high beta spare cryomodule developed in house. The average macro-pulse beam current for the STS will be 38 mA which is about a 40 % increase from the present beam current for 1.4 MW operation. Plans for the new cryomodules and for the existing cryomodules to support higher beam current for the STS are presented in this paper.

  19. Multi-cell disk-and-ring tapered structure for compact RF linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. V.; Boucher, S.; Kutsaev, S.; Hartzell, J.; Savin, E.

    2016-09-01

    A tubular disk-and-ring, tapered accelerating structure for small electron linacs and MicroLinacs is considered. It consists of metal and dielectric elements inserted into a metallic tube to eliminate multi-cell, multi-step brazing. The structure enables a wide range of phase velocities (including non-relativistic), a wide bandwidth allowing large number of cells (for standing wave mode) or short filling time (for traveling wave mode), combination of compensated and purely π-mode cells, alternative periodic focusing built-in to the RF structure (the disks), and combining of RF and vacuum windows. RF and accelerating performance of such a long structure having up to four dozens cells is analyzed. Some of beam dynamics, thermal, and vacuum aspects of the structure and MicroLinac performance are considered as well.

  20. Measurements of H/sup 0/ and H/sup +/ ion yields during H/sup -/ acceleration in a 50-MeV linac

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.; Madsen, J.; Shin, S.A.; Stipp, V.

    1981-01-01

    Unlike proton linacs where the only particles that can be transported are protons, an H/sup -/ linac can produce H/sup 0/ and protons by stripping off one or both electrons of H/sup -/ ions during acceleration. We have measured yields of these ions as a function of linac tank pressures.

  1. High Resolution Simulation of Beam Dynamics in Electron Linacs for Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, R.D.; Venturini, M.; Zholents, A.A.; Qiang, J.

    2009-01-05

    In this paper we report on large scale multi-physics simulation of beam dynamics in electron linacs for next generation free electron lasers (FELs). We describe key features of a parallel macroparticle simulation code including three-dimensional (3D) space-charge effects, short-range structure wake fields, longitudinal coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) wake fields, and treatment of radiofrequency (RF) accelerating cavities using maps obtained from axial field profiles. A macroparticle up-sampling scheme is described that reduces the shot noise from an initial distribution with a smaller number of macroparticles while maintaining the global properties of the original distribution. We present a study of the microbunching instability which is a critical issue for future FELs due to its impact on beam quality at the end of the linac. Using parameters of a planned FEL linac at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), we show that a large number of macroparticles (beyond 100 million) is needed to control numerical shot noise that drives the microbunching instability. We also explore the effect of the longitudinal grid on simulation results. We show that acceptable results are obtained with around 2048 longitudinal grid points, and we discuss this in view of the spectral growth rate predicted from linear theory. As an application, we present results from simulations using one billion macroparticles of the FEL linac under design at LBNL. We show that the final uncorrelated energy spread of the beam depends not only on the initial uncorrelated energy spread but also depends strongly on the shape of the initial current profile. By using a parabolic initial current profile, 5 keV initial uncorrelated energy spread at 40 MeV injection energy, and improved linac design, those simulations demonstrate that a reasonable beam quality can be achieved at the end of the linac, with the final distribution having about 100 keV energy spread, 2.4 GeV energy, and 1.2 kA peak

  2. Project for the development of the linac based NCT facility in University of Tsukuba.

    PubMed

    Kumada, H; Matsumura, A; Sakurai, H; Sakae, T; Yoshioka, M; Kobayashi, H; Matsumoto, H; Kiyanagi, Y; Shibata, T; Nakashima, H

    2014-06-01

    A project team headed by University of Tsukuba launched the development of a new accelerator based BNCT facility. In the project, we have adopted Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ)+Drift Tube Linac (DTL) type linac as proton accelerators. Proton energy generated from the linac was set to 8MeV and average current was 10mA. The linac tube has been constructed by Mitsubishi Heavy Industry Co. For neutron generator device, beryllium is selected as neutron target material; high intensity neutrons are generated by the reaction with beryllium and the 80kW proton beam. Our team chose beryllium as the neutron target material. At present beryllium target system is being designed with Monte-Carlo estimations and heat analysis with ANSYS. The neutron generator consists of moderator, collimator and shielding. It is being designed together with the beryllium target system. We also acquired a building in Tokai village; the building has been renovated for use as BNCT treatment facility. It is noteworthy that the linac tube had been installed in the facility in September 2012. In BNCT procedure, several medical devices are required for BNCT treatment such as treatment planning system, patient positioning device and radiation monitors. Thus these are being developed together with the linac based neutron source. For treatment planning system, we are now developing a new multi-modal Monte-Carlo treatment planning system based on JCDS. The system allows us to perform dose estimation for BNCT as well as particle radiotherapy and X-ray therapy. And the patient positioning device can navigate a patient to irradiation position quickly and properly. Furthermore the device is able to monitor movement of the patient׳s position during irradiation.

  3. Summary of the Superconducting RF Linac for Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, J.; Garoby, R.; Geer, S.; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    Project-X is a proposed project to be built at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory with several potential missions. A primary part of the Project-X accelerator chain is a Superconducting linac, and In October 2009 a workshop was held to concentrate on the linac parameters. The charge of the workshop was to 'focus only on the SRF linac approaches and how it can be used'. The focus of Working Group 2 of this workshop was to evaluate how the different linac options being considered impact the potential realization of Muon Collider (MC) and Neutrino Factory (NF) applications. In particular the working group charge was, 'to investigate the use of a multi-megawatt proton linac to target, phase rotate and collect muons to support a muon collider and neutrino factory'. To focus the working group discussion, three primary questions were identified early on, to serve as a reference: (1) What are the proton source requirements for muon colliders and neutrino factories? (2) What are the issues with respect to realizing the required muon collider and neutrino factory proton sources - (a) General considerations and (b) Considerations specific to the two linac configurations identified by Project-X? (3) What things need to be done before we can be reasonably confident that ICD1/ICD2 can be upgraded to provide the neutrino factory/muon collider needs? A number of presentations were given, and are available at the workshop web-site. This paper does not summarize the individual presentations, but rather addresses overall findings as related to the three guiding questions listed above.

  4. Project for the development of the linac based NCT facility in University of Tsukuba.

    PubMed

    Kumada, H; Matsumura, A; Sakurai, H; Sakae, T; Yoshioka, M; Kobayashi, H; Matsumoto, H; Kiyanagi, Y; Shibata, T; Nakashima, H

    2014-06-01

    A project team headed by University of Tsukuba launched the development of a new accelerator based BNCT facility. In the project, we have adopted Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ)+Drift Tube Linac (DTL) type linac as proton accelerators. Proton energy generated from the linac was set to 8MeV and average current was 10mA. The linac tube has been constructed by Mitsubishi Heavy Industry Co. For neutron generator device, beryllium is selected as neutron target material; high intensity neutrons are generated by the reaction with beryllium and the 80kW proton beam. Our team chose beryllium as the neutron target material. At present beryllium target system is being designed with Monte-Carlo estimations and heat analysis with ANSYS. The neutron generator consists of moderator, collimator and shielding. It is being designed together with the beryllium target system. We also acquired a building in Tokai village; the building has been renovated for use as BNCT treatment facility. It is noteworthy that the linac tube had been installed in the facility in September 2012. In BNCT procedure, several medical devices are required for BNCT treatment such as treatment planning system, patient positioning device and radiation monitors. Thus these are being developed together with the linac based neutron source. For treatment planning system, we are now developing a new multi-modal Monte-Carlo treatment planning system based on JCDS. The system allows us to perform dose estimation for BNCT as well as particle radiotherapy and X-ray therapy. And the patient positioning device can navigate a patient to irradiation position quickly and properly. Furthermore the device is able to monitor movement of the patient׳s position during irradiation. PMID:24637084

  5. Applied radiation research around a 15 MeV high-average-power linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahorte, P.; Mondelaers, W.; De Frenne, D.; Callens, F.; Vanhaelewyn, G.; Schacht, E.; Van Calenberg, S.; Van Cleemput, O.; Huyghebaert, A.

    1999-08-01

    The Department of Subatomic and Radiation Physics of the University Gent is equipped with a 15 MeV 20 kW linear electron accelerator (linac) facility. In its present configuration the accelerator is used as a multipurpose apparatus for research in the fields of polymer chemistry, biomedical materials, medicine, food technology, dosimetry, solid state physics, agriculture and nuclear and radiation physics. We present an overview of both the various research projects around our linac facility involving radiation chemistry and physics and the specialised technologies facilitating this research.

  6. Solenoid Fringe Field Effects for the Neutrino Factory Linac - MAD-X Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    M. Aslaninejad,C. Bontoiu,J. Pasternak,J. Pozimski,Alex Bogacz

    2010-05-01

    International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (IDS-NF) assumes the first stage of muon acceleration (up to 900 MeV) to be implemented with a solenoid based Linac. The Linac consists of three styles of cryo-modules, containing focusing solenoids and varying number of SRF cavities for acceleration. Fringe fields of the solenoids and the focusing effects in the SRF cavities have significant impact on the transverse beam dynamics. Using an analytical formula, the effects of fringe fields are studied in MAD-X. The resulting betatron functions are compared with the results of beam dynamics simulations using OptiM code.

  7. Waveguide detuning caused by transverse magnetic fields on a simulated in-line 6 MV linac

    SciTech Connect

    St Aubin, J.; Steciw, S.; Fallone, B. G.

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: Due to the close proximity of the linear accelerator (linac) to the magnetic resonance (MR) imager in linac-MR systems, it will be subjected to magnet fringe fields larger than the Earth's magnetic field of 5x10{sup -5} T. Even with passive or active shielding designed to reduce these fields, some magnitude of the magnetic field is still expected to intersect the linac, causing electron deflection and beam loss. This beam loss, resulting from magnetic fields that cannot be eliminated with shielding, can cause a detuning of the waveguide due to excessive heating. The detuning, if significant, could lead to an even further decrease in output above what would be expected strictly from electron deflections caused by an external magnetic field. Thus an investigation of detuning was performed through various simulations. Methods: According to the Lorentz force, the electrons will be deflected away from their straight course to the target, depositing energy as they impact the linac copper waveguide. The deposited energy would lead to a heating and deformation of the copper structure resulting in resonant frequency changes. PARMELA was used to determine the mean energy and fraction of total beam lost in each linac cavity. The energy deposited into the copper waveguide from the beam losses caused by transverse magnetic fields was calculated using the Monte Carlo program DOSRZnrc. From the total energy deposited, the rise in temperature and ultimately the deformation of the structure was estimated. The deformed structure was modeled using the finite element method program COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS to determine the change in cavity resonant frequency. Results: The largest changes in resonant frequency were found in the first two accelerating cavities for each field strength investigated. This was caused by a high electron fluence impacting the waveguide inner structures coupled with their low kinetic energies. At each field strength investigated, the total change in

  8. INCREASED UNDERSTANDING OF BEAM LOSSES FROM THE SNS LINAC PROTON EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Shishlo, Andrei P; Plum, Michael A; Lebedev, Valerie; Laface, Emanuele; Galambos, John D

    2013-01-01

    Beam loss is a major concern for high power hadron accelerators such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). An unexpected beam loss in the SNS superconducting linac (SCL) was observed during the power ramp up and early operation. Intra-beam-stripping (IBS) loss, in which interactions between H- particles within the accelerated bunch strip the outermost electron, was recently identified as a possible cause of the beam loss. A set of experiments using proton beam acceleration in the SNS linac was conducted, which supports IBS as the primary beam loss mechanism in the SNS SCL.

  9. Fluorescent screens and image processing for the APS linac test stand

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, W.; Ko, K.

    1992-12-01

    A fluorescent screen was used to monitor relative beam position and spot size of a 56-MeV electron beam in the linac test stand. A chromium doped alumina ceramic screen inserted into the beam was monitored by a video camera. The resulting image was captured using a frame grabber and stored into memory. Reconstruction and analysis of the stored image was performed using PV-WAVE. This paper will discuss the hardware and software implementation of the fluorescent screen and imaging system. Proposed improvements for the APS linac fluorescent screens and image processing will also be discussed.

  10. A Linac Simulation Code for Macro-Particles Tracking and Steering Algorithm Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    sun, yipeng

    2012-05-03

    In this paper, a linac simulation code written in Fortran90 is presented and several simulation examples are given. This code is optimized to implement linac alignment and steering algorithms, and evaluate the accelerator errors such as RF phase and acceleration gradient, quadrupole and BPM misalignment. It can track a single particle or a bunch of particles through normal linear accelerator elements such as quadrupole, RF cavity, dipole corrector and drift space. One-to-one steering algorithm and a global alignment (steering) algorithm are implemented in this code.

  11. Preliminary physical and electromagnetic design for the injector of the heavy ion superconducting linac.

    PubMed

    Hong, I S; Kim, Y; Kim, H J; Choi, B H; Jeon, D; Bahng, J B; Kim, E S

    2014-02-01

    The Rare Isotope Science Project in Korea has developed a high current heavy ion accelerator using superconducting linacs. A normal conducting injector system was proposed to supply heavy ions to the superconducting driver linac. A beam physics and engineering design study was performed, and the beam dynamics of the injector was simulated. Optimized beam transmission and emittance were obtained from the beam dynamics simulation. Various normal conducting bunchers, such as multi-harmonic buncher, velocity equalizer, radiofrequency quadrupole, and re-bunchers, will be used and have been electromagnetically calculated.

  12. Full spatially coherent multiturn ERL x-ray source (MARS) based on two linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getmanov, Ya V.; Kulipanov, G. N.; Shevchenko, O. A.; Skrinsky, A. N.; Tribendis, A. G.; Volkov, V. N.; Vinokurov, N. A.

    2013-03-01

    Multiturn energy recovery linacs (ERL) looks very promising for making ERLs less expensive and more flexible, but have serious intrinsic problems. Today, only one multiturn ERL exists. This Novosibirsk ERL operates with four orbit recuperation scheme. The conception of Multiturn Accelerator-recuperator Radiation Source (MARS) was proposed in 1997 by G.N. Kulipanov, A.N. Skrinsky and N.A. Vinokurov. The use of the two-linac ERL (D. Douglas, 2001) makes multiturn operation much easier. The feasibility study for such ERL-based high brightness x-ray source is presented.

  13. Beam dynamics studies and parametric characterization of a standing wave electron linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, R.; Mondal, J.; Sharma, A.; Mittal, K. C.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents the results of electron beam tracking simulations for a 30 MeV standing wave electron linac at Electron Beam Centre Kharghar, Navi Mumbai, India. For the pulsed mode operation of the present linac preferential operation parameters have been determined from the results of beam dynamics studies. This electron accelerator is a general purpose facility for generation of Bremsstrahlung X-rays and neutron scattering experiments. This electron accelerator-based experimental neutron facility will be used for measurement of neutron cross-section (n,γ), (n, xn) and (n, f) reactions at different energies for various materials and material irradiation studies.

  14. Activation caused by proton beam losses in Accelerator Production of Tritium LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, C.A.; Eaton, S.L.; Daemen, L.L.; Waters, L.S.; Wilson, W.B.

    1996-03-01

    A variety of accelerator designs are being considered for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project at Alamos National Laboratory. Because activation of the structural components of the accelerator is considered a major radiation protection issue, we have developed a computational methodology to estimate quantitatively radionuclide inventories and gamma dose rates resulting from accelerator operation. The work presented here illustrates the use of our computational methodology by focusing on the 20 and 100 MeV sections of the Bridge-Coupled Drift Tube LINAC (BCDTL), and the 100 and 1000 MeV sections of the Coupled Cavity LINAC (CCL).

  15. Driver linac design for a femtosecond head-on inverse Compton scatteringX-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, N. Y.; Lau, W. K.; Liang, C. C.; Lee, A. P.; Cheng, W. C.; Yang, S. S.

    2011-05-01

    The feasibility of generating an ultra-short relativistic electron beam with a thermionic cathode rf gun driver linac for a femtosecond head-on inverse Compton scattering (ICS) X-ray source has been examined by space charge tracking throughout the entire beamline, from the cathode to the interaction point. It has been determined that GHz-repetition-rate electron pulses as short as 49 fs can be produced by compressing the energy-chirped beam from a 2998-MHz, 1.5-cell rf gun with an alpha magnet and an rf linac operating at the injection phase near the zero crossing. These electron pulses, with a 42-pC bunch charge, are accelerated to 27 MeV with an S-band traveling-wave constant-gradient linac structure for the ICS in an interaction chamber located downstream. The driver linac design that allows the operation of an ultra-short ICS X-ray source at a 0.7-Å wavelength, with a peak photon flux of 9.08×1017 photons/s, is presented in this paper.

  16. Large-acceptance linac for accelerating l9w-energy muons

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, Sergey S; Jason, Andrew J; Miyadera, Haruo

    2010-01-01

    We propose a high-gradient linear accelerator for accelerating low-energy muons and pions in a strong solenoidal magnetic field. The acceleration starts immediately after collection of pions from a target by solenoidal magnets and brings muons to a kinetic energy of about 200 MeV over a distance of the order of 10 m. At this energy, both an ionization cooling of the muon beam and its further acceleration in a superconducting linac become feasible. The project presents unique challenges - a very large energy spread in a highly divergent beam, as well as pion and muon decays - requiring large longitudinal and transverse acceptances. One potential solution incorporates a normal-conducting linac consisting of independently fed O-mode RF cavities with wide apertures closed by thin metal windows or grids. The guiding magnetic field is provided by external superconducting solenoids. The cavity choice, overall linac design considerations, and simulation results of muon acceleration are presented. While the primary applications of such a linac are for homeland defense and industry, it can provide muon fluxes high enough to be of interest for physics experiments.

  17. Current status of the superconducting RF linac driver for the JAERI Free Electron Laser Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Minehara, E.J.; Sugimoto, M.; Sawamura, M.

    1995-12-31

    The commissioning of the superconducting rf linac driver for the JAERI free electron laser facility has been successfully performed at 10{approx}20 MeV before the end of the 1994 Japanese fiscal year. The performance obtained during the commissioning and current status of the JAERI FEL program at Tokai will be reported in detail.

  18. Recirculating linacs for a neutrino factory - Arc optics design and optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Alex Bogacz; Valeri Lebedev

    2001-10-21

    A conceptual lattice design for a muon accelerator based on recirculating linacs (Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 472 (2001) 499, these proceedings) is presented here. The challenge of accelerating and transporting a large phase space of short-lived muons is answered here by presenting a proof-of-principle lattice design for a recirculating linac accelerator. It is the centerpiece of a chain of accelerators consisting of a 3GeV linac and two consecutive recirculating linear accelerators, which facilitates acceleration starting after ionization cooling at 190MeV/c and proceeding to 50GeV. Beam transport issues for large-momentum-spread beams are accommodated by appropriate lattice design choices. The resulting arc optics is further optimized with a sextupole correction to suppress chromatic effects contributing to the emittance dilution. The presented proof-of-principle design of the arc optics with horizontal separation of multi-pass beams can be extended to all passes in both recirculating linacs.

  19. Recirculating linacs for a neutrino factory - Arc optics design and optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Valeri Lebedev; S. Bogacz

    2001-10-25

    A conceptual lattice design for a muon accelerator based on recirculating linacs (Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 472 (2001) 499, these proceedings) is presented here. The challenge of accelerating and transporting a large phase space of short-lived muons is answered here by presenting a proof-of-principle lattice design for a recirculating linac accelerator. It is the centerpiece of a chain of accelerators consisting of a 3 GeV linac and two consecutive recirculating linear accelerators, which facilitates acceleration starting after ionization cooling at 190 MeV/c and proceeding to 50 GeV. Beam transport issues for large-momentum-spread beams are accommodated by appropriate lattice design choices. The resulting arc optics is further optimized with a sextupole correction to suppress chromatic effects contributing to the emittance dilution. The presented proof-of-principle design of the arc optics with horizontal separation of multi-pass beams can be extended to all passes in both recirculating linacs.

  20. RF system developments for CW and/or long pulse linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, M.

    1998-12-31

    High Power Proton Linacs are under development or proposed for development at Los Alamos and elsewhere. By current standards these linacs all require very large amounts of RF power. The Accelerator for Production of Tritium (APT) is a CW accelerator with an output current and energy of 100 mA and 1,700 MeV, respectively. The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), in its ultimate configuration, is a pulsed accelerator with an average output power of 4 MW of beam. Other accelerators such as those that address transmutation and upgrades to LANSCE have similar requirements. For these high average power applications, the RF systems represent approximately half of the total cost of the linac and are thus key elements in the design and configuration of the accelerator. Los Alamos is fortunate to be actively working on both APT and SNS. For these programs the author is pursuing a number of component developments which are aimed at one or more of the key issues for large RF systems: technical performance, capital cost, reliability, and operating efficiency. This paper briefly describes some of the linac applications and then provides updates on the key RF developments being pursued.

