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Sample records for line expressing herpes

  1. A System for Creating Stable Cell Lines that Express a Gene of Interest from a Bidirectional and Regulatable Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Christopher B.; Halford, William P.; Geltz, Joshua; Villamizar, Olga; Gross, Jeffrey; Embalabala, Alison; Gershburg, Edward; Wilber, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Expression systems used to study the biological function of a gene of interest can have limited utility due to three major factors: i) weak or heterogeneous gene expression; ii) poorly controlled gene expression; and iii) low efficiencies of stable integration and persistent expression. We envisioned that the ideal system should be tightly controlled and coupled with the ability to efficiently create and identify stable cell lines. Herein, we describe a system based upon a bidirectional Herpes simplex virus type 1 promoter that is naturally responsive to the VP16 transactivator and modified to permit tetracycline-regulated transcription on one side while maintaining constitutive activity on the other side. Incorporation of this element into the Sleeping Beauty transposon resulted in a novel bidirectional system with the capacity for high-efficiency stable integration. Using this system, we created stable cell lines in which expression of a gene of interest was tightly and uniformly controlled across a broad range of levels via a novel combination of doxycycline-sensitive de-repression and VP16-mediated sequence-specific induction. The unique characteristics of this system address major limitations of current methods and provide an excellent strategy to investigate the effects of gene dosing in mammalian models. PMID:25823013

  2. Reporter cell lines for the detection of herpes simplex viruses.

    PubMed

    Kung, Szu-Hao

    2005-01-01

    Virus culture has played significant roles in basic and clinical virology, with a number of advantages that cannot be attainable by modern molecular techniques. However, virus culture is generally a slower process, as it inevitably takes the period of a full replication cycle of a given virus. A genetically modified cell culture with a virus-inducible marker is described here, using a frequently isolated DNA virus (herpes simplex virus) as a model. The assay system relies on expression of the reporter gene driven by a specific viral promoter that is triggered early in the course of viral infection. The reporter gene employed was green fluorescent protein (GFP) or secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP), whose assays offer real-time detection or quantification, respectively. This cell-based assay is simple, rapid, sensitive, specific, and quantitative and serves as a phenotypic method for determination of antiviral susceptibilities.

  3. Expression of varicella-zoster virus and herpes simplex virus in normal human trigeminal ganglia

    SciTech Connect

    Vafai, A.; Wellish, M.; Devlin, M.; Gilden, D.H. ); Murray, R.S. Veterans Administration Medical Center, Denver, CO )

    1988-04-01

    Lysates of radiolabeled explants from four human trigeminal ganglia were immunoprecipitated with antibodies to varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and to herpes simplex virus. Both herpes simplex virus- and VZV-specific proteins were detected in lysates of all four ganglia. Absence of reactivity in ganglion explants with monoclonal antibodies suggested that herpes simplex virus and VZV were not reactivated during the culture period. In situ hybridization studies demonstrated the presence of RNA transcripts from the VZV immediate early gene 63. This approach to the detection of herpes simplex virus and VZV expression in human ganglia should facilitate analysis of viral RNA and proteins in human sensory ganglia.

  4. Lytic Promoters Express Protein during Herpes Simplex Virus Latency

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Tiffany A.; Tscharke, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) has provided the prototype for viral latency with previously well-defined acute or lytic and latent phases. More recently, the deep quiescence of HSV latency has been questioned with evidence that lytic genes can be transcribed in this state. However, to date the only evidence that these transcripts might be translated has come from immunological studies that show activated T cells persist in the nervous system during latency. Here we use a highly sensitive Cre-marking model to show that lytic and latent phases are less clearly defined in two significant ways. First, around half of the HSV spread leading to latently infected sites occurred beyond the initial acute infection and second, we show direct evidence that lytic promoters can drive protein expression during latency. PMID:27348812

  5. Expression of IFN-Inducible Genes with Antiviral Function OAS1 and MX1 in Health and under Conditions of Recurrent Herpes Simplex Infection.

    PubMed

    Karaulov, A V; Shulzhenko, A E; Karsonova, A V

    2017-07-01

    We studied the expression of IFN-inducible genes OAS1 and Mx1 in lysates of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients suffering from recurrent Herpes simplex infections in comparison with healthy people. To induce the expression of the studied genes, blood mononuclears were incubated with recombinant IFN-α2b in concentrations of 1, 10, and 100 U/ml for 3 h and then the content of the studied transcripts was evaluated. Relative expression of OAS1 and Mx1 in patients with recurrent forms of Herpes simplex both during the acute stage and clinical remission did not differ significantly from that in healthy people after stimulation with IFN-α2b in a concentration of 1 U/ml and in higher concentrations (10 and 100 U/ml). It was concluded that intracellular signal transduction in IFN-α-activated cells in vitro was not disturbed in patients with recurrent forms of Herpes simplex infection. Thus, the reported phenomenon of IFN-signalling distortion by Herpes simplex virus proteins observed in experiments on model cell lines infected with Herpes simplex virus was not confirmed in our experiments on peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with Herpes simplex infection.

  6. Vaccinia Virus Recombinant Expressing Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Glycoprotein D Prevents Latent Herpes in Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremer, Kenneth J.; Mackett, Michael; Wohlenberg, Charles; Notkins, Abner Louis; Moss, Bernard

    1985-05-01

    In humans, herpes simplex virus causes a primary infection and then often a latent ganglionic infection that persists for life. Because these latent infections can recur periodically, vaccines are needed that can protect against both primary and latent herpes simplex infections. Infectious vaccinia virus recombinants that contain the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein D gene under control of defined early or late vaccinia virus promoters were constructed. Tissue culture cells infected with these recombinant viruses synthesized a glycosylated protein that had the same mass (60,000 daltons) as the glycoprotein D produced by HSV-1. Immunization of mice with one of these recombinant viruses by intradermal, subcutaneous, or intraperitoneal routes resulted in the production of antibodies that neutralized HSV-1 and protected the mice against subsequent lethal challenge with HSV-1 or HSV-2. Immunization with the recombinant virus also protected the majority of the mice against the development of a latent HSV-1 infection of the trigeminal ganglia. This is the first demonstration that a genetically engineered vaccine can prevent the development of latency.

  7. Tetracycline-regulated gene expression in replication-incompetent herpes simplex virus vectors.

    PubMed

    Schmeisser, Falko; Donohue, Megan; Weir, Jerry P

    2002-12-10

    Although herpes simplex virus (HSV) vectors appear to have great potential as gene delivery vectors both in vitro and in vivo, the expression of foreign genes in such vectors cannot be easily regulated. Of the known eukaryotic regulatory systems, the tetracycline-inducible gene expression system is perhaps the most widely used because of its induction characteristics and because of the well-known pharmacological properties of tetracycline (Tet) and analogs such as doxycycline. Here, we describe the adaptation of the Tet-inducible system for use in replication-incompetent HSV vectors. HSV vectors were constructed that contained several types of Tet-inducible promoters for foreign gene expression. These promoters contained a tetracycline response element (TRE) linked to either a minimal cytomegalovirus (CMV) immediate-early promoter, a minimal HSV ICP0 promoter, or a truncated HSV ICP0 promoter containing one copy of the HSV TAATGARAT cis-acting immediate-early regulatory element (where R represents a prime base). All three promoter constructs were regulated appropriately by doxycycline, as shown by the expression of the marker gene lacZ in cell lines engineered to express Tet transactivators. The ICP0 promoter constructs expressed the highest and most sustained levels of lacZ, but the CMV promoter construct had the highest relative level of induction, suggesting their use in different applications. To extend the utility of Tet-regulated HSV vectors, vectors were constructed that coexpressed an inducible Tet transactivator in addition to the inducible lacZ marker gene. This modification resulted in tetracycline-inducible gene expression that was not restricted to specific cell lines, and this vector was capable of inducible expression in irreversibly differentiated NT2 cells (NT-neurons) for several days. Finally, HSV vectors were constructed that expressed modified Tet transactivators, resulting in improved induction properties and indicating the flexibility of the

  8. Angiogenesis inhibition using an oncolytic herpes simplex virus expressing endostatin in a murine lung cancer model.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Jonathan M; Schmitt, Anthony D; McGinn, Christopher M; Fuchs, Bryan C; Kuruppu, Darshini; Tanabe, Kenneth K; Lanuti, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Herpes-mediated viral oncolysis alone is not sufficient to completely eradicate tumors. In this study we used a replication conditional, endostatin-expressing herpes simplex virus-1 mutant (HSV-Endo) in a murine lung cancer model. We hypothesized that the anti-angiogenic action of endostatin would improve upon the oncolytic effect of HSV-1. HSV-Endo was evaluated in a pulmonary metastases and orthotopic flank model, where there was significantly less tumor burden and reduced microvessel density compared to a control virus. Endostatin expression appears to improve the anti-tumor effect of HSV-1 in a lung cancer model.

  9. IL-12 Expressing oncolytic herpes simplex virus promotes anti-tumor activity and immunologic control of metastatic ovarian cancer in mice.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Eric D; Meza-Perez, Selene; Bevis, Kerri S; Randall, Troy D; Gillespie, G Yancey; Langford, Catherine; Alvarez, Ronald D

    2016-10-27

    Despite advances in surgical aggressiveness and conventional chemotherapy, ovarian cancer remains the most lethal cause of gynecologic cancer mortality; consequently there is a need for new therapeutic agents and innovative treatment paradigms for the treatment of ovarian cancer. Several studies have demonstrated that ovarian cancer is an immunogenic disease and immunotherapy represents a promising and novel approach that has not been completely evaluated in ovarian cancer. Our objective was to evaluate the anti-tumor activity of an oncolytic herpes simplex virus "armed" with murine interleukin-12 and its ability to elicit tumor-specific immune responses. We evaluated the ability of interleukin-12-expressing and control oncolytic herpes simplex virus to kill murine and human ovarian cancer cell lines in vitro. We also administered interleukin-12-expressing oncolytic herpes simplex virus to the peritoneal cavity of mice that had developed spontaneous, metastatic ovarian cancer and determined overall survival and tumor burden at 95 days. We used flow cytometry to quantify the tumor antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell response in the omentum and peritoneal cavity. All ovarian cancer cell lines demonstrated susceptibility to oncolytic herpes simplex virus in vitro. Compared to controls, mice treated with interleukin-12-expressing oncolytic herpes simplex virus demonstrated a more robust tumor antigen-specific CD8(+) T-cell immune response in the omentum (471.6 cells vs 33.1 cells; p = 0.02) and peritoneal cavity (962.3 cells vs 179.5 cells; p = 0.05). Compared to controls, mice treated with interleukin-12-expressing oncolytic herpes simplex virus were more likely to control ovarian cancer metastases (81.2 % vs 18.2 %; p = 0.008) and had a significantly longer overall survival (p = 0.02). Finally, five of 6 mice treated with interleukin-12-expressing oHSV had no evidence of metastatic tumor when euthanized at 6 months, compared to two of 4 mice treated

  10. Herpes - oral

    MedlinePlus

    Cold sore; Fever blister; Oral herpes simplex; Herpes labialis; Herpes simplex ... Oral herpes is a common infection of the mouth area. It is caused by ... genital herpes . However, sometimes HSV-2 is spread to the ...

  11. Structure and expression of the herpes simplex virus type 2 glycoprotein gB gene.

    PubMed Central

    Stuve, L L; Brown-Shimer, S; Pachl, C; Najarian, R; Dina, D; Burke, R L

    1987-01-01

    The gene for glycoprotein gB2 of herpes simplex virus type 2 strain 333 was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in mammalian cells. The gB2 protein had an overall nucleotide and amino acid sequence homology of 86% with the cognate gB1 protein. However, of the 125 amino acid substitutions or deletions, only 12.5% were conservative replacements. These differences were clustered within an NH2-terminal region, a central region, and a COOH-terminal region, resulting in domains of near identity broken by small regions of marked divergence. Regions of greatest homology included a 90-amino-acid stretch starting at residue 484 and 39 amino acids spanning residues 835 to 873, which cover a rate-of-entry locus mapped to Ala-552 and a syn locus mapped to Arg-857, respectively, in gB1 by Bzik et al. (D. J. Bzik, B. A. Fox, N. A. DeLuca, and S. Person, Virology 133:301-314, 1984). Pellett et al. (P. E. Pellett, K. G. Kousoulas, L. Pereira, and B. Roizman, J. Virol. 53:243-253, 1985) mapped the mutations in three monoclonal antibody-resistant gB1 mutants between amino acids 273 and 443. These epitopes are included in a region of 98 residues identical between gB1 and gB2. The identity of this protein was verified by placing a truncated gene lacking the 303 carboxyl-terminal amino acids of gB2 into mammalian COS and CHO cells. Expression was demonstrated by immunofluorescence and radioimmunoprecipitation. This protein will be purified from the stable CHO cell lines and compared with gB1 for immunogenicity and protective efficacy in animal challenge models. Images PMID:3027364

  12. Use of Adeno-Associated and Herpes Simplex Viral Vectors for In Vivo Neuronal Expression in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Penrod, Rachel D.; Wells, Audrey M.; Carlezon, William A.; Cowan, Christopher W.

    2015-01-01

    Adeno-associated viruses and the herpes simplex virus are the two most widely used vectors for the in vivo expression of exogenous genes. Advances in the development of these vectors have enabled remarkable temporal and spatial control of gene expression. This unit provides methods for storing, delivering, and verifying expression of adeno-associated and herpes simplex viruses in the adult mouse brain. It also describes important considerations for experiments using in vivo expression of these viral vectors, including serotype and promoter selection, as well as timing of expression. Additional protocols are provided that describe methods for preliminary experiments to determine the appropriate conditions for in vivo delivery. PMID:26426386

  13. Oncolytic herpes simplex virus expressing yeast cytosine deaminase: relationship between viral replication, transgene expression, prodrug bioactivation.

    PubMed

    Yamada, S; Kuroda, T; Fuchs, B C; He, X; Supko, J G; Schmitt, A; McGinn, C M; Lanuti, M; Tanabe, K K

    2012-03-01

    Yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD) is a well-characterized prodrug/enzyme system that converts 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and has been combined with oncolytic viruses. However, in vivo studies of the interactions between 5-FC bioactivation and viral replication have not been previously reported, nor have the kinetics of transgene expression and the pharmacokinetics of 5-FC and 5-FU. We constructed a replication-conditional Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) expressing yCD and examined cytotoxicity when 5-FC was initiated at different times after viral infection, and observed that earlier 5-FC administration led to greater cytotoxicity than later 5-FC administration in vitro and in vivo. In animal models, 12 days of 5-FC administration was superior to 6 days, but dosing beyond 12 days did not further enhance efficacy. Consistent with the dosing-schedule results, both viral genomic DNA copy number and viral titers were observed to peak on Day 3 after viral injection and gradually decrease thereafter. The virus is replication-conditional and was detected in tumors for as long as 2 weeks after viral injection. The maximum relative extent of yCD conversion of 5-FC to 5-FU in tumors was observed on Day 6 after viral injection and it decreased progressively thereafter. The observation that 5-FU generation within tumors did not lead to appreciable levels of systemic 5-FU (<10 ng ml⁻¹) is important and has not been previously reported. The approaches used in these studies of the relationship between the viral replication kinetics, transgene expression, prodrug administration and anti-tumor efficacy are useful in the design of clinical trials of armed, oncolytic viruses.

  14. Expression of cloned herpesvirus genes. I. Detection of nuclear antigens from herpes simplex virus type 2 inverted repeat regions in transfected mouse cells.

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, M H; Reyes, G R; Ciufo, D M; Buchan, A; Macnab, J C; Hayward, G S

    1982-01-01

    Three different recombinant plasmids containing the entire 15-kilobase L and S inverted repeat sequence of herpes simplex virus type 2 DNA have been introduced into cultured Ltk- or BSC cells by both the calcium and DEAE-dextran transfection procedures. In each case, after 24 h approximately 1% of the cells gave strongly positive nuclear staining when assayed by immunofluorescence with hyperimmune antisera made against early and immediate-early infected-cell polypeptides. The nuclear fluorescence pattern and intensity mimicked that observed within 2 to 3 h after infection of Ltk- cells with either herpes simplex virus type 1 or type 2 wild-type virus. Herpes simplex virus type 1 (KOStsB2)-infected Ltk- cells under nonpermissive conditions did not express these antigens in the nucleus. Therefore, we conclude that either one or both of the 185,000- and 110,000-molecular-weight immediate early proteins, or some other as yet unknown gene product encoded entirely within the inverted repeats, can be transiently expressed in large amounts in transfected cells in the absence of other viral genes or accompanying virion components. Permanent mouse cell lines derived from transfection with these plasmids by using the thymidine kinase coselection procedure did not express sufficient nuclear antigen to be detectable by immunofluorescence. Images PMID:6292452

  15. Activation of human papillomavirus type 18 gene expression by herpes simplex virus type 1 viral transactivators and a phorbol ester

    SciTech Connect

    Gius, D.; Laimins, L.A.

    1989-02-01

    Several viral trans-activators and a tumor promoter were examined for the ability to activate human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV-18) gene expression. A plasmid containing the HPV-18 noncoding region placed upstream of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene was cotransfected with different herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) genes into several cell lines. Both HSV-1 TIF and ICPO activated HPV-18 expression; however, activation by TIF was observed only in epithelial cells, while ICPO stimulated expression in a wide variety of cells. The element activated by both TIF and ICOP was mapped to a 229-base-pair fragment which also contains an HPV-18 epithelial cell-preferred enhancer. The inclusion of a papillomavirus E2 trans-activator with TIF and ICOP further increased HPV-18 expression. In contrast, the HSV-1 ICP4 and ICP27 genes, as well as the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 tat genes, were found to have no effect on HPV-18 expression. In transient assays, the addition of the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) also activated HPV-18 expression. The region of HPV-18 activated by TPA was localized to a sequence which is homologous to other TPA-responsive elements.

  16. Altered gene expression of glycosyltransferases and sialyltransferases and total amount of glycosphingolipids following herpes simplex virus infection.

    PubMed

    Miyaji, Kazuki; Furukawa, Jun-Ichi; Suzuki, Youichi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Shinohara, Yasuro; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2016-11-03

    There is a case report of a patient with overlapping Guillain-Barré syndrome and Bickerstaff brainstem encephalitis after infection with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), who carried high titers of serum anti-GQ1b IgG antibodies. Several studies have linked viral infection to the modulation of ganglioside expression such as human T-lymphotropic virus to GD2 and simian virus 40 to GM3. Also, enhancement of the expression of GM2 on the cell membrane after cytomegalovirus infection has been reported. The objective of this study was to unveil the relationship between HSV-1 infection and the alteration of cellular ganglioside expression in neuronal and glial cell lines. In addition to these cell lines, several human tumor cell lines including astrocytoma cells, neuroblastoma cells, T-cell leukemia cells and kidney cells derived from normal human and monkey were infected with HSV-1 as well as HSV-2. To measure changes in ganglioside-related gene expressions and gangliosides levels in cells, quantitative PCR and glycosphingolipid-glycomic analysis were performed. Changes in gene expression of glycosyltransferases and sialyltransferases were observed in HSV-1- and HSV-2-infected cells, although with different trends. 39 glycosphingolipid-glycans were quantitatively analyzed. HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections resulted in changes in the total amount of gangliosides depending on the cell lines used and type of virus. Qualitative changes caused by each infection of HSV-1 and HSV-2 were almost negligible. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Genital Herpes

    MedlinePlus

    ... having a first herpes "outbreak" or episode. Clinical manifestations of genital herpes differ between the first and ... What is the link between genital herpes and HIV? Genital ulcerative disease caused by herpes makes it easier to transmit ...

  18. Herpes - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Genital herpes - resources; Resources - genital herpes ... The following organizations are good resources for information on genital herpes : March of Dimes -- www.marchofdimes.com/pregnancy/complications-herpes The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists -- ...

  19. Comparison of an immortalized human corneal epithelial cell line with Vero cells in the isolation of Herpes simplex virus-1 for the laboratory diagnosis of Herpes simplex keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Athmanathan, Sreedharan; B Reddy, Sesha; Nutheti, Rishita; Rao, Gullapalli N

    2002-01-01

    Background Herpes simplex keratitis (HSK) is a sight threatening ocular infection often requiring a specific and prompt laboratory diagnosis. Isolation of Herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) in culture provides the most reliable and specific method and is considered as the "Gold Standard" in the laboratory diagnosis of HSK in spite of its low sensitivity. Using "cell lines of corneal origin" for virus isolation may be beneficial under such circumstances, since these cells have been shown to be excellent substrates for the growth of HSV-1 isolated from the cornea. We report a comparative study of a novel human corneal epithelial cell line (HCE) and the Vero cell line in the isolation of HSV-1 from corneal scrapings employing a shell vial assay. Methods Corneal scrapings were obtained from 17 patients with a clinical diagnosis of HSK. All the cases were confirmed by virological investigations (PCR and viral antigen detection positive, n = 15, PCR positive, n = 1, Viral antigen positive, n = 1). Scrapings obtained from 10 patients with infectious keratitis of non-viral origin were included as controls. All the scrapings were simultaneously inoculated into shell vials of HCE and Vero cells. Cultures were terminated at 24 h post-infection. Isolation of HSV-1 was confirmed using an indirect immunofluorescence/ immunoperoxidase assay. Results Virus could be isolated using both or either of the cell lines in 10/17 (58.82%) patients with HSK. HSV-1 was isolated from 10/ 17 (58.82%) and 4/17(23.52%) specimens in HCE and Vero cells, respectively (P = 0.036). None of the controls yielded HSV-1. While all the 10 (100%) strains were isolated in HCE, Vero yielded only 4/10 (40%) strains in the shell vial culture (P = 0.014). Conclusions HCE showed a statistically significant difference in the virus isolation rate with respect to Vero cells. HCE may be an excellent alternative cell line for the isolation of HSV-1, especially from corneal scrapings, for the laboratory diagnosis of HSK

  20. Expression of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Glycoprotein B by a Recombinant Vaccinia Virus and Protection of Mice against Lethal Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantin, Edouard M.; Eberle, Richard; Baldick, Joseph L.; Moss, Bernard; Willey, Dru E.; Notkins, Abner L.; Openshaw, Harry

    1987-08-01

    The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) strain F gene encoding glycoprotein gB was isolated and modified at the 5' end by in vitro oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis. The modified gB gene was inserted into the vaccinia virus genome and expressed under the control of a vaccinia virus promoter. The mature gB glycoprotein produced by the vaccinia virus recombinant was glycosylated, was expressed at the cell surface, and was indistinguishable from authentic HSV-1 gB in terms of electrophoretic mobility. Mice immunized intradermally with the recombinant vaccinia virus produced gB-specific neutralizing antibodies and were resistant to a lethal HSV-1 challenge.

  1. Transcriptional coactivators are not required for herpes simplex virus type 1 immediate-early gene expression in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kutluay, Sebla B; DeVos, Sarah L; Klomp, Jennifer E; Triezenberg, Steven J

    2009-04-01

    Virion protein 16 (VP16) of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a potent transcriptional activator of viral immediate-early (IE) genes. The VP16 activation domain can recruit various transcriptional coactivators to target gene promoters. However, the role of transcriptional coactivators in HSV-1 IE gene expression during lytic infection had not been fully defined. We showed previously that transcriptional coactivators such as the p300 and CBP histone acetyltransferases and the BRM and Brg-1 chromatin remodeling complexes are recruited to viral IE gene promoters in a manner dependent mostly on the presence of the activation domain of VP16. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that these transcriptional coactivators are required for viral IE gene expression during infection of cultured cells. The disrupted expression of the histone acetyltransferases p300, CBP, PCAF, and GCN5 or the BRM and Brg-1 chromatin remodeling complexes did not diminish IE gene expression. Furthermore, IE gene expression was not impaired in cell lines that lack functional p300, or BRM and Brg-1. We also tested whether these coactivators are required for the VP16-dependent induction of IE gene expression from transcriptionally inactive viral genomes associated with high levels of histones in cultured cells. We found that the disruption of coactivators also did not affect IE gene expression in this context. Thus, we conclude that the transcriptional coactivators that can be recruited by VP16 do not contribute significantly to IE gene expression during lytic infection or the induction of IE gene expression from nucleosomal templates in vitro.

  2. Gene Expression Correlates with the Number of Herpes Viral Genomes Initiating Infection in Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Efrat M.

    2016-01-01

    Viral gene expression varies significantly among genetically identical cells. The sources of these variations are not well understood and have been suggested to involve both deterministic host differences and stochastic viral host interactions. For herpesviruses, only a limited number of incoming viral genomes initiate expression and replication in each infected cell. To elucidate the effect of this limited number of productively infecting genomes on viral gene expression in single cells, we constructed a set of fluorescence-expressing genetically tagged herpes recombinants. The number of different barcodes originating from a single cell is a good representative of the number of incoming viral genomes replicating (NOIVGR) in that cell. We identified a positive correlation between the NOIVGR and viral gene expression, as measured by the fluorescent protein expressed from the viral genome. This correlation was identified in three distinct cell-types, although the average NOIVGR per cell differed among these cell-types. Among clonal single cells, high housekeeping gene expression levels are not supportive of high viral gene expression, suggesting specific host determinants effecting viral infection. We developed a model to predict NOIVGR from cellular parameters, which supports the notion that viral gene expression is tightly linked to the NOIVGR in single-cells. Our results support the hypothesis that the stochastic nature of viral infection and host cell determinants contribute together to the variability observed among infected cells. PMID:27923068

  3. Gene Expression Correlates with the Number of Herpes Viral Genomes Initiating Infection in Single Cells.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Efrat M; Kobiler, Oren

    2016-12-01

    Viral gene expression varies significantly among genetically identical cells. The sources of these variations are not well understood and have been suggested to involve both deterministic host differences and stochastic viral host interactions. For herpesviruses, only a limited number of incoming viral genomes initiate expression and replication in each infected cell. To elucidate the effect of this limited number of productively infecting genomes on viral gene expression in single cells, we constructed a set of fluorescence-expressing genetically tagged herpes recombinants. The number of different barcodes originating from a single cell is a good representative of the number of incoming viral genomes replicating (NOIVGR) in that cell. We identified a positive correlation between the NOIVGR and viral gene expression, as measured by the fluorescent protein expressed from the viral genome. This correlation was identified in three distinct cell-types, although the average NOIVGR per cell differed among these cell-types. Among clonal single cells, high housekeeping gene expression levels are not supportive of high viral gene expression, suggesting specific host determinants effecting viral infection. We developed a model to predict NOIVGR from cellular parameters, which supports the notion that viral gene expression is tightly linked to the NOIVGR in single-cells. Our results support the hypothesis that the stochastic nature of viral infection and host cell determinants contribute together to the variability observed among infected cells.

  4. Recombinant Listeria monocytogenes expressing an immunodominant peptide fails to protect after intravaginal challenge with herpes simplex virus-2

    PubMed Central

    Muller, William J.; Orgun, Nural N.; Dong, Lichun; Koelle, David M.; Huang, Meei-Li; Way, Sing Sing

    2009-01-01

    Recombinant Listeria monocytogenes expressing a type-common herpes simplex virus (HSV) gB-peptide was shown previously to protect against footpad inoculation with HSV-1. We tested this construct for protection against vaginal challenge with HSV-2. Primed mice demonstrated strong recall responses, had modest reductions in HSV-2 DNA in vaginal mucosa, but were not protected from disease. PMID:18443737

  5. Evaluation of microRNA Expression in Patients with Herpes Zoster

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xihan; Huang, Ying; Zhang, Yucheng; He, Na

    2016-01-01

    Reactivated varicella-zoster virus (VZV), which lies latent in the dorsal root ganglions and cranial nerves before its reactivation, is capable of causing herpes zoster (HZ), but the specific mechanism of virus reactivation and latency remains unknown. It was proposed that circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) in body fluids could potentially indicate infection. However, the connection between herpes zoster and circulating miRNAs has not been demonstrated. In this study, 41 HZ patients without superinfection were selected. The serum miRNA levels were analyzed by TaqMan low density array (TLDA) and confirmed individually by quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis. Thirty-five age-matched subjects without any infectious diseases or inflammation were selected as controls. The results showed that the serum miRNA expression profiles in 41 HZ patients were different from those of control subjects. Specifically, 18 miRNAs were up-regulated and 126 were down-regulated more than two-fold in HZ patients compared with controls. The subsequent confirmation of these results by qRT-PCR, as well as receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, revealed that six kinds of miRNAs, including miR-190b, miR-571, miR-1276, miR-1303, miR-943, and miR-661, exhibited statistically significant enhanced expression levels (more than four-fold) in HZ patients, compared with those of healthy controls and herpes simplex virus (HSV) patients. Subsequently, it is proposed that these circulating miRNAs are capable of regulating numerous pathways and some may even participate in the inflammatory response or nervous system activity. This study has initially demonstrated that the serum miRNA expression profiles in HZ patients were different from those of uninfected individuals. Additionally, these findings also suggest that six of the altered miRNA could be potentially used as biomarkers to test for latent HZ infection. PMID:27918431

  6. Reduced yield of infectious pseudorabies virus and herpes simplex virus from cell lines producing viral glycoprotein gp50.

    PubMed Central

    Petrovskis, E A; Meyer, A L; Post, L E

    1988-01-01

    Pseudorabies virus (PRV) glycoprotein gp50 is the homolog of herpes simplex virus (HSV) glycoprotein D. Several cell lines that constitutively synthesize gp50 were constructed. Vero cells, HeLa cells, and pig kidney (MVPK) cells that produce gp50 all gave reduced yields of PRV and HSV progeny viruses when compared with the parent cell line or the same cell line transfected to produce a different protein. The reduction in virus yield was greatest at low multiplicities of infection. The Vero and HeLa cells that produce gp50 showed an even greater reduction in HSV yield than in PRV yield. This phenomenon may be an example in a herpesvirus of the interference observed in retroviruses or cross-protection in plant virus systems. PMID:2835521

  7. Use of Adeno-Associated and Herpes Simplex Viral Vectors for In Vivo Neuronal Expression in Mice.

    PubMed

    Penrod, Rachel D; Wells, Audrey M; Carlezon, William A; Cowan, Christopher W

    2015-10-01

    Adeno-associated viruses and the herpes simplex virus are the two most widely used vectors for the in vivo expression of exogenous genes. Advances in the development of these vectors have enabled remarkable temporal and spatial control of gene expression. This unit provides methods for storing, delivering, and verifying expression of adeno-associated and herpes simplex viruses in the adult mouse brain. It also describes important considerations for experiments using in vivo expression of these viral vectors, including serotype and promoter selection, as well as timing of expression. Additional protocols are provided that describe methods for preliminary experiments to determine the appropriate conditions for in vivo delivery. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  8. PrP(c) expression influences the establishment of herpes simplex virus type 1 latency.

    PubMed

    Thackray, Alana M; Bujdoso, Raymond

    2002-03-01

    PrP(c) is a glycophosphatidylinositol-linked cell-surface protein expressed principally by neural tissue. The normal function of this protein is unestablished, although a role in either transmembrane signaling, cell-cell adhesion, or copper metabolism has been proposed. In this study we have investigated the effect of the neurotropic virus herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in strains of mice which express different levels of PrP(c). Viral gene expression under the control of the HSV-1 early promoter IE110, detected either by in situ hybridization for RNA transcripts or by beta-galactosidase (beta-Gal) activity from an inserted lacZ gene, showed that the magnitude of HSV replication was retarded in PrP-/- mice. This was reflected in the lower level of acute viral titers in tissues from these virus-inoculated mice. However, HSV-inoculated PrP-/- mice contained higher levels of latent virus in both peripheral and central nervous tissue than those seen in mice which express PrP(c). Our observations show that lack of PrP(c) expression favors the establishment of HSV latency whereas HSV replication proceeds more efficiently in neuronal tissue that expresses this protein. The data further suggest that PrP(c) may be involved in a metabolic pathway that culminates in apoptosis of neurons that have been infected by neurotropic viruses.

  9. The 3 facets of regulation of herpes simplex virus gene expression: A critical inquiry.

    PubMed

    Roizman, Bernard; Zhou, Guoying

    2015-05-01

    On entry into the body herpes simplex viruses (HSV) replicate in a series of steps that involves derepression of viral DNA activated by VP16, a virion protein, and sequential transcription of viral genes in a cascade fashion. HSV also enters into neurons in which viral DNA maintained as heterochromatin and with few exceptions viral gene expression is silenced. A third face of the interaction of HSV with its host cells takes place at the moment when the silenced viral genome in neurons is abruptly derepressed. The available data do no reveal evidence that HSV encodes different regulatory programs for each facet of its interaction with its host cells. Rather the data point to significant gaps in our knowledge of the mechanisms by which each facet is initiated and the roles of the infected cells at each facet of the interaction of viral gene products with the host cell. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The 3 facets of regulation of herpes simplex virus gene expression: a critical inquiry

    PubMed Central

    Roizman, Bernard; Zhou, Guoying

    2015-01-01

    On entry into the body herpes simplex viruses (HSV) replicate in a series of steps that involves derepression of viral DNA activated by VP16, a virion protein, and sequential transcription of viral genes in a cascade fashion. HSV also enters into neurons in which viral DNA maintained as heterochromatin and with few exceptions viral gene expression is silenced. A third face of the interaction of HSV with its host cells takes place at the moment when the silenced viral genome in neurons is abruptly derepressed. The available data do no reveal evidence that HSV encodes different regulatory programs for each facet of its interaction with its host cells. Rather the data point to significant gaps in our knowledge of the mechanisms by which each facet is initiated and the roles of the infected cells at each facet of the interaction of viral gene products with the host cell. PMID:25771487

  11. Imaging herpes simplex virus type 1 amplicon vector-mediated gene expression in human glioma spheroids.

    PubMed

    Kaestle, Christine; Winkeler, Alexandra; Richter, Raphaela; Sauer, Heinrich; Hescheler, Jürgen; Fraefel, Cornel; Wartenberg, Maria; Jacobs, Andreas H

    2011-06-01

    Vectors derived from herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) have great potential for transducing therapeutic genes into the central nervous system; however, inefficient distribution of vector particles in vivo may limit their therapeutic potential in patients with gliomas. This study was performed to investigate the extent of HSV-1 amplicon vector-mediated gene expression in a three-dimensional glioma model of multicellular spheroids by imaging highly infectious HSV-1 virions expressing green fluorescent protein (HSV-GFP). After infection or microscopy-guided vector injection of glioma spheroids at various spheroid sizes, injection pressures and injection times, the extent of HSV-1 vector-mediated gene expression was investigated via laser scanning microscopy. Infection of spheroids with HSV-GFP demonstrated a maximal depth of vector-mediated GFP expression at 70 to 80 μm. A > 80% transduction efficiency was reached only in small spheroids with a diameter of < 150 μm. Guided vector injection into the spheroids showed transduction efficiencies ranging between < 10 and > 90%. The results demonstrated that vector-mediated gene expression in glioma spheroids was strongly dependent on the mode of vector application-injection pressure and injection time being the most important parameters. The assessment of these vector application parameters in tissue models will contribute to the development of safe and efficient gene therapy protocols for clinical application.

  12. Latent herpes simplex virus infection of sensory neurons alters neuronal gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Martha F; Cook, W James; Roth, Frederick P; Zhu, Jia; Holman, Holly; Knipe, David M; Coen, Donald M

    2003-09-01

    The persistence of herpes simplex virus (HSV) and the diseases that it causes in the human population can be attributed to the maintenance of a latent infection within neurons in sensory ganglia. Little is known about the effects of latent infection on the host neuron. We have addressed the question of whether latent HSV infection affects neuronal gene expression by using microarray transcript profiling of host gene expression in ganglia from latently infected versus mock-infected mouse trigeminal ganglia. (33)P-labeled cDNA probes from pooled ganglia harvested at 30 days postinfection or post-mock infection were hybridized to nylon arrays printed with 2,556 mouse genes. Signal intensities were acquired by phosphorimager. Mean intensities (n = 4 replicates in each of three independent experiments) of signals from mock-infected versus latently infected ganglia were compared by using a variant of Student's t test. We identified significant changes in the expression of mouse neuronal genes, including several with roles in gene expression, such as the Clk2 gene, and neurotransmission, such as genes encoding potassium voltage-gated channels and a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. We confirmed the neuronal localization of some of these transcripts by using in situ hybridization. To validate the microarray results, we performed real-time reverse transcriptase PCR analyses for a selection of the genes. These studies demonstrate that latent HSV infection can alter neuronal gene expression and might provide a new mechanism for how persistent viral infection can cause chronic disease.

  13. Expression of herpes simplex virus 1 microRNAs in cell culture models of quiescent and latent infection.

    PubMed

    Jurak, Igor; Hackenberg, Michael; Kim, Ju Youn; Pesola, Jean M; Everett, Roger D; Preston, Chris M; Wilson, Angus C; Coen, Donald M

    2014-02-01

    To facilitate studies of herpes simplex virus 1 latency, cell culture models of quiescent or latent infection have been developed. Using deep sequencing, we analyzed the expression of viral microRNAs (miRNAs) in two models employing human fibroblasts and one using rat neurons. In all cases, the expression patterns differed from that in productively infected cells, with the rat neuron pattern most closely resembling that found in latently infected human or mouse ganglia in vivo.

  14. Functional expression of the Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Kit, S; Otsuka, H; Qavi, H; Kit, M

    1981-12-01

    The recombinant plasmid pAGO contains the Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) thymidine kinase (TK) gene and consists of a 2-kb PvuII fragment of HSV-1 DNA inserted into the PvuII site of pBR322. A deletion mutant of pAGO, designated pMH110, has been isolated which removes the normal HSV-1 TK gene promoter but places the promoter of the pBR322 tetracycline-resistance (tetr) gene only about 400 bp from the translational start codon of the HSV-1 TK polypeptide. In contrast to pAGO, which transforms mouse LM(TK-) cells to TK+ but is only weakly expressed in TK- bacteria, pMH110 not only efficiently transforms LM(TK-) cells to TK+ but also enables TK- Escherichia coli K-12 cells to form colonies on selective plates containing 5-fluorodeoxyuridine (FdUrd) plus thymidine (dThd) and to exhibit fully restored ability to incorporate [3H]dThd into DNA. The levels of TK activity expressed by bacteria harboring pMH110 were about as high as those expressed by bacteria harboring plasmid pTK3, which contains the wild-type E. coli TK gene. The TK activity expressed in bacteria harboring pMH110 was partially purified and shown to be HSV-1-specific by serological and disc PAGE analyses and by experiments demonstrating that this enzyme phosphorylated [125I]deoxycytidine.

  15. Evidence for a novel regulatory pathway for herpes simplex virus gene expression in trigeminal ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Kosz-Vnenchak, M; Jacobson, J; Coen, D M; Knipe, D M

    1993-09-01

    Thymidine kinase (TK)-negative (TK-) mutant strains of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) show reduced expression of alpha and beta viral genes during acute infection of trigeminal ganglion neurons following corneal infection (M. Kosz-Vnenchak, D. M. Coen, and D. M. Knipe, J. Virol. 64:5396-5402, 1990). It was surprising that a defect in a beta gene product would lead to decreased alpha and beta gene expression, given the regulatory pathways demonstrated for HSV infection of cultured cells. In this study, we have examined viral gene expression during reactivation from latent infection in explanted trigeminal ganglion tissue. In explant reactivation studies with wild-type virus, we observed viral productive gene expression over the first 48 h of explant incubation occurring in a temporal order (alpha, beta, gamma) similar to that in cultured cells. This occurred predominantly in latency-associated transcript-positive neurons but was limited to a fraction of these cells. In contrast, TK- mutant viruses showed greatly reduced alpha and beta gene expression upon explant of latently infected trigeminal ganglion tissue. An inhibitor of viral TK or an inhibitor of viral DNA polymerase greatly decreased viral lytic gene expression in trigeminal ganglion tissue latently infected with wild-type virus and explanted in culture. These results indicate that the regulatory mechanisms governing HSV gene expression are different in trigeminal ganglion neurons and cultured cells. We present a new model for viral gene expression in trigeminal ganglion neurons with implications for the nature of the decision process between latent infection and productive infection by HSV.

  16. Silencing Status Epilepticus-Induced BDNF Expression with Herpes Simplex Virus Type-1 Based Amplicon Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Falcicchia, Chiara; Trempat, Pascal; Binaschi, Anna; Perrier-Biollay, Coline; Roncon, Paolo; Soukupova, Marie; Berthommé, Hervé; Simonato, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been found to produce pro- but also anti-epileptic effects. Thus, its validity as a therapeutic target must be verified using advanced tools designed to block or to enhance its signal. The aim of this study was to develop tools to silence the BDNF signal. We generated Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) derived amplicon vectors, i.e. viral particles containing a genome of 152 kb constituted of concatameric repetitions of an expression cassette, enabling the expression of the gene of interest in multiple copies. HSV-1 based amplicon vectors are non-pathogenic and have been successfully employed in the past for gene delivery into the brain of living animals. Therefore, amplicon vectors should represent a logical choice for expressing a silencing cassette, which, in multiple copies, is expected to lead to an efficient knock-down of the target gene expression. Here, we employed two amplicon-based BDNF silencing strategies. The first, antisense, has been chosen to target and degrade the cytoplasmic mRNA pool of BDNF, whereas the second, based on the convergent transcription technology, has been chosen to repress transcription at the BDNF gene. Both these amplicon vectors proved to be effective in down-regulating BDNF expression in vitro, in BDNF-expressing mesoangioblast cells. However, only the antisense strategy was effective in vivo, after inoculation in the hippocampus in a model of status epilepticus in which BDNF mRNA levels are strongly increased. Interestingly, the knocking down of BDNF levels induced with BDNF-antisense was sufficient to produce significant behavioral effects, in spite of the fact that it was produced only in a part of a single hippocampus. In conclusion, this study demonstrates a reliable effect of amplicon vectors in knocking down gene expression in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, this approach may find broad applications in neurobiological studies. PMID:26954758

  17. Silencing Status Epilepticus-Induced BDNF Expression with Herpes Simplex Virus Type-1 Based Amplicon Vectors.

    PubMed

    Falcicchia, Chiara; Trempat, Pascal; Binaschi, Anna; Perrier-Biollay, Coline; Roncon, Paolo; Soukupova, Marie; Berthommé, Hervé; Simonato, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been found to produce pro- but also anti-epileptic effects. Thus, its validity as a therapeutic target must be verified using advanced tools designed to block or to enhance its signal. The aim of this study was to develop tools to silence the BDNF signal. We generated Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) derived amplicon vectors, i.e. viral particles containing a genome of 152 kb constituted of concatameric repetitions of an expression cassette, enabling the expression of the gene of interest in multiple copies. HSV-1 based amplicon vectors are non-pathogenic and have been successfully employed in the past for gene delivery into the brain of living animals. Therefore, amplicon vectors should represent a logical choice for expressing a silencing cassette, which, in multiple copies, is expected to lead to an efficient knock-down of the target gene expression. Here, we employed two amplicon-based BDNF silencing strategies. The first, antisense, has been chosen to target and degrade the cytoplasmic mRNA pool of BDNF, whereas the second, based on the convergent transcription technology, has been chosen to repress transcription at the BDNF gene. Both these amplicon vectors proved to be effective in down-regulating BDNF expression in vitro, in BDNF-expressing mesoangioblast cells. However, only the antisense strategy was effective in vivo, after inoculation in the hippocampus in a model of status epilepticus in which BDNF mRNA levels are strongly increased. Interestingly, the knocking down of BDNF levels induced with BDNF-antisense was sufficient to produce significant behavioral effects, in spite of the fact that it was produced only in a part of a single hippocampus. In conclusion, this study demonstrates a reliable effect of amplicon vectors in knocking down gene expression in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, this approach may find broad applications in neurobiological studies.

  18. Genital Herpes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Choosing the Right Sport for You Shyness Genital Herpes KidsHealth > For Teens > Genital Herpes Print A A A What's in this article? ... How Is It Prevented? What Is It? Genital herpes is caused by a virus called herpes simplex ( ...

  19. Herpes Simplex

    MedlinePlus

    ... is caused by a herpes simplex virus (HSV). Oral herpes causes cold sores around the mouth or face. Genital herpes affects the genitals, buttocks ... type 2 is the usual cause of genital herpes, but it also can infect the mouth. HSV spreads through direct contact. Some people have ...

  20. A cell line that secretes inducibly a reporter protein for monitoring herpes simplex virus infection and drug susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Chun; Kao, Chuan-Liang; Liu, Wu-Tse; Sun, Jun-Ren; Tai, Yi-Er; Kung, Szu-Hao

    2002-12-01

    A cell line modified genetically (Vero-ICP10-SEAP) that responds to infection by herpes simplex virus (HSV) was established. The cell line was constructed by stable transfection of Vero cell with a plasmid encoding the secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) driven by the promoter of the HSV-2 ICP10 gene. Following infection with HSV, the stable line secretes a high level of the SEAP in the supernatants as measured by a chemiluminescence-based assay. The detection system is sensitive to an HSV titer as low as a single plaque-forming unit (PFU), with a linear range up to the equivalent of 2.5 x 10(4) PFU inoculum after infection for 24 h. There was no detectable enhancement in SEAP activities following inoculations with several viruses other than HSV. The Vero-ICP10-SEAP cell line was also utilized to develop an assay for determination of antiviral susceptibility given that the induced SEAP activity appeared to reflect the numbers of plaque. Evaluations of the stable line with representative acyclovir (ACV)-sensitive and-resistant HSV isolates demonstrated that their drug susceptibilities were determined accurately. In summary, this novel SEAP reporter system is a sensitive means for rapid diagnosis, quantitation, and drug susceptibility testing for HSV, with potential to the development of an automated assay. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Gene Therapy for Bladder Overactivity and Nociception with Herpes Simplex Virus Vectors Expressing Preproenkephalin

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Sasaki, Katsumi; Franks, Michael E.; Goins, William F.; Goss, James R.; de Groat, William C.; Glorioso, Joseph C.; Chancellor, Michael B.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS) is a major challenge to treat. We studied the effect of targeted and localized expression of enkephalin in afferent nerves that innervate the bladder by gene transfer using replication-defective herpes simplex virus (HSV) vectors in a rat model of bladder hyperactivity and pain. Replication-deficient HSV vectors encoding preproenkephalin, which is a precursor for Met- and Leu-enkephalin, or control vector encoding the lacZ reporter gene, were injected into the bladder wall of female rats. After viral vector injection, quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed high preproenkephalin transgene levels in bladder and dorsal root ganglia innervating the bladder in enkephalin vector-treated animals. Functionally, enkephalin vector-treated animals showed reductions in bladder hyperactivity and nociceptive behavior induced by intravesical application of capsaicin; however, vector-mediated expression of enkephalin did not alter normal voiding. This antinociceptive effect of enkephalin gene therapy was antagonized by naloxone hydrochloride administration. Together, our results with HSV vectors encoding preproenkephalin demonstrated physiological improvement in visceral pain induced by bladder irritation. Thus, gene therapy may represent a potentially useful treatment modality for bladder hypersensitive disorders such as IC/PBS. PMID:20377371

  2. Gamma interferon expression during acute and latent nervous system infection by herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Cantin, E M; Hinton, D R; Chen, J; Openshaw, H

    1995-01-01

    This study was initiated to evaluate a role for gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) in herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection. At the acute stage of infection in mice, HSV-1 replication in trigeminal ganglia and brain stem tissue was modestly but consistently enhanced in mice from which IFN-gamma was by ablated monoclonal antibody treatment and in mice genetically lacking the IFN-gamma receptor (Rgko mice). As determined by reverse transcriptase PCR, IFN-gamma and tumor necrosis factor alpha transcripts were present in trigeminal ganglia during both acute and latent HSV-1 infection. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were detected initially in trigeminal ganglia at day 5 after HSV-1 inoculation, and these cells persisted for 6 months into latency. The T cells were focused around morphologically normal neurons that showed no signs of active infection, but many of which expressed HSV-1 latency-associated transcripts. Secreted IFN-gamma was present up to 6 months into latency in areas of the T-cell infiltration. By 9 months into latency, both the T-cell infiltrate and IFN-gamma expression had cleared, although there remained a slight increase in macrophage levels in trigeminal ganglia. In HSV-1-infected brain stem tissue, T cells and IFN-gamma expression were present at 1 month but were gone by 6 months after infection. Our hypothesis is that the persistence of T cells and the sustained IFN-gamma expression occur in response to an HSV-1 antigen(s) in the nervous system. This hypothesis is consistent with a new model of HSV-1 latency which suggests that limited HSV-1 antigen expression occurs during latency (M. Kosz-Vnenchak, J. Jacobson, D.M. Coen, and D.M. Knipe, J. Virol. 67:5383-5393, 1993). We speculate that prolonged secretion of IFN-gamma during latency may modulate a reactivated HSV-1 infection. PMID:7609058

  3. Cold sore susceptibility gene-1 genotypes affect the expression of herpes labialis in unrelated human subjects.

    PubMed

    Kriesel, John D; Bhatia, Amiteshwar; Thomas, Alun

    2014-01-01

    Our group has recently described a gene on human chromosome 21, the Cold Sore Susceptibility Gene-1 (CSSG-1, also known as C21orf91), which may confer susceptibility to frequent cold sores in humans. We present here a genotype-phenotype analysis of CSSG-1 in a new, unrelated human population. Seven hundred fifty-eight human subjects were enrolled in a case/control Cold Sore Study. CSSG-1 genotyping, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1) serotyping, demographic and phenotypic data was available from 622 analyzed subjects. Six major alleles (H1-H6) were tested for associations with each of the self-reported phenotypes. The statistical analysis was adjusted for age, sex and ethnicity. Genotype-phenotype associations were analyzed from 388 HSV1-seropositive subjects. There were significant CSSG-1 haplotype effects on annual cold sore outbreaks (P=0.006), lifetime cold sores (P=0.012) and perceived cold sore severity (P=0.012). There were relatively consistent trends toward protection from frequent and severe cold sores among those with the H3 or H5/6 haplotypes, whereas those with H1, H2, and H4 haplotypes tended to have more frequent and more severe episodes. Different alleles of the newly described gene CSSG-1 affect the expression of cold sore phenotypes in this new, unrelated human population, confirming the findings of the previous family-based study.

  4. Measuring herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase reporter gene expression in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yaghoubi, Shahriar S; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2006-01-01

    The herpes simplex 1 virus thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) positron emission tomography (PET) reporter gene (PRG) or its mutant HSV1-sr39tk are used to investigate intracellular molecular events in cultured cells and for imaging intracellular molecular events and cell trafficking in living subjects. Two in vitro methods are available to assay gene expression of HSV1-tk or HSV1-sr39tk in cells or tissues. One method determines the level of HSV1-TK or HSV1-sr39TK enzyme activity in cell or tissue lysates by measuring the amount of the radiolabeled substrates that have been phosphorylated by these enzymes in a fixed amount of cell lysate protein after a fixed incubation time. The other method, called the 'cell-uptake assay', takes into account the natural uptake and efflux characteristics of the radiolabeled substrate by specific cells, in addition to the level of HSV1-TK or HSV1-sr39TK activity. Both of these assays can be used to validate molecular models in cultured cells, prior to studying them in living research subjects. Each of these assays can be completed in one day.

  5. Enhanced lysis of herpes simplex virus type 1-infected mouse cell lines by NC and NK effectors

    SciTech Connect

    Colmenares, C.; Lopez, C.

    1986-05-01

    Spontaneously cytotoxic murine lymphocytes lysed certain cell types infected by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) better than uninfected cells. Although HSV-1 adsorbed to the surface of all the target cells, those in which the virus replicated more efficiently were lysed to a greater extent. As targets, the authors used cell lines that, when uninfected, were spontaneously lysed by NK cells (YAC-1) or by NC cells (WEHI-164). They also used a fibroblastoid cell line (M50) and a monocytic tumor line (PU51R), which were not spontaneously killed. NK cells lysed HSV-1-infected YAC cells better than uninfected cells, and an NC-like activity selectively lysed HSV-1-infected WEHI cells. These findings were consistent with the results of experiments performed to define the role of interferon in induction of virus-augmented cytolysis. Increased lysis of YAC-HSV and PU51R-HSV was entirely due to interferon activation and was completely abolished by performing the /sup 51/Cr-release assay in the presence of anti-interferon serum. The data show that HSV-1 infection of NK/NC targets induces increased cytotoxity, but the effector cell responsible for lysis is determined by the uninfected target, or by an interaction between the virus and target cell, rather than by a viral determinant alone.

  6. Epigenetic modulation of gene expression from quiescent herpes simplex virus genomes.

    PubMed

    Ferenczy, Michael W; DeLuca, Neal A

    2009-09-01

    The ability of herpes simplex virus to persist in cells depends on the extent of viral-gene expression, which may be controlled by epigenetic mechanisms. We used quiescent infection with the viral mutants d109 and d106 to explore the effects of cell type and the presence of the viral protein ICP0 on the expression and chromatin structure of the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) tk and gC promoters on the viral genome. Expression from the HCMV promoter on the d109 genome decreased with time and was considerably less in HEL cells than in Vero cells. Expression from the HCMV promoter in d106 was considerably more abundant than in d109, and this increased with time in both cell types. The same pattern of expression was seen on the tk and gC genes on the viral genomes, although the levels of tk and gC RNA were approximately 10(2)- and 10(5)-fold lower than those of wild-type virus in d106 and d109, respectively. In micrococcal-nuclease digestion experiments, nucleosomes were evident on the d109 genome, and the amount of total H3 as determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation was considerably greater on d109 than d106 genomes. The acetylation of histone H3 on the d106 genomes was evident at early and late times postinfection in Vero cells, but only at late times in HEL cells. The same pattern was observed for H3 acetylated on lysine 9. Trimethylation of H3K9 on d109 genomes was evident only at late times postinfection in Vero cells, while it was observed both early and late in HEL cells. Heterochromatin protein 1gamma (HP1gamma) was generally present only on d109 genomes at late times postinfection of HEL cells. The observations of chromatin structure correlate with the expression patterns of the three analyzed genes on the quiescent genomes. Therefore, several mechanisms generally affect the expression and contribute to the silencing of persisting genomes. These are the abundance of nucleosomes, the acetylation state of the histones, and heterochromatin. The extents to which

  7. The ATP-Dependent RNA Helicase DDX3X Modulates Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Khadivjam, Bita; Stegen, Camille; Hogue-Racine, Marc-Aurèle; El Bilali, Nabil; Döhner, Katinka; Sodeik, Beate

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human protein DDX3X is a DEAD box ATP-dependent RNA helicase that regulates transcription, mRNA maturation, and mRNA export and translation. DDX3X concomitantly modulates the replication of several RNA viruses and promotes innate immunity. We previously showed that herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), a human DNA virus, incorporates DDX3X into its mature particles and that DDX3X is required for optimal HSV-1 infectivity. Here, we show that viral gene expression, replication, and propagation depend on optimal DDX3X protein levels. Surprisingly, DDX3X from incoming viral particles was not required for the early stages of the HSV-1 infection, but, rather, the protein controlled the assembly of new viral particles. This was independent of the previously reported ability of DDX3X to stimulate interferon type I production. Instead, both the lack and overexpression of DDX3X disturbed viral gene transcription and thus subsequent genome replication. This suggests that in addition to its effect on RNA viruses, DDX3X impacts DNA viruses such as HSV-1 by an interferon-independent pathway. IMPORTANCE Viruses interact with a variety of cellular proteins to complete their life cycle. Among them is DDX3X, an RNA helicase that participates in most aspects of RNA biology, including transcription, splicing, nuclear export, and translation. Several RNA viruses and a limited number of DNA viruses are known to manipulate DDX3X for their own benefit. In contrast, DDX3X is also known to promote interferon production to limit viral propagation. Here, we show that DDX3X, which we previously identified in mature HSV-1 virions, stimulates HSV-1 gene expression and, consequently, virion assembly by a process that is independent of its ability to promote the interferon pathway. PMID:28148788

  8. The ATP-Dependent RNA Helicase DDX3X Modulates Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Khadivjam, Bita; Stegen, Camille; Hogue-Racine, Marc-Aurèle; El Bilali, Nabil; Döhner, Katinka; Sodeik, Beate; Lippé, Roger

    2017-04-15

    The human protein DDX3X is a DEAD box ATP-dependent RNA helicase that regulates transcription, mRNA maturation, and mRNA export and translation. DDX3X concomitantly modulates the replication of several RNA viruses and promotes innate immunity. We previously showed that herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), a human DNA virus, incorporates DDX3X into its mature particles and that DDX3X is required for optimal HSV-1 infectivity. Here, we show that viral gene expression, replication, and propagation depend on optimal DDX3X protein levels. Surprisingly, DDX3X from incoming viral particles was not required for the early stages of the HSV-1 infection, but, rather, the protein controlled the assembly of new viral particles. This was independent of the previously reported ability of DDX3X to stimulate interferon type I production. Instead, both the lack and overexpression of DDX3X disturbed viral gene transcription and thus subsequent genome replication. This suggests that in addition to its effect on RNA viruses, DDX3X impacts DNA viruses such as HSV-1 by an interferon-independent pathway.IMPORTANCE Viruses interact with a variety of cellular proteins to complete their life cycle. Among them is DDX3X, an RNA helicase that participates in most aspects of RNA biology, including transcription, splicing, nuclear export, and translation. Several RNA viruses and a limited number of DNA viruses are known to manipulate DDX3X for their own benefit. In contrast, DDX3X is also known to promote interferon production to limit viral propagation. Here, we show that DDX3X, which we previously identified in mature HSV-1 virions, stimulates HSV-1 gene expression and, consequently, virion assembly by a process that is independent of its ability to promote the interferon pathway. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  9. Expression of herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) in the cornea and trigeminal ganglia of normal and HSV-1 infected mice.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, S Krisztian; Tiwari, Vaibhav; Prandovszky, Emese; Dosa, Sandor; Bacsa, Sarolta; Valyi-Nagy, Klara; Shukla, Deepak; Valyi-Nagy, Tibor

    2009-10-01

    Herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) plays a critical role in the regulation of inflammation through interaction with its natural ligands LIGHT and lymphotoxin alpha and also serves as one of the entry receptors of herpes simplex virus (HSV). The purpose of this study was to better understand the expression of HVEM in the cornea and trigeminal ganglia (TG), which are important targets of HSV infection. Immunohistochemistry was used to define HVEM expression in the cornea and TG of normal and HSV-1 infected mice euthanized 2 to 5 days or 7 months following corneal inoculation of virus. We found that HVEM is widely expressed in the normal corneal epithelium and endothelium, is weakly and focally expressed in the corneal stroma, and is expressed in a portion of neurons and non-neuronal cells in the TG. Acute HSV-1 keratitis and ganglionitis were associated with increased HVEM expression in the corneal epithelium and stroma and in neurons and non-neuronal cells of TG, and many inflammatory cells in these tissues also expressed HVEM. TG derived from mice 7 months after virus inoculation demonstrated latent HSV-1 infection that was associated with increased HVEM expression in neurons and non-neuronal cells relative to uninfected control tissues. Latent TG also contained focal infiltrates of mononuclear inflammatory cells, many of which expressed HVEM. Corneas derived from latently infected mice demonstrated chronic keratitis, with no evidence of virus replication or increased HVEM expression in the corneal epithelium, and inflammatory cells present showed only weak HVEM expression. HVEM is expressed in the cornea and TG and therefore may serve as an HSV entry receptor in these tissues. Furthermore, these findings raise the possibility that changes in HVEM expression following ocular HSV-1 infection can modulate HSV spread and infection-induced inflammation in the cornea and TG.

  10. Tissue-Specific Expression of Herpes Simplex Virus Thymidine Kinase Gene Delivered by Adeno-Associated Virus Inhibits the Growth of Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Athymic Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Hua; Lu, Ronghua; Chang, Judy C.; Kan, Yuet Wai

    1997-12-01

    About 70% of hepatocellular carcinomas are known to express α -fetoprotein, which is normally expressed in fetal but not in adult livers. To induce herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase expression in these cancer cells, we constructed an adeno-associated viral vector containing the HSV-TK gene under the control of the α -fetoprotein enhancer and albumin promoter. We previously demonstrated in vitro that although this vector can transduce a variety of human cells, only transduced AFP and albumin-expressing hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines were sensitive to killing by ganciclovir (GCV). In the present study, we explored the effect of this vector on hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vivo. Subcutaneous tumors generated in nude mice by implanting hepatocellular carcinoma cells previously transduced with this vector shrank dramatically after treatment with GCV. Bystander effect was also observed on the tumors generated by mixing transduced and untransduced cells. To test whether the tumor cells can be transduced by the virus in vivo, we injected the recombinant adeno-associated virus into tumors generated by untransduced hepatocarcinoma cell line. Tumor growth were retarded after treatment with GCV. These experiments demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo transduction of tumor cell with rAAV.

  11. Genital Herpes

    MedlinePlus

    ... herpes is HSV-2. HSV-1 usually causes cold sores that appear on the mouth, lips, and eyes, but it is becoming more common as a cause of genital herpes, especially in young women. How common is the herpes virus? At least 50 million people in the United ...

  12. Genital Herpes

    MedlinePlus

    ... who have sex with women get genital herpes? Yes. It is possible to get genital herpes, or any other STI, if you are a woman who ... sex and avoid sexual activity during an outbreak. Yes. It is possible to get genital herpes, or any other STI, if you are a woman who ...

  13. Vaccinia virus, herpes simplex virus, and carcinogens induce DNA amplification in a human cell line and support replication of a helpervirus dependent parvovirus.

    PubMed

    Schlehofer, J R; Ehrbar, M; zur Hausen, H

    1986-07-15

    The SV40-transformed human kidney cell line, NB-E, amplifies integrated as well as episomal SV40 DNA upon treatment with chemical (DMBA) or physical (uv irradiation) carcinogens ("initiators") as well as after infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 or with vaccinia virus. In addition it is shown that vaccinia virus induces SV40 DNA amplification also in the SV40-transformed Chinese hamster embryo cell line, CO631. These findings demonstrate that human cells similar to Chinese hamster cells amplify integrated DNA sequences after treatment with carcinogens or infection with specific viruses. Furthermore, a poxvirus--vaccinia virus--similar to herpes group viruses induces DNA amplification. As reported for other systems, the vaccinia virus-induced DNA amplification in NB-E cells is inhibited by coinfection with adeno-associated virus (AAV) type 5. This is in line with previous studies on inhibition of carcinogen- or HSV-induced DNA amplification in CO631 cells. The experiments also demonstrate that vaccinia virus, in addition to herpes and adenoviruses acts as a helper virus for replication and structural antigen synthesis of AAV-5 in NB-E cells.

  14. Vaccinia virus, herpes simplex virus, and carcinogens induce DNA amplification in a human cell line and support replication of a helpervirus dependent parvovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Schlehofer, J.R.; Ehrbar, M.; zur Hausen, H.

    1986-07-15

    The SV40-transformed human kidney cell line, NB-E, amplifies integrated as well as episomal SV40 DNA upon treatment with chemical (DMBA) or physical (uv irradiation) carcinogens (initiators) as well as after infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 or with vaccinia virus. In addition it is shown that vaccinia virus induces SV40 DNA amplification also in the SV40-transformed Chinese hamster embryo cell line, CO631. These findings demonstrate that human cells similar to Chinese hamster cells amplify integrated DNA sequences after treatment with carcinogens or infection with specific viruses. Furthermore, a poxvirus--vaccinia virus--similar to herpes group viruses induces DNA amplification. As reported for other systems, the vaccinia virus-induced DNA amplification in NB-E cells is inhibited by coinfection with adeno-associated virus (AAV) type 5. This is in line with previous studies on inhibition of carcinogen- or HSV-induced DNA amplification in CO631 cells. The experiments also demonstrate that vaccinia virus, in addition to herpes and adenoviruses acts as a helper virus for replication and structural antigen synthesis of AAV-5 in NB-E cells.

  15. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Reduce the Number of Herpes Simplex Virus-1 Genomes Initiating Expression in Individual Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shapira, Lev; Ralph, Maya; Tomer, Enosh; Cohen, Shai; Kobiler, Oren

    2016-01-01

    Although many viral particles can enter a single cell, the number of viral genomes per cell that establish infection is limited. However, mechanisms underlying this restriction were not explored in depth. For herpesviruses, one of the possible mechanisms suggested is chromatinization and silencing of the incoming genomes. To test this hypothesis, we followed infection with three herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) fluorescence expressing recombinants in the presence or absence of histone deacetylases inhibitors (HDACi’s). Unexpectedly, a lower number of viral genomes initiated expression in the presence of these inhibitors. This phenomenon was observed using several HDACi: Trichostatin A (TSA), Suberohydroxamic Acid, Valporic Acid, and Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid. We found that HDACi presence did not change the progeny outcome from the infected cells but did alter the kinetic of the gene expression from the viral genomes. Different cell types (HFF, Vero, and U2OS), which vary in their capability to activate intrinsic and innate immunity, show a cell specific basal average number of viral genomes establishing infection. Importantly, in all cell types, treatment with TSA reduced the number of viral genomes. ND10 nuclear bodies are known to interact with the incoming herpes genomes and repress viral replication. The viral immediate early protein, ICP0, is known to disassemble the ND10 bodies and to induce degradation of some of the host proteins in these domains. HDACi treated cells expressed higher levels of some of the host ND10 proteins (promyelocytic leukemia and ATRX), which may explain the lower number of viral genomes initiating expression per cell. Corroborating this hypothesis, infection with three HSV-1 recombinants carrying a deletion in the gene coding for ICP0, show a reduction in the number of genomes being expressed in U2OS cells. We suggest that alterations in the levels of host proteins involved in intrinsic antiviral defense may result in

  16. Gene expression of herpes simplex virus. II. Uv radiological analysis of viral transcription units

    SciTech Connect

    Millette, R. L.; Klaiber, R.

    1980-06-01

    The transcriptional organization of the genome of herpes simplex virus type 1 was analyzed by measuring the sensitivity of viral polypeptide synthesis to uv irradiation of the infecting virus. Herpes simplex virus type 1 was irradiated with various doses of uv light and used to infect xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts. Immediate early transcription units were analyzed by having cycloheximide present throughout the period of infection, removing the drug at 8 h postinfection, and pulse-labeling proteins with (355)methionine. Delayed early transcription units were analyzed in similar studies by having 9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyladenine present during the experiment to block replication of the input irradiated genome. The results indicate that none of the immediate early genes analyzed can be cotranscribed, whereas some of the delayed early genes might be cotranscribed. No evidence was found for the existence of large, multigene transcription units.

  17. Herpes virus microRNA expression and significance in serous ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Deep; Mariani, Marisa; McHugh, Mark; Andreoli, Mirko; Sieber, Steven; He, Shiquan; Dowell-Martino, Candice; Fiedler, Paul; Scambia, Giovanni; Ferlini, Cristiano

    2014-01-01

    Serous ovarian cancer (SEOC) is the deadliest gynecologic malignancy. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small noncoding RNAs which regulate gene expression and protein translation. MiRNAs are also encoded by viruses with the intent of regulating their own genes and those of the infected cells. This is the first study assessing viral miRNAs in SEOC. MiRNAs sequencing data from 487 SEOC patients were downloaded from the TCGA website and analyzed through in-house sequencing pipeline. To cross-validate TCGA analysis, we measured the expression of miR-H25 by quantitative immunofluorescence in an additional cohort of 161 SEOC patients. Gene, miRNA expression, and cytotoxicity assay were performed on multiple ovarian cancer cell lines transfected with miR-H25 and miR-BART7. Outcome analysis was performed using multivariate Cox and Kaplan-Meier method. Viral miRNAs are more expressed in SEOC than in normal tissues. Moreover, Herpetic viral miRNAs (miR-BART7 from EBV and miR-H25 from HSV-2) are significant and predictive biomarkers of outcome in multivariate Cox analysis. MiR-BART7 correlates with resistance to first line chemotherapy and early death, whereas miR-H25 appears to impart a protective effect and long term survival. Integrated analysis of gene and viral miRNAs expression suggests that miR-BART7 induces directly cisplatin-resistance, while miR-H25 alters RNA processing and affects the expression of noxious human miRNAs such as miR-143. This is the first investigation linking viral miRNA expression to ovarian cancer outcome. Viral miRNAs can be useful to develop biomarkers for early diagnosis and as a potential therapeutic tool to reduce SEOC lethality.

  18. Genital Herpes

    MedlinePlus

    ... a sexually transmitted disease (STD) caused by a herpes simplex virus (HSV). It can cause sores on your genital or rectal area, buttocks, and thighs. You can get it from having vaginal, anal, or ... of herpes are called outbreaks. You usually get sores near ...

  19. The combined effects of irradiation and herpes simplex virus type 1 infection on an immortal gingival cell line

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Oral mucosa is frequently exposed to Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection and irradiation due to dental radiography. During radiotherapy for oral cancer, the surrounding clinically normal tissues are also irradiated. This prompted us to study the effects of HSV-1 infection and irradiation on viability and apoptosis of oral epithelial cells. Methods Immortal gingival keratinocyte (HMK) cells were infected with HSV-1 at a low multiplicity of infection (MOI) and irradiated with 2 Gy 24 hours post infection. The cells were then harvested at 24, 72 and 144 hours post irradiation for viability assays and qRT-PCR analyses for the apoptosis-related genes caspases 3, 8, and 9, bcl-2, NFκB1, and viral gene VP16. Mann–Whitney U-test was used for statistical calculations. Results Irradiation improved the cell viability at 144 hours post irradiation (P = 0.05), which was further improved by HSV-1 infection at MOI of 0.00001 (P = 0.05). Simultaneously, the combined effects of infection at MOI of 0.0001 and irradiation resulted in upregulation in NFκB1 (P = 0.05). The combined effects of irradiation and HSV infection also significantly downregulated the expression of caspases 3, 8, and 9 at 144 hours (P = 0.05) whereas caspase 3 and 8 significantly upregulated in non-irradiated, HSV-infected cells as compared to uninfected controls (P = 0.05). Infection with 0.0001 MOI downregulated bcl-2 in non-irradiated cells but was upregulated by 27% after irradiation when compared to non-irradiated infected cells (P = 0.05). Irradiation had no effect on HSV-1 shedding or HSV gene expression at 144 hours. Conclusions HSV-1 infection may improve the viability of immortal cells after irradiation. The effect might be related to inhibition of apoptosis. PMID:25005804

  20. Establishment of a human herpes virus-8-negative malignant effusion lymphoma cell line (STR-428) carrying concurrent translocations of BCL2 and c-MYC genes.

    PubMed

    Taira, Tamiko; Nagasaki, Akitoshi; Tomoyose, Takeaki; Miyagi, Jun-ichi; Kakazu, Naoki; Makino, Shigeyoshi; Shinjyo, Tetsuharu; Taira, Naoya; Masuda, Masato; Takasu, Nobuyuki

    2007-09-01

    A new cell line, STR-428 was established from ascites tumor cells of a malignant effusion lymphoma patient without human herpes virus-8 (HHV-8) infection. STR-428 cells showed an immunophenotype of mature B-cells and produced few cytokines related to lymphomatous effusion. Karyotypic and genetic analysis revealed complex translocations including t(14;18)(q32;q21) effecting IgH/BCL2 and der(8)t(3;8)(q27;q24) involving c-MYC. STR-428 represents a unique, B-cell lymphoma cell line carrying concurrent rearrangement of BCL2 and c-MYC genes with features distinct from those of HHV-8-related primary effusion lymphoma. This cell line may be a valuable tool, other than HHV-8, to investigate the pathogenesis of primary lymphomatous effusion.

  1. Interferon gamma regulates platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 expression and neutrophil infiltration into herpes simplex virus- infected mouse corneas

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    In a mouse model of herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 corneal infection, tissue destruction results from a CD4+ T cell-mediated chronic inflammation, in which interleukin 2 and interferon (IFN) gamma are requisite inflammatory mediators and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) are the predominant infiltrating cells. In vivo neutralization of IFN- gamma relieved inflammation at least in part through a specific block of PMN extravasation into HSV-1-infected corneas. Intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM) 1 and platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM) 1 were upregulated on the vascular endothelium of inflamed corneas. Reduced PMN extravasation in anti-IFN-gamma-treated mice was associated with a dramatic reduction of PECAM-1 but not ICAM-1 expression on vascular endothelium. PMN accumulated in the lumen of corneal vessels after in vivo IFN-gamma neutralization. PECAM-1 was readily detectable on PMN inside the vessels but was not detectable on PMN that extravasated into the infected cornea. Moreover, flow cytometric analysis revealed reduced PECAM-1 expression but elevated major histocompatibility complex class I expression on PMN that recently extravasated into the peritoneal cavity when compared with PMN in the peripheral blood. We conclude that IFN-gamma contributes to HSV- 1-induced corneal inflammation by facilitating PMN infiltration; this appears to be accomplished through upregulation of PECAM-1 expression on the vascular endothelium; and PMN downregulate PECAM-1 expression during the process of extravasation. PMID:8879215

  2. A neuron-specific host microRNA targets herpes simplex virus-1 ICP0 expression and promotes latency.

    PubMed

    Pan, Dongli; Flores, Omar; Umbach, Jennifer L; Pesola, Jean M; Bentley, Peris; Rosato, Pamela C; Leib, David A; Cullen, Bryan R; Coen, Donald M

    2014-04-09

    After infecting peripheral sites, herpes simplex virus (HSV) invades the nervous system and initiates latent infection in sensory neurons. Establishment and maintenance of HSV latency require host survival, and entail repression of productive cycle ("lytic") viral gene expression. We find that a neuron-specific microRNA, miR-138, represses expression of ICP0, a viral transactivator of lytic gene expression. A mutant HSV-1 (M138) with disrupted miR-138 target sites in ICP0 mRNA exhibits enhanced expression of ICP0 and other lytic proteins in infected neuronal cells in culture. Following corneal inoculation, M138-infected mice have higher levels of ICP0 and lytic transcripts in trigeminal ganglia during establishment of latency, and exhibit increased mortality and encephalitis symptoms. After full establishment of latency, the fraction of trigeminal ganglia harboring detectable lytic transcripts is greater in M138-infected mice. Thus, miR-138 is a neuronal factor that represses HSV-1 lytic gene expression, promoting host survival and viral latency.

