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Sample records for linear cell array

  1. Designing linear systolic arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, V.K.P.; Tsai, Y.C. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1989-12-01

    The authors develop a simple mapping technique to design linear systolic arrays. The basic idea of the technique is to map the computations of a certain class of two-dimensional systolic arrays onto one-dimensional arrays. Using this technique, systolic algorithms are derived for problems such as matrix multiplication and transitive closure on linearly connected arrays of PEs with constant I/O bandwidth. Compared to known designs in the literature, the technique leads to modular systolic arrays with constant hardware in each PE, few control lines, lexicographic data input/output, and improved delay time. The unidirectional flow of control and data in this design assures implementation of the linear array in the known fault models of wafer scale integration.

  2. Linear array optical edge sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejczy, Antal K. (Inventor); Primus, Howard C. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A series of independent parallel pairs of light emitting and detecting diodes for a linear pixel array, which is laterally positioned over an edge-like discontinuity in a workpiece to be scanned, is disclosed. These independent pairs of light emitters and detectors sense along intersecting pairs of separate optical axes. A discontinuity, such as an edge in the sensed workpiece, reflects a detectable difference in the amount of light from that discontinuity in comparison to the amount of light that is reflected on either side of the discontinuity. A sequentially sychronized clamping and sampling circuit detects that difference as an electrical signal which is recovered by circuitry that exhibits an improved signal-to-noise capability for the system.

  3. Breadboard linear array scan imager program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The performance was evaluated of large scale integration photodiode arrays in a linear array scan imaging system breadboard for application to multispectral remote sensing of the earth's resources. Objectives, approach, implementation, and test results of the program are presented.

  4. Multispectral linear array multiband selection device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, H. L.

    1986-01-01

    An apparatus for detecting multiple spectral bands, individually or concurrently, using linear detector arrays is described. The system employs a beamsplitter to divide the optical source into two or more optical beams which are directed at the linear detector arrays. Filter trays are positioned in the focal planes of the optical beams so that the beams pass through the filter trays prior to impinging upon the detector arrays. Multiple filters are placed on the filter trays. Linear actuators positioned adjacent the filter trays translate the trays across the focal planes of the optical beams so that individual filters are positioned in the path of beams such that those frequencies of the beams that fall within the spectral ranges of the individual bandpass filter through which it passes may be detected by the detector arrays for further examination and analysis.

  5. Some results concerning linear iterative (systolic) arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarra, O.H.; Palis, M.A.; Kim, S.M.

    1985-05-01

    The authors have shown some new interesting results concerning the properties, power, and limitations of various types of linear iterative (systolic) arrays. The method they employed consisted of finding sequential machine characterizations of these array models, and then using the characterizations to prove the results. Because of the absence of any concurrency and synchronization problems, the authors obtained simple proofs to results which when proved directly on the arrays would seem very difficult. The characterizations, therefore, provide a novel and promising method which can be used to analyze other systolic systems. In the future they hope to extend this methodology to the study of two-dimensional and multidimensional systolic arrays, and other systolic systems with different interconnection networks.

  6. Broadcasting on linear arrays and meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Seidel, S.R. . Dept. of Computer Science)

    1993-03-01

    The well known spanning binomial tree broadcast algorithm is generalized to obtain several new broadcast algorithms for linear arrays and meshes. These generalizations take advantage of bidirectional communication, the connectivity of two-dimensional meshes, and the difference between node-to-network and network-to-network bandwidth. It is shown how these algorithms can be further generalized so that any node can be the source of the broadcast message. A partitioning scheme is given that allows these algorithms to be used on linear arrays and meshes of any size. One of these algorithms, the bidirectional spanning tree broadcast, always has lower cost than the recursive halving broadcast for linear arrays. All of these algorithms offer significant performance improvements over the basic spanning tree broadcast. These algorithms do not rely on a knowledge of machine dependent constants for network bandwidth and latency, so their performance is not as sensitive to changes in machine characteristics as that of hybrid and pipelined algorithms. Performance measurements are given for some of these broadcast algorithms on the Intel Delta mesh.

  7. Linear-array systems for aerospace NDE

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Robert A.; Willsher, Stephen J.; Bending, Jamie M.

    1999-12-02

    Rapid large-area inspection of composite structures for impact damage and multi-layered aluminum skins for corrosion has been a recognized priority for several years in both military and civil aerospace applications. Approaches to this requirement have followed two clearly different routes: the development of novel large-area inspection systems, and the enhancement of current ultrasonic or eddy-current methods to reduce inspection times. Ultrasonic inspection is possible with standard flaw detection equipment but the addition of a linear ultrasonic array could reduce inspection times considerably. In order to investigate their potential, 9-element and 17-element linear ultrasonic arrays for composites, and 64-element arrays for aluminum skins, have been developed to DERA specifications for use with the ANDSCAN area scanning system. A 5 m{sup 2} composite wing surface has been scanned with a scan resolution of approximately 3 mm in 6 hours. With subsequent software and hardware improvements all four composite wing surfaces (top/bottom, left/right) of a military fighter aircraft can potentially be inspected in less than a day. Array technology has been very widely used in the medical ultrasound field although rarely above 10 MHz, whereas lap-joint inspection requires a pulse center-frequency of 12 to 20 MHz in order to resolve the separate interfaces in the lap joint. A 128 mm-long multi-element array of 5 mmx2 mm ultrasonic elements for use with the ANDSCAN scanning software was produced to a DERA specification by an NDT manufacturer with experience in the medical imaging field. This paper analyses the performance of the transducers that have been produced and evaluates their use in scanning systems of different configurations.

  8. Linear array CCD sensor for multispectral camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabbal, J.; Boucharlat, G.; Capppechi, F.; Benoit-Gonin, R.

    1985-10-01

    Design, operational and performance features are described for a new 2048 element CCD array in a ceramic package for beam sharing focal plane arrangements on remote sensing satellites. The device, labeled the TH 7805, furnishes 13 micron square pixels at 13 microns pitch over the 480-930 nm interval, two video outputs and a single-phase, buried channel CCD register. Each n-p photodiode is linked to a Si coating by a gate storing the photocharges. Crosstalk between elements is less than 1 percent and the rms noise level is 180 micro-V. The array output sensitivity is 1.37 micro-V/electron, linearity to less than 1 percent, and a 10 MHz maximum data rate. The entire sensor package draws under 150 mW power from the spacecraft. The TH 7805 has withstood over 10 krads in tests without exhibiting faults.

  9. Pyroelectric linear array sensor for object recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chari, Srikant; Jacobs, Eddie L.; Choudhary, Divya

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents a proof of concept sensor system based on a linear array of pyroelectric detectors for recognition of moving objects. The utility of this prototype sensor is demonstrated by its use in trail monitoring and perimeter protection applications for classifying humans against animals with object motion transverse to the field of view of the sensor array. Data acquisition using the system was performed under varied terrains and using a wide variety of animals and humans. With the objective of eventually porting the algorithms onto a low resource computational platform, simple signal processing, feature extraction, and classification techniques are used. The object recognition algorithm uses a combination of geometrical and texture features to provide limited insensitivity to range and speed. Analysis of system performance shows its effectiveness in discriminating humans and animals with high classification accuracy.

  10. Imaging radiometers employing linear thermoelectric arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McManus, Timothy J.; Mickelson, Steve

    1999-07-01

    Infrared Solutions, Inc. has developed a family of radiometers which employ silicon microstructure uncooled linear thermoelectric arrays, prepared by Honeywell Technology Center. Included in the family is a handheld imaging radiometer for predictive and preventive maintenance having a frame time of 1.4 sec, a linescanner radiometer for monitoring of industrial web process, an imaging radiometer for monitoring stationary industrial processes such as a die casting, and a linescanner radiometer for monitoring the temperature distribution of railcar wheels on trains moving at speeds up to 80 mph.

  11. Microbial Cell Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elad, Tal; Lee, Jin Hyung; Gu, Man Bock; Belkin, Shimshon

    The coming of age of whole-cell biosensors, combined with the continuing advances in array technologies, has prepared the ground for the next step in the evolution of both disciplines - the whole cell array. In the present chapter, we highlight the state-of-the-art in the different disciplines essential for a functional bacterial array. These include the genetic engineering of the biological components, their immobilization in different polymers, technologies for live cell deposition and patterning on different types of solid surfaces, and cellular viability maintenance. Also reviewed are the types of signals emitted by the reporter cell arrays, some of the transduction methodologies for reading these signals, and the mathematical approaches proposed for their analysis. Finally, we review some of the potential applications for bacterial cell arrays, and list the future needs for their maturation: a richer arsenal of high-performance reporter strains, better methodologies for their incorporation into hardware platforms, design of appropriate detection circuits, the continuing development of dedicated algorithms for multiplex signal analysis, and - most importantly - enhanced long term maintenance of viability and activity on the fabricated biochips.

  12. Stripe filters on multispectral linear arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J. H.; Blaha, F. C.; Frias, B. R.; Halvis, J.; Hubbard, E.

    1982-01-01

    Dielectric interference filters deposited directly on top of existing 200 element charge coupled device linear imaging arrays were designed, fabricated and evaluated. The optical performance of the filters was verified with regard to crosstalk between adjacent detector elements. The filters showed an average in-band transmittance greater than 80% and a total out of band transmittance of less than 5%. Filter stability was adequate for operation in a space environment. The filter elements were definable in 12 to 25 micron element size compatible with existing silicon detectors. These type of measurement were made: (1) spectral transmission of the filter as deposited on witness plates; (2) spectral response of the silicon sensing device; (3) any optical interaction between filter and sensing device; (4) the response of the filter/sensor combination; and (5) repeatability and uniformity of filter characteristics. Detailed discussion of these evaluations are given.

  13. Linear-array ultrasonic waveguide transducer for under sodium viewing.

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, S. H.; Chien, H. T.; Wang, K.; Lawrence, W. P.; Engel, D.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-09-01

    In this report, we first present the basic design of a low-noise waveguide and its performance followed by a review of the array transducer technology. The report then presents the concept and basic designs of arrayed waveguide transducers that can apply to under-sodium viewing for in-service inspection of fast reactors. Depending on applications, the basic waveguide arrays consist of designs for sideway and downward viewing. For each viewing application, two array geometries, linear and circular, are included in design analysis. Methods to scan a 2-D target using a linear array waveguide transducer are discussed. Future plan to develop a laboratory array waveguide prototype is also presented.

  14. Photovoltaic cell array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eliason, J. T. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A photovoltaic cell array consisting of parallel columns of silicon filaments is described. Each fiber is doped to produce an inner region of one polarity type and an outer region of an opposite polarity type to thereby form a continuous radial semi conductor junction. Spaced rows of electrical contacts alternately connect to the inner and outer regions to provide a plurality of electrical outputs which may be combined in parallel or in series.

  15. Linearly tapered slot antenna circular array for mobile communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Kelly, Eron; Lee, Richard Q.; Taub, Susan R.

    1993-01-01

    The design, fabrication and testing of a conformal K-band circular array is presented. The array consists of sixteen linearly tapered slot antennas (LTSA). It is fed by a 1:16 microstrip line power splitter via electromagnetic coupling. The array has an omni-directional pattern in the azimuth plane. In the elevation plane the beam is displaced above the horizon.

  16. Linear Array Ultrasonic Transducers: Sensitivity and Resolution Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramb, V. A.

    2005-04-01

    The University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI) under contract by the US Air Force has designed and integrated a fully automated inspection system for the inspection of turbine engines that incorporates linear phased array ultrasonic transducers. Phased array transducers have been successfully implemented into weld and turbine blade root inspections where the defect types are well known and characterized. Embedded defects in aerospace turbine engine components are less well defined, however. In order to determine the applicability of linear arrays to aerospace inspections the sensitivity of array transducers to embedded defects in engine materials must be characterized. In addition, the implementation of array transducers into legacy inspection procedures must take into account any differences in sensitivity between the array transducer and that of the single element transducer currently used. This paper discusses preliminary results in a study that compares the sensitivity of linear array and conventional single element transducers to synthetic hard alpha defects in a titanium alloy.

  17. Underwater Imaging Using a 1 × 16 CMUT Linear Array

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Wendong; He, Changde; Zhang, Yongmei; Song, Jinlong; Xue, Chenyang

    2016-01-01

    A 1 × 16 capacitive micro-machined ultrasonic transducer linear array was designed, fabricated, and tested for underwater imaging in the low frequency range. The linear array was fabricated using Si-SOI bonding techniques. Underwater transmission performance was tested in a water tank, and the array has a resonant frequency of 700 kHz, with pressure amplitude 182 dB (μPa·m/V) at 1 m. The −3 dB main beam width of the designed dense linear array is approximately 5 degrees. Synthetic aperture focusing technique was applied to improve the resolution of reconstructed images, with promising results. Thus, the proposed array was shown to be suitable for underwater imaging applications. PMID:26938536

  18. Underwater Imaging Using a 1 × 16 CMUT Linear Array.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Wendong; He, Changde; Zhang, Yongmei; Song, Jinlong; Xue, Chenyang

    2016-03-01

    A 1 × 16 capacitive micro-machined ultrasonic transducer linear array was designed, fabricated, and tested for underwater imaging in the low frequency range. The linear array was fabricated using Si-SOI bonding techniques. Underwater transmission performance was tested in a water tank, and the array has a resonant frequency of 700 kHz, with pressure amplitude 182 dB (μPa·m/V) at 1 m. The -3 dB main beam width of the designed dense linear array is approximately 5 degrees. Synthetic aperture focusing technique was applied to improve the resolution of reconstructed images, with promising results. Thus, the proposed array was shown to be suitable for underwater imaging applications.

  19. Jet Noise Source Localization Using Linear Phased Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agboola, Ferni A.; Bridges, James

    2004-01-01

    A study was conducted to further clarify the interpretation and application of linear phased array microphone results, for localizing aeroacoustics sources in aircraft exhaust jet. Two model engine nozzles were tested at varying power cycles with the array setup parallel to the jet axis. The array position was varied as well to determine best location for the array. The results showed that it is possible to resolve jet noise sources with bypass and other components separation. The results also showed that a focused near field image provides more realistic noise source localization at low to mid frequencies.

  20. Reconstruction Techniques for Sparse Multistatic Linear Array Microwave Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, David M.; Hall, Thomas E.

    2014-06-09

    Sequentially-switched linear arrays are an enabling technology for a number of near-field microwave imaging applications. Electronically sequencing along the array axis followed by mechanical scanning along an orthogonal axis allows dense sampling of a two-dimensional aperture in near real-time. In this paper, a sparse multi-static array technique will be described along with associated Fourier-Transform-based and back-projection-based image reconstruction algorithms. Simulated and measured imaging results are presented that show the effectiveness of the sparse array technique along with the merits and weaknesses of each image reconstruction approach.

  1. Linear antenna array optimization using flower pollination algorithm.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Prerna; Kothari, Ashwin

    2016-01-01

    Flower pollination algorithm (FPA) is a new nature-inspired evolutionary algorithm used to solve multi-objective optimization problems. The aim of this paper is to introduce FPA to the electromagnetics and antenna community for the optimization of linear antenna arrays. FPA is applied for the first time to linear array so as to obtain optimized antenna positions in order to achieve an array pattern with minimum side lobe level along with placement of deep nulls in desired directions. Various design examples are presented that illustrate the use of FPA for linear antenna array optimization, and subsequently the results are validated by benchmarking along with results obtained using other state-of-the-art, nature-inspired evolutionary algorithms such as particle swarm optimization, ant colony optimization and cat swarm optimization. The results suggest that in most cases, FPA outperforms the other evolutionary algorithms and at times it yields a similar performance. PMID:27066339

  2. Reconstruction techniques for sparse multistatic linear array microwave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, David M.; Hall, Thomas E.

    2014-06-01

    Sequentially-switched linear arrays are an enabling technology for a number of near-field microwave imaging applications. Electronically sequencing along the array axis followed by mechanical scanning along an orthogonal axis allows dense sampling of a two-dimensional aperture in near real-time. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed this technology for several applications including concealed weapon detection, groundpenetrating radar, and non-destructive inspection and evaluation. These techniques form three-dimensional images by scanning a diverging beam swept frequency transceiver over a two-dimensional aperture and mathematically focusing or reconstructing the data into three-dimensional images. Recently, a sparse multi-static array technology has been developed that reduces the number of antennas required to densely sample the linear array axis of the spatial aperture. This allows a significant reduction in cost and complexity of the linear-array-based imaging system. The sparse array has been specifically designed to be compatible with Fourier-Transform-based image reconstruction techniques; however, there are limitations to the use of these techniques, especially for extreme near-field operation. In the extreme near-field of the array, back-projection techniques have been developed that account for the exact location of each transmitter and receiver in the linear array and the 3-D image location. In this paper, the sparse array technique will be described along with associated Fourier-Transform-based and back-projection-based image reconstruction algorithms. Simulated imaging results are presented that show the effectiveness of the sparse array technique along with the merits and weaknesses of each image reconstruction approach.

  3. Fiber Optic Spectrophotometer With Photodiode Linear Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velluet, M. T.; Blanc, F.; Vernet, P.

    1989-01-01

    Spectrophotometric measurements are used in a great number of industrial processes (chemical, pharmaceutical, farm-produce...) in nuclear environment and with optical precision components. Especially the evolution of a chemical process or of an optical coating could be followed by these measurements. Spectrophotometers, using optical fibers to transport the signal out of the instrument make possible the measurement "in-situ" and in real time. The advantage of using a diode array to detect the signal is an instantaneous measurement all over the spectral range without moving parts. It allows an excellent reproductibility of the measurements. The instrument is controlled by a micro computer. The spectrophotometer will be described and its technical performs presented. An extension using optical fibers on a "classical" spectrophotometer (a H.P. one) will be also described and its technical performs with such a system presented.

  4. Slow-scan operation of long linear CCD arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicars-Harris, M.

    1975-01-01

    Linear CCD arrays used singly or in optically butted assemblies permit practical implementation of long line array systems with 6000 or more picture elements per line with readout rates in excess of 5 MHz. Display and tape recording of slow scan imagery with over 1000 picture elements per line also presents unique challenges. This paper discusses performance results and the operation of 1728-element CCD arrays for generation of high resolution slow scan imagery and some approaches for recording and display of the imagery. The implication of dark current and its control are discussed.

  5. Study of Far—Field Directivity Pattern for Linear Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ana-Maria, Chiselev; Luminita, Moraru; Laura, Onose

    2011-10-01

    A model to calculate directivity pattern in far field is developed in this paper. Based on this model, the three-dimensional beam pattern is introduced and analyzed in order to investigate geometric parameters of linear arrays and their influences on the directivity pattern. Simulations in azimuthal plane are made to highlight the influence of transducers parameters, including number of elements and inter-element spacing. It is true that these parameters are important factors that influence the directivity pattern and the appearance of side-lobes for linear arrays.

  6. Position sensor for linear synchronous motors employing halbach arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Post, Richard Freeman

    2014-12-23

    A position sensor suitable for use in linear synchronous motor (LSM) drive systems employing Halbach arrays to create their magnetic fields is described. The system has several advantages over previously employed ones, especially in its simplicity and its freedom from being affected by weather conditions, accumulated dirt, or electrical interference from the LSM system itself.

  7. Very High Frequency (Beyond 100 MHz) PZT Kerfless Linear Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Da-Wei; Zhou, Qifa; Geng, Xuecang; Liu, Chang-Geng; Djuth, Frank; Shung, K. Kirk

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication, and measurements of very high frequency kerfless linear arrays prepared from PZT film and PZT bulk material. A 12-µm PZT thick film fabricated from PZT-5H powder/solution composite and a piece of 15-µm PZT-5H sheet were used to fabricate 32-element kerfless high-frequency linear arrays with photolithography. The PZT thick film was prepared by spin-coating of PZT sol-gel composite solution. The thin PZT-5H sheet sample was prepared by lapping a PZT-5H ceramic with a precision lapping machine. The measured results of the 2 arrays were compared. The PZT film array had a center frequency of 120 MHz, a bandwidth of 60% with a parylene matching layer, and an insertion loss of 41 dB. The PZT ceramic sheet array was found to have a center frequency of 128 MHz with a poorer bandwidth (40% with a parylene matching layer) but a better sensitivity (28 dB insertion loss). PMID:19942516

  8. Linear laser diode arrays for improvement in optical disk recording

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alphonse, G. A.; Carlin, D. B.; Connolly, J. C.

    1990-01-01

    The development of individually addressable laser diode arrays for multitrack magneto-optic recorders for space stations is discussed. Three multi-element channeled substrate planar (CSP) arrays with output power greater than 30 mW with linear light vs current characteristics and stable single mode spectra were delivered to NASA. These devices have been used to demonstrate for the first time the simultaneous recording of eight data tracks on a 14-inch magneto-optic erasable disk. The yield of these devices is low, mainly due to non-uniformities inherent to the LPE growth that was used to fabricate them. The authors have recently developed the inverted CSP, based on the much more uniform MOCVD growth techniques, and have made low threshold quantum well arrays requiring about three times less current than the CSP to deliver 30 mW CW in a single spatial mode. The inverted CSP is very promising for use in space flight recorder applications.

  9. Solar cell array interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Carey, Paul G.; Thompson, Jesse B.; Colella, Nicolas J.; Williams, Kenneth A.

    1995-01-01

    Electrical interconnects for solar cells or other electronic components using a silver-silicone paste or a lead-tin (Pb-Sn) no-clean fluxless solder cream, whereby the high breakage of thin (<6 mil thick) solar cells using conventional solder interconnect is eliminated. The interconnects of this invention employs copper strips which are secured to the solar cells by a silver-silicone conductive paste which can be used at room temperature, or by a Pb-Sn solder cream which eliminates undesired residue on the active surfaces of the solar cells. Electrical testing using the interconnects of this invention has shown that no degradation of the interconnects developed under high current testing, while providing a very low contact resistance value.

  10. Solar cell array interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Carey, P.G.; Thompson, J.B.; Colella, N.J.; Williams, K.A.

    1995-11-14

    Electrical interconnects are disclosed for solar cells or other electronic components using a silver-silicone paste or a lead-tin (Pb-Sn) no-clean fluxless solder cream, whereby the high breakage of thin (<6 mil thick) solar cells using conventional solder interconnect is eliminated. The interconnects of this invention employs copper strips which are secured to the solar cells by a silver-silicone conductive paste which can be used at room temperature, or by a Pb-Sn solder cream which eliminates undesired residue on the active surfaces of the solar cells. Electrical testing using the interconnects of this invention has shown that no degradation of the interconnects developed under high current testing, while providing a very low contact resistance value. 4 figs.

  11. Double interconnection fuel cell array

    DOEpatents

    Draper, R.; Zymboly, G.E.

    1993-12-28

    A fuel cell array is made, containing number of tubular, elongated fuel cells which are placed next to each other in rows (A, B, C, D), where each cell contains inner electrodes and outer electrodes, with solid electrolyte between the electrodes, where the electrolyte and outer electrode are discontinuous, having two portions, and providing at least two opposed discontinuities which contain at least two oppositely opposed interconnections contacting the inner electrode, each cell having only three metallic felt electrical connectors which contact surrounding cells, where each row is electrically connected to the other. 5 figures.

  12. Double interconnection fuel cell array

    DOEpatents

    Draper, Robert; Zymboly, Gregory E.

    1993-01-01

    A fuel cell array (10) is made, containing number of tubular, elongated fuel cells (12) which are placed next to each other in rows (A, B, C, D), where each cell contains inner electrodes (14) and outer electrodes (18 and 18'), with solid electrolyte (16 and 16') between the electrodes, where the electrolyte and outer electrode are discontinuous, having two portions, and providing at least two opposed discontinuities which contain at least two oppositely opposed interconnections (20 and 20') contacting the inner electrode (14), each cell (12) having only three metallic felt electrical connectors (22) which contact surrounding cells, where each row is electrically connected to the other.

  13. Photoelectric solar cell array

    SciTech Connect

    Lidorenko, N.S.; Afian, V.V.; Martirosian, R.G.; Ryabikov, S.V.; Strebkov, D.S.; Vartanian, A.V.

    1983-11-29

    A photoelectric solar cell device comprises a dispersing element exposed to the sun's radiation and followed in the optical path by photocells having different spectral sensitivities. Each photocell has its working surface so oriented that the light beam with the wavelength corresponding to the maximum spectral sensitivity of that photocell impinges on its working surface. The dispersing element is a hologram representing light sources with different wavelengths. The photocells are positioned in the image planes of the light sources producing the light beams of the corresponding wavelengths.

  14. Spatial Signature Estimation with an Uncalibrated Uniform Linear Array.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiang; Xin, Jingmin; Nishio, Yoshifumi; Zheng, Nanning

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of spatial signature estimation using a uniform linear array (ULA) with unknown sensor gain and phase errors is considered. As is well known, the directions-of-arrival (DOAs) can only be determined within an unknown rotational angle in this array model. However, the phase ambiguity has no impact on the identification of the spatial signature. Two auto-calibration methods are presented for spatial signature estimation. In our methods, the rotational DOAs and model error parameters are firstly obtained, and the spatial signature is subsequently calculated. The first method extracts two subarrays from the ULA to construct an estimator, and the elements of the array can be used several times in one subarray. The other fully exploits multiple invariances in the interior of the sensor array, and a multidimensional nonlinear problem is formulated. A Gauss-Newton iterative algorithm is applied for solving it. The first method can provide excellent initial inputs for the second one. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithms is demonstrated by several simulation results. PMID:26076405

  15. Spatial Signature Estimation with an Uncalibrated Uniform Linear Array

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xiang; Xin, Jingmin; Nishio, Yoshifumi; Zheng, Nanning

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of spatial signature estimation using a uniform linear array (ULA) with unknown sensor gain and phase errors is considered. As is well known, the directions-of-arrival (DOAs) can only be determined within an unknown rotational angle in this array model. However, the phase ambiguity has no impact on the identification of the spatial signature. Two auto-calibration methods are presented for spatial signature estimation. In our methods, the rotational DOAs and model error parameters are firstly obtained, and the spatial signature is subsequently calculated. The first method extracts two subarrays from the ULA to construct an estimator, and the elements of the array can be used several times in one subarray. The other fully exploits multiple invariances in the interior of the sensor array, and a multidimensional nonlinear problem is formulated. A Gauss–Newton iterative algorithm is applied for solving it. The first method can provide excellent initial inputs for the second one. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithms is demonstrated by several simulation results. PMID:26076405

  16. Automated control of linear constricted plasma source array

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre; Maschwitz, Peter A.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for controlling an array of constricted glow discharge chambers are disclosed. More particularly a linear array of constricted glow plasma sources whose polarity and geometry are set so that the contamination and energy of the ions discharged from the sources are minimized. The several sources can be mounted in parallel and in series to provide a sustained ultra low source of ions in a plasma with contamination below practical detection limits. The quality of film along deposition "tracks" opposite the plasma sources can be measured and compared to desired absolute or relative values by optical and/or electrical sensors. Plasma quality can then be adjusted by adjusting the power current values, gas feed pressure/flow, gas mixtures or a combination of some or all of these to improve the match between the measured values and the desired values.

  17. Spatial frequency multiplier with active linearly tapered slot antenna array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Lee, Richard Q.

    1994-02-01

    A frequency multiplier with active linearly tapered slot antennas (LTSA's) has been demonstrated at the second harmonic frequency. In each antenna element, a GaAs monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) distributed amplifier is integrated with two LTSA's. The multiplier has a very wide bandwidth and large dynamic range. The fundamental-to-second harmonic conversion efficiency is 8.1 percent. The spatially combined second harmonic signal is 50 dB above the noise level. The design is suitable for constructing a large array using monolithic integration techniques.

  18. Space Power Amplification with Active Linearly Tapered Slot Antenna Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Lee, Richard Q.

    1993-01-01

    A space power amplifier composed of active linearly tapered slot antennas (LTSA's) has been demonstrated and shown to have a gain of 30 dB at 20 GHz. In each of the antenna elements, a GaAs monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) three-stage power amplifier is integrated with two LTSA's. The LTSA and the MMIC power amplifier has a gain of 11 dB and power added efficiency of 14 percent respectively. The design is suitable for constructing a large array using monolithic integration techniques.

  19. A multi-ink linear array of nanofountain probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldovan, N.; Kim, K.-H.; Espinosa, H. D.

    2006-10-01

    After the successful design and fabrication of a single-probe nanofountain pen, a second-generation device with two on-chip ink reservoirs feeding a linear array of 12 microfluidic cantilever probes was manufactured. The new device excels by sharper and more uniform tips, more robust fabrication and improved performance in writing and imaging. Its capabilities in writing sub-100 nm features and with two different inks delivered in liquid phase were demonstrated. Their applications range from an affordable method of nanopatterning with sub-100 nm resolution to microspotters for bio-assay generation and tools for combinatorial nanoscale biochemical experiments.

  20. Spatial frequency multiplier with active linearly tapered slot antenna array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Lee, Richard Q.

    1994-01-01

    A frequency multiplier with active linearly tapered slot antennas (LTSA's) has been demonstrated at the second harmonic frequency. In each antenna element, a GaAs monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) distributed amplifier is integrated with two LTSA's. The multiplier has a very wide bandwidth and large dynamic range. The fundamental-to-second harmonic conversion efficiency is 8.1 percent. The spatially combined second harmonic signal is 50 dB above the noise level. The design is suitable for constructing a large array using monolithic integration techniques.

  1. Design tradeoffs for a Multispectral Linear Array (MLA) instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mika, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    The heart of the multispectral linear array (MLA) design problem is to develop an instrument concept which concurrently provides a wide field-of-view with high resolution, spectral separation with precise band-to band registration, and excellent radiometric accuracy. Often, these requirements have conflicting design implications which can only be resolved by careful tradeoffs that consider performance, cost, fabrication feasibility and development risk. The key design tradeoffs for an MLA instrument are addressed, and elements of a baseline instrument concept are presented.

  2. Wake Vortex Detection: Phased Microphone vs. Linear Infrasonic Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Sullivan, Nicholas T.; Knight, Howard K.

    2014-01-01

    infrasonic array at the Newport News-Williamsburg International Airport early in the year 2013. A pattern of pressure burst, high-coherence intervals, and diminishing-coherence intervals was observed for all takeoff and landing events without exception. The results of a phased microphone vs. linear infrasonic array comparison will be presented.

  3. Thermal crosstalk simulation and measurement of linear terahertz detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weizhi; Huang, Zehua; Wang, Jun; Li, Mingyu; Gou, Jun; Jiang, Yadong

    2015-11-01

    Thermal simulation of differently structured linear terahertz detector arrays (TDAs) based on lithium tantalate was performed by finite element analysis (FEA). Simulation results revealed that a relatively simple TDA structure can have good thermal insulation, i.e., low thermal crosstalk effect (TCE), between adjacent pixels, which was thus selected for the real fabrication of TDA sample. Current responsivity (Ri) of the sample for a 2.52 THz source was measured to be 6.66 × 10-6 A/W and non-uniformity (NU) of Ri was 4.1%, showing good performance of the sample. TCE test result demonstrated that small TCE existed in the sample, which was in good agreement with the simulation results.

  4. YBa2Cu307 superconducting microbolometer linear arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Burgess R.; Ohnstein, Thomas R.; Marsh, Holly A.; Dunham, Scott B.; Kruse, Paul W.

    1992-09-01

    Single pixels and linear arrays of microbolometers employing the high-T(subscript c) superconductor YBa(subscript 2)Cu(subscript 3)O(subscript 7) have been fabricated by silicon micromachining techniques. The substrates are 3 in. diameter silicon wafers upon which buffer layers of Si(subscript 3)N(subscript 4) and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) have been deposited. The YBa(subscript 2)Cu(subscript 3)O(subscript 7) was deposited by ion beam sputtering upon the yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), then photolithographically patterned into serpentines 4 micrometers wide. Anisotropic etching in KOH removed the silicon underlying each pixel, thereby providing the necessary thermal isolation. When operated at 70 degree(s)K with 1 (mu) A dc bias, the D(superscript *) is 7.5 X 10(superscript 8) cm Hz(superscript 1/2)/Watt with a thermal response time of 24 msec.

  5. Peak velocity overestimation and linear-array spectral Doppler.

    PubMed

    Eicke, B M; Kremkau, F W; Hinson, H; Tegeler, C H

    1995-04-01

    Ultrasound instruments are used to evaluate blood flow velocities in the human body. Most clinical instruments perform velocity calculations based on the Doppler principle and measure the frequency shift of a reflected ultrasound beam. Doppler-only instruments use single-frequency, single-crystal transducers. Linear- and annular-array multiple-crystal transducers are used for duplex scanning (simultaneous B-mode image and Doppler). Clinical interpretation relies primarily on determination of peak velocities or frequency shifts as identified by the Doppler spectrum. Understanding of the validity of these measurements is important for instruments in clinical use. The present study examined the accuracy with which several ultrasound instruments could estimate velocities based on the identification of the peak of the Doppler spectrum, across a range of different angles of insonation, on a Doppler string phantom. The string was running in a water tank at constant speeds of 50, 100, and 150 cm/sec and also in a sine wave pattern at 100- or 150-cm/sec amplitude. Angles of insonation were 30, 45, 60, and 70 degrees. The single-frequency, single-crystal transducers (PC Dop 842, 2-MHz pulsed-wave, 4-MHz continuous-wave) provided acceptably accurate velocity estimates at all tested velocities independent of the angle of insonation. All duplex Doppler instruments with linear-array transducers (Philips P700, 5.0-MHz; Hewlett-Packard Sonos 1000, 7.5-MHz; ATL Ultramark 9 HDI, 7.5-MHz) exhibited a consistent overestimation of the true flow velocity due to increasing intrinsic spectral broadening with increasing angle of insonation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. A simplified solar cell array modelling program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    As part of the energy conversion/self sufficiency efforts of DSN engineering, it was necessary to have a simplified computer model of a solar photovoltaic (PV) system. This article describes the analysis and simplifications employed in the development of a PV cell array computer model. The analysis of the incident solar radiation, steady state cell temperature and the current-voltage characteristics of a cell array are discussed. A sample cell array was modelled and the results are presented.

  7. Fast 2D DOA Estimation Algorithm by an Array Manifold Matching Method with Parallel Linear Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lisheng; Liu, Sheng; Li, Dong; Jiang, Qingping; Cao, Hailin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of two-dimensional (2D) direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation with parallel linear arrays is addressed. Two array manifold matching (AMM) approaches, in this work, are developed for the incoherent and coherent signals, respectively. The proposed AMM methods estimate the azimuth angle only with the assumption that the elevation angles are known or estimated. The proposed methods are time efficient since they do not require eigenvalue decomposition (EVD) or peak searching. In addition, the complexity analysis shows the proposed AMM approaches have lower computational complexity than many current state-of-the-art algorithms. The estimated azimuth angles produced by the AMM approaches are automatically paired with the elevation angles. More importantly, for estimating the azimuth angles of coherent signals, the aperture loss issue is avoided since a decorrelation procedure is not required for the proposed AMM method. Numerical studies demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approaches. PMID:26907301

  8. Fast 2D DOA Estimation Algorithm by an Array Manifold Matching Method with Parallel Linear Arrays.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lisheng; Liu, Sheng; Li, Dong; Jiang, Qingping; Cao, Hailin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of two-dimensional (2D) direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation with parallel linear arrays is addressed. Two array manifold matching (AMM) approaches, in this work, are developed for the incoherent and coherent signals, respectively. The proposed AMM methods estimate the azimuth angle only with the assumption that the elevation angles are known or estimated. The proposed methods are time efficient since they do not require eigenvalue decomposition (EVD) or peak searching. In addition, the complexity analysis shows the proposed AMM approaches have lower computational complexity than many current state-of-the-art algorithms. The estimated azimuth angles produced by the AMM approaches are automatically paired with the elevation angles. More importantly, for estimating the azimuth angles of coherent signals, the aperture loss issue is avoided since a decorrelation procedure is not required for the proposed AMM method. Numerical studies demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approaches. PMID:26907301

  9. [Modeling and simulation of responses from ultrasonic linear phased array].

    PubMed

    He, Wenjing; Zhu, Yuanzhong; Wang, Yufeng; He, Lingli; Lai, Siyu

    2012-10-01

    Phased array transducers are very attractive because the beam generated by the arrays can be electronically focused and steered. The present work characterizes far-field 2D properties of phased array system by functions that are deduced from rectangle source, rectangle line array and phased array based on point source. Results are presented for the distribution of ultrasound intensity on plane xoz and on x-axis by simulation using numerical calculation. It is shown that the shape of response of rectangle line array is modulated by the single array element. It is also demonstrated that the delay time of phased array is the key to steer the beam, sacrificing the value of main lobe and increasing the number of side lobes.

  10. Ultrasonic linear array validation via concrete test blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Hoegh, Kyle Khazanovich, Lev; Ferraro, Chris; Clayton, Dwight

    2015-03-31

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) comparatively evaluated the ability of a number of NDE techniques to generate an image of the volume of 6.5′ X 5.0′ X 10″ concrete specimens fabricated at the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) NDE Validation Facility in Gainesville, Florida. These test blocks were fabricated to test the ability of various NDE methods to characterize various placements and sizes of rebar as well as simulated cracking and non-consolidation flaws. The first version of the ultrasonic linear array device, MIRA [version 1], was one of 7 different NDE equipment used to characterize the specimens. This paper deals with the ability of this equipment to determine subsurface characterizations such as reinforcing steel relative size, concrete thickness, irregularities, and inclusions using Kirchhoff-based migration techniques. The ability of individual synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) B-scan cross sections resulting from self-contained scans are compared with various processing, analysis, and interpretation methods using the various features fabricated in the specimens for validation. The performance is detailed, especially with respect to the limitations and implications for evaluation of a thicker, more heavily reinforced concrete structures.

  11. Acoustic trapping with a high frequency linear phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fan; Li, Ying; Hsu, Hsiu-Sheng; Liu, Changgeng; Tat Chiu, Chi; Lee, Changyang; Ham Kim, Hyung; Shung, K. Kirk

    2012-11-01

    A high frequency ultrasonic phased array is shown to be capable of trapping and translating microparticles precisely and efficiently, made possible due to the fact that the acoustic beam produced by a phased array can be both focused and steered. Acoustic manipulation of microparticles by a phased array is advantageous over a single element transducer since there is no mechanical movement required for the array. Experimental results show that 45 μm diameter polystyrene microspheres can be easily and accurately trapped and moved to desired positions by a 64-element 26 MHz phased array.

  12. Acoustic trapping with a high frequency linear phased array.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fan; Li, Ying; Hsu, Hsiu-Sheng; Liu, Changgeng; Tat Chiu, Chi; Lee, Changyang; Ham Kim, Hyung; Shung, K Kirk

    2012-11-19

    A high frequency ultrasonic phased array is shown to be capable of trapping and translating microparticles precisely and efficiently, made possible due to the fact that the acoustic beam produced by a phased array can be both focused and steered. Acoustic manipulation of microparticles by a phased array is advantageous over a single element transducer since there is no mechanical movement required for the array. Experimental results show that 45 μm diameter polystyrene microspheres can be easily and accurately trapped and moved to desired positions by a 64-element 26 MHz phased array.

  13. Parallel Spectral Acquisition with an Ion Cyclotron Resonance Cell Array.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Gun; Anderson, Gordon A; Navare, Arti T; Bruce, James E

    2016-01-19

    Mass measurement accuracy is a critical analytical figure-of-merit in most areas of mass spectrometry application. However, the time required for acquisition of high-resolution, high mass accuracy data limits many applications and is an aspect under continual pressure for development. Current efforts target implementation of higher electrostatic and magnetic fields because ion oscillatory frequencies increase linearly with field strength. As such, the time required for spectral acquisition of a given resolving power and mass accuracy decreases linearly with increasing fields. Mass spectrometer developments to include multiple high-resolution detectors that can be operated in parallel could further decrease the acquisition time by a factor of n, the number of detectors. Efforts described here resulted in development of an instrument with a set of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) cells as detectors that constitute the first MS array capable of parallel high-resolution spectral acquisition. ICR cell array systems consisting of three or five cells were constructed with printed circuit boards and installed within a single superconducting magnet and vacuum system. Independent ion populations were injected and trapped within each cell in the array. Upon filling the array, all ions in all cells were simultaneously excited and ICR signals from each cell were independently amplified and recorded in parallel. Presented here are the initial results of successful parallel spectral acquisition, parallel mass spectrometry (MS) and MS/MS measurements, and parallel high-resolution acquisition with the MS array system.

  14. Parallel Spectral Acquisition with an Ion Cyclotron Resonance Cell Array.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Gun; Anderson, Gordon A; Navare, Arti T; Bruce, James E

    2016-01-19

    Mass measurement accuracy is a critical analytical figure-of-merit in most areas of mass spectrometry application. However, the time required for acquisition of high-resolution, high mass accuracy data limits many applications and is an aspect under continual pressure for development. Current efforts target implementation of higher electrostatic and magnetic fields because ion oscillatory frequencies increase linearly with field strength. As such, the time required for spectral acquisition of a given resolving power and mass accuracy decreases linearly with increasing fields. Mass spectrometer developments to include multiple high-resolution detectors that can be operated in parallel could further decrease the acquisition time by a factor of n, the number of detectors. Efforts described here resulted in development of an instrument with a set of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) cells as detectors that constitute the first MS array capable of parallel high-resolution spectral acquisition. ICR cell array systems consisting of three or five cells were constructed with printed circuit boards and installed within a single superconducting magnet and vacuum system. Independent ion populations were injected and trapped within each cell in the array. Upon filling the array, all ions in all cells were simultaneously excited and ICR signals from each cell were independently amplified and recorded in parallel. Presented here are the initial results of successful parallel spectral acquisition, parallel mass spectrometry (MS) and MS/MS measurements, and parallel high-resolution acquisition with the MS array system. PMID:26669509

  15. Simplified seawater alkalinity analysis: Use of linear array spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Wensheng; Byrne, Robert H.

    1998-08-01

    Modified spectrophotometric procedures are presented for the determination of seawater total alkalinity using rapid scan linear array spectrometers. Continuous monitoring of solution pH allows titrations to be terminated at relatively high pH, whereby excess acid terms are very small. Excess acid concentrations are quantified using the sulfonephthalein indicators, bromocresol green and bromocresol purple. The outlined spectrophotometric procedures require no thermal equilibration of samples. Using bromocresol green, solution pH T ([H +] T in moles per kg of solution) is given as: pHT=4.2699+0.002578(35- S)+ log((R(25)-0.00131)/(2.3148-0.1299 R(25))) - log(1-0.001005S) and R(25)= R( t){1+0.00909(25- t)}, where 29⩽S⩽37, 13° C⩽t⩽32° C, and R( t) is the absorbance ratio ( A616/ A444) at temperature t and salinity S. Using bromocresol purple, the solution pH T is given as pH T=5.8182+0.00129(35- S)+log(( R(25)-0.00381)/(2.8729-0.05104 R(25))) and R(25)= R( t){1+0.01869(25- t)}, where 29⩽S⩽37, 13° C⩽t⩽32° C, and R( t)= A589/ A432. Alkalinity measurements using bromocresol purple had a precision on the order of 0.3 μmol kg -1 and were within 0.3-0.9 μmol kg -1 of the alkalinities of certified seawater reference materials.

  16. Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) measurement techniques for lenses and linear detector arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnabel, J. J., Jr.; Kaishoven, J. E., Jr.; Tom, D.

    1984-01-01

    Application is the determination of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) for linear detector arrays. A system set up requires knowledge of the MTF of the imaging lens. Procedure for this measurement is described for standard optical lab equipment. Given this information, various possible approaches to MTF measurement for linear arrays is described. The knife edge method is then described in detail.

  17. Breadboard linear array scan imager using LSI solid-state technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tracy, R. A.; Brennan, J. A.; Frankel, D. G.; Noll, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    The performance of large scale integration photodiode arrays in a linear array scan (pushbroom) breadboard was evaluated for application to multispectral remote sensing of the earth's resources. The technical approach, implementation, and test results of the program are described. Several self scanned linear array visible photodetector focal plane arrays were fabricated and evaluated in an optical bench configuration. A 1728-detector array operating in four bands (0.5 - 1.1 micrometer) was evaluated for noise, spectral response, dynamic range, crosstalk, MTF, noise equivalent irradiance, linearity, and image quality. Other results include image artifact data, temporal characteristics, radiometric accuracy, calibration experience, chip alignment, and array fabrication experience. Special studies and experimentation were included in long array fabrication and real-time image processing for low-cost ground stations, including the use of computer image processing. High quality images were produced and all objectives of the program were attained.

  18. Fan beam generated by a linear-array fed parabolic reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, John; Rahmat-Samii, Yahya

    1990-01-01

    The theoretical background and the results of computer simulations and experimental studies for a parabolic reflector fed by a linear array are detailed. The concept of using a parabolic reflector antenna fed by a small linear array to generate fan-beam patterns is validated. Large angle scan along the broad-beam direction of the fan beam can be achieved by offsetting the linear array laterally. It is both empirically and numerically demonstrated that the array feed must be displaced in the reflector's axial direction to an optimum location from the focal plane in order to achieve the best antenna gain performance. As a result, the linear-array-fed parabolic reflector can be used in place of a long planar array in a multifunctional reflector antenna system.

  19. A self-cohering technique for linear arrays using the Phase Gradient Autofocus Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, D.E.

    1991-02-01

    A towed linear hydrophone array is subject to snakelike bending. If the array were processed as if it were truly linear, poor array gain coupled with a degraded source bearing estimate would result. The signal phase errors produced by sensor position uncertainty in passive sonar arrays are similar to those observed in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery. The Phase Gradient Autofocus (PGA) Algorithm has been shown to be a robust and effective method used to extract degrading phase errors prevalent in SAR imagery. This report shows that with slight modifications, the PGA algorithm can be applied to correct phase errors resulting from sensor position uncertainty introduced into linear-passive arrays. The results of the technique applied to simulated linear array data is also presented. 9 refs., 8 figs.

  20. Iterative solutions of sparse linear systems on systolic arrays. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Melhem, R.

    1987-03-01

    The idea of grouping the non-zero elements of a sparse matrix into few strips that are almost parallel is applied to the design of a systolic accelerator for sparse matrix operations. This accelerator is, then, integrated into a complete systolic system for the solution of large sparse linear systems of equations. The design demonstrates that the application of systolic arrays is not limited to regular computations, and that computationally irregular problems may be solved on systolic networks if local storage is provided in each systolic cell for buffering the irregularity in the data movement and for absorbing the irregularity in the computation.

  1. Solar-cell array design handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauschenbach, H. S.

    1977-01-01

    Twelve-chapter two-volume compilation of solar cell design data is written from industrial, university, and governmental sources. Volumes contain tutorial descriptions of analytical methods, solar-cell characteristics, and cell material properties widely used in specifying solar-cell array performance and hardware design, as well as analysis, fabrication, and test methods.

  2. Method of fabricating a solar cell array

    DOEpatents

    Lazzery, Angelo G.; Crouthamel, Marvin S.; Coyle, Peter J.

    1982-01-01

    A first set of pre-tabbed solar cells are assembled in a predetermined array with at least part of each tab facing upward, each tab being fixed to a bonding pad on one cell and abutting a bonding pad on an adjacent cell. The cells are held in place with a first vacuum support. The array is then inverted onto a second vacuum support which holds the tabs firmly against the cell pads they abut. The cells are exposed to radiation to melt and reflow the solder pads for bonding the tab portions not already fixed to bonding pads to these pads.

  3. Micromolded Arrays for Separation of Adherent Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuli; Phillips, Colleen; Xu, Wei; Pai, Jeng-Hao; Dhopeshwarkar, Rahul; Sims, Christopher E.; Allbritton, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    We present an efficient, yet inexpensive, approach for isolating viable single cells or colonies from a mixed population. This cell microarray platform possesses innovations in both the array manufacture and the manner of target cell release. Arrays of microwells with bases composed of detachable concave elements, termed microrafts, were fabricated by a dip-coating process using a polydimethylsiloxane mold as the template and the array substrate. This manufacturing approach enabled the use of materials other than photoresists to create the array elements. Thus microrafts possessing low autofluorescence could be fabricated for fluorescence-based identification of cells. Cells plated on the microarray settled and attached at the center of the wells due to the microrafts’ concavity. Individual microrafts were readily dislodged by the action of a needle inserted through the compliant polymer substrate. The hard polymer material (polystyrene or epoxy resin) of which the microrafts were composed protected the cells from damage by the needle. For cell analysis and isolation, cells of interest were identified using a standard inverted microscope and microrafts carrying target cells were dislodged with the needle. The released cells/microrafts could be efficiently collected, cultured and clonally expanded. During the separation and collection procedures, the cells remained adherent and provided a measure of protection during manipulation, thus providing an extremely high single-cell cloning rate (>95%). Generation of a transfected cell line based on expression of a fluorescent protein demonstrated an important application for performing on-chip cell separations. PMID:20838672

  4. Real-time assessment of a linear pyroelectric sensor array for object classication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, William E., III; Brown, Jeremy B.; Chari, Srikant; Jacobs, Eddie L.

    2010-10-01

    Pyroelectric linear arrays can be used to generate profiles of targets. Simulations have shown that generated profiles can be used to classify human and animal targets. A pyroelectric array system was used to collect data and classify targets as either human or non-human in real time. The pyroelectric array system consists of a 128-element Dias 128LTI pyroelectric linear array, an F/0.86 germanium lens, and an 18F4550 pic microcontroller for A/D conversion and communication. The classifier used for object recognition was trained using data collected in petting zoos and tested using data collected at the US-Mexico border in Arizona.

  5. Design and synthesis of DNA-tethered ruthenium complexes that self-assemble into linear arrays.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Kristen M; McLaughlin, Larry W

    2003-12-01

    Ruthenium(II) bis(terpyridine) complexes have been prepared with two triethylene glycol linkers to which DNA sequences have been attached; hybridization at various complex ratios results in linear arrays of varying lengths.

  6. Compression dynamics of quasi-spherical wire arrays with different linear mass profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrofanov, K. N.; Aleksandrov, V. V.; Gritsuk, A. N.; Grabovski, E. V.; Frolov, I. N.; Laukhin, Ya. N.; Oleinik, G. M.; Ol'khovskaya, O. G.

    2016-09-01

    Results of experimental studies of the implosion of quasi-spherical wire (or metalized fiber) arrays are presented. The goal of the experiments was to achieve synchronous three-dimensional compression of the plasma produced in different regions of a quasi-spherical array into its geometrical center. To search for optimal synchronization conditions, quasi-spherical arrays with different initial profiles of the linear mass were used. The following dependences of the linear mass on the poloidal angle were used: m l (θ) ∝ sin-1θ and m l (θ) ∝ sin-2θ. The compression dynamics of such arrays was compared with that of quasi-spherical arrays without linear mass profiling, m l (θ) = const. To verify the experimental data, the spatiotemporal dynamics of plasma compression in quasi-spherical arrays was studied using various diagnostics. The experiments on three-dimensional implosion of quasi-spherical arrays made it possible to study how the frozen-in magnetic field of the discharge current penetrates into the array. By measuring the magnetic field in the plasma of a quasi-spherical array, information is obtained on the processes of plasma production and formation of plasma flows from the wire/fiber regions with and without an additionally deposited mass. It is found that penetration of the magnetic flux depends on the initial linear mass profile m l (θ) of the quasi-spherical array. From space-resolved spectral measurements and frame imaging of plasma X-ray emission, information is obtained on the dimensions and shape of the X-ray source formed during the implosion of a quasi-spherical array. The intensity of this source is estimated and compared with that of the Z-pinch formed during the implosion of a cylindrical array.

  7. Optimum linear array for aperture synthesis imaging based on redundant spacing calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Li; He, Yuntao; Zhang, Jianguo; Jia, Huayu; Ma, Jun

    2014-05-01

    Aperture synthesis imaging has been proved to be attractive in surveillance and detection applications. Such an imaging process is inevitably subject to aberrations introduced by instrument defects and/or turbulent media. Redundant spacing calibration (RSC) technique allows continuous calibration of these errors at any electromagnetic wavelength. However, it is based on specially designed array, in which just enough redundancy is included to permit the successful implementation of RSC. A new design criterion for linear RSC array is described, which introduces coverage efficiency and redundancy efficiency factors, aiming to find the perfect configurations, which have as complete uv-plane coverage as possible while containing required redundancy. Optimum linear arrays for N (number of subapertures) up to 10 are listed based on simulated annealing algorithm. The comparisons with existing linear RSC arrays with equivalent subaperture number are implemented. Results show that the optimized arrays have better performance of both optical transfer function, point spread function, and object reconstruction with reasonable value of the matrix condition number. After that, linear arrays are used to construct two-dimensional (2-D) pseudo-Y-shaped RSC arrays, which give a way to design 2-D RSC arrays without exhaustive searches.

  8. Si Wire-Array Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Shannon

    2010-03-01

    Micron-scale Si wire arrays are three-dimensional photovoltaic absorbers that enable orthogonalization of light absorption and carrier collection and hence allow for the utilization of relatively impure Si in efficient solar cell designs. The wire arrays are grown by a vapor-liquid-solid-catalyzed process on a crystalline (111) Si wafer lithographically patterned with an array of metal catalyst particles. Following growth, such arrays can be embedded in polymethyldisiloxane (PDMS) and then peeled from the template growth substrate. The result is an unusual photovoltaic material: a flexible, bendable, wafer-thickness crystalline Si absorber. In this paper I will describe: 1. the growth of high-quality Si wires with controllable doping and the evaluation of their photovoltaic energy-conversion performance using a test electrolyte that forms a rectifying conformal semiconductor-liquid contact 2. the observation of enhanced absorption in wire arrays exceeding the conventional light trapping limits for planar Si cells of equivalent material thickness and 3. single-wire and large-area solid-state Si wire-array solar cell results obtained to date with directions for future cell designs based on optical and device physics. In collaboration with Michael Kelzenberg, Morgan Putnam, Joshua Spurgeon, Daniel Turner-Evans, Emily Warren, Nathan Lewis, and Harry Atwater, California Institute of Technology.

  9. Multiview Hilbert transformation for full-view photoacoustic computed tomography using a linear array

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guo; Li, Lei; Zhu, Liren; Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Due to their low cost, hand-held convenience, wide selection of bandwidths, and ultrasound imaging capability, linear ultrasonic transducer arrays have been widely studied for photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT). As linear-array PACT suffers from a limited view, full-view imaging requires either the transducer or the object to be rotated. So far, both the central frequencies and bandwidth of linear transducer arrays applied in full-view PACT are low, limiting the spatial resolutions of the reconstructed images. Here, we present a multiview high-frequency PACT imaging system implemented with a commercial 40-MHz central frequency linear transducer array. By rotating the object through multiple angles with respect to the linear transducer array, we acquired full-view photoacoustic pressure measurements. Further, to quantify the unipolar initial pressures and overcome the limitations of the single-view Hilbert transformation, we developed a multiview Hilbert transformation method. The in-plane spatial resolution of this full-view linear-array PACT was quantified to be isotropically 60  μm within a 10×10  mm2 field of view. The system was demonstrated by imaging both a leaf skeleton and a zebrafish in vivo. PMID:26112369

  10. Micro-Machined High-Frequency (80 MHz) PZT Thick Film Linear Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qifa; Wu, Dawei; Liu, Changgeng; Zhu, Benpeng; Djuth, Frank; Shung, K. Kirk

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a micro-machined high-frequency linear array using PZT piezoelectric thick films. The linear array has 32 elements with an element width of 24 μm and an element length of 4 mm. Array elements were fabricated by deep reactive ion etching of PZT thick films, which were prepared from spin-coating of PZT solgel composite. Detailed fabrication processes, especially PZT thick film etching conditions and a novel transferring-and-etching method, are presented and discussed. Array designs were evaluated by simulation. Experimental measurements show that the array had a center frequency of 80 MHz and a fractional bandwidth (−6 dB) of 60%. An insertion loss of −41 dB and adjacent element crosstalk of −21 dB were found at the center frequency. PMID:20889407

  11. A 400 KHz line rate 2048-pixel stitched SWIR linear array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anchlia, Ankur; Vinella, Rosa M.; Gielen, Daphne; Wouters, Kristof; Vervenne, Vincent; Hooylaerts, Peter; Deroo, Pieter; Ruythooren, Wouter; De Gaspari, Danny; Das, Jo; Merken, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    Xenics has developed a family of stitched SWIR long linear arrays that operate up to 400 KHz of line rate. These arrays serve medical and industrial applications that require high line rates as well as space applications that require long linear arrays. The arrays are based on a modular ROIC design concept: modules of 512 pixels are stitched during fabrication to achieve 512, 1024 and 2048 pixel arrays. Each 512-pixel module has its own on-chip digital sequencer, analog readout chain and 4 output buffers. This modular concept enables a long array to run at a high line rates irrespective of the array length, which limits the line rate in a traditional linear array. The ROIC is flip-chipped with InGaAs detector arrays. The FPA has a pixel pitch of 12.5μm and has two pixel flavors: square (12.5μm) and rectangular (250μm). The frontend circuit is based on Capacitive Trans-impedance Amplifier (CTIA) to attain stable detector bias, and good linearity and signal integrity, especially at high speeds. The CTIA has an input auto-zero mechanism that allows to have low detector bias (<20mV). An on-chip Correlated Double Sample (CDS) facilitates removal of CTIA KTC and 1/f noise, and other offsets, achieving low noise performance. There are five gain modes in the FPA giving the full well range from 85Ke- to 40Me-. The measured input referred noise is 35e-rms in the highest gain mode. The FPA operates in Integrate While Read mode and, at a master clock rate of 60MHz and a minimum integration time of 1.4μs, achieves the highest line rate of 400 KHz. In this paper, design details and measurements results are presented in order to demonstrate the array performance.

  12. Low cost solar cell arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iles, P. A.; Mclennan, H.

    1975-01-01

    Limitations in both space and terrestial markets for solar cells are described. Based on knowledge of the state-of-the-art, six cell options are discussed; as a result of this discussion, the three most promising options (involving high, medium and low efficiency cells respectively) were selected and analyzed for their probable costs. The results showed that all three cell options gave promise of costs below $10 per watt in the near future. Before further cost reductions can be achieved, more R and D work is required; suggestions for suitable programs are given.

  13. Imaging of pancreas divisum by linear-array endoscopic ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Malay; Pathak, Amit; Rameshbabu, Chittapuram Srinivasan; Rai, Praveer; Kirnake, Vijendra; Shoukat, Abid

    2016-01-01

    Pancreas divisum (PD) is the most common developmental anatomic variant of pancreatic duct. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is often performed to evaluate idiopathic pancreatitis and has been shown to have high accuracy in diagnosis of PD. The different techniques to identify PD by linear EUS have been described differently by different authors. If EUS is done with a proper technique it can be a valuable tool in the diagnosis of PD. The anatomical and technical background of different signs has not been described so far. This article summarizes the different techniques of imaging of pancreatic duct in a suspected case of PD and gives a technical explanation of various signs. The common signs seen during evaluation of pancreatic duct in PD are stack sign of linear EUS, crossed duct sign on linear EUS, the dominant duct and ventral dorsal duct (VD) transition. Few other signs are described which include duct above duct, short ventral duct /absent ventral duct, separate opening of ducts with no communication, separate opening of ducts with filamentous communication, stacking of duct of Santorini and indirect signs like santorinecele. The principles of the sign have been explained on an anatomical basis and the techniques and the principles described in the review will be helpful in technical evaluation of PD during EUS. PMID:26879163

  14. Imaging of pancreas divisum by linear-array endoscopic ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Malay; Pathak, Amit; Rameshbabu, Chittapuram Srinivasan; Rai, Praveer; Kirnake, Vijendra; Shoukat, Abid

    2016-01-01

    Pancreas divisum (PD) is the most common developmental anatomic variant of pancreatic duct. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is often performed to evaluate idiopathic pancreatitis and has been shown to have high accuracy in diagnosis of PD. The different techniques to identify PD by linear EUS have been described differently by different authors. If EUS is done with a proper technique it can be a valuable tool in the diagnosis of PD. The anatomical and technical background of different signs has not been described so far. This article summarizes the different techniques of imaging of pancreatic duct in a suspected case of PD and gives a technical explanation of various signs. The common signs seen during evaluation of pancreatic duct in PD are stack sign of linear EUS, crossed duct sign on linear EUS, the dominant duct and ventral dorsal duct (VD) transition. Few other signs are described which include duct above duct, short ventral duct /absent ventral duct, separate opening of ducts with no communication, separate opening of ducts with filamentous communication, stacking of duct of Santorini and indirect signs like santorinecele. The principles of the sign have been explained on an anatomical basis and the techniques and the principles described in the review will be helpful in technical evaluation of PD during EUS.

  15. Non-linear, adaptive array processing for acoustic interference suppression.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Elizabeth; Roan, Michael

    2009-06-01

    A method is introduced where blind source separation of acoustical sources is combined with spatial processing to remove non-Gaussian, broadband interferers from space-time displays such as bearing track recorder displays. This differs from most standard techniques such as generalized sidelobe cancellers in that the separation of signals is not done spatially. The algorithm performance is compared to adaptive beamforming techniques such as minimum variance distortionless response beamforming. Simulations and experiments using two acoustic sources were used to verify the performance of the algorithm. Simulations were also used to determine the effectiveness of the algorithm under various signal to interference, signal to noise, and array geometry conditions. A voice activity detection algorithm was used to benchmark the performance of the source isolation.

  16. Improved multispectral solar cell array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmann, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    Solar-collector system projects oval-shaped color-band images onto solar cells designed to be most efficient at specific wavelength. Image size can be altered by changing width of reflecting mirror of power of lens. Image intensity is thus kept at optimum level, preventing cells from overheating.

  17. Elastomer Encapsulant for Solar-Cell Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, B.; Willis, P. B.

    1985-01-01

    Butyl acrylate syrups useful potting compounds for encapsulating photovoltaic cells in modular arrays. Material pourable liquid pumped into module, then cured to rubbery consistency. Cured material is thermoset elastomer highly transparent, low cost, flexible and with good low-temperature properties.

  18. Low cost silicon solar cell array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, F. T. C.

    1974-01-01

    The technological options available for producing low cost silicon solar cell arrays were examined. A project value of approximately $250/sq m and $2/watt is projected, based on mass production capacity demand. Recommendations are included for the most promising cost reduction options.

  19. Characterization of InGaAs linear array for applications to remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Christopher S.; Refaat, Tamer F.; Farnsworth, Glenn R.; Abedin, M. N.; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.

    2005-05-01

    An Indium Gallium Arsenide linear photodiode array in the 1.1-2.5 μm spectral range was characterized. The array has 1024X1 pixels with a 25 μm pitch and was manufactured by Sensors Unlimited, Inc. Characterization and analysis of the electrical and optical properties of a camera system were carried out at room temperature to obtain detector performance parameters. The signal and noise were measured while the array was uniformly illuminated at varying exposure levels. A photon transfer curve was generated by plotting noise as a function of average signal to obtain the camera gain constant. The spectral responsivity was also measured, and the quantum efficiency, read noise and full-well capacity were determined. This paper describes the characterization procedure, analyzes the experimental results, and discusses the applications of the InGaAs linear array to future earth and planetary remote sensing mission.

  20. Characterization of InGaAs Linear Array for Applications to Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Christopher S.; Refaat, Tamer F.; Farnsworth, Glenn R.; Abedin, M. N.; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.

    2005-01-01

    An Indium Gallium Arsenide linear photodiode array in the 1.1-2.5 micron spectral range was characterized. The array has 1024x1 pixels with a 25 micron pitch and was manufactured by Sensors Unlimited, Inc. Characterization and analysis of the electrical and optical properties of a camera system were carried out at room temperature to obtain detector performance parameters. The signal and noise were measured while the array was uniformly illuminated at varying exposure levels. A photon transfer curve was generated by plotting noise as a function of average signal to obtain the camera gain constant. The spectral responsivity was also measured, and the quantum efficiency, read noise and full-well capacity were determined. This paper describes the characterization procedure, analyzes the experimental results, and discusses the applications of the InGaAs linear array to future earth and planetary remote sensing mission.