  1. Integration and Commissioning of the ARIEL e-linac Cryogenic System at TRIUMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koveshnikov, Alexey; Bylinskii, Iouri; Hodgson, Geoff; Koscielniak, Shane; Nagimov, Ruslan; Yosifov, Dimo

    The Advanced Rare IsotopE Laboratory (ARIEL) is a major expansion of the Isotope Separation and Acceleration (ISAC) facility at TRIUMF. The key part of the ARIEL project is a superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) linear electron accelerator (e-linac). The e-linac helium cryogenic system was designed to meet the ARIEL specifications. The HELIAL LL helium liquefier byAir Liquide Advanced Technologiessupplies 4 K liquid helium (LHe) to cryomodules via aLHe distribution system. The cryomodules have a top-loaded-coldmass design. The 4 K-2 K temperature conversion is achieved by a counter flow heat exchanger and a JT-valve installed onboard each cryomodule[1]. The temperature in the 2 K volume of the cryomodules is controlled by pressure control in the sub-atmospheric line. Sub-atmospheric helium is warmed up in a custom-designed heat exchanger and after passing sub-atmospheric pumps goes to the helium compressor suction line. The LN2 system supplies liquid nitrogen to the liquefier, 80 K shielding of the cryomodules and LHe distribution system, as well as to the freeze-out helium purifier. The installation of the e-linac cryogenic system components started in February 2013 while the corresponding subsystems tests started in November 2013. This paper describes the e-linac cryogenic system components integration and presents the results of the acceptance tests and commissioning activities performed at TRIUMF since November 2013.

  2. Beam Effects from an Increase of LINAC Current from 40 ma to 49 Milliamperes

    SciTech Connect

    Ray Tomlin

    2002-06-05

    On March 25, 2002 the FNAL Linac had been running at a decreased 40 ma of beam current for some time. Both the 400 MeV Linac and the 8GeV Booster had been tuned to optimum running during that time. Optimum running for the Booster was at 4.1e12 per pulse. Losses at injection and at transition were limiting intensity at the time. By March 26, 2002 the Linac beam current had been increased to 49 ma. The optimum Booster intensity immediately jumped to 4.5e12 per pulse and increased in the next few days to 4.8e12 and 5e12 per pulse. Booster was not retuned until early April when a low-loss 5.0e12 was obtained for stacking operations. Linac current had sagged to 47 ma by then. Measurements were made on the 25th at 40 ma and the 26th and 27th at 49 ma. This is a report and discussion of those measurements.

  3. R & D on Very-High-Current Superconducting Proton Linac, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2013-03-31

    The aim of this R&D project was to develop a superconducting cavity for a very-­ high-current proton accelerator. The particular application motivating the proposal was a LHC upgrade called the Superconducting Proton Linac, or SPL. Under the grant awarded to Stony Brook University the cavity was designed, a prototype copper cavity, followed by the niobium cavity, were built. A new set of HOM dampers was developed. The cavity has outstanding RF performance parameters – low surface fields, low power loss and all HOMs are fully damped. In fact, it is a “universal cavity” in the sense that it is suited for the acceleration of high-­current protons and well as high current electrons. Its damping of HOM modes is so good that it can see service in a multi-pass linac or an Energy Recovery Linac in addition to the easier service in a single-pass linac. Extensive measurements were made on the cavities and couplers, with the exception of the cold test of the niobium cavity. At the time of this report the cavity has been chemically processed and is ready for vertical testing which will be carried out shortly.

  4. Compact heavy ion RFQ preaccelerator for use at the CERN Linac I

    SciTech Connect

    Gough, R.A.; Staples, J.; Caylor, R.; Howard, D.; MacGill, R.; Tanabe, J.

    1985-05-01

    This paper describes the LBL contribution to a project designed to provide fully-stripped oxygen beams for acceleration in the CERN PS complex. A preaccelerator for Linac I, consisting of an ECR ion source, an RFQ linac, and rf matching cavities, is being assembled as part of a collaborative arrangement among LBL, GSI, and CERN. The RFQ, designed and built at LBL, will accept analyzed oxygen +6 beam from the ECR at 5.6 keV/amu, and accelerate it to 139.5 keV/amu, the injection energy required for 2 ..beta..lambda operation of Linac I. Stripping to +8 will be done with a foil stripper at 12.5 MeV/amu at the exit of Linac I. The RFQ operates at 202.56 MHz and is 0.86 meters in length. The structure is stabilized with vane coupling rings, and uses a single drive loop and a single tuning loop. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Update on RF System Studies and VCX Fast Tuner Work for the RIA Drive Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Rusnak, B; Shen, S

    2003-05-06

    The limited cavity beam loading conditions anticipated for the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) create a situation where microphonic-induced cavity detuning dominates radio frequency (RF) coupling and RF system architecture choices in the linac design process. Where most superconducting electron and proton linacs have beam-loaded bandwidths that are comparable to or greater than typical microphonic detuning bandwidths on the cavities, the beam-loaded bandwidths for many heavy-ion species in the RIA driver linac can be as much as a factor of 10 less than the projected 80-150 Hz microphonic control window for the RF structures along the driver, making RF control problematic. While simply overcoupling the coupler to the cavity can mitigate this problem to some degree, system studies indicate that for the low-{beta} driver linac alone, this approach may cost 50% or more than an RF system employing a voltage controlled reactance (VCX) fast tuner. An update of these system cost studies, along with the status of the VCX work being done at Lawrence Livermore National Lab is presented here.

  6. A driver linac for the Advanced Exotic Beam Laboratory : physics design and beam dynamics simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Mustapha, B.; Nolen, J.; Physics

    2007-01-01

    The Advanced Exotic Beam Laboratory (AEBL) being developed at ANL consists of an 833 MV heavy-ion driver linac capable of producing uranium ions up to 200 MeV/u and protons to 580 MeV with 400 kW beam power. We have designed all accelerator components including a two charge state LEBT, an RFQ, a MEBT, a superconducting linac, a stripper station and chicane. We present the results of an optimized linac design and end-to-end simulations including machine errors and detailed beam loss analysis. The Advanced Exotic Beam Laboratory (AEBL) has been proposed at ANL as a reduced scale of the original Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) project with about half the cost but the same beam power. AEBL will address 90% or more of RIA physics but with reduced multi-users capabilities. The focus of this paper is the physics design and beam dynamics simulations of the AEBL driver linac. The reported results are for a multiple charge state U{sup 238} beam.

  7. Experimental results of the laserwire emittance scanner for LINAC4 at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Thomas; Boorman, Gary E.; Bosco, Alessio; Bravin, Enrico; Gibson, Stephen M.; Kruchinin, Konstantin O.; Raich, Uli; Roncarolo, Federico; Zocca, Francesca

    2016-09-01

    Within the framework of the LHC Injector Upgrade (LIU), the new LINAC4 is currently being commissioned to replace the existing LINAC2 proton source at CERN. After the expected completion at the end of 2016, the LINAC4 will accelerate H- ions to 160 MeV. To measure the transverse emittance of the H- beam, a method based on photo-detachment is proposed. This system will operate using a pulsed laser with light delivered via an optical fibre and subsequently focused onto the H- beam. The laser photons have sufficient energy to detach the outer electron and create H0/e- pairs. In a downstream dipole, the created H0 particles are separated from the unstripped H- ions and their distribution is measured with a dedicated detector. By scanning the focused laser beam across the H- beam, the transverse emittance of the H- beam can be reconstructed. This paper will first discuss the concept, design and simulations of the laser emittance scanner and then present results from a prototype system used during the 12 MeV commissioning of the LINAC4.

  8. Interaction-Region Design Options for a Linac-Ring LHeC

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, Frank; Bettoni, Simona; Bruning, Oliver; Holzer, Bernhard; Russenschuck, Stephan; Schulte, Daniel; Tomas, Rogelio; Aksakal, Husnu; Appleby, Robert; Chattopadhyay, Swapan; Korostelev, Maxim; Ciftci, Abbas; Ciftci, Rena; Zengin, Kahraman; Dainton, John; Klein, Max; Eroglu, Emre; Tapan, Ilhan; Kostka, Peter; Litvinenko, Vladimir; Paoloni, Eugenio; /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Bologna /DESY /SLAC

    2012-06-21

    The interaction-region design for a linac-ring electron-proton collider based on the LHC ('LR-LHeC') poses numerous challenges related to collision scheme, synchrotron radiation, aperture, magnet technology, and optics. We report a first assessment and various options.

  9. Effect of transverse magnetic fields on a simulated in-line 6 MV linac.

    PubMed

    St Aubin, J; Steciw, S; Fallone, B G

    2010-08-21

    The effects of a transverse magnetic field on an in-line side-coupled 6 MV linear accelerator are given. The results are directly applicable to a linac-MR system used for real-time image guided adaptive radiotherapy. Our previously designed end-to-end linac simulation incorporated the results from the axisymmetric 2D electron gun program EGN2w. However, since the magnetic fields being investigated are non-axisymmetric in nature for the work presented here, the electron gun simulation was performed using OPERA-3d/SCALA. The simulation results from OPERA-3d/SCALA showed excellent agreement with previous results. Upon the addition of external magnetic fields to our fully 3D linac simulation, it was found that a transverse magnetic field of 6 G resulted in a 45 +/- 1% beam loss, and by 14 G, no electrons were incident on the target. Transverse magnetic fields on the linac simulation produced a highly asymmetric focal spot at the target, which translated into a 13% profile asymmetry at 6 G. Upon translating the focal spot with respect to the target coordinates, profile symmetry was regained at the expense of a lateral shift in the dose profiles. It was found that all points in the penumbra failed a 1%/1 mm acceptance criterion for fields between 4 and 6 G. However, it was also found that the lateral profile shifts were corrected by adjusting the jaw positions asymmetrically. PMID:20679699

  10. LIGHT SOURCE: Physical design of a 10 MeV LINAC for polymer radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Guang-Yao; Pei, Yuan-Ji; Wang, Lin; Zhang, Shan-Cai; Wu, Cong-Feng; Jin, Kai; Li, Wei-Min

    2009-06-01

    In China, polymer radiation processing has become one of the most important processing industries. The radiation processing source may be an electron beam accelerator or a radioactive source. Physical design of an electron beam facility applied for radiation crosslinking is introduced in this paper because of it's much higher dose rate and efficiency. Main part of this facility is a 10 MeV travelling wave electron linac with constant impedance accelerating structure. A start to end simulation concerning the linac is reported in this paper. The codes Opera-3d, Poisson-superfish and Parmela are used to describe electromagnetic elements of the accelerator and track particle distribution from the cathode to the end of the linac. After beam dynamic optimization, wave phase velocities in the structure have been chosen to be 0.56, 0.9 and 0.999 respectively. Physical parameters about the main elements such as DC electron gun, iris-loaded periodic structure, solenoids, etc, are presented. Simulation results proves that it can satisfy the industrial requirement. The linac is under construction. Some components have been finished. Measurements proved that they are in a good agreement with the design values.

  11. Effect of transverse magnetic fields on a simulated in-line 6 MV linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. Aubin, J.; Steciw, S.; Fallone, B. G.

    2010-08-01

    The effects of a transverse magnetic field on an in-line side-coupled 6 MV linear accelerator are given. The results are directly applicable to a linac-MR system used for real-time image guided adaptive radiotherapy. Our previously designed end-to-end linac simulation incorporated the results from the axisymmetric 2D electron gun program EGN2w. However, since the magnetic fields being investigated are non-axisymmetric in nature for the work presented here, the electron gun simulation was performed using OPERA-3d/SCALA. The simulation results from OPERA-3d/SCALA showed excellent agreement with previous results. Upon the addition of external magnetic fields to our fully 3D linac simulation, it was found that a transverse magnetic field of 6 G resulted in a 45 ± 1% beam loss, and by 14 G, no electrons were incident on the target. Transverse magnetic fields on the linac simulation produced a highly asymmetric focal spot at the target, which translated into a 13% profile asymmetry at 6 G. Upon translating the focal spot with respect to the target coordinates, profile symmetry was regained at the expense of a lateral shift in the dose profiles. It was found that all points in the penumbra failed a 1%/1 mm acceptance criterion for fields between 4 and 6 G. However, it was also found that the lateral profile shifts were corrected by adjusting the jaw positions asymmetrically.

  12. A Monte Carlo Study for Photoneutron Dose Estimations around the High-Energy Linacs

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, N; Miri-Hakimabad, S H; Rafat-Motavalli, L

    2014-01-01

    Background: High-energy linear accelerator (linac) is a valuable tool and the most commonly used device for external beam radiation treatments in cancer patients. In the linac head, high-energy photons with energies above the threshold of (γ,n) interaction produce photoneutrons. These photoneutrons deliver the extra dose to the patients undergoing radiation treatment and increase the risk of secondary cancer. Objective: In this study, a simplified model of the linac head was simulated and photoneutron dose equivalent was calculated at the isocenter and maze in the sphere detector. In addition, the absorbed and equivalent dose of photoneutron were estimated in the some organs of the phantom. Methods: The simulations were made using the Monte Carlo code. The ICRP reference adult male voxel phantom was used as the human body model for dosimetry calculations. Results: The results of dose calculations at the isocenter and maze showed that photoneutron dose decreases as the function of distance from the isocenter and increases with increasing the distance from the entrance maze. Conclusion: It is concluded that the simplified model of linac head is a useful and reliable method in dosimetry calculations. Calculations illustrated that the photoneutron dose is not negligible and duo to its harmful biological effects on body, it should be considered in the treatment plans. PMID:25599059

  13. Landau damping in the improved SLC linac: A, The sensitivity to injection jitter

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.L.F.

    1988-04-01

    In this report we study the effects of injection jitter on emittance growth, and hence on luminosity, in the improved linac with stronger focusing, and for the new bunch parameters. We consider both cases when Landau damping has been invoked, and when it has not been.

  14. Novel linac structures for low-beta ions and for muons

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, Sergey S

    2010-01-01

    Development of two innovative linacs is discussed. (1) High-efficiency normal-conducting accelerating structures for ions with beam velocities in the range of a few percent of the speed of light. Two existing accelerator technologies - the H-mode resonator cavities and transverse beam focusing by permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ) - are merged to create efficient structures for light-ion beams of considerable currents. The inter-digital H-mode accelerator with PMQ focusing (IH-PMQ) has the shunt impedance 10-20 times higher than the standard drift-tube linac. Results of the combined 3-D modeling for an IH-PMQ accelerator tank - electromagnetic computations, beam-dynamics simulations, and thermal-stress analysis - are presented. H-PMQ structures following a short RFQ accelerator can be used in the front end of ion linacs or in stand-alone applications like a compact mobile deuteron-beam accelerator up to a few MeV. (2) A large-acceptance high-gradient linac for accelerating low-energy muons in a strong solenoidal magnetic field. When a proton beam hits a target, many low-energy pions are produced almost isotropically, in addition to a small number of high-energy pions in the forward direction. We propose to collect and accelerate copious muons created as the low-energy pions decay. The acceleration should bring muons to a kinetic energy of {approx}200 MeV in about 10 m, where both an ionization cooling of the muon beam and its further acceleration in a superconducting linac become feasible. One potential solution is a normal-conducting linac consisting of independently fed O-mode RF cavities with wide apertures closed by thin metal windows or grids. The guiding magnetic field is provided by external superconducting solenoids. The cavity choice, overall linac design considerations, and simulation results of muon acceleration are presented. Potential applications range from basic research to homeland defense to industry and medicine.

  15. Novel Linac Structures For Low-Beta Ions And For Muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurennoy, Sergey S.

    2011-06-01

    Development of two innovative linacs is discussed. (1) High-efficiency normal-conducting accelerating structures for ions with beam velocities in the range of a few percent of the speed of light. Two existing accelerator technologies—the H-mode resonator cavities and transverse beam focusing by permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ)—are merged to create efficient structures for light-ion beams of considerable currents. The inter-digital H-mode accelerator with PMQ focusing (IH-PMQ) has the shunt impedance 10-20 times higher than the standard drift-tube linac. Results of the combined 3-D modeling for an IH-PMQ accelerator tank—electromagnetic computations, beam-dynamics simulations, and thermal-stress analysis—are presented. H-PMQ structures following a short RFQ accelerator can be used in the front end of ion linacs or in stand-alone applications like a compact mobile deuteron-beam accelerator up to a few MeV. (2) A large-acceptance high-gradient linac for accelerating low-energy muons in a strong solenoidal magnetic field. When a proton beam hits a target, many low-energy pions are produced almost isotropically, in addition to a small number of high-energy pions in the forward direction. We propose to collect and accelerate copious muons created as the low-energy pions decay. The acceleration should bring muons to a kinetic energy of ˜200 MeV in about 10 m, where both an ionization cooling of the muon beam and its further acceleration in a superconducting linac become feasible. One potential solution is a normal-conducting linac consisting of independently fed 0-mode RF cavities with wide apertures closed by thin metal windows or grids. The guiding magnetic field is provided by external superconducting solenoids. The cavity choice, overall linac design considerations, and simulation results of muon acceleration are presented. Potential applications range from basic research to homeland defense to industry and medicine.

  16. Portable 1,5 MeV X-Band Linac For Non-destructive Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saversky, A. J.; Rodionov, A. E.; Shaltyrev, A. P.; Shchedrin, I. S.

    1997-05-01

    Portable linear electron accelerator Y-34 developed in Small Accelerator Laboratory of MEPhI for non-destructive industrial radiography. This Linac is a fully self-contained device with the exception of external electric power 220Vx50Gz, 1 phase, 5 kVA. Full mass of Linac Y-34 - less than 300 kg. The Radiographic parameters: Nominal Energy - 1,5 MeV; Energy Range - 0,7...1,8 MeV; Maximum pulse current - 100 mA; Maximum Intensity - 15 R/min@m; Focal spot size - less than 2 mm. The Linac is comprised of 4 subassemblies. The X-ray head with weight less than 100 kg, dimensions: 0,7x0,7x1,0 m contains the traveling-wave accelerating structure with lens 0,4 m, electron gun, vacuum pump, tungsten target and RF-system with 500-kW magnetron. The permanent magnets focusing system provides focal spot less than 2 mm. The high voltage power unit consist of a line-type magnetron/electron gun modulator 2 kW power supply, the weight is equal 70 kg. The self-contained cooling water supply provides temperature controlled water for accelerator structure and magnetron. The control console allows convenient monitoring of critical system and Linac parameters by manual or remote computer. Portable X-band Linac Y-34 is the effective X - ray and/or electron beam source for such applications as non-destructive examination of nuclear reactor systems, solid rocket motors, technology research.

  17. Smooth transverse and longitudinal focusing in high-intensity ion linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Billen, J.H.; Takeda, Harunori; Young, L.M.

    1996-09-01

    We examine ion linac designs that start with a high energy radio- frequency quadrupole (RFQ) followed by either a drift-tube linac (DTL) or a coupled-cavity drift-tube linac (CCDTL). For high energies a conventional CCL follows the CCDTL. High RFQ output energy allows tailoring the transverse and longitudinal focusing strengths to match into the following structure. When the RFQ beam enters a higher frequency structure, the DTL or CCDTL starts with a low accelerating gradient and large negative synchronous phase. The gradient and phase both ramp up gradually to higher values. Other changes later in the machine are also gradual. Beam dynamics simulations show that these linacs require no separate matching sections. Applications include a cw 100 mA H{sup +} beam from a 350-MHz, 6.7 MeV RFQ injecting a 700 MHz CCDTL and CCL; a 7% duty 28 mA H{sup -} beam from a 402.5 MHz RFQ and DTL injecting 805 MHz structures; a cw 135 mA D{sup +} beam produced by a 175 MHz, 8 MeV RFQ and DTL; and a 2.4% duty, 80 mA H{sup +} beam using a 433 MHz 10 MeV RFQ and a 1300 MHz CCDTL. The machines take advantage of the considerable flexibility of the CCDTL. Designs can use a variety of different transverse focusing lattices. Use of two coupling cavity orientations permits a constant period even when the number of drift tubes per cavity changes along the linac.

  18. Influence of the linac design on intensity-modulated radiotherapy of head-and-neck plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topolnjak, R.; van der Heide, U. A.; Meijer, G. J.; van Asselen, B.; Raaijmakers, C. P. J.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we quantify the impact of linac/MLC design parameters on IMRT treatment plans. The investigated parameters were leaf width in the MLC, leaf transmission, related to the thickness of the leaves, and penumbra related primarily to the source size. Seven head-and-neck patients with stage T1-T3N0-N2cM0 oropharyngeal cancer were studied. For each patient nine plans were made with a different set of linac/MLC parameters. The plans were optimized in Pinnacle3 v7.6c and PLATO RTS v2.6.4, ITP v1.1.8. A hypothetical ideal linac/MLC was introduced to investigate the influence of one parameter at a time without interaction of other parameters. When any of the three parameters was increased from the ideal set-up values (leaf width 2.5 mm, transmission 0%, penumbra 3 mm), the mean dose to the parotid glands increased, given the same tumour coverage. The largest increase was found for increasing leaf transmission. The investigation showed that by changing more than one parameter of the ideal linac/MLC set-up, the increase in the mean dose was smaller than the sum of dose increments for each parameter separately. As a reference to clinical practice, we also optimized the plans of the seven patients with the clinically used Elekta SLi 15, equipped with a standard MLC with a leaf width of 10 mm. As compared to the ideal linac, this resulted in an increase of the average dose to the parotid glands of 5.8 Gy.