  3. Genital Herpes

    MedlinePlus

    ... fetal scalp electrode (tiny wire used to check fetal heart rate). Cesarean birth may be recommended if you have an active herpes sore or prodromal symptoms such as pain or burning when you go into labor. After ...

  4. Gene expression of herpes simplex virus. II. UV radiological analysis of viral transcription units.

    PubMed Central

    Millette, R L; Klaiber, R

    1980-01-01

    The transcriptional organization of the genome of herpes simplex virus type 1 was analyzed by measuring the sensitivity of viral polypeptide synthesis to UV irradiation of the infecting virus. Herpes simplex virus type 1 was irradiated with various doses of UV light and used to infect xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts. Immediate early transcription units were analyzed by having cycloheximide present throughout the period of infection, removing the drug at 8 h postinfection, and pulse-labeling proteins with [35S]methionine. Delayed early transcription units were analyzed in similar studies by having 9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyladenine present during the experiment to block replication of the input irradiated genome. The viral polypeptides were separated by gel electrophoresis and quantitated by densitometry of the gel autoradiograms. The following results were obtained. (i) The UV target sizes for the viral transcription units analyzed ranged from 1.44 to 5.65 kilobase pairs. This implies that the corresponding primary transcripts have minimum molecular weights ranging from 0.46 x 10(6). (ii) The genes for the four viral proteins, 165, 145, 116, and 71 (molecular weight x 10(3), exhibited UV target sizes that agree with their calculated gene size or measured mRNA size or both and thus must reside in promoter-adjacent positions. (iii) The transcription units for the remaining genes analyzed showed target sizes that range from 0.42 to 2.59 kilobase pairs greater than needed to encode the respective proteins. This probably is a reflection of their distances from promoters or the presence of intervening sequences or both. It further suggests that these genes are transcribed as precursor RNA molecules that are larger than their mRNA's. (iv) The results indicate that none of the immediate early genes analyzed can be cotranscribed, whereas some of the delayed early genes might be cotranscribed. No evidence was found for the existance of large, multigene transcription units

  5. Axin expression delays herpes simplex virus-induced autophagy and enhances viral replication in L929 cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun-Jin; Kee, Sun-Ho

    2014-02-01

    Axin, a negative regulator of the Wnt signaling pathway, plays a critical role in various cellular events including cell proliferation and cell death. Axin-regulated cell death affects multiple processes, including viral replication. For example, axin expression suppresses herpes simplex virus (HSV)-induced necrotic cell death and enhances viral replication. Based on these observations, this study investigated the involvement of autophagy in regulation of HSV replication and found axin expression inhibits autophagy-mediated suppression of viral replication in L929 cells. HSV infection induced autophagy in a time- and viral dose-dependent manner in control L929 cells (L-EV), whereas virus-induced autophagy was delayed in axin-expressing L929 cells (L-axin). Subsequent analysis showed that induction of autophagy by rapamycin reduced HSV replication, and that inhibiting autophagy by 3-methyladenine (3MA) and beclin-1 knockdown facilitated viral replication in L-EV cells. In addition, preventing autophagy with 3MA suppressed virus-induced cytotoxicity in L-EV cells. In contrast, HSV replication in L-axin cells was resistant to changes in autophagy. These results suggest that axin expression may render L929 cells resistant to HSV-infection induced autophagy, leading to enhanced viral replication. © 2014 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. The alteration of SHARPIN expression in the mouse brainstem during herpes simplex virus 1-induced facial palsy.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Li, Jianfeng; Mao, Yanyan; Li, Xiaofei; Liu, Wenwen; Xu, Lei; Han, Yuechen; Wang, Haibo

    2015-01-23

    Bell's palsy presents a unilateral weakness or paralysis of the face due to acute dysfunction of the peripheral facial nerve with no readily identifiable cause. Although data show that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) may be the possible causative agent of Bell's palsy, the precise mechanism of the paralysis is still unknown. SHANK-associated RH domain-interacting protein (SHARPIN) is thought to play a role in the control of inflammatory responses. In order to clarify the molecular pathway of SHARPIN involved in the facial palsy caused by HSV-1 in mice and the inhibitory effect of corticosteroids, we used 4-week-old Balb/c mice inoculated with HSV-1 for experiments. The expression and location of SHARPIN in the facial nucleus of brainstem were detected respectively by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, western blot and immunofluorescence. Expression level of SHARPIN increased and peaked at 2 days and then decreased in the facial nucleus of brainstem after the manifestation of the facial paralysis. After the administration of MPSS, the protein expression of SHARPIN at the peak point was down-regulated. Our results suggest that SHRPIN were activated during the inflammatory reaction in the HSV-1-induced facial paralysis. MPSS can effectively inhibit the expression of SHARPIN that may contribute to attenuate HSV-1-mediated nervous system damage.

  7. Equine herpesvirus 1 gene 12 can substitute for vmw65 in the growth of herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1, allowing the generation of optimized cell lines for the propagation of HSV vectors with multiple immediate-early gene defects.

    PubMed

    Thomas, S K; Lilley, C E; Latchman, D S; Coffin, R S

    1999-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) has often been suggested for development as a vector, particularly for the nervous system. Considerable evidence has shown that for use of HSV as a vector, immediate-early (IE) gene expression must be minimized or abolished, otherwise such vectors are likely to be highly cytotoxic. Mutations of vmw65 which abolish IE promoter transactivating activity may also be included to reduce IE gene expression generally. However, when vmw65 mutations are combined with an IE gene deletion, such viruses are hard to propagate, even on cells which otherwise complement the IE gene deletion effectively. We have found that vmw65 mutants can be effectively grown on cell lines expressing equine herpesvirus 1 gene 12, a non-HSV homologue of vmw65 with little sequence similarity to its HSV counterpart. This prevents repair by homologous recombination of vmw65 mutations in the virus, which would occur if mutations were complemented by vmw65 itself. The gene 12 protein is not packaged into HSV virions, which is important if viruses grown on such cells are to be used as vectors. These results not only further strengthen the evidence for direct functional homology between and similar modes of action of the two proteins but have allowed the generation of gene 12-containing cell lines in which ICP4 and ICP27 expression is induced by virus infection (probably by ICP0) and which give efficient growth of viruses deficient in ICP27, ICP4, and vmw65 (the viruses also have ICP34.5/ORFP deleted). Efficient growth of such viruses has not previously been possible. As these viruses are highly deficient in IE gene expression generally, such virus-cell line combinations may provide an alternative to HSV vectors with deletions of all four of the regulatory IE genes which, for optimal growth, require cell lines containing all four IE genes but which are hard to generate due to the intrinsic cytotoxicity of each of the proteins.

  8. Herpes simplex virus is equipped with RNA- and protein-based mechanisms to repress expression of ATRX, an effector of intrinsic immunity.

    PubMed

    Jurak, Igor; Silverstein, Leah B; Sharma, Mayuri; Coen, Donald M

    2012-09-01

    Intrinsic immunity is a first-line intracellular defense against virus infection, and viruses have evolved mechanisms to counteract it. During herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection, nuclear domain 10 (ND10) components localize adjacent to incoming viral genomes and generate a repressive environment for viral gene expression. Here, we found that the ND10 component, alpha-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX) protein, is predicted to be a target of HSV-1 miR-H1 and HSV-2 miR-H6. These microRNAs (miRNAs) share a seed sequence and are abundant during lytic infection. Mimics of both miRNAs could deplete endogenous ATRX, and an miR-H1 mimic could repress the expression of a reporter linked to the 3' untranslated region of ATRX mRNA, identifying a cellular mRNA targeted by an HSV miRNA. Interestingly, ATRX protein and its mRNA were depleted in cells lytically infected with HSV, and ATRX protein was also depleted in cells infected with human cytomegalovirus. However, infection with an HSV-1 mutant lacking miR-H1 still resulted in ATRX depletion. This depletion was sensitive to a proteasome inhibitor and was largely ablated by a deletion of the gene encoding the immediate-early ICP0 protein. Additionally, a deletion of the gene encoding the tegument protein Vhs ablated most of the depletion of ATRX mRNA. Thus, HSV is equipped with multiple mechanisms to limit the expression of ATRX. As ATRX is implicated in repression of lytic viral gene expression, our results suggest roles for these different mechanisms during various phases of HSV infection.

  9. Infection of murine keratinocytes with herpes simplex virus type 1 induces the expression of interleukin-10, but not interleukin-1α or tumour necrosis factor-α

    PubMed Central

    Zak-Prelich, Malgorzata; Halliday, Katrina E; Walker, Craig; Yates, Catherine M; Norval, Mary; Mckenzie, Roddie C

    2001-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is known to possess several mechanisms whereby it can evade the normal host immune defences. In this study the expression of the immunosuppressive cytokine, interleukin (IL)-10, was monitored following infection of a murine keratinocyte cell line (PAM-212) and compared with the expression of two proinflammatory cytokines: IL-1α and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α. The PAM-212 cells were infected at a multiplicity of 0·5 with a clinical isolate of HSV type 1, and the mRNA of the three cytokines was assessed by semiquantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT–PCR) over the following 24 hr. By 12 hr postinfection the amount of IL-10 mRNA had increased significantly to five-fold greater than that found in uninfected cells (P < 0·01), and this elevated level was maintained until at least 24 hr postinfection. In contrast, IL-1α and TNF-α mRNAs were not significantly up-regulated by the HSV infection. Immunostaining with an IL-10 monoclonal antibody (mAb) revealed that cytoplasmic IL-10 protein had increased by 6–12 hr postinfection. This quantity was further increased at 24 hr postinfection, when the viral cytopathic effect was apparent. Viral replication was necessary, but not sufficient on its own, for IL-10 induction. Experiments with HSV mutants lacking functional transactivating factors suggested that the viral transactivating proteins ICP-0 and VP-16 may be necessary for HSV-induced IL-10 expression. Thus, the up-regulation in the expression of IL-10 mRNA and protein induced by HSV early in the infection of keratinocytes represents a specific response and may be part of the viral strategy to avoid local immune defence mechanisms in the skin. PMID:11899434

  10. A polysaccharide fraction from medicinal herb Prunella vulgaris downregulates the expression of herpes simplex virus antigen in Vero cells.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Lawrence Chi-Ming; Zhu, Wen; Ooi, Vincent Eng-Choon

    2004-07-01

    Herpes simplex viruses (HSV) are pathogenic. With the emergence of drug-resistant strains of HSV, new antiviral agents, especially those with different modes of action, are urgently needed. Prunella vulgaris L. (Labiatae), a perennial plant commonly found in China and Europe, has long been used as a folk medicine to cure ailments. In this study, a polysaccharide fraction was prepared from Prunella vulgaris (PPV), and its effects on the expressions of HSV-1 and HSV-2 antigens in their host Vero cells were investigated with flow cytometry. The HSV antigen increased time-dependently in the infected cells, and PPV reduced its expression. The effective concentrations of PPV with 50% reductions of the HSV-1 and HSV-2 antigens were 20.6 and 20.1 microg/ml, respectively. The novelty of PPV is that it also reduces the antigen expression of acyclovir-resistant strain of HSV-1. After incubations with 25-100 microg/ml of PPV the HSV antigen-positive cells were reduced by 24.8-92.6%, respectively, showing that this polysaccharide fraction has a different mode of anti-HSV action from acyclovir. Results from this study show that PPV is effective against both the HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections, and flow cytometry offers a quantitative and highly reproducible anti-HSV drug-susceptibility assay.

  11. Assessment of 123I-FIAU imaging of herpes simplex viral gene expression in the treatment of glioma.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, Mary F; Wyper, David; Owens, Jonathan; Pimlott, Sally; Papanastassiou, Vakis; Patterson, James; Hadley, Donald M; Nicol, Alice; Rampling, Roy; Brown, S M

    2006-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1716 (HSV1716), a selectively replication competent mutant of HSV1, is under investigation as an oncolytic viral therapy in human malignant glioma. As with similar therapies, a technique for measurement of viral replication and distribution over time following virus administration is required. Imaging expression of the HSV-thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene offers an opportunity for non-invasive assessment of viral distribution in living subjects. This is the first study to explore the use of HSV-tk as a reporter gene and radiolabelled thymidine analogue 5-[(123)I]iodo-1-(2-deoxy-2-fluoro-beta-D-arabinofuranosyl) uracil ((123)I-FIAU) as a marker substrate to non-invasively monitor HSV1716 replication in humans during treatment of high-grade glioma. I-FIAU brain SPECT imaging was undertaken in eight patients receiving intra-tumoural injection of HSV1716, before and after administration of the virus. Baseline images were acquired 3 days prior to virus administration and between 1 and 5 days following virus administration. Region of interest analysis was used to investigate whether there was an increase in (123)I-FIAU concentration following virus administration due to HSV-tk expression. Increased (123)I-FIAU accumulation due to HSV-tk expression was not detected in this study. The possible explanations for this finding are explored and design options for future studies are discussed.

  12. Do there exist synergistic antitumor effects by coexpression of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase with cytokine genes on human gastric cancer cell line SGC7901?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian-Hua; Wan, Ming-Xi; Yuan, Jia-Ying; Pan, Bo-Rong

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the synergistic antitumor effects of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) together with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) or interleukin-2 (IL-2) gene expression on gastric cancer cell line SGC7901. METHODS: Recombinant vectors pL(TT)SN and pL(TI)SN, which express TK-IRES-TNF-α and TK-IRES-IL-2 genes separately, as well as the control plasmids pL(TK)SN and pLXSN were employed to transfect PA317 cells respectively to generate the viruses that can stably express the objective genes through G418 selection. The gastric cancer cells were then transfected by the retroviral serum from the package cells and maintained in culture to determine the cell growth and apoptosis. The cytotoxic effects of HSV-TK together with TNF-α or IL-2 gene expression on the transfected cancer cells were evaluated by the cell viability and bystander effects in the presence of GCV supplemented in the cultural medium. RESULTS: Expression of recombinant proteins including TNF-α and IL-2 by stable transfectants was confirmed by Western blotting. The percentage of cell apoptosis in the SGC/0, SGC/TK-TNF-α, SGC/TK-IL-2 and SGC/TK clone was 2.3%, 12.3%, 11.1% and 10.9% respectively at 24 h post-transfection. Cell growth status among all the experimental groups as judged by cell absorbance (A) at 570nm did not exhibit any significant difference (P > 0.05); although it was noted to be slightly lower in the SGC/TT group. Cell survival rate in SGC/TI, SGC/TT and SGC/TK group was significantly decreased in a dose-dependent manner of GCV compared with that of the SGC/0 group (P < 0.05-0.01). Among all studied cells, the SGC/TT was shown most sensitive to GCV with a half lethal dose of 0.5 mg·L-1. In contrast, the survival rate of SGC/0 cells was not affected by the presence of GCV with the doses less than 10 mg·L-1. The half lethal dose of GCV for SGC/0 cells was more than 100 mg·L-1. Marked bystander effect induced by SGC/TI, SGC/TT and SGC/TK cells was confirmed by the

  13. Host cell reactivation of uv- and X-ray-damaged herpes simplex virus by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, E.E.; Long, W.K.

    1981-12-01

    The efficacy of using an infected centers assay, employing herpes simplex virus-infected, Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) as components, to study host cell reactivation has been explored. Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was shown through the infected centers assay to have detectable but varying ability to lytically infect LCLs established from chromosomal breakage syndromes or closely related genetic disorders. The rate of HSV inactivation by ultraviolet (uv) irradiation was faster in LCLs established from Cockaynes's syndrome than in normal LCLs, and faster still in LCLs established from xeroderma pigmentosum. These results indicate that Cockayne's syndrome, while having what appears to be quantitatively normal levels of uv-induced DNA repair replication, shows decreased ability to host cell reactivated uv-damaged HSV. In direct contrast, X-irradiated HSV showed identical survival when assayed on normal LCLs or LCLs established from ataxia telangiectasia showing increased sensitivity to X irradiation as measured by colony formation. Through the infected centers assay, it has also been possible to demonstrate low levels of multiplicity reactivation of mutagen-damaged HSV in permanently proliferating LCLs.

  14. Inhibition of herpes simplex virus 1 gene expression by designer zinc-finger transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Papworth, Monika; Moore, Michael; Isalan, Mark; Minczuk, Michal; Choo, Yen; Klug, Aaron

    2003-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) replicative cycle begins by binding of the viral activator, VP16, to a set of sequences in the immediate-early (IE) gene promoters. With the aim of inhibiting this cycle, we have constructed a number of synthetic zinc-finger DNA-binding peptides by using recently reported methods. Peptides containing either three or six fingers, targeted to a viral promoter, were engineered as fusions with a KOX-1 transcription repression domain. These proteins bound to the HSV-1 IE175k (ICP4) promoter, in vitro, with nanomolar or subnanomolar binding affinity. However, in a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter system, only the six-finger protein was found to repress VP16-activated transcription significantly. Thus the longer array of zinc fingers is required to compete successfully against VP16, one of the most powerful natural activators known. We found that the HSV-1 replication cycle can be partially repressed by the six-finger peptide with the viral titer reduced by 90%. PMID:12574501

  15. Persistent expression of chemokine and chemokine receptor RNAs at primary and latent sites of herpes simplex virus 1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Cook, W James; Kramer, Martha F; Walker, Russell M; Burwell, Timothy J; Holman, Holly A; Coen, Donald M; Knipe, David M

    2004-01-01

    Inflammatory cytokines and infiltrating T cells are readily detected in herpes simplex virus (HSV) infected mouse cornea and trigeminal ganglia (TG) during the acute phase of infection, and certain cytokines continue to be expressed at lower levels in infected TG during the subsequent latent phase. Recent results have shown that HSV infection activates Toll-like receptor signaling. Thus, we hypothesized that chemokines may be broadly expressed at both primary sites and latent sites of HSV infection for prolonged periods of time. Real-time reverse transcriptase-polymrease chain reaction (RT-PCR) to quantify expression levels of transcripts encoding chemokines and their receptors in cornea and TG following corneal infection. RNAs encoding the inflammatory-type chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR2, CCR5, and CXCR3, which are highly expressed on activated T cells, macrophages and most immature dendritic cells (DC), and the more broadly expressed CCR7, were highly expressed and strongly induced in infected cornea and TG at 3 and 10 days postinfection (dpi). Elevated levels of these RNAs persisted in both cornea and TG during the latent phase at 30 dpi. RNAs for the broadly expressed CXCR4 receptor was induced at 30 dpi but less so at 3 and 10 dpi in both cornea and TG. Transcripts for CCR3 and CCR6, receptors that are not highly expressed on activated T cells or macrophages, also appeared to be induced during acute and latent phases; however, their very low expression levels were near the limit of our detection. RNAs encoding the CCR1 and CCR5 chemokine ligands MIP-1α, MIP-1β and RANTES, and the CCR2 ligand MCP-1 were also strongly induced and persisted in cornea and TG during the latent phase. These and other recent results argue that HSV antigens or DNA can stimulate expression of chemokines, perhaps through activation of Toll-like receptors, for long periods of time at both primary and latent sites of HSV infection. These chemokines recruit activated T cells and other

  16. Persistent expression of chemokine and chemokine receptor RNAs at primary and latent sites of herpes simplex virus 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Cook, W James; Kramer, Martha F; Walker, Russell M; Burwell, Timothy J; Holman, Holly A; Coen, Donald M; Knipe, David M

    2004-09-23

    Inflammatory cytokines and infiltrating T cells are readily detected in herpes simplex virus (HSV) infected mouse cornea and trigeminal ganglia (TG) during the acute phase of infection, and certain cytokines continue to be expressed at lower levels in infected TG during the subsequent latent phase. Recent results have shown that HSV infection activates Toll-like receptor signaling. Thus, we hypothesized that chemokines may be broadly expressed at both primary sites and latent sites of HSV infection for prolonged periods of time. Real-time reverse transcriptase-polymrease chain reaction (RT-PCR) to quantify expression levels of transcripts encoding chemokines and their receptors in cornea and TG following corneal infection. RNAs encoding the inflammatory-type chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR2, CCR5, and CXCR3, which are highly expressed on activated T cells, macrophages and most immature dendritic cells (DC), and the more broadly expressed CCR7, were highly expressed and strongly induced in infected cornea and TG at 3 and 10 days postinfection (dpi). Elevated levels of these RNAs persisted in both cornea and TG during the latent phase at 30 dpi. RNAs for the broadly expressed CXCR4 receptor was induced at 30 dpi but less so at 3 and 10 dpi in both cornea and TG. Transcripts for CCR3 and CCR6, receptors that are not highly expressed on activated T cells or macrophages, also appeared to be induced during acute and latent phases; however, their very low expression levels were near the limit of our detection. RNAs encoding the CCR1 and CCR5 chemokine ligands MIP-1alpha, MIP-1beta and RANTES, and the CCR2 ligand MCP-1 were also strongly induced and persisted in cornea and TG during the latent phase. These and other recent results argue that HSV antigens or DNA can stimulate expression of chemokines, perhaps through activation of Toll-like receptors, for long periods of time at both primary and latent sites of HSV infection. These chemokines recruit activated T cells and

  17. Expression of herpes simplex virus type 1 recombinant thymidine kinase and its application to a rapid antiviral sensitivity assay.

    PubMed

    Shiota, Tomoyuki; Lixin, Wang; Takayama-Ito, Mutsuyo; Iizuka, Itoe; Ogata, Momoko; Tsuji, Masanori; Nishimura, Hidekazu; Taniguchi, Shuichi; Morikawa, Shigeru; Kurane, Ichiro; Mizuguchi, Masashi; Saijo, Masayuki

    2011-08-01

    Antiviral-resistant herpesvirus infection has become a great concern for immunocompromised patients. Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infections are treated with viral thymidine kinase (vTK)-associated drugs such as acyclovir (ACV), and most ACV-resistance (ACV(r)) is due to mutations in the vTK. The standard drug sensitivity test is usually carried out by the plaque reduction assay-based method, which requires over 10 days. To shorten the time required, a novel system was developed by the concept, in which 293T cells transiently expressing recombinant vTK derived from the test sample by transfection of the cells with an expression vector were infected with vTK-deficient and ACV(r) HSV-1 (TAR), and then cultured in a maintenance medium with or without designated concentrations of ACV, ganciclovir (GCV) and brivudine (BVdU). The replication of TAR was strongly inhibited by ACV, GCV and BVdU in 293T cells expressing recombinant vTK of the ACV-sensitive HSV-1, whereas replication was not or slightly inhibited in cells expressing the recombinant vTK of highly resistant or intermediately resistant HSV-1, respectively. An inverse correlation was demonstrated in the 50% effective concentrations (EC(50)s) and inhibitory effects of these compounds on the replication of TAR among ACV(s) and ACV(r) HSV-1 clones. These results indicate that the EC(50)s of the vTK-associated drugs including ACV can be assumed by measuring the inhibitory effect of drugs in 293T cells expressing recombinant vTK of the target virus. The newly developed antiviral sensitivity assay system for HSV-1 makes it possible to estimate EC(50) for vTK-associated drugs, when whole vTK gene is available for use by gene amplification directly from lesion's samples or from virus isolates.

  18. Requirement of the N-terminal activation domain of herpes simplex virus ICP4 for viral gene expression.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Lauren M; Bayer, Avraham; Deluca, Neal A

    2013-01-01

    ICP4 is the major activator of herpes simplex virus (HSV) transcription. Previous studies have defined several regions of ICP4 that are important for viral gene expression, including a DNA binding domain and transactivation domains that are contained in the C-terminal and N-terminal 520 and 274 amino acids, respectively. Here we show that the N-terminal 210 amino acids of ICP4 are required for interactions with components of TFIID and mediator and, as a consequence, are necessary for the activation of viral genes. A mutant of ICP4 deleted for amino acids 30 to 210, d3-10, was unable to complement an ICP4 null virus at the level of viral replication. This was the result of a severe deficiency in viral gene and protein expression. The absence of viral gene expression coincided with a defect in the recruitment of RNA polymerase II to a representative early promoter (thymidine kinase [TK]). Affinity purification experiments demonstrated that d3-10 ICP4 was not found in complexes with components of TFIID and mediator, suggesting that the defect in RNA polymerase II (Pol II) recruitment was the result of ablated interactions between d3-10 and TFIID and mediator. Complementation assays suggested that the N-terminal and C-terminal regions of ICP4 cooperate to mediate gene expression. The complementation was the result of the formation of more functional heterodimers, which restored the ability of the d3-10-containing molecules to interact with TFIID. Together, these studies suggest that the N terminus contains a true activation domain, mediating interactions with TFIID, mediator, and perhaps other transcription factors, and that the C terminus of the molecule contains activities that augment the functions of the activation domain.

  19. [Herpes gestationis].

    PubMed

    Mairos, João S; Veca, Concetta P; Ribeiro, Rui

    2004-01-01

    Herpes Gestationis is a serious dermatological disease, albeit rare, associated to pregnancy or to the trophoblast diseases. Contrary to what the name suggests, it is not a viral disease but an auto-immune disease. We present the clinical case of a 38 year-old woman to whom a case of Herpes Gestationis was diagnosed when she was 15 weeks pregnant and whom has been treated with corticosteroids and antihistamine's showing positive results and without major complications for the mother or the embryo. The authors are undertaking a review of the existing literature, based on this clinic case.

  20. Suicide gene therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma cells by survivin promoter-driven expression of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene

    PubMed Central

    QU, LILI; WANG, YANYUN; GONG, LAILING; ZHU, JIN; GONG, RUJUN; SI, JIN

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the selective killing effect of the herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (TK/GCV) suicide gene system controlled by the survivin promoter on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells in vitro. Recombinant plasmid vectors driven by the survivin promoter were constructed. HepG2 HCC and LO2 normal human liver cells were transfected with the recombinant plasmids, green fluorescent protein (GFP)/pSURV, TK/pSURV and TAT-TK/pSURV. GFP expression was detected by fluoroscopy and flow cytometry (FCM). TK gene expression was detected using RT-PCR and western blot analysis. The selective killing effects after GCV application were evaluated by tetrazolium assay, FCM and western blot analysis. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA. After transfection with GFP/pSURV, TK/pSURV and TAT-TK/pSURV for 48 h, GFP expression was observed in the HepG2 cells, but not in the L02 cells and TK gene expression was evidently detected by RT-PCR and western blot analysis in the HepG2 cells. Three stably transfected cell lines (HepG2/pSURV, HepG2/TK/pSURV and HepG2/TAT-TK/pSURV) were successfully established. Compared with the HepG2/TK/pSURV group, a significant ‘bystander effect’ was observed in the HepG2/TAT-TK/pSURV group with the incorporation of unmodifed HepG2 cells at different ratios. Following transfection with TK/pSURV and TAT-TK/pSURV, the growth of HepG2 cells in the presence of GCV was markedly inhibited. This finding was further corroborated by FCM and immunoblot analysis revealed the repressed expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Our results showed that the plasmid vectors carrying the TK and TAT-TK fusion protein gene driven by the survivin promoter were successfully constructed and their specific expression in HepG2 cells provided the basis for the targeted gene therapy of HCC. PMID:23354806

  1. Suicide gene therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma cells by survivin promoter-driven expression of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene.

    PubMed

    Qu, Lili; Wang, Yanyun; Gong, Lailing; Zhu, Jin; Gong, Rujun; Si, Jin

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the selective killing effect of the herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (TK/GCV) suicide gene system controlled by the survivin promoter on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells in vitro. Recombinant plasmid vectors driven by the survivin promoter were constructed. HepG2 HCC and LO2 normal human liver cells were transfected with the recombinant plasmids, green fluorescent protein (GFP)/pSURV, TK/pSURV and TAT-TK/pSURV. GFP expression was detected by fluoroscopy and flow cytometry (FCM). TK gene expression was detected using RT-PCR and western blot analysis. The selective killing effects after GCV application were evaluated by tetrazolium assay, FCM and western blot analysis. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA. After transfection with GFP/pSURV, TK/pSURV and TAT-TK/pSURV for 48 h, GFP expression was observed in the HepG2 cells, but not in the L02 cells and TK gene expression was evidently detected by RT-PCR and western blot analysis in the HepG2 cells. Three stably transfected cell lines (HepG2/pSURV, HepG2/TK/pSURV and HepG2/TAT-TK/pSURV) were successfully established. Compared with the HepG2/TK/pSURV group, a significant 'bystander effect' was observed in the HepG2/TAT-TK/pSURV group with the incorporation of unmodifed HepG2 cells at different ratios. Following transfection with TK/pSURV and TAT-TK/pSURV, the growth of HepG2 cells in the presence of GCV was markedly inhibited. This finding was further corroborated by FCM and immunoblot analysis revealed the repressed expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Our results showed that the plasmid vectors carrying the TK and TAT-TK fusion protein gene driven by the survivin promoter were successfully constructed and their specific expression in HepG2 cells provided the basis for the targeted gene therapy of HCC.

  2. Genital Herpes

    MedlinePlus

    ... best way to prevent genital herpes is abstinence. Teens who do have sex must properly use a latex condom every time ... Date reviewed: February 2016 previous 1 • ... Boyfriend Has an STD Before We Have Sex? Telling Your Partner You Have an STD Contact ...

  3. Genital Herpes

    PubMed Central

    Scappatura, F. Philip

    1987-01-01

    The author reviews the prevalence of genital herpes, outlines the typical clinical courses of the disease in its primary and recurrent forms. He discusses the physical, psychological and social effects of this sexually transmitted disease and provides three protocols for the use of oral acyclovir in its treatment. PMID:21263803

  4. Herpes simplex virus-mediated expression of Pax3 and MyoD in embryoid bodies results in lineage-Related alterations in gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Craft, April M; Krisky, David M; Wechuck, James B; Lobenhofer, Edward K; Jiang, Ying; Wolfe, Darren P; Glorioso, Joseph C

    2008-12-01

    The ability of embryonic stem cells to develop into multiple cell lineages provides a powerful resource for tissue repair and regeneration. Gene transfer offers a means to dissect the complex events in lineage determination but is limited by current delivery systems. We designed a high-efficiency replication-defective herpes simplex virus gene transfer vector (JDbetabeta) for robust and transient expression of the transcription factors Pax3 and MyoD, which are known to be involved in skeletal muscle differentiation. JDbetabeta-mediated expression of each gene in day 4 embryoid bodies (early-stage mesoderm) resulted in the induction of unique alterations in gene expression profiles, including the upregulation of known target genes relevant to muscle and neural crest development, whereas a control enhanced green fluorescent protein expression vector was relatively inert. This vector delivery system holds great promise for the use of gene transfer to analyze the impact of specific genes on both regulatory genetic events and commitment of stem cells to particular lineages.

  5. An acutely and latently expressed herpes simplex virus 2 viral microRNA inhibits expression of ICP34.5, a viral neurovirulence factor.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shuang; Bertke, Andrea S; Patel, Amita; Wang, Kening; Cohen, Jeffrey I; Krause, Philip R

    2008-08-05

    Latency-associated transcript (LAT) sequences regulate herpes simplex virus (HSV) latency and reactivation from sensory neurons. We found a HSV-2 LAT-related microRNA (miRNA) designated miR-I in transfected and infected cells in vitro and in acutely and latently infected ganglia of guinea pigs in vivo. miR-I is also expressed in human sacral dorsal root ganglia latently infected with HSV-2. miR-I is expressed under the LAT promoter in vivo in infected sensory ganglia. We also predicted and identified a HSV-1 LAT exon-2 viral miRNA in a location similar to miR-I, implying a conserved mechanism in these closely related viruses. In transfected and infected cells, miR-I reduces expression of ICP34.5, a key viral neurovirulence factor. We hypothesize that miR-I may modulate the outcome of viral infection in the peripheral nervous system by functioning as a molecular switch for ICP34.5 expression.

  6. Expression of RNA interference triggers from an oncolytic herpes simplex virus results in specific silencing in tumour cells in vitro and tumours in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to tumours remains a major obstacle for the development of RNA interference (RNAi)-based therapeutics. Following the promising pre-clinical and clinical results with the oncolytic herpes simplex virus (HSV) OncoVEXGM-CSF, we aimed to express RNAi triggers from oncolytic HSV, which although has the potential to improve treatment by silencing tumour-related genes, was not considered possible due to the highly oncolytic properties of HSV. Methods To evaluate RNAi-mediated silencing from an oncolytic HSV backbone, we developed novel replicating HSV vectors expressing short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) or artificial microRNA (miRNA) against the reporter genes green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and β-galactosidase (lacZ). These vectors were tested in non-tumour cell lines in vitro and tumour cells that are moderately susceptible to HSV infection both in vitro and in mice xenografts in vivo. Silencing was assessed at the protein level by fluorescent microscopy, x-gal staining, enzyme activity assay, and western blotting. Results Our results demonstrate that it is possible to express shRNA and artificial miRNA from an oncolytic HSV backbone, which had not been previously investigated. Furthermore, oncolytic HSV-mediated delivery of RNAi triggers resulted in effective and specific silencing of targeted genes in tumour cells in vitro and tumours in vivo, with the viruses expressing artificial miRNA being comprehensibly more effective. Conclusions This preliminary data provide the first demonstration of oncolytic HSV-mediated expression of shRNA or artificial miRNA and silencing of targeted genes in tumour cells in vitro and in vivo. The vectors developed in this study are being adapted to silence tumour-related genes in an ongoing study that aims to improve the effectiveness of oncolytic HSV treatment in tumours that are moderately susceptible to HSV infection and thus, potentially improve response rates seen in human clinical

  7. Selective Expression of CCR10 and CXCR3 by Circulating Human Herpes Simplex Virus-Specific CD8 T Cells.

    PubMed

    Hensel, Michael T; Peng, Tao; Cheng, Anqi; De Rosa, Stephen C; Wald, Anna; Laing, Kerry J; Jing, Lichen; Dong, Lichun; Magaret, Amalia S; Koelle, David M

    2017-10-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection is restricted to epithelial cells and neurons and is controlled by CD8 T cells. These cells both traffic to epithelial sites of recurrent lytic infection and to ganglia and persist at the dermal-epidermal junction for up to 12 weeks after lesion resolution. We previously showed that cutaneous lymphocyte-associated antigen (CLA), a functional E-selectin ligand (ESL), is selectively expressed on circulating HSV-2-specific CD8 T cells. CLA/ESL mediates adhesion of T cells to inflamed vascular endothelium. Later stages in T-cell homing involve chemokines (Ch) and lymphocyte chemokine receptors (ChR) for vascular wall arrest and diapedesis. Several candidate ChR have been implicated in skin homing. We measured cell surface ChR on HSV-specific human peripheral blood CD8 T cells and extended our studies to HSV-1. We observed preferential cell surface expression of CCR10 and CXCR3 by HSV-specific CD8 T cells compared to CD8 T cells specific for control viruses, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV), and compared to bulk memory CD8 T cells. CXCR3 ligand mRNA levels were selectively increased in skin biopsy specimens from persons with recurrent HSV-2, while the mRNA levels of the CCR10 ligand CCL27 were equivalent in lesion and control skin. Our data are consistent with a model in which CCL27 drives baseline recruitment of HSV-specific CD8 T cells expressing CCR10, while interferon-responsive CXCR3 ligands recruit additional cells in response to virus-driven inflammation.IMPORTANCE HSV-2 causes very localized recurrent infections in the skin and genital mucosa. Virus-specific CD8 T cells home to the site of recurrent infection and participate in viral clearance. The exit of T cells from the blood involves the use of chemokine receptors on the T-cell surface and chemokines that are present in infected tissue. In this study, circulating HSV-2-specific CD8 T cells were identified using specific fluorescent tetramer reagents, and

  8. Recombinant adeno-associated virus type 2 replication and packaging is entirely supported by a herpes simplex virus type 1 amplicon expressing Rep and Cap.

    PubMed Central

    Conway, J E; Zolotukhin, S; Muzyczka, N; Hayward, G S; Byrne, B J

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) type 2 (rAAV) vectors have recently been shown to have great utility as gene transfer agents both in vitro and in vivo. One of the problems associated with the use of rAAV vectors has been the difficulty of large-scale vector production. Low-efficiency plasmid transfection of the rAAV vector and complementing AAV type 2 (AAV-2) functions (rep and cap) followed by superinfection with adenovirus has been the standard approach to rAAV production. The objectives of this study were to demonstrate the ability of a recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) amplicon expressing AAV-2 Rep and Cap to support replication and packaging of rAAV vectors. HSV-1 amplicon vectors were constructed which contain the AAV-2 rep and cap genes under control of their native promoters (p5, p19, and p40). An HSV-1 amplicon vector, HSV-RC/KOS or HSV-RC/d27, was generated by supplying helper functions with either wild-type HSV-1 (KOS strain) or the ICP27-deleted mutant of HSV-1, d27-1, respectively. Replication of the amplicon stocks is not inhibited by the presence of AAV-2 Rep proteins, which highlights important differences between HSV-1 and adenovirus replication and the mechanism of providing helper function for productive AAV infection. Coinfection of rAAV and HSV-RC/KOS resulted in the replication and amplification of rAAV genomes. Similarly, rescue and replication of rAAV genomes occurred when rAAV vector plasmids were transfected into cells followed by HSV-RC/KOS infection and when two rAAV proviral cell lines were infected with HSV-RC/KOS or HSV-RC/d27. Production of infectious rAAV by rescue from two rAAV proviral cell lines has also been achieved with HSV-RC/KOS and HSV-RC/d27. The particle titer of rAAV produced with HSV-RC/d27 is equal to that achieved by supplying rep and cap by transfection followed by adenovirus superinfection. Importantly, no detectable wild-type AAV-2 is generated with this approach. These results demonstrate

  9. Genital herpes.

    PubMed

    Garland, Suzanne M; Steben, Marc

    2014-10-01

    Genital herpes is a relatively common infection caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV) type one or two (HSV-1, HSV-2) respectively. It is acquired most commonly via sexual activity. More recently there has been an increase in infections due to HSV-1. Most new cases of genital HSV are not diagnosed due to HSV infections having short-lived signs and symptoms, or in many instances are asymptomatic. Hence many people infected with HSV are unaware that they have it. The risk of transmission to a partner is highest during outbreak periods, when there are visible lesions, although genital HSV can also be transmitted during asymptomatic periods. Use of condoms and antiviral medications assist in preventing transmission. Antiviral agents are effective in controlling clinical episodes, but do not eradicate infection, which remains latent for the life of a patient. Despite the surge in vaccine research, there is unfortunately no readily available preventative or therapeutic vaccine for HSV to date.

  10. Expression of Arabidopsis LINEs from two promoters.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Yoshizu; Noma, Kenichi; Tsuchimoto, Suguru; Ohtsubo, Eiichi; Ohtsubo, Hisako

    2002-12-01

    Most Arabidopsis long interspersed elements (LINEs, called ATLNs) have two open reading frames, orf1 and orf2. In the 5' untranslated regions (UTRs) located upstream of orf1, the most proximal segments of tens of base pairs long are not homologous even in two ATLN members with almost identical sequences. In this study, we first show that RT-PCR products from ATLN39, a member of ATLN, can be detected only in total RNA from the hypomethylation mutant ddm1 or from suspension-cultured cells treated with a DNA methylation inhibitor 5-azacytidine, indicating that the expression of ATLN39 is negatively regulated by DNA methylation. We then show that orf1 fused in frame with the luciferase (luc) gene is expressed in suspension-cultured cells of A. thaliana when the 5' UTR is present in the region upstream of orf1. Analysis of deletion in the 5' UTR revealed that the 5' UTR has two promoters, designated here as P1 and P2. Analysis of transcripts by 5' RACE showed that their 5' ends were located at sites immediately upstream of the P1 region or at sites downstream of the P2 region. This observation and the fact that the P1 region contains no TATA sequence indicate that P1 is an internal promoter that initiates transcription from sites upstream of the promoter. A sequence containing GGCGA with a CpG methylatable site is conserved in the P1 regions in members closely related to ATLN39. The P2 region, however, contains the TATA sequence as well as another sequence with a CpG site. The TATA sequence is conserved in members closely related to ATLN39 but not in the other ATLN members, suggesting that P2 is the promoter uniquely present in the ATLN39-related members. Transcripts from promoter P1 can be used as templates to give new copies proficient in retroposition, but those from promoter P2 cannot because of the lack of the proximal half region of the 5' UTR sequence. Transcripts from promoter P2, as well as those from promoter P1 can, however, be used for the production of a

  11. Isolation and adaptation of bovine herpes virus Type 1 in embryonated chicken eggs and in Madin–Darby bovine kidney cell line

    PubMed Central

    Samrath, Devprabha; Shakya, Sanjay; Rawat, Nidhi; Gilhare, Varsha Rani; Singh, Fateh

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Objective of the present study was to isolate bovine herpes virus Type 1 (BHV-1) from semen of infected bull and to adapt it onto embryonated eggs and Madin–Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cell line. Further, the virus was identified by agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) test. Materials and Methods: Semen samples were collected from five BHV-1 positive bulls previously confirmed for the presence of antibodies against BHV-1 using avidin-biotin enzyme linked immunosorbent assay test. The virus from semen samples was adapted in chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of 11-day-old embryonated chickens eggs and in MDBK cell line. The presence of BHV-1 in infected CAM and cell culture fluid was confirmed by AGID test. Results: Virus infected CAM showed edema, congestion and thickening at first passage level. Small foci ranged from 1 to 2 mm in diameter, scattered all over the membrane were observed at first passage. More severe changes were observed in CAM after serial passaging. The large pock lesions, round in shape with opaque raised edge and depressed gray central area of necrosis ranged from 3 to 5 mm in diameter were developed at fourth passage. Blind passages in MDBK cell culture were made. The MDBK cell line at second passage level showed characteristic cytopathic effect viz. rounding of cells with shrinkage, followed by aggregation or clumping of cells which progressed rapidly and appeared as “bunch of grapes” at 72 h post inoculation. Few cells become elongated when compared with uninfected controls. A homogenate of CAM with distinct pock lesions and infected cell culture fluid developed precipitation line within 48 h against specific anti-BHV-1 immune serum by AGID test. Conclusion: BHV-1 was easily adapted in CAM of chicken embryos and in MDBK cell line. Virus infected CAM and cell culture fluid showed precipitin band by AGID test. PMID:27051213

  12. Expression of the herpes simplex virus type 1 latency-associated transcripts does not influence latency establishment of virus mutants deficient for neuronal replication.

    PubMed

    Nicoll, M P; Efstathiou, S

    2013-11-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 establishes latency within neurons of the trigeminal ganglion. During latency, viral gene expression is largely restricted to the latency-associated transcripts (LATs), which, whilst not essential for any aspect of latency, function to suppress lytic gene expression and enhance the survival of virus-infected neurons. The latent cell population comprises primary-order neurons infected directly from peripheral tissues and cells infected following further virus spread within the ganglion. In order to assess the role of LAT expression on latency establishment within first-order neurons, we infected ROSA26R reporter mice with Cre recombinase-expressing recombinant viruses harbouring deletion of the thymidine kinase lytic gene and/or the core LAT promoter. We found that LAT expression did not impact on latency establishment in viruses unable to replicate in neurons, and under these conditions, it was not required for the survival of neurons between 3 and 31 days post-infection.

  13. SPECT imaging of herpes simplex virus type1 thymidine kinase gene expression by [(123)I]FIAU(1).

    PubMed

    Choi, Seok Rye; Zhuang, Zhi-Ping; Chacko, Ann-Marie; Acton, Paul D; Tjuvajev-Gelovani, Juri; Doubrovin, Mikhai; Chu, David C K; Kung, Hank F

    2005-07-01

    Introduction of suicide genes, such as herpes simplex virus type1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk), in tumor cells has provided a useful method for tumor gene therapy. Several L-nucleosides, such as Lamivudine (3TC) and Clevudine (L-FMAU), have been successfully tested as high-potency antiviral agents. To investigate the potential differences between D- and L-isomers of nucleosides, [(125/123)I]-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1beta-D/L-arabino-furanosy-5-iodo-uracil (D/L-FIAU) have been synthesized and evaluated as potential SPECT agents for imaging HSV1-tk gene expression. [(125/123)I]D- and L-FIAU were prepared by iododestannylation of the respective tin precursors with (125/123)I-sodium iodide. In vitro cell uptake studies were performed by incubation of [(125)I]D- and L-FIAU in RG2 cells expressing HSV1-tk (RG2TK+). In vivo studies including biodistribution and SPECT were performed in RG2TK+ and RG2TK- tumor-bearing nude mice using [(123)I]D- and L-FIAU. Cell uptake and biodistribution studies indicated that [(125/123)I]L-FIAU did not show any high accumulation (sensitivity) or uptake ratios (selectivity) in HSV1-TK-positive (RG2TK+) tumors as compared to control tumors. In contrast, [(125/123)I]D-FIAU displayed both sensitivity and selectivity to RG2TK+ tumors. The selective in vivo accumulation of [(123)I]D-FIAU increased with time and the tumor uptake ratios (RG2TK+/RG2TK-) for 2, 4, and 24 hours averaged 6.2, 22.7, and 58.8, respectively. High-resolution SPECT of four nude tumor-bearing mice demonstrated a very high uptake of [(123)I]D-FIAU in the RG2TK+ tumor, while no significant tracer accumulation was observed in the RG2TK- tumor and other organs. The data suggest that only the D-isomer of [(123)I]FIAU is useful for imaging HSV1-tk gene expression in mice by high-resolution SPECT imaging.

  14. Regulation of viral gene expression by the herpes simplex virus 1UL24 protein (HSV-1UL24 inhibits accumulation of viral transcripts).

    PubMed

    Sanabria-Solano, Carolina; Gonzalez, Carmen Elena; Richerioux, Nicolas; Bertrand, Luc; Dridi, Slimane; Griffiths, Anthony; Langelier, Yves; Pearson, Angela

    2016-08-01

    UL24 is conserved among all Herpesviridae. In herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), UL24 mutations lead to reduced viral titers both in cell culture and in vivo, and reduced pathogenicity. The human cytomegalovirus ortholog of UL24 has a gene regulatory function; however, it is not known whether other UL24 orthologs also affect gene expression. We discovered that in co-transfection experiments, expression of UL24 correlated with a reduction in the expression of several viral proteins and transcripts. Substitution mutations targeting conserved residues in UL24 impaired this function. Reduced transcript levels did not appear attributable to changes in mRNA stability. The UL24 ortholog of Herpes B virus exhibited a similar activity. An HSV-1 mutant that does not express UL24 produced more viral R1 and R2 transcripts than the wild type or rescue virus relative to the amount of viral DNA. These results reveal a new role for HSV-1UL24 in regulating viral mRNA accumulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Herpes serology for genital herpes].

    PubMed

    Legoff, Jérôme; Aymard, Michèle; Braig, Suzanne; Ramel, Françoise; Dreno, Brigitte; Bélec, Laurent; Malkin, Jean-Elie

    2008-09-01

    The epidemiology of genital herpes is changing. The seroprevalence of HSV-2 infections is increasing, while HSV-1 is an increasingly common cause of herpetic ulcerations. The reference examination provides direct diagnosis after viral isolation in a cell culture or genome amplification. Herpes serology is indicated principally if direct examination is negative and in the absence of lesions. Non-type-specific serology detects antibodies common to HSV-1 and HSV-2. Its specificity and sensitivity are excellent, and it is approved as a reimbursable laboratory procedure. It cannot specify the viral type involved. Type-specific serology can distinguish between anti-HSV-1 and anti-HSV-2 antibodies. Currently available kits have a sensitivity and specificity, depending on the population studied, of 90 to 100%. It is not approved as a reimbursable laboratory procedure. HSV-1-specific serology cannot diagnose old HSV-1 genital infections, but seropositivity for HSV-2 generally suffices to diagnose HSV-2 genital herpes. The indication for type-specific serology must be discussed according to clinical context. The value of non-type-specific serology is limited.

  16. Meet the Herps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Describes some of the characteristics of "herps" (amphibians and reptiles). Contains teaching activities dealing with ancient herps, learning stations that encourage sensory experiences with herps, and games, puzzles, and a dramatic play about herps. Includes reproducible handouts designed to be used with the activities, as well as a quiz. (TW)

  17. Meet the Herps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Describes some of the characteristics of "herps" (amphibians and reptiles). Contains teaching activities dealing with ancient herps, learning stations that encourage sensory experiences with herps, and games, puzzles, and a dramatic play about herps. Includes reproducible handouts designed to be used with the activities, as well as a quiz. (TW)

  18. Herpes zoster and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay; Chawla, Aastha

    2016-08-01

    This review is a succinct description of the relationship between herpes zoster and diabetes. It makes a strong case for screening for diabetes in all patients of herpes zoster, and for using insulin to achieve optimal glycaemic control in persons with concomitant diabetes and herpes zoster. It highlights potential impact of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitor therapy and statin usage on herpes zoster incidence.

  19. Assembly of herpes simplex virus (HSV) intermediate capsids in insect cells infected with recombinant baculoviruses expressing HSV capsid proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, D R; Roof, L L; Homa, F L

    1994-01-01

    The capsid of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is composed of seven proteins, VP5, VP19C, VP21, VP22a, VP23, VP24, and VP26, which are the products of six HSV-1 genes. Recombinant baculoviruses were used to express the six capsid genes (UL18, UL19, UL26, UL26.5, UL35, and UL38) in insect cells. All constructs expressed the appropriate-size HSV proteins, and insect cells infected with a mixture of the six recombinant baculoviruses contained large numbers of HSV-like capsids. Capsids were purified by sucrose gradient centrifugation, and electron microscopy showed that the capsids made in Sf9 cells had the same size and appearance as authentic HSV B capsids. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis demonstrated that the protein composition of these capsids was nearly identical to that of B capsids isolated from HSV-infected Vero cells. Electron microscopy of thin sections clearly demonstrated that the capsids made in insect cells contained the inner electron-translucent core associated with HSV B capsids. In infections in which single capsid genes were left out, it was found that the UL18 (VP23), UL19 (VP5), UL38 (VP19C), and either the UL26 (VP21 and VP24) or the UL26.5 (VP22a) genes were required for assembly of 100-nm capsids. VP22a was shown to form the inner core of the B capsid, since in infections in which the UL26.5 gene was omitted the 100-nm capsids that formed lacked the inner core. The UL35 (VP26) gene was not required for assembly of 100-nm capsids, although assembly of B capsids was more efficient when it was present. These and other observations indicate that (i) the products of the UL18, UL19, UL35, and UL38 genes self-assemble into structures that form the outer surface (icosahedral shell) of the capsid, (ii) the products of the UL26 and/or UL26.5 genes are required (as scaffolds) for assembly of 100-nm capsids, and (iii) the interaction of the outer surface of the capsid with the scaffolding proteins requires the product

  20. Secretory expression of biologically active human Herpes virus interleukin-10 analogues in Escherichia coli via a modified Sec-dependent transporter construct

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Interleukin-10 homologues encoded by Herpes viruses such as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) hold interesting structural and biological characteristics compared to human interleukin-10 (hIL-10) that render these proteins promising candidates for therapeutic application in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Intestinal delivery of cytokines using bacterial carriers as chassis represents a novel approach for treatment of IBD patients. For proof of concept, a Sec-dependent transporter construct was designed for secretory expression of recombinant viral IL-10 proteins in the periplasm of Escherichia coli laboratory strain BL21 (DE3), which might serve as part of a prospective lysis based delivery and containment system. Results The signal peptide of E. coli outer membrane protein F fused to the mature form of the viral IL-10 proteins enabled successful transport into the periplasm, a compartment which seems crucial for proper assembly of the dimeric configuration of the cytokines. Cytokine concentrations in different bacterial compartments were determined by ELISA and achieved yields of 67.8 ng/ml ± 24.9 ng/ml for HCMV IL-10 and 1.5 μg/ml ± 841.4 ng/ml for EBV IL-10 in the periplasm. Immunoblot analysis was used to confirm the correct size of the E. coli-derived recombinant cytokines. Phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) as part of the signal transduction cascade after IL-10 receptor interaction, as well as suppression of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) release of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated mouse macrophages were used as read-out assays for proving in vitro biological activity of the E. coli derived, recombinant viral IL-10 counterparts. Conclusions In this study, proof of principle is provided that E. coli cells are a suitable chassis for secretory expression of viral IL-10 cytokines encoded by codon-optimized synthetic genes fused to the E. coli ompF signal sequence. In vitro

  1. The effect of captopril on the expression of MMP-9 and the prognosis of neurological function in herpes simplex encephalitis mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Zeng, Yan-Ping; Zhou, Qin; Guan, Jing-Xia; Lu, Zu-Neng

    2016-08-01

    Early increased matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) expression is involved in the evolution of herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) by facilitating the development of cerebrovascular complications. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the detrimental effects of MMP-9 in HSE has not been elucidated. Recent research finds angiotensin II plays an important role in regulation of MMP-9 activity. The aim of this work was to identify the influence of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) captopril on MMP-9 activation after herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection. Animal models of HSE were established by intracerebral inoculation of HSV-1 into mice. Brain tissue ROS levels were measured by staining with dihydroethidium. MMP-9 protein expression was detected by immunofluorescence and brain water content was measured with dry-wet weight method. Neurological function score was quantified 5 d after HSV-1 infection. Microglial cells were treated with various concentrations of captopril. MMP-9 gelatinolytic activity in the supematant of the cell cultures was assessed by zymography. RT-PCR was used to detect the mRNA expressions of p47phox and MMP-9. Immunofluorescence showed that expression of MMP-9 in brain tissue was mainly presented in OX-42 positive microglia. Quantification of gelatinolytic activity by densitometry showed that expression of MMP-9 in microglia was significantly increased after HSV-1 infection and inhibited by captopril treatment. NADPH oxidase subunit p47phox and MMP-9 mRNA expression were significantly increased 6 h after HSV-1 infection, and were seen reduced after captopril treatment in dose dependence. Captopril also downregulated ROS and MMP-9 protein expression following encephalitis in vivo, and attenuated brain edema, and improved neurological function. This compelling evidence suggests that MMP-9 is a key pathogenic factor within HSE. ACEI captopril could reduce the expression of MMP-9 mediated by ROS, then relieve cerebral edema and

  2. Gastrin gene expression and regulation in rat islet cell lines.

    PubMed

    Brand, S J; Wang, T C

    1988-11-15

    Gastrin gene expression was observed in two permanent rat insulinoma (RIN) cell lines derived from a rat insulinoma. Gastrin expression was selective; highest expression was seen in a cell line which did not express other islet cell hormones. Gastrin mRNA transcription initiated from the same promoter as antral gastrin mRNA. DNA transfection studies with a gastrin chloramphenicol acetyltransferase chimeric gene showed higher expression in gastrin-expressing RIN cells than non-gastrin-expressing islet cells. This implies that gastrin-expressing RIN cells selectively express a trans-acting transcriptional activator which binds to cis-acting regulatory sequences within the 5'-flanking DNA sequence and first exon of the gastrin gene. The gastrin peptide precursor synthesized in these RIN cell lines is subject to the same repertoire of posttranslational modifications within the cell's secretory apparatus (endoproteolytic cleavage, tyrosine sulfation, and C-terminal amidation) as seen in antral G cells. Gastrin mRNA levels in these RIN cells were selectively increased by increasing the extracellular calcium concentration. Membrane depolarization also stimulated gastrin mRNA levels, probably through activation of voltage-sensitive calcium channels. Thus, these gastrin-expressing RIN cell lines provide permanent cell lines useful in analyzing the cellular regulation of gastrin gene expression.

  3. [Herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia].

    PubMed

    Wollina, U; Machetanz, J

    2016-08-01

    Herpes zoster develops by endogenous reactivation of varizella zoster virus (VZV). Incidence increases with age. Females are more frequently affected than males. The reactivation rate in seropositive individuals is about 20 %. After a short prodromal stage, herpetiform-grouped vesicles appear in segmental arrangement. Pain and paresthesia are typical zoster symptoms. Complications like bacterial superinfections, vasculopathy, paresis, and oculopathy may occur. During pregnancy herpes zoster is a threat for mother and child. Among elderly patients, cardiovascular risk is increased during the first week of herpes zoster infection. Postherpetic neuropathy is feared. Diagnosis can be made clinically and by the use of polymerase chain reaction. First-line treatment is systemic antiviral drug therapy with either acyclovir or brivudine. Adjuvant therapies consist of pain management and topical treatment.

  4. Herpes Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, A.; St Leger, A.; Jeon, S.; Dhaliwal, D.K.; Knickelbein, J.E.; Hendricks, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    Herpes Simplex Virus-1 (HSV-1) infects the majority of the world’s population. These infections are often asymptomatic, but ocular HSV-1 infections cause multiple pathologies with perhaps the most destructive being Herpes Stromal Keratitis (HSK). HSK lesions, which are immunoinflammatory in nature, can recur throughout life and often cause progressive corneal scaring resulting in visual impairment. Current treatment involves broad local immunosuppression with topical steroids along with antiviral coverage. Unfortunately, the immunopathologic mechanisms defined in animal models of HSK have not yet translated into improved therapy. Herein, we review the clinical epidemiology and pathology of the disease and summarize the large amount of basic research regarding the immunopathology of HSK. We examine the role of the innate and adaptive immune system in the clearance of virus and the destruction of the normal corneal architecture that is typical of HSK. Our goal is to define current knowledge of the pathogenic mechanisms and recurrent nature of HSK and identify areas that require further study. PMID:22944008

  5. Significantly increased expression of beta-glucuronidase in the central nervous system of mucopolysaccharidosis type VII mice from the latency-associated transcript promoter in a nonpathogenic herpes simplex virus type 1 vector.

    PubMed

    Zhu, J; Kang, W; Wolfe, J H; Fraser, N W

    2000-07-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) has the ability to establish life-long latent infections in postmitotic neurons and to remain transcriptionally active, continuously expressing latency-associated transcripts (LAT) while producing minimal disease. These properties have made HSV an excellent candidate for neuronal gene transfer. Previously, we have shown that in mucopolysaccharidosis type VII mice (MPS VII, beta-glucuronidase deficiency) the LAT promoter is capable of expressing beta-glucuronidase (GUSB) in the trigeminal ganglion and the brainstem after latency is established. However, the number of neurons expressing GUSB is much lower than the number expressing 2-kb LAT following a wild-type virus infection. In this study, we have evaluated the effect of the position of the coding sequence relative to the LAT promoter on beta-glucuronidase gene expression in the central nervous system (CNS). Non-neurovirulent (ICP-34.5-deleted HSV-1) vectors were used, allowing direct intracranial injection. Significantly more GUSB activity was detected in brains of MPS VII mice inoculated with a recombinant virus (HSV-LAT-GUSB-JS) in which the GUSB cDNA was inserted near the LAT promoter, compared to viruses where it was inserted farther downstream in either the LAT exon 1 or overlapping exon 1 and the 2-kb LAT intron. This vector produced more than 100 times the number of positive cells than the other constructs. During acute infection, the distribution of viral replication differed from the distribution of GUSB enzyme expression. Viral antigen was predominately present in cells around the site of injection in the caudate putamen and in ependymal cells lining the ventricles. In contrast, GUSB expression was present mainly in cells of the thalamus and hypothalamus, which did not exhibit viral antigen, suggesting that GUSB enzyme activity was expressed from latently but not acutely infected neuronal cells. This vector design should be useful for high-level expression of various genes in

  6. Expression Profiling of Cell Lines Expressing Regulated NP2 Transcripts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    EGF in the presence or absence of exogenous HRS . The results will provide a framework fo r the interpretation of future gene expression studies in...e studies require further verification. Small sam- ple size, tissue heterogeneity, and inter-indivi- dual variations among human patients may result ... studies we proposed using gene expression profiling to determine change s in gene expression as a function of expression of the neurofibromatosis-2 (NF2

  7. Relationships among cell survival, O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase activity, and reactivation of methylated adenovirus 5 and herpes simplex virus type 1 in human melanoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Maynard, K.; Parsons, P.G.; Cerny, T.; Margison, G.P. )

    1989-09-01

    O6-Alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (ATase) activity and host cell reactivation (HCR) of 5-(3-methyl-1-triazeno)imidazole-4-carboxamide (MTIC)-methylated viruses were compared in human melanoma cell lines that were sensitive or resistant to killing by the antitumor DNA-methylating agent MTIC. Enhanced HCR of adenovirus 5 (defined as the Mer+ phenotype) generally showed a semiquantitative correlation with the natural or induced resistance of the host cells to the toxic effects of MTIC and to the level of ATase activity. However, one MTIC-resistant cell line was found (MM170) which had a low level of ATase and intermediate HCR of adenovirus. The HCR of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was enhanced in the Mer+ cells that had natural resistance to MTIC compared with Mer- cells. On the other hand, HCR of HSV-1 in Mer+ cells with induced resistance to MTIC was similar to that in Mer- cells. Neither adenovirus 5 nor HSV-1 infection induced ATase activity in Mer- cells. This indicates that resistance to the toxic effects of methylating agents is not invariably associated with high levels of ATase activity in human melanoma cells. Furthermore, while induction of the Mer+ phenotype from Mer- cells was usually accompanied by the recovery of ATase activity, induced Mer+ cells had less proficient repair than natural Mer+ cells, as judged quantitatively by slightly lower cellular resistance and qualitatively by deficient HCR response for HSV-1. These results suggest that the Mer- and induced Mer+ cells lack an ATase-independent DNA repair mechanism. No differences in MTIC-induced DNA repair synthesis or strand breaks were found between the Mer-, natural Mer+, and induced Mer+ phenotypes. However, UV-induced DNA repair synthesis was higher in the natural Mer+ than in the Mer- or induced Mer+ cells, both of which had increased cellular sensitivity to the antimetabolites methotrexate and hydroxyurea.

  8. The equine herpes virus 4 thymidine kinase is a better suicide gene than the human herpes virus 1 thymidine kinase.

    PubMed

    Loubière, L; Tiraby, M; Cazaux, C; Brisson, E; Grisoni, M; Zhao-Emonet, J; Tiraby, G; Klatzmann, D

    1999-09-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase suicide gene (HSV1tk) together with ganciclovir (GCV) have been successfully used for in vivo treatment of various experimental tumors, and many clinical trials using this system have been launched. With the aim to improve this therapeutic system, we compared the potential efficacy of different herpes virus derived thymidine kinases (HSV1, varicella-zoster virus, equine herpes virus type-4 and Epstein-Barr virus) as suicide genes in association with the nucleoside analogs acyclovir, ganciclovir and bromovinyldeoxyur- idine. Using various murine and human cell lines expressing these viral tk, we show that HSV1- and EHV4tk are the more efficient suicide genes for the different nucleoside analogs tested. Moreover, EHV4tk expressing murine and human cells were three- to 12-fold more sensitive to GCV than HSV1tk expressing cells. This was correlated with the presence of five-fold higher amounts of the toxic triphosphated-GCV in EHV4- versus HSV1tk expressing cells. Altogether, these experiments underline the potential advantages of the EHV4tk as a suicide gene.

  9. Synthesis and biological evaluation of a new acyclic pyrimidine derivative as a probe for imaging herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase gene expression.

    PubMed

    Meščić, Andrijana; Betzel, Thomas; Müller, Adrienne; Slavik, Roger; Cermak, Stjepko; Raić-Malić, Silvana; Ametamey, Simon M

    2013-07-19

    With the idea of finding a more selective radiotracer for imaging herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) gene expression by means of positron emission tomography (PET), a novel [¹⁸F]fluorine radiolabeled pyrimidine with 4-hydroxy-3-(hydroxymethyl)butyl side chain at N-1 (HHB-5-[¹⁸F]FEP) was prepared and evaluated as a potential PET probe. Unlabeled reference compound, HHB-5-FEP, was synthesized via a five-step reaction sequence starting from 5-(2-acetoxyethyl)-4-methoxypyrimidin-2-one. The radiosynthesis of HHB-[¹⁸F]-FEP was accomplished by nucleophilic radiofluorination of a tosylate precursor using [¹⁸F]fluoride-cryptate complex in 45% ± 4 (n = 4) radiochemical yields and high purity (>99%). The biological evaluation indicated the feasibility of using HHB-5-[¹⁸F]FEP as a PET radiotracer for monitoring HSV1-tk expression in vivo.

  10. Inhibition of protein deacetylation augments herpes simplex virus type 1-activated transcription of host fucosyltransferase genes associated with virus-induced sLex expression.

    PubMed

    Nordén, Rickard; Nyström, Kristina; Olofsson, Sigvard

    2010-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 induces expression of the selectin ligand sialyl Lewis X in infected cells by activating transcription of three normally silent host glycosyltransferase genes, FUT3, FUT5, and FUT6, a process that is initiated by binding of viral RNA to cellular protein kinase R. We investigated the involvement of protein deacetylation and promoter methylation in viral activation of host FUT genes by analysing the effects of appropriate inhibitors on the transcription rates of the FUT genes in virus-infected cells. The histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A augmented the viral activation of FUT transcription, whereas inhibition of DNA methylation did not affect transcription of these genes. The trichostatin A enhancement did not involve interference with expression of viral late genes or viral DNA replication. Thus, the virus-activated FUT genes are at least partially suppressed by deacetylation of histones or other regulatory proteins in uninfected HEL cells, whereas promoter methylation is a less important factor.

  11. Analysis of the 2-kilobase latency-associated transcript expressed in PC12 cells productively infected with herpes simplex virus type 1: evidence for a stable, nonlinear structure.

    PubMed Central

    Rødahl, E; Haarr, L

    1997-01-01

    The major latency-associated transcript (LAT) expressed in PC12 cells productively infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 is a 2-kb, nonpolyadenylated RNA molecule that accumulates in the nuclei of infected cells. In actinomycin D-treated cells, the 2-kb LAT gene transcript has a half-life considerably greater than 12 h. After polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, two species of the transcript were observed, a major species that was retarded in the gel and a minor species that migrated as a 1.96-kb RNA molecule. RNase H digestion after hybridization of the RNA with an oligonucleotide complementary to positions -80 to -101 relative to the 3' end of the 2-kb LAT gene transcript changed the mobility of the retarded species into that of the rapidly migrating species. Our data indicate that the 2-kb LAT gene transcript expressed in productively infected PC12 cells is present in a stable, nonlinear form. PMID:8995704

  12. Herpes simplex virus regulatory proteins VP16 and ICP0 counteract an innate intranuclear barrier to viral gene expression.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Meaghan H; Corcoran, Jennifer A; Smiley, James R

    2006-08-15

    HSV regulatory proteins VP16 and ICP0 play key roles in launching the lytic program of viral gene expression in most cell types. However, these activation functions are dispensable in U2OS osteosarcoma cells, suggesting that this cell line either expresses an endogenous activator of HSV gene expression or lacks inhibitory mechanisms that are inactivated by VP16 and ICP0 in other cells. To distinguish between these possibilities, we examined the phenotypes of somatic cell hybrids formed between U2OS cells and highly restrictive HEL fibroblasts. The U2OS-HEL heterokarya were as non-permissive as HEL cells, a phenotype that could be overcome by providing either VP16 or ICP0 in trans. Our data indicate that human fibroblasts contain one or more inhibitory factors that act within the nucleus to limit HSV gene expression and argue that VP16 and ICP0 stimulate viral gene expression at least in part by counteracting this innate antiviral defence mechanism.

  13. Transthyretin expression in medulloblastomas and medulloblastoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, S; Bayer, T A; Kraus, J A; Pietsch, T

    1995-10-01

    Transthyretin is a protein crucial to the transport of lipophilic molecules such as thyroid hormones and retinoids. In the central nervous system, large amounts of transthyretin are synthesized by the choroid plexus and are secreted into the cerebrospinal fluid. The choroid plexus is the only site of transthyretin synthesis in the brain. Transthyretin is expressed by most benign and malignant choroid plexus tumours while gliomas and meningiomas do not express transthyretin. Other major sites of transthyretin synthesis are the retinal pigment epithelium and hepatocytes. Medulloblastoma is the prototypical primitive neuroectodermal tumour of the cerebellum and can show multiple lines of differentiation, including the expression of retinal markers. In this study, we examined transthyretin expression both at the RNA and protein level in four medulloblastomas and six medulloblastoma cell lines using Northern and Western blot analysis, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR), RNA in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry. All four medulloblastomas and five of the six medulloblastoma cell lines expressed transthyretin-mRNA as demonstrated by reverse PCR and in situ hybridization while three medulloblastomas and one cell line were positive on Northern blot. The medulloblastoma with the most abundant RNA expression was transthyretin-immunoreactive on cryosections and the medulloblastoma cell line that was positive on Northern blot also expressed transthyretin at levels detectable by Western blot. No transthyretin-immunoreactivity was seen in 16 additional medulloblastomas studied on paraffin sections. These findings indicate that low-level expression of transthyretin-mRNA is common in medulloblastomas and medulloblastoma cell lines. Expression of transthyretin protein occurs rarely but can reach significant levels. Transthyretin expression in medulloblastoma is consistent with retinal pigment epithelium differentiation in medulloblastomas and reflects

  14. Shingles (Herpes Zoster)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Shingles (Herpes Zoster) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... will develop shingles, also known as zoster or herpes zoster, in their lifetime. There are an estimated ...

  15. Serum herpes simplex antibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003352.htm Serum herpes simplex antibodies To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Serum herpes simplex antibodies is a blood test that looks for ...

  16. Pregnancy and herpes

    MedlinePlus

    ... sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Newborn infants can become infected with herpes virus during pregnancy, during labor or delivery, or after birth. Causes Newborn infants can become infected with herpes virus: In the ...

  17. Piracy of prostaglandin E2/EP receptor-mediated signaling by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (HHV-8) for latency gene expression: strategy of a successful pathogen.

    PubMed

    George Paul, Arun; Sharma-Walia, Neelam; Kerur, Nagaraj; White, Carl; Chandran, Bala

    2010-05-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV) is implicated in the pathogenesis of KS, a chronic inflammation-associated malignancy. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and its metabolite prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), two pivotal proinflammatory/oncogeneic molecules, are proposed to play roles in the expression of major KSHV latency-associated nuclear antigen-1 (LANA-1). Microsomal PGE2 synthase, PGE2, and its receptors (EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4) were detected in KS lesions with the distinct staining of EP2/EP4 in KS lesions. In latently infected endothelial TIVE-LTC cells, EP receptor antagonists downregulated LANA-1 expression as well as Ca(2+), p-Src, p-PI3K, p-PKCzeta/lambda, and p-NF-kappaB, which are also some of the signal molecules proposed to be important in KS pathogenesis. Exogenous PGE2 and EP receptor agonists induced the LANA-1 promoter in 293 cells, and YY1, Sp1, Oct-1, Oct-6, C/EBP, and c-Jun transcription factors seem to be involved in this induction. PGE2/EP receptor-induced LANA-1 promoter activity was downregulated significantly by the inhibition of Ca(2+), p-Src, p-PI3K, p-PKCzeta/lambda, and p-NF-kappaB. These findings implicate the inflammatory PGE2/EP receptors and the associated signal molecules in herpes virus latency and uncover a novel paradigm that shows the evolution of KSHV genome plasticity to use inflammatory response for its survival advantage of maintaining latent gene expression. These data also suggest that potential use of anti-COX-2 and anti-EP receptor therapy may not only ameliorate the chronic inflammation associated with KS but could also lead to elimination of the KSHV latent infection and the associated KS lesions.

  18. Somatic expression of LINE-1 elements in human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Belancio, Victoria P.; Roy-Engel, Astrid M.; Pochampally, Radhika R.; Deininger, Prescott

    2010-01-01

    LINE-1 expression damages host DNA via insertions and endonuclease-dependent DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that are highly toxic and mutagenic. The predominant tissue of LINE-1 expression has been considered to be the germ line. We show that both full-length and processed L1 transcripts are widespread in human somatic tissues and transformed cells, with significant variation in both L1 expression and L1 mRNA processing. This is the first demonstration that RNA processing is a major regulator of L1 activity. Many tissues also produce translatable spliced transcript (SpORF2). An Alu retrotransposition assay, COMET assays and 53BP1 foci staining show that the SpORF2 product can support functional ORF2 protein expression and can induce DNA damage in normal cells. Tests of the senescence-associated β-galactosidase expression suggest that expression of exogenous full-length L1, or the SpORF2 mRNA alone in human fibroblasts and adult stem cells triggers a senescence-like phenotype, which is one of the reported responses to DNA damage. In contrast to previous assumptions that L1 expression is germ line specific, the increased spectrum of tissues exposed to L1-associated damage suggests a role for L1 as an endogenous mutagen in somatic tissues. These findings have potential consequences for the whole organism in the form of cancer and mammalian aging. PMID:20215437

  19. Transfer of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase synthesized in bacteria by a high-expression plasmid to tissue culture cells by protoplast fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Waldman, A.S.; Milman, G.

    1984-08-01

    The introduction of a protein into living tissue culture cells may permit the in vivo study of functions of the protein. The authors have previously described a high-efficiency-expression plasmid, pHETK2, containing the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (TK) gene which, upon temperature induction, causes TK to be synthesized as greater than 4% of the bacterial protein. In this report it is shown that enzymatically active TK was transferred to mouse Ltk- cells by polyethylene glycol-mediated fusion with protoplasts prepared from bacteria containing induced levels of TK. The presence of TK in the Ltk- cells was detected by the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine into cell nuclei as measured by autoradiography.