  1. System performance and performance enhancement relative to element position location errors for distributed linear antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrian, Andrew

    For the most part, antenna phased arrays have traditionally been comprised of antenna elements that are very carefully and precisely placed in very periodic grid structures. Additionally, the relative positions of the elements to each other are typically mechanically fixed as best as possible. There is never an assumption the relative positions of the elements are a function of time or some random behavior. In fact, every array design is typically analyzed for necessary element position tolerances in order to meet necessary performance requirements such as directivity, beamwidth, sidelobe level, and beam scanning capability. Consider an antenna array that is composed of several radiating elements, but the position of each of the elements is not rigidly, mechanically fixed like a traditional array. This is not to say that the element placement structure is ignored or irrelevant, but each element is not always in its relative, desired location. Relative element positioning would be analogous to a flock of birds in flight or a swarm of insects. They tend to maintain a near fixed position with the group, but not always. In the antenna array analog, it would be desirable to maintain a fixed formation, but due to other random processes, it is not always possible to maintain perfect formation. This type of antenna array is referred to as a distributed antenna array. A distributed antenna array's inability to maintain perfect formation causes degradations in the antenna factor pattern of the array. Directivity, beamwidth, sidelobe level and beam pointing error are all adversely affected by element relative position error. This impact is studied as a function of element relative position error for linear antenna arrays. The study is performed over several nominal array element spacings, from lambda to lambda, several sidelobe levels (20 to 50 dB) and across multiple array illumination tapers. Knowing the variation in performance, work is also performed to utilize a minimum

  2. Linear CCD attitude measurement system based on the identification of the auxiliary array CCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yinghui; Yuan, Feng; Li, Kai; Wang, Yan

    2015-10-01

    Object to the high precision flying target attitude measurement issues of a large space and large field of view, comparing existing measurement methods, the idea is proposed of using two array CCD to assist in identifying the three linear CCD with multi-cooperative target attitude measurement system, and to address the existing nonlinear system errors and calibration parameters and more problems with nine linear CCD spectroscopic test system of too complicated constraints among camera position caused by excessive. The mathematical model of binocular vision and three linear CCD test system are established, co-spot composition triangle utilize three red LED position light, three points' coordinates are given in advance by Cooperate Measuring Machine, the red LED in the composition of the three sides of a triangle adds three blue LED light points as an auxiliary, so that array CCD is easier to identify three red LED light points, and linear CCD camera is installed of a red filter to filter out the blue LED light points while reducing stray light. Using array CCD to measure the spot, identifying and calculating the spatial coordinates solutions of red LED light points, while utilizing linear CCD to measure three red LED spot for solving linear CCD test system, which can be drawn from 27 solution. Measured with array CCD coordinates auxiliary linear CCD has achieved spot identification, and has solved the difficult problems of multi-objective linear CCD identification. Unique combination of linear CCD imaging features, linear CCD special cylindrical lens system is developed using telecentric optical design, the energy center of the spot position in the depth range of convergence in the direction is perpendicular to the optical axis of the small changes ensuring highprecision image quality, and the entire test system improves spatial object attitude measurement speed and precision.

  3. A Wide Dynamic Range Tapped Linear Array Image Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washkurak, William D.; Chamberlain, Savvas G.; Prince, N. Daryl

    1988-08-01

    magnitide are obtained. To achieve the short integration times necessary in acousto-optic applications. t he wide dynamic range detector has been implemented into a tapped array architecture with eight outputs and 256 photoelements. Operation of each 01)1,1)111 at 16 MHz yields detector integration times of 2 micro-seconds. Buried channel two phase CCD shift register technology is utilized to minimize image sensor noise improve video output rates and increase ease of operation.

  4. An absorption detection approach for multiplexed capillary electrophoresis using a linear photodiode array.

    PubMed

    Gong, X; Yeung, E S

    1999-11-01

    A novel absorption detection method for highly multiplexed capillary electrophoresis is presented for zone electrophoresis and for micellar electrokinetic chromatography. The approach involves the use of a linear photodiode array on which a capillary array is imaged by a camera lens. Either a tungsten lamp or a mercury lamp can be used as the light source such that all common wavelengths for absorption detection are accessible by simply interchanging narrow-band filters. Each capillary spans several diodes in the photodiode array for absorption measurements. Over 100 densely packed capillaries can be monitored by a single photodiode array element with 1024 diodes. The detection limit for rhodamine 6G for each capillary in the multiplexed array is ∼1.8 × 10(-)(8) M injected (S/N = 2). The cross-talk between adjacent capillaries is less than 0.2%. Simultaneous analysis of 96 samples is demonstrated. PMID:21662842

  5. Advances in linear and area HgCdTe APD arrays for eyesafe LADAR sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jack, Michael D.; Asbrock, James F.; Anderson, C.; Bailey, Steven L.; Chapman, George; Gordon, E.; Herning, P. E.; Kalisher, Murray H.; Kosai, Kim; Liquori, V.; Randall, Valerie; Rosbeck, Joseph P.; Sen, Sanghamitra; Wetzel, P.; Halmos, Maurice J.; Trotta, Patrick A.; Hunter, Andrew T.; Jensen, John E.; de Lyon, Terence J.; Johnson, W.; Walker, B.; Trussel, Ward; Hutchinson, Andy; Balcerak, Raymond S.

    2001-11-01

    HgCdTe APDs and APD arrays offer unique advantages for high-performance eyesafe LADAR sensors. These include: operation at room temperature, low-excess noise, high gain, high-quantum efficiency at eyesafe wavelengths, GHz bandwidth, and high-packing density. The utility of these benefits for systems are being demonstrated for both linear and area array sensors. Raytheon has fabricated 32 element linear APD arrays utilizing liquid phase epitaxy (LPE), and packaged and integrating these arrays with low-noise amplifiers. Typical better APDs configured as 50-micron square pixels and fabricated utilizing RIE, have demonstrated high fill factors, low crosstalk, excellent uniformity, low dark currents, and noise equivalent power (NEP) from 1-2 nW. Two units have been delivered to NVESD, assembled with range extraction electronics, and integrated into the CELRAP laser radar system. Tests on these sensors in July and October 2000 have demonstrated excellent functionality, detection of 1-cm wires, and range imaging. Work is presently underway under DARPA's 3-D imaging Sensor Program to extend this excellent performance to area arrays. High-density arrays have been fabricated using LPE and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). HgCdTe APD arrays have been made in 5 X 5, 10 X 10 and larger formats. Initial data shows excellent typical better APD performance with unmultiplied dark current < 10 nA; and NEP < 2.0 nW at a gain of 10.

  6. The Santa Barbara Research Center multimodule shortwave IR linear array and scene simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cizdziel, Philip; Merlo, Thomas; Kormos, Karen; Fuquay, Ralph

    1988-01-01

    Alignment test results and scene simulator imagery are presented for a 1 x 1280 element linear assembly consisting of 5 end-butted modules. The modules include a Si readout chip, a 256 element photovoltaic HgCdTe detector array, and a Si/sapphire carrier. At 145 K, the operation of the LPE shortwave HgCdTE detector array yielded Resistance Area products of 420,000 ohm-sq cm. The results demonstrate the ability to fabricate high-performance, long linear multimodule shortwave IR focal planes for space applications.

  7. New Fabrication of High-Frequency (100-MHz) Ultrasound PZT Film Kerfless Linear Array

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Benpeng; Chan, Ngai Yui; Dai, Jiyan; Shung, K. Kirk; Takeuchi, Shinichi; Zhou, Qifa

    2013-01-01

    The paper describes the design, fabrication, and measurements of a high-frequency ultrasound kerfless linear array prepared from hydrothermal lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thick film. The 15-µm hydrothermal PZT thick film with an area of 1 × 1 cm, obtained through a self-separation process from Ti substrate, was used to fabricate a 32-element 100-MHz kerfless linear array with photolithography. The bandwidth at −6 dB without matching layer, insertion loss around center frequency, and crosstalk between adjacent elements were measured to be 39%, −30 dB, and −15 dB, respectively. PMID:23549547

  8. On resolving 2M - 1 narrow-band signals with an M sensor uniform linear array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Douglas B.; Johnson, Don H.

    1992-01-01

    Length 2M real signal vectors are used to address the problem of determining the maximum number of narrow-band signals whose parameters can be estimated with a linear array of M equally spaced sensors. It is shown that 2M of these real vectors are linearly independent with probability one, and, thus in the presence of additive white noise, the parameters of 2M - 1 signals can be estimated. An algorithm for determining directions and amplitudes is presented.

  9. Cell adhesion and guidance by micropost-array chemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantano, Paul; Quah, Soo-Kim; Danowski, Kristine L.

    2002-06-01

    An array of ~50,000 individual polymeric micropost sensors was patterned across a glass coverslip by a photoimprint lithographic technique. Individual micropost sensors were ~3-micrometers tall and ~8-micrometers wide. The O2-sensitive micropost array sensors (MPASs) comprised a ruthenium complex encapsulated in a gas permeable photopolymerizable siloxane. The pH-sensitive MPASs comprised a fluorescein conjugate encapsulated in a photocrosslinkable poly(vinyl alcohol)-based polymer. PO2 and pH were quantitated by acquiring MPAS luminescence images with an epifluorescence microscope/charge coupled device imaging system. O2-sensitive MPASs displayed linear Stern-Volmer quenching behavior with a maximum Io/I of ~8.6. pH-sensitive MPASs displayed sigmoidal calibration curves with a pKa of ~5.8. The adhesion of undifferentiated rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells across these two polymeric surface types was investigated. The greatest PC12 cell proliferation and adhesion occurred across the poly(vinyl alcohol)-based micropost arrays relative to planar poly(vinyl alcohol)-based surfaces and both patterned and planar siloxane surfaces. An additional advantage of the patterned MPAS layers relative to planar sensing layers was the ability to direct the growth of biological cells. Preliminary data is presented whereby nerve growth factor-differentiated PC12 cells grew neurite-like processes that extended along paths defined by the micropost architecture.

  10. Optimized Hyper Beamforming of Linear Antenna Arrays Using Collective Animal Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Ram, Gopi; Mandal, Durbadal; Kar, Rajib; Ghoshal, Sakti Prasad

    2013-01-01

    A novel optimization technique which is developed on mimicking the collective animal behaviour (CAB) is applied for the optimal design of hyper beamforming of linear antenna arrays. Hyper beamforming is based on sum and difference beam patterns of the array, each raised to the power of a hyperbeam exponent parameter. The optimized hyperbeam is achieved by optimization of current excitation weights and uniform interelement spacing. As compared to conventional hyper beamforming of linear antenna array, real coded genetic algorithm (RGA), particle swarm optimization (PSO), and differential evolution (DE) applied to the hyper beam of the same array can achieve reduction in sidelobe level (SLL) and same or less first null beam width (FNBW), keeping the same value of hyperbeam exponent. Again, further reductions of sidelobe level (SLL) and first null beam width (FNBW) have been achieved by the proposed collective animal behaviour (CAB) algorithm. CAB finds near global optimal solution unlike RGA, PSO, and DE in the present problem. The above comparative optimization is illustrated through 10-, 14-, and 20-element linear antenna arrays to establish the optimization efficacy of CAB. PMID:23970843

  11. a Method for Self-Calibration in Satellite with High Precision of Space Linear Array Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Qian, Fangming; Miao, Yuzhe; Wang, Rongjian

    2016-06-01

    At present, the on-orbit calibration of the geometric parameters of a space surveying camera is usually processed by data from a ground calibration field after capturing the images. The entire process is very complicated and lengthy and cannot monitor and calibrate the geometric parameters in real time. On the basis of a large number of on-orbit calibrations, we found that owing to the influence of many factors, e.g., weather, it is often difficult to capture images of the ground calibration field. Thus, regular calibration using field data cannot be ensured. This article proposes a real time self-calibration method for a space linear array camera on a satellite using the optical auto collimation principle. A collimating light source and small matrix array CCD devices are installed inside the load system of the satellite; these use the same light path as the linear array camera. We can extract the location changes of the cross marks in the matrix array CCD to determine the real-time variations in the focal length and angle parameters of the linear array camera. The on-orbit status of the camera is rapidly obtained using this method. On one hand, the camera's change regulation can be mastered accurately and the camera's attitude can be adjusted in a timely manner to ensure optimal photography; in contrast, self-calibration of the camera aboard the satellite can be realized quickly, which improves the efficiency and reliability of photogrammetric processing.

  12. (abstract) Scaling Nominal Solar Cell Impedances for Array Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert L; Wallace, Matthew T.; Iles, Peter

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses a task the objective of which is to characterize solar cell array AC impedance and develop scaling rules for impedance characterization of large arrays by testing single solar cells and small arrays. This effort is aimed at formulating a methodology for estimating the AC impedance of the Mars Pathfinder (MPF) cruise and lander solar arrays based upon testing single cells and small solar cell arrays and to create a basis for design of a single shunt limiter for MPF power control of flight solar arrays having very different inpedances.

  13. Optimization of element length for imaging small volumetric reflectors with linear ultrasonic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, T. S.; Wilcox, P. D.; Nixon, A. D.

    2016-02-01

    A 3D ultrasonic simulation study is presented, aimed at understanding the effect of element length for imaging small volumetric flaws with linear arrays in ultrasonically noisy materials. The geometry of a linear array can be described by the width, pitch and total number of the elements along with the length perpendicular to imaging plane. This paper is concerned with the latter parameter, which tends to be ignored in array optimization studies and is often chosen arbitrarily for industrial array inspections. A 3D analytical model based on imaging a point target is described, validated and used to make calculations of relative Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) as a function of element length. SNR is found to be highly sensitive to element length with a 12dB variation observed over the length range investigated. It is then demonstrated that the optimal length can be predicted directly from the Point Spread Function (PSF) of the imaging system as well as the natural focal point of the array element from 2D beam profiles perpendicular to the imaging plane. This result suggests that the optimal length for any imaging position can be predicted without the need for a full 3D model and is independent of element pitch and the number of elements. Array element design guidelines are then described with respect to wavelength and extensions of these results are discussed for application to realistically-sized defects and coarse-grained materials.

  14. A Low-Complexity ESPRIT-Based DOA Estimation Method for Co-Prime Linear Arrays.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fenggang; Gao, Bin; Chen, Lizhen; Lan, Peng

    2016-01-01

    The problem of direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation is investigated for co-prime array, where the co-prime array consists of two uniform sparse linear subarrays with extended inter-element spacing. For each sparse subarray, true DOAs are mapped into several equivalent angles impinging on the traditional uniform linear array with half-wavelength spacing. Then, by applying the estimation of signal parameters via rotational invariance technique (ESPRIT), the equivalent DOAs are estimated, and the candidate DOAs are recovered according to the relationship among equivalent and true DOAs. Finally, the true DOAs are estimated by combining the results of the two subarrays. The proposed method achieves a better complexity-performance tradeoff as compared to other existing methods. PMID:27571079

  15. A Low-Complexity ESPRIT-Based DOA Estimation Method for Co-Prime Linear Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Fenggang; Gao, Bin; Chen, Lizhen; Lan, Peng

    2016-01-01

    The problem of direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation is investigated for co-prime array, where the co-prime array consists of two uniform sparse linear subarrays with extended inter-element spacing. For each sparse subarray, true DOAs are mapped into several equivalent angles impinging on the traditional uniform linear array with half-wavelength spacing. Then, by applying the estimation of signal parameters via rotational invariance technique (ESPRIT), the equivalent DOAs are estimated, and the candidate DOAs are recovered according to the relationship among equivalent and true DOAs. Finally, the true DOAs are estimated by combining the results of the two subarrays. The proposed method achieves a better complexity–performance tradeoff as compared to other existing methods. PMID:27571079

  16. Bipolar battery with array of sealed cells

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.; Smaga, John A.

    1987-01-01

    A lithium alloy/metal sulfide battery as a dipolar battery is disclosed with an array of stacked cells with the anode and cathode electrode materials in each cell sealed in a confining structure and separated from one another except across separator material interposed therebetween. The separator material is contained in a module having separate perforated metallic sheets that sandwich opposite sides of the separator material for the cell and an annular insulating spacer that surrounds the separator material beyond the perforations and is also sandwiched between and sealed to the sheets. The peripheral edges of the sheets project outwardly beyond the spacer, traverse the side edges of the adjacent electrode material to form cup-like electrode holders, and are fused to the adjacent current collector or end face members of the array. Electrolyte is infused into the electrolyte cavity through the perforations of one of the metallic sheets with the perforations also functioning to allow ionic conductance across the separator material between the adjacent electrodes. A gas-tight housing provides an enclosure of the array.

  17. A proof of the Woodward-Lawson sampling method for a finite linear array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somers, Gary A.

    1993-01-01

    An extension of the continuous aperture Woodward-Lawson sampling theorem has been developed for a finite linear array of equidistant identical elements with arbitrary excitations. It is shown that by sampling the array factor at a finite number of specified points in the far field, the exact array factor over all space can be efficiently reconstructed in closed form. The specified sample points lie in real space and hence are measurable provided that the interelement spacing is greater than approximately one half of a wavelength. This paper provides insight as to why the length parameter used in the sampling formulas for discrete arrays is larger than the physical span of the lattice points in contrast with the continuous aperture case where the length parameter is precisely the physical aperture length.

  18. Digital Cell Counting Device Integrated with a Single-Cell Array

    PubMed Central

    Saeki, Tatsuya; Hosokawa, Masahito; Lim, Tae-kyu; Harada, Manabu; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel cell counting method accomplished using a single-cell array fabricated on an image sensor, complementary metal oxide semiconductor sensor. The single-cell array was constructed using a microcavity array, which can trap up to 7,500 single cells on microcavities periodically arranged on a plane metallic substrate via the application of a negative pressure. The proposed method for cell counting is based on shadow imaging, which uses a light diffraction pattern generated by the microcavity array and trapped cells. Under illumination, the cell-occupied microcavities are visualized as shadow patterns in an image recorded by the complementary metal oxide semiconductor sensor due to light attenuation. The cell count is determined by enumerating the uniform shadow patterns created from one-on-one relationships with single cells trapped on the microcavities in digital format. In the experiment, all cell counting processes including entrapment of non-labeled HeLa cells from suspensions on the array and image acquisition of a wide-field-of-view of 30 mm2 in 1/60 seconds were implemented in a single integrated device. As a result, the results from the digital cell counting had a linear relationship with those obtained from microscopic observation (r2 = 0.99). This platform could be used at extremely low cell concentrations, i.e., 25–15,000 cells/mL. Our proposed system provides a simple and rapid miniaturized cell counting device for routine laboratory use. PMID:24551208

  19. Microwell Arrays for Studying Many Individual Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folch, Albert; Kosar, Turgut Fettah

    2009-01-01

    "Laboratory-on-a-chip" devices that enable the simultaneous culturing and interrogation of many individual living cells have been invented. Each such device includes a silicon nitride-coated silicon chip containing an array of micromachined wells sized so that each well can contain one cell in contact or proximity with a patch clamp or other suitable single-cell-interrogating device. At the bottom of each well is a hole, typically 0.5 m wide, that connects the well with one of many channels in a microfluidic network formed in a layer of poly(dimethylsiloxane) on the underside of the chip. The microfluidic network makes it possible to address wells (and, thus, cells) individually to supply them with selected biochemicals. The microfluidic channels also provide electrical contact to the bottoms of the wells.

  20. Airborne Linear Array Image Geometric Rectification Method Based on Unequal Segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. M.; Li, C. R.; Zhou, M.; Hu, J.; Yang, C. M.

    2016-06-01

    As the linear array sensor such as multispectral and hyperspectral sensor has great potential in disaster monitoring and geological survey, the quality of the image geometric rectification should be guaranteed. Different from the geometric rectification of airborne planar array images or multi linear array images, exterior orientation elements need to be determined for each scan line of single linear array images. Internal distortion persists after applying GPS/IMU data directly to geometrical rectification. Straight lines may be curving and jagged. Straight line feature -based geometrical rectification algorithm was applied to solve this problem, whereby the exterior orientation elements were fitted by piecewise polynomial and evaluated with the straight line feature as constraint. However, atmospheric turbulence during the flight is unstable, equal piecewise can hardly provide good fitting, resulting in limited precision improvement of geometric rectification or, in a worse case, the iteration cannot converge. To solve this problem, drawing on dynamic programming ideas, unequal segmentation of line feature-based geometric rectification method is developed. The angle elements fitting error is minimized to determine the optimum boundary. Then the exterior orientation elements of each segment are fitted and evaluated with the straight line feature as constraint. The result indicates that the algorithm is effective in improving the precision of geometric rectification.

  1. Acoustic contrast control in an arc-shaped area using a linear loudspeaker array.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Sipei; Qiu, Xiaojun; Burnett, Ian

    2015-02-01

    This paper proposes a method of creating acoustic contrast control in an arc-shaped area using a linear loudspeaker array. The boundary of the arc-shaped area is treated as the envelope of the tangent lines that can be formed by manipulating the phase profile of the loudspeakers in the array. When compared with the existing acoustic contrast control method, the proposed method is able to generate sound field inside an arc-shaped area and achieve a trade-off between acoustic uniformity and acoustic contrast. The acoustic contrast created by the proposed method increases while the acoustic uniformity decreases with frequency.

  2. A linear monolithic 4-6 on silicon IR detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandamme, J.; Vermeiren, J.; Zogg, H.; Masek, J.; Fabbricotti, M.

    1992-12-01

    A linear array of monolithically grown PbTe and PbSnSe detectors on (111)-Si for MWIR and TIR imaging applications was designed and processed. The array consists of a staggered row of 2 by 128 detectors on a 100 micrometers pitch. The readout circuitry, integrated on the Si substrate consists of a COS multiplexer with a direct injection input stage, a charge reduction stage and charge to voltage conversion stage for each individual detector. This XDI (MultipeXed Direct Injection) circuit also allows for on-chip nonuniformity compensation with a switched capacitor network.

  3. Linear laser diode arrays for improvement in optical disk recording for space stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alphonse, G. A.; Carlin, D. B.; Connolly, J. C.

    1990-01-01

    The design and fabrication of individually addressable laser diode arrays for high performance magneto-optic recording systems are presented. Ten diode arrays with 30 mW cW light output, linear light vs. current characteristics and single longitudinal mode spectrum were fabricated using channel substrate planar (CSP) structures. Preliminary results on the inverse CSP structure, whose fabrication is less critically dependent on device parameters than the CSP, are also presented. The impact of systems parameters and requirements, in particular, the effect of feedback on laser design is assessed, and techniques to reduce feedback or minimize its effect on systems performance, including mode-stabilized structures, are evaluated.

  4. Power Pattern Sensitivity to Calibration Errors and Mutual Coupling in Linear Arrays through Circular Interval Arithmetics

    PubMed Central

    Anselmi, Nicola; Salucci, Marco; Rocca, Paolo; Massa, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivity to both calibration errors and mutual coupling effects of the power pattern radiated by a linear array is addressed. Starting from the knowledge of the nominal excitations of the array elements and the maximum uncertainty on their amplitudes, the bounds of the pattern deviations from the ideal one are analytically derived by exploiting the Circular Interval Analysis (CIA). A set of representative numerical results is reported and discussed to assess the effectiveness and the reliability of the proposed approach also in comparison with state-of-the-art methods and full-wave simulations. PMID:27258274

  5. Power Pattern Sensitivity to Calibration Errors and Mutual Coupling in Linear Arrays through Circular Interval Arithmetics.

    PubMed

    Anselmi, Nicola; Salucci, Marco; Rocca, Paolo; Massa, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivity to both calibration errors and mutual coupling effects of the power pattern radiated by a linear array is addressed. Starting from the knowledge of the nominal excitations of the array elements and the maximum uncertainty on their amplitudes, the bounds of the pattern deviations from the ideal one are analytically derived by exploiting the Circular Interval Analysis (CIA). A set of representative numerical results is reported and discussed to assess the effectiveness and the reliability of the proposed approach also in comparison with state-of-the-art methods and full-wave simulations. PMID:27258274

  6. Collective Interaction in a Linear Array of Supersonic Rectangular Jets: A Linear Spatial Instability Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    1999-01-01

    A linear spatial instability model for multiple spatially periodic supersonic rectangular jets is solved using Floquet-Bloch theory. It is assumed that in the region of interest a coherent wave can propagate. For the case studied large spatial growth rates are found. This work is motivated by an increase in mixing found in experimental measurements of spatially periodic supersonic rectangular jets with phase-locked screech and edge tone feedback locked subsonic jets. The results obtained in this paper suggests that phase-locked screech or edge tones may produce correlated spatially periodic jet flow downstream of the nozzles which creates a large span wise multi-nozzle region where a coherent wave can propagate. The large spatial growth rates for eddies obtained by model calculation herein are related to the increased mixing since eddies are the primary mechanism that transfer energy from the mean flow to the large turbulent structures. Calculations of spacial growth rates will be presented for a set of relative Mach numbers and spacings for which experimental measurements have been made. Calculations of spatial growth rates are presented for relative Mach numbers from 1.25 to 1.75 with ratios of nozzle spacing to nozzle width ratios from s/w(sub N) = 4 to s/w(sub N) = 13.7. The model may be of significant scientific and engineering value in the quest to understand and construct supersonic mixer-ejector nozzles which provide increased mixing and reduced noise.

  7. Array error calibration methods in downward-looking linear-array three-dimensional synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Weixian; Huang, Pingping; Han, Kuoye; Liu, Qi; Peng, Xueming

    2016-04-01

    In order to achieve high-precision three-dimensional (3-D) imaging with an airborne downward-looking linear-array 3-D synthetic aperture radar (LA-3D-SAR), a uniform virtual antenna array can be obtained by aperture synthesis of the cross-track sparse multiple-input-multiple-output array. However, the actual 3-D imaging quality is unavoidably degraded by array errors such as the multichannel amplitude-phase errors due to the nonideal antenna characteristics, and the virtual element position errors due to vibrations and motion measurement deviations. We investigate the effects of these errors on the forms and the degrees of image quality degradation and consider the use of corresponding calibration methods to eliminate the effects of errors. For the multichannel amplitude-phase errors, the target response is subject to an integrated sidelobe level increase introduced by the phase error, which can be calibrated based on external (parallel or point target) calibrators, as proposed in the paper. For the virtual element position errors, they mainly the result of contrast degradation and noise in the image along the cross-track direction and have little impact on the range and along-track directions. The imaging performance is more sensitive to the error component in the height direction as compared to other components, the precision requirement of which should be established as the calibration reference. A calibration method based on time-divided active calibrators is proposed to estimate and correct the virtual element position errors. Both numerical simulations and real data experiments have shown the validity of the analyses as well as the effectiveness of the proposed calibration methods.

  8. Identification and mapping of linear antibody epitopes in human serum albumin using high-density Peptide arrays.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Lajla Bruntse; Buus, Soren; Schafer-Nielsen, Claus

    2013-01-01

    We have recently developed a high-density photolithographic, peptide array technology with a theoretical upper limit of 2 million different peptides per array of 2 cm(2). Here, we have used this to perform complete and exhaustive analyses of linear B cell epitopes of a medium sized protein target using human serum albumin (HSA) as an example. All possible overlapping 15-mers from HSA were synthesized and probed with a commercially available polyclonal rabbit anti-HSA antibody preparation. To allow for identification of even the weakest epitopes and at the same time perform a detailed characterization of key residues involved in antibody binding, the array also included complete single substitution scans (i.e. including each of the 20 common amino acids) at each position of each 15-mer peptide. As specificity controls, all possible 15-mer peptides from bovine serum albumin (BSA) and from rabbit serum albumin (RSA) were included as well. The resulting layout contained more than 200.000 peptide fields and could be synthesized in a single array on a microscope slide. More than 20 linear epitope candidates were identified and characterized at high resolution i.e. identifying which amino acids in which positions were needed, or not needed, for antibody interaction. As expected, moderate cross-reaction with some peptides in BSA was identified whereas no cross-reaction was observed with peptides from RSA. We conclude that high-density peptide microarrays are a very powerful methodology to identify and characterize linear antibody epitopes, and should advance detailed description of individual specificities at the single antibody level as well as serologic analysis at the proteome-wide level.

  9. General polynomial factorization-based design of sparse periodic linear arrays.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Sanjit K; Mondal, Kalyan; Tchobanou, Mikhail K; Dolecek, Gordana Jovanovic

    2010-09-01

    We have developed several methods of designing sparse periodic arrays based upon the polynomial factorization method. In these methods, transmit and receive aperture polynomials are selected such that their product results in a polynomial representing the desired combined transmit/receive (T/R) effective aperture function. A desired combined T/R effective aperture is simply an aperture with an appropriate width exhibiting a spectrum that corresponds to the desired two-way radiation pattern. At least one of the two aperture functions that constitute the combined T/R effective aperture function will be a sparse polynomial. A measure of sparsity of the designed array is defined in terms of the element reduction factor. We show that elements of a linear array can be reduced with varying degrees of beam mainlobe width to sidelobe reduction properties.

  10. 250 kA compact linear transformer driver for wire array z-pinch loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bott, S. C.; Haas, D. M.; Madden, R. E.; Ueda, U.; Eshaq, Y.; Collins, G., IV; Gunasekera, K.; Mariscal, D.; Peebles, J.; Beg, F. N.; Mazarakis, M.; Struve, K.; Sharpe, R.

    2011-05-01

    We present the application of a short rise (˜150ns) 250 kA linear transformer driver (LTD) to wire array z-pinch loads for the first time. The generator is a modification of a previous driver in which a new conical power feed provides a low inductance coupling to wire loads. Performance of the new design using both short circuit and plasma loads is presented and discussed. The final design delivers ˜200kA to a wire array load which is in good agreement with SCREAMER calculations using a simplified representative circuit. Example results demonstrate successful experiments using cylindrical, conical, and inverse wire arrays as well as previously published work on x-pinch loads.

  11. CFD Analysis of a Finite Linear Array of Savonius Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkacem, Belabes; Paraschivoiu, Marius

    2016-09-01

    Vertical axis wind turbines such as Savonius rotors have been shown to be suitable for low wind speeds normally associated with wind resources in all corners of the world. However, the efficiency of the rotor is low. This paper presents results of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations for an array of Savonius rotors that show a significant increase in efficiency. It looks at identifying the effect on the energy yield of a number of turbines placed in a linear array. Results from this investigation suggest that an increase in the energy yield could be achieved which can reach almost two times than the conventional Savonius wind turbine in the case of an array of 11turbines with a distance of 1.4R in between them. The effect of different TSR values and different wind inlet speeds on the farm has been studied for both a synchronous and asynchronous wind farm.

  12. A two-dimensional linear array fiber amplifier based on the MOPA configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, L. Q.; Gao, C. X.; He, H. D.; Feng, L.; Cao, Z. Y.; Sun, C. D.; Zhu, S. L.

    2013-09-01

    A two-dimensional linear array fiber amplifier based on the master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) configuration is constructed and employed as the laser source of a high resolution 3D imaging LIDAR system. Each branch of the linear array system comprises a dual-stage Yb3+-doped large-mode-area double-clad fiber amplifier. The amplified pulse is of 2.3 ns temporal duration and 30 kHz repetition rate with an average power of 8.5 W when the pump power is 20 W. The optical-optical conversion efficiency is 41.8%. Furthermore, the SRS effect can be suppressed effectively. The M2 values of the output beam are 1.35 and 1.33 in the x- and y-axis directions, respectively.

  13. Covariance analysis and phase ambiguity resolution for a linear interferometer antenna array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, James Andrew

    This thesis explores the application of mathematical techniques for estimating the angle of arrival (AOA) using a receiving platform having a linear interferometer antenna array. It addresses the estimation accuracy of interferometer phase measurements of a signal with superposed Gaussian noise from multiple antenna baselines, and provides a method for resolving the modulo two-pi problem inherent to many phase measurement systems. The study extends prior theoretical work (Hanna, C., 1983) by laying a mathematical foundation to complement his geometrical approach, provides a robust method of performance prediction for such a system. Key elements include estimation accuracy of a signal parameter with additive noise; the design of the linear antenna array element spacings and the relationship to Diophantine equations; and the application of the Cramer-Rao lower bound on variance of parameter estimation. It is hoped that the work presented here will serve as a practical guide for research scientists and engineers.

  14. Coronary Artery Imaging with a Computerized Linear Diode Array Radiographic System

    PubMed Central

    Sashin, D.; Sternglass, E.J.; Bron, K.M.; Slasky, B.S.; Herron, J.M.; Kennedy, W.H.; Boyer, J.W.; Girdany, B.R.; Simpson, R.W.; Horton, J.A.; Hoy, R.J.; Feist, J.H.; Uretsky, B.F.

    1983-01-01

    Initial results for a new technique of imaging the small and rapidly moving coronary arteries using linear arrays of self-scanning diodes coupled directly to a computer are described. The technique involves a thin, fanshaped x-ray beam and a phosphor screen fiber-optically coupled to a set of light sensitive self-scanning linear diode arrays that are scanned across the heart to give a scatter-free, high detail digital image. Coronary arteries have been imaged successfully in the rapidly moving heart of 23 kg dogs using both aortic root and intravenous injections. In the aortic root injection, coronary arteries as small as 0.3 mm have been imaged. This is the first step in the development of a noninvasive, low-dose technique for the early detection and quantification of atherosclerotic disease in human coronary arteries presently going on in our laboratory. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3

  15. Orientation effects on linear time-reversing array retrofocusing in shallow water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dungan, Michael R.; Dowling, David R.

    2002-11-01

    A time-reversing array (TRA) can retrofocus acoustic energy, in both time and space, to the original sound-source location without any environmental information. This paper presents results from an analytical and computational investigation into the effects that array orientation has on linear TRA retrofocusing in shallow water environments. A linear TRA has three limiting orthogonal orientations with respect to a distant sound source in a shallow water waveguide: vertical, endfire, and broadside. Here, TRA retrofocus characteristics are predicted for monochromatic sound propagation in a Pekeris waveguide using a modal sum Green's function and in a more realistic sound channel having vertical sound speed variation using a computed Green's function. Both analytical and computational results are compared for the three orthogonal array orientations with vertical arrays performing best. Differences in TRA retrofocusing performance in the three orientations are primarily determined by geometrical considerations and the extra mode-shape weighting inherent in the back-propagated field of horizontal TRAs. copyright 2002 Acoustical Society of America.

  16. Broadband ultrasonic linear array using ternary PIN-PMN-PT single crystal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Zhao, Xiangyong; Or, Siu Wing; Leung, Chung Ming; Zhang, Yaoyao; Jiao, Jie; Luo, Haosu

    2012-09-01

    Ternary Pb(In(1/2)Nb(1/2))O(3)-Pb(Mg(1/3)Nb(2/3))O(3)-PbTiO(3) (PIN-PMN-PT) single crystal was investigated for potential application in ultrasonic linear array. Orientation and temperature dependences of height extensional electromechanical coupling coefficient k'(33) for PIN-PMN-PT single crystal were studied. It was found that the [001] poled PIN-PMN-PT diced along the [100] direction would achieve a maximum k'(33) (~87%) and the service temperature was up to 110 °C. Ultrasonic linear arrays using PIN-PMN-PT single crystal and PZT ceramic were fabricated and compared. The bandwidth at -6 dB, two-way insertion loss and pulse length of the PIN-PMN-PT array were 98.6%, -45.1 dB, and 0.28 μs, respectively, which were about 25% broader, 3.7dB higher, and 0.08 μs shorter than those of the PZT array. The experimental results agreed well with the theoretical simulation. These superior performances were attributable to the excellent piezoelectric properties of PIN-PMN-PT single crystal. PMID:23020406

  17. Broadband ultrasonic linear array using ternary PIN-PMN-PT single crystal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Zhao, Xiangyong; Or, Siu Wing; Leung, Chung Ming; Zhang, Yaoyao; Jiao, Jie; Luo, Haosu

    2012-09-01

    Ternary Pb(In(1/2)Nb(1/2))O(3)-Pb(Mg(1/3)Nb(2/3))O(3)-PbTiO(3) (PIN-PMN-PT) single crystal was investigated for potential application in ultrasonic linear array. Orientation and temperature dependences of height extensional electromechanical coupling coefficient k'(33) for PIN-PMN-PT single crystal were studied. It was found that the [001] poled PIN-PMN-PT diced along the [100] direction would achieve a maximum k'(33) (~87%) and the service temperature was up to 110 °C. Ultrasonic linear arrays using PIN-PMN-PT single crystal and PZT ceramic were fabricated and compared. The bandwidth at -6 dB, two-way insertion loss and pulse length of the PIN-PMN-PT array were 98.6%, -45.1 dB, and 0.28 μs, respectively, which were about 25% broader, 3.7dB higher, and 0.08 μs shorter than those of the PZT array. The experimental results agreed well with the theoretical simulation. These superior performances were attributable to the excellent piezoelectric properties of PIN-PMN-PT single crystal.

  18. Direct X-Ray Response Of Charge-Coupled Devices And Photodiode Linear Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Launspach, J.; Bourgade, J. L.; Cavailler, C.; de Mascureau, J.; Mens, A.; Sauneuf, R.

    1986-08-01

    For x-ray calibration of detectors used on laser created plasma experiments we have developed and characterized two kinds of sources : classical continuous x-ray sources operating at 1.8 keV and 5.4 keV and a pulsed source obtained by modifying a plasma Focus device. Calibration data for x-ray Charge - Coupled Devices (CCD) and photodiode linear array cameras are presented.

  19. Acoustic Field Calculation of Ultrasonic Linear Phased Array Transducers with Curve Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chunguang; Wang, Lijiu; Xiao, Dingguo; Zhou, Shiyuan

    2011-06-01

    The focus law and acoustic field computation method about circular arc linear phased array have been discussed in the paper. Acoustic field of transducers is given by the use of the coordinate transformation and an approximation with rectangle element instead of circular arc element, and was validated using Rayleigh-Sommerfeld Integral and nonparallel multiple Gaussian beam model respectively. The results of two methods match well.

  20. Liquid cooled, linear focus solar cell receiver

    DOEpatents

    Kirpich, A.S.

    1983-12-08

    Separate structures for electrical insulation and thermal conduction are established within a liquid cooled, linear focus solar cell receiver for use with parabolic or Fresnel optical concentrators. The receiver includes a V-shaped aluminum extrusion having a pair of outer faces each formed with a channel receiving a string of solar cells in thermal contact with the extrusion. Each cell string is attached to a continuous glass cover secured within the channel with spring clips to isolate the string from the external environment. Repair or replacement of solar cells is effected simply by detaching the spring clips to remove the cover/cell assembly without interrupting circulation of coolant fluid through the receiver. The lower surface of the channel in thermal contact with the cells of the string is anodized to establish a suitable standoff voltage capability between the cells and the extrusion. Primary electrical insulation is provided by a dielectric tape disposed between the coolant tube and extrusion. Adjacent solar cells are soldered to interconnect members designed to accommodate thermal expansion and mismatches. The coolant tube is clamped into the extrusion channel with a releasably attachable clamping strip to facilitate easy removal of the receiver from the coolant circuit.

  1. Liquid cooled, linear focus solar cell receiver

    DOEpatents

    Kirpich, Aaron S.

    1985-01-01

    Separate structures for electrical insulation and thermal conduction are established within a liquid cooled, linear focus solar cell receiver for use with parabolic or Fresnel optical concentrators. The receiver includes a V-shaped aluminum extrusion having a pair of outer faces each formed with a channel receiving a string of solar cells in thermal contact with the extrusion. Each cell string is attached to a continuous glass cover secured within the channel with spring clips to isolate the string from the external environment. Repair or replacement of solar cells is effected simply by detaching the spring clips to remove the cover/cell assembly without interrupting circulation of coolant fluid through the receiver. The lower surface of the channel in thermal contact with the cells of the string is anodized to establish a suitable standoff voltage capability between the cells and the extrusion. Primary electrical insulation is provided by a dielectric tape disposed between the coolant tube and extrusion. Adjacent solar cells are soldered to interconnect members designed to accommodate thermal expansion and mismatches. The coolant tube is clamped into the extrusion channel with a releasably attachable clamping strip to facilitate easy removal of the receiver from the coolant circuit.

  2. Correction of linear-array lidar intensity data using an optimal beam shaping approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fan; Wang, Yuanqing; Yang, Xingyu; Zhang, Bingqing; Li, Fenfang

    2016-08-01

    The linear-array lidar has been recently developed and applied for its superiority of vertically non-scanning, large field of view, high sensitivity and high precision. The beam shaper is the key component for the linear-array detection. However, the traditional beam shaping approaches can hardly satisfy our requirement for obtaining unbiased and complete backscattered intensity data. The required beam distribution should roughly be oblate U-shaped rather than Gaussian or uniform. Thus, an optimal beam shaping approach is proposed in this paper. By employing a pair of conical lenses and a cylindrical lens behind the beam expander, the expanded Gaussian laser was shaped to a line-shaped beam whose intensity distribution is more consistent with the required distribution. To provide a better fit to the requirement, off-axis method is adopted. The design of the optimal beam shaping module is mathematically explained and the experimental verification of the module performance is also presented in this paper. The experimental results indicate that the optimal beam shaping approach can effectively correct the intensity image and provide ~30% gain of detection area over traditional approach, thus improving the imaging quality of linear-array lidar.

  3. Linear azimuthons in circular fiber arrays and optical angular momentum of discrete optical vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Alexeyev, C. N.; Volyar, A. V.; Yavorsky, M. A.

    2009-12-15

    We study the field generated in the outer space by the superposition of modes of a regular circular monomode fiber array. It is shown that a supermode of the fiber array generates a discrete optical vortex; the formula for the topological charge of the vortex is obtained depending on the order of the supermode and the number of fibers in the array. The orbital angular momentum carried by an arbitrary superposition of supermodes is shown to equal the weighted sum of partial angular momenta of supermodes. It is shown that for certain combinations of supermodes the angular momentum comprises along with its intrinsic part also the extrinsic constituent. For such combinations precession of the angular momentum about the propagation axis is demonstrated. It is demonstrated that by combining supermodes one can generate in the array stable regularly rotating linear azimuthons. By creating a phased excitation of certain groups of fibers in the array one can control the global soliton-like motion of the excited domain.

  4. A 400 KHz line rate 2048 pixel modular SWIR linear array for earth observation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anchlia, Ankur; Vinella, Rosa M.; Wouters, Kristof; Gielen, Daphne; Hooylaerts, Peter; Deroo, Pieter; Ruythooren, Wouter; van der Zanden, Koen; Vermeiren, Jan; Merken, Patrick

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we report about a family of linear imaging FPAs sensitive in the [0.9 - 1.7um] band, developed for high speed applications such as LIDAR, wavelength references and OCT analyzers and also for earth observation applications. Fast linear FPAs can also be used in a wide variety of terrestrial applications, including high speed sorting, electro- and photo-luminesce and medical applications. The arrays are based on a modular ROIC design concept: modules of 512 pixels are stitched during fabrication to achieve 512, 1024 and 2048 pixel arrays. In principle, this concept can be extended to any multiple of 512 pixels, the limiting factor being the pixel yield of long InGaAs arrays and the CTE differences in the hybrid setup. Each 512-pixel module has its own on-chip digital sequencer, analog readout chain and 4 output buffers. This modular concept enables a long-linear array to run at a high line rate of 400 KHz irrespective of the array length, which limits the line rate in a traditional linear array. The pixel has a pitch of 12.5um. The detector frontend is based on CTIA (Capacitor Trans-impedance Amplifier), having 5 selectable integration capacitors giving full well from 62x103e- (gain0) to 40x106e- (gain4). An auto-zero circuit limits the detector bias non-uniformity to 5-10mV across broad intensity levels, limiting the input referred dark signal noise to 20e-rms for Tint=3ms at room temperature. An on-chip CDS that follows the CTIA facilitates removal of Reset/KTC noise, CTIA offsets and most of the 1/f noise. The measured noise of the ROIC is 35e-rms in gain0. At a master clock rate of 60MHz and a minimum integration time of 1.4us, the FPAs reach the highest line rate of 400 KHz.

  5. Comparison of Hybribio GenoArray and Roche human papillomavirus (HPV) linear array for HPV genotyping in anal swab samples.

    PubMed

    Low, Huey Chi; Silver, Michelle I; Brown, Brandon J; Leng, Chan Yoon; Blas, Magaly M; Gravitt, Patti E; Woo, Yin Ling

    2015-02-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is causally associated with anal cancer, as HPV DNA is detected in up to 90% of anal intraepithelial neoplasias and anal cancers. With the gradual increase of anal cancer rates, there is a growing need to establish reliable and clinically relevant methods to detect anal cancer precursors. In resource-limited settings, HPV DNA detection is a potentially relevant tool for anal cancer screening. Here, we evaluated the performance of the Hybribio GenoArray (GA) for genotyping HPV in anal samples, against the reference standard Roche Linear Array (LA). Anal swab samples were obtained from sexually active men who have sex with men. Following DNA extraction, each sample was genotyped using GA and LA. The overall interassay agreement, type-specific, and single and multiple genotype agreements were evaluated by kappa statistics and McNemar's χ(2) tests. Using GA and LA, 68% and 76% of samples were HPV DNA positive, respectively. There was substantial interassay agreements for the detection of all HPV genotypes (κ = 0.70, 86% agreement). Although LA was able to detect more genotypes per sample, the interassay agreement was acceptable (κ = 0.53, 63% agreement). GA had poorer specific detection of HPV genotypes 35, 42, and 51 (κ < 0.60). In conclusion, GA and LA showed good interassay agreement for the detection of most HPV genotypes in anal samples. However, the detection of HPV DNA in up to 76% of anal samples warrants further evaluation of its clinical significance. PMID:25502520

  6. Comparison of Hybribio GenoArray and Roche Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Linear Array for HPV Genotyping in Anal Swab Samples

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Michelle I.; Brown, Brandon J.; Leng, Chan Yoon; Blas, Magaly M.; Gravitt, Patti E.; Woo, Yin Ling

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is causally associated with anal cancer, as HPV DNA is detected in up to 90% of anal intraepithelial neoplasias and anal cancers. With the gradual increase of anal cancer rates, there is a growing need to establish reliable and clinically relevant methods to detect anal cancer precursors. In resource-limited settings, HPV DNA detection is a potentially relevant tool for anal cancer screening. Here, we evaluated the performance of the Hybribio GenoArray (GA) for genotyping HPV in anal samples, against the reference standard Roche Linear Array (LA). Anal swab samples were obtained from sexually active men who have sex with men. Following DNA extraction, each sample was genotyped using GA and LA. The overall interassay agreement, type-specific, and single and multiple genotype agreements were evaluated by kappa statistics and McNemar's χ2 tests. Using GA and LA, 68% and 76% of samples were HPV DNA positive, respectively. There was substantial interassay agreements for the detection of all HPV genotypes (κ = 0.70, 86% agreement). Although LA was able to detect more genotypes per sample, the interassay agreement was acceptable (κ = 0.53, 63% agreement). GA had poorer specific detection of HPV genotypes 35, 42, and 51 (κ < 0.60). In conclusion, GA and LA showed good interassay agreement for the detection of most HPV genotypes in anal samples. However, the detection of HPV DNA in up to 76% of anal samples warrants further evaluation of its clinical significance. PMID:25502520

  7. Super non-linear RRAM with ultra-low power for 3D vertical nano-crossbar arrays.

    PubMed

    Luo, Qing; Xu, Xiaoxin; Liu, Hongtao; Lv, Hangbing; Gong, Tiancheng; Long, Shibing; Liu, Qi; Sun, Haitao; Banerjee, Writam; Li, Ling; Gao, Jianfeng; Lu, Nianduan; Liu, Ming

    2016-08-25

    Vertical crossbar arrays provide a cost-effective approach for high density three-dimensional (3D) integration of resistive random access memory. However, an individual selector device is not allowed to be integrated with the memory cell separately. The development of V-RRAM has impeded the lack of satisfactory self-selective cells. In this study, we have developed a high performance bilayer self-selective device using HfO2 as the memory switching layer and a mixed ionic and electron conductor as the selective layer. The device exhibits high non-linearity (>10(3)) and ultra-low half-select leakage (<0.1 pA). A four layer vertical crossbar array was successfully demonstrated based on the developed self-selective device. High uniformity, ultra-low leakage, sub-nA operation, self-compliance, and excellent read/write disturbance immunity were achieved. The robust array level performance shows attractive potential for low power and high density 3D data storage applications. PMID:27510434

  8. Equivalent circuit-based analysis of CMUT cell dynamics in arrays.

    PubMed

    Oguz, H K; Atalar, Abdullah; Köymen, Hayrettin

    2013-05-01

    Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) are usually composed of large arrays of closely packed cells. In this work, we use an equivalent circuit model to analyze CMUT arrays with multiple cells. We study the effects of mutual acoustic interactions through the immersion medium caused by the pressure field generated by each cell acting upon the others. To do this, all the cells in the array are coupled through a radiation impedance matrix at their acoustic terminals. An accurate approximation for the mutual radiation impedance is defined between two circular cells, which can be used in large arrays to reduce computational complexity. Hence, a performance analysis of CMUT arrays can be accurately done with a circuit simulator. By using the proposed model, one can very rapidly obtain the linear frequency and nonlinear transient responses of arrays with an arbitrary number of CMUT cells. We performed several finite element method (FEM) simulations for arrays with small numbers of cells and showed that the results are very similar to those obtained by the equivalent circuit model.

  9. Maximum power transfer from a solar-cell array by sensing array temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sussman, M.

    1972-01-01

    A technique is described in which a spacecraft solar-cell array is caused to operate at or near maximum power output over a wide range of environmental conditions. The output of an array temperature sensor is used to vary the duty cycle of a pulse-width-modulated impedance regulator so that the array operates at the voltage of maximum power. A resistance-type temperature sensor was found to be applicable for most spacecraft missions. However, a solar cell used as a temperature sensor has the advantage of negligible transient errors on lightweight arrays for orbiting spacecraft.

  10. High-sensitive thermal video camera with self-scanned 128 InSb linear array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujisada, Hiroyuki

    1991-12-01

    A compact thermal video camera with very high sensitivity has been developed by using a self-scanned 128 InSb linear array photodiode. Two-dimensional images are formed by a self- scanning function of the linear array focal plane assembly in the horizontal direction and by a vibration mirror in the vertical direction. Images with 128 X 128 pixel number are obtained every 1/30 seconds. A small size InSb detector array with a total length of 7.68 mm is utilized in order to build the compact system. In addition, special consideration is given to a configuration of optics, vibration mirror, and focal plane assembly. Real-time signal processing by a microprocessor is carried out to compensate inhomogeneous sensitivities and irradiances for each detector. The standard NTSC TV format is employed for output video signals. The thermal video camera developed had a very high radiometric sensitivity. Minimum resolvable temperature difference (MRTD) is estimated at about 0.02 K for 300 K target. The stable operation is possible without blackbody reference, because of very small stray radiation.

  11. Solar cells incorporating light harvesting arrays

    DOEpatents

    Lindsey, Jonathan S.; Meyer, Gerald J.

    2002-01-01

    A solar cell incorporates a light harvesting array that comprises: (a) a first substrate comprising a first electrode; and (b) a layer of light harvesting rods electrically coupled to the first electrode, each of the light harvesting rods comprising a polymer of Formula I: X.sup.1.paren open-st.X.sup.m+1).sub.m (I) wherein m is at least 1, and may be from two, three or four to 20 or more; X.sup.1 is a charge separation group (and preferably a porphyrinic macrocycle, which may be one ligand of a double-decker sandwich compound) having an excited-state of energy equal to or lower than that of X.sup.2 ; and X.sup.2 through X.sup.m+1 are chromophores (and again are preferably porphyrinic macrocycles).

  12. Solar cells incorporating light harvesting arrays

    DOEpatents

    Lindsey, Jonathan S.; Meyer, Gerald J.

    2003-07-22

    A solar cell incorporates a light harvesting array that comprises: (a) a first substrate comprising a first electrode; and (b) a layer of light harvesting rods electrically coupled to the first electrode, each of the light harvesting rods comprising a polymer of Formula I: ##EQU1## wherein m is at least 1, and may be from two, three or four to 20 or more; X.sup.1 is a charge separation group (and preferably a porphyrinic macrocycle, which may be one ligand of a double-decker sandwich compound) having an excited-state of energy equal to or lower than that of X.sup.2 ; and X.sup.2 through X.sup.m+1 are chromophores (and again are preferably porphyrinic macrocycles).

  13. Non linear behaviour of cell tensegrity models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alippi, A.; Bettucci, A.; Biagioni, A.; Conclusio, D.; D'Orazio, A.; Germano, M.; Passeri, D.

    2012-05-01

    Tensegrity models for the cytoskeleton structure of living cells is largely used nowadays for interpreting the biochemical response of living tissues to mechanical stresses. Microtubules, microfilaments and filaments are the microscopic cell counterparts of struts (microtubules) and cables (microfilaments and filaments) in the macroscopic world: the formers oppose to compression, the latters to tension, thus yielding an overall structure, light and highly deformable. Specific cell surface receptors, such as integrins, act as the coupling elements that transmit the outside mechanical stress state into the cell body. Reversible finite deformations of tensegrity structures have been widely demonstrated experimentally and in a number of living cell simulations. In the present paper, the bistability behaviour of two general models, the linear bar oscillator and the icosahedron, is studied, as they are both obtained from mathematical simulation, the former, and from larger scale experiments, the latter. The discontinuity in the frequency response of the oscillation amplitude and the lateral bending of the resonance curves are put in evidence, as it grows larger as the driving amplitude increases, respectively.

  14. Modeling the effects of linear shallow-water internal waves on horizontal array coherence.

    PubMed

    Rouseff, Daniel; Lunkov, Andrey A

    2015-10-01

    The coherence length of a horizontal array is the maximum separation between two points where coherent processing gives useful gain when a distant source is at broadside. In shallow water, the coherence length is limited by the environmental variability caused by several relevant oceanographic processes. In the present study, a statistical model is developed that quantifies how one oceanographic process, linear internal waves, affects the coherence length. A key input to the ocean sub-model is the vertically integrated energy density of the internal wave field. The acoustic sub-model is based on the adiabatic normal mode approximation and so should be reasonable for frequencies under 1 kHz. Numerical calculations using environmental data from the Shallow Water 2006 Experiment (SW06) show how the coherence length of individual modes varies with consequent effects on array coherence. The coherence length is shown to be a strong function of where the source and array are positioned in the water column. For a bottom-mounted array above a moderately lossy seabed, the model predicts a coherence length that depends only weakly on range, an effect observed in field experiments.

  15. Mixed Linear/Square-Root Encoded Single Slope Ramp Provides a Fast, Low Noise Analog to Digital Converter with Very High Linearity for Focal Plane Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrigley, Christopher James (Inventor); Hancock, Bruce R. (Inventor); Newton, Kenneth W. (Inventor); Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An analog-to-digital converter (ADC) converts pixel voltages from a CMOS image into a digital output. A voltage ramp generator generates a voltage ramp that has a linear first portion and a non-linear second portion. A digital output generator generates a digital output based on the voltage ramp, the pixel voltages, and comparator output from an array of comparators that compare the voltage ramp to the pixel voltages. A return lookup table linearizes the digital output values.

  16. Plasmon enhanced linear and nonlinear photoluminescence in planar nanoparticle arrays (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Gary F.; Dal Negro, Luca

    2015-09-01

    Light emission from metal nanoparticles has potential appications as a highly sensitive refractive index detector. In order for this protential to be realized the mechanics of plasmon enhanced photoluminescence (PL) in planar nanoparticle arrays must be understude. We present an experimental exploreation of emission spectra and realitive efficiency of gold PL in nanoplasmonic arrays. We demonstrate tunability of metal PL by nanoparticle size and discover the critical role of near-field interparticle coupling on emission efficiency. We show that direct excition of plasmon resonances by photoexcited electron-hole pairs is the primary contributer to the metalic nanoparticle emission spectrum. We additionally show that emission is quenched by near-field interactions between nanoparticles leading to spectral broading by increased non-radiative plasmon decay. Finally, we show a correlation between plasmon life-time and PL efficiency. We explore this phenominan for both linear and nonlinear PL. Experimental results are supported by numerical simulations of plasmon life-time.

  17. Angle-Polarization Estimation for Coherent Sources with Linear Tripole Sensor Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kun; He, Jin; Shu, Ting; Liu, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    We propose a parallel factor (PARAFAC) analysis-based angle and polarization estimation algorithm for multiple coherent sources using a uniformly-spaced linear tripole sensor array. By forming a PARAFAC model using the spatial signature of the tripole array, the new algorithm requires neither spatial smoothing nor vector-field smoothing to decorrelate the signal coherency. We also establish that the angle-polarization parameters of K coherent signals can be uniquely determined by PARAFAC analysis, as long as the number of tripoles L≥2K−1. In addition, the proposed algorithm can offer enhanced angle and polarization estimation accuracy by extending the interspacing of the tripoles beyond a half wavelength. PMID:26907273

  18. High-Frequency (>50 MHz) Medical Ultrasound Linear Arrays Fabricated From Micromachined Bulk PZT Materials

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changgeng; Zhou, Qifa; Djuth, Frank T.; Shung, K. Kirk

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the development and characterization of a high-frequency (65-MHz) ultrasound transducer linear array. The array was built from bulk PZT which was etched using an optimized chlorine-based plasma dry-etching process. The median etch rate of 8 μm/h yielded a good profile (wall) angle (>83°) and a reasonable processing time for etch depths up to 40 μm (which corresponds to a 50-MHz transducer). A backing layer with an acoustic impedance of 6 MRayl and a front-end polymer matching layer yielded a transducer bandwidth of 40%. The major parameters of the transducer have been characterized. The two-way insertion loss and crosstalk between adjacent channels at the center frequency are 26.5 and −25 dB, respectively. PMID:24626041

  19. Coherent-weighted three-dimensional image reconstruction in linear-array-based photoacoustic tomography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Depeng; Wang, Yuehang; Zhou, Yang; Lovell, Jonathan F; Xia, Jun

    2016-05-01

    While the majority of photoacoustic imaging systems used custom-made transducer arrays, commercially-available linear transducer arrays hold the benefits of affordable price, handheld convenience and wide clinical recognition. They are not widely used in photoacoustic imaging primarily because of the poor elevation resolution. Here, without modifying the imaging geometry and system, we propose addressing this limitation purely through image reconstruction. Our approach is based on the integration of two advanced image reconstruction techniques: focal-line-based three-dimensional image reconstruction and coherent weighting. We first numerically validated our approach through simulation and then experimentally tested it in phantom and in vivo. Both simulation and experimental results proved that the method can significantly improve the elevation resolution (up to 4 times in our experiment) and enhance object contrast. PMID:27231634

  20. Coherent-weighted three-dimensional image reconstruction in linear-array-based photoacoustic tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Depeng; Wang, Yuehang; Zhou, Yang; Lovell, Jonathan F.; Xia, Jun

    2016-01-01

    While the majority of photoacoustic imaging systems used custom-made transducer arrays, commercially-available linear transducer arrays hold the benefits of affordable price, handheld convenience and wide clinical recognition. They are not widely used in photoacoustic imaging primarily because of the poor elevation resolution. Here, without modifying the imaging geometry and system, we propose addressing this limitation purely through image reconstruction. Our approach is based on the integration of two advanced image reconstruction techniques: focal-line-based three-dimensional image reconstruction and coherent weighting. We first numerically validated our approach through simulation and then experimentally tested it in phantom and in vivo. Both simulation and experimental results proved that the method can significantly improve the elevation resolution (up to 4 times in our experiment) and enhance object contrast. PMID:27231634

  1. NDT and SHM of Carbon Fiber Composites using Linear Drive MWM-Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washabaugh, Andrew; Martin, Christopher; Lyons, Robert; Grundy, David; Goldfine, Neil; Russell, Richard; Wincheski, Russell

    2012-01-01

    Carbon fiber composites are used in a wide range of structural applications due to their excellent specific strength and stiffness. However, the anisotropic mechanical and electrical properties associated with the fibers within each composite layer present challenges, and opportunities, for Nondestructive Testing (NDT) methods used to characterize and assess the structure condition. This includes composite condition after manufacture (such as fiber orientation and density, porosity, delamination, and bond strength) and during usage (such as damage from impact, fiber breakage, thermal exposure or applied stress). Ultrasonic and thermographic methods can address some of these challenges, but eddy current methods provide an alternative method for composite structures that contain a conducting material, such as carbon fibers or a metallic liner. This presentation reviews recent advances in the development of eddy current sensors and arrays for carbon fiber composite NDT and Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) applications. The focus is on eddy current sensor constructs with linear drive windings, such as MWM -Arrays, that induce currents primarily within the linear fibers of the composite. By combining this type of sensor construct with micromechanical models that relate composite constituent properties to measurable sensor responses, insight is obtained into the volumetric distribution of electrical properties within the composite and the associated manufacturing, damage, or strain conditions. With knowledge of the fiber layup, this MWM-Array technology is able to detect damage and strain/stress as a function of depth and fiber orientation. This work has been funded by NASA, NA V AIR and the Army for applications ranging from composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) to aircraft structures and rotorcraft blades. This presentation will specifically present background on the MWM-Array technology, results from the micromechanical modeling effort, and results from

  2. Application of linear array imaging techniques to the real-time inspection of airframe structures and substructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James G.

    1995-01-01

    Development and application of linear array imaging technologies to address specific aging-aircraft inspection issues is described. Real-time video-taped images were obtained from an unmodified commercial linear-array medical scanner of specimens constructed to simulate typical types of flaws encountered in the inspection of aircraft structures. Results suggest that information regarding the characteristics, location, and interface properties of specific types of flaws in materials and structures may be obtained from the images acquired with a linear array. Furthermore, linear array imaging may offer the advantage of being able to compare 'good' regions with 'flawed' regions simultaneously, and in real time. Real-time imaging permits the inspector to obtain image information from various views and provides the opportunity for observing the effects of introducing specific interventions. Observation of an image in real-time can offer the operator the ability to 'interact' with the inspection process, thus providing new capabilities, and perhaps, new approaches to nondestructive inspections.

  3. Guided torsional wave generation of a linear in-plane shear piezoelectric array in metallic pipes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wensong; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo; Shi, Tonglu

    2016-02-01

    Cylindrical guided waves based techniques are effective and promising tools for damage detection in long pipes. The essential operations are generation and reception of guided waves in the structures utilizing transducers. A novel in-plane shear (d36 type) PMNT wafer is proposed to generate and receive the guided wave, especially the torsional waves, in metallic pipes. In contrast to the traditional wafer, this wafer will directly introduce in-plane shear deformation when electrical field is conveniently applied through its thickness direction. A single square d36 PMNT wafer is bonded on the surface of the pipe positioned collinearly with its axis, when actuated can predominantly generate torsional (T) waves along the axial direction, circumferential shear horizontal (C-SH) waves along circumferential direction, and other complex cylindrical Lamb-like wave modes along other helical directions simultaneously. While a linear array of finite square size d36 PMNT wafers was equally spaced circumferentially, when actuated simultaneously can nearly uniform axisymmetric torsional waves generate in pipes and non-symmetric wave modes can be suppressed greatly if the number of the d36 PMNT wafer is sufficiently large. This paper first presents the working mechanism of the linear d36 PMNT array from finite element analysis (FEA) by examining the constructive and destructive displacement wavefield phenomena in metallic pipes. Furthermore, since the amplitude of the received fundamental torsional wave signal strongly depends on frequency, a series of experiments are conducted to determine the frequency tuning curve for the torsional wave mode. All results indicate the linear d36 PMNT array has potential for efficiently generating uniform torsional wavefield of the fundamental torsional wave mode, which is more effective in monitoring structural health in metallic pipes. PMID:26548525

  4. Highly efficient single cell arraying by integrating acoustophoretic cell pre-concentration and dielectrophoretic cell trapping.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Hyeon; Antfolk, Maria; Kobayashi, Marina; Kaneda, Shohei; Laurell, Thomas; Fujii, Teruo

    2015-11-21

    To array rare cells at the single-cell level, the volumetric throughput may become a bottleneck in the cell trapping and the subsequent single-cell analysis, since the target cells per definition commonly exist in a large sample volume after purification from the original sample. Here, we present a novel approach for high throughput single cell arraying by integrating two original microfluidic devices: an acoustofluidic chip and an electroactive microwell array. The velocity of the cells is geared down in the acoustofluidic chip while maintaining a high volume flow rate at the inlet of the microsystem, and the cells are subsequently trapped one by one into the microwell array using dielectrophoresis. The integrated system exhibited a 10 times improved sample throughput compared to trapping with the electroactive microwell array chip alone, while maintaining a highly efficient cell recovery above 90%. The results indicate that the serial integration of the acoustophoretic pre-concentration with the dielectrophoretic cell trapping drastically improves the performance of the electroactive microwell array for highly efficient single cell analysis. This simple and effective system for high throughput single cell arraying with further possible integration of additional functions, including cell sorting and downstream analysis after cell trapping, has potential for development to a highly integrated and automated platform for single-cell analysis of rare cells.

  5. Correction of rolling wheel images captured by a linear array camera.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiayuan; Sun, Ran; Tian, Yupeng; Xie, Qi; Yang, Ying; Liu, Hongdan; Cao, Lei

    2015-11-20

    As a critical part of the train, wheels affect railway transport security to a large extent. This paper introduces an online method to detect the wheel tread of a train. The wheel tread images are collected by industrial linear array charge coupled device (CCD) cameras when the train is moving at a low velocity. This study defines the positioning of the cameras and determines how to select other parameters such as the horizontal angle and the scanning range. The deformation of the wheel tread image can be calculated based on these parameters and corrected by gray interpolation.

  6. Detection of foreign body using fast thermoacoustic tomography with a multielement linear transducer array

    SciTech Connect

    Nie Liming; Xing Da; Yang Diwu; Zeng Lvming; Zhou Quan

    2007-04-23

    Current imaging modalities face challenges in clinical applications due to limitations in resolution or contrast. Microwave-induced thermoacoustic imaging may provide a complementary modality for medical imaging, particularly for detecting foreign objects due to their different absorption of electromagnetic radiation at specific frequencies. A thermoacoustic tomography system with a multielement linear transducer array was developed and used to detect foreign objects in tissue. Radiography and thermoacoustic images of objects with different electromagnetic properties, including glass, sand, and iron, were compared. The authors' results demonstrate that thermoacoustic imaging has the potential to become a fast method for surgical localization of occult foreign objects.