  19. SU-E-J-202: Performance of the Patient QA Systems in a Hybrid MRI-Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Houweling, A; Vries, W de; Wolthaus, J; Woodings, S; Asselen, B van; Kok, J; Lagendijk, J; Raaymakers, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The first clinical MR-linac will soon become operational, therefore patient plan QA procedures and equipment have to become MRcompatible. Reference dosimetry is affected by the magnetic field, however, relative dosimetry using patient QA systems haven’t been investigated extensively. The purpose of this study was to examine the performance characteristics of the MR-compatible ArcCHECK and Delta4 systems in a transverse 1.5 T magnetic field. Methods: Recently MR-compatible versions of both ArcCheck (Sun Nuclear) and Delta4 (Scandidos) have been developed. To examine the performance characteristics within the magnetic field, the reproducibility, dose linearity, dose rate dependence, field size and angular dependence were evaluated on the MR-linac (8 MV FFF beam, SAD of 142 cm) and a conventional linac (Elekta, 6MV). To allow comparison of the measurements with and without magnetic field, the measurement setup for the conventional linac is adapted to mimic the setup at the MR-linac if possible (e.g. SAD, dose rate). The results from the MR-linac were benchmarked to the results from the conventional linac as being the clinical reference. Results: At the moment of writing, measurements for the Delta4 are still running. Therefore, only the results of the ArcCheck are presented in this abstract. No significant difference was observed in the reproducibility of the ArcCheck (<0.06%) between both linacs. The maximum dose response difference when measuring the dose linearity was less than 0.4% and the varying dose rate resulted in maximal dose differences of 1.0% for both linacs. Response variation for varying field sizes was <2.6% at the conventional linac, and <1.0% at the MR-linac. Angular response was similar for both linacs. Conclusion: The reproducibility, dose linearity, dose rate dependence, field size and angular dependence of the MR compatible ArcCheck were not influenced by the presence of a transverse 1.5 T magnetic field. The results for the Delta4 are

  20. Design and experiments of RF transverse focusing in S-Band, 1 MeV standing wave linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, J.; Chandan, Shiv; Parashar, S.; Bhattacharjee, D.; Tillu, A. R.; Tiwari, R.; Jayapraksh, D.; Yadav, V.; Banerjee, S.; Choudhury, N.; Ghodke, S. R.; Dixit, K. P.; Nimje, V. T.

    2015-09-01

    S-Band standing wave (SW) linacs in the range of 1-10 MeV have many potential industrial applications world wide. In order to mitigate the industrial requirement it is required to reduce the overall size and weight of the system. On this context a 2856 M Hz, 1 Me V, bi-periodic on axis coupled self transverse focused SW linac has been designed and tested. The RF phase focusing is achieved by introducing an asymmetric field distribution in the first cell of the 1 MeV linac. The pulsed electron beam of 40 keV, 650 mA and 5 μs duration is injected from a LaB6 thermionic gun. This paper presents the structure design, beam dynamics simulation, fabrication and experimental results of the 1 MeV auto-focusing SW linac.

  1. SU-E-T-119: Dosimetric and Mechanical Characteristics of Elekta Infinity LINAC with Agility MLC

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J; Xu, Q; Xue, J; Zhai, Y; An, L; Chen, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Elekta Infinity is the one of the latest generation LINAC with unique features. Two Infinity LINACs are recently commissioned at our institution. The dosimetric and mechanical characteristics of the machines are presented. Methods: Both Infinity LINACs with Agility MLC (160 leaves with 0.5 cm leaf width) are configured with five electron energies (6, 9, 12, 15, and 18 MeV) and two photon energies (6 and 15 MV). One machine has additional photon energy (10 MV). The commissioning was performed by following the manufacturer's specifications and AAPM TG recommendations. Beam data of both electron and photon beams are measured with scanning ion chambers and linear diode array. Machines are adjusted to have the dosimetrically equivalent characteristics. Results: The commissioning of mechanical and imaging system meets the tolerances by TG recommendations. The PDD{sub 10} of various field sizes for 6 and 15 MV shows < 0.5% difference between two machines. For each electron beams, R{sub 80} matches with < 0.4 mm difference. The symmetry and flatness agree within 0.8% and 0.9% differences for photon beams, respectively. For electron beams, the differences of the symmetry and flatness are within 1.2% and 0.8%, respectively. The mean inline penumbras for 6, 10, and 15 MV are respectively 5.1±0.24, 5.6±0.07, and 5.9±0.10 mm for 10x10 cm at 10 cm depth. The crossline penumbras are larger than inline penumbras by 2.2, 1.4, and 1.0 mm, respectively. The MLC transmission factor with interleaf leakage is 0.5 % for all photon energies. Conclusion: The dosimetric and mechanical characteristics of two Infinity LINACs show good agreements between them. Although the Elekta Infinity has been used in many institutions, the detailed characteristics of the machine have not been reported. This study provides invaluable information to understand the Infinity LINAC and to compare the quality of commissioning data for other LINACs.

  2. SU-F-BRE-09: Linac Isocenter Quality Assurance: A Stereotactic Approach

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, B; Li, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A quantitative method was designed to independently determine the couch/collimator/gantry isocenters, as well as the overall LINAC mechanical isocenter in 3D. Methods: Performed on both a Varian TrueBeam™ STx and Trilogy with the gold standard front pointer positioned at 100 cm SAD, and a Radionics XKnife™ (RX) attached to the couch. At gantry and couch 0°, the RX laser alignment attachment (RXLAA) was centered to the front pointer using the micrometers (0.1-mm precision) on the RX. The 3D coordinates of the micrometers were recorded. The collimator was rotated to 90° and 270°. At each collimator rotation, the RXLAA was re-centered to the front pointer and the micrometer coordinates recorded. At collimator and gantry 0°, the process was repeated for couch angles 0°/90°/270°. Finally, at collimator and couch 0°, the steps were repeated for gantry rotations 0°/90°/180°/270°. The centers/radii of the smallest bounding spheres for the collimator, couch and gantry walkout were calculated (using MatLab™). The smallest bounding sphere containing the collimator, couch and gantry walkout spheres was then calculated. The center of this all-encompassing sphere is the overall mechanical isocenter of the LINAC. This position was dialed in on the RX. LINAC mechanical and radiation isocenter coincidence was determined by performing Winston- Lutz test at four cardinal gantry angles. Results: TrueBeam and Trilogy mechanical isocenters had overall walkout radii of 0.8 mm and 1.5 mm, respectively. For the TrueBeam and Trilogy 6-MV beams, the radii of radiation isocenter were 0.3 mm and 0.4 mm, respectively, with distances between LINAC mechanical and radiation isocenters of 0.5 mm and 0.9 mm, respectively. Conclusion: This efficient and simple method allows for an independent and reliable quantitative assessment of LINAC isocenter in 3D with equipment typically available in a radiation oncology clinic. It can easily be performed for LINAC commissioning and

  3. Design and simulation of C6+ hybrid single cavity linac for cancer therapy with direct plasma injection scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Liang; Hattori, Toshiyuki; Hayashizaki, Noriyosu

    2012-10-01

    A hybrid single cavity (HSC) linac, whose structure is formed by combining a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) structure and a drift tube (DT) structure into one interdigital-H (IH) cavity, has been developed over a span of a few years by our research team [1]. In the present work, several different structures of an HSC linac are analyzed in order to achieve an optimum cavity electric field distribution and to enhance beam transmission. The proposed HSC linac design is a direct injector linac for a heavy ion synchrotron for radiotherapy. This design also has potential as a neutron source in boron neutron capture therapy. According to our simulations, an HSC linac accelerated C6+ ions from 25 keV/u up to 2 MeV/u in 1800 mm for a 94 kW feeding power with a 100 MHz operation. The detailed HSC linac structure design and the results of the cavity electromagnetic field simulation are reported in this paper.

  4. Acceptance scan technique for the drift tube linac of the spallation neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, D.; Stovall, J.; Takeda, H.; Nath, S.; Billen, J.; Young, L.; Kisselev, I.; Shishlo, A.; Aleksandrov, A.; Assadi, S.; Chu, C. M.; Cousineau, S.; Danilov, V.; Galambos, J.; Henderson, S.; Kim, S.; Kravchuk, L.; Tanke, E.

    2007-01-01

    For high intensity proton accelerators, it is vital to reduce the machine activation by minimizing the beam loss from many sources. One of such sources is longitudinal mismatch. To minimize a potential mismatch, it is important to set accurately the rf set-point (rf field amplitude and phase) of a high-intensity linac such as the drift tube linac (DTL) of the spallation neutron source. A widely used technique called the acceptance scan was studied extensively and applied successfully to tune the DTL tanks since the initial commissioning. From the acceptance scan one can obtain the longitudinal beam profile at the entrance of each DTL tank. But except tank 1, acceptance scan alone cannot determine the incoming beam energy deviation, leading to small uncertainties in the rf set point.

  5. Capacitive beam position monitors for the low-β beam of the Chinese ADS proton linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Wu, Jun-Xia; Zhu, Guang-Yu; Jia, Huan; Xue, Zong-Heng; Zheng, Hai; Xie, Hong-Ming; Kang, Xin-Cai; He, Yuan; Li, Lin; Denard, Jean Claude

    2016-02-01

    Beam Position Monitors (BPMs) for the low-β beam of the Chinese Accelerator Driven Subcritical system (CADS) Proton linac are of the capacitive pick-up type. They provide higher output signals than that of the inductive type. This paper will describe the design and tests of the capacitive BPM system for the low-β proton linac, including the pick-ups, the test bench and the read-out electronics. The tests done with an actual proton beam show a good agreement between the measurements and the simulations in the time domain. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11405240) and “Western Light” Talents Training Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences

  6. New Injectors: The Linac4 Project and the New H- Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lettry, J.; Vretenar, M.

    Linac4 is a new 160 MeV linear accelerator designed to improve by a factor of 2 the beam brightness out of the LHC injection chain for the needs of the LHC luminosity upgrade. The project started in 2008 and beam commissioning takes place in 2014-2015. The new linac accelerates H- ions that are then stripped at injection into the PS Booster; production of the H- beam takes place in a state-of-the-art ion source of the RF-driven caesiated surface type. Acceleration is provided by four different accelerating sections matched to the increasing beam velocity, including two of novel designs, and focusing is provided by a combination of permanent-magnet and electromagnetic quadrupoles.

  7. Space charge compensation in the Linac4 low energy beam transport line with negative hydrogen ions

    SciTech Connect

    Valerio-Lizarraga, Cristhian A.; Lallement, Jean-Baptiste; Lettry, Jacques; Scrivens, Richard; Leon-Monzon, Ildefonso; Midttun, Øystein

    2014-02-15

    The space charge effect of low energy, unbunched ion beams can be compensated by the trapping of ions or electrons into the beam potential. This has been studied for the 45 keV negative hydrogen ion beam in the CERN Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport using the package IBSimu [T. Kalvas et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02B703 (2010)], which allows the space charge calculation of the particle trajectories. The results of the beam simulations will be compared to emittance measurements of an H{sup −} beam at the CERN Linac4 3 MeV test stand, where the injection of hydrogen gas directly into the beam transport region has been used to modify the space charge compensation degree.

  8. High-power proton linac for transmuting the long-lived fission products in nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, G.P.

    1991-01-01

    High power proton linacs are being considered at Los Alamos as drivers for high-flux spallation neutron sources that can be used to transmute the troublesome long-lived fission products in defense nuclear waste. The transmutation scheme being studied provides a high flux (> 10{sup 16}/cm{sup 2}{minus}s) of thermal neutrons, which efficiently converts fission products to stable or short-lived isotopes. A medium-energy proton linac with an average beam power of about 110 MW can burn the accumulated Tc99 and I129 inventory at the DOE's Hanford Site within 30 years. Preliminary concepts for this machine are described. 3 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. A geometrical model for the Monte Carlo simulation of the TrueBeam linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, M.; Sempau, J.; Fogliata, A.; Cozzi, L.; Sauerwein, W.; Brualla, L.

    2015-06-01

    Monte Carlo simulation of linear accelerators (linacs) depends on the accurate geometrical description of the linac head. The geometry of the Varian TrueBeam linac is not available to researchers. Instead, the company distributes phase-space files of the flattening-filter-free (FFF) beams tallied at a plane located just upstream of the jaws. Yet, Monte Carlo simulations based on third-party tallied phase spaces are subject to limitations. In this work, an experimentally based geometry developed for the simulation of the FFF beams of the Varian TrueBeam linac is presented. The Monte Carlo geometrical model of the TrueBeam linac uses information provided by Varian that reveals large similarities between the TrueBeam machine and the Clinac 2100 downstream of the jaws. Thus, the upper part of the TrueBeam linac was modeled by introducing modifications to the Varian Clinac 2100 linac geometry. The most important of these modifications is the replacement of the standard flattening filters by ad hoc thin filters. These filters were modeled by comparing dose measurements and simulations. The experimental dose profiles for the 6 MV and 10 MV FFF beams were obtained from the Varian Golden Data Set and from in-house measurements performed with a diode detector for radiation fields ranging from 3  ×  3 to 40  ×  40 cm2 at depths of maximum dose of 5 and 10 cm. Indicators of agreement between the experimental data and the simulation results obtained with the proposed geometrical model were the dose differences, the root-mean-square error and the gamma index. The same comparisons were performed for dose profiles obtained from Monte Carlo simulations using the phase-space files distributed by Varian for the TrueBeam linac as the sources of particles. Results of comparisons show a good agreement of the dose for the ansatz geometry similar to that obtained for the simulations with the TrueBeam phase-space files for all fields and depths considered, except for the

  10. Optimal focusing for a linac-based hard x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Krafft, G.; Talman, R.

    2011-03-28

    In spite of having a small average beam current limit, a linac can have features that make it attractive as an x-ray source: high energy, ultralow emittance and energy spread, and flexible beamline optics. Unlike a storage ring, in which an (undulator) radiation source is necessarily short and positioned at an electron beam waist, in a linac the undulator can be long and the electron beam can be adjusted to have a (virtual) waist far downstream toward the x-ray target. Using a planned CEBAF beamline as an example, this paper shows that a factor of 2000 in beam current can be overcome to produce a monochromatic hard x-ray source comparable with, or even exceeding, the performance of an x-ray line at a third generation storage ring. Optimal electron beam focusing conditions for x-ray flux density and brilliance are derived, and are verified by simulations using the SRW code.

  11. A geometrical model for the Monte Carlo simulation of the TrueBeam linac.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, M; Sempau, J; Fogliata, A; Cozzi, L; Sauerwein, W; Brualla, L

    2015-06-01

    Monte Carlo simulation of linear accelerators (linacs) depends on the accurate geometrical description of the linac head. The geometry of the Varian TrueBeam linac is not available to researchers. Instead, the company distributes phase-space files of the flattening-filter-free (FFF) beams tallied at a plane located just upstream of the jaws. Yet, Monte Carlo simulations based on third-party tallied phase spaces are subject to limitations. In this work, an experimentally based geometry developed for the simulation of the FFF beams of the Varian TrueBeam linac is presented. The Monte Carlo geometrical model of the TrueBeam linac uses information provided by Varian that reveals large similarities between the TrueBeam machine and the Clinac 2100 downstream of the jaws. Thus, the upper part of the TrueBeam linac was modeled by introducing modifications to the Varian Clinac 2100 linac geometry. The most important of these modifications is the replacement of the standard flattening filters by ad hoc thin filters. These filters were modeled by comparing dose measurements and simulations. The experimental dose profiles for the 6 MV and 10 MV FFF beams were obtained from the Varian Golden Data Set and from in-house measurements performed with a diode detector for radiation fields ranging from 3  ×  3 to 40  ×  40 cm(2) at depths of maximum dose of 5 and 10 cm. Indicators of agreement between the experimental data and the simulation results obtained with the proposed geometrical model were the dose differences, the root-mean-square error and the gamma index. The same comparisons were performed for dose profiles obtained from Monte Carlo simulations using the phase-space files distributed by Varian for the TrueBeam linac as the sources of particles. Results of comparisons show a good agreement of the dose for the ansatz geometry similar to that obtained for the simulations with the TrueBeam phase-space files for all fields and depths considered, except for

  12. Beam-dynamics driven design of the LHeC energy-recovery linac

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrini, Dario; Latina, Andrea; Schulte, Daniel; Bogacz, S. Alex

    2015-12-23

    The LHeC study is a possible upgrade of the LHC that aims at delivering an electron beam for collisions with the existing hadronic beams. The current baseline design for the electron facility consists of a multi-pass superconducting energy-recovery linac operating in a continuous wave mode. Here, we summarize the overall layout of such ERL complex located on the LHC site and introduce the most recent developments. We review of the lattice components, presenting their baseline design along with possible alternatives that aims at improving the overall machine performance. The detector bypass has been designed and integrated into the lattice. Tracking simulations allowed us to verify the high current (~150 mA in the linacs) beam operation required for the LHeC to serve as an Higgs Factory. The impact of single and multi-bunch wake-fields, synchrotron radiation and beam-beam effects has been assessed in this paper.

  13. Overview of the cryogenic system for the ariel e-linac at TRIUMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bylinskii, Iouri; Kishi, David; Koveshnikov, Alexey; Laxdal, Robert; Sekachev, Igor; Sitnikov, Alexandre; Yosifov, Dimo

    2012-06-01

    The Advanced Rare IsotopE Laboratory (ARIEL) is a major upgrade of the existing ISAC radioactive beam facility. After completion, ARIEL will triple TRIUMF's capability of the rare isotope production for the needs of the international scientific community. The key feature of this upgrade is the 50 MeV 10 mA continuous-wave (CW) electron linear accelerator (e-linac) utilizing superconducting bulk niobium technology at 1.3GHz. This paper presents the proposed layout of the e-linac cryogenic system including details of the accelerator cryomodules, estimated heat load of the helium refrigerator, and the description of the helium and LN2 storage and distribution systems with requirements for major components.

  14. A Dynamic Feedback Model for High Repetition Rate LINAC-Driven FELS

    SciTech Connect

    Mellado Munoz, M.; Doolittle, L.; Emma, P.; Huang, G.; Ratti, A.; Serrano, C.; Byrd, J. M.

    2012-05-20

    One of the concepts for the next generation of linacdriven FELs is a CW superconducting linac driving an electron beam with MHz repetition rates. One of the challenges for next generation FELs is improve the stability of the xray pulses by improving the shot-to-shot stability of the energy, charge, peak current, and timing jitter of the electron beam. A high repetition rate FEL with a CW linac presents an opportunity to use a variety of broadband feedbacks to stabilize the beam parameters. To understand the performance of such a feedback system, we are developing a dynamic model of the machine with a focus on the longitudinal beam properties. The model is being developed as an extension of the LITrack code and includes the dynamics of the beam-cavity interaction, RF feedback, beam-based feedback, and multibunch effects. In this paper, we present a detailed description of this model.

  15. Status of the low-energy Linac 200-MHz rf stations

    SciTech Connect

    Charles W. Schmidt et al.

    2002-03-21

    This report describes the present status of the five low-energy Linac 200-MHz RF stations with regard to availability and reliability of major components. An attempt has been made to describe possible solutions (or non-solutions) and to indicate some of the complexity and interplay between those solutions. For the problem at hand, the discontinuance of this one particular tube, an acceptable solution plan must be identified and designed in detail in the near future. As explained herein, the time scale for implementing a solution is five years; beyond that time there is considerable risk of finding ourselves with a non-maintainable Linac and no High Energy Physics program at Fermilab.

  16. A photocathode rf gun design for a mm-wave linac-based FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Nassiri, A.; Berenc, T,; Foster, J.; Waldschmidt, G.; Zhou, J.

    1995-07-01

    In recent years, advances in the rf gun technology have made it possible to produce small beam emittances suitable for short period microundulators which take advantage of the low emittance beam to reduce the wavelength of FELs. At the Advanced Photon Source, we are studying the design of a compact 50-MeV superconducting mm-wave linac-based FEL for the production of short wavelengths ({approximately}300 nm) to carry out FEL demonstration experiments. The electron source considered for the linac is a 30- GHz, 3 1/2-cell {pi}-mode photocathode rf gun. For cold model rf measurements a 15-GHz prototype structure was fabricated. Here we report on the design, numerical modelling and the initial cold-model rf measurement results on the 15-GHz prototype structure.

  17. Electron Linac design to drive bright Compton back-scattering gamma-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bacci, A.; Rossi, A. R.; Serafini, L.; Alesini, D.; Bellaveglia, M.; Boni, R.; Chiadroni, E.; Di Pirro, G.; Esposito, A.; Ferrario, M.; Gallo, A.; Gatti, G.; Ghigo, A.; Spataro, B.; Vaccarezza, C.; Antici, P.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Cianchi, A.; and others

    2013-05-21

    The technological development in the field of high brightness linear accelerators and high energy/high quality lasers enables today designing high brilliance Compton-X and Gamma-photon beams suitable for a wide range of applications in the innovative field of nuclear photonics. The challenging requirements of this kind of source comprise: tunable energy (1-20 MeV), very narrow bandwidth (0.3%), and high spectral density (10{sup 4} photons/s/eV). We present here a study focused on the design and the optimization of an electron Linac aimed to meet the source specifications of the European Extreme Light Infrastructure-Nuclear Physics project, currently funded and seeking for an innovative machine design in order to outperform state-of-the-art facilities. We show that the phase space density of the electron beam, at the collision point against the laser pulse, is the main quality factor characterizing the Linac.

  18. Results of LEBT/MEBT reconfiguration at BNL 200 MeV LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Raparia,D.; Alessi, J.; Briscoe, B.; Fite, J.; Gould, O.; Kponou, A.; Lo Destro, V.; Okamura, M.; Ritter, J.

    2009-05-04

    The low energy (35 keV) and medium energy (750 keV) transport lines for both polarized and unpolarized H{sup -} have been reconfigured to reduce the beam emittance and beam losses out of the 200 MeV Linac. The medium energy line in the original layout was 7 m long, and had ten quadrupoles, two beam choppers, and three bunchers. The bunchers were necessary to keep the beam bunched at the entrance of the Linac. About 35% beam loss occurred, and the emittance growth was several fold. In the new layout, the 750 keV line is only 0.7 m long, with three quads and one buncher. We will present the experimental result of the upgrade.

