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Sample records for linear control design

  1. Linear control design for guaranteed stability of uncertain linear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yedavalli, R. K.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper, a linear control design algorithm based on the elemental perturbation bounds developed recently is presented for a simple second order linear uncertain system satisfying matching conditions. The proposed method is compared with Guaranteed Cost Control (GCC), Multistep Guaranteed Cost Control (MGCC) and the Matching Condition (MC) methods and is shown to give guaranteed stability with lesser values for the control gains than some of the existing methods for the example considered.

  2. Design And Analysis Of Linear Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamison, John W.

    1991-01-01

    Package of five computer programs developed to assist in design and analysis of linear control systems by use of root-locus and frequency-response methods. Package written in FORTRAN (BODE, TPEAK) and BASIC (LOCUS, KTUNE, and POLYROOT).

  3. Design And Analysis Of Linear Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamison, John W.

    1991-01-01

    Package of five computer programs developed to assist in design and analysis of linear control systems by use of root-locus and frequency-response methods. Package written in FORTRAN (BODE, TPEAK) and BASIC (LOCUS, KTUNE, and POLYROOT).

  4. Controller design approach based on linear programming.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ryo; Shibasaki, Hiroki; Ogawa, Hiromitsu; Murakami, Takahiro; Ishida, Yoshihisa

    2013-11-01

    This study explains and demonstrates the design method for a control system with a load disturbance observer. Observer gains are determined by linear programming (LP) in terms of the Routh-Hurwitz stability criterion and the final-value theorem. In addition, the control model has a feedback structure, and feedback gains are determined to be the linear quadratic regulator. The simulation results confirmed that compared with the conventional method, the output estimated by our proposed method converges to a reference input faster when a load disturbance is added to a control system. In addition, we also confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed method by performing an experiment with a DC motor.

  5. Robust Control Design via Linear Programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keel, L. H.; Bhattacharyya, S. P.

    1998-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of synthesizing or designing a feedback controller of fixed dynamic order. The closed loop specifications considered here are given in terms of a target performance vector representing a desired set of closed loop transfer functions connecting various signals. In general these point targets are unattainable with a fixed order controller. By enlarging the target from a fixed point set to an interval set the solvability conditions with a fixed order controller are relaxed and a solution is more easily enabled. Results from the parametric robust control literature can be used to design the interval target family so that the performance deterioration is acceptable, even when plant uncertainty is present. It is shown that it is possible to devise a computationally simple linear programming approach that attempts to meet the desired closed loop specifications.

  6. Reaction Wheel Control Design Using Linear Quadratic Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nubli Muhamad, Nur; Susanto, Erwin; Syihabuddin, Budi; Prasetya Dwi Wibawa, Ig.

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies the design of active attitude control system of a nanosatellite in a single axis. In this paper, we consider dc motor based reaction wheel as an actuator, because of its pointing accuracy. However, the power consumption of the dc motor is often relatively large and needed to be optimized. Linear quadratic controller is supposed to have an ability to minimize power consumption and able to enhance the system performance. To show the advantage of this method, simulation result of attitude response, state trajectory, and trajectory of DC motor voltage are presented.

  7. Linear Controller Design: Limits of Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    147 Internal Stability 150 Modi ed Controller Paradigm...simulation of the control processor connected to the actual system to be controlled eld tests of the control system Often the controller is modi ...popularized in the s by researchers such as Zames Zamb Sandberg San Narendra NG and Willems Wil although some norms had been used in

  8. A sequential linear optimization approach for controller design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, L. G.; Juang, J.-N.; Junkins, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    A linear optimization approach with a simple real arithmetic algorithm is presented for reliable controller design and vibration suppression of flexible structures. Using first order sensitivity of the system eigenvalues with respect to the design parameters in conjunction with a continuation procedure, the method converts a nonlinear optimization problem into a maximization problem with linear inequality constraints. The method of linear programming is then applied to solve the converted linear optimization problem. The general efficiency of the linear programming approach allows the method to handle structural optimization problems with a large number of inequality constraints on the design vector. The method is demonstrated using a truss beam finite element model for the optimal sizing and placement of active/passive-structural members for damping augmentation. Results using both the sequential linear optimization approach and nonlinear optimization are presented and compared. The insensitivity to initial conditions of the linear optimization approach is also demonstrated.

  9. Control design based on a linear state function observer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Tzu-Jeng; Craig, Roy R., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    An approach to the design of low-order controllers for large scale systems is proposed. The method is derived from the theory of linear state function observers. First, the realization of a state feedback control law is interpreted as the observation of a linear function of the state vector. The linear state function to be reconstructed is the given control law. Then, based on the derivation for linear state function observers, the observer design is formulated as a parameter optimization problem. The optimization objective is to generate a matrix that is close to the given feedback gain matrix. Based on that matrix, the form of the observer and a new control law can be determined. A four-disk system and a lightly damped beam are presented as examples to demonstrate the applicability and efficacy of the proposed method.

  10. Powerful tool for design analysis of linear control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Maddux, Jr, A S

    1982-05-10

    The methods for designing linear controls for electronic or mechanical systems have been understood and put to practice. What has not been readily available to engineers, however, is a practical, quick and inexpensive method for analyzing these linear control (feedback) systems once they have been designed into the electronic or mechanical hardware. Now, the PET, manufactured by Commodore Business Machines (CBM), operating with several peripherals via the IEEE 488 Bus, brings to the engineer for about $4000 a complete set of office tools for analyzing these system designs.

  11. Non-contact electromagnetic exciter design with linear control method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin; Xiong, Xianzhi; Xu, Hua

    2017-01-01

    A non-contact type force actuator is necessary for studying the dynamic performance of a high-speed spindle system owing to its high-speed operating conditions. A non-contact electromagnetic exciter is designed for identifying the dynamic coefficients of journal bearings in high-speed grinding spindles. A linear force control method is developed based on PID controller. The influence of amplitude and frequency of current, misalignment and rotational speed on magnetic field and excitation force is investigated based on two-dimensional finite element analysis. The electromagnetic excitation force is measured with the auxiliary coils and calibrated by load cells. The design is validated by the experimental results. Theoretical and experimental investigations show that the proposed design can accurately generate linear excitation force with sufficiently large amplitude and higher signal to noise ratio. Moreover, the fluctuations in force amplitude are reduced to a greater extent with the designed linear control method even when the air gap changes due to the rotor vibration at high-speed conditions. Besides, it is possible to apply various types of excitations: constant, synchronous, and non-synchronous excitation forces based on the proposed linear control method. This exciter can be used as linear-force exciting and controlling system for dynamic performance study of different high-speed rotor-bearing systems.

  12. Linear tracking systems with applications to aircraft control system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, W. H.; Athans, M.; Castanon, D.; Bacchioloni, F.

    1977-01-01

    A class of optimal linear time invariant tracking systems, both in continuous time and discrete time, of which the number of inputs (which are restricted to be step functions) is equal to the number of system outputs, is studied. Along with derivation of equations and design procedures, two discretization schemes are presented, constraining either the control or its time derivative, to be a constant over each sampling period. Descriptions are given for the linearized model of the F-8C aircraft longitudinal dynamics, and the C* handling qualities criterion, which then serve as an illustration of the applications of these linear tracking designs. A suboptimal reduced state design is also presented. Numerical results are given for both the continuous time and discrete time designs.

  13. Design and performance of the Stanford Linear Collider Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Melen, R.E.

    1984-10-01

    The success of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) will be dependent upon the implementation of a very large advanced computer-based instrumentation and control system. This paper describes the architectural design of this system as well as a critique of its performance. This critique is based on experience obtained from its use in the control and monitoring of 1/3 of the SLAC linac and in support of an expensive experimental machine physics experimental program. 11 references, 3 figures.

  14. Linear parameter varying representations for nonlinear control design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Lance Huntington

    Linear parameter varying (LPV) systems are investigated as a framework for gain-scheduled control design and optimal hybrid control. An LPV system is defined as a linear system whose dynamics depend upon an a priori unknown but measurable exogenous parameter. A gain-scheduled autopilot design is presented for a bank-to-turn (BTT) missile. The method is novel in that the gain-scheduled design does not involve linearizations about operating points. Instead, the missile dynamics are brought to LPV form via a state transformation. This idea is applied to the design of a coupled longitudinal/lateral BTT missile autopilot. The pitch and yaw/roll dynamics are separately transformed to LPV form, where the cross axis states are treated as "exogenous" parameters. These are actually endogenous variables, so such a plant is called "quasi-LPV." Once in quasi-LPV form, a family of robust controllers using mu synthesis is designed for both the pitch and yaw/roll channels, using angle-of-attack and roll rate as the scheduling variables. The closed-loop time response is simulated using the original nonlinear model and also using perturbed aerodynamic coefficients. Modeling and control of engine idle speed is investigated using LPV methods. It is shown how generalized discrete nonlinear systems may be transformed into quasi-LPV form. A discrete nonlinear engine model is developed and expressed in quasi-LPV form with engine speed as the scheduling variable. An example control design is presented using linear quadratic methods. Simulations are shown comparing the LPV based controller performance to that using PID control. LPV representations are also shown to provide a setting for hybrid systems. A hybrid system is characterized by control inputs consisting of both analog signals and discrete actions. A solution is derived for the optimal control of hybrid systems with generalized cost functions. This is shown to be computationally intensive, so a suboptimal strategy is proposed that

  15. A decentralized linear quadratic control design method for flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Tzu-Jeng; Craig, Roy R., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A decentralized suboptimal linear quadratic control design procedure which combines substructural synthesis, model reduction, decentralized control design, subcontroller synthesis, and controller reduction is proposed for the design of reduced-order controllers for flexible structures. The procedure starts with a definition of the continuum structure to be controlled. An evaluation model of finite dimension is obtained by the finite element method. Then, the finite element model is decomposed into several substructures by using a natural decomposition called substructuring decomposition. Each substructure, at this point, still has too large a dimension and must be reduced to a size that is Riccati-solvable. Model reduction of each substructure can be performed by using any existing model reduction method, e.g., modal truncation, balanced reduction, Krylov model reduction, or mixed-mode method. Then, based on the reduced substructure model, a subcontroller is designed by an LQ optimal control method for each substructure independently. After all subcontrollers are designed, a controller synthesis method called substructural controller synthesis is employed to synthesize all subcontrollers into a global controller. The assembling scheme used is the same as that employed for the structure matrices. Finally, a controller reduction scheme, called the equivalent impulse response energy controller (EIREC) reduction algorithm, is used to reduce the global controller to a reasonable size for implementation. The EIREC reduced controller preserves the impulse response energy of the full-order controller and has the property of matching low-frequency moments and low-frequency power moments. An advantage of the substructural controller synthesis method is that it relieves the computational burden associated with dimensionality. Besides that, the SCS design scheme is also a highly adaptable controller synthesis method for structures with varying configuration, or varying mass

  16. Frequency weighted system identification and linear quadratic controller design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G.; Phan, Minh; Juang, Jer-Nan; Longman, Richard W.; Sulla, Jeffrey L.

    1991-01-01

    Application of filters for frequency weighting of Markov parameters (pulse response functions) is described in relation to system/observer identification. The time domain identification approach recovers a model which has a pulse response weighted according to frequency. The identified model is composed of the original system and filters. The augmented system is in a form which can be used directly for frequency weighted linear quadratic controller design. Data from either single or multiple experiments can be used to recover the Markov parameters. Measured acceleration signals from a truss structure are used for system identification and the model obtained is used for frequency weighted controller design. The procedure makes the identification and controler design complementary problems.

  17. PID controller design for trailer suspension based on linear model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushairi, S.; Omar, A. R.; Schmidt, R.; Isa, A. A. Mat; Hudha, K.; Azizan, M. A.

    2015-05-01

    A quarter of an active trailer suspension system having the characteristics of a double wishbone type was modeled as a complex multi-body dynamic system in MSC.ADAMS. Due to the complexity of the model, a linearized version is considered in this paper. A model reduction technique is applied to the linear model, resulting in a reduced-order model. Based on this simplified model, a Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) controller was designed in MATLAB/Simulink environment; primarily to reduce excessive roll motions and thus improving the ride comfort. Simulation results show that the output signal closely imitates the input signal in multiple cases - demonstrating the effectiveness of the controller.

  18. Control design for robust stability in linear regulators: Application to aerospace flight control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yedavalli, R. K.

    1986-01-01

    Time domain stability robustness analysis and design for linear multivariable uncertain systems with bounded uncertainties is the central theme of the research. After reviewing the recently developed upper bounds on the linear elemental (structured), time varying perturbation of an asymptotically stable linear time invariant regulator, it is shown that it is possible to further improve these bounds by employing state transformations. Then introducing a quantitative measure called the stability robustness index, a state feedback conrol design algorithm is presented for a general linear regulator problem and then specialized to the case of modal systems as well as matched systems. The extension of the algorithm to stochastic systems with Kalman filter as the state estimator is presented. Finally an algorithm for robust dynamic compensator design is presented using Parameter Optimization (PO) procedure. Applications in a aircraft control and flexible structure control are presented along with a comparison with other existing methods.

  19. Linear time-invariant controller design for two-channel decentralized control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desoer, Charles A.; Gundes, A. Nazli

    1987-01-01

    This paper analyzes a linear time-invariant two-channel decentralized control system with a 2 x 2 strictly proper plant. It presents an algorithm for the algebraic design of a class of decentralized compensators which stabilize the given plant.

  20. Multi Objective Controller Design for Linear System via Optimal Interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozbay, Hitay

    1996-01-01

    We propose a methodology for the design of a controller which satisfies a set of closed-loop objectives simultaneously. The set of objectives consists of: (1) pole placement, (2) decoupled command tracking of step inputs at steady-state, and (3) minimization of step response transients with respect to envelope specifications. We first obtain a characterization of all controllers placing the closed-loop poles in a prescribed region of the complex plane. In this characterization, the free parameter matrix Q(s) is to be determined to attain objectives (2) and (3). Objective (2) is expressed as determining a Pareto optimal solution to a vector valued optimization problem. The solution of this problem is obtained by transforming it to a scalar convex optimization problem. This solution determines Q(O) and the remaining freedom in choosing Q(s) is used to satisfy objective (3). We write Q(s) = (l/v(s))bar-Q(s) for a prescribed polynomial v(s). Bar-Q(s) is a polynomial matrix which is arbitrary except that Q(O) and the order of bar-Q(s) are fixed. Obeying these constraints bar-Q(s) is now to be 'shaped' to minimize the step response characteristics of specific input/output pairs according to the maximum envelope violations. This problem is expressed as a vector valued optimization problem using the concept of Pareto optimality. We then investigate a scalar optimization problem associated with this vector valued problem and show that it is convex. The organization of the report is as follows. The next section includes some definitions and preliminary lemmas. We then give the problem statement which is followed by a section including a detailed development of the design procedure. We then consider an aircraft control example. The last section gives some concluding remarks. The Appendix includes the proofs of technical lemmas, printouts of computer programs, and figures.

  1. Advanced Non-Linear Control Algorithms Applied to Design Highly Maneuverable Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    Advanced non- linear control algorithms applied to design highly maneuverable Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) Vladimir Djapic, Jay A. Farrell...hierarchical such that an ”inner loop” non- linear controller (outputs the appropriate thrust values) is the same for all mission scenarios while a...library of ”outer-loop” non- linear controllers are available to implement specific maneuvering scenarios. On top of the outer-loop is the mission planner

  2. Differential-Drive Mobile Robot Control Design based-on Linear Feedback Control Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurmaini, Siti; Dewi, Kemala; Tutuko, Bambang

    2017-04-01

    This paper deals with the problem of how to control differential driven mobile robot with simple control law. When mobile robot moves from one position to another to achieve a position destination, it always produce some errors. Therefore, a mobile robot requires a certain control law to drive the robot’s movement to the position destination with a smallest possible error. In this paper, in order to reduce position error, a linear feedback control is proposed with pole placement approach to regulate the polynoms desired. The presented work leads to an improved understanding of differential-drive mobile robot (DDMR)-based kinematics equation, which will assist to design of suitable controllers for DDMR movement. The result show by using the linier feedback control method with pole placement approach the position error is reduced and fast convergence is achieved.

  3. Controller Design for Linear Stochastic Systems with Uncertain Parameters.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-01

    example may be designed on a numerical basis. Also, the equivalence of this solution to the minimax solution may be analyzed numerically . Finally, in...must be such that Equation (3a) has a unique solution that is sample-path continuous, c) w must be such that the cost function, (5), is well-defined...problem can be reformulated as an optimization problem with equality constraints. 3.3. Problem Redefinition and Solution The system equations , (3

  4. Surface Effect Ship Heave Control Using a Linear Regulator Design.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    addition used signifi- cantly less computer time, In Ref. 6, Boggio conducted a study on the effect of the use of a flexible membrane in the plenum chamber...pitch accelerations. B. Te passive control technique discussed by Boggio in Ref. 6 should be examined further. The introduc- tion of a flexible...Motions Computer Pro- gram, M.S. Thesis, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California, December 1975. 6. Boggio , J. M., A Study of Pressure Volume Rates

  5. Enhanced approach to PD control design for linear time-invariant descriptor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filasová, Anna; Krokavec, Dušan

    2017-01-01

    Enhanced approaches to PD controller design, adjusted for linear time-invariant descriptor systems, are proposed in the paper. Presented in the sense of the second Lyapunov method, an associated structure of linear matrix inequalities is outlined to possess the regular closed-loop system dynamic properties. A simulation example, subject to the state and output PD control, demonstrates the effiectiveness of the proposed form of the design technique.

  6. Prompt critical control of the ACRR using a linear quadratic regulator design

    SciTech Connect

    Gilkey, J.C.

    1992-09-01

    This paper describes the application of linear control design techniques to the problem of nuclear reactor control. The control algorithm consists of generating a nominal trajectory within the control authority of the reactor rod drives, and then following this trajectory with a gain scheduled linear quadratic regulator (LQR). A controller based on this algorithm has generated power pulses up to 100 MW on Sandia`s Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR). Prompt critical control at $1.02 net reactivity and controlled start up rates over 350 DPM have also been demonstrated using tills controller.

  7. Prompt critical control of the ACRR using a linear quadratic regulator design

    SciTech Connect

    Gilkey, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the application of linear control design techniques to the problem of nuclear reactor control. The control algorithm consists of generating a nominal trajectory within the control authority of the reactor rod drives, and then following this trajectory with a gain scheduled linear quadratic regulator (LQR). A controller based on this algorithm has generated power pulses up to 100 MW on Sandia's Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR). Prompt critical control at $1.02 net reactivity and controlled start up rates over 350 DPM have also been demonstrated using tills controller.

  8. CFORM- LINEAR CONTROL SYSTEM DESIGN AND ANALYSIS: CLOSED FORM SOLUTION AND TRANSIENT RESPONSE OF THE LINEAR DIFFERENTIAL EQUATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamison, J. W.

    1994-01-01

    CFORM was developed by the Kennedy Space Center Robotics Lab to assist in linear control system design and analysis using closed form and transient response mechanisms. The program computes the closed form solution and transient response of a linear (constant coefficient) differential equation. CFORM allows a choice of three input functions: the Unit Step (a unit change in displacement); the Ramp function (step velocity); and the Parabolic function (step acceleration). It is only accurate in cases where the differential equation has distinct roots, and does not handle the case for roots at the origin (s=0). Initial conditions must be zero. Differential equations may be input to CFORM in two forms - polynomial and product of factors. In some linear control analyses, it may be more appropriate to use a related program, Linear Control System Design and Analysis (KSC-11376), which uses root locus and frequency response methods. CFORM was written in VAX FORTRAN for a VAX 11/780 under VAX VMS 4.7. It has a central memory requirement of 30K. CFORM was developed in 1987.

  9. CFORM- LINEAR CONTROL SYSTEM DESIGN AND ANALYSIS: CLOSED FORM SOLUTION AND TRANSIENT RESPONSE OF THE LINEAR DIFFERENTIAL EQUATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamison, J. W.

    1994-01-01

    CFORM was developed by the Kennedy Space Center Robotics Lab to assist in linear control system design and analysis using closed form and transient response mechanisms. The program computes the closed form solution and transient response of a linear (constant coefficient) differential equation. CFORM allows a choice of three input functions: the Unit Step (a unit change in displacement); the Ramp function (step velocity); and the Parabolic function (step acceleration). It is only accurate in cases where the differential equation has distinct roots, and does not handle the case for roots at the origin (s=0). Initial conditions must be zero. Differential equations may be input to CFORM in two forms - polynomial and product of factors. In some linear control analyses, it may be more appropriate to use a related program, Linear Control System Design and Analysis (KSC-11376), which uses root locus and frequency response methods. CFORM was written in VAX FORTRAN for a VAX 11/780 under VAX VMS 4.7. It has a central memory requirement of 30K. CFORM was developed in 1987.

  10. Linear matrix inequality-based proportional-integral control design with application to F-16 aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodore, Zachary B.

    A robust proportional-integral (PI) controller was synthesized for the F-16 VISTA (Variable stability In-flight Simulator Test Aircraft) using a linear matrix inequality (LMI) approach, with the goal of eventually designing and implementing a linear parameter-varying PI controller on high performance aircraft. The combination of classical and modern control theory provides theoretically guaranteed stability and performance throughout the flight envelope and ease of implementation due to the simplicity of the PI controller structure. The controller is designed by solving a set of LMIs with pole placement constraints. This closed-loop system was simulated in MATLAB/Simulink to analyze the performance of the controller. A robust Hinfinity controller was also developed to compare performance with PI controller. The simulation results showed stability, albeit with poor performance compared to the Hinfinity controlle.

  11. Central suboptimal H ∞ controller design for linear time-varying systems with unknown parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basin, Michael V.; Soto, Pedro; Calderon-Alvarez, Dario

    2011-05-01

    This article presents the central finite-dimensional H ∞ controller for linear time-varying systems with unknown parameters, that is suboptimal for a given threshold γ with respect to a modified Bolza-Meyer quadratic criterion including the attenuation control term with the opposite sign. In contrast to the previously obtained results, this article reduces the original H ∞ controller problem to the corresponding H 2 controller problem, using the technique proposed in Doyle et al. [Doyle, J.C., Glover, K., Khargonekar, P.P., and Francis, B.A. (1989), 'State-space Solutions to Standard H 2 and H Infinity Control Problems', IEEE Transactions Automatic Control, 34, 831-847]. This article yields the central suboptimal H ∞ controller for linear systems with unknown parameters in a closed finite-dimensional form, based on the corresponding H 2 controller obtained in Basin and Calderon-Alvarez [Basin, M.V., and Calderon-Alvarez, D. (2008), 'Optimal LQG Controller for Linear Systems with Unknown Parameters', Journal of The Franklin Institute, 345, 293-302]. Numerical simulations are conducted to verify performance of the designed central suboptimal controller for uncertain linear systems with unknown parameters against the conventional central suboptimal H ∞ controller for linear systems with exactly known parameter values.

  12. ORACLS: A system for linear-quadratic-Gaussian control law design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, E. S.

    1978-01-01

    A modern control theory design package (ORACLS) for constructing controllers and optimal filters for systems modeled by linear time-invariant differential or difference equations is described. Numerical linear-algebra procedures are used to implement the linear-quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) methodology of modern control theory. Algorithms are included for computing eigensystems of real matrices, the relative stability of a matrix, factored forms for nonnegative definite matrices, the solutions and least squares approximations to the solutions of certain linear matrix algebraic equations, the controllability properties of a linear time-invariant system, and the steady state covariance matrix of an open-loop stable system forced by white noise. Subroutines are provided for solving both the continuous and discrete optimal linear regulator problems with noise free measurements and the sampled-data optimal linear regulator problem. For measurement noise, duality theory and the optimal regulator algorithms are used to solve the continuous and discrete Kalman-Bucy filter problems. Subroutines are also included which give control laws causing the output of a system to track the output of a prescribed model.

  13. Design of Linear Control System for Wind Turbine Blade Fatigue Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toft, Anders; Roe-Poulsen, Bjarke; Christiansen, Rasmus; Knudsen, Torben

    2016-09-01

    This paper proposes a linear method for wind turbine blade fatigue testing at Siemens Wind Power. The setup consists of a blade, an actuator (motor and load mass) that acts on the blade with a sinusoidal moment, and a distribution of strain gauges to measure the blade flexure. Based on the frequency of the sinusoidal input, the blade will start oscillating with a given gain, hence the objective of the fatigue test is to make the blade oscillate with a controlled amplitude. The system currently in use is based on frequency control, which involves some non-linearities that make the system difficult to control. To make a linear controller, a different approach has been chosen, namely making a controller which is not regulating on the input frequency, but on the input amplitude. A non-linear mechanical model for the blade and the motor has been constructed. This model has been simplified based on the desired output, namely the amplitude of the blade. Furthermore, the model has been linearised to make it suitable for linear analysis and control design methods. The controller is designed based on a simplified and linearised model, and its gain parameter determined using pole placement. The model variants have been simulated in the MATLAB toolbox Simulink, which shows that the controller design based on the simple model performs adequately with the non-linear model. Moreover, the developed controller solves the robustness issue found in the existent solution and also reduces the needed energy for actuation as it always operates at the blade eigenfrequency.

  14. Prompt critical control of the ACRR using a linear quadratic regulator design

    SciTech Connect

    Gilkey, J.C. )

    1993-01-20

    This paper describes the application of Modern Control'' design techniques to the problem of nuclear reactor control. The control algorithm consists of generating a nominal trajectory within the control authority of the reactor rod drives, and then following this trajectory with a gain scheduled linear quadratic regulator (LQR). A controller based on this algorithm has generated power pulses up to 100 mW on Sandia's Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR). Prompt critical control at $1.02 net reactivity and at start-up rates over 350 decades per minute (DPM) has also been demonstrated using this controller.

  15. Robustness in linear quadratic feedback design with application to an aircraft control problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, R. V.; Sridhar, B.; Toda, M.

    1977-01-01

    Some new results concerning robustness and asymptotic properties of error bounds of a linear quadratic feedback design are applied to an aircraft control problem. An autopilot for the flare control of the Augmentor Wing Jet STOL Research Aircraft (AWJSRA) is designed based on Linear Quadratic (LQ) theory and the results developed in this paper. The variation of the error bounds to changes in the weighting matrices in the LQ design is studied by computer simulations, and appropriate weighting matrices are chosen to obtain a reasonable error bound for variations in the system matrix and at the same time meet the practical constraints for the flare maneuver of the AWJSRA. Results from the computer simulation of a satisfactory autopilot design for the flare control of the AWJSRA are presented.

  16. Control and actuator design for a precision magnetic suspension linear bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trumper, David L.; Queen, Michael A.

    1992-07-01

    In optical systems, where the positions of such components as mirrors must be controlled in six degrees of freedom (DOFs), magnetic bearings can impart forces and torques to the suspended component without rigidly constraining its DOFs, and obviate the complex flexures typical of conventional designs. Attention is here given to a magnetically suspended linear bearing employing variable-reluctance actuators to control three rotational and two translational DOFs, as well as to a linear motor charged with control of the sixth DOF. Applicability to vibration isolation and optical line-of-sight stabilization are noted.

  17. Space shuttle active-pogo-suppressor control design using linear quadratic regulator techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehtinen, B.; Lorenz, C. F.

    1979-01-01

    Two methods of active pogo suppression (stabilization) for the space shuttle vehicle were studied analytically. The basis for both approaches was the linear quadratic regulator, state space technique. The first approach minimized root-mean-square pump inlet pressure by using either fullstate feedback, partial-state feedback, or output feedback with a Kalman filter. The second approach increased the modal damping associated with the critical structural modes by using either full-state feedback or reconstructed state feedback. A number of implementable controls were found by both approaches. The designs were analyzed with respect to sensitivity, complexity, and controller energy requirements, as well as controller performance. Practical controllers resulting from the two design approaches tended to use pressure and flow as feedback variables for the minimum-rms method and structural accelerations or velocities for the modal control method. Both approaches are suitable for the design of active pogo-suppression controllers.

  18. Variable-Speed Wind Turbine Controller Systematic Design Methodology: A Comparison of Non-Linear and Linear Model-Based Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, M. M.

    1999-07-30

    Variable-speed, horizontal axis wind turbines use blade-pitch control to meet specified objectives for three regions of operation. This paper focuses on controller design for the constant power production regime. A simple, rigid, non-linear turbine model was used to systematically perform trade-off studies between two performance metrics. Minimization of both the deviation of the rotor speed from the desired speed and the motion of the actuator is desired. The robust nature of the proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller is illustrated, and optimal operating conditions are determined. Because numerous simulation runs may be completed in a short time, the relationship of the two opposing metrics is easily visualized. Traditional controller design generally consists of linearizing a model about an operating point. This step was taken for two different operating points, and the systematic design approach was used. A comparison of the optimal regions selected using the n on-linear model and the two linear models shows similarities. The linearization point selection does, however, affect the turbine performance slightly. Exploitation of the simplicity of the model allows surfaces consisting of operation under a wide range of gain values to be created. This methodology provides a means of visually observing turbine performance based upon the two metrics chosen for this study. Design of a PID controller is simplified, and it is possible to ascertain the best possible combination of controller parameters. The wide, flat surfaces indicate that a PID controller is very robust in this variable-speed wind turbine application.

  19. Intelligent, Robust Control of Deteriorated Turbofan Engines via Linear Parameter Varying Quadratic Lyapunov Function Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turso, James A.; Litt, Jonathan S.

    2004-01-01

    A method for accommodating engine deterioration via a scheduled Linear Parameter Varying Quadratic Lyapunov Function (LPVQLF)-Based controller is presented. The LPVQLF design methodology provides a means for developing unconditionally stable, robust control of Linear Parameter Varying (LPV) systems. The controller is scheduled on the Engine Deterioration Index, a function of estimated parameters that relate to engine health, and is computed using a multilayer feedforward neural network. Acceptable thrust response and tight control of exhaust gas temperature (EGT) is accomplished by adjusting the performance weights on these parameters for different levels of engine degradation. Nonlinear simulations demonstrate that the controller achieves specified performance objectives while being robust to engine deterioration as well as engine-to-engine variations.

  20. On stochastic control system design methods for weakly coupled large scale linear systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwong, R.; Chong, C.-Y.; Athans, M.

    1972-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of decentralized control of two weakly coupled linear stochastic systems, using quadratic performance indices. The basic idea is to have each controller control independently his own system, based upon noisy measurements of his own output. To compensate for the effects of weak coupling upon the resultant performance, fake white plant noise is introduced to each system. The appropriate intensity of the fake plant noise is obtained through the solution of an off-line deterministic matrix optimal control problem. The effects of this design method upon the overall coupled system performance are analyzed as a function of the degree of intersystem coupling.

  1. Robust control design for a wheel loader using Hinfinity and feedback linearization based methods.

    PubMed

    Fales, Roger; Kelkar, Atul

    2009-07-01

    The heavy equipment industry is building more and more equipment with electro-hydraulic control systems. The existing industry practices for the design of control systems in construction machines primarily rely on classical designs coupled with ad-hoc synthesis procedures. Such practices produce desirable results, but lack a systematic procedure to account for invariably present plant uncertainties in the design process as well as coupled dynamics of the multi-input multi-output (MIMO) configuration. In this paper, two H(infinity) based robust control designs are presented for an automatic bucket leveling mechanism of a wheel loader. In one case, the controller is designed for the base plant model. In another case, the controller is designed for the plant with a feedback linearization control law applied yielding improved stability robustness. A MIMO nonlinear model for an electro-hydraulically actuated wheel loader linkage is considered. The robustness of the controller designs are validated by using analysis and by simulation using a complete nonlinear model of the wheel loader linkage and hydraulic system.

  2. ORACLS - A modern control theory design package. [Optimal Regulator Algorithms for Control of Linear Systems computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, E. S.

    1975-01-01

    A digital computer program (ORACLS) for implementing the optimal regulator theory approach to the design of controllers for linear time-invariant systems is described. The user-oriented program employs the latest numerical techniques and is applicable to both the digital and continuous control problems.