  7. Correction of rolling wheel images captured by a linear array camera.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiayuan; Sun, Ran; Tian, Yupeng; Xie, Qi; Yang, Ying; Liu, Hongdan; Cao, Lei

    2015-11-20

    As a critical part of the train, wheels affect railway transport security to a large extent. This paper introduces an online method to detect the wheel tread of a train. The wheel tread images are collected by industrial linear array charge coupled device (CCD) cameras when the train is moving at a low velocity. This study defines the positioning of the cameras and determines how to select other parameters such as the horizontal angle and the scanning range. The deformation of the wheel tread image can be calculated based on these parameters and corrected by gray interpolation. PMID:26836530

  8. Fabrication of High power, High-Efficiency Linear Array Diode Lasers by Pulse Anodic Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xin; Zhang, Jing; Li, Hui; Qu, Yi; Bo, Baoxue

    2006-09-01

    InGaAlAs/AlGaAs/GaAs double-quantum-well (DQW) linear array diode lasers with asymmetric wide waveguide have been successfully fabricated by pulse anodic oxidation upon molecular beam epitaxy material growth. High-efficiency and high-power quasi-continuous-wave (QCW) output has been realized at 808 nm wavelength. The threshold current and slope efficiency of the prepared high-fill-factor QCW devices are 24 A and 1.25 A/W, respectively, and a maximum wall-plug efficiency of 51% has been achieved.

  9. On mapping algorithms to linear and fault-tolerant systolic arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, V.K.P.; Tsai, Y.C.

    1989-03-01

    The authors develop a simple mapping technique to design systolic arrays with limited I/O capability. Using this, improved systolic algorithms are derived for some matrix computations, on linearly connected arrays of processing elements (PEs) with constant I/O bandwidth. The important features of these designs are modularity with constant hardware in each PE, few control lines, simple data input/ouput format, and improved delay time. They extend the technique to design an optimal time systolic algorithm for n x n matrix multiplication. In this model, the propagation delay is assumed to be proportional to wire length. Fault reconfiguration is achieved by using buffers to bypass faulty PE's, which does not affect the clock rate of the system. The unidirectional flow of control and data in our design assures correctness of the algorithm in the presence of faulty PE's. This design can be implemented on reconfigurable fault-tolerant VLSI arrays using the Diogenes methodology. The authors compare their designs to those in the literature and are shown to be superior with respect to I/O format, control, and delay from input to output.

  10. First Experiments with Planar Wire Arrays on U Michigan's Linear Transformer Driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safronova, A. S.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Weller, M. E.; Shrestha, I. K.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Cooper, M. C.; Lorance, M.; Stafford, A.; Patel, S. G.; Steiner, A. M.; Yager-Elorriaga, D. A.; Jordan, N. M.; Gilgenbach, R. M.

    2014-10-01

    For petawatt-class Z-pinch accelerators, a Linear Transformer Driver (LTD)-driven accelerator promises to be (at a given pinch current and implosion time) more efficient than the conventionally used Marx-driven accelerator. Because there exists almost no data on how wire arrays radiate on LTD-based machines in the USA, it is very important to perform radiation and plasma physics studies on this new type of generator. We report on the first outcome of the new partnership with University of Michigan (UM), which resulted in successful UNR-UM experiments on the low-impedance MAIZE generator with planar wire arrays (PWA). PWA is a novel wire array load that was introduced and tested in detail on high-impedance Zebra at UNR during the last years and found to be the most efficient radiator. Implosion of Al Double PWAs of different configurations were achieved on MAIZE, observed with a set of various diagnostics which include x-ray diode detectors, x-ray spectroscopy and imaging, and shadowgraphy. Al and Mg plasmas of more than 450 eV were studied in detail. Research supported by NNSA under DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-NA0001984. S. G. Patel and A. M. Steiner supported by Sandia National Laboratories. D. A. Yager-Elorriaga supported by NSF GF.

  11. Multiple target three-dimensional coordinate estimation for bistatic MIMO radar with uniform linear receive array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Li, Huan; Long, Libing; Liao, Guisheng; Griffiths, Hugh

    2013-12-01

    A novel scheme to achieve three-dimensional (3D) target location in bistatic radar systems is evaluated. The proposed scheme develops the additional information of the bistatic radar, that is the transmit angles, to estimate the 3D coordinates of the targets by using multiple-input multiple-output techniques with a uniform circular array on transmit and a uniform linear array on receive. The transmit azimuth, transmit elevation angles and receive cone angle of the targets are first extracted from the receive data and the 3D coordinates are then calculated on the basis of these angles. The geometric dilution of precision which is based on the root Cramer-Rao bound of the angles, is derived to evaluate the performance bound of the proposed scheme. Further, an ESPRIT based algorithm is developed to estimate the 3D coordinates of the targets. The advantages of this scheme are that the hardware of the receive array is reduced and the 3D coordinates of the targets can be estimated in the absence of the range information in bistatic radar. Simulations and analysis show that the proposed scheme has potential to achieve good performance with low-frequency radar.

  12. Two-dimensional imaging via a narrowband MIMO radar system with two perpendicular linear arrays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dang-wei; Ma, Xiao-yan; Su, Yi

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents a system model and method for the 2-D imaging application via a narrowband multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar system with two perpendicular linear arrays. Furthermore, the imaging formulation for our method is developed through a Fourier integral processing, and the parameters of antenna array including the cross-range resolution, required size, and sampling interval are also examined. Different from the spatial sequential procedure sampling the scattered echoes during multiple snapshot illuminations in inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging, the proposed method utilizes a spatial parallel procedure to sample the scattered echoes during a single snapshot illumination. Consequently, the complex motion compensation in ISAR imaging can be avoided. Moreover, in our array configuration, multiple narrowband spectrum-shared waveforms coded with orthogonal polyphase sequences are employed. The mainlobes of the compressed echoes from the different filter band could be located in the same range bin, and thus, the range alignment in classical ISAR imaging is not necessary. Numerical simulations based on synthetic data are provided for testing our proposed method.

  13. Development of a 64 channel ultrasonic high frequency linear array imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Hu, ChangHong; Zhang, Lequan; Cannata, Jonathan M.; Yen, Jesse; Shung, K. Kirk

    2011-01-01

    In order to improve the lateral resolution and extend the field of view of a previously reported 48 element 30 MHz ultrasound linear array and 16-channel digital imaging system, the development of a 256 element 30 MHz linear array and an ultrasound imaging system with increased channel count has been undertaken. This paper reports the design and testing of a 64 channel digital imaging system which consists of an analog front-end pulser/receiver, 64 channels of Time-Gain Compensation (TGC), 64 channels of high-speed digitizer as well as a beamformer. A Personal Computer (PC) is used as the user interface to display real-time images. This system is designed as a platform for the purpose of testing the performance of high frequency linear arrays that have been developed in house. Therefore conventional approaches were taken it its implementation. Flexibility and ease of use are of primary concern whereas consideration of cost-effectiveness and novelty in design are only secondary. Even so, there are many issues at higher frequencies but do not exist at lower frequencies need to be solved. The system provides 64 channels of excitation pulsers while receiving simultaneously at a 20 MHz–120 MHz sampling rate to 12-bits. The digitized data from all channels are first fed through Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs), and then stored in memories. These raw data are accessed by the beamforming processor to re-build the image or to be downloaded to the PC for further processing. The beamformer that applies delays to the echoes of each channel is implemented with the strategy that combines coarse (8.3ns) and fine delays (2 ns). The coarse delays are integer multiples of the sampling clock rate and are achieved by controlling the write enable pin of the First-In-First-Out (FIFO) memory to obtain valid beamforming data. The fine delays are accomplished with interpolation filters. This system is capable of achieving a maximum frame rate of 50 frames per second. Wire phantom

  14. Development of a 64 channel ultrasonic high frequency linear array imaging system.

    PubMed

    Hu, ChangHong; Zhang, Lequan; Cannata, Jonathan M; Yen, Jesse; Shung, K Kirk

    2011-12-01

    In order to improve the lateral resolution and extend the field of view of a previously reported 48 element 30 MHz ultrasound linear array and 16-channel digital imaging system, the development of a 256 element 30 MHz linear array and an ultrasound imaging system with increased channel count has been undertaken. This paper reports the design and testing of a 64 channel digital imaging system which consists of an analog front-end pulser/receiver, 64 channels of Time-Gain Compensation (TGC), 64 channels of high-speed digitizer as well as a beamformer. A Personal Computer (PC) is used as the user interface to display real-time images. This system is designed as a platform for the purpose of testing the performance of high frequency linear arrays that have been developed in house. Therefore conventional approaches were taken it its implementation. Flexibility and ease of use are of primary concern whereas consideration of cost-effectiveness and novelty in design are only secondary. Even so, there are many issues at higher frequencies but do not exist at lower frequencies need to be solved. The system provides 64 channels of excitation pulsers while receiving simultaneously at a 20-120 MHz sampling rate to 12-bits. The digitized data from all channels are first fed through Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs), and then stored in memories. These raw data are accessed by the beamforming processor to re-build the image or to be downloaded to the PC for further processing. The beamformer that applies delays to the echoes of each channel is implemented with the strategy that combines coarse (8.3 ns) and fine delays (2 ns). The coarse delays are integer multiples of the sampling clock rate and are achieved by controlling the write enable pin of the First-In-First-Out (FIFO) memory to obtain valid beamforming data. The fine delays are accomplished with interpolation filters. This system is capable of achieving a maximum frame rate of 50 frames per second. Wire phantom images

  15. Calibration and linearity verification of capacitance type cryo level indicators using cryogenically multiplexed diode array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunanithi, R.; Jacob, Subhash; Singh Gour, Abhay Singh; Das, M.; Nadig, D. S.; Prasad, M. V. N.

    2012-06-01

    In space application the precision level measurement of cryogenic liquids in the storage tanks is done using triple redundant capacitance level sensor, for control and safety point of view. The linearity of each sensor element depends upon the cylindricity and concentricity of the internal and external electrodes. The complexity of calibrating all sensors together has been addressed by two step calibration methodology which has been developed and used for the calibration of six capacitance sensors. All calibrations are done using Liquid Nitrogen (LN2) as a cryogenic fluid. In the first step of calibration, one of the elements of Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) level sensor is calibrated using 700mm eleven point discrete diode array. Four wire method has been used for the diode array. Thus a linearity curve for a single element of LH2 is obtained. In second step of calibration, using the equation thus obtained for the above sensor, it is considered as a reference for calibrating remaining elements of the same LH2 sensor and other level sensor (either Liquid Oxygen (LOX) or LH2). The elimination of stray capacitance for the capacitance level probes has been attempted. The automatic data logging of capacitance values through GPIB is done using LabVIEW 8.5.

  16. Robot Eve-In-Hand Using Solid State Linear Array Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, R. C.; Chern, M. Y.

    1985-12-01

    An intelligent robot control system based on dynamic sensing feedback using visual eye-in-hand systems have attracted great research efforts, because these systems have several advantages over the use of a fixed external video camera system. For example, it ignores inadequate lighting and background contrast, optical shadows, environmental lighting variables, and an increased maneuverability to access widely scattered or hidden parts. This paper presents an eye-in-hand system using a solid-state linear line scanner as the sensing element. The system currently has the ability to determine the pose and shape of objects, and also is capable of defining the proper grasping site prior to grasping. The paper also describes the system configuration and the proposed object learning and recognition procedure using line scan methods in detail. In this research, an experimental model is built which is used to simulate a fully opened parallel jaw gripper. A photodiode array is embedded in one side of the finger. A Compaq microcomputer based on the Intel 8088 microprocessor is used as the host. An interface between linear array video scanning signals, CPU and Video RAM is built and successfully tested.

  17. Handheld Thermoacoustic Scanning System Based on a Linear-array Transducer.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhong; Ding, Wenzheng; Ye, Fanghao; Lou, Cunguang

    2016-07-01

    To receive the information necessary for imaging, traditional microwave-induced thermoacoustic imaging systems (MITISs) use a type of circular-scanning mode using single or arc detectors. However, the use of MITISs for body scanning is complicated by restrictions in space and imaging time. A linear-array detector, the most widely used transducer in medical ultrasound imaging systems for body scanning, is a possible alternative to MITISs for scanning biological tissues, such as from the breast or limbs. In this paper, a handheld MITIS, based on a linear-array detector and a multiple data acquisition system, is described, and the capacity of the system is explored experimentally. First, the vertical and lateral resolution of the system is discussed. Next, real-time imaging of a moving object, obtained with an image capture rate of 20 frame/s, is described. Finally, a phantom experiment is detailed, investigating the overall imaging capability. The results show that this system achieves rapid scanning with a large field of view. The system has the obvious advantages of being handheld, not using coupled fluids, and achieving real-time imaging with a large field of view, which make this MITIS more suitable for clinical applications.

  18. Handheld Thermoacoustic Scanning System Based on a Linear-array Transducer.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhong; Ding, Wenzheng; Ye, Fanghao; Lou, Cunguang

    2016-07-01

    To receive the information necessary for imaging, traditional microwave-induced thermoacoustic imaging systems (MITISs) use a type of circular-scanning mode using single or arc detectors. However, the use of MITISs for body scanning is complicated by restrictions in space and imaging time. A linear-array detector, the most widely used transducer in medical ultrasound imaging systems for body scanning, is a possible alternative to MITISs for scanning biological tissues, such as from the breast or limbs. In this paper, a handheld MITIS, based on a linear-array detector and a multiple data acquisition system, is described, and the capacity of the system is explored experimentally. First, the vertical and lateral resolution of the system is discussed. Next, real-time imaging of a moving object, obtained with an image capture rate of 20 frame/s, is described. Finally, a phantom experiment is detailed, investigating the overall imaging capability. The results show that this system achieves rapid scanning with a large field of view. The system has the obvious advantages of being handheld, not using coupled fluids, and achieving real-time imaging with a large field of view, which make this MITIS more suitable for clinical applications. PMID:26294659

  19. Nanotubular array solid oxide fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Motoyama, Munekazu; Chao, Cheng-Chieh; An, Jihwan; Jung, Hee Joon; Gür, Turgut M; Prinz, Friedrich B

    2014-01-28

    This report presents a demonstration and characterization of a nanotubular array of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) made of one-end-closed hollow tube Ni/yttria-stabilized zirconia/Pt membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs). The tubular MEAs are nominally ∼5 μm long and have <500 nm outside diameter with total MEA thickness of nearly 50 nm. Open circuit voltages up to 660 mV (vs air) and power densities up to 1.3 μW cm(-2) were measured at 550 °C using H2 as fuel. The paper also introduces a fabrication methodology primarily based on a template process involving atomic layer deposition and electrodeposition for building the nanotubular MEA architecture as an important step toward achieving high surface area ultrathin SOFCs operating in the intermediate to low-temperature regime. A fabricated nanotubular SOFC theoretically attains a 20-fold increase in the effective surface, while projections indicate the possibility of achieving up to 40-fold. PMID:24266776

  20. Effects of a near-field rigid sphere scatterer on the performance of linear microphone array beamformers.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuxiang; Zhou, Haoran; Lu, Jing; Qiu, Xiaojun

    2016-08-01

    Beamformers enable a microphone array to capture acoustic signals from a sound source with high signal to noise ratio in a noisy environment, and the linear microphone array is of particular importance, in practice, due to its simplicity and easy implementation. A linear microphone array sometimes is used near some scattering objects, which affect its beamforming performance. This paper develops a numerical model with a linear microphone array near a rigid sphere for both far-field plane wave and near-field sources. The effects of the scatterer on two typical beamformers, i.e., the delay-and-sum beamformer and the superdirective beamformer, are investigated by both simulations and experiments. It is found that the directivity factor of both beamformers improves due to the increased equivalent array aperture when the size of the array is no larger than that of the scatter. With the increase of the array size, the directivity factor tends to deteriorate at high frequencies because of the rising side-lobes. When the array size is significantly larger than that of the scatterer, the scattering has hardly any influence on the beamforming performance. PMID:27586725

  1. Off-Grid Direction of Arrival Estimation Based on Joint Spatial Sparsity for Distributed Sparse Linear Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yujie; Ying, Rendong; Lu, Zhenqi; Liu, Peilin

    2014-01-01

    In the design phase of sensor arrays during array signal processing, the estimation performance and system cost are largely determined by array aperture size. In this article, we address the problem of joint direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation with distributed sparse linear arrays (SLAs) and propose an off-grid synchronous approach based on distributed compressed sensing to obtain larger array aperture. We focus on the complex source distribution in the practical applications and classify the sources into common and innovation parts according to whether a signal of source can impinge on all the SLAs or a specific one. For each SLA, we construct a corresponding virtual uniform linear array (ULA) to create the relationship of random linear map between the signals respectively observed by these two arrays. The signal ensembles including the common/innovation sources for different SLAs are abstracted as a joint spatial sparsity model. And we use the minimization of concatenated atomic norm via semidefinite programming to solve the problem of joint DOA estimation. Joint calculation of the signals observed by all the SLAs exploits their redundancy caused by the common sources and decreases the requirement of array size. The numerical results illustrate the advantages of the proposed approach. PMID:25420150

  2. High-frequency Ultrasound Doppler System for Biomedical Applications with a 30 MHz Linear Array

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaochen; Sun, Lei; Cannata, Jonathan M.; Yen, Jesse T.; Shung, K. Kirk

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we report the development of the first high-frequency (HF) pulsed-wave Doppler system using a 30 MHz linear array transducer to assess the cardiovascular functions in small animal. This array based pulsed-wave Doppler system included a 16-channel HF analog beamformer, a HF pulsed-wave Doppler module, timing circuits, HF bipolar pulsers, and analog front-ends. The beamformed echoes acquired by the 16 channel analog beamformer, were directly fed to the HF pulsed-wave Doppler module. Then the in-phase and quadrature-phase (IQ) audio Doppler signals were digitized by either a sound card or a Gage digitizer and stored in a PC. The Doppler spectrogram was displayed on a PC in real time. The two-way beam-widths were determined to be 160 μm to 320 μm when the array was electronically focused at different focal points at depths from 5–10 mm. A micro flow phantom, consisting of a polyimide tube with inner diameter of 127 μm, and the wire phantom were used to evaluate and calibrate the system. The results show that the system is capable of detecting motion velocity of the wire phantom as low as 0.1 mm/s, and detecting blood-mimicking flow velocity in the 127 μm tube lower than 7 mm/s. The system was subsequently used to measure the blood flow in vivo in two mouse abdominal superficial vessels with diameters of approximately 200 μm, and a mouse aorta close to the heart. These results demonstrated that this system may become an indispensable part of the current HF array based imaging systems for small animal studies. PMID:17993243

  3. Spraylon fluorocarbon encapsulation for silicon solar cell arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A development program was performed for evaluating, modifying, and optimizing the Lockheed formulated liquid transparent filmforming Spraylon fluorocarbon protective coating for silicon solar cells and modules. The program objectives were designed to meet the requirements of the low-cost automated solar cell array fabrication process. As part of the study, a computer program was used to establish the limits of the safe working stress in the coated silicon solar cell array system under severe thermal shock.

  4. Design Methodology of a Dual-Halbach Array Linear Actuator with Thermal-Electromagnetic Coupling.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Paulo Roberto; Flores Filho, Aly Ferreira; Perondi, Eduardo; Ferri, Jeferson; Goltz, Evandro

    2016-03-11

    This paper proposes a design methodology for linear actuators, considering thermal and electromagnetic coupling with geometrical and temperature constraints, that maximizes force density and minimizes force ripple. The method allows defining an actuator for given specifications in a step-by-step way so that requirements are met and the temperature within the device is maintained under or equal to its maximum allowed for continuous operation. According to the proposed method, the electromagnetic and thermal models are built with quasi-static parametric finite element models. The methodology was successfully applied to the design of a linear cylindrical actuator with a dual quasi-Halbach array of permanent magnets and a moving-coil. The actuator can produce an axial force of 120 N and a stroke of 80 mm. The paper also presents a comparative analysis between results obtained considering only an electromagnetic model and the thermal-electromagnetic coupled model. This comparison shows that the final designs for both cases differ significantly, especially regarding its active volume and its electrical and magnetic loading. Although in this paper the methodology was employed to design a specific actuator, its structure can be used to design a wide range of linear devices if the parametric models are adjusted for each particular actuator.

  5. Design Methodology of a Dual-Halbach Array Linear Actuator with Thermal-Electromagnetic Coupling.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Paulo Roberto; Flores Filho, Aly Ferreira; Perondi, Eduardo; Ferri, Jeferson; Goltz, Evandro

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a design methodology for linear actuators, considering thermal and electromagnetic coupling with geometrical and temperature constraints, that maximizes force density and minimizes force ripple. The method allows defining an actuator for given specifications in a step-by-step way so that requirements are met and the temperature within the device is maintained under or equal to its maximum allowed for continuous operation. According to the proposed method, the electromagnetic and thermal models are built with quasi-static parametric finite element models. The methodology was successfully applied to the design of a linear cylindrical actuator with a dual quasi-Halbach array of permanent magnets and a moving-coil. The actuator can produce an axial force of 120 N and a stroke of 80 mm. The paper also presents a comparative analysis between results obtained considering only an electromagnetic model and the thermal-electromagnetic coupled model. This comparison shows that the final designs for both cases differ significantly, especially regarding its active volume and its electrical and magnetic loading. Although in this paper the methodology was employed to design a specific actuator, its structure can be used to design a wide range of linear devices if the parametric models are adjusted for each particular actuator. PMID:26978370

  6. Design Methodology of a Dual-Halbach Array Linear Actuator with Thermal-Electromagnetic Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, Paulo Roberto; Flores Filho, Aly Ferreira; Perondi, Eduardo; Ferri, Jeferson; Goltz, Evandro

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a design methodology for linear actuators, considering thermal and electromagnetic coupling with geometrical and temperature constraints, that maximizes force density and minimizes force ripple. The method allows defining an actuator for given specifications in a step-by-step way so that requirements are met and the temperature within the device is maintained under or equal to its maximum allowed for continuous operation. According to the proposed method, the electromagnetic and thermal models are built with quasi-static parametric finite element models. The methodology was successfully applied to the design of a linear cylindrical actuator with a dual quasi-Halbach array of permanent magnets and a moving-coil. The actuator can produce an axial force of 120 N and a stroke of 80 mm. The paper also presents a comparative analysis between results obtained considering only an electromagnetic model and the thermal-electromagnetic coupled model. This comparison shows that the final designs for both cases differ significantly, especially regarding its active volume and its electrical and magnetic loading. Although in this paper the methodology was employed to design a specific actuator, its structure can be used to design a wide range of linear devices if the parametric models are adjusted for each particular actuator. PMID:26978370

  7. Arraying heterotypic single cells on photoactivatable cell-culturing substrates.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Yukiko; Nakanishi, Jun; Shimizu, Takahiro; Nakayama, Hidekazu; Inoue, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Kazuo; Iwai, Hideo; Yoshida, Yasuhiko; Horiike, Yasuhiro; Takarada, Tohru; Maeda, Mizuo

    2008-11-18

    This article describes a photochemical method for the site-selective assembly of heterotypic cells on a glass substrate modified with a silane coupling agent having a caged functional group. Silane coupling agents having a carboxyl (COOH), amino (NH 2), hydroxyl (OH), or thiol (SH) group protected by a photocleavable 2-nitrobenzyl group were synthesized to modify the surfaces of glass coverslips. The caged substrates were first coated by the adsorption of a blocking agent, bovine serum albumin (BSA), to make the entire surface non-cell-adhesive and then irradiated at 365 nm under a standard fluorescence microscope. The photocleavage reaction on the surface was followed by contact angle measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. When COS7, NIH3T3, and HEK293 cells were seeded onto these substrates in a serum-free medium, the cells adhered selectively and efficiently to the irradiated regions on the caged NH 2 substrate, whereas the other caged COOH, SH, and OH substrates were nonphotoactivatable for cell adhesion. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of BSA adsorbed to the uncaged substrates revealed that this highly efficient photoactivation on the caged NH 2 substrate arose because of the following reasons: (i) upon photoactivation, BSA adsorbed in advance on the 2-nitrobenzyl groups was readsorbed onto the uncaged functional groups and (ii) BSA readsorbed onto the NH 2 groups became unable to passivate the surface against cell adhesion whereas BSA on the other groups still had normal passivating activity. It was also demonstrated that heterotypic single COS7, NIH3T3, and HEK293 cells were positioned at any desired arrangement on the caged NH 2 substrate by repeating the UV irradiation at optimized array spot sizes and cell seeding in optimized cell concentrations. The present method will be particularly useful in studying the dynamic processes of cell-cell interactions at a single-cell level.

  8. Amorphous silicon cell array powered solar tracking apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1985-01-01

    An array of an even number of amorphous silicon solar cells are serially connected between first and second terminals of opposite polarity. The terminals are connected to one input terminal of a DC motor whose other input terminal is connected to the mid-cell of the serial array. Vane elements are adjacent the end cells to selectively shadow one or the other of the end cells when the array is oriented from a desired attitude relative to the sun. The shadowing of one cell of a group of cells on one side of the mid-cell reduces the power of that group substantially so that full power from the group of cells on the other side of the mid-cell drives the motor to reorient the array to the desired attitude. The cell groups each have a full power output at the power rating of the motor. When the array is at the desired attitude the power output of the two groups of cells balances due to their opposite polarity so that the motor remains unpowered.

  9. Fabrication and Characterization of Linear Terahertz Detector Arrays Based on Lithium Tantalate Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weizhi; Wang, Jun; Gou, Jun; Huang, Zehua; Jiang, Yadong

    2015-01-01

    Two samples of 30-pixel linear terahertz detector arrays (TDAs) were fabricated based on lithium tantalate (LT) crystals. Pixel readout circuit (ROC) was designed to extract the weak current signal of TDAs. A test platform was established for performance evaluation of TDA+ROC components. By using a 2.52THz laser as radiation source, the test results reveal that average voltage responsivities of the components were larger than 7000V/W and non-uniformity no more than 2.1%. Average noise equivalent power ( NEP) of one sample was measured to be 1.5×10-9 W/Hz1/2, which is low enough and desirable for high performance THz detector.

  10. Beam profile monitor for the NSLS vuv ring employing linear photodiode arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Nawrocky, R.J.; Galayda, J.; Yu, L.H.; Shu, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    Among the most important parameters of a storage accelerator are the position and size of the particle beam. In an electron machine, these parameters can be derived from measurements of the emitted synchrotron radiation. We discuss a system which monitors the two-dimensional profile of the synchrotron light in the NSLS vuv ring using commercially available high-resolution linear photosensitive diode arrays. The optical system has been designed to match the size of the image space to the dimensions of the diode sensor area. The scanning rate is automatically adjusted to hold the peaks of the profiles constant over a wide range of beam intensity variations. Video signals from the diode sensors can be readily interfaced to a computer for beam diagnostic purposes. Optics and factors determining the overall resolution of the system are discussed. Preliminary results of beam observations are presented.

  11. Digital Radiography and Computed Tomography Project -- Fully Integrated Linear Detector ArrayStatus Report

    SciTech Connect

    Tim Roney; Robert Seifert; Bob Pink; Mike Smith

    2011-09-01

    The field-portable Digital Radiography and Computed Tomography (DRCT) x-ray inspection systems developed for the Project Manager for NonStockpile Chemical Materiel (PMNSCM) over the past 13 years have used linear diode detector arrays from two manufacturers; Thomson and Thales. These two manufacturers no longer produce this type of detector. In the interest of insuring the long term viability of the portable DRCT single munitions inspection systems and to improve the imaging capabilities, this project has been investigating improved, commercially available detectors. During FY-10, detectors were evaluated and one in particular, manufactured by Detection Technologies (DT), Inc, was acquired for possible integration into the DRCT systems. The remainder of this report describes the work performed in FY-11 to complete evaluations and fully integrate the detector onto a representative DRCT platform.

  12. Design and optimization of multi-class series-parallel linear electromagnetic array artificial muscle.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Ji, Zhenyu; Shi, Xuetao; You, Fusheng; Fu, Feng; Liu, Ruigang; Xia, Junying; Wang, Nan; Bai, Jing; Wang, Zhanxi; Qin, Xiansheng; Dong, Xiuzhen

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle exhibiting complex and excellent precision has evolved for millions of years. Skeletal muscle has better performance and simpler structure compared with existing driving modes. Artificial muscle may be designed by analyzing and imitating properties and structure of skeletal muscle based on bionics, which has been focused on by bionic researchers, and a structure mode of linear electromagnetic array artificial muscle has been designed in this paper. Half sarcomere is the minimum unit of artificial muscle and electromagnetic model has been built. The structural parameters of artificial half sarcomere actuator were optimized to achieve better movement performance. Experimental results show that artificial half sarcomere actuator possesses great motion performance such as high response speed, great acceleration, small weight and size, robustness, etc., which presents a promising application prospect of artificial half sarcomere actuator.

  13. Linear array of photodiodes to track a human speaker for video recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeTone, D.; Neal, H.; Lougheed, R.

    2012-12-01

    Communication and collaboration using stored digital media has garnered more interest by many areas of business, government and education in recent years. This is due primarily to improvements in the quality of cameras and speed of computers. An advantage of digital media is that it can serve as an effective alternative when physical interaction is not possible. Video recordings that allow for viewers to discern a presenter's facial features, lips and hand motions are more effective than videos that do not. To attain this, one must maintain a video capture in which the speaker occupies a significant portion of the captured pixels. However, camera operators are costly, and often do an imperfect job of tracking presenters in unrehearsed situations. This creates motivation for a robust, automated system that directs a video camera to follow a presenter as he or she walks anywhere in the front of a lecture hall or large conference room. Such a system is presented. The system consists of a commercial, off-the-shelf pan/tilt/zoom (PTZ) color video camera, a necklace of infrared LEDs and a linear photodiode array detector. Electronic output from the photodiode array is processed to generate the location of the LED necklace, which is worn by a human speaker. The computer controls the video camera movements to record video of the speaker. The speaker's vertical position and depth are assumed to remain relatively constant- the video camera is sent only panning (horizontal) movement commands. The LED necklace is flashed at 70Hz at a 50% duty cycle to provide noise-filtering capability. The benefit to using a photodiode array versus a standard video camera is its higher frame rate (4kHz vs. 60Hz). The higher frame rate allows for the filtering of infrared noise such as sunlight and indoor lighting-a capability absent from other tracking technologies. The system has been tested in a large lecture hall and is shown to be effective.

  14. Weapon detection using a wideband millimeter-wave linear array imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Collins, H. D.; Hall, Thomas E.

    1994-03-01

    A wideband millimeter-wave imaging technique has been developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the detection of concealed weapons carried by personnel through high- security areas, such as airports. A practical airport system based on this technique should be capable of real-time image frame rate of 10 to 30 frames per second. This technique, similar to an extremely high-resolution radar system, actively probes the target with millimeter-waves and reconstructs an image from the backscattered phase and amplitude data. The primary goal of the system is the detection of weapons and the placement of the detected weapon on the body. An important additional goal is the identification of detected items, which requires a high resolution imaging technique. An experimental system has been developed at PNL which has gathered millimeter wave imagery from clothed mannequins and human beings carrying concealed weapons. This system is capable of forming images in excess of 1 meter by 2 meters at resolutions on the order of 1 cm, and is capable of scanning in less than 5 seconds. This experimental system could be enhanced to function in real time by eliminating the relatively slow mechanical scan. A sequentially switched linear array of transceiver antennas would allow real-time gathering of the imaging information, since the data would be electronically scanned in the lateral direction and electronically swept in frequency. This allows formation of a 2D image from a 1D array of transceiver antennas.

  15. FPGA-based electronics for confocal line scanners with linear detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeytunge, Sanjee; Toledo-Crow, Ricardo; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2009-02-01

    One-dimensional linear detector arrays have been used in the development of microscopes. Our confocal line scanning microscope electronics incorporate two printed circuit boards: control board and detector board. This architecture separates control electronics from detection electronics allowing us to minimize the footprint at microscope detector head. The Field Programmable Gate array (FPGA) on the control board generates timing and synchronization signals to three systems: detector board, frame grabber and galvanometric mirror scanner. The detector is kept away from its control electronics, and the clock and control signals are sent over a differential twisted-pair cable. These differential signals are translated to single ended signals and forwarded to the detector at the microscope detector head. The synchronization signals for the frame grabber are sent over a shielded cable. The control board also generates a saw tooth analog ramp to drive the galvanometric mirror scanner. The analog video output of the detector is fed into an operational amplifier where the white and the black levels are adjusted. Finally the analog video is send to the frame grabber via a shielded cable. FPGA-based electronics offer an inexpensive convenient means to control and synchronize simple line-scanning confocal microscopes.

  16. Imaging of downward-looking linear array SAR using three-dimensional spatial smoothing MUSIC algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Siqian; Kuang, Gangyao

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, a novel three-dimensional imaging algorithm of downward-looking linear array SAR is presented. To improve the resolution, multiple signal classification (MUSIC) algorithm has been used. However, since the scattering centers are always correlated in real SAR system, the estimated covariance matrix becomes singular. To address the problem, a three-dimensional spatial smoothing method is proposed in this paper to restore the singular covariance matrix to a full-rank one. The three-dimensional signal matrix can be divided into a set of orthogonal three-dimensional subspaces. The main idea of the method is based on extracting the array correlation matrix as the average of all correlation matrices from the subspaces. In addition, the spectral height of the peaks contains no information with regard to the scattering intensity of the different scattering centers, thus it is difficulty to reconstruct the backscattering information. The least square strategy is used to estimate the amplitude of the scattering center in this paper. The above results of the theoretical analysis are verified by 3-D scene simulations and experiments on real data.

  17. Recent advances in a linear micromirror array for high-resolution projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, Francis; Doucet, Michel; Niall, Keith K.; Larouche, Carl; Savard, Maxime; Crisan, Silviu; Thibault, Simon; Jerominek, Hubert

    2004-05-01

    The visual displays of contemporary military flight simulators lack adequate definition to represent scenes in basic fast-jet fighter tasks. For example, air-to-air and air-to-ground targets are not projected with sufficient contrast and resolution for a pilot to perceive aspect, aspect rate and object detail at real world slant ranges. Simulator display geometries require the development of ultra-high resolution projectors with greater than 20 megapixel resolution at 60 Hz frame rate. A new micromirror device has been developed to address this requirement; it is able to modulate light intensity in an analog fashion with switching times shorter than 5 μs. When combined with a scanner, a laser and Schlieren optics, a linear array of these flexible micromirrors can display images composed of thousands of lines at a frame rate of 60 Hz. Recent results related to evaluation of this technology for high resolution projection are presented. Alternate operation modes for light modulation with flexible micromirrors are proposed. The related importance of controlling the residual micromirror curvature is discussed and results of experiments investigating the use of the deposition pressure to achieve such control are reported. Moreover, activities aiming at minimizing the micromirror response time and, so doing, maximizing the number of image columns per image frame are discussed. Finally, contrast measurement and estimate of the contrast limit achievable with the flexible micromirror technology are presented. All reported activities support the development of a fully addressable 2000-element micromirror array.

  18. A gate array structure for the efficient project of digital circuits: The unit cell array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler, Olaf

    In this study the principles for the development of a unit-cell-array-master, which shows all the advantages of gate-arrays, are presented. By taking the cabling influence on the chip surface into account, a stochastic model of cabling for sea-of-gates-structures is used, which allows establishment of the minimal dimensions of the master-components for the cabling. As regards the cell architecture, the gate isolation technique and smaller asymmetric p-n channel transistor pairs are employed. With logical structures such as Ram, Rom or PLA (programmed logic array), the Gt density increases. The analysis of gate-array cabling capacity shows that transistors with commercial gate-arrays are often of too great dimension. A greater transistor density and a lower dissipation without any performance decrease are possible by using smaller transistors and a parallel connection in circuit paths with higher cabling capacity. Apart from its initial high cost, unit cell array is interesting from an economical point of view.

  19. Thermal-independent properties of PIN-PMN-PT single-crystal linear-array ultrasonic transducers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ruimin; Wu, Jinchuan; Ho Lam, Kwok; Yao, Liheng; Zhou, Qifa; Tian, Jian; Han, Pengdi; Shung, K Kirk

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, low-frequency 32-element linear-array ultrasonic transducers were designed and fabricated using both ternary Pb(In(1/2)Nb(1/2))-Pb(Mg(1/3)Nb(2/3))-PbTiO(3) (PIN-PMN-PT) and binary Pb(Mg(1/3)Nb(2/3))-PbTiO(3) (PMNPT) single crystals. Performance of the array transducers was characterized as a function of temperature ranging from room temperature to 160°C. It was found that the array transducers fabricated using the PIN-PMN-PT single crystal were capable of satisfactory performance at 160°C, having a -6-dB bandwidth of 66% and an insertion loss of 37 dB. The results suggest that the potential of PIN-PMN-PT linear-array ultrasonic transducers for high-temperature ultrasonic transducer applications is promising. PMID:23221227

  20. A microfluidic array with cellular valving for single cell co-culture.

    PubMed

    Frimat, Jean-Philippe; Becker, Marco; Chiang, Ya-Yu; Marggraf, Ulrich; Janasek, Dirk; Hengstler, Jan G; Franzke, Joachim; West, Jonathan

    2011-01-21

    We present a highly parallel microfluidic approach for contacting single cell pairs. The approach combines a differential fluidic resistance trapping method with a novel cellular valving principle for homotypic and heterotypic single cell co-culturing. Differential fluidic resistance was used for sequential single cell arraying, with the adhesion and flattening of viable cells within the microstructured environment acting to produce valves in the open state. Reversal of the flow was used for the sequential single cell arraying of the second cell type. Plasma stencilling, along the linear path of least resistance, was required to confine the cells within the trap regions. Prime flow conditions with minimal shear stress were identified for highly efficient cell arraying (∼99%) and long term cell culture. Larger trap dimensions enabled the highest levels of cell pairing (∼70%). The single cell co-cultures were in close proximity for the formation of connexon structures and the study of contact modes of communication. The research further highlights the possibility of using the natural behaviour of cells as the working principle behind responsive microfluidic elements. PMID:20978708

  1. 3D Ta/TaO x /TiO2/Ti synaptic array and linearity tuning of weight update for hardware neural network applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, I.-Ting; Chang, Chih-Cheng; Chiu, Li-Wen; Chou, Teyuh; Hou, Tuo-Hung

    2016-09-01

    The implementation of highly anticipated hardware neural networks (HNNs) hinges largely on the successful development of a low-power, high-density, and reliable analog electronic synaptic array. In this study, we demonstrate a two-layer Ta/TaO x /TiO2/Ti cross-point synaptic array that emulates the high-density three-dimensional network architecture of human brains. Excellent uniformity and reproducibility among intralayer and interlayer cells were realized. Moreover, at least 50 analog synaptic weight states could be precisely controlled with minimal drifting during a cycling endurance test of 5000 training pulses at an operating voltage of 3 V. We also propose a new state-independent bipolar-pulse-training scheme to improve the linearity of weight updates. The improved linearity considerably enhances the fault tolerance of HNNs, thus improving the training accuracy.

  2. 3D Ta/TaO x /TiO2/Ti synaptic array and linearity tuning of weight update for hardware neural network applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, I-Ting; Chang, Chih-Cheng; Chiu, Li-Wen; Chou, Teyuh; Hou, Tuo-Hung

    2016-09-01

    The implementation of highly anticipated hardware neural networks (HNNs) hinges largely on the successful development of a low-power, high-density, and reliable analog electronic synaptic array. In this study, we demonstrate a two-layer Ta/TaO x /TiO2/Ti cross-point synaptic array that emulates the high-density three-dimensional network architecture of human brains. Excellent uniformity and reproducibility among intralayer and interlayer cells were realized. Moreover, at least 50 analog synaptic weight states could be precisely controlled with minimal drifting during a cycling endurance test of 5000 training pulses at an operating voltage of 3 V. We also propose a new state-independent bipolar-pulse-training scheme to improve the linearity of weight updates. The improved linearity considerably enhances the fault tolerance of HNNs, thus improving the training accuracy. PMID:27483492

  3. Measurements of hf auroral clutter using the verona ava linear array radar (VALAR). Report for June 1990-June 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, D.S.; Weijers, B.; Myers, N.B.

    1994-03-01

    Measurements of high frequency (HF) auroral clutter using the Verona Ava Linear Array Radar (VALAR) system are presented. VALAR is an experimental HF backscatter system capable of obtaining high resolution synoptic mapping of HF auroral clutter. The receive system includes a 700 meter long linear array. providing the high azimuthal resolution required for determining the spatial distribution of HF auroral clutter. Since the completion of the system at the end of 1989, data acquisition campaigns have been carried out on a near-monthly basis. In this report, the authors provide a brief description of VALAR and present preliminary measurements of three types of phenomena: ground backscatter, slant-F, and auroral backscatter.

  4. Microcup Arrays for the Efficient Isolation and Cloning of Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Sims, Christopher E.; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2010-01-01

    Arrays of transparent, releasable micron-scale structures termed “microcups” were created for the purpose of patterning and isolating viable cells from small cell samples. Cells were captured by the microcups without the need for barriers or walls on the intervening substrate. Furthermore, in contrast to prior methods for creating cell arrays with releasable elements, no chemical modification of the substrate was required. Individual microcups were released from the array using a pulsed laser at very low energy. Improvements in microcup design enabled cells in suspension to be loaded into the microcups with greater than 90% efficiency. Cells cultured within the microcups displayed 100% viability and were cultured over 4 days yielding colonies that remained sequestered within the microcups to generate pure clonal populations. Standard microscopic imaging was used to identify cells or colonies of interest, and the microcups containing these cells were then released and collected. Individual target cells isolated in this manner remained viable as demonstrated by clonal expansion of 100% of collected cells. Direct comparisons with cell isolation by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and magnetic-bead-based isolation systems demonstrated that the microcup cell isolation procedure yielded higher purity, yield and viability than these standard technologies when separating samples with small numbers of cells. The power of this technique was demonstrated by the isolation of hematopoietic stem cells from a human bone marrow aspirate possessing only 4,000 total cells. PMID:20199088

  5. Water pollutant monitoring by a whole cell array through lens-free detection on CCD.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hsieh-Fu; Tsai, Yi-Ching; Yagur-Kroll, Sharon; Palevsky, Noa; Belkin, Shimshon; Cheng, Ji-Yen

    2015-03-21

    Environmental contamination has become a serious problem to human and environmental health, as exposure to a wide range of possible contaminants continuously increases due to industrial and agricultural activities. Whole cell sensors have been proposed as a powerful tool to detect class-specific toxicants based upon their biological activity and bioavailability. We demonstrated a robust toxicant detection platform based on a bioluminescence whole cell sensor array biochip (LumiChip). LumiChip harbors an integrated temperature control and a 16-member sensor array, as well as a simple but highly efficient luminescence collection setup. On LumiChip, samples were infused in an oxygen-permeable microfluidic flow channel to reach the sensor array. Time-lapse changes in bioluminescence emitted by the array members were measured on a single window-removed linear charge-coupled device (CCD) commonly used in commercial industrial process control or in barcode readers. Removal of the protective window on the linear CCD allowed lens-free direct interfacing of LumiChip to the CCD surface for measurement with high light collection efficiency. Bioluminescence induced by simulated contamination events was detected within 15 to 45 minutes. The portable LumiSense system utilizing the linear CCD in combination with the miniaturized LumiChip is a promising potential platform for on-site environmental monitoring of toxicant contamination.

  6. An addressable cell array for a platform of biosensor chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Seungkyoung; Choi, Soo-hee; Jung, Moon Youn; Song, Kibong; Park, Jeong Won

    2013-05-01

    In order to detect interested matters in fields, various lab-on-a-chips where chemical, physical, or biological sensors are loaded have been developed. eNOSE can be a representative example among them. Because animals can sense 300~1000 different chemicals by olfactory system - smell -, the olfactory system has been spotlighted as new materials in the field of sensing. Those investigations, however, are usually focused on how to detect signals from the olfactory neurons or receptors loaded on chips and enhance sensing efficacy of chips. Therefore, almost of those chips are designed for only one material sensing. Multi-sensing using multi-channels will be needed when the olfactory systems are adopted well on chips. For multiple sensing, we developed an addressable cell array. The chip has 38 cell-chambers arranged in a circle shape and different cell types of thirty eight can be allocated with specific addresses on the chip without any complex valve system. In order to confirm the cell addressing, we loaded EGFP-transfected and empty vector-transfected HEK293a cells into inlets of the cell array in a planned address and those cells were positioned into each chamber by brief aspiration. The arrayed cells were confirmed as a specific pattern through EGFP and nuclei staining. This cell array which can generate address of sensor materials like cells with their own specification is expected to be applied to a platform for a biosensor chip at various sensing fields.

  7. Infrared line cameras based on linear arrays for industrial temperature measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drogmoeller, Peter; Hofmann, Guenter; Budzier, Helmut; Reichardt, Thomas; Zimmerhackl, Manfred

    2002-03-01

    The PYROLINE/ MikroLine cameras provide continuous, non-contact measurement of linear temperature distributions. Operation in conjunction with the IR_LINE software provides data recording, real-time graphical analysis, process integration and camera-control capabilities. One system is based on pyroelectric line sensors with either 128 or 256 elements, operating at frame rates of 128 and 544 Hz respectively. Temperatures between 0 and 1300DGRC are measurable in four distinct spectral ranges; 8-14micrometers for low temperatures, 3-5micrometers for medium temperatures, 4.8-5.2micrometers for glass-temperature applications and 1.4-1.8micrometers for high temperatures. A newly developed IR-line camera (HRP 250) based upon a thermoelectrically cooled, 160-element, PbSe detector array operating in the 3 - 5 micrometers spectral range permits the thermal gradients of fast moving targets to be measured in the range 50 - 180 degree(s)C at a maximum frequency of 18kHz. This special system was used to measure temperature distributions on rotating tires at velocities of more than 300 km/h (190 mph). A modified version of this device was used for real-time measurement of disk-brake rotors under load. Another line camera consisting a 256 element InGaAs array was developed for the spectral range of 1.4 - 1.8 micrometers to detect impurities of polypropylene and polyethylene in raw cotton at frequencies of 2.5 - 5 kHz.

  8. Measurement of changes in linear accelerator photon energy through flatness variation using an ion chamber array

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Song; Balter, Peter A.; Rose, Mark; Simon, William E.

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: To compare the use of flatness versus percent depth dose (PDD) for determining changes in photon beam energy for a megavoltage linear accelerator. Methods: Energy changes were accomplished by adjusting the bending magnet current by up to {+-}15% in 5% increments away from the value used clinically. Two metrics for flatness, relative flatness in the central 80% of the field (Flat) and average maximum dose along the diagonals normalized by central axis dose (F{sub DN}), were measured using a commercially available planner ionization chamber array. PDD was measured in water at depths of 5 and 10 cm in 3 Multiplication-Sign 3 cm{sup 2} and 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 cm{sup 2} fields using a cylindrical chamber. Results: PDD was more sensitive to changes in energy when the beam energy was increased than when it was decreased. For the 18-MV beam in particular, PDD was not sensitive to energy reductions below the nominal energy. The value of Flat was found to be more sensitive to decreases in energy than to increases, with little sensitivity to energy increases above the nominal energy for 18-MV beams. F{sub DN} was the only metric that was found to be sensitive to both increases and reductions of energy for both the 6- and 18-MV beams. Conclusions: Flatness based metrics were found to be more sensitive to energy changes than PDD, In particular, F{sub DN} was found to be the most sensitive metric to energy changes for photon beams of 6 and 18 MV. The ionization chamber array allows this metric to be conveniently measured as part of routine accelerator quality assurance.

  9. Wire Array Solar Cells: Fabrication and Photoelectrochemical Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spurgeon, Joshua Michael

    Despite demand for clean energy to reduce our addiction to fossil fuels, the price of these technologies relative to oil and coal has prevented their widespread implementation. Solar energy has enormous potential as a carbon-free resource but is several times the cost of coal-produced electricity, largely because photovoltaics of practical efficiency require high-quality, pure semiconductor materials. To produce current in a planar junction solar cell, an electron or hole generated deep within the material must travel all the way to the junction without recombining. Radial junction, wire array solar cells, however, have the potential to decouple the directions of light absorption and charge-carrier collection so that a semiconductor with a minority-carrier diffusion length shorter than its absorption depth (i.e., a lower quality, potentially cheaper material) can effectively produce current. The axial dimension of the wires is long enough for sufficient optical absorption while the charge-carriers are collected along the shorter radial dimension in a massively parallel array. This thesis explores the wire array solar cell design by developing potentially low-cost fabrication methods and investigating the energy-conversion properties of the arrays in photoelectrochemical cells. The concept was initially investigated with Cd(Se, Te) rod arrays; however, Si was the primary focus of wire array research because its semiconductor properties make low-quality Si an ideal candidate for improvement in a radial geometry. Fabrication routes for Si wire arrays were explored, including the vapor-liquid-solid growth of wires using SiCl4. Uniform, vertically aligned Si wires were demonstrated in a process that permits control of the wire radius, length, and spacing. A technique was developed to transfer these wire arrays into a low-cost, flexible polymer film, and grow multiple subsequent arrays using a single Si(111) substrate. Photoelectrochemical measurements on Si wire array

  10. Design and programming of systolic array cells for signal processing

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.A.W.

    1989-01-01

    This thesis presents a new methodology for the design, simulation, and programming of systolic arrays in which the algorithms and architecture are simultaneously optimized. The algorithms determine the initial architecture, and simulation is used to optimize the architecture. The simulator provides a register-transfer level model of a complete systolic array computation. To establish the validity of this design methodology two novel programmable systolic array cells were designed and programmed. The cells were targeted for applications in high-speed signal processing and associated matrix computations. A two-chip programmable systolic array cell using a 16-bit multiplier-accumulator chip and a semi-custom VLSI controller chip was designed and fabricated. A low chip count allows large arrays to be constructed, but the cell is flexible enough to be a building-block for either one- or two-dimensional systolic arrays. Another more flexible and powerful cell using a 32-bit floating-point processor and a second VLSI controller chip was also designed. It contains several architectural features that are unique in a systolic array cell: (1) each instruction is 32 bits, yet all resources can be updated every cycle, (2) two on-chip interchangeable memories are used, and (3) one input port can be used as either a global or local port. The key issues involved in programming the cells are analyzed in detail. A set of modules is developed which can be used to construct large programs in an effective manner. The utility of this programming approach is demonstrated with several important examples.

  11. The feasibility of MRI-guided whole prostate ablation with a linear aperiodic intracavitary ultrasound phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokka, S. D.; Hynynen, K. H.

    2000-11-01

    Over the past decade, numerous minimally invasive thermal procedures have been investigated to treat benign prostate hyperplasia and prostate cancer. Of these methods, ultrasound has shown considerable promise due to its ability to produce more precise and deeper thermal foci. In this study, a linear, transrectal ultrasound phased array capable of ablating large tissue volumes was fabricated and evaluated. The device was designed to be compatible for use with MRI guidance and thermometry. The intracavitary applicator increases treatable tissue volume by using an ultrasonic motor to provide a mechanical rotation angle of up to 100° to a 62-element 1D ultrasound array. An aperiodic array geometry was used to reduce grating lobes. In addition, a specially designed Kapton interconnect was used to reduce cable crosstalk and hence also improve the acoustic efficiency of the array. MRI-guided in vivo and ex vivo experiments were performed to verify the array's large-volume ablative capabilities. Ex vivo bovine experiments were performed to assess the focusing range of the applicator. The array generated foci in a 3 cm (2 to 5 cm from the array surface along the axis normal to the array) by 5.5 cm (along the long axis of the array) by 6 cm (along the transverse axis of the array at a depth of 4 cm) volume. In vivo rabbit thigh experiments were performed to evaluate the lesion-producing capabilities in perfused tissue. The array generated 3 cm × 2 cm × 2 cm lesions with 8 to 12 half-minute sonications equally spaced in the volume. The results indicate that transrectal ultrasound coagulation of the whole prostate is feasible with the developed device.

  12. Low-Concentration-Ratio Solar-Cell Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biss, M. S.; Reed, David A., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Paper presents design concept for mass-producible arrays of solar electric batteries and concentrators tailored to individual requirements. Arrays intended primarily for space stations needing about 100 kW of power. However, modular, lightweight, compact, and relatively low-cost design also fulfill requirements of some terrestrial applications. Arrays built with currently available materials. Pultrusions, injectionmolded parts, and composite materials used extensively to keep weight low. For added flexibility in design and construction, silicon and gallium arsenide solar-cell panels interchangeable.

  13. Interventional multispectral photoacoustic imaging with a clinical linear array ultrasound probe for guiding nerve blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Wenfeng; West, Simeon J.; Nikitichev, Daniil I.; Ourselin, Sebastien; Beard, Paul C.; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate identification of tissue structures such as nerves and blood vessels is critically important for interventional procedures such as nerve blocks. Ultrasound imaging is widely used as a guidance modality to visualize anatomical structures in real-time. However, identification of nerves and small blood vessels can be very challenging, and accidental intra-neural or intra-vascular injections can result in significant complications. Multi-spectral photoacoustic imaging can provide high sensitivity and specificity for discriminating hemoglobin- and lipid-rich tissues. However, conventional surface-illumination-based photoacoustic systems suffer from limited sensitivity at large depths. In this study, for the first time, an interventional multispectral photoacoustic imaging (IMPA) system was used to image nerves in a swine model in vivo. Pulsed excitation light with wavelengths in the ranges of 750 - 900 nm and 1150 - 1300 nm was delivered inside the body through an optical fiber positioned within the cannula of an injection needle. Ultrasound waves were received at the tissue surface using a clinical linear array imaging probe. Co-registered B-mode ultrasound images were acquired using the same imaging probe. Nerve identification was performed using a combination of B-mode ultrasound imaging and electrical stimulation. Using a linear model, spectral-unmixing of the photoacoustic data was performed to provide image contrast for oxygenated and de-oxygenated hemoglobin, water and lipids. Good correspondence between a known nerve location and a lipid-rich region in the photoacoustic images was observed. The results indicate that IMPA is a promising modality for guiding nerve blocks and other interventional procedures. Challenges involved with clinical translation are discussed.

  14. Large area magnetic micropallet arrays for cell colony sorting.

    PubMed

    Cox-Muranami, Wesley A; Nelson, Edward L; Li, G P; Bachman, Mark

    2016-01-01

    A new micropallet array platform for adherent cell colony sorting has been developed. The platform consisted of thousands of square plastic pallets, 270 μm by 270 μm on each side, large enough to hold a single colony of cells. Each pallet included a magnetic core, allowing them to be collected with a magnet after being released using a microscope mounted laser system. The micropallets were patterned from 1002F epoxy resist and were fabricated on translucent, gold coated microscope slides. The gold layer was used as seed for electroplating the ferromagnetic cores within every individual pallet. The gold layer also facilitated the release of each micropallet during laser release. This array allows for individual observation, sorting and collection of isolated cell colonies for biological cell colony research. In addition to consistent release and recovery of individual colonies, we demonstrated stable biocompatibility and minimal loss in imaging quality compared to previously developed micropallet arrays. PMID:26606460

  15. High-throughput cell analysis using multiplexed array technologies.

    PubMed

    Beske, Oren E; Goldbard, Simon

    2002-09-15

    The desire for more biologically relevant data from primary screening has resulted in a dramatic increase of cell-based assays in HTS labs. Consequently, new cell-array technologies are being developed to increase the quality and quantity of data emerging from such screens. These technologies take the form of both positional and non-positional formats, each with their own advantages. Notably, screens using these technologies generate databases of high-quality data that can be analyzed in ways currently not possible. The power of cell-based assays combined with new array and analytical technologies will enable the condensation of serial drug discovery processes, thereby decreasing the time and cost of taking a hit compound into clinical trials. Here, we compare array strategies being developed towards the goal of integrating multiplexed cell-based assays into HTS. PMID:12546879

  16. Large area magnetic micropallet arrays for cell colony sorting.

    PubMed

    Cox-Muranami, Wesley A; Nelson, Edward L; Li, G P; Bachman, Mark

    2016-01-01

    A new micropallet array platform for adherent cell colony sorting has been developed. The platform consisted of thousands of square plastic pallets, 270 μm by 270 μm on each side, large enough to hold a single colony of cells. Each pallet included a magnetic core, allowing them to be collected with a magnet after being released using a microscope mounted laser system. The micropallets were patterned from 1002F epoxy resist and were fabricated on translucent, gold coated microscope slides. The gold layer was used as seed for electroplating the ferromagnetic cores within every individual pallet. The gold layer also facilitated the release of each micropallet during laser release. This array allows for individual observation, sorting and collection of isolated cell colonies for biological cell colony research. In addition to consistent release and recovery of individual colonies, we demonstrated stable biocompatibility and minimal loss in imaging quality compared to previously developed micropallet arrays.

  17. [HPV genotypes prevalence in México and worldwide detected by Linear Array].

    PubMed

    Flores-Miramontes, María G; Torres-Reyes, Luis A; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Vallejo-Ruíz, Verónica; Piña-Sánchez, Patricia; Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Jave-Suárez, Luis Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main factor associated with the development of cervical cancer (CC). Knowing about the prevalence of HPVs at different stages in the development of CC is important for determining the HPV oncogenic risk, the development of screening strategies, the evaluation of prevention programs, and also for vaccine designing. This paper is a meta-analysis of HPV prevalence worldwide and in Mexico from studies using the Linear Array® HPV Genotyping Test as a diagnostic test (it is the commercial test that, up to date, identifies the largest number of HPV genotypes in a single sample) in DNA of cervical samples from women with normal cytology, with low grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LGSIL), with high grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HGSIL) and with CC. The most prevalent genotypes after HPV-16 and -18 in women with CC varies depending on geographic region, which supports the need to develop detection and prevention strategies according to the characteristics of the population.

  18. MLAOS: A Multi-Point Linear Array of Optical Sensors for Coniferous Foliage Clumping Index Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Yonghua; Fu, Lizhe; Han, Wenchao; Zhu, Yeqing; Wang, Jindi

    2014-01-01

    The canopy foliage clumping effect is primarily caused by the non-random distribution of canopy foliage. Currently, measurements of clumping index (CI) by handheld instruments is typically time- and labor-intensive. We propose a low-cost and low-power automatic measurement system called Multi-point Linear Array of Optical Sensors (MLAOS), which consists of three above-canopy and nine below-canopy optical sensors that capture plant transmittance at different times of the day. Data communication between the MLAOS node is facilitated by using a ZigBee network, and the data are transmitted from the field MLAOS to a remote data server using the Internet. The choice of the electronic element and design of the MLAOS software is aimed at reducing costs and power consumption. A power consumption test showed that, when a 4000 mAH Li-ion battery is used, a maximum of 8–10 months of work can be achieved. A field experiment on a coniferous forest revealed that the CI of MLAOS may reveal a clumping effect that occurs within the canopy. In further work, measurement of the multi-scale clumping effect can be achieved by utilizing a greater number of MLAOS devices to capture the heterogeneity of the plant canopy. PMID:24859029

  19. Absolute energy calibration of FD by an electron linear accelerator for Telescope Array

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, T.; Fukushima, M.; Ikeda, D.; Enomoto, A.; Fukuda, S.; Furukawa, K.; Ikeda, M.; Iwase, H.; Kakihara, K.; Kamitani, T.; Kondo, Y.; Ohsawa, S.; Sagawa, H.; Sanami, T.; Satoh, M.; Shidara, T.; Sugimura, T.; Yoshida, M.; Matthews, J. N.; Ogio, S.

    2011-09-22

    The primary energy of the ultra-high energy cosmic rays(UHECR) are measured with the number of fluorescence photons which are detected with fluorescence detectors(FD) in the Telescope Array experiment(TA). Howevery since there is large uncertinty as 19% in the measurement of the energy scale, the most important theme is improvement of the energy calibration. The electron light source(ELS) is a small electron linear accelerator for new energy calibration. The ELS is located 100 m far from the FD station, and injects electron beam which is accelerated to 40 MeV energy into the sky. We can calibrate the FD energy scale by detection the air shower directly which is generated by the electron beam. The ELS was developed in KEK Japan, and moved to the TA site in March 2009. We started the beam operation in September 2010, in consequence we detected the air shower which was generated by electron beam in the air. The output kinetic energy of the electron beam was 41.1 MeV, we adjusted the output charge from 40 to 140 pC/pulse. We expect that we can improve the uncertinty of the energy scale to about 10% with the ELS, futhermore ELS will be a very useful apparatus for R and D of future UHECR observation.

  20. Optofluidic holographic microscopy with custom field of view (FoV) using a linear array detector.

    PubMed

    Bianco, V; Paturzo, M; Marchesano, V; Gallotta, I; Di Schiavi, E; Ferraro, P

    2015-05-01

    Simple and effective imaging strategies are of utmost interest for applications on a lab-on-chip scale. In fact, the majority of diagnostic tools for medical as well as biotechnological studies still employ image-based approaches. Having onboard the chip a compact but powerful imaging apparatus with multiple imaging capabilities, such as 3D dynamic focusing along the optical axis, unlimited field of view (FoV) and double outputs, namely, intensity and quantitative phase-contrast maps of biological objects, is of extreme importance for the next generation of Lab-on-a-Chip (LoC) devices. Here we present a coherent 3D microscopy approach with a holographic modality that is specifically suitable for studying biological samples while they simply flow along microfluidic paths. The LoC device is equipped with a compact linear array detector to capture and generate a new conceptual type of a digital hologram in the space-time domain, named here as Space-Time Digital Hologram (STDH). The reported results show that the method is a promising diagnostic tool for optofluidic investigations of biological specimens. PMID:25832808

  1. Optofluidic holographic microscopy with custom field of view (FoV) using a linear array detector.

    PubMed

    Bianco, V; Paturzo, M; Marchesano, V; Gallotta, I; Di Schiavi, E; Ferraro, P

    2015-05-01

    Simple and effective imaging strategies are of utmost interest for applications on a lab-on-chip scale. In fact, the majority of diagnostic tools for medical as well as biotechnological studies still employ image-based approaches. Having onboard the chip a compact but powerful imaging apparatus with multiple imaging capabilities, such as 3D dynamic focusing along the optical axis, unlimited field of view (FoV) and double outputs, namely, intensity and quantitative phase-contrast maps of biological objects, is of extreme importance for the next generation of Lab-on-a-Chip (LoC) devices. Here we present a coherent 3D microscopy approach with a holographic modality that is specifically suitable for studying biological samples while they simply flow along microfluidic paths. The LoC device is equipped with a compact linear array detector to capture and generate a new conceptual type of a digital hologram in the space-time domain, named here as Space-Time Digital Hologram (STDH). The reported results show that the method is a promising diagnostic tool for optofluidic investigations of biological specimens.

  2. Linear stability of directional solidification cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, D.A. ); Levine, H. )

    1990-03-15

    We formulate the problem of finding the stability spectrum of the cellular pattern seen in directional solidification. This leads to a nonlinear eigenvalue problem for an integro-differential operator. We solve this problem numerically and compare our results to those obtained by linearizing the eigenvalue problem by employing the quasistatic approximation. Contrary to some recent claims, we find no evidence for a Hopf bifurcation to a dendritic pattern.

  3. Linear and Nonlinear Rheology of Living Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollmannsberger, Philip; Fabry, Ben

    2011-08-01

    Living cells are an active soft material with fascinating mechanical properties. Under mechanical loading, cells exhibit creep and stress relaxation behavior that follows a power-law response rather than a classical exponential response. Such a response puts cells in the context of soft colloidal glasses and other disordered metastable materials that share the same properties. In cells, however, both the power-law exponent and stiffness are related to the contractile prestress in the cytoskeleton. In addition, cells are made of a highly nonlinear material that stiffens and fluidizes under mechanical stress. They show active and adaptive mechanical behavior such as contraction and remodeling that sets them apart from any other nonliving material. Strikingly, all these observations can be linked by simple relationships with the power-law exponent as the only organizing parameter. Current theoretical models capture specific facets of cell mechanical behavior, but a comprehensive understanding is still emerging.

  4. Selective single cell isolation for genomics using microraft arrays

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Joshua D.; Williams, Lindsay A.; DiSalvo, Matthew; Brandt, Alicia T.; Marayati, Raoud; Sims, Christopher E.; Allbritton, Nancy L.; Prins, Jan F.; Yeh, Jen Jen; Jones, Corbin D.