  19. Determination of the initial beam parameters in Monte Carlo linac simulation.

    PubMed

    Aljarrah, Khaled; Sharp, Greg C; Neicu, Toni; Jiang, Steve B

    2006-04-01

    For Monte Carlo linac simulations and patient dose calculations, it is important to accurately determine the phase space parameters of the initial electron beam incident on the target. These parameters, such as mean energy and radial intensity distribution, have traditionally been determined by matching the calculated dose distributions with the measured dose distributions through a trial and error process. This process is very time consuming and requires a lot of Monte Carlo simulation experience and computational resources. In this paper, we propose an easy, efficient, and accurate method for the determination of the initial beam parameters. We hypothesize that (1) for one type of linacs, the geometry and material of major components of the treatment head are the same; the only difference is the phase space parameters of the initial electron beam incident on the target, and (2) most linacs belong to a limited number of linac types. For each type of linacs, Monte Carlo treatment planning system (MC-TPS) vendors simulate the treatment head and calculate the three-dimensional (3D) dose distribution in water phantom for a grid of initial beam energies and radii. The simulation results (phase space files and dose distribution files) are then stored in a data library. When a MC-TPS user tries to model their linac which belongs to the same type, a standard set of measured dose data is submitted and compared with the calculated dose distributions to determine the optimal combination of initial beam energy and radius. We have applied this method to the 6 MV beam of a Varian 21EX linac. The linac was simulated using EGSNRC/BEAM code and the dose in water phantom was calculated using EGSNRC/DOSXYZ. We have also studied issues related to the proposed method. Several common cost functions were tested for comparing measured and calculated dose distributions, including chi2, mean absolute error, dose difference at the penumbra edge point, slope of the dose difference of the

  20. Commissioning of the Electron Line of the Linac Coherent Light Source. Dose Rate Measurements and Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Santana Leitner, M; Bauer, J.M.; Fasso, A.; Liu, J.C.; Mao, X.S.; Prinz, A.; Rokni, H.; Sanami, T.; Vollaire, J.; /SLAC

    2009-05-20

    The Linac Coherent Light Source at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (operated by Stanford University for the US Department of Energy) is the world's first hard X-ray Free Electron Laser machine. It uses high energy electrons delivered by a linac to create ultrafast and brilliant X-ray pulses that can be used as a 'high-speed' camera to obtain images of atoms and molecules. LCLS is a pioneer machine and, as such, its design has encountered unprecedented challenges, the solutions to which will benefit future facilities of its kind across the globe. This article describes the radiation protection aspects of LCLS electron beamlines. Special emphasis is put on the successful commissioning of the LCLS electron line, where, for all examined loss sources, the measured prompt and residual dose rates are in agreement with or below the values predicted through detailed Monte Carlo simulations, used earlier to design the shielding.

  1. LARGE-SCALE SIMULATION OF BEAM DYNAMICS IN HIGH INTENSITY ION LINACS USING PARALLEL SUPERCOMPUTERS

    SciTech Connect

    R. RYNE; J. QIANG

    2000-08-01

    In this paper we present results of using parallel supercomputers to simulate beam dynamics in next-generation high intensity ion linacs. Our approach uses a three-dimensional space charge calculation with six types of boundary conditions. The simulations use a hybrid approach involving transfer maps to treat externally applied fields (including rf cavities) and parallel particle-in-cell techniques to treat the space-charge fields. The large-scale simulation results presented here represent a three order of magnitude improvement in simulation capability, in terms of problem size and speed of execution, compared with typical two-dimensional serial simulations. Specific examples will be presented, including simulation of the spallation neutron source (SNS) linac and the Low Energy Demonstrator Accelerator (LEDA) beam halo experiment.

  2. Beam-based monitoring of the SLC linac optics with a diagnostic pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Assmann, R.W.; Decker, F.J.; Hendrickson, L.J.; Phinney, N.; Siemann, R.H.; Underwood, K.K.; Woodley, M.

    1997-07-01

    The beam optics in a linear accelerator may be changed significantly by variations in the energy and energy spread profile along the linac. In particular, diurnal temperature swings in the SLC klystron gallery perturb the phase and amplitude of the accelerating RF fields. If such changes are not correctly characterized, the resulting errors will cause phase advance differences in the beam optics. In addition RF phase errors also affect the amplitude growth of betatron oscillations. The authors present an automated, simple procedure to monitor the beam optics in the SLC linac routinely and non-invasively. The measured phase advance and oscillation amplitude is shown as a function of time and is compared to the nominal optics.

  3. Single pass electron beam cooling of gold ions between EBIS LINAC and booster is theoretically possible!

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch, A.

    2011-01-01

    Electron beam cooling is examined as an option to reduce momentum of gold ions exiting the EBIS LINAC before injection into the booster. Electron beam parameters are based on experimental data (obtained at BNL) of electron beams extracted from a plasma cathode. Many issues, regarding a low energy high current electron beam that is needed for electron beam cooling to reduce momentum of gold ions exiting the EBIS LINAC before injection into the booster, were examined. Computations and some experimental data indicate that none of these issues is a show stopper. Preliminary calculations indicate that single pass cooling is feasible; momentum spread can be reduced by more than an order of magnitude in about one meter. Hence, this option cooling deserves further more serious considerations.

  4. PIC Simulations in Low Energy Part of PIP-II Proton Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, Gennady

    2014-07-01

    The front end of PIP-II linac is composed of a 30 keV ion source, low energy beam transport line (LEBT), 2.1 MeV radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ), and medium energy beam transport line (MEBT). This configuration is currently being assembled at Fermilab to support a complete systems test. The front end represents the primary technical risk with PIP-II, and so this step will validate the concept and demonstrate that the hardware can meet the specified requirements. SC accelerating cavities right after MEBT require high quality and well defined beam after RFQ to avoid excessive particle losses. In this paper we will present recent progress of beam dynamic study, using CST PIC simulation code, to investigate partial neutralization effect in LEBT, halo and tail formation in RFQ, total emittance growth and beam losses along low energy part of the linac.

  5. High power test of an injector linac for heavy ion cancer therapy facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Liang; Hattori, Toshiyuki; Zhao, Huanyu; Kawasaki, Katsunori; Sun, Liangting; He, Yuan; Zhao, Hongwei

    2015-11-01

    A hybrid single cavity (HSC) linac, combined with radio frequency quadrupole and drift tube structure in a single interdigital-H cavity, operates with high rf power as a prototype injector for cancer therapy synchrotron. The HSC adopts a direct plasma injection scheme (DPIS) with a laser ion source. The input beam current of the HSC is designed to be 20 mA C6 + ions. According to simulations, the HSC can accelerate a 6-mA C6 + beam which meets the requirement of the particle number for cancer therapy (1 08 ˜9 ions/pulse ). The HSC injector with DPIS makes the existing multiturn injection system and stripping system unnecessary; what is more, it can also bring down the size of the beam pipe in existing synchrotron magnets, which can reduce the whole cost of the synchrotron. Details of the field measurements of the HSC linac and results of the high power test are reported in this paper.

  6. Electromagnetic modeling of beam position and phase monitors for SNS linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurennoy, Sergey S.

    2000-11-01

    Electromagnetic modeling of the beam position monitors (BPMs) for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac has been performed with MAFIA. The signal amplitudes and phases on the BPM electrodes are computed as functions of the beam transverse position using time-domain 3-D simulations with an ultra-relativistic beam. An analytical model is then applied to extrapolate the results to lower beam velocities. It is shown that while the signal phases on the individual electrodes for an off-axis beam can differ from those for a centered beam by a few degrees, the phase of the summed signal from all electrodes is insensitive to the beam transverse position inside the device. Based on the analysis results, an optimal BPM design with 4 one-end-shorted 60-degree electrodes has been chosen. It provides a very good linearity and sufficient signal power for both position and phase measurements, while satisfying the linac geometrical constrains and mechanical requirements.

  7. PILAC: A pion linac facility for 1-GeV pion physics at LAMPF

    SciTech Connect

    Thiessen, H.A.

    1991-01-01

    A design study or a Pion Linac (PILAC) at LAMPF is underway at Los Alamos. We present here a reference design for a system of pion sources, linac, and high-resolution beam line and spectrometer that will provide 10{sup 9} pions per second on target and 200-keV resolution for the ({pi}{sup +}, K{sup +}) reaction at 0.92 GeV. A general-purpose beam line that delivers both positive and negative pions in the energy range 0.4--1.1 GeV is included, thus opening up the possibility of a broad experimental program as is discussed in this report. A kicker-based beam sharing system allows delivery of beam to both beamlines simultaneously with independent sign and energy control. Because the pionlinac acts like an rf particle separator, all beams produced by PILAC will be free of electron (or positron) and proton contamination. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Recent studies of dispersion matched steering for the ILC bunch compressor and main linac

    SciTech Connect

    Lebrun, Paul L.G.; Michelotti, Leo P.; Ostiguy, Jean-Francois; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The Dispersion Matched Steering (DMS) method is studied in detail in the context of a curved main linac. In the absence of cavity tilts (rotations in the YZ plane), DMS provides a unique and stable solution with negligible emittance growth. If cavity tilts are about 300 {micro}rad, the algorithm is not very robust. The emittance growth through the entire linac for positrons is about 5 nm, if the system is strictly static and statistical averaging can be used to improve beam position measurements. This growth is mostly eliminated if the dispersion and its derivative at injection can be adjusted. If anticipated ground motion, beam and klystron jitter, beam position measurement resolution are introduced (i.e. dynamical case), the emittance preservation goal is currently not achieved by DMS alone. Mitigation strategies are outlined.

  9. Single particle imaging with soft x-rays at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Andrew V.; Andreasson, Jakob; Aquila, Andrew; Bajt, Saša; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Barthelmess, Miriam; Barty, Anton; Benner, W. Henry; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John D.; Bucksbaum, Phillip; Caleman, Carl; Coppola, Nicola; DePonte, Daniel P.; Ekeberg, Tomas; Epp, Sascha W.; Erk, Benjamin; Farquar, George R.; Fleckenstein, Holger; Foucar, Lutz; Frank, Matthias; Gumprecht, Lars; Hampton, Christina Y.; Hantke, Max; Hartmann, Andreas; Hartmann, Elisabeth; Hartmann, Robert; Hau-Riege, Stephan P.; Hauser, Günther; Holl, Peter; Hoemke, André; Jönsson, Olof; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Kimmel, Nils; Kiskinova, Maya; Krasniqi, Faton; Krzywinski, Jacek; Liang, Mengning; Loh, Ne-Te Duane; Lomb, Lukas; Maia, Filipe R. N. C.; Marchesini, Stefano; Messerschmidt, Marc; Nass, Karol; Odic, Duško; Pedersoli, Emanuele; Reich, Christian; Rolles, Daniel; Rudek, Benedikt; Rudenko, Artem; Schmidt, Carlo; Schultz, Joachim; Seibert, M. Marvin; Shoeman, Robert L.; Sierra, Raymond G.; Soltau, Heike; Starodub, Dmitri; Steinbrener, Jan; Stellato, Francesco; Strüder, Lothar; Svenda, Martin; Tobias, Herbert; Ullrich, Joachim; Weidenspointner, Georg; Westphal, Daniel; White, Thomas A.; Williams, Garth; Hajdu, Janos; Schlichting, Ilme; Bogan, Michael J.; Chapman, Henry N.

    2011-06-01

    Results of coherent diffractive imaging experiments performed with soft X-rays (1-2 keV) at the Linac Coherent Light Source are presented. Both organic and inorganic nano-sized objects were injected into the XFEL beam as an aerosol focused with an aerodynamic lens. The high intensity and femtosecond duration of X-ray pulses produced by the Linac Coherent Light Source allow structural information to be recorded by X-ray diffraction before the particle is destroyed. Images were formed by using iterative methods to phase single shot diffraction patterns. Strategies for improving the reconstruction methods have been developed. This technique opens up exciting opportunities for biological imaging, allowing structure determination without freezing, staining or crystallization.

  10. Low-Z linac targets for low-MV gold nanoparticle radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tsiamas, P.; Mishra, P.; Berbeco, R. I.; Marcus, K.; Zygmanski, P. E-mail: Erno-Sajo@uml.edu; Cifter, F.; Sajo, E. E-mail: Erno-Sajo@uml.edu

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To investigate the potential of low-Z/low-MV (low-Z) linac targets for gold nanoparticle radiotherapy (GNPT) and to determine the microscopic dose enhancement ratio (DER) due to GNP for the alternative beamlines. In addition, to evaluate the degradation of dose enhancement arising from the increased attenuation of x rays and larger skin dose in water for the low-MV beams compared to the standard linac. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were used to compute dose and DER for various flattening-filter-free beams (2.5, 4, 6.5 MV). Target materials were beryllium, diamond, and tungsten-copper high-Z target. Target thicknesses were selected based on 20%, 60%, 70%, and 80% of the continuous slowing down approximation electron ranges for a given target material and energy. Evaluation of the microscopic DER was carried out for 100 nm GNP including the degradation factors due to beam attenuation. Results: The greatest increase in DER compared to the standard 6.5 MV linac was for a 2.5 MV Be-target (factor of ∼2). Skin dose ranged from ∼10% (Be, 6.5 MV-80%) to ∼85% (Be, 2.5 MV-20%) depending on the target case. Attenuation of 2.5 MV beams at 22 cm was higher by ∼75% compared with the standard beam. Taking into account the attenuation at 22 cm depth, the effective dose enhancement was up to ∼60% above the DER of the high-Z target. For these cases the effective DER ranged between ∼1.6 and 6 compared with the standard linac. Conclusions: Low-Z (2.5 MV) GNPT is possible even after accounting for greater beam attenuation for deep-seated tumors (22 cm) and the increased skin dose. Further, it can lead to significant sparing of normal tissue while simultaneously escalating the dose in the tumor cells.

  11. Optimization of the beam extraction systems for the Linac4 H{sup −} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, D. A.; Lettry, J.; Scrivens, R.; Steyaert, D.; Midttun, Ø.; Valerio-Lizarraga, C. A.

    2015-04-08

    The development of the Linac 4 and its integration into CERN’s acceleration complex is part of the foreseen luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The goal is to inject a 160 MeV H{sup −} beam into the CERN PS Booster (PSB) in order to increase the beam brightness by a factor of 2 compared to the 50 MeV proton linac, Linac 2, that is currently in operation. The requirements for the ion source are a 45 keV H{sup −} beam of 80 mA intensity, 2 Hz repetition rate and 0.5 ms pulse length within a normalized rms-emittance of 0.25 mm· mrad. The previously installed beam extraction system has been designed for an H{sup −} ion beam intensity of 20 mA produced by an RF-volume source with an electron to H{sup −} ratio of up to 50. For the required intensity upgrades of the Linac4 ion source, a new beam extraction system is being produced and tested; it is optimized for a cesiated surface RF-source with a nominal beam current of 40 mA and an electron to H{sup −} ratio of 4. The simulations, based on the IBSIMU code, are presented. At the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a peak beam current of more than 100 mA was demonstrated with a magnetron H{sup −} source at an energy of 35 keV and a repetition rate of 2 Hz. A new extraction system is required to operate at an energy of 45 keV; simulation of a two stage extraction system dedicated to the magnetron is presented.

  12. Status of RF system for the JAERI energy-recovery linac FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawamura, Masaru; Nagai, Ryoji

    2006-02-01

    The two types of the RF sources are used for the JAERI ERL-FEL. One is an all-solid state amplifier and the other is an inductive output tube (IOT). There are advantages of little failure and wide bandwidth for the all-solid state amplifier, low cost and high efficiency for IOT. The property of low cost with the IOT is suitable for a large machine like an energy recovery linac (ERL).

  13. Solid-state pulse modulator using Marx generator for a medical linac electron-gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Heuijin; Hyeok Jeong, Dong; Lee, Manwoo; Lee, Mujin; Yi, Jungyu; Yang, Kwangmo; Ro, Sung Chae

    2016-04-01

    A medical linac is used for the cancer treatment and consists of an accelerating column, waveguide components, a magnetron, an electron-gun, a pulse modulator, and an irradiation system. The pulse modulator based on hydrogen thyratron-switched pulse-forming network is commonly used in linac. As the improvement of the high power semiconductors in switching speed, voltage rating, and current rating, an insulated gate bipolar transistor has become the more popular device used for pulsed power systems. We propose a solid-state pulse modulator to generator high voltage by multi-stacked storage-switch stages based on the Marx generator. The advantage of our modulator comes from the use of two semiconductors to control charging and discharging of the storage capacitor at each stage and it allows to generate the pulse with various amplitudes, widths, and shapes. In addition, a gate driver for two semiconductors is designed to reduce the control channels and to protect the circuits. It is developed for providing the pulsed power to a medical linac electron-gun that requires 25 kV and 1 A as the first application. In order to improve the power efficiency and achieve the compactness modulator, a capacitor charging power supply, a Marx pulse generator, and an electron-gun heater isolated transformer are constructed and integrated. This technology is also being developed to extend the high power pulsed system with > 1 MW and also other applications such as a plasma immersed ion implantation and a micro pulse electrostatic precipitator which especially require variable pulse shape and high repetition rate > 1 kHz. The paper describes the design features and the construction of this solid-state pulse modulator. Also shown are the performance results into the linac electron-gun.

  14. Review of a Spoke-Cavity Design Option for the RIA Driver Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Petr Ostroumov; Kenneth Shepard; Jean Delayen

    2005-05-16

    A design option for the 1.4 GV, multiple-charge-state driver linac required for the U. S. Rare Isotope Accelerator Project based on 345 MHz, 3-cell spoke-loaded cavities has been previously discussed [1]. This paper updates consideration of design options for the RIA driver, including recent results from numerically-modeling the multi-charge-state beam dynamics and also cold test results for prototype superconducting niobium 3-cell spoke-loaded cavities.

  15. Review of a spoke-cavity design option for the RIA driver linac.

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Shepard, K. W.; Delayen, J. R.; Physics; Thomas Jefferson National Accel. Facility

    2005-01-01

    A design option for the 1.4 GV, multiple-charge-state driver linac required for the U.S. Rare Isotope Accelerator Project based on 345 MHz, 3-cell spoke-loaded cavities has been previously discussed [1]. This paper updates consideration of design options for the RIA driver, including recent results from numerically-modeling the multi-charge-state beam dynamics and also cold test results for prototype superconducting niobium three-spoke-loaded cavities.

  16. Studies of a Linac Driver for a High Repetition Rate X-Ray FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Venturini, M.; Corlett, J.; Doolittle, L.; Filippetto, D.; Papadopoulos, C.; Penn, G.; Prosnitz, D.; Qiang, J.; Reinsch, M.; Ryne, R.; Sannibale, F.; Staples, J.; Wells, R.; Wurtele, J.; Zolotorev, M.; Zholents, A.

    2011-06-01

    We report on on-going studies of a superconducting CW linac driver intended to support a high repetition rate FEL operating in the soft x-rays spectrum. We present a pointdesign for a 1.8 GeV machine tuned for 300 pC bunches and delivering low-emittance, low-energy spread beams as needed for the SASE and seeded beamlines.

  17. Niobium quarter-wave cavity for the New Delhi booster linac

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, K.W.; Roy, A.; Potukuchi, P.N.

    1997-09-01

    This paper reports the completion of development of a 97 Mhz niobium coaxial quarter-wave cavity to be used in a booster linac for the New Delhi 16UD pellatron electrostatic accelerator. A prototype cavity, which incorporates a niobium-bellows tuning device, has been completed and operated at 4.2 K at accelerating gradients above 4 MV/m for extended periods of time.

  18. Volume Changes After Stereotactic LINAC Radiotherapy in Vestibular Schwannoma: Control Rate and Growth Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Langenberg, Rick van de; Dohmen, Amy J.C.; Bondt, Bert J. de; Nelemans, Patty J.; Baumert, Brigitta G.; Stokroos, Robert J.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the control rate of vestibular schwannomas (VS) after treatment with linear accelerator (LINAC)-based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or radiotherapy (SRT) by using a validated volumetric measuring tool. Volume-based studies on prognosis after LINAC-based SRS or SRT for VS are reported scarcely. In addition, growth patterns and risk factors predicting treatment failure were analyzed. Materials and Methods: Retrospectively, 37 VS patients treated with LINAC based SRS or SRT were analyzed. Baseline and follow-up magnetic resonance imaging scans were analyzed with volume measurements on contrast enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Absence of intervention after radiotherapy was defined as 'no additional intervention group, ' absence of radiological growth was defined as 'radiological control group. ' Significant growth was defined as a volume change of 19.7% or more, as calculated in a previous study. Results: The cumulative 4-year probability of no additional intervention was 96.4% {+-} 0.03; the 4-year radiological control probability was 85.4% {+-} 0.1). The median follow-up was 40 months. Overall, shrinkage was seen in 65%, stable VS in 22%, and growth in 13%. In 54% of all patients, transient swelling was observed. No prognostic factors were found regarding VS growth. Previous treatment and SRS were associated with transient swelling significantly. Conclusions: Good control rates are reported for LINAC based SRS or SRT in VS, in which the lower rate of radiological growth control is attributed to the use of the more sensitive volume measurements. Transient swelling after radiosurgery is a common phenomenon and should not be mistaken for treatment failure. Previous treatment and SRS were significantly associated with transient swelling.

  19. Biomedical user facility at the 400-MeV Linac at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, W.T.

    1993-12-01

    In this paper, general requirements are discussed on a biomedical user facility at the Fermilab`s 400-MeV Linac, which meets the needs of biology and biophysics experiments, and a conceptual design and typical operations requirements of the facility is presented. It is assumed that no human patient treatment will take place in this facility. If human patients were treated, much greater attention would have to be paid to safeguarding the patients.