  3. Eco-inspired robust control design for linear dynamical systems with applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devarakonda, Nagini

    Recently, the idea of using Ecological Sign Stability approach for designing robust controllers for engineering systems has attracted attention with promising results. In this work, continued research on this topic is presented. It is well known that, in the field of control systems, key to a good controller design is the choice of the appropriate nominal system. Since it is assumed that the perturbations are about this nominal, the extent of allowed perturbation to maintain the stability and/or performance very much depends on this 'nominal' system. Therefore, it is evident that this nominal system must have superior robustness properties. Incorporating certain robustness measures proposed in the literature, control design techniques have been realized in state space framework. However, the variety of controllers in state space framework is not as large as that of robust control design methods in frequency domain. Even these very few methods tend to be complex and demand some specific structure to the real parameter uncertainty (such as matching conditions). Overall, the success of all these methods for application to complex aerospace systems is still a subject of debate. Hence, there is still significant interest in designing robust controllers which can perform better than the existing controllers. Addressing these issues, current research proposes that the stability robustness measures for parameter perturbation are considerably improved if the 'nominal' system is taken (or driven) to be a 'sign stable' system. Motivated by this observation, a new method for designing a robust controller for linear uncertain state space systems is proposed. The novelty of this research lies in the incorporation of ecological principles in order to design robust controllers for engineering systems. It is observed that an ecological perspective gives better understanding of the dynamics of the open and closed loop system (nominal) matrices. One of the attractive features of this

  4. Controlling the wave propagation through the medium designed by linear coordinate transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yicheng; He, Chengdong; Wang, Yuzhuo; Liu, Xuan; Zhou, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Based on the principle of transformation optics, we propose to control the wave propagating direction through the homogenous anisotropic medium designed by linear coordinate transformation. The material parameters of the medium are derived from the linear coordinate transformation applied. Keeping the space area unchanged during the linear transformation, the polarization-dependent wave control through a non-magnetic homogeneous medium can be realized. Beam benders, polarization splitter, and object illusion devices are designed, which have application prospects in micro-optics and nano-optics. The simulation results demonstrate the feasibilities and the flexibilities of the method and the properties of these devices. Design details and full-wave simulation results are provided. The work in this paper comprehensively applies the fundamental theories of electromagnetism and mathematics. The method of obtaining a new solution of the Maxwell equations in a medium from a vacuum plane wave solution and a linear coordinate transformation is introduced. These have a pedagogical value and are methodologically and motivationally appropriate for physics students and teachers at the undergraduate and graduate levels.

  5. An iterative approach to the optimal co-design of linear control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yu; Wang, Yebin; Bortoff, Scott A.; Jiang, Zhong-Ping

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates the optimal co-design of both physical plants and control policies for a class of continuous-time linear control systems. The optimal co-design of a specific linear control system is commonly formulated as a nonlinear non-convex optimisation problem (NNOP), and solved by using iterative techniques, where the plant parameters and the control policy are updated iteratively and alternately. This paper proposes a novel iterative approach to solve the NNOP, where the plant parameters are updated by solving a standard semi-definite programming problem, with non-convexity no longer involved. The proposed system design is generally less conservative in terms of the system performance compared to the conventional system-equivalence-based design, albeit the range of applicability is slightly reduced. A practical optimisation algorithm is proposed to compute a sub-optimal solution ensuring the system stability, and the convergence of the algorithm is established. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithm is illustrated by its application to the optimal co-design of a physical load positioning system.

  6. Sequential design of a linear quadratic controller for the Deep Space Network antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gawronski, W.

    1992-01-01

    A new linear quadratic controller design procedure is proposed for the NASA/JPL Deep Space Network antennas. The antenna model is divided into a tracking subsystem and a flexible subsystem. Controllers for the flexible and tracking parts are designed separately by adjusting the performance index weights. Ad hoc weights are chosen for the tracking part of the controller and the weights of the flexible part are adjusted. Next, the gains of the tracking part are determined, followed by the flexible controller final tune-up. In addition, the controller for the flexible part is designed separately for each mode; thus the design procedure consists of weight adjustment for small-size subsystems. Since the controller gains are obtained by adjusting the performance index weights, determination of the weight effect on system performance is a crucial task. A method of determining this effect that allows an on-line improvement of the tracking performance is presented in this article. The procedure is illustrated with the control system design for the Deep Space Station (DSS)-13 antenna.

  7. Sequential design of a linear quadratic controller for the Deep Space Network antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gawronski, W.

    1992-01-01

    A new linear quadratic controller design procedure is proposed for the NASA/JPL Deep Space Network antennas. The antenna model is divided into a tracking subsystem and a flexible subsystem. Controllers for the flexible and tracking parts are designed separately by adjusting the performance index weights. Ad hoc weights are chosen for the tracking part of the controller and the weights of the flexible part are adjusted. Next, the gains of the tracking part are determined, followed by the flexible controller final tune-up. In addition, the controller for the flexible part is designed separately for each mode; thus the design procedure consists of weight adjustment for small-size subsystems. Since the controller gains are obtained by adjusting the performance index weights, determination of the weight effect on system performance is a crucial task. A method of determining this effect that allows an on-line improvement of the tracking performance is presented in this article. The procedure is illustrated with the control system design for the DSS-13 antenna.

  8. Design and Initial In-Water Testing of Advanced Non-Linear Control Algorithms onto an Unmanned Underwater Vehicle (UUV)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    Design and initial in-water testing of advanced non- linear control algorithms onto an Unmanned Underwater Vehicle (UUV) Vladimir Djapic Unmanned...attitude or translating in a direction different from that of the surface. Non- linear controller that compensates for non-linear forces (such as drag...loop” non- linear controller (outputs the appropriate thrust values) is the same for all mission scenarios while an appropriate ”outer-loop” non

  9. Static output feedback control design for linear MIMO systems with actuator dynamics governed by diffusion PDEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun-Wei; Wu, Huai-Ning; Li, Han-Xiong

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of static output feedback (SOF) control design for a class of diffusion partial differential equation (PDE) and ordinary differential equation (ODE) cascades, where the ODE model is used to describe the dynamics of the multi-input and multi-output (MIMO) plant and the diffusion PDE model is employed to represent the dynamics of actuators. The objective of this paper is to develop a simple as well as effective SOF controller via the Lyapunov's direct method such that the resulting closed-loop system is globally exponentially stable. By constructing a quadratic Lyapunov function, the sufficient condition on the globally exponential stability of the closed-loop cascaded system is presented in terms of linear matrix inequality (LMI). Then, an LMI-based design method of the SOF controller is developed on the basis of the obtained stability analysis result. Finally, two numerical examples are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed design method.

  10. Piecewise controller design for affine fuzzy systems via dilated linear matrix inequality characterizations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huimin; Yang, Guang-Hong

    2012-11-01

    This paper studies the problem of state feedback controller design for a class of nonlinear systems, which are described by continuous-time affine fuzzy models. A convex piecewise affine controller design method is proposed based on a new dilated linear matrix inequality (LMI) characterization, where the system matrix is separated from Lyapunov matrix such that the controller parametrization is independent of the Lyapunov matrix. In contrast to the existing work, the derived stabilizability condition leads to less conservative LMI characterizations and much wider scope of the applicability. Furthermore, the results are extended to H(∞) state feedback synthesis. Finally, two numerical examples illustrate the superiority and effectiveness of the new results. Copyright © 2012 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Output-feedback sampled-data control design for linear parameter-varying systems with delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramezanifar, Amin; Mohammadpour, Javad; Grigoriadis, Karolos M.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we address the sampled-data output-feedback control design problem for continuous-time linear parameter-varying systems with time-varying delay in the system states. Due to the combination of the plant's continuous-time dynamics and the controller's discrete-time dynamics connected through A/D and D/A converter devices, the closed-loop system is a hybrid system. In order to analyse this hybrid system from stability and performance perspectives we use the input-delay approach to map the closed-loop system into the continuous-time domain with delay in the states. This results in a closed-loop system containing two types of delays, the system internal delay and the one imposed by the mapping. Next, we use delay-dependent conditions for analysis of stability and ?-norm performance which result in a sampled-data control synthesis procedure. The proposed output-feedback sampled-data controller is obtained based on the solution to a linear matrix inequality optimisation problem using a set of appropriately defined slack variables. A numerical example of a milling machine is presented to demonstrate the viability of the proposed sampled-data control design method to satisfy the stability and performance objectives even with a varying sampling rate.

  12. PID controller design for output PDFs of stochastic systems using linear matrix inequalities.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lei; Wang, Hong

    2005-02-01

    This paper presents a pseudo proportional-integral-derivative (PID) tracking control strategy for general non-Gaussian stochastic systems based on a linear B-spline model for the output probability density functions (PDFs). The objective is to control the conditional PDFs of the system output to follow a given target function. Different from existing methods, the control structure (i.e., the PID) is imposed before the output PDF controller design. Following the linear B-spline approximation on the measured output PDFs, the concerned problem is transferred into the tracking of given weights which correspond to the desired PDF. For systems with or without model uncertainties, it is shown that the solvability can be casted into a group of matrix inequalities. Furthermore, an improved controller design procedure based on the convex optimization is proposed which can guarantee the required tracking convergence with an enhanced robustness. Simulations are given to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed approach and encouraging results have been obtained.

  13. Linear parameter varying control design for rotating systems supported by journal bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida Gonçalves Siqueira, Adriano; Nicoletti, Rodrigo; Norrick, Nicklas; Lucchesi Cavalca, Kátia; Fiori de Castro, Helio; Bauer, Jens; Dohnal, Fadi

    2012-05-01

    Linear parameter varying (LPV) control is a model-based control technique that takes into account time-varying parameters of the plant. In the case of rotating systems supported by lubricated bearings, the dynamic characteristics of the bearings change in time as a function of the rotating speed. Hence, LPV control can tackle the problem of run-up and run-down operational conditions when dynamic characteristics of the rotating system change significantly in time due to the bearings and high vibration levels occur. In this work, the LPV control design for a flexible shaft supported by plain journal bearings is presented. The model used in the LPV control design is updated from unbalance response experimental results and dynamic coefficients for the entire range of rotating speeds are obtained by numerical optimization. Experimental implementation of the designed LPV control resulted in strong reduction of vibration amplitudes when crossing the critical speed, without affecting system behavior in sub- or super-critical speeds.

  14. Design of linear quadratic regulator (LQR) control system for flight stability of LSU-05

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purnawan, Heri; Mardlijah; Budi Purwanto, Eko

    2017-09-01

    Lapan Surveillance UAV-05 (LSU-05) is an unmanned aerial vehicle designed to cruise time in 6 hours and cruise velocity about 30 m/s. Mission of LSU-05 is surveillance for researchs and observations such as traffics and disaster investigations. This paper aims to design a control system on the LSU-05 to fly steadily. The methods used to stabilize LSU-05 is Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR). Based on LQR controller, there is obtained transient response for longitudinal motion, td = 0.221s, tr = 0.419s, ts = 0.719s, tp = 1.359s, and Mp = 0%. In other hand, transient response for lateral-directional motion showed that td = 0.186s, tr = 0.515s, ts = 0.87s, tp = 2.02s, and Mp = 0%. The result of simulation showed a good performance for this method.

  15. Linear-quadratic-regulator pointing control system design for a high-altitude balloon payload

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.E.; Etter, J.R.

    1987-11-01

    A pointing control system design for the science package of a NASA high-altitude research balloon is described. The balloon assembly consists of a single helium balloon connected to a payload recovery parachute, payload gondola, and ballast hopper. Pointing of the scientific payload is accomplished via an arrangement of drive motors and a flywheel. Linear quadratic regulator (LQR) synthesis techniques are employed to produce the azimuth and elevation controller designs. The use of LQR synthesis is motivated by the azimuthal dynamic coupling encountered between the balloon and gondola. Two control devices are employed in azimuth, one of which is a decoupler motor and the other a flywheel. The decoupler motor is intended to isolate the gondola from the balloon such that the flywheel can be accelerated or decelerated about a steady-state angular velocity to provide precise azimuthal pointing. The multiple-input/multiple-output nature of the azimuth pointing problem is best handled in a matrix synthesis procedure such as LQR. The controller design methodology is explained, and a combination of time responses and singular value analyses are used to analytically evaluate the performance of the control system. 11 refs., 17 figs.

  16. Linear control of a boiler-turbine unit: analysis and design.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wen; Fang, Fang; Tian, Liang; Fu, Caifen; Liu, Jizhen

    2008-04-01

    Linear control of a boiler-turbine unit is discussed in this paper. Based on the nonlinear model of the unit, this paper analyzes the nonlinearity of the unit, and selects the appropriate operating points so that the linear controller can achieve wide-range performance. Simulation and experimental results at the No. 4 Unit at the Dalate Power Plant show that the linear controller can achieve the desired performance under a specific range of load variations.

  17. Nonrigid, Resistive Linear Plasma Response Models Based on Perturbed Equilibria for Axisymmetric Tokamak Control Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, D. A.; Ferron, J. R.; Leuer, J. A.; Walker, M. L.; Welander, A. S.

    2003-10-01

    Linear, perturbed equilibrium plasma response models can accurately represent the experimental response of tokamak plasmas to applied fields [A. Coutlis, et al., Nucl. Fusion 39, 663 (1999)]. However, agreement between experiment and model is much better when average flux over the plasma, rather than at each fluid element, is conserved [P. Vyas, et al., Nucl. Fusion 38, 1043 (1998)]. The close experimental agreement of average flux-conserving models is consistent with approximating field penetration effects produced by finite plasma resistivity, particularly in the edge region. We report on the development of nonrigid linear plasma response models which include finite local plasma resistivity in order to more accurately represent the dynamic response due to this field penetration. Such response models are expected to be important for designing profile control algorithms in advanced tokamaks. Accounting for finite plasma resistivity is also important in designing multivariable integrated controllers which must simultaneously regulate plasma shape and plasma current. Consequences of including resisitivity will be illustrated and comparisons with DIII-D experimental plasma responses will be made.

  18. Mechanical and biomechanical analysis of a linear piston design for angular-velocity-based orthotic control.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Edward D; Samadi, Reza; Goudreau, Louis; Kofman, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    A linear piston hydraulic angular-velocity-based control knee joint was designed for people with knee-extensor weakness to engage knee-flexion resistance when knee-flexion angular velocity reaches a preset threshold, such as during a stumble, but to otherwise allow free knee motion. During mechanical testing at the lowest angular-velocity threshold, the device engaged within 2 degrees knee flexion and resisted moment loads of over 150 Nm. The device completed 400,000 loading cycles without mechanical failure or wear that would affect function. Gait patterns of nondisabled participants were similar to normal at walking speeds that produced below-threshold knee angular velocities. Fast walking speeds, employed purposely to attain the angular-velocity threshold and cause knee-flexion resistance, reduced maximum knee flexion by approximately 25 degrees but did not lead to unsafe gait patterns in foot ground clearance during swing. In knee collapse tests, the device successfully engaged knee-flexion resistance and stopped knee flexion with peak knee moments of up to 235.6 Nm. The outcomes from this study support the potential for the linear piston hydraulic knee joint in knee and knee-ankle-foot orthoses for people with lower-limb weakness.

  19. The design and control of linear bidirectional stepping motors - Application to machine tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrizza, N.

    Theoretical modeling and the results of operation of a model linear stepping motor for producing rapid in-plane translation in machining operations are presented. The theory of linear induction motors and their current implementation in the stepping mode are reviewed. A finite element method is developed for optimizing the contact stud shape through calculation of the magnetic fields and forces the motor experiences in static condition. An investigation into the characteristics of the air cushion which inhibits the motor from contacting the base is reported. Direct control with a microprocessor is described, including programming with an acceleration period at the beginning and deceleration at the end of each motion using circular and linear interpolations to obtain linear and circular motor displacements in the plane. Comparisons between linear step motors with variable reluctance and hybrid motors are made.

  20. A linear control design structure to maintain loop properties during limit operation in a multi-nozzle turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattern, Duane; Ouzts, Peter

    1991-01-01

    The implementation of multi-variable control systems on turbofan engines requires the use of limit protection to maintain safe engine operation. Since a turbofan engine typically encounters limits during transient operation, the use of a limit protection scheme that modifies the feedback loop may void the desired 'guarantees' associated with linear multi-variable control design methods, necessitating considerable simulation to validate the control with limit protection. An alternative control design structure is proposed that maintains the desired linear feedback properties when certain safety limits are encountered by moving the limit protection scheme outside of the feedback loop. This proposed structure is compared to a structure with a limit protection scheme that modifies the feedback loop properties. The two design structures are compared using both linear and nonlinear simulations. The evaluation emphasizes responses where the fan surge margin limit is encountered.

  1. A linear control design structure to maintain loop properties during limit operation in a multi-nozzle turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattern, Duane; Ouzts, Peter

    1991-01-01

    The implementation of multi-variable control systems on turbofan engines requires the use of limit protection to maintain safe engine operation. Since a turbofan engine typically encounters limits during transient operation, the use of a limit protection scheme that modifies the feedback loop may void the desired 'guarantees' associated with linear multi-variable control design methods, necessitating considerable simulation to validate the control with limited protection. An alternative control design structure is proposed that maintains the desired linear feedback properties when certain safety limits are encountered by moving the limit protection scheme outside the feedback loop. This proposed structure is compared to a structure with a limit protection scheme that modifies the feedback loop properties. The two design structures are compared using both linear and nonlinear simulations. The evaluation emphasizes responses where the fan surge margin limit is encountered.

  2. Analysis, design, and testing of a low cost, direct force command linear proof mass actuator for structural control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, G. L.; Shelley, Stuart; Jacobson, Mark

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, the design, analysis, and test of a low cost, linear proof mass actuator for vibration control is presented. The actuator is based on a linear induction coil from a large computer disk drive. Such disk drives are readily available and provide the linear actuator, current feedback amplifier, and power supply for a highly effective, yet inexpensive, experimental laboratory actuator. The device is implemented as a force command input system, and the performance is virtually the same as other, more sophisticated, linear proof mass systems.

  3. Optimal Linear Control.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    OPTIMAL LINEAR CONTROL C.A. HARVEY M.G. SAFO NOV G. STEIN J.C. DOYLE HONEYWELL SYSTEMS & RESEARCH CENTER j 2600 RIDGWAY PARKWAY j [ MINNEAPOLIS...RECIPIENT’S CAT ALC-’ W.IMIJUff’? * J~’ CR2 15-238-4F TP P EI)ŕll * (~ Optimal Linear Control ~iOGRPR UBA m a M.G Lnar o Con_ _ _ _ _ _ R PORT__ _ _ I RE...Characterizations of optimal linear controls have been derived, from which guides for selecting the structure of the control system and the weights in

  4. AESOP: A computer-aided design program for linear multivariable control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehtinen, B.; Geyser, L. C.

    1982-01-01

    An interactive computer program (AESOP) which solves quadratic optimal control and is discussed. The program can also be used to perform system analysis calculations such as transient and frequency responses, controllability, observability, etc., in support of the control and filter design computations.

  5. Linear regulator design for stochastic systems by a multiple time scales method. [with application to F-8 aircraft longitudinal control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teneketzis, D.; Sandell, N. R., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    This paper develops a hierarchically-structured, suboptimal controller for a linear stochastic system composed of fast and slow subsystems. It is proved that the controller is optimal in the limit as the separation of time scales of the subsystems becomes infinite. The methodology is illustrated by design of a controller to suppress the phugoid and short period modes of the longitudinal dynamics of the F-8 aircraft.

  6. Linear regulator design for stochastic systems by a multiple time scales method. [with application to F-8 aircraft longitudinal control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teneketzis, D.; Sandell, N. R., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    This paper develops a hierarchically-structured, suboptimal controller for a linear stochastic system composed of fast and slow subsystems. It is proved that the controller is optimal in the limit as the separation of time scales of the subsystems becomes infinite. The methodology is illustrated by design of a controller to suppress the phugoid and short period modes of the longitudinal dynamics of the F-8 aircraft.

  7. Aircraft ride quality controller design using new robust root clustering theory for linear uncertain systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yedavalli, R. K.

    1992-01-01

    The aspect of controller design for improving the ride quality of aircraft in terms of damping ratio and natural frequency specifications on the short period dynamics is addressed. The controller is designed to be robust with respect to uncertainties in the real parameters of the control design model such as uncertainties in the dimensional stability derivatives, imperfections in actuator/sensor locations and possibly variations in flight conditions, etc. The design is based on a new robust root clustering theory developed by the author by extending the nominal root clustering theory of Gutman and Jury to perturbed matrices. The proposed methodology allows to get an explicit relationship between the parameters of the root clustering region and the uncertainty radius of the parameter space. The current literature available for robust stability becomes a special case of this unified theory. The bounds derived on the parameter perturbation for robust root clustering are then used in selecting the robust controller.

  8. Output feedback non-linear decoupled control synthesis and observer design for manoeuvring aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, S. N.; Schy, A. A.

    1980-01-01

    A study of the applicability of nonlinear decoupling theory to the design of control systems using output feedback for maneuvering aircraft is presented. The response variables chosen for decoupled control were angular velocity components along roll, pitch, and yaw axes, angle of attack (p), and angle of sideslip, using aileron, rudder, and elevator controls. An observer design for a class of nonlinear systems was presented and this method was used to estimate angle of attack and sideslip; an approximate observer was obtained by neglecting derivatives of p and aileron deflection angles and it was used in a simulation study. A simulation study showed that precise rapid combined lateral and longitudinal maneuvers can be performed; it was also demonstrated that a bank-angle-command outer loop could be designed for precise bank angles changes and simultaneous large lift maneuvers.

  9. Application of a robust linear control design to a truss structure with nonlinear joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, Mark; Vander Velde, Wallace

    1991-01-01

    An efficient nonlinear equivalent beam finite-element method for the application of a full state feedback design is described, which is robust to plant uncertainties to a beamlike truss structure with nonlinear elements. The method may be extended to model nonlinear structures with other types of control systems, such as model-based compensators.

  10. The Total Synthesis Problem of linear multivariable control. II - Unity feedback and the design morphism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sain, M. K.; Antsaklis, P. J.; Gejji, R. R.; Wyman, B. F.; Peczkowski, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    Zames (1981) has observed that there is, in general, no 'separation principle' to guarantee optimality of a division between control law design and filtering of plant uncertainty. Peczkowski and Sain (1978) have solved a model matching problem using transfer functions. Taking into consideration this investigation, Peczkowski et al. (1979) proposed the Total Synthesis Problem (TSP), wherein both the command/output-response and command/control-response are to be synthesized, subject to the plant constraint. The TSP concept can be subdivided into a Nominal Design Problem (NDP), which is not dependent upon specific controller structures, and a Feedback Synthesis Problem (FSP), which is. Gejji (1980) found that NDP was characterized in terms of the plant structural matrices and a single, 'good' transfer function matrix. Sain et al. (1981) have extended this NDP work. The present investigation is concerned with a study of FSP for the unity feedback case. NDP, together with feedback synthesis, is understood as a Total Synthesis Problem.

  11. The Total Synthesis Problem of linear multivariable control. II - Unity feedback and the design morphism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sain, M. K.; Antsaklis, P. J.; Gejji, R. R.; Wyman, B. F.; Peczkowski, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    Zames (1981) has observed that there is, in general, no 'separation principle' to guarantee optimality of a division between control law design and filtering of plant uncertainty. Peczkowski and Sain (1978) have solved a model matching problem using transfer functions. Taking into consideration this investigation, Peczkowski et al. (1979) proposed the Total Synthesis Problem (TSP), wherein both the command/output-response and command/control-response are to be synthesized, subject to the plant constraint. The TSP concept can be subdivided into a Nominal Design Problem (NDP), which is not dependent upon specific controller structures, and a Feedback Synthesis Problem (FSP), which is. Gejji (1980) found that NDP was characterized in terms of the plant structural matrices and a single, 'good' transfer function matrix. Sain et al. (1981) have extended this NDP work. The present investigation is concerned with a study of FSP for the unity feedback case. NDP, together with feedback synthesis, is understood as a Total Synthesis Problem.

  12. Design of optimal partial state feedback controllers for linear systems in stochastic environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, S. M.

    1975-01-01

    The problem of obtaining an optimal control law, which is constrained to be a feedback of the available measurements, is considered for both continuous and discrete time linear systems subjected to additive white process noise and measurement noise. Necessary conditions are obtained for minimizing a quadratic performance function for both finite and infinite duration cases. The feedback gain matrices are constrained to be constant for the infinite duration cases. For all the cases considered, algorithms are derived for generating sequences of feedback gain matrices which successively improve the performance function. Computational aspects are discussed via application to two continuous time processes, including a helicopter/slung load system subjected to measurement noise and random wind gust input.

  13. Design of Linear DC Motor Two-degree-of-freedom Positioning System using Model Reference type Sliding Mode Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urushihara, Shiro; Kamano, Takuya; Yura, Satoshi; Yasuno, Takashi; Suzuki, Takayuki

    One of fundamental problems in the factory automation is how to obtain linear motion. Linear motors produce directly the linear motion force without a motion-transform mechanism. Linear d.c. motors (LDMs) have excellent performance and controllability. However, the dynamics of small-sized LDMs is adversely affected by the dead-band due to the friction between brushes and commutators. In this paper, it is described that the design of the two-degree-of-freedom positioning system with a LDM using model reference type sliding mode controller (SMC). The proposed positioning system consists of a fixed gain feedforward controller and a SMC used as a feedback controller. The objective of the SMC is to repress the influence of nonlinear characteristics (the dead-band and parameter variations etc.). The tracking performance can be improved as the fixed gain feedforward controller makes a dynamic inverse system in the feedforward path. The effectiveness of the proposed system for improvement of the tracking performance is demonstrated by experimental results.

  14. Time Domain Design of Robust Controllers for LQG (Linear Quadratic Gaussian); Application to Large Space Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    schemes involving more general perturbations. Also Desoer et al [8] have established conditions for stability robustness of linear multivarible...address regulators with quadratic performance indices. Desoer et al [8] have established conditions for stability robust- ness of linear...p. 45-46. 8. Desoer , C.A., Callier, F.M. and Chan, W.S., "Robustness of Stability Conditions for Linear Time Invariant Feedback Systems," IEEE

  15. Neural-genetic synthesis for state-space controllers based on linear quadratic regulator design for eigenstructure assignment.

    PubMed

    da Fonseca Neto, João Viana; Abreu, Ivanildo Silva; da Silva, Fábio Nogueira

    2010-04-01

    Toward the synthesis of state-space controllers, a neural-genetic model based on the linear quadratic regulator design for the eigenstructure assignment of multivariable dynamic systems is presented. The neural-genetic model represents a fusion of a genetic algorithm and a recurrent neural network (RNN) to perform the selection of the weighting matrices and the algebraic Riccati equation solution, respectively. A fourth-order electric circuit model is used to evaluate the convergence of the computational intelligence paradigms and the control design method performance. The genetic search convergence evaluation is performed in terms of the fitness function statistics and the RNN convergence, which is evaluated by landscapes of the energy and norm, as a function of the parameter deviations. The control problem solution is evaluated in the time and frequency domains by the impulse response, singular values, and modal analysis.

  16. Robustness of linear quadratic state feedback designs in the presence of system uncertainty. [application to Augmentor Wing Jet STOL Research Aircraft flare control autopilot design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, R. V.; Toda, M.; Sridhar, B.

    1977-01-01

    The paper deals with the problem of expressing the robustness (stability) property of a linear quadratic state feedback (LQSF) design quantitatively in terms of bounds on the perturbations (modeling errors or parameter variations) in the system matrices so that the closed-loop system remains stable. Nonlinear time-varying and linear time-invariant perturbations are considered. The only computation required in obtaining a measure of the robustness of an LQSF design is to determine the eigenvalues of two symmetric matrices determined when solving the algebraic Riccati equation corresponding to the LQSF design problem. Results are applied to a complex dynamic system consisting of the flare control of a STOL aircraft. The design of the flare control is formulated as an LQSF tracking problem.

  17. Controller design for delay-independent stability of linear time-invariant vibration systems with multiple delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoodi Nia, Payam; Sipahi, Rifat

    2013-07-01

    One of the critical parameters that can deteriorate the effectiveness of active vibration control (AVC) is the delay in sensors. Especially, in remote sensing where delays are large, and in high-speed applications with even small delays, instability can be inevitable. This paper presents algebraic approaches to design controllers in order to achieve stability regardless of the amount of delays for AVC applications modeled by linear time-invariant systems with "multiple" constant delays. The approaches are based on a nonconservative framework, and can identify the regions in the controller gain space where delay-independent stability (DIS) is achievable. With these controllers, we demonstrate via simulations that vibration suppression, within certain excitation frequency bands, can be improved or be as effective as those in AVC applications without delays.

  18. Controls/CFD Interdisciplinary Research Software Generates Low-Order Linear Models for Control Design From Steady-State CFD Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, Kevin J.

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center is developing analytical methods and software tools to create a bridge between the controls and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) disciplines. Traditionally, control design engineers have used coarse nonlinear simulations to generate information for the design of new propulsion system controls. However, such traditional methods are not adequate for modeling the propulsion systems of complex, high-speed vehicles like the High Speed Civil Transport. To properly model the relevant flow physics of high-speed propulsion systems, one must use simulations based on CFD methods. Such CFD simulations have become useful tools for engineers that are designing propulsion system components. The analysis techniques and software being developed as part of this effort are an attempt to evolve CFD into a useful tool for control design as well. One major aspect of this research is the generation of linear models from steady-state CFD results. CFD simulations, often used during the design of high-speed inlets, yield high resolution operating point data. Under a NASA grant, the University of Akron has developed analytical techniques and software tools that use these data to generate linear models for control design. The resulting linear models have the same number of states as the original CFD simulation, so they are still very large and computationally cumbersome. Model reduction techniques have been successfully applied to reduce these large linear models by several orders of magnitude without significantly changing the dynamic response. The result is an accurate, easy to use, low-order linear model that takes less time to generate than those generated by traditional means. The development of methods for generating low-order linear models from steady-state CFD is most complete at the one-dimensional level, where software is available to generate models with different kinds of input and output variables. One-dimensional methods have been extended

  19. Controls/CFD Interdisciplinary Research Software Generates Low-Order Linear Models for Control Design From Steady-State CFD Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, Kevin J.

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center is developing analytical methods and software tools to create a bridge between the controls and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) disciplines. Traditionally, control design engineers have used coarse nonlinear simulations to generate information for the design of new propulsion system controls. However, such traditional methods are not adequate for modeling the propulsion systems of complex, high-speed vehicles like the High Speed Civil Transport. To properly model the relevant flow physics of high-speed propulsion systems, one must use simulations based on CFD methods. Such CFD simulations have become useful tools for engineers that are designing propulsion system components. The analysis techniques and software being developed as part of this effort are an attempt to evolve CFD into a useful tool for control design as well. One major aspect of this research is the generation of linear models from steady-state CFD results. CFD simulations, often used during the design of high-speed inlets, yield high resolution operating point data. Under a NASA grant, the University of Akron has developed analytical techniques and software tools that use these data to generate linear models for control design. The resulting linear models have the same number of states as the original CFD simulation, so they are still very large and computationally cumbersome. Model reduction techniques have been successfully applied to reduce these large linear models by several orders of magnitude without significantly changing the dynamic response. The result is an accurate, easy to use, low-order linear model that takes less time to generate than those generated by traditional means. The development of methods for generating low-order linear models from steady-state CFD is most complete at the one-dimensional level, where software is available to generate models with different kinds of input and output variables. One-dimensional methods have been extended

  20. Design, control, and characterization of a Sliding Linear Investigative Platform for Analyzing Lower Limb Stability (SLIP-FALLS).