    2016-01-01

    Genomic methods are used increasingly to interrogate the individual cells that compose specific tissues. However, current methods for single cell isolation struggle to phenotypically differentiate specific cells in a heterogeneous population and rely primarily on the use of fluorescent markers. Many cellular phenotypes of interest are too complex to be measured by this approach, making it difficult to connect genotype and phenotype at the level of individual cells. Here we demonstrate that microraft arrays, which are arrays containing thousands of individual cell culture sites, can be used to select single cells based on a variety of phenotypes, such as cell surface markers, cell proliferation and drug response. We then show that a common genomic procedure, RNA-seq, can be readily adapted to the single cells isolated from these rafts. We show that data generated using microrafts and our modified RNA-seq protocol compared favorably with the Fluidigm C1. We then used microraft arrays to select pancreatic cancer cells that proliferate in spite of cytotoxic drug treatment. Our single cell RNA-seq data identified several expected and novel gene expression changes associated with early drug resistance. PMID:27530426

  5. Selective single cell isolation for genomics using microraft arrays.

    PubMed

    Welch, Joshua D; Williams, Lindsay A; DiSalvo, Matthew; Brandt, Alicia T; Marayati, Raoud; Sims, Christopher E; Allbritton, Nancy L; Prins, Jan F; Yeh, Jen Jen; Jones, Corbin D

    2016-09-30

    Genomic methods are used increasingly to interrogate the individual cells that compose specific tissues. However, current methods for single cell isolation struggle to phenotypically differentiate specific cells in a heterogeneous population and rely primarily on the use of fluorescent markers. Many cellular phenotypes of interest are too complex to be measured by this approach, making it difficult to connect genotype and phenotype at the level of individual cells. Here we demonstrate that microraft arrays, which are arrays containing thousands of individual cell culture sites, can be used to select single cells based on a variety of phenotypes, such as cell surface markers, cell proliferation and drug response. We then show that a common genomic procedure, RNA-seq, can be readily adapted to the single cells isolated from these rafts. We show that data generated using microrafts and our modified RNA-seq protocol compared favorably with the Fluidigm C1. We then used microraft arrays to select pancreatic cancer cells that proliferate in spite of cytotoxic drug treatment. Our single cell RNA-seq data identified several expected and novel gene expression changes associated with early drug resistance.

  6. Plasmonic Tipless Pyramid Arrays for Cell Poration.

    PubMed

    Courvoisier, Sébastien; Saklayen, Nabiha; Huber, Marinus; Chen, Jun; Diebold, Eric D; Bonacina, Luigi; Wolf, Jean-Pierre; Mazur, Eric

    2015-07-01

    Improving the efficiency, cell survival, and throughput of methods to modify and control the genetic expression of cells is of great benefit to biology and medicine. We investigate, both computationally and experimentally, a nanostructured substrate made of tipless pyramids for plasmonic-induced transfection. By optimizing the geometrical parameters for an excitation wavelength of 800 nm, we demonstrate a 100-fold intensity enhancement of the electric near field at the cell-substrate contact area, while the low absorption typical for gold is maintained. We demonstrate that such a substrate can induce transient poration of cells by a purely optically induced process.

  7. Effects of nanopillar array diameter and spacing on cancer cell capture and cell behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shunqiang; Wan, Yuan; Liu, Yaling

    2014-10-01

    While substrates with nanopillars (NPs) have emerged as promising platforms for isolation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs), the influence of diameter and spacing of NPs on CTC capture is still unclear. In this paper, CTC-capture yield and cell behaviors have been investigated by using antibody functionalized NPs of various diameters (120-1100 nm) and spacings (35-800 nm). The results show a linear relationship between the cell capture yield and effective contact area of NP substrates where a NP array of small diameter and reasonable spacing is preferred; however, spacing that is too small or too large adversely impairs the capture efficiency and specificity, respectively. In addition, the formation of pseudopodia between captured cells and the substrate is found to be dependent not only on cell adhesion status but also on elution strength and shear direction. These findings provide essential guidance in designing NP substrates for more efficient capture of CTCs and manipulation of cytomorphology in future.While substrates with nanopillars (NPs) have emerged as promising platforms for isolation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs), the influence of diameter and spacing of NPs on CTC capture is still unclear. In this paper, CTC-capture yield and cell behaviors have been investigated by using antibody functionalized NPs of various diameters (120-1100 nm) and spacings (35-800 nm). The results show a linear relationship between the cell capture yield and effective contact area of NP substrates where a NP array of small diameter and reasonable spacing is preferred; however, spacing that is too small or too large adversely impairs the capture efficiency and specificity, respectively. In addition, the formation of pseudopodia between captured cells and the substrate is found to be dependent not only on cell adhesion status but also on elution strength and shear direction. These findings provide essential guidance in designing NP substrates for more efficient capture of CTCs

  8. Cellular heterogeneity and live cell arrays.

    PubMed

    Walling, Maureen A; Shepard, Jason R E

    2011-07-01

    In the past decade, the tendency to move from a global, one-size-fits-all treatment philosophy to personalized medicine is based, in part, on the nuanced differences and sub-classifications of disease states. Our knowledge of these varied states stems from not only the ability to diagnose, classify, and perform experiments on cell populations as a whole, but also from new technologies that allow interrogation of cell populations at the individual cell level. Such departures from conventional thinking are driven by the recognition that clonal cell populations have numerous activities that manifest as significant levels of non-genetic heterogeneity. Clonal populations by definition originate from a single genetic origin so are regarded as having a high level of homogeneity as compared to genetically distinct cell populations. However, analysis at the single cell level has revealed a different phenomenon; cells and organisms require an inherent level of non-genetic heterogeneity to function properly, and in some cases, to survive. The growing understanding of this occurrence has lead to the development of methods to monitor, analyze, and better characterize the heterogeneity in cell populations. Following the trend of DNA- and protein microarrays, platforms capable of simultaneously monitoring each cell in a population have been developed. These cellular microarray platforms and other related formats allow for continuous monitoring of single live cells and simultaneously generate individual cell and average population data that are more descriptive and information-rich than traditional bulk methods. These technological advances have helped develop a better understanding of the intricacies associated with biological processes and afforded greater insight into complex biological systems. The associated instruments, techniques, and reagents now allow for highly multiplexed analyses, which enable multiple cellular activities, processes, or pathways to be monitored

  9. Thin solar cell and lightweight array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, Henry W., Jr. (Inventor); Weinberg, Irving (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A thin, lightweight solar cell that utilizes front contact metallization is presented. Both the front light receiving surface of the solar cell and the facing surface of the cover glass are recessed to accommodate this metallization. This enables the two surfaces to meet flush for an optimum seal.

  10. The Effects of Linear Microphone Array Changes on Computed Sound Exposure Level Footprints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Arnold W.; Wilson, Mark R.

    1997-01-01

    Airport land planning commissions often are faced with determining how much area around an airport is affected by the sound exposure levels (SELS) associated with helicopter operations. This paper presents a study of the effects changing the size and composition of a microphone array has on the computed SEL contour (ground footprint) areas used by such commissions. Descent flight acoustic data measured by a fifteen microphone array were reprocessed for five different combinations of microphones within this array. This resulted in data for six different arrays for which SEL contours were computed. The fifteen microphone array was defined as the 'baseline' array since it contained the greatest amount of data. The computations used a newly developed technique, the Acoustic Re-propagation Technique (ART), which uses parts of the NASA noise prediction program ROTONET. After the areas of the SEL contours were calculated the differences between the areas were determined. The area differences for the six arrays are presented that show a five and a three microphone array (with spacing typical of that required by the FAA FAR Part 36 noise certification procedure) compare well with the fifteen microphone array. All data were obtained from a database resulting from a joint project conducted by NASA and U.S. Army researchers at Langley and Ames Research Centers. A brief description of the joint project test design, microphone array set-up, and data reduction methodology associated with the database are discussed.

  11. High power density fuel cell comprising an array of microchannels

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Park, Hyung Gyu

    2013-10-15

    A fuel cell according to one embodiment includes a porous electrolyte support structure defining an array of microchannels, the microchannels including fuel and oxidant microchannels; fuel electrodes formed along some of the microchannels; and oxidant electrodes formed along other of the microchannels. A method of making a fuel cell according to one embodiment includes forming an array of walls defining microchannels therebetween using at least one of molding, stamping, extrusion, injection and electrodeposition; processing the walls to make the walls porous, thereby creating a porous electrolyte support structure; forming anode electrodes along some of the microchannels; and forming cathode electrodes along other of the microchannels. Additional embodiments are also disclosed.

  12. High linearity SPAD and TDC array for TCSPC and 3D ranging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, Federica; Lussana, Rudi; Bronzi, Danilo; Dalla Mora, Alberto; Contini, Davide; Tisa, Simone; Tosi, Alberto; Zappa, Franco

    2015-01-01

    An array of 32x32 Single-Photon Avalanche-Diodes (SPADs) and Time-to-Digital Converters (TDCs) has been fabricated in a 0.35 μm automotive-certified CMOS technology. The overall dimension of the chip is 9x9 mm2. Each pixel is able to detect photons in the 300 nm - 900 nm wavelength range with a fill-factor of 3.14% and either to count them or to time stamp their arrival time. In photon-counting mode an in-pixel 6-bit counter provides photon-numberresolved intensity movies at 100 kfps, whereas in photon-timing mode the 10-bit in-pixel TDC provides time-resolved maps (Time-Correlated Single-Photon Counting measurements) or 3D depth-resolved (through direct time-of-flight technique) images and movies, with 312 ps resolution. The photodetector is a 30 μm diameter SPAD with low Dark Count Rate (120 cps at room temperature, 3% hot-pixels) and 55% peak Photon Detection Efficiency (PDE) at 450 nm. The TDC has a 6-bit counter and a 4-bit fine interpolator, based on a Delay Locked Loop (DLL) line, which makes the TDC insensitive to process, voltage, and temperature drifts. The implemented sliding-scale technique improves linearity, giving 2% LSB DNL and 10% LSB INL. The single-shot precision is 260 ps rms, comprising SPAD, TDC and driving board jitter. Both optical and electrical crosstalk among SPADs and TDCs are negligible. 2D fast movies and 3D reconstructions with centimeter resolution are reported.

  13. Macroscopic Response Of The Retinal Mosaic To The Light Stimulus: Linear Array Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, P. K.; Calvo, M. L.

    1987-01-01

    It is known that the cones and rods of the retina have directional sensitivity. For a normal observer, in the absence of aberrations like myopia, astigmatism, etc. the light entering the pupil of the eye is directly focussed on the retinal plane by the optical system of the eye. There, in the retina, the cones and the rods are regularly distributed in different retinal regions forming a mosaic structure. It is very well established from the earlier works of Enoch, (1), that both types of optical photoreceptors act as optical waveguides. This behaviour can be accounted for due to their special optical properties allowing conditions for total internal reflections inside its structure. At the time of the confinement of the energy inside each single receptor an important phenomenon of orientation takes place as well. In this work, we wish to establish that the various effects arising out of this phenomenon can be interpreted in terms of a possible apodising action of the eye.It will be shown that an improvement in the resolution of the retinal image detection is possible by comparing the human visual system with an apodised optical system. For that purpose we have established a linear array model for a section of the fovea, ( all receptors having the same geometry and optical properties ), then, we have calculated the distribution of the density of energy captured in this particular section of the retina, by assuming that the receptors are acting as monomode optical waveguides.The orientation mechanism is also considered, by including an inclination factor affecting each single receptor. We have compared the so obtained distribution to the one associated to a single receptor

  14. Solar cell array design handbook, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauschenbach, H. S.

    1976-01-01

    Twelve chapters discuss the following: historical developments, the environment and its effects, solar cells, solar cell filters and covers, solar cell and other electrical interconnections, blocking and shunt diodes, substrates and deployment mechanisms, material properties, design synthesis and optimization, design analysis, procurement, production and cost aspects, evaluation and test, orbital performance, and illustrative design examples. A comprehensive index permits rapid locating of desired topics. The handbook consists of two volumes: Volume 1 is of an expository nature while Volume 2 contains detailed design data in an appendix-like fashion. Volume 2 includes solar cell performance data, applicable unit conversion factors and physical constants, and mechanical, electrical, thermal optical, magnetic, and outgassing material properties. Extensive references are provided.

  15. Cicada-inspired cell-instructive nanopatterned arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diu, Ting; Faruqui, Nilofar; Sjöström, Terje; Lamarre, Baptiste; Jenkinson, Howard F.; Su, Bo; Ryadnov, Maxim G.

    2014-11-01

    Biocompatible surfaces hold key to a variety of biomedical problems that are directly related to the competition between host-tissue cell integration and bacterial colonisation. A saving solution to this is seen in the ability of cells to uniquely respond to physical cues on such surfaces thus prompting the search for cell-instructive nanoscale patterns. Here we introduce a generic rationale engineered into biocompatible, titanium, substrates to differentiate cell responses. The rationale is inspired by cicada wing surfaces that display bactericidal nanopillar patterns. The surfaces engineered in this study are titania (TiO2) nanowire arrays that are selectively bactericidal against motile bacteria, while capable of guiding mammalian cell proliferation according to the type of the array. The concept holds promise for clinically relevant materials capable of differential physico-mechanical responses to cellular adhesion.

  16. Linear-array-based photoacoustic imaging of human microcirculation with a range of high frequency transducer probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafar, Haroon; Breathnach, Aedán; Subhash, Hrebesh M.; Leahy, Martin J.

    2015-05-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) with a linear-array-based probe can provide a convenient means of imaging the human microcirculation within its native structural context and adds functional information. PAI using a multielement linear transducer array combined with multichannel collecting system was used for in vivo volumetric imaging of the blood microcirculation, the total concentration of hemoglobin (HbT), and the hemoglobin oxygen saturation (sO2) within human tissue. Three-dimensional (3-D) PA and ultrasound (US) volumetric scans were acquired from the forearm skin by linearly translating the transducer with a stepper motor over a region of interest, while capturing two-dimensional images using 15, 21, and 40 MHz frequency transducer probes. For the microvasculature imaging, PA images were acquired at 800- and 1064-nm wavelengths. For the HbT and sO2 estimates, PA images were collected at 750- and 850-nm wavelengths. 3-D microcirculation, HbT, and sO2 maps of the forearm skin were obtained from normal subjects. The linear-array-based PAI has been found promising in terms of resolution, imaging depth, and imaging speed for in vivo microcirculation imaging within human skin. We believe that a reflection type probe, similar to existing clinical US probes, is most likely to succeed in real clinical applications. Its advantages include ease of use, speed, and familiarity for radiographers and clinicians.

  17. An advanced space photovoltaic concentrator array using Fresnel lenses, gallium arsenide cells, and prismatic cell covers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, Mark J.; Piszczor, Michael F.

    1988-01-01

    The current status of a space concentrator array which uses refractive optics, gallium arsenide cells, and prismatic cell covers to achieve excellent performance at a very low array mass is documented. The prismatically covered cells have established records for space cell performance (24.2 percent efficient at 100 AM0 suns and 25 C) and terrestrial single-junction cell performance (29.3 percent efficient at 200 AM1.5 suns and 25 C).

  18. Studies of encapsulant materials for terrestrial solar-cell arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmichael, D. C. (Compiler)

    1975-01-01

    Study 1 of this contract is entitled ""Evaluation of World Experience and Properties of Materials for Encapsulation of Terrestrial Solar-Cell Arrays.'' The approach of this study is to review and analyze world experience and to compile data on properties of encapsulants for photovoltaic cells and for related applications. The objective of the effort is to recommend candidate materials and processes for encapsulating terrestrial photovoltaic arrays at low cost for a service life greater than 20 years. The objectives of Study 2, ""Definition of Encapsulant Service Environments and Test Conditions,'' are to develop the climatic/environmental data required to define the frequency and duration of detrimental environmental conditions in a 20-year array lifetime and to develop a corresponding test schedule for encapsulant systems.

  19. Method of low temperature operation of an electrochemical cell array

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Prabhakar; Ruka, Roswell J.; Bratton, Raymond J.

    1994-01-01

    In the method of operating an electrochemical cell generator apparatus containing a generator chamber (20) containing an array of cells (12) having interior and exterior electrodes with solid electrolyte between the electrodes, where a hot gas (F) contacts the outside of the cells (12) and the generating chamber normally operates at over 850.degree. C., where N.sub.2 gas is fed to contact the interior electrode of the cells (12) in any case when the generating chamber (20) temperature drops for whatever reason to within the range of from 550.degree. C. to 800.degree. C., to eliminate cracking within the cells (12).

  20. Radiation degradation of solar cell arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, C. W.

    1975-01-01

    A method of incorporating a detailed solar cell radiation degradation model into a convenient computational scheme suitable for the solar electric propulsion system is outlined. The study shows that several existing codes may be applied in sequence to solve the problem.

  1. Microfluidic cell arrays for metabolic monitoring of stimulated cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei; Klauke, Norbert; Smith, Godfrey; Cooper, Jonathan M

    2010-04-01

    An array of PDMS microchambers was aligned to an array of sensor electrodes and stimulating microelectrodes, which was used for the electrochemical monitoring of the metabolic activity of single isolated adult ventricular myocytes inside the chamber array, stimulated within a transient electric field. The effect of the accumulation of metabolic byproducts in the limited extracellular volume of the picolitre chambers was demonstrated by measuring single muscle cell contraction optically, while concomitant changes in intracellular calcium transients and pH were recorded independently using fluorescent indicator dyes. Both the amplitude of the cell shortening and the magnitude of the intracellular calcium transients decreased over time and both nearly ceased after 20 min of continuous stimulation in the limited extracellullar volume. The intracellular pH decreased gradually during 20 min of continuous stimulation after which a dramatic pH drop was observed, indicating the breakdown of the intracellular buffering capacity. After continuous stimulation, intracellular lactate was released into the microchamber through cell electroporation and was detected electrochemically at a lactate microbiosensor, within the chamber. A mitochondrial uncoupler was used to mimic ischaemia and thus to enhance the cellular content of lactate. Under these circumstances, intracellular lactate concentrations were found to have risen to approximately 15 mM. This array system has the potential of simultaneous electrochemical and optical monitoring of extracellular and intracellular metabolites from single beating heart cells at a controlled metabolic state.

  2. Comparative Study on Synthesizing Reconfigurable Time- Modulated Linear Arrays using Differential Evolution, Artificial Bee Colony and Particle Swarm Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, S. K.; Singh, Harshavardhan; Mahanti, G. K.; Ghatak, Rowdra

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a new technique based on optimization tools to design phase only, digitally controlled, reconfigurable antenna arrays through time modulation. In the proposed approach, the on-time durations of the time-modulated elements and the static amplitudes of the array elements are perturbed in such a way that the same on-time sequence and discrete values of static amplitudes for four bit digital attenuators produces either a pencil or a flat-top beam pattern, depending on the suitable discrete phase distributions of five bit digital phase shifters. In order to illustrate the technique, three optimization tools: differential evolution (DE), artificial bee colony (ABC), and particle swarm optimization (PSO) are employed and their performances are compared. The numerical results for a 20-element linear array are presented.

  3. Imaging method for downward-looking sparse linear array three-dimensional synthetic aperture radar based on reweighted atomic norm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Qian; Han, Kuoye; Lin, Yun; Zhang, Bingchen; Liu, Jianguo; Hong, Wen

    2016-01-01

    We propose an imaging algorithm for downward-looking sparse linear array three-dimensional synthetic aperture radar (DLSLA 3-D SAR) in the circumstance of cross-track sparse and nonuniform array configuration. Considering the off-grid effect and the resolution improvement, the algorithm combines pseudo-polar formatting algorithm, reweighed atomic norm minimization (RANM), and a parametric relaxation-based cyclic approach (RELAX) to improve the imaging performance with a reduced number of array antennas. RANM is employed in the cross-track imaging after pseudo-polar formatting the DLSLA 3-D SAR echo signal, then the reconstructed results are refined by RELAX. By taking advantage of the reweighted scheme, RANM can improve the resolution of the atomic norm minimization, and outperforms discretized compressive sensing schemes that suffer from off-grid effect. The simulated and real data experiments of DLSLA 3-D SAR verify the performance of the proposed algorithm.

  4. Analytical and numerical analysis of lensing effect for linear surface water waves through a square array of nearly touching rigid square cylinders.

    PubMed

    Farhat, M; Guenneau, S; Enoch, S; Tayeb, G; Movchan, A B; Movchan, N V

    2008-04-01

    This paper describes transport properties of linear water waves propagating within a square array of fixed square cylinders. The main focus is on achieving the conditions for all-angle-negative-refraction (AANR) thanks to anomalous dispersion in fluid-filled periodic structures. Of particular interest are two limit cases when either the edges or the vertices of the cylinders come close to touching. In the former case, the array can be approximated by a lattice of thin water channels (for which dispersion curves are given in closed form and thus frequencies at which AANR occurs) whereas in the latter case, the array behaves as a checkerboard with cells consisting either of water tanks or rigid cylinders (for which standing modes are given in closed form). The tools of choice for the present analysis are, on the one hand, the finite element method which solves numerically spectral problems in periodic media, and on the other hand, a two-scale asymptotic method which provides estimates of dispersion curves and associated eigenfields through a lattice approximation (namely thin water channels between rigid cylinders). Simple duality correspondences are found based on fourfold symmetry of square water checkerboards that allow us to get some insight into their spectra. Last, some numerical evidence is provided for water waves focusing with no astigmatism through such arrays, when they are of finite extent.

  5. Optically Pumped Lasing of Ar(4p -->4s) Excited in Linear Microplasma Arrays at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawlins, Wilson; Galbally-Kinney, Kristin; Davis, Steven; Hoskinson, Alan; Hopwood, Jeffrey

    2014-10-01

    The optically pumped rare-gas metastable laser is a chemically inert analogue to alkali laser systems. These devices require efficient generation of electronically excited metastable atoms in a continuous-wave electric discharge in flowing gas mixtures at elevated pressure. Linear arrays of microstrip resonators are well suited for this task. We have observed CW optical gain and lasing at 912 nm using linear micro-discharge arrays to generate metastable rare-gas atoms at atmospheric pressure. Ar(4s) metastables are generated in flowing Ar/He mixtures by low-power, CW linear array microplasmas operating near 900 MHz and 1 atm. The metastables are optically excited to selected states in the Ar(4p) manifold by a tunable, CW Ti:S laser. Collisional energy transfer within the manifold produces a population inversion. The Ar(4s) concentration and the optical gain are probed by tunable diode laser spectroscopy. Supported by the Air Force Research Laboratory and High Energy Laser Joint Technology Office.

  6. A spatial capture-recapture model to estimate fish survival and location from linear continuous monitoring arrays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raabe, Joshua K.; Gardner, Beth; Hightower, Joseph E.

    2013-01-01

    We developed a spatial capture–recapture model to evaluate survival and activity centres (i.e., mean locations) of tagged individuals detected along a linear array. Our spatially explicit version of the Cormack–Jolly–Seber model, analyzed using a Bayesian framework, correlates movement between periods and can incorporate environmental or other covariates. We demonstrate the model using 2010 data for anadromous American shad (Alosa sapidissima) tagged with passive integrated transponders (PIT) at a weir near the mouth of a North Carolina river and passively monitored with an upstream array of PIT antennas. The river channel constrained migrations, resulting in linear, one-dimensional encounter histories that included both weir captures and antenna detections. Individual activity centres in a given time period were a function of the individual’s previous estimated location and the river conditions (i.e., gage height). Model results indicate high within-river spawning mortality (mean weekly survival = 0.80) and more extensive movements during elevated river conditions. This model is applicable for any linear array (e.g., rivers, shorelines, and corridors), opening new opportunities to study demographic parameters, movement or migration, and habitat use.

  7. Automatic Identification of Subcellular Phenotypes on Human Cell Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Christian; Erfle, Holger; Warnat, Patrick; Daigle, Nathalie; Lörch, Thomas; Ellenberg, Jan; Pepperkok, Rainer; Eils, Roland

    2004-01-01

    Light microscopic analysis of cell morphology provides a high-content readout of cell function and protein localization. Cell arrays and microwell transfection assays on cultured cells have made cell phenotype analysis accessible to high-throughput experiments. Both the localization of each protein in the proteome and the effect of RNAi knock-down of individual genes on cell morphology can be assayed by manual inspection of microscopic images. However, the use of morphological readouts for functional genomics requires fast and automatic identification of complex cellular phenotypes. Here, we present a fully automated platform for high-throughput cell phenotype screening combining human live cell arrays, screening microscopy, and machine-learning-based classification methods. Efficiency of this platform is demonstrated by classification of eleven subcellular patterns marked by GFP-tagged proteins. Our classification method can be adapted to virtually any microscopic assay based on cell morphology, opening a wide range of applications including large-scale RNAi screening in human cells. PMID:15173118

  8. Dielectrophoretic characterization of cells in a stationary nanoliter droplet array with generated chemical gradients.

    PubMed

    Ben-Arye, Tom; Park, Sinwook; Shemesh, Jonathan; Peer, Dan; Levenberg, Shulamit; Yossifon, Gilad

    2015-10-01

    A novel design of reusable microfluidic platform that generates a stationary nanoliter droplet array (SNDA) for cell incubation and analysis, equipped with a complementary array of individually addressable electrodes for each microwell is studied. Various solute concentration gradients were generated between the wells where dielectrophoresis (DEP) was used to characterize the effect of the gradients on the cell's response. The feasibility of generating concentration gradients and observation of DEP responses was demonstrated using a gradient of salts in combination with microparticles and viable cells. L1210 Lymphoma cells were used as the model cells in these experiments. Lymphoma cells' cross-over frequency (COF) decreased with increasing stress conditions. Specifically, a linear decrease in the cell COF was measured as a function of solution tonicity and blebbistatin dose. Lymphoma cells were incubated under a gradient of the chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin (DOX), which led to saturation in the cell-COF response at 30 nM DOX, demonstrating the potential of the platform in screening of label-free drugs. PMID:26286862

  9. Thermoelastic analysis of solar cell arrays and their material properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, M. A.; Rowe, W. M.; Yasui, R. K.

    1973-01-01

    A thermoelastic stress analysis procedure is reported for predicting the thermally induced stresses and failures in silicon solar cell arrays. A prerequisite for the analysis is the characterization of the temperature-dependent thermal and mechanical properties of the solar cell materials. Extensive material property testing was carried out in the temperature range -200 to +200 C for the filter glass, P- and N-type silicon, interconnector metals, solder, and several candidate silicone rubber adhesives. The analysis procedure is applied to several solar cell array design configurations. Results of the analysis indicate the optimum design configuration, with respect to compatible materials, effect of the solder coating, and effect of the interconnector geometry. Good agreement was found between results of the analysis and the test program.

  10. Astronomical camera using a high-performance indium antimonide linear array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, M.; Bailey, G. C.; Kupferman, P. N.; Macenka, S.

    1984-01-01

    The development and current status of InSb line arrays for astronomy are reviewed. Instrument concepts are currently being developed for an infrared instrument for NASA's Space Telescope which would use such detectors for both spectroscopy and imaging. Preliminary performance measurements are given for a simple pushbroom camera, using a 128-element line array, designed for operation on the 24-inch Cassegrain telescope at the JPL Table Mountain Observatory. The design and construction of the camera are described.

  11. Microtable Arrays for Culture and Isolation of Cell Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Jeng-Hao; Xu, Wei; Sims, Christopher E.; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2010-01-01

    Cell microarrays with culture sites composed of individually removable microstructures or micropallets have proven benefits for isolation of cells from a mixed population. The laser energy required to selectively remove these micropallets with attached cells from the array depends on the microstructure surface area in contact with the substrate. Laser energies sufficient to release micropallets greater than 100 μm resulted in loss of cell viability. A new 3-dimensional culture site similar in appearance to a table was designed and fabricated using a simple process that relied on a differential sensitivity of two photoresists to UV-mediated photopolymerization. With this design, the larger culture area rests on four small supports to minimize the surface area in contact with the substrate. Microtables up to 250 × 250 μm were consistently released with single 10 μJ pulses to each of the 4 support structures. In contrast, microstructures with a 150 × 150 μm surface area in contact with the substrate could not be reliably released at pulse energies up to 212 μJ. Cassie-Baxter wetting is required to provide a barrier of air to localize and sequester cells to the culture sites. A second asset of the design was an increased retention of this air barrier under conditions of decreased surface tension and after prolonged culture of cells. The improved air retention was due to the hydrophobic cavity created beneath the table and above the substrate which entrapped air when an aqueous solution was added to the array. The microtables proved an efficient method for isolating colonies from the array with 100% of selected colonies competent to expand following release from the array. PMID:20644916

  12. A High-Frequency High Frame Rate Duplex Ultrasound Linear Array Imaging System for Small Animal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lequan; Xu, Xiaochen; Hu, Changhong; Sun, Lei; Yen, Jesse T.; Cannata, Jonathan M.; Shung, K. Kirk

    2010-01-01

    High-frequency (HF) ultrasound imaging has been shown to be useful for non-invasively imaging anatomical structures of the eye and small animals in biological and pharmaceutical research, achieving superior spatial resolution. Cardiovascular research utilizing mice requires not only real-time B-scan imaging, but also ultrasound Doppler to evaluate both anatomy and blood flow of the mouse heart. This paper reports the development of a high frequency ultrasound duplex imaging system capable of both B-mode imaging and Doppler flow measurements, using a 64-element linear array. The system included a HF pulsed-wave Doppler module, a 32-channel HF B-mode imaging module, a PC with a 200 MS/s 14-bit A/D card, and real-time LabView software. A 50dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and a depth of penetration of larger than 12 mm were achieved using a 35 MHz linear array with 50 μm pitch. The two-way beam widths were determined to be 165 μm to 260 μm and the clutter energy to total energy ratio (CTR) were 9.1 dB to 12 dB, when the array was electronically focused at different focal points at depths from 4.8 mm to 9.6 mm. The system is capable of acquiring real-time B-mode images at a rate greater than 400 frames per second (fps) for a 4.8 × 13 mm field of view, using a 30 MHz 64-element linear array with 100 μm pitch. Sample in vivo cardiac high frame rate images and duplex images of mouse hearts are shown to assess its current imaging capability and performance for small animals. PMID:20639149

  13. Electrical impedance characterization of cell growth on interdigitated microelectrode array.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gi Hyun; Pyun, Jae-Chul; Cho, Sungbo

    2014-11-01

    Electrical cell-substrate impedance sensing is a method for label-free and real-time monitoring of biological cells, which has been increasingly employed in the diagnostic and pharmaceutical industries. In this study, we fabricated an interdigitated electrode (IDE) array, which consists of 10 fingers, with a length of 1.2 mm, width of 50 μm, spacing of 50 μm, and thickness of 75 nm. The impedance spectra of the fabricated IDE were measured without or with cells in the frequency range of 100 Hz to 100 kHz using a lock-in amplifier based system and characterized by equivalent circuit modelling. Regarding the total impedance as a series resistance (R) and capacitance (C) model, R and C parameters were traced at a selected frequency during cell growth. It was able to monitor cell adherence and proliferation dependent on the behaviours and characteristics of cells on the fabricated IDE array by monitoring RC parameters. The degree of changes in RC value during cell growth was dependent on the type of cells used.

  14. Single-cell chromosomal imbalances detection by array CGH

    PubMed Central

    Le Caignec, Cedric; Spits, Claudia; Sermon, Karen; De Rycke, Martine; Thienpont, Bernard; Debrock, Sophie; Staessen, Catherine; Moreau, Yves; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Van Steirteghem, Andre; Liebaers, Inge; Vermeesch, Joris R.

    2006-01-01

    Genomic imbalances are a major cause of constitutional and acquired disorders. Therefore, aneuploidy screening has become the cornerstone of preimplantation, prenatal and postnatal genetic diagnosis, as well as a routine aspect of the diagnostic workup of many acquired disorders. Recently, array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) has been introduced as a rapid and high-resolution method for the detection of both benign and disease-causing genomic copy-number variations. Until now, array CGH has been performed using a significant quantity of DNA derived from a pool of cells. Here, we present an array CGH method that accurately detects chromosomal imbalances from a single lymphoblast, fibroblast and blastomere within a single day. Trisomy 13, 18, 21 and monosomy X, as well as normal ploidy levels of all other chromosomes, were accurately determined from single fibroblasts. Moreover, we showed that a segmental deletion as small as 34 Mb could be detected. Finally, we demonstrated the possibility to detect aneuploidies in single blastomeres derived from preimplantation embryos. This technique offers new possibilities for genetic analysis of single cells in general and opens the route towards aneuploidy screening and detection of unbalanced translocations in preimplantation embryos in particular. PMID:16698960

  15. Status of wraparound contact solar cells and arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baraona, C. R.; Young, L. E.

    1978-01-01

    Solar cells with wraparound contacts provide the following advantages in array assembly: (1) eliminate the need for discretely formed, damage susceptible series tabs; (2) eliminate the n gap problem by allowing the use of uniform covers over the entire cell surface; (3) allow a higher packing factor by reducing the additional series spacing formly required for forming, and routing the series tab; and (4) allow the cell bonding to the interconnect system to be a single-side function wherein series contacts can be made at the same time parallel contracts are made.

  16. Iron-copper metallization for flexible solar/cell arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavendel, H. W.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of a copper-base metallization for shallow-junction cells applied in flexible solar arrays in space is discussed. This type of metallization will reduce usage of precious metals (such as silver), increase case of bonding (by welding or by soldering) and eliminate heavy high Z interconnects (such as molybdenum). The main points of concern are stability against thermally induced diffusion of copper into silicon which causes degradation of shallow cell junctions, and low series resistance of the contact with semiconductor which promotes cell efficiency.

  17. Magnetographic array for the capture and enumeration of single cells and cell pairs.

    PubMed

    Shields, C Wyatt; Livingston, Carissa E; Yellen, Benjamin B; López, Gabriel P; Murdoch, David M

    2014-07-01

    We present a simple microchip device consisting of an overlaid pattern of micromagnets and microwells capable of capturing magnetically labeled cells into well-defined compartments (with accuracies >95%). Its flexible design permits the programmable deposition of single cells for their direct enumeration and pairs of cells for the detailed analysis of cell-cell interactions. This cell arraying device requires no external power and can be operated solely with permanent magnets. Large scale image analysis of cells captured in this array can yield valuable information (e.g., regarding various immune parameters such as the CD4:CD8 ratio) in a miniaturized and portable platform.

  18. Design of High Temperature Ultrasonic Linear Arrays for Under-Sodium Viewing

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Bond, Leonard J.; Jones, Anthony M.; Peters, Timothy J.

    2010-11-07

    This paper summarizes the design process for high temperature ultrasonic phased array transducers for imaging in liquid sodium at temperatures up to 260C. The project is funded by the USDOE Generation IV Reactor Program and includes collaboration with the Japanese Atomic Energy Agency. The transducer system is being designed to be able to provide images inside a sodium cooled fast reactor, to support operation and maintenance activities including potentially location of looseor damaged parts during service outages. The prototype transducer array is being designed for 8 to 16, 3MHz rectangular lead niobate (K-81) or bismuth titanate (K-15) piezoelectric elements spaced at λ/2 (wavelength in sodium). A nickel or nickel alloy faceplate serves as the sodium wetting surface. Scan angle of the focused ultrasonic beam is ±30 degrees. Imaging spatial resolution is ≤ 1mm. The array is designed to be operated using a commercial phased array control system and it is planned that array testing will be performed in room temperature water, hot oil (260C), and molten sodium (260C).

  19. Micro-magnet arrays for specific single bacterial cell positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivetal, Jérémy; Royet, David; Ciuta, Georgeta; Frenea-Robin, Marie; Haddour, Naoufel; Dempsey, Nora M.; Dumas-Bouchiat, Frédéric; Simonet, Pascal

    2015-04-01

    In various contexts such as pathogen detection or analysis of microbial diversity where cellular heterogeneity must be taken into account, there is a growing need for tools and methods that enable microbiologists to analyze bacterial cells individually. One of the main challenges in the development of new platforms for single cell studies is to perform precise cell positioning, but the ability to specifically target cells is also important in many applications. In this work, we report the development of new strategies to selectively trap single bacterial cells upon large arrays, based on the use of micro-magnets. Escherichia coli bacteria were used to demonstrate magnetically driven bacterial cell organization. In order to provide a flexible approach adaptable to several applications in the field of microbiology, cells were magnetically and specifically labeled using two different strategies, namely immunomagnetic labeling and magnetic in situ hybridization. Results show that centimeter-sized arrays of targeted, isolated bacteria can be successfully created upon the surface of a flat magnetically patterned hard magnetic film. Efforts are now being directed towards the integration of a detection tool to provide a complete micro-system device for a variety of microbiological applications.

  20. INTEGRATING A LINEAR INTERPOLATION FUNCTION ACROSS TRIANGULAR CELL BOUNDARIES

    SciTech Connect

    J. R. WISEMAN; J. S. BROCK

    2000-04-01

    Computational models of particle dynamics often exchange solution data with discretized continuum-fields using interpolation functions. These particle methods require a series expansion of the interpolation function for two purposes: numerical analysis used to establish the model's consistency and accuracy, and logical-coordinate evaluation used to locate particles within a grid. This report presents discrete-expansions for a linear interpolation function commonly used within triangular cell geometries. Discrete-expansions, unlike a Taylor's series, account for interpolation discontinuities across cell boundaries and, therefore, are valid throughout a discretized domain. Verification of linear discrete-expansions is demonstrated on a simple test problem.

  1. Visible and infrared linear detector arrays for the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Gary C.

    1987-01-01

    The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) instrument uses four separate focal plane assemblies consisting of line array detectors that are multiplexed to a common J-FET preamp using a FET switch multiplexing (MUX) technique. A 32-element silicon line array covers the spectral range from 0.41 to 0.70 microns. Three additional 64-element indium antimonide (InSb) line arrays cover the spectral range from 0.68 to 2.45 microns. The spectral sampling interval per detector element is nominally 9.8 nm, giving a total of 224 spectral channels. All focal planes operate at liquid nitrogen temperature and are housed in separate dewars. Electrical performance characteristics include a read noise of less than 1000 e(-) in all channels, response and dark nonuniformity of 5 percent peak to peak, and quantum efficiency of greater than 60 percent.

  2. Improved cell design for Schottky barrier infrared detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Freeman D.; Mooney, Jonathan M.; Tzannes, Alexis P.; Murguia, James E.

    1995-09-01

    The responsivity of large scale platinum silicide arrays, having small pixels, is low compared to the responsivity of large area test diodes fabricated on the same wafer. Often, the responsivity loss is described by assigning a lower Fowler emission coefficient to the detectors. We find the reduced responsivity to be the direct result of a reduction in the effective active area of the detector. This reduction in effective active area becomes more pronounced as the detector cell size is reduced. We provide a simple model for the area reduction in terms of modulation of detector Schottky potential by the underlying depletion region of the detector guard ring. We also suggest changes in the detector array unit cell design, which will maximize responsivity.

  3. High power density fuel cell comprising an array of microchannels

    DOEpatents

    Sopchak, David A; Morse, Jeffrey D; Upadhye, Ravindra S; Kotovsky, Jack; Graff, Robert T

    2014-05-06

    A phosphoric acid fuel cell according to one embodiment includes an array of microchannels defined by a porous electrolyte support structure extending between bottom and upper support layers, the microchannels including fuel and oxidant microchannels; fuel electrodes formed along some of the microchannels; and air electrodes formed along other of the microchannels. A method of making a phosphoric acid fuel cell according to one embodiment includes etching an array of microchannels in a substrate, thereby forming walls between the microchannels; processing the walls to make the walls porous, thereby forming a porous electrolyte support structure; forming anode electrodes along some of the walls; forming cathode electrodes along other of the walls; and filling the porous electrolyte support structure with a phosphoric acid electrolyte. Additional embodiments are also disclosed.

  4. Cross-correlation, triangulation, and curved-wavefront focusing of coral reef sound using a bi-linear hydrophone array.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Simon E; Buckingham, Michael J; Freeman, Lauren A; Lammers, Marc O; D'Spain, Gerald L

    2015-01-01

    A seven element, bi-linear hydrophone array was deployed over a coral reef in the Papahãnaumokuãkea Marine National Monument, Northwest Hawaiian Islands, in order to investigate the spatial, temporal, and spectral properties of biological sound in an environment free of anthropogenic influences. Local biological sound sources, including snapping shrimp and other organisms, produced curved-wavefront acoustic arrivals at the array, allowing source location via focusing to be performed over an area of 1600 m(2). Initially, however, a rough estimate of source location was obtained from triangulation of pair-wise cross-correlations of the sound. Refinements to these initial source locations, and source frequency information, were then obtained using two techniques, conventional and adaptive focusing. It was found that most of the sources were situated on or inside the reef structure itself, rather than over adjacent sandy areas. Snapping-shrimp-like sounds, all with similar spectral characteristics, originated from individual sources predominantly in one area to the east of the array. To the west, the spectral and spatial distributions of the sources were more varied, suggesting the presence of a multitude of heterogeneous biological processes. In addition to the biological sounds, some low-frequency noise due to distant breaking waves was received from end-fire north of the array.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of two sulfonated resorcinarenes: a new example of a linear array of sodium centers and macrocycles.

    PubMed

    Sanabria, Edilma; Esteso, Miguel Ángel; Pérez-Redondo, Adrián; Vargas, Edgar; Maldonado, Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    Two sulfonated resorcinarenes were synthesized by reacting C-tetra(butyl) resorcinarene or C-tetra(2-(methylthio)ethyl)resorcinarene with formaldehyde in the presence of sodium sulfite. Their structures were determined via FT-IR, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR and mass spectrometry. Thermal gravimetric analyses of the derivatives were also carried out and revealed the presence of water molecules in the solid state. The sulfonated product of C-tetra(butyl)resorcinarene was characterized by an X-ray crystal structure determination. The asymmetric unit contains eight molecules of water and two of acetone, and analysis indicated that sulfonated resorcinarene prefers a cone configuration (rccc conformation) in the solid state. In the crystal array, classical hydrogen bond interactions O-H···O and intermolecular contacts were observed. In the crystal packing, a linear array of capsules of sulfonated resorcinarenes was generated for a chain of sodium atoms and sulfonate groups. PMID:26029860

  6. High efficiency micro solar cells integrated with lens array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidaner, Onur; Suarez, Ferran A.; Wiemer, Michael; Sabnis, Vijit A.; Asano, Tetsuya; Itou, Akihiro; Inoue, Daijiro; Hayashi, Nobuhiko; Arase, Hidekazu; Matsushita, Akio; Nakagawa, Tohru

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate high efficiency triple junction solar cells with submillimeter dimensions in an all-back-contact architecture. 550 × 550 μm2 cells flash at 41.3% efficiency under the air mass 1.5 direct normal spectrum at 50 W/cm2 at 25 °C. Compared to standard size production cells, the micro cells have reduced performance at 1-sun due to perimeter recombination, but the performance gap closes at higher concentrations. Micro cells integrated with lens arrays were tested on-sun with an efficiency of 34.7%. All-back-contact architecture and submillimeter dimensions are advantageous for module integration and heat dissipation, allowing for high-performance, compact, lightweight, and cost-effective concentrated photovoltaic modules.

  7. An all-silicon optical platform based on linear array of vertical high-aspect-ratio silicon/air photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surdo, Salvatore; Carpignano, Francesca; Silva, Gloria; Merlo, Sabina; Barillaro, Giuseppe

    2013-10-01

    An all-silicon optical platform (SiOP) that integrates a linear array of vertical (100-μm-deep) one-dimensional photonic crystals (1D-PhCs), with a different number of elementary silicon/air cells (from 2.5 to 11.5) and featuring a transmission peak around 1.55 μm, together with U-grooves (125-μm-wide) and end-stop-spacers for coupling/positioning/alignment of readout optical fibers in front of 1D-PhCs is reported. The SiOP is fabricated by electrochemical micromachining and characterized by measuring both reflection and transmission spectra of 1D-PhCs. An experimental/theoretical analysis of 1D-PhC features (transmissivity, quality factor, full-width-half-maximum) in transmission, around 1.55 μm, as a function of the number of elementary cells is reported.

  8. Mechanical Stress Inference for Two Dimensional Cell Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Chiou, Kevin K.; Hufnagel, Lars; Shraiman, Boris I.

    2012-01-01

    Many morphogenetic processes involve mechanical rearrangements of epithelial tissues that are driven by precisely regulated cytoskeletal forces and cell adhesion. The mechanical state of the cell and intercellular adhesion are not only the targets of regulation, but are themselves the likely signals that coordinate developmental process. Yet, because it is difficult to directly measure mechanical stress in vivo on sub-cellular scale, little is understood about the role of mechanics in development. Here we present an alternative approach which takes advantage of the recent progress in live imaging of morphogenetic processes and uses computational analysis of high resolution images of epithelial tissues to infer relative magnitude of forces acting within and between cells. We model intracellular stress in terms of bulk pressure and interfacial tension, allowing these parameters to vary from cell to cell and from interface to interface. Assuming that epithelial cell layers are close to mechanical equilibrium, we use the observed geometry of the two dimensional cell array to infer interfacial tensions and intracellular pressures. Here we present the mathematical formulation of the proposed Mechanical Inverse method and apply it to the analysis of epithelial cell layers observed at the onset of ventral furrow formation in the Drosophila embryo and in the process of hair-cell determination in the avian cochlea. The analysis reveals mechanical anisotropy in the former process and mechanical heterogeneity, correlated with cell differentiation, in the latter process. The proposed method opens a way for quantitative and detailed experimental tests of models of cell and tissue mechanics. PMID:22615550

  9. A K-Band Linear Phased Array Antenna Based on Ba(0.60)Sr(0.40)TiO3 Thin Film Phase Shifters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, R.; Bernhard, J.; Washington, G.; VanKeuls, F.; Miranda, F.; Cannedy, C.

    2000-01-01

    This paper summarizes the development of a 23.675 GHz linear 16-element scanning phased array antenna based on thin ferroelectric film coupled microstripline phase shifters and microstrip patch radiators.

  10. Controlling cell growth with tailorable 2D nanoholes arrays.

    PubMed

    Fragal, Vanessa H; Cellet, Thelma Sley P; Fragal, Elizângela H; Pereira, Guilherme M; Garcia, Francielle P; Nakamura, Celso V; Asefa, Tewodros; Rubira, Adley F; Silva, Rafael

    2016-03-15

    A facile and reproducible route that can lead to two-dimensional arrays of nanopores in thin polymer films is demonstrated. The formation of the pores in the polymer films involves breath figure phenomenon and occurs during the film deposition by spin coating. The formation of nanoporous thin films takes only few seconds, and the method does not require complex equipment or expensive chemicals. This method also constitutes a straightforward approach to control the size of the pores formed in thin films. Besides allowing control over the average pore size of the porous films, the use of dynamic deposition with the breath figure phenomenon causes the reduction in the pore size to nanometer scale. The nanoporous arrays obtained by the breath figure are applied as substrates for cell growth, and the effect of their nanopore size on cell growth was evaluated. Notably, it is found that cell viability is related to pore size, where 2D nanoporous structure is more beneficial for cell culture than 2D microporous structures. The change in the average pore size of the polymer films from 1.22 μm to 346 nm results in a threefold increase in cell viability. PMID:26722796

  11. Kinome profiling using peptide arrays in eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Kaushal; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; Ritsema, Tita

    2009-01-01

    Over the last 10 years array and mass spectrometry technologies have enabled the determination of the transcriptome and proteome of biological and in particular eukaryotic systems. This information will likely be of significant value to our elucidation of the molecular mechanisms that govern eukaryotic physiology. However, an equally, if not more important goal, is to define those proteins that participate in signalling pathways that ultimately control cell fate. Enzymes that phosphorylate tyrosine, serine, and threonine residues on other proteins play a major role in signalling cascades that determine cell-cycle entry, and survival and differentiation fate in the tissues across the eukaryotic kingdoms. Knowing which signalling pathways are being used in these cells is of critical importance. Traditional genetic and biochemical approaches can certainly provide answers here, but for technical and practical reasons there is typically pursued one gene or pathway at a time. Thus, a more comprehensive approach is needed in order to reveal signalling pathways active in nucleated cells. Towards this end, kinome analysis techniques using peptide arrays have begun to be applied with substantial success in a variety of organisms from all major branches of eukaryotic life, generating descriptions of cellular signalling without a priori assumptions as to possibly effected pathways. The general procedure and analysis methods are very similar disregarding whether the primary source of the material is animal, plant, or fungal of nature and will be described in this chapter. These studies will help us better understand what signalling pathways are critical to controlling eukaryotic cell function.

  12. Recent Advances in Genetic Technique of Microbial Report Cells and Their Applications in Cell Arrays.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do Hyun; Kim, Moon Il; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Microbial cell arrays have attracted consistent attention for their ability to provide unique global data on target analytes at low cost, their capacity for readily detectable and robust cell growth in diverse environments, their high degree of convenience, and their capacity for multiplexing via incorporation of molecularly tailored reporter cells. To highlight recent progress in the field of microbial cell arrays, this review discusses research on genetic engineering of reporter cells, technologies for patterning live cells on solid surfaces, cellular immobilization in different polymers, and studies on their application in environmental monitoring, disease diagnostics, and other related fields. On the basis of these results, we discuss current challenges and future prospects for novel microbial cell arrays, which show promise for use as potent tools for unraveling complex biological processes.

  13. Recent Advances in Genetic Technique of Microbial Report Cells and Their Applications in Cell Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do Hyun; Kim, Moon Il; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Microbial cell arrays have attracted consistent attention for their ability to provide unique global data on target analytes at low cost, their capacity for readily detectable and robust cell growth in diverse environments, their high degree of convenience, and their capacity for multiplexing via incorporation of molecularly tailored reporter cells. To highlight recent progress in the field of microbial cell arrays, this review discusses research on genetic engineering of reporter cells, technologies for patterning live cells on solid surfaces, cellular immobilization in different polymers, and studies on their application in environmental monitoring, disease diagnostics, and other related fields. On the basis of these results, we discuss current challenges and future prospects for novel microbial cell arrays, which show promise for use as potent tools for unraveling complex biological processes. PMID:26436087

  14. High-resolution dynamic CT scanner based on a variable-zoom XRII and a linear photodiode array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drangova, Maria; Holdsworth, David W.; Fenster, Aaron

    1993-09-01

    We have developed a CT scanner with high temporal and spatial resolution which can be used to acquire dynamic images of objects undergoing periodic motion. Our system comprises of an x-ray image intensifier (XRII) optically coupled to a linear photo-diode array (PDA) camera. The XRII has been modified to vary electronically the magnification of the image continuously over fields-of-view (FOV) ranging between 8 and 24 cm, and thus increasing the resolution from 1.4 mm-1 to 3.8 mm-1. In this way, we can select a magnification which maximizes the image resolution for a given object.

  15. Linear arrays of InGaAs/InP avalanche photodiodes for 1.0-1.7 micron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackley, D. E.; Hladky, J.; Lange, M. J.; Mason, S.; Erickson, G.; Olsen, G. H.; Ban, V. S.; Forrest, S. R.; Staller, C.

    1990-01-01

    Separate absorption and multiplication InGaAs/InP avalanche photodiodes (SAM-APDs) with a floating guard ring structure that is well-suited to array applications have been successfully demonstrated. Individual APDs have breakdown voltages greater than 80 V, multiplications over 40 at 100 nA dark current, and uniform spatial gain profiles. Uniform I-V characteristics and gains have been measured over linear dimensions as large as 1.2 cm. Gains over 10 at low multiplied dark currents were measured on 21 consecutive devices at the wafer level.

  16. Comparison of real-time multiplex human papillomavirus (HPV) PCR assays with the linear array HPV genotyping PCR assay and influence of DNA extraction method on HPV detection.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Christine C; Swoyer, Ryan; Bryan, Janine T; Taddeo, Frank J

    2011-05-01

    Real-time human papillomavirus (HPV) type-specific multiplex PCR assays were developed to detect HPV DNA in specimens collected for the efficacy determination of the quadrivalent HPV (type 6, 11, 16, and 18) L1 virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine (Gardasil). We evaluated the concordance between type-specific multiplex HPV PCR and the widely used, commercially available Roche Linear Array genotyping PCR assay. Female genital swab specimens were tested for the presence of L1, E6, and E7 sequences of HPV type 6 (HPV6), HPV11, HPV16, HPV18, HPV31, HPV45, HPV52, and HPV58 and E6 and E7 sequences of HPV33, HPV35, HPV39, HPV51, HPV56, and HPV59 in type- and gene-specific real-time multiplex PCR assays. Specimens were also tested for the presence of L1 sequences using two versions of the Roche Linear Array genotyping assay. Measures of concordance of a modified version of the Linear Array and the standard Linear Array PCR assay were evaluated. With specimen DNA extraction using the Qiagen Spin blood kit held as the constant, multiplex PCR assays detect more HPV-positive specimens for the 14 HPV types common to both than either version of the Linear Array HPV genotyping assay. Type-specific agreements between the assays were good, at least 0.838, but were often driven by negative agreement in HPV types with low prevalence, as evidenced by reduced proportions of positive agreement. Overall HPV status agreements ranged from 0.615 for multiplex PCR and standard Linear Array to 0.881 for multiplex PCR and modified Linear Array. An alternate DNA extraction technique, that used by the Qiagen MinElute kit, impacted subsequent HPV detection in both the multiplex PCR and Linear Array assays.

  17. Imaging through a convex interface with unknown position and shape using an ultrasonic linear array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matuda, Marcelo Y.; Buiochi, Flávio; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents a technique for improving the internal imaging of a solid object immersed in water using an ultrasonic array. This technique consists in determining the position and shape of a convex object surface using a combination of synthetic transmit aperture (STA) and sign coherence factor (SCF) methods. The SCF attenuates the grating lobe noise. The technique is applied to a cylindrical aluminium object with internal holes simulating defects. The first step is the acquisition of a sequence of STA images with SCF, using a distinct group of adjacent array elements for each image. In the second step, a circle is fitted to the positions of the peak values in each image. Finally, using the Fermat's principle and this circle as the interface between the water and the metallic object, the propagation delays from the array elements to the image grid points may be calculated and used in another STA image. In this final image, the small holes in the cylindrical object can clearly be identified. The effects of the SCF for a large diameter circular reflector are simulated and compared with experimental data.

  18. Plasmonic hole arrays with extreme optical chirality in linear and nonlinear regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorkunov, Maxim V.; Kondratov, Alexei V.; Darinskii, Alexander N.; Artemov, Vladimir V.; Rogov, Oleg Y.; Gainutdinov, Radmir V.

    2016-04-01

    Metamaterials with high optical activity (OA) and circular dichroism (CD) are desired for various prospective applications ranging from circular light polarizing to enhanced chiral sensing and biosensing. Modern techniques allow fabricating subwavelength arrays of holes of complex chiral shapes that exhibit extreme optical chirality: their OA and CD take the whole range of possible values in the visible. In order to understand the nature of extreme chirality, we performed the electromagnetic finite difference time domain simulations for the hole shapes resolved by atomic force microscopy. The analysis of the simulation data allowed us to develop an analytical chiral coupled-mode model that nicely fits the results and explains the extreme chirality as determined by the Fano-type transmission resonance due to the interference of a weak background channel and a resonant plasmon channel. The model shows critical importance of the dissipation losses, the hole shape symmetry and chirality. In a planar 2D-chiral hole array, the mirror asymmetry can be induced by the difference of dielectric materials adjacent to the array sides and even their weak deviation results in remarkably strong OA and CD. We note that such deviations can arise due to the dielectric nonlinearity and discuss how 2D-chiral metamaterials in symmetric environment can acquire optical chirality due to the nonlinear symmetry breaking.

  19. Linear and Non-Linear Optical Imaging of Cancer Cells with Silicon Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Tolstik, Elen; Osminkina, Liubov A.; Akimov, Denis; Gongalsky, Maksim B.; Kudryavtsev, Andrew A.; Timoshenko, Victor Yu.; Heintzmann, Rainer; Sivakov, Vladimir; Popp, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    New approaches for visualisation of silicon nanoparticles (SiNPs) in cancer cells are realised by means of the linear and nonlinear optics in vitro. Aqueous colloidal solutions of SiNPs with sizes of about 10–40 nm obtained by ultrasound grinding of silicon nanowires were introduced into breast cancer cells (MCF-7 cell line). Further, the time-varying nanoparticles enclosed in cell structures were visualised by high-resolution structured illumination microscopy (HR-SIM) and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Additionally, the nonlinear optical methods of two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) with infrared laser excitation were applied to study the localisation of SiNPs in cells. Advantages of the nonlinear methods, such as rapid imaging, which prevents cells from overheating and larger penetration depth compared to the single-photon excited HR-SIM, are discussed. The obtained results reveal new perspectives of the multimodal visualisation and precise detection of the uptake of biodegradable non-toxic SiNPs by cancer cells and they are discussed in view of future applications for the optical diagnostics of cancer tumours. PMID:27626408

  20. Linear and Non-Linear Optical Imaging of Cancer Cells with Silicon Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tolstik, Elen; Osminkina, Liubov A; Akimov, Denis; Gongalsky, Maksim B; Kudryavtsev, Andrew A; Timoshenko, Victor Yu; Heintzmann, Rainer; Sivakov, Vladimir; Popp, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    New approaches for visualisation of silicon nanoparticles (SiNPs) in cancer cells are realised by means of the linear and nonlinear optics in vitro. Aqueous colloidal solutions of SiNPs with sizes of about 10-40 nm obtained by ultrasound grinding of silicon nanowires were introduced into breast cancer cells (MCF-7 cell line). Further, the time-varying nanoparticles enclosed in cell structures were visualised by high-resolution structured illumination microscopy (HR-SIM) and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Additionally, the nonlinear optical methods of two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) with infrared laser excitation were applied to study the localisation of SiNPs in cells. Advantages of the nonlinear methods, such as rapid imaging, which prevents cells from overheating and larger penetration depth compared to the single-photon excited HR-SIM, are discussed. The obtained results reveal new perspectives of the multimodal visualisation and precise detection of the uptake of biodegradable non-toxic SiNPs by cancer cells and they are discussed in view of future applications for the optical diagnostics of cancer tumours. PMID:27626408

  1. An approach for configuring space photovoltaic tandem arrays based on cell layer performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flora, C. S.; Dillard, P. A.

    1991-01-01

    Meeting solar array performance goals of 300 W/Kg requires use of solar cells with orbital efficiencies greater than 20 percent. Only multijunction cells and cell layers operating in tandem produce this required efficiency. An approach for defining solar array design concepts that use tandem cell layers involve the following: transforming cell layer performance at standard test conditions to on-orbit performance; optimizing circuit configuration with tandem cell layers; evaluating circuit sensitivity to cell current mismatch; developing array electrical design around selected circuit; and predicting array orbital performance including seasonal variations.

  2. Solar cell array design handbook - The principles and technology of photovoltaic energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauschenbach, H. S.

    1980-01-01

    Photovoltaic solar cell array design and technology for ground-based and space applications are discussed from the user's point of view. Solar array systems are described, with attention given to array concepts, historical development, applications and performance, and the analysis of array characteristics, circuits, components, performance and reliability is examined. Aspects of solar cell array design considered include the design process, photovoltaic system and detailed array design, and the design of array thermal, radiation shielding and electromagnetic components. Attention is then given to the characteristics and design of the separate components of solar arrays, including the solar cells, optical elements and mechanical elements, and the fabrication, testing, environmental conditions and effects and material properties of arrays and their components are discussed.

  3. Re-evaluation of EMG-torque relation in chronic stroke using linear electrode array EMG recordings

    PubMed Central

    Bhadane, Minal; Liu, Jie; Rymer, W. Zev; Zhou, Ping; Li, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to re-evaluate the controversial reports of EMG-torque relation between impaired and non-impaired sides using linear electrode array EMG recordings. Ten subjects with chronic stroke performed a series of submaximal isometric elbow flexion tasks. A 20-channel linear array was used to record surface EMG of the biceps brachii muscles from both impaired and non-impaired sides. M-wave recordings for bilateral biceps brachii muscles were also made. Distribution of the slope of the EMG-torque relations for the individual channels showed a quasi-symmetrical “M” shaped pattern. The lowest value corresponded to the innervation zone (IZ) location. The highest value from the slope curve for each side was selected for comparison to minimize the effect of electrode placement and IZ asymmetry. The slope was greater on the impaired side in 4 of 10 subjects. There were a weak correlation between slope ratio and strength ratio and a moderate to high correlation between slope ratio and M-wave ratio between two sides. These findings suggest that the EMG-torque relations are likely mediated and influenced by multiple factors. Our findings emphasize the importance of electrode placement and suggest the primary role of peripheral adaptive changes in the EMG-torque relations in chronic stroke. PMID:27349938

  4. Design of broadband linear micromachined ultrasonic transducer arrays by means of boundary element method coupled with normal mode theory.

    PubMed

    Boulmé, Audren; Certon, Dominique

    2015-09-01

    In view of the maturity of fabrication processes for capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (cMUTs), engineers and researchers now need efficient and accurate modeling tools to design linear arrays according to a set of technological specifications, such as sensitivity, bandwidth, and directivity pattern. A simplified modeling tool was developed to meet this requirement. It consists of modeling one element as a set of cMUT columns, each being a 1-D periodic array of cMUTs. Model description and assessment of simulation results are given in the first part of the paper. The approach is based on the theory of linear systems so the output data are linked to input data through a large matrix, known as an admittance matrix. In the second part of the paper, we propose reorganization of matrix equations by applying the normal mode theory. From the modal decomposition, two categories of eigenmodes are highlighted, one for which all cMUTs vibrate in phase (the fundamental mode) and the others, which correspond to localized subwavelength resonances, known as baffle modes. The last part of the paper focuses mainly on the fundamental mode and gives several design strategies to optimize the frequency response of an element.

  5. Stoichiometric control of live cell mixing to enable fluidically-encoded co-culture models in perfused microbioreactor arrays.

    PubMed

    Occhetta, P; Glass, N; Otte, E; Rasponi, M; Cooper-White, J J

    2016-02-01

    In vivo, tissues are maintained and repaired through interactions between the present (different) cell types, which communicate with each other through both the secretion of paracrine factors and direct cell-cell contacts. In order to investigate and better understand this dynamic, complex interplay among diverse cell populations, we must develop new in vitro co-culture strategies that enable us to recapitulate such native tissue complexity. In this work, a microfluidic mixer based on a staggered herringbone design was computationally designed and experimentally validated that features the ability to mix large, non-diffusive particles (i.e. live cells) in a programmed manner. This is the first time that the herringbone mixer concept has been shown to effectively mix particles of the size range applicable to live cells. The cell mixer allowed for sequentially mixing of two cell types to generate reverse linear concentration co-culture patterns. Once validated, the mixer was integrated into a perfused microbioreactor array as an upstream module to deliver mixed cells to five downstream culture units, each consisting of ten serially-connected circular microculture chambers. This novel cell mixer microbioreactor array (CM-MBA) platform was validated through the establishment of spatio-temporally tunable osteogenic co-culture models, investigating the role of pre-osteoblastic cells (SAOS2) on human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) commitment to an osteogenic endpoint. An increase on expression of alkaline phosphatase in sequential (downstream) chambers, consistent with the initial linear distribution of SAOS2, suggests not only osteoblastic cell-driven hMSCs induction towards the osteogenic phenotype, but also the importance of paracrine signaling. In conclusion, the cell mixer microbioreactor array combines the ability to rapidly establish cell co-culture models in a high-throughput, programmable fashion, with the additional advantage of maintaining cells in culture

  6. Note: Design principles of a linear array multi-channel effusive metal-vapor atom source

    SciTech Connect

    Jana, B.; Majumder, A.; Thakur, K. B.; Das, A. K.

    2013-10-15

    Atomic beams can easily be produced by allowing atoms to effuse through a channel. In an earlier investigation [A. Majumder et al., Vacuum 83, 989 (2009)], we had designed, fabricated, and characterized an effusive metal-vapor source using collinear-array of multi-channel. In this note, we describe the theoretical basis of designing the source. Atom density in atomic beam has been estimated using a set of analytical expressions for long-channel operated in transparent mode. Parametric studies on aspect ratio of channel, inter-channel separation, beam width, and vertical distance from the source are carried out. They are useful in providing physical picture and optimizing design parameters.