  20. Immunoglobulin expression and synthesis by human haemic cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, J; Hough, D; Karpas, A; Smith, J L

    1977-01-01

    Twenty-six human cell lines derived from a variety of lymphoid and non-lymphoid malignancies, were investigated for their immunological markers, with special reference to the class of immunoglobulin expressed. Twenty-five of the lines stained positively for surface immunoglobulin and IgD together with IgM proved to be the major immunoglobulin classes on these cells. Six of the lines were chosen for a study of their immunoglobulin synthesis patterns over an 18-h period and the immunoglobulin produced was analysed on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Patterns obtained from the cell lines were similar to that from normal lymph node lymphocytes and differed markedly to plasma cells. Two of the cell lines had abnormal immunoglobulin synthesis patterns characterized as free light chains in one case. The cell lines are evaluated for their usefulness as models of immunoglobulin synthesis and analogues of normal and neoplastic states. PMID:608682

  1. Over-expression of secreted proteins from mammalian cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Annamarie C; Barton, William A

    2014-01-01

    Secreted mammalian proteins require the development of robust protein over-expression systems for crystallographic and biophysical studies of protein function. Due to complex disulfide bonds and distinct glycosylation patterns preventing folding and expression in prokaryotic expression hosts, many secreted proteins necessitate production in more complex eukaryotic expression systems. Here, we elaborate on the methods used to obtain high yields of purified secreted proteins from transiently or stably transfected mammalian cell lines. Among the issues discussed are the selection of appropriate expression vectors, choice of signal sequences for protein secretion, availability of fusion tags for enhancing protein stability and purification, choice of cell line, and the large-scale growth of cells in a variety of formats. PMID:24510886

  2. Herpes simplex virus 1 microRNAs expressed abundantly during latent infection are not essential for latency in mouse trigeminal ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Martha F.; Jurak, Igor; Pesola, Jean M.; Boissel, Sandrine; Knipe, David M.; Coen, Donald M.

    2013-01-01

    Several herpes simplex virus 1 microRNAs are encoded within or near the latency associated transcript (LAT) locus, and are expressed abundantly during latency. Some of these microRNAs can repress the expression of important viral proteins and are hypothesized to play important roles in establishing and/or maintaining latent infections. We found that in lytically infected cells and in acutely infected mouse ganglia, expression of LAT-encoded microRNAs was weak and unaffected by a deletion that includes the LAT promoter. In mouse ganglia latently infected with wild type virus, the microRNAs accumulated to high levels, but deletions of the LAT promoter markedly reduced expression of LAT-encoded microRNAs and also miR-H6, which is encoded upstream of LAT and can repress expression of ICP4. Because these LAT deletion mutants establish and maintain latent infections, these microRNAs are not essential for latency, at least in mouse trigeminal ganglia, but may help promote it. PMID:21782205

  3. Expression of late viral proteins is restricted in nasal mucosal leucocytes but not in epithelial cells during early-stage equine herpes virus-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Gryspeerdt, Annick C; Vandekerckhove, Annelies P; Baghi, Hossein Bannazadeh; Van de Walle, Gerlinde R; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2012-08-01

    Equine herpes virus (EHV)-1 replicates in the epithelial cells of the upper respiratory tract and reaches the lamina propria and bloodstream in infected mononuclear cells. This study evaluated expression of the late viral proteins gB, gC, gD and gM in respiratory epithelial and mononuclear cells using: (1) epithelial-like rabbit kidney cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells infected with EHV-1 in vitro; (2) an equine ex vivo nasal explant system; and (3) nasal mucosa tissue of ponies infected in vivo. The viral proteins were expressed in all late-infected epithelial cells, whereas expression was not observed in infected leucocytes where proteins gB and gM were expressed in 60-90%, and proteins gC and gD in only 20% of infected cells, respectively. The results indicate that expression of these viral proteins during early-stage EHV-1 infection is highly dependent on the cell type infected.

  4. Comparing effects of BK virus agnoprotein and herpes simplex-1 ICP47 on MHC-I and MHC-II expression.

    PubMed

    Cioni, Michela; Mittelholzer, Christian; Wernli, Marion; Hirsch, Hans H

    2013-01-01

    Among human polyomaviruses, only BK virus (BKV) and JC virus (JCV) encode an agnoprotein upstream of VP1 on the viral late transcript. BKV agnoprotein is abundantly expressed late in the viral life cycle, but specific cellular and humoral immune responses are low or absent. We hypothesized that agnoprotein might contribute to BKV immune evasion by downregulating HLA expression, similar to Herpes simplex virus-1 ICP47. UTA-6 or primary human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells (RPTEC) were co-transfected with plasmids constitutively expressing agnoprotein, or ICP47, and enhanced green-fluorescent protein (EGFP). EGFP-gated cells were analyzed for HLA-ABC and HLA-DR expression by flow cytometry. HLA-ABC and HLA-DR expression was also analyzed on UTA-6 bearing tetracycline-regulated agnoprotein or ICP47. Effects of agnoprotein on viral peptide-dependent T-cell killing were investigated using (51)Cr release. ICP47 downregulated HLA-ABC without affecting HLA-DR, whereas agnoprotein did not affect HLA-ABC or HLA-DR expression. Interferon- γ treatment increased HLA-ABC in a dose-dependent manner, which was antagonized by ICP47, but not by agnoprotein. In UTA-6 cells, agnoprotein expression did neither impair HLA-ABC or -DR expression nor peptide-specific killing impaired by HLA-matched T-cells. Unlike the HSV-1 ICP47, BKV agnoprotein does not contribute to viral immune evasion by down-regulating HLA-ABC, or interfere with HLA-DR expression or peptide-dependent T-cell cytotoxicity.

  5. Synthesis and in vitro evaluation of 5-[(18)f]fluoroalkyl pyrimidine nucleosides for molecular imaging of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase reporter gene expression.

    PubMed

    Chacko, Ann-Marie; Qu, Wenchao; Kung, Hank F

    2008-09-25

    Two novel series of 5-fluoroalkyl-2'-deoxyuridines (FPrDU, FBuDU, FPeDU) and 2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-5-fluoroalkylarabinouridines (FFPrAU, FFBuAU, FFPeAU) that have three, four, or five methylene units (propyl, butyl, or pentyl) at C-5 were prepared and tested as reporter probes for imaging herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1- tk) gene expression. The Negishi coupling methodology was employed in efficiently synthesizing the radiolabeling precursors. All six 5-[(18)F]fluoroalkyl pyrimidines were readily prepared from 3-N-benzoyl-3',5'-di-O-benzoyl-protected 5-O-mesylate precursors in 17-35% radiochemical yield (decay-corrected). In vitro studies highlighted that all six [(18)F]-labeled nucleosides selectively accumulated in cells expressing the HSV1-TK protein and there was negligible uptake in control cells. [(18)F]FPrDU, [(18)F]FBuDU, [(18)F]FPeDU, and [(18)F]FFBuAU had the best uptake profiles. Despite their selective accumulation in HSV1- tk-expressing cells, all 5-fluoroalkyl pyrimidine nucleosides had low-to-negligible cytotoxic activity (CC50 > 1000-1209 microM). Ultimately, the results demonstrated that 5-[(18)F]fluoropropyl, [(18)F]fluorobutyl, and [(18)F]fluoropentyl pyrimidine nucleosides have the potential to be in vivo HSV1-TK PET reporter probes over a dynamic range of reporter gene expression levels.

  6. Human cytomegalovirus immediate early gene expression in the osteosarcoma line U2OS is repressed by the cell protein ATRX.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, Steven; Preston, Chris M

    2011-04-01

    The control of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) immediate early (IE) gene expression in infected human fibroblasts was compared with that in the U2OS human osteosarcoma cells. Viral IE expression was stimulated by the virion protein pp71 and repressed by the cell protein hDaxx in fibroblasts, as expected from published data. Neither of these events occurred in infected U2OS cells, suggesting that this cell line lacks one or more factors that repress HCMV IE expression. The chromatin remodeling factor ATRX is absent from U2OS cells, therefore the effect of introducing this protein by electroporation of plasmid DNA was investigated. Provision of ATRX inhibited HCMV IE expression, and the presence of the HCMV-specified virion phosphoprotein pp71 overcame the repression. The experiments demonstrate that ATRX can act as a cellular intrinsic antiviral defense in U2OS cells by blocking gene expression from incoming HCMV genomes. In contrast, ATRX did not affect the replication of herpes simplex virus type 1, showing that there are differences in the way U2OS cells respond to the presence of the herpesviral genomes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Cloning and expression of the complement receptor glycoprotein C from Herpesvirus simiae (herpes B virus): protection from complement-mediated cell lysis.

    PubMed

    Huemer, Hartwig P; Wechselberger, Christian; Bennett, Alice M; Falke, Dietrich; Harrington, Lesley

    2003-05-01

    Simian herpes B virus (SHBV) is the herpes simplex virus (HSV) homologue for the species MACACA: Unlike in its natural host, and unlike other animal herpesviruses, SHBV causes high mortality in accidentally infected humans. SHBV-infected cells, like those infected with HSV-1 and equine herpesvirus types 1 and 4, express complement C3 receptor activity. To study immunoregulatory functions involved in susceptibility/resistance against interspecies transmission, the SHBV glycoprotein C (gC(SHBV)) gene (encoding 467 aa) was isolated. Sequence analysis revealed amino acid identity with gC proteins from HSV-2 (46.9 %), HSV-1 (44.5 %) and pseudorabies virus (21.2 %). Highly conserved cysteine residues were also noted. Similar to gC(HSV-2), gC(SHBV) is less glycosylated than gC(HSV-1), resulting in a molecular mass of 65 kDa if expressed in replication-deficient vaccinia virus Ankara. Stable transfectants expressing full-length gC(SHBV) on the cell surface induced C3 receptor activity and were substantially protected from complement-mediated lysis; no protection was observed with control constructs. This suggests that expression of the gC homologues on infected cell surfaces might also contribute to the survival of infected cells in addition to decreased virion inactivation. Interestingly, soluble gC(SHBV) isolated from protein-free culture supernatants did not interfere with the binding of the alternative complement pathway activator properdin to C3b, which is similar to our findings with gC(HSV-2) and could be attributed to major differences in the amino-terminal portion of the protein with extended deletions in both gC(SHBV) and gC(HSV-2). Binding of recombinant gC(SHBV) to polysulphates was observed. This, together with the heparin-sensitivity of the gC(SHBV)-C3 interaction on the infected cell surface, suggests a role in adherence to heparan sulphate, similar to the gC proteins of other herpesviruses.

  8. Corneal infection of herpes simplex virus type 2--induced neuronal apoptosis in the brain stem of mice with expression of tumor suppressor gene (p53) and transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, D; Honda, T; Nishio, K; Tomita, Y; Sugiura, Y; Nishiyama, Y

    2000-12-01

    To understand the mechanism of neuronal apoptosis induced by herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection in vivo, the distribution of viral antigen, the appearance of apoptotic bodies, and the expressions of the tumor suppressor gene p53 and several transcription factors such as c-fos, c-jun and NF-kappaB were examined immunohistochemically and histopathologically after corneal infection of mice with HSV type 2 strain 186. Five days after HSV infection, viral antigen was diffusely detected in the corneal epithelium, the trigeminal ganglion and the pars caudalis of the spinal trigeminal nucleus. Neuronal apoptosis was observed in the brain stem ipsilateral to the HSV-infected side with the immunoreactivities of c-fos, c-jun, NF-kappaB and p53. Dual-labeling immunohistochemical studies revealed that almost all of the viral antigen-positive neurons and glia in the brain stem also showed p53 immunoreactivity. On the other hand, no neuronal apoptosis but only with the expression of c-jun was found in the trigeminal ganglion. Our results suggest that the different expression of transcription factors between the brain stem and the trigeminal ganglion may influence the neuronal apoptosis induced by HSV infection.

  9. Ectopic expression of DNA encoding IFN-alpha 1 in the cornea protects mice from herpes simplex virus type 1-induced encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Noisakran, S; Campbell, I L; Carr, D J

    1999-04-01

    A novel approach to combat acute herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection has recently been developed by administration with a plasmid DNA construct encoding cytokine genes. Cytokines, especially type I IFNs (IFN-alpha and IFN-beta) play an important role in controlling acute HSV-1 infection. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the potential efficacy of ectopically expressed IFN-alpha 1 against ocular HSV-1 infection following in situ transfection of mouse cornea with a naked IFN-alpha 1-containing plasmid DNA. Topical administration of the IFN-alpha 1 plasmid DNA exerted protection against ocular HSV-1 challenge in a time- and dose-dependent manner and antagonized HSV-1 reactivation. In addition, IFN-alpha 1-transfected eyes expressed a fivefold increase in MHC class I mRNA over vector-treated controls. The protective efficacy of the IFN-alpha 1 transgene antagonized viral replication, as evidenced by the reduction of the viral gene transcripts (infected cell polypeptide 27, thymidine kinase, and viral protein 16) and viral load in eyes and trigeminal ganglia during acute infection. The administration of neutralizing Ab to IFN-alpha beta antagonized the protective effect of the IFN-alpha 1 transgene in mice. Collectively, these findings demonstrate the potential of using naked plasmid DNA transfection in the eye to achieve ectopic gene expression of therapeutically active agents.

  10. PI3K/Akt signaling mediated apoptosis blockage and viral gene expression in oral epithelial cells during herpes simplex virus infection.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Mei-Ju; Wu, Ching-Yi; Chiang, Hsiao-Han; Lai, Yu-Lin; Hung, Shan-Ling

    2010-10-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3Ks) function in the anti-apoptotic pathway, and are commonly exploited by various viruses to accomplish the viral life cycle. This study examined the role of the PI3K pathway in human oral epithelial cells following herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection. The results showed that HSV-1 induced the phosphorylation of Akt and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3). Phosphorylation of Akt, but not GSK-3, induced by HSV-1 was PI3K-dependent. The expression of HSV-1 immediate-early genes may be involved in the initial phosphorylation of Akt and GSK-3. Inhibition of HSV-1-induced PI3K activity increased DNA fragmentation and cleavage of poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP), caspase 3 and caspase 7 compared with infected alone. Inhibition of PI3K attenuated the expression of HSV-1-infected cell protein 0 (ICP0), but not thymidine kinase (TK) and viral replication. Collectively, these data suggested that, in oral epithelial cells, the HSV-1-induced PI3K/Akt activation was involved in the regulation of apoptosis blockage and viral gene expression.

  11. Herpes simplex virus type 1 ICP0 protein mediates activation of adeno-associated virus type 2 rep gene expression from a latent integrated form.

    PubMed

    Geoffroy, Marie-Claude; Epstein, Alberto L; Toublanc, Estelle; Moullier, Philippe; Salvetti, Anna

    2004-10-01

    Adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV-2) is a human parvovirus that requires the presence of a helper virus, such as the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) to accomplish a complete productive cycle. In the absence of helper virus, AAV-2 can establish a latent infection that is characterized by the absence of expression of viral genes. So far, four HSV-1 early genes, UL5/8/52 (helicase primase complex) and UL29 (single-stranded DNA-binding protein), were defined as sufficient for AAV replication when cells were transfected with a plasmid carrying the wild-type AAV-2 genome. However, none of these viral products was shown to behave as a transcriptional factor able to activate AAV gene expression. Our study provides the first evidence that the immediate-early HSV-1 protein ICP0 can promote rep gene expression in cells latently infected with wild-type AAV-2. This ICP0-mediated effect occurs at the transcriptional level and involves the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Furthermore, using deletion mutants, we demonstrate that the localization of ICP0 to ND10 and their disruption is not required for the activation of the rep promoter, whereas binding of ICP0 to the ubiquitin-specific protease HAUSP makes a significant contribution to this effect.

  12. Herpes simplex virus 1 activates cdc2 to recruit topoisomerase II alpha for post-DNA synthesis expression of late genes.

    PubMed

    Advani, Sunil J; Weichselbaum, Ralph R; Roizman, Bernard

    2003-04-15

    A subset (gamma(2)) of late herpes simplex virus 1 genes depends on viral DNA synthesis for its expression. For optimal expression, a small number of these genes, exemplified by U(S)11, also requires two viral proteins, the alpha protein infected cell protein (ICP) 22 and the protein kinase U(L)13. Earlier we showed that U(L)13 and ICP22 mediate the stabilization of cdc2 and the replacement of its cellular partner, cyclin B, with the viral DNA polymerase processivity factor U(L)42. Here we report that cdc2 and its new partner, U(L)42, bind a phosphorylated form of topoisomerase II alpha. The posttranslational modification of topoisomerase II alpha and its interaction with cdc2-U(L)42 proteins depend on ICP22 in infected cells. Although topoisomerase II is required for viral DNA synthesis, ICP22 is not, indicating a second function for topoisomerase II alpha. The intricate manner in which the virus recruits topoisomerase II alpha for post-DNA synthesis expression of viral genes suggests that topoisomerase II alpha also is required for untangling concatemeric DNA progeny for optimal transcription of late genes.

  13. Nectin-1 is a marker of thyroid cancer sensitivity to herpes oncolytic therapy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Yao; Yu, Zhenkun; Lin, Shu-Fu; Li, Sen; Fong, Yuman; Wong, Richard J

    2007-05-01

    The prognosis for patients diagnosed with anaplastic thyroid cancer is dismal, with a median survival time of only 6 months. Novel therapies are needed for these and other thyroid cancers that are refractory to conventional therapy. Our goals were to assess the ability of an attenuated, replication-competent, oncolytic herpes virus (NV1023) to enter and lyse human thyroid cancers and determine whether herpes simplex virus receptor expression is a determinant of NV1023 efficacy. A panel of 12 human thyroid cancer cell lines including anaplastic, medullary, follicular, and papillary cancers were exposed to NV1023 and assessed for susceptibility to viral entry and oncolysis. The expression of herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D receptors nectin-1 and herpes virus entry mediator was assessed by quantitative fluorescence-activated cell sorter and correlated with NV1023 entry and oncolysis. There was significant variation in the ability of NV1023 to enter thyroid cancer cells as measured by lacZ expression. Thyroid cancer nectin-1 expression correlated strongly with NV1023 entry. Nectin-1 transfections and antibody receptor blocking studies validated the importance of nectin-1 for NV1023 entry. Follicular cancers were least sensitive to NV1023 oncolysis. All anaplastic, medullary, and papillary cancers tested exhibited greater than 85% cytotoxicity 7 d after exposure to NV1023 at multiplicity of infection 1, although oncolysis was variable at multiplicity of infection 0.01. Significant correlations between nectin-1 expression and NV1023 oncolysis were identified using Pearson's coefficients. NV1023 causes significant cytotoxicity of anaplastic, medullary, and papillary thyroid cancers. Nectin-1 is a novel marker of thyroid cancer sensitivity to herpes oncolytic therapy that might guide patient selection for therapy.

  14. Thyroid hormone-dependent epigenetic suppression of herpes simplex virus-1 gene expression and viral replication in differentiated neuroendocrine cells.

    PubMed

    Figliozzi, Robert W; Chen, Feng; Balish, Matthew; Ajavon, Amakoe; Hsia, S Victor

    2014-11-15

    A global HSV-1 gene repression occurs during latency in sensory neurons where most viral gene transcriptions are suppressed. The molecular mechanisms of gene silencing and how stress factors trigger the reactivation are not well understood. Thyroid hormones are known to be altered due to stress, and with its nuclear receptor impart transcriptional repression or activation depending upon the hormone level. Therefore we hypothesized that triiodothyronine (T3) treatment of infected differentiated neuron like cells would reduce the ability of HSV-1 to produce viral progeny compared to untreated infected cells. Previously we identified putative thyroid hormone receptor elements (TREs) within the promoter regions of HSV-1 thymidine kinase (TK) and other key genes. Searching for a human cell line that can model neuronal HSV-1 infection, we performed HSV-1 infection experiments on differentiated human neuroendocrine cells, LNCaP. Upon androgen deprivation these cells undergo complete differentiation and exhibit neuronal-like morphology and physiology. These cells were readily infected by our HSV-1 recombinant virus, expressing GFP and maintaining many processes iconic of dendritic morphology. Our results demonstrated that differentiated LNCaP cells produced suppressive effects on HSV-1 gene expression and replication compared to its undifferentiated counterpart and T3 treatment has further decreased the viral plaque counts compared to untreated cells. Upon washout of the T3 viral plaque counts were restored, indicating an increase of viral replication. The qRT-PCR experiments using primers for TK showed reduced expression under T3 treatment. ChIP assays using a panel of antibodies for H3 lysine 9 epigenetic marks showed increased repressive marks on the promoter regions of TK. In conclusion we have demonstrated a T3 mediated quiescent infection in differentiated LNCaP cells that has potential to mimic latent infection. In this HSV-1 infection model thyroid hormone

  15. Herpes zoster virus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Woolery, William Alan

    2008-10-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is the etiologic agent of varicella and herpes zoster (HZ) in humans. Herpes zoster is the result of reactivation of VZV within certain sensory ganglia. The burden of illness from HZ and post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN) is high. Herpes-zoster vaccine contains live attenuated varicella-zoster virus in an amount approximately 14 times greater than that found in the varicella virus vaccine. Herpes zoster vaccine is approved for the prevention of shingles in appropriate persons aged 60 and older. The vaccine is administered in a single subcutaneous dose. Reported side effects are mild and generally limited to localized injection site findings. Herpes-zoster vaccine reportedly decreases the occurrence of herpes zoster by approximately 50 percent and prevents the development of PHN by two thirds. The vaccine appears to be minimally effective in those individuals over the age of 80 and is not recommended in this age group.

  16. UL69 of human cytomegalovirus, an open reading frame with homology to ICP27 of herpes simplex virus, encodes a transactivator of gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, M; Rice, S A; Stamminger, T

    1994-01-01

    The UL69 open reading frame of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is homologous to the immediate-early protein ICP27 of herpes simplex virus, an essential viral regulatory protein involved in the transition from early to late gene expression. Genes with homology to ICP27 have been detected in all subclasses of herpesviruses so far. While the respective proteins in alpha- and gammaherpesviruses have been defined as trans-regulatory molecules, nothing is known about these genes in betaherpesviruses. This study was therefore undertaken in order to investigate expression from the UL69 gene locus of HCMV. Northern (RNA) blot experiments revealed a complex pattern of transcripts that changed during the time course of the HCMV replicative cycle: two transcripts of 2.7 and 3.5 kb that were regulated differentially could be detected as early as 7 h after infection. However, these transcripts could not be detected in the presence of cycloheximide. Additional, larger transcripts were present exclusively at late times after infection. To analyze protein expression from the UL69 gene region, the UL69 open reading frame was expressed as a histidine-tagged protein in Escherichia coli. A specific antiserum was generated and used to detect the UL69 protein in HCMV-infected cells which revealed its localization within the intranuclear inclusions that are characteristic for HCMV infection. In cotransfection experiments, an HCMV true late promoter could not be activated by UL69, whereas an early promoter and several heterologous promoters were stimulated about 10-fold. Complementation studies showed that the UL69 protein cannot substitute for ICP27 in the context of the HSV infection, suggesting functional differences between these two proteins. In summary, these experiments define a novel regulatory protein encoded by HCMV that is expressed as an early-late gene and appears to exert a broad stimulatory effect on gene expression. Images PMID:8189530

  17. High-level expression and purification of secreted forms of herpes simplex virus type 1 glycoprotein gD synthesized by baculovirus-infected insect cells.

    PubMed

    Sisk, W P; Bradley, J D; Leipold, R J; Stoltzfus, A M; Ponce de Leon, M; Hilf, M; Peng, C; Cohen, G H; Eisenberg, R J

    1994-02-01

    Two forms of herpes simplex virus glycoprotein gD were recombined into Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (baculovirus) and expressed in infected Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells. Each protein was truncated at residue 306 of mature gD. One form, gD-1(306t), contains the coding sequence of Patton strain herpes simplex virus type 1 gD; the other, gD-1(QAAt), contains three mutations which eliminate all signals for addition of N-linked oligosaccharides. Prior to recombination, each gene was cloned into the baculovirus transfer vector pVT-Bac, which permits insertion of the gene minus its natural signal peptide in frame with the signal peptide of honeybee melittin. As in the case with many other baculovirus transfer vectors, pVT-Bac also contains the promoter for the baculovirus polyhedrin gene and flanking sequences to permit recombination into the polyhedrin site of baculovirus. Each gD gene was engineered to contain codons for five additional histidine residues following histidine at residue 306, to facilitate purification of the secreted protein on nickel-containing resins. Both forms of gD-1 were abundantly expressed and secreted from infected Sf9 cells, reaching a maximum at 96 h postinfection for gD-1(306t) and 72 h postinfection for gD-1(QAAt). Secretion of the latter protein was less efficient than gD-1(306t), possibly because of the absence of N-linked oligosaccharides from gD-1(QAAt). Purification of the two proteins by a combination of immunoaffinity chromatography, nickel-agarose chromatography, and gel filtration yielded products that were > 99% pure, with excellent recovery. We are able to obtain 20 mg of purified gD-1(306t) and 1 to 5 mg of purified gD-1(QAAt) per liter of infected insect cells grown in suspension. Both proteins reacted with monoclonal antibodies to discontinuous epitopes, indicating that they retain native structure. Use of this system for gD expression makes crystallization trials feasible.

  18. Herpes zoster following cryosurgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael R; Ryman, William

    2005-02-01

    A 56-year-old man developed reactivation of herpes zoster infection on his right forehead after treatment of several solar keratoses with cryosurgery. The rash was blistering and painful. Treatment with oral aciclovir was instituted and the lesions healed within 2 weeks. Known risk factors for reactivation include age and decreased immunity. Previous case reports have indicated trauma may be a risk factor in herpes zoster. We report a case of herpes zoster as a complication of cryosurgery.

  19. Detection of herpes simplex virus type 1 latency-associated transcript expression in trigeminal ganglia by in situ reverse transcriptase PCR.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, R; Poliani, P L; Levine, M; Glorioso, J C; Fink, D J

    1996-09-01

    One of the defining characteristics of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection is the ability of the virus to establish a lifelong latent state in neurons. We previously demonstrated (R. Ramakrishnan, A.J. Fink, G. Jiang, P. Desai, J. C. Glorioso, and M. Levine, J. Virol. 68:1864-1873, 1994) by in situ PCR that many more neurons contain viral genomes than are detected by in situ hybridization for HSV latency-associated transcripts (LATs). To determine whether all cells which contain genomes express LATs, we examined trigeminal ganglia for LATs 1 and 8 weeks after corneal scarification with ribonucleotide reductase-deficient HSV-1 by in situ reverse transcriptase PCR. The number of LAT-positive cells detected by in situ reverse transcriptase was substantially greater than the number of cells positive by in situ hybridization and appeared to be similar to the number of cells containing HSV genomes by in situ PCR and the number of ganglionic neurons that project to the cornea as detected by retrograde labeling with Fluorogold. These results demonstrate LAT expression in many neurons containing HSV-1 genomes.

  20. Replication-Coupled Recruitment of Viral and Cellular Factors to Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Replication Forks for the Maintenance and Expression of Viral Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Dembowski, Jill A.

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infects over half the human population. Much of the infectious cycle occurs in the nucleus of cells where the virus has evolved mechanisms to manipulate host processes for the production of virus. The genome of HSV-1 is coordinately expressed, maintained, and replicated such that progeny virions are produced within 4–6 hours post infection. In this study, we selectively purify HSV-1 replication forks and associated proteins from virus-infected cells and identify select viral and cellular replication, repair, and transcription factors that associate with viral replication forks. Pulse chase analyses and imaging studies reveal temporal and spatial dynamics between viral replication forks and associated proteins and demonstrate that several DNA repair complexes and key transcription factors are recruited to or near replication forks. Consistent with these observations we show that the initiation of viral DNA replication is sufficient to license late gene transcription. These data provide insight into mechanisms that couple HSV-1 DNA replication with transcription and repair for the coordinated expression and maintenance of the viral genome. PMID:28095497

  1. Replication-Coupled Recruitment of Viral and Cellular Factors to Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Replication Forks for the Maintenance and Expression of Viral Genomes.

    PubMed

    Dembowski, Jill A; Dremel, Sarah E; DeLuca, Neal A

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infects over half the human population. Much of the infectious cycle occurs in the nucleus of cells where the virus has evolved mechanisms to manipulate host processes for the production of virus. The genome of HSV-1 is coordinately expressed, maintained, and replicated such that progeny virions are produced within 4-6 hours post infection. In this study, we selectively purify HSV-1 replication forks and associated proteins from virus-infected cells and identify select viral and cellular replication, repair, and transcription factors that associate with viral replication forks. Pulse chase analyses and imaging studies reveal temporal and spatial dynamics between viral replication forks and associated proteins and demonstrate that several DNA repair complexes and key transcription factors are recruited to or near replication forks. Consistent with these observations we show that the initiation of viral DNA replication is sufficient to license late gene transcription. These data provide insight into mechanisms that couple HSV-1 DNA replication with transcription and repair for the coordinated expression and maintenance of the viral genome.

  2. Regulation of herpes simplex virus γ134.5 expression and oncolysis of diffuse liver metastases by Myb34.5

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Hideo; Kasuya, Hideki; Mullen, John T.; Yoon, Sam S.; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Chandrasekhar, Soundararajalu; Donahue, James M.; Chiocca, E. Antonio; Chung, Richard Y.; Tanabe, Kenneth K.

    2002-01-01

    Myb34.5 is a herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) mutant deleted in the gene for ribonucleotide reductase (ICP6). It also carries a version of γ134.5 (a viral gene product that promotes the dephosphorylation of eIF-2α) that is under control of the E2F-responsive cellular B-myb promoter, rather than of its endogenous promoter. Myb34.5 replication in tumor cells results in their destruction (oncolysis). γ134.5 expression by HSV-1 subverts an important cell defense mechanism against viral replication by preventing shutoff of protein synthesis after viral infection. Infection of colon carcinoma cells with Myb34.5 results in greater eIF-2α dephosphorylation and viral replication compared with infection with HSV-1 mutants completely defective in γ134.5 expression. In contrast, infection of normal hepatocytes with Myb34.5 results in low levels of eIF-2α dephosphorylation and viral replication that are similar to those observed with HSV-1 mutants completely defective in γ134.5 and ICP6. When administered intravascularly into mice with diffuse liver metastases, Myb34.5 has greater antineoplastic activity than HSV-1 mutants with completely defective γ134.5 expression and more restricted biodistribution compared with HSV-1 mutants with wild-type γ134.5 expression. Myb34.5 displays reduced virulence and toxicity compared to HSV-1 mutants with wild-type γ134.5 expression. Portal venous administration of Myb34.5 significantly reduces liver tumor burden in and prolongs the life of mice with diffuse liver metastases. Preexisting Ab’s to HSV-1 do not reduce the antitumor efficacy of Myb34.5 in vivo. PMID:11927614

  3. Establishment a CHO Cell Line Expressing Human CD52 Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Kadijeh, Tati; Mahsa, Yazdanpanah-Samani; Amin, Ramezani; Elham, Mahmoudi Maymand; Abbas, Ghaderi

    2016-01-01

    Background: CD52 is a small glycoprotein with a GPI anchor at its C-terminus. CD52 is expressed by Normal and malignant T and B lymphocytes and monocytes. There are detectable amounts of soluble CD52 in plasma of patients with CLL and could be used as a tumor marker. Although the biological function of CD52 is unknown but it seems that CD52 may be involved in migration and activation of T-cells .The aim of this study was to clone and express human CD52 gene in CHO cell line and studying its function in more details Methods: Based on GenBank databases two specific primers were designed for amplification of cd52 gene. Total RNA was extracted from Raji cell line and cDNA synthesized. Amplified fragment was cloned in pBudCE4.1 vector. The new construct was transfected to CHO-K1 cell line using electroporation method. Expression of recombinant CD52 protein was evaluated by Real time PCR and flow cytometry methods. Results: Amplification of CD52 gene using specific primers on Raji cDNA showed a 209 bp band. New construct was confirmed by PCR and restriction pattern and sequence analysis. The new construct was designated as pBudKT1. RT-PCR analysis detected cd52 mRNAs in transfected cells and Flow cytometry Results showed that 78.4 % of cells represented CD52 in their surfaces. Conclusion: In conclusion, we established a human CD52 positive cell line, CHO-CD52, and the protein was expressed on the membrane. Cloning of the CD52 gene could be the first step for the production of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies and detection systems for soluble CD52 in biological fluids PMID:28070536

  4. Herpes simplex virus 1 immediate-early and early gene expression during reactivation from latency under conditions that prevent infectious virus production.

    PubMed

    Pesola, Jean M; Zhu, Jia; Knipe, David M; Coen, Donald M

    2005-12-01

    The program of gene expression exhibited by herpes simplex virus during productive infection of cultured cells is well established; however, less is known about the regulatory controls governing reactivation from latency in neurons. One difficulty in examining gene regulation during reactivation lies in distinguishing between events occurring in initial reactivating cells versus events occurring in secondarily infected cells. Thus, two inhibitors were employed to block production of infectious virus: acyclovir, which inhibits viral DNA synthesis, and WAY-150138, which permits viral DNA synthesis but inhibits viral DNA encapsidation. Latently infected murine ganglia were explanted in the presence of either inhibitor, and then amounts of RNA, DNA, or infectious virus were quantified. In ganglia explanted for 48 h, the levels of five immediate-early and early RNAs did not exhibit meaningful differences between acyclovir and WAY-150138 treatments when analyzed by in situ hybridization or quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. However, comparative increases in viral DNA and RNA content in untreated ganglia suggested that virus was produced before 48 h postexplant. This was confirmed by the detection of infectious virus as early as 14 h postexplant. Together, these results suggest that high levels of viral gene expression at 48 h postexplant are due largely to the production of infectious virus and subsequent spread through the tissue. These results lead to a reinterpretation of previous results indicating a role for DNA replication in immediate-early and early viral gene expression; however, it remains possible that viral gene expression is regulated differently in neurons than in cultured cells.

  5. Neurovirulent factor ICP34.5 uniquely expressed in the herpes simplex virus type 1 Delta gamma 1 34.5 mutant 1716.

    PubMed

    Holman, Holly A; MacLean, Alasdair R

    2008-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) diploid gene gamma(1)34.5 encodes a neurovirulent factor, infected cell protein 34.5 (ICP34.5). The promoter to gamma(1)34.5 is located within the HSV-1 genome where there are repeated sequences. This region of the genome also contains important overlapping transcripts involved with the virus's ability to establish lytic and latent infections and reactivation. These transcripts include the latency-associated transcripts and regulator proteins ICP0 and ICP4. This study aimed to separate ICP34.5 from these overlapping transcripts and test if its expression from a single gene could restore wild-type HSV-1 strain 17+ virulence. To address these aims, different recombinant viruses were constructed using the Delta gamma(1)34.5 mutant 1716. Immunoblots probed with different ICP34.5 antisera demonstrated that one of the newly generated recombinant viruses, 1622, overexpresses ICP34.5 relative to a panel of wild-type viruses. Interestingly, the overexpression of ICP34.5 does not yield a more virulent virus. The onset of ICP34.5 expression from 1622-infected cells in vitro matched that of 17+, and its expression restored the function of maintaining protein synthesis in human neuroblastoma cells. Replication of 1622, however, was only partially restored to 17+ levels in vivo. Additionally, plaque morphology from 1622-infected cells indicates there is an additional defect. The authors report that the mutant virus 1622 can express ICP34.5 from a single gamma(1)34.5 gene and restore most (but not all) wild-type function. These findings are discussed with respect to the use of the gamma(1)34.5 deleted mutant, 1716, in oncolytic viral vector therapies and future studies for ICP34.5.

  6. Engineering an improved cell cycle-regulatable herpes simplex virus type 1 amplicon vector with enhanced transgene expression in proliferating cells yet attenuated activities in resting cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Grace Y; Ho, Ivy A W; Sia, Kian C; Miao, L; Hui, Kam M; Lam, Paula Y P

    2007-03-01

    We previously generated a herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-based amplicon vector (denoted pC8-36) in which gene expression from the minimal cyclin A promoter is repressed by preventing the binding of a trans-activating protein, Gal4-NF-YA, to it through selective interaction with the transcriptional repressor protein CDF-1. Because CDF-1 is absent in actively dividing cells, transgene expression conferred by the pC8-36 vector is therefore cell cycle dependent. As gene therapy evolves to become a promising therapeutic modality for many human diseases, there is an increasing need to further improve the kinetics of gene regulation. In the present study, we examined whether the availability of more binding sites for CDF-1 repressor proteins could enhance transgene expression. Using an overlap extension polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method, the CDE and CHR elements within the minimum cyclin A promoter were multimerized to contain two, three, and six copies of the designated CDE/CHR sequence. Interestingly, our results demonstrated that six-copy CDE/CHR sequence motifs (pC8-6CC-Luc) conferred an approximately 20-fold increase in the ratio of cell cycle regulation compared with the previous reported construct. Further, the overall transcriptional activities mediated by pC8-6CC-Luc were stronger compared with the native human survivin promoter, which consists of three copies of the CDE element and one copy of the CHR element. pC8-6CC-Luc contained, in essence, only the synthetic six-copy CDE/CHR sequence motif (about 262 bp). In comparison with other native endogenous promoters, which usually contain many other transcription binding sites, pC8-6CC-Luc amplicon vectors should confer better regulated and consistent transgene expression and may be considered a gene delivery vector of choice to target actively proliferating tumor cells.

  7. Herpes biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... if a person has been infected with the herpes simplex virus (I or II). This test does not detect the virus itself. If antibodies to the virus are present, the person has been infected with herpes simplex at some point in his or her life. ...

  8. Genital herpes simplex.

    PubMed Central

    Tummon, I. S.; Dudley, D. K.; Walters, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    Genital herpes is a sexually transmitted disease caused by the herpes simplex virus. Following the initial infection the virus becomes latent in the sacral ganglia. Approximately 80% of patients are then subject to milder but unpredictable recurrences and may shed the virus even when they are asymptomatic. The disorder causes concern because genital herpes in the mother can result in rare but catastrophic neonatal infection and because of a possible association between genital herpes and cancer of the cervix. No effective treatment is as yet available. Weekly monitoring for virus by cervical culture from 32 weeks' gestation is recommended for women with a history of genital herpes and for those whose sexual partner has such a history. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 PMID:7020907

  9. Widespread correction of lysosomal storage in the mucopolysaccharidosis type VII mouse brain with a herpes simplex virus type 1 vector expressing beta-glucuronidase.

    PubMed

    Berges, Bradford K; Yellayi, Srikanth; Karolewski, Brian A; Miselis, Richard R; Wolfe, John H; Fraser, Nigel W

    2006-05-01

    We have inoculated a herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) vector into a variety of sites in the mouse brain and assayed the regions of latency and expression of a beta-glucuronidase (GUSB) cDNA from the latency-associated transcript promoter. Injection sites used were somatosensory cortex, visual cortex, striatum, dorsal hippocampus, and CSF spaces. Latent vector was detected in regions at a distance from the respective injection sites, consistent with axonal transport of vector. Regions of GUSB activity varied by injection site and included cerebral cortex, striatum, thalamus, hypothalamus, substantia nigra, hippocampus, midbrain, pons, medulla, cerebellum, and spinal cord. After a single injection, GUSB enzymatic activity reached wild-type levels in several brain regions. GUSB was found in some areas without any detectable vector, indicative of axonal transport of GUSB enzyme. GUSB-deficient mice, which have the lysosomal storage disease mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) VII, have lysosomal storage lesions in cells throughout the brain. Adult MPS VII mice treated by injection of vector into a single site on each side of the brain had correction of storage lesions in a large volume of brain. The potential for long-term, widespread correction of lysosomal storage diseases with HSV-1 vectors is discussed.

  10. Human Antiviral Protein IFIX Suppresses Viral Gene Expression during Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) Infection and Is Counteracted by Virus-induced Proteasomal Degradation.

    PubMed

    Crow, Marni S; Cristea, Ileana M

    2017-04-01

    The interferon-inducible protein X (IFIX), a member of the PYHIN family, was recently recognized as an antiviral factor against infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). IFIX binds viral DNA upon infection and promotes expression of antiviral cytokines. How IFIX exerts its host defense functions and whether it is inhibited by the virus remain unknown. Here, we integrated live cell microscopy, proteomics, IFIX domain characterization, and molecular virology to investigate IFIX regulation and antiviral functions during HSV-1 infection. We find that IFIX has a dynamic localization during infection that changes from diffuse nuclear and nucleoli distribution in uninfected cells to discrete nuclear puncta early in infection. This is rapidly followed by a reduction in IFIX protein levels. Indeed, using immunoaffinity purification and mass spectrometry, we define IFIX interactions during HSV-1 infection, finding an association with a proteasome subunit and proteins involved in ubiquitin-proteasome processes. Using synchronized HSV-1 infection, microscopy, and proteasome-inhibition experiments, we demonstrate that IFIX co-localizes with nuclear proteasome puncta shortly after 3 h of infection and that its pyrin domain is rapidly degraded in a proteasome-dependent manner. We further demonstrate that, in contrast to several other host defense factors, IFIX degradation is not dependent on the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of the viral protein ICP0. However, we show IFIX degradation requires immediate-early viral gene expression, suggesting a viral host suppression mechanism. The IFIX interactome also demonstrated its association with transcriptional regulatory proteins, including the 5FMC complex. We validate this interaction using microscopy and reciprocal isolations and determine it is mediated by the IFIX HIN domain. Finally, we show IFIX suppresses immediate-early and early viral gene expression during infection. Altogether, our study demonstrates that IFIX antiviral

  11. De Novo Herpes Simplex Virus VP16 Expression Gates a Dynamic Programmatic Transition and Sets the Latent/Lytic Balance during Acute Infection in Trigeminal Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Sawtell, Nancy M.; Thompson, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    The life long relationship between herpes simplex virus and its host hinges on the ability of the virus to aggressively replicate in epithelial cells at the site of infection and transport into the nervous system through axons innervating the infection site. Interaction between the virus and the sensory neuron represents a pivot point where largely unknown mechanisms lead to a latent or a lytic infection in the neuron. Regulation at this pivot point is critical for balancing two objectives, efficient widespread seeding of the nervous system and host survival. By combining genetic and in vivo in approaches, our studies reveal that the balance between latent and lytic programs is a process occurring early in the trigeminal ganglion. Unexpectedly, activation of the latent program precedes entry into the lytic program by 12 -14hrs. Importantly, at the individual neuronal level, the lytic program begins as a transition out of this acute stage latent program and this escape from the default latent program is regulated by de novo VP16 expression. Our findings support a model in which regulated de novo VP16 expression in the neuron mediates entry into the lytic cycle during the earliest stages of virus infection in vivo. These findings support the hypothesis that the loose association of VP16 with the viral tegument combined with sensory axon length and transport mechanisms serve to limit arrival of virion associated VP16 into neuronal nuclei favoring latency. Further, our findings point to specialized features of the VP16 promoter that control the de novo expression of VP16 in neurons and this regulation is a key component in setting the balance between lytic and latent infections in the nervous system. PMID:27607440

  12. De Novo Herpes Simplex Virus VP16 Expression Gates a Dynamic Programmatic Transition and Sets the Latent/Lytic Balance during Acute Infection in Trigeminal Ganglia.

    PubMed

    Sawtell, Nancy M; Thompson, Richard L

    2016-09-01

    The life long relationship between herpes simplex virus and its host hinges on the ability of the virus to aggressively replicate in epithelial cells at the site of infection and transport into the nervous system through axons innervating the infection site. Interaction between the virus and the sensory neuron represents a pivot point where largely unknown mechanisms lead to a latent or a lytic infection in the neuron. Regulation at this pivot point is critical for balancing two objectives, efficient widespread seeding of the nervous system and host survival. By combining genetic and in vivo in approaches, our studies reveal that the balance between latent and lytic programs is a process occurring early in the trigeminal ganglion. Unexpectedly, activation of the latent program precedes entry into the lytic program by 12 -14hrs. Importantly, at the individual neuronal level, the lytic program begins as a transition out of this acute stage latent program and this escape from the default latent program is regulated by de novo VP16 expression. Our findings support a model in which regulated de novo VP16 expression in the neuron mediates entry into the lytic cycle during the earliest stages of virus infection in vivo. These findings support the hypothesis that the loose association of VP16 with the viral tegument combined with sensory axon length and transport mechanisms serve to limit arrival of virion associated VP16 into neuronal nuclei favoring latency. Further, our findings point to specialized features of the VP16 promoter that control the de novo expression of VP16 in neurons and this regulation is a key component in setting the balance between lytic and latent infections in the nervous system.

  13. Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR9 Expressed in Trigeminal Ganglia are Critical to Viral Control During Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Graciela Kunrath; Zolini, Guilherme Pimenta; Mansur, Daniel Santos; Freire Lima, Bráulio Henrique; Wischhoff, Uschi; Astigarraga, Ruiz Gerhardt; Dias, Marcela França; Silva, Mariana das Graças Almeida; Béla, Samantha Ribeiro; do Valle Antonelli, Lis Ribeiro; Arantes, Rosa Maria; Gazzinelli, Ricardo Tostes; Báfica, André; Kroon, Erna Geessien; Campos, Marco Antônio

    2010-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a neurotropic DNA virus that is responsible for several clinical manifestations in humans, including encephalitis. HSV-1 triggers toll-like receptors (TLRs), which elicit cytokine production. Viral multiplication and cytokine expression in C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) mice infected with HSV-1 were evaluated. Virus was found in the trigeminal ganglia (TG), but not in the brains of animals without signs of encephalitis, between 2 and 6 days postinfection (d.p.i.). Cytokine expression in the TG peaked at 5 d.p.i. TLR9−/− and TLR2/9−/− mice were more susceptible to the virus, with 60% and 100% mortality, respectively, as opposed to 10% in the WT and TLR2−/− mice. Increased levels of both CXCL10/IP-10 and CCL2/MCP-1, as well as reduced levels of interferon-γ and interleukin 1-β transcripts, measured in both the TG and brains at 5 d.p.i., and the presence of virus in the brain were correlated with total mortality in TLR2/9−/− mice. Cytokine alterations in TLR2/9−/− mice coincided with histopathological changes in their brains, which did not occur in WT and TLR2−/− mice and occurred only slightly in TLR9−/− mouse brain. Increased cellularity, macrophages, CD8 T cells producing interferon-γ, and expression levels of TLR2 and TLR9 were detected in the TG of WT-infected mice. We hypothesize that HSV-1 infection is controlled by TLR-dependent immune responses in the TG, which prevent HSV-1 encephalitis. PMID:20864677

  14. Expression of Herpes Simplex Virus Thymidine Kinase/Ganciclovir by RNA Trans-Splicing Induces Selective Killing of HIV-Producing Cells.

    PubMed

    Ingemarsdotter, Carin K; Poddar, Sushmita; Mercier, Sarah; Patzel, Volker; Lever, Andrew M L

    2017-06-16

    Antiviral strategies targeting hijacked cellular processes are less easily evaded by the virus than viral targets. If selective for viral functions, they can have a high therapeutic index. We used RNA trans-splicing to deliver the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase-ganciclovir (HSV-tk/GCV) cell suicide system into HIV-producing cells. Using an extensive in silico bioinformatics and RNA structural analysis approach, ten HIV RNA trans-splicing constructs were designed targeting eight different HIV splice donor or acceptor sites and were tested in cells expressing HIV. Trans-spliced mRNAs were identified in HIV-expressing cells using qRT-PCR with successful detection of fusion RNA transcripts between HIV RNA and the HSV-tk RNA transcripts from six of ten candidate RNA trans-splicing constructs. Conventional PCR and Sanger sequencing confirmed RNA trans-splicing junctions. Measuring cell viability in the presence or absence of GCV expression of HSV-tk by RNA trans-splicing led to selective killing of HIV-producing cells using either 3' exon replacement or 5' exon replacement in the presence of GCV. Five constructs targeting four HIV splice donor and acceptor sites, D4, A5, A7, and A8, involved in regulating the generation of multiple HIV RNA transcripts proved to be effective for trans-splicing mediated selective killing of HIV-infected cells, within which individual constructs targeting D4 and A8 were the most efficient. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cellular Transcriptional Coactivator RanBP10 and Herpes Simplex Virus 1 ICP0 Interact and Synergistically Promote Viral Gene Expression and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yuka; Kato, Akihisa; Maruzuru, Yuhei; Oyama, Masaaki; Kozuka-Hata, Hiroko; Arii, Jun

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT To investigate the molecular mechanism(s) by which herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) regulatory protein ICP0 promotes viral gene expression and replication, we screened cells overexpressing ICP0 for ICP0-binding host cell proteins. Tandem affinity purification of transiently expressed ICP0 coupled with mass spectrometry-based proteomics technology and subsequent analyses showed that ICP0 interacted with cell protein RanBP10, a known transcriptional coactivator, in HSV-1-infected cells. Knockdown of RanBP10 in infected HEp-2 cells resulted in a phenotype similar to that observed with the ICP0-null mutation, including reduction in viral replication and in the accumulation of viral immediate early (ICP27), early (ICP8), and late (VP16) mRNAs and proteins. In addition, RanBP10 knockdown or the ICP0-null mutation increased the level of histone H3 association with the promoters of these viral genes, which is known to repress transcription. These effects observed in wild-type HSV-1-infected HEp-2 RanBP10 knockdown cells or those observed in ICP0-null mutant virus-infected control HEp-2 cells were remarkably increased in ICP0-null mutant virus-infected HEp-2 RanBP10 knockdown cells. Our results suggested that ICP0 and RanBP10 redundantly and synergistically promoted viral gene expression by regulating chromatin remodeling of the HSV-1 genome for efficient viral replication. IMPORTANCE Upon entry of herpesviruses into a cell, viral gene expression is restricted by heterochromatinization of the viral genome. Therefore, HSV-1 has evolved multiple mechanisms to counteract this epigenetic silencing for efficient viral gene expression and replication. HSV-1 ICP0 is one of the viral proteins involved in counteracting epigenetic silencing. Here, we identified RanBP10 as a novel cellular ICP0-binding protein and showed that RanBP10 and ICP0 appeared to act synergistically to promote viral gene expression and replication by modulating viral chromatin remodeling. Our results

  16. Cellular Transcriptional Coactivator RanBP10 and Herpes Simplex Virus 1 ICP0 Interact and Synergistically Promote Viral Gene Expression and Replication.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuka; Kato, Akihisa; Maruzuru, Yuhei; Oyama, Masaaki; Kozuka-Hata, Hiroko; Arii, Jun; Kawaguchi, Yasushi

    2016-01-06

    To investigate the molecular mechanism(s) by which herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) regulatory protein ICP0 promotes viral gene expression and replication, we screened cells overexpressing ICP0 for ICP0-binding host cell proteins. Tandem affinity purification of transiently expressed ICP0 coupled with mass spectrometry-based proteomics technology and subsequent analyses showed that ICP0 interacted with cell protein RanBP10, a known transcriptional coactivator, in HSV-1-infected cells. Knockdown of RanBP10 in infected HEp-2 cells resulted in a phenotype similar to that observed with the ICP0-null mutation, including reduction in viral replication and in the accumulation of viral immediate early (ICP27), early (ICP8), and late (VP16) mRNAs and proteins. In addition, RanBP10 knockdown or the ICP0-null mutation increased the level of histone H3 association with the promoters of these viral genes, which is known to repress transcription. These effects observed in wild-type HSV-1-infected HEp-2 RanBP10 knockdown cells or those observed in ICP0-null mutant virus-infected control HEp-2 cells were remarkably increased in ICP0-null mutant virus-infected HEp-2 RanBP10 knockdown cells. Our results suggested that ICP0 and RanBP10 redundantly and synergistically promoted viral gene expression by regulating chromatin remodeling of the HSV-1 genome for efficient viral replication. Upon entry of herpesviruses into a cell, viral gene expression is restricted by heterochromatinization of the viral genome. Therefore, HSV-1 has evolved multiple mechanisms to counteract this epigenetic silencing for efficient viral gene expression and replication. HSV-1 ICP0 is one of the viral proteins involved in counteracting epigenetic silencing. Here, we identified RanBP10 as a novel cellular ICP0-binding protein and showed that RanBP10 and ICP0 appeared to act synergistically to promote viral gene expression and replication by modulating viral chromatin remodeling. Our results provide insight into

  17. Regulation of alkaline phosphatase expression in human choriocarcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, T A; Tin, A W; Sussman, H H

    1979-01-01

    The coincident expression of two structurally distinct isoenzymes of human alkaline phosphatase was demonstrated in two independently derived gestational choriocarcinoma cell lines. These proteins were shown to have enzymatic, antigenic, and physical-chemical properties resembling those of isoenzymes from term placenta and adult liver. The regulation of these isoenzymes has been studied during the exposure of both cell lines to 5-bromodeoxyuridine and dibutyryl cyclic AMP. The responses of the alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes to these agents have also been compared with the response of another protein phenotypic to placenta, the alpha subunit of chorionic gonadotropin. The results show that (i) the separate structural genes coding for placental and liver alkaline phosphatases are regulated in a noncoordinate fashion; (ii) both alkaline phosphatase genes respond independently of the alpha subunit; and (iii) the induction of the placental type isoenzyme occurs via at least two independent pathways. Images PMID:218197

  18. Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Julie L; Amzat, Rianot; Martin, Nicolle

    2015-09-01

    Herpes zoster is a commonly encountered disorder. It is estimated that there are approximately 1 million new cases of herpes zoster in the United States annually, with an incidence of 3.2 per 1000 person-years. Patients with HIV have the greatest risk of developing herpes zoster ophthalmicus compared with the general population. Other risk factors include advancing age, use of immunosuppressive medications, and primary infection in infancy or in utero. Vaccination against the virus is a primary prevention modality. Primary treatments include antivirals, analgesics, and anticonvulsants. Management may require surgical intervention and comanagement with pain specialists, psychiatrists, and infectious disease specialists. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Human herpes simplex labialis.

    PubMed

    Fatahzadeh, M; Schwartz, R A

    2007-11-01

    Humans are the natural host for eight of more than 80 known herpes viruses. Infections with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) are ubiquitous worldwide and highly transmissible. Herpes simplex labialis (HSL) is the best-recognized recrudescent infection of the lips and perioral tissues caused by HSV-1. Facial lesions of HSL may be unsightly, frequent outbreaks unpleasant, and the infection itself more severe locally and systemically in immunocompromised people. This article highlights the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnostic features and management issues for HSL.

  20. Mutations within the pathogenic region of herpes simplex virus 1 gK signal sequences alter cell surface expression and neurovirulence.

    PubMed

    Matundan, Harry H; Mott, Kevin R; Akhtar, Aslam Abbasi; Breunig, Joshua J; Ghiasi, Homayon

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the role of the signal sequences of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) gK on virus replication and viral pathogenesis, we constructed recombinant viruses with or without mutations within the signal sequences of gK. These recombinant viruses expressed two additional copies of the mutated (MgK) or native (NgK) form of the gK gene in place of the latency-associated transcript with a myc epitope tag to facilitate detection at their 3' ends. The replication of MgK virus was similar to that of NgK both in vitro and in vivo, as well as in the trigeminal ganglia (TG) of latently infected mice. The levels of gB and gK transcripts in the corneas, TG, and brains of infected mice on days 3 and 5 postinfection were markedly virus and time dependent, as well as tissue specific. Mutation in the signal sequence of gK in MgK virus blocked cell surface expression of gK-myc in rabbit skin cells, increased 50% lethal dose, and decreased corneal scarring in ocularly infected mice compared to the NgK or revertant (RgK) virus. MgK and NgK viruses, and not the RgK virus, showed a reduced extent of explant reactivation at the lower dose of ocular infection but not at the higher dose. However, the time of reactivation was not affected by overexpression of the different forms of gK. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that the 8mer peptide (ITAYGLVL) within the signal sequence of gK promotes cell surface expression of gK in infected cells and ocular pathogenesis in infected mice. In this study, we show for the first time that mutations within the signal sequence of gK blocked cell surface expression of inserted recombinant gK in vitro. Furthermore, this blockage in cell surface expression was correlated with higher 50% lethal dose and less corneal scarring in vivo. Thus, these studies point to a key role for the 8mer within the signal sequence of gK in HSV-1-induced pathogenicity. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Herpes simplex virus 2 expresses a novel form of ICP34.5, a major viral neurovirulence factor, through regulated alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shuang; Guo, Nini; Patel, Amita; Krause, Philip R

    2013-05-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2, two closely related neurotropic human herpesviruses, achieve neurotropism through ICP34.5, a major viral neurovirulence factor. In this report, in addition to the full-length 38-kDa protein (ICP34.5α), we identified a 28-kDa novel form of ICP34.5 (ICP34.5β) in HSV-2-infected cells. ICP34.5β is translated from unspliced ICP34.5 mRNA, with the retained intron introducing a premature stop codon. Thus, ICP34.5β lacks the C-terminal conserved GADD34 domain but includes 19 additional amino acids encoded by the intron. Although a fraction of both HSV-2 ICP34.5 proteins are detected in the nucleolus, ICP34.5α is predominantly located in cytoplasm, and ICP34.5β is mainly detected more diffusely in the nucleus. ICP34.5β is unable to counteract PKR-mediated eIF2 phosphorylation but does not interfere with ICP34.5α's function in this process. Efficient expression of ICP34.5β in cell culture assays is dependent on viral infection or expression of ICP27, a multifunctional immediate-early gene. The effect of ICP27 on the ICP34.5β protein level is attributed to its selective inhibition of ICP34.5 splicing, which results in increased expression of ICP34.5β but a reduced level of ICP34.5α. The C- terminal KH3 domain but not the RNA binding domain of ICP27 is required for its specific inhibition of ICP34.5 splicing and promotion of ICP34.5β expression. Our results suggest that the expression of ICP34.5α and ICP34.5β is tightly regulated in HSV-2 and likely contributes to viral pathogenesis.

  2. Mutations within the Pathogenic Region of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 gK Signal Sequences Alter Cell Surface Expression and Neurovirulence

    PubMed Central

    Matundan, Harry H.; Mott, Kevin R.; Akhtar, Aslam Abbasi; Breunig, Joshua J.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT To investigate the role of the signal sequences of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) gK on virus replication and viral pathogenesis, we constructed recombinant viruses with or without mutations within the signal sequences of gK. These recombinant viruses expressed two additional copies of the mutated (MgK) or native (NgK) form of the gK gene in place of the latency-associated transcript with a myc epitope tag to facilitate detection at their 3′ ends. The replication of MgK virus was similar to that of NgK both in vitro and in vivo, as well as in the trigeminal ganglia (TG) of latently infected mice. The levels of gB and gK transcripts in the corneas, TG, and brains of infected mice on days 3 and 5 postinfection were markedly virus and time dependent, as well as tissue specific. Mutation in the signal sequence of gK in MgK virus blocked cell surface expression of gK-myc in rabbit skin cells, increased 50% lethal dose, and decreased corneal scarring in ocularly infected mice compared to the NgK or revertant (RgK) virus. MgK and NgK viruses, and not the RgK virus, showed a reduced extent of explant reactivation at the lower dose of ocular infection but not at the higher dose. However, the time of reactivation was not affected by overexpression of the different forms of gK. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that the 8mer peptide (ITAYGLVL) within the signal sequence of gK promotes cell surface expression of gK in infected cells and ocular pathogenesis in infected mice. IMPORTANCE In this study, we show for the first time that mutations within the signal sequence of gK blocked cell surface expression of inserted recombinant gK in vitro. Furthermore, this blockage in cell surface expression was correlated with higher 50% lethal dose and less corneal scarring in vivo. Thus, these studies point to a key role for the 8mer within the signal sequence of gK in HSV-1-induced pathogenicity. PMID:25505072

  3. Increased Expression of Herpes Virus-Encoded hsv1-miR-H18 and hsv2-miR-H9-5p in Cancer-Containing Prostate Tissue Compared to That in Benign Prostate Hyperplasia Tissue.

    PubMed

    Yun, Seok Joong; Jeong, Pildu; Kang, Ho Won; Shinn, Helen Ki; Kim, Ye-Hwan; Yan, Chunri; Choi, Young-Ki; Kim, Dongho; Ryu, Dong Hee; Ha, Yun-Sok; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kwon, Tae Gyun; Kim, Jung Min; Suh, Sang Heon; Kim, Seon-Kyu; Kim, Seon-Young; Kim, Sang Tae; Kim, Won Tae; Lee, Ok-Jun; Moon, Sung-Kwon; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Kim, Isaac Yi; Kim, Jayoung; Cha, Hee-Jae; Choi, Yung-Hyun; Cha, Eun-Jong; Kim, Wun-Jae

    2016-06-01

    Previously, we reported the presence of virus-encoded microRNAs (miRNAs) in the urine of prostate cancer (CaP) patients. In this study, we investigated the expression of two herpes virus-encoded miRNAs in prostate tissue. A total of 175 tissue samples from noncancerous benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), 248 tissue samples from patients with CaP and BPH, and 50 samples from noncancerous surrounding tissues from these same patients were analyzed for the expression of two herpes virus-encoded miRNAs by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunocytochemistry using nanoparticles as molecular beacons. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR results revealed significantly higher expression of hsv1-miR-H18 and hsv2-miRH9- 5p in surrounding noncancerous and CaP tissues than that in BPH tissue (each comparison, P<0.001). Of note, these miRNA were expressed equivalently in the CaP tissues and surrounding noncancerous tissues. Moreover, immunocytochemistry clearly demonstrated a significant enrichment of both hsv1-miR-H18 and hsv2-miR-H9 beacon-labeled cells in CaP and surrounding noncancerous tissue compared to that in BPH tissue (each comparison, P<0.05 for hsv1-miR-H18 and hsv2- miR-H9). These results suggest that increased expression of hsv1-miR-H18 and hsv2-miR-H95p might be associated with tumorigenesis in the prostate. Further studies will be required to elucidate the role of these miRNAs with respect to CaP and herpes viral infections.

  4. Expression and detection of LINE-1 ORF-encoded proteins.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lixin; LaCava, John; Taylor, Martin S; Boeke, Jef D

    2014-01-01

    LINE-1 (L1) elements are endogenous retrotransposons active in mammalian genomes. The L1 RNA is bicistronic, encoding two non-overlapping open reading frames, ORF1 and ORF2, whose protein products (ORF1p and ORF2p) bind the L1 RNA to form a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex that is presumed to be a critical retrotransposition intermediate. However, ORF2p is expressed at a significantly lower level than ORF1p; these differences are thought to be controlled at the level of translation, due to a low frequency ribosome reinitiation mechanism controlling ORF2 expression. As a result, while ORF1p is readily detectable, ORF2p has previously been very challenging to detect in vitro and in vivo. To address this, we recently tested several epitope tags fused to the N- or C-termini of the ORF proteins in an effort to enable robust detection and affinity purification from native (L1RP) and synthetic (ORFeus-Hs) L1 constructs. An analysis of tagged RNPs from both L1RP and ORFeus-Hs showed similar host-cell-derived protein interactors. Our observations also revealed that the tag sequences affected the retrotransposition competency of native and synthetic L1s differently although they encode identical ORF proteins. Unexpectedly, we observed apparently stochastic expression of ORF2p within seemingly homogenous L1-expressing cell populations.

  5. Transformation of Drosophila cell lines: an alternative approach to exogenous protein expression.

    PubMed

    Cherbas, Lucy; Cherbas, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Techniques and experimental applications are described for exogenous protein expression in Drosophila cell lines. Ways in which the Drosophila cell lines and the baculovirus expression vector system differ in their applications are emphasized.

  6. Gene expression profile induced by BCNU in human glioma cell lines with differential MGMT expression.

    PubMed

    Bandres, Eva; Andion, Esther; Escalada, Alvaro; Honorato, Beatriz; Catalan, Victoria; Cubedo, Elena; Cordeu, Lucia; Garcia, Fermin; Zarate, Ruth; Zabalegui, Natalia; Garcia-Foncillas, Jesus

    2005-07-01

    Chemotherapy with the alkylating agent BCNU (1,3-bis (2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea) is the most commonly used chemotherapeutic agent for gliomas. However, the usefulness of this agent is limited because tumor cell resistance to BCNU is frequently found in clinical brain tumor therapy. The O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase protein (MGMT) reverses alkylation at the O6 position of guanine and we have reported the role of MGMT in the response of brain tumors to alkylating agents. However, the different mechanisms underlying the patterns related to MGMT remain unclear. To better understand the molecular mechanism by which BCNU exerts its effect in glioma cell lines according MGMT expression, we used microarray technology to interrogate 3800 known genes and determine the gene expression profiles altered by BCNU treatment. Our results showed that treatment with BCNU alters the expression of a diverse group of genes in a time-dependent manner. A subset of gene changes was found common in both glioma cell lines and other subset is specific of each cell line. After 24 h of BCNU treatment, up-regulation of transcription factors involved in the nucleation of both RNA polymerase II and III transcription initiation complexes was reported. Interestingly, BCNU promoted the expression of actin-dependent regulators of chromatin. Similar effects were found with higher BCNU doses in MGMT+ cell line showing a similar mechanism that in MGMT-deficient cell with standard doses. Our data suggest that human glioma cell lines treated with BCNU, independently of MGMT expression, show changes in the expression of cell cycle and survival-related genes interfering the transcription mechanisms and the chromatin regulation.

  7. 5-[18F]Fluoroalkyl pyrimidine nucleosides: probes for positron emission tomography imaging of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase gene expression.

    PubMed

    Chacko, Ann-Marie; Blankemeyer, Eric; Lieberman, Brian P; Qu, Wenchao; Kung, Hank F

    2009-01-01

    The preliminary in vivo evaluation of novel 5-[(18)F]fluoroalkyl-2'-deoxyuridines ([(18)F]FPrDU, [(18)F]FBuDU, [(18)F]FPeDU; [(18)F]1a-c, respectively) and 2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-5-[(18)F]fluoroalkyl-1-beta-d-arabinofuranosyl uracils ([(18)F]FFPrAU, [(18)F]FFBuAU, [(18)F]FFPeAU; [(18)F]1d-f, respectively) as probes for imaging herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) gene expression is described. [(18)F]1a-f were successfully synthesized by a rapid and efficient two-step one-pot nucleophilic fluorination reaction using 5-O-mesylate precursors and [(18)F]F(-). For in vivo studies, tumor xenografts were grown in nude mice by implanting RG2 cells stably expressing HSV1-tk (RG2TK+) and wild-type cells (RG2). Biodistribution studies at 2 h pi revealed that the uptake of [(18)F]1a-b and [(18)F]1d-e in RG2TK+ tumors was not significantly different from control tumors. However, [(18)F]1c and [(18)F]1f had an average 1.6- and 1.7-fold higher uptake in RG2TK+ tumors than control RG2 tumors. Blood activity curves for [(18)F]1c and [(18)F]1f highlight rapid clearance of radioactivity in the blood. Dynamic small animal PET (A-PET) imaging studies of tumor-bearing mice with [(18)F]1c and [(18)F]1f showed higher initial uptake (3.5- and 1.4-fold, respectively) in RG2TK+ tumors than in control tumors, with continued washout of activity from both tumors over time. Biological evaluations suggest that [(18)F]1c and [(18)F]1f may have limited potential for imaging HSV1-tk gene expression due to fast washout of activity from the blood, thus significantly decreasing sensitivity and specificity of tracer accumulation in HSV1-tk-expressing tumors.

  8. Genital Herpes (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Know STDs Questions and Answers About Sex Genital Warts (HPV) Can You Get Genital Herpes From a ... Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) About Birth Control Genital Warts (HPV) Telling Your Partner You Have an STD ...

  9. Expression of Herpes Simplex Virus 1-Encoded MicroRNAs in Human Trigeminal Ganglia and Their Relation to Local T-Cell Infiltrates ▿

    PubMed Central

    Held, Kathrin; Junker, Andreas; Dornmair, Klaus; Meinl, Edgar; Sinicina, Inga; Brandt, Thomas; Theil, Diethilde; Derfuss, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    Herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1) is a neurotropic virus which establishes lifelong latency in human trigeminal ganglia (TG). Currently, two nonexclusive control mechanisms of HSV-1 latency are discussed: antiviral CD8+ T cells and viral microRNAs (miRNAs) encoded by the latency associated transcript (LAT). We investigate here to what extent these mechanisms may contribute to the maintenance of HSV-1 latency. We show that only a small proportion of LAT+ neurons is surrounded by T cells in human TG. This indicates that viral latency in human TG might be controlled by other mechanisms such as viral miRNAs. Therefore, we assessed TG sections for the presence of HSV-1 miRNA, DNA, and mRNA by combining LAT in situ hybridization, T-cell immunohistochemistry, and single cell analysis of laser-microdissected sensory neurons. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) revealed that LAT+ neurons with or without surrounding T cells were always positive for HSV-1 miRNAs and DNA. Furthermore, ICP0 mRNA could rarely be detected only in LAT+ neurons, as analyzed by single-cell RT-PCR. In contrast, in LAT− neurons that were surrounded by T cells, neither miRNAs nor the DNA of HSV-1, HSV-2, or varicella-zoster virus could be detected. These data indicate that the majority of LAT+ neurons is not directly controlled by T cells. However, miRNA expression in every latently infected neuron would provide an additional checkpoint before viral replication is initiated. PMID:21795359

  10. Polyneuritis and herpes zoster

    PubMed Central

    Dayan, A. D.; Ogul, E.; Graveson, G. S.

    1972-01-01

    Widespread neurological disorders following herpes zoster are exceptional. They include encephalitis and myelitis, and a type of polyneuropathy. The latter is particularly rare as only 16 cases have been described since the first account by Wohlwill in 1924. We present two clinical cases of polyneuropathy following herpes zoster with neuropathological studies on one of them, and discuss its possible aetiology and pathogenesis in the light of previous reports and recent experimental studies. Images PMID:5037030

  11. Overexpression of herpes simplex virus glycoprotein K (gK) alters expression of HSV receptors in ocularly-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Allen, Sariah J; Mott, Kevin R; Ghiasi, Homayon

    2014-04-15

    We have shown previously that HSV-1 glycoprotein K (gK) exacerbates corneal scarring (CS) in mice and rabbits. Here, we investigated the relative impact of gK overexpression on host responses during primary corneal infection and latency in trigeminal ganglia (TG) of infected mice. Mice were infected ocularly with HSV-gK(3) (expressing two extra copies of gK replacing latency associated transcript [LAT]), HSV-gK(3) revertant (HSV-gK(3)R), or wild-type HSV-1 strain McKrae. Individual corneas on day 5 post infection (PI) and TG on day 28 PI were isolated and used for detection of gB DNA in the TG, HSV-1 receptors in the cornea and TG, and inflammatory infiltrates in TG. During primary HSV-1 infection, gK overexpression resulted in altered expression of herpesvirus entry mediator (HVEM), 3-O-sulfated heparin sulfate (3-OS-HS), paired immunoglobulin-like type 2 receptor-α (PILR-α), nectin-1, and nectin-2 in cornea of BALB/c, but not C57BL/6 mice. However, gK overexpression did have an effect on 3-OS-HS, PILR-α, nectin-1, and nectin-2 expression (but not HVEM expression) in TG of C57BL/6 mice during latency. These differences did not affect the level of latency, but instead were correlated with the presence of CS. The presence of LAT increased HVEM expression and this effect was enhanced further by the presence of CS in latently-infected mice. Finally, the presence of LAT, but not overexpression of gK, affected CD4, CD8, TNF-α, Tim-3, PD-1, IL-21, IL-2, and IFN-γ expression in TG. We demonstrate a novel link between gK exacerbation of CS and HSV-1 receptors, suggesting a gK-induced molecular route for the pathogenesis as well as selective advantage of these entry routes for the pathogen during latency-reactivation cycle.

  12. Overexpression of Herpes Simplex Virus Glycoprotein K (gK) Alters Expression of HSV Receptors in Ocularly-Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Sariah J.; Mott, Kevin R.; Ghiasi, Homayon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We have shown previously that HSV-1 glycoprotein K (gK) exacerbates corneal scarring (CS) in mice and rabbits. Here, we investigated the relative impact of gK overexpression on host responses during primary corneal infection and latency in trigeminal ganglia (TG) of infected mice. Methods. Mice were infected ocularly with HSV-gK3 (expressing two extra copies of gK replacing latency associated transcript [LAT]), HSV-gK3 revertant (HSV-gK3R), or wild-type HSV-1 strain McKrae. Individual corneas on day 5 post infection (PI) and TG on day 28 PI were isolated and used for detection of gB DNA in the TG, HSV-1 receptors in the cornea and TG, and inflammatory infiltrates in TG. Results. During primary HSV-1 infection, gK overexpression resulted in altered expression of herpesvirus entry mediator (HVEM), 3-O-sulfated heparin sulfate (3-OS-HS), paired immunoglobulin-like type 2 receptor-α (PILR-α), nectin-1, and nectin-2 in cornea of BALB/c, but not C57BL/6 mice. However, gK overexpression did have an effect on 3-OS-HS, PILR-α, nectin-1, and nectin-2 expression (but not HVEM expression) in TG of C57BL/6 mice during latency. These differences did not affect the level of latency, but instead were correlated with the presence of CS. The presence of LAT increased HVEM expression and this effect was enhanced further by the presence of CS in latently-infected mice. Finally, the presence of LAT, but not overexpression of gK, affected CD4, CD8, TNF-α, Tim-3, PD-1, IL-21, IL-2, and IFN-γ expression in TG. Conclusions. We demonstrate a novel link between gK exacerbation of CS and HSV-1 receptors, suggesting a gK-induced molecular route for the pathogenesis as well as selective advantage of these entry routes for the pathogen during latency-reactivation cycle. PMID:24667863

  13. Herpes simplex virus-mediated human hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene transfer into neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Palella, T D; Silverman, L J; Schroll, C T; Homa, F L; Levine, M; Kelley, W N

    1988-01-01

    The virtually complete deficiency of the purine salvage enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) results in a devastating neurological disease, Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. Transfer of the HPRT gene into fibroblasts and lymphoblasts in vitro and into hematopoietic cells in vivo has been accomplished by other groups with retroviral-derived vectors. It appears to be necessary, however, to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal cells to correct the neurological dysfunction of this disorder. The neurotropic virus herpes simplex virus type 1 has features that make it suitable for use as a vector to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal tissue. This report describes the isolation of an HPRT-deficient rat neuroma cell line, designated B103-4C, and the construction of a recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 that contained human HPRT cDNA. These recombinant viruses were used to infect B103-4C cells. Infected cells expressed HPRT activity which was human in origin.