    PubMed

    Robinson, C J; Purucker, M C; Faulkner, L W

    1998-09-01

    A novel device, the Sliding Linear Investigative Platform For Analyzing Lower Limb Stability (SLIP-FALLS), has been designed to study the detection and discrimination thresholds of humans to uniaxial horizontal step, ramp, or sinusoidal translations of the surface upon which they stand or stride. The device also can be used to test the human potential for, and mechanisms of, slips and falls. The SLIP utilizes air bearing technology and a noncontact linear motor to produce ultra-low-vibration translations. The FALLS system measures the forces on four load cells, platform linear and head tri-axial accelerations, four channels of electromyographic data, motor voltage, and a subject's psychophysical response; and derives other physiological and biomechanical measures, like center-of-pressure and shear force. The effect of acceleration and shear force on the accuracy of the center-of-pressure calculations is presented. Operating ranges depend on the interactions among displacement, velocity, acceleration, and jerk parameters for linear translations, and between amplitudes and frequencies for sinusoidal translations. Displacements from 5 microm to 0.277 m, velocities from 5 microm/s to 0.3 m/s, and accelerations up to 2.5 m/s2 are achievable with precise control (i.e., without overshoot), but tradeoffs exist such that all three maxima cannot be reached simultaneously. For a 0.15 m/s linear translation at 4 m/s2, SLIP-FALLS produces substantially less vibration than the worm-driven NeuroTest system. The usefulness of having precise control over movement parameters is discussed.

  1. Linear Controllers for Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Junwoo; Kim, John; Kang, Sung-Moon; Speyer, Jason

    2000-11-01

    Several recent studies have shown that controllers based on a linear system theory work surprisingly well in turbulent flows, suggesting that a linear mechanism may play an important role even in turbulent flows. It has been also shown that non-normality of the linearized Navier-Stokes equations is an essential characteristic in the regeneration of near-wall turbulence structures in turbulent boundary layers. A few controllers designed to reduce the role of different linear mechanisms, including that to minimize the non-normality of the linearized Navier-Stokes equations, have been developed and applied to a low Reynolds nubmer turbulent channel flow. A reduced-order model containing the most controllable and observables modes is derived for each system. Other existing control schemes, such as Choi et al's opposition control, have been examined from the point of a linear system control. Further discussion on controller design, such as choice of cost function and other control parameters, will be presented.

  2. Accurate Modelling of a Flexible-Link Planar Mechanism by Means of a Linearized Model in the State-Space Form for Design of a Vibration Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GASPARETTO, A.

    2001-02-01

    Vibration control of flexible link mechanisms with more than two flexible links is still an open question, mainly because defining a model that is adequate for the designing of a controller is a rather difficult task. In this work, an accurate dynamic non-linear model of a flexible-link planar mechanism is presented. In order to bring the system into a form that is suitable for the design of a vibration controller, the model is then linearized about an operating point, so as to achieve a linear model of the system in the standard state-space form of system theory. The linear model obtained, which is valid for whatever planar mechanism with any number of flexible link, is then applied to a four-bar planar linkage. Extensive simulation is carried out, aimed at comparing the system dynamic evolution, both in the open- and in the closed-loop case, using the non-linear model and the linearized one. The results prove that the error made by using the linearized system instead of the non-linear one is small. Therefore, it can be concluded that the model proposed in this work can constitute an effective basis for designing and testing many types of vibration controllers for flexible planar mechanisms.

  3. Linear decentralized learning control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Soo C.; Longman, Richard W.; Phan, Minh

    1992-01-01

    The new field of learning control develops controllers that learn to improve their performance at executing a given task, based on experience performing this task. The simplest forms of learning control are based on the same concept as integral control, but operating in the domain of the repetitions of the task. This paper studies the use of such controllers in a decentralized system, such as a robot with the controller for each link acting independently. The basic result of the paper is to show that stability of the learning controllers for all subsystems when the coupling between subsystems is turned off, assures stability of the decentralized learning in the coupled system, provided that the sample time in the digital learning controller is sufficiently short.

  4. Linear control of the flywheel inverted pendulum.

    PubMed

    Olivares, Manuel; Albertos, Pedro

    2014-09-01

    The flywheel inverted pendulum is an underactuated mechanical system with a nonlinear model but admitting a linear approximation around the unstable equilibrium point in the upper position. Although underactuated systems usually require nonlinear controllers, the easy tuning and understanding of linear controllers make them more attractive for designers and final users. In a recent paper, a simple PID controller was proposed by the authors, leading to an internally unstable controlled plant. To achieve global stability, two options are developed here: first by introducing an internal stabilizing controller and second by replacing the PID controller by an observer-based state feedback control. Simulation and experimental results show the effectiveness of the design.

  5. Linear Hereditary Control Systems,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Relationships between external and internal models for systems with time lags are discussed. The use of various canonical forms for the models in solving optimal control problems is considered. (Author)

  6. Manipulator control by exact linearization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruetz, K.

    1987-01-01

    Comments on the application to rigid link manipulators of geometric control theory, resolved acceleration control, operational space control, and nonlinear decoupling theory are given, and the essential unity of these techniques for externally linearizing and decoupling end effector dynamics is discussed. Exploiting the fact that the mass matrix of a rigid link manipulator is positive definite, a consequence of rigid link manipulators belonging to the class of natural physical systems, it is shown that a necessary and sufficient condition for a locally externally linearizing and output decoupling feedback law to exist is that the end effector Jacobian matrix be nonsingular. Furthermore, this linearizing feedback is easy to produce.

  7. Gain optimization with non-linear controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, G. L.; Kandadai, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    An algorithm has been developed for the analysis and design of controls for non-linear systems. The technical approach is to use statistical linearization to model the non-linear dynamics of a system by a quasi-Gaussian model. A covariance analysis is performed to determine the behavior of the dynamical system and a quadratic cost function. Expressions for the cost function and its derivatives are determined so that numerical optimization techniques can be applied to determine optimal feedback laws. The primary application for this paper is centered about the design of controls for nominally linear systems but where the controls are saturated or limited by fixed constraints. The analysis is general, however, and numerical computation requires only that the specific non-linearity be considered in the analysis.

  8. Multi-variable control of the GE T700 engine using the LQG/LTR design methodology. [Linear Quadratic Gaussian/Loop Transfer Recovery method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfeil, W. H.; Athans, M.; Spang, H. A., III

    1986-01-01

    The design of scalar and multi-variable feedback control systems for the GE T700 turboshaft engine coupled to a helicopter rotor system is examined. A series of linearized models are presented and analyzed. Robustness and performance specifications are posed in the frequency domain. The linear-quadratic-Gaussian with loop-transfer-recovery (LQG/LTR) methodology is used to obtain a sequence of three feedback designs. Even in the single-input/single-output case, comparison of the current control system with that derived from the LQG/LTR approach shows significant performance improvement. The multi-variable designs, evaluated using linear and nonlinear simulations, show even more potential for performance improvement.

  9. Multivariable control of a twin lift helicopter system using the LQG/LTR design methodology. [Linear Quadratic Gaussian/Loop Transfer Recovery method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, A. A.; Athans, M.

    1986-01-01

    Guidelines for developing a multivariable centralized automatic flight control system (AFCS) for a twin lift helicopter system (TLHS) are presented. Singular value ideas are used to formulate performance and stability robustness specifications. A linear Quadratic Gaussian with Loop Transfer Recovery (LQG/LTR) design is obtained and evaluated.

  10. A direct application of the non-linear inverse transformation flight control system design on a STOVL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, W. W.; Mcneill, W. E.; Stortz, M. W.

    1993-01-01

    The nonlinear inverse transformation flight control system design method is applied to the Lockheed Ft. Worth Company's E-7D short takeoff and vertical land (STOVL) supersonic fighter/attack aircraft design with a modified General Electric F110 engine which has augmented propulsive lift capability. The system is fully augmented to provide flight path control and velocity control, and rate command attitude hold for angular axes during the transition and hover operations. In cruise mode, the flight control system is configured to provide direct thrust command, rate command attitude hold for pitch and roll axes, and sideslip command with turn coordination. A control selector based on the nonlinear inverse transformation method is designed specifically to be compatible with the propulsion system's physical configuration which has a two dimensional convergent-divergent aft nozzle, a vectorable ventral nozzle, and a thrust augmented ejector. The nonlinear inverse transformation is used to determine the propulsive forces and nozzle deflections, which in combination with the aerodynamic forces and moments (including propulsive induced contributions), and gravitational force, are required to achieve the longitudinal and vertical acceleration commands. The longitudinal control axes are fully decoupled within the propulsion system's performance envelope. A piloted motion-base flight simulation was conducted on the Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) at NASA Ames Research Center to examine the handling qualities of this design. Based on results of the simulation, refinements to the control system have been made and will also be covered in the report.

  11. Design of Linear Quadratic Regulators and Kalman Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehtinen, B.; Geyser, L.

    1986-01-01

    AESOP solves problems associated with design of controls and state estimators for linear time-invariant systems. Systems considered are modeled in state-variable form by set of linear differential and algebraic equations with constant coefficients. Two key problems solved by AESOP are linear quadratic regulator (LQR) design problem and steady-state Kalman filter design problem. AESOP is interactive. User solves design problems and analyzes solutions in single interactive session. Both numerical and graphical information available to user during the session.

  12. Design of Linear Quadratic Regulators and Kalman Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehtinen, B.; Geyser, L.

    1986-01-01

    AESOP solves problems associated with design of controls and state estimators for linear time-invariant systems. Systems considered are modeled in state-variable form by set of linear differential and algebraic equations with constant coefficients. Two key problems solved by AESOP are linear quadratic regulator (LQR) design problem and steady-state Kalman filter design problem. AESOP is interactive. User solves design problems and analyzes solutions in single interactive session. Both numerical and graphical information available to user during the session.

  13. On non-linear dynamics and control designs applied to the ideal and non-ideal variants of the Fitzhugh Nagumo (FN) mathematical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavarette, Fábio Roberto; Balthazar, José Manoel; Peruzzi, Nelson José; Rafikov, Marat

    2009-03-01

    The Fitzhugh-Nagumo (FH) mathematical model is considered a simplification of the Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) model. This paper analyzes the non-linear dynamics of the Fitzhugh-Nagumo (FN) mathematical model, and still presents some modifications in the governing equations of the system in order to transform it into a non-ideal one (taking into account that an energy source has limited power supply). We also developed an optimal linear control design and used Sinhas's theory for the membrane's action potential in order to stabilize the variation of this potential.

  14. Linear stochastic optimal control and estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geyser, L. C.; Lehtinen, F. K. B.

    1976-01-01

    Digital program has been written to solve the LSOCE problem by using a time-domain formulation. LSOCE problem is defined as that of designing controls for linear time-invariant system which is disturbed by white noise in such a way as to minimize quadratic performance index.

  15. Linear stochastic optimal control and estimation problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geyser, L. C.; Lehtinen, F. K. B.

    1980-01-01

    Problem involves design of controls for linear time-invariant system disturbed by white noise. Solution is Kalman filter coupled through set of optimal regulator gains to produce desired control signal. Key to solution is solving matrix Riccati differential equation. LSOCE effectively solves problem for wide range of practical applications. Program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on IBM 360.

  16. Robust Control Design for Flight Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-01

    to achieve desired performance over the full flight envelope when linear feedback is employed. Exact linearization methods [48] provide means for...designing nonlinear feedback laws which satisfy these requirements. However, exact linearization is not always compatible with control authority...specific situations. The most promising approaches appear to be those associated with methods of exact linearization . This procedure is based on some

  17. Linear Parameter Varying Control for Actuator Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Jong-Yeob; Wu, N. Eva; Belcastro, Christine; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A robust linear parameter varying (LPV) control synthesis is carried out for an HiMAT vehicle subject to loss of control effectiveness. The scheduling parameter is selected to be a function of the estimates of the control effectiveness factors. The estimates are provided on-line by a two-stage Kalman estimator. The inherent conservatism of the LPV design is reducing through the use of a scaling factor on the uncertainty block that represents the estimation errors of the effectiveness factors. Simulations of the controlled system with the on-line estimator show that a superior fault-tolerance can be achieved.

  18. Linear quadratic optimal control for symmetric systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, J. H.; Martin, C. F.

    1983-01-01

    Special symmetries are present in many control problems. This paper addresses the problem of determining linear-quadratic optimal control problems whose solutions preserve the symmetry of the initial linear control system.

  19. Linear control theory for gene network modeling.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yong-Jun; Bleris, Leonidas

    2010-09-16

    Systems biology is an interdisciplinary field that aims at understanding complex interactions in cells. Here we demonstrate that linear control theory can provide valuable insight and practical tools for the characterization of complex biological networks. We provide the foundation for such analyses through the study of several case studies including cascade and parallel forms, feedback and feedforward loops. We reproduce experimental results and provide rational analysis of the observed behavior. We demonstrate that methods such as the transfer function (frequency domain) and linear state-space (time domain) can be used to predict reliably the properties and transient behavior of complex network topologies and point to specific design strategies for synthetic networks.

  20. Control-System Design Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, Harold P.

    1987-01-01

    Control-theory design package, Optimal Regulator Algorithms for Control of Linear Systems (ORACLS), developed to aid in design of controllers and optimal filters for systems modeled by linear, time-invariant differential and difference equations. Optimal linear quadratic regulator theory, Linear-Quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) problem, most widely accepted method of determining optimal control policy. Provides for solution to time-in-variant continuous or discrete LQG problems. Attractive to control-system designer providing rigorous tool for dealing with multi-input and multi-output dynamic systems in continuous and discrete form. CDO version written in FORTRAN IV. VAX version written in FORTRAN 77.

  1. Controllability of non-linear biochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Ervadi-Radhakrishnan, Anandhi; Voit, Eberhard O

    2005-07-01

    Mathematical methods of biochemical pathway analysis are rapidly maturing to a point where it is possible to provide objective rationale for the natural design of metabolic systems and where it is becoming feasible to manipulate these systems based on model predictions, for instance, with the goal of optimizing the yield of a desired microbial product. So far, theory-based metabolic optimization techniques have mostly been applied to steady-state conditions or the minimization of transition time, using either linear stoichiometric models or fully kinetic models within biochemical systems theory (BST). This article addresses the related problem of controllability, where the task is to steer a non-linear biochemical system, within a given time period, from an initial state to some target state, which may or may not be a steady state. For this purpose, BST models in S-system form are transformed into affine non-linear control systems, which are subjected to an exact feedback linearization that permits controllability through independent variables. The method is exemplified with a small glycolytic-glycogenolytic pathway that had been analyzed previously by several other authors in different contexts.

  2. Feedback linearization for control of air breathing engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Stephen; Mattern, Duane

    1991-01-01

    The method of feedback linearization for control of the nonlinear nozzle and compressor components of an air breathing engine is presented. This method overcomes the need for a large number of scheduling variables and operating points to accurately model highly nonlinear plants. Feedback linearization also results in linear closed loop system performance simplifying subsequent control design. Feedback linearization is used for the nonlinear partial engine model and performance is verified through simulation.

  3. Designing Genetic Feedback Controllers.

    PubMed

    Harris, Andreas W K; Dolan, James A; Kelly, Ciarán L; Anderson, James; Papachristodoulou, Antonis

    2015-08-01

    By incorporating feedback around systems we wish to manipulate, it is possible to improve their performance and robustness properties to meet pre-specified design objectives. For decades control engineers have been successfully implementing feedback controllers for complex mechanical and electrical systems such as aircraft and sports cars. Natural biological systems use feedback extensively for regulation and adaptation but apart from the most basic designs, there is no systematic framework for designing feedback controllers in Synthetic Biology. In this paper we describe how classical approaches from linear control theory can be used to close the loop. This includes the design of genetic circuits using feedback control and the presentation of a biological phase lag controller.

  4. Design and Initial In-Water Testing of Advanced Non-Linear Control Algorithms onto an Unmanned Underwater Vehicle (UUV)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    controllable speeds, the ability to maintain a set distance and attitude ( pitch and roll ) relative to some surface for optimal sensor (both sonar and...bottom by adjusting its pitch and roll based on the information coming from the sonar sensor. Another task for the vehicle was to track a line along...are the roll , pitch , and yaw backstepping terms, Θbs. For attitude control, based on eqn. (2), we define the signal ωoc = Ω −1 ( −KΘΘ̃ + Θ̇c −Θbs

  5. Design of dissipative linear phase filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phares, R. L.

    1968-01-01

    Set of design curves eliminates work involved in designing linear phase filters by being normalized in such a way as to apply to low, band, and high-pass filters of any bandwidth. Similar curves for any number of poles are plotted by solving a system of simultaneous equations.

  6. Linear control of oscillator and amplifier flows*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Peter J.; Sipp, Denis

    2016-08-01

    Linear control applied to fluid systems near an equilibrium point has important applications for many flows of industrial or fundamental interest. In this article we give an exposition of tools and approaches for the design of control strategies for globally stable or unstable flows. For unstable oscillator flows a feedback configuration and a model-based approach is proposed, while for stable noise-amplifier flows a feedforward setup and an approach based on system identification is advocated. Model reduction and robustness issues are addressed for the oscillator case; statistical learning techniques are emphasized for the amplifier case. Effective suppression of global and convective instabilities could be demonstrated for either case, even though the system-identification approach results in a superior robustness to off-design conditions.

  7. Fuzzy scheduled RTDA controller design.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, K; Anbarasan, K

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, the design and development of fuzzy scheduled robustness, tracking, disturbance rejection and overall aggressiveness (RTDA) controller design for non-linear processes are discussed. pH process is highly non-linear and the design of good controller for this process is always a challenging one due to large gain variation. Fuzzy scheduled RTDA controller design based on normalized integral square error (N_ISE) performance criteria for pH neutralization process is developed. The applicability of the proposed controller is tested for other different non-linear processes like type I diabetic process and conical tank process. The servo and regulatory performance of fuzzy scheduled RTDA controller design is compared with well-tuned internal model control (IMC) and dynamic matrix control (DMC)-based control schemes. Copyright © 2012 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Linear transmitter design for MSAT terminals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, Ross; Macleod, John; Beach, Mark; Bateman, Andrew

    1990-01-01

    One of the factors that will undoubtedly influence the choice of modulation format for mobile satellites, is the availability of cheap, power-efficient, linear amplifiers for mobile terminal equipment operating in the 1.5-1.7 GHz band. Transmitter linearity is not easily achieved at these frequencies, although high power (20W) class A/AB devices are becoming available. However, these components are expensive and require careful design to achieve a modest degree of linearity. In this paper an alternative approach to radio frequency (RF) power amplifier design for mobile satellite (MSAT) terminals using readily-available, power-efficient, and cheap class C devices in a feedback amplifier architecture is presented.

  9. Parametric approach to linear induction accelerator design

    SciTech Connect

    Bresie, D.A.; Andrews, J.A.; Ingram, S.W. . Center for Electromechanics)

    1991-01-01

    Past work on the design of linear induction accelerators has centered on the development of computer codes to analyze accelerator designs, using the current filament method. While these filament models are a very valuable tool for evaluating the performance of an induction launcher design, they provide little insight into the selection of dimensions, materials, and operation points for accelerators with interesting performance. Described in this paper is a parametric approach to defining effective accelerator designs. This method uses a computer optimization routine to iteratively seek out effective designs. The optimization routine is forced to search within a parameter space restricted to interesting and realistic parameters such as size, weight, voltage, and temperature rises. A filament model is used as the filter for the optimizer. Several linear induction accelerators have been designed using this method. The accelerators designed all used a switched capacitor power supply. While the run time of this code on The University of Texas' CRAY XMP-24 computer is moderately long, the resulting designs have good predicted performance. With realistic power supplies and materials, accelerator efficiencies in the 20 to 40% range were easily obtained. This paper describes the effect of armature diameter, length-to-diameter ratio, and weight, as well as other parameters, on the optimum accelerator design.

  10. Robot arm force control through system linearization by nonlinear feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarn, T. J.; Bejczy, A. K.; Yun, Xiaoping

    1988-01-01

    Based on a differential geometric feedback linearization technique for nonlinear time-varying systems, a dynamic force control method for robot arms is developed. It uses active force-moment measurements at the robot wrist. The controller design fully incorporate the robot-arm dynamics and is so general that it can be reduced to pure position control, hybrid position/force control, pure force control. The controller design is independent of the tasks to be performed. Computer simulations show that the controller improves the position error by a factor of ten in cases in which position errors generate force measurements. A theorem on linearization of time-varying system is also presented.

  11. Linearization of Attitude-Control Error Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bach, Ralph; Paielli, Russell

    1993-01-01

    Direction cosines and quaternions are useful for representing rigid-body attitude because they exhibit no kinematic singularities. Each utilizes more variables than the minimum three degrees of freedom required to specify attitude. Therefore, application of a nonlinear inversion procedure to either formulation introduces singularities. Furthermore, in designing an attitude-control system, it is not appropriate to express attitude error as a difference of direction cosines (or quaternions). One should employ a measure of attitude error that not only is minimal but preserves orthogonal rotation properties as well. This note applies an inversion procedure to an appropriate measure of attitude error, so that the singularity occurs when the error reaches +/- 180 deg. This approach leads to the realization of a new model-follower attitude-control system that exhibits exact linear attitude-error dynamics.

  12. Linearization of Attitude-Control Error Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bach, Ralph; Paielli, Russell

    1993-01-01

    Direction cosines and quaternions are useful for representing rigid-body attitude because they exhibit no kinematic singularities. Each utilizes more variables than the minimum three degrees of freedom required to specify attitude. Therefore, application of a nonlinear inversion procedure to either formulation introduces singularities. Furthermore, in designing an attitude-control system, it is not appropriate to express attitude error as a difference of direction cosines (or quaternions). One should employ a measure of attitude error that not only is minimal but preserves orthogonal rotation properties as well. This note applies an inversion procedure to an appropriate measure of attitude error, so that the singularity occurs when the error reaches +/- 180 deg. This approach leads to the realization of a new model-follower attitude-control system that exhibits exact linear attitude-error dynamics.

  13. Approximate Controllability Results for Linear Viscoelastic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Shirshendu; Mitra, Debanjana; Ramaswamy, Mythily; Renardy, Michael

    2017-09-01

    We consider linear viscoelastic flow of a multimode Maxwell or Jeffreys fluid in a bounded domain with smooth boundary, with a distributed control in the momentum equation. We establish results on approximate and exact controllability.

  14. SLAC linear collider conceptual design report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    The linear collider system is described in detail, including the transport system, the collider lattice, final focusing system, positron production, beam damping and compression, high current electron source, instrumentation and control, and the beam luminosity. The experimental facilities and the experimental uses are discussed along with the construction schedule and estimated costs. Appendices include a discussion of space charge effects in the linear accelerator, emittance growth in the collider, the final focus system, beam-beam instabilities and pinch effects, and detector backgrounds. (GHT)

  15. Linear adaptive control of a single-tether system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, M. E.; Carter, J. T.; Walls, J. L.

    1992-01-01

    A control law for a single-tether orbiting satellite system based on a reduced order linear adaptive control technique is presented. The main advantages of this technique are its design simplicity and the facts that specific system parameters and model linearization are not required when designing the controller. Two controllers are developed: one which uses only tension in the tether as control actuation and one which uses both tension and in-plane thrusters as control actuation. Both a sixth-order nonlinear and an 11th-order bead model of a tethered satellite system are used for simulation purposes, demonstrating the ability of the controller to manage an uncertain system. Retrieval and stationkeeping results using these nonlinear models and the linear adaptive controller demonstrate the feasibility of the method. The robustness of the controller with respect to parameter uncertainties is also demonstrated by changing the nonlinear model and parameters within the model without redesigning the controller.

  16. Linear optimal control of tokamak fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Kessel, C.E.; Firestone, M.A.; Conn, R.W.

    1989-05-01

    The control of plasma position, shape and current in a tokamak fusion reactor is examined using linear optimal control. These advanced tokamaks are characterized by non up-down symmetric coils and structure, thick structure surrounding the plasma, eddy currents, shaped plasmas, superconducting coils, vertically unstable plasmas, and hybrid function coils providing ohmic heating, vertical field, radial field, and shaping field. Models of the electromagnetic environment in a tokamak are derived and used to construct control gains that are tested in nonlinear simulations with initial perturbations. The issues of applying linear optimal control to advanced tokamaks are addressed, including complex equilibrium control, choice of cost functional weights, the coil voltage limit, discrete control, and order reduction. Results indicate that the linear optimal control is a feasible technique for controlling advanced tokamaks where the more common classical control will be severely strained or will not work. 28 refs., 13 figs.

  17. Exact Linearization For Control Of Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreutz, Kenneth K.

    1990-01-01

    Equivalence of several theoretical approaches discussed. Report comments on application of geometric control theory (GCT), resolved-acceleration control (RAC), operational-space control (OSC), and nonlinear-decoupling theory (NDT) to remote manipulator consisting of multiple rigid links. Principal concern, search for nonlinear feedback law making end effector behave, for purposes of control, as though its dynamics linear and decoupled.

  18. Exact Linearization For Control Of Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreutz, Kenneth K.

    1990-01-01

    Equivalence of several theoretical approaches discussed. Report comments on application of geometric control theory (GCT), resolved-acceleration control (RAC), operational-space control (OSC), and nonlinear-decoupling theory (NDT) to remote manipulator consisting of multiple rigid links. Principal concern, search for nonlinear feedback law making end effector behave, for purposes of control, as though its dynamics linear and decoupled.

  19. A free lunch in linearized experimental design?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, Darrell; Curtis, Andrew

    2011-08-01

    The No Free Lunch (NFL) theorems state that no single optimization algorithm is ideally suited for all objective functions and, conversely, that no single objective function is ideally suited for all optimization algorithms. This paper examines the influence of the NFL theorems on linearized statistical experimental design (SED). We consider four design algorithms with three different design objective functions to examine their interdependency. As a foundation for the study, we consider experimental designs for fitting ellipses to data, a problem pertinent to the study of transverse isotropy in many disciplines. Surprisingly, we find that the quality of optimized experiments, and the computational efficiency of their optimization, is generally independent of the criterion-algorithm pairing. We discuss differences in the performance of each design algorithm, providing a guideline for selecting design algorithms for other problems. As a by-product we demonstrate and discuss the principle of diminishing returns in SED, namely, that the value of experimental design decreases with experiment size. Another outcome of this study is a simple rule-of-thumb for prescribing optimal experiments for ellipse fitting, which bypasses the computational expense of SED. This is used to define a template for optimizing survey designs, under simple assumptions, for Amplitude Variations with Azimuth and Offset (AVAZ) seismics in the specialized problem of fracture characterization, such as is of interest in the petroleum industry. Finally, we discuss the scope of our conclusions for the NFL theorems as they apply to nonlinear and Bayesian SED.

  20. A free lunch in linearized experimental design?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, D.; Curtis, A.

    2009-12-01

    The No Free Lunch (NFL) theorems state that no single optimization algorithm is ideally suited for all objective functions and, conversely, that no single objective function is ideally suited for all optimization algorithms (Wolpert and Macready, 1997). It is therefore of limited use to report the performance of a particular algorithm with respect to a particular objective function because the results cannot be safely extrapolated to other algorithms or objective functions. We examine the influence of the NFL theorems on linearized statistical experimental design (SED). We are aware of no publication that compares multiple design criteria in combination with multiple design algorithms. We examine four design algorithms in concert with three design objective functions to assess their interdependency. As a foundation for the study, we consider experimental designs for fitting ellipses to data, a problem pertinent, for example, to the study of transverse isotropy in a variety of disciplines. Surprisingly, we find that the quality of optimized experiments, and the computational efficiency of their optimization, is generally independent of the criterion-algorithm pairing. This is promising for linearized SED. While the NFL theorems must generally be true, the criterion-algorithm pairings we investigated are fairly robust to the theorems, indicating that we need not account for independency when choosing design algorithms and criteria from the set examined here. However, particular design algorithms do show patterns of performance, irrespective of the design criterion, and from this we establish a rough guideline for choosing from the examined algorithms for other design problems. As a by-product of our study we demonstrate that SED is subject to the principle of diminishing returns. That is, we see that the value of experimental design decreases with survey size, a fact that must be considered when deciding whether or not to design an experiment at all. Another outcome

  1. Switched linear model predictive controllers for periodic exogenous signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liuping; Gawthrop, Peter; Owens, David. H.; Rogers, Eric

    2010-04-01

    This article develops switched linear controllers for periodic exogenous signals using the framework of a continuous-time model predictive control. In this framework, the control signal is generated by an algorithm that uses receding horizon control principle with an on-line optimisation scheme that permits inclusion of operational constraints. Unlike traditional repetitive controllers, applying this method in the form of switched linear controllers ensures bumpless transfer from one controller to another. Simulation studies are included to demonstrate the efficacy of the design with or without hard constraints.

  2. A Comparison of the Application of Classical and Modern Control Design Techniques for Reduction of Disturbance Effects on a Second-Order, Linear, Time-Invariant Plant.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    control design technique is applied to the design of disturbance state models for two different disturbances and to the design of the composite state ... observers necessary for implementation of the compensator. The performance of each of the compensators in reducing disturbance effects in the plant output is investigated. (Author)

  3. Stochastic Linear Quadratic Optimal Control Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.; Yong, J.

    2001-07-01

    This paper is concerned with the stochastic linear quadratic optimal control problem (LQ problem, for short) for which the coefficients are allowed to be random and the cost functional is allowed to have a negative weight on the square of the control variable. Some intrinsic relations among the LQ problem, the stochastic maximum principle, and the (linear) forward-backward stochastic differential equations are established. Some results involving Riccati equation are discussed as well.

  4. Piecewise linear approximation for hereditary control problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Propst, Georg

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents finite-dimensional approximations for linear retarded functional differential equations by use of discontinuous piecewise linear functions. The approximation scheme is applied to optimal control problems, when a quadratic cost integral must be minimized subject to the controlled retarded system. It is shown that the approximate optimal feedback operators converge to the true ones both in the case where the cost integral ranges over a finite time interval, as well as in the case where it ranges over an infinite time interval. The arguments in the last case rely on the fact that the piecewise linear approximations to stable systems are stable in a uniform sense.

  5. International linear collider reference design report

    SciTech Connect

    Aarons, G.

    2007-06-22

    The International Linear Collider will give physicists a new cosmic doorway to explore energy regimes beyond the reach of today's accelerators. A proposed electron-positron collider, the ILC will complement the Large Hadron Collider, a proton-proton collider at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, together unlocking some of the deepest mysteries in the universe. With LHC discoveries pointing the way, the ILC -- a true precision machine -- will provide the missing pieces of the puzzle. Consisting of two linear accelerators that face each other, the ILC will hurl some 10 billion electrons and their anti-particles, positrons, toward each other at nearly the speed of light. Superconducting accelerator cavities operating at temperatures near absolute zero give the particles more and more energy until they smash in a blazing crossfire at the centre of the machine. Stretching approximately 35 kilometres in length, the beams collide 14,000 times every second at extremely high energies -- 500 billion-electron-volts (GeV). Each spectacular collision creates an array of new particles that could answer some of the most fundamental questions of all time. The current baseline design allows for an upgrade to a 50-kilometre, 1 trillion-electron-volt (TeV) machine during the second stage of the project. This reference design provides the first detailed technical snapshot of the proposed future electron-positron collider, defining in detail the technical parameters and components that make up each section of the 31-kilometer long accelerator. The report will guide the development of the worldwide R&D program, motivate international industrial studies and serve as the basis for the final engineering design needed to make an official project proposal later this decade.

  6. Feedback linearization application for LLRF control system

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, S.; Regan, A.; Wang, Y.M.; Rohlev, T.

    1998-12-31

    The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) being constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory will serve as the prototype for the low energy section of Acceleration Production of Tritium (APT) accelerator. This paper addresses the problem of the LLRF control system for LEDA. The authors propose a control law which is based on exact feedback linearization coupled with gain scheduling which reduces the effect of the deterministic klystron cathode voltage ripple that is due to harmonics of the high voltage power supply and achieves tracking of desired set points. Also, they propose an estimator of the ripple and its time derivative and the estimates based feedback linearization controller.