  7. Continuous perfusion microfluidic cell culture array for high-throughput cell-based assays.

    PubMed

    Hung, Paul J; Lee, Philip J; Sabounchi, Poorya; Lin, Robert; Lee, Luke P

    2005-01-01

    We present for the first time a microfluidic cell culture array for long-term cellular monitoring. The 10 x 10 array could potentially assay 100 different cell-based experiments in parallel. The device was designed to integrate the processes used in typical cell culture experiments on a single self-contained microfluidic system. Major functions include repeated cell growth/passage cycles, reagent introduction, and real-time optical analysis. The single unit of the array consists of a circular microfluidic chamber, multiple narrow perfusion channels surrounding the main chamber, and four ports for fluidic access. Human carcinoma (HeLa) cells were cultured inside the device with continuous perfusion of medium at 37 degrees C. The observed doubling time was 1.4 +/- 0.1 days with a peak cell density of approximately 2.5*10(5) cells/cm(2). Cell assay was demonstrated by monitoring the fluorescence localization of calcein AM from 1 min to 10 days after reagent introduction. Confluent cell cultures were passaged within the microfluidic chambers using trypsin and successfully regrown, suggesting a stable culture environment suitable for continuous operation. The cell culture array could offer a platform for a wide range of assays with applications in drug screening, bioinformatics, and quantitative cell biology. PMID:15580587

  8. Mixed Linear/Square-Root Encoded Single-Slope Ramp Provides Low-Noise ADC with High Linearity for Focal Plane Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrigley, Chris J.; Hancock, Bruce R.; Newton, Kenneth W.; Cunningham, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Single-slope analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) are particularly useful for onchip digitization in focal plane arrays (FPAs) because of their inherent monotonicity, relative simplicity, and efficiency for column-parallel applications, but they are comparatively slow. Squareroot encoding can allow the number of code values to be reduced without loss of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by keeping the quantization noise just below the signal shot noise. This encoding can be implemented directly by using a quadratic ramp. The reduction in the number of code values can substantially increase the quantization speed. However, in an FPA, the fixed pattern noise (FPN) limits the use of small quantization steps at low signal levels. If the zero-point is adjusted so that the lowest column is onscale, the other columns, including those at the center of the distribution, will be pushed up the ramp where the quantization noise is higher. Additionally, the finite frequency response of the ramp buffer amplifier and the comparator distort the shape of the ramp, so that the effective ramp value at the time the comparator trips differs from the intended value, resulting in errors. Allowing increased settling time decreases the quantization speed, while increasing the bandwidth increases the noise. The FPN problem is solved by breaking the ramp into two portions, with some fraction of the available code values allocated to a linear ramp and the remainder to a quadratic ramp. To avoid large transients, both the value and the slope of the linear and quadratic portions should be equal where they join. The span of the linear portion must cover the minimum offset, but not necessarily the maximum, since the fraction of the pixels above the upper limit will still be correctly quantized, albeit with increased quantization noise. The required linear span, maximum signal and ratio of quantization noise to shot noise at high signal, along with the continuity requirement, determines the number of

  9. Efficient Multiterminal Spectrum Splitting via a Nanowire Array Solar Cell

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Nanowire-based solar cells opened a new avenue for increasing conversion efficiency and rationalizing material use by growing different III–V materials on silicon substrates. Here, we propose a multiterminal nanowire solar cell design with a theoretical conversion efficiency of 48.3% utilizing an efficient lateral spectrum splitting between three different III–V material nanowire arrays grown on a flat silicon substrate. This allows choosing an ideal material combination to achieve the proper spectrum splitting as well as fabrication feasibility. The high efficiency is possible due to an enhanced absorption cross-section of standing nanowires and optimization of the geometric parameters. Furthermore, we propose a multiterminal contacting scheme that can be fabricated with a technology close to standard CMOS. As an alternative we also consider a single power source with a module level voltage matching. These new concepts open avenues for next-generation solar cells for terrestrial and space applications. PMID:26878027

  10. Properties of linear arrays of Josephson junctions capacitively coupled to a diffusive metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobos, Alejandro; Giamarchi, Thierry

    2011-03-01

    Josephson junctions arrays (JJAs) are strongly-correlated quantum systems showing a rich and complex behavior at low-temperatures. Besides their potential uses in applications, JJAs allow to investigate (under controlled conditions) many aspects of low-dimensional superconductivity which remain to be understood. In this work we study the phase diagram and the low-energy properties of a one-dimensional (1D) JJA capacitively coupled to a diffusive two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) placed at a distance d , which provides dissipation. We derive an effective field-theoretical model for the 1D JJA coupled to the 2DEG, and predict a superconductor-insulator transition (SIT) at T = 0 , in agreement with former theoretical predictions. We discuss implications for transport experiments and for the observed SIT in 1DJJAs. Both in the superconducting and insulating phases, the coupling to the 2DEG produces deviations with respect to the resistivity as a function of T predicted for an isolated array. This work was supported in part by the Swiss SNF under MaNEP and division II.

  11. Radial microwire array solar cell with pyramidal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyadarshini, Bindu; Das, Mukul Kumar; Sen, Mrinal; Kumar, Subindu

    2016-10-01

    In this work, a theoretical model for radial p-n junction microwire array solar cell with pyramidal structures in the space between microwires has been developed. Incorporation of pyramidal structures results in reflection of light, which would otherwise be unused, and illuminates side walls of the microwires. This additional illumination enhances absorption and, hence, efficiency of the whole structure. Efficiency enhancement is analyzed by varying different device parameters e.g., radius and length of each microwire and packing fraction of the structure. Results show that the maximum fractional efficiency enhancement can be obtained as 30% by suitable choice of these parameters.

  12. Distributed hydrophone array based on liquid crystal cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodzeli, Zourab; Ladouceur, Francois; Silvestri, Leonardo; Michie, Andrew; Chigrinov, Vladimir; Guo, Grace Qi; Pozhidaev, Eugene P.; Kiselev, Alexei D.

    2012-02-01

    We describe a fibre optic hydrophone array system that could be used for underwater acoustic surveillance applications e.g. military, counter terrorist and customs authorities in protecting ports and harbors, offshore production facilities or coastal approaches as well as various marine applications. In this paper we propose a new approach to underwater sonar systems using voltage-controlled Liquid Crystals (LC) and simple multiplexing method. The proposed method permits measurements of sound under water at multiple points along an optical fibre using low cost components (LC cells), standard single mode fibre, without complex interferometric measurement techniques, electronics or demodulation software.

  13. Feedback Linearized Aircraft Control Using Dynamic Cell Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, C. C.

    1998-01-01

    A Dynamic Cell Structure (DCS ) Neural Network was developed which learns a topology representing network (TRN) of F-15 aircraft aerodynamic stability and control derivatives. The network is combined with a feedback linearized tracking controller to produce a robust control architecture capable of handling multiple accident and off-nominal flight scenarios. This paper describes network and its performance for accident scenarios including differential stabilator lock, soft sensor failure, control, stability derivative variation, and turbulence.

  14. Low power, highly linear output buffer. [for infrared focal plane arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foley, D.; Butler, N.; Stobie, J.

    1992-01-01

    A class AB CMOS output buffer has been designed for use on an IR focal plane array. Given the requirements for power dissipation and load capacitance a class A output, such as a source follower, would be unsuitable. The approach taken uses a class AB amplifier configured as a charge integrator. Thus it converts a charge packet in the focal plane multiplexer to a voltage which is then the output of the focal plane. With a quiescent current of 18 micro-a and a load capacitance of 100 pf, the amplifier has an open loop unity gain bandwidth of 900 khz. Integral nonlinearity is better than .03 percent over 5.5 volts when run with VDD-VSS = 6v.

  15. Indium antimonide infrared CCD linear imaging arrays with on-chip preprocessing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thom, R. D.; Koch, T. L.; Parrish, W. J.

    1978-01-01

    A description is presented of the fabrication of a new InSb CCD chip based on an improved process which eliminates the limitations inherent with the earlier techniques. This process includes planar junction formation and an aluminum and SiO2 material system which is amenable to state-of-the-art chemical and plasma delineation techniques. Further, the new chip integrates for the first time in monolithic format InSb IR detectors with an InSb CCD. The reported experiments represent the first operation of an InSb infrared CCD array. In addition to fuller characterization of the 20-element charge-coupled infrared imaging device, several factors which influence device performance are currently being addressed. These include surface state density, the CCD output circuit, and storage time (dark current).

  16. Self-Partitioned Droplet Array on Laser-Patterned Superhydrophilic Glass Surface for Wall-less Cell Arrays.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kerui; Wang, Xiaopu; Ford, Roseanne M; Landers, James P

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we report a novel method for the creation of superhydrophilic patterns on the surface of hydrophobically coated glass through CO2 laser cleaning. This mask-free approach requires no photolithography for the print of the features, and only a single-step surface pretreatment is needed. The laser-cleaned glass surface enables self-partitioning of liquid into droplet arrays with controllable, quantitative volumes. We further designed wall-less cell arrays for the mapping of culturing conditions and demonstrated the potential of this droplet-arraying method. PMID:26878418

  17. Inverted Silicon Nanopencil Array Solar Cells with Enhanced Contact Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xiaoguang; Shu, Lei; Lin, Hao; Fang, Ming; Zhang, Heng; Dong, Guofa; Yip, Senpo; Xiu, Fei; Ho, Johnny C.

    2016-09-01

    Although three-dimensional nanostructured solar cells have attracted extensive research attention due to their superior broadband and omnidirectional light-harvesting properties, majority of them are still suffered from complicated fabrication processes as well as disappointed photovoltaic performances. Here, we employed our newly-developed, low-cost and simple wet anisotropic etching to fabricate hierarchical silicon nanostructured arrays with different solar cell contact design, followed by systematic investigations of their photovoltaic characteristics. Specifically, nano-arrays with the tapered tips (e.g. inverted nanopencils) are found to enable the more conformal top electrode deposition directly onto the nanostructures for better series and shunt conductance, but its insufficient film coverage at the basal plane would still restrict the charge carrier collection. In contrast, the low-platform contact design facilitates a substantial photovoltaic device performance enhancement of ~24%, as compared to the one of conventional top electrode design, due to the shortened current path and improved lateral conductance for the minimized carrier recombination and series resistance. This enhanced contact structure can not only maintain excellent photon-trapping behaviors of nanostructures, but also help to eliminate adverse impacts of these tapered nano-morphological features on the contact resistance, providing further insight into design consideration in optimizing the contact geometry for high-performance nanostructured photovoltaic devices.

  18. Inverted Silicon Nanopencil Array Solar Cells with Enhanced Contact Structures

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiaoguang; Shu, Lei; Lin, Hao; Fang, Ming; Zhang, Heng; Dong, Guofa; Yip, SenPo; Xiu, Fei; Ho, Johnny C.

    2016-01-01

    Although three-dimensional nanostructured solar cells have attracted extensive research attention due to their superior broadband and omnidirectional light-harvesting properties, majority of them are still suffered from complicated fabrication processes as well as disappointed photovoltaic performances. Here, we employed our newly-developed, low-cost and simple wet anisotropic etching to fabricate hierarchical silicon nanostructured arrays with different solar cell contact design, followed by systematic investigations of their photovoltaic characteristics. Specifically, nano-arrays with the tapered tips (e.g. inverted nanopencils) are found to enable the more conformal top electrode deposition directly onto the nanostructures for better series and shunt conductance, but its insufficient film coverage at the basal plane would still restrict the charge carrier collection. In contrast, the low-platform contact design facilitates a substantial photovoltaic device performance enhancement of ~24%, as compared to the one of conventional top electrode design, due to the shortened current path and improved lateral conductance for the minimized carrier recombination and series resistance. This enhanced contact structure can not only maintain excellent photon-trapping behaviors of nanostructures, but also help to eliminate adverse impacts of these tapered nano-morphological features on the contact resistance, providing further insight into design consideration in optimizing the contact geometry for high-performance nanostructured photovoltaic devices. PMID:27671709

  19. Research of thermal stress between long linear MCT arrays and lead board using FEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wen; Wu, Yonghong; Liu, Dafu

    2010-10-01

    For the long wavelength infrared detection, HgCdTe (MCT) photoconductive devices are selected as the core of next-generation meteorological because of its mature fabrication technique and stable performance. During the assembly process, an innovative multilayer ceramic board providing mechanical support is designed as the electrical interconnection between MCT chips and external circuits for cryogenic application. Furthermore, due to its brittleness, long linear MCT device is normally glued to sapphire substrates on the multilayer ceramic board with cryogenic glue. Thus, it can be seen clearly that the assembly structure is a multilayer configuration which comprises various kinds of materials, including ceramic broad, sapphire, MCT and glues. As a result, the difference in Thermal Expansion Coefficient (TEC) between the layers could create the potential to introduce thermal stress at working environmental temperature (approximately 70K), which could result in device performance degradation, even die crack. This article analyzes the thermal stress between long linear MCT devices and a multilayer ceramic board by using Finite Element Method (FEM). According to analysis results, two factors are revealed as the most significant causes for introducing thermal stress: one is the sapphire substrate thickness; the other is the parameters of various materials, for instance Yong's modulus and TEC. Since the structure of MCT detector is determined by system requirements and is under the limitation of manufacture technology, this article reveals two effective approaches to reduce the unavoidable thermal stress: first, choosing the appropriate thickness of ceramic board which is made by Al2O3; second, adding another metal cushion Invar. With the above considerations, the distribution of thermal stress is simulated using FEM under different parameter conditions. Based on the results of simulations, an optimal design of package structure which could improve the reliability of

  20. PARALIND-based blind joint angle and delay estimation for multipath signals with uniform linear array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xu; Guang, Liang; Yang, Longxiang; Zhu, Hongbo

    2012-12-01

    A novel joint angle and delay estimation (JADE) algorithm for multipath signals, based on the PARAllel profiles with LINear Dependencies (PARALIND) model, is proposed. Capitalizing on the structure property of Vandermonde matrices, PARALIND model is proved to be unique. Angle and delay of multiple rays of sources can be estimated by PARALIND decomposition and an ESPRIT-like shift-invariance technique. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm outperforms the traditional JADE algorithm. It can automatically distinguish the estimated parameters between sources, and still be available when the number of rays is larger than the number of receiving antennae.

  1. Development of a Microforce Sensor and Its Array Platform for Robotic Cell Microinjection Force Measurement.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yu; Zhou, Yunlei; Lin, Yuzi; Wang, Lingyun; Xi, Wenming

    2016-04-06

    Robot-assisted cell microinjection, which is precise and can enable a high throughput, is attracting interest from researchers. Conventional probe-type cell microforce sensors have some real-time injection force measurement limitations, which prevent their integration in a cell microinjection robot. In this paper, a novel supported-beam based cell micro-force sensor with a piezoelectric polyvinylidine fluoride film used as the sensing element is described, which was designed to solve the real-time force-sensing problem during a robotic microinjection manipulation, and theoretical mechanical and electrical models of the sensor function are derived. Furthermore, an array based cell-holding device with a trapezoidal microstructure is micro-fabricated, which serves to improve the force sensing speed and cell manipulation rates. Tests confirmed that the sensor showed good repeatability and a linearity of 1.82%. Finally, robot-assisted zebrafish embryo microinjection experiments were conducted. These results demonstrated the effectiveness of the sensor working with the robotic cell manipulation system. Moreover, the sensing structure, theoretical model, and fabrication method established in this study are not scale dependent. Smaller cells, e.g., mouse oocytes, could also be manipulated with this approach.

  2. Development of a Microforce Sensor and Its Array Platform for Robotic Cell Microinjection Force Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yu; Zhou, Yunlei; Lin, Yuzi; Wang, Lingyun; Xi, Wenming

    2016-01-01

    Robot-assisted cell microinjection, which is precise and can enable a high throughput, is attracting interest from researchers. Conventional probe-type cell microforce sensors have some real-time injection force measurement limitations, which prevent their integration in a cell microinjection robot. In this paper, a novel supported-beam based cell micro-force sensor with a piezoelectric polyvinylidine fluoride film used as the sensing element is described, which was designed to solve the real-time force-sensing problem during a robotic microinjection manipulation, and theoretical mechanical and electrical models of the sensor function are derived. Furthermore, an array based cell-holding device with a trapezoidal microstructure is micro-fabricated, which serves to improve the force sensing speed and cell manipulation rates. Tests confirmed that the sensor showed good repeatability and a linearity of 1.82%. Finally, robot-assisted zebrafish embryo microinjection experiments were conducted. These results demonstrated the effectiveness of the sensor working with the robotic cell manipulation system. Moreover, the sensing structure, theoretical model, and fabrication method established in this study are not scale dependent. Smaller cells, e.g., mouse oocytes, could also be manipulated with this approach. PMID:27058545

  3. Development of a Microforce Sensor and Its Array Platform for Robotic Cell Microinjection Force Measurement.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yu; Zhou, Yunlei; Lin, Yuzi; Wang, Lingyun; Xi, Wenming

    2016-01-01

    Robot-assisted cell microinjection, which is precise and can enable a high throughput, is attracting interest from researchers. Conventional probe-type cell microforce sensors have some real-time injection force measurement limitations, which prevent their integration in a cell microinjection robot. In this paper, a novel supported-beam based cell micro-force sensor with a piezoelectric polyvinylidine fluoride film used as the sensing element is described, which was designed to solve the real-time force-sensing problem during a robotic microinjection manipulation, and theoretical mechanical and electrical models of the sensor function are derived. Furthermore, an array based cell-holding device with a trapezoidal microstructure is micro-fabricated, which serves to improve the force sensing speed and cell manipulation rates. Tests confirmed that the sensor showed good repeatability and a linearity of 1.82%. Finally, robot-assisted zebrafish embryo microinjection experiments were conducted. These results demonstrated the effectiveness of the sensor working with the robotic cell manipulation system. Moreover, the sensing structure, theoretical model, and fabrication method established in this study are not scale dependent. Smaller cells, e.g., mouse oocytes, could also be manipulated with this approach. PMID:27058545

  4. Topographical control of cell-cell interaction in C6 glioma by nanodot arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chia-Hui; Cheng, Ya-Wen; Huang, G. Steven

    2014-05-01

    Nanotopography modulates the physiological behavior of cells and cell-cell interactions, but the manner of communication remains unclear. Cell networking (syncytium) of astroglia provides the optimal microenvironment for communication of the nervous system. C6 glioma cells were seeded on nanodot arrays with dot diameters ranging from 10 to 200 nm. Cell viability, morphology, cytoskeleton, and adhesion showed optimal cell growth on 50-nm nanodots if sufficient incubation was allowed. In particular, the astrocytic syncytium level maximized at 50 nm. The gap junction protein Cx43 showed size-dependent and time-dependent transport from the nucleus to the cell membrane. The transport efficiency was greatly enhanced by incubation on 50-nm nanodots. In summary, nanotopography is capable of modulating cell behavior and influencing the cell-cell interactions of astrocytes. By fine-tuning the nanoenvironment, it may be possible to regulate cell-cell communications and optimize the biocompatibility of neural implants.

  5. Topographical control of cell-cell interaction in C6 glioma by nanodot arrays.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chia-Hui; Cheng, Ya-Wen; Huang, G Steven

    2014-01-01

    Nanotopography modulates the physiological behavior of cells and cell-cell interactions, but the manner of communication remains unclear. Cell networking (syncytium) of astroglia provides the optimal microenvironment for communication of the nervous system. C6 glioma cells were seeded on nanodot arrays with dot diameters ranging from 10 to 200 nm. Cell viability, morphology, cytoskeleton, and adhesion showed optimal cell growth on 50-nm nanodots if sufficient incubation was allowed. In particular, the astrocytic syncytium level maximized at 50 nm. The gap junction protein Cx43 showed size-dependent and time-dependent transport from the nucleus to the cell membrane. The transport efficiency was greatly enhanced by incubation on 50-nm nanodots. In summary, nanotopography is capable of modulating cell behavior and influencing the cell-cell interactions of astrocytes. By fine-tuning the nanoenvironment, it may be possible to regulate cell-cell communications and optimize the biocompatibility of neural implants. PMID:24917700

  6. Analytical and Experimental Characterization of a Linear-Array Thermopile Scanning Radiometer for Geo-Synchronous Earth Radiation Budget Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, Ira J.

    1998-01-01

    The Thermal Radiation Group, a laboratory in the department of Mechanical Engineering at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, is currently working towards the development of a new technology for cavity-based radiometers. The radiometer consists of a 256-element linear-array thermopile detector mounted on the wall of a mirrored wedgeshaped cavity. The objective of this research is to provide analytical and experimental characterization of the proposed radiometer. A dynamic end-to-end opto-electrothermal model is developed to simulate the performance of the radiometer. Experimental results for prototype thermopile detectors are included. Also presented is the concept of the discrete Green's function to characterize the optical scattering of radiant energy in the cavity, along with a data-processing algorithm to correct for the scattering. Finally, a parametric study of the sensitivity of the discrete Green's function to uncertainties in the surface properties of the cavity is presented.

  7. Reflection at a liquid-solid interface of a transient ultrasonic field radiated by a linear phased array transducer.

    PubMed

    Maghlaoui, Nadir; Belgroune, Djema; Ourak, Mohamed; Djelouah, Hakim

    2016-09-01

    In order to put in evidence the specular reflection and the non-specular reflection in the transient case, we have used a model for the study of the transient ultrasonic waves radiated by a linear phased array transducer in a liquid and reflected by a solid plane interface. This method is an extension of the angular spectrum method to the transient case where the reflection at the plane interface is taken into account by using the reflection coefficient for harmonic plane waves. The results obtained highlighted the different components of the ultrasonic field: the direct and edge waves as well as the longitudinal head waves or leaky Rayleigh waves. The transient representation of these waves have been carefully analyzed and discussed by the rays model. Instantaneous cartographies allowed a clear description of all the waves which appear at the liquid-solid interface. The obtained results have been compared to those obtained with a finite element method package.

  8. Automating the design of image processing pipelines for novel color filter arrays: local, linear, learned (L3) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Qiyuan; Lansel, Steven; Farrell, Joyce E.; Wandell, Brian A.

    2014-03-01

    The high density of pixels in modern color sensors provides an opportunity to experiment with new color filter array (CFA) designs. A significant bottleneck in evaluating new designs is the need to create demosaicking, denoising and color transform algorithms tuned for the CFA. To address this issue, we developed a method(local, linear, learned or L3) for automatically creating an image processing pipeline. In this paper we describe the L3 algorithm and illustrate how we created a pipeline for a CFA organized as a 2×2 RGB/Wblock containing a clear (W) pixel. Under low light conditions, the L3 pipeline developed for the RGB/W CFA produces images that are superior to those from a matched Bayer RGB sensor. We also use L3 to learn pipelines for other RGB/W CFAs with different spatial layouts. The L3 algorithm shortens the development time for producing a high quality image pipeline for novel CFA designs.

  9. Reflection at a liquid-solid interface of a transient ultrasonic field radiated by a linear phased array transducer.

    PubMed

    Maghlaoui, Nadir; Belgroune, Djema; Ourak, Mohamed; Djelouah, Hakim

    2016-09-01

    In order to put in evidence the specular reflection and the non-specular reflection in the transient case, we have used a model for the study of the transient ultrasonic waves radiated by a linear phased array transducer in a liquid and reflected by a solid plane interface. This method is an extension of the angular spectrum method to the transient case where the reflection at the plane interface is taken into account by using the reflection coefficient for harmonic plane waves. The results obtained highlighted the different components of the ultrasonic field: the direct and edge waves as well as the longitudinal head waves or leaky Rayleigh waves. The transient representation of these waves have been carefully analyzed and discussed by the rays model. Instantaneous cartographies allowed a clear description of all the waves which appear at the liquid-solid interface. The obtained results have been compared to those obtained with a finite element method package. PMID:27290651

  10. A Versatile Multiple Target Detection System Based on DNA Nano-assembled Linear FRET Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yansheng; Du, Hongwu; Wang, Wenqian; Zhang, Peixun; Xu, Liping; Wen, Yongqiang; Zhang, Xueji

    2016-01-01

    DNA molecules have been utilized both as powerful synthetic building blocks to create nanoscale architectures and as inconstant programmable templates for assembly of biosensors. In this paper, a versatile, scalable and multiplex detection system is reported based on an extending fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET) cascades on a linear DNA assemblies. Seven combinations of three kinds of targets are successfully detected through the changes of fluorescence spectra because of the three-steps FRET or non-FRET continuity mechanisms. This nano-assembled FRET-based nanowire is extremely significant for the development of rapid, simple and sensitive detection system. The method used here could be extended to a general platform for multiplex detection through more-step FRET process. PMID:27230484

  11. Innovating spectrometry studies at undergraduate level using a linear CCD array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Amit; Sharma, Reena; Dhingra, Vishal

    2011-10-01

    Students are less enthused in performing various spectrometry experiments in a conventional optics laboratory at the undergraduate level. In order to motivate students towards spectrometry, the present development focuses on innovating spectrometry experiments in undergraduate optics laboratory by integrating a linear CCD (Charge Coupled Device) for optical intensity capture using LabVIEW based application and a Digital Storage Oscilloscope with NI LabVIEW Signal Express. In the first step, students have calibrated wavelength in terms of x- position using a standard Mercury light source. Then this calibration has been used to display and measure the emission spectra of various light sources. Various measurements performed include characterizing various LEDs in terms of wavelengths emitted for use in measurement of Planck's constant, measuring characteristic wavelengths in emission spectra of hydrogen lamp (for calculating Rydberg's constant).

  12. A Versatile Multiple Target Detection System Based on DNA Nano-assembled Linear FRET Arrays.

    PubMed

    Li, Yansheng; Du, Hongwu; Wang, Wenqian; Zhang, Peixun; Xu, Liping; Wen, Yongqiang; Zhang, Xueji

    2016-05-27

    DNA molecules have been utilized both as powerful synthetic building blocks to create nanoscale architectures and as inconstant programmable templates for assembly of biosensors. In this paper, a versatile, scalable and multiplex detection system is reported based on an extending fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET) cascades on a linear DNA assemblies. Seven combinations of three kinds of targets are successfully detected through the changes of fluorescence spectra because of the three-steps FRET or non-FRET continuity mechanisms. This nano-assembled FRET-based nanowire is extremely significant for the development of rapid, simple and sensitive detection system. The method used here could be extended to a general platform for multiplex detection through more-step FRET process.

  13. Reliability of Superficial Male Pelvic Floor Structural Measurements Using Linear-Array Transperineal Sonography

    PubMed Central

    Roll, Shawn C.; Rana, Manku; Sigward, Susan M.; Yani, Moheb S.; Kirages, Daniel J.; Kutch, Jason J.

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated reliability of measures for superficial structures of the male pelvic floor (PF) obtained via transperineal sonography. Two embalmed cadavers were dissected to identify positioning of muscles on and around the bulb of the penis and to confirm the PF protocol. Cross-sectional area (CSA) and linear thickness of the bulb of the penis, urethra, bulbospongiosus (BS) muscles, and ischiocavernosus (IC) muscles were measured on 38 transverse images from 20 male subjects by three raters with varied study knowledge and sonographic experience. Intra- and interrater reliability were calculated with Two-way, mixed effects intra-class correlation coefficients. Measures of the bulb of the penis had the best reliability. CSA of all muscles and sagittal thickness of the BS near the central tendon had good reliability. Reliability varied for rater identified thickest muscle region and measures of the urethra. Our study suggests that structures of the male PF can be reliably evaluated using a transperineal sonographic approach. PMID:25444690

  14. A Versatile Multiple Target Detection System Based on DNA Nano-assembled Linear FRET Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yansheng; Du, Hongwu; Wang, Wenqian; Zhang, Peixun; Xu, Liping; Wen, Yongqiang; Zhang, Xueji

    2016-05-01

    DNA molecules have been utilized both as powerful synthetic building blocks to create nanoscale architectures and as inconstant programmable templates for assembly of biosensors. In this paper, a versatile, scalable and multiplex detection system is reported based on an extending fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET) cascades on a linear DNA assemblies. Seven combinations of three kinds of targets are successfully detected through the changes of fluorescence spectra because of the three-steps FRET or non-FRET continuity mechanisms. This nano-assembled FRET-based nanowire is extremely significant for the development of rapid, simple and sensitive detection system. The method used here could be extended to a general platform for multiplex detection through more-step FRET process.

  15. Linear terrestrial laser scanning using array avalanche photodiodes as detectors for rapid three-dimensional imaging.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yinqiao; Tong, Xiaohua; Tong, Peng; Bu, Hongyi; Shu, Rong

    2010-12-01

    As an active remote sensor technology, the terrestrial laser scanner is widely used for direct generation of a three-dimensional (3D) image of an object in the fields of geodesy, surveying, and photogrammetry. In this article, a new laser scanner using array avalanche photodiodes, as designed by the Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, is introduced for rapid collection of 3D data. The system structure of the new laser scanner is first presented, and a mathematical model is further derived to transform the original data to the 3D coordinates of the object in a user-defined coordinate system. The performance of the new laser scanner is tested through a comprehensive experiment. The result shows that the new laser scanner can scan a scene with a field view of 30° × 30° in 0.2 s and that, with respect to the point clouds obtained on the wall and ground floor surfaces, the root mean square errors for fitting the two planes are 0.21 and 0.01 cm, respectively. The primary advantages of the developed laser scanner include: (i) with a line scanning mode, the new scanner achieves simultaneously the 3D coordinates of 24 points per single laser pulse, which enables it to scan faster than traditional scanners with a point scanning mode and (ii) the new scanner makes use of two galvanometric mirrors to deflect the laser beam in both the horizontal and the vertical directions. This capability makes the instrument smaller and lighter, which is more acceptable for users.

  16. TAB interconnects for space concentrator solar cell arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avery, J.; Bauman, J. S.; Gallagher, P.; Yerkes, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    The Boeing Company has evaluated the use of Tape Automated Bonding (TAB) and Surface Mount Technology (SMT) for a highly reliable, low cost interconnect for concentrator solar cell arrays. TAB and SMT are currently used in the electronics industry for chip interconnects and printed circuit board assembly. TAB tape consists of sixty-four 3-mil/1-oz tin-plated copper leads on 8-mil centers. The leads are thermocompression gang bonded to GaAs concentrator solar cell with silver contacts. This bond, known as an Inner Lead Bond (ILB), allows for pretesting and sorting capability via nondestruct wire bond pull and flash testing. Destructive wire pull tests resulted in preferred mid-span failures. Improvements in fill factor were attributed to decreased contact resistance on TAB bonded cells. Preliminary thermal cycling and aging tests were shown excellent bond strength and metallurgical results. Auger scans of bond sites reveals an Ag-Cu-Tin composition. Improper bonds are identified through flash testing as a performance degradation. On going testing of cells are underway at Lewis Research Center. SMT techniques are utilized to excise and form TAB leads post ILB. The formed leads' shape isolates thermal mismatches between the cells and the flex circuit they are mounted on. TABed cells are picked and placed with a gantry x-y-z positioning system with pattern recognition. Adhesives are selected to avoid thermal expansion mismatch and promote thermal transfer to the flex circuit. TAB outer lead bonds are parallel gap welded (PGW) to the flex circuit to finish the concentrator solar cell subassembly.

  17. Deformation measurement of individual cells in large populations using a single-cell microchamber array chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doh, I.; Lee, W. C.; Cho, Y.-H.; Pisano, A. P.; Kuypers, F. A.

    2012-04-01

    We analyze the deformability of individual red blood cells (RBCs) using SiCMA technology. Our approach is adequate to quickly measure large numbers of individual cells in heterogeneous populations. Individual cells are trapped in a large-scale array of micro-wells, and dielectrophoretic (DEP) force is applied to deform the cells. The simple structures of micro-wells and DEP electrodes facilitate the analysis of thousands of RBCs in parallel. This unique method allows the correlation of red cell deformation with cell surface and cytosolic characteristics to define the distribution of individual cellular characteristics in heterogeneous populations.

  18. The effect of plasma on solar cell array arc characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, D. B.; Tyree, E.

    1985-01-01

    The influence from the ambient plasma on the arc characteristics of a negatively biased solar cell array was investigated. The arc characteristics examined were the peak current during an arc, the decay time as the arc terminates, and the charge lost during the arc. These arc characteristics were examined in a nitrogen plasma with charge densities ranging from 15,000 to 45,000 cu cm. Background gas pressures ranged from 8x1,000,000 to 6x100,000 torr. Over these ranges of parameters no significant effect on the arc characteristics were seen. Arc characteristics were also examined for three gas species: helium, nitrogen and argon. The helium arcs have higher peak currents and shorter decay times than nitrogen and argon arcs. There are slight differences in the arc characteristics between nitrogen and argon. These differences may be caused by the differences in mass of the respective species. Also, evidence is presented for an electron emission mechanism appearing as a precursor to solar array arcs. Occasionally the plasma generator could be turned off, and currents could still be detected in the vacuum system. When these currents are presented, arcs may occur.

  19. The effect of plasma on solar cell array arc characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, D. B.; Tyree, E.

    1984-01-01

    The influence from the ambient plasma on the arc characteristics of a negatively biased solar cell array was investigated. The arc characteristics examined were the peak current during an arc, the decay time as the arc terminates, and the charge lost during the arc. These arc characteristics were examined in a nitrogen plasma with charge densities ranging from 15,000 to 45,000 cu cm. Background gas pressures ranged from 8x1,000,000 to 6x100,000 torr. Over these ranges of parameters no significant effect on the arc characteristics were seen. Arc characteristics were also examined for three gas species: helium, nitrogen and argon. The helium arcs have higher peak currents and shorter decay times than nitrogen and argon arcs. There are slight differences in the arc characteristics between nitrogen and argon. These differences may be caused by the differences in mass of the respective species. Also, evidence is presented for an electron emission mechanism appearing as a precursor to solar array arcs. Occassionally the plasma generator could be turned off, and currents could still be detected in the vacuum system. When these currents are presented, arcs may occur.

  20. Absolute energy calibration of the Telescope Array fluorescence detector with an electron linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, T.; Beitollahi, M.; Fukushima, M.; Ikeda, D.; Langely, K.; Matthews, J. N.; Sagawa, H.; Shin, B. K.; Thomas, S. B.; Thomson, G. B.

    2013-06-01

    The Electron Light Source(ELS) is a new light source for the absolute energy calibration of cosmic ray Fluorescence Detector(FD) telescopes. The ELS is a compact electron linear accelerator with a typical output of 109 electrons per pulse at 40 MeV. We fire the electron beam vertically into the air 100 m in front of the telescope. The electron beam excites the gases of the atmosphere in the same way as the charged particles of the cosmic ray induced extensive air shower. The gases give off the same light with the same wavelength dependence. The light passes through a small amount of atmosphere and is collected by the same mirror and camera with their wavelength dependence. In this way we can use the electron beam from ELS to make an end-to-end calibration of the telescope. In September 2010, we began operation of the ELS and the FD telescopes observed the fluorescence photons from the air shower which was generated by the electron beam. In this article, we will reort the status of analysis of the absolute energy calibration with data which was taken in September 2010, and beam monitor study in November 2011.

  1. Cell manipulation tool with combined microwell array and optical tweezers for cell isolation and deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaolin; Gou, Xue; Chen, Shuxun; Yan, Xiao; Sun, Dong

    2013-07-01

    Isolation from rare cells and deposition of sorted cells with high accuracy for further study are critical to a wide range of biomedical applications. In the current paper, we report an automated cell manipulation tool with combined optical tweezers and a uniquely designed microwell array, which functions for recognition, isolation, assembly, transportation and deposition of the interesting cells. The microwell array allows the passive hydrodynamic docking of cells, while offering the opportunity to inspect the interesting cell phenotypes with high spatio-temporal resolution based on the flexible image processing technique. In addition, dynamic and parallel cell manipulation in three dimensions can realize the target cell levitation from microwell and pattern assembly with multiple optical traps. Integrated with the programmed motorized stage, the optically levitated and assembled cells can be transported and deposited to the predefined microenvironment, so the tool can facilitate the integration of other on-chip functionalities for further study without removing these isolated cells from the chip. Experiments on human embryonic stem cells and yeast cells are performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed cell manipulation tool. Besides the application to cell isolation and deposition, three other biological applications with this tool are also presented.

  2. Bima Array Detections of HCN in Comets Linear (C/2002 T7) and Neat (C/2001 Q4)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedel, D. N.; Remijan, A.; Snyder, L. E.; AHearn, M. F.; Blake, Geoffrey A.; dePater, Imke; Dickel, H. R.; Forster, J. R.; Hogerheijde, M. R.

    2004-01-01

    We present interferometric detections of HCN in comets LINEAR (C/2002 T7) and NEAT (C/2001 Q4) with the Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland Association (BIMA) Array in its D-configuration cross-correlation mode. We detected the HCN J = 1 - 0 emission line in both comets. With a 25".4 x 20".3 synthesized beam around Comet LINEAR, we found a total beam averaged HCN column density (assuming a rotation temperature of 146 K) of < N(sub T) > = 2.1(11)x 10(sup 13) cm(exp -2), and a HCN production rate of Q(HCN)=2.8(15)x 10(sup 27) s(exp -1). With a 21".3 x 17".5 synthesized beam around Comet NEAT, we found a total beam averaged HCN column density (assuming a rotation temperature of 107 K) of < N(sub T) > = 5.7(30) x 10(sup l2) cm(exp -2), and a HCN production rate of Q(HCN)=8.3(44) x 10(sup 26) s(exp -l) giving a production rate of HCN relative to H2O of approximately 0.09(5)%. The production rates relative to H2O and spatial extent of HCN are similar to previous comet observations.

  3. Improving resolution of solid state linear array x-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borras, Guillem; Odet, Christophe; Vuorinen, Kimmo; Gaffiot, Frederic; Jacquemod, Gilles

    1998-04-01

    Linear solid-state detectors are nowadays a widespread media in industrial and medical x-ray imaging. The resolution reached with this system has been largely improved in these past years, but is still too poor for some high resolution applications. We first have carried out an optimization of the detector characteristics through a behavioral simulation using a hardware description language. Furthermore, our work concerned the resolution enhancement for this kind of detectors via signal processing. Our approach takes into account the modeled point spread function (PSF) of the system. This modeled PSF is obtained with a new edge technique. The knowledge about the system response is used in a restoration scheme in order to improve the response of the detector to the high frequencies in the digital image. The restoration problem is an ill posed problem ad uses an inverse Wiener filtering. Another intrinsic limitation of solid-state detectors is the spatial sampling step. In order to overcome this problem, we also tested the feasibility of a finer sampling of the acquired image, buy interlacing several slightly shifted acquisitions of the same test object. The restoration applied to this finer sampled signal results in a resolution enhancement that is theoretically impossible to reach with a single detector acquisition. Some experimental results obtained on a variable bar-space pattern phantom are presented. This kind of phantom allows for a precise evaluation of the modulation transfer function on the acquired and processed images. The contribution of the image processing to the restoration enhancement can thus be quantified.

  4. Tripling the detection view of high-frequency linear-array-based photoacoustic computed tomography by using two planar acoustic reflectors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guo; Xia, Jun; Wang, Kun; Maslov, Konstantin; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Linear-array-based photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) suffers from a limited view. Circular scanning does increase the detection view angle but is time-consuming. Therefore, it is desirable to increase the detection view angle of linear-array-based PACT without sacrificing imaging speed. Methods Two planar acoustic reflectors placed at 120 degrees to each other were added to a linear-array-based PACT system. Each reflector redirects originally undetectable photoacoustic waves back to the transducer array elements, and together they triple the original detection view angle of the PACT system. Results Adding two reflectors increased the detection view angle from 80 to 240 degrees. As a comparison, a single-reflector PACT has a detection view angle of only 160 degrees. A leaf skeleton phantom with a rich vascular network was imaged with the double-reflector PACT, and most of its features were recovered. Conclusions The two acoustic reflectors triple the detection view angle of a linear-array-based PACT without compromising the original imaging speed. This nearly full-view detection capability produces higher-quality images than single-reflector PACT or conventional PACT without reflectors. PMID:25694954

  5. Performance of the Linear Gas Cell at the NSCL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Kortney; Morrissey, David; Ringle, Ryan; Schwarz, Stefan; Sumithrarachchi, Chandana; Savard, Guy

    2014-09-01

    Beam thermalization allows projectile fragmentation facilities to produce low-energy ion beams. The beam thermalization technique employed by the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) involves high-energy ion beams first passing through solid degraders to remove the bulk of the beam's kinetic energy. The remaining kinetic energy is then dissipated through collisions with the buffer gas atoms of a linear gas cell constructed by Argonne National Lab (ANL). Numerous experiments have been performed for the commissioning and online operation of the gas cell. These experiments used incident ions that ranged from 29Mg, 29P, 33Cl, 37K, 40S, 46Ar, to 76Ga at incoming rates ranging from 102 pps to 107 pps. The extraction efficiency as well as the overall efficiency of the system has been analyzed for each experiment. LISE + + , particle-in-cell (PIC), and SIMION simulations have been carried out for the data obtained with 76Ga ions. Both the experimental and simulated results for the gas cell's performance will be presented and discussed. Beam thermalization allows projectile fragmentation facilities to produce low-energy ion beams. The beam thermalization technique employed by the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) involves high-energy ion beams first passing through solid degraders to remove the bulk of the beam's kinetic energy. The remaining kinetic energy is then dissipated through collisions with the buffer gas atoms of a linear gas cell constructed by Argonne National Lab (ANL). Numerous experiments have been performed for the commissioning and online operation of the gas cell. These experiments used incident ions that ranged from 29Mg, 29P, 33Cl, 37K, 40S, 46Ar, to 76Ga at incoming rates ranging from 102 pps to 107 pps. The extraction efficiency as well as the overall efficiency of the system has been analyzed for each experiment. LISE + + , particle-in-cell (PIC), and SIMION simulations have been carried out for the data obtained

  6. Inkjet printing of silk nest arrays for cell hosting.

    PubMed

    Suntivich, Rattanon; Drachuk, Irina; Calabrese, Rossella; Kaplan, David L; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2014-04-14

    An inkjet printing approach is presented for the facile fabrication of microscopic arrays of biocompatible silk "nests" capable of hosting live cells for prospective biosensors. The patterning of silk fibroin nests were constructed by the layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of silk polyelectrolytes chemically modified with poly-(l-lysine) and poly-(l-glutamic acid) side chains. The inkjet-printed silk circular regions with a characteristic "nest" shape had diameters of 70-100 μm and a thickness several hundred nanometers were stabilized by ionic pairing and by the formation of the silk II crystalline secondary structure. These "locked-in" silk nests remained anchored to the substrate during incubation in cell growth media to provide a biotemplated platform for printing-in, immobilization, encapsulation and growth of cells. The process of inkjet-assisted printing is versatile and can be applied on any type of substrate, including rigid and flexible, with scalability and facile formation. PMID:24605757

  7. Design of a 5-MA 100-ns linear-transformer-driver accelerator for wire array Z-pinch experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lin; Li, Zhenghong; Wang, Zhen; Liang, Chuan; Li, Mingjia; Qi, Jianmin; Chu, Yanyun

    2016-03-01

    The linear-transformer-driver (LTD) is a recently developed pulsed-power technology that shows great promise for a number of applications. These include a Z -pinch-driven fission-fusion-hybrid reactor that is being developed by the Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics. In support of the reactor development effort, we are planning to build an LTD-based accelerator that is optimized for driving wire-array Z -pinch loads. The accelerator comprises six modules in parallel, each of which has eight series 0.8-MA LTD cavities in a voltage-adder configuration. Vacuum transmission lines are used from the interior of the adder to the central vacuum chamber where the load is placed. Thus the traditional stack-flashover problem is eliminated. The machine is 3.2 m tall and 12 m in outer diameter including supports. A prototype cavity was built and tested for more than 6000 shots intermittently at a repetition rate of 0.1 Hz. A novel trigger, in which only one input trigger pulse is needed by utilizing an internal trigger brick, was developed and successfully verified in these shots. A full circuit modeling was conducted for the accelerator. The simulation result shows that a current pulse rising to 5.2 MA in 91 ns (10%-90%) can be delivered to the wire-array load, which is 1.5 cm in height, 1.2 cm in initial radius, and 1 mg in mass. The maximum implosion velocity of the load is 32 cm /μ s when compressed to 0.1 of the initial radius. The maximum kinetic energy is 78 kJ, which is 11.7% of the electric energy stored in the capacitors. This accelerator is supposed to enable a radiation energy efficiency of 20%-30%, providing a high efficient facility for research on the fast Z pinch and technologies for repetition-rate-operated accelerators.

  8. Cancer Cell Analyses at the Single Cell-Level Using Electroactive Microwell Array Device

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Marina; Kim, Soo Hyeon; Nakamura, Hiroko; Kaneda, Shohei; Fujii, Teruo

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs), shed from primary tumors and disseminated into peripheral blood, are playing a major role in metastasis. Even after isolation of CTCs from blood, the target cells are mixed with a population of other cell types. Here, we propose a new method for analyses of cell mixture at the single-cell level using a microfluidic device that contains arrayed electroactive microwells. Dielectrophoretic (DEP) force, induced by the electrodes patterned on the bottom surface of the microwells, allows efficient trapping and stable positioning of single cells for high-throughput biochemical analyses. We demonstrated that various on-chip analyses including immunostaining, viability/apoptosis assay and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) at the single-cell level could be conducted just by applying specific reagents for each assay. Our simple method should greatly help discrimination and analysis of rare cancer cells among a population of blood cells. PMID:26558904

  9. Cancer Cell Analyses at the Single Cell-Level Using Electroactive Microwell Array Device.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Marina; Kim, Soo Hyeon; Nakamura, Hiroko; Kaneda, Shohei; Fujii, Teruo

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs), shed from primary tumors and disseminated into peripheral blood, are playing a major role in metastasis. Even after isolation of CTCs from blood, the target cells are mixed with a population of other cell types. Here, we propose a new method for analyses of cell mixture at the single-cell level using a microfluidic device that contains arrayed electroactive microwells. Dielectrophoretic (DEP) force, induced by the electrodes patterned on the bottom surface of the microwells, allows efficient trapping and stable positioning of single cells for high-throughput biochemical analyses. We demonstrated that various on-chip analyses including immunostaining, viability/apoptosis assay and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) at the single-cell level could be conducted just by applying specific reagents for each assay. Our simple method should greatly help discrimination and analysis of rare cancer cells among a population of blood cells. PMID:26558904

  10. Evaluation of solar cells and arrays for potential solar power satellite applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almgren, D. W.; Csigi, K.; Gaudet, A. D.

    1978-01-01

    Proposed solar array designs and manufacturing methods are evaluated to identify options which show the greatest promise of leading up to the develpment of a cost-effective SPS solar cell array design. The key program elements which have to be accomplished as part of an SPS solar cell array development program are defined. The issues focussed on are: (1) definition of one or more designs of a candidate SPS solar array module, using results from current system studies; (2) development of the necessary manufacturing requirements for the candidate SPS solar cell arrays and an assessment of the market size, timing, and industry infrastructure needed to produce the arrays for the SPS program; (3) evaluation of current DOE, NASA and DOD photovoltaic programs to determine the impacts of recent advances in solar cell materials, array designs and manufacturing technology on the candidate SPS solar cell arrays; and (4) definition of key program elements for the development of the most promising solar cell arrays for the SPS program.

  11. Dielectrophoretic Capture of E. coli Cells at Nanoelectrode Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Lateef U; Liu, Jianwei; Price, Alex; Li, Yi-fen; Culbertson, Christopher; Li, Jun

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports capture and detection of pathogenic bacteria based on AC dielectrophoresis (DEP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) employing an embedded vertically aligned carbon nanofiber (VACNF) nanoelectrode array (NEA) vs. a macroscopic indium tin oxide (ITO) transparent electrode in “points-and-lid” configuration. The nano-DEP device was fabricated using photolithography processes to define an exposed active region on a randomly distributed NEA and a microfluidic channel on ITO to guide the flow of labeled E. coli cells, respectively, and then bond them into a fluidic chip. A high frequency (100 kHz) AC field was applied to generate positive DEP at the tips of exposed CNFs. Enhanced electric field gradient was achieved due to reduction in electrode size down to nanometer scale which helped to overcome the large hydrodynamic drag force experienced by E. coli cells at high flow velocities (up to 1.6 mm/sec). This DEP device was able to effectively capture a significant number of E. coli. Significant decrease in the absolute impedance (|Z|) at the NEA was observed by EIS experiments. The results obtained in this study suggest the possibility of integration of a fully functional electronic device for rapid, reversible and label-free capture and detection of pathogenic bacteria. PMID:21823128

  12. Technical evaluation of Solar Cells, Inc., CdTe module and array at NREL

    SciTech Connect

    Kroposki, B.; Strand, T.; Hansen, R.; Powell, R.; Sasala, R.

    1996-05-01

    The Engineering and Technology Validation Team at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducts in-situ technical evaluations of polycrystalline thin-film photovoltaic (PV) modules and arrays. This paper focuses on the technical evaluation of Solar Cells, Inc., (SCI) cadmium telluride (CdTe) module and array performance by attempting to correlate individual module and array performance. This is done by examining the performance and stability of the modules and array over a period of more than one year. Temperature coefficients for module and array parameters (P{sub max}, V{sub oc}, V{sub max}, I{sub sc}, I{sub max}) are also calculated.

  13. An intelligent sensor array distributed system for vibration analysis and acoustic noise characterization of a linear switched reluctance actuator.

    PubMed

    Salvado, José; Espírito-Santo, António; Calado, Maria

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a distributed system for analysis and monitoring (DSAM) of vibrations and acoustic noise, which consists of an array of intelligent modules, sensor modules, communication bus and a host PC acting as data center. The main advantages of the DSAM are its modularity, scalability, and flexibility for use of different type of sensors/transducers, with analog or digital outputs, and for signals of different nature. Its final cost is also significantly lower than other available commercial solutions. The system is reconfigurable, can operate either with synchronous or asynchronous modes, with programmable sampling frequencies, 8-bit or 12-bit resolution and a memory buffer of 15 kbyte. It allows real-time data-acquisition for signals of different nature, in applications that require a large number of sensors, thus it is suited for monitoring of vibrations in Linear Switched Reluctance Actuators (LSRAs). The acquired data allows the full characterization of the LSRA in terms of its response to vibrations of structural origins, and the vibrations and acoustic noise emitted under normal operation. The DSAM can also be used for electrical machine condition monitoring, machine fault diagnosis, structural characterization and monitoring, among other applications.

  14. An Intelligent Sensor Array Distributed System for Vibration Analysis and Acoustic Noise Characterization of a Linear Switched Reluctance Actuator

    PubMed Central

    Salvado, José; Espírito-Santo, António; Calado, Maria

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a distributed system for analysis and monitoring (DSAM) of vibrations and acoustic noise, which consists of an array of intelligent modules, sensor modules, communication bus and a host PC acting as data center. The main advantages of the DSAM are its modularity, scalability, and flexibility for use of different type of sensors/transducers, with analog or digital outputs, and for signals of different nature. Its final cost is also significantly lower than other available commercial solutions. The system is reconfigurable, can operate either with synchronous or asynchronous modes, with programmable sampling frequencies, 8-bit or 12-bit resolution and a memory buffer of 15 kbyte. It allows real-time data-acquisition for signals of different nature, in applications that require a large number of sensors, thus it is suited for monitoring of vibrations in Linear Switched Reluctance Actuators (LSRAs). The acquired data allows the full characterization of the LSRA in terms of its response to vibrations of structural origins, and the vibrations and acoustic noise emitted under normal operation. The DSAM can also be used for electrical machine condition monitoring, machine fault diagnosis, structural characterization and monitoring, among other applications. PMID:22969364

  15. Controllable in-situ cell electroporation with cell positioning and impedance monitoring using micro electrode array

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaoliang; Zhu, Rong

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a novel microarray chip for in-situ, real-time and selective electroporation on individual cells integrated with cell positioning and impedance monitoring. An array of quadrupole-electrode units (termed positioning electrodes) and pairs of planar center electrodes located at the centers of each quadrupole-electrode unit were fabricated on the chip. The positioning electrodes are used to trap and position living cells onto the center electrodes based on negative dielectrophoresis (nDEP). The center electrodes are used for in-situ cell electroporation, and also used to measure cell impedance for monitoring cellular dynamics in real time. Controllably selective electroporation and electrical measurement on the cells in array are realized. We present an evidence of selective electroporation through use of fluorescent dyes. Subsequently we use in-situ and real-time impedance measurement to monitor the process, which demonstrates the dynamic behavior of the cell electroporation. Finally, we show the use of this device to perform successful transfection onto individual HeLa cells with vector DNA encoding a green fluorescent. PMID:27507603

  16. The impact of solar cell technology on planar solar array performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, Michael W.; Kurland, Richard M.

    1989-01-01

    The results of a study into the potential impact of advanced solar cell technologies on the characteristics (weight, cost, area) of typical planar solar arrays designed for low, medium and geosynchronous altitude earth orbits are discussed. The study considered planar solar array substrate designs of lightweight, rigid-panel graphite epoxy and ultra-lightweight Kapton. The study proposed to answer the following questions: Do improved cell characteristics translate into array-level weight, size and cost improvements; What is the relative importance of cell efficiency, weight and cost with respect to array-level performance; How does mission orbital environment affect array-level performance. Comparisons were made at the array level including all mechanisms, hinges, booms, and harnesses. Array designs were sized to provide 5kW of array power (not spacecraft bus power, which is system dependent but can be scaled from given values). The study used important grass roots issues such as use of the GaAs radiation damage coefficients as determined by Anspaugh. Detailed costing was prepared, including cell and cover costs, and manufacturing attrition rates for the various cell types.

  17. A self-assembled monolayer-based micropatterned array for controlling cell adhesion and protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Jin; Lee, Jong Min; Park, Jin-Goo; Chung, Bong Geun

    2011-05-01

    We developed a surface micropatterning technique to control the cell adhesion and protein adsorption. This micropatterned array system was fabricated by a photolithography technique and self-assembled monolayer (SAM) deposition. It was hypothesized that the wettability and functional terminal group would regulate cell adhesion and protein adsorption. To demonstrate this hypothesis, glass-based micropatterned arrays with various functional terminal groups, such as amine (NH(2)) group (3-aminopropyl-triethoxysilane, APT), methyl (CH(3)) group (trichlorovinylsilane, TVS), and fluorocarbon (CF(3)) group (trichloro(1H, 1H, 2H, 2H-perfluorooctyl)silane, FOTS), were used. The contact angle was measured to determine the hydrophilic and hydrophobic properties of materials, demonstrating that TVS and FOTS were hydrophobic, whereas APTs were relatively hydrophilic. The cell adhesion was significantly affected by the wettability, showing that the cells were not adhered to hydrophobic surfaces, such as TVS and FOTS. Thus, the cells were selectively adhered to glass substrates within TVS- and FOTS-based micropatterned arrays. However, the cells were randomly adhered to APTs-based micropatterned arrays due to hydrophilic property of APTs. Furthermore, the protein adsorption of the SAM-based micropatterned array was analyzed, showing that the protein was more absorbed to the TVS surface. The surface functional terminal group enabled the control of protein adsorption. Therefore, this SAM-based micropatterned array system enabled the control of cell adhesion and protein adsorption and could be a potentially powerful tool for regulating the cell-cell interactions in a well-defined microenvironment.

  18. Differential Collective- and Single-Cell Behaviors on Silicon Micropillar Arrays.

    PubMed

    Jahed, Zeinab; Zareian, Ramin; Chau, Yeung Yeung; Seo, Brandon B; West, Mary; Tsui, Ting Y; Wen, Weijia; Mofrad, Mohammad R K

    2016-09-14

    Three-dimensional vertically aligned nano- and micropillars have emerged as promising tools for a variety of biological applications. Despite their increasing usage, the interaction mechanisms of cells with these rigid structures and their effect on single- and collective-cell behaviors are not well understood for different cell types. In the present study, we examine the response of glioma cells to micropillar arrays using a new microfabricated platform consisting of rigid silicon micropillar arrays of various shapes, sizes, and configurations fabricated on a single platform. We compare collective- and single-cell behaviors at micropillar array interfaces and show that glial cells under identical chemical conditions form distinct arrangements on arrays of different shapes and sizes. Tumor-like aggregation and branching of glial cells only occur on arrays with feature diameters greater than 2 μm, and distinct transitions are observed at interfaces between various arrays on the platform. Additionally, despite the same side-to-side spacing and gaps between micropillars, single glial cells interact with the flat silicon surface in the gap between small pillars but sit on top of larger micropillars. Furthermore, micropillars induced local changes in stress fibers and actin-rich filopodia protrusions as the cells conformed to the shape of spatial cues formed by these micropillars. PMID:27536959

  19. The glycosylphosphatidylinositol-PLC in Trypanosoma brucei forms a linear array on the exterior of the flagellar membrane before and after activation.

    PubMed

    Hanrahan, Orla; Webb, Helena; O'Byrne, Robert; Brabazon, Elaine; Treumann, Achim; Sunter, Jack D; Carrington, Mark; Voorheis, H Paul

    2009-06-01

    Bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei contain a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (GPI-PLC) that cleaves the GPI-anchor of the variable surface glycoprotein (VSG). Its location in trypanosomes has been controversial. Here, using confocal microscopy and surface labelling techniques, we show that the GPI-PLC is located exclusively in a linear array on the outside of the flagellar membrane, close to the flagellar attachment zone, but does not co-localize with the flagellar attachment zone protein, FAZ1. Consequently, the GPI-PLC and the VSG occupy the same plasma membrane leaflet, which resolves the topological problem associated with the cleavage reaction if the VSG and the GPI-PLC were on opposite sides of the membrane. The exterior location requires the enzyme to be tightly regulated to prevent VSG release under basal conditions. During stimulated VSG release in intact cells, the GPI-PLC did not change location, suggesting that the release mechanism involves lateral diffusion of the VSG in the plane of the membrane to the fixed position of the GPI-PLC.

  20. The Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-PLC in Trypanosoma brucei Forms a Linear Array on the Exterior of the Flagellar Membrane Before and After Activation

    PubMed Central

    Hanrahan, Orla; Webb, Helena; O'Byrne, Robert; Brabazon, Elaine; Treumann, Achim; Sunter, Jack D.; Carrington, Mark; Voorheis, H. Paul

    2009-01-01

    Bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei contain a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (GPI-PLC) that cleaves the GPI-anchor of the variable surface glycoprotein (VSG). Its location in trypanosomes has been controversial. Here, using confocal microscopy and surface labelling techniques, we show that the GPI-PLC is located exclusively in a linear array on the outside of the flagellar membrane, close to the flagellar attachment zone, but does not co-localize with the flagellar attachment zone protein, FAZ1. Consequently, the GPI-PLC and the VSG occupy the same plasma membrane leaflet, which resolves the topological problem associated with the cleavage reaction if the VSG and the GPI-PLC were on opposite sides of the membrane. The exterior location requires the enzyme to be tightly regulated to prevent VSG release under basal conditions. During stimulated VSG release in intact cells, the GPI-PLC did not change location, suggesting that the release mechanism involves lateral diffusion of the VSG in the plane of the membrane to the fixed position of the GPI-PLC. PMID:19503825

  1. Feasibility of Concurrent Treatment with the Scanning Ultrasound Reflector Linear Array System (SURLAS) and the Helical Tomotherapy System

    PubMed Central

    Peñagarícano, José A.; Moros, Eduardo; Novák, Petr; Yan, Yulong; Corry, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the feasibility of concurrent treatment with the Scanning Ultrasound Reflector Linear Array System (SURLAS) and helical tomotherapy (HT) intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods The SURLAS was placed on a RANDO phantom simulating a patient with superficial or deep recurrent breast cancer. A Megavoltage CT (MVCT) of the phantom with and without the SURLAS was obtained in the HT system. MVCT images with the SURLAS were obtained for two configurations: i) with the SURLAS' long axis parallel and ii) perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the phantom. The MVCT simulation data set was then transferred to a radiation therapy planning station. Organs at risk (OAR) were contoured including the lungs, heart, abdomen and spinal cord. The metallic parts of the SURLAS were contoured as well and constraints were assigned to completely or directionally block radiation through them. The MVCT-simulation data set and regions of interest (ROI) files were subsequently transferred to the HT planning station. Several HT plans were obtained with optimization parameters that are usually used in the clinic. For comparison purposes, planning was also performed without the SURLAS on the phantom. Results All plans with the SURLAS on the phantom showed adequate dose covering 95% of the planning target volume (PTV D95%), average dose and coefficient of variation of the planning target volume (PTV) dose distribution regardless of the SURLAS' orientation with respect to the RANDO phantom. Likewise, all OAR showed clinically acceptable dose values. Spatial dose distributions and dose-volume histogram (DVH) evaluation showed negligible plan degradation due to the presence of the SURLAS. Beam-on time varied depending on the selected optimization parameters. Conclusion From the perspective of the radiation dosage, concurrent treatment with the SURLAS and HT IMRT is feasible as demonstrated by the obtained clinically acceptable treatment plans. In addition, proper

  2. Large-scale arrays of picolitre chambers for single-cell analysis of large cell populations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won Chul; Rigante, Sara; Pisano, Albert P; Kuypers, Frans A

    2010-11-01

    We present a new method to analyze the cytoplasmic contents of single cells in large cell populations. This new method consists of an array of microchambers in which individual cells are collected, enclosed, and lysed to create a reaction mixture of the cytoplasm with extracellular detection agents. This approach was tested for the analysis of red blood cells in 10,000 microchambers in parallel. Single cells were routinely collected in more than 60% of microchambers, the collected cells were robustly (up to 99%) lysed by electric fields, and the cytoplasm enclosed in each microchamber was analyzed with fluorescence microscopy. Using a heterogeneous cell mixture, we verified that the new method could distinguish individual cells by cytoplasmic composition and the analysis compared well with conventional flow-cytometric evaluation of mixed cell populations. In contrast to flow-cytometry, the new method monitored single cells over time, thus characterizing the distributions of caspase activities of 5000 individual cells. This approach should be interesting for a variety of applications that would benefit from the ability to measure the distribution of cytoplasmic compounds in complex cell populations, including hematology, oncology, and immunology.

  3. Microlens array induced light absorption enhancement in polymer solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yuqing; Elshobaki, Moneim; Ye, Zhuo; Park, Joong-Mok; Noack, Max A.; Ho, Kai-Ming; Chaudhary, Sumit

    2013-01-24

    Over the last decade, polymer solar cells (PSCs) have attracted a lot of attention and highest power conversion efficiencies (PCE) are now close to 10%. Here we employ an optical structure – the microlens array (MLA) – to increase light absorption inside the active layer, and PCE of PSCs increased even for optimized devices. Normal incident light rays are refracted at the MLA and travel longer optical paths inside the active layers. Two PSC systems – poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl):(6,6)-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM) and poly[[9-(1-octylnonyl)-9H-carbazole-2,7-diyl]-2,5-thiophenediyl-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole-4,7-diyl-2,5-thiophenediyl]:(6,6)-phenyl C71 butyric acid methyl ester (PCDTBT:PC70BM) – were investigated. In the P3HT:PCBM system, MLA increased the absorption, absolute external quantum efficiency, and the PCE of an optimized device by [similar]4.3%. In the PCDTBT:PC70BM system, MLA increased the absorption, absolute external quantum efficiency, and PCE by more than 10%. In addition, simulations incorporating optical parameters of all structural layers were performed and they support the enhancement of absorption in the active layer with the assistance of MLA. Our results show that utilizing MLA is an effective strategy to further increase light absorption in PSCs, in which optical losses account for [similar]40% of total losses. MLA also does not pose materials processing challenges to the active layers since it is on the other side of the transparent substrate.

  4. Microlens array induced light absorption enhancement in polymer solar cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuqing; Elshobaki, Moneim; Ye, Zhuo; Park, Joong-Mok; Noack, Max A; Ho, Kai-Ming; Chaudhary, Sumit

    2013-03-28

    Over the last decade, polymer solar cells (PSCs) have attracted a lot of attention and highest power conversion efficiencies (PCE) are now close to 10%. Here we employ an optical structure - the microlens array (MLA) - to increase light absorption inside the active layer, and PCE of PSCs increased even for optimized devices. Normal incident light rays are refracted at the MLA and travel longer optical paths inside the active layers. Two PSC systems - poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl):(6,6)-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM) and poly[[9-(1-octylnonyl)-9H-carbazole-2,7-diyl]-2,5-thiophenediyl-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole-4,7-diyl-2,5-thiophenediyl]:(6,6)-phenyl C71 butyric acid methyl ester (PCDTBT:PC70BM) - were investigated. In the P3HT:PCBM system, MLA increased the absorption, absolute external quantum efficiency, and the PCE of an optimized device by ∼4.3%. In the PCDTBT:PC70BM system, MLA increased the absorption, absolute external quantum efficiency, and PCE by more than 10%. In addition, simulations incorporating optical parameters of all structural layers were performed and they support the enhancement of absorption in the active layer with the assistance of MLA. Our results show that utilizing MLA is an effective strategy to further increase light absorption in PSCs, in which optical losses account for ∼40% of total losses. MLA also does not pose materials processing challenges to the active layers since it is on the other side of the transparent substrate. PMID:23407762

  5. Amorphous Alumina Nanowire Array Efficiently Delivers Ac-DEVD-CHO to Inhibit Apoptosis of Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lampert, Lester; Timonen, Brittany; Smith, Sean; Davidge, Brittney; Li, Haiyan; Conley, John F.; Singer, Jeffrey D.; Jiao, Jun

    2014-01-01

    To create an effective well-ordered delivery platform still remains a challenge. Herein we fabricate vertically aligned alumina nanowire arrays via atomic layer deposition templated by carbon nanotubes. Using these arrays, a caspase-3/7 inhibitor was delivered into DC 2.4 cells and blocked apoptosis, as confirmed by fluorescence microscopy. PMID:24336780

  6. Patterning pallet arrays for cell selection based on high-resolution measurements of fluorescent biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Shadpour, Hamed; Zawistowski, Jon S.; Herman, Annadele; Hahn, Klaus; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2011-01-01

    Pallet arrays enable cells to be separated while they remain adherent to a surface and provide a much greater range of cell selection criteria relative to that of current technologies. However there remains a need to further broaden cell selection criteria to include dynamic intracellular signaling events. To demonstrate the feasibility of measuring cellular protein behavior on the arrays using high resolution microscopy, the surfaces of individual pallets were modified to minimize the impact of scattered light at the pallet edges. The surfaces of the three-dimensional pallets on an array were patterned with a coating such as fibronectin using a customized stamping tool. Micropatterns of varying shape and size were printed in designated regions on the pallets in single or multiple steps to demonstrate the reliability and precision of patterning molecules on the pallet surface. Use of a fibronectin matrix stamped at the center of each pallet permitted the localization of H1299 and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells to the pallet centers and away from the edges. Compared to pallet arrays with fibronection coating the entire top surface, arrays with a central fibronectin pattern increased the percentage of cells localized to the pallet center by 3-4 fold. Localization of cells to the pallet center also enabled the physical separation of cells from optical artifacts created by the rough pallet side walls. To demonstrate the measurement of dynamic intracellular signaling on the arrays, fluorescence measurements of high spatial resolution were performed using a RhoA GTPase biosensor. This biosensor utilized fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) to measure localized RhoA activity in cellular ruffles at the cell periphery. These results demonstrated the ability to perform spatially resolved measurements of fluorescence-based sensors on the pallet arrays. Thus, the patterned pallet

  7. Patterning pallet arrays for cell selection based on high-resolution measurements of fluorescent biosensors.

    PubMed

    Shadpour, Hamed; Zawistowski, Jon S; Herman, Annadele; Hahn, Klaus; Allbritton, Nancy L

    2011-06-24

    Pallet arrays enable cells to be separated while they remain adherent to a surface and provide a much greater range of cell selection criteria relative to that of current technologies. However there remains a need to further broaden cell selection criteria to include dynamic intracellular signaling events. To demonstrate the feasibility of measuring cellular protein behavior on the arrays using high resolution microscopy, the surfaces of individual pallets were modified to minimize the impact of scattered light at the pallet edges. The surfaces of the three-dimensional pallets on an array were patterned with a coating such as fibronectin using a customized stamping tool. Micropatterns of varying shape and size were printed in designated regions on the pallets in single or multiple steps to demonstrate the reliability and precision of patterning molecules on the pallet surface. Use of a fibronectin matrix stamped at the center of each pallet permitted the localization of H1299 and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells to the pallet centers and away from the edges. Compared to pallet arrays with fibronectin coating the entire top surface, arrays with a central fibronectin pattern increased the percentage of cells localized to the pallet center by 3-4-fold. Localization of cells to the pallet center also enabled the physical separation of cells from optical artifacts created by the rough pallet side walls. To demonstrate the measurement of dynamic intracellular signaling on the arrays, fluorescence measurements of high spatial resolution were performed using a RhoA GTPase biosensor. This biosensor utilized fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) to measure localized RhoA activity in cellular ruffles at the cell periphery. These results demonstrated the ability to perform spatially resolved measurements of fluorescence-based sensors on the pallet arrays. Thus, the patterned pallet arrays

  8. Arrays of horizontally-oriented mini-reservoirs generate steady microfluidic flows for continuous perfusion cell culture and gradient generation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoyue; Yi Chu, Leonard; Chueh, Bor-han; Shen, Mingwu; Hazarika, Bhaskar; Phadke, Nandita; Takayama, Shuichi

    2004-11-01

    This paper describes the use of arrays of horizontally-oriented reservoirs to deliver liquids through microchannels at a constant flow rate over extended periods of time (hours to days). The horizontal orientation maintains a constant hydraulic pressure drop across microfluidic channels even as the volumes of liquids within the reservoirs change over time. For a given channel-reservoir system, the magnitude of the flow velocity depends linearly on the height difference between reservoirs. The simple structure and operation mechanism make this pumping system versatile. A one-inlet-one-outlet system was used to continuously deliver media for perfusion cell culture, and an array of inlet reservoirs coupled to an outlet reservoir via microchannels was used to drive flows of multiple laminar streams. The parallel pumping scheme conveniently generated various smooth and step concentration gradients, and allowed evaluation of the effect of colchicine on myoblasts. Since the reservoir arrays are configured to be compatible with commercialized multichannel pipettors designed for 96 well plate handling, this simple pumping scheme is envisioned to be broadly useful for medium to high throughput microfluidic perfusion cell culture assays, cell migration assays, multiple laminar flow drug tests, and any other applications needing multiple microfluidic streams.