  14. Herpes simplex virus-mediated human hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene transfer into neuronal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Palella, T.D.; Silverman, L.J.; Schroll, C.T.; Homa, F.L.; Levine, M.; Kelley, W.N.

    1988-01-01

    The virtually complete deficiency of the purine salvage enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) results in a devastating neurological disease, Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. Transfer of the HPRT gene into fibroblasts and lymphoblasts in vitro and into hematopoietic cells in vivo has been accomplished by other groups with retroviral-derived vectors. It appears to be necessary, however, to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal cells to correct the neurological dysfunction of this disorder. The neurotropic virus herpes simplex virus type 1 has features that make it suitable for use as a vector to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal tissue. This report describes the isolation of an HPRT-deficient rat neuroma cell line, designated B103-4C, and the construction of a recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 that contained human HPRT cDNA. These recombinant viruses were used to infect B103-4C cells. Infected cells expressed HPRT activity which was human in origin.

  15. Activation of gene expression by herpes simplex virus type 1 ICP0 occurs at the level of mRNA synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, R; Schaffer, P A

    1997-01-01

    ICP0 is a nuclear phosphoprotein involved in the activation of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) gene expression during lytic infection and reactivation from viral latency. Although available evidence suggests that ICP0 acts at the level of transcription, definitive studies specifically addressing this issue have not been reported. In the present study we measured the ability of ICP0 to activate gene expression (i) from promoters representing the major kinetic classes of viral genes in transient expression assays and (ii) from the same promoters during viral infection at multiplicities of infection ranging from 0.1 to 5.0 PFU/cell. The levels of synthesis and steady-state accumulation of mRNA, mRNA stability, and levels of protein synthesis were compared in cells transfected with a reporter plasmid in the presence and absence of ICP0 and in cells infected with wild-type HSV-1 or an ICP0 null mutant, n212. In transient expression assays and during viral infection at all multiplicities tested, the levels of steady-state mRNA and protein were significantly lower in the absence of ICP0, indicating that ICP0 activates gene expression at the level of mRNA accumulation. In transient expression assays and during infection at low multiplicities (< 1 PFU/cell) in the presence or absence of ICP0, marked increases in the levels of viral mRNAs accompanied by proportional increases in the levels of protein synthesis were observed with increasing multiplicity. At a high multiplicity (5 PFU/cell) in the presence or absence of ICP0, mRNA levels did not increase as a function of multiplicity and changes in the levels of protein were no longer related to changes in the levels of mRNA. Collectively, these tests indicate that transcription of viral genes is rate limiting at low multiplicities and that translation is rate limiting at high multiplicities, independent of ICP0. Consistent with the lower levels of mRNA detected in the absence of ICP0, the rates of transcription initiation

  16. Herpes zoster (shingles) disseminated (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Herpes zoster (shingles) normally occurs in a limited area that follows a dermatome (see the "dermatome" picture). In individuals with damaged immune systems, herpes zoster may be widespread (disseminated), causing serious illness. ...

  17. Elevated PD-1 expression and decreased telomerase activity in memory T cells of patients with symptomatic Herpes Zoster infection.

    PubMed

    Zangeneh, Z; Golmoghaddam, H; Emad, M; Erfani, N; Doroudchi, M

    2014-11-16

    We investigated PD-1 levels on VZV-specific CD8+ T-cells of patients with zoster and the effect of PD-1 on the telomerase activity. CD3, CD8, CD137 and PD-1 expressions were analyzed on PBMCs from 9 symptomatic and 5 asymptomatic individuals. The effect of PD-1 blockade at the time of stimulation on the telomerase activity of non-senescent CD57-CD45RO+CD8+CD3+ memory T-cells was evaluated. PD-1 was elevated on CD8+ T-cells in patients. The frequency of PD-1+ and CD137- cells in total CD3+CD8+ T cells of patients was elevated compared to controls. Telomerase activity of non-senescent memory T-cells was lower than that of controls. Blockade of PD-1 at the time of stimulation increased telomerase activity of non-senescent memory T-cells, accompanied by increased CD137 expression. Low telomerase activity of the patients with reactivated zoster could be partially overcome by blocking PD-1 pathway.

  18. An Empirical Expression for the Line Widths of Ammonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Linda R.; Peterson, Dean B.

    1994-01-01

    The hydrogen-broadened line widths of 116 (sup 14)NH(sub 3) ground state transitions have been measured at 0.006 cm(sup -1) resolution using a Bruker spectrometer in the 24 to 210 cm(sup -1) region. The rotational variation of the experimental widths with J(sup '),K(sup ') = 1,0 to 10,10 has been reproduced to 2.4 % using an heuristically derived expression of the form

    gamma = a(sub 0) + a(sub 1) J(sup ') + a (sub 2) K(sup ') + a(sub 3) J(sup ')(sup 2) + a(sub 4) J(sup ') K(sup ')

    where J(sup ') and K(sup ') are the lower state symmetric top quantum numbers. This function has also been applied to the measured widths of the 58 transitions of nu(sub 1) at 3 (micro)m, each broadened by N(sub 2), O(sub 2), Ar, H(sub 2), and He. The rms of the observed minus calculated widths are 5% or better for the five foreign broadeners. The values of the fitted constants suggest that for some broadeners the expression might also be written as

    gamma = a(sub 0) + b(sub 1) J(sup ') + b(sub 2)(J(sup ' )- K(sup ')) + b(sub 3) J(sup ')(J(sup ') - K(sup '))

    .

  19. An Empirical Expression for the Line Widths of Ammonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Linda R.; Peterson, Dean B.

    1994-01-01

    The hydrogen-broadened line widths of 116 (sup 14)NH(sub 3) ground state transitions have been measured at 0.006 cm(sup -1) resolution using a Bruker spectrometer in the 24 to 210 cm(sup -1) region. The rotational variation of the experimental widths with J(sup '),K(sup ') = 1,0 to 10,10 has been reproduced to 2.4 % using an heuristically derived expression of the form

    gamma = a(sub 0) + a(sub 1) J(sup ') + a (sub 2) K(sup ') + a(sub 3) J(sup ')(sup 2) + a(sub 4) J(sup ') K(sup ')

    where J(sup ') and K(sup ') are the lower state symmetric top quantum numbers. This function has also been applied to the measured widths of the 58 transitions of nu(sub 1) at 3 (micro)m, each broadened by N(sub 2), O(sub 2), Ar, H(sub 2), and He. The rms of the observed minus calculated widths are 5% or better for the five foreign broadeners. The values of the fitted constants suggest that for some broadeners the expression might also be written as

    gamma = a(sub 0) + b(sub 1) J(sup ') + b(sub 2)(J(sup ' )- K(sup ')) + b(sub 3) J(sup ')(J(sup ') - K(sup '))

    .

  20. Evaluation of neurovirulence and biodistribution of Venezuelan equine encephalitis replicon particles expressing herpes simplex virus type 2 glycoprotein D.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Jacek; Adkins, Karissa; Gangolli, Seema; Ren, Jian; Arendt, Heather; DeStefano, Joanne; Obregon, Jennifer; Tummolo, Donna; Natuk, Robert J; Brown, Tom P; Parks, Christopher L; Udem, Stephen A; Long, Deborah

    2007-03-08

    The safety of a propagation-defective Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) replicon particle vaccine was examined in mice. After intracranial inoculation we observed approximately 5% body weight loss, modest inflammatory changes in the brain, genome replication, and foreign gene expression. These changes were transient and significantly less severe than those caused by TC-83, a live-attenuated vaccinal strain of VEEV that has been safely used to immunize military personnel and laboratory workers. Replicon particles injected intramuscularly or intravenously were detected at limited sites 3 days post-administration, and were undetectable by day 22. There was no evidence of dissemination to spinal cord or brain after systemic administration. These results demonstrate that propagation-defective VEEV replicon particles are minimally neurovirulent and lack neuroinvasive potential.

  1. A novel bicistronic high-capacity gutless adenovirus vector that drives constitutive expression of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase and tet-inducible expression of Flt3L for glioma therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Puntel, Mariana; Muhammad, A K M G; Candolfi, Marianela; Salem, Alireza; Yagiz, Kader; Farrokhi, Catherine; Kroeger, Kurt M; Xiong, Weidong; Curtin, James F; Liu, Chunyan; Bondale, Niyati S; Lerner, Jonathan; Pechnick, Robert N; Palmer, Donna; Ng, Philip; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Castro, Maria G

    2010-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a deadly primary brain tumor. Conditional cytotoxic/immune-stimulatory gene therapy (Ad-TK and Ad-Flt3L) elicits tumor regression and immunological memory in rodent GBM models. Since the majority of patients enrolled in clinical trials would exhibit adenovirus immunity, which could curtail transgene expression and therapeutic efficacy, we used high-capacity adenovirus vectors (HC-Ads) as a gene delivery platform. Herein, we describe for the first time a novel bicistronic HC-Ad driving constitutive expression of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) and inducible Tet-mediated expression of Flt3L within a single-vector platform. We achieved anti-GBM therapeutic efficacy with no overt toxicities using this bicistronic HC-Ad even in the presence of systemic Ad immunity. The bicistronic HC-Ad-TK/TetOn-Flt3L was delivered into intracranial gliomas in rats. Survival, vector biodistribution, neuropathology, systemic toxicity, and neurobehavioral deficits were assessed for up to 1 year posttreatment. Therapeutic efficacy was also assessed in animals preimmunized against Ads. We demonstrate therapeutic efficacy, with vector genomes being restricted to the brain injection site and an absence of overt toxicities. Importantly, antiadenoviral immunity did not inhibit therapeutic efficacy. These data represent the first report of a bicistronic vector platform driving the expression of two therapeutic transgenes, i.e., constitutive HSV1-TK and inducible Flt3L genes. Further, our data demonstrate no promoter interference and optimum gene delivery and expression from within this single-vector platform. Analysis of the efficacy, safety, and toxicity of this bicistronic HC-Ad vector in an animal model of GBM strongly supports further preclinical testing and downstream process development of HC-Ad-TK/TetOn-Flt3L for a future phase I clinical trial for GBM.

  2. Expression of MIF and CD74 in leukemic cell lines: correlation to DR expression destiny.

    PubMed

    Georgouli, Mirella; Papadimitriou, Lina; Glymenaki, Maria; Patsaki, Valia; Athanassakis, Irene

    2016-06-01

    Invariant chain (Ii) or CD74 is a non-polymorphic glycoprotein, which apart from its role as a chaperone dedicated to MHCII molecules, is known to be a high-affinity receptor for macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). The present study aimed to define the roles of CD74 and MIF in the immune surveillance escape process. Towards this direction, the cell lines HL-60, Raji, K562 and primary pre-B leukemic cells were examined for expression and secretion of MIF. Flow cytometry analysis detected high levels of MIF and intracellular/membrane CD74 expression in all leukemic cells tested, while MIF secretion was shown to be inversely proportional to intracellular HLA-DR (DR) expression. In the MHCII-negative cells, IFN-γ increased MIF expression and induced its secretion in HL-60 and K562 cells, respectively. In K562 cells, CD74 (Iip33Iip35) was shown to co-precipitate with HLA-DOβ (DOβ), inhibiting thus MIF or DR binding. Induced expression of DOα in K562 (DOα-DOβ+) cells in different transfection combinations decreased MIF expression and secretion, while increasing surface DR expression. Thus, MIF could indeed be part of the antigen presentation process.

  3. Local expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-2 correlates with protection against corneal scarring after ocular challenge of vaccinated mice with herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Ghiasi, H; Wechsler, S L; Kaiwar, R; Nesburn, A B; Hofman, F M

    1995-01-01

    To correlate specific local immune responses with protection from corneal scarring, we examined immune cell infiltrates in the cornea after ocular challenge of vaccinated mice with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). This is the first report to examine corneal infiltrates following ocular challenge of a vaccinated mouse rather than following infection of a naive mouse. Mice were vaccinated systemically with vaccines that following ocular challenge with HSV-1 resulted in (i) complete protection against corneal disease (KOS, an avirulent strain of HSV-1); (ii) partial protection, resulting in moderate corneal disease (baculovirus-expressed HSV-1 glycoprotein E [gE]); and (iii) no protection, resulting in severe corneal disease (mock vaccine). Infiltration into the cornea of CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, macrophages, and cells containing various lymphokines was monitored on days 0, 1, 3, 7, and 10 postchallenge by immunocytochemistry of corneal sections. Prior to ocular challenge, no eye disease or corneal infiltrates were detected in any mice. KOS-vaccinated mice developed high HSV-1 neutralizing antibody titers (> 1:640) in serum. After ocular challenge, they were completely protected against death, developed no corneal disease, and had no detectable virus in their tear films at any time examined. In response to the ocular challenge, these mice developed high local levels of infiltrating CD4+ T cells and cells containing interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-4, IL-6, or tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). In contrast, only low levels of infiltrating CD8+ T cells were found, and gamma interferon (IFN-gamma)-containing cells were not present until day 10. gE-vaccinated mice developed neutralizing antibody titers in serum almost as high as those of the KOS-vaccinated mice (> 1:320). After ocular challenge, they were also completely protected against death. However, the gE-vaccinated mice developed low levels of corneal disease and virus was detected in one-third of their eyes

  4. 78 FR 76140 - Extension of Public Comment Period for the Champlain Hudson Power Express Transmission Line...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-16

    ... Extension of Public Comment Period for the Champlain Hudson Power Express Transmission Line Project Draft... Hudson Power Express Transmission Line Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0447). The... permit to the Applicant, Champlain Hudson Power Express, Inc. (CHPEI), to construct, operate,...

  5. Unexpected expression of intermediate filament protein genes in human oligodendroglioma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Kashima, Tsuyoshi; Vinters, H.V.; Campagnoni, A.T.

    1995-01-01

    From a human oligodendroglioma cell line cDNA library, ten intermediate filament (IF) cDNA clones were isolated. Five clones corresponded to vimentin mRNA, two corresponded to cytokeratin K7 mRNA, and two corresponded to cytokeratin K8 mRNA. One clone encoded a novel IF mRNA. The expression of these and other IF protein genes was examined in five cell lines derived from human oligodendroglioma, astrocytoma and neuroblastoma tumors. Vimentin mRNA and K18 mRNA were expressed in all the cell lines. The K7 and K8 genes were expressed only in the oligodendroglioma cell lines. Surprisingly, nestin mRNA was expressed in the astrocytoma lines and the neuroblastoma line, but was not expressed in the oligodendroglioma lines. These results indicate that oligodendroglioma cell lines express Types I and II cytokeratin genes. This pattern of IF gene expression was different from that of the astrocytoma and neuroblastoma cell lines, which expressed IF genes usually associated with the mature cell types or with differentiating fetal neural precursor cells, i.e. GFAP and neurofilament-L. The results also suggest that the oligodendroglioma cell lines are more epithelial in character and do not reflect the gene expression of mature oligodendrocytes. 46 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. A tracer kinetic model for 18F-FHBG for quantitating herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase reporter gene expression in living animals using PET.

    PubMed

    Green, Leeta Alison; Nguyen, Khoi; Berenji, Bijan; Iyer, Meera; Bauer, Eileen; Barrio, Jorge R; Namavari, Mohammad; Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2004-09-01

    Reporter probe 9-(4-18F-fluoro-3-[hydroxymethyl]butyl)guanine (18F-FHBG) and reporter gene mutant herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-sr39tk) have been used for imaging reporter gene expression with PET. Current methods for quantitating the images using the percentage injected dose per gram of tissue do not distinguish between the effects of probe transport and subsequent phosphorylation. We therefore investigated tracer kinetic models for 18F-FHBG dynamic microPET data and noninvasive methods for determining blood time-activity curves in an adenoviral gene delivery model in mice. 18F-FHBG (approximately 7.4 MBq [approximately 200 microCi]) was injected into 4 mice; 18F-FHBG concentrations in plasma and whole blood were measured from mouse heart left ventricle (LV) direct sampling. Replication-incompetent adenovirus (0-2 x 10(9) plaque-forming units) with the E1 region deleted (n = 8) or replaced by HSV1-sr39tk (n = 18) was tail-vein injected into mice. Mice were dynamically scanned using microPET (approximately 7.4 MBq [approximately 200 microCi] 18F-FHBG) over 1 h; regions of interest were drawn on images of the heart and liver. Serial whole blood 18F-FHBG concentrations were measured in 6 of the mice by LV sampling, and 1 least-squares ratio of the heart image to the LV time-activity curve was calculated for all 6 mice. For 2 control mice and 9 mice expressing HSV1-sr39tk, heart image (input function) and liver image time-activity curves (tissue curves) were fit to 2- and 3-compartment models using Levenberg-Marquardt nonlinear regression. The models were compared using an F statistic. HSV1-sr39TK enzyme activity was determined from liver samples and compared with model parameter estimates. For another 3 control mice and 6 HSV1-sr39TK-positive mice, the model-predicted relative percentage of metabolites was compared with high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. The ratio of 18F-FHBG in plasma to whole blood was 0.84 +/- 0.05 (mean +/- SE

  7. Herpes and papilloma viruses

    SciTech Connect

    De Palo, G.; Rilke, F.; Zur Hausen, H.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains over 25 selections. Some of the titles are: Seroepidemiologic Asociation of HSV-2 with Cervical Cancers: Transforming Viral Genes; Organization and Expression of Human Papillomavirus DNA in Cervical Cancer Cell Lines; An Investigation of Cervical Scrapes by DNA Hybridization: and Human Papillomaviruses in Genital Tissue: Examination by Immunohistochemistry and in situ DNA Hybridization.

  8. Global gene expression analyses of hematopoietic stem cell-like cell lines with inducible Lhx2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Karin; Wirta, Valtteri; Dahl, Lina; Bruce, Sara; Lundeberg, Joakim; Carlsson, Leif; Williams, Cecilia

    2006-01-01

    Background Expression of the LIM-homeobox gene Lhx2 in murine hematopoietic cells allows for the generation of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC)-like cell lines. To address the molecular basis of Lhx2 function, we generated HSC-like cell lines where Lhx2 expression is regulated by a tet-on system and hence dependent on the presence of doxycyclin (dox). These cell lines efficiently down-regulate Lhx2 expression upon dox withdrawal leading to a rapid differentiation into various myeloid cell types. Results Global gene expression of these cell lines cultured in dox was compared to different time points after dox withdrawal using microarray technology. We identified 267 differentially expressed genes. The majority of the genes overlapping with HSC-specific databases were those down-regulated after turning off Lhx2 expression and a majority of the genes overlapping with those defined as late progenitor-specific genes were the up-regulated genes, suggesting that these cell lines represent a relevant model system for normal HSCs also at the level of global gene expression. Moreover, in situ hybridisations of several genes down-regulated after dox withdrawal showed overlapping expression patterns with Lhx2 in various tissues during embryonic development. Conclusion Global gene expression analysis of HSC-like cell lines with inducible Lhx2 expression has identified genes putatively linked to self-renewal / differentiation of HSCs, and function of Lhx2 in organ development and stem / progenitor cells of non-hematopoietic origin. PMID:16600034

  9. Hands-on Herps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Activities, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Presents a hands-on activity to help primary, intermediate, and advanced students learn about and compare the general characteristics of reptiles and amphibians. Suggests "herp stations" to provide experiences. Details materials, background and procedures necessary for using this activity. (CW)

  10. Hands-on Herps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Activities, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Presents a hands-on activity to help primary, intermediate, and advanced students learn about and compare the general characteristics of reptiles and amphibians. Suggests "herp stations" to provide experiences. Details materials, background and procedures necessary for using this activity. (CW)

  11. Genital Herpes: A Review.

    PubMed

    Groves, Mary Jo

    2016-06-01

    Genital herpes is a common sexually transmitted disease, affecting more than 400 million persons worldwide. It is caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV) and characterized by lifelong infection and periodic reactivation. A visible outbreak consists of single or clustered vesicles on the genitalia, perineum, buttocks, upper thighs, or perianal areas that ulcerate before resolving. Symptoms of primary infection may include malaise, fever, or localized adenopathy. Subsequent outbreaks, caused by reactivation of latent virus, are usually milder. Asymptomatic shedding of transmissible virus is common. Although HSV-1 and HSV-2 are indistinguishable visually, they exhibit differences in behavior that may affect management. Patients with HSV-2 have a higher risk of acquiring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Polymerase chain reaction assay is the preferred method of confirming HSV infection in patients with active lesions. Treatment of primary and subsequent outbreaks with nucleoside analogues is well tolerated and reduces duration, severity, and frequency of recurrences. In patients with HSV who are HIV-negative, treatment reduces transmission of HSV to uninfected partners. During pregnancy, antiviral prophylaxis with acyclovir is recommended from 36 weeks of gestation until delivery in women with a history of genital herpes. Elective cesarean delivery should be performed in laboring patients with active lesions to reduce the risk of neonatal herpes.

  12. Herpes zoster vaccine (Zostavax).

    PubMed

    2006-09-11

    A live attenuated varicella-zoster vaccine (Zostavax--Merck) has been approved by the FDA for prevention of herpes zoster (HZ; zoster; shingles) in persons > or = 60 years old. Each dose of Zostavax contains about 14 times as much varicella-zoster virus (VZV) as Varivax, which has been used in the US since 1995 to vaccinate against varicella (chicken pox).

  13. Vaccine against herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Pasternak, Jacyr

    2013-01-01

    The herpes zoster vaccine is made using high doses of live attenuated varicella/zoster virus. The vaccine is well tolerated and has few adverse effects: the most common one is pain at the injection site. Complications can occur mainly in persons who had prior zoster keratitis or uveitis. The vaccine can prevent this disease with low mortality but high morbidity.

  14. Herpes Zoster and Recurrent Herpes Zoster

    PubMed Central

    Toyama, Nozomu; Daikoku, Tohru; Yajima, Misako

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background. The incidence of recurrent herpes zoster (HZ) and the relationship between initial and recurrent HZ are not clear. Methods. The Miyazaki Dermatologist Society has surveyed ~5000 patients with HZ annually since 1997. A questionnaire regarding HZ and its recurrence was completed by the dermatologists. Results. A total of 34 877 patients with HZ were registered at 43 clinics between June 2009 and November 2015. Among 16 784 patients seen at 10 of the 43 clinics, 1076 patients (6.41%) experienced recurrence. Herpes zoster was more frequent in female than in male patients (5.27 vs 4.25 in 1000 person-years, P < .001), as was HZ recurrence (7.63% vs 4.73%, P < .001). Two and three recurrences were observed in 49 and 3 patients, respectively. Recurrence in the same dermatome was observed in 16.3% of patients, and more frequently this occurred in the left side (P = .027). The number of HZ-experienced persons increased with age, and one third of the population had experienced HZ by the age of 80. Conclusions. Recurrent HZ was observed in 6.41% of patients, with a higher incidence in women. Moreover, HZ experience reduced the HZ incidence to 31.7% of the incidence in the HZ-naive population. PMID:28480280

  15. Can You Get Genital Herpes from a Cold Sore?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lucy* Yes — it is possible to get genital herpes from oral sex. Genital herpes is caused by the herpes ... Genital herpes is usually caused by HSV-2; oral herpes (cold sores) is usually caused by HSV-1. ...

  16. Complexity of expression of the intermediate filaments of six new human ovarian carcinoma cell lines: new expression of cytokeratin 20.

    PubMed Central

    Yanagibashi, T.; Gorai, I.; Nakazawa, T.; Miyagi, E.; Hirahara, F.; Kitamura, H.; Minaguchi, H.

    1997-01-01

    Six permanent human ovarian carcinoma cell lines (OVISE, OVTOKO, OVMANA and OVSAYO from clear cell adenocarcinoma, and OVSAHO and OVKATE from serous papillary adenocarcinoma) were established from solid tumours. The cell lines have been in culture for 5-8 years, the passage number varying from 62 to 246. Immunohistochemical analysis has shown that five of the six cell lines express at least six cytokeratin (CK) polypeptides. OVISE and OVSAYO expressed CKs 6, 7, 8, 18, 19 and 15 and/or 16. OVTOKO was positive for CKs 7, 8, 18, 19 and 15 and/or 16. OVSAHO expressed CKs 6, 7, 8, 14, 18, 19 and 15 and/or 16. OVMANA expressed CKs 6, 7, 8, 18, 19, 20 and 15 and/or 16. OVKATE expressed CKs 6, 7, 8, 13, 17, 18, 19, 20 and 15 and/or 16. The expression of CK7, additional expression of vimentin, and clinical and histopathological findings enabled us to confirm that six cell lines had been established from primary ovarian cancers. Two of the six cell lines were positive for CK20, although CK20 was not expressed in the original tumours. The heterotransplanted tumours produced by CK20-positive cells also expressed CK20. This is the first report of ovarian carcinoma cell lines that express CK20 irrespective of their histological type. CK20 has been found in all colon carcinoma cell lines, but only in the mucinous type of ovarian tumours. These new ovarian carcinoma cell lines will therefore provide a relevant experimental system for elucidating the regulatory control mechanisms of intermediate filament expression. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9328139

  17. Assessment of tumor characteristic gene expression in cell lines using a tissue similarity index (TSI)

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, Rickard; Ernberg, Ingemar

    2005-01-01

    The gene expression profiles of 60 cell lines, derived from nine different tissues, were compared with their corresponding in vivo tumors and tissues. Cell lines expressed few tissue-specific (2%) or tumor-specific (5%) genes when analyzed group-wise. A tissue similarity index (TSI) was designed based upon singular value decomposition that measured in vivo tumor characteristic gene expression in each cell line independently. Only 34 of the 60 cell lines received the highest TSI toward its tumor of origin. In addition, we identified the most appropriate cell lines to be used as model systems for different in vivo tumors. Seven cell lines were identified as being of another origin than the originally presumed one. The proposed TSI will likely become an important tool for the selection of the most appropriate cell lines in pharmaceutical screening programs and experimental and biomedical research. PMID:15671165

  18. Assessment of tumor characteristic gene expression in cell lines using a tissue similarity index (TSI).

    PubMed

    Sandberg, Rickard; Ernberg, Ingemar

    2005-02-08

    The gene expression profiles of 60 cell lines, derived from nine different tissues, were compared with their corresponding in vivo tumors and tissues. Cell lines expressed few tissue-specific (2%) or tumor-specific (5%) genes when analyzed group-wise. A tissue similarity index (TSI) was designed based upon singular value decomposition that measured in vivo tumor characteristic gene expression in each cell line independently. Only 34 of the 60 cell lines received the highest TSI toward its tumor of origin. In addition, we identified the most appropriate cell lines to be used as model systems for different in vivo tumors. Seven cell lines were identified as being of another origin than the originally presumed one. The proposed TSI will likely become an important tool for the selection of the most appropriate cell lines in pharmaceutical screening programs and experimental and biomedical research.

  19. Identification of genes expressed in the hermaphrodite germ line of C. elegans using SAGE.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Zhao, Yongjun; Wong, Kim; Ehlers, Peter; Kohara, Yuji; Jones, Steven J; Marra, Marco A; Holt, Robert A; Moerman, Donald G; Hansen, Dave

    2009-05-09

    Germ cells must progress through elaborate developmental stages from an undifferentiated germ cell to a fully differentiated gamete. Some of these stages include exiting mitosis and entering meiosis, progressing through the various stages of meiotic prophase, adopting either a male (sperm) or female (oocyte) fate, and completing meiosis. Additionally, many of the factors needed to drive embryogenesis are synthesized in the germ line. To increase our understanding of the genes that might be necessary for the formation and function of the germ line, we have constructed a SAGE library from hand dissected C. elegans hermaphrodite gonads. We found that 4699 genes, roughly 21% of all known C. elegans genes, are expressed in the adult hermaphrodite germ line. Ribosomal genes are highly expressed in the germ line; roughly four fold above their expression levels in the soma. We further found that 1063 of the germline-expressed genes have enriched expression in the germ line as compared to the soma. A comparison of these 1063 germline-enriched genes with a similar list of genes prepared using microarrays revealed an overlap of 460 genes, mutually reinforcing the two lists. Additionally, we identified 603 germline-enriched genes, supported by in situ expression data, which were not previously identified. We also found >4 fold enrichment for RNA binding proteins in the germ line as compared to the soma. Using multiple technological platforms provides a more complete picture of global gene expression patterns. Genes involved in RNA metabolism are expressed at a significantly higher level in the germ line than the soma, suggesting a stronger reliance on RNA metabolism for control of the expression of genes in the germ line. Additionally, the number and expression level of germ line expressed genes on the X chromosome is lower than expected based on a random distribution.

  20. Heat shock protein (HSP70) RNA expression differs among rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) clonal lines.

    PubMed

    Heredia-Middleton, Pilar; Brunelli, Joseph; Drew, Robert E; Thorgaard, Gary H

    2008-04-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70, 70 kDa) is the most commonly expressed protein in response to thermal stress. The extent of its expression is associated with differences in environmental temperatures. We investigated the heat shock response in red blood cells collected from one-year-old rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Three different clonal lines of rainbow trout (Arlee, OSU and Whale Rock) were utilized, originating from habitats that likely experienced different thermal profile. The relative expression of HSP70 from blood cells treated at 13 degrees C, 16 degrees C, 18 degrees C, 20 degrees C, 22 degrees C, and 24 degrees C was quantified using real-time PCR. The use of red blood cells allows for the control and replication of HSP70 expression patterns. Relative expression of HSP70 differed significantly among the three clonal lines. The Arlee line had the lowest HSP70 response of the three clonal lines at any temperature; indicating a heritable difference. Maximum expression of HSP70 occurred at 22 degrees C in the OSU line and at 24 degrees C in the Whale Rock line. The discovery of variation in HSP70 expression among the clonal lines indicates that future studies to map the genetic control of HSP70 expression differences are possible.

  1. Expression Profiling of a Human Thyroid Cell Line Stably Expressing the BRAFVV600E Mutation

    PubMed Central

    KIM*, BYOUNG-AE; JEE*, HYEON-GUN; WOOK YI*, JIN; KIM, SU-JIN; JUN CHAI, YOUNG; YOUNG CHOI, JUNE; EUN LEE, KYU

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim: The BRAFV600E mutation acts as an initiator of cancer development in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). Gene expression changes caused by the BRAFV600E mutation may have an important role in thyroid cancer development. Materials and Methods: To study genomic alterations caused by the BRAFV600E mutation, we made human thyroid cell lines that harbor the wild-type BRAF gene (Nthy/WT) and the V600E mutant-type BRAF gene (Nthy/V600E). Results: Flow cytometry and western blotting showed stable transfection of the BRAF gene. In functional experiments, Nthy/V600E showed increased anchorage-independent growth and invasion through Matrigel, compared to Nthy/WT. Microarray analysis revealed that 2,441 genes were up-regulated in Nthy/V600E compared to Nthy/WT. Gene ontology analysis showed that the up-regulated genes were associated with cell adhesion, migration, and the ERK and MAPK cascade, and pathway analysis showed enrichment in cancer-related pathways. Conclusion: Our Nthy/WT and Nthy/V600E cell line pair could be a suitable model to study the molecular characteristics of BRAFV600E PTC. *These Authors contributed equally to this study. PMID:28031237

  2. [Flavonoids contents and expression analysis of related genes in red cell line of Saussurea medusa].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yajie; Li, Houhua; Fu, Wanyi; Gao, Yan; Wang, Bingjie; Li, Ling

    2014-08-01

    Saussurea medusa is a rare traditional Chinese medicinal herb. Besides anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities, it has effects of disinhibiting cold, dispelling dampness and promoting blood circulation. Flavonoids are the main medicinal compounds in S. medusa. Contents of flavonoids and expression of flavonoids biosynthesis related genes in white and red (induced by low temperature, high sucrose and high light) callus were analyzed. The results showed that the total flavone in red line was 3.60 times higher compared to white line. The accumulation of rutin in red line (0.25% of dry weight) was 2.40 times higher compared to white line. Anthocyanins were abundant in red line, with the contents of cyanidin 3-O-glucosidechloride and cyanidin 3-O-succinyl glycoside 0.12% and 0.19% of dry weight respectively. CHS, F3'H, FNS, FLS, DFR and ANS genes were highly expressed in red line compared to white line. Expression of three transcription factors (MYB, bHLH and WD40) in red line was significantly higher than that in white line, especially the expression of MYB (19.70 times higher compared to white line). These results indicated that high expression levels of transcription factors induced high expression of structural genes in red line, thereby enhancing the flavonoids biosynthesis. The expression of bHLH and WD40 was similar, whereas it was significantly different from that of MYB, indicating that bHLH and WD40 could form a binary complex to regulate expression of structural genes and flavonoids biosynthesis.

  3. Dysregulated expression of IFN-γ and IL-10 and impaired IFN-γ-mediated responses at different disease stages in patients with genital herpes simplex virus-2 infection

    PubMed Central

    SINGH, R; KUMAR, A; CREERY, W D; RUBEN, M; GIULIVI, A; DIAZ-MITOMA, F

    2003-01-01

    Cell-mediated T-helper type-1 (Th1) responses play a vital role in the immunopathogenesis of genital infections caused by herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2). We investigated the role of Th responses in HSV-2 infection at different disease stages by analysing the production of Th cytokines in HSV-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). IFN-γ production decreased over time following a recurrence, whereas levels of IL-10, and to a lesser extent IL-2, remained elevated during this period. In addition, PBMCs from asymptomatic seropositive individuals produced high levels of IFN-γ and low levels of IL-10, in contrast to individuals with a history of genital ulcers. Following a recurrence, virus copy number in the genital lesions decreased progressively over time, in a manner similar to IFN-γ production by HSV-2-stimulated PBMCs. Enhanced production of IFN-γ may modulate HSV replication and B7 expression on monocytic cells of HSV-infected individuals. In contrast to seronegative controls, IFN-γ failed to enhance B7 expression on monocytic cells of HSV-infected individuals. In addition, monocytic cells from HSV-2-infected individuals with recurrent disease supported greater HSV replication than did those of HSV-infected asymptomatic individuals or seronegative controls. Furthermore, addition of IFN-γ resulted in enhanced HSV replication in monocytic cells of HSV-infected individuals with recurrent disease, in contrast to the inhibition observed in HSV-seropositive asymptomatic individuals and seronegative controls. Taken together, our results suggest that dysregulated production of IFN-γ at different disease stages and the impaired ability of monocytic cells to respond to IFN-γ may play a role in the pathogenesis of recurrent genital herpes disease. PMID:12823283

  4. Expressing gait-line symmetry in able-bodied gait

    PubMed Central

    Jeleń, Piotr; Wit, Andrzej; Dudziński, Krzysztof; Nolan, Lee

    2008-01-01

    Background Gait-lines, or the co-ordinates of the progression of the point of application of the vertical ground reaction force, are a commonly reported parameter in most in-sole measuring systems. However, little is known about what is considered a "normal" or "abnormal" gait-line pattern or level of asymmetry. Furthermore, no reference databases on healthy young populations are available for this parameter. Thus the aim of this study is to provide such reference data in order to allow this tool to be better used in gait analysis. Methods Vertical ground reaction force data during several continuous gait cycles were collected using a Computer Dyno Graphy in-sole system® for 77 healthy young able-bodied subjects. A curve (termed gait-line) was obtained from the co-ordinates of the progression of the point of application of the force. An Asymmetry Coefficient Curve (AsC) was calculated between the mean gait-lines for the left and right foot for each subject. AsC limits of ± 1.96 and 3 standard deviations (SD) from the mean were then calculated. Gait-line data from 5 individual subjects displaying pathological gait due to disorders relating to the discopathy of the lumbar spine (three with considerable plantarflexor weakness, two with considerable dorsiflexor weakness) were compared to the AsC results from the able-bodied group. Results The ± 1.96 SD limit suggested that non-pathological gait falls within 12–16% asymmetry for gait-lines. Those exhibiting pathological gait fell outside both the ± 1.96 and ± 3SD limits at several points during stance. The subjects exhibiting considerable plantarflexor weakness all fell outside the ± 1.96SD limit from 30–50% of foot length to toe-off while those exhibiting considerable dorsiflexor weakness fell outside the ± 1.96SD limit between initial contact to 25–40% of foot length, and then surpassed the ± 3SD limit after 55–80% of foot length. Conclusion This analysis of gait-line asymmetry provides a reference

  5. [Effect of proteflazid on TLRs expression by mononuclear leukocytes of peripheral blood and epithelial cells of mucous membranes and skin in patients with herpes-associated erythema multiforme and erythema annulare centrifugum].

    PubMed

    Sorokina, E V; Akhmatova, N K; Skhodova, S A

    2014-01-01

    The article reports survey data on 23 patients with erythemas, including 19 patients with herpes-associated erythema multiforme (HAEM) and 4 patients with Darier's erythema annulare centrifugum (DEAC). Patients in the initial state (baseline) and after two weeks of therapy with proteflazid were characterized by measuring the levels of Toll-like receptor (TLR) expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and in epithelial cells of the throat and the skin. The TLR expression in PBMC and skin was assessed by flow cytometry with monoclonal antibodies (ICA) (Caltag Laboratories, USA; Hycult Biotech, Netherlands) against relevant antigens. In addition, patients were also characterized by the content of subpopulations of lymphocytes expressing surface markers CD3, CD4, CD8, CD16, CD21, CD23, CD72, CD25, and HLA-DR in the peripheral blood, which was measured by flow cytometry. The therapy with proteflazid in patients with both HAEM and DEAC led to normalization of the level of both T-cell and B-cell immunity, which was manifested by an increase in the total number of lymphocytes, CD3+, CD4+, CD21+, and CD72+. Measurements of the dynamics of TLR expression in the course of immunotherapy showed an increase in the number of TLR 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, and 9 in PBMC (which was especially pronounced for TLR2) and in epithelium of the pharyngeal mucosa and skin (increased expression of TLR3, 7, and 9).

  6. Upregulation of class I major histocompatibility complex gene expression in primary sensory neurons, satellite cells, and Schwann cells of mice in response to acute but not latent herpes simplex virus infection in vivo

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) deficiency is typical of almost all resident cells in normal neural tissue. However, CD8+ T cells, which recognize antigenic peptides in the context of class I MHC molecules, are known to mediate clearance of herpes simplex virus (HSV) from spinal ganglia of experimentally infected mice, leading to the hypothesis that class I expression in the peripheral nervous system must be upregulated in response to HSV infection. In addressing this hypothesis it is shown, in BALB/c (H-2d) mice, that normally deficient class I transcripts transiently accumulate in peripheral nerve Schwann cells, ganglionic satellite cells, and primary sensory neurons, indicating that in each of these cell types class I expression is regulated at the transcriptional level in vivo. Furthermore, for 3-4 wk after infection, H-2Kd/Dd antigens are expressed by satellite and Schwann cells but not neurons, suggesting additional posttranscriptional regulation of class I synthesis in neurons. Alternatively, the class I RNAs induced in neurons may not be derived from classical class I genes. Factors regulating H-2 class I expression emanate from within infected ganglia, probably from infected neurons themselves. However, induction of class I molecules was not maintained during latency, when viral gene expression in neurons is restricted to a single region within the virus repeats. These data have implications for the long-term survival of cells in HSV-infected neural tissue. PMID:8064236

  7. Mutations Inactivating Herpes Simplex Virus 1 MicroRNA miR-H2 Do Not Detectably Increase ICP0 Gene Expression in Infected Cultured Cells or Mouse Trigeminal Ganglia.

    PubMed

    Pan, Dongli; Pesola, Jean M; Li, Gang; McCarron, Seamus; Coen, Donald M

    2017-01-15

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) latency entails the repression of productive ("lytic") gene expression. An attractive hypothesis to explain some of this repression involves inhibition of the expression of ICP0, a lytic gene activator, by a viral microRNA, miR-H2, which is completely complementary to ICP0 mRNA. To test this hypothesis, we engineered mutations that disrupt miR-H2 without affecting ICP0 in HSV-1. The mutant virus exhibited drastically reduced expression of miR-H2 but showed wild-type levels of infectious virus production and no increase in ICP0 expression in lytically infected cells, which is consistent with the weak expression of miR-H2 relative to the level of ICP0 mRNA in that setting. Following corneal inoculation of mice, the mutant was not significantly different from wild-type virus in terms of infectious virus production in the trigeminal ganglia during acute infection, mouse mortality, or the rate of reactivation from explanted latently infected ganglia. Critically, the mutant was indistinguishable from wild-type virus for the expression of ICP0 and other lytic genes in acutely and latently infected mouse trigeminal ganglia. The latter result may be related to miR-H2 being less effective in inhibiting ICP0 expression in transfection assays than a host microRNA, miR-138, which has previously been shown to inhibit lytic gene expression in infected ganglia by targeting ICP0 mRNA. Additionally, transfected miR-138 reduced lytic gene expression in infected cells more effectively than miR-H2. While this study provides little support for the hypothesis that miR-H2 promotes latency by inhibiting ICP0 expression, the possibility remains that miR-H2 might target other genes during latency.

  8. Ube2g2-gp78-mediated HERP polyubiquitylation is involved in ER stress recovery.

    PubMed

    Yan, Long; Liu, Weixiao; Zhang, Huihui; Liu, Chao; Shang, Yongliang; Ye, Yihong; Zhang, Xiaodong; Li, Wei

    2014-04-01

    A large number of studies have focused on how individual organisms respond to a stress condition, but little attention has been paid to the stress recovery process, such as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress recovery. Homocysteine-induced ER protein (HERP) was originally identified as a chaperone-like protein that is strongly induced upon ER stress. Here we show that, after ER stress induction, HERP is rapidly degraded by Ube2g2-gp78-mediated ubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation. The polyubiquitylation of HERP in vitro depends on a physical interaction between the CUE domain of gp78 and the ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain of HERP, which is essential for HERP degradation in vivo during ER stress recovery. We further show that although HERP promotes cell survival under ER stress, high levels of HERP expression reduce cell viability under oxidative stress conditions, suggesting that HERP plays a dual role in cellular stress adaptation. Together, these results establish the ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated degradation of HERP as a novel mechanism that fine-tunes the stress tolerance capacity of the cell.

  9. Genital herpes - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    Herpes - genital - self-care; Herpes simplex - genital - self-care; Herpesvirus 2 - self-care; HSV-2 - self-care ... Call your health care provider if you have any of the following: Symptoms of an outbreak that worsen despite medicine and self-care ...

  10. Herpes zoster vaccine in Korea

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Herpes zoster and post-herpetic neuralgia deteriorate the quality of life because of severe pain and complications, and cause considerable social and economic burden of disease. In 2012, herpes zoster vaccine was released in Korea. The efficacy of herpes zoster vaccine is known to be 51.3-66.5% among the aged over 60 and 69.8-72.4% among adults between 50 and 59. It is also known that preventive efficacy is maintained for at least 5 years. Although there can be local reactions such as redness, pain and swelling at the site of injection and systemic reaction such as headache and eruption after herpes zoster vaccination, most of the adverse reactions are minor and disappear within days by themselves. As it is a live vaccine, persons with severe immune-suppression and pregnant women should not be vaccinated with the vaccine. Currently, Korean Society of Infectious Diseases recommended for the aged over 60 to be vaccinated with herpes zoster vaccine by subcutaneous route. In this article, clinical aspects and burden of disease of herpes zoster, efficacy and effects of herpes zoster vaccine, and herpes zoster vaccine recommendation by Korean Society of Infectious Diseases are discussed. PMID:23858399

  11. Herpes zoster vaccine in Korea.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won Suk

    2013-07-01

    Herpes zoster and post-herpetic neuralgia deteriorate the quality of life because of severe pain and complications, and cause considerable social and economic burden of disease. In 2012, herpes zoster vaccine was released in Korea. The efficacy of herpes zoster vaccine is known to be 51.3-66.5% among the aged over 60 and 69.8-72.4% among adults between 50 and 59. It is also known that preventive efficacy is maintained for at least 5 years. Although there can be local reactions such as redness, pain and swelling at the site of injection and systemic reaction such as headache and eruption after herpes zoster vaccination, most of the adverse reactions are minor and disappear within days by themselves. As it is a live vaccine, persons with severe immune-suppression and pregnant women should not be vaccinated with the vaccine. Currently, Korean Society of Infectious Diseases recommended for the aged over 60 to be vaccinated with herpes zoster vaccine by subcutaneous route. In this article, clinical aspects and burden of disease of herpes zoster, efficacy and effects of herpes zoster vaccine, and herpes zoster vaccine recommendation by Korean Society of Infectious Diseases are discussed.

  12. Silencing effect of lentiviral vectors encod-ing shRNA of Herp on endoplasmic reticulum stress and inflammatory responses in RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chen, F L; Li, Q; Zhang, J Y; Lei, L J; Zhang, Z; Mahmoud, T N; Wang, X G; Lin, P F; Jin, Y P; Wang, A H

    2015-12-21

    Herp, a mammalian protein with a ubiquitin-like domain, can be strongly upregulated by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress during ER-associated protein degradation. However, the other cellular functions of Herp remain unclear. We explored the effect of Herp on ER stress and inflammatory responses in RAW 264.7 macrophages that had been exposed to tunicamycin or thapsigargin. We successfully constructed recombinant lentiviral vectors for Herp short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression to better understand the contribution made by Herp to other signaling pathways. Western blotting revealed that the recombinant Herp lentiviral shRNA vector significantly inhibited the expression of the Herp protein in the thapsigargin-treated RAW 264.7 macrophages. The reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction results showed that knockdown Herp inhibited the expression of ER stress-related genes during exposure to tunicamycin or thapsigargin. In RAW 264.7 macrophages, knockdown Herp markedly attenuated the expression of inflammatory cytokines when exposed to tunicamycin; however, it strongly enhanced the expression of inflammatory cytokines when exposed to thapsigargin. We concluded that Herp lentiviral shRNA vectors had been successfully constructed; knockdown Herp inhibited ER stress and had a different effect on inflammatory responses in RAW 264.7 macrophages depending on whether they were exposed to tunicamycin or thapsigargin.

  13. During herpes simplex virus type 1 infection of rabbits, the ability to express the latency-associated transcript increases latent-phase transcription of lytic genes.

    PubMed

    Giordani, Nicole V; Neumann, Donna M; Kwiatkowski, Dacia L; Bhattacharjee, Partha S; McAnany, Peterjon K; Hill, James M; Bloom, David C

    2008-06-01

    Trigeminal ganglia (TG) from rabbits latently infected with either wild-type herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) or the latency-associated transcript (LAT) promoter deletion mutant 17DeltaPst were assessed for their viral chromatin profile and transcript abundance. The wild-type 17syn+ genomes were more enriched in the transcriptionally permissive mark dimethyl H3 K4 than were the 17DeltaPst genomes at the 5' exon and ICP0 and ICP27 promoters. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed significantly more ICP4, tk, and glycoprotein C lytic transcripts in 17syn+ than in 17DeltaPst. These results suggest that, for efficient reactivation from latency in rabbits, the LAT is important for increased transcription of lytic genes during latency.

  14. The isolation and characterization of growth regulatory factors produced by a herpes simplex virus Type 2 transformed mouse tumor cell line, H238

    SciTech Connect

    Stagg, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    This study was performed in an attempt to associate HSV-2-transformation with specific growth factors in order to develop a testable model for HSV-2-transformation. We report here the isolation and characterization of four growth regulatory factors produced by H238, an HSV-2-transformed mouse tumor cell line. These factors were separated from the H238-CM by heparin-sepharose affinity chromatography into three peaks of mitogenic activity and a fourth containing inhibitory activity for splenocytes. The three peaks of mitogenic activity have been identified based on physiochemical characteristics: the first supported the anchorage-independent growth of EGF treated NRK-c-49 cells and resembles transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}); the second bound to lectin-coated sepharose beads and was sensitive to trypsin, neuroaminidase, and the reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT) and, resembled a platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-like factor; and the third displaced ({sup 125}I)-labeled basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in a dose-dependent fashion when tested with a radioimmune assay. The fourth peak was inhibitory for a variety of splenocyte function assays. A model for the interaction of these factors in vivo is presented with an emphasis on testability.

  15. Liposome armed with herpes virus-derived gH625 peptide to overcome doxorubicin resistance in lung adenocarcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Perillo, Emiliana; Porto, Stefania; Falanga, Annarita; Zappavigna, Silvia; Stiuso, Paola; Tirino, Virginia; Desiderio, Vincenzo; Papaccio, Gianpaolo; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Giordano, Antonio; Galdiero, Stefania; Caraglia, Michele

    2016-01-26

    New delivery systems including liposomes have been developed to circumvent drug resistance. To enhance the antitumor efficacy of liposomes encapsulating anti-cancer agents, we used liposomes externally conjugated to the 20 residue peptide gH625. Physicochemical characterization of the liposome system showed a size of 140 nm with uniform distribution and high doxorubicin encapsulation efficiency. We evaluated the effects of increasing concentrations of liposomes encapsulating Doxo (LipoDoxo), liposomes encapsulating Doxo conjugated to gH625 (LipoDoxo-gH625), empty liposomes (Lipo) or free Doxo on growth inhibition of either wild type (A549) or doxorubicin-resistant (A549 Dx) human lung adenocarcinoma. After 72 h, we found that the growth inhibition induced by LipoDoxo-gH625 was higher than that caused by LipoDoxo with an IC50 of 1 and 0.3 μM in A549 and A549 Dx cells, respectively. The data on cell growth inhibition were paralleled by an higher oxidative stress and an increased uptake of Doxo induced by LipoDoxo-gH625 compared to LipoDoxo, above all in A549 Dx cells. Cytometric analysis showed that the antiproliferative effects of each drug treatment were mainly due to the induction of apoptosis. In conclusion, liposomes armed with gH625 are able to overcome doxorubicin resistance in lung adenocarcinoma cell lines.

  16. Liposome armed with herpes virus-derived gH625 peptide to overcome doxorubicin resistance in lung adenocarcinoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Falanga, Annarita; Zappavigna, Silvia; Stiuso, Paola; Tirino, Virginia; Desiderio, Vincenzo; Papaccio, Gianpaolo; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Giordano, Antonio; Galdiero, Stefania; Caraglia, Michele

    2016-01-01

    New delivery systems including liposomes have been developed to circumvent drug resistance. To enhance the antitumor efficacy of liposomes encapsulating anti-cancer agents, we used liposomes externally conjugated to the 20 residue peptide gH625. Physicochemical characterization of the liposome system showed a size of 140 nm with uniform distribution and high doxorubicin encapsulation efficiency. We evaluated the effects of increasing concentrations of liposomes encapsulating Doxo (LipoDoxo), liposomes encapsulating Doxo conjugated to gH625 (LipoDoxo-gH625), empty liposomes (Lipo) or free Doxo on growth inhibition of either wild type (A549) or doxorubicin-resistant (A549 Dx) human lung adenocarcinoma. After 72 h, we found that the growth inhibition induced by LipoDoxo-gH625 was higher than that caused by LipoDoxo with an IC50 of 1 and 0.3 μM in A549 and A549 Dx cells, respectively. The data on cell growth inhibition were paralleled by an higher oxidative stress and an increased uptake of Doxo induced by LipoDoxo-gH625 compared to LipoDoxo, above all in A549 Dx cells. Cytometric analysis showed that the antiproliferative effects of each drug treatment were mainly due to the induction of apoptosis. In conclusion, liposomes armed with gH625 are able to overcome doxorubicin resistance in lung adenocarcinoma cell lines. PMID:26554306

  17. Analysis of differential protein expression in normal and neoplastic human breast epithelial cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K.; Chubb, C.; Huberman, E.; Giometti, C.S.

    1997-07-01

    High resolution two dimensional get electrophoresis (2DE) and database analysis was used to establish protein expression patterns for cultured normal human mammary epithelial cells and thirteen breast cancer cell lines. The Human Breast Epithelial Cell database contains the 2DE protein patterns, including relative protein abundances, for each cell line, plus a composite pattern that contains all the common and specifically expressed proteins from all the cell lines. Significant differences in protein expression, both qualitative and quantitative, were observed not only between normal cells and tumor cells, but also among the tumor cell lines. Eight percent of the consistently detected proteins were found in significantly (P < 0.001) variable levels among the cell lines. Using a combination of immunostaining, comigration with purified protein, subcellular fractionation, and amino-terminal protein sequencing, we identified a subset of the differentially expressed proteins. These identified proteins include the cytoskeletal proteins actin, tubulin, vimentin, and cytokeratins. The cell lines can be classified into four distinct groups based on their intermediate filament protein profile. We also identified heat shock proteins; hsp27, hsp60, and hsp70 varied in abundance and in some cases in the relative phosphorylation levels among the cell lines. Finally, we identified IMP dehydrogenase in each of the cell lines, and found the levels of this enzyme in the tumor cell lines elevated 2- to 20-fold relative to the levels in normal cells.

  18. Gene expression signatures of seven individual human embryonic stem cell lines.

    PubMed

    Skottman, Heli; Mikkola, Milla; Lundin, Karolina; Olsson, Cia; Strömberg, Anne-Marie; Tuuri, Timo; Otonkoski, Timo; Hovatta, Outi; Lahesmaa, Riitta

    2005-10-01

    Identification of molecular components that define a pluripotent human embryonic stem cell (hESC) provides the basis for understanding the molecular mechanisms regulating the maintenance of pluripotency and induction of differentiation. We compared the gene expression profiles of seven genetically independent hESC lines with those of nonlineage-differentiated cells derived from each line. A total of 8,464 transcripts were expressed in all hESC lines. More than 45% of them have no yet-known biological function, which indicates that a high number of unknown factors contribute to hESC pluripotency. Among these 8,464 transcripts, 280 genes were specific for hESCs and 219 genes were more than twofold differentially expressed in all hESC lines compared with nonlineage-differentiated cells. They represent genes implicated in the maintenance of pluripotency and those involved in early differentiation. The chromosomal distribution of these hESC-enriched genes showed over-representation in chromosome 19 and under-representation in chromosome 18. Although the overall gene expression profiles of the seven hESC lines were markedly similar, each line also had a subset of differentially expressed genes reflecting their genetic variation and possibly preferential differentiation potential. Limited overlap between gene expression profiles illustrates the importance of cross-validation of results between different ESC lines.

  19. Systematic variation in gene expression patterns in human cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Douglas T.; Scherf, Uwe; Eisen, Michael B.; Perou, Charles M.; Rees, Christian; Spellman, Paul; Iyer, Vishwanath; Jeffrey, Stefanie S.; Van de Rijn, Matt; Waltham, Mark; Pergamenschikov, Alexander; Lee, Jeffrey C.F.; Lashkari, Deval; Shalon, Dari; Myers, Timothy G.; Weinstein, John N.; Botstein, David; Brown, Patrick O.

    2000-01-01

    We used cDNA micro arrays to explore the variation in expression of approximately 8,000 unique genes among the 60 cell lines used in the National Cancer Institute s screen for anti-cancer drugs. Classification of the cell lines based solely on the observed patterns of gene expression revealed a correspondence to the ostensible origins of the tumors from which the cell lines were derived. The consistent relationship between the gene expression patterns and the tissue of origin allowed us to recognize outliers whose previous classification appeared incorrect. Specific features of the gene expression patterns appeared to be related to physiological properties of the cell lines, such as their doubling time in culture, drug metabolism or the interferon response. Comparison of gene expression patterns in the cell lines to those observed in normal breast tissue or in breast tumor specimens revealed features of the expression patterns in the tumors that had recognizable counterparts in specific cell lines, reflecting the tumor, stromal and inflammatory components of the tumor tissue. These results provided a novel molecular characterization of this important group of human cell lines and their relationships to tumors in vivo.

  20. Zebrafish: modeling for herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Antoine, Thessicar Evadney; Jones, Kevin S; Dale, Rodney M; Shukla, Deepak; Tiwari, Vaibhav

    2014-02-01

    For many years, zebrafish have been the prototypical model for studies in developmental biology. In recent years, zebrafish has emerged as a powerful model system to study infectious diseases, including viral infections. Experiments conducted with herpes simplex virus type-1 in adult zebrafish or in embryo models are encouraging as they establish proof of concept with viral-host tropism and possible screening of antiviral compounds. In addition, the presence of human homologs of viral entry receptors in zebrafish such as 3-O sulfated heparan sulfate, nectins, and tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 14-like receptor bring strong rationale for virologists to test their in vivo significance in viral entry in a zebrafish model and compare the structure-function basis of virus zebrafish receptor interaction for viral entry. On the other end, a zebrafish model is already being used for studying inflammation and angiogenesis, with or without genetic manipulations, and therefore can be exploited to study viral infection-associated pathologies. The major advantage with zebrafish is low cost, easy breeding and maintenance, rapid lifecycle, and a transparent nature, which allows visualizing dissemination of fluorescently labeled virus infection in real time either at a localized region or the whole body. Further, the availability of multiple transgenic lines that express fluorescently tagged immune cells for in vivo imaging of virus infected animals is extremely attractive. In addition, a fully developed immune system and potential for receptor-specific knockouts further advocate the use of zebrafish as a new tool to study viral infections. In this review, we focus on expanding the potential of zebrafish model system in understanding human infectious diseases and future benefits.

  1. Zebrafish: Modeling for Herpes Simplex Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Antoine, Thessicar Evadney; Jones, Kevin S.; Dale, Rodney M.; Shukla, Deepak

    2014-01-01

    Abstract For many years, zebrafish have been the prototypical model for studies in developmental biology. In recent years, zebrafish has emerged as a powerful model system to study infectious diseases, including viral infections. Experiments conducted with herpes simplex virus type-1 in adult zebrafish or in embryo models are encouraging as they establish proof of concept with viral-host tropism and possible screening of antiviral compounds. In addition, the presence of human homologs of viral entry receptors in zebrafish such as 3-O sulfated heparan sulfate, nectins, and tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 14-like receptor bring strong rationale for virologists to test their in vivo significance in viral entry in a zebrafish model and compare the structure–function basis of virus zebrafish receptor interaction for viral entry. On the other end, a zebrafish model is already being used for studying inflammation and angiogenesis, with or without genetic manipulations, and therefore can be exploited to study viral infection-associated pathologies. The major advantage with zebrafish is low cost, easy breeding and maintenance, rapid lifecycle, and a transparent nature, which allows visualizing dissemination of fluorescently labeled virus infection in real time either at a localized region or the whole body. Further, the availability of multiple transgenic lines that express fluorescently tagged immune cells for in vivo imaging of virus infected animals is extremely attractive. In addition, a fully developed immune system and potential for receptor-specific knockouts further advocate the use of zebrafish as a new tool to study viral infections. In this review, we focus on expanding the potential of zebrafish model system in understanding human infectious diseases and future benefits. PMID:24266790

  2. A deficiency of Herp, an endoplasmic reticulum stress protein, suppresses atherosclerosis in ApoE knockout mice by attenuating inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Shinozaki, Shohei; Chiba, Tsuyoshi; Kokame, Koichi; Miyata, Toshiyuki; Kaneko, Eiji; Shimokado, Kentaro

    2013-01-01

    Herp was originally identified as an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress protein in vascular endothelial cells. ER stress is induced in atherosclerotic lesions, but it is not known whether Herp plays any role in the development of atherosclerosis. To address this question, we generated Herp- and apolipoprotein E (apoE)-deficient mice (Herp(-/-); apoE(-/-) mice) by crossbreeding Herp(-/-) mice and apoE(-/-) mice. Herp was expressed in the endothelial cells and medial smooth muscle cells of the aorta, as well as in a subset of macrophages in the atherosclerotic lesions in apoE(-/-) mice, while there was no expression of Herp in the Herp(-/-); apoE(-/-) mice. The doubly deficient mice developed significantly fewer atherosclerotic lesions than the apoE(-/-) mice at 36 and 72 weeks of age, whereas the plasma levels of cholesterol and triglycerides were not significantly different between the strains. The plasma levels of non-esterified fatty acids were significantly lower in the Herp(-/-); apoE(-/-) mice when they were eight and 16 weeks old. The gene expression levels of ER stress response proteins (GRP78 and CHOP) and inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and MCP-1) in the aorta were significantly lower in Herp(-/-); apoE(-/-) mice than in apoE(-/-) mice, suggesting that Herp mediated ER stress-induced inflammation. In fact, peritoneal macrophages isolated from Herp-deficient mice and RAW264.7 macrophages in which Herp was eliminated with a siRNA expressed lower levels of mRNA for inflammatory cytokines when they were treated with tunicamycin. Herp deficiency affected the major mediators of the unfolded protein response, including IRE1 and PERK, but not ATF6. These findings suggest that a deficiency of Herp suppressed the development of atherosclerosis by attenuating the ER stress-induced inflammatory reactions.

  3. Oncogenic relevant defensins: expression pattern and proliferation characteristics of human tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Winter, Jochen; Kraus, Dominik; Reckenbeil, Jan; Probstmeier, Rainer

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate gene expression levels of oncogenic relevant human defensins and their impact on proliferation rates of 29 cell lines derived from main types of different tumor origins. Differential gene expression analysis of human defensins was performed by real-time PCR experiments. The proliferation rate of tumor cells that had been cultivated in the absence or presence of biologically active peptides was analyzed with a lactate dehydrogenase assay kit. At least one member of the defensin family was expressed in each tumor cell line, whereby α-defensin (DEFA1), DEFA2, or DEFA3 transcripts could be ubiquitously detected. Cell lines of neural origin (glioma, neuroblastoma, and small-cell lung carcinoma) expressed far less human β-defensins (hBDs) in comparison to other tumor types. The expression level of a specific defensin in various cell lines could vary by more than five orders of magnitude. Compensatory mechanisms on the expression levels of the different defensins could not be strictly observed. Only in 3 out of 29 tumor cell lines the proliferation rate was affected after defensin stimulation. The variable appearance of defensins, as well as the cell line-restricted functional activity, argues for the integration of defensins in complex cellular and molecular networks that tolerate rather flexible expression patterns.

  4. Differentially expressed cytosolic proteins in human leukemia and lymphoma cell lines correlate with lineages and functions.

    PubMed

    Gez, Swetlana; Crossett, Ben; Christopherson, Richard I

    2007-09-01

    Identification of cytosolic proteins differentially expressed between types of leukemia and lymphoma may provide a molecular basis for classification and understanding their cellular properties. Two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) and mass spectrometry have been used to identify proteins that are differentially expressed in cytosolic extracts from four human leukemia and lymphoma cell lines: HL-60 (acute promyelocytic leukemia), MEC1 (B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia), CCRF-CEM (T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia) and Raji (B-cell Burkitt's lymphoma). A total of 247 differentially expressed proteins were identified between the four cell lines. Analysis of the data by principal component analysis identified 22 protein spots (17 different protein species) differentially expressed at more than a 95% variance level between these cell lines. Several of these proteins were differentially expressed in only one cell line: HL-60 (myeloperoxidase, phosphoprotein 32 family member A, ras related protein Rab-11B, protein disulfide-isomerase, ran-specific GTPase-activating protein, nucleophosmin and S-100 calcium binding protein A4), and Raji (ezrin). Several of these proteins were differentially expressed in two cell lines: Raji and MEC1 (C-1-tetrahydrofolate synthase, elongation factor 2, alpha- and beta-tubulin, transgelin-2 and stathmin). MEC1 and CCRF-CEM (gamma-enolase), HL-60 and CCRF-CEM (ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 N). The differentially expressed proteins identified in these four cell lines correlate with cellular properties and provide insights into the molecular basis of these malignancies.

  5. Herpes Virus Amplicon Vectors

    PubMed Central

    de Silva, Suresh; Bowers, William J.

    2009-01-01

    Since its emergence onto the gene therapy scene nearly 25 years ago, the replication-defective Herpes Simplex Virus Type-1 (HSV-1) amplicon has gained significance as a versatile gene transfer platform due to its extensive transgene capacity, widespread cellular tropism, minimal immunogenicity, and its amenability to genetic manipulation. Herein, we detail the recent advances made with respect to the design of the HSV amplicon, its numerous in vitro and in vivo applications, and the current impediments this virus-based gene transfer platform faces as it navigates a challenging path towards future clinical testing. PMID:19956558

  6. Immunodetection of Human LINE-1 Expression in Cultured Cells and Human Tissues.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Reema; Rodić, Nemanja; Burns, Kathleen H; Taylor, Martin S

    2016-01-01

    Long interspersed element-1 (LINE-1) is the only active protein-coding retrotransposon in humans. It is not expressed in somatic tissue but is aberrantly expressed in a wide variety of human cancers. ORF1p protein is the most robust indicator of LINE-1 expression; the protein accumulates in large quantities in cellular cytoplasm. Recently, monoclonal antibodies have allowed more complete characterizations of ORF1p expression and indicated potential for developing ORF1p as a clinical biomarker. Here, we describe a mouse monoclonal antibody specific for human LINE-1 ORF1p and its application in immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry of both cells and human tissues. We also describe detection of tagged LINE-1 ORF2p via immunofluorescence. These general methods may be readily adapted to use with many other proteins and antibodies.

  7. Gene expression profile changes correlating with radioresistance in human cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Ken-ichi; Koyama-Saegusa, Kumiko; Otsuka, Yoshimi; Ishikawa, Atsuko; Kawai, Seiko; Yasuda, Kaori; Suga, Tomo; Michikawa, Yuichi; Suzuki, Masao; Iwakawa, Mayumi; Imai, Takashi . E-mail: imait@nirs.go.jp

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To identify gene expression profiles specific to radioresistance of human cells. Methods and Materials: Global gene expression profiles of a total of 15 tumor and normal fibroblast cell lines were analyzed using DNA microarrays and statistical clustering methods. Initially, six of the cell lines were categorized into radioresistant (RG) or nonradioresistant (NRG) groups according to the radiation dose required to reduce their survival to 10% (D{sub 1}). Genes for which expression was specific to each group at 1 or 3 h after irradiation were identified using statistical procedures including analysis of variance and a two-dimensional hierarchical clustering method. The remaining nine cell lines were subjected to the k-nearest neighbor pattern classification. Results: The nine test cell lines were successfully classified by their D{sub 1} value using 46 and 44 genes for which transcription levels had significantly changed at 1 and 3 h after irradiation, respectively. Of these genes, 25 showed altered expression at both time points in the NRG or RG, but independently were unable to classify the test cell lines. Conclusions: Radioresistant cell lines analyzed in this study showed certain radiation-induced changes in gene expression profiles that are different from the profile changes of the more-sensitive cell lines.

  8. Divergent functional properties of ryanodine receptor types 1 and 3 expressed in a myogenic cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Fessenden, J D; Wang, Y; Moore, R A; Chen, S R; Allen, P D; Pessah, I N

    2000-01-01

    Of the three known ryanodine receptor (RyR) isoforms expressed in muscle, RyR1 and RyR2 have well-defined roles in contraction. However, studies on mammalian RyR3 have been difficult because of low expression levels relative to RyR1 or RyR2. Using the herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) helper-free amplicon system, we expressed either RyR1 or RyR3 in 1B5 RyR-deficient myotubes. Western blot analysis revealed that RyR1- or RyR3-transduced cells expressed the appropriate RyR isoform of the correct molecular mass. Although RyR1 channels exhibited the expected unitary conductance for Cs(+) in bilayer lipid membranes, 74 of 88 RyR3 channels exhibited pronounced subconductance behavior. Western blot analysis with an FKBP12/12.6-selective antibody reveals that differences in gating behavior exhibited by RyR1 and RyR3 may be, in part, the result of lower affinity of RyR3 for FKBP12. In calcium imaging studies, RyR1 restored skeletal-type excitation-contraction coupling, whereas RyR3 did not. Although RyR3-expressing myotubes were more sensitive to caffeine than those expressing RyR1, they were much less sensitive to 4-chloro-m-cresol (CMC). In RyR1-expressing cells, regenerative calcium oscillations were observed in response to caffeine and CMC but were never seen in RyR3-expressing 1B5 cells. In [(3)H]ryanodine binding studies, only RyR1 exhibited sensitivity to CMC, but both RyR isoforms responded to caffeine. These functional differences between RyR1 and RyR3 expressed in a mammalian muscle context may reflect differences in association with accessory proteins, especially FKBP12, as well as structural differences in modulator binding sites. PMID:11053126

  9. Divergent functional properties of ryanodine receptor types 1 and 3 expressed in a myogenic cell line.

    PubMed

    Fessenden, J D; Wang, Y; Moore, R A; Chen, S R; Allen, P D; Pessah, I N

    2000-11-01

    Of the three known ryanodine receptor (RyR) isoforms expressed in muscle, RyR1 and RyR2 have well-defined roles in contraction. However, studies on mammalian RyR3 have been difficult because of low expression levels relative to RyR1 or RyR2. Using the herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) helper-free amplicon system, we expressed either RyR1 or RyR3 in 1B5 RyR-deficient myotubes. Western blot analysis revealed that RyR1- or RyR3-transduced cells expressed the appropriate RyR isoform of the correct molecular mass. Although RyR1 channels exhibited the expected unitary conductance for Cs(+) in bilayer lipid membranes, 74 of 88 RyR3 channels exhibited pronounced subconductance behavior. Western blot analysis with an FKBP12/12.6-selective antibody reveals that differences in gating behavior exhibited by RyR1 and RyR3 may be, in part, the result of lower affinity of RyR3 for FKBP12. In calcium imaging studies, RyR1 restored skeletal-type excitation-contraction coupling, whereas RyR3 did not. Although RyR3-expressing myotubes were more sensitive to caffeine than those expressing RyR1, they were much less sensitive to 4-chloro-m-cresol (CMC). In RyR1-expressing cells, regenerative calcium oscillations were observed in response to caffeine and CMC but were never seen in RyR3-expressing 1B5 cells. In [(3)H]ryanodine binding studies, only RyR1 exhibited sensitivity to CMC, but both RyR isoforms responded to caffeine. These functional differences between RyR1 and RyR3 expressed in a mammalian muscle context may reflect differences in association with accessory proteins, especially FKBP12, as well as structural differences in modulator binding sites.

  10. Production of the R2 subunit of ribonucleotide reductase from herpes simplex virus with prokaryotic and eukaryotic expression systems: higher activity of R2 produced by eukaryotic cells related to higher iron-binding capacity.

    PubMed Central

    Lamarche, N; Matton, G; Massie, B; Fontecave, M; Atta, M; Dumas, F; Gaudreau, P; Langelier, Y

    1996-01-01

    The R2 subunit of ribonucleotide reductase from herpes simplex virus type 2 was overproduced with prokaryotic and eukaryotic expression systems. The recombinant R2 purified by a two-step procedure exhibited a 3-fold higher activity when produced in eukaryotic cells. Precise quantification of the R2 concentration at each step of the purification indicated that the activity was not altered during the purification procedure. Moreover, we have observed that the level of R2 expression, in eukaryotic cells as well as in prokaryotic cells, did not influence R2 activity. Extensive characterization of the recombinant R2 purified from eukaryotic and prokaryotic expression systems has shown that both types of pure R2 preparations were similar in their 76 kDa dimer contents (more than 95%) and in their ability to bind the R1 subunit. However, we have found that the higher activity of R2 produced in eukaryotic cells is more probably related to a higher capability of binding the iron cofactor as well as a 3-fold greater ability to generate the tyrosyl free radical. PMID:8947477

  11. PET imaging of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) or mutant HSV1-sr39tk reporter gene expression in mice and humans using [18F]FHBG.

    PubMed

    Yaghoubi, Shahriar S; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2006-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) positron emission tomography (PET) reporter gene (PRG) or its mutant HSV1-sr39tk are used to investigate intracellular molecular events in cultured cells and to image intracellular molecular events and cell trafficking in living subjects. The expression of these PRGs can be imaged using 18F- or 124I-radiolabeled acycloguanosine or pyrimidine analog PET reporter probes (PRPs). This protocol describes the procedures for imaging HSV1-tk or HSV1-sr39tk PRG expression in living subjects with the acycloguanosine analog 9-4-[18F]fluoro-3-(hydroxymethyl)butyl]guanine ([18F]FHBG). [18F]FHBG is a high-affinity substrate for the HSV1-sr39TK enzyme with relatively low affinity for mammalian TK enzymes, resulting in improved detection sensitivity. Furthermore, [18F]FHBG is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration as an investigational new imaging agent and has been shown to detect HSV1-tk transgene expression in the liver tumors of patients. MicroPET imaging of each small animal can be completed in approximately 1.5 h, and each patient imaging session takes approximately 3 h.

  12. The Function of Herpes Simplex Virus Genes: A Primer for Genetic Engineering of Novel Vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roizman, Bernard

    1996-10-01

    Herpes simplex virus vectors are being developed for delivery and expression of human genes to the central nervous system, selective destruction of cancer cells, and as carriers for genes encoding antigens that induce protective immunity against infectious agents. Vectors constructed to meet these objectives must differ from wild-type virus with respect to host range, reactivation from latency, and expression of viral genes. The vectors currently being developed are (i) helper free amplicons, (ii) replication defective viruses, and (iii) genetically engineered replication competent viruses with restricted host range. Whereas the former two types of vectors require stable, continuous cell lines expressing viral genes for their replication, the replication competent viruses will replicate on approved primary human cell strains.

  13. Caring On-Line: On-Line Empathy, Self-Disclosure, Emotional Expression, and Nurturing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burford, Vicki Niemants; Gross, Daniel D.

    The purpose of this study was to analyze, categorize, and critique actual responses to expressed student confusion and frustration with online courses. Samplings of actual student messages from two courses were used to frame instructor responses, as well as a focus group survey of current college students. The focus of the study was the…

  14. Expression pattern of mda-7/IL-24 receptors in liver cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hong; Yang, Zhi-Bin

    2009-08-01

    The mda-7/IL-24 receptor belongs to the type II cytokine receptor family, and its two heterodimeric receptors are IL-22R1/IL-20R2 and IL-20R1/IL-20R2. Mda-7/IL-24 receptor expression in liver cancer cell lines has not yet been described. This information may be helpful for further clinical gene therapy. With normal skin total RNA as template, the cDNA sequences of IL-20R1, IL-20R2 and IL-22R were amplified by RT-PCR. Total RNA was extracted from cultured liver cancer cell lines and a normal liver cell line, then detected by northern blotting, and the expression of mda-7/IL-24 receptors was analyzed. PLC/PRF/5 and SMMC-7721 expressed IL-20R1; BEL-7402, Hep3B, HepG2, and PLC/PRF/5 expressed IL-20R2; and HepG2 and PLC/PRF/5 expressed IL-22R. Only HepG2 expressed the IL-22R/IL-20R2 receptor complex. PLC/PRF/5 completely expressed both heterodimeric receptors. Huh-7, QGY-7701 and WRL-68 did not express the IL-24 receptor. Complete mda-7/IL-24 receptors are seldom expressed in liver cancer cell lines.