  20. Upgrading the Data Acquisition and Control System of the LANSCE LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Baros, Dolores

    2011-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory LANL is in the process of upgrading the control system for the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) linear accelerator. The 38 year-old data acquisition and control equipment is being replaced with COTS hardware. An overview of the current system requirements and how the National Instruments cRIO system meets these requirements will be given, as well as an update on the installation and operation of a prototype system in the LANSCE LINAC.

  1. Emittance Reduction between EBIS LINAC and Booster by Electron Beam Cooling; Is Single Pass Cooling Possible?

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch,A.

    2008-04-01

    Electron beam cooling is examined as an option to reduce momentum of gold ions exiting the EBIS LINAC before injection into the booster. Electron beam parameters are based on experimental data (obtained at BNL) of electron beams extracted from a plasma cathode. Preliminary calculations indicate that single pass cooling is feasible; momentum spread can be reduced by more than an order of magnitude in less than one meter.

  2. Inverse planning in the age of digital LINACs: station parameter optimized radiation therapy (SPORT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Lei; Li, Ruijiang

    2014-03-01

    The last few years have seen a number of technical and clinical advances which give rise to a need for innovations in dose optimization and delivery strategies. Technically, a new generation of digital linac has become available which offers features such as programmable motion between station parameters and high dose-rate Flattening Filter Free (FFF) beams. Current inverse planning methods are designed for traditional machines and cannot accommodate these features of new generation linacs without compromising either dose conformality and/or delivery efficiency. Furthermore, SBRT is becoming increasingly important, which elevates the need for more efficient delivery, improved dose distribution. Here we will give an overview of our recent work in SPORT designed to harness the digital linacs and highlight the essential components of SPORT. We will summarize the pros and cons of traditional beamlet-based optimization (BBO) and direct aperture optimization (DAO) and introduce a new type of algorithm, compressed sensing (CS)-based inverse planning, that is capable of automatically removing the redundant segments during optimization and providing a plan with high deliverability in the presence of a large number of station control points (potentially non-coplanar, non-isocentric, and even multi-isocenters). We show that CS-approach takes the interplay between planning and delivery into account and allows us to balance the dose optimality and delivery efficiency in a controlled way and, providing a viable framework to address various unmet demands of the new generation linacs. A few specific implementation strategies of SPORT in the forms of fixed-gantry and rotational arc delivery are also presented.

  3. Emittance Preservation in the International Linear Collider Ring to Main Linac Transfer Line

    SciTech Connect

    Tenenbaum, P.; Latina, A.; Smith, J.C.; Kubo, K.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2007-06-27

    The very small vertical beam emittance in the International Linear Collider (ILC) can be degraded by dispersion, xy coupling, transverse wakefields, and time-varying transverse fields introduced by elements with misalignments, strength errors, xy rotation errors, or yz rotation errors in the Ring to Main Linac (RTML) transfer line. We present a plan for emittance preservation in this beamline which uses local, quasi-local, and global correction schemes. Results of simulations of the emittance preservation algorithm are also presented and discussed.

  4. A high gradient superconducting quadrupole for a low charge state ion linac

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.W.; Shepard, K.W.; Nolen, J.A.

    1995-07-01

    A superconducting quadrupole magnet has been designed for use as the focusing element in a low charge state linac proposed at Argonne. The expected field gradient is 350 T/m at an operating current of 53 A, and the bore diameter is 3 cm. The use of rare earth material holmium for pole tips provides about 10% more gradient then iron pole tips. The design and the status of construction of a prototype singlet magnet is described.

  5. CERN’s Linac4 H{sup −} sources: Status and operational results

    SciTech Connect

    Lettry, J. Aguglia, D.; Andersson, P.; Bertolo, S.; Butterworth, A.; Coutron, Y.; Dallocchio, A.; David, N.; Chaudet, E.; Fink, D.; Gil-Flores, J.; Garlasche, M.; Grudiev, A.; Guida, R.; Hansen, J.; Haase, M.; Jones, A.; Koszar, I.; Machado, C.; Mastrostefano, C.; and others

    2015-04-08

    Two volume sources equipped with DESY and CERN plasma generators and a low voltage electron dump were operated at 45 kV in the Linac4 tunnel and on a dedicated test stand. These volume sources delivered approximately 20 mA and ensured the commissioning of the Radio Frequency Quadrupole accelerator and of the first section of the Drift Tube Linac. CERN’s prototype of a cesiated surface source equipped with this electron dump was operated continuously from November 2013 to April 2014 on the ion source test stand and is being commissioned in the Linac4 tunnel. Before cesiation, the prototype conditioned in volume mode provided up to 30 mA H{sup −} beam. Short cesiations, of the order of 10 mg effectively reduced the intensity of co-extracted electrons down to 2 - 8 times the H{sup −} current; this cesiated surface operation mode delivered up to 60 mA H{sup −} beam. An H{sup −} beam of the order of 40 mA was sustained up to four weeks operation with 500 μs pulses at 1.2s spacing. A new extraction was designed to match these beam properties. A copy of BNL’s magnetron produced at CERN was tested at BNL and delivered at 40 kV H{sup −} beam exceeding Linac4’s nominal intensity of 80 mA. In this contribution, the performances, dynamic response to cesiation, stability and availability of these prototypes are described. The needed optimization of the emittance of H{sup −} beam above 40 mA is presented, which requires an evolution of the front end that encompasses implementation of a large ceramic insulator.

  6. Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) Bunch-Length Monitor using Coherent Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Juhao; Emma, P.; /SLAC

    2007-03-21

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a SASE x-ray Free-Electron Laser (FEL) based on the final kilometer of the Stanford Linear Accelerator. One of the most critical diagnostic devices is the bunch length monitor (BLM), which is to be installed right after each compressor utilizing coherent radiation from the last bending magnet. We describe the components and the optical layout of such a BLM. Based on the setup geometry, we discuss some issues about the coherent radiation signal.

  7. An improvement in IMRT QA results and beam matching in linacs using statistical process control.

    PubMed

    Gagneur, Justin D; Ezzell, Gary A

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to apply the principles of statistical process control (SPC) in the context of patient specific intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) QA to set clinic-specific action limits and evaluate the impact of changes to the multileaf collimator (MLC) calibrations on IMRT QA results. Ten months of IMRT QA data with 247 patient QAs collected on three beam-matched linacs were retrospectively analyzed with a focus on the gamma pass rate (GPR) and the average ratio between the measured and planned doses. Initial control charts and action limits were calculated. Based on this data, changes were made to the leaf gap parameter for the MLCs to improve the consistency between linacs. This leaf gap parameter is tested monthly using a MLC sweep test. A follow-up dataset with 424 unique QAs were used to evaluate the impact of the leaf gap parameter change. The initial data average GPR was 98.6% with an SPC action limit of 93.7%. The average ratio of doses was 1.003, with an upper action limit of 1.017 and a lower action limit of 0.989. The sweep test results for the linacs were -1.8%, 0%, and +1.2% from nominal. After the adjustment of the leaf gap parameter, all sweep test results were within 0.4% of nominal. Subsequently, the average GPR was 99.4% with an SPC action limit of 97.3%. The average ratio of doses was 0.997 with an upper action limit of 1.011 and a lower action limit of 0.981. Applying the principles of SPC to IMRT QA allowed small differences between closely matched linacs to be identified and reduced. Ongoing analysis will monitor the process and be used to refine the clinical action limits for IMRT QA. PMID:25207579

  8. The X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, A.; Curtis, R.; Flath, D.; Gray, A.; Sikorski, M.; Song, S.; Srinivasan, V.; Stefanescu, D.

    2013-03-01

    The X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument (XCS) at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a dedicated instrument using coherent x-ray scattering techniques to investigate dynamics in condensed matter systems. XCS can probe both slow and ultrafast dynamics on lengthscales of interest. It employs an extensive suite of X-ray instrumentation to tailor the LCLS X-ray beam properties to experimental requirements. Results demonstrating the full transverse coherence of the LCLS beam are presented.

  9. Intra-coil interactions in split gradient coils in a hybrid MRI-LINAC system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Fangfang; Freschi, Fabio; Sanchez Lopez, Hector; Repetto, Maurizio; Liu, Feng; Crozier, Stuart

    2016-04-01

    An MRI-LINAC system combines a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system with a medical linear accelerator (LINAC) to provide image-guided radiotherapy for targeting tumors in real-time. In an MRI-LINAC system, a set of split gradient coils is employed to produce orthogonal gradient fields for spatial signal encoding. Owing to this unconventional gradient configuration, eddy currents induced by switching gradient coils on and off may be of particular concern. It is expected that strong intra-coil interactions in the set will be present due to the constrained return paths, leading to potential degradation of the gradient field linearity and image distortion. In this study, a series of gradient coils with different track widths have been designed and analyzed to investigate the electromagnetic interactions between coils in a split gradient set. A driving current, with frequencies from 100 Hz to 10 kHz, was applied to study the inductive coupling effects with respect to conductor geometry and operating frequency. It was found that the eddy currents induced in the un-energized coils (hereby-referred to as passive coils) positively correlated with track width and frequency. The magnetic field induced by the eddy currents in the passive coils with wide tracks was several times larger than that induced by eddy currents in the cold shield of cryostat. The power loss in the passive coils increased with the track width. Therefore, intra-coil interactions should be included in the coil design and analysis process.

  10. X-ray Sources by Energy Recovered Linacs and Their Needed R&D

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, Stephen; Douglas, David; Dowell, David; Hernandez-Garcia, Carlos; Kayran, D; Krafft, Geoffrey; Legg, Robert; Moog, E; Obina, T; Rimmer, Robert; Yakimenko, V

    2011-05-01

    In this paper we review the current state of research on energy recovered linacs as drivers for future X-ray sources. For many types of user experiments, such sources may have substantial advantages compared to the workhorse sources of the present: high energy storage rings. Energy recovered linacs need to be improved beyond present experience in both energy and average current to support this application. To build an energy recovered linac based X-ray user facility presents many interesting challenges. We present summaries on the Research and Development (R&D) topics needed for full development of such a source, including the discussion at the Future Light Sources Workshop held in Gaithersburg, Maryland on September 15- 17, 2009. A rst iteration of an R&D plan is presented that is founded on the notion of building a set of succeedingly larger test accelerators exploring cathode physics, high average current injector physics, and beam recirculation and beam energy recovery at high average current. Our basic conclusion is that a reviewable design of such a source can be developed after an R&D period of ve to ten years.

  11. Solid state power amplifier as 805 MHz master source for the LANSCE coupled-cavity linac

    SciTech Connect

    Lyles, J.; Davis, J.

    1998-12-31

    From 100 to 800 MeV, the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) proton linac receives RF power from forty-four 1.25 MW klystrons at 805 Megahertz (MHz). A single master RF source provides a continuous high level phase reference signal which drives the klystrons along the 731 meter-long linac through a coaxial transmission line. A single point failure of this system can deenergize the entire coupled-cavity linac (CCL) RF plant. The authors replaced a physically large air-cooled tetrode amplifier with a compact water-cooled unit based on modular amplifier pallets developed at LANSCE. Each 600 Watt pallet utilizes eight push-pull bipolar power transistor pairs operated in class AB. Four of these can easily provide the 2000 watt reference carrier from the stable master RF source. A radial splitter and combiner parallels the modules. This amplifier has proven to be completely reliable after two years of operation without failure. A second unit was constructed and installed for redundancy, and the old tetrode system was removed in 1998. The compact packaging for cooling, DC power, impedance matching, RF interconnection, and power combining met the electrical and mechanical requirements. CRT display of individual collector currents and RF levels is made possible with built-in samplers and a VXI data acquisition unit.

  12. Updating the CSNS injector linac to 250 MeV with superconducting double-spoke cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-Hui; Fu, Shi-Nian

    2015-03-01

    In order to update the beam power from 100 kW to 500 kW in the China Spallation neutron source (CSNS) Phase II, one of the important measures is to replace the 80 m long beam transport line between the present 80 MeV linac injector and the rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) to another kind of acceleration structure. In this paper, we proposed a scheme based on 324 MHz double-spoke superconducting cavities. Unlike the superconducting elliptical cavity and normal conducting coupled cavity linac (CCL) structure, the double-spoke cavity belongs to the TE mode structure and has a smaller transverse dimension compared with that of the TH mode one. It can work at base frequency as the drift tube Linac (DTL) section, so that the cost and complexity of the RF system will be much decreased, and the behaviors of the beam dynamics are also improved significantly because of the low charge density and larger longitudinal acceptance. Furthermore, because of the relatively longer interactive length between the charged particle and the electromagnetic field per cell, it needs relatively less cell numbers and it has larger velocity acceptance compared with the double frequency TH structures. The superconducting section consists of 14 periods, each of which includes 3 superconducting cavities encapsulated in one cryomodule and a doublet in room temperate. The general considerations on cavity and beam dynamics design are discussed and the main results are presented. Supported by National Nature Sciences Foundation of China (11375122, 91126003) and China ADS Project

  13. Design of Coherent Femto-Second THz Radiation Source Using 60-MeV Electron Linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, H. S.; Lim, C. M.; Kang, T. H.; Choi, J.; Ko, I. S.

    2007-01-01

    A coherent femto-second THz radiation source using 60-MeV electron linac is under construction at PAL. The linac consists of an S-band photocathode RF-gun, two S-band accelerating structures (AC1 and AC2), two chicane bunch compressors (Chicane-1 and Chicane-2), and a 1-m long planar undulator. Chicane 1 will be located between AC1 and AC2, and Chicane-2 after AC2. Two kinds of radiation sources will be prepared: optical transition radiation (OTR) after Chicane-2, and undulator radiation at the end of linac. The PARMELA code simulation result shows that the beam with 0.2 nC charge can be compressed down to a few tens of femto-second by Chicane-2 for OTR and also by Chicane-1 for undulator radiation. Beam dynamics design was also done for higher charge of 0.5nC, and the bunch length is expected to be about one hundred femto-seconds.

  14. Femtosecond electron beam generation by S-band laser photocathode RF gun and linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesaka, M.; Kinoshita, K.; Watanabe, T.; Ueda, T.; Yoshii, K.; Harano, H.; Sugahara, J.; Nakajima, K.; Ogata, A.; Sakai, F.; Dewa, H.; Kando, M.; Kotaki, H.; Kondo, S.

    1999-07-01

    A laser photocathode RF electron gun was installed in the second linac of the S-hand twin linac system of Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory (NERL) of University of Tokyo in August in 1997. Since then, the behavior of the new gun has been tested and the characteristic parameters have been evaluated. At the exit of the gun, the energy is 3.5 MeV, the charge per bunch 1˜2 nC, the pulse width is 10 ps(FWHM), respectively, for 6 MW RF power supply from a klystron. The electron bunch is accelerated up to 17 MeV and horizontal and vertical normalized emittances of 3 π mm.mrad are achieved. Then, the bunch is compressed to be 440 fs(FWHM) with 0.35 nC by the chicane-type magnetic pulse compressor. The linac with the gun and a new femto- and picosecond laser system is planned to be installed for femtosecond pulseradiolysis for radiation chemistry in 1999.

  15. Design Features and Initial RF Performance of a Gradient Hardened 17 GHz TW Linac Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Haimson, J.; Mecklenburg, B.

    2009-01-22

    To avoid surface erosion damage and to assist in studying RF breakdown thresholds in 17 GHz TW linac structures, a gradient hardened structure has been fabricated with high temperature brazed and machined stainless steel surfaces located in the peak E-field region of the beam apertures and the peak H-field regions of the input coupler cavity. The microwave design parameters and physical dimensions of this 22 cavity, 120 degree phase advance structure were chosen to allow the high gradient performance to be compared against a similar design all-copper structure that has been tested in a dual ring, power recirculating amplifier system. The final design parameters of the gradient hardened structure are discussed; the influence of stainless steel RF losses on the power buildup of the resonant ring and on the structure gradient distribution are described; waveforms are shown of the unique ability of the power amplifier to rapidly quench RF breakdown discharges in the linac structure by automatically sensing and redirecting the RF source power to a matched load; and preliminary test results during high power RF processing of the gradient hardened linac structure are presented.

  16. Intra-coil interactions in split gradient coils in a hybrid MRI-LINAC system.

    PubMed

    Tang, Fangfang; Freschi, Fabio; Sanchez Lopez, Hector; Repetto, Maurizio; Liu, Feng; Crozier, Stuart

    2016-04-01

    An MRI-LINAC system combines a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system with a medical linear accelerator (LINAC) to provide image-guided radiotherapy for targeting tumors in real-time. In an MRI-LINAC system, a set of split gradient coils is employed to produce orthogonal gradient fields for spatial signal encoding. Owing to this unconventional gradient configuration, eddy currents induced by switching gradient coils on and off may be of particular concern. It is expected that strong intra-coil interactions in the set will be present due to the constrained return paths, leading to potential degradation of the gradient field linearity and image distortion. In this study, a series of gradient coils with different track widths have been designed and analyzed to investigate the electromagnetic interactions between coils in a split gradient set. A driving current, with frequencies from 100 Hz to 10 kHz, was applied to study the inductive coupling effects with respect to conductor geometry and operating frequency. It was found that the eddy currents induced in the un-energized coils (hereby-referred to as passive coils) positively correlated with track width and frequency. The magnetic field induced by the eddy currents in the passive coils with wide tracks was several times larger than that induced by eddy currents in the cold shield of cryostat. The power loss in the passive coils increased with the track width. Therefore, intra-coil interactions should be included in the coil design and analysis process. PMID:26852418

  17. Initial studies of Bremsstrahlung energy deposition in small-bore superconducting undulator structures in linac environments

    SciTech Connect

    Cremer, T.; Tatchyn, R.

    1995-12-31

    One of the more promising technologies for developing minimal-length insertion devices for linac-driven, single-pass Free Electron Lasers (FELs) operating in the x-ray range is based on the use of superconducting (SC) materials. In recent FEL simulations, for example, a bifilar helical SC device with a 2 cm period and 1.8 T field was found to require a 30 m saturation length for operation at 1.5{Angstrom} on a 15 GeV linac, more than 40% shorter than an alternative hybrid/permanent magnet (hybrid/PM) undulator. AT the same time, however, SC technology is known to present characteristic difficulties for insertion device design, both in engineering detail and in operation. Perhaps the most critical problem, as observed, e.g., by Madey and co-workers in their initial FEL experiments, was the frequent quenching induced by scattered electrons upstream of their (bifilar) device. Postulating that this quenching was precipitated by directly-scattered or bremsstrahlung-induced particle energy deposited into the SC material or into material contiguous with it, the importance of numerical and experimental characterizations of this phenomenon for linac-based, user-facility SC undulator design becomes evident. In this paper we discuss selected prior experimental results and report on initial EGS4 code studies of scattered and bremsstrahlung induced particle energy deposition into SC structures with geometries comparable to a small-bore bifilar helical undulator.

  18. New high power 200 MHz RF system for the LANSCE drift tube linac

    SciTech Connect

    Lyles, J.; Friedrichs, C.; Lynch, M.

    1998-12-31

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) linac provides an 800 MeV direct H{sup +} proton beam, and injects H{sup {minus}} to the upgraded proton storage ring for charge accumulation for the Short Pulse Spallation Source. Accelerating these interlaced beams requires high average power from the 201.25 MHz drift tube linac (DTL) RF system. Three power amplifiers have operated at up to three Megawatts with 12% duty factor. The total number of electron power tubes in the RF amplifiers and their modulators has been reduced from fifty-two to twenty-four. The plant continues to utilize the original design of a tetrode driving a super power triode. Further increases in the linac duty factor are limited, in part, by the maximum dissipation ratings of the triodes. A description of the system modifications proposed to overcome these limitations includes new power amplifiers using low-level RF modulation for tank field control. The first high power Diacrode{reg_sign} is being delivered and a new amplifier cavity is being designed. With only eight power tubes, the new system will deliver both peak power and high duty factor, with lower mains power and cooling requirements. The remaining components needed for the new RF system will be discussed.

  19. Proton Linac Front End for High Intensity Neutrino Source at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Wai-Ming; Apollinari, Giorgio; Madrak, Robyn; Moretti, Alfred; Ristori, Leonardo; Romanov, Gennady; Steimel, James; Webber, Robert; Wildman, David

    2008-04-01

    Fermilab has recently proposed the construction of an 8 GeV superconducting linac for the exploration of the high intensity frontier. The High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) R&D program was established to explore the feasibility of certain technical solutions proposed for the front end of a high intensity linac. The low energy (˜60 MeV) section operates at 325 MHz and comprises an RFQ, two re-buncher cavities, 16 room temperature (RT) and 29 superconducting cross-bar H-type resonators, and superconducting solenoid focusing elements. One of the distinguishing features of this linac is the use of one klystron to feed multiple radio frequency (RF) elements. As an example, the RFQ, the re-bunchers and the 16 RT cavities are powered by a single 2.5 MW pulsed klystron. To achieve individual control over the phase and the voltage amplitude, each of the RF elements is equipped with a high power vector modulator. The RF control system will be discussed. The first RT cavity is completed with a power coupler, two mechanical tuners, vacuum and cooling systems, and has been RF conditioned. Preliminary tests on resonance frequency stability control and tests results of the cavity resonance frequency response to cooling water temperature and tuner position will also be discussed.