  7. On manipulator control by exact linearization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreutz, Kenneth

    1989-01-01

    Comments are given on the application to rigid-link manipulators of geometric control theory, resolved acceleration control, operational space control, and nonlinear decoupling theory, and the essential unity of these techniques for externally linearizing and decoupling end-effector dynamics is discussed. Exploiting the fact that the mass matrix of a rigid-link manipulator is positive definite, and the fact that there is an independent input for each degree of freedom, it is shown that a necessary and sufficient condition for a locally externally linearizing and output decoupling feedback law to exist is that the end effector Jacobian matrix be nonsingular.

  8. Linearizing feedforward/feedback attitude control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paielli, Russell A.; Bach, Ralph E.

    1991-01-01

    An approach to attitude control theory is introduced in which a linear form is postulated for the closed-loop rotation error dynamics, then the exact control law required to realize it is derived. The nonminimal (four-component) quaternion form is used to attitude because it is globally nonsingular, but the minimal (three-component) quaternion form is used for attitude error because it has no nonlinear constraints to prevent the rotational error dynamics from being linearized, and the definition of the attitude error is based on quaternion algebra. This approach produces an attitude control law that linearizes the closed-loop rotational error dynamics exactly, without any attitude singularities, even if the control errors become large.

  9. Linearizing feedforward/feedback attitude control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paielli, Russell A.; Bach, Ralph E.

    1991-01-01

    An approach to attitude control theory is introduced in which a linear form is postulated for the closed-loop rotation error dynamics, then the exact control law required to realize it is derived. The nonminimal (four-component) quaternion form is used to attitude because it is globally nonsingular, but the minimal (three-component) quaternion form is used for attitude error because it has no nonlinear constraints to prevent the rotational error dynamics from being linearized, and the definition of the attitude error is based on quaternion algebra. This approach produces an attitude control law that linearizes the closed-loop rotational error dynamics exactly, without any attitude singularities, even if the control errors become large.

  10. Piecewise linear approximation for hereditary control problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Propst, Georg

    1987-01-01

    Finite dimensional approximations are presented for linear retarded functional differential equations by use of discontinuous piecewise linear functions. The approximation scheme is applied to optimal control problems when a quadratic cost integral has to be minimized subject to the controlled retarded system. It is shown that the approximate optimal feedback operators converge to the true ones both in case the cost integral ranges over a finite time interval as well as in the case it ranges over an infinite time interval. The arguments in the latter case rely on the fact that the piecewise linear approximations to stable systems are stable in a uniform sense. This feature is established using a vector-component stability criterion in the state space R(n) x L(2) and the favorable eigenvalue behavior of the piecewise linear approximations.

  11. Design of a transverse-flux permanent-magnet linear generator and controller for use with a free-piston stirling engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jigui; Huang, Yuping; Wu, Hongxing; Zheng, Ping

    2016-07-01

    Transverse-flux with high efficiency has been applied in Stirling engine and permanent magnet synchronous linear generator system, however it is restricted for large application because of low and complex process. A novel type of cylindrical, non-overlapping, transverse-flux, and permanent-magnet linear motor(TFPLM) is investigated, furthermore, a high power factor and less process complexity structure research is developed. The impact of magnetic leakage factor on power factor is discussed, by using the Finite Element Analysis(FEA) model of stirling engine and TFPLM, an optimization method for electro-magnetic design of TFPLM is proposed based on magnetic leakage factor. The relation between power factor and structure parameter is investigated, and a structure parameter optimization method is proposed taking power factor maximum as a goal. At last, the test bench is founded, starting experimental and generating experimental are performed, and a good agreement of simulation and experimental is achieved. The power factor is improved and the process complexity is decreased. This research provides the instruction to design high-power factor permanent-magnet linear generator.

  12. Fuzzy control for linear plants with uncertain output backlashes.

    PubMed

    Tao, C W

    2002-01-01

    In this correspondence, a new approach to design a fuzzy controller for systems with uncertain output backlash to have good tracking performance is presented. Without using a compensation mechanism or a backlash inverse, the fuzzy control mechanism is designed to implicitly compensate the delay effect arising from an uncertain output backlash and to make the output backlash system stable without limit cycles. Also, the proposed fuzzy controller is presented to be insensitive to the variations of the backlash and system plant parameters. Moreover, the proposed approach is extended to design a fuzzy controller for a two-input two-output (TITO) linear plant with output backlash. The effectiveness of the designed fuzzy controller is illustrated by the simulation results on linear, low-order, nonlinear plants and the experimental results on an amplifier-motor system with a gear train.

  13. Regulation of nuclear reactors by duplexed control rods; Linearized analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Haidar, N.H.S. ); Diab, H.B. )

    1991-10-01

    In this paper the dynamic behavior of a duplex control rod for a nuclear reactor is analyzed by linearized modeling. A simulation-aided design for this duplex, which has performance and safety characteristics that are improved over those of conventional single control rods with the same stability margins, is reported.

  14. Linear predictive control with state variable constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bdirina, K.; Djoudi, D.; Lagoun, M.

    2012-11-01

    While linear model predictive control is popular since the 70s of the past century, the 90s have witnessed a steadily increasing attention from control theoretists as well as control practitioners in the area of model predictive control (MPC). The practical interest is driven by the fact that today's processes need to be operated under tighter performance specifications. At the same time more and more constraints, stemming for example from environmental and safety considerations, need to besatisfied. Often these demands can only be met when process constraints are explicitly considered in the controller. Predictive control with constraints appears to be a well suited approach for this kind of problems. In this paper the basic principle of MPC with constraints is reviewed and some of the theoretical, computational, and implementation aspects of MPC are discussed. Furthermore the MPC with constraints was applied to linear example.

  15. Linear, Parameter-Varying Control of Aeroservoelastic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno Chicunque, Claudia Patricia

    Modern aircraft designers are adopting light-weight, high-aspect ratio flexible wings to improve performance and reduce operation costs. A technical challenge associated with these designs is that the large deformations in flight of the wings lead to adverse interactions between the aircraft aerodynamic forces and structural forces. These adverse interactions produce excessive vibrations that can degrade flying qualities and may result in severe structural damages or catastrophic failure. This dissertation is focused on the application of multivariable robust control techniques for suppression of these adverse interactions in flexible aircraft. Here, the aircraft coupled nonlinear equations of motion are represented in the linear, parameter-varying framework. These equations account for the coupled aerodynamics, rigid body dynamics, and deformable body dynamics of the aircraft. Unfortunately, the inclusion of this coupled dynamics results in high-order models that increase the computational complexity of linear, parameter-varying control techniques. This dissertation addresses three key technologies for linear, parameter-varying control of flexible aircraft: (i) linear, parameter-varying model reduction; (ii) selection of actuators and sensors for vibration suppression; and (iii) design of linear, parameter-varying controllers for vibration suppression. All of these three technologies are applied to an experimental research platform located at the University of Minnesota. The objective of this dissertation is to provide to the flight control community with a set of design methodologies to safely exploit the benefits of light-weight flexible aircraft.

  16. Optimum linear synchronous motor design for high speed ground transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azukizawa, T.

    1983-10-01

    This paper decribes fundamental concepts pertinent to designing an optimum linear synchronous motor as the propulsion system for high speed ground transportation. The complicated interactions between the key parameters are systematically arranged to show what is essential to determine these parameters. Some important guideposts to determine these parameters are obtained. Particularly, 0.7 tau sub s - 0.75 tau sub s long superconducting magnets are recommended (tau sub s: pole pitch). Also, a control method for economical linear synchronous motor operation is discussed.

  17. Robust H∞ state-feedback control for linear systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Wang, Huazhang

    2017-04-01

    This paper investigates the problem of robust H∞ control for linear systems. First, the state-feedback closed-loop control algorithm is designed. Second, by employing the geometric progression theory, a modified augmented Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional (LKF) with the geometric integral interval is established. Then, parameter uncertainties and the derivative of the delay are flexibly described by introducing the convex combination skill. This technique can eliminate the unnecessary enlargement of the LKF derivative estimation, which gives less conservatism. In addition, the designed controller can ensure that the linear systems are globally asymptotically stable with a guaranteed H∞ performance in the presence of a disturbance input and parameter uncertainties. A liquid monopropellant rocket motor with a pressure feeding system is evaluated in a simulation example. It shows that this proposed state-feedback control approach achieves the expected results for linear systems in the sense of the prescribed H∞ performance.

  18. Light-controllable linear dichroism in nematics.

    PubMed

    Petriashvili, Gia; Hamdi, Ridha; De Santo, Maria Penelope; Gary, Ramla; Barberi, Riccardo

    2015-10-01

    We report a method to obtain a light-controllable dichroism. The main effect is achieved using spiropyran-doped (SP-doped) nematic liquid crystal mixtures. SP molecules exhibit a high solubility in the liquid crystal host, which can vary between 1% and 4% in weight, without destroying the liquid crystalline phase. Due to their elongated shape, SP molecules are oriented along the nematic liquid crystal director. The obtained linear dichroism was measured to be 1.08 with a dichroic ratio of 7.12. Further, a two-direction linear dichroism was obtained by adding a dichroic dye to the mixture. The angle between the two dichroic axes was found to be 11°. Two-direction linear dichroism is also light controllable and can be switched back to one-direction dichroism.

  19. Computer-aided-analysis of linear control system robustness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengel, Robert F.; Ray, Laura R.

    1990-01-01

    Stochastic robustness is a simple technique used to estimate the stability and performance robustness of linear, time-invariant systems. The use of high-speed graphics workstations and control system design software in stochastic robustness analysis is discussed and demonstrated. It is shown that stochastic robustness makes good use of modern computational and graphic tools, and it is easily implemented using commercial control system design and analysis software.

  20. Optimal second order sliding mode control for linear uncertain systems.

    PubMed

    Das, Madhulika; Mahanta, Chitralekha

    2014-11-01

    In this paper an optimal second order sliding mode controller (OSOSMC) is proposed to track a linear uncertain system. The optimal controller based on the linear quadratic regulator method is designed for the nominal system. An integral sliding mode controller is combined with the optimal controller to ensure robustness of the linear system which is affected by parametric uncertainties and external disturbances. To achieve finite time convergence of the sliding mode, a nonsingular terminal sliding surface is added with the integral sliding surface giving rise to a second order sliding mode controller. The main advantage of the proposed OSOSMC is that the control input is substantially reduced and it becomes chattering free. Simulation results confirm superiority of the proposed OSOSMC over some existing.

  1. Solar Control design package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Information used in the evaluation of design of Solar Control's solar heating and cooling system controller and the Solarstat is given. Some of the information includes system performance specifications, design data brochures, and detailed design drawings.

  2. Controlling a Linear Process in Turbulent Channel Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Junwoo; Kim, John

    1999-11-01

    Recent studies have shown that controllers developed based on a linear system theory work surprisingly well in reducing the viscous drag in turbulent boundary layers, suggesting that the essential dynamics of near-wall turbulence may well be approximated by the linearized model. Of particular interest is the linear process due to the coupling term between the wall-normal velocity and wall-normal vorticity terms in the linearized Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations, which enhances non-normality of the linearized system. This linear process is investigated through numerical simulations of a turbulent channel flow. It is shown that the linear coupling term plays an important role in fully turbulent -- and hence, nonlinear -- flows. Near-wall turbulence is shown to decay in the absence of the linear coupling term. The fact that the coupling term plays an essential role in maintaining near-wall turbulence suggests that an effective control algorithm for the drag reduction in turbulent flows should be aimed at reducing the effect of the coupling term in the wall region. Designing a control algorithm that directly accounts for the coupling term in a cost to be minimized will be discussed.

  3. Linear combinations come alive in crossover designs.

    PubMed

    Shuster, Jonathan J

    2017-10-30

    Before learning anything about statistical inference in beginning service courses in biostatistics, students learn how to calculate the mean and variance of linear combinations of random variables. Practical precalculus examples of the importance of these exercises can be helpful for instructors, the target audience of this paper. We shall present applications to the "1-sample" and "2-sample" methods for randomized short-term 2-treatment crossover studies, where patients experience both treatments in random order with a "washout" between the active treatment periods. First, we show that the 2-sample method is preferred as it eliminates "conditional bias" when sample sizes by order differ and produces a smaller variance. We also demonstrate that it is usually advisable to use the differences in posttests (ignoring baseline and post washout values) rather than the differences between the changes in treatment from the start of the period to the end of the period ("delta of delta"). Although the intent is not to provide a definitive discussion of crossover designs, we provide a section and references to excellent alternative methods, where instructors can provide motivation to students to explore the topic in greater detail in future readings or courses. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. AESOP- INTERACTIVE DESIGN OF LINEAR QUADRATIC REGULATORS AND KALMAN FILTERS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehtinen, B.

    1994-01-01

    AESOP was developed to solve a number of problems associated with the design of controls and state estimators for linear time-invariant systems. The systems considered are modeled in state-variable form by a set of linear differential and algebraic equations with constant coefficients. Two key problems solved by AESOP are the linear quadratic regulator (LQR) design problem and the steady-state Kalman filter design problem. AESOP is designed to be used in an interactive manner. The user can solve design problems and analyze the solutions in a single interactive session. Both numerical and graphical information are available to the user during the session. The AESOP program is structured around a list of predefined functions. Each function performs a single computation associated with control, estimation, or system response determination. AESOP contains over sixty functions and permits the easy inclusion of user defined functions. The user accesses these functions either by inputting a list of desired functions in the order they are to be performed, or by specifying a single function to be performed. The latter case is used when the choice of function and function order depends on the results of previous functions. The available AESOP functions are divided into several general areas including: 1) program control, 2) matrix input and revision, 3) matrix formation, 4) open-loop system analysis, 5) frequency response, 6) transient response, 7) transient function zeros, 8) LQR and Kalman filter design, 9) eigenvalues and eigenvectors, 10) covariances, and 11) user-defined functions. The most important functions are those that design linear quadratic regulators and Kalman filters. The user interacts with AESOP when using these functions by inputting design weighting parameters and by viewing displays of designed system response. Support functions obtain system transient and frequency responses, transfer functions, and covariance matrices. AESOP can also provide the user

  5. Design and investigation of a linear smart actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Chaitanya, S.; Dhanalakshmi, K.

    2015-04-01

    Motors are nearly the sole constituents for actuation and driving applications, but there exist cases where their use proves to be impractical. Shape memory alloy (SMA), then revolutionized the actuator technology, thereby opening the door for new ideas and designs and with it what seemed unfeasible in the past have now become challenging. Many conventional actuators and sensors could be substituted with SMA, obtaining advantages in terms of reduction of weight, dimensions and its cost. SMAs are a group of metallic materials that revert to a predefined shape via phase transformation induced by a thermal procedure. Unlike metals that exhibit thermal expansion, SMA exhibits contraction when heated, which is larger by a hundredfold and exerts tremendous force for its small size. The focus of this work is to realize SMA wire as actuator which finds suitable applications (space, aerospace, biomechanics, etc.) where minimizing space, weight and cost are prime objectives. The accomplishments reported in this paper represent a significant development in the design of SMA actuator configurations for linear actuation. Report on design, fabrication and characterisation of the proposed system is presented. The design took advantage of converting the small linear displacement of the SMA wire into a large linear elastic motion under the influence of biasing element. From the results with control it is aspired that with further improvements on the design, the actuator can be utilized in enabling practical SMA technologies for potential robotic and commercial applications.

  6. Design of nonlinear observer by augmented linear system based on formal linearization using fourier expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Kazuo; Takata, Hitoshi

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we consider an observer design by using a formal linearization based on Fourier expansion for nonlinear dynamic and measurement systems. A non-linear dynamic system is given by a nonlinear ordinary differential equation, and a measurement sysetm is done by a nonlinear equation. Defining a linearization function which consists of the trigonometric functions considered up to the higher-order, a nonlinear dynamic system is transformed into an augmented linear one with respect to this linearization function by using Fourier expansion. Introducing an augmented measurement vector which consists of polynomials of measurement data, a measurement equation is transformed into an augmented linear one with respect to the linearization function in the same way. To these augmented linearized systems, a linear estimation theory is applied to design a new non-linear observer.

  7. Optimal Regulator Algorithms For The Control Of Linear Systems (ORACLS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, Harold P.

    1990-01-01

    Control theory design package offers engineer full range of subroutines to manipulate and solve Linear-Quadratic-Gaussian types of problems. ORACLS is rigorous tool, intended for multi-input and multi-output dynamic systems in both continuous and discrete form. Written in FORTRAN.

  8. Distributed control using linear momentum exchange devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharkey, J. P.; Waites, Henry; Doane, G. B., III

    1987-01-01

    MSFC has successfully employed the use of the Vibrational Control of Space Structures (VCOSS) Linear Momentum Exchange Devices (LMEDs), which was an outgrowth of the Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratory (AFWAL) program, in a distributed control experiment. The control experiment was conducted in MSFC's Ground Facility for Large Space Structures Control Verification (GF/LSSCV). The GF/LSSCV's test article was well suited for this experiment in that the LMED could be judiciously placed on the ASTROMAST. The LMED placements were such that vibrational mode information could be extracted from the accelerometers on the LMED. The LMED accelerometer information was processed by the control algorithms so that the LMED masses could be accelerated to produce forces which would dampen the vibrational modes of interest. Experimental results are presented showing the LMED's capabilities.

  9. Stochastic Optimal Control and Linear Programming Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Buckdahn, R.; Goreac, D.; Quincampoix, M.

    2011-04-15

    We study a classical stochastic optimal control problem with constraints and discounted payoff in an infinite horizon setting. The main result of the present paper lies in the fact that this optimal control problem is shown to have the same value as a linear optimization problem stated on some appropriate space of probability measures. This enables one to derive a dual formulation that appears to be strongly connected to the notion of (viscosity sub) solution to a suitable Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation. We also discuss relation with long-time average problems.

  10. High Accuracy Attitude Control of a Spacecraft Using Feedback Linearization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    ock i6. i•’ice Gode. Enter appropriate price Block 8. Performinq Orqanizznuon Rao t ccde (NTIS only).. Number. Enter the unique a h.:-~ eric rooz...raised by this initial design. Recommendations for future reasearch and design are also presented. Appendix A describes the notation used throughout...Test the linear controller for expected performance under the assumption the exact lin- earization will cause the behavior of the nonlinear system to

  11. Nutrient Control Design Manual

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Nutrient Control Design Manual will present an extensive state-of-the-technology review of the engineering design and operation of nitrogen and phosphorous control technologies and techniques applied at municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). This manual will present ...

  12. Nutrient Control Design Manual

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Nutrient Control Design Manual will present an extensive state-of-the-technology review of the engineering design and operation of nitrogen and phosphorous control technologies and techniques applied at municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). This manual will present ...

  13. Colorized linear CCD data acquisition system with automatic exposure control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaofan; Sui, Xiubao

    2014-11-01

    Colorized linear cameras deliver superb color fidelity at the fastest line rates in the industrial inspection. It's RGB trilinear sensor eliminates image artifacts by placing a separate row of pixels for each color on a single sensor. It's advanced design minimizes distance between rows to minimize image artifacts due to synchronization. In this paper, the high-speed colorized linear CCD data acquisition system was designed take advantages of the linear CCD sensor μpd3728. The hardware and software design of the system based on FPGA is introduced and the design of the functional modules is performed. The all system is composed of CCD driver module, data buffering module, data processing module and computer interface module. The image data was transferred to computer by Camera link interface. The system which automatically adjusts the exposure time of linear CCD, is realized with a new method. The integral time of CCD can be controlled by the program. The method can automatically adjust the integration time for different illumination intensity under controlling of FPGA, and respond quickly to brightness changes. The data acquisition system is also offering programmable gains and offsets for each color. The quality of image can be improved after calibration in FPGA. The design has high expansibility and application value. It can be used in many application situations.

  14. Design of an Internal Model Control strategy for single-phase grid-connected PWM inverters and its performance analysis with a non-linear local load and weak grid.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Eric N; Coelho, Ernane A A; Carvalho, Henrique T M; Freitas, Luiz C G; Júnior, João B V; Freitas, Luiz C

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the design of a controller based on Internal Model Control (IMC) applied to a grid-connected single-phase PWM inverter. The mathematical modeling of the inverter and the LCL output filter, used to project the 1-DOF IMC controller, is presented and the decoupling of grid voltage by a Feedforward strategy is analyzed. A Proportional - Resonant Controller (P+Res) was used for the control of the same plant in the running of experimental results, thus moving towards the discussion of differences regarding IMC and P+Res performances, which arrived at the evaluation of the proposed control strategy. The results are presented for typical conditions, for weak-grid and for non-linear local load, in order to verify the behavior of the controller against such situations.

  15. State feedback control of switched linear systems: An LMI approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagner, V. F.; Leite, V. J. S.; Oliveira, R. C. L. F.; Peres, P. L. D.

    2006-10-01

    This paper addresses the problem of state feedback control of continuous-time switched linear systems with arbitrary switching rules. A quadratic Lyapunov function with a common matrix is used to derive a stabilizing switching control strategy that guarantees: (i) the assignment of all the eigenvalues of each linear subsystem inside a chosen circle in the left-hand half of the complex plane; (ii) a minimum disturbance attenuation level for the closed-loop switched system. The proposed design conditions are given in terms of linear matrix inequalities that encompass previous results based on quadratic stability conditions with fixed control gains. Although the quadratic stability based on a fixed Lyapunov matrix has been widely used in robust control design, the use of this condition to provide a convex design method for switching feedback gains has not been fully investigated. Numerical examples show that the switching control strategy can cope with more stringent design specifications than the fixed gain strategy, being useful to improve the performance of this class of systems.

  16. Control system design guide

    SciTech Connect

    Sellers, David; Friedman, Hannah; Haasl, Tudi; Bourassa, Norman; Piette, Mary Ann

    2003-05-01

    The ''Control System Design Guide'' (Design Guide) provides methods and recommendations for the control system design process and control point selection and installation. Control systems are often the most problematic system in a building. A good design process that takes into account maintenance, operation, and commissioning can lead to a smoothly operating and efficient building. To this end, the Design Guide provides a toolbox of templates for improving control system design and specification. HVAC designers are the primary audience for the Design Guide. The control design process it presents will help produce well-designed control systems that achieve efficient and robust operation. The spreadsheet examples for control valve schedules, damper schedules, and points lists can streamline the use of the control system design concepts set forth in the Design Guide by providing convenient starting points from which designers can build. Although each reader brings their own unique questions to the text, the Design Guide contains information that designers, commissioning providers, operators, and owners will find useful.

  17. Design and Laboratory Testing of a Prototype Linear Temperature Sensor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-01

    Report DT-8203-01 Dynamics Technology, Inc. ’-4 DESIGN AND LABORATORY TESTING OF A PROTOTYPE LINEAR TEMPERATURE SENSOR C. Michael Dube and Christian...PERIOD COVERED DESIGN AND LABORATORY TESTING OF A PROTOTYPE FINAL REPORT LINEAR TEMPERATURE SENSOR 1 January 82 - 30 June 1982 7. AUTOMIGHOR. EPRTNUBE...discusses the basic theory, design, and laboratory testing of a A p.ototype linear temperature sensor (or "line sensor "), which is an instru- m1ent for

  18. A non-linear programming approach to the computer-aided design of regulators using a linear-quadratic formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, P.

    1985-01-01

    A design technique is proposed for linear regulators in which a feedback controller of fixed structure is chosen to minimize an integral quadratic objective function subject to the satisfaction of integral quadratic constraint functions. Application of a non-linear programming algorithm to this mathematically tractable formulation results in an efficient and useful computer-aided design tool. Particular attention is paid to computational efficiency and various recommendations are made. Two design examples illustrate the flexibility of the approach and highlight the special insight afforded to the designer.

  19. A non-linear programming approach to the computer-aided design of regulators using a linear-quadratic formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, P.

    1985-01-01

    A design technique is proposed for linear regulators in which a feedback controller of fixed structure is chosen to minimize an integral quadratic objective function subject to the satisfaction of integral quadratic constraint functions. Application of a non-linear programming algorithm to this mathematically tractable formulation results in an efficient and useful computer-aided design tool. Particular attention is paid to computational efficiency and various recommendations are made. Two design examples illustrate the flexibility of the approach and highlight the special insight afforded to the designer.

  20. Performance-oriented antiwindup for a class of linear control systems with augmented neural network controller.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Guido; Turner, Matthew C; Postlethwaite, Ian

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents a conditioning scheme for a linear control system which is enhanced by a neural network (NN) controller and subjected to a control signal amplitude limit. The NN controller improves the performance of the linear control system by directly estimating an actuator-matched, unmodeled, nonlinear disturbance, in closed-loop, and compensating for it. As disturbances are generally known to be bounded, the nominal NN-control element is modified to keep its output below the disturbance bound. The linear control element is conditioned by an antiwindup (AW) compensator which ensures performance close to the nominal controller and swift recovery from saturation. For this, the AW compensator proposed is of low order, designed using convex linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) optimization.

  1. Passive dynamic controllers for non-linear mechanical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Wu, Shih-Chin; Phan, Minh; Longman, Richard W.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology for model-independent controller design for controlling large angular motion of multi-body dynamic systems is outlined.The controlled system may consist of rigid and flexible components that undergo large rigid body motion and small elastic deformations. Control forces/torques are applied to drive the system, and at the same time suppress the vibrations due to flexibility of the components. The proposed controller consists of passive second-order systems which may be designed with little knowledge of the system parameters, even if the controlled system is non-linear. Under rather general assumptions, the passive design assures that the closed loop system has guaranteed stability properties. Unlike positive real controller design, stabilization can be accomplished without direct velocity feedback. In addition, the second-order passive design allows dynamic feedback controllers with considerable freedom to tune for desired system response, and to avoid actuator saturation. After developing the basic mathematical formulation of the design methodology, simulation results are presented to illustrate the proposed approach applied to a flexible six-degree-of-freedom manipulator.

  2. Passive dynamic controllers for non-linear mechanical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Wu, Shih-Chin; Phan, Minh; Longman, Richard W.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology for model-independent controller design for controlling large angular motion of multi-body dynamic systems is outlined.The controlled system may consist of rigid and flexible components that undergo large rigid body motion and small elastic deformations. Control forces/torques are applied to drive the system, and at the same time suppress the vibrations due to flexibility of the components. The proposed controller consists of passive second-order systems which may be designed with little knowledge of the system parameters, even if the controlled system is non-linear. Under rather general assumptions, the passive design assures that the closed loop system has guaranteed stability properties. Unlike positive real controller design, stabilization can be accomplished without direct velocity feedback. In addition, the second-order passive design allows dynamic feedback controllers with considerable freedom to tune for desired system response, and to avoid actuator saturation. After developing the basic mathematical formulation of the design methodology, simulation results are presented to illustrate the proposed approach applied to a flexible six-degree-of-freedom manipulator.

  3. Linearized flexibility models in multibody dynamics and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cimino, William W.

    1989-01-01

    Simulation of structural response of multi-flexible-body systems by linearized flexible motion combined with nonlinear rigid motion is discussed. Advantages and applicability of such an approach for accurate simulation with greatly reduced computational costs and turnaround times are described, restricting attention to the control design environment. Requirements for updating the linearized flexibility model to track large angular motions are discussed. Validation of such an approach by comparison with other existing codes is included. Application to a flexible robot manipulator system is described.

  4. The Next Linear Collider Design: NLC 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, Alberta

    2001-08-21

    Recent studies in elementary particle physics have made the need for an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider able to reach energies of 500 GeV and above with high luminosity more compelling than ever. Observations and measurements completed in the last five years at the SLC (SLAC), LEP (CERN), and the Tevatron (FNAL) can be explained only by the existence of at least one particle or interaction that has not yet been directly observed in experiment. The Higgs boson of the Standard Model could be that particle. The data point strongly to a mass for the Higgs boson that is just beyond the reach of existing colliders. This brings great urgency and excitement to the potential for discovery at the upgraded Tevatron early in this decade, and almost assures that later experiments at the LHC will find new physics. But the next generation of experiments to be mounted by the world-wide particle physics community must not only find this new physics, they must find out what it is. These experiments must also define the next important threshold in energy. The need is to understand physics at the TeV energy scale as well as the physics at the 100-GeV energy scale is now understood. This will require both the LHC and a companion linear electron-positron collider.

  5. Application of linear gauss pseudospectral method in model predictive control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liang; Zhou, Hao; Chen, Wanchun

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a model predictive control(MPC) method aimed at solving the nonlinear optimal control problem with hard terminal constraints and quadratic performance index. The method combines the philosophies of the nonlinear approximation model predictive control, linear quadrature optimal control and Gauss Pseudospectral method. The current control is obtained by successively solving linear algebraic equations transferred from the original problem via linearization and the Gauss Pseudospectral method. It is not only of high computational efficiency since it does not need to solve nonlinear programming problem, but also of high accuracy though there are a few discrete points. Therefore, this method is suitable for on-board applications. A design of terminal impact with a specified direction is carried out to evaluate the performance of this method. Augmented PN guidance law in the three-dimensional coordinate system is applied to produce the initial guess. And various cases for target with straight-line movements are employed to demonstrate the applicability in different impact angles. Moreover, performance of the proposed method is also assessed by comparison with other guidance laws. Simulation results indicate that this method is not only of high computational efficiency and accuracy, but also applicable in the framework of guidance design.

  6. Special Purpose Non-Linear Digital Position Control Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, David W.

    1987-10-01

    A Position Control Algorithm with interesting features has been used in the design of an electro-mechanical actuator for a particular application where volume and weight limits are extremely tight. Position feedback, non-linear derived rate feedback, a saturable full-time main integrator, an intermittent fast integrator, compensation for mechanical system compliance, and derived acceleration feedback are used in an extension and modification of classical control concepts. The calculating and decision making power of a microcomputer contained in the actuator has been used to significantly improve upon well known control methods for this special case.

  7. Computational Aspects of Realization & Design Algorithms in Linear Systems Theory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, Chia-Chi

    Realization and design problems are two major problems in linear time-invariant systems control theory and have been solved theoretically. However, little is understood about their numerical properties. Due to the large scale of the problem and the finite precision of computer computation, it is very important and is the purpose of this study to investigate the computational reliability and efficiency of the algorithms for these two problems. In this dissertation, a reliable algorithm to achieve canonical form realization via Hankel matrix is developed. A comparative study of three general realization algorithms, for both numerical reliability and efficiency, shows that the proposed algorithm (via Hankel matrix) is the most preferable one among the three. The design problems, such as the state feedback design for pole placement, the state observer design, and the low order single and multi-functional observer design, have been solved by using canonical form systems matrices. In this dissertation, a set of algorithms for solving these three design problems is developed and analysed. These algorithms are based on Hessenberg form systems matrices which are numerically more reliable to compute than the canonical form systems matrices.

  8. Linear quadratic servo control of a reusable rocket engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musgrave, Jeffrey L.

    1991-01-01

    A design method for a servo compensator is developed in the frequency domain using singular values. The method is applied to a reusable rocket engine. An intelligent control system for reusable rocket engines was proposed which includes a diagnostic system, a control system, and an intelligent coordinator which determines engine control strategies based on the identified failure modes. The method provides a means of generating various linear multivariable controllers capable of meeting performance and robustness specifications and accommodating failure modes identified by the diagnostic system. Command following with set point control is necessary for engine operation. A Kalman filter reconstructs the state while loop transfer recovery recovers the required degree of robustness while maintaining satisfactory rejection of sensor noise from the command error. The approach is applied to the design of a controller for a rocket engine satisfying performance constraints in the frequency domain. Simulation results demonstrate the performance of the linear design on a nonlinear engine model over all power levels during mainstage operation.

  9. Recursive Deadbeat Controller Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Phan, Minh Q.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a recursive algorithm for a deadbeat predictive controller design. The method combines together the concepts of system identification and deadbeat controller designs. It starts with the multi-step output prediction equation and derives the control force in terms of past input and output time histories. The formulation thus derived satisfies simultaneously system identification and deadbeat controller design requirements. As soon as the coefficient matrices are identified satisfying the output prediction equation, no further work is required to compute the deadbeat control gain matrices. The method can be implemented recursively just as any typical recursive system identification techniques.

  10. Design and simulation of HTS bulk linear synchronous motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, K.; Matsumoto, H.