  15. Genital herpes: a review.

    PubMed

    Beauman, John G

    2005-10-15

    Genital herpes simplex virus infection is a recurrent, lifelong disease with no cure. The strongest predictor for infection is a person's number of lifetime sex partners. The natural history includes first-episode mucocutaneous infection, establishment of latency in the dorsal root ganglion, and subsequent reactivation. Most infections are transmitted via asymptomatic viral shedding. Classic outbreaks consist of a skin prodrome and possible constitutional symptoms such as headache, fever, and inguinal lymphadenopathy. As the infection progresses, papules, vesicles on an erythematous base, and erosions appear over hours to days. These lesions usually crust, re-epithelialize, and heal without scarring. First-episode infections are more extensive: primary lesions last two to six weeks versus approximately one week for lesions in recurrent disease. Atypical manifestations are common. Infected persons experience a median of four recurrences per year after their first episode, but rates vary greatly. Genital herpes simplex virus type 2 recurs six times more frequently than type 1. Viral culture is preferred over polymerase chain reaction testing for diagnosis. Serologic testing can be useful in persons with a questionable history. Effective oral antiviral medications are available for initial, episodic, and suppressive therapy but are not a cure. There is some evidence that alternative therapies such as L-lysine, zinc, and some herbal preparations may offer some benefit. Counseling patients about the risk of transmission is crucial and helps prevent the spread of disease and neonatal complications.

  16. Neonatal herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Pinninti, Swetha G; Kimberlin, David W

    2013-04-01

    Neonatal herpes simplex virus infections are uncommon, but because of the morbidity and mortality associated with the infection they are often considered in the differential diagnosis of ill neonates. The use of polymerase chain reaction for diagnosis of central nervous system infections and the development of safe and effective antiviral therapy has revolutionized the diagnosis and management of these infants. Initiation of long-term antiviral suppressive therapy in these infants has led to significant improvement in morbidity. This article summarizes the epidemiology of neonatal herpes simplex virus infections and discusses clinical presentation, diagnosis, management, and follow up of infants with neonatal herpes disease.

  17. Neonatal herpes simplex virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cherpes, Thomas L; Matthews, Dean B; Maryak, Samantha A

    2012-12-01

    Neonatal herpes, seen roughly in 1 of 3000 live births in the United States, is the most serious manifestation of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection in the perinatal period. Although acyclovir therapy decreases infant mortality associated with perinatal HSV transmission, development of permanent neurological disabilities is not uncommon. Mother-to-neonate HSV transmission is most efficient when maternal genital tract HSV infection is acquired proximate to the time of delivery, signifying that neonatal herpes prevention strategies need to focus on decreasing the incidence of maternal infection during pregnancy and more precisely identifying infants most likely to benefit from prophylactic antiviral therapy.

  18. Novel antiviral activity of mung bean sprouts against respiratory syncytial virus and herpes simplex virus -1: an in vitro study on virally infected Vero and MRC-5 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hafidh, Rand R; Abdulamir, Ahmed S; Abu Bakar, Fatimah; Sekawi, Zamberi; Jahansheri, Fatemeh; Jalilian, Farid Azizi

    2015-06-11

    New sources for discovering novel antiviral agents are desperately needed. The current antiviral products are both expensive and not very effective. The antiviral activity of methanol extract of mung bean sprouts (MBS), compared to Ribavarin and Acyclovir, on respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and Herpes Simplex virus -1 (HSV-1) was investigated using cytotoxicity, virus yield reduction, virucidal activity, and prophylactic activity assays on Vero and MRC-5 cell lines. Moreover, the level of antiviral cytokines, IFNβ, TNFα, IL-1, and IL-6 was assessed in MBS-treated, virally infected, virally infected MBS-treated, and control groups of MRC-5 cells using ELISA. MBS extract showed reduction factors (RF) 2.2 × 10 and 0.5 × 10(2) for RSV and HSV-1, respectively. The 2 h incubation virucidal and prophylactic selectivity indices (SI) of MBS on RSV were 14.18 and 12.82 versus Ribavarin SI of 23.39 and 21.95, respectively, and on HSV-1, SI were 18.23 and 10.9 versus Acyclovir, 22.56 and 15.04, respectively. All SI values were >10 indicating that MBS has a good direct antiviral and prophylactic activities on both RSV and HSV-1. Moreover, interestingly, MBS extract induced vigorously IFNβ, TNFα, IL-1, and IL-6 cytokines in MRC-5 infected-treated group far more than other groups (P < 0.05) and induced TNFα and IL-6 in treated group more than infected group (P < 0.05). MBS extract has potent antiviral and to a lesser extent, prophylactic activities against both RSV and HSV-1, and in case of HSV-1, these activities were comparable to Acyclovir. Part of the underlying mechanism(s) of these activities is attributed to MBS potential to remarkably induce antiviral cytokines in human cells. Hence, we infer that MBS methanol extract could be used as such or as purified active component in protecting and treating RSV and HSV-1 infections. More studies are needed to pinpoint the exact active components responsible for the MBS antiviral activities.

  19. Cell Cycle-Dependent Expression of Adeno-Associated Virus 2 (AAV2) Rep in Coinfections with Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) Gives Rise to a Mosaic of Cells Replicating either AAV2 or HSV-1.

    PubMed

    Franzoso, Francesca D; Seyffert, Michael; Vogel, Rebecca; Yakimovich, Artur; de Andrade Pereira, Bruna; Meier, Anita F; Sutter, Sereina O; Tobler, Kurt; Vogt, Bernd; Greber, Urs F; Büning, Hildegard; Ackermann, Mathias; Fraefel, Cornel

    2017-08-01

    Adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) depends on the simultaneous presence of a helper virus such as herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) for productive replication. At the same time, AAV2 efficiently blocks the replication of HSV-1, which would eventually limit its own replication by diminishing the helper virus reservoir. This discrepancy begs the question of how AAV2 and HSV-1 can coexist in a cell population. Here we show that in coinfected cultures, AAV2 DNA replication takes place almost exclusively in S/G2-phase cells, while HSV-1 DNA replication is restricted to G1 phase. Live microscopy revealed that not only wild-type AAV2 (wtAAV2) replication but also reporter gene expression from both single-stranded and double-stranded (self-complementary) recombinant AAV2 vectors preferentially occurs in S/G2-phase cells, suggesting that the preference for S/G2 phase is independent of the nature of the viral genome. Interestingly, however, a substantial proportion of S/G2-phase cells transduced by the double-stranded but not the single-stranded recombinant AAV2 vectors progressed through mitosis in the absence of the helper virus. We conclude that cell cycle-dependent AAV2 rep expression facilitates cell cycle-dependent AAV2 DNA replication and inhibits HSV-1 DNA replication. This may limit competition for cellular and viral helper factors and, hence, creates a biological niche for either virus to replicate.IMPORTANCE Adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) differs from most other viruses, as it requires not only a host cell for replication but also a helper virus such as an adenovirus or a herpesvirus. This situation inevitably leads to competition for cellular resources. AAV2 has been shown to efficiently inhibit the replication of helper viruses. Here we present a new facet of the interaction between AAV2 and one of its helper viruses, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). We observed that AAV2 rep gene expression is cell cycle dependent and gives rise to distinct time-controlled windows

  20. Generation of hepatocytes expressing functional cytochromes P450 from a pancreatic progenitor cell line in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Marek, Carylyn J; Cameron, Gary A; Elrick, Lucy J; Hawksworth, Gabrielle M; Wright, Matthew C

    2003-01-01

    The proliferating AR42J-B13 pancreatic cell line is known to respond to glucocorticoid treatment by producing foci of cells that express the liver-specific albumin gene. We demonstrate that this cell line also expresses liver-specific or liver-enriched functional cytochrome P450 proteins when stimulated to trans-differentiate into hepatocytes by glucocorticoid. These data suggest that this cell line has an unusual ability to trans-differentiate into functional hepatocytes and that it could be possible to generate a limitless supply of functional hepatocyte-like cells in vitro. PMID:12542397

  1. The repressing and enhancing functions of the herpes simplex virus regulatory protein ICP27 map to C-terminal regions and are required to modulate viral gene expression very early in infection.

    PubMed Central

    McMahan, L; Schaffer, P A

    1990-01-01

    The phenotypic properties of ICP27 temperature-sensitive and deletion mutants and the results of transient expression assays have demonstrated that ICP27 has a modulatory effect on viral gene expression induced by ICPs 0 and 4. In order to identify the regions of the ICP27 molecule that are responsible for its enhancing and repressing activities, 10 nonsense and 3 in-frame deletion mutations were introduced into the coding sequence of the cloned ICP27 gene. These mutant genes were tested in transient expression assays for their ability to complement an ICP27 null mutant and to enhance and repress expression from a spectrum of herpes simplex virus type 1 promoters in reporter CAT genes when expression was induced by ICP0 or ICP4. The results of assays with cloned mutant genes demonstrate that the ICP27 polypeptide contains two regions, located between amino acid residues 327 and 407 and residues 465 and 511, that contribute to its repressing activity. The amino acid region located between the two repressing regions (residues 407 to 465) is able to interfere with ICP27 repressing activity. None of the mutant genes exhibited efficient enhancing activity for any of the herpes simplex type 1 promoters tested, demonstrating that amino acids comprising the carboxy-terminal half of the ICP27 molecule, including the terminal phenylalanine residue, are required for wild-type enhancement as well as for efficient complementation of an ICP27 null mutant. Phenotypic characterization of an in-frame deletion mutant, vd3, and a previously isolated null mutant, 5dl 1.2 (A. M. McCarthy, L. and P. A. Schaffer, J. Virol. 63:18-27, 1989), demonstrated that ICP27 is required to induce the expression of all classes of viral genes very early in infection and confirmed the requirement for ICP27 later in infection (i) to repress early gene expression, (ii) to induce wild-type levels of delayed-early or gamma 1 gene expression, and (iii) to induce true late or gamma 2 gene expression. The vd3

  2. A Transgenic Mouse Line Expressing the Red Fluorescent Protein tdTomato in GABAergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Besser, Stefanie; Sicker, Marit; Marx, Grit; Winkler, Ulrike; Eulenburg, Volker; Hülsmann, Swen; Hirrlinger, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    GABAergic inhibitory neurons are a large population of neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) of mammals and crucially contribute to the function of the circuitry of the brain. To identify specific cell types and investigate their functions labelling of cell populations by transgenic expression of fluorescent proteins is a powerful approach. While a number of mouse lines expressing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) in different subpopulations of GABAergic cells are available, GFP expressing mouse lines are not suitable for either crossbreeding to other mouse lines expressing GFP in other cell types or for Ca2+-imaging using the superior green Ca2+-indicator dyes. Therefore, we have generated a novel transgenic mouse line expressing the red fluorescent protein tdTomato in GABAergic neurons using a bacterial artificial chromosome based strategy and inserting the tdTomato open reading frame at the start codon within exon 1 of the GAD2 gene encoding glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65). TdTomato expression was observed in all expected brain regions; however, the fluorescence intensity was highest in the olfactory bulb and the striatum. Robust expression was also observed in cortical and hippocampal neurons, Purkinje cells in the cerebellum, amacrine cells in the retina as well as in cells migrating along the rostral migratory stream. In cortex, hippocampus, olfactory bulb and brainstem, 80% to 90% of neurons expressing endogenous GAD65 also expressed the fluorescent protein. Moreover, almost all tdTomato-expressing cells coexpressed GAD65, indicating that indeed only GABAergic neurons are labelled by tdTomato expression. This mouse line with its unique spectral properties for labelling GABAergic neurons will therefore be a valuable new tool for research addressing this fascinating cell type. PMID:26076353

  3. Prevalent expression of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptors and FGF2 in human tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Chandler, L A; Sosnowski, B A; Greenlees, L; Aukerman, S L; Baird, A; Pierce, G F

    1999-05-05

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) has potent mitogenic and angiogenic activities that have been implicated in tumor development and malignant progression. The biological effects of FGF2 and other members of the FGF ligand family are mediated by 4 transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptors (FGFRs). To better understand the roles of FGFRs in cancer, the expression of FGF2 and each of the 4 FGFRs was assessed by RNase protection analysis of 60 human tumor cell lines, representing 9 tumor types. Expression of at least one FGFR isoform was detected in 90% and FGF2 mRNA in 35% of the cell lines. Our comprehensive analysis of FGF2 and FGFR expression in human tumor cell lines provides evidence that FGF signaling pathways are active in a majority of human tumor cell lines, and lends support to the development of anti-tumor strategies that target FGFRs.

  4. Frequencies of memory T cells specific for varicella-zoster virus, herpes simplex virus, and cytomegalovirus by intracellular detection of cytokine expression.

    PubMed

    Asanuma, H; Sharp, M; Maecker, H T; Maino, V C; Arvin, A M

    2000-03-01

    Memory T cells specific for varicella-zoster virus (VZV), herpes simplex virus (HSV), and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) were compared in immune adults by intracellular cytokine (ICC) detection. The mean percentages of CD4+ T cells were 0.11% for VZV and 0.22% for HSV by interferon (IFN)-gamma production; the frequency for HCMV was significantly higher at 1.21%. Percentages of VZV-, HSV-, and HCMV-specific CD4+ T cells were similar by use of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha. HCMV-stimulated CD8+ T cells produced IFN-gamma (1.11%) and TNF-alpha (1.71%); VZV- and HSV-specific CD8+ T cells were not detectable. VZV CD4+ T cell numbers were similar in young adults with natural or vaccine-induced immunity. VZV CD4+ T cells were significantly less frequent in older adults. Secondary varicella immunization did not increase VZV-specific CD4+ T cell frequencies by ICC assay. Numbers of memory T cells specific for herpesviruses may vary with sites of viral latency and with host age.

  5. Combination electro-gene therapy using herpes virus thymidine kinase and interleukin-12 expression plasmids is highly efficient against murine carcinomas in vivo.

    PubMed

    Goto, Tomoaki; Nishi, Toru; Kobayashi, Osamu; Tamura, Takahiko; Dev, Sukhendu B; Takeshima, Hideo; Kochi, Masato; Kuratsu, Jun-ichi; Sakata, Tsuneaki; Ushio, Yukitaka

    2004-11-01

    We report the use of plasmid DNA-mediated combination gene therapy for tumor-bearing mice using in vivo electroporation, also called electro-gene therapy (EGT), that resulted in uncomplicated and complete cures in more than 90% of the mice. Subcutaneously inoculated CT26 tumors in syngeneic BALB/c mice were subjected to repeated EGT treatments consisting of intratumoral co-injection of naked plasmids encoding the cytokine interleukin-12 (IL-12) (p35 and p40 subunits) and the suicide gene herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk), followed by in vivo electroporation. The early anti-tumor effect was always stronger, and the rate of cure, as seen in the long-term follow-up, was always greater in the groups treated with combination EGT than in those treated with IL-12 or HSV-tk EGT alone. Systemic levels of IL-12 and IFN-gamma increased in both combination and IL-12-alone EGT-treated groups. Moreover, combination EGT for established subcutaneous tumors strongly reduced hematogenous lung metastases and increased survival time when live CT26 tumor cells were injected through the tail vein. Limited experiments on C57/B16 mice with murine melanoma also showed very similar trends. These results suggest that this simple and safe method of plasmid-mediated combination EGT may provide a potentially effective gene therapy for cancer.

  6. LINE-1 retrotransposition events regulate gene expression after X-ray irradiation.

    PubMed

    Banaz-Yaşar, Ferya; Gedik, Nilgün; Karahan, Selda; Diaz-Carballo, David; Bongartz, Birthe M; Ergün, Süleyman

    2012-09-01

    Long interspersed nuclear element-1 (LINE-1) retrotransposons are mobile elements that insert into new genomic locations via reverse transcription of an RNA intermediate. The mechanism of retrotransposition is not entirely understood. The integration of these elements occurs by target-primed reverse transcription (TPRT), which initiates double-strand breaks (DSBs) during the LINE-1 integration. Also, X-ray is known to induce DNA damage. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential effects of LINE-1 de novo retrotransposition on the expression of different genes after X-ray irradiation in human endothelial cells. After stable transfection of the human hybrid endothelial cell line EA.hy926 with the human LINE-1 element, we analyzed the expression of different genes after irradiation with 5 Gy X-rays by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We determine the expression level of phosphorylated p53 and γ-histone H2AX protein levels upon X-ray irradiation with 5 Gy for 24 h. Our results showed that EA.hy926 LINE-1 cell clones react with a strong upregulation of phosphorylated p53 protein, already 15 min after irradiation compared to the wild type (WT) cells. Also, the expression of γ-histone H2AX protein was elevated in the cell clones with retrotransposition events 15 min after irradiation, whereas the WT cells have a delayed expression of phosphorylated histone H2AX protein. Taken together, our findings provide that LINE-1 retrotransposition events regulate different gene expression after irradiation in the EA.hy926 cell line.

  7. Widely Used Herpes Simplex Virus 1 ICP0 Deletion Mutant Strain dl1403 and Its Derivative Viruses Do Not Express Glycoprotein C Due to a Secondary Mutation in the gC Gene.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Cristina W; Taylor, Kathryne E; Pritchard, Suzanne M; Delboy, Mark G; Komala Sari, Tri; Aguilar, Hector C; Mossman, Karen L; Nicola, Anthony V

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) ICP0 is a multi-functional phosphoprotein expressed with immediate early kinetics. An ICP0 deletion mutant, HSV-1 dl1403, has been widely used to study the roles of ICP0 in the HSV-1 replication cycle including gene expression, latency, entry and assembly. We show that HSV-1 dl1403 virions lack detectable levels of envelope protein gC, and that gC is not synthesized in infected cells. Sequencing of the gC gene from HSV-1 dl1403 revealed a single amino acid deletion that results in a frameshift mutation. The HSV-1 dl1403 gC gene is predicted to encode a polypeptide consisting of the original 62 N-terminal amino acids of the gC protein followed by 112 irrelevant, non-gC residues. The mutation was also present in a rescuant virus and in two dl1403-derived viruses, D8 and FXE, but absent from the parental 17+, suggesting that the mutation was introduced during the construction of the dl1403 virus, and not as a result of passage in culture.

  8. Widely Used Herpes Simplex Virus 1 ICP0 Deletion Mutant Strain dl1403 and Its Derivative Viruses Do Not Express Glycoprotein C Due to a Secondary Mutation in the gC Gene

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Suzanne M.; Delboy, Mark G.; Komala Sari, Tri; Aguilar, Hector C.; Mossman, Karen L.; Nicola, Anthony V.

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) ICP0 is a multi-functional phosphoprotein expressed with immediate early kinetics. An ICP0 deletion mutant, HSV-1 dl1403, has been widely used to study the roles of ICP0 in the HSV-1 replication cycle including gene expression, latency, entry and assembly. We show that HSV-1 dl1403 virions lack detectable levels of envelope protein gC, and that gC is not synthesized in infected cells. Sequencing of the gC gene from HSV-1 dl1403 revealed a single amino acid deletion that results in a frameshift mutation. The HSV-1 dl1403 gC gene is predicted to encode a polypeptide consisting of the original 62 N-terminal amino acids of the gC protein followed by 112 irrelevant, non-gC residues. The mutation was also present in a rescuant virus and in two dl1403-derived viruses, D8 and FXE, but absent from the parental 17+, suggesting that the mutation was introduced during the construction of the dl1403 virus, and not as a result of passage in culture. PMID:26186447

  9. Herp enhances ER-associated protein degradation by recruiting ubiquilins

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tae-Yeon; Kim, Eunmin; Yoon, Sungjoo Kim; Yoon, Jong-Bok

    2008-05-02

    ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD) is a protein quality control system of ER, which eliminates misfolded proteins by proteasome-dependent degradation and ensures export of only properly folded proteins from ER. Herp, an ER membrane protein upregulated by ER stress, is implicated in regulation of ERAD. In the present study, we show that Herp interacts with members of the ubiquilin family, which function as a shuttle factor to deliver ubiquitinated substrates to the proteasome for degradation. Knockdown of ubiquilin expression by small interfering RNA stabilized the ERAD substrate CD3{delta}, whereas it did not alter or increased degradation of non-ERAD substrates tested. CD3{delta} was stabilized by overexpressed Herp mutants which were capable of binding to ubiquilins but were impaired in ER membrane targeting by deletion of the transmembrane domain. Our data suggest that Herp binding to ubiquilin proteins plays an important role in the ERAD pathway and that ubiquilins are specifically involved in degradation of only a subset of ubiquitinated targets, including Herp-dependent ERAD substrates.

  10. Connexin expression in epidermal cell lines from SENCAR mouse skin tumors.

    PubMed

    Budunova, I V; Carbajal, S; Viaje, A; Slaga, T J

    1996-03-01

    Alteration of gap-junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) has long been proposed to be involved in carcinogenesis. Previously, we reported that the level of gap junctional intercellular communication in mouse skin carcinoma cell lines is significantly lower than in papilloma cell lines and normal mouse keratinocytes Klann et al., Cancer Res 49:699-705, 1989). Here, we present data on expression of the gap-junctional protein connexins (Cx) 26, Cx31.1, and Cx43 in a comprehensive panel of keratinocyte cell lines representing different stages of mouse skin carcinogenesis and the effect of different conditions of propagation on Cx phenotype. Northern and western blot analyses and immunostaining showed that all cell lines studied in vitro expressed Cx43 but most did not express Cx31.1 or Cx26. The abundance of Cx43 expression on plasma membranes correlated well with the level of GJIC. In vivo expression of Cx43 and Cx26 was strongly increased. Whereas none of tumorigenic cell lines expressed Cx26 gap junctions in culture, those growing as tumors in nude mice began to express Cx26 protein. The comparison of Cx expression on the keratinocyte membranes in three different groups of tumors (papillomas and squamous cell and spindle cell carcinomas) clearly revealed that the abundance of Cx43 and Cx26 expression directly correlated with the level of tumor differentiation. All studied tumors were Cx31.1 negative. These results suggest that both Cx expression and gap-junction permeability are gradually reduced during the tumor progression stage of mouse skin carcinogenesis.

  11. Expression of membrane glycoproteins in normal keratinocytes and squamous carcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Rayter, Z. ); McIlhinney, R. ); Gusterson, B. )

    1989-08-01

    Con A acceptor glycoproteins were analyzed by 2D-PAGE and {sup 125}I-Con A overlay in three squamous carcinoma cell lines and compared with those in the simian virus (SV40)-transformed keratinocyte cell line SVK-14 and in normal keratinocytes. The majority of the glycoproteins identified by this technique were expressed at similar levels in all of the cells examined, independent of the culture conditions used. A cell surface glycoprotein gp34 was increased in the tumor cells compared with normal keratinocytes and expression varied with the culture density. Another glycoprotein, gp21, was found to be increased in expression in normal keratinocytes and stratified hyperconfluent cultures of squamous carcinoma cell lines. This paper describes the potential of this technique to identify membrane glycoproteins which may be expressed as a function of proliferation or differentiation.

  12. Growth dynamics and cyclin expression in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Biskup, Edyta; Manfé, Valentina; Kamstrup, Maria R.; Gniadecki, Robert

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated cell growth dynamics and cyclins B1 and E expression in cell lines derived from mycosis fungoides (MyLa), Sézary syndrome (SeAx), and CD30+ lympho-proliferative diseases (Mac1, Mac2a, JK). Mac1 and Mac2a had the highest growth rate (doubling time 18–28 h, >90% cycling cells) whereas SeAx was proliferating slowly (doubling time 55 h, approximately 35% cycling cells). Expression of cyclin B1 correlated positively with doubling time whereas expression of cyclin E was unscheduled and constant across the investigated cell lines. All cell lines exhibited high expression of PCNA. Thus, we concluded that cyclin B1 could be used for rapid screening of cell proliferation in malignant lymphocytes derived from cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. PMID:25386244

  13. Herpes viral culture of lesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... virus; Herpes simplex virus culture Images Viral lesion culture References Costello M, Sabatini LM, Yungbluth M. Viral infections. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods . 22nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  14. Reading Recovery Following Herpes Encephalitis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, C. D.; Peters, Phyllis

    1979-01-01

    The article presents the medical, psychological, and reading diagnoses of a 24-year-old man with herpes encephalitis, an acute neurological disease. Test results are reported and the client's response to learning disability remedial techniques are reviewed. (SBH)

  15. Reading Recovery Following Herpes Encephalitis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, C. D.; Peters, Phyllis

    1979-01-01

    The article presents the medical, psychological, and reading diagnoses of a 24-year-old man with herpes encephalitis, an acute neurological disease. Test results are reported and the client's response to learning disability remedial techniques are reviewed. (SBH)

  16. The Significance of Herpes Simplex for School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ensor, Deirdre

    2005-01-01

    Herpes simplex is a common recurrent viral infection caused by the herpes simplex virus. The two closely related but distinct viruses that cause herpes simplex infections are herpes simplex 1 (HSV-1) and herpes simplex 2 (HSV-2). HSV-1 is commonly associated with infections around the oral mucosa and is the cause of herpes labialis, often referred…

  17. The Significance of Herpes Simplex for School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ensor, Deirdre

    2005-01-01

    Herpes simplex is a common recurrent viral infection caused by the herpes simplex virus. The two closely related but distinct viruses that cause herpes simplex infections are herpes simplex 1 (HSV-1) and herpes simplex 2 (HSV-2). HSV-1 is commonly associated with infections around the oral mucosa and is the cause of herpes labialis, often referred…

  18. Herpes simplex virus type 1 UL46 and UL47 deletion mutants lack VP11 and VP12 or VP13 and VP14, respectively, and exhibit altered viral thymidine kinase expression.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y; McKnight, J L

    1993-01-01

    The gene products of herpes simplex virus type 1 UL46 and UL47 enhance the efficiency of alpha TIF (VP16)-mediated alpha gene expression through an unknown mechanism of action. To further characterize the function of the UL46- and UL47-encoded proteins during virus infection, a series of isogenic herpes simplex virus type 1 strain F-derived UL46 and UL47 single-deletion mutants and a UL46/47 double-deletion mutant were constructed and compared with the wild type. Analysis of purified virions obtained from the UL46 deletion mutant showed for the first time that UL46 encoded the viron tegument phosphoproteins VP11 and VP12 (VP11/12). Similar analyses of the UL47 deletion mutants confirmed an earlier report by McLean et al. that UL47 also encoded two virion tegument phosphoproteins, VP13 and VP14 (VP13/14) (G. McLean, F. Rixon, N. Langeland, L. Haarr, and H. Marsden, J. Gen. Virol. 71:2953-2960, 1990). Kinetic analysis demonstrated a delay of approximately 2 h in the appearance of thymidine kinase (TK) activity in all of the UL46 and UL47 single-deletion mutants. In the UL46/47 double-deletion mutant, the delay in TK activity increased twofold, suggesting that the proteins encoded by UL46 and UL47 may act at the same level. Since the delay in TK expression occurred within the first 4 h of infection, the actions of VP11/12 and VP13/14 resulted from their virion association and not from their de novo synthesis as late (beta gamma and gamma) genes. Densitometric analysis of purified virions showed that the levels of VP11/12 and VP13/14 in the virion tegument were near the molar ratios of alpha TIF. On the basis of these observations, we predict that the abilities of UL46 and UL47 to enhance alpha TIF-mediated transcription could result from a stoichiometric association of VP11/12 and VP13/14 with alpha TIF within the infecting virion. Images PMID:8382306

  19. Common questions about herpes: analysis of chat-room transcripts.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Lisa K; Omisore, Folashade

    2009-01-01

    Patients diagnosed with genital herpes typically undergo a period of psychological adjustment. Although healthcare providers can play a key role in this adjustment, in several patient surveys patients have expressed dissatisfaction with the information and counselling offered by professionals. To address this gap, providers must first identify the common questions and myths that are not addressed, or are addressed inadequately. This article is that first step. Through a content analysis of herpes chat-room transcripts captured on their website from autumn 2001 to spring 2006, researchers from the American Social Health Association identified common herpes questions and myths. The 1968 chat passages were coded into 12 themes and 50 sub-themes. Frequently, visitors' questions concerned transmission, symptoms and diagnosis followed by natural history, psychosocial issues and treatment options. The results of this analysis will aid in the creation of tailored messages to address common factual questions and provide psychosocial support.

  20. Mechanisms involved in biological behavior changes associated with Angptl4 expression in colon cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xue-Feng; Han, Jie; Hu, Xiao-Tong; He, Chao

    2012-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common causes of cancer-related deaths throughout the world. Angiopoietin-like-4 (Angptl4), a member of the angiopoietin family of secreted proteins, is frequently expressed in the perinecrotic areas of different human tumors, yet its role is still unclear in colorectal cancer. Angptl4 mRNA expression in primary colorectal cancer tissue and seven colon cancer cell lines was measured by semi-quantitative RT-PCR; the influence of Angptl4 expression on the colon cancer cell lines was investigated by either overexpression or knockdown of Angptl4 in colon cancer cell lines HCT116 and HT29, respectively. The results showed that Angptl4 mRNA is frequently expressed in human colorectal cancer tissues and cell lines. Overexpression of Angptl4 promoted cell migration, F-actin reorganization and formation of pseudopodia. Further investigation showed that high Angptl4 expression was associated with an increase in ezrin/radixin/moesin and vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein expression and a decrease in E-cadherin expression. These results indicate that overexpression of Angptl4 may promote invasion and metastasis in CRC.

  1. RNA interference inhibits herpes simplex virus type 1 isolated from saliva samples and mucocutaneous lesions.

    PubMed

    Silva, Amanda Perse da; Lopes, Juliana Freitas; Paula, Vanessa Salete de

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of RNA interference to inhibit herpes simplex virus type-1 replication in vitro. For herpes simplex virus type-1 gene silencing, three different small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting the herpes simplex virus type-1 UL39 gene (sequence si-UL 39-1, si-UL 39-2, and si-UL 39-3) were used, which encode the large subunit of ribonucleotide reductase, an essential enzyme for DNA synthesis. Herpes simplex virus type-1 was isolated from saliva samples and mucocutaneous lesions from infected patients. All mucocutaneous lesions' samples were positive for herpes simplex virus type-1 by real-time PCR and by virus isolation; all herpes simplex virus type-1 from saliva samples were positive by real-time PCR and 50% were positive by virus isolation. The levels of herpes simplex virus type-1 DNA remaining after siRNA treatment were assessed by real-time PCR, whose results demonstrated that the effect of siRNAs on gene expression depends on siRNA concentration. The three siRNA sequences used were able to inhibit viral replication, assessed by real-time PCR and plaque assays and among them, the sequence si-UL 39-1 was the most effective. This sequence inhibited 99% of herpes simplex virus type-1 replication. The results demonstrate that silencing herpes simplex virus type-1 UL39 expression by siRNAs effectively inhibits herpes simplex virus type-1 replication, suggesting that siRNA based antiviral strategy may be a potential therapeutic alternative.

  2. Expression profile of hypothalamic neuropeptides in chicken lines selected for high or low residual feed intake.

    PubMed

    Sintubin, P; Greene, E; Collin, A; Bordas, A; Zerjal, T; Tesseraud, S; Buyse, J; Dridi, S

    2014-08-01

    The R(+) and R(-) chicken lines have been divergently selected for high (R(+)) or low (R(-)) residual feed intake. For the same body weight and egg production, the R(+) chickens consume 40% more food than their counterparts R(-) lines. In the present study we sought to determine the hypothalamic expression profile of feeding-related neuropeptides in these lines maintained under fed or food-deprived conditions. In the fed condition, the suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) was 17-fold lower (P<0.05) and the ghrelin receptor was 7-fold higher (P<0.05) in R(+) compared to R(-) chicken lines. The hypothalamic expression of the other studied genes remained unchanged between the two lines. In the fasted state, orexigenic neuropeptide Y and agouti-related peptide were more responsive, with higher significant levels in the R(+) compared to R(-) chickens, while no significant differences were seen for the anorexigenic neuropeptides pro-opiomelanocortin and corticotropin releasing hormone. Interestingly, C-reactive protein, adiponectin receptor 1 and ghrelin receptor gene expression were significantly higher (12-, 2- and 3-folds, respectively), however ghrelin and melanocortin 5 receptor mRNA levels were lower (4- and 2-folds, P=0.05 and P=0.03, respectively) in R(+) compared to R(-) animals. We identified several key feeding-related genes that are differently expressed in the hypothalamus of R(+) and R(-) chickens and that might explain the difference in feed intake observed between the two lines. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Metastatic progression and gene expression between breast cancer cell lines from African American and Caucasian women

    PubMed Central

    Yancy, Haile F; Mason, Jacquline A; Peters, Sharla; Thompson, Charles E; Littleton, George K; Jett, Marti; Day, Agnes A

    2007-01-01

    African American (AA) women have a lower overall incidence of breast cancer than do Caucasian (CAU) women, but a higher overall mortality. Little is known as to why the incidence of breast cancer is lower yet mortality is higher in AA women. Many studies speculate that this is only a socio-economical problem. This investigation suggests the possibility that molecular mechanisms contribute to the increased mortality of AA women with breast cancer. This study investigates the expression of 14 genes which have been shown to play a role in cancer metastasis. Cell lines derived from AA and CAU patients were analyzed to demonstrate alterations in the transcription of genes known to be involved in cancer and the metastatic process. Total RNA was isolated from cell lines and analyzed by RT-PCR analysis. Differential expression of the 14 targeted genes between a spectrum model (6 breast cancer cell lines and 2 non-cancer breast cell lines) and a metastasis model (12 metastatic breast cancer cell lines) were demonstrated. Additionally, an in vitro comparison of the expression established differences in 5 of the 14 biomarker genes between African American and Caucasian breast cell lines. Results from this study indicates that altered expression of the genes Atp1b1, CARD 10, KLF4, Spint2, and Acly may play a role in the aggressive phenotype seen in breast cancer in African American women. PMID:17472751

  4. Expression, Inducers and Cellular Sources of the Chemokine MIG (CXCL 9), During Primary Herpes Simplex Virus Type-1 Infection of the Cornea.

    PubMed

    Molesworth-Kenyon, Sara J; Milam, Ashley; Rockette, Amanda; Troupe, Allison; Oakes, John E; Lausch, Robert N

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the production of monokine induced by gamma-interferon (MIG) during a primary Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection of the cornea. We hypothesize that multiple CXCR3 ligands are involved in T cell recruitment during HSV-1 corneal infection and that neutrophils have the potential to contribute to their production. Levels of MIG were evaluated in an in vivo murine model of HSV-1 corneal infection by quantitative ELISA. Cultured murine corneal fibroblast (MCF) cells and purified neutrophils were stimulated in vitro with IFN-γ and IL-1α to determine inducers of MIG. Cellular sources of MIG production in vivo were investigated via cellular depletion studies. Additionally, MIG production resulting from interaction between resident human corneal cells and neutrophils was evaluated in an ex vivo model of human corneal infection. MIG was significantly elevated on days 2-6 and on day 8 following corneal infection. MCF and neutrophils secreted MIG in response to IFN-γ, but not IL-1α stimulation. Co-stimulation with IFN-γ and IL-1α induced a four-fold increase in MIG production by MCF. However, the same combination led to a three-fold decrease in MIG production by neutrophils. In vivo, a 52% reduction in MIG levels was observed in the neutrophil depleted host. In the human ex vivo model, MIG levels were significantly elevated in response to communication between HSV-1 infected corneal tissue and neutrophils. Here, we report the evidence for the production of MIG, a second CXCR3 ligand, during the primary immune response to HSV-1 corneal infection. Our results support the hypothesis that both neutrophils and resident corneal cells contribute to MIG production in vivo. However, neutrophils produce MIG in response to communication with HSV-1-infected resident corneal cells more efficiently than by direct interaction with virus. In addition, we found that MIG production by neutrophils and resident corneal cells was differentially regulated by IL-1α.

  5. Clinical and biological significance of CXCR5 expressed by prostate cancer specimens and cell lines.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shailesh; Singh, Rajesh; Singh, Udai P; Rai, Shesh N; Novakovic, Kristian R; Chung, Leland W K; Didier, Peter J; Grizzle, William E; Lillard, James W

    2009-11-15

    Chemokines and chemokine receptors have been shown to be involved in metastatic process of prostate cancer (PCa). In this study, we show primary PCa tissues and cell lines (LNCaP and PC3) express CXCR5, a specific chemokine receptor for CXCL13. Expression of CXCR5 was significantly higher (p < 0.001) in PCa cases than compared to normal match (NM) tissues. CXCR5 intensity correlated (R(2) = 0.97) with Gleason score. While prostate tumor tissues with Gleason scores >or= 7, displayed predominantly nuclear CXCR5 expression patterns, PCa specimens with Gleason scores expression patterns that were comparable to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Similar to tissue expression, PCa cell lines expressed significantly more CXCR5 than normal prostatic epithelial cells (PrECs), and CXCR5 expression was distributed among intracellular and extracellular compartments. Functional in vitro assays showed higher migratory and invasive potentials toward CXCL13, an effect that was mediated by CXCR5. In both PCa cell lines, CXCL13 treatment increased the expression of collagenase-1 or matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), collagenase-3 (MMP-13), stromelysin-1 (MMP-3), stromelysin-2 (MMP-10) and stromelysin-3 (MMP-11). These data demonstrate the clinical and biological relevance of the CXCL13-CXCR5 pathway and its role in PCa cell invasion and migration.

  6. Expression of tropomyosin 2 gene isoforms in human breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    DUBE, SYAMALIMA; THOMAS, ANISH; ABBOTT, LYNN; BENZ, PATRICIA; MITSCHOW, CHARLES; DUBE, DIPAK K.; POIESZ, BERNARD J.

    2016-01-01

    In humans, four tropomyosin genes (TPM1, TPM2, TPM3, and TPM4) are known to produce a multitude of isoforms via alternate splicing and/or using alternate promoters. Expression of tropomyosin has been shown to be modulated at both the transcription and the translational levels. Tropomyosins are known to make up some of the stress fibers of human epithelial cells and differences in their expression has been demonstrated in malignant breast epithelial cell lines compared to 'normal' breast cell lines. We have recently reported the expression of four novel TPM1 isoforms (TPM1λ, TPM1µ, TPM1ν, and TPM1ξ) from human malignant tumor breast cell lines that are not expressed in adult and fetal cardiac tissue. Also, we evaluated their expression in relation to the stress fiber formation. In this study, nine malignant breast epithelial cell lines and three 'normal' breast cell lines were examined for stress fiber formation and expression of tropomyosin 2 (TPM2) isoform-specific RNAs and proteins. Stress fiber formation was assessed by immunofluorescence using Leica AF6000 Deconvolution microscope. Stress fiber formation was strong (++++) in the 'normal' cell lines and varied among the malignant cell lines (negative to +++). No new TPM2 gene RNA isoforms were identified, and TPM2β was the most frequently expressed TPM2 RNA and protein isoform. Stress fiber formation positively correlated with TPM2β RNA or protein expression at high, statistically significant degrees. Previously, we had shown that TPM1δ and TPM1λ positively and inversely, respectively, correlated with stress fiber formation. The most powerful predictor of stress fiber formation was the combination of TPM2β RNA, TPM1δ RNA, and the inverse of TPM1λ RNA expression. Our results suggest that the increased expression of TPM1λ and the decreased expression of TPM1δ RNA and TPM2β may lead to decreased stress fiber formation and malignant transformation in human breast epithelial cells. PMID:27108600

  7. [Expression of aquaporins and its significance in human pulmonary adenocarcinoma cell line SPC-A-1].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Bai, Chunxue; Zhang, Min; Ren, Zhenyi; Hu, Jie

    2004-06-20

    To investigate the expression of aquaporins in human pulmonary adenocarcinoma cell line SPC-A-1. The expressions of aquaporin 1, aquaporin 3, aquaporin 4, and aquaporin 5 in mRNA level and their locations were determined in cell line SPC-A-1 respectively by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. The immunohistochemical stain showed aquaporin 3 and aquaporin 5 located on the membrane of SPC-A-1 cell, but no positive stain of aquaporin 1 and aquaporin 4 was observed. Both aquaporin 3 and aquaporin 5 mRNA expressed in SPC-A-1 cell line, and the expression level of aquaporin 5 mRNA was significantly higher than that of aquaporin 3 mRNA ( P < 0.01). Aquaporin 1 and aquaporin 4 mRNA did not express in SPC-A-1 cell line. Aquaporin 3 and aquaporin 5 express in SPC-A-1 cell, and their roles in water transport of SPC-A-1 cell should be further investigated.

  8. [MYETS1 recombinant expression in prokaryotic cells and deletion analysis in multiple myeloma cell lines].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianjun; Hong, Liping; Pan, Yi; Liu, Shuiping; Wu, Kunlu; Tang, Lijun

    2012-01-01

    To explore the down-expression mechanism of MYETS1 gene in multiple myeloma cell lines ARH-77 or KM3, and express MYETS1 gene in prokaryotic express system. The region of chromosome 13q14.3 in ARH-77 and KM3 was detected by FISH. MYETS1 gene was amplified by RT-PCR and cloned into prokaryotic expression vector pGEX-4T. Positive consequence was acquired in 13q14.3 where MYETS1 located by FISH in ARH- 77 and KM3 cell lines. Bioinformatics indicated highly sequence homology between MYETS1 and LECT1, but excluded the homology of open reading frame between MYETS1 and that of LECT1 by RT-PCR. Myets1 protein was expressed and harvested successfully. The region of chromosome 13q14.3 ,where MYETS1 gene located, was not defected in ARH-77 and KM3 cell lines. Down-expression of MYETS1 might be regulated by other mechanisms in multiple myeloma cell lines.

  9. Overexpression of the Ubiquitin-Specific Protease 7 Resulting from Transfection or Mutations in the ICP0 Binding Site Accelerates Rather than Depresses Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Kalamvoki, Maria; Gu, Haidong

    2012-01-01

    Earlier studies reported that ICP0, a key regulatory protein encoded by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), binds ubiquitin-specific protease 7 (USP7). The fundamental conclusion of these studies is that depletion of USP7 destabilized ICP0, that ICP0 mediated the degradation of USP7, and that amino acid substitutions in ICP0 that abolished binding to USP7 significantly impaired the ability of HSV-1 to replicate. We show here that, indeed, depletion of USP7 leads to reduction of ICP0 and that USP7 is degraded in an ICP0-dependent manner. However, overexpression of USP7 or substitution in ICP0 of a single amino acid to abolish binding to USP7 accelerated the accumulation of viral mRNAs and proteins at early times after infection and had no deleterious effect on virus yields. A clue as to why USP7 is degraded emerged from the observation that, notwithstanding the accelerated expression of viral genes, the plaques formed by the mutant virus were very small, implying a defect in virus transmission from cell to cell. PMID:22993145

  10. Wide variations in herpes simplex virus type 1 inoculum dose and latency-associated transcript expression phenotype do not alter the establishment of latency in the rabbit eye model.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, J E; Loutsch, J M; Aguilar, J S; Hill, J M; Wagner, E K; Bloom, D C

    2004-05-01

    The latency-associated transcript (LAT) is required for efficient reactivation of herpes simplex virus type 1 from latent infection in the rabbit eye model, but LAT's mechanism of action is unknown. In addition to reactivation, the LAT region seems to correspond to multiple functions, with some LAT deletion mutants exhibiting increased virulence, increased neuronal death, and restricted establishment of latency. While a LAT promoter deletion mutant (17DeltaPst) seems to be primarily restricted in reactivation in the rabbit, subtle effects on virulence or the establishment of latency cannot be precluded at the normal high levels of virus inoculum used in the rabbit model. Since such additional LAT phenotypes may be more evident with lower doses of virus, we evaluated the influence of initial viral inoculum and LAT expression on the progression of acute infection and the establishment of latency. We have assayed both virus recovery rates and viral genome loads in rabbit corneas and trigeminal ganglia. Our results show that (i) in the corneas and trigeminal ganglia, the maximum amount of virus present during acute infection is independent of the LAT genotype and inoculum dose, although greater viral yields are obtained earlier with higher inoculum doses, and (ii) the range in numbers of latent genomes detected in the ganglia is independent of the inoculum dose and the LAT genotype and therefore no difference in establishment of latency is observed.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of a C6 nucleoside analogue for the in vivo imaging of the gene expression of herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (HSV1 TK).

    PubMed

    Johayem, Anass; Raić-Malić, Silvana; Lazzati, Katia; Schubiger, Pius A; Scapozza, Leonardo; Ametamey, Simon M

    2006-03-01

    The synthesis and biological evaluation of '6-(1,3-dihydroxyisobutyl)thymine' (DHBT; 1), which corresponds to 6-[3-hydroxy-2-(hydroxymethyl)propyl]-5-methylpyrimidine-2,4(1H,3H)-dione, is reported. DHBT (1) was designed as a new substrate for herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (HSV1 TK). The compound was found to be exclusively phosphorylated by HSV1 TK, and to exhibit good binding affinity (Ki = 35.3+/-1.3 microM). Cell-proliferation assays with HSV1-TK-transduced human osteosarcoma cells (143B-TK+-HSV1-WT) and with both human-thymidine-kinase-1-negative (143B-TK-) and non-transduced parental (MG-63) cells indicate that 1 is less cytotoxic than the standard drug Ganciclovir. Thus, DHBT (1) represents a promising precursor of a nontoxic reporter probe for the monitoring of HSV1 TK gene expression by means of positron-emission tomography (PET).

  12. Recurrent facial urticaria following herpes simplex labialis.

    PubMed

    Zawar, Vijay; Godse, Kiran

    2012-03-01

    We describe recurrent acute right-sided facial urticaria associated with herpes labialis infection in a middle-aged female patient. Antiviral medications and antihistamines not only successfully cleared the herpes infection and urticaria but also prevented further recurrences.

  13. Herpes Simplex - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Herpes Simplex URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Herpes Simplex - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  14. Maternal and neonatal herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Pinninti, Swetha G; Kimberlin, David W

    2013-02-01

    Genital herpes infections are extremely common worldwide and ~22% of pregnant women are infected with herpes simplex virus. Eighty percent of those affected with genital herpes are unaware of being infected. The most devastating consequence of maternal genital herpes is neonatal herpes disease. Fortunately, neonatal herpes simplex infections are uncommon but due to the morbidity and mortality associated with the infection are often considered in the differential diagnosis of ill neonates. The use of polymerase chain reaction assay for diagnosis of central nervous system infections and the development of safe and effective antiviral therapy have revolutionized the diagnosis and management of these infants. Most recently, the initiation of long-term antiviral suppressive therapy in these infants has led to significant improvement in morbidity. This review will summarize the epidemiology of maternal and neonatal herpes infections and discuss clinical presentation, diagnosis, management, and follow-up of infants with neonatal herpes disease.

  15. Expression of P2Y receptors in cell lines derived from the human lung.

    PubMed

    Communi, D; Paindavoine, P; Place, G A; Parmentier, M; Boeynaems, J M

    1999-05-01

    1. Northern blotting experiments have been performed with RNA extracted from several cell lines derived from the human lung in order to detect P2Y1, P2Y2, P2Y4 and P2Y6 mRNA. We have investigated the 1HAEo- and 16HBE14o- epithelial cell lines derived from the airway epithelium, the A549 cell line displaying properties of type II alveolar epithelial cells, the CALU-3 serous cells, the 6CFSMEo- submucosal cells and the HASMSC1 airway smooth muscle cells. We have also evaluated one pancreatic epithelial cell line called CFPAC-1. These experiments revealed that P2Y2 and P2Y6 mRNA are co-expressed in the IHAEo-, 16HBE14o- and A549 epithelial cell lines. The CFPAC-1 pancreatic cell line was strongly positive for the P2Y2 receptor. No signal was obtained for the P2Y1 and P2Y4 receptors. 2. We have then performed RT-PCR experiments with specific oligonucleotides of these last two P2Y receptors with the RNA used for the Northern blotting experiments. P2Y4 mRNA was detected in five cell lines: 1HAEo-, 16HBE14o-, 6CFSMEo-, HASMSC1 and CFPAC-1. P2Y1 mRNA was only detected in the CALU-3 cell line. 3. Inositol trisphosphates assays have identified a response typical of the P2Y2 receptor in the 1HAEo- and the 16HBE14o- airway epithelial cell lines which co-express P2Y2 and P2Y6 mRNA. By contrast, the 6CFSMEo- submucosal cells expressed a UTP-specific response which displayed pharmacological characteristics compatible with the human P2Y4 receptor: in particular, there was no response to UDP or ATP and the UTP effect was totally inhibited by pertussis toxin.

  16. The expression and functional characterization of sigma (sigma) 1 receptors in breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Aydar, Ebru; Onganer, Pinar; Perrett, Rebecca; Djamgoz, Mustafa B; Palmer, Christopher P

    2006-10-28

    Sigma (sigma) receptors have been implicated in cancer. However, to date there is little molecular data demonstrating the role of sigma1 receptors in cancer. Expression of sigma1 receptors in various human cancer cell lines in comparison to non-cancerous cell lines was investigated, using real time RT-PCR and by western blotting with a sigma1 receptor specific antibody. Our results indicate that cancer cells express higher levels of sigma1 receptors than corresponding non-cancerous cells. Localization of the sigma1 receptor was investigated in MDA-MB-231 cells by immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy, expression was visualized predominantly at the cell periphery. We have tested the effect of sigma1 and sigma2 drugs and a sigma1 receptor silencing construct on various aspects of the metastatic process on two breast cell lines of different metastatic potential and a normal breast cell line. Both sigma1 and sigma2 drugs and the sigma1 receptor silencing construct had effects on proliferation and adhesion for breast cancer cell lines, compared to a non-cancerous breast cell line. This data suggests sigma1 receptor plays a role in proliferation and adhesion of breast cancer cells. Therefore, it is likely to be a potential target for the diagnosis and therapy of breast cancer.

  17. Establishment of enhancer detection lines expressing GFP in the gut of the ascidian Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Reiko; Sasakura, Yasunori

    2012-01-01

    The gut is a tubular, endodermal organ for digesting food and absorbing nutrients. In this study, we characterized eight enhancer detection lines that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the whole or part of the digestive tube of the ascidian Ciona intestinalis. Three enhancer detection lines for the pyloric gland, a structure associated with the digestive tube, were also analyzed. These lines are valuable markers for analyzing the mechanisms of development of the gut. Based on the GFP expression of the enhancer detection lines together with morphological characteristics, the digestive tube of Ciona can be subdivided into at least 10 compartments in which different genetic cascades operate. Causal insertion sites of the enhancer detection lines were identified, and the expression pattern of the genes near the insertion sites were characterized by means of whole-mount in situ hybridization. We have characterized four and two genes that were specifically or strongly expressed in the digestive tube and pyloric gland, respectively. The present data provide the basic information and useful resources for studying gut formation in Ciona.

  18. Calcium spirulan derived from Spirulina platensis inhibits herpes simplex virus 1 attachment to human keratinocytes and protects against herpes labialis.

    PubMed

    Mader, Julia; Gallo, Antonio; Schommartz, Tim; Handke, Wiebke; Nagel, Claus-Henning; Günther, Patrick; Brune, Wolfram; Reich, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Chronic infections with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 are highly prevalent in populations worldwide and cause recurrent oral lesions in up to 40% of infected subjects. We investigated the antiviral activity of a defined Spirulina platensis microalga extract and of purified calcium spirulan (Ca-SP), a sulfated polysaccharide contained therein. The inhibitory effects of HSV-1 were assessed by using a plaque reduction assay and quantitative PCR in a susceptible mammalian epithelial cell line and confirmed in human keratinocytes. Time-of-addition and attachment experiments and fluorescence detection of the HSV-1 tegument protein VP16 were used to analyze the mechanism of HSV-1 inhibition. Effects of Ca-SP on Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus/human herpes virus 8 replication and uptake of the ORF45 tegument protein were tested in human retinal pigment epithelial cells. In an observational trial the prophylactic effects of topically applied Ca-SP were compared with those of systemic and topical nucleoside analogues in 198 volunteers with recurrent herpes labialis receiving permanent lip makeup. Ca-SP inhibited HSV-1 infection in vitro with a potency at least comparable to that of acyclovir by blocking viral attachment and penetration into host cells. Ca-SP also inhibited entry of Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus/human herpes virus 8. In the clinical model of herpes exacerbation, the prophylactic effect of a Ca-SP and microalgae extract containing cream was superior to that of acyclovir cream. These data indicate a potential clinical use of Ca-SP containing Spirulina species extract for the prophylactic treatment of herpes labialis and suggest possible activity of Ca-SP against infections caused by other herpesviruses. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Piracy of PGE2/EP receptor mediated signaling by Kaposi’s sarcoma associated herpes virus (KSHV/HHV-8) for latency gene expression: Strategy of a successful pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Arun George; Sharma-Walia, Neelam; Kerur, Nagaraj; White, Carl; Chandran, Bala

    2010-01-01

    KSHV is implicated in the pathogenesis of KS, a chronic inflammation associated malignancy. COX-2 and its metabolite PGE2, two pivotal proinflammatory/oncogeneic molecules, are proposed to play roles in the expression of major KSHV latency associated nuclear antigen-1 (LANA-1). Microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase (mPGES), PGE2 and its receptors (EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4) were detected in KS lesions with the distinct staining of EP2/EP4 in KS lesions. In latently infected endothelial TIVE-LTC cells, EP receptor antagonists down-regulated LANA-1 expression as well as Ca2+, p-Src, p-PI3K, p-PKCζ/λ, and p-NF-κB, which are also some of the signal molecules proposed to be important in KS pathogenesis. Exogenous PGE2 and EP receptor agonists induced the LANA-1 promoter in 293 cells, and YY1, Sp1, Oct-1, Oct-6, C/EBP and c-Jun transcription factors appear to be involved in this induction. PGE2/EP receptor induced LANA-1 promoter activity was down-regulated significantly by the inhibition of Ca2+, p-Src, p-PI3K, p-PKCζ/λ, and p-NF-κB. These findings implicate the inflammatory PGE2/EP receptors and the associated signal molecules in herpes virus latency and uncover a novel paradigm that demonstrates the evolution of KSHV genome plasticity to utilize inflammatory response for its survival advantage of maintaining latent gene expression. This data also suggests that potential use of anti-COX-2 and anti-EP receptor therapy may not only ameliorate the chronic inflammation associated with KS but could also lead to elimination of the KSHV latent infection and the associated KS lesions. PMID:20388794

  20. Comparison of [14C]FMAU, [3H]FEAU, [14C]FIAU, and [3H]PCV for monitoring reporter gene expression of wild type and mutant herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Kang, Keon Wook; Min, Jung-Joon; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2005-01-01

    To assess the optimal reporter probe/reporter gene combination for monitoring herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) gene expression, we compared the cellular uptake of 1-(2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-D-arabinofuranosyl)-5-methyluracil (FMAU), 2'-fluoro-2'-deoxyarabinofuranosyl-5-ethyluracil (FEAU), 2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-beta-D-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil (FIAU) and penciclovir (PCV) in both HSV1-tk and HSV1-sr39tk expressing cells. For stably transfected cell studies, C6 rat glioma cells, C6 HSV1-tk transfectant, C6 mutant HSV1-sr39tk transfectant, rat Morris hepatoma cells (MH3924A), and MH3924A HSV1-tk transfectant cells were used. For adenoviral infection studies, C6 rat glioma cells were exposed to serial titers of AdCMV-HSV1-tk, AdCMV-HSV1-sr39tk, or AdCMV-fluc for 24 hours. These cells were incubated with [(14)C]FMAU, [(3)H]FEAU, [(14)C]FIAU, and [(3)H]PCV, and cellular uptake of radioactivity was measured. [(3)H]FEAU exhibited the highest or second highest accumulation and the most selectivity regardless of the mode of gene transfer for both HSV1-tk and mutant HSV1-sr39tk reporter genes. This combination of high accumulation and high selectivity for both HSV1-tk and HSV1-sr39tk makes suitably radiolabeled FEAU a promising candidate as a radiotracer for imaging HSV1-tk/HSV1-sr39tk gene expression in living subjects.

  1. Valacyclovir for the treatment of genital herpes.

    PubMed

    Brantley, Julie S; Hicks, Lindsey; Sra, Karan; Tyring, Stephen K

    2006-06-01

    Genital herpes is the most prevalent sexually transmitted infection in the USA. While sometimes mild in severity, it can be a distressing and painful chronic condition. Likewise, herpes labialis and herpes zoster can be both physically and psychologically painful. While there is no cure for these conditions, treatment to alleviate symptoms, suppress recurrences and reduce transmission has been drastically improved over the past 20 years with the use of guanine nucleoside antivirals, such as valacyclovir hydrochloride (Valtrex), GlaxoSmithKline) the highly bioavailable prodrug of acyclovir (Zovirax((R)), GlaxoSmithKline), and famciclovir (Famvir, Novartis), a highly bioavailable prodrug of penciclovir (Denavir, Novartis). Clinical trials involving approximately 10,000 patients (including patients from nongenital herpes studies, such as herpes zoster) have assessed the safety and efficacy of valacyclovir in the treatment of initial genital herpes outbreaks, episodic treatment of recurrent episodes and daily suppressive therapy. It was shown that valacyclovir has similar efficacy to acyclovir in the episodic and suppressive treatment of genital herpes. Valacyclovir is the only antiviral drug approved for a once-daily dose of suppressive therapy for genital herpes, as well as the only antiviral drug US FDA approved for a 3-day regimen of episodic treatment of recurrent genital herpes. In addition, valacyclovir is also indicated in the reduction of the sexual transmission of herpes simplex virus infection and for the treatment of herpes labialis. In herpes zoster, valacyclovir is more effective than acyclovir or placebo (and as equally effective as famciclovir) in shortening the length and severity of herpes zoster-associated pain and postherpetic neuralgia. Valacyclovir has an acceptable safety profile in patients with herpes simplex and herpes zoster. The less frequent dosing regimen makes it an attractive option in the treatment of genital herpes and other viral

  2. Correct developmental expression of a cloned alcohol dehydrogenase gene transduced into the Drosophila germ line.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, D A; Posakony, J W; Maniatis, T

    1983-08-01

    We have used P-element-mediated transformation to introduce a cloned Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene into the germ line of ADH null flies. Six independent transformants expressing ADH were identified by their acquired resistance to ethanol. Each transformant carries a single copy of the cloned Adh gene in a different chromosomal location. Four of the six transformant lines exhibit normal Adh expression by the following criteria: quantitative levels of ADH enzyme activity in larvae and adults; qualitative tissue specificity; the size of stable Adh mRNA; and the characteristic developmental switch in utilization of two different Adh promoters. The remaining two transformants express ADH enzyme activity with the correct tissue specificity, but at a lower level than wild type. These results demonstrate that an 11.8 kb chromosomal fragment containing the Adh gene includes the cis-acting sequences necessary for its correct developmental expression, and that a variety of chromosomal sites permit proper Adh gene function.

  3. Lenalidomide affect expression level of cereblon protein in multiple myeloma cell line RPMI8226.

    PubMed

    Yang, D Y; Ren, J H; Guo, X N; Guo, X L; Cai, X Y; Guo, X F; Zhang, J N

    2015-10-29

    We investigated the mechanisms of action of immuno-modulatory drug (lenalidomide) on the protein expression of cereblon (CRBN) and their therapeutic targets in the multiple myeloma cell line RPMI8226. The multiple myeloma cell line RPMI8226 was cultured and treated with different concentrations of lenalidomide and bortezomib to determine the proliferation inhibition rate, apoptosis rate, and protein expression of CRBN. The results revealed that both lenalidomide and bortezomib inhibited the proliferation of RPMI8226 and promoted cell apoptosis. However, the protein expression of CRBN decreased signifi-cantly after treatment with lenalidomide, while bortezomib had no effect on the expression of CRBN. We confirmed that CRBN may be a target of lenalidomide.

  4. Effects of a traditional Chinese medicine, Longdanxiegan formula granule, on Toll-like receptor pathway in female guinea pigs with recurrent genital herpes.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Lin; Deng, Yihui; Liu, Xiaodan; Zou, Zhixiang; Mi, Lan

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of Longdanxiegan formula granule (LDXGFG), a Chinese traditional medicine on Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway in recurrent genital herpes. An experimental recurrent genital herpes model was constructed using herpes guinea pig model. The effect of LDXGFG on expression levels of TLR pathway genes were detected using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Furthermore, the dendritic cells and Langerhans cells were isolated and the TLR pathway genes of these cells were assayed after LDXGFG treatment. The result suggested two different expression patterns of TLR pathway genes in genital herpes and recurrent genital herpes, including upregulated genes and downregulated genes. TLR1, TLR4, TLR6, TLR7, TLR8, TLR9, and TLR10 showed a significant decrease while, TLR2, TLR3, and TLR5 increased in genital herpes and recurrent genital herpes guinea pigs. Meanwhile, the downregulated genes in genital herpes and recurrent genital herpes were stimulated by LDXGFG. By contrast, the upregulated genes decreased significantly after LDXGFG treatment. In both dendritic cells and Langerhans cells, the TLR pathway genes exhibited same pattern: the LDXGFG corrected the abnormal expression of TLR pathway genes. The present results suggest that LDXGFG is an alternative, inexpensive, and lasting-effect medicine for herpes simplex virus 2 infection. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Herpes simplex keratitis.

    PubMed

    Kaye, Stephen; Choudhary, Anshoo

    2006-07-01

    Herpes simplex keratitis (HSK) results from an infection with the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) also known as human herpesvirus type 1 (HHV-1). Primary infection may involve an ocular or non-ocular site, following which latency might be established principally in the trigeminal ganglion but also in the cornea. During latency, the virus appears as a circular episome associated with histones with active transcription only from the region encoding the latency-associated transcript (LAT). The LAT region is implicated in neuronal survival, anti-apoptosis, virulence, suppression of transcription, establishment of and reactivation from latency. The initial keratitis may develop after infection through the "front door route" (entry into the ocular surface from droplet spread) or "back door route" (spread to the eye from a non-ocular site, principally the mouth). The initial ocular infection may be mild. Visual morbidity results from recurrent keratitis, which leads to corneal scarring, thinning and neovascularisation. Although, recurrent disease may potentially occur through anterograde axonal spread from the trigeminal ganglion to the cornea, recent evidence suggests that HSV-1 in the cornea may be another source of recurrent disease. The pathogenesis and severity of HSK is largely determined by an interaction between viral genes encoded by the strain of HSV-1 and the make up of the host's immune system. Herpetic stromal disease is due to the immune response to virus within the cornea and the ability of the strain to cause corneal stromal disease is correlated with its ability to induce corneal vascularisation. The pathogenesis of corneal scarring and vascularisation is uncertain but appears to be a complex interaction of various cytokines, chemokines and growth factors either brought in by inflammatory cells or produced locally in response to HSV-1 infection. Evidence now suggests that HSV-1 infection disrupts the normal equilibrium between angiogenic and anti

  6. Differential pattern of integrin receptor expression in differentiated and anaplastic thyroid cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, S; Maschuw, K; Hassan, I; Reckzeh, B; Wunderlich, A; Lingelbach, S; Zielke, A

    2005-09-01

    Adhesion of tumor cells to the extracellular matrix (ECM) is a crucial step for the development of metastatic disease and is mediated by specific integrin receptor molecules (IRM). The pattern of metastatic spread differs substantially among the various histotypes of thyroid cancer (TC). However, IRM have only occasionally been characterized in TC until now. IRM expression was investigated in 10 differentiated (FTC133, 236, 238, HTC, HTC TSHr, XTC, PTC4.0/4.2, TPC1, Kat5) and two anaplastic TC cell lines (ATC, C643, Hth74), primary cultures of normal thyroid tissue (Thy1,3), and thyroid cancer specimens (TCS). Expression of 16 IRM (beta1-4, beta7, alpha1-6, alphaV, alphaIIb, alphaL, alphaM, alphaX) and of four IRM heterodimers (alpha2beta1, alpha5beta1, alphaVbeta3, alphaVbeta5), was analyzed by fluorescent-activated cell sorter (FACS) and immunohistochemical staining. Thyroid tumor cell adhesion to ECM proteins and their IRM expression in response to thyrotropin (TSH) was assessed. Follicular TC cell lines presented high levels of integrins alpha2, alpha3, alpha5, beta1, beta3 and low levels of alpha1, whereas papillary lines expressed a heterogenous pattern of IRM, dominated by alpha5 and beta1. ATC mainly displayed integrins alpha2, alpha3, alpha5, alpha6, beta1 and low levels of alpha1, alpha4 and alphaV. Integrin heterodimers correlated with monomer expression. Evaluation of TCS largely confirmed these results with few exceptions, namely alpha4, alpha6, and beta3. The ability of TC cell lines to adhere to purified ECM proteins correlated with IRM expression. TSH induced TC cell adhesion in a dose-dependent fashion, despite an unchanged array of IRM expression or level of a particular IRM. Thyroid carcinoma cell lines of different histogenetic background display profoundly different patterns of IRM expression that appear to correlate with tumor aggressiveness. In vitro adhesion to ECM proteins and IRM expression concur. Finally, TSH-stimulated adhesion of

  7. Differential hormonal and gene expression dynamics in two inbred sunflower lines with contrasting dormancy level.

    PubMed

    Roselló, Paula L; Vigliocco, Ana E; Andrade, Andrea M; Riera, Natalí V; Calafat, Mario; Molas, María L; Alemano, Sergio G

    2016-05-01

    Seed germination and dormancy are tightly regulated by hormone metabolism and signaling pathway. We investigated the endogenous content of abscisic acid (ABA), its catabolites, and gibberellins (GAs), as well as the expression level of certain ABA and GAs metabolic and signaling genes in embryo of dry and imbibed cypselas of inbred sunflower (Helianthus annuus L., Asteraceae) lines: B123 (dormant) and B91 (non-dormant). Under our experimental conditions, the expression of RGL2 gene might be related to the ABA peak in B123 line at 3 h of imbibition. Indeed, RGL2 transcripts are absent in dry and early embedded cypselas of the non-dormant line B91. ABA increase was accompanied by a significant ABA-Glucosyl ester (ABA-GE) and phaseic acid (PA) (two ABA catabolites) decrease in B123 line (3 h) which indicates that ABA metabolism seems to be more active in this line, and that it would be involved in the imposition and maintenance of sunflower seed dormancy, as it has been reported for many species. Finally, an increase of bioactive GAs (GA1 and GA3) occurs at 12 h of imbibition in both lines after a decrease in ABA content. This study shows the first report about the RGL2 tissue-specific gene expression in sunflower inbred lines with contrasting dormancy level. Furthermore, our results provide evidence that ABA and GAs content and differential expression of metabolism and signaling genes would be interacting in seed dormancy regulation through a mechanism of action related to embryo itself.

  8. Gastrointestinal hormone mRNA expression in human colonic adenocarcinomas, hepatic metastases and cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Monges, G; Biagini, P; Cantaloube, J F; De Micco, P; Parriaux, D; Seitz, J F; Delpero, J R; Hassoun, J

    1996-01-01

    Aims—(1) To investigate the expression of the four main hormones of the digestive tract by performing reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) on a series of samples, comprising tumoral and healthy colonic tissues, hepatic metastases and colonic cell line samples; and (2) to study the patterns of labelling obtained with serological and morphological markers. Methods—After extraction and reverse transcription, gastrin, somatostatin, cholecystokinin (CCK) and transforming growth factor α (TGFα) mRNAs were detected by PCR and nested PCR using specific primers. The corresponding proteins were detected by immunohistochemistry. Results—The cell lines expressed all four mRNAs. Gastrin mRNA was present in most tumoral and metastatic samples, while the somatostatin transcript was detected in all samples and was frequently overexpressed in the normal colon. TGFα mRNA was expressed systematically in tumours of the right and transverse colon, but not in those located in the left colon; the expression of CCK mRNA was systematically absent in the left colon. Conclusions—The data presented here shed some light on the transcriptional events involved in the production of the various hormones present in the gastrointestinal tract, in both healthy and tumoral tissues. The various mRNAs expressed in cell lines are therefore not systematically expressed in the human pathology. Images PMID:16696065

  9. Systemic alteration of cell-surface and secreted glycoprotein expression in malignant breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Timpe, Leslie C; Yen, Roger; Haste, Nicole V; Litsakos-Cheung, Christina; Yen, Ten-Yang; Macher, Bruce A

    2013-11-01

    Breast cancer cell lines express fewer transmembrane and secreted glycoproteins than nonmalignant ones. The objective of these experiments was to characterize the changes in the expression of several hundred glycoproteins quantitatively. Secreted and cell-surface glycoproteins were isolated using a glycoprotein capture protocol and then identified by tandem mass spectrometry. Glycoproteins expressed by a group of cell lines originating from malignant tumors of the breast were compared with those expressed by a nonmalignant set. The average number of spectral counts (proportional to relative protein abundance) and the total number of glycopeptides in the malignant samples were reduced to about two-thirds of the level in the nonmalignant samples. Most glycoproteins were expressed at a different level in the malignant samples, with nearly as many increasing as decreasing. The glycoproteins with reduced expression accounted for a larger change in spectral counts, and hence for the net loss of spectral counts in the malignant lines. Similar results were found when the glycoproteins were studied via identified glycosylation sites only, or through identified sites together with non-glycopeptides. The overall reduction is largely due to the loss of integrins, laminins and other proteins that form or interact with the basement membrane.

  10. Drosophila enhancer-Gal4 lines show ectopic expression during development

    PubMed Central

    Arnés, Mercedes; Ferrús, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster the most widely used technique to drive gene expression is the binary UAS/Gal4 system. We show here that a set of nervous system specific enhancers (elav, D42/Toll-6, OK6/RapGAP1) display ectopic activity in epithelial tissues during development, which is seldom considered in experimental studies. This ectopic activity is variable, unstable and influenced by the primary sequence of the enhancer and the insertion site in the chromosome. In addition, the ectopic activity is independent of the protein expressed, Gal4, as it is reproduced also with the expression of Gal80. Another enhancer, LN2 from the sex lethal (Sxl) gene, shows sex-dependent features in its ectopic expression. Feminization of LN2 expressing males does not alter the male specific pattern indicating that the sexual dimorphism of LN2 expression is an intrinsic feature of this enhancer. Other X chromosome enhancers corresponding to genes not related to sex determination do not show sexual dimorphism in their ectopic expressions. Although variable and unstable, the ectopic activation of enhancer-Gal4 lines seems to be regulated in terms of tissue and intensity. To characterize the full domain of expression of enhancer-Gal4 constructs is relevant for the design of transgenic animal models and biotechnology tools, as well as for the correct interpretation of developmental and behavioural studies in which Gal4 lines are used. PMID:28405401

  11. Differential expression of alkaline phosphatase gene in proliferating primary lymphocytes and malignant lymphoid cell lines.

    PubMed

    Latheef, S A A; Devanabanda, Mallaiah; Sankati, Swetha; Madduri, Ramanadham

    2016-02-01

    Alkaline Phosphatase (APase) activity has been shown to be enhanced specifically in mitogen stimulated B lymphocytes committed to proliferation, but not in T lymphocytes. APase gene expression was analyzed in proliferating murine and human primary lymphocytes and human malignant cell lines using reverse transcriptase and real time PCR. In mitogen stimulated murine splenic lymphocytes, enhancement of APase activity correlated well with an increase in APase gene expression. However, in mitogen stimulated murine T lymphocytes and human PBL despite a vigorous proliferative response, no increase in APase enzyme activity or gene expression was observed. A constitutive expression of APase activity concomitant with APase gene expression was observed inhuman myeloma cell line, U266 B1. However, neither enzyme activity nor gene expression of APase were observed in human T cell lymphoma, SUPT-1. The results suggest a differential expression of APase activity and its gene in proliferating primary lymphocytes of mice and humans. The specific expression of APase activity and its gene only in human myeloma cells, but not in proliferating primary B cells can be exploited as a sensitive disease marker.