  20. Study of effects of failure of beamline elements and their compensation in CW superconducting linac

    SciTech Connect

    Saini, A.; Ranjan, K.; Solyak, N.; Mishra, S.; Yakovlev, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Project-X is the proposed high intensity proton facility to be built at Fermilab, US. First stage of the Project-X consists of superconducting linac which will be operated in continuous wave (CW) mode to accelerate the beam from 2.5 MeV to 3 GeV. The operation at CW mode puts high tolerances on the beam line components, particularly on radiofrequency (RF) cavity. The failure of beam line elements at low energy is very critical as it results in mis-match of the beam with the following sections due to different beam parameters than designed parameter. It makes the beam unstable which causes emittance dilution, and ultimately results in beam losses. In worst case, it could affect the reliability of the machine and may lead to the shutdown of the Linac to replace the failed elements. Thus, it is important to study these effects and their compensation to get smooth beam propagation in linac. This paper describes the results of study performed for the failure of RF cavity & solenoid in SSR0 section.

  1. Neutron production from flattening filter free high energy medical linac: A Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najem, M. A.; Abolaban, F. A.; Podolyák, Z.; Spyrou, N. M.

    2015-11-01

    One of the problems arising from using a conventional linac at high energy (>8 MV) is the production of neutrons. One way to reduce neutron production is to remove the flattening filter (FF). The main purpose of this work was to study the effect of FF removal on neutron fluence and neutron dose equivalent inside the treatment room at different photon beam energies. Several simulations based on Monte Carlo techniques were carried out in order to calculate the neutron fluence at different locations in the treatment room from different linac energies with and without a FF. In addition, a step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiotherapy (SnS IMRT) for prostate cancer was modelled using the 15 MV photon beam with and without a FF on a water phantom to calculate the neutron dose received in a full treatment. The results obtained show a significant drop-off in neutrons fluence and dose equivalent when the FF was removed. For example, the neutron fluence was decreased by 54%, 76% and 75% for 10, 15 and 18 MV, respectively. This can decrease the neutron dose to the patient as well as reduce the shielding cost of the treatment room. The neutron dose equivalent of the SnS IMRT for prostate cancer was reduced significantly by 71.3% when the FF was removed. It can be concluded that the flattening filter removal from the head of the linac could reduce the risk of causing secondary cancers and the shielding cost of radiotherapy treatment rooms.

  2. Beam dynamics studies in the driver LINAC pre-Stripper section of the RIA facility.

    SciTech Connect

    Lessner, E. S.; Ostroumov, P. N.

    2003-07-10

    The RIA facility driver linac consists of about 400 superconducting (SC) independently phased rf cavities. The linac is designed to accelerate simultaneously several-charge-state beams to generate as much as 400 kW of uranium beam power. The linac beam dynamics is most sensitive to the focusing and accelerating-structure parameters of the prestripper section, where the uranium beam is accelerated from 0.17 keV/u to 9.4 MeV/u. This section is designed to accept and accelerate 2 charge states (28 and 29) of uranium beam from an ECR ion source. The prestripper section must be designed to minimize the beam emittance distortion of this two-charge-state beam. In particular, the inter-cryostat spaces must be minimized and beam parameters near transitions of the accelerating and focusing lattices must be matched carefully. Several sources of possible effective emittance growth are considered in the design of the prestripper section and a tolerance budget is established. Numerical beam dynamics studies include realistic electric and magnetic 3-dimensional field distributions in the SC rf cavities and SC solenoids. Error effects in the longitudinal beam parameters are studied.

  3. Investigation of the sag in linac secondary collimator and MLC carriage during arc deliveries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowshanfarzad, Pejman; Sabet, Mahsheed; O'Connor, Daryl J.; Greer, Peter B.

    2012-06-01

    In modern radiotherapy, it is vitally important to monitor the performance of all linac components including the collimation system. In this study, a simple measurement method and accurate algorithm are introduced for investigation of the secondary and tertiary collimator sag during radiotherapy arc treatments. The method is based on cine EPID images of a ball bearing marker fixed to the gantry head and determines the jaw and MLC sag in all directions relative to the reference at zero gantry angle. Analysis was performed using different field sizes and collimator angles, different linacs and different gantry rotation directions. The accuracy of the method was tested and was less than 0.02 mm. The repeatability and reproducibility of the method was 0.005 and 0.09 mm, respectively. The setup is easy and quick and the algorithm is fast and fully automatic with sub-pixel accuracy. This method is suitable to be included in the routine quality assurance of linacs to monitor the collimator system performance.

  4. Experimental investigation of heating phenomena in linac mechanical interfaces due to RF field penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Fazio, M.V.; Reid, D.W.; Potter, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    In a high duty-factor, high-current, drift-tube linear accelerator, a critical interface exists between the drift-tube stem and the tank wall. This interface must provide vacuum integrity and RF continuity, while simultaneously allowing alignment flexibility. Because of past difficulties with RF heating of vacuum bellows and RF joints encountered by others, a paucity of available information, and the high reliability requirement for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) accelerator, a program was initiated to study the problem. Because RF heating is the common failure mode, an attempt was made to find a correlation between the drift-tube-stem/linac-tank interface geometry and RF field penetration from the tank into the interface region. Experiments were performed at 80 MHz on an RF structure designed to simulate the conditions to which a drift-tube stem and vacuum bellows are exposed in a drift-tube linac. Additional testing was performed on a 367-MHz model of the FMIT prototype drift-tube linac. Experimental results, and a method to predict excessive RF heating, is presented. An experimentally tested solution to the problem is discussed.

  5. X-ray Sources by Energy Recovered Linacs and Their Needed R&D

    SciTech Connect

    Geoffrey Krafft, Stephen Benson, Michael Borland, David Douglas, David Dowell, Carlos Hernandez-Garcia, Dmitry Kayran, Robert Legg, Elizabeth Moog, Takashi Obina, Robert Rimmer, Vitaly Yakimenko

    2011-05-01

    In this paper we review the current state of research on energy recovered linacs as drivers for future X-ray sources. For many types of user experiments, such sources may have substantial advantages compared to the workhorse sources of the present: high energy storage rings. Energy recovered linacs need to be improved beyond present experience in both energy and average current to support this application. To build an energy recovered linac based X-ray user facility presents many interesting challenges. We present summaries on the Research and Development (R&D) topics needed for full development of such a source, including the discussion at the Future Light Sources Workshop held in Gaithersberg, Maryland on September 15-17, 2009. A first iteration of an R&D plan is presented that is founded on the notion of building a set of succeedingly larger test accelerators exploring cathode physics, high average current injector physics, and beam recirculation and beam energy recovery at high average current. Our basic conclusion is that a reviewable design of such a source can be developed after an R&D period of reasonably short duration.

  6. Study of the 100 fs 10 kA X-band linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeshita, A.; Uesaka, M.; Watanabe, Tomoyuki; Yamamoto, Masashi; Kaneko, Namio

    1999-01-01

    Design and numerical analysis of an X-band femtosecond electron linear accelerator (linac) is presented. We aim to generate a 100 fs (full width at half maxium: FWHM) electron single bunch with more than 1 nC at the X-band femtosecond linac. The simulation of electron dynamics including magnetic pulse compression is carried out by using PARMELA and SUPERFISH. It is found that the 700 ps (tail-to-tail) electron emission from a 150 kV thermionic gun can be bunched and compressed to 100 fs (FWHM) electron single bunch with the charge of 1 nC which gives 10 kA. We plan to use one high power X-band klystron which can supply 60 MW with more than 200 ns pulse duration. The flatness of plateau of the RF pulse should be 0.2% for stable ultrashort bunch generation. The influence of the klystron voltage fluctuation on the accelerating voltage is quantitatively evaluated and the vacuum design is also done. We have confirmed the feasibility of the linac from viewpoints of state-of the-art technologies.

  7. Design and Analysis of Vacuum Pumping Systems for SNS DTL and CCL Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, S; Tung, L; Kishiyama, K; Nederbragt, W; Bernardin,; Bustos, G; Gillis, R; Meyer, Sr, R

    2001-06-14

    The mechanical design of the vacuum pumping systems for SNS DTL (Drift Tube Linac) and CCL (Cavity Coupled Linac) linac systems is summarized. Both vacuum systems were modeled to select the optimal pump configuration. The pressure history in up to 182 sub-volumes was analyzed in detail. Included in the model are time-dependent outgassing rates and pressure-dependent pump speeds for a variety of gas species. With this information, we solved for the pressure history during roughing and with turbo and ion pumps. The number and size of each pump were optimized to achieve the desired pressure with minimal costs. In the optimized design, directly mounted ion pumps were provided for six DTL tanks. For four CCL modules (each in length of 12-15 m), ion pumps with manifolds were selected. With all metallic surface outgassing, seal leakage and expected gas loads from all diagnostic devices taken into account, the designed systems can provide operating drift-tube pressure below 1.8 x 10{sup -7} Torr and CCL beamline pressures below 9.2 x 10{sup -8} Torr even under abnormal conditions. Details of the design and the modeling results are presented.

  8. Note: Recent achievements at the 60-MeV Linac for sub-picosecond terahertz radiation at the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Yim, Changmook; Hong, Juho; Parc, Yongwoon; Ko, In Soo; Jung, Seonghoon; Park, Jaehun; Kang, Heung-Sik; Han, Daehun; Ryu, Jaehyun

    2011-10-15

    A femtosecond (fs) terahertz (THz) linac has been constructed to generate fs-THz radiation by using ultrashort electron beam at the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory. To generate an ultrashort electron beam with 60-MeV energy, a chicane bunch compressor has been adopted. Simulation studies have been conducted to design the linac. In this note, recent achievements at 60-MeV linac are presented.

  9. Optimizing LINAC-based stereotactic radiotherapy of uveal melanomas: 7 years' clinical experience

    SciTech Connect

    Dieckmann, Karin . E-mail: Karin.Dieckmann@akhwien.at; Georg, Dietmar; Bogner, Joachim; Zehetmayer, Martin; Petersch, Bernhard; Chorvat, Martin; Weitmann, Hajo; Poetter, Richard

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To report on the clinical outcome of LINAC-based stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) of uveal melanomas. Additionally, a new prototype (hardware and software) for automated eye monitoring and gated SRT using a noninvasive eye fixation technique is described. Patients and Methods: Between June 1997 and March 2004, 158 patients suffering from uveal melanoma were treated at a LINAC with 6 MV (5 x 14 Gy; 5 x 12 Gy prescribed to 80% isodose) photon beams. To guarantee identical patient setup during treatment planning (CT and MRI) and treatment delivery, patients were immobilized with a BrainLAB thermoplastic mask. Eye immobilization was achieved by instructing the patient to fixate on a light source integrated into the mask system. A mini-video camera was used to provide on-line information about the eye and pupil position, respectively. A new CT and magnetic resonance (MR) compatible prototype, based on head-and-neck fixation and the infrared tracking system ExacTrac, has been developed and evaluated since 2002. This system records maximum temporal and angular deviations during treatment and, based on tolerance limits, a feedback signal to the LINAC enables gated SRT. Results: After a median follow-up of 33.4 months (range, 3-85 months), local control was achieved in 98%. Fifteen patients (9.0%) developed metastases. Secondary enucleation was performed in 23 patients (13.8%). Long-term side effects were retinopathy (n = 70; 44%), cataract (n = 30; 23%), optic neuropathy (n = 65; 41%), and secondary neovascular glaucoma (n = 23; 13.8%). Typical situations when preset deviation criteria were exceeded were slow drifts (fatigue), large sudden eye movements (irritation), or eye closing (fatigue). In these cases, radiation was reliably interrupted by the gating system. In our clinical setup, the novel system for computer-controlled gated SRT of uveal melanoma was well tolerated by about 30 of the patients treated with this system so far. Conclusion: LINAC-based SRT of

  10. Compact Short-Pulsed Electron Linac Based Neutron Sources for Precise Nuclear Material Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesaka, M.; Tagi, K.; Matsuyama, D.; Fujiwara, T.; Dobashi, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Harada, H.

    2015-10-01

    An X-band (11.424GHz) electron linac as a neutron source for nuclear data study for the melted fuel debris analysis and nuclear security in Fukushima is under development. Originally we developed the linac for Compton scattering X-ray source. Quantitative material analysis and forensics for nuclear security will start several years later after the safe settlement of the accident is established. For the purpose, we should now accumulate more precise nuclear data of U, Pu, etc., especially in epithermal (0.1-10 eV) neutrons. Therefore, we have decided to modify and install the linac in the core space of the experimental nuclear reactor "Yayoi" which is now under the decommission procedure. Due to the compactness of the X-band linac, an electron gun, accelerating tube and other components can be installed in a small space in the core. First we plan to perform the time-of-flight (TOF) transmission measurement for study of total cross sections of the nuclei for 0.1-10 eV energy neutrons. Therefore, if we adopt a TOF line of less than 10m, the o-pulse length of generated neutrons should be shorter than 100 ns. Electronenergy, o-pulse length, power, and neutron yield are ~30 MeV, 100 ns - 1 micros, ~0.4 kW, and ~1011 n/s (~103 n/cm2/s at samples), respectively. Optimization of the design of a neutron target (Ta, W, 238U), TOF line and neutron detector (Ce:LiCAF) of high sensitivity and fast response is underway. We are upgrading the electron gun and a buncher to realize higher current and beam power with a reasonable beam size in order to avoid damage of the neutron target. Although the neutron flux is limited in case of the X-band electron linac based source, we take advantage of its short pulse aspect and availability for nuclear data measurement with a short TOF system. First, we form a tentative configuration in the current experimental room for Compton scattering in 2014. Then, after the decommissioning has been finished, we move it to the "Yayoi" room and perform

  11. A Compact X-Band Linac for an X-Ray FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Adolphsen, Chris; Huang, Zhirong; Bane, Karl L.F.; Li, Zenghai; Zhou, Feng; Wang, Faya; Nantista, Christopher D.; /SLAC

    2011-09-12

    With the growing demand for FEL light sources, cost issues are being reevaluated. To make the machines more compact, higher frequency room temperature linacs are being considered, specifically ones using C-band (5.7 GHz) rf technology, for which 40 MV/m gradients are achievable. In this paper, we show that an X-band (11.4 GHz) linac using the technology developed for NLC/GLC can provide an even lower cost solution. In particular, stable operation is possible at gradients of 100 MV/m for single bunch operation and 70 MV/m for multibunch operation. The concern, of course, is whether the stronger wakefields will lead to unacceptable emittance dilution. However, we show that the small emittances produced in a 250 MeV, low bunch charge, LCLS-like S-band injector and bunch compressor can be preserved in a multi-GeV X-band linac with reasonable alignment tolerances. The successful lasing and operation of the LCLS [1] has generated world-wide interest in X-ray FELs. The demand for access to such a light source by researchers eager to harness the capabilities of this new tool far exceeds the numbers that can be accommodated, spurring plans for additional facilities. Along with cost, spatial considerations become increasingly important for a hard X-ray machine driven by a multi-GeV linac. The consequent need for high acceleration gradient focuses attention on higher frequency normal conducting accelerator technology, rather than the superconducting technology of a soft X-ray facility like FLASH. C-band technology, such as used by Spring-8, is a popular option, capable of providing 40 MV/m. However, more than a decade of R&D toward an X-band linear collider, centered at SLAC and KEK, has demonstrated that this frequency option can extend the gradient reach to the 70-100 MV/m range. The following design and beam dynamics calculations show an X-band linac to be an attractive choice on which to base an X-ray FEL.

  12. FEM design and simulation of a short, 10 MV, S-band Linac with Monte Carlo dose simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Baillie, Devin; Aubin, J. St.; Steciw, S.; Fallone, B. G.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Current commercial 10 MV Linac waveguides are 1.5 m. The authors’ current 6 MV linear accelerator–magnetic resonance imager (Linac–MR) system fits in typical radiotherapy vaults. To allow 10 MV treatments with the Linac–MR and still fit within typical vaults, the authors design a 10 MV Linac with an accelerator waveguide of the same length (27.5 cm) as current 6 MV Linacs. Methods: The first design stage is to design a cavity such that a specific experimental measurement for breakdown is applicable to the cavity. This is accomplished through the use of finite element method (FEM) simulations to match published shunt impedance, Q factor, and ratio of peak to mean-axial electric field strength from an electric breakdown study. A full waveguide is then designed and tuned in FEM simulations based on this cavity design. Electron trajectories are computed through the resulting radio frequency fields, and the waveguide geometry is modified by shifting the first coupling cavity in order to optimize the electron beam properties until the energy spread and mean energy closely match values published for an emulated 10 MV Linac. Finally, Monte Carlo dose simulations are used to compare the resulting photon beam depth dose profile and penumbra with that produced by the emulated 10 MV Linac. Results: The shunt impedance, Q factor, and ratio of peak to mean-axial electric field strength are all matched to within 0.1%. A first coupling cavity shift of 1.45 mm produces an energy spectrum width of 0.347 MeV, very close to the published value for the emulated 10 MV of 0.315 MeV, and a mean energy of 10.53 MeV, nearly identical to the published 10.5 MeV for the emulated 10 MV Linac. The depth dose profile produced by their new Linac is within 1% of that produced by the emulated 10 MV spectrum for all depths greater than 1.5 cm. The penumbra produced is 11% narrower, as measured from 80% to 20% of the central axis dose. Conclusions: The authors have successfully

  13. Investigation of the mechanical performance of Siemens linacs components during arc: gantry, MLC, and electronic portal imaging device

    PubMed Central

    Rowshanfarzad, Pejman; Häring, Peter; Riis, Hans L; Zimmermann, Sune J; Ebert, Martin A

    2015-01-01

    Background In radiotherapy treatments, it is crucial to monitor the performance of linac components including gantry, collimation system, and electronic portal imaging device (EPID) during arc deliveries. In this study, a simple EPID-based measurement method is suggested in conjunction with an algorithm to investigate the stability of these systems at various gantry angles with the aim of evaluating machine-related errors in treatments. Methods The EPID sag, gantry sag, changes in source-to-detector distance (SDD), EPID and collimator skewness, EPID tilt, and the sag in leaf bank assembly due to linac rotation were separately investigated by acquisition of 37 EPID images of a simple phantom with five ball bearings at various gantry angles. A fast and robust software package was developed for automated analysis of image data. Three Siemens linacs were investigated. Results The average EPID sag was within 1 mm for all tested linacs. Two machines showed >1 mm gantry sag. Changes in the SDD values were within 7.5 mm. EPID skewness and tilt values were <1° in all machines. The maximum sag in leaf bank assembly was <1 mm. Conclusion The method and software developed in this study provide a simple tool for effective investigation of the behavior of Siemens linac components with gantry rotation. Such a comprehensive study has been performed for the first time on Siemens machines. PMID:26604840

  14. Performance of a cylindrical diode array for use in a 1.5 T MR-linac.

    PubMed

    Houweling, A C; de Vries, J H W; Wolthaus, J; Woodings, S; Kok, J G M; van Asselen, B; Smit, K; Bel, A; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W

    2016-02-01

    At the UMC Utrecht, a linear accelerator with integrated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been developed, the MR-linac. Patient-specific quality assurance (QA) of treatment plans for MRI-based image guided radiotherapy requires QA equipment compatible with this 1.5 T magnetic field. The purpose of this study was to examine the performance characteristics of the ArcCHECK-MR in a transverse 1.5 T magnetic field. To this end, the short-term reproducibility, dose linearity, dose rate dependence, field size dependence, dose per pulse dependence and inter-diode dose response variation of the ArcCHECK-MR diode array were evaluated on a conventional linac and on the MR-linac. The ArcCHECK-MR diode array performed well for all tests on both linacs, no significant differences in performance characteristics were observed. Differences in the maximum dose deviations between both linacs were less than 1.5%. Therefore, we conclude that the ArcCHECK-MR can be used in a transverse 1.5 T magnetic field. PMID:26767389

  15. Skin Dose in Longitudinal and Transverse Linac-MRIs using Monte-Carlo and realistic 3D MRI field models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyvanloo Shahrestanaky, Amirmohamad

    The integration of a clinical linear accelerator (linac) with a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system would provide real-time tumor tracking. The magnetic fields of linac-MR systems modify the path of contaminant electrons in photon beams, which alters patient skin dose. In this work, we used Monte Carlo calculations that incorporate realistic 3D magnetic field models of longitudinal and transverse linac-MR systems to accurately quantify the changes in skin dose. The results show that fringe fields of realistic 3D B-fields decay rapidly and have a very small magnitude at the linac’s head. As a result, for longitudinal linac-MR systems only a small increase in the entrance skin dose is predicted. For transverse linac-MR systems, changes to the entrance skin dose are small for most scenarios. On the exit side, however, a fairly large increase is observed for perpendicular beams due to the electron return effect, but significantly drops for large oblique angles of incidence.

  16. Performance of a cylindrical diode array for use in a 1.5 T MR-linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houweling, A. C.; de Vries, J. H. W.; Wolthaus, J.; Woodings, S.; Kok, J. G. M.; van Asselen, B.; Smit, K.; Bel, A.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.

    2016-02-01

    At the UMC Utrecht, a linear accelerator with integrated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been developed, the MR-linac. Patient-specific quality assurance (QA) of treatment plans for MRI-based image guided radiotherapy requires QA equipment compatible with this 1.5 T magnetic field. The purpose of this study was to examine the performance characteristics of the ArcCHECK-MR in a transverse 1.5 T magnetic field. To this end, the short-term reproducibility, dose linearity, dose rate dependence, field size dependence, dose per pulse dependence and inter-diode dose response variation of the ArcCHECK-MR diode array were evaluated on a conventional linac and on the MR-linac. The ArcCHECK-MR diode array performed well for all tests on both linacs, no significant differences in performance characteristics were observed. Differences in the maximum dose deviations between both linacs were less than 1.5%. Therefore, we conclude that the ArcCHECK-MR can be used in a transverse 1.5 T magnetic field.