  9. Deformable L-shaped microwell array for trapping pairs of heterogeneous cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gi-Hun; Kim, Sung-Hwan; Kang, AhRan; Takayama, Shuichi; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Park, Joong Yull

    2015-03-01

    To study cell-to-cell interactions, there has been a continuous demand on developing microsystems for trapping pairs of two different cells in microwell arrays. Here, we propose an L-shaped microwell (L-microwell) array that relies on the elasticity of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate for trapping and pairing heterogeneous cells. We designed an L-microwell suitable for trapping single cell in each branch via stretching/releasing the PDMS substrate, and also performed 3D time-dependent diffusion simulations to visualize how cell-secreted molecules diffuse in the L-microwell and communicate with the partner cell. The computational results showed that the secreted molecule first contacted the partner cell after 35 min, and the secreted molecule fully covered the partner cell in 4 h (when referenced to 10% of the secreted molecular concentration). The molecules that diffused to the outside of the L-microwell were significantly diluted by the bulk solution, which prevented unwanted cellular communication between neighboring L-microwells. We produced over 5000 cell pairs in one 2.25 cm2 array with about 30 000 L-microwells. The proposed L-microwell array offers a versatile and convenient cell pairing method to investigate cell-to-cell interactions in, for example, cell fusion, immune reactions, and cancer metastasis.

  10. Hybrid triple-level-cell/multi-level-cell NAND flash storage array with chip exchangeable method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachiya, Shogo; Johguchi, Koh; Miyaji, Kousuke; Takeuchi, Ken

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a mix-and-match design method for triple level cell (TLC)/multi level cell (MLC) NAND flash hybrid and exchangeable storage arrays. A TLC-NAND flash provides an low cost and high capacity memory solution. However the reliability and access latency of TLC NAND flash are degraded from MLC NAND flash. Additionally, the block unit write is preferable for TLC NAND flash since the write order is complicated due to narrow data margin and write disturbance. The proposed solution combines TLC and MLC NAND flash memories for a storage array. To reduce access to TLC NAND flash, the stored data is screened and only the static frozen data are stored into TLC NAND flash with a Round-Robin frozen data collection algorithm (RR-FDCA). Furthermore, the proposed chip exchanging method extends the solid-state drive (SSD) lifetime without system suspending. As a result, in spite of moderate characteristics of TLC NAND flash, the proposed storage array can achieve 29% write energy saving and 56% write performance enhancement with 17% cost reduction, compared with the conventional MLC-only SSD.

  11. Method of making silicon solar cell array. [and mounting on flexible substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forestieri, A. F.; Broder, J. D.; Bernatowicz, D. T. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A heat sealable transparent plastic film, such as a flourinated ethylene propylene copolymer, is used both as a cover material and as an adhesive for mounting a solar cell array to a flexible substrate.

  12. Photovoltaic cell and array technology development for future unique NASA missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, S.; Curtis, H.; Piszczor, M.; Surampudi, R.; Hamilton, T.; Rapp, D.; Stella, P.; Mardesich, N.; Mondt, J.; Bunker, R.; Nesmith, B.; Gaddy, E.; Marvin, D.; Kazmerski, L.

    2002-01-01

    A technology review committee from NASA, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the Air Force Research Lab, was formed to assess solar cell and array technologies required for future NASA science missions.

  13. Nuclear resonant scattering measurements on {sup 57}Fe by multichannel scaling with a 64-pixel silicon avalanche photodiode linear-array detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kishimoto, S. Haruki, R.; Mitsui, T.; Yoda, Y.; Taniguchi, T.; Shimazaki, S.; Ikeno, M.; Saito, M.; Tanaka, M.

    2014-11-15

    We developed a silicon avalanche photodiode (Si-APD) linear-array detector for use in nuclear resonant scattering experiments using synchrotron X-rays. The Si-APD linear array consists of 64 pixels (pixel size: 100 × 200 μm{sup 2}) with a pixel pitch of 150 μm and depletion depth of 10 μm. An ultrafast frontend circuit allows the X-ray detector to obtain a high output rate of >10{sup 7} cps per pixel. High-performance integrated circuits achieve multichannel scaling over 1024 continuous time bins with a 1 ns resolution for each pixel without dead time. The multichannel scaling method enabled us to record a time spectrum of the 14.4 keV nuclear radiation at each pixel with a time resolution of 1.4 ns (FWHM). This method was successfully applied to nuclear forward scattering and nuclear small-angle scattering on {sup 57}Fe.

  14. Human Papillomavirus Genotyping Using Archival Vulval Dysplastic or Neoplastic Biopsy Tissues: Comparison between the INNO-LiPA and Linear Array Assays▿

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Sarah E.; Garland, Suzanne M.; Rumbold, Alice R.; Tabrizi, Sepehr N.

    2010-01-01

    The Roche Linear Array (LA) and Innogenetics INNO-LiPA human papillomavirus (HPV) genotyping assays were compared for paraffin-embedded vulval tissues. The LA detected amplifiable DNA in 28 (57%) out of 49 biopsy specimens, 20 (40%) being HPV genotyped, compared to 49 (100%) and 41 (83%), respectively, detected by the INNO-LiPA. The INNO-LiPA provides greater sensitivity for HPV genotyping in archival tissue. PMID:20181920

  15. Linear array measurements of enhanced dynamic wedge and treatment planning system (TPS) calculation for 15 MV photon beam and comparison with electronic portal imaging device (EPID) measurements

    PubMed Central

    Petrovic, Borislava; Grzadziel, Aleksandra; Rutonjski, Laza; Slosarek, Krzysztof

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. Enhanced dynamic wedges (EDW) are known to increase drastically the radiation therapy treatment efficiency. This paper has the aim to compare linear array measurements of EDW with the calculations of treatment planning system (TPS) and the electronic portal imaging device (EPID) for 15 MV photon energy. Materials and methods. The range of different field sizes and wedge angles (for 15 MV photon beam) were measured by the linear chamber array CA 24 in Blue water phantom. The measurement conditions were applied to the calculations of the commercial treatment planning system XIO CMS v.4.2.0 using convolution algorithm. EPID measurements were done on EPID-focus distance of 100 cm, and beam parameters being the same as for CA24 measurements. Results Both depth doses and profiles were measured. EDW linear array measurements of profiles to XIO CMS TPS calculation differ around 0.5%. Profiles in non-wedged direction and open field profiles practically do not differ. Percentage depth doses (PDDs) for all EDW measurements show the difference of not more than 0.2%, while the open field PDD is almost the same as EDW PDD. Wedge factors for 60 deg wedge angle were also examined, and the difference is up to 4%. EPID to linear array differs up to 5%. Conclusions The implementation of EDW in radiation therapy treatments provides clinicians with an effective tool for the conformal radiotherapy treatment planning. If modelling of EDW beam in TPS is done correctly, a very good agreement between measurements and calculation is obtained, but EPID cannot be used for reference measurements. PMID:22933916

  16. Process development for cell aggregate arrays encapsulated in a synthetic hydrogel using negative dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Abdallat, Rula G; Ahmad Tajuddin, Aziela S; Gould, David H; Hughes, Michael P; Fatoyinbo, Henry O; Labeed, Fatima H

    2013-04-01

    Spatial patterning of cells is of great importance in tissue engineering and biotechnology, enabling, for example the creation of bottom-up histoarchitectures of heterogeneous cells, or cell aggregates for in vitro high-throughput toxicological and therapeutic studies within 3D microenvironments. In this paper, a single-step process for creating peelable and resilient hydrogels, encapsulating arrays of biological cell aggregates formed by negative DEP has been devised. The dielectrophoretic trapping within low-energy regions of the DEP-dot array reduces cell exposure to high field stresses while creating distinguishable, evenly spaced arrays of aggregates. In addition to using an optimal combination of PEG diacrylate pre-polymer solution concentration and a novel UV exposure mechanism, total processing time was reduced. With a continuous phase medium of PEG diacrylate at 15% v/v concentration, effective dielectrophoretic cell patterned arrays and photo-polymerisation of the mixture was achieved within a 4 min period. This unique single-step process was achieved using a 30 s UV exposure time frame within a dedicated, wide exposure area DEP light box system. To demonstrate the developed process, aggregates of yeast, human leukemic (K562) and HeLa cells were immobilised in an array format within the hydrogel. Relative cell viability for both cells within the hydrogels, after maintaining them in appropriate iso-osmotic media, over a week period was greater than 90%. PMID:23436271

  17. Disturbance characteristics of half-selected cells in a cross-point resistive switching memory array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhe; Li, Haitong; Chen, Hong-Yu; Chen, Bing; Liu, Rui; Huang, Peng; Zhang, Feifei; Jiang, Zizhen; Ye, Hongfei; Gao, Bin; Liu, Lifeng; Liu, Xiaoyan; Kang, Jinfeng; Wong, H.-S. Philip; Yu, Shimeng

    2016-05-01

    Disturbance characteristics of cross-point resistive random access memory (RRAM) arrays are comprehensively studied in this paper. An analytical model is developed to quantify the number of pulses (#Pulse) the cell can bear before disturbance occurs under various sub-switching voltage stresses based on physical understanding. An evaluation methodology is proposed to assess the disturb behavior of half-selected (HS) cells in cross-point RRAM arrays by combining the analytical model and SPICE simulation. The characteristics of cross-point RRAM arrays such as energy consumption, reliable operating cycles and total error bits are evaluated by the methodology. A possible solution to mitigate disturbance is proposed.

  18. Effect of the plasma production rate on the implosion dynamics of cylindrical wire/fiber arrays with a profiled linear mass

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, V. V.; Mitrofanov, K. N. Gritsuk, A. N.; Frolov, I. N.; Grabovski, E. V.; Laukhin, Ya. N.

    2013-10-15

    Results are presented from experimental studies on the implosion of arrays made of wires and metalized fibers under the action of current pulses with an amplitude of up to 3.5 MA at the Angara-5-1 facility. The effect of the parameters of an additional linear mass of bismuth and gold deposited on the wires/fibers is investigated. It is examined how the material of the wires/fibers and the metal coating deposited on them affect the penetration of the plasma with the frozen-in magnetic field into a cylindrical array. Information on the plasma production rate for different metals is obtained by analyzing optical streak images of imploding arrays. The plasma production rate m-dot{sub m} for cylindrical arrays made of the kapron fibers coated with bismuth is determined. For the initial array radius of R{sub 0} = 1 cm and discharge current of I = 1 MA, the plasma production rate is found to be m-dot{sub m} approx. 0.095 ± 0.015 μg/(cm{sup 2} ns)

  19. Supporting Structures for Flat Solar-Cell Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, A. H.

    1986-01-01

    Strong supporting structures for flat solar photovoltaic arrays built with such commonly available materials as wood and galvanized steel sheet. Structures resist expected static loads from snow and ice as well as dynamic loads from winds and even Earthquake vibrations. Supporting structure uses inexpensive materials. Parts prefabricated to minimize assembly work in field.

  20. Tissue matrix arrays for high throughput screening and systems analysis of cell function

    PubMed Central

    Beachley, Vince Z.; Wolf, Matthew T.; Sadtler, Kaitlyn; Manda, Srikanth S.; Jacobs, Heather; Blatchley, Michael; Bader, Joel S.; Pandey, Akhilesh; Pardoll, Drew; Elisseeff, Jennifer H.

    2015-01-01

    Cell and protein arrays have demonstrated remarkable utility in the high-throughput evaluation of biological responses; however, they lack the complexity of native tissue and organs. Here, we describe tissue extracellular matrix (ECM) arrays for screening biological outputs and systems analysis. We spotted processed tissue ECM particles as two-dimensional arrays or incorporated them with cells to generate three-dimensional cell-matrix microtissue arrays. We then investigated the response of human stem, cancer, and immune cells to tissue ECM arrays originating from 11 different tissues, and validated the 2D and 3D arrays as representative of the in vivo microenvironment through quantitative analysis of tissue-specific cellular responses, including matrix production, adhesion and proliferation, and morphological changes following culture. The biological outputs correlated with tissue proteomics, and network analysis identified several proteins linked to cell function. Our methodology enables broad screening of ECMs to connect tissue-specific composition with biological activity, providing a new resource for biomaterials research and translation. PMID:26480475

  1. A microfluidic localized, multiple cell culture array using vacuum actuated cell seeding: integrated anticancer drug testing.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan; Li, Peng; Pappas, Dimitri

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we introduced a novel and convenient approach to culture multiple cells in localized arrays of microfluidic chambers using one-step vacuum actuation. In one device, we integrated 8 individually addressable regions of culture chambers, each only requiring one simple vacuum operation to seed cell lines. Four cell lines were seeded in designated regions in one device via sequential injection with high purity (99.9 %-100 %) and cultured for long-term. The on-chip simultaneous culture of HuT 78, Ramos, PC-3 and C166-GFP cells for 48 h was demonstrated with viabilities of 92 %+/-2 %, 94 %+/-4 %, 96 %+/-2 % and 97 %+/-2 %, respectively. The longest culture period for C166-GFP cells in this study was 168 h with a viability of 96 %+/-10 %. Cell proliferation in each individual side channel can be tracked. Mass transport between the main channel and side channels was achieved through diffusion and studied using fluorescein solution. The main advantage of this device is the capability to perform multiple cell-based assays on the same device for better comparative studies. After treating cells with staurosporine or anti-human CD95 for 16 h, the apoptotic cell percentage of HuT 78, CCRF-CEM, PC-3 and Ramos cells were 36 %+/-3 %, 24 %+/-4 %, 12 %+/-2 %, 18 %+/-4 % for staurosporine, and 63 %+/-2 %, 45 %+/-1 %, 3 %+/-3 %, 27 %+/-12 % for anti-human CD95, respectively. With the advantages of enhanced integration, ease of use and fabrication, and flexibility, this device will be suitable for long-term multiple cell monitoring and cell based assays.

  2. Comparison of the GenoFlow human papillomavirus (HPV) test and the Linear Array assay for HPV screening in an Asian population.

    PubMed

    Wong, Oscar Gee-Wan; Lo, C K; Chow, Joanne N K; Tsun, Obe K L; Szeto, Elaine; Liu, Stephanie S; Ngan, Hextan Y S; Cheung, Annie N Y

    2012-05-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) DNA detection in cervical cytology samples is useful for primary screening of cervical cancer and for triage of patients with equivocal cytological findings. The GenoFlow HPV array test (GF assay; Diagcor Bioscience Inc., Hong Kong) was recently developed to detect 33 HPV genotypes by a "flowthrough" hybridization technology. In this study, we assessed the analytical sensitivity and reproducibility of the GF assay and compared its genotyping results with those of the Linear Array (LA) assay (Roche Molecular Diagnostics, Indianapolis, IN), using 400 archived liquid-based cytology samples representing the full range of cytology findings. Genotyping findings of the GF and LA assays were concordant or compatible for 93.44% of tested samples, with a good (κ = 0.797) to very good (κ = 0.812) strength of agreement for assay-common and oncogenic HPV types, respectively. The two assays showed good (κ = 0.635) agreement in detecting infections with multiple HPV genotypes. The lowest detection limits of the GF assay for HPV16 and HPV18 were 25 copies and 20 copies, respectively. Repeat testing of 60 samples by use of two different lots of the GF assay revealed no discordant results, suggesting good reproducibility of the assay. Both assays achieved approximately 80% and 100% sensitivity for identifying cases of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) with subsequent detection of LSIL+ and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions or higher (HSIL+) in 2 years, respectively. Among ASC-US samples, the GF assay achieved the highest specificity (23.08%) for indicating subsequent identification of HSIL compared with the LA (19.23%) and Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) (8.97%) assays. The GF and LA assays showed significant discrepancy in detecting HPV genotypes 11, 26, 39, 52, and 66. More sensitive detection of HPV52 by GF assay offers an advantage in regions where HPV52

  3. Enrichment and Expansion of Cells using Antibody-Coated Micropallet Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Shadpour, Hamed; Sims, Christopher E.; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2009-01-01

    Background Positive selection, sorting, and collection of single cells from within a heterogeneous population are required for many biological studies. We recently demonstrated a miniaturized cell array for this purpose; however, on-chip pre-enrichment and isolation of specific target cells would provide significant value for cell isolation. Methods In the current work, mixed cell samples of fewer than 30,000 cells were used for panning by means of on-array antibody-capture to pre-enrich the target population. The cell surface receptors FcεR1, c-Kit, and ErbB2 were used for positive selection of RBL, RBL, and SK-BR-3 cells, respectively, from the mixed population. The capture efficiency, selectivity, and enrichment for the target cells were calculated and compared to fibronectin-coated controls. Results As expected, the capture efficiency depended upon the frequency of the target cell in the mixed population over the range of 0.3% to 33%. For a frequency of 5% target cells, the capture efficiency was 39 – 53% for the three conditions, while the selectivity varied between 78 – 98% with 16 – 20 fold enrichment. Furthermore, single-cell cloning studies demonstrated a high cloning efficiency of target cells selectively isolated from the array. Conclusions Antibody-based pre-enrichment in combination with micropallet-based cell selection will be a valuable tool for isolation and expansion of rare cells from small heterogeneous populations. PMID:19504569

  4. Controllably moving individual living cell in an array by modulating signal phase difference based on dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoliang; Zhu, Rong

    2015-06-15

    This paper reports a novel dielectrophoresis (DEP) based method for manipulating individual living cells by modulating phase difference of electrical signals applied on DEP electrodes. A novel microchip with an array structure is also proposed, consisting of a plurality of quadrupole-electrode units patterned into array on a glass substrate with a pair of center electrodes locating at the center of each quadrupole-electrode unit. Living cells can be trapped and positioned at the center of each quadrupole-electrode unit by using negative DEP (nDEP) manipulation and form an array. The trapped cells in the array can be controllably moved from one position to another and even from one of quadrupole-electrode units to adjacent unit by changing the phase difference of the signals applied on the two pairs of opposite electrodes in each quadrupole-electrode unit. The microchip allows an efficient and flexible manipulation of individual living cells that can be applied to study single cells. The experiments are performed to verify that different types of cells (MCF-7 cell and HeLa cell) can be effectively distinguished between each other using the method without label and fluorometric measurements. An identification of individual living cell from dead cells is also well demonstrated. PMID:25638795

  5. Sorting and Expansion of Murine Embryonic Stem Cell Colonies using Micropallet Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Shadpour, Hamed; Sims, Christopher E.; Thresher, Randy J.; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2008-01-01

    Background Isolation of cell colonies is an essential task in most stem cell studies. Conventional techniques for colony selection and isolation require significant time, labor, and consumption of expensive reagents. New microengineered technologies hold the promise for improving colony manipulation by reducing the required manpower and reagent consumption. Methods Murine embryonic stem cells were cultured on arrays composed of releasable elements termed micropallets created from a biocompatible photoresist. Micropallets containing undifferentiated colonies were released using a laser-based technique followed by cell collection and expansion in culture. Results The micropallet arrays provided a biocompatible substrate for maintaining undifferentiated murine stem cells in culture. A surface coating of 0.025% gelatin was shown to be optimal for cell culture and collection. Arrays composed of surface roughened micropallets provided further improvements in culture and isolation. Colonies of viable stem cells were efficiently isolated and collected. Colonies sorted in this manner were shown to remain undifferentiated even after collection and further expansion in culture. Conclusions Qualitative and quantitative analyses of sorting, collection efficiency and cell viability after release and expansion of stem cell colonies demonstrated that the micropallet array technology is a promising alternative to conventional sorting methods for stem cell applications. PMID:19012319

  6. Array of Hall Effect Sensors for Linear Positioning of a Magnet Independently of Its Strength Variation. A Case Study: Monitoring Milk Yield during Milking in Goats

    PubMed Central

    García-Diego, Fernando-Juan; Sánchez-Quinche, Angel; Merello, Paloma; Beltrán, Pedro; Peris, Cristófol

    2013-01-01

    In this study we propose an electronic system for linear positioning of a magnet independent of its modulus, which could vary because of aging, different fabrication process, etc. The system comprises a linear array of 24 Hall Effect sensors of proportional response. The data from all sensors are subject to a pretreatment (normalization) by row (position) making them independent on the temporary variation of its magnetic field strength. We analyze the particular case of the individual flow in milking of goats. The multiple regression analysis allowed us to calibrate the electronic system with a percentage of explanation R2 = 99.96%. In our case, the uncertainty in the linear position of the magnet is 0.51 mm that represents 0.019 L of goat milk. The test in farm compared the results obtained by direct reading of the volume with those obtained by the proposed electronic calibrated system, achieving a percentage of explanation of 99.05%. PMID:23793020

  7. A clinically applicable approach for detecting spontaneous action potential spikes in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with a linear electrode array.

    PubMed

    Jahanmiri-Nezhad, Faezeh; Li, Xiaoyan; Barkhaus, Paul E; Rymer, William Z; Zhou, Ping

    2014-02-01

    Examination of spontaneous muscle activity is an important part of the routine electromyogram (EMG) in assessing neuromuscular diseases. The EMG is specifically valuable as a diagnostic test in supporting the diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. High-density surface EMG is a relatively new technique that has until now been used in research but has the potential for clinical application. This study presents a simple high-density surface EMG method for automatic detection of spontaneous action potentials from surface electrode array recordings of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. To reduce computational complexity while maintaining useful information from the electrode array recording, the multichannel high-density surface EMG was transferred to single-dimensional data by calculating the maximum difference across all channels of the electrode array. A spike detection threshold was then set in the single-dimensional domain to identify the firing times of each spontaneous action potential spike, whereas a spike extraction threshold was used to define the onset and offset of the spontaneous spikes. These data were used to extract the spontaneous spike waveforms from the electrode array EMG. A database of detected spontaneous spikes was thus obtained, including their waveforms, on all channels along with their corresponding firing times. This newly developed method makes use of the information from different channels of the electrode array EMG recording. It also has the primary feature of being simple and fast in implementation, with convenient parameter adjustment and user-computer interaction. Hence, it has good possibilities for clinical application.

  8. Engineering complex tissue-like microgel arrays for evaluating stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Guermani, Enrico; Shaki, Hossein; Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Mehrali, Mehdi; Arpanaei, Ayyoob; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K; Dolatshahi-Pirouz, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Development of tissue engineering scaffolds with native-like biology and microarchitectures is a prerequisite for stem cell mediated generation of off-the-shelf-tissues. So far, the field of tissue engineering has not full-filled its grand potential of engineering such combinatorial scaffolds for engineering functional tissues. This is primarily due to the many challenges associated with finding the right microarchitectures and ECM compositions for optimal tissue regeneration. Here, we have developed a new microgel array to address this grand challenge through robotic printing of complex stem cell-laden microgel arrays. The developed microgel array platform consisted of various microgel environments that where composed of native-like cellular microarchitectures resembling vascularized and bone marrow tissue architectures. The feasibility of our array system was demonstrated through localized cell spreading and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) into complex tissue-like structures. In summary, we have developed a tissue-like microgel array for evaluating stem cell differentiation within complex and heterogeneous cell microenvironments. We anticipate that the developed platform will be used for high-throughput identification of combinatorial and native-like scaffolds for tissue engineering of functional organs. PMID:27465860

  9. Engineering complex tissue-like microgel arrays for evaluating stem cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Guermani, Enrico; Shaki, Hossein; Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Mehrali, Mehdi; Arpanaei, Ayyoob; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K.; Dolatshahi-Pirouz, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Development of tissue engineering scaffolds with native-like biology and microarchitectures is a prerequisite for stem cell mediated generation of off-the-shelf-tissues. So far, the field of tissue engineering has not full-filled its grand potential of engineering such combinatorial scaffolds for engineering functional tissues. This is primarily due to the many challenges associated with finding the right microarchitectures and ECM compositions for optimal tissue regeneration. Here, we have developed a new microgel array to address this grand challenge through robotic printing of complex stem cell-laden microgel arrays. The developed microgel array platform consisted of various microgel environments that where composed of native-like cellular microarchitectures resembling vascularized and bone marrow tissue architectures. The feasibility of our array system was demonstrated through localized cell spreading and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) into complex tissue-like structures. In summary, we have developed a tissue-like microgel array for evaluating stem cell differentiation within complex and heterogeneous cell microenvironments. We anticipate that the developed platform will be used for high-throughput identification of combinatorial and native-like scaffolds for tissue engineering of functional organs. PMID:27465860

  10. A discrete component low-noise preamplifier readout for a linear (1×16) SiC photodiode array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahle, Duncan; Aslam, Shahid; Herrero, Federico A.; Waczynski, Augustyn

    2016-09-01

    A compact, low-noise and inexpensive preamplifier circuit has been designed and fabricated to optimally readout a common cathode (1×16) channel 4H-SiC Schottky photodiode array for use in ultraviolet experiments. The readout uses an operational amplifier with 10 pF capacitor in the feedback loop in parallel with a low leakage switch for each of the channels. This circuit configuration allows for reiterative sample, integrate and reset. A sampling technique is given to remove Johnson noise, enabling a femtoampere level readout noise performance. Commercial-off-the-shelf acquisition electronics are used to digitize the preamplifier analog signals. The data logging acquisition electronics has a different integration circuit, which allows the bandwidth and gain to be independently adjusted. Using this readout, photoresponse measurements across the array between spectral wavelengths 200 nm and 370 nm are made to establish the array pixels external quantum efficiency, current responsivity and noise equivalent power.

  11. Ultra-dense silicon nanowire array solar cells by nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Liu, Pei; Siontas, Stylianos; Zaslavsky, Alexander; Pacifici, Domenico; Ha, Jong-Yoon; Krylyuk, Sergiy; Davydov, Albert

    Nanowire (NW) solar cells have been attracting increasing interest due to their potentially superior light absorption compared to thin bulk films. In order to improve light trapping, we have used nanoimprint lithography (NIL) to fabricate high-density NW arrays with deep sub-micron pitch (P) and diameter (D). We have grown dense vertical arrays of Si axial p - i - n junction NWs of D = 170 nm and P = 500 nm by vapor-liquid-solid epitaxy on seed arrays produced by NIL. The NWs were 9 µm length long with a 5 µm intrinsic section. The NW arrays were planarized using SU-8 photoresist, followed by reactive ion etching to expose the NW tips. Top n-contact was realized by sputter deposition of a transparent 200 nm IZO layer. The nanoimprinted NW array samples measured under AM 1.5 G illumination showed a peak external quantum efficiency of ~8% and internal quantum efficiency of ~90% in the visible spectral range. Three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain simulations of Si NW periodic arrays with varying P confirm the importance of high NW density. Specifically, due to diffractive scattering and light trapping, absorption efficiency close to 100% in the 400-650 nm spectral range is predicted for a Si NW array with an even smaller P = 250 nm, significantly outperforming a blanket Si film of the same thickness. Such pitch values are accessible to NIL and work on such arrays is in progress. National Science Foundation.

  12. A microneedle array able to inject tens of thousands of cells simultaneously

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teichert, Gregory H.; Burnett, Sandra; Jensen, Brian D.

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents a biological microelectromechanical system for injecting foreign particles into thousands of cells simultaneously. The system inserts an array of microneedles into a monolayer of cells, and the foreign particles enter the cells by diffusion. The needle array is fabricated using a series of deep reactive ion etches and produces about 4 million needles that average 1 μm in diameter and 8 μm in length with 10 μm spacing. The insertion of the needles is controlled through a compliant suspension. The compliant suspension was designed to provide for needle motion into the cells while restraining rotations or transverse motions that could result in tearing of the cell membranes. Testing was performed using propidium iodide, a membrane impermeable dye, injected into HeLa cells. Average cell survivability was found to be 97.7%, and up to 97.9% of the surviving cells received the propidium iodide.

  13. Triggering cell detachment from patterned electrode arrays by programmed subcellular release

    PubMed Central

    Wildt, Bridget; Wirtz, Denis; Searson, Peter C

    2010-01-01

    Programmed subcellular release is an in vitro technique for the quantitative study of cell detachment. The dynamics of cell contraction are measured by releasing cells from surfaces to which they are attached with spatial and temporal control. Release of subcellular regions of cells is achieved by plating cells on an electrode array created by standard microfabrication methods. The electrodes are then biochemically functionalized with an arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD)-terminated thiol. Application of a voltage pulse results in electrochemical desorption of the RGD-terminated thiols, triggering cell detachment. This method allows for the study of the full cascade of events from detachment to subsequent subcellular reorganization. Fabrication of the electrode arrays may take 1–2 d. Preparation for experiments, including surface functionalization and cell plating, can be completed in 10 h. A series of cell release experiments on one device may last several hours. PMID:20595956

  14. Triggering cell detachment from patterned electrode arrays by programmed subcellular release.

    PubMed

    Wildt, Bridget; Wirtz, Denis; Searson, Peter C

    2010-07-01

    Programmed subcellular release is an in vitro technique for the quantitative study of cell detachment. The dynamics of cell contraction are measured by releasing cells from surfaces to which they are attached with spatial and temporal control. Release of subcellular regions of cells is achieved by plating cells on an electrode array created by standard microfabrication methods. The electrodes are then biochemically functionalized with an arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD)-terminated thiol. Application of a voltage pulse results in electrochemical desorption of the RGD-terminated thiols, triggering cell detachment. This method allows for the study of the full cascade of events from detachment to subsequent subcellular reorganization. Fabrication of the electrode arrays may take 1-2 d. Preparation for experiments, including surface functionalization and cell plating, can be completed in 10 h. A series of cell release experiments on one device may last several hours. PMID:20595956

  15. Highly efficient ultrathin-film amorphous silicon solar cells on top of imprinted periodic nanodot arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Wensheng Gu, Min; Tao, Zhikuo; Ong, Thiam Min Brian

    2015-03-02

    The addressing of the light absorption and conversion efficiency is critical to the ultrathin-film hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells. We systematically investigate ultrathin a-Si:H solar cells with a 100 nm absorber on top of imprinted hexagonal nanodot arrays. Experimental evidences are demonstrated for not only notable silver nanodot arrays but also lower-cost ITO and Al:ZnO nanodot arrays. The measured external quantum efficiency is explained by the simulation results. The J{sub sc} values are 12.1, 13.0, and 14.3 mA/cm{sup 2} and efficiencies are 6.6%, 7.5%, and 8.3% for ITO, Al:ZnO, and silver nanodot arrays, respectively. Simulated optical absorption distribution shows high light trapping within amorphous silicon layer.

  16. Periodically Aligned Si Nanopillar Arrays as Efficient Antireflection Layers for Solar Cell Applications

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Periodically aligned Si nanopillar (PASiNP) arrays were fabricated on Si substrate via a silver-catalyzed chemical etching process using the diameter-reduced polystyrene spheres as mask. The typical sub-wavelength structure of PASiNP arrays had excellent antireflection property with a low reflection loss of 2.84% for incident light within the wavelength range of 200–1,000 nm. The solar cell incorporated with the PASiNP arrays exhibited a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of ~9.24% with a short circuit current density (JSC) of ~29.5 mA/cm2 without using any extra surface passivation technique. The high PCE of PASiNP array-based solar cell was attributed to the excellent antireflection property of the special periodical Si nanostructure. PMID:21124636

  17. High voltage solar cell power generating system for regulated solar array development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, E., Jr.; Hoffman, A. C.

    1973-01-01

    A laboratory solar power system regulated by on-panel switches has been delivered for operating high power (3 kw), high voltage (15,000 volt) loads (communication tubes, ion thrusters). The modular system consists of 26 solar arrays, each with an integral light source and cooling system. A typical array contains 2560 series-connected cells. Each light source consists of twenty 500 watt tungsten iodide lamps providing plus or minus 5 per cent uniformity at one solar constant. An array temperature of less than 40 C is achieved using an infrared filter, a water cooled plate, a vacuum hold-down system, and air flushing.

  18. Copy Number Variation Analysis by Array Analysis of Single Cells Following Whole Genome Amplification.

    PubMed

    Dimitriadou, Eftychia; Zamani Esteki, Masoud; Vermeesch, Joris Robert

    2015-01-01

    Whole genome amplification is required to ensure the availability of sufficient material for copy number variation analysis of a genome deriving from an individual cell. Here, we describe the protocols we use for copy number variation analysis of non-fixed single cells by array-based approaches following single-cell isolation and whole genome amplification. We are focusing on two alternative protocols, an isothermal and a PCR-based whole genome amplification method, followed by either comparative genome hybridization (aCGH) or SNP array analysis, respectively.

  19. Array tomography: characterizing FAC-sorted populations of zebrafish immune cells by their 3D ultrastructure

    PubMed Central

    Wacker, Irene; Chockley, Peter; Bartels, Carolin; Spomer, Waldemar; Hofmann, Andreas; Gengenbach, Ulrich; Singh, Sachin; Thaler, Marlene; Grabher, Clemens; SCHRÖDER, RASMUS R

    2015-01-01

    For 3D reconstructions of whole immune cells from zebrafish, isolated from adult animals by FAC-sorting we employed array tomography on hundreds of serial sections deposited on silicon wafers. Image stacks were either recorded manually or automatically with the newly released ZEISS Atlas 5 Array Tomography platform on a Zeiss FEGSEM. To characterize different populations of immune cells, organelle inventories were created by segmenting individual cells. In addition, arrays were used for quantification of cell populations with respect to the various cell types they contained. The detection of immunological synapses in cocultures of cell populations from thymus or WKM with cancer cells helped to identify the cytotoxic nature of these cells. Our results demonstrate the practicality and benefit of AT for high-throughput ultrastructural imaging of substantial volumes. Lay Description To look at immune cells from zebrafish we employed array tomography, a technique where arrays of serial sections deposited on solid substrates are used for imaging. Cell populations were isolated from the different organs of zebrafish involved in haematopoiesis, the production of blood cells. They were chemically fixed and centrifuged to concentrate them in a pellet that was then dehydrated and embedded in resin. Using a custom-built handling device it was possible to place hundreds of serial sections on silicon wafers as well ordered arrays. To image a whole cell at a resolution that would allow identifying all the organelles (i.e. compartments surrounded by membranes) inside the cell, stacks of usually 50–100 images were recorded in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). This recording was either done manually or automatically using the newly released Atlas Array Tomography platform on a ZEISS SEM. For the imaging of the sections a pixel size of about 5 nm was chosen, which defines membrane boundaries very well and allows segmentation of the membrane topology. After alignment of the

  20. Collision rates for rare cell capture in periodic obstacle arrays strongly depend on density of cell suspension.

    PubMed

    Cimrák, I

    2016-11-01

    Recently, computational modelling has been successfully used for determination of collision rates for rare cell capture in periodic obstacle arrays. The models were based on particle advection simulations where the cells were advected according to velocity field computed from two dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. This approach may be used under the assumption of very dilute cell suspensions where no mutual cell collisions occur. We use the object-in-fluid framework to demonstrate that even with low cell-to-fluid ratio, the optimal geometry of the obstacle array significantly changes. We show computational simulations for ratios of 3.5, 6.9 and 10.4% determining the optimal geometry of the periodic obstacle arrays. It was already previously demonstrated that cells in periodic obstacle arrays follow trajectories in two modes: the colliding mode and the zig-zag mode. The colliding mode maximizes the cell-obstacle collision frequency. Our simulations reveal that for dilute suspensions and for suspensions with cell-to-fluid ratio 3.5%, there is a range of column shifts for which the cells follow colliding trajectories. However we showed, that for 6.9 and 10.4%, the cells never follow colliding trajectories. PMID:27023645

  1. NeuroArray: a universal interface for patterning and interrogating neural circuitry with single cell resolution.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Xu, Zhen; Huang, Junzhe; Lin, Xudong; Luo, Rongcong; Chen, Chia-Hung; Shi, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Recreation of neural network in vitro with designed topology is a valuable tool to decipher how neurons behave when interacting in hierarchical networks. In this study, we developed a simple and effective platform to pattern primary neurons in array formats for interrogation of neural circuitry with single cell resolution. Unlike many surface-chemistry-based patterning methods, our NeuroArray technique is specially designed to accommodate neuron's polarized morphologies to make regular arrays of cells without restricting their neurite outgrowth, and thus allows formation of freely designed, well-connected, and spontaneously active neural network. The NeuroArray device was based on a stencil design fabricated using a novel sacrificial-layer-protected PDMS molding method that enables production of through-structures in a thin layer of PDMS with feature sizes as small as 3 µm. Using the NeuroArray along with calcium imaging, we have successfully demonstrated large-scale tracking and recording of neuronal activities, and used such data to characterize the spiking dynamics and transmission within a diode-like neural network. Essentially, the NeuroArray is a universal patterning platform designed for, but not limited to neuron cells. With little adaption, it can be readily interfaced with other interrogation modalities for high-throughput drug testing, and for building neuron culture based live computational devices. PMID:24759264

  2. NeuroArray: A Universal Interface for Patterning and Interrogating Neural Circuitry with Single Cell Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Xu, Zhen; Huang, Junzhe; Lin, Xudong; Luo, Rongcong; Chen, Chia-Hung; Shi, Peng

    2014-04-01

    Recreation of neural network in vitro with designed topology is a valuable tool to decipher how neurons behave when interacting in hierarchical networks. In this study, we developed a simple and effective platform to pattern primary neurons in array formats for interrogation of neural circuitry with single cell resolution. Unlike many surface-chemistry-based patterning methods, our NeuroArray technique is specially designed to accommodate neuron's polarized morphologies to make regular arrays of cells without restricting their neurite outgrowth, and thus allows formation of freely designed, well-connected, and spontaneously active neural network. The NeuroArray device was based on a stencil design fabricated using a novel sacrificial-layer-protected PDMS molding method that enables production of through-structures in a thin layer of PDMS with feature sizes as small as 3 µm. Using the NeuroArray along with calcium imaging, we have successfully demonstrated large-scale tracking and recording of neuronal activities, and used such data to characterize the spiking dynamics and transmission within a diode-like neural network. Essentially, the NeuroArray is a universal patterning platform designed for, but not limited to neuron cells. With little adaption, it can be readily interfaced with other interrogation modalities for high-throughput drug testing, and for building neuron culture based live computational devices.

  3. Dye-sensitized solar cells based on ZnO nanorod arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yu; Li, Shaoyan; Zhang, Ting; Joshi, Prakash; Fong, Hao; Ropp, Mike; Galipeau, David; Qiao, Qiquan

    2008-08-01

    A series of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) were fabricated using ZnO nanorod arrays as the anode electrode. The ZnO nanorod arrays were grown on the fluorine doped tin dioxide (FTO) substrates by a hydrothermal method. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images indicated that the ZnO nanorod arrays were highly oriented on FTO substrates with an average diameter of ~40 nm and an average length of ~1 μm. After sensitized by Z-907 dye via impregnation in solution, ZnO nanorod arrays changed the color from white to pink. This indicated that the dye had been successfully attached to ZnO nanorods. The high-aspect-ratio (~25) ZnO nanorod arrays are expected to improve charge transport through the formation of continuous channels along the nanorods. We fabricated photovoltaic cells based on these ZnO nanorod arrays and found the deposition time and effective area were two important factors affecting short circuit current densities and cell efficiencies. The device performance (Voc = 0.48 V, Jsc = 5.39 mA/cm2, η = 0.73 %) showed a great potential for solar energy conversion.

  4. Quantification of stromal vascular cell mechanics with a linear cell monolayer rheometer

    SciTech Connect

    Elkins, Claire M. Fuller, Gerald G.; Shen, Wen-Jun; Khor, Victor K.; Kraemer, Fredric B.

    2015-01-15

    Over the past few decades researchers have developed a variety of methods for measuring the mechanical properties of whole cells, including traction force microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and single-cell tensile testing. Though each of these techniques provides insight into cell mechanics, most also involve some nonideal conditions for acquiring live cell data, such as probing only one portion of a cell at a time, or placing the cell in a nonrepresentative geometry during testing. In the present work, we describe the development of a linear cell monolayer rheometer (LCMR) and its application to measure the mechanics of a live, confluent monolayer of stromal vascular cells. In the LCMR, a monolayer of cells is contacted on both top and bottom by two collagen-coated plates and allowed to adhere. The top plate then shears the monolayer by stepping forward to induce a predetermined step strain, while a force transducer attached to the top plate collects stress information. The stress and strain data are then used to determine the maximum relaxation modulus recorded after step-strain, G{sub r}{sup 0}, referred to as the zero-time relaxation modulus of the cell monolayer. The present study validates the ability of the LCMR to quantify cell mechanics by measuring the change in G{sub r}{sup 0} of a confluent cell monolayer upon the selective inhibition of three major cytoskeletal components (actin microfilaments, vimentin intermediate filaments, and microtubules). The LCMR results indicate that both actin- and vimentin-deficient cells had ∼50% lower G{sub r}{sup 0} values than wild-type, whereas tubulin deficiency resulted in ∼100% higher G{sub r}{sup 0} values. These findings constitute the first use of a cell monolayer rheometer to quantitatively distinguish the roles of different cytoskeletal elements in maintaining cell stiffness and structure. Significantly, they are consistent with results obtained using single-cell mechanical testing methods

  5. Highly-efficient single-cell capture in microfluidic array chips using differential hydrodynamic guiding structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Jaehoon; Kim, Young-Ji; Yoon, Euisik

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents a highly efficient single cell capture scheme using hydrodynamic guiding structures in a microwell array. The implemented structure has a capturing efficiency of >80%, and has a capacity to place individual cells into separated microwells, allowing for the time-lapse monitoring on single cell behavior. Feasibility was tested by injecting microbeads (15 μm in diameter) and prostate cancer PC3 cells in an 8×8 microwell array chip and >80% of the microwells were occupied by single ones. Using the chips, the number of cells required for cell assays can be dramatically reduced and this will facilitate overcoming a huddle of assays with scarce supply of cells.

  6. A microchip integrating cell array positioning with in situ single-cell impedance measurement.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoliang; Zhu, Rong; Zong, Xianli

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a novel microarray chip integrating cell positioning with in situ, real-time and long-time impedance measurement on a single cell. The microchip integrates a plurality of quadrupole-electrode units (termed positioning electrodes) patterned into an array with pairs of planar electrodes (termed measuring electrodes) located at the centers of each quadrupole-electrode unit. The positioning electrodes are utilized to trap and position living cells onto the measuring electrodes based on negative dielectrophoresis (nDEP), while the measuring electrodes are used to measure impedances of the trapped single cells. Each measuring electrode has a small footprint area of 7 × 7 μm(2) to ensure inhabiting only one single cell on it. However, the electrode with a small surface area has a low double-layer capacitance when it is immersed in a liquid solution, thus generating a large double-layer impedance, which reduces the sensitivity for impedance measurement on the single cell. To enlarge the effective surface areas of the measuring electrodes, a novel surface-modification process is proposed to controllably construct gold nanostructures on the surfaces of the measuring electrodes while the positioning electrodes are unstained. The double layer capacitances of the modified electrodes are increased by about one order after surface-modification. The developed microchip is used to monitor the adhering behavior of a single HeLa cell by measuring its impedance spectra in real time. The measured impedance is analyzed and used to extract cellular electrical parameters, which demonstrated that the cell compresses the electrical double layer in the process of adherence and adheres onto the measuring electrodes after 4-5 hours. PMID:26282920

  7. A microchip integrating cell array positioning with in situ single-cell impedance measurement.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoliang; Zhu, Rong; Zong, Xianli

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a novel microarray chip integrating cell positioning with in situ, real-time and long-time impedance measurement on a single cell. The microchip integrates a plurality of quadrupole-electrode units (termed positioning electrodes) patterned into an array with pairs of planar electrodes (termed measuring electrodes) located at the centers of each quadrupole-electrode unit. The positioning electrodes are utilized to trap and position living cells onto the measuring electrodes based on negative dielectrophoresis (nDEP), while the measuring electrodes are used to measure impedances of the trapped single cells. Each measuring electrode has a small footprint area of 7 × 7 μm(2) to ensure inhabiting only one single cell on it. However, the electrode with a small surface area has a low double-layer capacitance when it is immersed in a liquid solution, thus generating a large double-layer impedance, which reduces the sensitivity for impedance measurement on the single cell. To enlarge the effective surface areas of the measuring electrodes, a novel surface-modification process is proposed to controllably construct gold nanostructures on the surfaces of the measuring electrodes while the positioning electrodes are unstained. The double layer capacitances of the modified electrodes are increased by about one order after surface-modification. The developed microchip is used to monitor the adhering behavior of a single HeLa cell by measuring its impedance spectra in real time. The measured impedance is analyzed and used to extract cellular electrical parameters, which demonstrated that the cell compresses the electrical double layer in the process of adherence and adheres onto the measuring electrodes after 4-5 hours.

  8. Characterization of the San Jacinto Fault Zone Northwest of the Trifurcation Area from Earthquake Data Recorded by a Dense Linear Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Share, P. E.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Ross, Z.; Qiu, H.; Vernon, F.

    2015-12-01

    Data generated by earthquakes and recorded by a linear seismic array at Blackburn saddle NW of the trifurcation area, crossing the Clark branch of the San Jacinto Fault Zone, are used to study the internal fault zone structure in the area. The linear array (BB) is 180 m long and comprises 7 broadband three-component 1-Hz seismometers. Automatic algorithms are used to detect P and S body waves and fault zone head and trapped waves. Statistical analyses of P body wave travel times of 765 events, occurring during 2012-2014 within a 110 by 20 km window centered along the length of the Clark fault, show a 0.6-0.8 % gradual increase in slowness from the SW most (BB01) to the NE most (BB07) station. The results suggest the NE most stations overlie a zone of greater damage. Sharp velocity contrasts across the fault are imaged using fault zone head waves. In total, 72 events (within the same 110 by 20 km window) are found to produce phases with clear head wave characteristics. Further analysis of the candidate events leads to the characterization of two separate groups. The first, consisting of 51 events within approximately 11 km epicentral distance from the array, shows a clear increase of head to P body wave differential times with increasing along fault distance. Based on this moveout, an average velocity contrast across of the fault of 4 % (SW block is slower) is calculated for the portion of the Clark Fault beneath the array. Differential times for the second group show no moveout with along fault distance, suggesting a local secondary bimaterial interface with limited along-strike and/or depth extent. Events located in a broad region that also includes the San Andreas and Elsinore Faults produce candidate trapped waves that are most clear at stations BB05, BB06 and BB07 (the three NE most stations). Waveform modeling results will be presented in the meeting.

  9. A novel electrochemiluminescent immunosensor based on CdS-coated ZnO nanorod arrays for HepG2 cell detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Danqing; Wang, Lei; Ma, Shenghua; Jiang, Zhaohua; Yang, Bin; Han, Xiaojun; Liu, Shaoqin

    2015-02-01

    In this work, the highly oriented CdS-coated-ZnO nanorod arrays have been fabricated. The CdS-coated-ZnO nanorod arrays show high electrochemiluminescence intensity, fast response and good stability. All of the desirable properties spur the development of an ECL immunosensor for the detection of the liver cancer cell line (HepG2 cells). Two successive modification steps of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane and gold nanoparticles onto the CdS-coated-ZnO nanorod arrays not only offer the substrates for conjugation of antibody, but also effectively enhance the ECL signal, resulting in production of the high performance ECL immunosensor. The ECL immunosensor exhibits a sensitive response to HepG2 cells in a linear range of 300-10 000 cells mL-1 with a detection limit of 256 cells mL-1. The proposed sensor characteristics of high specificity, good reproducibility and remarkable stability will provide a sensitive, selective, and convenient approach for the clinical detection of cancer cells.In this work, the highly oriented CdS-coated-ZnO nanorod arrays have been fabricated. The CdS-coated-ZnO nanorod arrays show high electrochemiluminescence intensity, fast response and good stability. All of the desirable properties spur the development of an ECL immunosensor for the detection of the liver cancer cell line (HepG2 cells). Two successive modification steps of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane and gold nanoparticles onto the CdS-coated-ZnO nanorod arrays not only offer the substrates for conjugation of antibody, but also effectively enhance the ECL signal, resulting in production of the high performance ECL immunosensor. The ECL immunosensor exhibits a sensitive response to HepG2 cells in a linear range of 300-10 000 cells mL-1 with a detection limit of 256 cells mL-1. The proposed sensor characteristics of high specificity, good reproducibility and remarkable stability will provide a sensitive, selective, and convenient approach for the clinical detection of cancer cells

  10. Overexpressed TPX2 causes ectopic formation of microtubular arrays in the nuclei of acentrosomal plant cells.

    PubMed

    Petrovská, Beáta; Jerábková, Hana; Kohoutová, Lucie; Cenklová, Vera; Pochylová, Žaneta; Gelová, Zuzana; Kocárová, Gabriela; Váchová, Lenka; Kurejová, Michaela; Tomastíková, Eva; Binarová, Pavla

    2013-11-01

    TPX2 performs multiple roles in microtubule organization. Previously, it was shown that plant AtTPX2 binds AtAurora1 kinase and colocalizes with microtubules in a cell cycle-specific manner. To elucidate the function of TPX2 further, this work analysed Arabidopsis cells overexpressing AtTPX2-GFP. Distinct arrays of bundled microtubules, decorated with AtTPX2-GFP, were formed in the vicinity of the nuclear envelope and in the nuclei of overexpressing cells. The microtubular arrays showed reduced sensitivity to anti-microtubular drugs. TPX2-mediated formation of nuclear/perinuclear microtubular arrays was not specific for the transition to mitosis and occurred independently of Aurora kinase. The fibres were not observed in cells with detectable programmed cell death and, in this respect, they differed from TPX2-dependent microtubular assemblies functioning in mammalian apoptosis. Colocalization and co-purification data confirmed the interaction of importin with AtTPX2-GFP. In cells with nuclear foci of overexpressed AtTPX2-GFP, strong nuclear signals for Ran and importin diminished when microtubular arrays were assembled. This observation suggests that TPX2-mediated microtubule formation might be triggered by a Ran cycle. Collectively, the data suggest that in the acentrosomal plant cell, in conjunction with importin, overexpressed AtTPX2 reinforces microtubule formation in the vicinity of chromatin and the nuclear envelope.

  11. Cancer Stem Cell Biomarker Discovery Using Antibody Array Technology.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Rob; Huang, Ruo-Pan

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a complex disease involving hundreds of pathways and numerous levels of disease progression. In addition, there is a growing body of evidence that the origins and growth rates of specific types of cancer may involve "cancer stem cells," which are defined as "cells within a tumor that possess the capacity to self-renew and to cause the development of heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor.(1)" Many types of cancer are now thought to harbor cancer stem cells. These cells themselves are thought to be unique in comparison to other cells types present within the tumor and to exhibit characteristics that allow for the promotion of tumorigenesis and in some cases metastasis. In addition, it is speculated that each type of cancer stem cell exhibits a unique set of molecular and biochemical markers. These markers, alone or in combination, may act as a signature for defining not only the type of cancer but also the progressive state. These biomarkers may also double as signaling entities which act autonomously or upon neighboring cancer stem cells or other cells within the local microenvironment to promote tumorigenesis. This review describes the heterogeneic properties of cancer stem cells and outlines the identification and application of biomarkers and signaling molecules defining these cells as they relate to different forms of cancer. Other examples of biomarkers and signaling molecules expressed by neighboring cells in the local tumor microenvironment are also discussed. In addition, biochemical signatures for cancer stem cell autocrine/paracrine signaling, local site recruitment, tumorigenic potential, and conversion to a stem-like phenotype are described.

  12. Application of a Halbach magnetic array for long-range cell and particle separations in biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Joo H.; Driscoll, Harry; Super, Michael; Ingber, Donald E.

    2016-05-01

    Here, we describe a versatile application of a planar Halbach permanent magnet array for an efficient long-range magnetic separation of living cells and microparticles over distances up to 30 mm. A Halbach array was constructed from rectangular bar magnets using 3D-printed holders and compared to a conventional alternating array of identical magnets. We theoretically predicted the superiority of the Halbach array for a long-range magnetic separation and then experimentally validated that the Halbach configuration outperforms the alternating array for isolating magnetic microparticles or microparticle-bound bacterial cells at longer distances. Magnetophoretic velocities (ymag) of magnetic particles (7.9 μm diameter) induced by the Halbach array in a microfluidic device were significantly higher and extended over a larger area than those induced by the alternating magnet array (ymag = 178 versus 0 μm/s at 10 mm, respectively). When applied to 50 ml tubes (˜30 mm diameter), the Halbach array removed >95% of Staphylococcus aureus bacterial cells bound with 1 μm magnetic particles compared to ˜70% removed using the alternating array. In addition, the Halbach array enabled manipulation of 1 μm magnetic beads in a deep 96-well plate for ELISA applications, which was not possible with the conventional magnet arrays. Our analysis demonstrates the utility of the Halbach array for the future design of devices for high-throughput magnetic separations of cells, molecules, and toxins.

  13. Inverting microwell array chip for the cultivation of human induced pluripotent stem cells with controlled aggregate size and geometrical arrangement

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Taku; Sugiura, Shinji; Sumaru, Kimio; Ozaki, Shigenori; Gomi, Shinichi; Kurakazu, Tomoaki; Oshima, Yasuhiro; Kanamori, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel cell culture chip, namely, “inverting microwell array chip,” for cultivation of human induced pluripotent stem cells. The chip comprises a lower hydrogel microwell array and an upper polystyrene culture surface. We demonstrate the formation of uniform cellular aggregates in the microwell array, and after inversion, a culture with controlled aggregate size and geometrical arrangement on the polystyrene surface. Here, we report effects of cell concentrations on a cultivation sequence in the chip. PMID:24803961

  14. Oligonucleotide arrays vs. metaphase-comparative genomic hybridisation and BAC arrays for single-cell analysis: first applications to preimplantation genetic diagnosis for Robertsonian translocation carriers.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Laia; del Rey, Javier; Daina, Gemma; García-Aragonés, Manel; Armengol, Lluís; Fernandez-Encinas, Alba; Parriego, Mònica; Boada, Montserrat; Martinez-Passarell, Olga; Martorell, Maria Rosa; Casagran, Oriol; Benet, Jordi; Navarro, Joaquima

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive chromosome analysis techniques such as metaphase-Comparative Genomic Hybridisation (CGH) and array-CGH are available for single-cell analysis. However, while metaphase-CGH and BAC array-CGH have been widely used for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis, oligonucleotide array-CGH has not been used in an extensive way. A comparison between oligonucleotide array-CGH and metaphase-CGH has been performed analysing 15 single fibroblasts from aneuploid cell-lines and 18 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. Afterwards, oligonucleotide array-CGH and BAC array-CGH were also compared analysing 16 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. All three comprehensive analysis techniques provided broadly similar cytogenetic profiles; however, non-identical profiles appeared when extensive aneuploidies were present in a cell. Both array techniques provided an optimised analysis procedure and a higher resolution than metaphase-CGH. Moreover, oligonucleotide array-CGH was able to define extra segmental imbalances in 14.7% of the blastomeres and it better determined the specific unbalanced chromosome regions due to a higher resolution of the technique (≈ 20 kb). Applicability of oligonucleotide array-CGH for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis has been demonstrated in two cases of Robertsonian translocation carriers 45,XY,der(13;14)(q10;q10). Transfer of euploid embryos was performed in both cases and pregnancy was achieved by one of the couples. This is the first time that an oligonucleotide array-CGH approach has been successfully applied to Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for balanced chromosome rearrangement carriers. PMID:25415307

  15. Oligonucleotide Arrays vs. Metaphase-Comparative Genomic Hybridisation and BAC Arrays for Single-Cell Analysis: First Applications to Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for Robertsonian Translocation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Laia; del Rey, Javier; Daina, Gemma; García-Aragonés, Manel; Armengol, Lluís; Fernandez-Encinas, Alba; Parriego, Mònica; Boada, Montserrat; Martinez-Passarell, Olga; Martorell, Maria Rosa; Casagran, Oriol; Benet, Jordi; Navarro, Joaquima

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive chromosome analysis techniques such as metaphase-Comparative Genomic Hybridisation (CGH) and array-CGH are available for single-cell analysis. However, while metaphase-CGH and BAC array-CGH have been widely used for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis, oligonucleotide array-CGH has not been used in an extensive way. A comparison between oligonucleotide array-CGH and metaphase-CGH has been performed analysing 15 single fibroblasts from aneuploid cell-lines and 18 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. Afterwards, oligonucleotide array-CGH and BAC array-CGH were also compared analysing 16 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. All three comprehensive analysis techniques provided broadly similar cytogenetic profiles; however, non-identical profiles appeared when extensive aneuploidies were present in a cell. Both array techniques provided an optimised analysis procedure and a higher resolution than metaphase-CGH. Moreover, oligonucleotide array-CGH was able to define extra segmental imbalances in 14.7% of the blastomeres and it better determined the specific unbalanced chromosome regions due to a higher resolution of the technique (≈20 kb). Applicability of oligonucleotide array-CGH for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis has been demonstrated in two cases of Robertsonian translocation carriers 45,XY,der(13;14)(q10;q10). Transfer of euploid embryos was performed in both cases and pregnancy was achieved by one of the couples. This is the first time that an oligonucleotide array-CGH approach has been successfully applied to Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for balanced chromosome rearrangement carriers. PMID:25415307

  16. Oligonucleotide arrays vs. metaphase-comparative genomic hybridisation and BAC arrays for single-cell analysis: first applications to preimplantation genetic diagnosis for Robertsonian translocation carriers.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Laia; del Rey, Javier; Daina, Gemma; García-Aragonés, Manel; Armengol, Lluís; Fernandez-Encinas, Alba; Parriego, Mònica; Boada, Montserrat; Martinez-Passarell, Olga; Martorell, Maria Rosa; Casagran, Oriol; Benet, Jordi; Navarro, Joaquima

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive chromosome analysis techniques such as metaphase-Comparative Genomic Hybridisation (CGH) and array-CGH are available for single-cell analysis. However, while metaphase-CGH and BAC array-CGH have been widely used for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis, oligonucleotide array-CGH has not been used in an extensive way. A comparison between oligonucleotide array-CGH and metaphase-CGH has been performed analysing 15 single fibroblasts from aneuploid cell-lines and 18 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. Afterwards, oligonucleotide array-CGH and BAC array-CGH were also compared analysing 16 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. All three comprehensive analysis techniques provided broadly similar cytogenetic profiles; however, non-identical profiles appeared when extensive aneuploidies were present in a cell. Both array techniques provided an optimised analysis procedure and a higher resolution than metaphase-CGH. Moreover, oligonucleotide array-CGH was able to define extra segmental imbalances in 14.7% of the blastomeres and it better determined the specific unbalanced chromosome regions due to a higher resolution of the technique (≈ 20 kb). Applicability of oligonucleotide array-CGH for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis has been demonstrated in two cases of Robertsonian translocation carriers 45,XY,der(13;14)(q10;q10). Transfer of euploid embryos was performed in both cases and pregnancy was achieved by one of the couples. This is the first time that an oligonucleotide array-CGH approach has been successfully applied to Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for balanced chromosome rearrangement carriers.

  17. Solar Cell and Array Technology Development for NASA Solar Electric Propulsion Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piszczor, Michael; McNatt, Jeremiah; Mercer, Carolyn; Kerslake, Tom; Pappa, Richard

    2012-01-01

    NASA is currently developing advanced solar cell and solar array technologies to support future exploration activities. These advanced photovoltaic technology development efforts are needed to enable very large (multi-hundred kilowatt) power systems that must be compatible with solar electric propulsion (SEP) missions. The technology being developed must address a wide variety of requirements and cover the necessary advances in solar cell, blanket integration, and large solar array structures that are needed for this class of missions. Th is paper will summarize NASA's plans for high power SEP missions, initi al mission studies and power system requirements, plans for advanced photovoltaic technology development, and the status of specific cell and array technology development and testing that have already been conducted.

  18. A linear photodiode array employed in a short range laser triangulation obstacle avoidance sensor. M.S. Thesis; [Martian roving vehicle sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odenthal, J. P.

    1980-01-01

    An opto-electronic receiver incorporating a multi-element linear photodiode array as a component of a laser-triangulation rangefinder was developed as an obstacle avoidance sensor for a Martian roving vehicle. The detector can resolve the angle of laser return in 1.5 deg increments within a field of view of 30 deg and a range of five meters. A second receiver with a 1024 elements over 60 deg and a 3 meter range is also documented. Design criteria, circuit operation, schematics, experimental results and calibration procedures are discussed.

  19. Carbon-Ring Microelectrode Arrays for Electrochemical Imaging of Single Cell Exocytosis: Fabrication and Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yuqing; Trouillon, Raphaël; Svensson, Maria I.; Keighron, Jacqueline D.; Cans, Ann-Sofie; Ewing, Andrew G.