    2002-10-01

    A new type high temperature superconducting (HTS) bulk linear synchronous motor (LSM) theory is proposed by authors which is based on an idea of considering the pinning force as a synchronizing one in using current-carrying-armature-winding instead of permanent magnets. Electromagnetic force which HTS bulk produces depends on strongly the space distribution of an applied magnetic field under field cooling. LSM thrust force distribution on HTS bulk which is essentially different from that on a permanent magnet. It is generally difficult to design HTS bulk LSM. This paper presents a design of HTS bulk LSM by the finite element method (FEM) and its dynamics simulation of propulsion motion. Dynamics simulation is carried out using an instantaneous-maximum-thrust-force control method proposed here which is based on an analytical formula of LSM thrust force derived from the FEM capable of modeling HTS bulk.

  11. A linear quadratic tracker for Control Moment Gyro based attitude control of the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaidy, J. T.

    1986-01-01

    The paper discusses a design for an attitude control system for the Space Station which produces fast response, with minimal overshoot and cross-coupling with the use of Control Moment Gyros (CMG). The rigid body equations of motion are linearized and discretized and a Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) design and analysis study is performed. The resulting design is then modified such that integral and differential terms are added to the state equations to enhance response characteristics. Methods for reduction of computation time through channelization are discussed as well as the reduction of initial torque requirements.

  12. Extensibility of a linear rapid robust design methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinfeldt, Bradley A.; Braun, Robert D.

    2016-05-01

    The extensibility of a linear rapid robust design methodology is examined. This analysis is approached from a computational cost and accuracy perspective. The sensitivity of the solution's computational cost is examined by analysing effects such as the number of design variables, nonlinearity of the CAs, and nonlinearity of the response in addition to several potential complexity metrics. Relative to traditional robust design methods, the linear rapid robust design methodology scaled better with the size of the problem and had performance that exceeded the traditional techniques examined. The accuracy of applying a method with linear fundamentals to nonlinear problems was examined. It is observed that if the magnitude of nonlinearity is less than 1000 times that of the nominal linear response, the error associated with applying successive linearization will result in ? errors in the response less than 10% compared to the full nonlinear error.

  13. The new control system of the Saclay Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Gournay, J.F.; Garreau, F.; Giraud, A.; Gourcy, G.; Rouault, J.

    1985-10-01

    A new control system for the Saclay Linear Accelerator is now being designed. The computer control architecture is based on 3 dedicated VME crates with MC68000 micro-processors : one crate with a disk-based operating system will run the high level application programs and the data base management facilities, another one will manage the man-machine communications and the third one will interface the system to the linac equipments. Communications between the VME microcomputers will be done through 16 bit parallel links. The software is modular and organized in specific layers, the data base is fully distributed. About 90% of the code is written in Fortran.

  14. Design and development of a linear thermal actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, G.; Osborne, D.

    1985-01-01

    The design and development of a linear thermal actuator (LTA) for space applications is described. The actuator is driven by thermal energy and utilizes the property of thermal expansion to do work. Equations to predict performance are developed and used to optimize the design of the development model LTA. Design details and test results are presented and discussed.

  15. Comparison of two approaches to linear collider design

    SciTech Connect

    Schnell, W.

    1987-11-01

    This paper reviews linear collider parameters. It aims at analyzing two specific design approachs - the ones for CLIC at CERN and for a TeV linear collider at SLAC - which appear to lead into remarkably different directions although they start from the same premises and try to respect the same boundary conditions. 19 refs.

  16. Methodological development of fuzzy-logic controllers from multivariable linear control.

    PubMed

    Tso, S K; Fung, Y H

    1997-01-01

    It is the function of the design of a fuzzy-logic controller to determine the universes of discourse of the antecedents and the consequents, number of membership labels, distribution and shape of membership functions, rule formulation, etc. Much of the information is usually extracted from expert knowledge, operator experience, or heuristic thinking. It is hence difficult to mechanize the first-stage design of fuzzy-logic controllers using linguistic labels whose performance is no worse than that of conventional multivariable linear controllers such as state-feedback controllers, PID controllers, etc. In this paper, an original systematic seven-step linear-to-fuzzy (LIN2FUZ) algorithm is proposed for generating the labels, universes of discourse of the antecedents and the consequents, and fuzzy rules of ;basically linear' fuzzy-logic controllers, given the reference design of available conventional multivariable linear controllers. The functionally equivalent fuzzy-logic controllers can thus provide the sound basis for the further development to achieve performance beyond the capability or the conventional controllers. The validity and effectiveness of the proposed LIN2FUZ algorithm are demonstrated by a four-input one-output inverted pendulum system.

  17. Design and optimization of a modal- independent linear ultrasonic motor.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shengli; Yao, Zhiyuan

    2014-03-01

    To simplify the design of the linear ultrasonic motor (LUSM) and improve its output performance, a method of modal decoupling for LUSMs is proposed in this paper. The specific embodiment of this method is decoupling of the traditional LUSM stator's complex vibration into two simple vibrations, with each vibration implemented by one vibrator. Because the two vibrators are designed independently, their frequencies can be tuned independently and frequency consistency is easy to achieve. Thus, the method can simplify the design of the LUSM. Based on this method, a prototype modal- independent LUSM is designed and fabricated. The motor reaches its maximum thrust force of 47 N, maximum unloaded speed of 0.43 m/s, and maximum power of 7.85 W at applied voltage of 200 Vpp. The motor's structure is then optimized by controlling the difference between the two vibrators' resonance frequencies to reach larger output speed, thrust, and power. The optimized results show that when the frequency difference is 73 Hz, the output force, speed, and power reach their maximum values. At the input voltage of 200 Vpp, the motor reaches its maximum thrust force of 64.2 N, maximum unloaded speed of 0.76 m/s, maximum power of 17.4 W, maximum thrust-weight ratio of 23.7, and maximum efficiency of 39.6%.

  18. Design of multivariable controllers for robot manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, H.

    1986-01-01

    The paper presents a simple method for the design of linear multivariable controllers for multi-link robot manipulators. The control scheme consists of multivariable feedforward and feedback controllers. The feedforward controller is the minimal inverse of the linearized model of robot dynamics and contains only proportional-double-derivative (PD2) terms. This controller ensures that the manipulator joint angles track any reference trajectories. The feedback controller is of proportional-integral-derivative (PID) type and achieves pole placement. This controller reduces any initial tracking error to zero as desired and also ensures that robust steady-state tracking of step-plus-exponential trajectories is achieved by the joint angles. The two controllers are independent of each other and are designed separately based on the linearized robot model and then integrated in the overall control scheme. The proposed scheme is simple and can be implemented for real-time control of robot manipulators.

  19. Design of multivariable controllers for robot manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, H.

    1986-01-01

    The paper presents a simple method for the design of linear multivariable controllers for multi-link robot manipulators. The control scheme consists of multivariable feedforward and feedback controllers. The feedforward controller is the minimal inverse of the linearized model of robot dynamics and contains only proportional-double-derivative (PD2) terms. This controller ensures that the manipulator joint angles track any reference trajectories. The feedback controller is of proportional-integral-derivative (PID) type and achieves pole placement. This controller reduces any initial tracking error to zero as desired and also ensures that robust steady-state tracking of step-plus-exponential trajectories is achieved by the joint angles. The two controllers are independent of each other and are designed separately based on the linearized robot model and then integrated in the overall control scheme. The proposed scheme is simple and can be implemented for real-time control of robot manipulators.

  20. On control and synchronization in chaotic and hyperchaotic systems via linear feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafikov, Marat; Balthazar, José Manoel

    2008-09-01

    This paper presents the control and synchronization of chaos by designing linear feedback controllers. The linear feedback control problem for nonlinear systems has been formulated under optimal control theory viewpoint. Asymptotic stability of the closed-loop nonlinear system is guaranteed by means of a Lyapunov function which can clearly be seen to be the solution of the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation thus guaranteeing both stability and optimality. The formulated theorem expresses explicitly the form of minimized functional and gives the sufficient conditions that allow using the linear feedback control for nonlinear system. The numerical simulations were provided in order to show the effectiveness of this method for the control of the chaotic Rössler system and synchronization of the hyperchaotic Rössler system.

  1. Control system design method

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David G [Tijeras, NM; Robinett, III, Rush D.

    2012-02-21

    A control system design method and concomitant control system comprising representing a physical apparatus to be controlled as a Hamiltonian system, determining elements of the Hamiltonian system representation which are power generators, power dissipators, and power storage devices, analyzing stability and performance of the Hamiltonian system based on the results of the determining step and determining necessary and sufficient conditions for stability of the Hamiltonian system, creating a stable control system based on the results of the analyzing step, and employing the resulting control system to control the physical apparatus.

  2. Nutrient Control Design Manual

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this EPA design manual is to provide updated, state‐of‐the‐technology design guidance on nitrogen and phosphorus control at municipal Wastewater Treatment Plants (WWTPs). Similar to previous EPA manuals, this manual contains extensive information on the principles ...

  3. Nutrient Control Design Manual

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this EPA design manual is to provide updated, state‐of‐the‐technology design guidance on nitrogen and phosphorus control at municipal Wastewater Treatment Plants (WWTPs). Similar to previous EPA manuals, this manual contains extensive information on the principles ...

  4. Identification and robust control of linear parameter-varying systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Lawton Hubert

    This dissertation deals with linear parameter-varying (LPV) systems: linear dynamic systems that depend on time-varying parameters. These systems appear in gain scheduling problems, and much recent research has been devoted to their prospective usefulness for systematic gain scheduling. We primarily focus on robust control of uncertain LPV systems and identification of LPV systems that are modelable as linear-fractional transformations (LFTs). Using parameter-dependent quadratic Lyapunov functions, linear matrix inequalities (LMIs), and scaled small-gain arguments, we define notions of stability and induced-{cal L}sb2 performance for uncertain LPV systems whose parameters and rates of parameter variation satisfy given bounds. The performance criterion involves integral quadratic constraints and implies naturally parameter-dependent induced-{cal L}sb2 norm bounds. We formulate and solve an {cal H}sb{infty}-like control problem for an LPV plant with measurable parameters and an "Output/State Feedback" structure: the feedback outputs include some noiselessly measured states. Necessary and sufficient solvability conditions reduce to LMIs that can be solved approximately using finite-dimensional convex programming. Reduced-order LPV controllers are constructed from the LMI solutions. A D-K iteration-like procedure provides robustness to structured, time-varying, parametric uncertainty. The design method is applied to a motivating example: flight control for the F-16 VISTA throughout its subsonic flight envelope. Parameter-dependent weights and {cal H}sb{infty} design principles describe the performance objectives. Closed-loop responses exhibited by nonlinear simulations indicate satisfactory flying qualities. Identification of linear-fractional LPV systems is treated using maximum-likelihood parameter estimation. Computing the gradient and Hessian of a maximum-likelihood cost function reduces to simulating one LPV filter per identified parameter. We use nonlinear

  5. Intelligent motion control for linear piezoelectric ceramic motor drive.

    PubMed

    Wai, Rong-Jong; Lee, Jeng-Dao

    2004-10-01

    Since the dynamic characteristics of a linear piezoelectric ceramic motor (LPCM) are highly nonlinear and time varying, it is difficult to design a suitable motor drive and position controller that realizes accurate position control at all time. This study investigates a double-inductance double-capacitance (LLCC) resonant driving circuit and a sliding-mode fuzzy-neural-network control (SMFNNC) system for the motion control of an LPCM. First, the motor structure and LLCC driving circuit of an LPCM are introduced. The LLCC resonant inverter is designed to operate at an optimal switching frequency such that the output voltage will not be influenced by the variation of quality factor. Moreover, a SMFNNC system is designed to achieve favorable tracking performance without precise dynamic models being controlled. All adaptive learning algorithms in the SMFNNC system are derived in the sense of Lyapunov stability analysis, so that system-tracking stability can be guaranteed in the closed-loop system. The effectiveness of the proposed driving circuit and control system is verified by experimental results.

  6. From linear to nonlinear control means: a practical progression.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhiqiang

    2002-04-01

    With the rapid advance of digital control hardware, it is time to take the simple but effective proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control technology to the next level of performance and robustness. For this purpose, a nonlinear PID and active disturbance rejection framework are introduced in this paper. It complements the existing theory in that (1) it actively and systematically explores the use of nonlinear control mechanisms for better performance, even for linear plants; (2) it represents a control strategy that is rather independent of mathematical models of the plants, thus achieving inherent robustness and reducing design complexity. Stability analysis, as well as software/hardware test results, are presented. It is evident that the proposed framework lends itself well in seeking innovative solutions to practical problems while maintaining the simplicity and the intuitiveness of the existing technology.

  7. A User’s Manual for Interactive Linear Control Programs on IBM/3033.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    There existed a need for an interactive program that would provide the user assistance it solving applications of linear control theory. The linear ...analysis, design and simulation of a broad class of linear control problems. LINCON consists of two groups: matrix manipulation, transfer function and... control program (LINCON) and its user’s guide satisfy this need. A series of ten interactive programs are presented which permit the user to carry out

  8. Robust fault detection observer design for linear uncertain systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiukun; Verhaegen, Michel

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses the fault detection observer design issue for linear time invariant (LTI) systems with additive or multiplicative uncertainties, which are also subject to unknown disturbances. The observer design is investigated under the ℋ∞/ℋ- index framework using the generalised KYP lemma in the finite-frequency domain. Sufficient conditions for the existence of such a fault detection observer are given in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). The threshold design issue is discussed and a method for estimating the worst undetectable fault size is proposed. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithms is illustrated by numerical simulation examples.

  9. The application of linear actuators for telescope pointing control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrington, C. K.; Davis, B. G.

    1992-01-01

    A study team at MSFC has conceptually designed two lunar-based telescopes, a 16 m aperture Large Lunar Telescope (LLT) and a 4 m Cluster Telescope Experiment (CTE). The CTE serves as a technology tested for the LLT. The CTE utilizes a hexapod telescope mount to obtain a small gimbal angle that significantly extends the viewing space and observation time from that of a stationary transit telescope. This paper addresses the applicability of six linear actuators to provide limited gimbal rotation of the CTE telescope assembly. Kinematic constraint equations for the hexapod mount have been applied to a six degree-of-freedom rigid body model. Static equilibrium equations have been solved to address configuration design issues, and a feedback tracking control system has been designed and simulated.

  10. Singular linear quadratic control problem for systems with linear and constant delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sesekin, A. N.; Andreeva, I. Yu.; Shlyakhov, A. S.

    2016-12-01

    This article is devoted to the singular linear-quadratic optimization problem on the trajectories of the linear non-autonomous system of differential equations with linear and constant delay. It should be noted that such task does not solve the class of integrable controls, so to ensure the existence of a solution is needed to expand the class of controls to include the control impulse components. For the problem under consideration, we have built program control containing impulse components in the initial and final moments time. This is done under certain assumptions on the functional and the right side of the control system.

  11. Design Techniques for Uniform-DFT, Linear Phase Filter Banks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Honglin; DeLeon, Phillip

    1999-01-01

    Uniform-DFT filter banks are an important class of filter banks and their theory is well known. One notable characteristic is their very efficient implementation when using polyphase filters and the FFT. Separately, linear phase filter banks, i.e. filter banks in which the analysis filters have a linear phase are also an important class of filter banks and desired in many applications. Unfortunately, it has been proved that one cannot design critically-sampled, uniform-DFT, linear phase filter banks and achieve perfect reconstruction. In this paper, we present a least-squares solution to this problem and in addition prove that oversampled, uniform-DFT, linear phase filter banks (which are also useful in many applications) can be constructed for perfect reconstruction. Design examples are included illustrate the methods.

  12. Multivariable control of the Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System using linearization by state feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gettman, Chang-Ching L.; Adams, Neil; Bedrossian, Nazareth; Valavani, Lena

    1993-01-01

    This paper demonstrates an approach to nonlinear control system design that uses linearization by state feedback to allow faster maneuvering of payloads by the Shuttle Remote Manipulator System (SRMS). A nonlinear feedback law is defined to cancel the nonlinear plant dynamics so that a linear controller can be designed for the SRMS. First a nonlinear design model was generated via SIMULINK. This design model included nonlinear arm dynamics derived from the Lagrangian approach, linearized servo model, and linearized gearbox model. The current SRMS position hold controller was implemented on this system. Next, a trajectory was defined using a rigid body kinematics SRMS tool, KRMS. The maneuver was simulated. Finally, higher bandwidth controllers were developed. Results of the new controllers were compared with the existing SRMS automatic control modes for the Space Station Freedom Mission Build 4 Payload extended on the SRMS.

  13. Multivariable control of the Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System using linearization by state feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gettman, Chang-Ching L.; Adams, Neil; Bedrossian, Nazareth; Valavani, Lena

    1993-01-01

    This paper demonstrates an approach to nonlinear control system design that uses linearization by state feedback to allow faster maneuvering of payloads by the Shuttle Remote Manipulator System (SRMS). A nonlinear feedback law is defined to cancel the nonlinear plant dynamics so that a linear controller can be designed for the SRMS. First a nonlinear design model was generated via SIMULINK. This design model included nonlinear arm dynamics derived from the Lagrangian approach, linearized servo model, and linearized gearbox model. The current SRMS position hold controller was implemented on this system. Next, a trajectory was defined using a rigid body kinematics SRMS tool, KRMS. The maneuver was simulated. Finally, higher bandwidth controllers were developed. Results of the new controllers were compared with the existing SRMS automatic control modes for the Space Station Freedom Mission Build 4 Payload extended on the SRMS.

  14. A Design Method for Pole Placement and Observer of Linear Time-Varying Discrete MIMO Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutoh, Yasuhiko; Hara, Tomohiro

    It is well known that, the pole placement controller can be designing for linear time-varying systems using the Frobenius canonical form, as for the time invariant case. This paper presents the new approach to the design of the pole placement controller for linear time-varying discrete multivariable systems. The concept of the relative degrees of multivariable system plays an important role, and the time-varying feedback gain can be simply calculated without transforming the system into any canonical form, which is regarded as a discrete Ackerman's method. This method is applied in order to calculate the observer gain for linear time-varying systems.

  15. Two level optimization of a redundant linear control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, C. F.; Harding, R. S.

    1975-01-01

    A linear system with two sets of controls, one primary and the other redundant, is considered. A two level optimization procedure is used to control the system and to maintain maximal availability of the primary control.

  16. 2002 Controls Design Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Ronald A.; Vetter, T. K.; Wells, S. R.

    2002-01-01

    This document is intended to provide the specifications and requirements for a flight control system design challenge. The response to the challenge will involve documenting whether the particular design has met the stated requirements through analysis and computer simulation. The response should be written in the general format of a technical publication with corresponding length limits, e.g., an approximate maximum length of 45 units, with each full-size figure and double-spaced typewritten page constituting one unit.

  17. Linear regulator design for stochastic systems by a multiple time scales method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teneketzis, D.; Sandell, N. R., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A hierarchically-structured, suboptimal controller for a linear stochastic system composed of fast and slow subsystems is considered. The controller is optimal in the limit as the separation of time scales of the subsystems becomes infinite. The methodology is illustrated by design of a controller to suppress the phugoid and short period modes of the longitudinal dynamics of the F-8 aircraft.

  18. Linear, multivariable robust control with a mu perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, Andy; Doyle, John; Balas, Gary

    1993-01-01

    The structured singular value is a linear algebra tool developed to study a particular class of matrix perturbation problems arising in robust feedback control of multivariable systems. These perturbations are called linear fractional, and are a natural way to model many types of uncertainty in linear systems, including state-space parameter uncertainty, multiplicative and additive unmodeled dynamics uncertainty, and coprime factor and gap metric uncertainty. The structured singular value theory provides a natural extension of classical SISO robustness measures and concepts to MIMO systems. The structured singular value analysis, coupled with approximate synthesis methods, make it possible to study the tradeoff between performance and uncertainty that occurs in all feedback systems. In MIMO systems, the complexity of the spatial interactions in the loop gains make it difficult to heuristically quantify the tradeoffs that must occur. This paper examines the role played by the structured singular value (and its computable bounds) in answering these questions, as well as its role in the general robust, multivariable control analysis and design problem.

  19. Linear, multivariable robust control with a mu perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, Andy; Doyle, John; Balas, Gary

    1993-01-01

    The structured singular value is a linear algebra tool developed to study a particular class of matrix perturbation problems arising in robust feedback control of multivariable systems. These perturbations are called linear fractional, and are a natural way to model many types of uncertainty in linear systems, including state-space parameter uncertainty, multiplicative and additive unmodeled dynamics uncertainty, and coprime factor and gap metric uncertainty. The structured singular value theory provides a natural extension of classical SISO robustness measures and concepts to MIMO systems. The structured singular value analysis, coupled with approximate synthesis methods, make it possible to study the tradeoff between performance and uncertainty that occurs in all feedback systems. In MIMO systems, the complexity of the spatial interactions in the loop gains make it difficult to heuristically quantify the tradeoffs that must occur. This paper examines the role played by the structured singular value (and its computable bounds) in answering these questions, as well as its role in the general robust, multivariable control analysis and design problem.

  20. String Stability of a Linear Formation Flight Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Michael J.; Ryan, Jack; Hanson, Curtis E.; Parle, James F.

    2002-01-01

    String stability analysis of an autonomous formation flight system was performed using linear and nonlinear simulations. String stability is a measure of how position errors propagate from one vehicle to another in a cascaded system. In the formation flight system considered here, each i(sup th) aircraft uses information from itself and the preceding ((i-1)(sup th)) aircraft to track a commanded relative position. A possible solution for meeting performance requirements with such a system is to allow string instability. This paper explores two results of string instability and outlines analysis techniques for string unstable systems. The three analysis techniques presented here are: linear, nonlinear formation performance, and ride quality. The linear technique was developed from a worst-case scenario and could be applied to the design of a string unstable controller. The nonlinear formation performance and ride quality analysis techniques both use nonlinear formation simulation. Three of the four formation-controller gain-sets analyzed in this paper were limited more by ride quality than by performance. Formations of up to seven aircraft in a cascaded formation could be used in the presence of light gusts with this string unstable system.

  1. Predictive current control of permanent magnet synchronous motor based on linear active disturbance rejection control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kunpeng

    2017-01-01

    The compatibility problem between rapidity and overshooting in the traditional predictive current control structure is inevitable and difficult to solve by reason of using PI controller. A novel predictive current control (PCC) algorithm for permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) based on linear active disturbance rejection control (LADRC) is presented in this paper. In order to displace PI controller, the LADRC strategy which consisted of linear state error feedback (LSEF) control algorithm and linear extended state observer (LESO), is designed based on the mathematic model of PMSM. The purpose of LSEF is to make sure fast response to load mutation and system uncertainties, and LESO is designed to estimate the uncertain disturbances. The principal structures of the proposed system are speed outer loop based on LADRC and current inner loop based on predictive current control. Especially, the instruction value of qaxis current in inner loop is derived from the control quantity which is designed in speed outer loop. The simulation is carried out in Matlab/Simulink software, and the results illustrate that the dynamic and static performances of proposed system are satisfied. Moreover the robust against model parameters mismatch is enhanced obviously.

  2. Distributed Control of Uncertain Systems using Superpositions of Linear operators

    PubMed Central

    Sanger, Terence D.

    2011-01-01

    Control in the natural environment is difficult in part because of uncertainty in the effect of actions. Uncertainty can be due to added motor or sensory noise, unmodeled dynamics, or quantization of sensory feedback. Biological systems are faced with further difficulties, since control must be performed by networks of cooperating neurons and neural subsystems. Here, we propose a new mathematical framework for modeling and simulation of distributed control systems operating in an uncertain environment. Stochastic Differential Operators can be derived from the stochastic differential equation describing a system, and they map the current state density into the differential of the state density. Unlike discrete-time Markov update operators, stochastic differential operators combine linearly for a large class of linear and nonlinear systems, and therefore the combined effects of multiple controllable and uncontrollable subsystems can be predicted. Design using these operators yields systems whose statistical behavior can be specified throughout state space. The relationship to Bayesian estimation and discrete-time Markov processes is described. PMID:21521040

  3. Distributed control of uncertain systems using superpositions of linear operators.

    PubMed

    Sanger, Terence D

    2011-08-01

    Control in the natural environment is difficult in part because of uncertainty in the effect of actions. Uncertainty can be due to added motor or sensory noise, unmodeled dynamics, or quantization of sensory feedback. Biological systems are faced with further difficulties, since control must be performed by networks of cooperating neurons and neural subsystems. Here, we propose a new mathematical framework for modeling and simulation of distributed control systems operating in an uncertain environment. Stochastic differential operators can be derived from the stochastic differential equation describing a system, and they map the current state density into the differential of the state density. Unlike discrete-time Markov update operators, stochastic differential operators combine linearly for a large class of linear and nonlinear systems, and therefore the combined effects of multiple controllable and uncontrollable subsystems can be predicted. Design using these operators yields systems whose statistical behavior can be specified throughout state-space. The relationship to Bayesian estimation and discrete-time Markov processes is described.

  4. Feedback linearizing control of a MIMO power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyes, Laszlo

    Prior research has demonstrated that either the mechanical or electrical subsystem of a synchronous electric generator may be controlled using single-input single-output (SISO) nonlinear feedback linearization. This research suggests a new approach which applies nonlinear feedback linearization to a multi-input multi-output (MIMO) model of the synchronous electric generator connected to an infinite bus load model. In this way, the electrical and mechanical subsystems may be linearized and simultaneously decoupled through the introduction of a pair of auxiliary inputs. This allows well known, linear, SISO control methods to be effectively applied to the resulting systems. The derivation of the feedback linearizing control law is presented in detail, including a discussion on the use of symbolic math processing as a development tool. The linearizing and decoupling properties of the control law are validated through simulation. And finally, the robustness of the control law is demonstrated.

  5. A piecewise linear approximation scheme for hereditary optimal control problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, E. M.; Burns, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    An approximation scheme based on 'piecewise linear' approximations of L2 spaces is employed to formulate a numerical method for solving quadratic optimal control problems governed by linear retarded functional differential equations. This piecewise linear method is an extension of the so called averaging technique. It is shown that the Riccati equation for the linear approximation is solved by simple transformation of the averaging solution. Thus, the computational requirements are essentially the same. Numerical results are given.

  6. A piecewise linear approximation scheme for hereditary optimal control problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, E. M.; Burns, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    An approximation scheme based on 'piecewise linear' approximations of L2 spaces is employed to formulate a numerical method for solving quadratic optimal control problems governed by linear retarded functional differential equations. This piecewise linear method is an extension of the so called averaging technique. It is shown that the Riccati equation for the linear approximation is solved by simple transformation of the averaging solution. Thus, the computational requirements are essentially the same. Numerical results are given.

  7. On Decay Estimates of Solutions to One-dimensional Linear Parabolic Feedback Control Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nambu, Takao

    In feedback stabilization for linear parabolic systems,a control scheme is designed so that the “state” of the system decays with a designated decay rate as t → ∞. An arbitrary linear functional of the state, which is subordinate to the state, also decays at least with the same decay rate. We study in the paper a class of linear parabolic systems of one dimension, and construct a specific control scheme such that a nontrivial linear functional decays exactly faster than the state.

  8. Numerical methods for control optimization in linear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyatyushkin, A. I.

    2015-05-01

    Numerical methods are considered for solving optimal control problems in linear systems, namely, terminal control problems with control and phase constraints and time-optimal control problems. Several algorithms with various computer storage requirements are proposed for solving these problems. The algorithms are intended for finding an optimal control in linear systems having certain features, for example, when the reachable set of a system has flat faces.

  9. Optimization-based controller design for rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsing, N.-K.; Fan, M. K. H.; Barlow, J.; Tits, A. L.; Tischler, M. B.

    1993-01-01

    An optimization-based methodology for linear control system design is outlined by considering the design of a controller for a UH-60 rotorcraft in hover. A wide range of design specifications is taken into account: internal stability, decoupling between longitudinal and lateral motions, handling qualities, and rejection of windgusts. These specifications are investigated while taking into account physical limitations in the swashplate displacements and rates of displacement. The methodology crucially relies on user-machine interaction for tradeoff exploration.

  10. Design and analysis of a high efficiency linear power amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sucheng; Zhou, Luowei; Liu, Xiaodong; Lu, Weiguo

    2011-10-01

    A high efficiency linear power amplifier is introduced based on the idea of Switch-Linear Hybrid (SLH) power conversion. The SLH power amplifier developed from the conventional class B power amplifier, while the class B configuration power unit in the SLH power amplifier is fed by a dynamic switching power supply, not the usual constant DC power supply. Thus, the efficiency of the class B configuration power unit in SLH power amplifier can be greatly improved. By combining linear power amplifier with switching power supply, the SLH power amplifier has synthetic performance of high fidelity, high efficiency and excellent dynamic characteristics. In this article, analysis of SLH power amplifier is performed, especially focusing on its linear power unit which is the core of SLH power amplifier. Design considerations are also presented parallel with the analysis. Both the theoretical analysis and experimental results verify the validity of SLH power amplifier.

  11. H(2)- and H(infinity)-design tools for linear time-invariant systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ly, Uy-Loi

    1989-01-01

    Recent advances in optimal control have brought design techniques based on optimization of H(2) and H(infinity) norm criteria, closer to be attractive alternatives to single-loop design methods for linear time-variant systems. Significant steps forward in this technology are the deeper understanding of performance and robustness issues of these design procedures and means to perform design trade-offs. However acceptance of the technology is hindered by the lack of convenient design tools to exercise these powerful multivariable techniques, while still allowing single-loop design formulation. Presented is a unique computer tool for designing arbitrary low-order linear time-invarient controllers than encompasses both performance and robustness issues via the familiar H(2) and H(infinity) norm optimization. Application to disturbance rejection design for a commercial transport is demonstrated.

  12. Singular linear-quadratic control problem for systems with linear delay

    SciTech Connect

    Sesekin, A. N.

    2013-12-18

    A singular linear-quadratic optimization problem on the trajectories of non-autonomous linear differential equations with linear delay is considered. The peculiarity of this problem is the fact that this problem has no solution in the class of integrable controls. To ensure the existence of solutions is required to expand the class of controls including controls with impulse components. Dynamical systems with linear delay are used to describe the motion of pantograph from the current collector with electric traction, biology, etc. It should be noted that for practical problems fact singularity criterion of quality is quite commonly occurring, and therefore the study of these problems is surely important. For the problem under discussion optimal programming control contained impulse components at the initial and final moments of time is constructed under certain assumptions on the functional and the right side of the control system.

  13. Design considerations for a laser-plasma linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Toth, Cs.; Leemans, W. P.

    2009-01-22

    Design considerations for a next-generation electron-positron linear collider based on laser-plasma-accelerators are discussed. Several of the advantages and challenges of laser-plasma-based accelerator technology are addressed. An example of the parameters for a 1 TeV laser-plasma-based collider is presented.

  14. Design considerations for a laser-plasma linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Toth, Cs.; Leemans, W. P.

    2008-08-01

    Design considerations for a next-generation electron-positron linear collider based on laser-plasma-accelerators are discussed. Several of the advantages and challenges of laser-plasma based accelerator technology are addressed. An example of the parameters for a 1 TeV laser-plasma based collider is presented.