  12. Hypothalamic and amygdalar cell lines differ markedly in mitochondrial rather than nuclear encoded gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) plays an important role in regulating the mammalian stress response. Two of the most extensively studied neuronal populations that express CRH are in the hypothalamus and amygdala. Both regions are involved in the stress response, but the amygdala is also involved in mediating response to fear and anxiety. Given that both hypothalamus and amygdala have overlapping functions, but their CRH-expressing neurons may respond differently to a given perturbation, we sought to identify differentially expressed genes between two neuronal cell types, amygdalar AR-5 and hypothalamic IVB cells. Thus, we performed a microarray analysis. Our hypothesis was that we would identify differentially expressed transcription factors, coregulators and chromatin-modifying enzymes. Results A total of 31,042 genes were analyzed, 10,572 of which were consistently expressed in both cell lines at a 95% confidence level. Of the 10,572 genes, 2,320 genes in AR-5 were expressed at ≥ 2-fold relative to IVBs, 1,104 genes were expressed at ≥2-fold in IVB relative to AR-5 and 7,148 genes were expressed at similar levels between the two cell lines. The greatest difference was in six mitochondrial DNA-encoded genes, which were highly abundant in AR-5 relative to IVB cells. The relative abundance of these genes ranged from 413 to 885-fold according to the microarray results. Differential expression of these genes was verified by RTqPCR. The differentially expressed mitochondrial genes were cytochrome b (MT-CYB), cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and 2 (MT-CO1 and MT-CO2) and NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase chain 1, 2, and 3 (MT-ND1, MT-ND2, MT-ND3). Conclusion As expected, the array revealed differential expression of transcription factors and coregulators; however the greatest difference between the two cell lines was in genes encoded by the mitochondrial genome. These genes were abundant in AR-5 relative to IVBs. At present, the reason for the marked

  13. Using the Tg(nrd:egfp)/albino Zebrafish Line to Characterize In Vivo Expression of neurod

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jennifer L.; Ochocinska, Margaret J.; Hitchcock, Peter F.; Thummel, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we used a newly-created transgenic zebrafish, Tg(nrd:egfp)/albino, to further characterize the expression of neurod in the developing and adult retina and to determine neurod expression during adult photoreceptor regeneration. We also provide observations regarding the expression of neurod in a variety of other tissues. In this line, EGFP is found in cells of the developing and adult retina, pineal gland, cerebellum, olfactory bulbs, midbrain, hindbrain, neural tube, lateral line, inner ear, pancreas, gut, and fin. Using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, we compare the expression of the nrd:egfp transgene to that of endogenous neurod and to known retinal cell types. Consistent with previous data based on in situ hybridizations, we show that during retinal development, the nrd:egfp transgene is not expressed in proliferating retinal neuroepithelium, and is expressed in a subset of retinal neurons. In contrast to previous studies, nrd:egfp is gradually re-expressed in all rod photoreceptors. During photoreceptor regeneration in adult zebrafish, in situ hybridization reveals that neurod is not expressed in Müller glial-derived neuronal progenitors, but is expressed in photoreceptor progenitors as they migrate to the outer nuclear layer and differentiate into new rod photoreceptors. During photoreceptor regeneration, expression of the nrd:egfp matches that of neurod. We conclude that Tg(nrd:egfp)/albino is a good representation of endogenous neurod expression, is a useful tool to visualize neurod expression in a variety of tissues and will aid investigating the fundamental processes that govern photoreceptor regeneration in adults. PMID:22235264

  14. A conditional transgenic mouse line for targeted expression of the stem cell marker LGR5.

    PubMed

    Norum, Jens Henrik; Bergström, Åsa; Andersson, Agneta Birgitta; Kuiper, Raoul V; Hoelzl, Maria A; Sørlie, Therese; Toftgård, Rune

    2015-08-15

    LGR5 is a known marker of embryonic and adult stem cells in several tissues. In a mouse model, Lgr5+ cells have shown tumour-initiating properties, while in human cancers, such as basal cell carcinoma and colon cancer, LGR5 expression levels are increased: however, the effect of increased LGR5 expression is not fully understood. To study the effects of elevated LGR5 expression levels we generated a novel tetracycline-responsive, conditional transgenic mouse line expressing human LGR5, designated TRELGR5. In this transgenic line, LGR5 expression can be induced in any tissue depending on the expression pattern of the chosen transcriptional regulator. For the current study, we used transgenic mice with a tetracycline-regulated transcriptional transactivator linked to the bovine keratin 5 promoter (K5tTA) to drive expression of LGR5 in the epidermis. As expected, expression of human LGR5 was induced in the skin of double transgenic mice (K5tTA;TRELGR5). Inducing LGR5 expression during embryogenesis and early development resulted in macroscopically and microscopically detectable phenotypic changes, including kink tail, sparse fur coat and enlarged sebaceous glands. The fur and sebaceous gland phenotypes were reversible upon discontinued expression of transgenic LGR5, but this was not observed for the kink tail phenotype. There were no apparent phenotypic changes if LGR5 expression was induced at three weeks of age. The results demonstrate that increased expression of LGR5 during embryogenesis and the neonatal period alter skin development and homeostasis.

  15. Treatment of herpes zoster

    PubMed Central

    Opstelten, Wim; Eekhof, Just; Neven, Arie Knuistingh; Verheij, Theo

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To review the evidence regarding treatment of herpes zoster (HZ) in the short-term, focusing on the prevention of postherpetic neuralgia (PHN). QUALITY OF EVIDENCE The evidence relating to treatment of HZ is derived mainly from randomized controlled trials (level I evidence). MAIN MESSAGE Antiviral drugs might have some effect on the severity of acute pain and on the duration of skin lesions. Corticosteroids also alleviate acute pain. Oral antiviral medication reduces the risk of eye complications in patients with ophthalmic HZ. There is no convincing evidence that antiviral medication reduces the risk of PHN. Some studies, however, have shown that famciclovir and valacyclovir shorten the duration of PHN. The effectiveness of amitriptyline or cutaneous and percutaneous interventions in preventing PHN has not been proven. CONCLUSION Oral antiviral drugs should be prescribed to elderly HZ patients with high risk of PHN. Moreover, these drugs should be prescribed to all patients at the first signs of ophthalmic HZ, irrespective of age or severity of symptoms. PMID:18337531

  16. Induction of resistance to Aplidin in a human ovarian cancer cell line related to MDR expression.

    PubMed

    Tognon, Gianluca; Bernasconi, Sergio; Celli, Nicola; Faircloth, Glynn T; Cuevas, Carmen; Jimeno, José; Erba, Eugenio; D'Incalci, Maurizio

    2005-12-01

    Aplidin-resistant IGROV-1/APL cells were derived from the human ovarian cancer IGROV-1 cell line by exposing the cells to increasing concentration of Aplidin for eight months, starting from a concentration of 10 nM to a final concentration of 4 microM. IGROV-1/APL cell line possesses five fold relative resistance to Aplidin. IGROV-1/APL resistant cell line shows the typical MDR phenotype: (1) increased expression of membrane-associated P-glycoprotein, (2) cross-resistance to drugs like etoposide, doxorubicin, vinblastine, vincristine, taxol, colchicin and the novel anticancer drug Yondelis (ET-743). The Pgp inhibitor cyclosporin-A restored the sensitivity of IGROV-1/APL cells to Aplidin by increasing the drug intracellular concentration. The resistance to Aplidin was not due to the other proteins, such as LPR-1 and MRP-1, being expressed at the same level in resistant and parental cell line. The finding that cells over-expressing Pgp are resistant to Aplidin was confirmed in CEM/VLB 100 cells, that was found to be 5-fold resistant to Aplidin compared to the CEM parental cell line.

  17. Replication-Competent Controlled Herpes Simplex Virus.

    PubMed

    Bloom, David C; Feller, Joyce; McAnany, Peterjon; Vilaboa, Nuria; Voellmy, Richard

    2015-10-01

    We present the development and characterization of a replication-competent controlled herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). Replication-essential ICP4 and ICP8 genes of HSV-1 wild-type strain 17syn+ were brought under the control of a dually responsive gene switch. The gene switch comprises (i) a transactivator that is activated by a narrow class of antiprogestins, including mifepristone and ulipristal, and whose expression is mediated by a promoter cassette that comprises an HSP70B promoter and a transactivator-responsive promoter and (ii) transactivator-responsive promoters that drive the ICP4 and ICP8 genes. Single-step growth experiments in different cell lines demonstrated that replication of the recombinant virus, HSV-GS3, is strictly dependent on an activating treatment consisting of administration of a supraphysiological heat dose in the presence of an antiprogestin. The replication-competent controlled virus replicates with an efficiency approaching that of the wild-type virus from which it was derived. Essentially no replication occurs in the absence of activating treatment or if HSV-GS3-infected cells are exposed only to heat or antiprogestin. These findings were corroborated by measurements of amounts of viral DNA and transcripts of the regulated ICP4 gene and the glycoprotein C (gC) late gene, which was not regulated. Similar findings were made in experiments with a mouse footpad infection model. The alphaherpesviruses have long been considered vectors for recombinant vaccines and oncolytic therapies. The traditional approach uses vector backbones containing attenuating mutations that restrict replication to ensure safety. The shortcoming of this approach is that the attenuating mutations tend to limit both the immune presentation and oncolytic properties of these vectors. HSV-GS3 represents a novel type of vector that, when activated, replicates with the efficiency of a nonattenuated virus and whose safety is derived from deliberate, stringent regulation of

  18. Replication-Competent Controlled Herpes Simplex Virus

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, David C.; Feller, Joyce; McAnany, Peterjon; Vilaboa, Nuria

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We present the development and characterization of a replication-competent controlled herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). Replication-essential ICP4 and ICP8 genes of HSV-1 wild-type strain 17syn+ were brought under the control of a dually responsive gene switch. The gene switch comprises (i) a transactivator that is activated by a narrow class of antiprogestins, including mifepristone and ulipristal, and whose expression is mediated by a promoter cassette that comprises an HSP70B promoter and a transactivator-responsive promoter and (ii) transactivator-responsive promoters that drive the ICP4 and ICP8 genes. Single-step growth experiments in different cell lines demonstrated that replication of the recombinant virus, HSV-GS3, is strictly dependent on an activating treatment consisting of administration of a supraphysiological heat dose in the presence of an antiprogestin. The replication-competent controlled virus replicates with an efficiency approaching that of the wild-type virus from which it was derived. Essentially no replication occurs in the absence of activating treatment or if HSV-GS3-infected cells are exposed only to heat or antiprogestin. These findings were corroborated by measurements of amounts of viral DNA and transcripts of the regulated ICP4 gene and the glycoprotein C (gC) late gene, which was not regulated. Similar findings were made in experiments with a mouse footpad infection model. IMPORTANCE The alphaherpesviruses have long been considered vectors for recombinant vaccines and oncolytic therapies. The traditional approach uses vector backbones containing attenuating mutations that restrict replication to ensure safety. The shortcoming of this approach is that the attenuating mutations tend to limit both the immune presentation and oncolytic properties of these vectors. HSV-GS3 represents a novel type of vector that, when activated, replicates with the efficiency of a nonattenuated virus and whose safety is derived from deliberate

  19. [Cloning of flavone synthase (FNSII) gene and expression in three cell lines of Saussurea medusa].

    PubMed

    Wang, Bingjie; Li, Houhua; Wang, Yajie; Gaol, Yan; Fu, Wany; Weil, Xincui

    2015-12-01

    Saussurea medusa is a rare traditional Chinese medicinal herb, of which luteolin is the niain active medicinal compound for cancer prevention and treatment. A full-length FNSII gene, namely SmFNSII (GenBank Accession No. KF170286), was obtained from green cell line of Saussurea medusa by RT-PCR and RACE-PCR. Sequence analysis indicated that SmFNSII is 1 710 bp in full length, containing a 34 bp 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR), a 125 bp 3'-UTR, and a 1 551 bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding 516 amino acid residues. Amino acid sequence analysis indicated that SmFNSII belonged to subfamily CYP93B of plant cytochrome P450. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis revealed that amino acid sequences of SmFNSII shared 87% homology with the protein in Hieracium pilosella. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that SmFNSII expression is the highest in red cell line and the lowest in white cell line, corresponding to quantitative analysis of luteolin concentration. pET-SmFNSII, a prokaryotic expression recombinant plasmid, was constructed and transferred into Escherichia coli, and the expressed protein band was the same size with predicted protein. Saussurea medusa cultivars with high anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer activities and health care function would be cultivated through filtering cell lines and plants with high expression level of FNSII gene and luteolin accumulation.

  20. A recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 expressing two additional copies of gK is more pathogenic than wild-type virus in two different strains of mice.

    PubMed

    Mott, Kevin R; Perng, Guey-Chuen; Osorio, Yanira; Kousoulas, Konstantin G; Ghiasi, Homayon

    2007-12-01

    The effect of glycoprotein K (gK) overexpression on herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection in two different strains of mice was evaluated using a recombinant HSV-1 virus that expresses two additional copies of the gK gene in place of the latency-associated transcript (LAT). This mutant virus (HSV-gK3) expressed higher levels of gK than either the wild-type McKrae virus or the parental dLAT2903 virus both in vitro (in cultured cells) and in vivo (in infected mouse corneas and trigeminal ganglia [TG] of BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice). gK transcripts were detected in the TG of both HSV-gK3-infected mouse strains on day 30 postinfection (p.i.), while gB transcripts were detected only in the TG of the HSV-gK3-infected C57BL/6 mice, a finding that suggests that increased gK levels promote chronic infection. C57BL/6 mice infected with HSV-gK3 also contained free virus in their TG on day 30 p.i. Both HSV-gK3-infected mouse strains had significantly higher corneal scarring (CS) than did McKrae-infected mice. T-cell depletion studies in C57BL/6 mice suggested that this CS enhancement in the HSV-gK3-infected mice was mediated by a CD8+ T-cell response. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that increased gK levels promote eye disease and chronic infection in infected mice.

  1. Cure of mice with established metastatic friend leukemia cell tumors by a combined therapy with tumor cells expressing both interferon-alpha 1 and herpes simplex thymidine kinase followed by ganciclovir.

    PubMed

    Santodonato, L; Ferrantini, M; Gabriele, L; Proietti, E; Venditti, M; Musiani, P; Modesti, A; Modica, A; Lupton, S D; Belardelli, F

    1996-01-01

    Transduction of the murine interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) gene into various malignant mouse tumor cells has resulted in the loss of tumorigenicity and an acquired capacity to induce long-lasting antitumor immunity following their injection into immunocompetent syngeneic mice. In the present study, we investigated the effectiveness of IFN-alpha-producing tumor cells in the therapy of mice with established mouse tumors. In DBA/2 mice bearing subcutaneous (s.c.) Friend erythroleukemia cell (FLC) tumors, we found that to achieve some antitumor response (i) it was necessary to inject high numbers of IFN-alpha-producing FLC, which occasionally lead to the formation of slowly growing tumors; and, that (ii) repeated injections of irradiated IFN-alpha-FLC did not result in any antitumor effect. The therapeutic potential of IFN-alpha-producing FLC rendered sensitive to ganciclovir (GCV), by transfer of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (tk) gene, was investigated. Complete tumor rejection and cure was observed in > or = 70% of the animals after injection of high numbers (10(7)) of IFN-alpha-producing tk-expressing tumor cells followed 4 days later by repeated GCV treatments, whereas only a slight increase in survival time was obtained after administration of control tk-expressing tumor cells (not producing IFN) and GCV. Tumor rejection was associated with a dramatic destruction of tumor tissue and with the subsequent development of a potent and long-lasting antitumor immunity. No therapeutic effect was observed in immunosuppressed nude mice. These data indicate that this approach may represent an effective and safe therapeutic strategy for antitumor cytokine gene therapy.

  2. Human hedgehog interacting protein expression and promoter methylation in medulloblastoma cell lines and primary tumor samples

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Mehdi H.; Afzal, Mohammad; Sinha, Subrata; Eberhart, Charles G.; Rey, Juan A.; Fan, Xing

    2015-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common pediatric brain tumor and its development is affected by genetic and epigenetic factors. In this study we found there is low or no expression of the hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP), a negative regulator of the sonic hedgehog pathway, in most medulloblastoma cell lines and primary samples explored. We proceeded to promoter methylation assays of this gene by MCA-Meth, and found that HHIP was hypermethylated in all medulloblastoma cell lines, but only in 2 out of 14 (14%) primary tumor samples. Methylation correlated with low or unexpressed HHIP in cell lines but not in primary tumor samples. These results suggest the possibility of epigenetic regulation of HHIP in medulloblastoma, similarly to gastric, hepatic and pancreatic cancer. However, HHIP seems to be not only under regulation of promoter methylation, but under other factors involved in the control of its low levels of expression in medulloblastoma. PMID:20853133

  3. Herpes zoster: A clinicocytopathological insight

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Snehal; Singaraju, Sasidhar; Einstein, A; Sharma, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Herpes zoster or shingles is reactivation of the varicella zoster virus that had entered the cutaneous nerve endings during an earlier episode of chicken pox traveled to the dorsal root ganglia and remained in a latent form. This condition is characterized by occurrence of multiple, painful, unilateral vesicles and ulceration which shows a typical single dermatome involvement. In this case report, we present a patient with herpes zoster involving the mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve, with unilateral vesicles over the right side of lower third of face along the trigeminal nerve tract, with intraoral involvement of buccal mucosa, labial mucosa and the tongue of the same side. Cytopathology revealed classic features of herpes infection including inclusion bodies, perinuclear halo and multinucleated cells. PMID:27721631

  4. Herpes simplex virus-mediated human hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene transfer into neuronal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Palella, T D; Silverman, L J; Schroll, C T; Homa, F L; Levine, M; Kelley, W N

    1988-01-01

    The virtually complete deficiency of the purine salvage enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) results in a devastating neurological disease, Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. Transfer of the HPRT gene into fibroblasts and lymphoblasts in vitro and into hematopoietic cells in vivo has been accomplished by other groups with retroviral-derived vectors. It appears to be necessary, however, to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal cells to correct the neurological dysfunction of this disorder. The neurotropic virus herpes simplex virus type 1 has features that make it suitable for use as a vector to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal tissue. This report describes the isolation of an HPRT-deficient rat neuroma cell line, designated B103-4C, and the construction of a recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 that contained human HPRT cDNA. These recombinant viruses were used to infect B103-4C cells. Infected cells expressed HPRT activity which was human in origin. Images PMID:2827006

  5. Matrigel Basement Membrane Matrix influences expression of microRNAs in cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Karina J.; Tsykin, Anna; Giles, Keith M.; Sladic, Rosemary T.; Epis, Michael R.; Ganss, Ruth; Goodall, Gregory J.; Leedman, Peter J.

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Matrigel alters cancer cell line miRNA expression relative to culture on plastic. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Many identified Matrigel-regulated miRNAs are implicated in cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-1290, -210, -32 and -29b represent a Matrigel-induced miRNA signature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-32 down-regulates Integrin alpha 5 (ITGA5) mRNA. -- Abstract: Matrigel is a medium rich in extracellular matrix (ECM) components used for three-dimensional cell culture and is known to alter cellular phenotypes and gene expression. microRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression and have roles in cancer. While miRNA profiles of numerous cell lines cultured on plastic have been reported, the influence of Matrigel-based culture on cancer cell miRNA expression is largely unknown. This study investigated the influence of Matrigel on the expression of miRNAs that might facilitate ECM-associated cancer cell growth. We performed miRNA profiling by microarray using two colon cancer cell lines (SW480 and SW620), identifying significant differential expression of miRNAs between cells cultured in Matrigel and on plastic. Many of these miRNAs have previously been implicated in cancer-related processes. A common Matrigel-induced miRNA signature comprised of up-regulated miR-1290 and miR-210 and down-regulated miR-29b and miR-32 was identified using RT-qPCR across five epithelial cancer cell lines (SW480, SW620, HT-29, A549 and MDA-MB-231). Experimental modulation of these miRNAs altered expression of their known target mRNAs involved in cell adhesion, proliferation and invasion, in colon cancer cell lines. Furthermore, ITGA5 was identified as a novel putative target of miR-32 that may facilitate cancer cell interactions with the ECM. We propose that culture of cancer cell lines in Matrigel more accurately recapitulates miRNA expression and function in cancer than culture on plastic and thus is a

  6. Diversity of Reporter Expression Patterns in Transgenic Mouse Lines Targeting Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone-Expressing Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Molet, Jenny; Gunn, Benjamin G.; Ressler, Kerry

    2015-01-01

    Transgenic mice, including lines targeting corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF or CRH), have been extensively employed to study stress neurobiology. These powerful tools are poised to revolutionize our understanding of the localization and connectivity of CRH-expressing neurons, and the crucial roles of CRH in normal and pathological conditions. Accurate interpretation of studies using cell type-specific transgenic mice vitally depends on congruence between expression of the endogenous peptide and reporter. If reporter expression does not faithfully reproduce native gene expression, then effects of manipulating unintentionally targeted cells may be misattributed. Here, we studied CRH and reporter expression patterns in 3 adult transgenic mice: Crh-IRES-Cre;Ai14 (tdTomato mouse), Crfp3.0CreGFP, and Crh-GFP BAC. We employed the CRH antiserum generated by Vale after validating its specificity using CRH-null mice. We focused the analyses on stress-salient regions, including hypothalamus, amygdala, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and hippocampus. Expression patterns of endogenous CRH were consistent among wild-type and transgenic mice. In tdTomato mice, most CRH-expressing neurons coexpressed the reporter, yet the reporter identified a few non-CRH-expressing pyramidal-like cells in hippocampal CA1 and CA3. In Crfp3.0CreGFP mice, coexpression of CRH and the reporter was found in central amygdala and, less commonly, in other evaluated regions. In Crh-GFP BAC mice, the large majority of neurons expressed either CRH or reporter, with little overlap. These data highlight significant diversity in concordant expression of reporter and endogenous CRH among 3 available transgenic mice. These findings should be instrumental in interpreting important scientific findings emerging from the use of these potent neurobiological tools. PMID:26402844

  7. [Establishment of a stable and regulable 293 cell line expressing mycoplasma hyorhinis protein P37].

    PubMed

    Gong, Man-man; Meng, Lin; Liu, Wen-bin; Zhang, Jian-zhi; Shou, Cheng-chao

    2005-12-18

    To establish a stable cell line, which can express P37 protein of mycoplasma hyorhinis and be regulated by tetracycline, for investigating the effect of p37 on phenotype of cells and its mechanism. Recombinant plasmid PcDNA5/FRT/TO-p37 was constructed and cotransfected with pOG44 into Flp-In-T-REx-293 cells by lipofectamine. Positive clones were screened with Hygromycin and Blasticidin. RT-PCR and Western blot were used to exam the mRNA and protein expression in selected clones. The expression level at different inducing times and concentrations of tetracycline were examined. MTT assay was used to observe the effect of P37 on proliferation of 293 cells. P37 protein, which is 43.5x10(3), was expressed in the selected clone as well as secreted from cells. Tetracycline showed a good regulation on the expression of P37 protein, which was not detectable without tetracycline induction. When induced with 2 mg/L tetracycline for 60 hours, the P37 protein expression reached maximum level. Cell growth was promoted after being transfected with p37. A stable cell line expressing P37 regularly was established, which provides a good cell model for studying p37 function and its molecular mechanism.

  8. Development of stable cell lines for production or regulated expression using matrix attachment regions.

    PubMed

    Zahn-Zabal, M; Kobr, M; Girod, P A; Imhof, M; Chatellard, P; de Jesus, M; Wurm, F; Mermod, N

    2001-04-27

    One of the major hurdles of isolating stable, inducible or constitutive high-level producer cell lines is the time-consuming selection procedure. Given the variation in the expression levels of the same construct in individual clones, hundreds of clones must be isolated and tested to identify one or more with the desired characteristics. Various boundary elements (BEs), matrix attachment regions, and locus control regions (LCRs) were screened for their ability to augment the expression of heterologous genes in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Of the chromatin elements assayed, the chicken lysozyme matrix-attachment region (MAR) was the only element to significantly increase stable reporter expression. We found that the use of the MAR increases the proportion of high-producing clones, thus reducing the number of clones that need to be screened. These benefits are observed both for constructs with MARs flanking the transgene expression cassette, as well as when constructs are co-transfected with the MAR on a separate plasmid. Moreover, the MAR was co-transfected with a multicomponent regulatable beta-galactosidase expression system in C2C12 cells and several clones exhibiting regulated expression were identified. Hence, MARs are useful in the development of stable cell lines for production or regulated expression.

  9. Assessment of a systematic expression profiling approach in ENU-induced mouse mutant lines.

    PubMed

    Seltmann, Matthias; Horsch, Marion; Drobyshev, Alexei; Chen, Yali; de Angelis, Martin Hrabé; Beckers, Johannes

    2005-01-01

    Comparative genomewide expression profiling is a powerful tool in the effort to annotate the mouse genome with biological function. The systematic analysis of RNA expression data of mouse lines from the Munich ENU mutagenesis screen might support the understanding of the molecular biology of such mutants and provide new insights into mammalian gene function. In a direct comparison of DNA microarray experiments of individual versus pooled RNA samples of organs from ENU-induced mouse mutants, we provide evidence that individual RNA samples may outperform pools in some aspects. Genes with high biological variability in their expression levels (noisy genes) are identified as false positives in pooled samples. Evidence suggests that highly stringent housing conditions and standardized procedures for the isolation of organs significantly reduce biological variability in gene expression profiling experiments. Data on wild-type individuals demonstrate the positive effect of controlling variables such as social status, food intake before organ sampling, and stress with regard to reproducibility of gene expression patterns. Analyses of several organs from various ENU-induced mutant lines in general show low numbers of differentially expressed genes. We demonstrate the feasibility to detect transcriptionally affected organs employing RNA expression profiling as a tool for molecular phenotyping.

  10. Genetic variation and expression diversity between grain and sweet sorghum lines

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Biological scientists have long sought after understanding how genes and their structural/functional changes contribute to morphological diversity. Though both grain (BT×623) and sweet (Keller) sorghum lines originated from the same species Sorghum bicolor L., they exhibit obvious phenotypic variations. However, the genome re-sequencing data revealed that they exhibited limited functional diversity in their encoding genes in a genome-wide level. The result raises the question how the obvious morphological variations between grain and sweet sorghum occurred in a relatively short evolutionary or domesticated period. Results We implemented an integrative approach by using computational and experimental analyses to provide a detail insight into phenotypic, genetic variation and expression diversity between BT×623 and Keller lines. We have investigated genome-wide expression divergence between BT×623 and Keller under normal and sucrose treatment. Through the data analysis, we detected more than 3,000 differentially expressed genes between these two varieties. Such expression divergence was partially contributed by differential cis-regulatory elements or DNA methylation, which was genetically determined by functionally divergent genes between these two varieties. Both tandem and segmental duplication played important roles in the genome evolution and expression divergence. Conclusion Substantial differences in gene expression patterns between these two varieties have been observed. Such an expression divergence is genetically determined by the divergence in genome level. PMID:23324212

  11. Significance of COX-2 expression in human renal cell carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qinzhong; Shinohara, Nobuo; Abe, Takashige; Watanabe, Takafumi; Nonomura, Katsuya; Koyanagi, Tomohiko

    2004-03-01

    Accumulating evidences indicate that cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 plays an important role in tumorigenesis in many human cancers. Yet the relationship between COX-2 and human renal cell carcinoma (RCC) remains unclear. The aim of our study was to evaluate COX-2 expression in human RCC cell lines and its role in tumorigenesis of human RCC. Among the human RCC cell lines (SMKT-R4, OS-RC-2, ACHN) and normal renal cell line RPTEC, COX-2 overexpression was found in OS-RC-2 cells both at mRNA and protein levels. COX-2 sense- and antisense-orientated vectors were constructed and transferred into RCC cells. Significant suppression of cellular proliferation was demonstrated in OS-RC-2 antisense transfectants, whereas promotion was found in SMKT-R4 sense transfectants by colony-forming assay despite the observation that COX-2 specific inhibitor NS398 exhibited similar IC50 among RCC cell lines by MTT assay. In comparison with parent cells and sense transfectants, significant suppression of COX-2 expression and PGE2 production and increase in butyrate-induced apoptosis were observed in OS-RC-2 antisense transfectants by Western blot, ELISA assay and FACS analysis, respectively. Furthermore, tumor growth and angiogenesis of OS-RC-2 antisense transfectants in nude mice was significantly suppressed and the survival time of these mice was significantly prolonged. Our study demonstrates that COX-2 is overexpressed in OS-RC-2 RCC cell line and plays an important role in tumorigenesis of the cells in vivo, which implies that COX-2 may be a therapeutic target for COX-2-expressing RCC, and that suppression of COX-2 expression by antisense-based strategy may have potential utility in treatment of COX-2-expressing RCC. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. 'Fluorescent Cell Chip' for immunotoxicity testing: Development of the c-fos expression reporter cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Trzaska, Dominika; Zembek, Patrycja; Olszewski, Maciej; Adamczewska, Violetta; Ulleras, Erik; Dastych, JarosIaw . E-mail: jdastych@cbm.pan.pl

    2005-09-01

    The Fluorescent Cell Chip for in vitro immunotoxicity testing employs cell lines derived from lymphocytes, mast cells, and monocytes-macrophages transfected with various EGFP cytokine reporter gene constructs. While cytokine expression is a valid endpoint for in vitro immunotoxicity screening, additional marker for the immediate-early response gene expression level could be of interest for further development and refinement of the Fluorescent Cell Chip. We have used BW.5147.3 murine thymoma transfected with c-fos reporter constructs to obtain reporter cell lines expressing ECFP under the control of murine c-fos promoter. These cells upon serum withdrawal and readdition and incubation with heavy metal compounds showed paralleled induction of c-Fos expression as evidenced by Real-Time PCR and ECFP fluorescence as evidenced by computer-supported fluorescence microscopy. In conclusion, we developed fluorescent reporter cell lines that could be employed in a simple and time-efficient screening assay for possible action of chemicals on c-Fos expression in lymphocytes. The evaluation of usefulness of these cells for the Fluorescent Cell Chip-based detection of immunotoxicity will require additional testing with a larger number of chemicals.

  13. Elevated expression of basic fibroblast growth factor in an immortalized rabbit smooth muscle cell line.

    PubMed

    Winkles, J A; Friesel, R; Alberts, G F; Janat, M F; Liau, G

    1993-08-01

    Intimal smooth muscle cell accumulation is regarded as an important component of atherosclerotic plaque formation, angioplasty-induced restenosis, and vascular graft occlusion. Vascular smooth muscle cells can both express and respond to acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF); therefore, under certain conditions these polypeptides may regulate smooth muscle cell growth in an autocrine manner. Previous studies using smooth muscle cells cultured in vitro have identified factors that can enhance aFGF and bFGF gene expression. In this study, we assayed fibroblast growth factor gene expression in a spontaneously immortalized rabbit smooth muscle cell line. In contrast to "normal" rabbit smooth muscle cells, these immortalized cells acquire an altered morphology and enhanced proliferative rate during; cell passaging in vitro. Both "normal" and immortalized rabbit smooth muscle cells express bFGF but not aFGF transcripts. RNA gel blot hybridization, reverse transcription/polymerase chain reaction amplification, and Western blotting techniques demonstrate that bFGF expression in the immortalized smooth muscle cell line increases as a function of passage level. This continuous cell line should prove valuable for studying both the regulation of bFGF synthesis and the control of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation.

  14. PKCeta expression contributes to the resistance of Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Abu-Ghanem, Sara; Oberkovitz, Galia; Benharroch, Daniel; Gopas, Jacob; Livneh, Etta

    2007-09-01

    The Hodgkin-Reed-Sternberg (HRS) malignant cells in Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) originate from germinal center B lymphocytes that did not undergo apoptosis. Protein Kinase C (PKC), a family of serine/threonine kinases, plays a crucial role in signal transduction modulating cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis. Here, we report the expression of PKC isoforms in two HL-derived cell lines, L428 and KMH2 and their correlation with drug resistance to CPT and doxorubicin. Among the PKC isoforms examined, only PKCeta and PKCbetaII were preferentially expressed in the drug resistant L428 cells. We have shown correlation between the response to apoptosis of L428 and KMH2 cells and PKCeta expression in these cell lines. In order to directly demonstrate a role for PKCeta in apoptosis, its expression was knocked-down by siRNA in the resistant L428 cells. Downregulation of PKCeta rendered L428 cells more sensitive to doxorubicin and CPT. Furthermore, PKCeta knocked-down cells showed increased PARP-1 cleavage, cytochrome c release and caspase 7 activation. It appears that PKCeta functions as an anti-apoptotic protein in HL-derived cell lines, and as we show here that it is also expressed in HRS of HL biopsies, it may have therapeutic relevance in HL. Thus, PKCeta could provide a new target aimed to reduce resistance to anti-cancer treatments of HL and other cancer patients.

  15. Prolonged gene expression and cell survival after infection by a herpes simplex virus mutant defective in the immediate-early genes encoding ICP4, ICP27, and ICP22.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, N; Watkins, S C; Schaffer, P A; DeLuca, N A

    1996-01-01

    Very early in infection, herpes simplex virus (HSV) expresses four immediate-early (IE) regulatory proteins, ICP4, ICP0, ICP22, and ICP27. The systematic inactivation of sets of the IE proteins in cis, and the subsequent phenotypic analysis of the resulting mutants, should provide insights into how these proteins function in the HSV life cycle and also into the specific macromolecular events that are altered or perturbed in cells infected with virus strains blocked very early in infection. This approach may also provide a rational basis to assess the efficacy and safety of HSV mutants for use in gene transfer experiments. In this study, we generated and examined the phenotype of an HSV mutant simultaneously mutated in the ICP4, ICP27, and ICP22 genes of HSV. Unlike mutants deficient in ICP4 (d120), ICP4 and ICP27 (d92), and ICP4 and ICP22 (d96), mutants defective in ICP4, ICP27, and ICP22 (d95) were visually much less toxic to Vero and human embryonic lung cells. Cells infected with d95 at a multiplicity of infection of 10 PFU per cell retained a relatively normal morphology and expressed genes from the viral and cellular genomes for at least 3 days postinfection. The other mutant backgrounds were too toxic to allow examination of gene expression past 1 day postinfection. However, when cell survival was measured by the capacity of the infected cells to form colonies, d95 inhibited colony formation similarly to d92. This apparent paradox was reconciled by the observation that host cell DNA synthesis was inhibited in cells infected with d120, d92, d96, and d95. In addition, all of the mutants exhibited pronounced and distinctive alterations in nuclear morphology, as determined by electron microscopy. The appearance of d95-infected cells deviated from that of uninfected cells in that large circular structures formed in the nucleus. d95-infected cells abundantly expressed ICP0, which accumulated in fine punctate structures in the nucleus at early times postinfection

  16. Increased IMP dehydrogenase gene expression in solid tumor tissues and tumor cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Collart, F.R.; Chubb, C.B.; Mirkin, B.L.; Huberman, E.

    1992-07-10

    IMP dehydrogenase, a regulatory enzyme of guanine nucleotide biosynthesis, may play a role in cell proliferation and malignancy. To assess this possibility, we examined IMP dehydrogenase expression in a series of human solid tumor tissues and tumor cell lines in comparison with their normal counterparts. Increased IMP dehydrogenase gene expression was observed in brain tumors relative to normal brain tissue and in sarcoma cells relative to normal fibroblasts. Similarly, in several B- and T-lymphoid leukemia cell lines, elevated levels of IMP dehydrogenase mRNA and cellular enzyme were observed in comparison with the levels in peripheral blood lymphocytes. These results are consistent with an association between increased IMP dehydrogenase expression and either enhanced cell proliferation or malignant transformation.

  17. [Effect of zedoary oil for cat D and cat K expression in A549 cell line].

    PubMed

    Yang, Changfu; Huang, Chunfang; Sun, Xiaofang; Niu, Jianzhao; Wang, Jifeng

    2012-03-01

    To explore the Zedoary oil on A549 cell line of collagen deposition cat D and cat K expression. The A549 cell line were treat by Zedoary oil on four different concentrations (0, 40, 80, 120 mg x L(-1)) in different time. Dynamic changes of collagen in A549 cell using Picric-sirius red method. Cat D and Cat K expression of level were detected by using western blot. The collagen content showed that Zedoary oil had an inhibitory effect on the deposition of A549 cells. The results of western blot showed that the expression of cat D and cat K were up-regulated significangly in A549 cells of Zedoary oil groups compared with that in controls. A549 cell of collagen deposition were reduced by Zedoary oil. The effects may due to the up-regulation of cat D and cat K.

  18. Analysis of CCL5 expression in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma L428 cell line.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fanrong; Zhang, Yan; Wu, Zi-Qing; Zhao, Tong

    2011-01-01

    CCL5 is one of the chemoattractant cytokines involved in inflammatory observed in both diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and classical Hodgkin's lymphoma (CHL). However, the pathological effects of CCL5 remain unclear. To gain a better understanding of the role of CCL5 in CHL and DLBCL, we examined the expression of CCL5 in the CHL cell line L428 and the DLBCL cell lines Ly1 and Ly8, as well as its chemotactic effect on CD4+ T cells. CCL5 mRNA expression was detected by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. Intracellular CCL5 protein expression was analyzed using confocal microscopy, and CCL5 protein secretion was detected by ELISA. The chemotactic function of CCL5 was assessed using a Transwell coculture system, and the number of migrated CD4+ T cells was counted. Moreover, the p-iкBα and p65 levels of NF-кB signaling molecules in these lymphoma cell lines were detected by Western blotting. The results showed that CCL5 mRNA and protein expression in the L428 cells was significantly higher than in Ly1 and Ly8 cells (p<0.05). L428 cells secreted more CCL5 than the Ly1 or Ly8 cells, and the secreted CCL5 was capable of inducing CD4+ T cell migration. The expression levels of the NF-кB transcription factors p65 and p-iкBα were examined in these lymphoma cells. L428, Ly1 and Ly8 cells expressed similar levels of p65, while p-iкBα expression was higher in the L428 cells than in the Ly1 or Ly8 cells, indicating that a high CCL5 expression may be related to the increased activity of the NF-кB signaling pathway in L428 cells.

  19. Differential Expression of OCT4 Pseudogenes in Pluripotent and Tumor Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Poursani, Ensieh M.; Mohammad Soltani, Bahram; Mowla, Seyed Javad

    2016-01-01

    Objective The human OCT4 gene, the most important pluripotency marker, can generate at least three different transcripts (OCT4A, OCT4B, and OCT4B1) by alternative splicing. OCT4A is the main isoform responsible for the stemness property of embryonic stem (ES) cells. There also exist eight processed OCT4 pseudogenes in the human genome with high homology to the OCT4A, some of which are transcribed in various cancers. Recent conflicting reports on OCT4 expression in tumor cells and tissues emphasize the need to discriminate the expression of OCT4A from other variants as well as OCT4 pseudogenes. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, DNA sequencing confirmed the authenticity of transcripts of OCT4 pseudogenes and their expression patterns were investigated in a panel of different human cell lines by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results Differential expression of OCT4 pseudogenes in various human cancer and pluripotent cell lines was observed. Moreover, the expression pattern of OCT4-pseudogene 3 (OCT4-pg3) followed that of OCT4A during neural differentiation of the pluripotent cell line of NTERA-2 (NT2). Although OCT4-pg3 was highly expressed in undifferentiated NT2 cells, its expression was rapidly down-regulated upon induction of neural differentiation. Analysis of protein expression of OCT4A, OCT4-pg1, OCT4-pg3, and OCT4-pg4 by Western blotting indicated that OCT4 pseudogenes cannot produce stable proteins. Consistent with a newly proposed competitive role of pseudogene microRNA docking sites, we detected miR-145 binding sites on all transcripts of OCT4 and OCT4 pseudogenes. Conclusion Our study suggests a potential coding-independent function for OCT4 pseudogenes during differentiation or tumorigenesis. PMID:27054116

  20. Nuclear hormone receptor expression in mouse kidney and renal cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Daisuke; Eguchi, Jun; Wada, Jun; Terami, Naoto; Hatanaka, Takashi; Tachibana, Hiromi; Nakatsuka, Atsuko; Horiguchi, Chikage Sato; Nishii, Naoko; Makino, Hirofumi

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) are transcription factors that regulate carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, immune responses, and inflammation. Although several NHRs, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) and PPARα, demonstrate a renoprotective effect in the context of diabetic nephropathy (DN), the expression and role of other NHRs in the kidney are still unrecognized. To investigate potential roles of NHRs in the biology of the kidney, we used quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction to profile the expression of all 49 members of the mouse NHR superfamily in mouse kidney tissue (C57BL/6 and db/m), and cell lines of mesangial (MES13), podocyte (MPC), proximal tubular epithelial (mProx24) and collecting duct (mIMCD3) origins in both normal and high-glucose conditions. In C57BL/6 mouse kidney cells, hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α, chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II (COUP-TFII) and COUP-TFIII were highly expressed. During hyperglycemia, the expression of the NHR 4A subgroup including neuron-derived clone 77 (Nur77), nuclear receptor-related factor 1, and neuron-derived orphan receptor 1 significantly increased in diabetic C57BL/6 and db/db mice. In renal cell lines, PPARδ was highly expressed in mesangial and proximal tubular epithelial cells, while COUP-TFs were highly expressed in podocytes, proximal tubular epithelial cells, and collecting duct cells. High-glucose conditions increased the expression of Nur77 in mesangial and collecting duct cells, and liver x receptor α in podocytes. These data demonstrate NHR expression in mouse kidney cells and cultured renal cell lines and suggest potential therapeutic targets in the kidney for the treatment of DN.

  1. Coordinated steroid hormone-dependent and independent expression of multiple kallikreins in breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Paliouras, Miltiadis; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2007-03-01

    The regulation of gene expression by steroid hormones plays an important role in the normal development and function of many organs, as well in the pathogenesis of endocrine-related cancers. Previous experiments have shown that many kallikrein genes are under steroid hormone regulation in breast cancer cell lines. We here examine the coordinated expression of multiple kallikrein genes in several breast cancer cell lines after steroid hormone stimulation. Breast cancer cell lines were treated with various steroid hormones and kallikrein (KLK/hK) expression of hK3 (prostate-specific antigen, PSA), hK5, hK6, hK7, hK8, hK10, hK11, hK13, and hK14 was analyzed at the RNA level via RT-PCR and at the protein level by immunofluorometric ELISA assays. We identified several distinct hK hormone-dependent and hormone-independent expression patterns. Hormone-specific modulation of expression was seen for several kallikreins in BT-474, MCF-7, and T-47D cell lines. hK6 was specifically up-regulated upon estradiol treatment in all three cell lines whereas PSA expression was induced by dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and norgestrel stimulation in BT-474 and T-47D. hK10, hK11, hK13, and hK14 were specifically up-regulated by DHT in T-47D and by estradiol in BT-474 cells. Bioinformatic analysis of upstream proximal promoter sequences for these hKs did not identify any recognizable hormone-response elements (HREs), suggesting that the coordinated activation of these four hKs represents a unique expression "cassette", utilizing a common hormone-dependent mechanism. We conclude that groups of human hKs are coordinately expressed in a steroid hormone-dependent manner. Our data supports clinical observations linking expression of multiple hKs with breast cancer prognosis.

  2. Mimicking herpes simplex virus 1 and herpes simplex virus 2 mucosal behavior in a well-characterized human genital organ culture.

    PubMed

    Steukers, Lennert; Weyers, Steven; Yang, Xiaoyun; Vandekerckhove, Annelies P; Glorieux, Sarah; Cornelissen, Maria; Van den Broeck, Wim; Temmerman, Marleen; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2014-07-15

    We developed and morphologically characterized a human genital mucosa explant model (endocervix and ectocervix/vagina) to mimic genital herpes infections caused by herpes simplex virus types 1 (HSV-1) and 2 (HSV-2). Subsequent analysis of HSV entry receptor expression throughout the menstrual cycle in genital tissues was performed, and the evolution of HSV-1/-2 mucosal spread over time was assessed. Nectin-1 and -2 were expressed in all tissues during the entire menstrual cycle. Herpesvirus entry mediator expression was limited mainly to some connective tissue cells. Both HSV-1 and HSV-2 exhibited a plaque-wise mucosal spread across the basement membrane and induced prominent epithelial syncytia.

  3. The expression of TIPE1 in murine tissues and human cell lines.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jian; Zhang, Guizhong; Hao, Chunyan; Wang, Yan; Lou, Yunwei; Zhang, Wenqian; Wang, Juan; Liu, Suxia

    2011-07-01

    Members of the tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced protein-8 (TNFAIP8 or TIPE) family play important roles in immune homeostasis and cancer. TIPE1 (TNFAIP8-like 1) is a new member of the TIPE family that may regulate cell death. However, due to the lack of a suitable antibody, the nature of cells and tissues that express TIPE1 protein has not been determined. In this study, we generated a highly specific antibody to TIPE1 and examined TIPE1 expression in various murine tissues and human cell lines by immunohistochemistry, reverse transcription real-time PCR, and Western blot. We found that TIPE1 protein was detected in a wide variety of tissues in C57BL/6 mice, such as neurons in brain, hepatocytes, germ cells of female and male reproductive organs, muscular tissues, and a variety of cells of the epithelial origin, particularly those with secretory functions. TIPE1 protein was not expressed in mature T or B lymphocytes, but detectable in human B lymphoblast cell line HMy2.CIR and murine T cell line EL4. Furthermore, high levels of TIPE1 mRNA were detected in most human carcinoma cell lines, especially in cells transformed with viral genomes. These results indicate that TIPE1 may perform functions in cell secretion and carcinogenesis, but not in immunity.

  4. Expression and initial promoter characterization of PCAN1 in retinal tissue and prostate cell lines.

    PubMed

    Cross, D; Reding, D J; Salzman, S A; Zhang, K Q; Catalona, W J; Burke, J; Burmester, J K

    2004-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed neoplasia in men and one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths in men over 60. In an effort to understand the molecular events leading to prostate cancer, we have identified PCAN1 (prostate cancer gene 1) (also known as GDEP), a gene that is highly expressed in prostate epithelial tissue and frequently mutated in prostate tumors. Here we demonstrate its expression in neural retina, and retinoblastoma cell culture but not retinal pigment epithelial cell culture. We further characterize PCAN1 expression in the prostate cell lines RWPE1, RWPE2, and LnCAP FGC. We demonstrate an increase in expression when the cells are grown in the presence of Matrigel, an artificial extracellular basement membrane. Expression was time dependent, with expression observed on d 6 and little or no expression on d 12. Testosterone was not found to increase PCAN1 expression in this culture system. In addition, normal prostate epithelial cells co-cultured with normal prostate stromal cells did not exhibit PCAN1 expression at any time. To definitively locate the transcription initiation sites, we performed restriction-ligase-mediated 5' RACE, to selectively amplify only mRNA with a 5' cap. An initial characterization of the sequence upstream of the initiation sites determined six possible binding sites for the prostate specific regulatory protein NKX3.1 and four potential binding sites for the PPAR/RXR heterodimer that is involved in the control of cell differentiation and apoptosis.

  5. Expressing genes do not forget their LINEs: transposable elements and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Kines, Kristine J.; Belancio, Victoria P.

    2012-01-01

    1. ABSTRACT Historically the accumulated mass of mammalian transposable elements (TEs), particularly those located within gene boundaries, was viewed as a genetic burden potentially detrimental to the genomic landscape. This notion has been strengthened by the discovery that transposable sequences can alter the architecture of the transcriptome, not only through insertion, but also long after the integration process is completed. Insertions previously considered harmless are now known to impact the expression of host genes via modification of the transcript quality or quantity, transcriptional interference, or by the control of pathways that affect the mRNA life-cycle. Conversely, several examples of the evolutionary advantageous impact of TEs on the host gene structure that diversified the cellular transcriptome are reported. TE-induced changes in gene expression can be tissue-or disease-specific, raising the possibility that the impact of TE sequences may vary during development, among normal cell types, and between normal and disease-affected tissues. The understanding of the rules and abundance of TE-interference with gene expression is in its infancy, and its contribution to human disease and/or evolution remains largely unexplored. PMID:22201807

  6. Expressing genes do not forget their LINEs: transposable elements and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kines, Kristine J; Belancio, Victoria P

    2012-01-01

    Historically the accumulated mass of mammalian transposable elements (TEs), particularly those located within gene boundaries, was viewed as a genetic burden potentially detrimental to the genomic landscape. This notion has been strengthened by the discovery that transposable sequences can alter the architecture of the transcriptome, not only through insertion, but also long after the integration process is completed. Insertions previously considered harmless are now known to impact the expression of host genes via modification of the transcript quality or quantity, transcriptional interference, or by the control of pathways that affect the mRNA life-cycle. Conversely, several examples of the evolutionary advantageous impact of TEs on the host gene structure that diversified the cellular transcriptome are reported. TE-induced changes in gene expression can be tissue- or disease-specific, raising the possibility that the impact of TE sequences may vary during development, among normal cell types, and between normal and disease-affected tissues. The understanding of the rules and abundance of TE-interference with gene expression is in its infancy, and its contribution to human disease and/or evolution remains largely unexplored.

  7. PTH-C1: a rat continuous cell line expressing the parathyroid phenotype.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Sergio; Ciuffi, Simone; Nardone, Valeria; Gomes, Ana Rita; Mavilia, Carmelo; Zonefrati, Roberto; Galli, Gianna; Luzi, Ettore; Tanini, Annalisa; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2014-09-01

    The lack of a continuous cell line of epithelial parathyroid cells able to produce parathyroid hormone (PTH) has hampered the studies on in vitro evaluation of the mechanisms involved in the control of parathyroid cell function and proliferation. The PT-r cell line was first established from rat parathyroid tissue in 1987, but these cells were known to express the parathyroid hormone-related peptide (Pthrp) gene, but not the Pth gene. In an attempt to subclone the PT-r cell line, a rat parathyroid cell strain was isolated and named PTH-C1. During 3 years, in culture, PTH-C1 cells maintained an epithelioid morphology, displaying a diploid chromosome number, a doubling time around 15 h during the exponential phase of growth, and parathyroid functional features. PTH-C1 cell line produces PTH and expresses the calcium sensing receptor (Casr) gene and other genes known to be involved in parathyroid function. Most importantly, the PTH-C1 cells also exhibit an in vitro secretory response to calcium. Altogether these findings indicate the uniqueness of the PTH-C1 cell line as an in vitro model for cellular and molecular studies on parathyroid physiopathology.

  8. Cell line specific modulation of connexin43 expression after exposure to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Banaz-Yaşar, Ferya; Tischka, Rabea; Iliakis, George; Winterhager, Elke; Gellhaus, Alexandra

    2005-01-01

    Gap junctional intercellular communication plays a significant role in mediating radiation-induced bystander effects. However, the level of Cx43 itself is influenced by ionizing radiation, which could modify the bystander effect. Here we have investigated several cell lines for the modulation of Cx43 expression 24 h after irradiation with 5 Gy X-rays. The mouse endothelial cell line bEnd3 revealed a significantly elevated level of Cx43 already 15 min after exposure to X-rays, whereas human hybrid endothelial cells (EA.hy926) exhibited a transient downregulation of Cx43 mRNA. No obvious changes in the communication properties of the different cell lines could be observed after irradiation. The communication-deficient malignant human trophoblast cell line Jeg3 stably transfected with Cx43 did not reveal any induction of endogenous nor alteration in the exogenous Cx43 transcript level upon exposure to 5 Gy. Taken together, our data show a cell line specific modulation of Cx43 expression after exposure to X-rays.

  9. HPV 5 and 8 E6 Expression Reduces ATM Protein Levels and Attenuates LINE-1 Retrotransposition

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Nicholas A.; Gasior, Stephen L.; Faber, Zachary J.; Howie, Heather L.; Deininger, Prescott L.; Galloway, Denise A.

    2013-01-01

    The expression of the E6 protein from certain members of the HPV genus β (β HPV 5 and 8 E6) can disrupt p53 signaling by diminishing the steady state levels of two p53 modifying enzymes, ATR and p300. Here, we show that β-HPV 5 and 8 E6 are also capable of reducing the steady state levels of another p53 modifying enzyme, ATM, and as a result restrict LINE-1 retrotransposition. Furthermore, we show that the reduction of both ATM and LINE-1 retrotransposition is dependent upon the ability of β-HPV 8 E6 to bind and degrade p300. We use inhibitors and dominant negative mutants to confirm that ATM is needed for efficient LINE-1 retrotransposition. Furthermore, neither sensitivity to LINE-1 expression nor LINE-1 induced DSB formation is altered in an ATM deficient background. Together, these data illustrate the broad impact some β-HPVs have on DNA damage signaling by promoting p300 degradation. PMID:23706308

  10. Exogenous ACE2 Expression Allows Refractory Cell Lines To Support Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Mossel, Eric C.; Huang, Cheng; Narayanan, Krishna; Makino, Shinji; Tesh, Robert B.; Peters, C. J.

    2005-01-01

    Of 30 cell lines and primary cells examined, productive severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (Urbani strain) (SARS-CoV) infection after low-multiplicity inoculation was detected in only six: three African green monkey kidney epithelial cell lines (Vero, Vero E6, and MA104), a human colon epithelial line (CaCo-2), a porcine kidney epithelial line [PK(15)], and mink lung epithelial cells (Mv 1 Lu). SARS-CoV produced a lytic infection in Vero, Vero E6, and MA104 cells, but there was no visible cytopathic effect in Caco-2, Mv 1 Lu, or PK(15) cells. Multistep growth kinetics were identical in Vero E6 and MA104 cells, with maximum titer reached 24 h postinoculation (hpi). Virus titer was maximal 96 hpi in CaCo-2 cells, and virus was continually produced from infected CaCo-2 cells for at least 6 weeks after infection. CaCo-2 was the only human cell type of 13 tested that supported efficient SARS-CoV replication. Expression of the SARS-CoV receptor, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), resulted in SARS-CoV replication in all refractory cell lines examined. Titers achieved were variable and dependent upon the method of ACE2 expression. PMID:15731278

  11. Increased Expression of Several Collagen Genes is Associated with Drug Resistance in Ovarian Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Januchowski, Radosław; Świerczewska, Monika; Sterzyńska, Karolina; Wojtowicz, Karolina; Nowicki, Michał; Zabel, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynaecological cancer. The main reason for the high mortality among ovarian cancer patients is the development of drug resistance. The expression of collagen genes by cancer cells can increase drug resistance by inhibiting the penetration of the drug into the cancer tissue as well as increase apoptosis resistance. In this study, we present data that shows differential expression levels of collagen genes and proteins in cisplatin- (CIS), paclitaxel- (PAC), doxorubicin- (DOX), topotecan- (TOP), vincristine- (VIN) and methotrexate- (MTX) resistant ovarian cancer cell lines. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions were performed to determine the mRNA levels. Protein expression was detected using Western blot and immunocytochemistry assays. In the drug resistant cell lines, we observed the upregulation of eight collagen genes at the mRNA level and based on these expression levels, we divided the collagen genes into the following three groups: 1. Genes with less than a 50-fold increase in expression: COL1A1, COL5A2, COL12A1 and COL17A1. 2. Genes with greater than a 50-fold increase in expression: COL1A2, COL15A1 and COL21A1. 3. Gene with a very high level of expression: COL3A1. Expression of collagen (COL) proteins from groups 2 and 3 were also confirmed using immunocytochemistry. Western blot analysis showed very high expression levels of COL3A1 protein, and immunocytochemistry analysis showed the presence of extracellular COL3A1 in the W1TR cell line. The cells mainly responsible for the extracellular COL3A1 production are aldehyde dehydrogenase-1A1 (ALDH1A1) positive cells. All correlations between the types of cytostatic drugs and the expression levels of different COL genes were studied, and our results suggest that the expression of fibrillar collagens may be involved in the TOP and PAC resistance of the ovarian cancer cells. The expression pattern of COL genes provide a preliminary view into the role of these proteins in

  12. Defective Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Expression in a Sarcomatoid Renal Cell Carcinoma Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, Michael K.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Cohen, Peter A.; Marincola, Francesco M.; Cheshire, L. Bryan; Linehan, W. Marston; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Alexander, Richard B.

    2008-01-01

    Summary We studied major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I expression in 12 tumor cell culture lines established from patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). In one of these cell culture lines, UOK 123, we found no surface expression of β2-microglobulin (β2m) and MHC class I by flow cytometry. Immunofluorescence staining using three different monoclonal antibodies to β2m revealed no detectable β2m in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), Golgi apparatus, cytoplasm, or on the cell surface. There was no evidence of folded class I molecules inside or on the surface of the cells; however, the ER stained intensively for unfolded class I molecules. Transient expression of β2m by UOK 123 after infection with a recombinant vaccinia virus containing the gene for β2m resulted in normal expression of both β2m and class I (HLA-A, B, C) determinants assessed by flow cytometry analysis. No expression of class I or β2m was seen with the recombinant vaccinia vector carrying a control gene. The inability of class I molecules to reach the cell surface is due to the requirement of β2m for proper folding and presentation of the class I MHC complex. The failure to assemble and express MHC class I complex on the cell surface renders these cells incapable of antigen presentation to cyto-toxic T cells and provides a mechanism for escape from immune recognition by the tumor. PMID:7582258

  13. High levels of protein expression using different mammalian CMV promoters in several cell lines.

    PubMed

    Xia, Wei; Bringmann, Peter; McClary, John; Jones, Patrick P; Manzana, Warren; Zhu, Ying; Wang, Soujuan; Liu, Yi; Harvey, Susan; Madlansacay, Mary Rose; McLean, Kirk; Rosser, Mary P; MacRobbie, Jean; Olsen, Catherine L; Cobb, Ronald R

    2006-01-01

    With the recent completion of the human genome sequencing project, scientists are faced with the daunting challenge of deciphering the function of these newly found genes quickly and efficiently. Equally as important is to produce milligram quantities of the therapeutically relevant gene products as quickly as possible. Mammalian expression systems provide many advantages to aid in this task. Mammalian cell lines have the capacity for proper post-translational modifications including proper protein folding and glycosylation. In response to the needs described above, we investigated the protein expression levels driven by the human CMV in the presence or absence of intron A, the mouse and rat CMV promoters with intron A, and the MPSV promoter in plasmid expression vectors. We evaluated the different promoters using an in-house plasmid vector backbone. The protein expression levels of four genes of interest driven by these promoters were evaluated in HEK293EBNA and CHO-K1 cells. Stable and transient transfected cells were utilized. In general, the full-length human CMV, in the presence of intron A, gave the highest levels of protein expression in transient transfections in both cell lines. However, the MPSV promoter resulted in the highest levels of stable protein expression in CHO-K1 cells. Using the CMV driven constitutive promoters in the presence of intron A, we have been able to generate >10 microg/ml of recombinant protein using transient transfections.

  14. Divergent expression and roles for caveolin-1 in mouse hepatocarcinoma cell lines with varying invasive ability

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Huimin; Jia Li; Wang Shujing; Wang Hongmei; Chu Haiying; Hu Yichuan; Cao Jun; Zhang Jianing . E-mail: jnzhang@dlmedu.edu.cn

    2006-06-23

    Caveolin-1 is the major component protein of caveolae and associated with a lot of cellular events such as endocytosis, cholesterol homeostasis, signal transduction, and tumorigenesis. The majority of results suggest that caveolin-1 might not only act as a tumor suppressor gene but also a promoting metastasis gene. In this study, the divergent expression and roles of caveolin-1 were investigated in mouse hepatocarcinoma cell lines Hca-F, Hca-P, and Hepa1-6, which have high, low, and no metastatic potential in the lymph nodes, as compared with normal mouse liver cell line IAR-20. The results showed that expression of caveolin-1 mRNA and protein along with the amount of caveolae number in Hca-F cells was higher than that in Hca-P cells, but was not detectable in Hepa1-6 cells. When caveolin-1 expression in Hca-F cells was down-regulated by RNAi approach, Hca-F cells proliferation rate in vitro declined and the expression of lymphangiogenic factor VEGFA in Hca-F decreased as well. Furthermore, in vivo implantation assay indicated that reduction of caveolin-1 expression in Hca-F prevented the lymphatic metastasis tumor burden of Hca-F cells in 615 mice. These results suggest that caveolin-1 facilities the lymphatic metastasis ability of mouse hepatocarcinoma cells via regulation tumor cell growth and VEGFA expression.

  15. Improved cell survival by the reduction of immediate-early gene expression in replication-defective mutants of herpes simplex virus type 1 but not by mutation of the virion host shutoff function.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, P A; Wang, M J; Friedmann, T

    1994-01-01

    Derivatives of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) have elicited considerable interest as gene transfer vectors because of their ability to infect a wide range of cell types efficiently, including fully differentiated neurons. However, it has been found that infection of many types of cell with vectors derived from replication-defective mutants of HSV-1 is associated with cytopathic effects (CPE). We have previously shown that viral gene expression played an important role in the induction of CPE caused by an HSV-1 mutant deleted for the essential immediate-early gene 3 (IE 3) (P.A. Johnson, A. Miyanohara, F. Levine, T. Cahill, and T. Friedmann, J. Virol. 66:2952-2965, 1992). We have investigated which viral genes might be responsible for CPE by comparing the ability of each of the individual genes expressed by an IE 3 deletion mutant during a nonproductive infection to inhibit biochemical transformation after cotransfection of BHK or CV-1 cells with a selectable marker gene. Transfection of IE genes 1,2, and 4 individually all caused a marked inhibition of colony formation, while transfection of IE 5 and the large subunit of ribonucleotide reductase had little effect. These results suggested that it would be necessary to mutate or reduce the expression of nearly all HSV-1 IE genes to reduce virus-induced CPE. Therefore, we have used VP16 mutants, which are unable to transinduce IE gene expression (C. I. Ace, T. A. McKee, J. M. Ryan, J. M. Cameron, and C. M. Preston, J. Virol. 63:2260-2269, 1989), to derive two replication-defective strains: 14H delta 3, which is deleted for both copies of IE 3, and in 1850 delta 42, which has a deletion in the essential early gene UL42. The IE 3-VP16 double mutant, 14H delta 3, is significantly less toxic than a single IE 3 deletion mutant over a range of multiplicities of infection, as measured in a cell-killing assay, and has an enhanced ability to persist in infected cells in a biologically retrievable form. In contrast, the UL

  16. Expression of extracellular calcium-sensing receptor in human osteoblastic MG-63 cell line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Chattopadhyay, N.; Kifor, O.; Ye, C.; Vassilev, P. M.; Sanders, J. L.; Brown, E. M.

    2001-01-01

    We have previously shown the expression of the extracellular calcium (Ca2+o)-sensing receptor (CaR) in osteoblast-like cell lines, and others have documented its expression in sections of murine, bovine, and rat bone. The existence of the CaR in osteoblasts remains controversial, however, since some studies have failed to document its expression in the same osteoblast-like cell lines. The goals of the present study were twofold. 1) We sought to determine whether the CaR is expressed in the human osteoblast-like cell line, MG-63, which has recently been reported by others not to express this receptor. 2) We investigated whether the CaR, if present in MG-63 cells, is functionally active, since most previous studies have not proven the role of the CaR in mediating known actions of Ca2+o on osteoblast-like cells. We used immunocytochemistry and Western blotting with the specific, affinity-purified anti-CaR antiserum 4637 as well as Northern blot analysis and RT-PCR using a riboprobe and PCR primers specific for the human CaR, respectively, to show readily detectable CaR protein and mRNA expression in MG-63 cells. Finally, we employed the patch-clamp technique to show that an elevation in Ca2+o as well as the specific, allosteric CaR activator NPS R-467 (0.5 microM), but not its less active stereoisomer NPS S-467 (0.5 microM), activate an outward K+ channel in MG-63 cells, strongly suggesting that the CaR in MG-63 cells is not only expressed but is functionally active.

  17. Expression of extracellular calcium-sensing receptor in human osteoblastic MG-63 cell line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Chattopadhyay, N.; Kifor, O.; Ye, C.; Vassilev, P. M.; Sanders, J. L.; Brown, E. M.

    2001-01-01

    We have previously shown the expression of the extracellular calcium (Ca2+o)-sensing receptor (CaR) in osteoblast-like cell lines, and others have documented its expression in sections of murine, bovine, and rat bone. The existence of the CaR in osteoblasts remains controversial, however, since some studies have failed to document its expression in the same osteoblast-like cell lines. The goals of the present study were twofold. 1) We sought to determine whether the CaR is expressed in the human osteoblast-like cell line, MG-63, which has recently been reported by others not to express this receptor. 2) We investigated whether the CaR, if present in MG-63 cells, is functionally active, since most previous studies have not proven the role of the CaR in mediating known actions of Ca2+o on osteoblast-like cells. We used immunocytochemistry and Western blotting with the specific, affinity-purified anti-CaR antiserum 4637 as well as Northern blot analysis and RT-PCR using a riboprobe and PCR primers specific for the human CaR, respectively, to show readily detectable CaR protein and mRNA expression in MG-63 cells. Finally, we employed the patch-clamp technique to show that an elevation in Ca2+o as well as the specific, allosteric CaR activator NPS R-467 (0.5 microM), but not its less active stereoisomer NPS S-467 (0.5 microM), activate an outward K+ channel in MG-63 cells, strongly suggesting that the CaR in MG-63 cells is not only expressed but is functionally active.

  18. Differential expression of the ufo/axl oncogene in human leukemia-lymphoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Challier, C; Uphoff, C C; Janssen, J W; Drexler, H G

    1996-05-01

    The ufo protein (also termed axl) is a member of a new family of receptor tyrosine kinases and is encoded by a transforming gene that was initially isolated from primary human myeloid leukemia cells by DNA-mediated transformation of NIH/3T3 cells. The ligand, Gas6, a protein S-related molecule lacking any known function yet, has recently been identified. We report the expression pattern of ufo mRNA in a panel of 76 human continuous leukemia-lymphoma cell lines. The gene was not expressed in cell lines derived from lymphoid malignancies (n=28), but transcription was seen in 3/11 myeloid, 0/6 monocytic, 9/13 erythroid and 11/18 megakaryocytic cell lines. Several cell lines were treated with phorbol ester leading to significant upregulation of the ufo message in constitutively positive cells. An apparent ufo mRNA overexpression was not found in any of the positive leukemia cell lines, but was identified in the drug-resistant subclones of the cervix carcinoma cell line HeLa. Southern blot analysis of restriction enzyme-digested genomic DNA did not provide evidence for gene amplification, but the HeLa subclones showed banding patterns suggestive of gene rearrangement. Two main ufo mRNA bands of 3.2 and 5.0 kb were identified; no differences in the half-lives (t1/2 = 2.5 h) of these two mRNA species could be identified. In summary, ufo, representing a novel type of receptor tyrosine kinase, is expressed solely in myeloid and erythro-megakaryocytic leukemias but not in lymphoid malignancies. These and previous data suggest an involvement of the ufo receptor tyrosine kinase in normal and malignant myelopoiesis; however, its exact role, if any, and mode of operation in leukemogenesis remains to be determined.

  19. Creation and characterization of an airway epithelial cell line for stable expression of CFTR variants

    PubMed Central

    Gottschalk, Laura B.; Vecchio-Pagan, Briana; Sharma, Neeraj; Han, Sangwoo T.; Franca, Arianna; Wohler, Elizabeth S.; Batista, Denise A.S.; Goff, Loyal A.; Cutting, Garry R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Analysis of the functional consequences and treatment response of rare CFTR variants is challenging due to the limited availability of primary airways cells. Methods A Flp recombination target (FRT) site for stable expression of CFTR was incorporated into an immortalized CF bronchial epithelial cell line (CFBE41o−). CFTR cDNA was integrated into the FRT site. Expression was evaluated by western blotting and confocal microscopy and function measured by short circuit current. RNA sequencing was used to compare the transcriptional profile of the resulting CF8Flp cell line to primary cells and tissues. Results Functional CFTR was expressed from integrated cDNA at the FRT site of the CF8Flp cell line at levels comparable to that seen in native airway cells. CF8Flp cells expressing WT-CFTR have a stable transcriptome comparable to that of primary cultured airway epithelial cells, including genes that play key roles in CFTR pathways. Conclusion CF8Flp cells provide a viable substitute for primary CF airway cells for the analysis of CFTR variants in a native context. PMID:26694805

  20. Deciphering causal and statistical relations of molecular aberrations and gene expressions in NCI-60 cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cancer cells harbor a large number of molecular alterations such as mutations, amplifications and deletions on DNA sequences and epigenetic changes on DNA methylations. These aberrations may dysregulate gene expressions, which in turn drive the malignancy of tumors. Deciphering the causal and statistical relations of molecular aberrations and gene expressions is critical for understanding the molecular mechanisms of clinical phenotypes. Results In this work, we proposed a computational method to reconstruct association modules containing driver aberrations, passenger mRNA or microRNA expressions, and putative regulators that mediate the effects from drivers to passengers. By applying the module-finding algorithm to the integrated datasets of NCI-60 cancer cell lines, we found that gene expressions were driven by diverse molecular aberrations including chromosomal segments' copy number variations, gene mutations and DNA methylations, microRNA expressions, and the expressions of transcription factors. In-silico validation indicated that passenger genes were enriched with the regulator binding motifs, functional categories or pathways where the drivers were involved, and co-citations with the driver/regulator genes. Moreover, 6 of 11 predicted MYB targets were down-regulated in an MYB-siRNA treated leukemia cell line. In addition, microRNA expressions were driven by distinct mechanisms from mRNA expressions. Conclusions The results provide rich mechanistic information regarding molecular aberrations and gene expressions in cancer genomes. This kind of integrative analysis will become an important tool for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer in the era of personalized medicine. PMID:22051105

  1. Rapid clearance of herpes simplex virus type 2 by CD8+ T cells requires high level expression of effector T cell functions

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Michelle H.; Bird, Melanie D.; Chu, Chin-Fun; Johnson, Alison J.; Friedrich, Brian M.; Allman, Windy R.; Milligan, Gregg N.

    2011-01-01

    CD8+ T cells are important for resolution of HSV-2 lesions from the female genital epithelium. It is uncertain whether optimal clearance of viruses such as HSV-2 that cause a limited, non-systemic infection solely requires expression of effector functions by infiltrating CD8+ T lymphocytes, or if the clearance rate is reflective of the expression level of critical effector functions. To address this, CD8+ T cells from normal OT-I mice or OT-I mice deficient in IFNγ (IFNγ−/−) or the IFNγ receptor (IFNγR−/−) were activated in vitro in the presence of IFNγ or IL-4 to generate a series of effector populations (Tc1 and Tc2-like respectively) that secreted different levels of IFNγ and expressed different levels of HSV-specific cytolytic function. Compared with Tc1 cells, Tc2-like cells produced the type 2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-5, exhibited decreased IFNγ secretion, diminished proliferation in vitro, and decreased antigen-specific cytolysis in vivo. Clearance of an ovalbumin-expressing HSV-2 strain (HSV-2 tk− OVA) by adoptively transferred Tc2-like cells was delayed relative to Tc1 cell recipients. Because donor Tc2-like cells proliferated in vivo and infiltrated the infected genital epithelium similar to Tc1 cells, the diminished virus clearance by Tc2-like effector cells correlated with reduced expression of critical effector functions. Together, these results suggest that high level expression of protective T cell functions by effector T cells is necessary for optimal clearance of HSV-2 from the genital epithelium. These results have important implications for vaccines designed to elicit CD8+ T cells against viruses such as HSV-2 that infect the genital tract. PMID:21444117

  2. Rapid clearance of herpes simplex virus type 2 by CD8+ T cells requires high level expression of effector T cell functions.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Michelle H; Bird, Melanie D; Chu, Chin-Fun; Johnson, Alison J; Friedrich, Brian M; Allman, Windy R; Milligan, Gregg N

    2011-04-01

    CD8(+) T cells are important for resolution of HSV-2 lesions from the female genital epithelium. It is uncertain whether optimal clearance of viruses such as HSV-2 that cause a limited, non-systemic infection solely requires expression of effector functions by infiltrating CD8(+) T lymphocytes, or if the clearance rate is reflective of the expression level of critical effector functions. To address this, CD8(+) T cells from normal OT-I mice or OT-I mice deficient in IFNγ (IFNγ(-/-)) or the IFNγ receptor (IFNγR(-/-)) were activated in vitro in the presence of IFNγ or IL-4 to generate a series of effector populations (Tc1 and Tc2-like respectively) that secreted different levels of IFNγ and expressed different levels of HSV-specific cytolytic function. Compared with Tc1 cells, Tc2-like cells produced the type 2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-5, exhibited decreased IFNγ secretion, diminished proliferation in vitro, and decreased antigen-specific cytolysis in vivo. Clearance of an ovalbumin-expressing HSV-2 strain (HSV-2 tk(-) OVA) by adoptively transferred Tc2-like cells was delayed relative to Tc1 cell recipients. Because donor Tc2-like cells proliferated in vivo and infiltrated the infected genital epithelium similar to Tc1 cells, the diminished virus clearance by Tc2-like effector cells correlated with reduced expression of critical effector functions. Together, these results suggest that high level expression of protective T cell functions by effector T cells is necessary for optimal clearance of HSV-2 from the genital epithelium. These results have important implications for vaccines designed to elicit CD8(+) T cells against viruses such as HSV-2 that infect the genital tract.

  3. Let's Hear It for Herps!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braus, Judy, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Ranger Rick's NatureScope is a creative education series dedicated to inspiring in children an understanding and appreciation of the natural world while developing the skills they will need to make responsible decisions about the environment. The topic of this issue is "Let's Hear It for the Herps!" Contents are organized into the…

  4. Let's Hear It for Herps!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braus, Judy, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Ranger Rick's NatureScope is a creative education series dedicated to inspiring in children an understanding and appreciation of the natural world while developing the skills they will need to make responsible decisions about the environment. The topic of this issue is "Let's Hear It for the Herps!" Contents are organized into the…

  5. Herpes: Removing Fact from Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glover, Elbert D.

    1984-01-01

    Factual information dealing with the virus herpes is provided in hopes of allaying the public fears that have recently appeared because of misinformation presented by the media. Symptoms, types, and new developments in treatment are explored. Recommendations for obtaining additional information are offered. (DF)

  6. Herpes: Removing Fact from Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glover, Elbert D.

    1984-01-01

    Factual information dealing with the virus herpes is provided in hopes of allaying the public fears that have recently appeared because of misinformation presented by the media. Symptoms, types, and new developments in treatment are explored. Recommendations for obtaining additional information are offered. (DF)

  7. Neurotoxic Methamphetamine Doses Increase LINE-1 Expression in the Neurogenic Zones of the Adult Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Moszczynska, Anna; Flack, Amanda; Qiu, Ping; Muotri, Alysson R.; Killinger, Bryan A.