    2012-01-01

    Fabrication of carbon microelectrode arrays, with up to 15 electrodes in total tips as small as 10 to 50 μm, is presented. The support structures of microelectrodes were obtained by pulling multiple quartz capillaries together to form hollow capillary arrays before carbon deposition. Carbon ring microelectrodes were deposited by pyrolysis of acetylene in the lumen of these quartz capillary arrays. Each carbon deposited array tip was filled with epoxy, followed by beveling of the tip of the array to form a deposited carbon-ring microelectrode array (CRMA). Both the number of the microelectrodes in the array and the tip size are independently tunable. These CRMAs have been characterized using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and electrogenerated chemiluminescence. Additionally, the electrochemical properties were investigated with steady-state voltammetry. In order to demonstrate the utility of these fabricated microelectrodes in neurochemistry, CRMAs containing eight microring electrodes were used for electrochemical monitoring of exocytotic events from single PC12 cells. Subcellular temporal heterogeneities in exocytosis (ie. cold spots vs. hot spots) were successfully detected with the CRMAs. PMID:22339586

  20. Life on Magnets: Stem Cell Networking on Micro-Magnet Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Zablotskii, Vitalii; Dejneka, Alexandr; Kubinová, Šárka; Le-Roy, Damien; Dumas-Bouchiat, Frédéric; Givord, Dominique; Dempsey, Nora M.; Syková, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between a micro-magnet array and living cells may guide the establishment of cell networks due to the cellular response to a magnetic field. To manipulate mesenchymal stem cells free of magnetic nanoparticles by a high magnetic field gradient, we used high quality micro-patterned NdFeB films around which the stray field’s value and direction drastically change across the cell body. Such micro-magnet arrays coated with parylene produce high magnetic field gradients that affect the cells in two main ways: i) causing cell migration and adherence to a covered magnetic surface and ii) elongating the cells in the directions parallel to the edges of the micro-magnet. To explain these effects, three putative mechanisms that incorporate both physical and biological factors influencing the cells are suggested. It is shown that the static high magnetic field gradient generated by the micro-magnet arrays are capable of assisting cell migration to those areas with the strongest magnetic field gradient, thereby allowing the build up of tunable interconnected stem cell networks, which is an elegant route for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:23936425

  1. Life on magnets: stem cell networking on micro-magnet arrays.

    PubMed

    Zablotskii, Vitalii; Dejneka, Alexandr; Kubinová, Šárka; Le-Roy, Damien; Dumas-Bouchiat, Frédéric; Givord, Dominique; Dempsey, Nora M; Syková, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between a micro-magnet array and living cells may guide the establishment of cell networks due to the cellular response to a magnetic field. To manipulate mesenchymal stem cells free of magnetic nanoparticles by a high magnetic field gradient, we used high quality micro-patterned NdFeB films around which the stray field's value and direction drastically change across the cell body. Such micro-magnet arrays coated with parylene produce high magnetic field gradients that affect the cells in two main ways: i) causing cell migration and adherence to a covered magnetic surface and ii) elongating the cells in the directions parallel to the edges of the micro-magnet. To explain these effects, three putative mechanisms that incorporate both physical and biological factors influencing the cells are suggested. It is shown that the static high magnetic field gradient generated by the micro-magnet arrays are capable of assisting cell migration to those areas with the strongest magnetic field gradient, thereby allowing the build up of tunable interconnected stem cell networks, which is an elegant route for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  2. Stochastic model explains formation of cell arrays on H/O-diamond patterns.

    PubMed

    Ukraintsev, Egor; Broz, Antonin; Hubalek Kalbacova, Marie; Kromka, Alexander; Rezek, Bohuslav

    2015-01-01

    Cell migration plays an important role in many biological systems. A relatively simple stochastic model is developed and used to describe cell behavior on chemically patterned substrates. The model is based on three parameters: the speed of cell movement (own and external), the probability of cell adhesion, and the probability of cell division on the substrate. The model is calibrated and validated by experimental data obtained on hydrogen- and oxygen-terminated patterns on diamond. Thereby, the simulations reveal that: (1) the difference in the cell movement speed on these surfaces (about 1.5×) is the key factor behind the formation of cell arrays on the patterns, (2) this difference is provided by the presence of fetal bovine serum (validated by experiments), and (3) the directional cell flow promotes the array formation. The model also predicts that the array formation requires mean distance of cell travel at least 10% of intended stripe width. The model is generally applicable for biosensors using diverse cells, materials, and structures.

  3. Linear fitting of multi-threshold counting data with a pixel-array detector for spectral X-ray imaging

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Ryan D.; Pogranichney, Nicholas R.; Muir, J. Lewis; Sullivan, Shane Z.; Battaile, Kevin P.; Mulichak, Anne M.; Toth, Scott J.; Keefe, Lisa J.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2014-01-01

    Experiments and modeling are described to perform spectral fitting of multi-threshold counting measurements on a pixel-array detector. An analytical model was developed for describing the probability density function of detected voltage in X-ray photon-counting arrays, utilizing fractional photon counting to account for edge/corner effects from voltage plumes that spread across multiple pixels. Each pixel was mathematically calibrated by fitting the detected voltage distributions to the model at both 13.5 keV and 15.0 keV X-ray energies. The model and established pixel responses were then exploited to statistically recover images of X-ray intensity as a function of X-ray energy in a simulated multi-wavelength and multi-counting threshold experiment. PMID:25178010

  4. Cell membrane conformation at vertical nanowire array interface revealed by fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthing, Trine; Bonde, Sara; Rostgaard, Katrine R.; Hannibal Madsen, Morten; Sørensen, Claus B.; Nygård, Jesper; Martinez, Karen L.

    2012-10-01

    The perspectives offered by vertical arrays of nanowires for biosensing applications in living cells depend on the access of individual nanowires to the cell interior. Recent results on electrical access and molecular delivery suggest that direct access is not always obtained. Here, we present a generic approach to directly visualize the membrane conformation of living cells interfaced with nanowire arrays, with single nanowire resolution. The method combines confocal z-stack imaging with an optimized cell membrane labelling strategy which was applied to HEK293 cells interfaced with 2-11 μm long and 3-7 μm spaced nanowires with various surface coatings (bare, aminosilane-coated or polyethyleneimine-coated indium arsenide). We demonstrate that, for all commonly used nanowire lengths, spacings and surface coatings, nanowires generally remain enclosed in a membrane compartment, and are thereby not in direct contact with the cell interior.

  5. Insertion of linear 8.4 μm diameter 16 channel carbon fiber electrode arrays for single unit recordings

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Paras R.; Na, Kyounghwan; Zhang, Huanan; Kozai, Takashi D. Y.; Kotov, Nicholas A.; Yoon, Euisik; Chestek, Cynthia A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Single carbon fiber electrodes (d=8.4 μm) insulated with parylene-c and functionalized with PEDOT:pTS have been shown to record single unit activity but manual implantation of these devices with forceps can be difficult. Without an improvement in the insertion method any increase in the channel count by fabricating carbon fiber arrays would be impractical. In this study, we utilize a water soluble coating and structural backbones that allow us to create, implant, and record from fully functionalized arrays of carbon fibers with ~150 μm pitch. Approach Two approaches were tested for the insertion of carbon fiber arrays. The first method used a PEG coating that temporarily stiffened the fibers while leaving a small portion at the tip exposed. The small exposed portion (500 μm – 1 mm) readily penetrated the brain allowing for an insertion that did not require the handling of each fiber by forceps. The second method involved the fabrication of silicon support structures with individual shanks spaced 150 μm apart. Each shank consisted of a small groove that held an individual carbon fiber. Main results Our results showed that the PEG coating allowed for the chronic implantation of carbon fiber arrays in 5 rats with unit activity detected at 31 days post-implant. The silicon support structures recorded single unit activity in 3 acute rat surgeries. In one of those surgeries a stacked device with 3 layers of silicon support structures and carbon fibers was built and shown to readily insert into the brain with unit activity on select sites. Significance From these studies we have found that carbon fibers spaced at ~150 μm readily insert into the brain. This greatly increases the recording density of chronic neural probes and paves the way for even higher density devices that have a minimal scarring response. PMID:26035638

  6. Insertion of linear 8.4 μm diameter 16 channel carbon fiber electrode arrays for single unit recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Paras R.; Na, Kyounghwan; Zhang, Huanan; Kozai, Takashi D. Y.; Kotov, Nicholas A.; Yoon, Euisik; Chestek, Cynthia A.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. Single carbon fiber electrodes (d = 8.4 μm) insulated with parylene-c and functionalized with PEDOT:pTS have been shown to record single unit activity but manual implantation of these devices with forceps can be difficult. Without an improvement in the insertion method any increase in the channel count by fabricating carbon fiber arrays would be impractical. In this study, we utilize a water soluble coating and structural backbones that allow us to create, implant, and record from fully functionalized arrays of carbon fibers with ˜150 μm pitch. Approach. Two approaches were tested for the insertion of carbon fiber arrays. The first method used a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) coating that temporarily stiffened the fibers while leaving a small portion at the tip exposed. The small exposed portion (500 μm-1 mm) readily penetrated the brain allowing for an insertion that did not require the handling of each fiber by forceps. The second method involved the fabrication of silicon support structures with individual shanks spaced 150 μm apart. Each shank consisted of a small groove that held an individual carbon fiber. Main results. Our results showed that the PEG coating allowed for the chronic implantation of carbon fiber arrays in five rats with unit activity detected at 31 days post-implant. The silicon support structures recorded single unit activity in three acute rat surgeries. In one of those surgeries a stacked device with three layers of silicon support structures and carbon fibers was built and shown to readily insert into the brain with unit activity on select sites. Significance. From these studies we have found that carbon fibers spaced at ˜150 μm readily insert into the brain. This greatly increases the recording density of chronic neural probes and paves the way for even higher density devices that have a minimal scarring response.

  7. Role of nanocone and nanohemisphere arrays in improving light trapping of thin film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhaopeng; Huangfu, Huichao; Li, Xiaowei; Qiao, Huiling; Guo, Wanchun; Guo, Jingwei; Wang, Haiyan

    2016-10-01

    A new crystalline silicon solar cell with Si nanocone arrays on the top and Al nanohemisphere arrays on bottom surface were proposed. The light-trapping ability were systematically studied by COMSOL Multiphysics. The nanocone arrays benefit light-trapping by introducing gradient change of refractive index and coupling the incoming light into optical modes. The metallic nanohemisphere arrays affect the light-harvesting by surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) and scattering effect. The numerical simulations show that the optimal parameters for the periodic nanocone arrays are 350 nm in diameter and 1.1 of the pitch/diameter ratio. The optimal parameters for the nanohemisphere arrays are 160 nm in diameter, 1.3 of the pitch/diameter ratio respectively. Eliminating the Ohmic Loss in metallic nanohemisphere, a 700 nm thick silicon solar cell with the combination of these two nanostructures will contribute an average absorption of 72.928% and a 33.311 mA/cm2 short circuit photocurrent density in the wavelength of 310-1127 nm.

  8. Reliable Single Cell Array CGH for Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    Czyż, Zbigniew T.; Hoffmann, Martin; Schlimok, Günter; Polzer, Bernhard; Klein, Christoph A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Disseminated cancer cells (DCCs) and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are extremely rare, but comprise the precursors cells of distant metastases or therapy resistant cells. The detailed molecular analysis of these cells may help to identify key events of cancer cell dissemination, metastatic colony formation and systemic therapy escape. Methodology/Principal Findings Using the Ampli1™ whole genome amplification (WGA) technology and high-resolution oligonucleotide aCGH microarrays we optimized conditions for the analysis of structural copy number changes. The protocol presented here enables reliable detection of numerical genomic alterations as small as 0.1 Mb in a single cell. Analysis of single cells from well-characterized cell lines and single normal cells confirmed the stringent quantitative nature of the amplification and hybridization protocol. Importantly, fixation and staining procedures used to detect DCCs showed no significant impact on the outcome of the analysis, proving the clinical usability of our method. In a proof-of-principle study we tracked the chromosomal changes of single DCCs over a full course of high-dose chemotherapy treatment by isolating and analyzing DCCs of an individual breast cancer patient at four different time points. Conclusions/Significance The protocol enables detailed genome analysis of DCCs and thereby assessment of the clonal evolution during the natural course of the disease and under selection pressures. The results from an exemplary patient provide evidence that DCCs surviving selective therapeutic conditions may be recruited from a pool of genomically less advanced cells, which display a stable subset of specific genomic alterations. PMID:24465780

  9. An IB-LBM study of continuous cell sorting in deterministic lateral displacement arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qiang; Xu, Yuan-Qing; Tang, Xiao-Ying; Tian, Fang-Bao

    2016-07-01

    The deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) is an important method used to sort particles and cells of different sizes. In this paper, the flexible cell sorting with the DLD method is studied by using a numerical model based on the immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method (IB-LBM). In this model, the fluid motion is solved by the LBM, and the cell membrane-fluid interaction is modeled with the LBM. The proposed model is validated by simulating the rigid particle sorted with the DLD method, and the results are found in good agreement with those measured in experiments. We first study the effect of flexibility on a single cell and multiple cells continuously going through a DLD device. It is found that the cell flexibility can significantly affect the cell path, which means the flexibility could have significant effects on the continuous cell sorting by the DLD method. The sorting characteristics of white blood cells and red blood cells are further studied by varying the spatial distribution of cylinder arrays and the initial cell-cell distance. The numerical results indicate that a well concentrated cell sorting can be obtained under a proper arrangement of cylinder arrays and a large enough initial cell-cell distance.

  10. Hubble Space telescope thermal cycle test report for large solar array samples with BSFR cells (Sample numbers 703 and 704)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    The Hubble space telescope (HST) solar array was designed to meet specific output power requirements after 2 years in low-Earth orbit, and to remain operational for 5 years. The array, therefore, had to withstand 30,000 thermal cycles between approximately +100 and -100 C. The ability of the array to meet this requirement was evaluated by thermal cycle testing, in vacuum, two 128-cell solar cell modules that exactly duplicated the flight HST solar array design. Also, the ability of the flight array to survive an emergency deployment during the dark (cold) portion of an orbit was evaluated by performing a cold-roll test using one module.

  11. Low cost, high concentration ratio solar cell array for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, R. E.; Rauschenbach, H. S.; Cannady, M. D.; Whang, U. S.; Crabtree, W. L.

    1981-01-01

    A miniaturized Cassegrainian-type concentrator solar array concept for space applications is described. In-orbit cell operating temperatures near 80 C are achieved with purely passive cell cooling and a net concentration ratio of 100. A multiplicity of miniaturized, rigid solar cell concentrator subassemblies are electrically interconnected in conventional fashion and mounted into rigid frames to form concentrator solar panel assemblies approximately 14-mm thick. A plurality of such interconnected panels forms a stowable and deployable solar cell blanket. It is projected that for 20% efficient silicon cells an array of 500 kW beginning-of-life output capability, including orbiter cradle structures, can be transported by a single shuttle orbiter flight into low earth orbit. In-orbit array specific performance is calculated to be approximately 100 W/sq m and 20 W/kg, including all stowage, deployment and array figure control equipment designed for a 30-year orbital life. Higher efficiency gallium arsenide and multiple band gap solar cells will improve these performance factors correspondingly.

  12. Development of High Efficiency (14%) Solar Cell Array Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iles, P. A.; Khemthong, S.; Olah, S.; Sampson, W. J.; Ling, K. S.

    1979-01-01

    High efficiency solar cells required for the low cost modules was developed. The production tooling for the manufacture of the cells and modules was designed. The tooling consisted of: (1) back contact soldering machine; (2) vacuum pickup; (3) antireflective coating tooling; and (4) test fixture.

  13. Formation of organic crystalline nanopillar arrays and their application to organic photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Hirade, Masaya; Nakanotani, Hajime; Yahiro, Masayuki; Adachi, Chihaya

    2011-01-01

    To enhance the performance of organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells, preparation of organic nanometer-sized pillar arrays is fascinating because a significantly large area of a donor/acceptor heterointerface having continuous conduction path to both anode and cathode electrodes can be realized. In this study, we grew cupper phthalocyanine (CuPc) crystalline nanopillar arrays by conventional thermal gradient sublimation technique using a few-nanometer-sized trigger seeds composed of a CuPc and 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA) stacked layer. We optimized the pillar density by tuning crystal growth condition in order to apply it to OPV cells.

  14. A microfluidic pipette array for mechanophenotyping of cancer cells and mechanical gating of mechanosensitive channels

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lap Man; Liu, Allen P.

    2014-01-01

    Micropipette aspiration measures the mechanical properties of single cells. A traditional micropipette aspiration system requires a bulky infrastructure, and has a low throughput and limited potential for automation. We have developed a simple micro fluidic device, which is able to trap and apply pressure to single cells in designated aspiration arrays. By changing the volume flow rate using a syringe pump, we can accurately exert pressure difference across the trapped cells for pipette aspiration. By examining cell deformation and protrusion length into the pipette under an optical microscope, several important cell mechanical properties such as the cortical tension and the Young’s modulus, can be measured quantitatively using automated image analysis. Using the micro fluidic pipette array, the stiffness of breast cancer cells and healthy breast epithelial cells were measured and compared. Finally, we applied our device to examine the gating threshold of the mechanosensitive channel MscL expressed in mammalian cells. Together, the development of a micro fluidic pipette array could enable rapid mechanophenotyping of individual cells and for mechanotransduction studies. PMID:25361042

  15. Non-linear interactions in a boundary layer developing over an array of cubes using stochastic estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackman, Karin; Perret, Laurent

    2016-09-01

    In the present work, a boundary layer developing over a rough-wall consisting of staggered cubes with a plan area packing density, λp = 25%, is studied within a wind tunnel using combined particle image velocimetry and hot-wire anemometry to investigate the non-linear interactions between large-scale momentum regions and small-scale structures induced by the presence of the roughness. Due to the highly turbulent nature of the roughness sub-layer and measurement equipment limitations, temporally resolved flow measurements are not feasible, making the conventional filtering methods used for triple decomposition unsuitable for the present work. Thus, multi-time delay linear stochastic estimation is used to decompose the flow into large-scales and small-scales. Analysis of the scale-decomposed skewness of the turbulent velocity (u') shows a significant contribution of the non-linear term uL ' uS ' 2 ¯ , which represents the influence of the large-scales ( uL ' ) onto the small-scales ( uS ' ). It is shown that this non-linear influence of the large-scale momentum regions occurs with all three components of velocity in a similar manner. Finally, through two-point spatio-temporal correlation analysis, it is shown quantitatively that large-scale momentum regions influence small-scale structures throughout the boundary layer through a non-linear top-down mechanism.

  16. Sealable Femtoliter Chamber Arrays for Cell-free Biology

    PubMed Central

    Norred, Sarah Elizabeth; Caveney, Patrick M.; Retterer, Scott T.; Boreyko, Jonathan B.; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Collier, Charles Patrick; Simpson, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Cell-free systems provide a flexible platform for probing specific networks of biological reactions isolated from the complex resource sharing (e.g., global gene expression, cell division) encountered within living cells. However, such systems, used in conventional macro-scale bulk reactors, often fail to exhibit the dynamic behaviors and efficiencies characteristic of their living micro-scale counterparts. Understanding the impact of internal cell structure and scale on reaction dynamics is crucial to understanding complex gene networks. Here we report a microfabricated device that confines cell-free reactions in cellular scale volumes while allowing flexible characterization of the enclosed molecular system. This multilayered poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) device contains femtoliter-scale reaction chambers on an elastomeric membrane which can be actuated (open and closed). When actuated, the chambers confine Cell-Free Protein Synthesis (CFPS) reactions expressing a fluorescent protein, allowing for the visualization of the reaction kinetics over time using time-lapse fluorescent microscopy. Here we demonstrate how this device may be used to measure the noise structure of CFPS reactions in a manner that is directly analogous to those used to characterize cellular systems, thereby enabling the use of noise biology techniques used in cellular systems to characterize CFPS gene circuits and their interactions with the cell-free environment. PMID:25867144

  17. Sealable femtoliter chamber arrays for cell-free biology

    DOE PAGES

    Retterer, Scott T.; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Collier, Charles Patrick; Simpson, Michael L.; Norred, Sarah Elizabeth; Caveney, Patrick M.; Boreyko, Jonathan B.

    2015-03-11

    Cell-free systems provide a flexible platform for probing specific networks of biological reactions isolated from the complex resource sharing (e.g. global gene expression, cell division) encountered within living cells. However, such systems, used in conventional macro-scale bulk reactors, often fail to exhibit the dynamic behaviors and efficiencies characteristic of their living micro-scale counterparts. Understanding the impact of internal cell structure and scale on reaction dynamics is crucial to understanding complex gene networks. Here we report a microfabricated device that confines cell-free reactions in cellular scale volumes while allowing flexible characterization of the enclosed molecular system. This multilayered poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) devicemore » contains femtoliter-scale reaction chambers on an elastomeric membrane which can be actuated (open and closed). When actuated, the chambers confine Cell-Free Protein Synthesis (CFPS) reactions expressing a fluorescent protein, allowing for the visualization of the reaction kinetics over time using time-lapse fluorescent microscopy. Lastly, we demonstrate how this device may be used to measure the noise structure of CFPS reactions in a manner that is directly analogous to those used to characterize cellular systems, thereby enabling the use of noise biology techniques to characterize CFPS gene circuits and their interactions with the cell-free environment.« less

  18. Sealable femtoliter chamber arrays for cell-free biology

    SciTech Connect

    Retterer, Scott T.; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Collier, Charles Patrick; Simpson, Michael L.; Norred, Sarah Elizabeth; Caveney, Patrick M.; Boreyko, Jonathan B.

    2015-03-11

    Cell-free systems provide a flexible platform for probing specific networks of biological reactions isolated from the complex resource sharing (e.g. global gene expression, cell division) encountered within living cells. However, such systems, used in conventional macro-scale bulk reactors, often fail to exhibit the dynamic behaviors and efficiencies characteristic of their living micro-scale counterparts. Understanding the impact of internal cell structure and scale on reaction dynamics is crucial to understanding complex gene networks. Here we report a microfabricated device that confines cell-free reactions in cellular scale volumes while allowing flexible characterization of the enclosed molecular system. This multilayered poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) device contains femtoliter-scale reaction chambers on an elastomeric membrane which can be actuated (open and closed). When actuated, the chambers confine Cell-Free Protein Synthesis (CFPS) reactions expressing a fluorescent protein, allowing for the visualization of the reaction kinetics over time using time-lapse fluorescent microscopy. Lastly, we demonstrate how this device may be used to measure the noise structure of CFPS reactions in a manner that is directly analogous to those used to characterize cellular systems, thereby enabling the use of noise biology techniques to characterize CFPS gene circuits and their interactions with the cell-free environment.

  19. Single cell pattern formation and transient cytoskeletal arrays

    PubMed Central

    Bement, William M.; von Dassow, George

    2015-01-01

    A major goal of developmental biology is to explain the emergence of pattern in cell layers, tissues and organs. Developmental biologists now accept that reaction diffusion-based mechanisms are broadly employed in developing organisms to direct pattern formation. Here we briefly consider these mechanisms and then apply some of the concepts derived from them to several processes that occur in single cells: wound repair, yeast budding, and cytokinesis. Two conclusions emerge from this analysis: first, there is considerable overlap at the level of general mechanisms between developmental and single cell pattern formation; second, dynamic structures based on the actin cytoskeleton may be far more ordered than is generally recognized. PMID:24529246

  20. Combinatorial electrochemical cell array for high throughput screening of micro-fuel-cells and metal/air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Rongzhong

    2007-07-01

    An electrochemical cell array was designed that contains a common air electrode and 16 microanodes for high throughput screening of both fuel cells (based on polymer electrolyte membrane) and metal/air batteries (based on liquid electrolyte). Electrode materials can easily be coated on the anodes of the electrochemical cell array and screened by switching a graphite probe from one cell to the others. The electrochemical cell array was used to study direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs), including high throughput screening of electrode catalysts and determination of optimum operating conditions. For screening of DMFCs, there is about 6% relative standard deviation (percentage of standard deviation versus mean value) for discharge current from 10to20mA/cm2. The electrochemical cell array was also used to study tin/air batteries. The effect of Cu content in the anode electrode on the discharge performance of the tin/air battery was investigated. The relative standard deviations for screening of metal/air battery (based on zinc/air) are 2.4%, 3.6%, and 5.1% for discharge current at 50, 100, and 150mA/cm2, respectively.

  1. Combinatorial electrochemical cell array for high throughput screening of micro-fuel-cells and metal/air batteries.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Rongzhong

    2007-07-01

    An electrochemical cell array was designed that contains a common air electrode and 16 microanodes for high throughput screening of both fuel cells (based on polymer electrolyte membrane) and metal/air batteries (based on liquid electrolyte). Electrode materials can easily be coated on the anodes of the electrochemical cell array and screened by switching a graphite probe from one cell to the others. The electrochemical cell array was used to study direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs), including high throughput screening of electrode catalysts and determination of optimum operating conditions. For screening of DMFCs, there is about 6% relative standard deviation (percentage of standard deviation versus mean value) for discharge current from 10 to 20 mAcm(2). The electrochemical cell array was also used to study tin/air batteries. The effect of Cu content in the anode electrode on the discharge performance of the tin/air battery was investigated. The relative standard deviations for screening of metal/air battery (based on zinc/air) are 2.4%, 3.6%, and 5.1% for discharge current at 50, 100, and 150 mAcm(2), respectively. PMID:17672740

  2. Tandem Spinach Array for mRNA Imaging in Living Bacterial Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jichuan; Fei, Jingyi; Leslie, Benjamin J; Han, Kyu Young; Kuhlman, Thomas E; Ha, Taekjip

    2015-11-27

    Live cell RNA imaging using genetically encoded fluorescent labels is an important tool for monitoring RNA activities. A recently reported RNA aptamer-fluorogen system, the Spinach, in which an RNA aptamer binds and induces the fluorescence of a GFP-like 3,5-difluoro-4-hydroxybenzylidene imidazolinone (DFHBI) ligand, can be readily tagged to the RNA of interest. Although the aptamer-fluorogen system is sufficient for imaging highly abundant non-coding RNAs (tRNAs, rRNAs, etc.), it performs poorly for mRNA imaging due to low brightness. In addition, whether the aptamer-fluorogen system may perturb the native RNA characteristics has not been systematically characterized at the levels of RNA transcription, translation and degradation. To increase the brightness of these aptamer-fluorogen systems, we constructed and tested tandem arrays containing multiple Spinach aptamers (8-64 aptamer repeats). Such arrays enhanced the brightness of the tagged mRNA molecules by up to ~17 fold in living cells. Strong laser excitation with pulsed illumination further increased the imaging sensitivity of Spinach array-tagged RNAs. Moreover, transcriptional fusion to the Spinach array did not affect mRNA transcription, translation or degradation, indicating that aptamer arrays might be a generalizable labeling method for high-performance and low-perturbation live cell RNA imaging.

  3. Terrestrial solar cell module automated array assembly, task 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A cost effective design and manufacturing process which would produce solar cell modules capable of meeting qualification test criteria was developed. Emphasis was placed on the development of an aluminum paste back contact process.

  4. Carbon nanotube array inducing osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Baiyao; Ju, Yang; Cui, Yanbin; Song, Guanbin

    2015-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are a kind of nanomaterials which have been shown a promising application for biomedicine. There are a lot of studies to use CNTs to induce the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). However, the cellular behavior of MSCs on the top layer of CNT array was still not well understood. In this study, we evaluated the morphology, the gene expressions of the osteogenic differentiation related markers, and the gene expressions of collagen type II (Col II, a marker of chondrogenesis), PPARγ (a marker of adipogenesis) and scleraxis (SCX, a marker of tenogenesis) in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) cultured on multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) array. The effect of MWCNT array on the mineralization of hMSCs which were cultured in osteogenic differentiation medium (ODM) was further assayed. Our results showed that the hMSCs cultured on MWCNT array spread well, formed numerous spiral shaped cell colons and showed perinuclear morphology. Compared to hMSCs cultured on dish, the gene expression of osteocalcin (OCN) was increased while the gene expressions of collagen type II (Col II), PPARγ and scleraxis (SCX) were decreased in hMSCs which were cultured on MWCNT array without any differentiation factors. Furthermore, compared with hMSCs on dish, the gene expressions of collagen type I (Col I), osteocalcin (OCN), osteopontin (OPN) and RUNX2, and the mineralization of hMSCs on MWCNT array were enhanced when they were cultured in osteogenic differentiation medium (ODM). Our results indicated that MWCNT array was able to promote the osteogenesis of hMSCs.

  5. [Study on the B cell linear epitopes of rabies virus CVS-11 nucleoprotein].

    PubMed

    Lv, Xin-Jun; Shen, Xin-Xin; Yu, Peng-Cheng; Li, Hao; Wang, Li-Hua; Tang, Qing; Liang, Guo-Dong

    2014-05-01

    To study the B cell linear epitopes of rabies virus CVS-11 nucleoprotein, peptides were synthesized according to the amino acid sequences of B cell linear epitopes. Linear epitopes predicted by bioinformatics analysis were evaluated with immunological techniques. Indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that titers of antibodies to peptides (355-369 and 385-400 residues of rabies virus CVS-11 nucleoprotein) were above 1:12 800 in mouse sera. The antibodies recognized denatured rabies virus CVS-11 nucleoprotein in Western blot analysis. Purified anti-peptide antibodies recognized natural rabies virus CVS-11 nucleoprotein in BHK-21 cells in indirect fluorescent antibody test. The 355-369 and 385-400 residues of rabies virus CVS-11 nucleoprotein were validated as B cell linear epitopes.

  6. Alginate gel microwell arrays using electrodeposition for three-dimensional cell culture.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Fumisato; Ino, Kosuke; Arai, Toshiharu; Ramón-Azcón, Javier; Takahashi, Yasufumi; Shiku, Hitoshi; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2013-08-01

    In this study, we developed a novel method for fabricating microwell arrays constructed from alginate gels, and the alginate gel microwells were used for three-dimensional (3D) cell culture. The alginate gel microwells were fabricated on a patterned ITO electrode using alginate gel electrodeposition. Embryonic stem (ES) cells or hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) were cultured in the alginate gel microwells containing 3T3 cells. During the culture, embryoid bodies (EBs) or HepG2 spheroids were successfully fabricated in the alginate gel microwells. The oxygen consumption of the EBs indicated that they were successfully cultured. Liver-specific gene expressions of the HepG2 spheroids apparently increased by performing 3D co-culture in the microwell arrays with 3T3 cells. These results show that the alginate gel microwells are a useful 3D culture system.

  7. Cell-Based Odorant Sensor Array for Odor Discrimination Based on Insect Odorant Receptors.

    PubMed

    Termtanasombat, Maneerat; Mitsuno, Hidefumi; Misawa, Nobuo; Yamahira, Shinya; Sakurai, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Nagamune, Teruyuki; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2016-07-01

    The olfactory system of living organisms can accurately discriminate numerous odors by recognizing the pattern of activation of several odorant receptors (ORs). Thus, development of an odorant sensor array based on multiple ORs presents the possibility of mimicking biological odor discrimination mechanisms. Recently, we developed novel odorant sensor elements with high sensitivity and selectivity based on insect OR-expressing Sf21 cells that respond to target odorants by displaying increased fluorescence intensity. Here we introduce the development of an odorant sensor array composed of several Sf21 cell lines expressing different ORs. In this study, an array pattern of four cell lines expressing Or13a, Or56a, BmOR1, and BmOR3 was successfully created using a patterned polydimethylsiloxane film template and cell-immobilizing reagents, termed biocompatible anchor for membrane (BAM). We demonstrated that BAM could create a clear pattern of Sf21 sensor cells without impacting their odorant-sensing performance. Our sensor array showed odorant-specific response patterns toward both odorant mixtures and single odorant stimuli, allowing us to visualize the presence of 1-octen-3-ol, geosmin, bombykol, and bombykal as an increased fluorescence intensity in the region of Or13a, Or56a, BmOR1, and BmOR3 cell lines, respectively. Therefore, we successfully developed a new methodology for creating a cell-based odorant sensor array that enables us to discriminate multiple target odorants. Our method might be expanded into the development of an odorant sensor capable of detecting a large range of environmental odorants that might become a promising tool used in various applications including the study of insect semiochemicals and food contamination.

  8. Three-dimensional X-ray observation of atmospheric biological samples by linear-array scanning-electron generation X-ray microscope system.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Toshihiko

    2011-01-01

    Recently, we developed a soft X-ray microscope called the scanning-electron generation X-ray microscope (SGXM), which consists of a simple X-ray detection system that detects X-rays emitted from the interaction between a scanning electron beam (EB) and the thin film of the sample mount. We present herein a three-dimensional (3D) X-ray detection system that is based on the SGXM technology and designed for studying atmospheric biological samples. This 3D X-ray detection system contains a linear X-ray photodiode (PD) array. The specimens are placed under a CuZn-coated Si₃N₄ thin film, which is attached to an atmospheric sample holder. Multiple tilt X-ray images of the samples are detected simultaneously by the linear array of X-ray PDs, and the 3D structure is calculated by a new 3D reconstruction method that uses a simulated-annealing algorithm. The resulting 3D models clearly reveal the inner structure of the bacterium. In addition, the proposed method can easily be used for diverse samples in a broad range of scientific fields.

  9. Three-Dimensional X-ray Observation of Atmospheric Biological Samples by Linear-Array Scanning-Electron Generation X-ray Microscope System

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Toshihiko

    2011-01-01

    Recently, we developed a soft X-ray microscope called the scanning-electron generation X-ray microscope (SGXM), which consists of a simple X-ray detection system that detects X-rays emitted from the interaction between a scanning electron beam (EB) and the thin film of the sample mount. We present herein a three-dimensional (3D) X-ray detection system that is based on the SGXM technology and designed for studying atmospheric biological samples. This 3D X-ray detection system contains a linear X-ray photodiode (PD) array. The specimens are placed under a CuZn-coated Si3N4 thin film, which is attached to an atmospheric sample holder. Multiple tilt X-ray images of the samples are detected simultaneously by the linear array of X-ray PDs, and the 3D structure is calculated by a new 3D reconstruction method that uses a simulated-annealing algorithm. The resulting 3D models clearly reveal the inner structure of the bacterium. In addition, the proposed method can easily be used for diverse samples in a broad range of scientific fields. PMID:21731770

  10. The theory and experiment of very-long-wavelength 256×1 GaAs/Al x Ga1- x As quantum well infrared detector linear arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fangmin; Li, Ning; Xiong, Dayuan; Zhen, Honglou; Xu, Xiangyan; Hou, Ying; Ding, Ruijun; Lu, Wei; Huang, Qi; Zhou, Junming

    2008-07-01

    The 256×1 linear array of multiple quantum wells infrared photodetector (QWIP) is designed and fabricated for the peak response wavelength at λ P = 14.6 μm. The response spectral width is bigger than 2.2 μm. The two-dimensional (2D) diffractive coupling grating has been formed on the top QWIP photosensitive pixel for coupling the infrared radiation to the infrared detective layers. The performance of the device at V B = 3 V and T = 45 K has the responsibility 4.28×10-2 (A/W), the blackbody detectivity D b* = 5.14×109 (cm·Hz1/2/W), and the peak detectivity D λ * = 4.24× 1010 (cm·Hz1/2/W). The sensor pixels are connected with CMOS read out circuit (ROC) hybridization by indium bumps. When integral time is 100 μs, the linear array has the effective pixel of QWIP FPA N ef of 99.2%, the average responsibility overline R (V/W) of 3.48×106 (V/W), the average peak detectivity D λ * of 8.29×109 (cm·Hz1/2/W), and the non-uniformity UR of 5.83%. This device is ready for the thermal image application.

  11. Observations of the O I lambda 7773 triplet in intermediate-type supergiants using a linear photodiode array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkinson, G. R.; Humrich, A.

    1981-05-01

    Partially resolved spectra of the infrared oxygen triplet in A-G supergiants have been obtained with a new self-scanned photodiode array system. Curve of growth analyses indicate that the lines are formed in non-LTE. A line is identified at 7777.9 A which is strong in A supergiants and which will complicate the analysis of low resolution spectra. At a resolution of 0.45 A/diode the CN lines which appear in G8 and later stars are blended with the O I triplet rendering its equivalent width unreliable as a luminosity indicator.

  12. Hydrothermal growth of TiO2 nanorod arrays and in situ conversion to nanotube arrays for highly efficient quantum dot-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hui; Pan, Lei; Lim, Chiew Keat; Gong, Hua; Guo, Jun; Tse, Man Siu; Tan, Ooi Kiang

    2013-09-23

    TiO2 nanorod (NR) and nanotube (NT) arrays grown on transparent conductive substrates are attractive electrode for solar cells. In this paper, TiO2 NR arrays are hydrothermally grown on FTO substrate, and are in situ converted into NT arrays by hydrothermally etching. The TiO2 NR arrays are reported as single crystalline, but the TiO2 NR arrays are demonstrated to be polycrystalline with a bundle of 2-5 nm single crystalline nanocolumns grown along [001] throughout the whole NR from bottom to top. TiO2 NRs can be converted to NTs by hydrothermal selective etching of the (001) core and remaining the inert sidewall of (110) face. A growth mechanism of the NR and NT arrays is proposed. Quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSCs) are fabricated by coating CdSe QDs on to the TiO2 arrays. After conversion from NRs to NTs, more QDs can be filled in the NTs and the energy conversion efficiency of the QDSCs almost double.

  13. Multi-Sensor Arrays for Online Monitoring of Cell Dynamics in in vitro Studies with Choroid Plexus Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mestres-Ventura, Pedro; Morguet, Andrea; de las Heras, Soledad García Gómez

    2012-01-01

    Sensors and multi-sensor arrays are the basis of new technologies for the non-label monitoring of cell activity. In this paper we show that choroid plexus cells can be cultured on silicon chips and that sensors register in real time changes in their activity, constituting an interesting experimental paradigm for cell biology and medical research. To validate the signals recorded (metabolism = peri-cellular acidification, oxygen consumption = respiration; impedance = adhesion, cell shape and motility) we performed experiments with compounds that act in a well-known way on cells, influencing these parameters. Our in vitro model demonstrates the advantages of multi-sensor arrays in assessment and experimental characterization of dynamic cellular events—in this case in choroid plexus functions, however with applicability to other cell types as well. PMID:22438715

  14. High Density Crossbar Arrays with Sub- 15 nm Single Cells via Liftoff Process Only.

    PubMed

    Khiat, Ali; Ayliffe, Peter; Prodromakis, Themistoklis

    2016-01-01

    Emerging nano-scale technologies are pushing the fabrication boundaries at their limits, for leveraging an even higher density of nano-devices towards reaching 4F(2)/cell footprint in 3D arrays. Here, we study the liftoff process limits to achieve extreme dense nanowires while ensuring preservation of thin film quality. The proposed method is optimized for attaining a multiple layer fabrication to reliably achieve 3D nano-device stacks of 32 × 32 nanowire arrays across 6-inch wafer, using electron beam lithography at 100 kV and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) resist at different thicknesses. The resist thickness and its geometric profile after development were identified to be the major limiting factors, and suggestions for addressing these issues are provided. Multiple layers were successfully achieved to fabricate arrays of 1 Ki cells that have sub- 15 nm nanowires distant by 28 nm across 6-inch wafer. PMID:27585643

  15. High Density Crossbar Arrays with Sub- 15 nm Single Cells via Liftoff Process Only

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khiat, Ali; Ayliffe, Peter; Prodromakis, Themistoklis

    2016-09-01

    Emerging nano-scale technologies are pushing the fabrication boundaries at their limits, for leveraging an even higher density of nano-devices towards reaching 4F2/cell footprint in 3D arrays. Here, we study the liftoff process limits to achieve extreme dense nanowires while ensuring preservation of thin film quality. The proposed method is optimized for attaining a multiple layer fabrication to reliably achieve 3D nano-device stacks of 32 × 32 nanowire arrays across 6-inch wafer, using electron beam lithography at 100 kV and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) resist at different thicknesses. The resist thickness and its geometric profile after development were identified to be the major limiting factors, and suggestions for addressing these issues are provided. Multiple layers were successfully achieved to fabricate arrays of 1 Ki cells that have sub- 15 nm nanowires distant by 28 nm across 6-inch wafer.

  16. High Density Crossbar Arrays with Sub- 15 nm Single Cells via Liftoff Process Only

    PubMed Central

    Khiat, Ali; Ayliffe, Peter; Prodromakis, Themistoklis

    2016-01-01

    Emerging nano-scale technologies are pushing the fabrication boundaries at their limits, for leveraging an even higher density of nano-devices towards reaching 4F2/cell footprint in 3D arrays. Here, we study the liftoff process limits to achieve extreme dense nanowires while ensuring preservation of thin film quality. The proposed method is optimized for attaining a multiple layer fabrication to reliably achieve 3D nano-device stacks of 32 × 32 nanowire arrays across 6-inch wafer, using electron beam lithography at 100 kV and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) resist at different thicknesses. The resist thickness and its geometric profile after development were identified to be the major limiting factors, and suggestions for addressing these issues are provided. Multiple layers were successfully achieved to fabricate arrays of 1 Ki cells that have sub- 15 nm nanowires distant by 28 nm across 6-inch wafer. PMID:27585643

  17. Design guideline of high efficiency crystalline Si thin film solar cell with nanohole array textured surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei; Yu, Hongyu; Li, Junshuai; Wong, Shemein; Sun, Xiao Wei; Wang, Xincai; Zheng, Hongyu

    2011-04-01

    Silicon thin film with a nanohole (NH) array textured surface is systematically studied via simulation for solar energy harvesting and compared with a nanopillar (NP) array textured one. It is found that for the same thickness and optimized structure parameters, the NH array shows superior light trapping capability and thus, higher power conversion efficiency than its NP counterpart. The requirement for efficient cells at the optically optimized NH and NP geometries are studied in terms of minority carrier diffusion length, emitter doping level, and the emitter junction depth after considering the impact of surface recombination velocity. The results provide a practical guideline to design and fabricate high efficiency and cost effective NH textured Si thin film solar cells.

  18. Whole Genome Amplification of Labeled Viable Single Cells Suited for Array-Comparative Genomic Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Kroneis, Thomas; El-Heliebi, Amin

    2015-01-01

    Understanding details of a complex biological system makes it necessary to dismantle it down to its components. Immunostaining techniques allow identification of several distinct cell types thereby giving an inside view of intercellular heterogeneity. Often staining reveals that the most remarkable cells are the rarest. To further characterize the target cells on a molecular level, single cell techniques are necessary. Here, we describe the immunostaining, micromanipulation, and whole genome amplification of single cells for the purpose of genomic characterization. First, we exemplify the preparation of cell suspensions from cultured cells as well as the isolation of peripheral mononucleated cells from blood. The target cell population is then subjected to immunostaining. After cytocentrifugation target cells are isolated by micromanipulation and forwarded to whole genome amplification. For whole genome amplification, we use GenomePlex(®) technology allowing downstream genomic analysis such as array-comparative genomic hybridization.

  19. A photonic crystal hydrogel suspension array for the capture of blood cells from whole blood.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Cai, Yunlang; Shang, Luoran; Wang, Huan; Cheng, Yao; Rong, Fei; Gu, Zhongze; Zhao, Yuanjin

    2016-02-14

    Diagnosing hematological disorders based on the separation and detection of cells in the patient's blood is a significant challenge. We have developed a novel barcode particle-based suspension array that can simultaneously capture and detect multiple types of blood cells. The barcode particles are polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogel inverse opal microcarriers with characteristic reflection peak codes that remain stable during cell capture on their surfaces. The hydrophilic PAAm hydrogel scaffolds of the barcode particles can entrap various plasma proteins to capture different cells in the blood, with little damage to captured cells. PMID:26815946

  20. An ultra-compact and low loss passive beam-forming network integrated on chip with off chip linear array

    SciTech Connect

    Lepkowski, Stefan Mark

    2015-05-01

    The work here presents a review of beam forming architectures. As an example, the author presents an 8x8 Butler Matrix passive beam forming network including the schematic, design/modeling, operation, and simulated results. The limiting factor in traditional beam formers has been the large size dictated by transmission line based couplers. By replacing these couplers with transformer-based couplers, the matrix size is reduced substantially allowing for on chip compact integration. In the example presented, the core area, including the antenna crossover, measures 0.82mm×0.39mm (0.48% the size of a branch line coupler at the same frequency). The simulated beam forming achieves a peak PNR of 17.1 dB and 15dB from 57 to 63GHz. At the 60GHz center frequency the average insertion loss is simulated to be 3.26dB. The 8x8 Butler Matrix feeds into an 8-element antenna array to show the array patterns with single beam and adjacent beam isolation.

  1. Spraylon fluorocarbon encapsulation for silicon solar cell arrays, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naes, L. G.

    1978-01-01

    The liquid transparent film-forming, fluorocarbon, Spraylon, a protective coating for terrestrial solar cell modules was evaluated. Two modules were completed and field tested. Problems developed early in the field testing which led to the shortened test period, specifically, lifting of the antireflection coating, followed in some areas by complete film delamination. It is believed that although these problems were certainly induced by the presence of the SPRAYLON film, they were not failures of the material per se. Instead, assembly procedures, module design, and cell coating quality should be evaluated to determine cause of failure.

  2. A microwell array device capable of measuring single-cell oxygen consumption rates

    PubMed Central

    Molter, Timothy W.; McQuaide, Sarah C.; Suchorolski, Martin T.; Strovas, Tim J.; Burgess, Lloyd W.; Meldrum, Deirdre R.; Lidstrom, Mary E.

    2009-01-01

    Due to interest in cell population heterogeneity, the development of new technology and methodologies for studying single cells has dramatically increased in recent years. The ideal single cell measurement system would be high throughput for statistical relevance, would measure the most important cellular parameters, and minimize disruption of normal cell function. We have developed a microwell array device capable of measuring single cell oxygen consumption rates (OCR). This OCR device is able to diffusionally isolate single cells and enables the quantitative measurement of oxygen consumed by a single cell with fmol/min resolution in a non-invasive and relatively high throughput manner. A glass microwell array format containing fixed luminescent sensors allows for future incorporation of additional cellular parameter sensing capabilities. To demonstrate the utility of the OCR device, we determined the oxygen consumption rates of a small group of single cells (12 to 18) for three different cells lines: murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7, human epithelial lung cancer cell line A549, and human Barrett’s esophagus cell line CP-D. PMID:20084089

  3. Microliter-bioreactor array with buoyancy-driven stirring for human hematopoietic stem cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Luni, Camilla; Feldman, Hope C.; Pozzobon, Michela; De Coppi, Paolo; Meinhart, Carl D.; Elvassore, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    This work presents the development of an array of bioreactors where finely controlled stirring is provided at the microliter scale (100–300 μl). The microliter-bioreactor array is useful for performing protocol optimization in up to 96 parallel experiments of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) cultures. Exploring a wide range of experimental conditions at the microliter scale minimizes cost and labor. Once the cell culture protocol is optimized, it can be applied to large-scale bioreactors for stem cell production at the clinical level. The controlled stirring inside the wells of a standard 96-well plate is provided by buoyancy-driven thermoconvection. The temperature and velocity fields within the culture volume are determined with numerical simulations. The numerical results are verified with experimental velocity measurements using microparticle image velocimetry (μPIV) and are used to define feasible experimental conditions for stem cell cultures. To test the bioreactor array’s functionality, human umbilical cord blood-derived CD34+ cells were cultured for 7 days at five different stirring conditions (0.24–0.58 μm∕s) in six repeated experiments. Cells were characterized in terms of proliferation, and flow cytometry measurements of viability and CD34 expression. The microliter-bioreactor array demonstrates its ability to support HSC cultures under stirred conditions without adversely affecting the cell behavior. Because of the highly controlled operative conditions, it can be used to explore culture conditions where the mass transport of endogenous and exogenous growth factors is selectively enhanced, and cell suspension provided. While the bioreactor array was developed for culturing HSCs, its application can be extended to other cell types. PMID:20824067

  4. Subplasmalemmal linear densities in cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system in lung.

    PubMed Central

    Kawanami, O.; Ferrans, V. J.; Crystal, R. G.

    1980-01-01

    The presence of subplasmalemmal linear densities in cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system was investigated in pulmonary biopsies from 33 patients with fibrotic lung disorders. Subplasmalemmal linear densities, consisting of a thin layer of electron-dense material immediately subjacent to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane, were found in 30 of the 33 patients, including each of 6 patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis, 18 of 19 patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, 4 of 5 patients with collagen-vascular diseases, 1 patient with pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis, and 1 patient with marked interstitial pulmonary fibrosis associated with squamous cell carcinoma of the lung. Subplasmalemmal linear densities were found in epithelioid cells, macrophages, and giant cells in granulomas in the 6 patients with sarcoidosis and in alveolar macrophages in 4 of these patients. In patients with other fibrotic lung disorders, subplasmalemmal linear densities were limited in distribution to interstitial and alveolar macrophages. In all patients with sarcoidosis some of the subplasmalemmal linear densities of adjacent mononuclear phagocytes, particularly of those in granulomas, were paired and formed specialized intercellular junctions. Such junctions also were observed in macrophages in 10 of the patients with other fibrotic lung disorders. The junctions formed by subplasmalemmal linear densities differed from other types of junctional structures. Subplasmalemmal linear densities appear to function in 1) the binding of action filalar junctions, which may contribute to the immobilization of mononuclear phagocytes in granulomas and alveolar lumens. Images Figures 5 and 66 Figure 7 figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7190361

  5. Gate array, standard cell, and fully custom - Building blocks for the digital avionics designer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, H. L., III; Kopp, M. T.

    The VLSI design options called Gate Array, Standard Cell, and Fully Custom are studied along with digital hybrids and programmable logic. The design process for each of the options is illustrated and design methodologies are outlined. Design considerations required in order to use CAD tools in the design process are examined along with testability and packaging considerations.

  6. Large Absorption Enhancement in Ultrathin Solar Cells Patterned by Metallic Nanocavity Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Zhang, Jiasen; Che, Xiaozhou; Qin, Guogang

    2016-10-01

    A new type of light trapping structure utilizing ring-shaped metallic nanocavity arrays is proposed for the absorption enhancement in ultrathin solar cells with few photonic waveguide modes. Dozens of times of broadband absorption enhancement in the spectral range of 700 to 1100 nm is demonstrated in an ultrathin Si3N4/c-Si/Ag prototype solar cell by means of finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation, and this dramatic absorption enhancement can be attributed to the excitation of plasmonic cavity modes in these nanocavity arrays. The cavity modes optimally compensate for the lack of resonances in the longer wavelength range for ultrathin solar cells, and eventually a maximum Jsc enhancement factor of 2.15 is achieved under AM 1.5G solar illumination. This study opens a new perspective for light management in thin film solar cells and other optoelectronic devices.

  7. Large Absorption Enhancement in Ultrathin Solar Cells Patterned by Metallic Nanocavity Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Zhang, Jiasen; Che, Xiaozhou; Qin, Guogang

    2016-01-01

    A new type of light trapping structure utilizing ring-shaped metallic nanocavity arrays is proposed for the absorption enhancement in ultrathin solar cells with few photonic waveguide modes. Dozens of times of broadband absorption enhancement in the spectral range of 700 to 1100 nm is demonstrated in an ultrathin Si3N4/c-Si/Ag prototype solar cell by means of finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation, and this dramatic absorption enhancement can be attributed to the excitation of plasmonic cavity modes in these nanocavity arrays. The cavity modes optimally compensate for the lack of resonances in the longer wavelength range for ultrathin solar cells, and eventually a maximum Jsc enhancement factor of 2.15 is achieved under AM 1.5G solar illumination. This study opens a new perspective for light management in thin film solar cells and other optoelectronic devices. PMID:27703176

  8. Development of single-cell array for large-scale DNA fluorescence in situ hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yingru; Kirkland, Brett; Shirley, James; Wang, Zhibin; Zhang, Peipei; Stembridge, Jacquelyn; Wong, Wilson; Takebayashi, Shin-ichiro; Gilbert, David M.; Lenhert, Steven

    2013-01-01

    DNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a powerful cytogenetic assay, but conventional sample-preparation methods for FISH do not support large-scale high-throughput data acquisition and analysis, which are potentially useful for several biomedical applications. To address this limitation, we have developed a novel FISH sample-preparation method based on generating a centimetre-sized cell array, in which all cells are precisely positioned and separated from their neighbours. This method is simple and easy and capable of patterning nonadherent human cells. We have successfully performed DNA FISH on the single-cell arrays, which facilitate analysis of FISH results with the FISH-FINDER computer program. PMID:23370691

  9. Microconstriction Arrays for High-Throughput Quantitative Measurements of Cell Mechanical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Janina R.; Steinwachs, Julian; Kolb, Thorsten; Lautscham, Lena A.; Harder, Irina; Whyte, Graeme; Fabry, Ben

    2015-01-01

    We describe a method for quantifying the mechanical properties of cells in suspension with a microfluidic device consisting of a parallel array of micron-sized constrictions. Using a high-speed charge-coupled device camera, we measure the flow speed, cell deformation, and entry time into the constrictions of several hundred cells per minute during their passage through the device. From the flow speed and the occupation state of the microconstriction array with cells, the driving pressure across each constriction is continuously computed. Cell entry times into microconstrictions decrease with increased driving pressure and decreased cell size according to a power law. From this power-law relationship, the cell elasticity and fluidity can be estimated. When cells are treated with drugs that depolymerize or stabilize the cytoskeleton or the nucleus, elasticity and fluidity data from all treatments collapse onto a master curve. Power-law rheology and collapse onto a master curve are predicted by the theory of soft glassy materials and have been previously shown to describe the mechanical behavior of cells adhering to a substrate. Our finding that this theory also applies to cells in suspension provides the foundation for a quantitative high-throughput measurement of cell mechanical properties with microfluidic devices. PMID:26153699

  10. Non-Cell-Adhesive Substrates for Printing of Arrayed Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Appel, Eric A.; Larson, Benjamin L.; Luly, Kathryn M.; Kim, Jinseong D.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular microarrays have become extremely useful in expediting the investigation of large libraries of (bio)materials for both in vitro and in vivo biomedical applications. We have developed an exceedingly simple strategy for the fabrication of non-cell-adhesive substrates supporting the immobilization of diverse (bio)material features, including both monomeric and polymeric adhesion molecules (e.g. RGD and polylysine), hydrogels, and polymers. PMID:25430948

  11. Flexible Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell Based on Vertical ZnO Nanowire Arrays

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Flexible dye-sensitized solar cells are fabricated using vertically aligned ZnO nanowire arrays that are transferred onto ITO-coated poly(ethylene terephthalate) substrates using a simple peel-off process. The solar cells demonstrate an energy conversion efficiency of 0.44% with good bending tolerance. This technique paves a new route for building large-scale cost-effective flexible photovoltaic and optoelectronic devices. PMID:27502660

  12. Space satellite power system. [conversion of solar energy by photovoltaic solar cell arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, P. E.

    1974-01-01

    The concept of a satellite solar power station was studied. It is shown that it offers the potential to meet a significant portion of future energy needs, is pollution free, and is sparing of irreplaceable earth resources. Solar energy is converted by photovoltaic solar cell arrays to dc energy which in turn is converted into microwave energy in a large active phased array. The microwave energy is beamed to earth with little attenuation and is converted back to dc energy on the earth. Economic factors are considered.

  13. Computer modeling of inversion layer MOS solar cells and arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Fat Duen

    1991-01-01

    A two dimensional numerical model of the inversion layer metal insulator semiconductor (IL/MIS) solar cell is proposed by using the finite element method. The two-dimensional current flow in the device is taken into account in this model. The electrostatic potential distribution, the electron concentration distribution, and the hole concentration distribution for different terminal voltages are simulated. The results of simple calculation are presented. The existing problems for this model are addressed. Future work is proposed. The MIS structures are studied and some of the results are reported.

  14. Development of high efficiency (14 percent) solar cell array module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iles, P. A.; Khemthong, S.; Olah, S.; Sampson, W. J.; Ling, K. S.

    1980-01-01

    Most effort was concentrated on development of procedures to provide large area (3 in. diameter) high efficiency (16.5 percent AM1, 28 C) P+NN+ solar cells. Intensive tests with 3 in. slices gave consistently lower efficiency (13.5 percent). The problems were identified as incomplete formation of and optimum back surface field (BSF), and interaction of the BSF process and the shallow P+ junction. The problem was shown not to be caused by reduced quality of silicon near the edges of the larger slices.

  15. Non-destructive visualization of linear explosive-induced Pyroshock using phase arrayed laser-induced shock in a space launcher composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    kyeong Jang, Jae; Ryul Lee, Jung

    2015-07-01

    Separation mechanism of Space launch vehicles are used in various separation systems and pyrotechnic devices. The operation of these pyrotechnic devices generates Pyroshock that can cause failures in electronic components. The prediction of high frequency structural response, especially the shock response spectrum (SRS), is important. This paper presents a non-destructive visualization and simulation of linear explosive-induced Pyroshock using phase arrayed Laser-induced shock. The proposed method includes a laser shock test based on laser beam and filtering zone conditioning to predict the SRS of Pyroshock. A ballistic test based on linear explosive and non-contact Laser Doppler Vibrometers and a nondestructive Laser shock measurement using laser excitation and several PZT sensors, are performed using a carbon composite sandwich panel. The similarity of the SRS of the conditioned laser shock to that of the real explosive Pyroshock is evaluated with the Mean Acceleration Difference. The average of MADs over the two training points was 33.64%. And, MAD at verification point was improved to 31.99%. After that, experimentally found optimal conditions are applied to any arbitrary points in laser scanning area. Finally, it is shown that linear explosive-induced real Pyroshock wave propagation can be visualized with high similarity based on the proposed laser technology.

  16. A Silicone-Based Stretchable Micropost Array Membrane for Monitoring Live-Cell Subcellular Cytoskeletal Response

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Jennifer M.; Lam, Raymond H. W.; Weng, Shinuo; Sun, Yubing; Fu, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    External forces are increasingly recognized as major regulators of cellular structure and function, yet the underlying mechanism by which cells sense forces and transduce them into intracellular biochemical signals and behavioral responses (‘mechanotransduction’) is largely undetermined. To aid in the mechanistic study of mechanotransduction, herein we devised a cell stretch device that allowed for quantitative control and real-time measurements of mechanical stimuli and cellular biomechanical responses. Our strategy involved a microfabricated array of silicone elastomeric microposts integrated onto a stretchable elastomeric membrane. By using a computer-controlled vacuum, this micropost array membrane (mPAM) was activated to apply equibiaxial cell stretching forces to adherent cells attached on the microposts. Using the mPAM, we studied live-cell subcellular dynamic responses of contractile forces of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to sustained static equibiaxial cell stretches. Our data showed that in response to sustained cell stretches, VSMCs regulated their cytoskeletal (CSK) contractility in a biphasic manner: they first acutely enhanced their contraction to resist rapid cell deformation (‘stiffening’) before they allowed slow adaptive inelastic CSK reorganization to release their contractility (‘softening’). The contractile response across entire single VSMCs was spatially inhomogeneous and force-dependent. Our mPAM device and live-cell subcellular contractile measurements will help elucidate the mechanotransductive system in VSMCs and thus contribute to our understanding of pressure-induced vascular disease processes. PMID:22193351

  17. A photonic crystal hydrogel suspension array for the capture of blood cells from whole blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Cai, Yunlang; Shang, Luoran; Wang, Huan; Cheng, Yao; Rong, Fei; Gu, Zhongze; Zhao, Yuanjin

    2016-02-01

    Diagnosing hematological disorders based on the separation and detection of cells in the patient's blood is a significant challenge. We have developed a novel barcode particle-based suspension array that can simultaneously capture and detect multiple types of blood cells. The barcode particles are polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogel inverse opal microcarriers with characteristic reflection peak codes that remain stable during cell capture on their surfaces. The hydrophilic PAAm hydrogel scaffolds of the barcode particles can entrap various plasma proteins to capture different cells in the blood, with little damage to captured cells.Diagnosing hematological disorders based on the separation and detection of cells in the patient's blood is a significant challenge. We have developed a novel barcode particle-based suspension array that can simultaneously capture and detect multiple types of blood cells. The barcode particles are polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogel inverse opal microcarriers with characteristic reflection peak codes that remain stable during cell capture on their surfaces. The hydrophilic PAAm hydrogel scaffolds of the barcode particles can entrap various plasma proteins to capture different cells in the blood, with little damage to captured cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06368j

  18. Where the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann cell model fails: Spurious phase separation in charged colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamashiro, M. N.; Schiessel, H.

    2003-07-01

    The Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) spherical Wigner-Seitz cell model—introduced to theoretically describe suspensions of spherical charged colloidal particles—is investigated at the nonlinear and linearized levels. The linearization of the mean-field PB functional yields linearized Debye-Hückel-type equations agreeing asymptotically with the nonlinear PB results in the weak-coupling (high-temperature) limit. Both the canonical (fixed number of microions) as well as the semigrand-canonical (in contact with an infinite salt reservoir) cases are considered and discussed in a unified linearized framework. In disagreement with the exact nonlinear PB solution inside a Wigner-Seitz cell, the linearized theory predicts the occurrence of a thermodynamical instability with an associated phase separation of the homogeneous suspension into dilute (gas) and dense (liquid) phases, being thus a spurious result of the linearization. We show that these artifacts, although thermodynamically consistent with quadratic expansions of the nonlinear functional and osmotic pressure, may be traced back to the nonfulfillment of the underlying assumptions of the linearization. This raises questions about the reliability of the prediction of gas/liquid-like phase separation in deionized aqueous suspensions of charged colloids mediated by monovalent counterions obtained by linearized theories.

  19. Cell-Type Dependent Effect of Surface-Patterned Microdot Arrays on Neuronal Growth

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Min Jee; Kim, Woon Ryoung; Joo, Sunghoon; Ryu, Jae Ryun; Lee, Eunsoo; Nam, Yoonkey; Sun, Woong

    2016-01-01

    Surface micropatterns have been widely used as chemical cues to control the microenvironment of cultured neurons, particularly for neurobiological assays and neurochip designs. However, the cell-type dependency on the interactions between neurons and underlying micropatterns has been rarely investigated despite the inherent differences in the morphology of neuronal types. In this study, we used surface-printed microdot arrays to investigate the effect of the same micropatterns on the growth of mouse spinal interneuron, mouse hippocampal neurons, and rat hippocampal neurons. While mouse hippocampal neurons showed no significantly different growth on control and patterned substrates, we found the microdot arrays had different effects on early neuronal growth depending on the cell type; spinal interneurons tended to grow faster in length, whereas hippocampal neurons tended to form more axon collateral branches in response to the microdot arrays. Although there was a similar trend in the neurite length and branch number of both neurons changed across the microdot arrays with the expanded range of size and spacing, the dominant responses of each neuron, neurite elongation of mouse spinal interneurons and branching augmentation of rat hippocampal neurons were still preserved. Therefore, our results demonstrate that the same design of micropatterns could cause different neuronal growth results, raising an intriguing issue of considering cell types in neural interface designs. PMID:27242421

  20. Microchannel arrays with improved accessibility and use for cell studies and emulsification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Yuji; Kikuchi, Hiroko E.; Kuboki, Yoshinori; Nakajima, Mitsutoshi

    2000-03-01

    Arrays of microgrooves (groove width; 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, and 14 micrometer, groove interval; width x3, x10, and x20, one size and interval per chip) each connecting a center well and a side edge of a silicon substrate were created by photolithography and anisotropic wet etching. A penetrating hole was made by sand blast at the substrate center for the access to the center well. By tightly covering the substrate surface with a glass plate, the microgroove arrays were converted to microchannel arrays having one ends open at the side edges of the substrate. These microchannel arrays were used for cell trapping for microinjection and also used for emulsification. Poplar (Populus alba) protoplasts were used for the test of cell trapping. Cells showed a very large variation in size and irregularity in shape, and, furthermore, the protoplast preparation contained a number of cell membrane fragments and chloroplasts. Despite the cell size and shape variations and obstruction by the admixtures, many cells could be trapped by aspiration at the channel ends because of their openness to the outside free space and also their large multiplicity in parallel. The free space outside the side of the substrate allowed a free manipulation of a glass micropipette under microscopic observation using transmitted illumination. The microscopic observation direction nearly perpendicular to the movement directions of the micropipette further allowed the movement of the pipette tip nearly always in focus. These led to an easy pointing and puncturing. In addition, the cell trapping points in a line made successive approach to adjacent cells easier. Soybean oil containing 1.5 wt% polyoxyethylene(20)sorbitan monoolete as a surfactant was forced to flow into physiological saline filling the outside of the substrate through the microchannels. Regularly sized oil particles were created by this process with a variation coefficient (S.D./mean) 16% of their diameter. This variation, which is

  1. ZnO nanorod arrays for photoelectrochemical cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qiang; Cao, Chuanbao

    2012-05-01

    The splitting of water using photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells to produce hydrogen is one of the most sustainable forms of energy production and more and more 1-D nanostructrues semiconductors used as photoelectrodes have been studied extensively. However, it is not clear whether the photoconversion efficiencies of such nanostructure devices are limited by the architectures of the 1-D electrodes. Here, we explore the effect of the architecture like the length and width of ZnO nanorods on the PEC cells performance for the first time. The as-prepared nanorods have diameters of 40-50 nm and lengths of 400-800 nm. Preliminary measurements exhibit that the resulting electrodes have promising PEC properties. Mott-Schottky measurements give a flat-band potential of +0.10 V, a carrier density of 3.7 x 10(17) cm(-3), and a space-charge layer of 26 nm. The photocurrent of 800 nm-long nanorods shows 10 times higher than that of 400 nm-long ones, and an encouraging maximum photoconversion efficiency of 0.25% is obtained under illumination of 100 mW/cm2 (AM 1.5), which is among the highest reported for an undoped ZnO photoelectrode to date.

  2. Using the group of non-linear cells design metamaterial bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hongwei; Song, Xin; Hu, Xiaolei; Gu, Jinliang

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents the wave propagation in one-dimensional metamaterial bar with attached group of non-linear local oscillators by using analytical and numerical models. The focus is on the influence of group of non-linear cells on the filtering properties of the bar in the 1000Hz to 2000Hz range. Group of Periodic cells with alternating properties exhibit interesting dynamic characteristics that enable them to act as filters. Waves can propagate along bars within specific bands of frequencies called pass bands, and attenuate within bands of frequencies called gaps. Gaps in structures with group of periodic cells are located according on the frequency of cells. From the cell, we can yield the effect negative stiffness and effect negative mass. We can also design the gaps from attached oscillators or cells. In the uniform case the gap is located around the resonant frequency of the oscillators, and thus a stop band can be created in the lower frequency range. In the case with group of non-linear cells the results show that the position of the gap can be designed, and the design depends on the amplitude and the degree of non-linear cells.