  15. Optimal Flow Control Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Brian; Owens, Lewis

    2010-01-01

    In support of the Blended-Wing-Body aircraft concept, a new flow control hybrid vane/jet design has been developed for use in a boundary-layer-ingesting (BLI) offset inlet in transonic flows. This inlet flow control is designed to minimize the engine fan-face distortion levels and the first five Fourier harmonic half amplitudes while maximizing the inlet pressure recovery. This concept represents a potentially enabling technology for quieter and more environmentally friendly transport aircraft. An optimum vane design was found by minimizing the engine fan-face distortion, DC60, and the first five Fourier harmonic half amplitudes, while maximizing the total pressure recovery. The optimal vane design was then used in a BLI inlet wind tunnel experiment at NASA Langley's 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel. The experimental results demonstrated an 80-percent decrease in DPCPavg, the reduction in the circumferential distortion levels, at an inlet mass flow rate corresponding to the middle of the operational range at the cruise condition. Even though the vanes were designed at a single inlet mass flow rate, they performed very well over the entire inlet mass flow range tested in the wind tunnel experiment with the addition of a small amount of jet flow control. While the circumferential distortion was decreased, the radial distortion on the outer rings at the aerodynamic interface plane (AIP) increased. This was a result of the large boundary layer being distributed from the bottom of the AIP in the baseline case to the outer edges of the AIP when using the vortex generator (VG) vane flow control. Experimental results, as already mentioned, showed an 80-percent reduction of DPCPavg, the circumferential distortion level at the engine fan-face. The hybrid approach leverages strengths of vane and jet flow control devices, increasing inlet performance over a broader operational range with significant reduction in mass flow requirements. Minimal distortion level requirements

  16. Switching control of linear systems subject to asymmetric actuator saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Chengzhi; Wu, Fen

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we study the saturation control problem for linear time-invariant (LTI) systems subject to asymmetric actuator saturation under a switching control framework. The LTI plant with asymmetric saturation is first transformed to an equivalent switched linear model with each subsystem subject to symmetric actuator saturation, based on which a dwell-time switching controller augmented with a controller state reset is then developed by using multiple Lyapunov functions. The controller synthesis conditions are formulated as linear matrix inequalities (LMIs), which can be solved efficiently. Simulation results are also included to illustrate the effectiveness and advantages of the proposed approach.

  17. Pattern Recognition Control Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gambone, Elisabeth A.

    2018-01-01

    Spacecraft control algorithms must know the expected vehicle response to any command to the available control effectors, such as reaction thrusters or torque devices. Spacecraft control system design approaches have traditionally relied on the estimated vehicle mass properties to determine the desired force and moment, as well as knowledge of the effector performance to efficiently control the spacecraft. A pattern recognition approach was used to investigate the relationship between the control effector commands and spacecraft responses. Instead of supplying the approximated vehicle properties and the thruster performance characteristics, a database of information relating the thruster ring commands and the desired vehicle response was used for closed-loop control. A Monte Carlo simulation data set of the spacecraft dynamic response to effector commands was analyzed to establish the influence a command has on the behavior of the spacecraft. A tool developed at NASA Johnson Space Center to analyze flight dynamics Monte Carlo data sets through pattern recognition methods was used to perform this analysis. Once a comprehensive data set relating spacecraft responses with commands was established, it was used in place of traditional control methods and gains set. This pattern recognition approach was compared with traditional control algorithms to determine the potential benefits and uses.

  18. Pattern Recognition Control Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gambone, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Spacecraft control algorithms must know the expected spacecraft response to any command to the available control effectors, such as reaction thrusters or torque devices. Spacecraft control system design approaches have traditionally relied on the estimated vehicle mass properties to determine the desired force and moment, as well as knowledge of the effector performance to efficiently control the spacecraft. A pattern recognition approach can be used to investigate the relationship between the control effector commands and the spacecraft responses. Instead of supplying the approximated vehicle properties and the effector performance characteristics, a database of information relating the effector commands and the desired vehicle response can be used for closed-loop control. A Monte Carlo simulation data set of the spacecraft dynamic response to effector commands can be analyzed to establish the influence a command has on the behavior of the spacecraft. A tool developed at NASA Johnson Space Center (Ref. 1) to analyze flight dynamics Monte Carlo data sets through pattern recognition methods can be used to perform this analysis. Once a comprehensive data set relating spacecraft responses with commands is established, it can be used in place of traditional control laws and gains set. This pattern recognition approach can be compared with traditional control algorithms to determine the potential benefits and uses.

  19. Stochastic robustness of linear control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengel, Robert F.; Ryan, Laura E.

    1990-01-01

    A simple numerical procedure for estimating the stochastic robustness of a linear, time-invariant system is described. Monte Carlo evaluation of the system's eigenvalues allows the probability of instability and the related stochastic root locus to be estimated. This definition of robustness is an alternative to existing deterministic definitions that address both structured and unstructured parameter variations directly. This analysis approach treats not only Gaussian parameter uncertainties but non-Gaussian cases, including uncertain-but-bounded variations. Trivial extensions of the procedure admit alternate discriminants to be considered. Thus, the probabilities that stipulated degrees of instability will be exceeded or that closed-loop roots will leave desirable regions also can be estimated. Results are particularly amenable to graphical presentation.

  20. Bounded Linear Stability Margin Analysis of Nonlinear Hybrid Adaptive Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Boskovic, Jovan D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a bounded linear stability analysis for a hybrid adaptive control that blends both direct and indirect adaptive control. Stability and convergence of nonlinear adaptive control are analyzed using an approximate linear equivalent system. A stability margin analysis shows that a large adaptive gain can lead to a reduced phase margin. This method can enable metrics-driven adaptive control whereby the adaptive gain is adjusted to meet stability margin requirements.

  1. Improved LTVMPC design for steering control of autonomous vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velhal, Shridhar; Thomas, Susy

    2017-01-01

    An improved linear time varying model predictive control for steering control of autonomous vehicle running on slippery road is presented. Control strategy is designed such that the vehicle will follow the predefined trajectory with highest possible entry speed. In linear time varying model predictive control, nonlinear vehicle model is successively linearized at each sampling instant. This linear time varying model is used to design MPC which will predict the future horizon. By incorporating predicted input horizon in each successive linearization the effectiveness of controller has been improved. The tracking performance using steering with front wheel and braking at four wheels are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  2. Design tradeoffs for a Multispectral Linear Array (MLA) instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mika, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    The heart of the multispectral linear array (MLA) design problem is to develop an instrument concept which concurrently provides a wide field-of-view with high resolution, spectral separation with precise band-to band registration, and excellent radiometric accuracy. Often, these requirements have conflicting design implications which can only be resolved by careful tradeoffs that consider performance, cost, fabrication feasibility and development risk. The key design tradeoffs for an MLA instrument are addressed, and elements of a baseline instrument concept are presented.

  3. Optimal Discounted Linear Control of the Wiener Process.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-01

    1r~~ ~~ • 7 ~O—AO7 8 ~87 BROWN UNIV PROVIDENCE R I LEFSCHETZ CENTER FOR DYNAM— ETC F/s IUt I OPTIMAL DISCOUNTED LINEAR CONTROL OF THE WIENER...4I • —~~~~~ A — --a -I’ p.posa-ra- 79~~ 124 9 OPTIMAL DISCOU NTED LINEAR CONTROL OF THE WIENER PROCESS~ by -J loannis Kara t:as Lefsche tz Center for...DISCOUNTED LINEAR CONTROL OF THE WIENER PROCESS~ loannis Karat zas ABSTRACT The following stochastic control problem is considered

  4. Design of linear equalizers optimized for the structural similarity index.

    PubMed

    Channappayya, Sumohana S; Bovik, Alan Conrad; Caramanis, Constantine; Heath, Robert W

    2008-06-01

    We propose an algorithm for designing linear equalizers that maximize the structural similarity (SSIM) index between the reference and restored signals. The SSIM index has enjoyed considerable application in the evaluation of image processing algorithms. Algorithms, however, have not been designed yet to explicitly optimize for this measure. The design of such an algorithm is nontrivial due to the nonconvex nature of the distortion measure. In this paper, we reformulate the nonconvex problem as a quasi-convex optimization problem, which admits a tractable solution. We compute the optimal solution in near closed form, with complexity of the resulting algorithm comparable to complexity of the linear minimum mean squared error (MMSE) solution, independent of the number of filter taps. To demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed algorithm, it is applied to restore images that have been blurred and corrupted with additive white gaussian noise. As a special case, we consider blur-free image denoising. In each case, its performance is compared to a locally adaptive linear MSE-optimal filter. We show that the images denoised and restored using the SSIM-optimal filter have higher SSIM index, and superior perceptual quality than those restored using the MSE-optimal adaptive linear filter. Through these results, we demonstrate that a) designing image processing algorithms, and, in particular, denoising and restoration-type algorithms, can yield significant gains over existing (in particular, linear MMSE-based) algorithms by optimizing them for perceptual distortion measures, and b) these gains may be obtained without significant increase in the computational complexity of the algorithm.

  5. Design and testing of a coaxial linear magnetic spring with integral linear motor. [for spacecraft energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patt, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    The design of a coaxial linear magnetic spring which incorporates a linear motor to control axial motion and overcome system damping is presented, and the results of static and dynamic tests are reported. The system has nominal stiffness 25,000 N/m and is designed to oscillate a 900-g component over a 4.6-mm stroke in a Stirling-cycle cryogenic refrigerator being developed for long-service (5-10-yr) space applications (Stolfi et al., 1983). Mosaics of 10 radially magnetized high-coercivity SmCO5 segments enclosed in Ti cans are employed, and the device is found to have quality factor 70-100, corresponding to energy-storage efficiency 91-94 percent. Drawings, diagrams, and graphs are provided.

  6. Non-linear modelling and optimal control of a hydraulically actuated seismic isolator test rig

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, Stefano; Russo, Riccardo; Strano, Salvatore; Terzo, Mario

    2013-02-01

    This paper investigates the modelling, parameter identification and control of an unidirectional hydraulically actuated seismic isolator test rig. The plant is characterized by non-linearities such as the valve dead zone and frictions. A non-linear model is derived and then employed for parameter identification. The results concerning the model validation are illustrated and they fully confirm the effectiveness of the proposed model. The testing procedure of the isolation systems is based on the definition of a target displacement time history of the sliding table and, consequently, the precision of the table positioning is of primary importance. In order to minimize the test rig tracking error, a suitable control system has to be adopted. The system non-linearities highly limit the performances of the classical linear control and a non-linear one is therefore adopted. The test rig mathematical model is employed for a non-linear control design that minimizes the error between the target table position and the current one. The controller synthesis is made by taking no specimen into account. The proposed approach consists of a non-linear optimal control based on the state-dependent Riccati equation (SDRE). Numerical simulations have been performed in order to evaluate the soundness of the designed control with and without the specimen under test. The results confirm that the performances of the proposed non-linear controller are not invalidated because of the presence of the specimen.

  7. Active control transport design criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, B. M.; Harris, R. B.

    1976-01-01

    Vehicle design considerations for active control applications to subsonic transports are examined. Active control is defined along with those functions which are considered in the study of design criteria. The FAA regulations governing transport aircraft design are briefly discussed.

  8. Design Of Feedforward Controllers For Multivariable Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, Homayoun

    1989-01-01

    Controllers based on simple low-order transfer functions. Mathematical criteria derived for design of feedforward controllers for class of multiple-input/multiple-output linear plants. Represented by simple low-order transfer functions, obtained without reconstruction of states of commands and disturbances. Enables plant to track command while remaining unresponsive to disturbance in steady state. Feedback controller added independently to stabilize plant or to make control system less susceptible to variations in parameters of plant.

  9. Evaluation of Linear Regression Simultaneous Myoelectric Control Using Intramuscular EMG.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lauren H; Kuiken, Todd A; Hargrove, Levi J

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of linear regression models to decode patterns of muscle coactivation from intramuscular electromyogram (EMG) and provide simultaneous myoelectric control of a virtual 3-DOF wrist/hand system. Performance was compared to the simultaneous control of conventional myoelectric prosthesis methods using intramuscular EMG (parallel dual-site control)-an approach that requires users to independently modulate individual muscles in the residual limb, which can be challenging for amputees. Linear regression control was evaluated in eight able-bodied subjects during a virtual Fitts' law task and was compared to performance of eight subjects using parallel dual-site control. An offline analysis also evaluated how different types of training data affected prediction accuracy of linear regression control. The two control systems demonstrated similar overall performance; however, the linear regression method demonstrated improved performance for targets requiring use of all three DOFs, whereas parallel dual-site control demonstrated improved performance for targets that required use of only one DOF. Subjects using linear regression control could more easily activate multiple DOFs simultaneously, but often experienced unintended movements when trying to isolate individual DOFs. Offline analyses also suggested that the method used to train linear regression systems may influence controllability. Linear regression myoelectric control using intramuscular EMG provided an alternative to parallel dual-site control for 3-DOF simultaneous control at the wrist and hand. The two methods demonstrated different strengths in controllability, highlighting the tradeoff between providing simultaneous control and the ability to isolate individual DOFs when desired.

  10. Asymptotically optimal feedback control for a system of linear oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovseevich, Alexander; Fedorov, Aleksey

    2013-12-01

    We consider problem of damping of an arbitrary number of linear oscillators under common bounded control. We are looking for a feedback control steering the system to the equilibrium. The obtained control is asymptotically optimal: the ratio of motion time to zero with this control to the minimum one is close to 1, if the initial energy of the system is large.

  11. Control of Linear Systems Over Commutative Normed Algebras with Applications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-02-01

    Identify by block number) System Theory, Linear Systems, Control, Systems with Time Delays, Time - Varying Systems, State- Space Models, Pole...modes for the class of linear time -varying systems. These concepts are defined in terms of a noncommutative factorization of opera- tor polynomials...classes of complex linear systems, including systems with time delays, systems with unknown parameters and time -varying systems. In the work on

  12. Design of four-beam IH-RFQ linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Shota; Murata, Aki; Hayashizaki, Noriyosu

    2017-09-01

    The multi-beam acceleration method is an acceleration technique for low-energy high-intensity heavy ion beams, which involves accelerating multiple beams to decrease space charge effects, and then integrating these beams by a beam funneling system. At the Tokyo Institute of Technology a two beam IH-RFQ linear accelerator was developed using a two beam laser ion source with direct plasma injection scheme. This system accelerated a carbon ion beam with a current of 108 mA (54 mA/channel × 2) from 5 up to 60 keV/u. In order to demonstrate that a four-beam IH-RFQ linear accelerator is suitable for high-intensity heavy ion beam acceleration, we have been developing a four-beam prototype. A four-beam IH-RFQ linear accelerator consists of sixteen RFQ electrodes (4 × 4 set) with stem electrodes installed alternately on the upper and lower ridge electrodes. As a part of this development, we have designed a four-beam IH-RFQ linear accelerator using three dimensional electromagnetic simulation software and beam tracking simulation software. From these simulation results, we have designed the stem electrodes, the center plate and the side shells by evaluating the RF properties such as the resonance frequency, the power loss and the electric strength distribution between the RFQ electrodes.

  13. Distributed adaptive output consensus control of second-order systems containing unknown non-linear control gains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang; Wang, Chaoli; Du, Qinghui; Cai, Xuan

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we address the output consensus problem of tracking a desired trajectory for a group of second-order agents on a directed graph with a fixed topology. Each agent is modelled by a second-order non-linear system with unknown non-linear dynamics and unknown non-linear control gains. Only a subset of the agents is given access to the desired trajectory information directly. A distributed adaptive consensus protocol driving all agents to track the desired trajectory is presented using the backstepping technique and approximation technique of Fourier series (FSs). The FS structure is taken not only for tracking the non-linear dynamics but also the unknown portion in the controller design procedure, which can avoid virtual controllers containing the uncertain terms. Stability analysis and parameter convergence of the proposed algorithm are conducted based on the Lyapunov theory and the algebraic graph theory. It is also demonstrated that arbitrary small tracking errors can be achieved by appropriately choosing design parameters. Though the proposed work is applicable for second-order non-linear systems containing unknown non-linear control gains, the proposed controller design can be easily extended to higher-order non-linear systems containing unknown non-linear control gains. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed schemes.

  14. Asymptotic Linearity of Optimal Control Modification Adaptive Law with Analytical Stability Margins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2010-01-01

    Optimal control modification has been developed to improve robustness to model-reference adaptive control. For systems with linear matched uncertainty, optimal control modification adaptive law can be shown by a singular perturbation argument to possess an outer solution that exhibits a linear asymptotic property. Analytical expressions of phase and time delay margins for the outer solution can be obtained. Using the gradient projection operator, a free design parameter of the adaptive law can be selected to satisfy stability margins.

  15. Sequential design of linear quadratic state regulators via the optimal root-locus techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shieh, L. S.; Dib, H. M.; Yates, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    The use of well-known root-locus techniques for sequentially finding the weighting matrices and the linear quadratic state regulators of multivariable control systems in the frequency domain is considered. This sequential design method permits the retention of some stable open-loop poles and the associated eigenvectors in the closed-loop system; it also allows some optimal closed-loop poles to be placed in a specific region of the complex plane. In addition, it provides a design procedure for determining the weighting matrices and linear quadratic state regulators for the optimal control of multivariable systems in the frequency domain.

  16. Sequential design of linear quadratic state regulators via the optimal root-locus techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shieh, L. S.; Dib, H. M.; Yates, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    The use of well-known root-locus techniques for sequentially finding the weighting matrices and the linear quadratic state regulators of multivariable control systems in the frequency domain is considered. This sequential design method permits the retention of some stable open-loop poles and the associated eigenvectors in the closed-loop system; it also allows some optimal closed-loop poles to be placed in a specific region of the complex plane. In addition, it provides a design procedure for determining the weighting matrices and linear quadratic state regulators for the optimal control of multivariable systems in the frequency domain.

  17. Optimal Stationary Linear Control of the Wiener Process.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-29

    OPTIMAL STATIONARY LINEAR CONTROL OF THE WIENER PROCESS. (U) FES 80 V E BENES. I KARATZAS AFOSR-76-3063 UNCLASSIFIED AFOSR -TR-8O-0338 NL...mElllllllllll mhmmmmmmmmm mmmmmmmr( EFOSR-TR- 2 0-0S8 0 3 OPTIMAL STATIONARY LINEAR CONTROL OF THE WIENER PROCESS by LEVEL CVACLAV E. BENES Bell Telephone...or " DIst. special D U L I. F UNCLASSIFIED _ _ _ , ,_I_ _ _ _ _ _. OPTIMAL STATIONARY LINEAR CONTROL OF TIlE WIENER PROCESS V’aclav E. Benes and

  18. Linear Quadratic Gaussian-Based Closed-Loop Control of Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Patek, Stephen D.; Breton, Marc D.; Chen, Yuanda; Solomon, Chad; Kovatchev, Boris

    2007-01-01

    Background We investigated the applicability of linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) methodology to the subcutaneous blood glucose regulation problem. We designed an LQG-based feedback control algorithm using linearization of a previously published metabolic model of type 1 diabetes. A key feature of the controller is a Kalman filter used to estimate metabolic states of the patient based on continuous glucose monitoring. Insulin infusion is computed from linear quadratic regulator feedback gains applied to these estimates, generally seeking to minimize squared deviations from a target glucose concentration and basal insulin rate. We evaluated in silico subject-specific LQG control and compared it to preexisting proportional-integral-derivative control. PMID:19756210

  19. On the design and implementation of linear differential microphone arrays.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingdong; Benesty, Jacob; Pan, Chao

    2014-12-01

    Differential microphone array (DMA), a particular kind of sensor array that is responsive to the differential sound pressure field, has a broad range of applications in sound recording, noise reduction, signal separation, dereverberation, etc. Traditionally, an Nth-order DMA is formed by combining, in a linear manner, the outputs of a number of DMAs up to (including) the order of N - 1. This method, though simple and easy to implement, suffers from a number of drawbacks and practical limitations. This paper presents an approach to the design of linear DMAs. The proposed technique first transforms the microphone array signals into the short-time Fourier transform (STFT) domain and then converts the DMA beamforming design to simple linear systems to solve. It is shown that this approach is much more flexible as compared to the traditional methods in the design of different directivity patterns. Methods are also presented to deal with the white noise amplification problem that is considered to be the biggest hurdle for DMAs, particularly higher-order implementations.

  20. Optimal control for perfect state transfer in linear quantum memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakao, Hideaki; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2017-03-01

    A quantum memory is a system that enables transfer, storage, and retrieval of optical quantum states by ON/OFF switching of the control signal in each stage of the memory. In particular, it is known that, for perfect transfer of a single-photon state, appropriate shaping of the input pulse is required. However, in general, such a desirable pulse shape has a complicated form, which would be hard to generate in practice. In this paper, for a wide class of linear quantum memory systems, we develop a method that reduces the complexity of the input pulse shape of a single photon while maintaining the perfect state transfer. The key idea is twofold; (i) the control signal is allowed to vary continuously in time to introduce an additional degree of freedom, and then (ii) an optimal control problem is formulated to design a simple-formed input pulse and the corresponding control signal. Numerical simulations are conducted for Λ-type atomic media and networked atomic ensembles, to show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  1. Steady state decoupling and design of linear multivariable systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J. Y.; Thaler, G. J.

    1974-01-01

    A constructive criterion for decoupling the steady states of linear multivariable systems is developed. The criterion consists of n(n-1) inequalities with the type numbers of the compensator transfer functions as the unknowns. These unknowns can be chosen to satisfy the inequalities and hence achieve a steady state decoupling scheme. It turns out that pure integrators in the loops play an important role. An extended root locus design method is then developed to take care of the stability and transient response. The overall procedure is applied to the compensation design for STOL C-8A aircraft in the approach mode.

  2. Steady-state decoupling and design of linear multivariable systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaler, G. J.

    1974-01-01

    A constructive criterion for decoupling the steady states of a linear time-invariant multivariable system is presented. This criterion consists of a set of inequalities which, when satisfied, will cause the steady states of a system to be decoupled. Stability analysis and a new design technique for such systems are given. A new and simple connection between single-loop and multivariable cases is found. These results are then applied to the compensation design for NASA STOL C-8A aircraft. Both steady-state decoupling and stability are justified through computer simulations.

  3. A design methodology for nonlinear systems containing parameter uncertainty: Application to nonlinear controller design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, G.

    1982-01-01

    A design methodology capable of dealing with nonlinear systems, such as a controlled ecological life support system (CELSS), containing parameter uncertainty is discussed. The methodology was applied to the design of discrete time nonlinear controllers. The nonlinear controllers can be used to control either linear or nonlinear systems. Several controller strategies are presented to illustrate the design procedure.

  4. Linear Test Bed. Volume 2: Test Bed No. 2. [linear aerospike test bed for thrust vector control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Test bed No. 2 consists of 10 combustors welded in banks of 5 to 2 symmetrical tubular nozzle assemblies, an upper stationary thrust frame, a lower thrust frame which can be hinged, a power package, a triaxial combustion wave ignition system, a pneumatic control system, pneumatically actuated propellant valves, a purge and drain system, and an electrical control system. The power package consists of the Mark 29-F fuel turbopump, the Mark 29-0 oxidizer turbopump, a gas generator assembly, and propellant ducting. The system, designated as a linear aerospike system, was designed to demonstrate the feasibility of the concept and to explore technology related to thrust vector control, thrust vector optimization, improved sequencing and control, and advanced ignition systems. The propellants are liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen. The system was designed to operate at 1200-psia chamber pressure at an engine mixture ratio of 5.5. With 10 combustors, the sea level thrust is 95,000 pounds.

  5. Comparative performance of decoupled input-output linearizing controller and linear interpolation PID controller: enhancing biomass and ethanol production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Persad, A; Chopda, V R; Rathore, A S; Gomes, J

    2013-02-01

    A decoupled input-output linearizing controller (DIOLC) was designed as an alternative advanced control strategy for controlling bioprocesses. Simulation studies of its implementation were carried out to control ethanol and biomass production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its performance was compared to that of a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller with parameters tuned according to a linear schedule. The overall performance of the DIOLC was better in the test experiments requiring the controllers to respond accurately to simultaneous changes in the trajectories of the substrate and dissolved oxygen concentration. It also exhibited better performance in perturbation experiments of the most significant parameters q (S,max), q (O2,max), and k ( s ), determined through a statistical design of experiments involving 730 simulations. DIOLC exhibited a superior ability of constraining the process when implemented in extreme metabolic regimes of high oxygen demand for maximizing biomass concentration and low oxygen demand for maximizing ethanol concentration.

  6. Adaptive control design for hysteretic smart systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiang; Smith, Ralph C.

    2009-03-01

    Ferroelectric and ferromagnetic actuators are being considered for a range of industrial, aerospace, aeronautic and biomedical applications due to their unique transduction capabilities. However, they also exhibit hysteretic and nonlinear behavior that must be accommodated in models and control designs. If uncompensated, these effects can yield reduced system performance and, in the worst case, can produce unpredictable behavior of the control system. One technique for control design is to approximately linearize the actuator dynamics using an adaptive inverse compensator that is also able to accommodate model uncertainties and error introduced by the inverse algorithm. This paper describes the design of an adaptive inverse control technique based on the homogenized energy model for hysteresis. The resulting inverse filter is incorporated in an L1 control theory to provide a robust control algorithm capable of providing high speed, high accuracy tracking in the presence of actuator hysteresis and nonlinearities. Properties of the control design are illustrated through numerical examples.

  7. LQR-Based Optimal Distributed Cooperative Design for Linear Discrete-Time Multiagent Systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huaguang; Feng, Tao; Liang, Hongjing; Luo, Yanhong

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, a novel linear quadratic regulator (LQR)-based optimal distributed cooperative design method is developed for synchronization control of general linear discrete-time multiagent systems on a fixed, directed graph. Sufficient conditions are derived for synchronization, which restrict the graph eigenvalues into a bounded circular region in the complex plane. The synchronizing speed issue is also considered, and it turns out that the synchronizing region reduces as the synchronizing speed becomes faster. To obtain more desirable synchronizing capacity, the weighting matrices are selected by sufficiently utilizing the guaranteed gain margin of the optimal regulators. Based on the developed LQR-based cooperative design framework, an approximate dynamic programming technique is successfully introduced to overcome the (partially or completely) model-free cooperative design for linear multiagent systems. Finally, two numerical examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed design methods.

  8. Elastic robot control - Nonlinear inversion and linear stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, S. N.; Schy, A. A.

    1986-01-01

    An approach to the control of elastic robot systems for space applications using inversion, servocompensation, and feedback stabilization is presented. For simplicity, a robot arm (PUMA type) with three rotational joints is considered. The third link is assumed to be elastic. Using an inversion algorithm, a nonlinear decoupling control law u(d) is derived such that in the closed-loop system independent control of joint angles by the three joint torquers is accomplished. For the stabilization of elastic oscillations, a linear feedback torquer control law u(s) is obtained applying linear quadratic optimization to the linearized arm model augmented with a servocompensator about the terminal state. Simulation results show that in spite of uncertainties in the payload and vehicle angular velocity, good joint angle control and damping of elastic oscillations are obtained with the torquer control law u = u(d) + u(s).

  9. Design and Analysis of Tubular Permanent Magnet Linear Wave Generator

    PubMed Central

    Si, Jikai; Feng, Haichao; Su, Peng; Zhang, Lufeng

    2014-01-01

    Due to the lack of mature design program for the tubular permanent magnet linear wave generator (TPMLWG) and poor sinusoidal characteristics of the air gap flux density for the traditional surface-mounted TPMLWG, a design method and a new secondary structure of TPMLWG are proposed. An equivalent mathematical model of TPMLWG is established to adopt the transformation relationship between the linear velocity of permanent magnet rotary generator and the operating speed of TPMLWG, to determine the structure parameters of the TPMLWG. The new secondary structure of the TPMLWG contains surface-mounted permanent magnets and the interior permanent magnets, which form a series-parallel hybrid magnetic circuit, and their reasonable structure parameters are designed to get the optimum pole-arc coefficient. The electromagnetic field and temperature field of TPMLWG are analyzed using finite element method. It can be included that the sinusoidal characteristics of air gap flux density of the new secondary structure TPMLWG are improved, the cogging force as well as mechanical vibration is reduced in the process of operation, and the stable temperature rise of generator meets the design requirements when adopting the new secondary structure of the TPMLWG. PMID:25050388

  10. Design and analysis of tubular permanent magnet linear wave generator.

    PubMed

    Si, Jikai; Feng, Haichao; Su, Peng; Zhang, Lufeng

    2014-01-01

    Due to the lack of mature design program for the tubular permanent magnet linear wave generator (TPMLWG) and poor sinusoidal characteristics of the air gap flux density for the traditional surface-mounted TPMLWG, a design method and a new secondary structure of TPMLWG are proposed. An equivalent mathematical model of TPMLWG is established to adopt the transformation relationship between the linear velocity of permanent magnet rotary generator and the operating speed of TPMLWG, to determine the structure parameters of the TPMLWG. The new secondary structure of the TPMLWG contains surface-mounted permanent magnets and the interior permanent magnets, which form a series-parallel hybrid magnetic circuit, and their reasonable structure parameters are designed to get the optimum pole-arc coefficient. The electromagnetic field and temperature field of TPMLWG are analyzed using finite element method. It can be included that the sinusoidal characteristics of air gap flux density of the new secondary structure TPMLWG are improved, the cogging force as well as mechanical vibration is reduced in the process of operation, and the stable temperature rise of generator meets the design requirements when adopting the new secondary structure of the TPMLWG.

  11. Asynchronous switching output feedback control of discrete-time switched linear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Chengzhi; Wu, Fen

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the problem of dynamic output-feedback control synthesis is addressed for discrete-time switched linear systems under asynchronous switching. The proposed hybrid controller consists of a standard dynamic output-feedback switching control law and an impulsive reset law induced by controller state jumps. Using the average dwell time technique incorporating with multiple quadratic Lyapunov functions, the switching control synthesis conditions for asymptotic stability with guaranteed weighted ℓ2-gain performance are derived as a set of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). The proposed hybrid synthesis scheme advances existing design methods for output-feedback asynchronous switching control of switched linear systems in two important aspects: LMI formulation of the synthesis problem; and arbitrary order of the controller state. A numerical example is used to illustrate the effectiveness and advantages of the proposed design technique.

  12. The design of linear algebra libraries for high performance computers

    SciTech Connect

    Dongarra, J.J. |; Walker, D.W.

    1993-08-01

    This paper discusses the design of linear algebra libraries for high performance computers. Particular emphasis is placed on the development of scalable algorithms for MIMD distributed memory concurrent computers. A brief description of the EISPACK, LINPACK, and LAPACK libraries is given, followed by an outline of ScaLAPACK, which is a distributed memory version of LAPACK currently under development. The importance of block-partitioned algorithms in reducing the frequency of data movement between different levels of hierarchical memory is stressed. The use of such algorithms helps reduce the message startup costs on distributed memory concurrent computers. Other key ideas in our approach are the use of distributed versions of the Level 3 Basic Linear Algebra Subprograms (BLAS) as computational building blocks, and the use of Basic Linear Algebra Communication Subprograms (BLACS) as communication building blocks. Together the distributed BLAS and the BLACS can be used to construct higher-level algorithms, and hide many details of the parallelism from the application developer. The block-cyclic data distribution is described, and adopted as a good way of distributing block-partitioned matrices. Block-partitioned versions of the Cholesky and LU factorizations are presented, and optimization issues associated with the implementation of the LU factorization algorithm on distributed memory concurrent computers are discussed, together with its performance on the Intel Delta system. Finally, approaches to the design of library interfaces are reviewed.

  13. Design and test of a linear thermal actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, G.; Osborne, D.; Wehrle, V. A.

    1985-12-01

    A linear thermal actuator (LTA) to serve as the actuating element of a shape control system which compensates actively for deployment inaccuracies or thermal distortions of large antennas or other space structures requiring high dimensional stability was developed. The LTA was subjected to spacecraft-level vibration and thermal vacuum tests. Results and effect on ambient performance are presented. A follow-on development effort in which it is proposed to incorporate a network of distributed LTAs into a shape control system for a phased-array planar antenna of a hypothetical ice surveillance satellite is outlined.

  14. Boundary control problem of linear Stokes equation with point observations

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Z.

    1994-12-31

    We will discuss the linear quadratic regulator problems (LQR) of linear Stokes system with point observations on the boundary and box constraints on the boundary control. By using hydropotential theory, we proved that the LQR problems without box constraint on the control do not admit any non trivial solution, while the LQR problems with box constraints have a unique solution. The optimal control is given explicitly, and its singular behaviors are displayed explicitly through a decomposition formula. Based upon the characteristic formula of the optimal control, a generic numerical algorithm is given for solving the box constrained LQR problems.