  17. Conceptual design of the Project-X 1.3 GHz 3-8 GeV pulsed linac

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N.; Eidelman, Y.; Nagaitsev, S.; Ostiguy, J.-F.; Vostrikov, A.; Yakovlev, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Project-X, a multi-MW proton source, is under development at Fermilab. It enables a Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment via a new beam line pointed to DUSEL in Lead, South Dakota, and a broad suite of rare decay experiments. The initial acceleration is provided by a 3-GeV 1-mA CW superconducting linac. In a second stage, about 5% of the H{sup -} beam is accelerated up to 8 GeV in a 1.3 GHz SRF pulsed linac and injected into the Recycler/Main Injector complex. In order to mitigate problems with stripping foil heating during injection, higher current pulses are accelerated in the CW linac in conjunction with the 1 mA beam which is separated and further accelerated in the pulsed linac. The optimal current in the pulsed linac is discussed as well as the constraints that led to its selection. A conceptual design which covers optics and RF stability analysis is presented. Finally, the need for HOM damping is discussed.

  18. Measuring linac photon beam energy through EPID image analysis of physically wedged fields

    SciTech Connect

    Dawoud, S. M. Weston, S. J.; Bond, I.; Ward, G. C.; Rixham, P. A.; Mason, J.; Huckle, A.; Sykes, J. R.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have proven to be useful tools for measuring several parameters of interest in linac quality assurance (QA). However, a method for measuring linac photon beam energy using EPIDs has not previously been reported. In this report, such a method is devised and tested, based on fitting a second order polynomial to the profiles of physically wedged beams, where the metric of interest is the second order coefficientα. The relationship between α and the beam quality index [percentage depth dose at 10 cm depth (PDD{sub 10})] is examined to produce a suitable calibration curve between these two parameters. Methods: Measurements were taken in a water-tank for beams with a range of energies representative of the local QA tolerances about the nominal value 6 MV. In each case, the beam quality was found in terms of PDD{sub 10} for 100 × 100 mm{sup 2} square fields. EPID images of 200 × 200 mm{sup 2} wedged fields were then taken for each beam and the wedge profile was fitted in MATLAB 2010b (The MathWorks, Inc., Natick, MA). α was then plotted against PDD{sub 10} and fitted with a linear relation to produce the calibration curve. The uncertainty in α was evaluated by taking five repeat EPID images of the wedged field for a beam of 6 MV nominal energy. The consistency of measuring α was found by taking repeat measurements on a single linac over a three month period. The method was also tested at 10 MV by repeating the water-tank crosscalibration for a range of energies centered approximately about a 10 MV nominal value. Finally, the calibration curve from the test linac and that from a separate clinical machine were compared to test consistency of the method across machines in a matched fleet. Results: The relationship betweenα and PDD{sub 10} was found to be strongly linear (R{sup 2} = 0.979) while the uncertainty in α was found to be negligible compared to that associated with measuring PDD{sub 10} in the water-tank (

  19. Obtaining the Bunch Shape in a Linac from Beam Spectrum Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, Karl LF

    1999-04-14

    In linacs with high single-bunch charge, and tight tolerances for energy spread and emittance growth, controlling the short-range wakefield effects becomes extremely important. The effects of the wakefields, in turn, depend on the bunch length and also on the bunch shape. It was shown in the linac of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC), for example, that by shaping the bunch, the final rms energy spread could be greatly reduced, compared to for the standard Gaussian bunch shape[1]. Therefore, in machines with high single-bunch charge, a method of measuring bunch shape can be an important beam diagnostic. In a linac with low single-bunch charge, the longitudinal bunch shape can be obtained relatively easily from a single measurement of the beam's final energy spectrum, provided that the final to initial energy ratio is large. One merely shifts the average phase of the beam, so that it rides off-crest sufficiently to induce an energy variation that is monotonic with longitudinal position. Then, by knowing the initial and final energies, the rf wave number, and the average beam phase, one can directly map the spectrum into the bunch shape. In a linac with high single-bunch charge, however, due to the effect of the longitudinal wakefield, this method either does not work at all, or it requires such a large shift in beam phase as to become impractical. In earlier work[2],[3] it was shown that, even when wakefields are important, if one measures the final beam spectrum for two different (properly chosen) values of beam phase, then one can again obtain the bunch shape, and--as a by-product--also the form of the wakefield induced voltage; this method was then illustrated using data from the linac of the SLC. These SLC measurements, however, had been performed with the machine in a special configuration, where the current was low; in addition, the noise the data was low and the measured spectra were smooth distributions. Under normal SLC conditions, however, the currents

  20. Niobium cavity development for the high-energy linac of the rare isotope accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    D. Barni; C. Pagani; P. Pierini; C. Compton; T. Grimm; W. Hartung; H. Podlech; R. York; G. Ciovati; P. Kneisel

    2001-08-01

    The Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) is being designed to supply an intense beam of exotic isotopes for nuclear physics research [1]. Superconducting cavities are to be used to accelerate the CW beam of heavy ions to 400 MeV per nucleon, with a beam power of up to 400 kW. Because of the varying velocity of the ion beam along the linac, a number of different types of superconducting structures are needed. The RIA linac will accelerate heavy ions over the same velocity range as the proton linac for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). It was decided to use the 6-cell axisymmetric 805 MHz cavities and cryostats of SNS for the downstream portion of the RIA linac, thereby saving the non-recurring development and engineering costs. For additional cost saving, it was decided to extend the SNS multi-cell axisymmetric cavity design to lower velocity, {beta} = v/c = 0.4, using the same cryostats and RF systems. Axisymmetric cavities will thus constitute about three-quarters of RIA's total accelerating voltage, and most of that voltage will be provided by cavities already developed for SNS. The axisymmetric cavities will accelerate the RIA beam from {beta} = 0.4 to {beta} = 0.72. This velocity range can be efficiently covered with two different types of 6-cell cavities, one with a geometric {beta}, {beta}{sub g}, of 0.47, and the other with a {beta}{sub g} of 0.61. The {beta}{sub g} = 0.61 cavity will be of the existing SNS design; some {beta}{sub g} = 0.81 SNS cavities may also be desired at the end of the RIA linac for acceleration of light ions above 400 MeV per nucleon. Prototypes for both {beta}{sub g} = 0.61 and {beta}{sub g} = 0.81 have been fabricated and tested [2]. The {beta}{sub g} = 0.47 cavity is the focus of the present work. The reduction in {beta}{sub g} to 0.47 results in less favourable electromagnetic and mechanical properties, and opens up the possibility of multipacting, but several groups have already designed and prototyped cavities in this range. These

  1. Towards reference dosimetry for the MR-linac: magnetic field correction of the ionization chamber reading.

    PubMed

    Smit, K; van Asselen, B; Kok, J G M; Aalbers, A H L; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W

    2013-09-01

    In the UMC Utrecht a prototype MR-linac has been installed. The system consists of a 6 MV Elekta (Crawley, UK) linear accelerator and a 1.5 T Philips (Best, The Netherlands) Achieva MRI system. This paper investigates the feasibility to correct the ionization chamber reading for the magnetic field within the dosimetry calibration method described by Almond et al (1999 Med. Phys. 26 1847-70). Firstly, the feasibility of using an ionization chamber in an MR-linac was assessed by investigating possible influences of the magnetic field on NE2571 Farmer-type ionization chamber characteristics: linearity, repeatability, orientation in the magnetic field; and AAPM TG51 correction factor for voltage polarity and ion recombination. We found that these AAPM correction factors for the NE2571 chamber were not influenced by the magnetic field. Secondly, the influence of the permanent 1.5 T magnetic field on the NE2571 chamber reading was quantified. The reading is influenced by the magnetic field; therefore, a correction factor has been added. For the standardized setup used in this paper, the NE2571 chamber reading increases by 4.9% (± 0.2%) due to the transverse 1.5 T magnetic field. Dosimetry measurements in an MR-linac are feasible, if a setup-specific magnetic field correction factor (P1.5 T) for the charge reading is introduced. For the setup investigated in this paper, the P1.5 T has a value of 0.953.

  2. RF phase stability in the 100-MeV proton linac operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seol, Kyung-Tae

    2015-02-01

    The 100-MeV proton linac of the Korea multi-purpose accelerator complex (KOMAC) has been operated to provide a proton beam to users. The 100-MeV linac consists of a 3-MeV radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator (RFQ), four 20-MeV drift-tube linac (DTL) tanks, two medium-energy beam-transmitter (MEBT) tanks, and seven 100-MeV DTL tanks. The requirements of the field stability are within ±1% in RF amplitude and ±1 degree in RF phase. The RF phase stability is influenced by a RF reference line, RF transmission lines, and a RF control system. The RF reference signal is chosen to be a 300-MHz local oscillator (LO) signal, and a rigid copper coaxial line with temperature control was installed for an RF reference distribution. A phase stability of ±0.1 degrees was measured under a temperature change of ±0.1 °C. A digital feedback control system with a field-programmable gate-array (FPGA) module was adopted for a high RF stability. The RF phase was maintained within ±0.1 degrees with a dummy cavity and was within ±0.3 degrees at RFQ operation. In the case of the 20-MeV DTL tanks, one klystron drives 4 tanks, and the input phases of 4 tanks were designed to be in phase. The input phases of 4 tanks were fixed within ±1 degree by adjusting a phase shifter in each waveguide.

  3. Towards reference dosimetry for the MR-linac: magnetic field correction of the ionization chamber reading.

    PubMed

    Smit, K; van Asselen, B; Kok, J G M; Aalbers, A H L; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W

    2013-09-01

    In the UMC Utrecht a prototype MR-linac has been installed. The system consists of a 6 MV Elekta (Crawley, UK) linear accelerator and a 1.5 T Philips (Best, The Netherlands) Achieva MRI system. This paper investigates the feasibility to correct the ionization chamber reading for the magnetic field within the dosimetry calibration method described by Almond et al (1999 Med. Phys. 26 1847-70). Firstly, the feasibility of using an ionization chamber in an MR-linac was assessed by investigating possible influences of the magnetic field on NE2571 Farmer-type ionization chamber characteristics: linearity, repeatability, orientation in the magnetic field; and AAPM TG51 correction factor for voltage polarity and ion recombination. We found that these AAPM correction factors for the NE2571 chamber were not influenced by the magnetic field. Secondly, the influence of the permanent 1.5 T magnetic field on the NE2571 chamber reading was quantified. The reading is influenced by the magnetic field; therefore, a correction factor has been added. For the standardized setup used in this paper, the NE2571 chamber reading increases by 4.9% (± 0.2%) due to the transverse 1.5 T magnetic field. Dosimetry measurements in an MR-linac are feasible, if a setup-specific magnetic field correction factor (P1.5 T) for the charge reading is introduced. For the setup investigated in this paper, the P1.5 T has a value of 0.953. PMID:23938362

  4. LOW LOSS DESIGN OF THE LINAC AND ACCUMULATOR RING FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect

    RAPARIA,D.

    2003-02-03

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a second generation pulsed neutron source and is presently in the fourth year of a seven-year construction cycle at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A collaboration of six national laboratories (ANL, BNL, LANL, LBNL, ORNL, TJNAF) is responsible for the design and construction of the various subsystems. The operation of the facility will begin in 2006 and deliver a 1.0 GeV, 1.4 MW proton beam with pulse length of 650 nanosecond at a repetition rate of 60 Hz, on a liquid mercury target. It consists of an RF volume H{sup -} source of 50 mA peak current at 6% duty; an all electrostatic Low-Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) which also serves as a first stage beam chopper with {+-} 25 ns rise/fall time; a 402.5 MHz, 4-vane Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) for acceleration up to 2.5 MeV; a Medium Energy Beam Transport (MEBT) housing a second stage chopper (<{+-} 10ns rise/fall), an adjustable beam halo scraper, and diagnostics devices; a 6-tank Drift Tube Linac (DTL) with permanent magnet quadrupoles up to 87 MeV; an 805 MHz, 4-module, Side Coupled Cavity Linac (CCL) up to 186 MeV; an 805 MHz, superconducting RF (SRF) linac with eleven medium beta ({beta} = 0.61) cryo-modules and twelve high beta ({beta} = 0.81) cryo-modules accelerating the beam to the full energy; a High Energy Beam transport (HEBT) for diagnostics, transverse and longitudinal collimation, energy correction, painting and matching; an accumulator ring compressing the 1 GeV, 1 ms pulse to 650 ns for delivery onto the target through a Ring to Target Beam Transport (RTBT) with transverse collimators.

  5. Temperature control feedback loops for the linac upgrade side coupled cavities at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Crisp, J.

    1990-10-25

    The linac upgrade project at Fermilab will replace the last 4 drift-tube linac tanks with seven side coupled cavity strings. This will increase the beam energy from 200 to 400 MeV at injection into the Booster accelerator. The main objective of the temperature loop is to control the resonant frequency of the cavity strings. A cavity string will constant of 4 sections connected with bridge couplers driven with a 12 MW klystron at 805 MHz. Each section is a side coupled cavity chain consisting of 16 accelerating cells and 15 side coupling cells. For the linac upgrade, 7 full cavity strings will be used. A separate temperature control system is planned for each of the 28 accelerating sections, the two transition sections, and the debuncher section. The cavity strings will be tuned to resonance for full power beam loaded conditions. A separate frequency loop is planned that will sample the phase difference between a monitor placed in the end cell of each section and the rf drive. The frequency loop will control the set point for the temperature loop which will be able to maintain the resonant frequency through periods within beam or rf power. The frequency loop will need the intelligence required to determine under what conditions the phase error information is valid and the temperature set point should be adjusted. This paper will discuss some of the reason for temperature control, the implementation, and some of the problems encountered. An appendix contains some useful constants and descriptions of some of the sensor and control elements used. 13 figs.

  6. Radiation Safety Aspects of the Linac Coherent Light Source Project At SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Rokni, S.H.; Fasso, A.; Mao, S.; Vincke, H.; /SLAC /LCLS

    2005-07-06

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission based Free Electron Laser (FEL) that is being designed and built at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) by a multilaboratory collaboration. This facility will provide ultra-short pulses of coherent x-ray radiation with the fundamental harmonic energy tunable over the energy range of 0.82 to 8.2 keV. One-third of the existing SLAC LINAC will compress and accelerate the electron beam to energies ranging from 4.5 GeV to 14.35 GeV. The beam will then be transported through a 130-meter long undulator, emit FEL and spontaneous radiation. After passing through the undulator, the electron beam is bent to the main electron dump. The LCLS will have two experiment halls as well as x-ray optics and infrastructure necessary to make use of the FEL for research and development in a variety of scientific fields. The facility design will incorporate features that would make it possible to expand in future such that up to 6 independent undulators can be used. While some of the radiation protection issues for the LCLS are similar to those encountered at both high-energy electron linacs and synchrotron radiation facilities, LCLS poses new challenges as well. Some of these new issues include: the length of the facility and of the undulator, the experimental floor in line with the electron beam and the occupancy near zero degrees, and the very high instantaneous intensity of the FEL. The shielding design criteria, methodology, and results from Monte Carlo and analytical calculations are presented.

  7. Towards reference dosimetry for the MR-linac: magnetic field correction of the ionization chamber reading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smit, K.; van Asselen, B.; Kok, J. G. M.; Aalbers, A. H. L.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.

    2013-09-01

    In the UMC Utrecht a prototype MR-linac has been installed. The system consists of a 6 MV Elekta (Crawley, UK) linear accelerator and a 1.5 T Philips (Best, The Netherlands) Achieva MRI system. This paper investigates the feasibility to correct the ionization chamber reading for the magnetic field within the dosimetry calibration method described by Almond et al (1999 Med. Phys. 26 1847-70). Firstly, the feasibility of using an ionization chamber in an MR-linac was assessed by investigating possible influences of the magnetic field on NE2571 Farmer-type ionization chamber characteristics: linearity, repeatability, orientation in the magnetic field; and AAPM TG51 correction factor for voltage polarity and ion recombination. We found that these AAPM correction factors for the NE2571 chamber were not influenced by the magnetic field. Secondly, the influence of the permanent 1.5 T magnetic field on the NE2571 chamber reading was quantified. The reading is influenced by the magnetic field; therefore, a correction factor has been added. For the standardized setup used in this paper, the NE2571 chamber reading increases by 4.9% (± 0.2%) due to the transverse 1.5 T magnetic field. Dosimetry measurements in an MR-linac are feasible, if a setup-specific magnetic field correction factor (P1.5 T) for the charge reading is introduced. For the setup investigated in this paper, the P1.5 T has a value of 0.953.

  8. The UHV system of the 10 MeV RF electron linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, D.; Jayaprakash, D.; Mishra, R. L.; Nimje, V. T.; Mittal, K. C.

    2008-05-01

    A 10 MeV, 10 kW RF Electron Linac, for Industrial applications, is installed and commissioned at Electron Beam Centre (EBC), Kharghar, Navi Mumbai. The accelerator consists of the electron gun, RF Linac, Vacuum system, Beam diagnostics system, Magnetic sweep scanning system and Scan horn. The accelerator is divided into three sections with gate valves to isolate them, to enable servicing of pumps and modifications. The vacuum requirement in the accelerator is 10-7 mbar considering the breakdown parameters of the RF field within the linac. Total length of the accelerator from electron gun to the scan horn is about 5.0 meters. Vacuum plumb lines are of SS 304 pipes of nominal bores of 100 mm and 150 mm, machined internally to a surface finish of 0.8 μm. It encloses a volume of 156 litres. Total surface area exposed to vacuum is 57,500 cm2. It consists of 5250 cm2 of OFHC Copper, 51300 cm2 of SS 304 and 940 cm2 of ceramic sections. Leak-tightness of the order of 1 × 10-9mbar.l/s is ensured for the whole system, after eliminating the leaks at every stage of the assembly. Baking the plumb line and pumps at 150° C, for eight hours an ultimate vacuum of 2 × 10-7mbar is achieved in the accelerator. Modifications of the vacuum system is undertaken to suit the design changes in the gun and the diagnostic systems.

  9. X-ray optics design studies for the SLAC 1.5-15 Å Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatchyn, R.; Arthur, J.; Boyce, R.; Fasso, A.; Montgomery, J.; Vylet, V.; Walz, D.; Yotam, R.; Freund, A. K.; Howells, M.

    1999-06-01

    In recent years, a number of systematic studies have been carried out on the design and R&D aspects of X-ray free-electron laser (XRFEL) schemes based on driving highly compressed electron bunches from a multi-GeV linac through long (30 m - 100+ m) undulators. These sources, when operated in the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) mode, feature singularly high peak output power densities and frequently unprecedented combinations of phase-space and output-parameter values. This has led to correspondingly pivotal design challenges and opportunities for the optical materials, systems, components, and experimental configurations for transporting and utilizing this radiation. In this paper we summarize the design and R&D status of the X-ray optics section of the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), a 1.5 Angstrom SASE FEL driven by the last kilometer of the SLAC 3-kilometer S-band linac.

  10. Measurement of optical emission from the hydrogen plasma of the Linac4 ion source and the SPL plasma generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lettry, J.; Bertolo, S.; Castel, A.; Chaudet, E.; Ecarnot, J.-F.; Favre, G.; Fayet, F.; Geisser, J.-M.; Haase, M.; Habert, A.; Hansen, J.; Joffe, S.; Kronberger, M.; Lombard, D.; Marmillon, A.; Balula, J. Marques; Mathot, S.; Midttun, O.; Moyret, P.; Nisbet, D.; O'Neil, M.; Paoluzzi, M.; Prever-Loiri, L.; Arias, J. Sanchez; Schmitzer, C.; Steyaert, R. Scrivens D.; Vestergard, H.; Wilhelmsson, M.

    2011-09-01

    At CERN, a non caesiated H- ion volume source derived from the DESY ion source is being commissioned. For a proposed High Power Superconducting Proton Linac (HP-SPL), a non caesiated plasma generator was designed to operate at the two orders of magnitude larger duty factor required by the SPL. The commissioning of the plasma generator test stand and the plasma generator prototype are completed and briefly described. The 2 MHz RF generators (100 kW, 50 Hz repetition rate) was successfully commissioned; its frequency and power will be controlled by arbitrary function generators during the 1 ms plasma pulse. In order to characterize the plasma, RF-coupling, optical spectrometer, rest gas analyzer and Langmuir probe measurements will be used. Optical spectrometry allows direct comparison with the currently commissioned Linac4 H- ion source plasma. The first measurements of the optical emission of the Linac4 ion source and of the SPL plasma generator plasmas are presented.

  11. Beam energy spread in FERMI@elettra gun and linac induced by intrabeam scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Zholents, Alexander A; Zholents, Alexander A; Zolotorev, Max S.; Penco, Giuseppe

    2008-07-11

    Intrabeam scattering (IBS) of electrons in the pre-cathode area in the electron guns know in the literature as Boersh effect is responsible for a growth of the electron beam energy spread there. Albeit most visible within the electron gun where the electron beam density is large and the energy spread is small, the IBS acts all along the entire electron beam pass through the Linac. In this report we calculate the energy spread induced by IBS in the FERMI@elettra electron gun.