    2015-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a widely abused psychostimulant with the potential to cause neurotoxicity in the striatum and hippocampus. Several epigenetic changes have been described after administration of METH; however, there are no data regarding the effects of METH on the activity of transposable elements in the adult brain. The present study demonstrates that systemic administration of neurotoxic METH doses increases the activity of Long INterspersed Element (LINE-1) in two neurogenic niches in the adult rat brain in a promoter hypomethylation-independent manner. Our study also demonstrates that neurotoxic METH triggers persistent decreases in LINE-1 expression and increases the LINE-1 levels within genomic DNA in the striatum and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, and that METH triggers LINE-1 retrotransposition in vitro. We also present indirect evidence for the involvement of glutamate (GLU) in LINE-1 activation. The results suggest that LINE-1 activation might occur in neurogenic areas in human METH users and might contribute to METH abuse-induced hippocampus-dependent memory deficits and impaired performance on several cognitive tasks mediated by the striatum. PMID:26463126

  8. Neurotoxic Methamphetamine Doses Increase LINE-1 Expression in the Neurogenic Zones of the Adult Rat Brain.

    PubMed

    Moszczynska, Anna; Flack, Amanda; Qiu, Ping; Muotri, Alysson R; Killinger, Bryan A

    2015-10-14

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a widely abused psychostimulant with the potential to cause neurotoxicity in the striatum and hippocampus. Several epigenetic changes have been described after administration of METH; however, there are no data regarding the effects of METH on the activity of transposable elements in the adult brain. The present study demonstrates that systemic administration of neurotoxic METH doses increases the activity of Long INterspersed Element (LINE-1) in two neurogenic niches in the adult rat brain in a promoter hypomethylation-independent manner. Our study also demonstrates that neurotoxic METH triggers persistent decreases in LINE-1 expression and increases the LINE-1 levels within genomic DNA in the striatum and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, and that METH triggers LINE-1 retrotransposition in vitro. We also present indirect evidence for the involvement of glutamate (GLU) in LINE-1 activation. The results suggest that LINE-1 activation might occur in neurogenic areas in human METH users and might contribute to METH abuse-induced hippocampus-dependent memory deficits and impaired performance on several cognitive tasks mediated by the striatum.

  9. Generation and gene expression profiling of 48 transcription-factor-inducible mouse embryonic stem cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Yamamizu, Kohei; Sharov, Alexei A.; Piao, Yulan; Amano, Misa; Yu, Hong; Nishiyama, Akira; Dudekula, Dawood B.; Schlessinger, David; Ko, Minoru S. H.

    2016-01-01

    Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can differentiate into a wide range – and possibly all cell types in vitro, and thus provide an ideal platform to study systematically the action of transcription factors (TFs) in cell differentiation. Previously, we have generated and analyzed 137 TF-inducible mouse ESC lines. As an extension of this “NIA Mouse ESC Bank,” we generated and characterized 48 additional mouse ESC lines, in which single TFs in each line could be induced in a doxycycline-controllable manner. Together, with the previous ESC lines, the bank now comprises 185 TF-manipulable ESC lines (>10% of all mouse TFs). Global gene expression (transcriptome) profiling revealed that the induction of individual TFs in mouse ESCs for 48 hours shifts their transcriptomes toward specific differentiation fates (e.g., neural lineages by Myt1 Isl1, and St18; mesodermal lineages by Pitx1, Pitx2, Barhl2, and Lmx1a; white blood cells by Myb, Etv2, and Tbx6, and ovary by Pitx1, Pitx2, and Dmrtc2). These data also provide and lists of inferred target genes of each TF and possible functions of these TFs. The results demonstrate the utility of mouse ESC lines and their transcriptome data for understanding the mechanism of cell differentiation and the function of TFs. PMID:27150017

  10. Improving expression of recombinant human IGF-1 using IGF-1R knockout CHO cell lines.

    PubMed

    Romand, Sandrine; Jostock, Thomas; Fornaro, Mara; Schmidt, Joerg; Ritter, Anett; Wilms, Burkhard; Laux, Holger

    2016-05-01

    Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells are widely used for the large-scale production of recombinant biopharmaceuticals. However, attempts to express IGF-1 (a mutated human Insulin-like growth factor 1 Ea peptide (hIGF-1Ea mut)) in CHO cells resulted in poor cell growth and low productivity (0.1-0.2 g/L). Human IGF-1 variants negatively impacted CHO cell growth via the IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R). Therefore knockout (KO) of the IGF-1R gene in two different CHO cell lines as well as knockdown (KD) of IGF-1R in one CHO cell line were performed. These cell line engineering approaches decreased significantly the hIGF-1 mediated cell growth inhibition and increased productivity of both KO CHO cell lines as well as of the KD CHO cell line. A productivity increase of 10-fold at pool level and sevenfold at clone level was achieved, resulting in a titer of 1.3 g/L. This data illustrate that cell line engineering approaches are powerful tools to improve the yields of recombinant proteins which are difficult to produce in CHO cells.

  11. Synthesis and In Vitro Evaluation of 5-[18F]Fluoroalkyl Pyrimidine Nucleosides for Molecular Imaging of Herpes Simplex Virus Type-1 Thymidine Kinase Reporter Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Chacko, Ann-Marie; Qu, Wenchao; Kung, Hank F.

    2014-01-01

    Two novel series of 5-fluoroalkyl-2′-deoxyuridines (FPrDU, FBuDU, FPeDU) and 2′-fluoro-2′-deoxy-5-fluoroalkylarabinouridines (FFPrAU, FFBuAU, FFPeAU), having three, four or five methylene units (propyl, butyl, or pentyl) at C-5, were prepared and tested as reporter probes for imaging HSV1-tk gene expression. The Negishi coupling methodology was employed to efficiently synthesize the radiolabeling precursors. All six 5-[18F]fluoroalkyl pyrimidines were prepared readily from 3-N-benzoyl-3′,5′-di-O-benzoyl-protected 5-O-mesylate precursors in 17–35% radiochemical yield (decay-corrected). In vitro studies highlighted that all six [18F]labeled nucleosides selectively accumulated in cells expressing the HSV1-TK protein, with negligible uptake in control cells. [18F]FPrDU, [18F]FBuDU, [18F]FPeDU, and [18F]FFBuAU had the best uptake profiles. Despite selective accumulation in HSV1-tk expressing cells, all 5-fluoroalkyl pyrimidine nucleosides had low to negligible cytotoxic activity (CC50>1000–209 μM). Ultimately, results demonstrated that 5-[18F]fluoropropyl, [18F]fluorobutyl, and [18F]fluoropentyl pyrimidine nucleosides have potential as in vivo HSV1-TK PET reporter probes over a dynamic range of reporter gene expression levels. PMID:18800764

  12. Lines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mires, Peter B.

    2006-01-01

    National Geography Standards for the middle school years generally stress the teaching of latitude and longitude. There are many creative ways to explain the great grid that encircles our planet, but the author has found that students in his college-level geography courses especially enjoy human-interest stories associated with lines of latitude…

  13. Lines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mires, Peter B.

    2006-01-01

    National Geography Standards for the middle school years generally stress the teaching of latitude and longitude. There are many creative ways to explain the great grid that encircles our planet, but the author has found that students in his college-level geography courses especially enjoy human-interest stories associated with lines of latitude…

  14. APP-dependent glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor gene expression drives neuromuscular junction formation.

    PubMed

    Stanga, Serena; Zanou, Nadège; Audouard, Emilie; Tasiaux, Bernadette; Contino, Sabrina; Vandermeulen, Gaëlle; René, Frédérique; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe; Clotman, Frédéric; Gailly, Philippe; Dewachter, Ilse; Octave, Jean-Noël; Kienlen-Campard, Pascal

    2016-05-01

    Besides its crucial role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, the knowledge of amyloid precursor protein (APP) physiologic functions remains surprisingly scarce. Here, we show that APP regulates the transcription of the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). APP-dependent regulation of GDNF expression affects muscle strength, muscular trophy, and both neuronal and muscular differentiation fundamental for neuromuscular junction (NMJ) maturation in vivo In a nerve-muscle coculture model set up to modelize NMJ formation in vitro, silencing of muscular APP induces a 30% decrease in secreted GDNF levels and a 40% decrease in the total number of NMJs together with a significant reduction in the density of acetylcholine vesicles at the presynaptic site and in neuronal maturation. These defects are rescued by GDNF expression in muscle cells in the conditions where muscular APP has been previously silenced. Expression of GDNF in muscles of amyloid precursor protein null mice corrected the aberrant synaptic morphology of NMJs. Our findings highlight for the first time that APP-dependent GDNF expression drives the process of NMJ formation, providing new insights into the link between APP gene regulatory network and physiologic functions.-Stanga, S., Zanou, N., Audouard, E., Tasiaux, B., Contino, S., Vandermeulen, G., René, F., Loeffler, J.-P., Clotman, F., Gailly, P., Dewachter, I., Octave, J.-N., Kienlen-Campard, P. APP-dependent glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor gene expression drives neuromuscular junction formation. © FASEB.

  15. Cell surface expression of hepatitis B surface and core antigens in transfected rat fibroblast cell lines.

    PubMed

    Gholson, C F; Siddiqui, A; Vierling, J M

    1990-04-01

    Hepatocellular necrosis during hepatitis B virus infection is hypothesized to result from host immune responses against either hepatitis B surface antigen or hepatitis B core antigen expressed on the surface membrane of infected hepatocytes. To study the capacity of hepatitis B deoxyribonucleic acid to induce membrane expression of either hepatitis B surface antigen or hepatitis B core antigen in vitro, we assessed transfected rat fibroblast cell lines by indirect immunofluorescence. Rat fibroblasts were transfected with plasmid vectors containing the natural promoters, native enhancer, and uninterrupted sequences of either the Pre S/S gene or core gene. Resulting cell lines produced hepatitis B surface antigen and hepatitis B core antigen/hepatitis B e antigen, respectively. Immunofluorescence microscopy or flow cytometry showed that hepatitis B surface antigen and hepatitis B core antigen were expressed in a granular pattern in the surface membrane of transfected cells. We conclude that surface membrane expression of both hepatitis B surface antigen and hepatitis B core antigen is an intrinsic consequence of expression of either the Pre S/S or core gene.

  16. Roles of histamine on the expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 in endometrioid adenocarcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Jiang, Yang; Ikeda, Jun-Ichiro; Tian, Tian; Sato, Atsushi; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Morii, Eiichi

    2014-10-01

    Cancer-initiating cells (CICs) are a limited number of cells that are essential for maintenance, recurrence, and metastasis of tumors. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) has been recognized as a marker of CICs. We previously reported that ALDH1-high cases of uterine endometrioid adenocarcinoma showed poor prognosis, and that ALDH1 high population was more tumorigenic, invasive, and resistant to apoptosis than ALDH1 low population. Histamine plays a critical role in cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Here, we examined the effect of histamine on ALDH1 expression in endometrioid adenocarcinoma cell line. The addition of histamine increased ALDH1 high population, which was consistent with the result that histamine enhanced the invasive ability and the resistance to anticancer drug. Among 4 types of histamine receptors, histamine H1 and H2 receptor (H1R and H2R) were expressed in endometrioid adenocarcinoma cell line. The addition of H1R agonist but not H2R agonist increased ALDH1. The antagonist H1R but not H2R inhibited the effect of histamine on ALDH1 expression. These results indicated that histamine increased the expression of ALDH1 via H1R but not H2R. These findings may provide the evidence for exploring a new strategy to suppress CICs by inhibiting ALDH1 expression with histamine.

  17. Hepatitis B virus down-regulates expressions of MHC class I molecules on hepatoplastoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongyan; Cheng, Min; Tian, Zhigang

    2006-10-01

    Chronic HBV infection is associated with a 100-fold high risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma. Tumor recognition is of the most importance during the immune surveillance process that prevents cancer development in humans. In the present study, the expressions of MHC class I molecules on hepatoplastoma cell line HepG2.2.15 were investigated to indicate the possible effects of HBV on the immune recognition during HBV-associated hepatocellular carcinoma. It was found that the expressions of MHC class I molecules HLA-ABC, HLA-E and MICA were much lower in HepG2.2.15 cells compared with HepG2 cells. The expressing HBV in human hepatoplastoma cell line significantly down-regulated the expressions of MHC class I molecules. Additionally, it was observed that in murine chronic HBsAg carriers the expression of classical MHC-I molecule on hepatocytes was down-regulated. These results demonstrated that HBV might affect the immune recognition during HBV-associated hepatocellular carcinoma such as the recognition of CD8+ T, NK-CTL and NK cells and prevent the immune surveillance against tumors. However, the effects of HBV down-regulation of MHC class I molecules on the target cells in vivo should be further studied.

  18. LOX-1 expression and oxidized LDL uptake and toxicity in the HN33 neuronal cell line.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiaoou; Xie, Lin; Greenberg, David A

    2014-09-19

    Cardiovascular risk factors appear to influence the risk and progression of neurodegenerative disease, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. We investigated the possible involvement of oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor (LOX-1) and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL) in neurodegeneration by studying the expression of LOX-1 and the effects of Ox-LDL in HN33 cells, a neuronal cell line of central nervous system origin. HN33 cells showed LOX-1 protein expression, hypoxic induction of LOX-1, Ox-LDL uptake and Ox-LDL toxicity. LOX-1/Ox-LDL signaling may contribute to the association between cardiovascular risk factors and neurodegenerative disease.

  19. Expression Status of UBE2Q2 in Colorectal Primary Tumors and Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Shafiee, Sayed Mohammad; Seghatoleslam, Atefeh; Nikseresht, Mohsen; Hosseini, Seyed Vahid; Alizadeh-Naeeni, Mahvash; Safaei, Akbar; Owji, Ali Akbar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in various malignancies, including colorectal cancer, is established. This pathway mediates the degradation of damaged proteins and regulates growth and stress response. The novel human gene, UBE2Q2, with a putative ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme activity, is reported to be overexpressed in some malignancies. We sought to investigate the expression levels of the UBE2Q2 gene in colorectal cell lines as well as in cancerous and normal tissues from patients with colorectal cancer. Methods: Levels of UBE2Q2 mRNA in cell lines were assessed by Real-Time PCR. Western blotting was employed to investigate the levels of the UBE2Q2 protein in 8 colorectal cell lines and 43 colorectal tumor samples. Results: Expression of UBE2Q2 was observed at the level of both mRNA and protein in colorectal cell lines, HT29/219, LS180, SW742, Caco2, HTC116, SW48, SW480, and SW1116. Increased levels of UBE2Q2 immunoreactivity was observed in the 65.11% (28 out of 43) of the colorectal carcinoma tissues when compared with their corresponding normal tissues. Difference between the mean intensities of UBE2Q2 bands from cancerous and normal tissues was statistically significant at P<0.001 (paired t test). Conclusion: We showed the expression pattern of the novel human gene, UBE2Q2, in 8 colorectal cell lines. Overexpression of UBE2Q2 in the majority of the colorectal carcinoma samples denotes that it may have implications for the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. PMID:24753643

  20. Successful Reconstruction of Tooth Germ with Cell Lines Requires Coordinated Gene Expressions from the Initiation Stage

    PubMed Central

    Komine, Akihiko; Tomooka, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Tooth morphogenesis is carried out by a series of reciprocal interactions between the epithelium and mesenchyme in embryonic germs. Previously clonal dental epithelial cell (epithelium of molar tooth germ (emtg)) lines were established from an embryonic germ. They were odontogenic when combined with a dental mesenchymal tissue, although the odontogenesis was quantitatively imperfect. To improve the microenvironment in the germs, freshly isolated dental epithelial cells were mixed with cells of lines, and germs were reconstructed in various combinations. The results demonstrated that successful tooth construction depends on the mixing ratio, the age of dental epithelial cells and the combination with cell lines. Analyses of gene expression in these germs suggest that some signal(s) from dental epithelial cells makes emtg cells competent to communicate with mesenchymal cells and the epithelial and mesenchymal compartments are able to progress odontogenesis from the initiation stage. PMID:24710535

  1. Cutting edge: recombinant Listeria monocytogenes expressing a single immune-dominant peptide confers protective immunity to herpes simplex virus-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Orr, Mark T; Orgun, Nural N; Wilson, Christopher B; Way, Sing Sing

    2007-04-15

    The vast majority of the world's population is infected with HSV. Although antiviral therapy can reduce the incidence of reactivation and asymptomatic viral shedding, and limit morbidity and mortality from active disease, it cannot cure infection. Therefore, the development of an effective vaccine is an important global health priority. In this study, we demonstrate that recombinant Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) expressing the H-2K(b) glycoprotein B (gB)(498-505) peptide from HSV-1 triggers a robust CD8 T cell response to this Ag resulting in protective immunity to HSV infection. Following challenge with HSV-1, immune-competent mice primed with recombinant Lm-expressing gB(498-505) Ag were protected from HSV-induced paralysis. Protection was associated with dramatic reductions in recoverable virus, and early expansion of HSV-1-specific CD8 T cells in the regional lymph nodes. Thus, recombinant Lm-expressing Ag from HSV represents a promising new class of vaccines against HSV infection.

  2. Production and characterization of a bicistronic Moloney-based retroviral vector expressing human interleukin 2 and herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase for gene therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Pizzato, M; Franchin, E; Calvi, P; Boschetto, R; Colombo, M; Ferrini, S; Palù, G

    1998-07-01

    Gene-based therapeutic strategies for cancer mainly include augmentation of immunotherapeutic and chemotherapeutic approaches. In this study we report the design and functional assay of a novel bicistronic Moloney-based retroviral vector expressing human interleukin-2 (IL-2) and herpesvirus thymidine kinase (tk) through a cap-dependent translation and an internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-regulated translation, respectively. This construct has the potential for allowing combination of cytokine and suicide gene therapy, especially in areas such as the brain, composed of post-mitotic cells refractory to transduction by type C retroviral vectors. Accordingly, human glioma cells were used as targets for gene transfer after selecting a packaging cell clone that produced a reasonable titer of recombinant virus and expressed high levels of IL-2 and tk transcripts. Although transduction efficiency was reduced in glioma cells as compared with murine NIH 3T3 cells, transgene expression was effectively achieved. Transduced glioma cells were sensitive to ganciclovir and secreted around 1000 U/ml IL-2 in the culture supernatants. Simultaneous production of IL-2 and tk in vivo by genetically treated tumor cells would hopefully potentiate the effect of gangiclovir-induced metabolic suicide, possibly by boosting the immune response associated with tumor debulking or by amplifying the bystander response.

  3. Gene expression profiling of hematologic malignant cell lines resistant to oncolytic virus treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nam Hee; Kim, Mikyung; Oh, Sung Yong; Kim, Seong-Geun; Kwon, Hyuk-Chan; Hwang, Tae-Ho

    2017-01-01

    Pexa-Vec (pexastimogene devacirpvec; JX-594) has emerged as an attractive tool in oncolytic virotherapy. Pexa-Vec demonstrates oncolytic and immunotherapeutic mechanisms of action. But the determinants of resistance to Pexa-Vec are mostly unknown. We treated hemoatologic malignant cells with Pexa-Vec and examined the gene-expression pattern of sensitive and resistant cells. Human myeloid malignant cell lines (RPMI-8226, IM-9, K562, THP-1) and lymphoid cancer cell lines (MOLT4, CCRF-CEM, Ramos, U937) were treated with Pexa-Vec. Pexa-Vec was cytotoxic on myeloid cell lines in a dose-dependent manner, and fluorescent imaging and qPCR revealed that Pexa-Vec expression was low in RAMOS than IM-9 after 24 hrs and 48 hrs of infection. Gene expression profiles between two groups were analyzed by microarray. Genes with at least 2-fold increase or decrease in their expression were identified. A total of 660 genes were up-regulated and 776 genes were down-regulated in lymphoid cancer cell lines. The up- and down-regulated genes were categorized into 319 functional gene clusters. We identified the top 10 up-regulated genes in lymphoid cells. Among them three human genes (LEF1, STAMBPL1, and SLFN11) strongly correlated with viral replication. Up-regulation of PVRIG, LPP, CECR1, Arhgef6, IRX3, IGFBP2, CD1d were related to resistant to Pexa-Vec. In conclusion, lymphoid malignant cells are resistant to Pexa-Vec and displayed up-regulated genes associated with resistance to oncolytic viral therapy. These data provide potential targets to overcome resistance, and suggest that molecular assays may be useful in selecting patients for further clinical trials with Pexa-Vec. PMID:27901484

  4. The hESC line Envy expresses high levels of GFP in all differentiated progeny.

    PubMed

    Costa, Magdaline; Dottori, Mirella; Ng, Elizabeth; Hawes, Susan M; Sourris, Koula; Jamshidi, Pegah; Pera, Martin F; Elefanty, Andrew G; Stanley, Edouard G

    2005-04-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have been advanced as a potential source of cells for use in cell replacement therapies. The ability to identify hESCs and their differentiated progeny readily in transplantation experiments will facilitate the analysis of hESC potential and function in vivo. We have generated a hESC line designated 'Envy', in which robust levels of green fluorescent protein (GFP) are expressed in stem cells and all differentiated progeny.

  5. Effect of Thymoquinone on P53 Gene Expression and Consequence Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Dastjerdi, Mehdi Nikbakht; Mehdiabady, Ebrahim Momeni; Iranpour, Farhad Golshan; Bahramian, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nigella sativa has been a nutritional flavoring factor and natural treatment for many ailments for so many years in medical science. Earlier studies have been reported that thymoquinone (TQ), an active compound of its seed, contains anticancer properties. Previous studies have shown that TQ induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells but it is unclear the role of P53 in the apoptotic pathway. Hereby, this study reports the potency of TQ on expression of tumor suppressor gene P53 and apoptosis induction in breast cancer cell line Michigan Cancer Foundation-7 (MCF-7). Methods: MCF-7 cell line was cultured and treated with TQ, and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was carried out for evaluating the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values after 24 h of treatment. The percentage of apoptotic cells was measured by flow cytometry. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed to estimate the messenger RNA expression of P53 in MCF-7 cell line at different times. Results: The IC50 value for the TQ in MCF-7 cells was 25 μM that determined using MTT assay. The flow cytometry and real-time PCR results showed that TQ could induce apoptosis in MCF-7 cells, and the P53 gene expression was dramatically up-regulated by ascending time, respectively. Hence, there was significant difference in 48 and 72 h. Conclusions: Our results demonstrated that TQ could induce apoptosis in MCF-7 cells through up-regulation of P53 expression in breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) by time-dependent manner. PMID:27141285

  6. Differential gene expression in human hepatocyte cell lines exposed to the antiretroviral agent zidovudine.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jia-Long; Han, Tao; Wu, Qiangen; Beland, Frederick A; Chang, Ching-Wei; Guo, Lei; Fuscoe, James C

    2014-03-01

    Zidovudine (3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine; AZT) is the most widely used nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor for the treatment of AIDS patients and prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1. Previously, we demonstrated that AZT had significantly greater growth inhibitory effects upon the human liver carcinoma cell line HepG2 as compared to the immortalized human liver cell line THLE2. We have now used gene expression profiling to determine the molecular pathways associated with toxicity in both cell lines. HepG2 cells were incubated with 0, 2, 20, or 100 μM AZT for 2 weeks; THLE2 cells were treated with 0, 50, 500, or 2,500 μM AZT, concentrations that were equi-toxic to those used in the HepG2 cells. After the treatment, total RNA was isolated and subjected to microarray analysis. Global analysis of gene expression, with a false discovery rate ≤0.01 and a fold change ≥1.5, indicated that 6- to 70-fold more genes were differentially expressed in a significant concentration-dependent manner in HepG2 cells when compared to THLE2 cells. Comparative analysis indicated that 7 % of these genes were common to both cell lines. Among the common differentially expressed genes, 70 % changed in the same direction, most of which were associated with cell death and survival, cell cycle, cell growth and proliferation, and DNA replication, recombination, and repair. As determined by the uptake of [methyl-(3)H]AZT, the intracellular levels of total AZT were approximately twofold higher in THLE2 cells than in HepG2 cells. The expression of thymidine kinase 1 (TK1) and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 2B7 (UGT2B7) genes that regulate the metabolic activation and deactivation of AZT, respectively, was increased in HepG2 cells but decreased in THLE2 cells after treatment with AZT. This differential response in AZT metabolism was confirmed by real-time PCR, western blotting, and/or enzymatic assays. These data indicate that molecular pathways involved with cell death and

  7. Identification of circadian-related gene expression profiles in entrained breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Monreal, Miguel A; Treviño, Victor; Moreno-Cuevas, Jorge E; Scott, Sean-Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells have broken circadian clocks when compared to their normal tissue counterparts. Moreover, it has been shown in breast cancer that disruption of common circadian oscillations is associated with a more negative prognosis. Numerous studies, focused on canonical circadian genes in breast cancer cell lines, have suggested that there are no mRNA circadian-like oscillations. Nevertheless, cancer cell lines have not been extensively characterized and it is unknown to what extent the circadian oscillations are disrupted. We have chosen representative non-cancerous and cancerous breast cell lines (MCF-10A, MCF-7, ZR-75-30, MDA-MB-231 and HCC-1954) in order to determine the degree to which the circadian clock is damaged. We used serum shock to synchronize the circadian clocks in culture. Our aim was to initially observe the time course of gene expression using cDNA microarrays in the non-cancerous MCF-10A and the cancerous MCF-7 cells for screening and then to characterize specific genes in other cell lines. We used a cosine function to select highly correlated profiles. Some of the identified genes were validated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and further evaluated in the other breast cancer cell lines. Interestingly, we observed that breast cancer and non-cancerous cultured cells are able to generate specific circadian expression profiles in response to the serum shock. The rhythmic genes, suggested via microarray and measured in each particular subtype, suggest that each breast cancer cell type responds differently to the circadian synchronization. Future results could identify circadian-like genes that are altered in breast cancer and non-cancerous cells, which can be used to propose novel treatments. Breast cell lines are potential models for in vitro studies of circadian clocks and clock-controlled pathways.

  8. [Application of the human hepatoblastoma cell lines inducibly expressing peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs)].

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Keisuke

    2007-08-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors and commonly play an important role in the regulation of lipid homeostasis. Although three PPAR subtypes, alpha, delta and gamma show a relatively close amino acid sequence homology, the functions of each PPAR are distinct. For example, PPARalpha and PPARdelta induce lipid oxidation, while PPARgamma activates lipid storage and adipogenesis. To analyze the detail functions of human PPARs, we previously established tetracycline-regulated human hepatoblastoma cell lines that can be induced to express each human PPAR subtype. The expression of each PPAR subtype in established cell line was tightly controlled by the concentration of doxycycline. DNA microarray analyses using these cell lines were performed with or without adding ligand and provided the important information on the PPAR target genes. Furthermore, we analyzed the 5'-flanking region of the human adipose differentiation-related protein (adrp) gene that responded to all subtypes of PPARs, and determined the functional PPRE of the human adrp gene. Here we discuss the usefulness of these cell lines.

  9. Resistance of cell lines to prion toxicity aided by phospho-ERK expression.

    PubMed

    Uppington, Kay M; Brown, David R

    2008-05-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders. They are characterised by neuronal loss and the accumulation of an abnormal protein in the CNS. Cell lines exist that express the toxic form of the prion protein (PrP) with little evidence of cell death. Other cell based models studying the mechanism by which cell death occurs employ exogenous application of peptides or fragments of PrP. In this study, we demonstrated that full-length recombinant PrP binding manganese was toxic to PrP-expressing cell lines and primary neuronal cultures but not to PrP-knockout neurones. This toxic form of PrP was also toxic to cell lines equivalently regardless of whether they were infected with scrapie or not. Both scrapie-infected cells and cells resistant to the toxicity of PrP showed increased levels of phosphorylated ERK protein. Scrapie-infected cells also showed elevated levels of caspase 12. Inhibition of phospho-ERK resulted in increased cell death suggesting the increased levels of phospho-ERK served a protective effect. These results suggest that scrapie-infected cell lines resist the toxicity of the prions they generate because they produce only low levels of abnormal protein and have increased resistance to apoptotic signs because of heightened activity of the MAP kinase pathway.

  10. Murine bone cell lines as models for spaceflight induced effects on differentiation and gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, P.; Hellweg, C. E.; Baumstark-Khan, C.; Reitz, G.

    Critical health factors for space crews especially on long-term missions are radiation exposure and the absence of gravity DNA double strand breaks DSB are presumed to be the most deleterious DNA lesions after radiation as they disrupt both DNA strands in close proximity Besides radiation risk the absence of gravity influences the complex skeletal apparatus concerning muscle and especially bone remodelling which results from mechanical forces exerting on the body Bone is a dynamic tissue which is life-long remodelled by cells from the osteoblast and osteoclast lineage Any imbalance of this system leads to pathological conditions such as osteoporosis or osteopetrosis Osteoblastic cells play a crucial role in bone matrix synthesis and differentiate either into bone-lining cells or into osteocytes Premature terminal differentiation has been reported to be induced by a number of DNA damaging or cell stress inducing agents including ionising and ultraviolet radiation as well as treatment with mitomycin C In the present study we compare the effects of sequential differentiation by adding osteoinductive substances ss -glycerophosphate and ascorbic acid Radiation-induced premature differentiation was investigated regarding the biosynthesis of specific osteogenic marker molecules and the differentiation dependent expression of marker genes The bone cell model established in our laboratory consists of the osteocyte cell line MLO-Y4 the osteoblast cell line OCT-1 and the subclones 4 and 24 of the osteoblast cell line MC3T3-E1 expressing several

  11. LINE1 family member is negative regulator of HLA-G expression

    PubMed Central

    Ikeno, Masashi; Suzuki, Nobutaka; Kamiya, Megumi; Takahashi, Yuji; Kudoh, Jun; Okazaki, Tsuneko

    2012-01-01

    Class Ia molecules of human leucocyte antigen (HLA-A, -B and -C) are widely expressed and play a central role in the immune system by presenting peptides derived from the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. In contrast, class Ib molecules such as HLA-G serve novel functions. The distribution of HLA-G is mostly limited to foetal trophoblastic tissues and some tumour tissues. The mechanism required for the tissue-specific regulation of the HLA-G gene has not been well understood. Here, we investigated the genomic regulation of HLA-G by manipulating one copy of a genomic DNA fragment on a human artificial chromosome. We identified a potential negative regulator of gene expression in a sequence upstream of HLA-G that overlapped with the long interspersed element (LINE1); silencing of HLA-G involved a DNA secondary structure generated in LINE1. The presence of a LINE1 gene silencer may explain the limited expression of HLA-G compared with other class I genes. PMID:23002136

  12. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate induces apoptosis in gastric cancer cell lines by down-regulating survivin expression.

    PubMed

    Onoda, Chihiro; Kuribayashi, Kageaki; Nirasawa, Shinya; Tsuji, Naoki; Tanaka, Maki; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Watanabe, Naoki

    2011-05-01

    The polyphenol (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is a green tea constituent, which has been shown to inhibit cancer cell growth in vitro, in vivo and in epidemiological studies. In this study, we investigated its effects in gastric cancer cell lines. Five gastric cancer cell lines, the MKN-1, MKN-28, MKN-45, NUGC-3 and TMK-1, were found to be sensitive to EGCG treatment. Of all the cell lines tested, NUGC-3 was the most sensitive. EGCG treatment of NUGC-3 cells induced apoptosis, which was confirmed by sub-G1 analysis, caspase-Glo assay and Western blotting against cleaved PARP and cleaved caspase-3. EGCG treatment lowered survivin and increased Bax and TRAIL expression. Furthermore, EGCG induced p73 activation in NUGC-3 cells. Small interfering RNA against p73 diminished EGCG effects on survivin expression and cell viability. These results show that EGCG induces cell death in gastric cancer cells by apoptosis via inhibition of survivin expression downstream of p73. This study provides a novel mechanism whereby EGCG potentially inhibits cancer cell growth, concluding that EGCG may be a potential candidate in anti-survivin cancer therapy.

  13. Concurrent expression of heme oxygenase-1 and p53 in human retinal pigment epithelial cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang Yull; Jo, Hong Jae; Kim, Kang Mi; Song, Ju Dong; Chung, Hun Taeg; Park, Young Chul

    2008-01-25

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a stress-responsive protein that is known to regulate cellular functions such as cell proliferation, inflammation, and apoptosis. Here, we investigated the effects of HO activity on the expression of p53 in the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell line ARPE-19. Cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) induced the expression of both HO-1 and p53 without significant toxicity to the cells. In addition, the blockage of HO activity with the iron chelator DFO or with HO-1 siRNA inhibited the CoPP-induced expression of p53. Similarly, zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP), an inhibitor of HO, suppressed p53 expression in ARPE-19 cells, although ZnPP increased the level of HO-1 protein while inhibiting HO activity. Also, CoPP-induced p53 expression was not affected by the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Based on these results, we conclude that HO activity is involved in the regulation of p53 expression in a ROS-independent mechanism, and also suggest that the expression of p53 in ARPE-19 cells is associated with heme metabolites such as biliverdin/bilirubin, carbon monoxide, and iron produced by the activity of HO.

  14. Profiling of differential expression of messenger RNA in normal, benign, and metastatic prostate cell lines.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Ratna; Robles, Liza D; Gibson, Jane; Muroski, Megan

    2002-12-01

    To understand the phenotypic changes associated with prostate cancer development and metastasis, we investigated differential gene expression in primary and established prostate cell lines used as models. We have used a differential display of messenger RNA (DDRT-PCR) technique using 168 primer combinations and total RNA from BPH-1, LNCaP, and PC3 cells to identify filter-based cDNA microarrays containing 18,376 nonredundant clones of genes and expressed sequence tags (EST) using mRNA from PrEC and MDAPCa2a cells to identify genes that are differentially expressed in normal, benign, and cancerous prostate cell lines. Twenty-five cDNA with a significant difference in expression of 76 candidate cDNA, as identified by DDRT-PCR and confirmed by slot-blot analysis, were selected for sequence analysis. Of these, 14 cDNA were further confirmed by Northern blot analysis. Analysis of the cDNA microarray data showed that a variety of genes/EST were up- or down-regulated in the metastatic prostate tumor cells and a majority of these genes encode cytoskeletal proteins and proteins with regulatory function. Expression profile of two EST was confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. We also have identified a number of genes exhibiting differential expression in prostate cancer cells, which were not known earlier to be involved in prostate cancer. This report provides a comparative analysis of differential gene expression between normal prostatic epithelial cells and prostate cancer cells, and a foundation to facilitate in-depth studies on the mechanism of prostate cancer development and metastasis.

  15. Experimental investigation of herpes simplex virus latency.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, E K; Bloom, D C

    1997-01-01

    The clinical manifestations of herpes simplex virus infection generally involve a mild and localized primary infection followed by asymptomatic (latent) infection interrupted sporadically by periods of recrudescence (reactivation) where virus replication and associated cytopathologic findings are manifest at the site of initial infection. During the latent phase of infection, viral genomes, but not infectious virus itself, can be detected in sensory and autonomic neurons. The process of latent infection and reactivation has been subject to continuing investigation in animal models and, more recently, in cultured cells. The initiation and maintenance of latent infection in neurons are apparently passive phenomena in that no virus gene products need be expressed or are required. Despite this, a single latency-associated transcript (LAT) encoded by DNA encompassing about 6% of the viral genome is expressed during latent infection in a minority of neurons containing viral DNA. This transcript is spliced, and the intron derived from this splicing is stably maintained in the nucleus of neurons expressing it. Reactivation, which can be induced by stress and assayed in several animal models, is facilitated by the expression of LAT. Although the mechanism of action of LAT-mediated facilitation of reactivation is not clear, all available evidence argues against its involving the expression of a protein. Rather, the most consistent models of action involve LAT expression playing a cis-acting role in a very early stage of the reactivation process. PMID:9227860

  16. Characterization of a new human melanoma cell line with CD133 expression.

    PubMed

    Gil-Benso, Rosario; Monteagudo, Carlos; Cerdá-Nicolás, Miguel; Callaghan, Robert C; Pinto, Sandra; Martínez-Romero, Alicia; Pellín-Carcelén, Ana; San-Miguel, Teresa; Cigudosa, Juan C; López-Ginés, Concha

    2012-06-01

    A novel human malignant melanoma cell line, designated MEL-RC08, was established from a pericranial metastasis of a malignant melanoma of the skin. The cell line has been subcultured for more than 150 passages and is tumorigenic in nude mice. Growth kinetics, cytogenetics, flow cytometry, and molecular techniques for analysis of the genes implicated in cell cycle control; mutations in BRAF, NRAS, C-KiT, RB, and TP53 genes; and amplification of MDM2, CDK4, and cyclin D1 have been studied. Cytogenetically, the tumor and the cell line showed a hypertriploid karyotype with many clonal numeric and structural abnormalities. DNA flow cytometry showed an aneuploid peak with a DNA index value of 1.5. Mutations in TP53 and BRAF genes were demonstrated in both tumor and cell line. Furthermore, stem cell marker CD133 expression was detected in most cells, together with other stem cell markers, suggesting the presence of cells with tumor-initiating potential in this cell line.

  17. Functional expression of the serotonin 5-HT7 receptor in human glioblastoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Mahé, Cécile; Bernhard, Michel; Bobirnac, Ionel; Keser, Corinna; Loetscher, Erika; Feuerbach, Dominik; Dev, Kumlesh K; Schoeffter, Philippe

    2004-01-01

    Serotonin 5-HT7 receptors are present in astrocytes. Understanding their role in this type of cell would greatly benefit from the identification of astroglial cell lines expressing this receptor type. The aim of the present study was to assess the expression of native 5-HT7 receptors and 5-HT7 receptor mRNA in a number of human glioblastoma cell lines, by means of cAMP measurements, Western blot analysis and reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT–PCR) analysis. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT), 5-methoxytryptamine (5-MeOT) and 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) induced concentration-dependent stimulations of cAMP accumulation in the human glioblastoma cell lines, U-373 MG, U-138 MG, U-87 MG, DBTRG-05MG, T98G, H4, CCF-STTG1 and Hs 683. The rank order of potency was 5-CT>5-HT=5-MeOT≫8-OH-DPAT. The effect of 5-CT was inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by the selective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist SB-269970 in all human glioblastoma cells. Schild analyses yielded slope factors close to unity (0.89–1.13) and pA2 values of 8.69–9.05. Western blot analysis revealed the presence of immunoreactive bands corresponding to the human 5-HT7 receptor in extracts of all human glioblastoma cell lines. The presence of the three splice variants of the 5-HT7 receptor (5-HT7(a/b/d)) was visualized by RT–PCR analysis with specific primers in all human glioblastoma cell lines. In conclusion, human glioblastoma cell lines express functional 5-HT7 receptors and the three splice variants of the corresponding mRNA. These cell lines could serve as model systems of native 5-HT7 receptors in glial cells to investigate their putative role in processes like release of neurotrophic factors or inflammatory cytokines. PMID:15339860

  18. [Expression of the apomictic potential and selection for apomixis in sorghum line AS-1a].

    PubMed

    El'konin, L A; Beliaeva, E V; Fadeeva, I Iu

    2012-01-01

    Expression of elements of apomixis was studied for ten seasons in sorghum line AS-la and its backcross hybrids on the 9E and A3 sterile cytoplasms. Cytoembryological analysis revealed aposporous embryo sacks (apo-ESs), their initial cells, and, rare, parthenogeneic proembryos in ovules of line AS-la and its BC2 and BC3 hybrids on the 9E cytoplasm. The A3 sterile cytoplasm suppressed the development of parthenogenetic proembryos, but did not affect the apo-ES formation. The frequency of apomictic elements increased in seasons with high daily temperatures and total precipitation deficiency in the period when the ovule and megagametophyte developed (r = -0.805, P < 0.01). Selection was used to isolate the families where the frequency of ovules with apo-ESs was 28% and the frequency of parthenogenetic proembryos was 14%. Emasculated panicles of line AS-la were pollinated with pollen of line Volzhskoe-4v, which carried the Rs marker dominant gene, responsible for the anthocyan color of coleoptyles and leaves in seedlings. Plants of the maternal type were found in the progenies of these crosses at a frequency of 1.4-28.1%. The genetic structure of the endosperm in grains with maternal-type seedlings was inferred from the electrophoretic patterns of storage proteins (kafirins). The kafirin spectra of grains producing maternal-type seedlings was similar to the spectrum of line AS-la and differed from the spectra of grains producing hybrid seedlings, indicating that the endosperm developed independently when apomictic grains formed in line AS-1a. The results showed that lines with facultative apomixis can be constructed in functionally diploid plants.

  19. Misdirection of endosomal trafficking mediated by herpes simplex virus-encoded glycoprotein B.

    PubMed

    Niazy, Naima; Temme, Sebastian; Bocuk, Derya; Giesen, Carmen; König, Angelika; Temme, Nadine; Ziegfeld, Angelique; Gregers, Tone F; Bakke, Oddmund; Lang, Thorsten; Eis-Hübinger, Anna M; Koch, Norbert

    2017-04-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV)-encoded glycoprotein B (gB) is the most abundant protein in the viral envelope and promotes fusion of the virus with the cellular membrane. In the present study, we found that gB impacts on the major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-II pathway of antigen presentation by fostering homotypic fusion of early endosomes and trapping MHC-II molecules in these altered endosomes. By using an overexpression approach, we demonstrated that transient expression of gB induces giant vesicles of early endosomal origin, which contained Rab5, early endosomal antigen 1 (EEA1), and large amounts of MHC-II molecules [human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR, and HLA-DM], but no CD63. In HSV-1-infected and stably transfected cell lines that expressed lower amounts of gB, giant endosomes were not observed, but strongly increased amounts of HLA-DR and HLA-DM were found in EEA1(+) early endosomes. We used these giant vesicles as a model system and revealed that gB interacts with Rab5 and EEA1, and that gB-induced homotypic fusion of early endosomes to giant endosomes requires phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate, the activity of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors, and the cytosolic gB sequence (889)YTQVPN(894) We conclude that gB expression alters trafficking of molecules of the HLA-II processing pathway, which leads to increased retention of MHC-II molecules in early endosomal compartments, thereby intercepting antigen presentation.-Niazy, N., Temme, S., Bocuk, D., Giesen, C., König, A., Temme, N., Ziegfeld, A., Gregers, T. F., Bakke, O., Lang, T., Eis-Hübinger, A. M., Koch, N. Misdirection of endosomal trafficking mediated by herpes simplex virus-encoded glycoprotein B. © FASEB.

  20. Optimal management of genital herpes: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sauerbrei, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    As one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases, genital herpes is a global medical problem with significant physical and psychological morbidity. Genital herpes is caused by herpes simplex virus type 1 or type 2 and can manifest as primary and/or recurrent infection. This manuscript provides an overview about the fundamental knowledge on the virus, its epidemiology, and infection. Furthermore, the current possibilities of antiviral therapeutic interventions and laboratory diagnosis of genital herpes as well as the present situation and perspectives for the treatment by novel antivirals and prevention of disease by vaccination are presented. Since the medical management of patients with genital herpes simplex virus infection is often unsatisfactory, this review aims at all physicians and health professionals who are involved in the care of patients with genital herpes. The information provided would help to improve the counseling of affected patients and to optimize the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of this particular disease.

  1. Optimal management of genital herpes: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Sauerbrei, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    As one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases, genital herpes is a global medical problem with significant physical and psychological morbidity. Genital herpes is caused by herpes simplex virus type 1 or type 2 and can manifest as primary and/or recurrent infection. This manuscript provides an overview about the fundamental knowledge on the virus, its epidemiology, and infection. Furthermore, the current possibilities of antiviral therapeutic interventions and laboratory diagnosis of genital herpes as well as the present situation and perspectives for the treatment by novel antivirals and prevention of disease by vaccination are presented. Since the medical management of patients with genital herpes simplex virus infection is often unsatisfactory, this review aims at all physicians and health professionals who are involved in the care of patients with genital herpes. The information provided would help to improve the counseling of affected patients and to optimize the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of this particular disease. PMID:27358569

  2. Dynamic gene expression by putative hair-cell progenitors during regeneration in the zebrafish lateral line.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Aaron B; Kim, Taeryn; Cabot, Victoria; Hudspeth, A J

    2014-04-08

    Hearing loss is most commonly caused by the destruction of mechanosensory hair cells in the ear. This condition is usually permanent: Despite the presence of putative hair-cell progenitors in the cochlea, hair cells are not naturally replenished in adult mammals. Unlike those of the mammalian ear, the progenitor cells of nonmammalian vertebrates can regenerate hair cells throughout life. The basis of this difference remains largely unexplored but may lie in molecular dissimilarities that affect how progenitors respond to hair-cell death. To approach this issue, we analyzed gene expression in hair-cell progenitors of the lateral-line system. We developed a transgenic line of zebrafish that expresses a red fluorescent protein in the presumptive hair-cell progenitors known as mantle cells. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting from the skins of transgenic larvae, followed by microarray-based expression analysis, revealed a constellation of transcripts that are specifically enriched in these cells. Gene expression analysis after hair-cell ablation uncovered a cohort of genes that are differentially regulated early in regeneration, suggesting possible roles in the response of progenitors to hair-cell death. These results provide a resource for studying hair-cell regeneration and the biology of sensory progenitor cells.

  3. Dynamic gene expression by putative hair-cell progenitors during regeneration in the zebrafish lateral line

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Taeryn; Cabot, Victoria; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2014-01-01

    Hearing loss is most commonly caused by the destruction of mechanosensory hair cells in the ear. This condition is usually permanent: Despite the presence of putative hair-cell progenitors in the cochlea, hair cells are not naturally replenished in adult mammals. Unlike those of the mammalian ear, the progenitor cells of nonmammalian vertebrates can regenerate hair cells throughout life. The basis of this difference remains largely unexplored but may lie in molecular dissimilarities that affect how progenitors respond to hair-cell death. To approach this issue, we analyzed gene expression in hair-cell progenitors of the lateral-line system. We developed a transgenic line of zebrafish that expresses a red fluorescent protein in the presumptive hair-cell progenitors known as mantle cells. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting from the skins of transgenic larvae, followed by microarray-based expression analysis, revealed a constellation of transcripts that are specifically enriched in these cells. Gene expression analysis after hair-cell ablation uncovered a cohort of genes that are differentially regulated early in regeneration, suggesting possible roles in the response of progenitors to hair-cell death. These results provide a resource for studying hair-cell regeneration and the biology of sensory progenitor cells. PMID:24706895

  4. Extracellular matrix proteins expression profiling in chemoresistant variants of the A2780 ovarian cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Januchowski, Radosław; Zawierucha, Piotr; Ruciński, Marcin; Nowicki, Michał; Zabel, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death among gynaecological malignancies. Extracellular matrix (ECM) can affect drug resistance by preventing the penetration of the drug into cancer cells and increased resistance to apoptosis. This study demonstrates alterations in the expression levels of ECM components and related genes in cisplatin-, doxorubicin-, topotecan-, and paclitaxel-resistant variants of the A2780 ovarian cancer cell line. Affymetrix Gene Chip Human Genome Array Strips were used for hybridisations. The genes that had altered expression levels in drug-resistant sublines were selected and filtered by scatter plots. The genes that were up- or downregulated more than fivefold were selected and listed. Among the investigated genes, 28 genes were upregulated, 10 genes were downregulated, and two genes were down- or upregulated depending on the cell line. Between upregulated genes 12 were upregulated very significantly--over 20-fold. These genes included COL1A2, COL12A1, COL21A1, LOX, TGFBI, LAMB1, EFEMP1, GPC3, SDC2, MGP, MMP3, and TIMP3. Four genes were very significantly downregulated: COL11A1, LAMA2, GPC6, and LUM. The expression profiles of investigated genes provide a preliminary insight into the relationship between drug resistance and the expression of ECM components. Identifying correlations between investigated genes and drug resistance will require further analysis.

  5. Highly and moderately aggressive mouse ovarian cancer cell lines exhibit differential gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wensheng; Kale, Shubha P.; McFerrin, Harris; Davenport, Ian; Wang, Guangdi; Skripnikova, Elena; Li, Xiao-Lin; Bowen, Nathan J.; McDaniels, Leticia B; Meng, Yuan-Xiang; Polk, Paula; Liu, Yong-Yu; Zhang, Qian-Jin

    2017-01-01

    Patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer often experience disease recurrence after standard therapies, a critical factor in determining their five-year survival rate. Recent reports indicated that long-term or short-term survival is associated with varied gene expression of cancer cells. Thus, identification of novel prognostic biomarkers should be considered. Since the mouse genome is similar to the human genome, we explored potential prognostic biomarkers using two groups of mouse ovarian cancer cell lines (group 1: IG-10, IG-10pw, and IG-10pw/agar; group 2: IG-10 clones 2, 3, and 11) which display highly and moderately aggressive phenotypes in vivo. Mice injected with these cell lines have different survival time and rates, capacities of tumor, and ascites formations, reflecting different prognostic potentials. Using an Affymetrix Mouse Genome 430 2.0 Array, a total of 181 genes were differentially expressed (P<0.01) by at least twofold between two groups of the cell lines. Of the 181 genes, 109 and 72 genes were overexpressed in highly and moderately aggressive cell lines, respectively. Analysis of the 109 and 72 genes using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) tool revealed two cancer-related gene networks. One was associated with the highly aggressive cell lines and affiliated with MYC gene, and another was associated with the moderately aggressive cell lines and affiliated with the androgen receptor (AR). Finally, the gene enrichment analysis indicated that the overexpressed 89 genes (out of 109 genes) in highly aggressive cell lines had a function annotation in the David database. The cancer-relevant significant gene ontology (GO) terms included Cell cycle, DNA metabolic process, and Programmed cell death. None of the genes from a set of the 72 genes overexpressed in the moderately aggressive cell lines had a function annotation in the David database. Our results suggested that the overexpressed MYC and 109 gene set represented highly aggressive ovarian

  6. Expression of a bioactive recombinant human interleukin-11 in chicken HD11 cell line.

    PubMed

    Léon, Arnaud; Wang, Xiao-Ming; Champion-Arnaud, Patrick; Sobczyk, André; Pain, Bertrand; Content, Jean; Jacques, Yannick; Valarché, Isabelle

    2005-06-21

    To direct the synthesis and secretion of recombinant human interleukin-11 (rhIL-11) in chicken HD11 cells, a plasmid targeting the c-lysozyme gene has been constructed which contains the mature cytokine cDNA in frame with the lysozyme leader sequence. The upregulation of rhIL-11 mediated by LPS proves the knock-in of hIL-11 cDNA in the lysozyme gene. The bioactivity of the expressed protein is demonstrated and quantified with the hIL-11 dependent 7TD1 and B9 cell lines. The electrophoretic mobility, receptor binding properties and growth promoting effect of the chicken-derived cytokine are identical to those of a rhIL-11 expressed in Escherichia coli. These results describe the secretion of a biologically active rhIL-11 expressed by an avian cellular machinery.

  7. Herpes simplex virus infection during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Stephenson-Famy, Alyssa; Gardella, Carolyn

    2014-12-01

    Genital herpes in pregnancy continues to cause significant maternal morbidity, with an increasing number of infections being due to oral-labial transmission of herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1. Near delivery, primary infections with HSV-1 or HSV-2 carry the highest risk of neonatal herpes infection, which is a rare but potentially devastating disease for otherwise healthy newborns. Prevention efforts have been limited by lack of an effective intervention for preventing primary infections and the unclear role of routine serologic testing.

  8. The expression of the proteins of equine herpesvirus 1 which share homology with herpes simplex virus 1 glycoproteins H and L.

    PubMed

    Stokes, A; Alber, D G; Greensill, J; Amellal, B; Carvalho, R; Taylor, L A; Doel, T R; Killington, R A; Halliburton, I W; Meredith, D M

    1996-01-01

    Several expression systems were used in studies aimed at characterizing the equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) glycoprotein H and L homologues of HSV-1 (EHV-1 gH and gL) and the products were compared to the authentic proteins synthesized in virus infected cells. Using an in vitro transcription/translation system two gH species were detected (an unprocessed 89 kDa and a processed 116 kDa product). Three low molecular weight proteins were found in the case of gL (21.8 kDa, 22.9 kDa and 26.9 kDa) and these showed a slight reduction in mobility on the addition of microsomal membranes to the reactions. A gL fusion protein was produced in pGEX-2T, expression being confirmed by Western blotting using a gL-specific antiserum raised against a peptide incorporating the 13 carboxyl terminal amino acids of the protein. A gH specific peptide antiserum precipitated both gH and two smaller proteins from EHV-1 infected cells thought to be two forms of gL. Insect cells infected with gH or gL baculovirus recombinants were used to vaccinate C3H (H-2k) mice. Some protection against EHV-1 infection was conferred to the gH inoculated mice. The results will enable further studies on the importance of the gH and gL interaction in the pathogenesis of EHV-1 to be evaluated and their potential in contributing to a subunit vaccine to be assessed.

  9. Selection of maize inbred lines and gene expression for resistance to ear rot.

    PubMed

    Pereira, G S; Pinho, R G V; Pinho, E V R V; Pires, L P M; Bernardo Junior, L A Y; Pereira, J L A; Melo, M P

    2017-07-06

    In recent years, there has been a large incidence of fungi causing "ear rot" in maize in Brazil, the main fungus being Fusarium verticillioides. The most efficient and competitive alternative for control of this disease consists of using maize hybrids resistant to this pathogen. Thus, the aims of this study were to analyze the genetic variability of maize inbred lines in regard to resistance to ear rot to observe if there is a maternal effect to resistance to ear rot, to study genetic control of the traits evaluated in hybrids originating from inbred lines of the maize breeding program at the Agriculture Department of Universidade Federal de Lavras (Lavras, MG, Brazil), and characterize the gene expression pattern related to the plant defense mechanism against F. verticillioides. High genetic availability was observed for resistance to this disease among the inbred lines evaluated. Considering combined diallel analysis, it was observed that the mean square of general combining ability (GCA) was not significant for the characteristic under study. However, specific combining ability (SCA) was significant, which indicates the predominance of non-additive effects involved in control of the characteristic for the population evaluated. A maternal effect was not observed for the characteristic of ear rot resistance in this study. Inbred lines 22, 58, and 91 showed potential for use in breeding programs aiming at resistance to F. verticillioides. Only two genes, LOX8 and Hsp82, had a satisfactory result that was able to be related to a plant defense mechanism when there is ear rot infection, though expression of these genes was observed in only one susceptible genotype. Thus, the genes LOX8 and Hsp82 are potential molecular markers for selection of maize inbred lines resistant to F. verticillioides.

  10. Zinc transporter mRNA expression in the RWPE-1 human prostate epithelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Amy L; Somji, Seema; Sens, Mary Ann; Sens, Donald A; Garrett, Scott H

    2008-08-01

    The human prostate gland undergoes a prominent alteration in Zn+2 homeostasis during the development of prostate cancer. The goal of the present study was to determine if the immortalized human prostate cell line (RWPE-1) could serve as a model system to study the role of zinc in prostate cancer. The study examined the expression of mRNA for 19 members of the zinc transporter gene family in normal prostate tissue, the prostate RWPE-1 cell line, and the LNCaP, DU-145 and PC-3 prostate cancer cell lines. The study demonstrated that the expression of the 19 zinc transporters was similar between the RWPE-1 cell line and the in situ prostate gland. Of the 19 zinc transporters, only 5 had levels that were different between the RWPE-1 cells and the tissue samples; all five being increased (ZnT-6, Zip-1, Zip-3A, Zip-10, and Zip-14). The response of the 19 transporters was also determined when the cell lines were exposed to 75 microM Zn+2 for 24 h. It was shown for the RWPE-1 cells that only 5 transporters responded to Zn+2 with mRNA for ZnT-1 and ZnT-2 being increased while mRNA for ZnT-7, Zip-7 and Zip-10 transporters were decreased. It was shown for the LNCaP, DU-145 and PC-3 cells that Zn+2 had no effect on the mRNA levels of all 19 transporters except for an induction of ZnT-1 in PC-3 cells. Overall, the study suggests that the RWPE-1 cells could be a valuable model for the study of the zinc transporter gene family in the prostate.

  11. Characterization of MTAP Gene Expression in Breast Cancer Patients and Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Sarah Franco Vieira; Ganzinelli, Monica; Chilà, Rosaria; Serino, Leandro; Maciel, Marcos Euzébio; Urban, Cícero de Andrade; de Lima, Rubens Silveira; Cavalli, Iglenir João; Generali, Daniele; Broggini, Massimo; Damia, Giovanna; Ribeiro, Enilze Maria de Souza Fonseca

    2016-01-01

    MTAP is a ubiquitously expressed gene important for adenine and methionine salvage. The gene is located at 9p21, a chromosome region often deleted in breast carcinomas, similar to CDKN2A, a recognized tumor suppressor gene. Several research groups have shown that MTAP acts as a tumor suppressor, and some therapeutic approaches were proposed based on a tumors´ MTAP status. We analyzed MTAP and CDKN2A gene (RT-qPCR) and protein (western-blotting) expression in seven breast cancer cell lines and evaluated their promoter methylation patterns to better characterize the contribution of these genes to breast cancer. Cytotoxicity assays with inhibitors of de novo adenine synthesis (5-FU, AZA and MTX) after MTAP gene knockdown showed an increased sensitivity, mainly to 5-FU. MTAP expression was also evaluated in two groups of samples from breast cancer patients, fresh tumors and paired normal breast tissue, and from formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) core breast cancer samples diagnosed as Luminal-A tumors and triple negative breast tumors (TNBC). The difference of MTAP expression between fresh tumors and normal tissues was not statistically significant. However, MTAP expression was significantly higher in Luminal-A breast tumors than in TNBC, suggesting the lack of expression in more aggressive breast tumors and the possibility of using the new approaches based on MTAP status in TNBC.

  12. Increased expression of the integral membrane proteins EGFR and FGFR3 in anti-apoptotic Chinese hamster ovary cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ohsfeldt, Erika; Huang, Szu-Han; Baycin-Hizal, Deniz; Kristoffersen, Linda; Le, Thuy-My T; Li, Edwin; Hristova, Kalina; Betenbaugh, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Membrane proteins such as receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) have a vital role in many cellular functions, making them potential targets for therapeutic research. In this study, we investigated the coexpression of the anti-apoptosis gene Bcl-x(L) with model membrane proteins as a means of increasing membrane protein expression in mammalian cells. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing heterologous Bcl-x(L) and wild-type CHO cells were transfected with either epidermal growth factor receptor or fibroblast growth factor receptor 3. The CHO-Bcl-x(L) cell lines showed increased expression of both RTK proteins as compared with the wild-type CHO cell lines in transient expression analysis, as detected by Western blot and flow cytometry after 15 days of antibiotic selection in stable expression pools. Increased expression was also seen in clonal isolates from the CHO-Bcl-x(L) cell lines, whereas the clonal cell line expression was minimal in wild-type CHO cell lines. Our results demonstrate that application of the anti-apoptosis gene Bcl-x(L) can increase expression of RTK proteins in CHO cells. This approach may be applied to improve stable expression of other membrane proteins in the future using mammalian cell lines with Bcl-x(L) or perhaps other anti-apoptotic genes.

  13. Expanding the role of 3-O sulfated heparan sulfate in herpes simplex virus type-1 entry

    SciTech Connect

    O'Donnell, Christopher D.; Kovacs, Maria; Akhtar, Jihan; Valyi-Nagy, Tibor; Shukla, Deepak

    2010-02-20

    Heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans are commonly exploited by multiple viruses for initial attachment to host cells. Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) is unique because it can use HS for both attachment and penetration, provided specific binding sites for HSV-1 envelope glycoprotein gD are present. The interaction with gD is mediated by specific HS moieties or 3-O sulfated HS (3-OS HS), which are generated by all but one of the seven isoforms of 3-O sulfotransferases (3-OSTs). Here we demonstrate that several common experimental cell lines express unique sets of 3-OST isoforms. While the isoforms 3-OST-3, -5 and -6 were most commonly expressed, isoforms 3-OST-2 and -4 were undetectable in the cell lines examined. Since most cell lines expressed multiple 3-OST isoforms, we addressed the significance of 3-OS HS in HSV-1 entry by down-regulating 2-O-sulfation, a prerequisite for 3-OS HS formation, by knocking down 2-OST expression by RNA interference (RNAi). 2-OST knockdown was verified by reverse-transcriptase PCR and Western blot analysis, while 3-OS HS knockdown was verified by immunofluorescence. Cells showed a significant decrease in viral entry, suggesting an important role for 3-OS HS. Implicating 3-OS HS further, cells knocked down for 2-OST expression also demonstrated decreased cell-cell fusion when cocultivated with effector cells transfected with HSV-1 glycoproteins. Our findings suggest that 3-OS HS may play an important role in HSV-1 entry into many different cell lines.

  14. Cannabidiol changes P-gp and BCRP expression in trophoblast cell lines.

    PubMed

    Feinshtein, Valeria; Erez, Offer; Ben-Zvi, Zvi; Erez, Noam; Eshkoli, Tamar; Sheizaf, Boaz; Sheiner, Eyal; Huleihel, Mahmud; Holcberg, Gershon

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Marijuana is the most commonly used illicit drug during pregnancy. Due to high lipophilicity, cannabinoids can easily penetrate physiological barriers like the human placenta and jeopardize the developing fetus. We evaluated the impact of cannabidiol (CBD), a major non-psychoactive cannabinoid, on P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP) expression, and P-gp function in a placental model, BeWo and Jar choriocarcinoma cell lines (using P-gp induced MCF7 cells (MCF7/P-gp) for comparison). Study design. Following the establishment of the basal expression of these transporters in the membrane fraction of all three cell lines, P-gp and BCRP protein and mRNA levels were determined following chronic (24-72 h) exposure to CBD, by Western Blot and qPCR. CBD impact on P-gp efflux function was examined by uptake of specific P-gp fluorescent substrates (calcein-AM, DiOC2(3) and rhodamine123(rh123)). Cyclosporine A (CsA) served as a positive control. Results. Chronic exposure to CBD resulted in significant changes in the protein and mRNA levels of both transporters. While P-gp was down-regulated, BCRP levels were up-regulated in the choriocarcinoma cell lines. CBD had a remarkably different influence on P-gp and BCRP expression in MCF7/P-gp cells, demonstrating that these are cell type specific effects. P-gp dependent efflux (of calcein, DiOC2(3) and rh123) was inhibited upon short-term exposure to CBD. Conclusions. Our study shows that CBD might alter P-gp and BCRP expression in the human placenta, and inhibit P-gp efflux function. We conclude that marijuana use during pregnancy may reduce placental protective functions and change its morphological and physiological characteristics.

  15. Botulinum neurotoxin type A inhibits synaptic vesicle 2 expression in breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Bandala, C; Cortés-Algara, AL; Mejía-Barradas, CM; Ilizaliturri-Flores, I; Dominguez-Rubio, R; Bazán-Méndez, CI; Floriano-Sánchez, E; Luna-Arias, JP; Anaya-Ruiz, M; Lara-Padilla, E

    2015-01-01

    Aim: It is known that botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNTA) improves some kinds of cancer (e.g. prostate) and that synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2 (SV2) is the molecular target of this neurotoxin. Besides having potential therapeutic value, this glycoprotein has recently been proposed as a molecular marker for several types of cancer. Although the mechanisms of cancer development and the improvement found with botulinum treatment are not well understood, the formation of the botulinum-SV2 complex may influence the presence and distribution of SV2 and the function of vesicles. To date, there are no reports on the possible effect of botulinum on breast cancer of unknown causes, which have a great impact on women’s health. Thus we determined the presence of SV2 in three breast cancer cell lines and the alterations found with botulinum application. Materials and methods: With and without adding 10 units of botulinum, SV2 protein expression was determined by optical densitometry in T47D, MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-453 cell lines and the distribution of SV2 was observed with immunochemistry (hematoxylin staining). Results: The SV2 protein was abundant in the cancer cells herein tested, and maximally so in T47D. In all three cancer cell lines botulinum diminished SV2 expression, which was found mostly in the cell periphery. Conclusion: SV2 could be a molecular marker in breast cancer. Its expression and distribution is regulated by botulinum, suggesting an interesting control mechanism for SV2 expression and a possible alternative therapy. Further studies are needed in this sense. PMID:26339411

  16. Therapeutic Options for Herpes Simplex Infections.

    PubMed

    Au, Eugene; Sacks, Stephen L.

    2003-02-01

    Herpes simplex viruses are responsible for a number of disease states in infected individuals. Capable of establishing latent infection, herpes simplex can reactivate, causing pain, discomfort, and psychosocial consequences. Because no cure is available, treatment modalities for herpes simplex infection are required, from both personal and public health standpoints. To date, therapy has centered around the use of antiviral drugs to control infection and suppress recurrences. To expand the scope of available treatments, efforts have focused on the development of vaccines against herpes simplex virus and new agents such as immune response modifiers. Recent data suggest that these new agents are promising in their therapeutic potential.

  17. Generating protective immunity against genital herpes.

    PubMed

    Shin, Haina; Iwasaki, Akiko

    2013-10-01

    Genital herpes is an incurable, chronic disease that affects millions of people worldwide. Not only does genital herpes cause painful, recurrent symptoms, it is also a significant risk factor for the acquisition of other sexually transmitted infections such as HIV-1. Antiviral drugs are used to treat herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection, but they cannot stop viral shedding and transmission. Thus, developing a vaccine that can prevent or clear infection will be crucial in limiting the spread of disease. In this review we outline recent studies that improve our understanding of host responses against HSV infection, discuss past clinical vaccine trials, and highlight new strategies for vaccine design against genital herpes.

  18. Immunity and the burden of herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won Suk; Kwon, Soon Sun; Lee, Jacob; Choi, Su-Mi; Lee, Jin Soo; Eom, Joong Sik; Sohn, Jang Wook; Choeng, Hee Jin

    2014-03-01

    The burden of herpes zoster may be related to patients' immunity, although this has not been studied extensively. This hypothesis was tested in a matched case-control study of patients with herpes zoster who sought treatment at one of seven university hospitals in Korea from January 1, 2007, to December 31, 2010. Patients diagnosed with herpes zoster were placed into three groups based on their immune status: severely immunocompromised, mild-to-moderately immunocompromised, and normal immunity. Each patient in the severely immunocompromised group was matched with one patient in the mild-to-moderately immunocompromised group and one patient in the normal immunity group in the same hospital based on age, sex, and date of herpes zoster onset. A total of 582 patients with herpes zoster were included in the analysis: 194 in each of the three groups. Patients in the severely immunocompromised group had the highest herpes zoster-related hospitalization rate as compared to patients in the mild-to-moderately immunocompromised and normal immune groups (P < 0.01). The length of hospital stay and herpes zoster-related medical cost increased significantly with the deterioration of patients' immunity (P < 0.01, respectively). Cutaneous complications occurred more frequently in the severely immunocompromised group than in the other two groups (P < 0.01). An increase in herpes zoster burden was observed as the patients' immunity decreased. Therefore, effective measures are necessary to prevent herpes zoster and reduce its burden in severely immunocompromised patients.

  19. Herpes simplex virus following stab phlebectomy.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Caitlin W; Lum, Ying Wei; Heller, Jennifer A

    2017-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus infection following surgery is an unusual postoperative phenomenon. Many mechanisms have been suggested, with the most likely explanation related to latent virus reactivation due to a proinflammatory response in the setting of local trauma. Here, we present a case of herpes simplex virus reactivation in an immunocompetent female following a conventional right lower extremity stab phlebectomy. Salient clinical and physical examination findings are described, and management strategies for herpes simplex virus reactivation are outlined. This is the first known case report of herpes simplex virus reactivation following lower extremity phlebectomy.

  20. Ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) is expressed in prostate cancer tissues and cell lines and expression is differentially regulated in vitro by ghrelin

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ghrelin is a 28 amino acid peptide hormone that is expressed in the stomach and a range of peripheral tissues, where it frequently acts as an autocrine/paracrine growth factor. Ghrelin is modified by a unique acylation required for it to activate its cognate receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR), which mediates many of the actions of ghrelin. Recently, the enzyme responsible for adding the fatty acid residue (octanoyl/acyl group) to the third amino acid of ghrelin, GOAT (ghrelin O-acyltransferase), was identified. Methods We used cell culture, quantitative real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and immunohistochemistry to demonstrate the expression of GOAT in prostate cancer cell lines and tissues from patients. Real-time RT-PCR was used to demonstrate the expression of prohormone convertase (PC)1/3, PC2 and furin in prostate cancer cell lines. Prostate-derived cell lines were treated with ghrelin and desacyl ghrelin and the effect on GOAT expression was measured using quantitative RT-PCR. Results We have demonstrated that GOAT mRNA and protein are expressed in the normal prostate and human prostate cancer tissue samples. The RWPE-1 and RWPE-2 normal prostate-derived cell lines and the LNCaP, DU145, and PC3 prostate cancer cell lines express GOAT and at least one other enzyme that is necessary to produce mature, acylated ghrelin from proghrelin (PC1/3, PC2 or furin). Finally, ghrelin, but not desacyl ghrelin (unacylated ghrelin), can directly regulate the expression of GOAT in the RWPE-1 normal prostate derived cell line and the PC3 prostate cancer cell line. Ghrelin treatment (100nM) for 6 hours significantly decreased GOAT mRNA expression two-fold (P < 0.05) in the PC3 prostate cancer cell line, however, ghrelin did not regulate GOAT expression in the DU145 and LNCaP prostate cancer cell lines. Conclusions This study demonstrates that GOAT is expressed in prostate cancer specimens and cell lines. Ghrelin regulates GOAT

  1. Characteristics of nobiletin-mediated alteration of gene expression in cultured cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Nemoto, Kiyomitsu; Ikeda, Ayaka; Yoshida, Chiaki; Kimura, Junko; Mori, Junki; Fujiwara, Hironori; Yokosuka, Akihito; Mimaki, Yoshihiro; Ohizumi, Yasushi; Degawa, Masakuni

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► Nobiletin-mediated alterations of gene expression were examined with DNA microarrays. ► Three organ-derived cell lines were treated with 100 μM nobiletin for 24 h. ► In all cell lines, 3 endoplasmic reticulum stress-responsive genes were up-regulated. ► Some cell cycle-regulating and oxidative stress-promoting genes were down-regulated. ► These alterations may contribute to nobiletin-mediated biological effects. -- Abstract: Nobiletin, a polymethoxylated flavonoid that is highly contained in the peels of citrus fruits, exerts a wide variety of beneficial effects, including anti-proliferative effects in cancer cells, repressive effects in hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia, and ameliorative effects in dementia at in vitro and in vivo levels. In the present study, to further understand the mechanisms of these actions of nobiletin, the nobiletin-mediated alterations of gene expression in three organ-derived cell lines – 3Y1 rat fibroblasts, HuH-7 human hepatocarcinoma cells, and SK-N-SH human neuroblastoma cells – were first examined with DNA microarrays. In all three cell lines, treatments with nobiletin (100 μM) for 24 h resulted in more than 200% increases in the expression levels of five genes, including the endoplasmic reticulum stress-responsive genes Ddit3, Trib3, and Asns, and in less than 50% decreases in the expression levels of seven genes, including the cell cycle-regulating genes Ccna2, Ccne2, and E2f8 and the oxidative stress-promoting gene Txnip. It was also confirmed that in each nobiletin-treated cell line, the levels of the DDIT3 (DNA-damage-inducible transcript 3, also known as CHOP and GADD153) and ASNS (asparagine synthetase) proteins were increased, while the level of the TXNIP (thioredoxin-interacting protein, also known as VDUP1 and TBP-2) protein was decreased. All these findings suggest that nobiletin exerts a wide variety of biological effects, at least partly, through induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress and

  2. Natural remedies for Herpes simplex.

    PubMed

    Gaby, Alan R

    2006-06-01

    Herpes simplex is a common viral infection of the skin or mucous membranes. The lesions caused by this infection are often painful, burning, or pruritic, and tend to recur in most patients. Short-term treatment with acyclovir can accelerate the healing of an acute outbreak, and continuous acyclovir therapy is often prescribed for people with frequent recurrences. While this drug can reduce the recurrence rate by 60-90 percent, it can also cause a wide array of side effects, including renal failure, hepatitis, and anaphylaxis. Safe and effective alternatives are therefore needed. There is evidence that certain dietary modifications and natural substances may be useful for treating active Herpes simplex lesions or preventing recurrences. Treatments discussed include lysine, vitamin C, zinc, vitamin E, adenosine monophosphate, and lemon balm (Melissa officinalis).

  3. Expression of the TIMP2 gene is not regulated by promoter hypermethylation in the Caski cell line.

    PubMed

    Parashar, Gaurav; Capalash, Neena

    2012-05-01

    Promoter hypermethylation has been linked to loss of expression of tumor suppressor genes in various types of tumors. A strong reciprocal correlation between promoter hypermethylation and expression of the TIMP2 gene was observed in the Caski cell line. The TIMP2 promoter was found to be methylated within the 1919 and 1987 region (-325 to -257), relative to the transcription start site through methylation-specific PCR in the HeLa, SiHa and Caski cervical cancer cell lines. However, a reverse transcription PCR analysis of the TIMP2 gene confirmed a normal expression in the HeLa and SiHa cell lines with a high expression in the Caski cell line, indicating that expression of the TIMP2 gene is independent of methylation of CpG sites located within the -325 to -257 region of the TIMP2 promoter, relative to the transcription start site.