  15. Note on the SC Linear Collider TESLA Cavity Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekutowicz, J.; Proch, D.; Tang, C.

    1997-05-01

    The experience we have gained over the last few years from experiments with superconducting cavities for the TESLA test facility justifies a revision of the design decided almost five years ago. The proposed new design takes advantage of the high quality factor Q0 > 10^10 and the low electron emission as demonstrated by some tested cavities. The main aim of the new design is to simplify the production and preparation of sc cavities and thus to reduce the cost of the linear collider. The new cavity shape has an enlarged iris diameter with the following advantages: significant lower loss factors, simplified and less expensive scheme for the HOM damping, suitability of hydroforming and higher stability of the field profile.

  16. Optimizing Design and Execution of Linear Reconstructions on the Face.

    PubMed

    Sobanko, Joseph F

    2015-10-01

    Linear closure (LC) is the most common reconstructive design for cutaneous defects. Successful performance of a LC is dependent on both appropriate surgical planning and technical execution. To review the design and execution of LCs on the face. A systematic evaluation of LCs is provided to guide a logical approach for the repair of cutaneous facial defects. Reproducibly excellent aesthetic and functional results may be achieved with strategies that reduce incisional tension, preserve free margin position, and restore skin contour. Cosmetic unit borders and relaxed skin tension lines may be used to further camouflage facial scars. A comprehensive knowledge of facial anatomy, biomechanical properties of the skin, and incisional tension vectors facilitates correct preoperative planning and intraoperative technique. Proper design and execution of LCs allow for enhanced cosmesis and permit the cutaneous surgeon to progress to more technically advanced surgical procedures such as cutaneous flaps.

  17. Adjustment of design parameters for improved feedback properties in the linear quadratic regulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, R. S.

    1982-03-01

    Classical analysis and design methods for single input-single output (SISO) systems, such as gain and phase margins, do not generalize easily to MIMO systems. Recently, the singular values of the return difference and inverse Nyquist matrices have proven useful in analyzing multiple input-multiple output (MIMO) systems. The linear quadratic formulation is useful for the design of MIMO controllers. A disadvantage of this design method is that all the design specifications must be incorporated into a quadratic cost functional. This thesis contains a systematic method for adjusting the quadratic cost to manipulate the singular value functionals and the feedback properties and thus achieve the design requirements.

  18. Application of linear programming techniques for controlling linear dynamic plants in real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabasov, R.; Kirillova, F. M.; Ha, Vo Thi Thanh

    2016-03-01

    The problem of controlling a linear dynamic plant in real time given its nondeterministic model and imperfect measurements of the inputs and outputs is considered. The concepts of current distributions of the initial state and disturbance parameters are introduced. The method for the implementation of disclosable loop using the separation principle is described. The optimal control problem under uncertainty conditions is reduced to the problems of optimal observation, optimal identification, and optimal control of the deterministic system. To extend the domain where a solution to the optimal control problem under uncertainty exists, a two-stage optimal control method is proposed. Results are illustrated using a dynamic plant of the fourth order.

  19. Design and analysis of linear cascade DNA hybridization chain reactions using DNA hairpins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, Hieu; Garg, Sudhanshu; Miao, Vincent; Song, Tianqi; Mokhtar, Reem; Reif, John

    2017-01-01

    DNA self-assembly has been employed non-conventionally to construct nanoscale structures and dynamic nanoscale machines. The technique of hybridization chain reactions by triggered self-assembly has been shown to form various interesting nanoscale structures ranging from simple linear DNA oligomers to dendritic DNA structures. Inspired by earlier triggered self-assembly works, we present a system for controlled self-assembly of linear cascade DNA hybridization chain reactions using nine distinct DNA hairpins. NUPACK is employed to assist in designing DNA sequences and Matlab has been used to simulate DNA hairpin interactions. Gel electrophoresis and ensemble fluorescence reaction kinetics data indicate strong evidence of linear cascade DNA hybridization chain reactions. The half-time completion of the proposed linear cascade reactions indicates a linear dependency on the number of hairpins.

  20. Linear-constraint wavefront control for exoplanet coronagraphic imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, He; Eldorado Riggs, A. J.; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Vanderbei, Robert J.; Groff, Tyler Dean

    2017-01-01

    A coronagraph is a leading technology for achieving high-contrast imaging of exoplanets in a space telescope. It uses a system of several masks to modify the diffraction and achieve extremely high contrast in the image plane around target stars. However, coronagraphic imaging systems are very sensitive to optical aberrations, so wavefront correction using deformable mirrors (DMs) is necessary to avoid contrast degradation in the image plane. Electric field conjugation (EFC) and Stroke minimization (SM) are two primary high-contrast wavefront controllers explored in the past decade. EFC minimizes the average contrast in the search areas while regularizing the strength of the control inputs. Stroke minimization calculates the minimum DM commands under the constraint that a target average contrast is achieved. Recently in the High Contrast Imaging Lab at Princeton University (HCIL), a new linear-constraint wavefront controller based on stroke minimization was developed and demonstrated using numerical simulation. Instead of only constraining the average contrast over the entire search area, the new controller constrains the electric field of each single pixel using linear programming, which could led to significant increases in speed of the wavefront correction and also create more uniform dark holes. As a follow-up of this work, another linear-constraint controller modified from EFC is demonstrated theoretically and numerically and the lab verification of the linear-constraint controllers is reported. Based on the simulation and lab results, the pros and cons of linear-constraint controllers are carefully compared with EFC and stroke minimization.

  1. Spacecraft flight control with the new phase space control law and optimal linear jet select

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergmann, E. V.; Croopnick, S. R.; Turkovich, J. J.; Work, C. C.

    1977-01-01

    An autopilot designed for rotation and translation control of a rigid spacecraft is described. The autopilot uses reaction control jets as control effectors and incorporates a six-dimensional phase space control law as well as a linear programming algorithm for jet selection. The interaction of the control law and jet selection was investigated and a recommended configuration proposed. By means of a simulation procedure the new autopilot was compared with an existing system and was found to be superior in terms of core memory, central processing unit time, firings, and propellant consumption. But it is thought that the cycle time required to perform the jet selection computations might render the new autopilot unsuitable for existing flight computer applications, without modifications. The new autopilot is capable of maintaining attitude control in the presence of a large number of jet failures.

  2. Design and characterization of a linear Hencken-type burner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, M. F.; Bohlin, G. A.; Schrader, P. E.; Bambha, R. P.; Kliewer, C. J.; Johansson, K. O.; Michelsen, H. A.

    2016-11-01

    We have designed and constructed a Hencken-type burner that produces a 38-mm-long linear laminar partially premixed co-flow diffusion flame. This burner was designed to produce a linear flame for studies of soot chemistry, combining the benefit of the conventional Hencken burner's laminar flames with the advantage of the slot burner's geometry for optical measurements requiring a long interaction distance. It is suitable for measurements using optical imaging diagnostics, line-of-sight optical techniques, or off-axis optical-scattering methods requiring either a long or short path length through the flame. This paper presents details of the design and operation of this new burner. We also provide characterization information for flames produced by this burner, including relative flow-field velocities obtained using hot-wire anemometry, temperatures along the centerline extracted using direct one-dimensional coherent Raman imaging, soot volume fractions along the centerline obtained using laser-induced incandescence and laser extinction, and transmission electron microscopy images of soot thermophoretically sampled from the flame.

  3. Design and characterization of a linear Hencken-type burner.

    PubMed

    Campbell, M F; Bohlin, G A; Schrader, P E; Bambha, R P; Kliewer, C J; Johansson, K O; Michelsen, H A

    2016-11-01

    We have designed and constructed a Hencken-type burner that produces a 38-mm-long linear laminar partially premixed co-flow diffusion flame. This burner was designed to produce a linear flame for studies of soot chemistry, combining the benefit of the conventional Hencken burner's laminar flames with the advantage of the slot burner's geometry for optical measurements requiring a long interaction distance. It is suitable for measurements using optical imaging diagnostics, line-of-sight optical techniques, or off-axis optical-scattering methods requiring either a long or short path length through the flame. This paper presents details of the design and operation of this new burner. We also provide characterization information for flames produced by this burner, including relative flow-field velocities obtained using hot-wire anemometry, temperatures along the centerline extracted using direct one-dimensional coherent Raman imaging, soot volume fractions along the centerline obtained using laser-induced incandescence and laser extinction, and transmission electron microscopy images of soot thermophoretically sampled from the flame.

  4. GA and Lyapunov theory-based hybrid adaptive fuzzy controller for non-linear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Ananya; Das Sharma, Kaushik

    2015-02-01

    In this present article, a new hybrid methodology for designing stable adaptive fuzzy logic controllers (AFLCs) for a class of non-linear system is proposed. The proposed design strategy exploits the features of genetic algorithm (GA)-based stochastic evolutionary global search technique and Lyapunov theory-based local adaptation scheme. The objective is to develop a methodology for designing AFLCs with optimised free parameters and guaranteed closed-loop stability. Simultaneously, the proposed method introduces automation in the design process. The stand-alone Lyapunov theory-based design, GA-based design and proposed hybrid GA-Lyapunov design methodologies are implemented for two benchmark non-linear plants in simulation case studies with different reference signals and one experimental case study. The results demonstrate that the hybrid design methodology outperforms the other control strategies on the whole.

  5. Beam Dynamics Design and Simulation in Ion Linear Accelerators (

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, Peter N.; Asseev, Vladislav N.; Mustapha, and Brahim

    2006-08-01

    Orginally, the ray tracing code TRACK has been developed to fulfill the many special requirements for the Rare Isotope Accelerator Facility known as RIA. Since no available beam-dynamics code met all the necessary requirements, modifications to the code TRACK were introduced to allow end-to-end (from the ion souce to the production target) simulations of the RIA machine, TRACK is a general beam-dynamics code and can be applied for the design, commissioning and operation of modern ion linear accelerators and beam transport systems.

  6. Computer-aided design studies of the homopolar linear synchronous motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, G. E.; Eastham, A. R.; Ong, R.

    1984-09-01

    The linear induction motor (LIM), as an urban transit drive, can provide good grade-climbing capabilities and propulsion/braking performance that is independent of steel wheel-rail adhesion. In view of its 10-12 mm airgap, the LIM is characterized by a low power factor-efficiency product of order 0.4. A synchronous machine offers high efficiency and controllable power factor. An assessment of the linear homopolar configuration of this machine is presented as an alternative to the LIM. Computer-aided design studies using the finite element technique have been conducted to identify a suitable machine design for urban transit propulsion.

  7. Feedback Linearized Aircraft Control Using Dynamic Cell Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, C. C.

    1998-01-01

    A Dynamic Cell Structure (DCS ) Neural Network was developed which learns a topology representing network (TRN) of F-15 aircraft aerodynamic stability and control derivatives. The network is combined with a feedback linearized tracking controller to produce a robust control architecture capable of handling multiple accident and off-nominal flight scenarios. This paper describes network and its performance for accident scenarios including differential stabilator lock, soft sensor failure, control, stability derivative variation, and turbulence.

  8. Dynamic manipulation of asymmetric forebody vortices to achieve linear control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Richard

    forebody. The findings in the water tunnel also suggest that the 'stacked' arrangement of the vortices for a slender forebody may be responsible for the finding that yawing moment and side force with blowing are no greater than the baseline magnitudes. The research indicates that the dynamic manipulation scheme using forward blowing, either below or above the reversal threshold, is a viable and attractive means of obtaining linear yaw control of an aircraft-like configuration. Considerably more test data are still required, however, to better define the design space and to reduce technical risk. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  9. Finite time control of uncertain networked switched linear systems with quantizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaoling; Zhou, Guopeng; Tian, Fengxia; Liu, Hao

    2017-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the finite-time control problem for uncertain networked switched linear systems with both state and control input quantizations. By employing average well dwell time (ADT) and Lyapunov-like function method, a feedback controller is designed to guarantee that the dynamic augment closed-loop system is finite-time boundedness. Then based on this, some sufficient conditions which ensure the finite-time boundedness of networked switched systems are derived in terms of linear matrix inequalities. Finally, a numerical example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed design approach.

  10. Robustness with observers. [linear optimal feedback control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, J. C.; Stein, G.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes an adjustment procedure for observer-based linear control systems which asymptotically achieves the same loop transfer functions (and hence the same relative stability, robustness, and disturbance rejection properties) as full-state feedback control implementations. Full-state loop-transfer properties can be recovered asymptotically if the plant is minimum phase; this occurs at the expense of noise performance.

  11. On Optimal Feedback Control for Stationary Linear Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, David L.

    2010-04-15

    We study linear-quadratic optimal control problems for finite dimensional stationary linear systems AX+BU=Z with output Y=CX+DU from the viewpoint of linear feedback solution. We interpret solutions in relation to system robustness with respect to disturbances Z and relate them to nonlinear matrix equations of Riccati type and eigenvalue-eigenvector problems for the corresponding Hamiltonian system. Examples are included along with an indication of extensions to continuous, i.e., infinite dimensional, systems, primarily of elliptic type.

  12. Use of probabilistic weights to enhance linear regression myoelectric control.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lauren H; Kuiken, Todd A; Hargrove, Levi J

    2015-12-01

    Clinically available prostheses for transradial amputees do not allow simultaneous myoelectric control of degrees of freedom (DOFs). Linear regression methods can provide simultaneous myoelectric control, but frequently also result in difficulty with isolating individual DOFs when desired. This study evaluated the potential of using probabilistic estimates of categories of gross prosthesis movement, which are commonly used in classification-based myoelectric control, to enhance linear regression myoelectric control. Gaussian models were fit to electromyogram (EMG) feature distributions for three movement classes at each DOF (no movement, or movement in either direction) and used to weight the output of linear regression models by the probability that the user intended the movement. Eight able-bodied and two transradial amputee subjects worked in a virtual Fitts' law task to evaluate differences in controllability between linear regression and probability-weighted regression for an intramuscular EMG-based three-DOF wrist and hand system. Real-time and offline analyses in able-bodied subjects demonstrated that probability weighting improved performance during single-DOF tasks (p < 0.05) by preventing extraneous movement at additional DOFs. Similar results were seen in experiments with two transradial amputees. Though goodness-of-fit evaluations suggested that the EMG feature distributions showed some deviations from the Gaussian, equal-covariance assumptions used in this experiment, the assumptions were sufficiently met to provide improved performance compared to linear regression control. Use of probability weights can improve the ability to isolate individual during linear regression myoelectric control, while maintaining the ability to simultaneously control multiple DOFs.

  13. Use of probabilistic weights to enhance linear regression myoelectric control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Lauren H.; Kuiken, Todd A.; Hargrove, Levi J.

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Clinically available prostheses for transradial amputees do not allow simultaneous myoelectric control of degrees of freedom (DOFs). Linear regression methods can provide simultaneous myoelectric control, but frequently also result in difficulty with isolating individual DOFs when desired. This study evaluated the potential of using probabilistic estimates of categories of gross prosthesis movement, which are commonly used in classification-based myoelectric control, to enhance linear regression myoelectric control. Approach. Gaussian models were fit to electromyogram (EMG) feature distributions for three movement classes at each DOF (no movement, or movement in either direction) and used to weight the output of linear regression models by the probability that the user intended the movement. Eight able-bodied and two transradial amputee subjects worked in a virtual Fitts’ law task to evaluate differences in controllability between linear regression and probability-weighted regression for an intramuscular EMG-based three-DOF wrist and hand system. Main results. Real-time and offline analyses in able-bodied subjects demonstrated that probability weighting improved performance during single-DOF tasks (p < 0.05) by preventing extraneous movement at additional DOFs. Similar results were seen in experiments with two transradial amputees. Though goodness-of-fit evaluations suggested that the EMG feature distributions showed some deviations from the Gaussian, equal-covariance assumptions used in this experiment, the assumptions were sufficiently met to provide improved performance compared to linear regression control. Significance. Use of probability weights can improve the ability to isolate individual during linear regression myoelectric control, while maintaining the ability to simultaneously control multiple DOFs.

  14. Linear vs. function-based dose algorithm designs.

    PubMed

    Stanford, N

    2011-03-01

    The performance requirements prescribed in IEC 62387-1, 2007 recommend linear, additive algorithms for external dosimetry [IEC. Radiation protection instrumentation--passive integrating dosimetry systems for environmental and personal monitoring--Part 1: General characteristics and performance requirements. IEC 62387-1 (2007)]. Neither of the two current standards for performance of external dosimetry in the USA address the additivity of dose results [American National Standards Institute, Inc. American National Standard for dosimetry personnel dosimetry performance criteria for testing. ANSI/HPS N13.11 (2009); Department of Energy. Department of Energy Standard for the performance testing of personnel dosimetry systems. DOE/EH-0027 (1986)]. While there are significant merits to adopting a purely linear solution to estimating doses from multi-element external dosemeters, differences in the standards result in technical as well as perception challenges in designing a single algorithm approach that will satisfy both IEC and USA external dosimetry performance requirements. The dosimetry performance testing standards in the USA do not incorporate type testing, but rely on biennial performance tests to demonstrate proficiency in a wide range of pure and mixed fields. The test results are used exclusively to judge the system proficiency, with no specific requirements on the algorithm design. Technical challenges include mixed beta/photon fields with a beta dose as low as 0.30 mSv mixed with 0.05 mSv of low-energy photons. Perception-based challenges, resulting from over 20 y of experience with this type of performance testing in the USA, include the common belief that the overall quality of the dosemeter performance can be judged from performance to pure fields. This paper presents synthetic testing results from currently accredited function-based algorithms and new developed purely linear algorithms. A comparison of the performance data highlights the benefits of each

  15. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 4: Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Behnke, Ties

    2013-06-26

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to increase significantly our understanding of the fundamental processes that govern the evolution of the Universe.

  16. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 2: Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Howard; Barklow, Tim; Fujii, Keisuke; Gao, Yuanning; Hoang, Andre; Kanemura, Shinya; List, Jenny; Logan, Heather E.; Nomerotski, Andrei; Perelstein, Maxim; Peskin, Michael E.; Pöschl, Roman; Reuter, Jürgen; Riemann, Sabine; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Tait, Tim P.; Yu, Jaehoon

    2013-06-26

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to increase significantly our understanding of the fundamental processes that govern the evolution of the Universe.

  17. Improved control using PFC and modified linear quadratic regulator for a kind of nonlinear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ridong; Lu, Renquan; Wang, Shuqing

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes the combination design of predictive functional control (PFC) and optimal linear quadratic (LQ) method for a kind of nonlinear process with output feedback coupling. In many existing control methods for this kind of nonlinear systems, the nonlinear part is either ignored or represented as a rough linear one when corresponding predictive control methods are designed. However, by assuming that the nonlinearity can be ignored or simplified to a linear time-varying part may not lead to the good control performance of subsequent linear control designs. The paper is a further investigation on this kind of systems, in which a procedure of PFC plus a modified optimal LQ control is developed. With respect to the proposed control strategy and the corresponding processes, the closed-loop performance is improved concerning tracking ability and disturbance rejection compared with previous predictive control methods. In addition, the proposed control is easy to implement as it selects a simple structure and a modification of the classical control scheme.

  18. An application of nonlinear programming to the design of regulators of a linear-quadratic formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, P.

    1983-01-01

    A design technique is proposed for linear regulators in which a feedback controller of fixed structure is chosen to minimize an integral quadratic objective function subject to the satisfaction of integral quadratic constraint functions. Application of a nonlinear programming algorithm to this mathematically tractable formulation results in an efficient and useful computer aided design tool. Particular attention is paid to computational efficiency and various recommendations are made. Two design examples illustrate the flexibility of the approach and highlight the special insight afforded to the designer. One concerns helicopter longitudinal dynamics and the other the flight dynamics of an aerodynamically unstable aircraft.

  19. Stabilization of linear distributed control systems with unbounded delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henríquez, Hernán R.; Hernández M., Eduardo

    2005-07-01

    In this paper we study the asymptotic stabilization of linear distributed parameter control systems with unbounded delay. Assuming that the semigroup of operators associated with the uncontrolled and nondelayed equation is compact and that the phase space is a uniform fading memory space, we characterize those systems that can be stabilized using a feedback control. As consequence we conclude that every system of this type is stabilizable with an appropriated finite dimensional control.

  20. Dynamic feedback linearization control of spacecraft with flexible appendages based on extended state observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jinli; Li, Donghai; Sun, Xianfang

    2006-11-01

    A dynamic feedback linearization control approach is designed in this paper for the pitch angle trajectory control and vibration suppression of a flexible spacecraft. Using the extended state observer, the pitch rate and entire unknown dynamics can be estimated, so only pitch angle is needed to measure in the feedback linearization control. The expression of the control law is simple, and few observer parameters need to be tuned. These all reduce the engineering difficulty greatly. The design of this control law does not depend on elastic modes included in the spacecraft model. Simulation results are presented to show that, the control law designed can ensure that pitch angle maneuver to its target precisely and smoothly, and elastic vibration is suppressed effectively.

  1. Design of external forces for eliminating traveling wave in a piecewise linear FitzHugh-Nagumo model.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Keiji; Takeuchi, Masashi; Shimizu, Tsuyoshi

    2011-06-01

    Elimination and control of nonlinear phenomena in excitable media are important for academic interests and practical applications. This paper provides a systematic procedure to design external forces for eliminating a traveling wave in a one-dimensional piecewise linear FitzHugh-Nagumo model. This procedure allows us to design nonfeedback and feedback control systems. The feedback control systems are designed using classical control theory. Furthermore, this procedure is extended to a two-dimensional model and verified using numerical simulation.

  2. Mode localized MEMS transducers with voltage-controlled linear coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manav, M.; Srikantha Phani, A.; Cretu, E.

    2017-05-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated mode localized resonant micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) sensing devices with orders of magnitude improvement in sensitivity. Avoided crossings or eigenvalue veering is the physical mechanism exploited to achieve the enhancement in sensitivity of devices operating either in vacuum or in air. The mode localized MEMS devices are typically designed to be symmetric and use gap-varying electrostatic springs to couple motions of two or more resonators. The role of asymmetry in the design of devices and its influence on sensitivity is not fully understood. Furthermore, gap-varying electrostatic springs suffer from nonlinearities when gap variation between coupling plates becomes large due to mode localization, imposing limitations on the device performance. To address these shortcomings, this contribution has two principal objectives. The first objective is to critically assess the role of asymmetry in the device design and operation. We show, based on energy analysis, that carefully designed asymmetry in devices can lead to even higher sensitivities than reported in the literature. Our second objective is to design and implement linear, tunable, electrostatic springs, using shaped combs, which allow large vibration amplitudes of resonators thereby increasing the signal to noise ratio. We experimentally demonstrate linear electrostatic coupling in a two oscillator device. Our study suggests that a future avenue for progress in the mode localized resonant sensing technology is to combine asymmetric devices with tunable linear coupling designs.

  3. Integrated control-structure design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunziker, K. Scott; Kraft, Raymond H.; Bossi, Joseph A.

    1991-01-01

    A new approach for the design and control of flexible space structures is described. The approach integrates the structure and controller design processes thereby providing extra opportunities for avoiding some of the disastrous effects of control-structures interaction and for discovering new, unexpected avenues of future structural design. A control formulation based on Boyd's implementation of Youla parameterization is employed. Control design parameters are coupled with structural design variables to produce a set of integrated-design variables which are selected through optimization-based methodology. A performance index reflecting spacecraft mission goals and constraints is formulated and optimized with respect to the integrated design variables. Initial studies have been concerned with achieving mission requirements with a lighter, more flexible space structure. Details of the formulation of the integrated-design approach are presented and results are given from a study involving the integrated redesign of a flexible geostationary platform.

  4. Error control of iterative linear solvers for integrated groundwater models.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Matthew F; Bai, Zhaojun; Brush, Charles F; Chung, Francis I; Dogrul, Emin C; Kadir, Tariq N

    2011-01-01

    An open problem that arises when using modern iterative linear solvers, such as the preconditioned conjugate gradient method or Generalized Minimum RESidual (GMRES) method, is how to choose the residual tolerance in the linear solver to be consistent with the tolerance on the solution error. This problem is especially acute for integrated groundwater models, which are implicitly coupled to another model, such as surface water models, and resolve both multiple scales of flow and temporal interaction terms, giving rise to linear systems with variable scaling. This article uses the theory of "forward error bound estimation" to explain the correspondence between the residual error in the preconditioned linear system and the solution error. Using examples of linear systems from models developed by the US Geological Survey and the California State Department of Water Resources, we observe that this error bound guides the choice of a practical measure for controlling the error in linear systems. We implemented a preconditioned GMRES algorithm and benchmarked it against the Successive Over-Relaxation (SOR) method, the most widely known iterative solver for nonsymmetric coefficient matrices. With forward error control, GMRES can easily replace the SOR method in legacy groundwater modeling packages, resulting in the overall simulation speedups as large as 7.74×. This research is expected to broadly impact groundwater modelers through the demonstration of a practical and general approach for setting the residual tolerance in line with the solution error tolerance and presentation of GMRES performance benchmarking results.

  5. Attitude control with realization of linear error dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paielli, Russell A.; Bach, Ralph E.

    1993-01-01

    An attitude control law is derived to realize linear unforced error dynamics with the attitude error defined in terms of rotation group algebra (rather than vector algebra). Euler parameters are used in the rotational dynamics model because they are globally nonsingular, but only the minimal three Euler parameters are used in the error dynamics model because they have no nonlinear mathematical constraints to prevent the realization of linear error dynamics. The control law is singular only when the attitude error angle is exactly pi rad about any eigenaxis, and a simple intuitive modification at the singularity allows the control law to be used globally. The forced error dynamics are nonlinear but stable. Numerical simulation tests show that the control law performs robustly for both initial attitude acquisition and attitude control.

  6. Attitude control with realization of linear error dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paielli, Russell A.; Bach, Ralph E.

    1993-01-01

    An attitude control law is derived to realize linear unforced error dynamics with the attitude error defined in terms of rotation group algebra (rather than vector algebra). Euler parameters are used in the rotational dynamics model because they are globally nonsingular, but only the minimal three Euler parameters are used in the error dynamics model because they have no nonlinear mathematical constraints to prevent the realization of linear error dynamics. The control law is singular only when the attitude error angle is exactly pi rad about any eigenaxis, and a simple intuitive modification at the singularity allows the control law to be used globally. The forced error dynamics are nonlinear but stable. Numerical simulation tests show that the control law performs robustly for both initial attitude acquisition and attitude control.

  7. Neighboring extremal guidance for systems with a piecewise linear control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, David G.; Helfrich, Clifford E.

    1991-01-01

    The neighboring extremal feedback control law is developed for systems with a piecewise linear control for the case where the optimal control is obtained by nonlinear programming techniques. To develop the control perturbation for a given deviation from the nominal path, the second variation is minimized subject to the constraint that the final conditions be satisfied. This process leads to a feedback relationship between the control perturbation and the measured deviation from the nominal state. A simple example, the lunar launch problem, is used to demonstrate the validity of the guidance law. For model errors on the order of 5 percent, the results indicate that 5 percent errors occur in the final conditions.

  8. Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator conceptual design report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    This document presents the scientific justification and the conceptual design for the {open_quotes}Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator{close_quotes} (NLCTA) at SLAC. The goals of the NLCTA are to integrate the new technologies of X-band accelerator structures and rf systems being developed for the Next Linear Collider, to measure the growth of the {open_quotes}dark current{close_quotes} generated by rf field emission in the accelerator, to demonstrate multi-bunch beam-loading energy compensation and suppression of higher-order deflecting modes, and to measure any transverse components of the accelerating field. The NLCTA will be a 42-meter-long beam line consisting, consecutively, of a thermionic-cathode gun, an X-band buncher, a magnetic chicane, six 1.8-meter-long sections of 11.4-GHz accelerator structure, and a magnetic spectrometer. Initially, the unloaded accelerating gradient will be 50 MV/m. A higher-gradient upgrade option eventually would increase the unloaded gradient to 100 MV/m.

  9. Nonlinear systems approach to control system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, G.

    1984-01-01

    Consider some of the control system design methods for plants with nonlinear dynamics. If the nonlinearity is weak relative to the size of the operating region, then the linear methods apply directly. Fixed-gain design may be feasible even for significant nonlinearities. It may be possible to find a single gain which provides adequate control of the linear models at several perturbation points. If the nonlinearity is restricted to a sector, that fact may be used to obtain a fixed-gain controller. Otherwise, a gain may have to be associated with each perturbation point Pi. A gain schedule K(p(v)) is obtained by connecting the perturbation points by a function, say p(v), of the scheduling parameter v (i.e., speed). When the scheduling parameter must be multidimensional, this approach is difficult; the objective is to develop an easier procedure.

  10. Multileaf shielding design against neutrons produced by medical linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Rebello, W F; Silva, A X; Facure, A

    2008-01-01

    This work aims at presenting a study using Monte Carlo simulation of a Multileaf Shielding (MLS) System designed to be used for the protection of patients who undergo radiotherapy treatment, against undesired exposure to neutrons produced in the components of the medical linear accelerator heads. The choice of radiotherapy equipment as the subject of study fell on the Varian Clinac 2,100/2,300 with MLC-120 operating at 18 MeV. The general purpose Monte Carlo N-Particle radiation transport code, MCNP5, was used in the computer simulation in order to determine the ambient dose equivalent, H (10), on several points on the patient's plane, with the equipment operation with and without the MLS. The results of the simulations showed a significant neutron dose reduction after the inclusion of the proposed shielding.

  11. Shielding design for multiple-energy linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Barish, Robert J

    2014-05-01

    The introduction of medical linear accelerators (linacs) capable of producing three different x-ray energies has complicated the process of designing shielding for these units. The conventional approach for the previous generation of dual-energy linacs relied on the addition of some amount of supplementary shielding to that calculated for the higher-energy beam, where the amount of that supplement followed the historical "two-source" rule, also known as the "add one HVL rule," a practice derived from other two-source shielding considerations. The author describes an iterative approach that calculates shielding requirements accurately for any number of multiple beam energies assuming the workload at each energy can be specified at the outset. This method is particularly useful when considering the requirements for possible modifications to an existing vault when new equipment is to be installed as a replacement for a previous unit.

  12. Hybrid state-space self-tuning control of uncertain linear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shieh, L. S.; Wang, Y. J.; Sunkel, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    The paper presents a hybrid state-space self-tuner using a new dual-rate sampling scheme for digital adaptive control of continuous-time uncertain linear systems. A state-space-based recursive least-squares algorithm, together with a variable forgetting factor, is used for direct estimations of both the equivalent discrete-time uncertain linear system parameters and the associated discrete-time state of a continuous-time uncertain linear system from the sampled input and output data. An analogue optimal regional pole-placement design method is used for designing an optimal observer-based analogue controller. A suboptimal observer-based digital controller is then designed from the designed analogue controller using digital redesign technique. To enhance the robustness of parameter identification and state estimation algorithms, a dynamic bound for a class of uncertain bilinear parameters and a fast-rate digital controller are developed at each fast-sampling period. Also, to accommodate computation loads and computation delay for developing the advanced hybrid self-tuner, the designed analogue controller and observer gains are both updated at each slow-sampling period. This control technique has been successfully applied to benchmark control problems.

  13. Linear-Parameter-Varying Antiwindup Compensation for Enhanced Flight Control Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Bei; Wu, Fen; Kim, Sung Wan

    2005-01-01

    Actuator saturation is one of the major issues of flight control in the high angle-of-attack region. This paper presents a saturation control scheme for linear parameter varyjing (LPV) systems from an antiwindup control perspective. The proposed control approach is advantageous from the implementation standpoint because it can be thought of as an augmented control algorithm to the existing control system. Moreover, the synthesis condition for an antiwindup compensator is formulated as a linear matrix inequality (LMI) optimization problem and can be solved efficiently. We have applied te LPV antiwindup controller to an F-16 longitudinal autopilot control system design and compared it with the thrust vectoring control scheme. The nonlinear simulations show that an LPV antiwindup controller improves flight quality and offers advantages over thrust vectoring in a high angle-of-attack region.