  3. Phased array compaction cell for measurement of the transversely isotropic elastic properties of compacting sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Nihei, K.T.; Nakagawa, S.; Reverdy, F.; Meyer, L.R.; Duranti, L.; Ball, G.

    2010-12-15

    Sediments undergoing compaction typically exhibit transversely isotropic (TI) elastic properties. We present a new experimental apparatus, the phased array compaction cell, for measuring the TI elastic properties of clay-rich sediments during compaction. This apparatus uses matched sets of P- and S-wave ultrasonic transducers located along the sides of the sample and an ultrasonic P-wave phased array source, together with a miniature P-wave receiver on the top and bottom ends of the sample. The phased array measurements are used to form plane P-waves that provide estimates of the phase velocities over a range of angles. From these measurements, the five TI elastic constants can be recovered as the sediment is compacted, without the need for sample unloading, recoring, or reorienting. This paper provides descriptions of the apparatus, the data processing, and an application demonstrating recovery of the evolving TI properties of a compacting marine sediment sample.

  4. Flexible complementary metal oxide semiconductor microelectrode arrays with applications in single cell characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajouhi, H.; Jou, A. Y.; Jain, R.; Ziabari, A.; Shakouri, A.; Savran, C. A.; Mohammadi, S.

    2015-11-01

    A highly flexible microelectrode array with an embedded complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) instrumentation amplifier suitable for sensing surfaces of biological entities is developed. The array is based on ultrathin CMOS islands that are thermally isolated from each other and are interconnected by meandered nano-scale wires that can adapt to cellular surfaces with micro-scale curvatures. CMOS temperature sensors are placed in the islands and are optimally biased to have high temperature sensitivity. While no live cell thermometry is conducted, a measured temperature sensitivity of 0.15 °C in the temperature range of 35 to 40 °C is achieved by utilizing a low noise CMOS lock-in amplifier implemented in the same technology. The monolithic nature of CMOS sensors and amplifier circuits and their versatile flexible interconnecting wires overcome the sensitivity and yield limitations of microelectrode arrays fabricated in competing technologies.

  5. A miniature high voltage plasma interaction flight experiment - Project MINX. [for measuring solar cell array parasitic current drain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, T. J.; Triner, J. E.; Sater, B. L.; Cohen, D.; Somberg, H.

    1974-01-01

    A miniature high-voltage array was fabricated, incorporating the multi-junction edge illuminated (MJC) cell technique. The array consists of 32 2x2.2 cm MJCs, series connected, capable of 1600 V open circuit at 1 AMO and 1.2 mA short circuit. A solid state, high-voltage relay is connected across each 4-cell subgroup of the array. It was built to test plasma current drain on space systems using high voltage as might occur when a high-voltage solar array is operated from low to synchronous orbit.

  6. Integrated Antenna/Solar Array Cell (IA/SAC) System for Flexible Access Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ricard Q.; Clark, Eric B.; Pal, Anna Maria T.; Wilt, David M.; Mueller, Carl H.

    2004-01-01

    Present satellite communications systems normally use separate solar cells and antennas. Since solar cells generally account for the largest surface area of the spacecraft, co-locating the antenna and solar cells on the same substrate opens the possibility for a number of data-rate-enhancing communications link architecture that would have minimal impact on spacecraft weight and size. The idea of integrating printed planar antenna and solar array cells on the same surface has been reported in the literature. The early work merely attempted to demonstrate the feasibility by placing commercial solar cells besides a patch antenna. Recently, Integrating multiple antenna elements and solar cell arrays on the same surface was reported for both space and terrestrial applications. The application of photovoltaic solar cell in a planar antenna structure where the radiating patch antenna is replaced by a Si solar cell has been demonstrated in wireless communication systems (C. Bendel, J. Kirchhof and N. Henze, 3rd Would Photovotaic Congress, Osaka, Japan, May 2003). Based on a hybrid approach, a 6x1 slot array with circularly polarized crossdipole elements co-located on the same surface of the solar cells array has been demonstrated (S. Vaccaro, J. R. Mosig and P. de Maagt, IEEE Trans. Ant. and Propag., Vol. 5 1, No. 8, Aug. 2003). Amorphous silicon solar cells with about 5-10% efficiency were used in these demonstrations. This paper describes recent effort to integrate advanced solar cells with printed planar antennas. Compared to prior art, the proposed WSAC concept is unique in the following ways: 1) Active antenna element will be used to achieve dynamic beam steering; 2) High efficiency (30%) GaAs multi-junction solar cells will be used instead of Si, which has an efficiency of about 15%; 3) Antenna and solar cells are integrated on a common GaAs substrate; and 4) Higher data rate capability. The IA/SAC is designed to operate at X-band (8-12 GH) and higher frequencies

  7. High efficiency, broadband solar cell architectures based on arrays of volumetrically distributed narrowband photovoltaic fibers.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Brendan; Nothern, Denis; Pipe, Kevin P; Shtein, Max

    2010-09-13

    We propose a novel solar cell architecture consisting of multiple fiber-based photovoltaic (PV) cells. Each PV fiber element is designed to maximize the power conversion efficiency within a narrow band of the incident solar spectrum, while reflecting other spectral components through the use of optical microcavity effects and distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) coatings. Combining PV fibers with complementary absorption and reflection characteristics into volume-filling arrays enables spectrally tuned modules having an effective dispersion element intrinsic to the architecture, resulting in high external quantum efficiency over the incident spectrum. While this new reflective tandem architecture is not limited to one particular material system, here we apply the concept to organic PV (OPV) cells that use a metal-organic-metal-dielectric layer structure, and calculate the expected performance of such arrays. Using realistic material properties for organic absorbers, transport layers, metallic electrodes, and DBR coatings, 17% power conversion efficiency can be reached.

  8. Interfacial electron transfer of Shewanella putrefaciens enhanced by nanoflaky nickel oxide array in microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Yan; Wu, Xiao-Shuai; Li, Chang Ming

    2014-11-01

    A uniform nanoflaky nickel oxide (NiO) array is constructed on carbon cloth via optimized conditions, and further employed as an anode in Shewanella putrefaciens (S. putrefaciens) microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Results indicate that the NiO nanoflakes/carbon cloth anode significantly improves the MFC performance in comparison to the unmodified carbon cloth, delivering about three times higher power density. This attributes to an enhanced interfacial electron transfer rate between bacteria cell and nanoflaky NiO array-modified carbon fiber and improved adhesion of bacteria cells on the modified carbon fiber for more active reaction centers. Considering the facile synthesis process, low cost and long discharging lifetime, this NiO/carbon cloth anode could be very promising to be applied for high performance, large scale MFCs.

  9. Genomic profiling of invasive melanoma cell lines by array comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Koroknai, Viktória; Ecsedi, Szilvia; Vízkeleti, Laura; Kiss, Tímea; Szász, István; Lukács, Andrea; Papp, Orsolya; Ádány, Róza; Balázs, Margit

    2016-04-01

    Malignant melanoma is one of the most aggressive human cancers. Invasion of cells is the first step in metastasis, resulting in cell migration through tissue compartments. We aimed to evaluate genomic alterations specifically associated with the invasive characteristics of melanoma cells. Matrigel invasion assays were used to determine the invasive properties of cell lines that originated from primary melanomas. Array comparative genomic hybridization analyses were carried out to define the chromosome copy number alterations (CNAs). Several recurrent CNAs were identified by array comparative genomic hybridization that affected melanoma-related genes. Invasive primary cell lines showed high frequencies of CNAs, including the loss of 7q and gain of 12q chromosomal regions targeting PTPN12, ADAM22, FZD1, TFPI2, GNG11, COL1A2, SMURF1, VGF, RELN and GLIPR1 genes. Gain of the GDNF (5p13.1), GPAA1, PLEC and SHARPIN (8q24.3) genes was significantly more frequent in invasive cell lines compared with the noninvasive ones. Importantly, copy number gains of these genes were also found in cell lines that originated from metastases, suggesting their role in melanoma metastasis formation. The present study describes genomic differences between invasive and noninvasive melanoma cell lines that may contribute toward the aggressive phenotype of human melanoma cells. PMID:26656572

  10. Design of coated standing nanowire array solar cell performing beyond the planar efficiency limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yang; Ye, Qinghao; Shen, Wenzhong

    2016-05-01

    The single standing nanowire (SNW) solar cells have been proven to perform beyond the planar efficiency limits in both open-circuit voltage and internal quantum efficiency due to the built-in concentration and the shifting of the absorption front. However, the expandability of these nano-scale units to a macro-scale photovoltaic device remains unsolved. The main difficulty lies in the simultaneous preservation of an effective built-in concentration in each unit cell and a broadband high absorption capability of their array. Here, we have provided a detailed theoretical guideline for realizing a macro-scale solar cell that performs furthest beyond the planar limits. The key lies in a complementary design between the light-trapping of the single SNWs and that of the photonic crystal slab formed by the array. By tuning the hybrid HE modes of the SNWs through the thickness of a coaxial dielectric coating, the optimized coated SNW array can sustain an absorption rate over 97.5% for a period as large as 425 nm, which, together with the inherited carrier extraction advantage, leads to a cell efficiency increment of 30% over the planar limit. This work has demonstrated the viability of a large-size solar cell that performs beyond the planar limits.

  11. Design and Implementation of A CMOS Light Pulse Receiver Cell Array for Spatial Optical Communications

    PubMed Central

    Sarker, Md. Shakowat Zaman; Itoh, Shinya; Hamai, Moeta; Takai, Isamu; Andoh, Michinori; Yasutomi, Keita; Kawahito, Shoji

    2011-01-01

    A CMOS light pulse receiver (LPR) cell for spatial optical communications is designed and evaluated by device simulations and a prototype chip implementation. The LPR cell consists of a pinned photodiode and four transistors. It works under sub-threshold region of a MOS transistor and the source terminal voltage which responds to the logarithm of the photo current are read out with a source follower circuit. For finding the position of the light spot on the focal plane, an image pixel array is embedded on the same plane of the LPR cell array. A prototype chip with 640 × 240 image pixels and 640 × 240 LPR cells is implemented with 0.18 μm CMOS technology. A proposed model of the transient response of the LPR cell agrees with the result of the device simulations and measurements. Both imaging at 60 fps and optical communication at the carrier frequency of 1 MHz are successfully performed. The measured signal amplitude and the calculation results of photocurrents show that the spatial optical communication up to 100 m is feasible using a 10 × 10 LED array. PMID:22319398

  12. Design and implementation of a CMOS light pulse receiver cell array for spatial optical communications.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Md Shakowat Zaman; Itoh, Shinya; Hamai, Moeta; Takai, Isamu; Andoh, Michinori; Yasutomi, Keita; Kawahito, Shoji

    2011-01-01

    A CMOS light pulse receiver (LPR) cell for spatial optical communications is designed and evaluated by device simulations and a prototype chip implementation. The LPR cell consists of a pinned photodiode and four transistors. It works under sub-threshold region of a MOS transistor and the source terminal voltage which responds to the logarithm of the photo current are read out with a source follower circuit. For finding the position of the light spot on the focal plane, an image pixel array is embedded on the same plane of the LPR cell array. A prototype chip with 640 × 240 image pixels and 640 × 240 LPR cells is implemented with 0.18 μm CMOS technology. A proposed model of the transient response of the LPR cell agrees with the result of the device simulations and measurements. Both imaging at 60 fps and optical communication at the carrier frequency of 1 MHz are successfully performed. The measured signal amplitude and the calculation results of photocurrents show that the spatial optical communication up to 100 m is feasible using a 10 × 10 LED array.

  13. Efficient Perovskite Solar Cells Depending on TiO2 Nanorod Arrays.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Dai, Si-Min; Zhu, Pei; Deng, Lin-Long; Xie, Su-Yuan; Cui, Qian; Chen, Hong; Wang, Ning; Lin, Hong

    2016-08-24

    Perovskite solar cells (PSCs) with TiO2 materials have attracted much attention due to their high photovoltaic performance. Aligned TiO2 nanorods have long been used for potential application in highly efficient perovskite solar cells, but the previously reported efficiencies of perovskite solar cells based on TiO2 nanorod arrays were underrated. Here we show a solvothermal method based on a modified ketone-HCl system with the addition of organic acids suitable for modulation of the TiO2 nanorod array films to fabricate highly efficient perovskite solar cells. Photovoltaic measurements indicated that efficient nanorod-structured perovskite solar cells can be achieved with the length of the nanorods as long as approximately 200 nm. A record efficiency of 18.22% under the reverse scan direction has been optimized by avoiding direct contact between the TiO2 nanorods and the hole transport materials, eliminating the organic residues on the nanorod surfaces using UV-ozone treatment and tuning the nanorod array morphologies through addition of different organic acids in the solvothermal process. PMID:27480286

  14. Efficient Perovskite Solar Cells Depending on TiO2 Nanorod Arrays.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Dai, Si-Min; Zhu, Pei; Deng, Lin-Long; Xie, Su-Yuan; Cui, Qian; Chen, Hong; Wang, Ning; Lin, Hong

    2016-08-24

    Perovskite solar cells (PSCs) with TiO2 materials have attracted much attention due to their high photovoltaic performance. Aligned TiO2 nanorods have long been used for potential application in highly efficient perovskite solar cells, but the previously reported efficiencies of perovskite solar cells based on TiO2 nanorod arrays were underrated. Here we show a solvothermal method based on a modified ketone-HCl system with the addition of organic acids suitable for modulation of the TiO2 nanorod array films to fabricate highly efficient perovskite solar cells. Photovoltaic measurements indicated that efficient nanorod-structured perovskite solar cells can be achieved with the length of the nanorods as long as approximately 200 nm. A record efficiency of 18.22% under the reverse scan direction has been optimized by avoiding direct contact between the TiO2 nanorods and the hole transport materials, eliminating the organic residues on the nanorod surfaces using UV-ozone treatment and tuning the nanorod array morphologies through addition of different organic acids in the solvothermal process.

  15. Investigation of optimal method for inducing harmonic motion in tissue using a linear ultrasound phased array--a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Heikkilä, Janne; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2006-04-01

    Many noninvasive ultrasound techniques have been developed to explore mechanical properties of soft tissues. One of these methods, Localized Harmonic Motion Imaging (LHMI), has been proposed to be used for ultrasound surgery monitoring. In LHMI, dynamic ultrasound radiation-force stimulation induces displacements in a target that can be measured using pulse-echo imaging and used to estimate the elastic properties of the target. In this initial, simulation study, the use of a one-dimensional phased array is explored for the induction of the tissue motion. The study compares three different dual-frequency and amplitude-modulated single-frequency methods for the inducing tissue motion. Simulations were computed in a homogeneous soft-tissue volume. The Rayleigh integral was used in the simulations of the ultrasound fields and the tissue displacements were computed using a finite-element method (FEM). The simulations showed that amplitude-modulated sonication using a single frequency produced the largest vibration amplitude of the target tissue. These simulations demonstrate that the properties of the tissue motion are highly dependent on the sonication method and that it is important to consider the full three-dimensional distribution of the ultrasound field for controlling the induction of tissue motion.

  16. Demonstration of a micromachined planar distribution network in gap waveguide technology for a linear slot array antenna at 100 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahiminejad, S.; Zaman, A. U.; Haasl, S.; Kildal, P.-S.; Enoksson, P.

    2016-07-01

    The need for high frequency antennas is rapidly increasing with the development of new wireless rate communication technology. Planar antennas have an attractive form factor, but they require a distribution network. Microstrip technology is most commonly used at low frequency but suffers from large dielectric and ohmic losses at higher frequencies and particularly above 100 GHz. Substrate-integrated waveguides also suffer from dielectric losses. In addition, standard rectangular waveguide interfaces are inconvenient due to the four flange screws that must be tightly fastened to the antenna to avoid leakage. The current paper presents a planar slot array antenna that does not suffer from any of these problems. The distribution network is realized by micromachining using low-loss gap waveguide technology, and it can be connected to a standard rectangular waveguide flange without using any screws or additional packaging. To realize the antenna at these frequencies, it was fabricated with micromachining, which offers the required high precision, and a low-cost fabrication method. The antenna was micromachined with DRIE in two parts, one silicon-on-insulator plate and one Si plate, which were both covered with Au to achieve conductivity. The input reflection coefficient was measured to be below 10 dB over a 15.5% bandwidth, and the antenna gain was measured to be 10.4 dBi, both of which are in agreement with simulations.

  17. Role of the array geometry in multi-bilayer hair cell sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamaddoni, Nima J.; Sarles, Stephen A.

    2014-03-01

    Recently, a bio-inspired, synthetic membrane-based hair cell sensor was fabricated and characterized. This sensor generates current in response to mechanical stimuli, such as airflow or free vibration, which perturb the sensor's hair. Vibration transferred from the hair to a lipid membrane (lipid bilayer) causes a voltage-dependent time rate of change in electrical capacitance of the membrane, which produces measurable current. Studies to date have been performed on systems containing only two droplets and a single bilayer, even though an array of multiple bilayers can be formed with more than 2 droplets. Thus, it is yet to be determined how multiple lipid bilayers affect the sensing response of a membrane-based hair cell sensor. In this work, we assemble serial droplet arrays with more than 1 bilayer to experimentally study the current generated by each membrane in response to perturbation of a single hair element. Two serial array configurations are studied: The first consists of a serial array of 3 bilayers formed using 4 droplets with the hair positioned in an end droplet. The second configuration consists of 3 droplets and 2 bilayers in series with the hair positioned in the central droplet. In serial arrays of up to four droplets, we observe that mechanotransduction of the hair's motion into a capacitive current occurs at every membrane, with bilayers positioned adjacent to the droplet containing the hair generating the largest sensing current. The measured currents suggest the total current generated by all bilayers in a 4-droplet, 3-bilaye array is greater than the current produced by a single-membrane sensor and similar in magnitude to the sum of currents output by 3, single-bilayer sensors operated independently. Moreover, we learned that bilayers positioned on the same side of the hair produce sensing currents that are in-phase, whereas bilayers positioned on opposite sides of the droplet containing the hair generate out-of-phase responses.

  18. A microfluidic microbial fuel cell array that supports long-term multiplexed analyses of electricigens.

    PubMed

    Hou, Huijie; Li, Lei; Ceylan, Cemile Ümran; Haynes, Abria; Cope, Julia; Wilkinson, Heather H; Erbay, Celal; de Figueiredo, Paul; Han, Arum

    2012-10-21

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are green energy technologies that exploit microbial metabolism to generate electricity. The widespread implementation of MFC technologies has been stymied by their high cost and limited power. MFC arrays in which device configurations or microbial consortia can be screened have generated significant interest because of their potential for defining aspects that will improve performance featuring high throughput characteristics. However, current miniature MFCs and MFC array systems do not support long-term studies that mimic field conditions, and hence, have limitations in fully characterizing and understanding MFC performances in varieties of conditions. Here, we describe an MFC array device that incorporates microfluidic technology to enable continuous long-term analysis of MFC performance at high throughput utilizing periodic anolyte/catholyte replenishment. The system showed 360% higher power output and 700% longer operating time when compared to MFC arrays without catholyte replenishment. We further demonstrate the utility of the system by reporting its successful use in screening microbial consortia collected from geographically diverse environments for communities that support enhanced MFC performance. Taken together, this work demonstrates that anolyte/catholyte replenishment can significantly improve the long-term performance of microfabricated MFC arrays, and support the characterization of diverse microbial consortia.

  19. A mixed approach to artifacts minimization in a continuous-rotate X-ray based tomographic imaging system using linear detector array.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Umesh; Ramakrishna, G S

    2002-10-01

    Adaptation of a general-purpose digital radiographic scintillator-based linear detector array (LDA) in a continuous-rotate third generation X-ray industrial tomographic imaging system and the resulting artifacts are discussed. Sources of error in the projection data are identified and a mixed approach, involving neighborhood averaging and row-wise application of a low-pass filter for the minimization of artifacts in the reconstructed images using weighted convolution back projection algorithm is illustrated. It is observed that the recently launched LDA can easily be adapted for industrial tomographic imaging of low-density specimen in a cost effective way by incorporating the suggested artifact removal technique in the given configuration.

  20. A non-destructive readout circuit of the linear array image sensor with over 90dB dynamic range and 190k fps for radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Cong-jie; Gao, Zhi-yuan; Zeng, Xin-ji; Yao, Su-ying; Gao, Jing

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a non-destructive readout circuit of the linear array image sensor with wide dynamic range and high speed readout for radar system. A multi-capacitor and self-regulated capacitive trans-impedance amplifier (CTIA) structure is employed to extend the dynamic range. The gain of the CTIA is auto adjusted by switching different capacitors to the integration node asynchronously according to the output voltage. A class AB OPA is utilized to drive all the additional capacitors to achieve high speed readout. A photo response curve presents as a polyline with 5 segments, which enables a 101.7 dB dynamic range. In addition, the exposure time is 5.12us in the simulation, then an over 190k fps is achieved.

  1. Cell culture arrays using micron-sized ferromagnetic ring-shaped thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chen-Yu; Wei, Zung-Hang; Lai, Mei-Feng; Ger, Tzong-Rong

    2015-05-07

    Cell patterning has become an important technology for tissue engineering. In this research, domain walls are formed at the two ends of a ferromagnetic ring thin film after applying a strong external magnetic field, which can effectively attract magnetically labeled cells and control the position for biological cell. Magnetophoresis experiment was conducted to quantify the magnetic nanoparticle inside the cells. A ring-shaped magnetic thin films array was fabricated through photolithography. It is observed that magnetically labeled cells can be successfully attracted to the two ends of the ring-shaped magnetic thin film structure and more cells were attracted and further attached to the structures. The cells are co-cultured with the structure and kept proliferating; therefore, such ring thin film can be an important candidate for in-vitro biomedical chips or tissue engineering.

  2. Absorption efficiency enhancement in inorganic and organic thin film solar cells via plasmonic honeycomb nanoantenna arrays.

    PubMed

    Tok, Rüştü Umut; Sendur, Kürşat

    2013-08-15

    We demonstrate theoretically that by embedding plasmonic honeycomb nanoantenna arrays into the active layers of inorganic (c-Si) and organic (P3HT:PCBM/PEDOT:PSS) thin film solar cells, absorption efficiency can be improved. To obtain the solar cell absorption spectrum that conforms to the solar radiation, spectral broadening is achieved by breaking the symmetry within the Wigner-Seitz unit cell on a uniform hexagonal grid. For optimized honeycomb designs, absorption efficiency enhancements of 106.2% and 20.8% are achieved for c-Si and P3HT:PCBM/PEDOT:PSS thin film solar cells, respectively. We have demonstrated that the transverse modes are responsible for the enhancement in c-Si solar cells, whereas both the longitudinal and transverse modes, albeit weaker, are the main enhancement mechanisms for P3HT:PCBM/PEDOT:PSS solar cells. For both inorganic and organic solar cells, the absorption enhancement is independent of polarization.

  3. Axial ultrasound B-scans of the entire eye with a 20-MHz linear array: correction of crystalline lens phase aberration by applying Fermat's principle.

    PubMed

    Mateo, Tony; Chang, Alexandre; Mofid, Yassine; Pisella, Pierre-Jean; Ossant, Frederic

    2014-11-01

    In ophthalmic ultrasonography the crystalline lens is known to be the main source of phase aberration, causing a significant decrease in resolution and distortion effects on axial B-scans. This paper proposes a computationally efficient method to correct the phase aberration arising from the crystalline lens, including refraction effects using a bending ray tracing approach based on Fermat's principle. This method is used as a basis to perform eye-adapted beamforming (BF), with appropriate focusing delays for a 128-element 20-MHz linear array in both emission and reception. Implementation was achieved on an in-house developed experimental ultrasound scanning device, the ECODERM. The proposed BF was tested in vitro by imaging a wire phantom through an eye phantom consisting of a synthetic gelatin lens anatomically set up in an appropriate liquid (turpentine) to approach the in vivo velocity ratio. Both extremes of accommodation shapes of the human crystalline lens were investigated. The performance of the developed BF was evaluated in relation to that in homogeneous medium and compared to a conventional delay-and-sum (DAS) BF and a second adapted BF which was simplified to ignore the lens refraction. Global expectations provided by our method with the transducer array are reviewed by an analysis quantifying both image quality and spatial fidelity, as well as the detrimental effects of a crystalline lens in conventional reconstruction. Compared to conventional array imaging, the results indicated a two-fold improvement in the lateral resolution, greater sensitivity and a considerable reduction of spatial distortions that were sufficient to envisage reliable biometry directly in B-mode, especially phakometry. PMID:24988589

  4. Non-linear waveform analysis for water-layer response and its application to high-frequency receiver function analysis using OBS array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akuhara, Takeshi; Mochizuki, Kimihiro; Kawakatsu, Hitoshi; Takeuchi, Nozomu

    2016-09-01

    Determination of a response of the sea water column to teleseismic plane wave is important to suppress adverse effects of water reverberations in calculating receiver functions (RFs) using ocean-bottom seismometer (OBS) records. We present a novel non-linear waveform analysis method using the simulated annealing algorithm to determine such a water-layer response recorded by an OBS array. We then demonstrate its usefulness for the RF estimation through its application to synthetic and observed data. Synthetic experiments suggest that the water-layer response constrained in this way has a potential to improve RFs of OBS records drastically even in the high-frequency range (to 4 Hz). By applying it to data observed by the OBS array around the Kii Peninsula, southwestern Japan, we identified a low-velocity zone at the top of the subducting Philippine Sea plate. This zone may represent the incoming fluid-rich sediment layer that has been reported by active-source seismic survey.

  5. Phenomic Assessment of Genetic Buffering by Kinetic Analysis of Cell Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, John; Guo, Jingyu; Hartman, John L.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Quantitative high throughput cell array phenotyping (Q-HTCP) is applied to the genomic collection of yeast gene deletion mutants for systematic, comprehensive assessment of the contribution of genes and gene combinations to any phenotype of interest (phenomic analysis). Interacting gene networks influence every phenotype. Genetic buffering refers to how gene interaction networks stabilize or destabilize a phenotype. Like genomics, phenomics varies in its resolution with there being a tradeoff allocating a greater number of measurements per sample to enhance quantification of the phenotype vs. increasing the number of different samples by obtaining fewer measurement per sample. The Q-HTCP protocol we describe assesses 50,000–70,000 cultures per experiment by obtaining kinetic growth curves from time series imaging of agar cell arrays. This approach was developed for the yeast gene deletion strains, but it could be applied as well to other microbial mutant arrays grown on solid agar media. The methods we describe are for creation and maintenance of frozen stocks, liquid source array preparation, agar destination plate printing, image scanning, image analysis, curve fitting and evaluation of gene interaction. PMID:25213246

  6. Ag nanoparticle-deposited TiO2 nanotube arrays for electrodes of Dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Go; Ohmi, Hayato; Tan, Wai Kian; Lockman, Zainovia; Muto, Hiroyuki; Matsuda, Atsunori

    2015-05-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells composed of a photoanode of Ag nanoparticle (NP)-deposited TiO2 nanotube (TNT) arrays were fabricated. The TNT arrays were prepared by anodizing Ti films on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO)-coated glass substrates. Efficient charge transportation through the ordered nanostructure of TNT arrays should be carried out compared to conventional particulate TiO2 electrodes. However, it has been a big challenge to grow TNT arrays on FTO glass substrates with the lengths needed for sufficient light-harvesting (tens of micrometers). In this work, we deposited Ag nanoparticles (NPs) on the wall of TNT arrays to enhance light-harvesting property. Dye-sensitized solar cells with these Ag NP-deposited TNT arrays yielded a higher power conversion efficiency (2.03 %) than those without Ag NPs (1.39 %).

  7. Process Development for Automated Solar Cell and Module Production. Task 4: Automated Array Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A baseline sequence for the manufacture of solar cell modules was specified. Starting with silicon wafers, the process goes through damage etching, texture etching, junction formation, plasma edge etch, aluminum back surface field formation, and screen printed metallization to produce finished solar cells. The cells were then series connected on a ribbon and bonded into a finished glass tedlar module. A number of steps required additional developmental effort to verify technical and economic feasibility. These steps include texture etching, plasma edge etch, aluminum back surface field formation, array layup and interconnect, and module edge sealing and framing.

  8. A Multi-Modality CMOS Sensor Array for Cell-Based Assay and Drug Screening.

    PubMed

    Chi, Taiyun; Park, Jong Seok; Butts, Jessica C; Hookway, Tracy A; Su, Amy; Zhu, Chengjie; Styczynski, Mark P; McDevitt, Todd C; Wang, Hua

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we present a fully integrated multi-modality CMOS cellular sensor array with four sensing modalities to characterize different cell physiological responses, including extracellular voltage recording, cellular impedance mapping, optical detection with shadow imaging and bioluminescence sensing, and thermal monitoring. The sensor array consists of nine parallel pixel groups and nine corresponding signal conditioning blocks. Each pixel group comprises one temperature sensor and 16 tri-modality sensor pixels, while each tri-modality sensor pixel can be independently configured for extracellular voltage recording, cellular impedance measurement (voltage excitation/current sensing), and optical detection. This sensor array supports multi-modality cellular sensing at the pixel level, which enables holistic cell characterization and joint-modality physiological monitoring on the same cellular sample with a pixel resolution of 80 μm × 100 μm. Comprehensive biological experiments with different living cell samples demonstrate the functionality and benefit of the proposed multi-modality sensing in cell-based assay and drug screening.

  9. Aluminum oxide passivated radial junction sub-micrometre pillar array textured silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudasaini, Pushpa Raj; Elam, David; Ayon, Arturo A.

    2013-06-01

    We report radial, p-n junction, sub-micrometre, pillar array textured solar cells, fabricated on an n-type Czochralski silicon wafer. Relatively simple processing schemes such as metal-assisted chemical etching and spin on dopant techniques were employed for the fabrication of the proposed solar cells. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) grown aluminum oxide (Al2O3) was employed as a surface passivation layer on the B-doped emitter surface. In spite of the fact that the sub-micrometre pillar array textured surface has a relatively high surface-to-volume ratio, we observed an open circuit voltage (VOC) and a short circuit current density (JSC) as high as 572 mV and 29.9 mA cm-2, respectively, which leads to a power conversion efficiency in excess of 11.30%, for the optimized structure of the solar cell described herein. Broadband omnidirectional antireflection effects along with the light trapping property of the sub-micrometre, pillar array textured surface and the excellent passivation quality of the ALD-grown Al2O3 on the B-doped emitter surface were responsible for the enhanced electrical performance of the proposed solar cells.

  10. Three dimensional microfluidic cell arrays for ex vivo drug screening with mimicked vascular flow.

    PubMed

    Dereli-Korkut, Zeynep; Akaydin, H Dogus; Ahmed, A H Rezwanuddin; Jiang, Xuejun; Wang, Sihong

    2014-03-18

    Currently, there are no reliable ex vivo models that predict anticancer drug responses in human tumors accurately. A comprehensive method of mimicking a 3D microenvironment to study effects of anticancer drugs on specific cancer types is essential. Here, we report the development of a three-dimensional microfluidic cell array (3D μFCA), which reconstructs a 3D tumor microenvironment with cancer cells and microvascular endothelial cells. To mimic the in vivo spatial relationship between microvessels and nonendothelial cells embedded in extracellular matrix, three polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layers were built into this array. The multilayer property of the device enabled the imitation of the drug delivery in a microtissue array with simulated blood circulation. This 3D μFCA system may provide better predictions of drug responses and identification of a suitable treatment for a specific patient if biopsy samples are used. To the pharmaceutical industry, the scaling-up of our 3D μFCA system may offer a novel high throughput screening tool. PMID:24568664

  11. Electric Cell-Substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS) with Microelectrode Arrays for Investigation of Cancer Cell-Fibroblasts Interaction.

    PubMed

    Tran, Trong Binh; Baek, Changyoon; Min, Junhong

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment, including stromal cells, surrounding blood vessels and extracellular matrix components, has been defined as a crucial factor that influences the proliferation, drug-resistance, invasion and metastasis of malignant epithelial cells. Among other factors, the communications and interaction between cancer cells and stromal cells have been reported to play pivotal roles in cancer promotion and progression. To investigate these relationships, an on-chip co-culture model was developed to study the cellular interaction between A549-human lung carcinoma cells and MRC-5-human lung epithelial cells in both normal proliferation and treatment conditions. In brief, a co-culture device consisting of 2 individual fluidic chambers in parallel, which were separated by a 100 μm fence was utilized for cell patterning. Microelectrodes arrays were installed within each chamber including electrodes at various distances away from the confrontation line for the electrochemical impedimetric sensing assessment of cell-to-cell influence. After the fence was removed and cell-to-cell contact occurred, by evaluating the impedance signal responses representing cell condition and behavior, both direct and indirect cell-to-cell interactions through conditioned media were investigated. The impact of specific distances that lead to different influences of fibroblast cells on cancer cells in the co-culture environment was also defined. PMID:27088611

  12. Electric Cell-Substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS) with Microelectrode Arrays for Investigation of Cancer Cell – Fibroblasts Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Trong Binh; Baek, Changyoon; Min, Junhong

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment, including stromal cells, surrounding blood vessels and extracellular matrix components, has been defined as a crucial factor that influences the proliferation, drug-resistance, invasion and metastasis of malignant epithelial cells. Among other factors, the communications and interaction between cancer cells and stromal cells have been reported to play pivotal roles in cancer promotion and progression. To investigate these relationships, an on-chip co-culture model was developed to study the cellular interaction between A549—human lung carcinoma cells and MRC-5—human lung epithelial cells in both normal proliferation and treatment conditions. In brief, a co-culture device consisting of 2 individual fluidic chambers in parallel, which were separated by a 100 μm fence was utilized for cell patterning. Microelectrodes arrays were installed within each chamber including electrodes at various distances away from the confrontation line for the electrochemical impedimetric sensing assessment of cell-to-cell influence. After the fence was removed and cell-to-cell contact occurred, by evaluating the impedance signal responses representing cell condition and behavior, both direct and indirect cell-to-cell interactions through conditioned media were investigated. The impact of specific distances that lead to different influences of fibroblast cells on cancer cells in the co-culture environment was also defined. PMID:27088611

  13. Dynamic analysis and linear control strategies for proton exchange membrane fuel cell using a distributed parameter model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Methekar, R. N.; Prasad, V.; Gudi, R. D.

    To satisfy high power density demand in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), a robust control strategy is essential. A linear ratio control strategy is examined in this work. The manipulated variables are selected using steady-state relative gain array (RGA) analysis to be the inlet molar flow rates of hydrogen and coolant, and the controlled variables are average power density and average solid temperature, respectively. By selecting proper manipulated variables, the PEMFC does not exhibit sign change in gain and hence can be controlled by using a linear controller. Transfer function models obtained from step tests on the distributed parameter PEMFC model are used to design controllers for the multiple input-multiple output (MIMO) system. In addition, a ratio control strategy is proposed and evaluated, where the inlet molar flow rate of oxygen is used as a dependent manipulated variable and changed in a constant ratio with respect to the inlet molar flow rate of hydrogen. Simulation results show that the ratio control strategy provides a faster response than a MIMO control strategy. This ratio control strategy is able to circumvent the problem of oxygen starvation, and the increase in average solid temperature is small as compared to the MIMO control strategy.

  14. Time-Resolved Study of Nanoparticle Induced Apoptosis Using Microfabricated Single Cell Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Röttgermann, Peter J. F.; Dawson, Kenneth A.; Rädler, Joachim O.

    2016-01-01

    Cell fate decisions like apoptosis are heterogeneously implemented within a cell population and, consequently, the population response is recognized as sum of many individual dynamic events. Here, we report on the use of micro-patterned single-cell arrays for real-time tracking of nanoparticle-induced (NP) cell death in sets of thousands of cells in parallel. Annexin (pSIVA) and propidium iodide (PI), two fluorescent indicators of apoptosis, are simultaneously monitored after exposure to functionalized polystyrene (PS−NH2) nanobeads as a model system. We find that the distribution of Annexin onset times shifts to later times and broadens as a function of decreasing NP dose. We discuss the mean time-to-death as a function of dose, and show how the EC50 value depends both on dose and time of measurement. In addition, the correlations between the early and late apoptotic markers indicate a systematic shift from apoptotic towards necrotic cell death during the course of the experiment. Thus, our work demonstrates the potential of array-based single cell cytometry for kinetic analysis of signaling cascades in a high-throughput format. PMID:27600074

  15. Time-Resolved Study of Nanoparticle Induced Apoptosis Using Microfabricated Single Cell Arrays.

    PubMed

    Röttgermann, Peter J F; Dawson, Kenneth A; Rädler, Joachim O

    2016-01-01

    Cell fate decisions like apoptosis are heterogeneously implemented within a cell population and, consequently, the population response is recognized as sum of many individual dynamic events. Here, we report on the use of micro-patterned single-cell arrays for real-time tracking of nanoparticle-induced (NP) cell death in sets of thousands of cells in parallel. Annexin (pSIVA) and propidium iodide (PI), two fluorescent indicators of apoptosis, are simultaneously monitored after exposure to functionalized polystyrene (PS - NH 2) nanobeads as a model system. We find that the distribution of Annexin onset times shifts to later times and broadens as a function of decreasing NP dose. We discuss the mean time-to-death as a function of dose, and show how the EC 50 value depends both on dose and time of measurement. In addition, the correlations between the early and late apoptotic markers indicate a systematic shift from apoptotic towards necrotic cell death during the course of the experiment. Thus, our work demonstrates the potential of array-based single cell cytometry for kinetic analysis of signaling cascades in a high-throughput format. PMID:27600074

  16. Ultra-low-mass flexible planar solar arrays using 50-micron-thick solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costogue, E. N.; Rayl, G.

    1978-01-01

    A conceptual design study has been completed which has shown the feasibility of ultra-low-mass planar solar arrays with specific power of 200 watts/kilogram. The beginning of life (BOL) power output of the array designs would be 10 kW at 1 astronomical unit (AU) and a 55C deg operating temperature. Two designs were studied: a retractable rollout design and a non-retractable fold-out. The designs employed a flexible low-mass blanket and low-mass structures. The blanket utilized 2 x 2 cm high-efficiency (13.5% at 28C deg AM0), ultra-thin (50 micron), silicon solar cells protected by thin (75 micron) plastic encapsulants. The structural design utilized the 'V'-stiffened approach which allows a lower mass boom to be used. In conjunction with the conceptual design, modules using the thin cells and plastic encapsulant were designed and fabricated.

  17. Water management in a planar air-breathing fuel cell array using operando neutron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coz, E.; Théry, J.; Boillat, P.; Faucheux, V.; Alincant, D.; Capron, P.; Gébel, G.

    2016-11-01

    Operando Neutron imaging is used for the investigation of a planar air-breathing array comprising multiple cells in series. The fuel cell demonstrates a stable power density level of 150 mW/cm2. Water distribution and quantification is carried out at different operating points. Drying at high current density is observed and correlated to self-heating and natural convection. Working in dead-end mode, water accumulation at lower current density is largely observed on the anode side. However, flooding mechanisms are found to begin with water condensation on the cathode side, leading to back-diffusion and anodic flooding. Specific in-plane and through-plane water distribution is observed and linked to the planar array design.

  18. Solid phase microextraction of diclofenac using molecularly imprinted polymer sorbent in hollow fiber combined with fiber optic-linear array spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pebdani, Arezou Amiri; Shabani, Ali Mohammad Haji; Dadfarnia, Shayessteh; Khodadoust, Saeid

    2015-08-01

    A simple solid phase microextraction method based on molecularly imprinted polymer sorbent in the hollow fiber (MIP-HF-SPME) combined with fiber optic-linear array spectrophotometer has been applied for the extraction and determination of diclofenac in environmental and biological samples. The effects of different parameters such as pH, times of extraction, type and volume of the organic solvent, stirring rate and donor phase volume on the extraction efficiency of the diclofenac were investigated and optimized. Under the optimal conditions, the calibration graph was linear (r2 = 0.998) in the range of 3.0-85.0 μg L-1 with a detection limit of 0.7 μg L-1 for preconcentration of 25.0 mL of the sample and the relative standard deviation (n = 6) less than 5%. This method was applied successfully for the extraction and determination of diclofenac in different matrices (water, urine and plasma) and accuracy was examined through the recovery experiments.

  19. Solid phase microextraction of diclofenac using molecularly imprinted polymer sorbent in hollow fiber combined with fiber optic-linear array spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Pebdani, Arezou Amiri; Shabani, Ali Mohammad Haji; Dadfarnia, Shayessteh; Khodadoust, Saeid

    2015-08-01

    A simple solid phase microextraction method based on molecularly imprinted polymer sorbent in the hollow fiber (MIP-HF-SPME) combined with fiber optic-linear array spectrophotometer has been applied for the extraction and determination of diclofenac in environmental and biological samples. The effects of different parameters such as pH, times of extraction, type and volume of the organic solvent, stirring rate and donor phase volume on the extraction efficiency of the diclofenac were investigated and optimized. Under the optimal conditions, the calibration graph was linear (r(2)=0.998) in the range of 3.0-85.0 μg L(-1) with a detection limit of 0.7 μg L(-1) for preconcentration of 25.0 mL of the sample and the relative standard deviation (n=6) less than 5%. This method was applied successfully for the extraction and determination of diclofenac in different matrices (water, urine and plasma) and accuracy was examined through the recovery experiments.

  20. Imaging of a linear diode bar for an optical cell stretcher

    PubMed Central

    Roth, K. B.; Neeves, K. B.; Squier, J.; Marr, D. W. M.

    2015-01-01

    We present a simplified approach for imaging a linear diode bar laser for application as an optical stretcher within a microfluidic geometry. We have recently shown that these linear sources can be used to measure cell mechanical properties; however, the source geometry creates imaging challenges. To minimize intensity losses and simplify implementation within microfluidic systems without the use of expensive objectives, we combine aspheric and cylindrical lenses to create a 1:1 image of the source at the stretcher focal plane and demonstrate effectiveness by measuring the deformation of human red blood cells and neutrophils. PMID:25798305

  1. Array-based sensing with nanoparticles: “Chemical noses” for sensing biomolecules and cell surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Oscar R.; Creran, Brian; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2010-01-01

    Nanoparticle-based arrays have been used to distinguish a wide range of biomolecular targets through pattern recognition. In this report, we highlight new “chemical nose” methodologies that use nanoparticle systems to provide high sensitivity sensing of biomolecular targets, including fluorescent polymer/gold nanoparticle complexes that can discriminate between different bioanalytes including proteins, bacteria, and mammalian cells as well as dye-based micellar systems for the detection of clinically important metallo- and non-metallo proteins. PMID:20801707

  2. Design of Low Power CMOS Read-Out with TDI Function for Infrared Linear Photodiode Array Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vizcaino, Paul; Ramirez-Angulo, Jaime; Patel, Umesh D.

    2007-01-01

    A new low voltage CMOS infrared readout circuit using the buffer-direct injection method is presented. It uses a single supply voltage of 1.8 volts and a bias current of 1uA. The time-delay integration technique is used to increase the signal to noise ratio. A current memory circuit with faulty diode detection is used to remove dark current for background compensation and to disable a photodiode in a cell if detected as faulty. Simulations are shown that verify the circuit that is currently in fabrication in 0.5ym CMOS technology.

  3. The status of lightweight photovoltaic space array technology based on amorphous silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanak, Joseph J.; Kaschmitter, Jim

    1991-01-01

    Ultralight, flexible photovoltaic (PV) array of amorphous silicon (a-Si) was identified as a potential low cost power source for small satellites. A survey was conducted of the status of the a-Si PV array technology with respect to present and future performance, availability, cost, and risks. For existing, experimental array blankets made of commercial cell material, utilizing metal foil substrates, the Beginning of Life (BOL) performance at Air Mass Zero (AM0) and 35 C includes total power up to 200 W, power per area of 64 W/sq m and power per weight of 258 W/kg. Doubling of power per weight occurs when polyimide substrates are used. Estimated End of Life (EOL) power output after 10 years in a nominal low earth orbit would be 80 pct. of BOL, the degradation being due to largely light induced effects (-10 to -15 pct.) and in part (-5 pct.) to space radiation. Predictions for the year 1995 for flexible PV arrays, made on the basis of published results for rigid a-Si modules, indicate EOL power output per area and per weight of 105 W/sq m and 400 W/kg, respectively, while predictions for the late 1990s based on existing U.S. national PV program goals indicate EOL values of 157 W/sq m and 600 W/kg. Cost estimates by vendors for 200 W ultralight arrays in volume of over 1000 units range from $100/watt to $125/watt. Identified risks include the lack of flexible, space compatible encapsulant, the lack of space qualification effort, recent partial or full acquisitions of US manufacturers of a-Si cells by foreign firms, and the absence of a national commitment for a long range development program toward developing of this important power source for space.

  4. Laser Printing of Three-Dimensional Multicellular Arrays for Studies of Cell–Cell and Cell–Environment Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Pflaum, Michael; Hess, Christian; Diamantouros, Stefanos; Schlie, Sabrina; Deiwick, Andrea; Koch, Lothar; Wilhelmi, Mathias; Jockenhoevel, Stefan; Haverich, Axel; Chichkov, Boris

    2011-01-01

    Utilization of living cells for therapies in regenerative medicine requires a fundamental understanding of the interactions between different cells and their environment. Moreover, common models based on adherent two-dimensional cultures are not appropriate to simulate the complex interactions that occur in a three-dimensional (3D) cell–microenvironment in vivo. In this study, we present a computer-aided method for the printing of multiple cell types in a 3D array using laser-assisted bioprinting. By printing spots of human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) and endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs), we demonstrate that (i) these cell spots can be arranged layer-by-layer in a 3D array; (ii) any cell–cell ratio, cell quantity, cell-type combination, and spot spacing can be realized within this array; and (iii) the height of the 3D array is freely scalable. As a proof of concept, we printed separate spots of ASCs and ECFCs within a 3D array and observed cell–cell interactions in vascular endothelial growth factor-free medium. It has been demonstrated that direct cell–cell contacts trigger the development of stable vascular-like networks. This method can be applied to study complex and dynamic relationships between cells and their local environment. PMID:21585313

  5. Large-Scale Arrays of Bowtie Nanoaperture Antennas for Nanoscale Dynamics in Living Cell Membranes.

    PubMed

    Flauraud, Valentin; van Zanten, Thomas S; Mivelle, Mathieu; Manzo, Carlo; Garcia Parajo, Maria F; Brugger, Jürgen

    2015-06-10

    We present a novel blurring-free stencil lithography patterning technique for high-throughput fabrication of large-scale arrays of nanoaperture optical antennas. The approach relies on dry etching through nanostencils to achieve reproducible and uniform control of nanoantenna geometries at the nanoscale, over millimeter-sizes in a thin aluminum film. We demonstrate the fabrication of over 400 000 bowtie nanoaperture (BNA) antennas on biocompatible substrates, having gap sizes ranging from (80 ± 5) nm down to (20 ± 10) nm. To validate their applicability on live cell research, we used the antenna substrates as hotspots of localized illumination to excite fluorescently labeled lipids on living cell membranes. The high signal-to-background afforded by the BNA arrays allowed the recording of single fluorescent bursts corresponding to the passage of freely diffusing individual lipids through hotspot excitation regions as small as 20 nm. Statistical analysis of burst length and intensity together with simulations demonstrate that the measured signals arise from the ultraconfined excitation region of the antennas. Because these inexpensive antenna arrays are fully biocompatible and amenable to their integration in most fluorescence microscopes, we foresee a large number of applications including the investigation of the plasma membrane of living cells with nanoscale resolution at endogenous expression levels.

  6. Large-Scale Arrays of Bowtie Nanoaperture Antennas for Nanoscale Dynamics in Living Cell Membranes.

    PubMed

    Flauraud, Valentin; van Zanten, Thomas S; Mivelle, Mathieu; Manzo, Carlo; Garcia Parajo, Maria F; Brugger, Jürgen

    2015-06-10

    We present a novel blurring-free stencil lithography patterning technique for high-throughput fabrication of large-scale arrays of nanoaperture optical antennas. The approach relies on dry etching through nanostencils to achieve reproducible and uniform control of nanoantenna geometries at the nanoscale, over millimeter-sizes in a thin aluminum film. We demonstrate the fabrication of over 400 000 bowtie nanoaperture (BNA) antennas on biocompatible substrates, having gap sizes ranging from (80 ± 5) nm down to (20 ± 10) nm. To validate their applicability on live cell research, we used the antenna substrates as hotspots of localized illumination to excite fluorescently labeled lipids on living cell membranes. The high signal-to-background afforded by the BNA arrays allowed the recording of single fluorescent bursts corresponding to the passage of freely diffusing individual lipids through hotspot excitation regions as small as 20 nm. Statistical analysis of burst length and intensity together with simulations demonstrate that the measured signals arise from the ultraconfined excitation region of the antennas. Because these inexpensive antenna arrays are fully biocompatible and amenable to their integration in most fluorescence microscopes, we foresee a large number of applications including the investigation of the plasma membrane of living cells with nanoscale resolution at endogenous expression levels. PMID:25926327

  7. Visualization and simulation of a linear explosive-induced pyroshock wave using Q-switched laser and phased array transducers in a space launcher composite structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Ryul; Jang, Jae-Kyeong; Choi, Mijin; Kong, Cheol-Won

    2015-04-01

    During space flights, pyrotechnic devices are used for various purposes such as separation of boosters, satellites, fairings, and stages. In particular, the prediction of high shock structural response induced by linear explosives is important for safe operation of pyrotechnic devices. In general, repetitive explosive testing using distributed accelerometers is widely used, but multiple test structures are usually necessary because they are easily damaged and not reusable. This paper pertains to a nondestructive technology to replace the damage-causing, time-consuming, expensive, dangerous, and low-repeatability explosive test with a laser-induced shock test. The method proposed in this paper predicts nondestructively the linear explosive-induced pyroshock wave, visualizes its propagation, and allows the simulation of some detonation conditions. A ballistic test based on a linear explosive and noncontact laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) as well as a nondestructive pyroshock test using laser-induced shock and PZT array sensors is performed in a 12.68-mm thick composite sandwich panel. The optimal laser-induced shock experimental conditions to predict real pyroshock response spectra (SRSs) are investigated by controlling the optical characteristics of the laser beam and adjusting the frequency bands in signal acquisition. The similarity of the SRS of the conditioned laser-induced shock to that of the real explosive pyroshock is evaluated with the mean acceleration difference. Next, the experimentally-determined optimal conditions are applied to arbitrary points in the laser-induced shock scanning area. Finally, it is shown that the proposed method will allow nondestructive and quantitative pyroshock testing, pyroshock wave propagation visualization showing the direction and magnitude of principal wave propagation, and detonation speed simulation depending on explosive type and detonation initiation point and direction.

  8. Simple and versatile methods for the fabrication of arrays of live mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Peterbauer, Thomas; Heitz, Johannes; Olbrich, Michael; Hering, Steffen

    2006-07-01

    Single-step methods for the generation of patterned surfaces on hydrogels are presented. Poly(vinyl alcohol) films covalently bonded on glass cover slips and commercially available hydrogel-coated polystyrene plates were used as cell-repellent surfaces. Cell-adhesive domains were created by spotting dilute solutions of sodium hypochlorite onto the surfaces. Alternatively, domains supporting cell attachment were created by exposure to UV light from a xenon excimer lamp, employing a contact mask. Rat skeletal myoblast cells, HEK 293 human embryonic kidney cells and Caco-2 colon carcinoma cells adhered and spread exclusively on modified areas. The surfaces are durable for weeks under cell culture conditions and re-usable after removal of the cells by trypsin treatment. Arrays of adhesive spots seeded with cells at a low density permitted dynamic monitoring of cell proliferation. Selected colonies can be harvested from the surfaces by means of local trypsination. Thus, these techniques may provide useful tools for the isolation of clonal cell populations. Additionally, we demonstrate the possibility of surface-mediated gene delivery from the micro patterns. We show that DNA, complexed with a lipid reagent, can be adsorbed on modified poly(vinyl alcohol) coatings, resulting in spatially controlled adhesion and reverse transfection of HEK 293 cells.

  9. Traceable clonal culture and chemodrug assay of heterogeneous prostate carcinoma PC3 cells in microfluidic single cell array chips

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jaehoon; Ingram, Patrick N.; Bersano-Begey, Tom; Yoon, Euisik

    2014-01-01

    Cancer heterogeneity has received considerable attention for its role in tumor initiation and progression, and its implication for diagnostics and therapeutics in the clinic. To facilitate a cellular heterogeneity study in a low cost and highly efficient manner, we present a microfluidic platform that allows traceable clonal culture and characterization. The platform captures single cells into a microwell array and cultures them for clonal expansion, subsequently allowing on-chip characterization of clonal phenotype and response against drug treatments. Using a heterogeneous prostate cancer model, the PC3 cell line, we verified our prototype, identifying three different sub-phenotypes and correlating their clonal drug responsiveness to cell phenotype. PMID:25553180

  10. Evaluation of genome coverage and fidelity of multiple displacement amplification from single cells by SNP array.

    PubMed

    Ling, Jiawei; Zhuang, Guanglun; Tazon-Vega, Barbara; Zhang, Chenhui; Cao, Baoqiang; Rosenwaks, Zev; Xu, Kangpu

    2009-11-01

    The scarce amount of DNA contained in a single cell is a limiting factor for clinical application of preimplantation genetic diagnosis mainly due to the risk of misdiagnosis caused by allele dropout and the difficulty in obtaining copy number variations in all 23 pairs of chromosomes. Multiple displacement amplification (MDA) has been reported to generate large quantity of products from small amount of templates. Here, we evaluated the fidelity of whole-genome amplification MDA from single or a few cells and determined the accuracy of chromosome copy number assessment on these MDA products using an Affymetrix 10K 2.0 SNP Mapping Array. An average coverage rate (86.2%) from single cells was obtained and the rates increased significantly when five or more cells were used as templates. Higher concordance for chromosome copy number from single cells could be achieved when the MDA amplified product was used as reference (93.1%) than when gDNA used as reference (82.8%). The present study indicates that satisfactory genome coverage can be obtained from single-cell MDA which may be used for studies where only a minute amount of genetic materials is available. Clinically, MDA coupled with SNP mapping array may provide a reliable and accurate method for chromosome copy number analysis and most likely for the detection of single-gene disorders as well. PMID:19671595

  11. Silicon microhole arrays architecture for stable and efficient photoelectrochemical cells using ionic liquids electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xiaojuan; Chen, Ling; Li, Junnan; Zhao, Jie

    2016-06-01

    Silicon microhole arrays (SiMHs) structure is constructed and fabricated by a low-cost maskless anodic etching process, which is applied as the photoanode for the silicon photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells. The depths of silicon microhole arrays can be independently controlled by the etching time. The light-scattering properties are also investigated. Additionally, surface morphology analysis show that large hole diameters of SiMHs is very favourable for the full-filling of ionic liquids electrolyte. Therefore, better electrochemical contact as well as high ionic conductivity of the ionic liquids electrolyte renders the PEC SiMHs solar cells to exhibit more excellent performance. After optimization, the maximum PCE could be achieved at 4.04% for the SiMHs cell. The performance of the SiMHs cell is highly comparable to that of silicon nanowires cell. More importantly, the liquid-state electrolyte is confined in the unique microhole structure, which can obviously prevent the leakage of the ionic liquids electrolyte, resulting in much better long-term stability than the reference devices. These preliminary results validate the concept of interpenetrating networks with semiconductor structure/ILs junction to develop stable and efficient PEC cells.

  12. A Research on Sour Sensation Mechanism of Fungiform Taste Receptor Cells Based on Microelectrode Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Chen, Peihua; Xiao, Lidan; Liu, Qingjun; Wang, Ping

    2009-05-01

    Taste receptor cells as the fundamental units of taste sensation are not only passive receivers to outside stimulus, but some primary process for the signals and information. In this paper, an innovation on acquisition of taste receptor cells was introduced and larger amount of cells could be obtained. A multichannel microelectrode array (MEA) system was applied in signal recording, which is used in non-invasive, multiple and simultaneous extracellular recording of taste receptor cells. The cells were treated with sour solutions of different pHs, and the relations between concentration of hydrogen and firing rate were observed. Firing rates on pH 7, pH 4 and pH 2 were approximately 1.38±0.01 (MEAN±SE)/s, 1.61±0.07/s and 2.75+0.15/s.

  13. Macroscopic quasi-linear theory and particle-in-cell simulation of helium ion anisotropy instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Peter H.; Seough, Jungjoon; Hwang, Junga; Nariyuki, Yasuhiro

    2015-08-01

    The protons and helium ions in the solar wind are observed to possess anisotropic temperature profiles. The anisotropy appears to be limited by various marginal instability conditions. One of the efficient methods to investigate the global dynamics and distribution of various temperature anisotropies in the large-scale solar wind models may be that based upon the macroscopic quasi-linear approach. The present paper investigates the proton and helium ion anisotropy instabilities on the basis of the quasi-linear theory versus particle-in-cell simulation. It is found that the overall dynamical development of the particle temperatures is quite accurately reproduced by the macroscopic quasi-linear scheme. The wave energy development in time, however, shows somewhat less restrictive comparisons, indicating that while the quasi-linear method is acceptable for the particle dynamics, the wave analysis probably requires higher-order physics, such as wave-wave coupling or nonlinear wave-particle interaction.

  14. Low cost microfluidic cell culture array using normally closed valves for cytotoxicity assay.

    PubMed

    Pasirayi, Godfrey; Scott, Simon M; Islam, Meez; O'Hare, Liam; Bateson, Simon; Ali, Zulfiqur

    2014-11-01

    A reusable low cost microfluidic cell culture array device (MCCAD) integrated with a six output concentration gradient generator (cGG) and 4×6 arrays of microchamber elements, addressed by a series of row and columnar pneumatically actuated normally closed (NC) microvalves was fabricated for cell-based screening of chemotherapeutic compounds. The poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) device consists of three layers: fluidic, control and membrane which are held by surface contact and made leak-proof by clamping pressure. The NC valves are actuated by a thick PDMS membrane that was created by a novel method based on the self-assembly of PDMS pre-polymer molecules over a denser calcium chloride solution. The membrane actuated the valves reliably and particulates such as alumina particles (3 µm) and MCF-7 cells (20-24 µm) (2×10(5) cells/mL) were flowed through the valves without causing blockage or leakage and consequently avoiding contamination of the different cell culture elements. The MCCAD was cast and assembled in a standard laboratory without specialist equipment and demonstrated for performing quantitative cell-based cytotoxicity assays of pyocyanine on human breast cancer (MCF-7) cells and assessed for toxic effect on human hepatocyte carcinoma (HepG2) cells as an indicator for liver injury. Then, the MCCAD was demonstrated for sequential drug combinatorial screening involving gradient generation of paclitaxel doses followed by treatment with aspirin doses on the viability of MCF-7 cells. The interaction between paclitaxel and aspirin was evaluated by using the Bliss independence predictive model and results showed reasonable agreement with the model. A robust, portable, easily fabricated and low cost device is therefore shown to conveniently carry out culturing of multiple cell lines for high throughput screening of anti-cancer compounds using minimal reagents. PMID:25127624

  15. Analysis of cell surface carbohydrate expression patterns in normal and tumorigenic human breast cell lines using lectin arrays.

    PubMed

    Chen, Siyuan; Zheng, Ting; Shortreed, Michael R; Alexander, Caroline; Smith, Lloyd M

    2007-08-01

    Cell surface carbohydrates play important roles in a wide variety of biological processes including cell adhesion, fertilization, differentiation, development, and tumor cell metastasis. Lectins are proteins of nonimmune origin which recognize and bind to specific carbohydrate structural epitopes. We have recently described the development and use of lectin arrays as tools for the elucidation of the carbohydrate structures expressed on cell surfaces. In the present work this technology is employed for the characterization of differences in carbohydrate expression patterns on normal and tumorigenic human breast cell lines, as well as on sublines differing in their tendency to "home" to different tissues during metastasis. Significant differences were observed, including changes that correlate with metastatic potential as well as with tissue-specific homing of metastatic cells.

  16. Process development for automated solar cell and module production. Task 4: Automated array assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A process sequence which can be used in conjunction with automated equipment for the mass production of solar cell modules for terrestrial use was developed. The process sequence was then critically analyzed from a technical and economic standpoint to determine the technological readiness of certain process steps for implementation. The steps receiving analysis were: back contact metallization, automated cell array layup/interconnect, and module edge sealing. For automated layup/interconnect, both hard automation and programmable automation (using an industrial robot) were studied. The programmable automation system was then selected for actual hardware development.

  17. Amplitude-modulated reticle constructed by a liquid crystal cell array.

    PubMed

    Itakura, Y; Sugimura, A; Tsutsumi, S

    1981-08-15

    A new type of amplitude-modulated (AM) reticle constructed by a liquid crystal (LC) cell array finds an excellent application in remote sensing for a flow velocity with unpredictable variation of speed and direction. The LC-AM reticle is a spatiotemporal spatial filter, optoelectrically achieved by using the consequent opaqueness due to the LCs dynamic scattering caused by the electric field sequentially applied to the respective LC cell. A feasibility test for the sensor with a pair of these reticles has measured the flow-velocity vector of a river. PMID:20333047

  18. Fabrication of polyHEMA grids by micromolding in capillaries for cell patterning and single-cell arrays.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fang; Ma, Binghe; Gao, Jie; Xie, Li; Wei, Chen; Jiang, Jin

    2015-10-01

    Control of cell adhesion and growth by microfabrication technology and surface chemistry is important in an increasing number of applications in biotechnology and medicine. In this study, we developed a method to fabricate (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (polyHEMA) grids on glass by micromolding in capillaries (MIMIC). As a non-fouling biomaterial, polyHEMA was used to inhibit the nonspecific bonding of cells, whereas the glass surface provided a cell adhesive background. The polyHEMA chemical barrier was directly obtained using MIMIC without surface modification, and the microchannel networks used for capillarity were easily achieved by reversibly bonding the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)mold and the glass. After fabrication of the polyHEMA micropattern, individual cytophilic microwells surrounded by cytophobic sidewalls were presented on the glass surface. The polyHEMA micropattern proved effective in controlling the shape and spreading of cells, and square-shaped mouse osteoblast MC3T3-E1 cells were obtained in microwell arrays after incubation for 3 days. Moreover, the widths of the microwells in this micropattern were optimized for use as single-cell arrays. The proposed method could be a convenient tool in the field of drug screening, stem cell research, and tissue engineering.

  19. From immobilized cells to motile cells on a bed-of-nails: effects of vertical nanowire array density on cell behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Persson, Henrik; Li, Zhen; Tegenfeldt, Jonas O.; Oredsson, Stina; Prinz, Christelle N.

    2015-01-01

    The field of vertical nanowire array-based applications in cell biology is growing rapidly and an increasing number of applications are being explored. These applications almost invariably rely on the physical properties of the nanowire arrays, creating a need for a better understanding of how their physical properties affect cell behaviour. Here, we investigate the effects of nanowire density on cell migration, division and morphology for murine fibroblasts. Our results show that few nanowires are sufficient to immobilize cells, while a high nanowire spatial density enables a ”bed-of-nails” regime, where cells reside on top of the nanowires and are fully motile. The presence of nanowires decreases the cell proliferation rate, even in the “bed-of-nails” regime. We show that the cell morphology strongly depends on the nanowire density. Cells cultured on low (0.1 μm−2) and medium (1 μm−2) density substrates exhibit an increased number of multi-nucleated cells and micronuclei. These were not observed in cells cultured on high nanowire density substrates (4 μm−2). The results offer important guidelines to minimize cell-function perturbations on nanowire arrays. Moreover, these findings offer the possibility to tune cell proliferation and migration independently by adjusting the nanowire density, which may have applications in drug testing. PMID:26691936

  20. Enabling linear alkyl carbonate electrolytes for high voltage Li-ion cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jian; Petibon, Remi; Xiong, Deijun; Ma, Lin; Dahn, J. R.

    2016-10-01

    Some of the problems of current electrolytes for high voltage Li-ion cells originate from ethylene carbonate (EC) which is thought to be an essential electrolyte component for Li-ion cells. Ethylene carbonate-free electrolytes containing 1 M LiPF6 in ethylmethyl carbonate (EMC) with small loadings of vinylene carbonate, fluoroethylene carbonate, or (4R,5S)-4,5-Difluoro-1,3-dioxolan-2-one acting as "enablers" were developed. These electrolytes used in Li(Ni0.4Mn0.4Co0.2)O2/graphite pouch type Li-ion cells tested at 4.2 V and 4.5 V yielded excellent charge-discharge cycling and storage properties. The results for cells containing linear alkyl carbonate electrolytes with no EC were compared to those of cells with EC-containing electrolytes incorporating additives proven to enhance cyclability of cells. The combination of EMC with appropriate amounts of these enablers yields cells with better performance than cells with EC-containing electrolytes incorporating additives tested to 4.5 V. Further optimizing these linear alkyl carbonate electrolytes with appropriate co-additives may represent a viable path to the successful commercial utilization of NMC/graphite Li-ion cells operated to 4.5 V and above.