  4. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 polymorphisms, expression and activity in selected human tumour cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Zaremba, T; Ketzer, P; Cole, M; Coulthard, S; Plummer, E R; Curtin, N J

    2009-01-01

    Background: Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is a DNA-binding enzyme activated by DNA breaks and involved in DNA repair and other cellular processes. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity can be higher in cancer than in adjacent normal tissue, but cancer predisposition is reported to be greater in individuals with a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) V762A (T2444C) in the catalytic domain that reduces PARP-1 activity. Methods: To resolve these divergent observations, we determined PARP-1 polymorphisms, PARP-1 protein expression and activity in a panel of 19 solid and haematological, adult and paediatric human cancer cell lines. Results: There was a wide variation in PARP activity in the cell line panel (coefficient of variation, CV=103%), with the lowest and the highest activity being 2460 pmol PAR/106 (HS-5 cells) and 85 750 pmol PAR/106 (NGP cells). Lower variation (CV=32%) was observed in PARP-1 protein expression with the lowest expression being 2.0 ng μg−1 (HS-5 cells) and the highest being 7.1 ng μg−1 (ML-1 cells). The mean activity in the cancer cells was 45-fold higher than the mean activity in normal human lymphocytes and the PARP-1 protein levels were 23-fold higher. Conclusions: Surprisingly, there was no significant correlation between PARP activity and PARP-1 protein level or the investigated polymorphisms, T2444C and CA. PMID:19568233

  5. Heparanase overexpression down-regulates syndecan-1 expression in a gallbladder carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hao; Zhou, Shaobo; Yang, Song; Cao, Hai-Ming

    2017-04-01

    Objective To discuss the relevance of heparanase and syndecan-1 and regulation of the heparanase-syndecan1 axis in the invasiveness of gallbladder carcinoma cells. Methods 1. Generation of a gallbladder cancer cell line overexpressing a heparanase (GBD-SD) transgene. 2. Western blot analysis of syndecan-1 levels of GBD-SD and control gallbladder carcinoma (GBC-SD) cells. 3. RT-PCR analysis of syndecan-1 mRNA levels of GBD-SD and GBC-SD. 4. Evaluation of invasion and migration of GBD-SD and GBC-SD cells. Results 1. Heparanase expression in GBD-SD cells was significantly increased. 2. The syndecan-1 mRNA level of GBD-SD cells was significantly lower compared with that of GBC-SD cells. 3. The syndecan-1 DNA copy number in GBD-SD cells was significantly lower compared with that of GBC-SD. 4. The invasiveness and migration of GBD-SD cells were significantly higher compared with GBC-SD cells. Conclusions 1. The expression of heparanase negatively correlated with that of syndecan-1 in a gallbladder carcinoma cell line. 2. The expression of heparanase and syndecan-1 in gallbladder carcinomas negatively correlated, similar to other tumours. 3. The heparanase/syndecan1 axis in gallbladder carcinoma plays an important role in the invasion and metastasis, thus providing a new therapeutic target. 4. Further research is required to identify the detailed mechanisms.

  6. Aberrant Cosmc genes result in Tn antigen expression in human colorectal carcinoma cell line HT-29

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaofeng; Du, Zhenzhen; Sun, Xuhong; Shi, Chuanqin; Zhang, Huaixiang; Hu, Tao

    2015-01-01

    The Tn antigen, which arises from mutation in the Cosmc gene is one of the most common tumor associated carbohydrate antigens. Cosmc resides in X24 encoded by a single gene and functions as a specific molecular chaperone for T-synthase. While the Tn antigen cannot be detected in normal cells, Cosmc mutations inactivate T-synthase and consequently result in Tn antigen expression within certain cancers. In addition to this Cosmc mutation-induced expression, the Tn antigen is also expressed in such cell lines as Jurkat T, LSC and LS174T. Whether the Cosmc mutation is present in the colon cancer cell line HT-29 is still unclear. Here, we isolate HT-29-Tn+ cells from HT-29 cells derived from a female colon cancer patient. These HT-29-Tn+ cells show a loss of the Cosmc gene coding sequence (CDS) leading to an absence of T-synthase activity and Tn antigen expression. Additionally, almost no methylation of Cosmc CpG islands was detected in HT-29-Tn+ as well as in HT-29-Tn- and Tn- tumor cells from male patients. In contrast, the methylation frequency of CpG island of Cosmc in normal female cells was ~50%. Only one active allele of Cosmc existed in HT-29-Tn+ and HT-29-Tn- cells as based upon detection of SNP sites. These results indicate that Tn antigens expression and T-synthase inactivity in HT-29-Tn+ cells can be related to the absence of CDS in Cosmc active alleles, while an inactive allele deletion of Cosmc in HT-29 cells has no influence on Cosmc function. PMID:26045765

  7. Caveolin-1 expression is maintained in rat and human astroglioma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Patricia L; Liu, Changdan; Smart, Deedee K; Hantus, Stephen T; Fick, James R; Cameron, Richard S

    2002-03-01

    Caveolin-1 is the principal structural and functional component of caveolae, a plasmalemmal compartment that has been proposed to sequester lipid and protein components that participate in transmembrane signal transduction processes. Multiple studies reveal a reduction in the expression level of caveolin-1 mRNA and protein in many carcinomas as well as transformed cells. The human caveolin-1 gene is localized to a suspected tumor suppressor locus (7q31.1). Collectively, these data have been taken to imply that caveolin-1 may function in a tumor suppressor capacity. To determine if a reduction in the expression level of caveolin-1 mRNA and protein accompanied the transformation of astrocytes, we undertook studies of two transformed rat astroglial cell lines, C6 and DI TNC(1), as well as several cell lines derived from human glioblastoma tumors: T98G, U87MG, U118MG, U138MG, and U373MG. Ultrastructural, immunolocalization, immunoblot, and Northern blot analyses demonstrated that caveolin-1 message and protein were expressed in all rat and human glioma cells. The localization pattern, buoyant density, and detergent-insolubility property of caveolin-1 protein were indistinguishable from that determined for nontransformed type 1 astrocytes in culture. Nucleotide sequence analyses of caveolin-1 cDNAs indicate that mutations are not present in the caveolin-1 sequence in any of the glioma cell types. Taken together with previous analyses, these data indicate that, at least for astrocytes, the process of transformation in and of itself is not solely sufficient to reduce the level of caveolin-1 expression, and that caveolin-1 expression in and of itself is not solely sufficient to prevent the acquisition of a transformed phenotype. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Prevention agenda for genital herpes.

    PubMed

    Handsfield, H H; Stone, K M; Wasserheit, J N

    1999-04-01

    Few meeting participants envisioned a prevention and control program on the scale or scope of CDC's programs to prevent HIV infection, syphilis, gonorrhea, and chlamydial infection, but all agreed that the virtual absence of public health interventions to prevent genital herpes is no longer appropriate in light of evolving epidemiologic knowledge and other research advances. The ultimate scope of a national genital herpes prevention effort will depend in part on the results of the recommended research agenda, which probably will evolve over the better part of a decade. Numerous other STD prevention partners will also need to contribute to this effort and help to determine the makeup of future programs. Substantial new fiscal resources will be required both to implement the proposed research agenda and, depending on the results, to undertake the prevention efforts indicated by those studies. Competing STD prevention priorities and other national health needs will influence the availability of those resources. The consultants' meeting and the research and program activities summarized above are described in more detail in the full meeting report, which is posted on the Division's web site (www.cdc.gov/nchstp/dstd/dstdp.html) or may be requested directly from the Division. DSTDP is interested in receiving comments and suggestions about herpes prevention.

  9. Characteristics of nobiletin-mediated alteration of gene expression in cultured cell lines.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Kiyomitsu; Ikeda, Ayaka; Yoshida, Chiaki; Kimura, Junko; Mori, Junki; Fujiwara, Hironori; Yokosuka, Akihito; Mimaki, Yoshihiro; Ohizumi, Yasushi; Degawa, Masakuni

    2013-02-15

    Nobiletin, a polymethoxylated flavonoid that is highly contained in the peels of citrus fruits, exerts a wide variety of beneficial effects, including anti-proliferative effects in cancer cells, repressive effects in hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia, and ameliorative effects in dementia at in vitro and in vivo levels. In the present study, to further understand the mechanisms of these actions of nobiletin, the nobiletin-mediated alterations of gene expression in three organ-derived cell lines - 3Y1 rat fibroblasts, HuH-7 human hepatocarcinoma cells, and SK-N-SH human neuroblastoma cells - were first examined with DNA microarrays. In all three cell lines, treatments with nobiletin (100 μM) for 24 h resulted in more than 200% increases in the expression levels of five genes, including the endoplasmic reticulum stress-responsive genes Ddit3, Trib3, and Asns, and in less than 50% decreases in the expression levels of seven genes, including the cell cycle-regulating genes Ccna2, Ccne2, and E2f8 and the oxidative stress-promoting gene Txnip. It was also confirmed that in each nobiletin-treated cell line, the levels of the DDIT3 (DNA-damage-inducible transcript 3, also known as CHOP and GADD153) and ASNS (asparagine synthetase) proteins were increased, while the level of the TXNIP (thioredoxin-interacting protein, also known as VDUP1 and TBP-2) protein was decreased. All these findings suggest that nobiletin exerts a wide variety of biological effects, at least partly, through induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress and suppressions of oxidative stress and cell proliferation.

  10. Human UDP-Glucuronosyltransferases: Effects of altered expression in breast and pancreatic cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Dates, Centdrika R; Fahmi, Tariq; Pyrek, Sebastian J; Yao-Borengasser, Aiwei; Borowa-Mazgaj, Barbara; Bratton, Stacie M; Kadlubar, Susan A; Mackenzie, Peter I; Haun, Randy S; Radominska-Pandya, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Increased aerobic glycolysis and de novo lipid biosynthesis are common characteristics of invasive cancers. UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) are phase II drug metabolizing enzymes that in normal cells possess the ability to glucuronidate these lipids and speed their excretion; however, de-regulation of these enzymes in cancer cells can lead to an accumulation of bioactive lipids, which further fuels cancer progression. We hypothesize that UGT2B isoform expression is down-regulated in cancer cells and that exogenous re-introduction of these enzymes will reduce lipid content, change the cellular phenotype, and inhibit cancer cell proliferation. In this study, steady-state mRNA levels of UGT isoforms from the 2B family were measured using qPCR in 4 breast cancer and 5 pancreatic cancer cell lines. Expression plasmids for UGT2B isoforms known to glucuronidate cellular lipids, UGT2B4, 2B7, and 2B15 were transfected into MCF-7 and Panc-1 cells, and the cytotoxic effects of these enzymes were analyzed using trypan blue exclusion, annexin V/PI staining, TUNEL assays, and caspase-3 immunohistochemistry. There was a significant decrease in cell proliferation and a significant increase in the number of dead cells after transfection with each of the 3 UGT isoforms in both cell lines. Cellular lipids were also found to be significantly decreased after transfection. The results presented here support our hypothesis and emphasize the important role UGTs can play in cellular proliferation and lipid homeostasis. Evaluating the effect of UGT expression on the lipid levels in cancer cell lines can be relevant to understanding the complex regulation of cancer cells, identifying the roles of UGTs as "lipid-controllers" in cellular homeostasis, and illustrating their suitability as targets for future clinical therapy development.

  11. A catalog of HLA type, HLA expression, and neo-epitope candidates in human cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Boegel, Sebastian; Löwer, Martin; Bukur, Thomas; Sahin, Ugur; Castle, John C

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cell lines are a tremendous resource for cancer biology and therapy development. These multipurpose tools are commonly used to examine the genetic origin of cancers, to identify potential novel tumor targets, such as tumor antigens for vaccine devel­opment, and utilized to screen potential therapies in preclinical studies. Mutations, gene expression, and drug sensitivity have been determined for many cell lines using next-generation sequencing (NGS). However, the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) type and HLA expression of tumor cell lines, characterizations necessary for the development of cancer vaccines, have remained largely incomplete and, such information, when available, has been distributed in many publications. Here, we determine the 4-digit HLA type and HLA expression of 167 cancer and 10 non-cancer cell lines from publically available RNA-Seq data. We use standard NGS RNA-Seq short reads from “whole transcriptome” sequencing, map reads to known HLA types, and statistically determine HLA type, heterozygosity, and expression. First, we present previously unreported HLA Class I and II genotypes. Second, we determine HLA expression levels in each cancer cell line, providing insights into HLA downregulation and loss in cancer. Third, using these results, we provide a fundamental cell line “barcode” to track samples and prevent sample annotation swaps and contamination. Fourth, we integrate the cancer cell-line specific HLA types and HLA expression with available cell-line specific mutation information and existing HLA binding prediction algorithms to make a catalog of predicted antigenic mutations in each cell line. The compilation of our results are a fundamental resource for all researchers selecting specific cancer cell lines based on the HLA type and HLA expression, as well as for the development of immunotherapeutic tools for novel cancer treatment modalities. PMID:25960936

  12. A catalog of HLA type, HLA expression, and neo-epitope candidates in human cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Boegel, Sebastian; Löwer, Martin; Bukur, Thomas; Sahin, Ugur; Castle, John C

    Cancer cell lines are a tremendous resource for cancer biology and therapy development. These multipurpose tools are commonly used to examine the genetic origin of cancers, to identify potential novel tumor targets, such as tumor antigens for vaccine devel-opment, and utilized to screen potential therapies in preclinical studies. Mutations, gene expression, and drug sensitivity have been determined for many cell lines using next-generation sequencing (NGS). However, the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) type and HLA expression of tumor cell lines, characterizations necessary for the development of cancer vaccines, have remained largely incomplete and, such information, when available, has been distributed in many publications. Here, we determine the 4-digit HLA type and HLA expression of 167 cancer and 10 non-cancer cell lines from publically available RNA-Seq data. We use standard NGS RNA-Seq short reads from "whole transcriptome" sequencing, map reads to known HLA types, and statistically determine HLA type, heterozygosity, and expression. First, we present previously unreported HLA Class I and II genotypes. Second, we determine HLA expression levels in each cancer cell line, providing insights into HLA downregulation and loss in cancer. Third, using these results, we provide a fundamental cell line "barcode" to track samples and prevent sample annotation swaps and contamination. Fourth, we integrate the cancer cell-line specific HLA types and HLA expression with available cell-line specific mutation information and existing HLA binding prediction algorithms to make a catalog of predicted antigenic mutations in each cell line. The compilation of our results are a fundamental resource for all researchers selecting specific cancer cell lines based on the HLA type and HLA expression, as well as for the development of immunotherapeutic tools for novel cancer treatment modalities.

  13. Distinct lithium-induced gene expression effects in lymphoblastoid cell lines from patients with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Fries, Gabriel R; Colpo, Gabriela D; Monroy-Jaramillo, Nancy; Zhao, Junfei; Zhao, Zhongming; Arnold, Jodi G; Bowden, Charles L; Walss-Bass, Consuelo

    2017-09-19

    Lithium is the most commonly prescribed medication for the treatment of bipolar disorder (BD), yet the mechanisms underlying its beneficial effects are still unclear. We aimed to compare the effects of lithium treatment in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from BD patients and controls. LCLs were generated from sixty-two BD patients (based on DSM-IV) and seventeen healthy controls matched for age, sex, and ethnicity. Patients were recruited from outpatient clinics from February 2012 to October 2014. LCLs were treated with 1mM lithium for 7 days followed by microarray gene expression assay and validation by real-time quantitative PCR. Baseline differences between groups, as well as differences between vehicle- and lithium-treated cells within each group were analyzed. The biological significance of differentially expressed genes was examined by pathway enrichment analysis. No significant differences in baseline gene expression (adjusted p-value < 0.05) were detected between groups. Lithium treatment of LCLs from controls did not lead to any significant differences. However, lithium altered the expression of 236 genes in LCLs from patients; those genes were enriched for signaling pathways related to apoptosis. Among those genes, the alterations in the expression of PIK3CG, SERP1 and UPP1 were validated by real-time PCR. A significant correlation was also found between circadian functioning and CEBPG and FGF2 expression levels. In summary, our results suggest that lithium treatment induces expression changes in genes associated with the apoptosis pathway in BD LCLs. The more pronounced effects of lithium in patients compared to controls suggest a disease-specific effect of this drug. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  14. Insulin-induced reactivation of an inactive herpes simplex thymidine kinase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Clough, D W; Morse, B S; Kucherlapati, R S; Davidson, R L

    1984-01-01

    A line of mouse cells transformed with ultraviolet-irradiated herpes simplex virus type 1 and containing a methylated and inactive viral thymidine kinase (TK) gene was treated with insulin in an attempt to induce expression of the inactive gene. Insulin was found to be capable of inducing the inactive TK gene in these cells. The induction of the TK+ phenotype was dose dependent (from 1-100 micrograms of insulin per ml), and the TK activity induced was shown to be of viral origin. Analysis of the methylation pattern of the viral TK gene by using the methylation-sensitive restriction endonucleases Sma I, Hpa II, and Hha I revealed that the active viral TK gene in the parental transformed cells was hypomethylated, whereas the inactive TK gene in the uninduced TK- cells was methylated. The active TK gene in three insulin-induced TK+ lines also was methylated, but the methylation patterns in the insulin-induced lines all were different from the uninduced TK- line. These data suggest that extensive hypomethylation of the inactive TK gene is not required for insulin induction. Four other transformed lines containing an inactive viral TK gene were tested for insulin inducibility, but insulin was unable to induce expression of the TK gene in any of the other lines. Thus, insulin inducibility does not seem to be a function of the viral TK gene itself. These results suggest that insulin inducibility of the viral TK gene may be a reflection of the region of the host genome into which the TK gene was integrated. Images PMID:6322172

  15. Temozolomide Resistance in Glioblastoma Cell Lines: Implication of MGMT, MMR, P-Glycoprotein and CD133 Expression.

    PubMed

    Perazzoli, Gloria; Prados, Jose; Ortiz, Raul; Caba, Octavio; Cabeza, Laura; Berdasco, Maria; Gónzalez, Beatriz; Melguizo, Consolación

    2015-01-01

    The use of temozolomide (TMZ) has improved the prognosis for glioblastoma multiforme patients. However, TMZ resistance may be one of the main reasons why treatment fails. Although this resistance has frequently been linked to the expression of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) it seems that this enzyme is not the only molecular mechanism that may account for the appearance of drug resistance in glioblastoma multiforme patients as the mismatch repair (MMR) complex, P-glycoprotein, and/or the presence of cancer stem cells may also be implicated. Four nervous system tumor cell lines were used to analyze the modulation of MGMT expression and MGMT promoter methylation by TMZ treatment. Furthermore, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine was used to demethylate the MGMT promoter and O(6)-benzylguanine to block GMT activity. In addition, MMR complex and P-glycoprotein expression were studied before and after TMZ exposure and correlated with MGMT expression. Finally, the effect of TMZ exposure on CD133 expression was analyzed. Our results showed two clearly differentiated groups of tumor cells characterized by low (A172 and LN229) and high (SF268 and SK-N-SH) basal MGMT expression. Interestingly, cell lines with no MGMT expression and low TMZ IC50 showed a high MMR complex expression, whereas cell lines with high MGMT expression and high TMZ IC50 did not express the MMR complex. In addition, modulation of MGMT expression in A172 and LN229 cell lines was accompanied by a significant increase in the TMZ IC50, whereas no differences were observed in SF268 and SK-N-SH cell lines. In contrast, P-glycoprotein and CD133 was found to be unrelated to TMZ resistance in these cell lines. These results may be relevant in understanding the phenomenon of TMZ resistance, especially in glioblastoma multiforme patients laking MGMT expression, and may also aid in the design of new therapeutic strategies to improve the efficacy of TMZ in glioblastoma multiforme patients.

  16. EGFR and PDGFRA co-expression and heterodimerization in glioblastoma tumor sphere lines.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Debyani; Pedraza, Alicia M; Cotari, Jesse; Liu, Angela H; Punko, Diana; Kokroo, Aushim; Huse, Jason T; Altan-Bonnet, Gregoire; Brennan, Cameron W

    2017-08-22

    Concurrent amplifications of EGFR and PDGFRA have been reported in up to 5% of glioblastoma (GBM) and it remains unclear why such independent amplification events, and associated receptor overexpression, would be adaptive during glioma evolution. Here, we document that EGFR and PDGFRA protein co-expression occurs in 37% of GBM. There is wide cell-to-cell variation in the expressions of these receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) in stable tumor sphere lines, frequently defining tumor cell subpopulations with distinct sensitivities to growth factors and RTK inhibitors. We also find evidence for functional transactivation of PDGFRA by EGFR and EGF-induced receptor heterodimerization, both of which are abolished by EGFR inhibitors. These results indicate that GBM growth responses to targeted therapies previously tested in clinical trials are strongly influenced by the balance of EGFR and PDGFRA activation in individual cells, which is heterogeneous at baseline.

  17. Micro-RNA expression in cisplatin resistant germ cell tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Port, Matthias; Glaesener, Stephanie; Ruf, Christian; Riecke, Armin; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Meineke, Viktor; Honecker, Friedemann; Abend, Michael

    2011-05-15

    We compared microRNA expression patterns in three cisplatin resistant sublines derived from paternal cisplatin sensitive germ cell tumor cell lines in order to improve our understanding of the mechanisms of cisplatin resistance. Three cisplatin resistant sublines (NTERA-2-R, NCCIT-R, 2102EP-R) showing 2.7-11.3-fold increase in drug resistance after intermittent exposure to increasing doses of cisplatin were compared to their parental counterparts, three well established relatively cisplatin sensitive germ cell tumor cell lines (NTERA-2, NCCIT, 2102EP). Cells were cultured and total RNA was isolated from all 6 cell lines in three independent experiments. RNA was converted into cDNA and quantitative RT-PCR was run using 384 well low density arrays covering almost all (738) known microRNA species of human origin. Altogether 72 of 738 (9.8%) microRNAs appeared differentially expressed between sensitive and resistant cell line pairs (NTERA-2R/NTERA-2 = 43, NCCIT-R/NCCIT = 53, 2102EP-R/2102EP = 15) of which 46.7-95.3% were up-regulated (NTERA-2R/NTERA-2 = 95.3%, NCCIT-R/NCCIT = 62.3%, 2102EP-R/2102EP = 46.7%). The number of genes showing differential expression in more than one of the cell line pairs was 34 between NTERA-2R/NTERA-2 (79%) and NCCIT-R/NCCIT (64%), and 3 and 4, respectively, between these two cell lines and 2102EP-R/2102EP (about 27%). Only the has-miR-10b involved in breast cancer invasion and metastasis and has-miR-512-3p appeared to be up-regulated (2-3-fold) in all three cell lines. The hsa-miR-371-373 cluster (counteracting cellular senescence and linked with differentiation potency), as well as hsa-miR-520c/-520h (inhibiting the tumor suppressor p21) were 3.9-16.3 fold up-regulated in two of the three cisplatin resistant cell lines. Several new micro-RNA species missing an annotation towards cisplatin resistance could be identified. These were hsa-miR-512-3p/-515/-517/-518/-525 (up to 8.1-fold up-regulated) and hsa-miR-99a/-100/-145 (up to 10-fold

  18. Alteration of CD44 expression in HIV type 1-infected T cell lines.

    PubMed

    Giordanengo, V; Limouse, M; Doglio, A; Lesimple, J; Lefebvre, J C

    1996-11-20

    CD44 is known to interfere in HIV replication and to participate in many physiological processes such as lymphocyte binding to high endothelial venules of lymphoid tissue, lymph nodes, and mucosal endothelium. The T cell lines MOLT-4 and CEM, and CEM subclones were infected with the HIV-1 LAI strain and monitored for the expression of CD44 during the course of chronic virus production until the infected cells were at the stage of latent infection. The levels of CD44 protein expression were quantified using cell surface immunostaining and biotinylation. The maturation of CD44 molecules was evaluated by metabolic sulforadiolabeling and CD44 mRNA was visualized by Northern blot analysis. We show a downmodulation of CD44 expression in infected T cell lines and subclones. This phenomenon was most evident at the stage of latent infection. Then, CD44 molecules were undetectable at both the protein and mRNA levels in latently infected CEM cells and CEM subclones. In addition, the 97-kDa standard CD44 isoform showed a shift upward, while detectable during the stage of chronic virus production. In latently infected MOLT-4 cells, the CD44 protein levels were dramatically decreased; CD44 mRNA was detected, but the sizes differed from the mRNA in uninfected cells. Since CD44 is known to regulate in part lymphocyte homing and HIV replication, the alterations that were observed in the expression of this molecule could interfere with the particular homing of HIV-infected cells and/or viral latency.

  19. Experiential Interventions for Clients with Genital Herpes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Anne L.

    1999-01-01

    Explores potential benefits of incorporating concepts and interventions from experimental therapy to help clients with psychosocial difficulties in learning to live with genital herpes. Recommends experimental counseling of two-chair dialog, empty chair, and metaphor for helping clients with emotional sequelae of genital herpes. Presents case…

  20. Herpes in Dyadic Relationships: Patterns and Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drob, Sanford; Bernard, Harold S.

    1985-01-01

    Explores how dyadic relationships can be affected when one partner suffers from genital herpes. Six patterns are described: When One Partner Does Not Know, The Compromise Relationship, The Enraged Partner, The Mark of Guilt, Problems in Risk Management, and Herpes Used as Weapon. Treatment strategies for dealing with patterns are offered.…

  1. Autism and Herpes Simplex Encephalitis. Brief Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghaziuddin, Mohammad; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents two case studies of children who developed herpes virus infection in the intrauterine or early postnatal period and presented with features of autism around two years of age. Other research suggesting a link between herpes and autism is reviewed. (DB)

  2. Herpes in Dyadic Relationships: Patterns and Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drob, Sanford; Bernard, Harold S.

    1985-01-01

    Explores how dyadic relationships can be affected when one partner suffers from genital herpes. Six patterns are described: When One Partner Does Not Know, The Compromise Relationship, The Enraged Partner, The Mark of Guilt, Problems in Risk Management, and Herpes Used as Weapon. Treatment strategies for dealing with patterns are offered.…

  3. Psychosocial Treatment for Recurrent Genital Herpes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longo, David J.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Assigned 21 individuals with recurrent genital herpes to psychosocial intervention, social support, or waiting-list control conditions. Those receiving psychosocial intervention (herpes simplex virus information, relaxation training, stress management instructions, and an imagery technique) reported significantly greater reductions in herpes…

  4. Autism and Herpes Simplex Encephalitis. Brief Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghaziuddin, Mohammad; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents two case studies of children who developed herpes virus infection in the intrauterine or early postnatal period and presented with features of autism around two years of age. Other research suggesting a link between herpes and autism is reviewed. (DB)

  5. Psychosocial Treatment for Recurrent Genital Herpes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longo, David J.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Assigned 21 individuals with recurrent genital herpes to psychosocial intervention, social support, or waiting-list control conditions. Those receiving psychosocial intervention (herpes simplex virus information, relaxation training, stress management instructions, and an imagery technique) reported significantly greater reductions in herpes…

  6. Longitudinal Claudin Gene Expression Analyses in Canine Mammary Tissues and Thereof Derived Primary Cultures and Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Susanne C.; Becker, Annegret; Rateitschak, Katja; Mohr, Annika; Lüder Ripoli, Florenza; Hennecke, Silvia; Junginger, Johannes; Hewicker-Trautwein, Marion; Brenig, Bertram; Ngezahayo, Anaclet; Nolte, Ingo; Murua Escobar, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    Human and canine mammary tumours show partial claudin expression deregulations. Further, claudins have been used for directed therapeutic approaches. However, the development of claudin targeting approaches requires stable claudin expressing cell lines. This study reports the establishment and characterisation of canine mammary tissue derived cell lines, analysing longitudinally the claudin-1, -3, -4 and -7 expressions in original tissue samples, primary cultures and developed cell lines. Primary cultures were derived from 17 canine mammary tissues: healthy, lobular hyperplasia, simple adenoma, complex adenoma, simple tubular carcinoma, complex carcinoma, carcinoma arising in a benign mixed tumour and benign mixed tissue. Cultivation was performed, if possible, until passage 30. Claudin mRNA and protein expressions were analysed by PCR, QuantiGene Plex Assay, immunocytochemistry and immunofluorescence. Further, cytokeratin expression was analysed immunocytochemically. Cultivation resulted in 11 established cell lines, eight showing epithelial character. In five of the early passages the claudin expressions decreased compared to the original tissues. In general, claudin expressions were diminished during cultivation. Three cell lines kept longitudinally claudin, as well as epithelial marker expressions, representing valuable tools for the development of claudin targeted anti-tumour therapies. PMID:27690019

  7. Autonomous Bioluminescent Expression of the Bacterial Luciferase Gene Cassette (lux) in a Mammalian Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Close, Dan M.; Patterson, Stacey S.; Ripp, Steven; Baek, Seung J.; Sanseverino, John; Sayler, Gary S.

    2010-01-01

    Background The bacterial luciferase (lux) gene cassette consists of five genes (luxCDABE) whose protein products synergistically generate bioluminescent light signals exclusive of supplementary substrate additions or exogenous manipulations. Historically expressible only in prokaryotes, the lux operon was re-synthesized through a process of multi-bicistronic, codon-optimization to demonstrate for the first time self-directed bioluminescence emission in a mammalian HEK293 cell line in vitro and in vivo. Methodology/Principal Findings Autonomous in vitro light production was shown to be 12-fold greater than the observable background associated with untransfected control cells. The availability of reduced riboflavin phosphate (FMNH2) was identified as the limiting bioluminescence substrate in the mammalian cell environment even after the addition of a constitutively expressed flavin reductase gene (frp) from Vibrio harveyi. FMNH2 supplementation led to a 151-fold increase in bioluminescence in cells expressing mammalian codon-optimized luxCDE and frp genes. When injected subcutaneously into nude mice, in vivo optical imaging permitted near instantaneous light detection that persisted independently for the 60 min length of the assay with negligible background. Conclusions/Significance The speed, longevity, and self-sufficiency of lux expression in the mammalian cellular environment provides a viable and powerful alternative for real-time target visualization not currently offered by existing bioluminescent and fluorescent imaging technologies. PMID:20805991

  8. Gene array analysis of embryonic- versus adult-derived hypothalamic NPY-expressing cell lines.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Sandeep S; Gingerich, Sarah; Virtanen, Carl; Belsham, Denise D

    2012-07-06

    Few studies have utilized microarray analysis to understand the genome wide changes involved in the development of the hypothalamus despite its overall importance to basic physiology. Gene expression profiling of immortalized, clonal hypothalamic neurons, embryonic-derived mHypoE-46 and adult-derived mHypoA-2/12, reveals that the expression of 1225 probes was significantly changed between the two neuronal models. Further comparison of the gene expression profiles identified two categories of genes that were confirmed with qRT-PCR: (i) genes implicated in the Wnt signaling pathway; and (ii) transcription factors previously implicated in the development of the central nervous system. Yet, functional analysis of the two cell lines, including hormonal responses and secretion, indicate that they are comparable despite their developmental origin. This study provides a comprehensive analysis of embryonic- and adult-derived hypothalamic neuronal cell models that both express neuropeptide Y, and identifies novel genes as candidates for mediating the development of specific hypothalamic neurons. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Resistin and Visfatin Expression in HCT-116 Colorectal Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Ghaemmaghami, Sara; Mohaddes, Seyed Mojtaba; Hedayati, Mehdi; Gorgian Mohammadi, Masumeh; Dehbashi, Golnoosh

    2013-01-01

    Adipocytokines, hormones secreted from adipose tissue, have been shown to be associated with many cancers such as breast, prostate and colorectal cancer. Recent studies have indicated that resistin and visfatin, two of these adipokines have high level plasma concentrations in colorectal cancer patients and may be promising biomarkers for colorectal cancer. The aim of this study was to identify whether the colorectal cancer cell line, HCT-116, itself is the source of these two adipokines secretion. Resistin and visfatin expression were investigated in HCT-116 by RT – PCR at mRNA level and confirmed by ELISA at protein level. Visfatin showed a high expression at both mRNA and protein levels in HCT-116. Conversely, resistin was not expressed in either cell lysate or supernatant. These results showed that HCT-116 colorectal cancer cells secrete and express visfatin endogenously. However, they are not the main source of resistin and the high level of resistin in colorectal cancer may be due to monocytes and other inflammatory cells which increase in proinflammation status of cancer. Taken together, visfatin may act on colorectal cancer cell in an autocrine manner while resistin may act in a paracrine manner. PMID:24551805

  10. The mechanosensitive cell line ND-C does not express functional thermoTRP channels.

    PubMed

    Rugiero, François; Wood, John N

    2009-06-01

    The molecular basis of mechanosensation in sensory neurons has yet to be defined. We found that ND-C cells, a hybrid cell line derived from neonatal rat DRG neurons, express mechanosensitive ion channels, and provide a useful expression system for testing candidate mechanosensitive ion channels. ND-C cells retain some important features of DRG neurons such as the expression of TTX-sensitive Na(+) and acid-activated currents as well as the ability to respond to mechanical stimulation with cationic currents sensitive to the analgesic peptide NMB1. ND-C cells do not respond to agonists of the 'thermoTRP' channels, suggesting that these channels are not responsible for MA currents in these cells and DRG neurons. Furthermore, transfecting ND-C cells with the candidate mechanotransducer channel TRPA1 does not increase MA current amplitudes, despite TRPA1 being functionally expressed at the plasma membrane. This correlates well with the fact that all types of MA currents can be recorded from TRPA1-negative DRG neurons.

  11. Gene-expression analysis of hair cell regeneration in the zebrafish lateral line

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Linjia; Romero-Carvajal, Andres; Haug, Jeff S.; Seidel, Christopher W.; Piotrowski, Tatjana

    2014-01-01

    Deafness caused by the terminal loss of inner ear hair cells is one of the most common sensory diseases. However, nonmammalian animals (e.g., birds, amphibians, and fish) regenerate damaged hair cells. To understand better the reasons underpinning such disparities in regeneration among vertebrates, we set out to define at high resolution the changes in gene expression associated with the regeneration of hair cells in the zebrafish lateral line. We performed RNA-Seq analyses on regenerating support cells purified by FACS. The resulting expression data were subjected to pathway enrichment analyses, and the differentially expressed genes were validated in vivo via whole-mount in situ hybridizations. We discovered that cell cycle regulators are expressed hours before the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling following hair cell death. We propose that Wnt/β-catenin signaling is not involved in regulating the onset of proliferation but governs proliferation at later stages of regeneration. In addition, and in marked contrast to mammals, our data clearly indicate that the Notch pathway is significantly down-regulated shortly after injury, thus uncovering a key difference between the zebrafish and mammalian responses to hair cell injury. Taken together, our findings lay the foundation for identifying differences in signaling pathway regulation that could be exploited as potential therapeutic targets to promote either sensory epithelium or hair cell regeneration in mammals. PMID:24706903

  12. Antigenic relatedness of equine herpes virus types 1 and 3.

    PubMed

    Gutekunst, D E; Malmquist, W A; Becvar, C S

    1978-01-01

    Antiserums prepared in specific pathogen free (SPF) ponies were used in direct and indirect immunofluorescence, immunodiffusion, complement fixation and serum neutralization procedures to study the interrelationships of the three types of equine herpes viruses (EHV-1, EHV-2, and EHV-3). Equine cell cultures infected with each type virus fluoresced when stained with homologous conjugated antiserum. In reciprocal tests EHV-1 and EHV-3 cross-fluoresced, but EHV-2 did not cross-fluoresce. Non-infected cell cultures did not fluoresce when stained with the 3 conjugates. EHV-1 and EHV-3 cross-fluoresced in reciprocal indirect fluorescent antibody tests, but no cross-fluorescence was shown with EHV-2. Antigens representing each type of equine herpes virus reacted with their homologous antiserum in the immunodiffusion test. In reciprocal tests, a common line(s) of identity formed with EHV-1 and EHV-3; however, the precipitin line(s) was not common with EHV-2. Antigen prepared from noninfected embryonic mule skin (EMS) cell cultures did not react with any of the antiserums. Specific complement-fixing antibodies were present in antiserums when tested against their homologous antigens. In reciprocal complement fixation tests EHV-1 and EHV-3 crossreacted, but no cross-reactivity was shown with EHV-2. Significant levels of neutralizing antibody were in an antiserum when tested against homologous virus, whereas cross-neutralization was not detectable in reciprocal tests. These studies indicate that each type of equine herpes virus contains specific antigenic components, and EHV-1 and EHV-3 share a common antigen(s) that is not shared with EHV-2.

  13. Transient HEXA expression in a transformed human fetal Tay-Sachs disease neuroglial cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandes, M.J.; Hechtman, P.; Kaplan, F.

    1994-09-01

    Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) is a severe neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the accumulation of GM{sub 2} ganglioside in the neurons of the central cortex. The recessively inherited disorder results from deficiency of hexosaminidase A (Hex A), a heterodimer of an {alpha} and {beta} subunit encoded by the HEXA and HEXB genes. Expression of HEXA mutations in COS cells has several disadvantages including high endogenous hexosaminidase activity. We report a new transient expression system with very low endogenous Hex A activity. An SV40-transformed fetal TSD neuroglial cell line was assessed for transient expression of the HEXA gene. pCMV{alpha}, a vector incorporating the cytomegalovirus promoter with the human {alpha}-subunit cDNA insert, proved to be the most efficient expression vector. Transfection of 4x10{sup 6} cells with 5-20 {mu}g of plasmid resulted in 100 to 500-fold Hex A activity (4MUGS hydrolysis) relative to mock-transfected cells. Use of pCMV{beta}-Gal as a control for transfection efficiency indicated that 10-20% of cells were transfected. Hex A specific activity increased for at least 72 h post-transfection. This new transient expression system should greatly improve the characterization of mutations in which low levels of HEXA expression result in milder clinical phenotypes and permit studies on enzymatic properties of mutant forms of Hex A. Since the cells used are of CNS origin and synthesize gangliosides, it should also be possible to study, in culture, the metabolic phenotype associated with TSD.

  14. Gene and microRNA expression reveals sensitivity to paclitaxel in laryngeal cancer cell line

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Cheng-Zhi; Xie, Jin; Jin, Bin; Chen, Xin-Wei; Sun, Zhen-Feng; Wang, Bao-Xing; Dong, Pin

    2013-01-01

    Paclitaxel is a widely used chemotherapy drug for advanced laryngeal cancer patients. However, the fact that there are 20-40% of advanced laryngeal cancer patients do not response to paclitaxel makes it necessary to figure out potential biomarkers for paclitaxel sensitivity prediction. In this work, Hep2, a laryngeal cancer cell line, untreated or treated with lower dose of paclitaxel for 24 h, was applied to DNA microarray chips for gene and miR expression profile analysis. Expression of eight genes altered significantly following paclitaxel treatment, which was further validated by quantitative real-time PCR. Four up-regulated genes were ID2, BMP4, CCL4 and ACTG2, in which ID2 and BMP4 were implicated to be involved in several drugs sensitivity. While the down-regulated four genes, MAPK4, FASN, INSIG1 and SCD, were mainly linked to the endoplasmic reticulum and fatty acid biosynthesis, these two cell processes that are associated with drug sensitivity by increasing evidences. After paclitaxel treatment, expression of 49 miRs was significantly altered. Within these miRs, the most markedly expression-changed were miR-31-star, miR-1264, miR-3150b-5p and miR-210. While the miRs putatively modulated the mRNA expression of the most significantly expression-altered genes were miR-1264, miR-130a, miR-27b, miR-195, miR-1291, miR-214, miR-1277 and miR-1265, which were obtained by miR target prediction and miRNA target correlation. Collectively, our study might provide potential biomarkers for paclitaxel sensitivity prediction and drug resistance targets in laryngeal cancer patients. PMID:23826416

  15. Characterization of keratin and cell cycle protein expression in cell lines from squamous intraepithelial lesions progressing towards a malignant phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Hietanen, S.; Syrjänen, K.; Syrjänen, S.

    1998-01-01

    Two cell lines derived from vaginal intraepithelial neoplasias (VAINs) expressing human papillomavirus (HPV) 33 (VAIN I, UT-DEC-1) and 16 (VAIN II, UT-DEC-2) E6-E7 mRNA were studied in organotypic culture for their keratins and cell cycle regulatory proteins in relation to replicative aging. Early-passage UT-DEC-1 and UT-DEC-2 cells reproduced epithelial patterns consistent with VAIN. Cells from later passages resembled full-thickness intraepithelial neoplasia (UT-DEC-1) and microinvasive cancer (UT-DEC-2). The morphological changes were compatible with these cell lines' ability for anchorage-independent growth at later passages. Simple epithelial keratins were aberrantly expressed in both cell lines. K18 (absent in normal vaginal keratinocytes) and K17 expression increased in UT-DEC-1 and UT-DEC-2 cells at late passages. No marked differences in expression of p53 (wild type in both cell lines), mdm-2 or PCNA were detected in parallel with progression. The expression of p21WAF1/cip1 localized mostly to the upper half of the epithelium at early passage and was more intense in the HPV 16-positive UT-DEC-2 cell line expressing K10. In Northern blot analyses, the transcription pattern of the HPV 33 E6-E7 of the UT-DEC-1 cell line changed during later passages, whereas that of the HPV 16 E6-E7 of the UT-DEC-2 cell line remained unaltered. The present characterization of the phenotype of these cell lines derived from natural squamous intraepithelial lesions shows an association between simple epithelial-type keratin expression and progressive changes in growth and morphology, but fails to demonstrate consistent changes in the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins studied in parallel with progression. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9514056

  16. ICAM-1 expression by lung cancer cell lines: effects of upregulation by cytokines on the interaction with LAK cells.

    PubMed

    Melis, M; Spatafora, M; Melodia, A; Pace, E; Gjomarkaj, M; Merendino, A M; Bonsignore, G

    1996-09-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression by tumour cells may be involved in their interaction with defensive cells. In this study the surface ICAM-1 expression and soluble ICAM-1 (sICAM-1) production by five small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and five non-SCLC (NSCLC) cell lines was investigated. In addition, the effects of ICAM-1 upregulation by cytokines on the adhesion of lung cancer cells to allogeneic lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells and susceptibility to LAK cytotoxicity was also evaluated. ICAM-1 expression was assessed by flow cytometry. Soluble ICAM-1 release was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Interaction with LAK cells was tested by adhesion and cytotoxicity assays. At baseline, SCLC lines did not express ICAM-1, while 4 of the 5 NSCLC lines expressed ICAM-1. ICAM-1 expression was induced by interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) in 4 of the 5 SCLC lines and upregulated in 1 of the 5 NSCLC lines. ICAM-1 expression was induced by tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in 1 of the 5 SCLC lines (National Cancer Institute (NCI) H211), and upregulated in 2 of the 5 NSCLC lines (NCI H460 and NCI H838). Among the latter lines, one (NCI H838) released significant amounts of sICAM-1. Adhesion to LAK cells and susceptibility to LAK cytotoxicity were significantly higher in TNF-alpha-treated NCI H460 and NCI H211 cells, compared to untreated NCI H460 and NCI H211 cells. In contrast, no difference in adhesion to LAK cells and susceptibility to LAK cytotoxicity was detected between baseline and TNF-alpha-treated NCI H838 cells. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 surface expression and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 release may play an important role in interactions between lymphokine-activated killer cells and lung cancer cells.

  17. Pediatrics and herpes simplex virus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Richard; Rosenthal, Susan L; Stanberry, Lawrence R

    2005-01-01

    This review explores the development of prophylactic genital herpes vaccines and their potential impact on perinatal and oral-facial disease. Vaccine strategies have included the use of whole killed virus, viral subunits, attenuated live virus, viral vectors, and bare DNA. To date, the recombinant subunit vaccine, truncated HSV-2 gD and alum/MPL, has been the most efficacious. The vaccine is 73 to 74 percent effective in preventing genital disease in herpes simplex virus seronegative women but is not effective in men or seropositive women. Models predict a significant impact on genital herpes if it limits viral shedding. Reductions in perinatal and oral-facial disease are likely to occur as well. Once an efficacious herpes vaccine is available, its effectiveness will depend ultimately on vaccine acceptance by professional organizations, healthcare professionals, and parents. Further research is required to improve on and fully understand the implications of prophylactic herpes simplex vaccines.

  18. An updated approach to treating and preventing herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Garrubba, Carl; Donkers, Kelly

    2013-12-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) causes chickenpox and herpes zoster. Herpes zoster is a common infection in older adults and can lead to potentially debilitating postherpetic neuralgia. This article reviews the diagnosis and management of herpes zoster, including strategies to reduce disease frequency and severity with the herpes zoster vaccine.

  19. A Stable HeLa Cell Line That Inducibly Expresses Poliovirus 2Apro: Effects on Cellular and Viral Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Barco, Angel; Feduchi, Elena; Carrasco, Luis

    2000-01-01

    A HeLa cell clone (2A7d) that inducibly expresses the gene for poliovirus protease 2A (2Apro) under the control of tetracycline has been obtained. Synthesis of 2Apro induces severe morphological changes in 2A7d cells. One day after tetracycline removal, cells round up and a few hours later die. Poliovirus 2Apro cleaves both forms of initiation factor eIF4G, causing extensive inhibition of capped-mRNA translation a few hours after protease induction. Methoxysuccinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Val-chloromethylketone, a selective inhibitor of 2Apro, prevents both eIF4G cleavage and inhibition of translation but not cellular death. Expression of 2Apro still allows both the replication of poliovirus and the translation of mRNAs containing a picornavirus leader sequence, while vaccinia virus replication is drastically inhibited. Translation of transfected capped mRNA is blocked in 2A7d-On cells, while luciferase synthesis from a mRNA bearing a picornavirus internal ribosome entry site (IRES) sequence is enhanced by the presence of 2Apro. Moreover, synthesis of 2Apro in 2A7d cells complements the translational defect of a poliovirus 2Apro-defective variant. These results show that poliovirus 2Apro expression mimics some phenotypical characteristics of poliovirus-infected cells, such as cell rounding, inhibition of protein synthesis and enhancement of IRES-driven translation. This cell line constitutes a useful tool to further analyze 2Apro functions, to complement poliovirus 2Apro mutants, and to test antiviral compounds. PMID:10666269

  20. Evaluation of cytokine gene expression after avian influenza virus infection in avian cell lines and primary cell cultures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The innate immune responses elicited by avian influenza virus (AIV) infection has been studied by measuring cytokine gene expression by relative real time PCR (rRT-PCR) in vitro, using both cell lines and primary cell cultures. Continuous cell lines offer advantages over the use of primary cell cult...

  1. Focus formation and neoplastic transformation by herpes simplex virus type 2 inactivated intracellularly by 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine and near UV light

    SciTech Connect

    Manak, M.M.; Aurelian, L.; Ts'o, P.O.

    1981-01-01

    The induction of focus formation in low serum and of neoplastic transformation of Syrian hamster embryo cells was examined after the expression of herpes simplex virus type 2 functions. Syrian hamster embryo cells infected at a high multiplicity (5 PFU/cell) with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-labeled herpes simplex virus type 2 (11% substitution of thymidine residues) were exposed to near UV light irradiation at various times postinfection. This procedure specifically inactivated the viral genome, while having little, if any, effect on the unlabeled cellular DNA. Focus formation in 1% serum and neoplastic transformation were observed in cells exposed to virus inactivated before infection, but the frequency was enhanced (15- to 27-fold) in cells in which the virus was inactivated at 4 to 8 h postinfection. Only 2 to 45 independently isolated foci were capable of establishing tumorigenic lines. The established lines exhibited phenotypic alterations characteristic of a transformed state, including reduced serum requirement, anchorage-independent growth, and tumorigenicity. They retained viral DNA sequences and, even at relatively late passage, expressed viral antigens, including ICP 10.

  2. Combination of FACS and homologous recombination for the generation of stable and high-expression engineered cell lines.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Chen, Xuesi; Tang, Wenying; Li, Zhenyi; Liu, Jin; Gao, Feng; Sang, Jianli

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, cell line generation requires several months and involves screening of over several hundred cell clones for high productivity before dozens are selected as candidate cell lines. Here, we have designed a new strategy for the generation of stable and high-expression cell lines by combining homologous recombination (HR) and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). High expression was indicated by the expression of secreted green fluorescent protein (SEGFP). Parental cell lines with the highest expression of SEGFP were then selected by FACS and identified by stability analysis. Consequently, HR vectors were constructed using the cassette for SEGFP as the HR region. After transfecting the HR vector, the cells with negative SEGFP expression were enriched by FACS. The complete exchange between SEGFP and target gene (TNFR-Fc) cassettes was demonstrated by DNA analysis. Compared with the traditional method, by integrating the cassette containing the gene of interest into the pre-selected site, the highest producing cells secreted a more than 8-fold higher titer of target protein. Hence, this new strategy can be applied to isolated stable cell lines with desirable expression of any gene of interest. The stable cell lines can rapidly produce proteins for researching protein structure and function and are even applicable in drug discovery.

  3. Combination of FACS and Homologous Recombination for the Generation of Stable and High-Expression Engineered Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lei; Chen, Xuesi; Tang, Wenying; Li, Zhenyi; Liu, Jin; Gao, Feng; Sang, Jianli

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, cell line generation requires several months and involves screening of over several hundred cell clones for high productivity before dozens are selected as candidate cell lines. Here, we have designed a new strategy for the generation of stable and high-expression cell lines by combining homologous recombination (HR) and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). High expression was indicated by the expression of secreted green fluorescent protein (SEGFP). Parental cell lines with the highest expression of SEGFP were then selected by FACS and identified by stability analysis. Consequently, HR vectors were constructed using the cassette for SEGFP as the HR region. After transfecting the HR vector, the cells with negative SEGFP expression were enriched by FACS. The complete exchange between SEGFP and target gene (TNFR-Fc) cassettes was demonstrated by DNA analysis. Compared with the traditional method, by integrating the cassette containing the gene of interest into the pre-selected site, the highest producing cells secreted a more than 8-fold higher titer of target protein. Hence, this new strategy can be applied to isolated stable cell lines with desirable expression of any gene of interest. The stable cell lines can rapidly produce proteins for researching protein structure and function and are even applicable in drug discovery. PMID:24646904

  4. Human peripheral blood granulocytes and myeloid leukemic cell lines express both transcripts encoding for stem cell factor.

    PubMed

    Ramenghi, U; Ruggieri, L; Dianzani, I; Rosso, C; Brizzi, M F; Camaschella, C; Pietsch, T; Saglio, G

    1994-09-01

    Stem cell factor (SCF), the ligand for the c-kit proto-oncogene, has been shown to play a critical role in the migration of melanocytes and germ cells during embryogenesis as well as in the proliferative control of the hematopoietic compartment. In this study we investigated the expression of both the soluble and transmembrane SCF forms in purified peripheral blood populations and in several hematopoietic cell lines. Expression of both transcripts, though in different ratios, was identified in whole bone marrow, in bone marrow stromal cells and in human peripheral blood. In peripheral blood, SCF expression could be ascribable to polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), whereas no SCF expression was detected in isolated lymphocytes, monocytes and in some T lymphoid cell lines. Conversely, some hematopoietic myeloid cell lines, such as HL-60, KG1 and K562, express SCF with similar patterns.

  5. In vitro invasion of small-cell lung cancer cell lines correlates with expression of epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Damstrup, L.; Rude Voldborg, B.; Spang-Thomsen, M.; Brünner, N.; Skovgaard Poulsen, H.

    1998-01-01

    Formation of metastasis is a multistep process involving attachment to the basement membrane, local proteolysis and migration into surrounding tissues, lymph or bloodstream. In the present study, we have analysed the correlation between in vitro invasion and presence of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in a panel of 21 small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines. We have previously reported that ten of these cell lines expressed EGFR protein detected by radioreceptor and affinity labelling assays. In 11 small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines, EGFR mRNA was detected by Northern blot analysis. In vitro invasion in a Boyden chamber assay was found in all EGFR-positive cell lines, whereas no invasion was detected in the EGFR-negative cell lines. Quantification of the in vitro invasion in 12 selected SCLC cell lines demonstrated that, in the EGFR-positive cell lines, between 5% and 16% of the cells added to the upper chamber were able to traverse the Matrigel membrane. Expression of several matrix metalloproteases (MMP), of tissue inhibitor of MMP (TIMP) and of cathepsin B was evaluated by immunoprecipitation, Western blot analysis and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). However, in vitro invasive SCLC cell lines could not be distinguished from non-invasive cell lines based on the expression pattern of these molecules. In six SCLC cell lines, in vitro invasion was also determined in the presence of the EGFR-neutralizing monoclonal antibody mAb528. The addition of this antibody resulted in a significant reduction of the in vitro invasion in three selected EGFR-positive cell lines. Our results show that only EGFR-positive SCLC cell lines had the in vitro invasive phenotype, and it is therefore suggested that the EGFR might play an important role for the invasion potential of SCLC cell lines. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9744504

  6. A designed equine herpes thymidine kinase (EHV4 TK) variant improves ganciclovir-induced cell-killing.

    PubMed

    McSorley, Theresa; Ort, Stephan; Monnerjahn, Christian; Konrad, Manfred

    2014-02-01

    The limitations of the ganciclovir (GCV)/herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV1 TK: EC 2.7.1.21) system as a suicide gene therapy approach have been extensively studied over the years. In our study, we focused on improving the cytotoxic profile of the GCV/equine herpes virus-4 thymidine kinase (EHV4 TK: EC 2.7.1.21) system. Our approach involved the structure-guided mutagenesis of EHV4 TK in order to switch its ability to preferentially phosphorylate the natural substrate deoxythymidine (dT) to that of GCV. We performed steady-state kinetic analysis, genetic complementation in a thymidine kinase-deficient Escherichia coli strain, isothermal titration calorimetry, and analysis of GCV-induced cell killing through generation of HEK 293 stable cell-lines expressing EHV4 TK mutants and wild-type EHV4 TK. We found that the EHV4 TK S144H-GFP mutant preferentially phosphorylates GCV and confers increased GCV-induced cytotoxicity compared to wild-type EHV4 TK.

  7. Expression and autoregulation of transforming growth factor beta receptor mRNA in small-cell lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Nørgaard, P.; Spang-Thomsen, M.; Poulsen, H. S.

    1996-01-01

    In small-cell lung cancer cell lines resistance to growth inhibition by transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta 1, was previously shown to correlate with lack of TGF-beta receptor I (RI) and II (RII) proteins. To further investigate the role of these receptors, the expression of mRNA for RI, RII and beta-glycan (RIII) was examined. The results showed that loss of RII mRNA correlated with TGF-beta 1 resistance. In contrast, RI-and beta-glycan mRNA was expressed by all cell lines, including those lacking expression of these proteins. According to Southern blot analysis, the loss of type II mRNA was not due to gross structural changes in the gene. The effect of TGF-beta 1 on expression of TGF-beta receptor mRNA (receptor autoregulation) was examined by quantitative Northern blotting in four cell lines with different expression of TGF-beta receptor proteins. In two cell lines expressing all three TGF-beta receptor proteins beta-glycan mRNA was rapidly down-regulated and this effect was sustained throughout the 24 h observation period. RI and RII mRNAs were slightly increased 24 h after treatment. In one cell line sensitive to growth inhibition by TGF-beta, 1 but lacking beta-glycan expression, and one cell line expressing only beta-glycan and thus TGF-beta 1 -resistant, no autoregulation of mRNA of either TGF-beta receptor was demonstrated. The results suggest that TGF-beta 1 regulates the expression of its receptors, in particular beta-glycan, and that this effect is dependent on co-expression of beta-glycan, RI and RII. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:8624260

  8. Divergent control of Cav-1 expression in non-cancerous Li-Fraumeni syndrome and human cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Sherif, Zaki A.; Sultan, Ahmed S.

    2013-01-01

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is primarily characterized by development of tumors exhibiting germ-line mutations in the p53 gene. Cell lines developed from patients of a LFS family have decreased p53 activity as evidenced by the absence of apoptosis upon etoposide treatment. To test our hypothesis that changes in gene expression beyond p53 per se are contributing to the development of tumors, we compared gene expression in non-cancerous skin fibroblasts of LFS-affected (p53 heterozygous) vs. non-affected (p53 wild-type homozygous) family members. Expression analysis showed that several genes were differentially regulated in the p53 homozygous and heterozygous cell lines. We were particularly intrigued by the decreased expression (~88%) of a putative tumor-suppressor protein, caveolin-1 (Cav-1), in the p53-mutant cells. Decreased expression of Cav-1 was also seen in both p53-knockout and p21-knockout HTC116 cells suggesting that p53 controls Cav-1 expression through p21 and leading to the speculation that p53, Cav-1 and p21 may be part of a positive auto-regulatory feedback loop. The direct relationship between p53 and Cav-1 was also tested with HeLa cells (containing inactive p53), which expressed a significantly lower Cav-1 protein. A panel of nonfunctional and p53-deficient colon and epithelial breast cancer cell lines showed undetectable expression of Cav-1 supporting the role of p53 in the control of Cav-1. However, in two aggressively metastasizing breast cancer cell lines, Cav-1 was strongly expressed suggesting a possible role in tumor metastasis. Thus, there is a divergent control of Cav-1 expression as evidenced in non-cancerous Li-Fraumeni syndrome and some aggressive human cancer cell lines. PMID:23114650

  9. Heat shock and herpes virus: enhanced reactivation without untargeted mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lytle, C.D.; Carney, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    Enhanced reactivation of Ultraviolet-irradiated virus has been reported to occur in heat-shocked host cells. Since enhanced virus reactivation is often accompanied by untargeted mutagenesis, we investigated whether such mutagenesis would occur for herpes simplex virus (HSV) in CV-1 monkey kidney cells subjected to heat shock. In addition to expressing enhanced reactivation, the treated cells were transiently more susceptible to infection by unirradiated HSV. No mutagenesis of unirradiated HSV was found whether infection occurred at the time of increased susceptibility to infection or during expression of enhanced viral reactivation.

  10. Epigenetic regulation of proMMP-1 expression in the HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Poplineau, Mathilde; Dufer, Jean; Antonicelli, Frank; Trussardi-Regnier, Aurelie

    2011-06-01

    The matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family members play an important role in various physiological and pathological processes. Although MMP-1 (collagenase-1) has been shown to be involved in tumor invasiveness, the regulation of its expression is still not fully elucidated and could implicate epigenetic mechanisms. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of the Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor (HDI) trichostatin A (TSA) and the inhibitor of DNA methylation 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-azadC) on the proMMP-1 expression in the human HT1080 fibrosarcoma cell line. Real-time RT-PCR revealed that 5-azadC or 5-azadC + TSA but not TSA alone, despite global histone H4 hyperacetylation, increased proMMP-1 mRNA levels. This transcription activation was correlated with chromatin decondensation determined by nuclear texture image analysis technique. Western blot analysis of cell culture conditioned media revealed a significant increase in proMMP-1 secretion after 5-azadC or 5-azadC + TSA treatment compared to untreated cells. These results suggested that epigenetic mechanisms could be involved in proMMP-1 gene expression including chromatin supra-organization changes. Indeed, although the proMMP-1 gene promoter does not appear to contain CpG islands, its expression can be induced by the demethylating agent 5-azadC. Further experiments revealed that inhibition of protein neosynthesis by cycloheximide decreased 5-azadC-induced proMMP-1 mRNA, suggesting that epigenetically regulated intermediate molecules could be involved in proMMP-1 expression regulation in these cells.

  11. Interleukin-6 stimulates cell migration, invasion and integrin expression in HTR-8/SVneo cell line.

    PubMed

    Jovanović, M; Vićovac, L

    2009-04-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is present in human endometrium throughout menstrual cycle and in pregnancy. Trophoblast also expresses IL-6. IL-6R and its associated signal transducer gp130 were found in trophoblast as well. IL-6 is generally assumed to be relevant for trophoblast invasion. This study was undertaken to determine influence of endogenous and externally added IL-6 on invasion and migration of first trimester of pregnancy trophoblast in vitro. Integrins alpha(5)beta(1) and alpha(1)beta(1) have been shown to play an important role in trophoblast invasion and the effect of IL-6 on the expression of these integrin subunits was studied. We are showing that in both isolated first trimester of pregnancy cytotrophoblast (CTB) and HTR-8/SVneo cell line IL-6 and IL-6R are present. The effect on migration was studied using cell wounding and migration test on HTR-8/SVneo cells. Effect of IL-6 and function blocking anti-IL-6 antibody in Matrigel invasion tests was studied on both cell types. The effect of IL-6 on integrin subunit expression was determined by cell-based ELISA and Western blot on HTR-8/SVneo cells. The results obtained show that exogenous IL-6 has stimulatory effect on cell migration in HTR-8/SVneo and invasion by both cell types. Function blocking anti-IL-6 inhibited unstimulated invasion by isolated first trimester cytotrophoblast and both cell migration and invasion in unstimulated HTR-8/SVneo. Integrin alpha(5) expression was stimulated by IL-6 to 134% (p<0.05), alpha(1) to 135% (p<0.005), and beta(1) to 134% (p<0.001) of control in cell-based ELISA, but also in Western blot. The data obtained show for the first time sensitivity of extravillous trophoblast cell line HTR-8/SVneo to IL-6, in addition to isolated first trimester cytotrophoblast. We conclude that both exogenous and endogenous IL-6 stimulate trophoblast cell migration and invasion, which may be partly attributable to stimulation of expression of the studied integrin subunits.

  12. Vascular endothelial growth factor expression and inhibition in uveal melanoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Patrick; Burnier, Julia; Burnier, Miguel N.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Uveal melanoma (UM) is a disease that affects approximately five people per million in the United States. This disease metastasises predominantly to the liver, and treatment options following the clinical detection of these sequelae are limited. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) is the primary activator of tumour angiogenesis and functions by binding to VEGF-Receptor 2 (VEGF-R2) and is often required for tumour growth beyond 2–3 mm. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of VEGF-A and the primary VEGF-R2 in three UM cell lines. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of VEGF-A inhibition on receptor activation and production of other cytokines. Finally, the effects of VEGF-A inhibition on the proliferation, migration, and invasion in the cell lines were ascertained. Materials: Three UM cell lines (92.1, OCM-1, and UW-1) were incubated with and without the addition of 100 μg/mL of bevacizumab. VEGF-A expression under both conditions was determined by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and phosphorylated VEGF-R2 expression was determined using western blot. The effects of VEGF-A inhibition on 20 cytokines (IL-1a, IL-2, IL-5, IL-8, IL-12p70, GM-CSF, IFNy, CCL3, MMP-9, TNF-a, IL-1b, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-13, GRO, MCP-1, MIP-1b, and RANTES) were determined using a multiplex sandwich ELISA. Proliferation rates before and after treatment were evaluated via sulforhodamine B assay, and migration and invasion assays implementing the Boyden chamber technique, the latter with artificial extracellular matrix, were used to assess their respective abilities. The Student’s t-test was used to compare changes in cytokine expression following VEGF-A inhibition. Analysis of variance was used to compare changes in the functional abilities of three uveal melanoma cell lines following VEGF-A inhibition. A P-value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: All three cell lines produced copious amounts of

  13. Herpes Mastitis: Diagnosis and Management.

    PubMed

    Toussaint, Arnaud; Simonson, Colin; Valla, Christian

    2016-05-01

    Herpetic lesions most frequently occur on oral and genital areas. However, herpes simplex virus (HSV) can be a rare cause of breast infection. In few published articles, the route of transmission is predominantly from infant to mother. We report two cases about simultaneous mammary and extramammary (oral and genital) herpetic infection in nonlactating women. In both cases, HSV breast lesions were acquired by sexual contacts with partners who were asymptomatic HSV carriers. Through a review of literature, we highlight clinical signs for an early diagnosis. We also emphasize the advantage of the valacyclovir for treating this uncommon pathology.

  14. Muscle Paralysis in Herpes Zoster

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, David; Fusfeld, Robert D.

    1965-01-01

    Herpes zoster may, in some instances, cause motor paralysis as well as the usual sensory and cutaneous manifestations. It is suggested that the presence of electromyographic denervation potentials be used as the criterion of muscle paresis in order to avoid mistaking atrophy of disuse for true lower motor neuron disease. Use of the proper physical therapy procedures hastens the recovery of function and may serve to retard denervation atrophy and fibrosis in patients with muscle paralysis. ImagesFigure 1 (Case 1).Figure 1 (Case 1). PMID:5828175

  15. Neonatal Herpes Simplex Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    James, Scott H; Kimberlin, David W

    2015-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 and HSV-2 infections are highly prevalent worldwide and are characterized by establishing lifelong infection with periods of latency interspersed with periodic episodes of reactivation. Acquisition of HSV by an infant during the peripartum or postpartum period results in neonatal HSV disease, a rare but significant infection that can be associated with severe morbidity and mortality, especially if there is dissemination or central nervous system involvement. Diagnostic and therapeutic advances have led to improvements in mortality and, to a lesser extent, neurodevelopmental outcomes, but room exists for further improvement.

  16. Insights into gene expression profiling of natural resistance to coccidiosis in contrasting chicken lines

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Coccidiosis is a parasitic disease with major economic impact, one of whose main causative agents is Eimeria tenella. Chicken breeds display variable natural resistance to this disease. Unravelling the genetic bases of such variations could provide new clues for protection strategies. Transcriptomic experiments were conducted comparing resistant (Fayoumi) and susceptible (Leghorn) lines. Caecum and caecal tonsils were analysed. A global increase in differential gene expression following infection was observed for caecum comparisons, whereas a global decrease following infection was observed for caecal tonsils. Gene lists for infected tissues display 40 genes in common across breeds, 20 of which were specific to infected tissues. Among these specific genes, 9 belong to the 100 more differentially expressed genes of the infected caecum comparison. Gene expression networks were constructed in parallel, identifying highly connected genes. Comparing information from differential gene lists and gene network analysis allows one to highlight potential pivotal genes in the infection process, one of which was located in a putative significant QTL region for infection associated lesions. PMID:21645306

  17. Expression of xenobiotic transporters in the human renal proximal tubule cell line RPTEC/TERT1.

    PubMed

    Aschauer, Lydia; Carta, Giada; Vogelsang, Nadine; Schlatter, Eberhard; Jennings, Paul

    2015-12-25

    The kidney is a major target for drug-induced injury, primarily due the fact that it transports a wide variety of chemical entities into and out of the tubular lumen. Here, we investigated the expression of the main xenobiotic transporters in the human renal proximal tubule cell line RPTEC/TERT1 at an mRNA and/or protein level. RPTEC/TERT1 cells expressed OCT2, OCT3, OCTN2, MATE1, MATE2, OAT1, OAT3 and OAT4. The functionality of the OCTs was demonstrated by directional transport of the fluorescent dye 4-Di-1-ASP. In addition, P-glycoprotein activity in RPTEC/TERT1 cells was verified by fluorescent dye retention in presence of various P-glycoprotein inhibitors. In comparison to proliferating cells, contact inhibited RPTEC/TERT1 cells expressed increased mRNA levels of several ABC transporter family members and were less sensitive to cyclosporine A. We conclude that differentiated RPTEC/TERT1 cells are well suited for utilisation in xenobiotic transport and pharmacokinetic studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Bortezomib and Arsenic Trioxide Activity on a Myelodysplastic Cell Line (P39): A Gene Expression Study

    PubMed Central

    Savlı, Hakan; Galimberti, Sara; Sünnetçi, Deniz; Canestraro, Martina; Palumbo, Giuseppe; Nagy, Balint; Raimondo, Francesco Di; Petrini, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to understand the molecular pathways affected by bortezomib and arsenic trioxide treatment on myelomonocytoid cell line P39. Materials and Methods: Oligonucleotide microarray platforms were used for gene expression and pathway analysis. Confirmation studies were performed using quantitative real time PCR. Results: Bortezomib treatment has shown upregulated DIABLO and NF-κBIB (a NF-κB inhibitor) and downregulated NF-κB1, NF-κB2, and BIRC1 gene expressions. Combination treatment of the two compounds showed gene expression deregulations in concordance by the results of single bortezomib treatment. Especially, P53 was a pathway more significantly modified and a gene network centralized around the beta estradiol gene. Beta estradiol, BRCA2, and FOXA1 genes were remarkable deregulations in our findings. Conclusion: Results support the suggestions about possible use of proteasome inhibitors in the treatment of high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). NF-κB was observed as an important modulator in leukemic transformation of MDS. PMID:25913414

  19. Whole-genome expression analysis of mammalian-wide interspersed repeat elements in human cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Carnevali, Davide; Conti, Anastasia; Pellegrini, Matteo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract With more than 500,000 copies, mammalian-wide interspersed repeats (MIRs), a sub-group of SINEs, represent ∼2.5% of the human genome and one of the most numerous family of potential targets for the RNA polymerase (Pol) III transcription machinery. Since MIR elements ceased to amplify ∼130 myr ago, previous studies primarily focused on their genomic impact, while the issue of their expression has not been extensively addressed. We applied a dedicated bioinformatic pipeline to ENCODE RNA-Seq datasets of seven human cell lines and, for the first time, we were able to define the Pol III-driven MIR transcriptome at single-locus resolution. While the majority of Pol III-transcribed MIR elements are cell-specific, we discovered a small set of ubiquitously transcribed MIRs mapping within Pol II-transcribed genes in antisense orientation that could influence the expression of the overlapping gene. We also identified novel Pol III-transcribed ncRNAs, deriving from transcription of annotated MIR fragments flanked by unique MIR-unrelated sequences, and confirmed the role of Pol III-specific internal promoter elements in MIR transcription. Besides demonstrating widespread transcription at these retrotranspositionally inactive elements in human cells, the ability to profile MIR expression at single-locus resolution will facilitate their study in different cell types and states including pathological alterations. PMID:28028040

  20. Monitoring of bystander effect of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/acyclovir system using fluorescence resonance energy transfer technique.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Tao; Li, Yongjun; Ni, Fenge; Zhang, Feng

    2012-02-01

    Cytotoxic gene therapy mediated by gene transfer of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene followed by acyclovir (ACV) treatment has been reported to inhibit malignant tumor growth in a variety of studies. The magnitude of "bystander effect" is an essential factor for this anti-tumor approach in vivo. However, the mechanism by which HSV-tk/ACV brings "bystander effect" is poorly understood. In this report, the plasmid CD3 (ECFP-CRS-DsRed) and TK-GFP were transferred to the human adenoid cystic carcinoma line ACC-M cell line. The CD3-expressing cells apoptosis was monitored using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique. First, CD3 and TK-GFP co-expressing ACC-M cells apoptosis was monitored using FRET technique. The apoptosis was induced by ACV and initiated by caspase3. The FRET efficient was remarkably decreased and then disappeared during cellular apoptosis, which indicated that the TK-GFP expressing ACC-M cells apoptosis, induced by ACV, was via a caspase3-dependent pathway. Secondly, CD3 and TK-GFP mixed expressing ACC-M cells apoptosis, induced by ACV, were monitored using FRET technique. The apoptotic phenomena appeared in the CD3-expressing ACC-M cells. The results show that HSV-tk/ACV system killed ACC-M cells using its bystander effect. These results confirm that HSV-tk/ACV system is potential for cancer gene therapy.

  1. Identification and analysis of putative promoter motifs in bovine herpes virus.

    PubMed

    Kurjogi, Mahantesh Mallikrjun; Sanakal, Rajeshwari Danappa; Kaliwal, Basappa Basaveneppa

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify and analyse the putative promoter motifs in the bovine herpes virus which causes several diseases in cattle worldwide including bovine mastitis with large economic impact on dairy industry. Bovine mastitis caused due to virus is often neglected as bacterial infections are held mainly responsible for the disease. Therefore, in this in silico investigation with all the existing experimental data a total of 147 promoter were identified along with their sequences from three genome viz bovine herpes virus 1 (BHV), bovine herpes virus 4 and bovine herpes virus 5, out of which 39 promoters were from bovine herpes virus 4 (BHV 4), 95 from BHV1 and 13 from BHV5 and it was observed that BHV1 and BHV5 have a close evolutionary history. However, they belong to the same subfamily and size of the genome and GC% of BHV1 and BHV5 was almost equal and very high compare to that of BHV4. This analysis may help in designing the live attenuated vaccine against BHV causing bovine mastitis that reduces the incidence of bovine mastitis. Identification of promoters may also help in designing of expression vectors which help in better understanding of the regulation of gene expression. In the era of large genomics and proteomics prediction of promoters in the whole genome is crucial for the advancement of drug discovery and gene therapy.

  2. SV40-IMMORTALIZED NON-TUMORIGENIC AND TUMORIGENIC CELL LINES DIFFER IN EXPRESSION OF HALLMARK VIRAL RESPONSE MRNAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SV40-Immortalized Non-Tumorigenic and Tumorigenic Cell Lines Differ in Expression of Hallmark Viral Response mRNAs.

    Prior to the use of an in vitra/in viva transformation system to examine the tumorigenic activity of environmental contaminants, in vitra gene expression pa...

  3. SV40-IMMORTALIZED NON-TUMORIGENIC AND TUMORIGENIC CELL LINES DIFFER IN EXPRESSION OF HALLMARK VIRAL RESPONSE MRNAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SV40-Immortalized Non-Tumorigenic and Tumorigenic Cell Lines Differ in Expression of Hallmark Viral Response mRNAs.

    Prior to the use of an in vitra/in viva transformation system to examine the tumorigenic activity of environmental contaminants, in vitra gene expression pa...

  4. Apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor-alpha in rat hepatocyte cell lines expressing hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed Central

    Guilhot, S.; Miller, T.; Cornman, G.; Isom, H. C.

    1996-01-01

    Three well differentiated SV40-immortalized rat hepatocyte cell lines, CWSV1, CWSV2, and CWSV14, and Hepatitis B Virus (HBV)-producing cell lines derived from them were examined for sensitivity to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha. CWSV1, CWSV2, and CWSV14 cells were co-transfected with a DNA construct containing a dimer of the HBV genome and the neo gene and selected in G418 to generate stable cell lines. Characterization of these cell lines indicated that they contain integrated HBV DNA, contain low molecular weight HBV DNA compatible with the presence of HBV replication intermediates, express HBV transcripts, and produce HBV proteins. The viability of CWSV1, CWSV2, and CWSV2 cells was not significantly altered when they were treated with TNF-alpha at concentrations as high as 20,000 U/ml. The HBV-expressing CWSV1 cell line, SV1di36, and the HBV-expressing CWSV14 cell line, SV14di208, were also not killed when treated with TNF-alpha. However, the HBV-expressing CWSV2 cell line, SV2di366, was extensively killed when treated with TNF-alpha at concentrations ranging from 200 to 20,000 U/ml. Analysis of several different HBV-producing CWSV2 cell lines indicated that TNF-alpha killing depended upon the level of HBV expression. The TNF-alpha-induced cell killing in high HBV-producing CWSV2 cell lines was accompanied by the presence of an oligonucleosomal DNA ladder characteristic of apoptosis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:8774135

  5. The genital herpes problem in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Guerra, B; Puccetti, C; Cervi, F

    2012-10-01

    Genital herpes is a common sexually transmitted infection. In reproductive age it involves the additional risk of vertical transmission to the neonate. Rates of transmission are affected by the viral type and whether the infectio