  12. SU-E-P-32: Adapting An MMLC to a Conventional Linac to Perform Stereotactic Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Emam, I; Hosini, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Micro-MLCs minimizes beam scalloping effects caused by conventional-MLCs and facilitates conformal dynamic treatment delivery. But their effect on dosimetric parameters require careful investigations. Physical and dosimetric parameters and Linac mechanical stability with mMLC (net weight 30 Kg) attached to the gantry are to be investigated. Moreover, output study along with recommended jaws offsets are studied. Adaptation of an mMLC to our 16-years old conventional Linac is investigated in this work Methods: BrainLab mMLC (m3) mounted in a detachable chassis to the Philips SL-15 Linac (30kg). Gantry and collimator spoke shots measurements are made using a calibrated film in a solid phantom and compared with pin-point measurements. Leaf penumbra, transmission, leakage between the leaves, percentage depth dose (PDD) are measured using IBA pin-point ion chamber at 6 and 10 MV. For output measurements (using brass build-up cap), jaws are modified continuously regarding to m3-fields while output factor are compared with fixed jaws situation, while the mMLC leaf configuration is modified for different m3-fields Results: Mean transmission through leaves is 1.9±0.1% and mean leakage between leaves is 2.8±0.15%. Between opposing leaves abutting along the central beam-axis mean transmission is 15±3%, but it is reduced to 4.5±0.6% by moving the abutment position 4.5cm off-axis. The penumbra was sharper for m3 -fields than jaws-fields (maximum difference is 1.51±0.2%). m3-fields PDD show ∼3% variation from those of jaws-fields. m3-fields output factors show large variations (<4%) from Jaws defined fields. Output for m3-rectangular fields show slight variation in case of leaf-end&leaf-side as well as X-jaw&Y-jaw exchange. Circular m3-fields output factors shows close agreement with their corresponding square jaws-defined fields using 2mm Jaws offsets, If jaws are retracted to m3 limits, differences become <5%. Conclusion: BrainLab m3 is successfully adapted to

  13. The X-ray correlation spectroscopy instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Caronna, Chiara; Chollet, Matthieu; Curtis, Robin; Damiani, Daniel S.; Defever, Jim; Feng, Yiping; Flath, Daniel L.; Glownia, James M.; Lee, Sooheyong; Lemke, Henrik T.; Nelson, Silke; Bong, Eric; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Srinivasan, Venkat; Stefanescu, Daniel; Zhu, Diling; Robert, Aymeric

    2015-03-03

    The X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument is dedicated to the study of dynamics in condensed matter systems using the unique coherence properties of free-electron lasers. It covers a photon energy range of 4–25 keV. The intrinsic temporal characteristics of the Linac Coherent Light Source, in particular the 120 Hz repetition rate, allow for the investigation of slow dynamics (milliseconds) by means of X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. Double-pulse schemes could probe dynamics on the picosecond timescale. In addition, a description of the instrument capabilities and recent achievements is presented.

  14. The Development of the Undulator Controls Module at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Alarcon, A.D.; /SLAC

    2009-12-11

    The Linac Coherent Light Source, LCLS, at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, SNAL, is the first hard x-ray Free Electron Laser. The Undulator Controls Module, UCM, controls five cams and two translation stages that regulate the position of each of the 33 permanent undulator magnet segments within 10 microns. The UCM package, hardware and software, was designed and built by the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne. Important lessons were learned throughout the collaborative design, installation, testing, and commissioning periods that could be invaluable to future similar controls projects.

  15. New linear accelerator (Linac) design based on C-band accelerating structures for SXFEL facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meng; Gu, Qiang

    2011-11-01

    A C-band accelerator structure is one promising technique for a compact XFEL facility. It is also attractive in beam dynamics in maintaining a high quality electron beam, which is an important factor in the performance of a free electron laser. In this paper, a comparison between traditional S-band and C-band accelerating structures is made based on the linac configuration of a Shanghai Soft X-ray Free Electron Laser (SXFEL) facility. Throughout the comprehensive simulation, we conclude that the C-band structure is much more competitive.

  16. Photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy using an S-band compact electron linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taira, Y.; Kuroda, R.; Tanaka, M.; Kumaki, M.; Oshima, N.; O'Rourke, B. E.; Suzuki, R.; Toyokawa, H.

    2014-02-01

    A new photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy approach has been developed using an S-band compact electron linac at the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST). The high energy (<42MeV), intense (105 photons pulse-1), and ultra-short pulse (3 ps pulse width) photon beam creates positrons throughout an entire sample via pair production. A positron lifetime spectrum can be obtained by measuring the time difference between the accelerator's RF frequency and the detection time of the annihilation gamma rays. The positron lifetimes for lead and yttria-stabilized zirconia samples have been successfully measured.

  17. The Atomic, Molecular and Optical Science instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Ken R.; Bucher, Maximilian; Bozek, John D.; Carron, Sebastian; Castagna, Jean-Charles; Coffee, Ryan; Curiel, G. Ivan; Holmes, Michael; Krzywinski, Jacek; Messerschmidt, Marc; Minitti, Michael; Mitra, Ankush; Moeller, Stefan; Noonan, Peter; Osipov, Timur; Schorb, Sebastian; Swiggers, Michele; Wallace, Alexander; Yin, Jing; Bostedt, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The Atomic, Molecular and Optical Science (AMO) instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) provides a tight soft X-ray focus into one of three experimental endstations. The flexible instrument design is optimized for studying a wide variety of phenomena requiring peak intensity. There is a suite of spectrometers and two photon area detectors available. An optional mirror-based split-and-delay unit can be used for X-ray pump–probe experiments. Recent scientific highlights illustrate the imaging, time-resolved spectroscopy and high-power density capabilities of the AMO instrument. PMID:25931058

  18. Status of the first batch of niobium resonator production for the New Delhi booster linac.

    SciTech Connect

    Potukuchi, P. N.

    1999-03-16

    This paper reports the status and details of the costs of construction of niobium superconducting resonant cavities for a linear accelerator, presently being built as a booster for the 15 UD tandem Pelletron accelerator at the Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi. The linear accelerator will have three cryostat modules, each holding eight quarter-wave resonators. Construction of a batch of ten resonators for the linac started at Argonne National Laboratory in May 1997. For production, all fabrication and all electron beam welding is being done through commercial vendors. Details of construction and present status of the project are presented.

  19. X-ray Optics and Diagnostics for the First Experiments on the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Wootton, A; Arthur, J; Barbee, T; Bionta, R; London, R; Park, H-S; Ryutov, D; Spiller, E; Tatchyn, R

    2001-06-13

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a 1.5 to 15 {angstrom}-wavelength free-electron laser (FEL), currently proposed for the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The photon output consists of high brightness, transversely coherent pulses with duration < 300 fs, together with a broad spontaneous spectrum with total power comparable to the coherent output. The output fluence, and pulse duration, pose special challenges for optical component and diagnostic designs. We discuss some of the proposed solutions, and give specific examples related to the planned initial experiments.

  20. Observation of transverse instabilities in the FNAL 200 MeV Linac

    SciTech Connect

    McCrory, E.; Lee, G.; Webber, R.C.

    1988-10-01

    Using newly installed Beam Position Monitors in the downstream half of the FNAL Linac, we have observed significant transverse beam instabilities within the 30 ..mu..s beam pulse. We can affect the instability so that the peak-to-peak amplitude is as small as 0.5 mm or as large as 8 mm. The effect is largely due to a beam-plasma instability in the ten-meter 750-keV transport line. Other causes are being investigated. Using these instabilities as an analysis tool, the betatron amplitude of the beam has been reduced. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Induction-linac based free-electron laser amplifiers for plasma heating

    SciTech Connect

    Jong, R.A.

    1988-08-22

    We describe an induction-linac based free-electron laser amplifier that is presently under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. It is designed to produce up to 2 MW of average power at a frequency of 250 GHz for plasma heating experiments in the Microwave Tokamak Experiment. In addition, we shall describe a FEL amplifier design for plasma heating of advanced tokamak fusion devices. This system is designed to produce average power levels of about 10 MW at frequencies ranging form 280 to 560 GHz. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  2. Neutron interrogation of shielded/unshielded uranium by a 4 MeV linac.

    PubMed

    Lakosi, L; Nguyen, C Tam; Serf, E

    2011-09-01

    A non-destructive active assay method was developed for revealing illicit trafficking of uranium. Photoneutrons produced in beryllium or heavy water by bremsstrahlung from a linac induced fission in the samples. Delayed fission neutrons were detected by a neutron collar built up of (3)He counters embedded in polyethylene moderator. High-enriched uranium samples shielded and unshielded by lead up to 14 mm thickness were detected, with a performance practically unaltered. 25 mg (235)U can be revealed in a 1 min interrogation time. PMID:21507663

  3. First results from the Cornell high Q cw full linac cryo- module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhorn, R.; Furuta, F.; He, Y.; Ge, M.; Hoffstaetter, G.; O'Connell, T.; Quigley, P.; Sabol, D.; Sears, J.; Smith, E.; Liepe, M.; Markham, S.; Bullock, B.; Elmore, B.; Kaufman, J.; Conway, J.; Veshcherevich, V.

    2015-12-01

    Cornell University has finished building a 10 m long superconducting accelerator module as a prototype of the main linac of a proposed ERL facility. This module houses 6 superconducting cavities- operated at 1.8 K in continuous wave (CW) mode - with individual HOM absorbers and one magnet/ BPM section. In pushing the limits, a high quality factor of the cavities (2•1010) and high beam currents (100 mA accelerated plus 100 mA decelerated) were targeted. The design of the cryomodule and the results of components tested before assembly will be presented in this paper.

  4. Potential and challenges of upgrading the Advanced Photon Source to an Energy Recovery Linac.

    SciTech Connect

    Borland, M.; Decker, G.; Nassiri, A.; Sun, Y.-e; White, M.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2007-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is a third generation synchrotron radiation source operating at 7 GeV that has been in operation for over 10 years. In that time, the emittance has been improved from 8 nm to the present value of 3.1 nm, which is close to the practical minimum. Recently, APS undertook an intensive exploration of potential upgrades, including options for a replacement storage ring or Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) injector. Our conclusion was that only the ERL would provide a dramatically new capability. This paper discusses the potential performance available from an ERL upgrade to the APS and reviews the challenges of delivering this performance.

  5. Design of an induction linac driven CARM (Cyclotron Auto Resonance Maser) oscillator at 250 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Caplan, M.; Kulke, B.

    1990-01-24

    We present the design of a 250 GHz, 400 MW Cyclotron Auto Resonance Maser (CARM) oscillator driven by a 1 KA, 2 MeV electron beam produced by the induction linac at the ARC facility of LLNL. The oscillator circuit is designed as a feedback amplifier operating in the TE{sub 11} mode at ten times cutoff terminated at each end with Bragg reflectors. Theory and cold test results are in good agreement for a manufactured Bragg reflector using 50 {mu}m corrugations to ensure mode purity. The CARM is to be operational by February 1990. 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Bunching in time at the ATLAS (Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System) accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo, R.

    1986-01-01

    The ability to manipulate the energy spread and time width of the beam from the ATLAS linac is an important feature used by the experimental program at Argonne. The time resolution which can be obtained on target has been shown to be less than 150 ps. for all beams through /sup 58/Ni. The fundamental ideas which apply to the bunching of heavy ion beams are described and the limitations and capabilities of the bunching system are discussed. A sequential guide for obtaining good timing on target is included.

  7. A 4 to 0.1 nm FEL Based on the SLAC Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrini, C.; /UCLA

    2012-06-05

    The author show that using existing electron gun technology and a high energy linac like the one at SLAC, it is possible to build a Free Electron Laser operating around the 4 nm water window. A modest improvement in the gun performance would further allow to extend the FEL to the 0.1 nm region. Such a system would produce radiation with a brightness many order of magnitude above that of any synchrotron radiation source, existing or under construction, with laser power in the multigawatt region and subpicosecond pulse length.

  8. A 250-GHz CARM (Cyclotron Auto Resonance Maser) oscillator experiment driven by an induction linac

    SciTech Connect

    Caplan, M.; Kulke, B.; Bubp, D.G. ); McDermott, D.; Luhmann, N. )

    1990-09-14

    A 250-GHz Cyclotron Auto Resonance Maser (CARM) oscillator has been designed and constructed and will be tested using a 1-kA, 2-MeV electron beam produced by the induction linac at the Accelerator Research Center (ARC) facility of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The oscillator circuit was made to operate in the TE{sub 11} mode at ten times cutoff using waveguide Bragg reflectors to create an external cavity Q of 8000. Theory predicts cavity fill times of less than 30 ns (pulse length) and efficiencies approaching 20% is sufficiently low transverse electron velocity spreads are maintained (2%).

  9. The X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Caronna, Chiara; Chollet, Matthieu; Curtis, Robin; Damiani, Daniel S.; Defever, Jim; Feng, Yiping; Flath, Daniel L.; Glownia, James M.; Lee, Sooheyong; Lemke, Henrik T.; Nelson, Silke; Bong, Eric; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Srinivasan, Venkat; Stefanescu, Daniel; Zhu, Diling; Robert, Aymeric

    2015-01-01

    The X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument is dedicated to the study of dynamics in condensed matter systems using the unique coherence properties of free-electron lasers. It covers a photon energy range of 4–25 keV. The intrinsic temporal characteristics of the Linac Coherent Light Source, in particular the 120 Hz repetition rate, allow for the investigation of slow dynamics (milli­seconds) by means of X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. Double-pulse schemes could probe dynamics on the picosecond timescale. A description of the instrument capabilities and recent achievements is presented. PMID:25931061

  10. The X-ray correlation spectroscopy instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE PAGES

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Caronna, Chiara; Chollet, Matthieu; Curtis, Robin; Damiani, Daniel S.; Defever, Jim; Feng, Yiping; Flath, Daniel L.; Glownia, James M.; Lee, Sooheyong; et al

    2015-03-03

    The X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument is dedicated to the study of dynamics in condensed matter systems using the unique coherence properties of free-electron lasers. It covers a photon energy range of 4–25 keV. The intrinsic temporal characteristics of the Linac Coherent Light Source, in particular the 120 Hz repetition rate, allow for the investigation of slow dynamics (milliseconds) by means of X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. Double-pulse schemes could probe dynamics on the picosecond timescale. In addition, a description of the instrument capabilities and recent achievements is presented.

  11. Transport of intense proton beams in an induction linac by solenoid lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namkung, W.; Choe, J. Y.; Uhm, H. S.

    1986-01-01

    In the proposed proton induction linac at NSWC, a 100 A and 3 μs proton beam is accelerated to 5 MeV through a series of accelerating gaps. This beam can be effectively focused by solenoid lenses in this low energy regime and can be transported by adjusting the focusing strength in each period. For the transport channel design to reduce the number of independently controlled lenses, a theory of matched beams in the space-charge dominated regime has been developed. This study can be applied to cost efficient designs of induction accelerators for heavy ion fusion and free electron lasers.

  12. High density harp for SSCL linac. [Suerconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL)

    SciTech Connect

    Fritsche, C.T.; Krogh, M.L. . Bendix Kansas City Div.); Crist, C.E. )

    1993-05-01

    AlliedSignal Inc., Kansas City Division, and the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) are collaboratively developing a high density harp for the SSCL linac. This harp is designed using hybrid microcircuit (HMC) technology to obtain a higher wire density than previously available. The developed harp contains one hundred twenty-eight 33-micron-diameter carbon wires on 0.38-mm centers. The harp features an onboard broken wire detection circuit. Carbon wire preparation and attachment processes were developed. High density surface mount connectors were located. The status of high density harp development will be presented along with planned future activities.

  13. Possible sources of pulse-to-pulse orbit variation in the SLAC linac

    SciTech Connect

    Assmann, R.; Zimmermann, F.

    1996-08-01

    Pulse-to-pulse variation of the transverse beam orbit, frequently referred to as jitter, has long been a major problem in SLC operation. It impairs the SLC luminosity both by reducing the average beam overlap at the IP and by hampering precision tuning of the final focus. The origin of the fast orbit variation is not fully understood. Measurements during the 1994/95 SLC run showed that it is random from pulse to pulse, increases strongly with current and grows steadily along the SLAC linac, with a typical final rms amplitude of about half the beam size. In this paper, they investigate possible sources of the vertical orbit jitter.

  14. Asymptotic analysis of the longitudinal instability of a heavy ion induction linac

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.P.; Smith, L.

    1990-09-01

    An Induction Linac accelerating high ion currents at sub-relativistic energies is predicted to exhibit unstable growth of current fluctuations at low frequencies. The instability is driven by the interaction between the beam and complex impedance of the induction modules. In general, the detailed form of the growing disturbance depends on the initial perturbation and ratio of pulse length to accelerator length, as well as the specific form of the impedance. An asymptotic analysis of the several regimes of interest is presented. 1 ref.

  15. Neutron interrogation of shielded/unshielded uranium by a 4 MeV linac.

    PubMed

    Lakosi, L; Nguyen, C Tam; Serf, E

    2011-09-01

    A non-destructive active assay method was developed for revealing illicit trafficking of uranium. Photoneutrons produced in beryllium or heavy water by bremsstrahlung from a linac induced fission in the samples. Delayed fission neutrons were detected by a neutron collar built up of (3)He counters embedded in polyethylene moderator. High-enriched uranium samples shielded and unshielded by lead up to 14 mm thickness were detected, with a performance practically unaltered. 25 mg (235)U can be revealed in a 1 min interrogation time.

  16. Special design problems and solutions for high powered continuous duty linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Liska, D.; Carlisle, L.; McCauley, G.; Ellis, S.; Ilg, T.; Smith, P.

    1993-06-01

    Several high powered linac designs are being considered for various purposes including radioactive waste treatment, tritium production, and neutron factories for materials studies. Since the fractional beam losses must be in the 10{sup {minus}}5 to 10{sup {minus}}6 range and are clearly subject to operational variables, the design engineers are forced to develop concepts which combine maintainability under radioactivity conditions, high availability, and very high reliability while dealing with the operating parameters resulting from CW operation. Several design solutions to selected problems are presented.

  17. Cryogenic Topics Associated with the Superconducting Linac Proposed for the Cosy-Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Eichhorn, R.; Esser, F.; Laatsch, B.; Lennartz, M.; Schug, G.; Stassen, R.

    2004-06-23

    An upgrade of the existing proton and deuteron accelerator facility COSY at the Forschungszentrum Juelich, based on a superconducting linac is under investigation. This paper will report on the cryogenic aspects of the project: The cryomodule layout will be shown and special emphasis will put on the short cold-warm transition, the heat transfer of which was calculated using finite element simulation techniques. The cavity tuner, based on fast piezo-electric actuators to adjust the resonators' frequency, will be shown as well as the adjustable power coupler that uses a cold siphon-shaped window to prevent surface contamination of the cavity during assembly and operation.

  18. The Atomic, Molecular and Optical Science instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE PAGES

    Ferguson, Ken R.; Bucher, Maximilian; Bozek, John D.; Carron, Sebastian; Castagna, Jean-Charles; Coffee, Ryan; Curiel, G. Ivan; Holmes, Michael; Krzywinski, Jacek; Messerschmidt, Marc; et al

    2015-05-01

    The Atomic, Molecular and Optical Science (AMO) instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) provides a tight soft X-ray focus into one of three experimental endstations. The flexible instrument design is optimized for studying a wide variety of phenomena requiring peak intensity. There is a suite of spectrometers and two photon area detectors available. An optional mirror-based split-and-delay unit can be used for X-ray pump–probe experiments. Recent scientific highlights illustrate the imaging, time-resolved spectroscopy and high-power density capabilities of the AMO instrument.

  19. A Non-Interfering Beam Radius Diagnostic Suitable For Induction Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Nexsen, W E

    2005-06-07

    High current electron induction linacs operate in a parameter regime that allows the use of a diamagnetic loop (DML) to measure the beam magnetic moment. Under certain easily met conditions the beam radius can be derived from the moment measurement. The DML has the advantage over the present methods of measuring beam radius in that it is an electrical measurement with good time resolution that does not interfere with the beam transport. I describe experiments on the LLNL accelerators, ETA-II and FXR that give confidence in the use of a DML as a beam diagnostic.

  20. A comprehensive study of the mechanical performance of gantry, EPID and the MLC assembly in Elekta linacs during gantry rotation

    PubMed Central

    Riis, H L; Zimmermann, S J; Ebert, M A

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In radiotherapy treatments, it is crucial to monitor the performance of linear accelerator (linac) components, including gantry, collimation system and electronic portal imaging device (EPID) during arc deliveries. In this study, a simple EPID-based measurement method is suggested in conjunction with an algorithm to investigate the stability of these systems at various gantry angles with the aim of evaluating machine-related errors in treatments. Methods: The EPID sag, gantry sag, changes in source-to-detector distance (SDD), EPID and collimator skewness, EPID tilt and the sag in leaf bank assembly owing to linac rotation were separately investigated by acquisition of 37 EPID images of a simple phantom with 5 ball bearings at various gantry angles. A fast and robust software package was developed for automated analysis of the image data. Nine Elekta AB (Stockholm, Sweden) linacs of different models and number of years in service were investigated. Results: The average EPID sag was within 2 mm for all tested linacs. Some machines showed >1-mm gantry sag. Changes in the SDD values were within 1.3 cm. EPID skewness and tilt values were <1° in all machines. The maximum sag in multileaf collimator leaf bank assemblies was around 1 mm. A meaningful correlation was found between the age of the linacs and their mechanical performance. Conclusions and Advances in knowledge: The method and software developed in this study provide a simple tool for effective investigation of the behaviour of Elekta linac components with gantry rotation. Such a comprehensive study has been performed for the first time on Elekta machines. PMID:25906294