  14. Multi-mode sliding mode control for precision linear stage based on fixed or floating stator.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jiwen; Long, Zhili; Wang, Michael Yu; Zhang, Lufan; Dai, Xufei

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the control performance of a linear motion stage driven by Voice Coil Motor (VCM). Unlike the conventional VCM, the stator of this VCM is regulated, which means it can be adjusted as a floating-stator or fixed-stator. A Multi-Mode Sliding Mode Control (MMSMC), including a conventional Sliding Mode Control (SMC) and an Integral Sliding Mode Control (ISMC), is designed to control the linear motion stage. The control is switched between SMC and IMSC based on the error threshold. To eliminate the chattering, a smooth function is adopted instead of a signum function. The experimental results with the floating stator show that the positioning accuracy and tracking performance of the linear motion stage are improved with the MMSMC approach.

  15. Multi-mode sliding mode control for precision linear stage based on fixed or floating stator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jiwen; Long, Zhili; Wang, Michael Yu; Zhang, Lufan; Dai, Xufei

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the control performance of a linear motion stage driven by Voice Coil Motor (VCM). Unlike the conventional VCM, the stator of this VCM is regulated, which means it can be adjusted as a floating-stator or fixed-stator. A Multi-Mode Sliding Mode Control (MMSMC), including a conventional Sliding Mode Control (SMC) and an Integral Sliding Mode Control (ISMC), is designed to control the linear motion stage. The control is switched between SMC and IMSC based on the error threshold. To eliminate the chattering, a smooth function is adopted instead of a signum function. The experimental results with the floating stator show that the positioning accuracy and tracking performance of the linear motion stage are improved with the MMSMC approach.

  16. Design and analysis of linear oscillating motor for linear pump application-magnetic field, dynamics and thermotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Zongxia; Wang, Tianyi; Yan, Liang

    2016-12-01

    A linear oscillating motor is an electromagnetic actuator that can achieve short-stroke reciprocating movement directly without auxiliary transmission mechanisms. It has been widely used in linear pump applications as the source of power and motion. However, because of the demand of high power density in a linear actuation system, the performance of linear oscillating motors has been the focus of studies and deserves further research for high power density. In this paper, a general framework of linear oscillating motor design and optimization is addressed in detail, including the electromagnetic, dynamics, and thermal aspects. First, the electromagnetic and dynamics characteristics are modeled to reveal the principle for optimization. Then, optimization and analysis on magnetic structure, resonant system, and thermal features are conducted, which provide the foundation for prototype development. Finally, experimental results are provided for validation. As a whole, this process offers complete guidance for high power density linear oscillating motors in linear pump applications.

  17. Tunneling control using classical non-linear oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Kar, Susmita; Bhattacharyya, S. P.

    2014-04-24

    A quantum particle is placed in symmetric double well potential which is coupled to a classical non-linear oscillator via a coupling function. With different spatial symmetry of the coupling and under various controlling fashions, the tunneling of the quantum particle can be enhanced or suppressed, or totally destroyed.

  18. Coherent-control of linear signals: Frequency-domain analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukamel, Shaul

    2013-10-01

    The dependence of various types of linear signals on the phase profile of broadband optical pulses is examined using fundamental time translation invariance symmetry of multipoint correlation functions. The frequency-domain wave-mixing analysis presented here unifies several arguments made earlier with respect to the conditions whereby coherent control schemes may be used.

  19. Alternative methods for the design of jet engine control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sain, M. K.; Leake, R. J.; Basso, R.; Gejji, R.; Maloney, A.; Seshadri, V.

    1976-01-01

    Various alternatives to linear quadratic design methods for jet engine control systems are discussed. The main alternatives are classified into two broad categories: nonlinear global mathematical programming methods and linear local multivariable frequency domain methods. Specific studies within these categories include model reduction, the eigenvalue locus method, the inverse Nyquist method, polynomial design, dynamic programming, and conjugate gradient approaches.

  20. Alternative methods for the design of jet engine control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sain, M. K.; Leake, R. J.; Basso, R.; Gejji, R.; Maloney, A.; Seshadri, V.

    1976-01-01

    Various alternatives to linear quadratic design methods for jet engine control systems are discussed. The main alternatives are classified into two broad categories: nonlinear global mathematical programming methods and linear local multivariable frequency domain methods. Specific studies within these categories include model reduction, the eigenvalue locus method, the inverse Nyquist method, polynomial design, dynamic programming, and conjugate gradient approaches.

  1. Optimal design of linear and non-linear dynamic vibration absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordanov, I. N.; Cheshankov, B. I.

    1988-05-01

    An efficient numerical method is applied to obtain optimal parameters for both linear and non-linear damped dynamic vibration absorbers. The minimization of the vibration response has been carried out for damped as well as undamped force excited primary systems with linear and non-linear spring characteristics. Comparison is made with the optimum absorber parameters that are determined by using Den Hartog's classical results in the linear case. Six optimization criteria by which the response is minimized over narrow and broad frequency bands are examined. Pareto optimal solutions of the multi-objective decision making problem are obtained.

  2. Active Control of Linear Periodic System with Two Unstable Modes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    tV;;;.~II.~9 - B ~ZV ~- p1 . ,,~ >. ~ ACTIVE CONTROL OF LINEAR PERIODIC SYSTEM WITH TWO UNSTABLE MODES THESIS by Gregory E. Myers, B.S.E. 2nd Lt...PERIODIC SYSTEM WITH TWO UNSTABLE MODES THESIS Presented to the Faculty of the School of Engineering of the Air Force Institute of Technology Air University...December 1982 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited -ow PREFACE This thesis is a continuation of the work done by Yeakel in the control of

  3. A non-linear UAV altitude PSO-PD control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlando, Calogero

    2015-12-01

    In this work, a nonlinear model based approach is presented for the altitude stabilization of a hexarotor unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). The mathematical model and control of the hexacopter airframe is presented. To stabilize the system along the vertical direction, a Proportional Derivative (PD) control is taken into account. A particle swarm optimization (PSO) approach is used in this paper to select the optimal parameters of the control algorithm taking into account different objective functions. Simulation sets are performed to carry out the results for the non-linear system to show how the PSO tuned PD controller leads to zero the error of the position along Z earth direction.

  4. Linear control of neuronal spike timing using phase response curves.

    PubMed

    Stigen, Tyler; Danzl, Per; Moehlis, Jeff; Netoff, Theoden

    2009-01-01

    We propose a simple, robust, linear method to control the spike timing of a periodically firing neuron. The control scheme uses the neuron's phase response curve to identify an area of optimal sensitivity for the chosen stimulation parameters. The spike advance as a function of current pulse amplitude is characterized at the optimal phase and a linear least-squares regression is fit to the data. The inverted regression is used as the control function for this method. The efficacy of this method is demonstrated through numerical simulations of a Hodgkin-Huxley style neuron model as well as in real neurons from rat hippocampal slice preparations. The study shows a proof of concept for the application of a linear control scheme to control neuron spike timing in-vitro. This study was done on an individual cell level, but translation to a tissue or network level is possible. Control schemes of this type could be implemented in a closed loop implantable device to treat neuromotor disorders involving pathologically neuronal activity such as epilepsy or Parkinson's disease.

  5. ORACLS - A linear-quadratic-Gaussian computer-aided design package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, E. S.

    1982-01-01

    ORACLS, an acronym denoting Optimal Regular Algorithms for the Control of Linear Systems, is a collection of FORTRAN coded subroutines dedicated to the formulation and solution of the Linear-Quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) design problem modeled in both continuous and discrete form. The ORACLS system is under continuous development at the NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, and is widely used by universities and industry within the U.S.A. The current (operational) ORACLS version as well as new software under development is described.

  6. Linear active disturbance rejection control of underactuated systems: the case of the Furuta pendulum.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Neria, M; Sira-Ramírez, H; Garrido-Moctezuma, R; Luviano-Juárez, A

    2014-07-01

    An Active Disturbance Rejection Control (ADRC) scheme is proposed for a trajectory tracking problem defined on a nonfeedback linearizable Furuta Pendulum example. A desired rest to rest angular position reference trajectory is to be tracked by the horizontal arm while the unactuated vertical pendulum arm stays around its unstable vertical position without falling down during the entire maneuver and long after it concludes. A linear observer-based linear controller of the ADRC type is designed on the basis of the flat tangent linearization of the system around an arbitrary equilibrium. The advantageous combination of flatness and the ADRC method makes it possible to on-line estimate and cancels the undesirable effects of the higher order nonlinearities disregarded by the linearization. These effects are triggered by fast horizontal arm tracking maneuvers driving the pendulum substantially away from the initial equilibrium point. Convincing experimental results, including a comparative test with a sliding mode controller, are presented.

  7. Feedback linearization based control of a variable air volume air conditioning system for cooling applications.

    PubMed

    Thosar, Archana; Patra, Amit; Bhattacharyya, Souvik

    2008-07-01

    Design of a nonlinear control system for a Variable Air Volume Air Conditioning (VAVAC) plant through feedback linearization is presented in this article. VAVAC systems attempt to reduce building energy consumption while maintaining the primary role of air conditioning. The temperature of the space is maintained at a constant level by establishing a balance between the cooling load generated in the space and the air supply delivered to meet the load. The dynamic model of a VAVAC plant is derived and formulated as a MIMO bilinear system. Feedback linearization is applied for decoupling and linearization of the nonlinear model. Simulation results for a laboratory scale plant are presented to demonstrate the potential of keeping comfort and maintaining energy optimal performance by this methodology. Results obtained with a conventional PI controller and a feedback linearizing controller are compared and the superiority of the proposed approach is clearly established.

  8. Stochastic Stability of Sampled Data Systems with a Jump Linear Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, Oscar R.; Herencia-Zapana, Heber; Gray, W. Steven

    2004-01-01

    In this paper an equivalence between the stochastic stability of a sampled-data system and its associated discrete-time representation is established. The sampled-data system consists of a deterministic, linear, time-invariant, continuous-time plant and a stochastic, linear, time-invariant, discrete-time, jump linear controller. The jump linear controller models computer systems and communication networks that are subject to stochastic upsets or disruptions. This sampled-data model has been used in the analysis and design of fault-tolerant systems and computer-control systems with random communication delays without taking into account the inter-sample response. This paper shows that the known equivalence between the stability of a deterministic sampled-data system and the associated discrete-time representation holds even in a stochastic framework.

  9. A feedback linearization control for the nonlinear 5-DOF flywheel suspended by the permanent magnet biased hybrid magnetic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Wen; Jiancheng, Fang

    2012-10-01

    The dynamic model of the magnetic suspension flywheel (MSFW) whose rotor is suspended by the permanent magnet (PM) biased hybrid magnetic bearing is nonlinear, complicated and coupled because of the superposition and couple of the electromagnetic flux and PM flux. It is a challenge for the closed-loop controller design of the MSFW. In this paper, the MIMO nonlinear dynamic model of such MSFW has been obtained using the equivalent magnetic flux circuit calculation and integrating the rotor dynamics. A nonlinear Luenberger observer has been designed to estimate the state variables of the system, and then the dynamic model has been exact linearized to linear and decoupled one using the state feedback. At last, a linear controller has been designed based on the obtained exact linearization model. The better abilities of decoupling and disturbance depression of the proposed controller compared to the controllers designed based on the Taylor linearization model are verified by simulations and experiments.

  10. Design of turbofan engine controls using output feedback regulator theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    A multivariable control design procedure based on output feedback regulator (OFR) theory is applied to the F100 turbofan engine. Results for the OFR design are compared to a design based on linear quadratic regulator (LQR) theory. The OFR feedback control is designed in the full order state space and thus eliminates any need for model reduction techniques. Using the performance measure and control structure of the LQR design, an equivalent OFR feedback control is obtained. The flexibility of the OFR as a control design procedure is demonstrated, and differing feedback control structures are evaluated.

  11. Stability of linear dynamic systems over the packet erasure channel: a co-design approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhadi, Alireza

    2015-12-01

    This paper is concerned with the stability of linear time-invariant dynamic systems over the packet erasure channel subject to minimum bit rate constraint when an encoder and a decoder are unaware of the control signal. This assumption results in co-designing the encoder, decoder and controller. The encoder, decoder, controller and conditions relating transmission rate to packet erasure probability and eigenvalues of the system matrix A are presented for almost sure asymptotic stability of linear time-invariant dynamic systems over the packet erasure channel with feedback acknowledgment. When the eigenvalues of the system matrix A are real valued, it is shown that the obtained condition for stability is tight. Simulation result illustrates the satisfactory performance of the proposed encoder, decoder and controller for almost sure asymptotic stability.

  12. Fault-tolerant control for a class of non-linear systems with dead-zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mou; Jiang, Bin; Guo, William W.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a fault-tolerant control scheme is proposed for a class of single-input and single-output non-linear systems with the unknown time-varying system fault and the dead-zone. The non-linear state observer is designed for the non-linear system using differential mean value theorem, and the non-linear fault estimator that estimates the unknown time-varying system fault is developed. On the basis of the designed fault estimator, the observer-based fault-tolerant tracking control is then developed using the backstepping technique for non-linear systems with the dead-zone. The stability of the whole closed-loop system is rigorously proved via Lyapunov analysis and the satisfactory tracking control performance is guaranteed in the presence of the unknown time-varying system fault and the dead-zone. Numerical simulation results are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed backstepping fault-tolerant control scheme for non-linear systems.

  13. Digital program for solving the linear stochastic optimal control and estimation problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geyser, L. C.; Lehtinen, B.

    1975-01-01

    A computer program is described which solves the linear stochastic optimal control and estimation (LSOCE) problem by using a time-domain formulation. The LSOCE problem is defined as that of designing controls for a linear time-invariant system which is disturbed by white noise in such a way as to minimize a performance index which is quadratic in state and control variables. The LSOCE problem and solution are outlined; brief descriptions are given of the solution algorithms, and complete descriptions of each subroutine, including usage information and digital listings, are provided. A test case is included, as well as information on the IBM 7090-7094 DCS time and storage requirements.

  14. Controlling coexisting attractors of an impacting system via linear augmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Páez Chávez, Joseph

    2017-06-01

    This paper studies the control of coexisting attractors in an impacting system via a recently developed control law based on linear augmentation. Special attention is given to two control issues in the framework of multistable engineering systems, namely, the switching between coexisting attractors without altering the system's main parameters and the avoidance of grazing-induced chaotic responses. The effectiveness of the proposed control scheme is confirmed numerically for the case of a periodically excited, soft impact oscillator. Our analysis shows how path-following techniques for non-smooth systems can be used in order to determine the optimal control parameters in terms of energy expenditure due to the control signal and transient behavior of the control error, which can be applied to a broad range of engineering problems.

  15. Fluid loss control differences of crosslinked and linear fracturing fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Zigrye, J.L.; Whitfill, D.L.; Sievert, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Three fracturing fluids--a crosslinked guar, a delayed hydrating guar, and a linear guar--were tested for fluid loss control at set time intervals while being conditioned in a heated, pressurized flow loop. Each fluid was tested with 3 different fluid loss additive systems: diesel, silica flour, and a combination of diesel and silica flour. The crosslinked system was tested also with 2 additional fluid loss additive systems. These fluids were diesel plus an anionic surfactant and the combination of diesel/silica flour plus the anionic surfactant. These tests show that the fluid loss of crosslinked fracturing fluids is best controlled by using diesel in combination with a surfactant or a properly sized particulate material. The fluid loss of linear fluids is controlled best with particulate additives.

  16. Control methods to improve non-linear HVAC system operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phalak, Kaustubh Pradeep

    The change of weather conditions and occupancy schedules makes heating ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems heavily dynamic. The mass and thermal inertia, nonlinear characteristics and interactions in HVAC systems make the control more complicated. As a result, some conventional control methods often cannot provide desired control performance under variable operating conditions. The purpose of this study is to develop control methods to improve the control performance of HVAC systems. This study focuses on optimizing the airflow-pressure control method of air side economizers, identifying robust building pressurization controls, developing a control method to control outdoor air and building pressure in absence of flow and pressure sensors, stabilizing the cooling coil valve operation and, return fan speed control. The improvements can be achieved by identifying and selecting a method with relatively linear performance characteristics out of the available options, applying fans rather than dampers to control building pressure, and improving the controller's stability range using cascade control method. A steady state nonlinear network model, for an air handling unit (AHU), air distribution system and conditioned space, is applied to analyze the system control performance of air-side economizers and building pressurization. The study shows that traditional controls with completely interlinked outdoor air, recirculated air, relief air dampers have the best control performance. The decoupled relief damper control may result in negative building static pressure at lower outdoor airflow ratio and excessively positive building static pressure at higher outdoor airflow ratio. On the other hand, return fan speed control has a better controllability on building pressurization. In absence of flow and pressure sensors fixed interlinked damper and linear return fan speed tracking control can maintain constant outside air ratio and positive building pressure. The

  17. CONTROL SYSTEM ANALYSIS FOR THE PERTURBED LINEAR ACCELERATOR RF SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    SUNG-IL KWON; AMY H. REGAN

    2002-04-10

    This paper addresses the modeling problem of the linear accelerator RF system in SNS. Klystrons are modeled as linear parameter varying systems. The effect of the high voltage power supply ripple on the klystron output voltage and the output phase is modeled as an additive disturbance. The cavity is modeled as a linear system and the beam current is modeled as the exogenous disturbance. The output uncertainty of the low level RF system which results from the uncertainties in the RF components and cabling is modeled as multiplicative uncertainty. Also, the feedback loop uncertainty and digital signal processing signal conditioning subsystem uncertainties are lumped together and are modeled as multiplicative uncertainty. Finally, the time delays in the loop are modeled as a lumped time delay. For the perturbed open loop system, the closed loop system performance, and stability are analyzed with the PI feedback controller.

  18. Teaching medical device design using design control.

    PubMed

    May-Newman, Karen; Cornwall, G Bryan

    2012-01-01

    The design of medical devices requires an understanding of a large number of factors, many of which are difficult to teach in the traditional educational format. This subject benefits from using a challenge-based learning approach, which provides focused design challenges requiring students to understand important factors in the context of a specific device. A course was designed at San Diego State University (CA, USA) that applied challenge-based learning through in-depth design challenges in cardiovascular and orthopedic medicine, and provided an immersive field, needs-finding experience to increase student engagement in the process of knowledge acquisition. The principles of US FDA 'design control' were used to structure the students' problem-solving approach, and provide a format for the design documentation, which was the basis of grading. Students utilized a combination of lecture materials, industry guest expertise, texts and readings, and internet-based searches to develop their understanding of the problem and design their solutions. The course was successful in providing a greatly increased knowledge base and competence of medical device design than students possessed upon entering the course.

  19. [Optimizing algorithm design of piecewise linear classifier for spectra].

    PubMed

    Lan, Tian-Ge; Fang, Yong-Hua; Xiong, Wei; Kong, Chao; Li, Da-Cheng; Dong, Da-Ming

    2008-11-01

    Being able to identify pollutant gases quickly and accurately is a basic request of spectroscopic technique for envirment monitoring for spectral classifier. Piecewise linear classifier is simple needs less computational time and approachs nonlinear boundary beautifully. Combining piecewise linear classifier and linear support vector machine which is based on the principle of maximizing margin, an optimizing algorithm for single side piecewise linear classifier was devised. Experimental results indicate that the piecewise linear classifier trained by the optimizing algorithm proposed in this paper can approach nonolinear boundary with fewer super_planes and has higher veracity for classification and recognition.

  20. Modular design attitude control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chichester, F. D.

    1982-01-01

    A hybrid multilevel linear quadratic regulator (ML-LQR) approach was developed and applied to the attitude control of models of the rotational dynamics of a prototype flexible spacecraft and of a typical space platform. Three axis rigid body flexible suspension models were developed for both the spacecraft and the space platform utilizing augmented body methods. Models of the spacecraft with hybrid ML-LQR attitude control and with LQR attitude control were simulated and their response with the two different types of control were compared.

  1. Aircraft digital control design methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. D.; Parsons, E.; Tashker, M. G.

    1976-01-01

    Variations in design methods for aircraft digital flight control are evaluated and compared. The methods fall into two categories; those where the design is done in the continuous domain (or s plane) and those where the design is done in the discrete domain (or z plane). Design method fidelity is evaluated by examining closed loop root movement and the frequency response of the discretely controlled continuous aircraft. It was found that all methods provided acceptable performance for sample rates greater than 10 cps except the uncompensated s plane design method which was acceptable above 20 cps. A design procedure based on optimal control methods was proposed that provided the best fidelity at very slow sample rates and required no design iterations for changing sample rates.

  2. Automatic control design procedures for restructurable aircraft control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Looze, D. P.; Krolewski, S.; Weiss, J.; Barrett, N.; Eterno, J.

    1985-01-01

    A simple, reliable automatic redesign procedure for restructurable control is discussed. This procedure is based on Linear Quadratic (LQ) design methodologies. It employs a robust control system design for the unfailed aircraft to minimize the effects of failed surfaces and to extend the time available for restructuring the Flight Control System. The procedure uses the LQ design parameters for the unfailed system as a basis for choosing the design parameters of the failed system. This philosophy alloys the engineering trade-offs that were present in the nominal design to the inherited by the restructurable design. In particular, it alloys bandwidth limitations and performance trade-offs to be incorporated in the redesigned system. The procedure also has several other desirable features. It effectively redistributes authority among the available control effectors to maximize the system performance subject to actuator limitations and constraints. It provides a graceful performance degradation as the amount of control authority lessens. When given the parameters of the unfailed aircraft, the automatic redesign procedure reproduces the nominal control system design.

  3. Model-free adaptive fractional order control of stable linear time-varying systems.

    PubMed

    Yakoub, Z; Amairi, M; Chetoui, M; Saidi, B; Aoun, M

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents a new model-free adaptive fractional order control approach for linear time-varying systems. An online algorithm is proposed to determine some frequency characteristics using a selective filtering and to design a fractional PID controller based on the numerical optimization of the frequency-domain criterion. When the system parameters are time-varying, the controller is updated to keep the same desired performances. The main advantage of the proposed approach is that the controller design depends only on the measured input and output signals of the process. The effectiveness of the proposed method is assessed through a numerical example.

  4. Linear Time Invariant Models for Integrated Flight and Rotor Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olcer, Fahri Ersel

    2011-12-01

    Recent developments on individual blade control (IBC) and physics based reduced order models of various on-blade control (OBC) actuation concepts are opening up opportunities to explore innovative rotor control strategies for improved rotor aerodynamic performance, reduced vibration and BVI noise, and improved rotor stability, etc. Further, recent developments in computationally efficient algorithms for the extraction of Linear Time Invariant (LTI) models are providing a convenient framework for exploring integrated flight and rotor control, while accounting for the important couplings that exist between body and low frequency rotor response and high frequency rotor response. Formulation of linear time invariant (LTI) models of a nonlinear system about a periodic equilibrium using the harmonic domain representation of LTI model states has been studied in the literature. This thesis presents an alternative method and a computationally efficient scheme for implementation of the developed method for extraction of linear time invariant (LTI) models from a helicopter nonlinear model in forward flight. The fidelity of the extracted LTI models is evaluated using response comparisons between the extracted LTI models and the nonlinear model in both time and frequency domains. Moreover, the fidelity of stability properties is studied through the eigenvalue and eigenvector comparisons between LTI and LTP models by making use of the Floquet Transition Matrix. For time domain evaluations, individual blade control (IBC) and On-Blade Control (OBC) inputs that have been tried in the literature for vibration and noise control studies are used. For frequency domain evaluations, frequency sweep inputs are used to obtain frequency responses of fixed system hub loads to a single blade IBC input. The evaluation results demonstrate the fidelity of the extracted LTI models, and thus, establish the validity of the LTI model extraction process for use in integrated flight and rotor control

  5. Koopman Invariant Subspaces and Finite Linear Representations of Nonlinear Dynamical Systems for Control.

    PubMed

    Brunton, Steven L; Brunton, Bingni W; Proctor, Joshua L; Kutz, J Nathan

    2016-01-01

    In this wIn this work, we explore finite-dimensional linear representations of nonlinear dynamical systems by restricting the Koopman operator to an invariant subspace spanned by specially chosen observable functions. The Koopman operator is an infinite-dimensional linear operator that evolves functions of the state of a dynamical system. Dominant terms in the Koopman expansion are typically computed using dynamic mode decomposition (DMD). DMD uses linear measurements of the state variables, and it has recently been shown that this may be too restrictive for nonlinear systems. Choosing the right nonlinear observable functions to form an invariant subspace where it is possible to obtain linear reduced-order models, especially those that are useful for control, is an open challenge. Here, we investigate the choice of observable functions for Koopman analysis that enable the use of optimal linear control techniques on nonlinear problems. First, to include a cost on the state of the system, as in linear quadratic regulator (LQR) control, it is helpful to include these states in the observable subspace, as in DMD. However, we find that this is only possible when there is a single isolated fixed point, as systems with multiple fixed points or more complicated attractors are not globally topologically conjugate to a finite-dimensional linear system, and cannot be represented by a finite-dimensional linear Koopman subspace that includes the state. We then present a data-driven strategy to identify relevant observable functions for Koopman analysis by leveraging a new algorithm to determine relevant terms in a dynamical system by ℓ1-regularized regression of the data in a nonlinear function space; we also show how this algorithm is related to DMD. Finally, we demonstrate the usefulness of nonlinear observable subspaces in the design of Koopman operator optimal control laws for fully nonlinear systems using techniques from linear optimal control.ork, we explore finite

  6. Modular design attitude control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chichester, F. D.

    1984-01-01

    A sequence of single axismodels and a series of reduced state linear observers of minimum order are used to reconstruct inaccessible variables pertaining to the modular attitude control of a rigid body flexible suspension model of a flexible spacecraft. The single axis models consist of two, three, four, and five rigid bodies, each interconnected by a flexible shaft passing through the mass centers of the bodies. Modal damping is added to each model. Reduced state linear observers are developed for synthesizing the inaccessible modal state variables for each modal model.

  7. Control design and simulation of systems modeled using ADAMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohoni, Vikram N.

    1989-01-01

    A technique for control design and simulation using the ADAMS software and a control design software package is presented. For design of control systems ADAMS generates a minimum realization linear time invariant (LTI), state space representation of multi-body models. This LTI representation can be produced in formats for input to several commercial control design packages. The user can exercise various design strategies in the control design software to arrive at a suitable compensator. The resulting closed loop model can then be simulated using ADAMS. This procedure is illustrated with two examples.

  8. Design of a biochemical circuit motif for learning linear functions.

    PubMed

    Lakin, Matthew R; Minnich, Amanda; Lane, Terran; Stefanovic, Darko

    2014-12-06

    Learning and adaptive behaviour are fundamental biological processes. A key goal in the field of bioengineering is to develop biochemical circuit architectures with the ability to adapt to dynamic chemical environments. Here, we present a novel design for a biomolecular circuit capable of supervised learning of linear functions, using a model based on chemical reactions catalysed by DNAzymes. To achieve this, we propose a novel mechanism of maintaining and modifying internal state in biochemical systems, thereby advancing the state of the art in biomolecular circuit architecture. We use simulations to demonstrate that the circuit is capable of learning behaviour and assess its asymptotic learning performance, scalability and robustness to noise. Such circuits show great potential for building autonomous in vivo nanomedical devices. While such a biochemical system can tell us a great deal about the fundamentals of learning in living systems and may have broad applications in biomedicine (e.g. autonomous and adaptive drugs), it also offers some intriguing challenges and surprising behaviours from a machine learning perspective.

  9. Design of a biochemical circuit motif for learning linear functions

    PubMed Central

    Lakin, Matthew R.; Minnich, Amanda; Lane, Terran; Stefanovic, Darko

    2014-01-01

    Learning and adaptive behaviour are fundamental biological processes. A key goal in the field of bioengineering is to develop biochemical circuit architectures with the ability to adapt to dynamic chemical environments. Here, we present a novel design for a biomolecular circuit capable of supervised learning of linear functions, using a model based on chemical reactions catalysed by DNAzymes. To achieve this, we propose a novel mechanism of maintaining and modifying internal state in biochemical systems, thereby advancing the state of the art in biomolecular circuit architecture. We use simulations to demonstrate that the circuit is capable of learning behaviour and assess its asymptotic learning performance, scalability and robustness to noise. Such circuits show great potential for building autonomous in vivo nanomedical devices. While such a biochemical system can tell us a great deal about the fundamentals of learning in living systems and may have broad applications in biomedicine (e.g. autonomous and adaptive drugs), it also offers some intriguing challenges and surprising behaviours from a machine learning perspective. PMID:25401175

  10. Nonlinear robust control of proton exchange membrane fuel cell by state feedback exact linearization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Q.; Chen, W.; Wang, Y.; Jia, J.; Han, M.

    By utilizing the state feedback exact linearization approach, a nonlinear robust control strategy is designed based on a multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) dynamic nonlinear model of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The state feedback exact linearization approach can achieve the global exact linearization via the nonlinear coordinate transformation and the dynamic extension algorithm such that H ∞ robust control strategy can be directly utilized to guarantee the robustness of the system. The proposed dynamic nonlinear model is tested by comparing the simulation results with the experimental data in Fuel Cell Application Centre in Temasek Polytechnic. The comprehensive results of simulation manifest that the dynamic nonlinear model with nonlinear robust control law has better transient and robust stability when the vehicle running process is simulated. The proposed nonlinear robust controller will be very useful to protect the membrane damage by keeping the pressure deviations as small as possible during large disturbances and prolong the stack life of PEMFC.

  11. Linear and Nonlinear Schemes Applied to Pitch Control of Wind Turbines

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Geng

    2014-01-01

    Linear controllers have been employed in industrial applications for many years, but sometimes they are noneffective on the system with nonlinear characteristics. This paper discusses the structure, performance, implementation cost, advantages, and disadvantages of different linear and nonlinear schemes applied to the pitch control of the wind energy conversion systems (WECSs). The linear controller has the simplest structure and is easily understood by the engineers and thus is widely accepted by the industry. In contrast, nonlinear schemes are more complicated, but they can provide better performance. Although nonlinear algorithms can be implemented in a powerful digital processor nowadays, they need time to be accepted by the industry and their reliability needs to be verified in the commercial products. More information about the system nonlinear feature is helpful to simplify the controller design. However, nonlinear schemes independent of the system model are more robust to the uncertainties or deviations of the system parameters. PMID:25295299

  12. Linear and nonlinear schemes applied to pitch control of wind turbines.

    PubMed

    Geng, Hua; Yang, Geng

    2014-01-01

    Linear controllers have been employed in industrial applications for many years, but sometimes they are noneffective on the system with nonlinear characteristics. This paper discusses the structure, performance, implementation cost, advantages, and disadvantages of different linear and nonlinear schemes applied to the pitch control of the wind energy conversion systems (WECSs). The linear controller has the simplest structure and is easily understood by the engineers and thus is widely accepted by the industry. In contrast, nonlinear schemes are more complicated, but they can provide better performance. Although nonlinear algorithms can be implemented in a powerful digital processor nowadays, they need time to be accepted by the industry and their reliability needs to be verified in the commercial products. More information about the system nonlinear feature is helpful to simplify the controller design. However, nonlinear schemes independent of the system model are more robust to the uncertainties or deviations of the system parameters.

  13. Koopman Invariant Subspaces and Finite Linear Representations of Nonlinear Dynamical Systems for Control

    PubMed Central

    Brunton, Steven L.; Brunton, Bingni W.; Proctor, Joshua L.; Kutz, J. Nathan

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we explore finite-dimensional linear representations of nonlinear dynamical systems by restricting the Koopman operator to an invariant subspace spanned by specially chosen observable functions. The Koopman operator is an infinite-dimensional linear operator that evolves functions of the state of a dynamical system. Dominant terms in the Koopman expansion are typically computed using dynamic mode decomposition (DMD). DMD uses linear measurements of the state variables, and it has recently been shown that this may be too restrictive for nonlinear systems. Choosing the right nonlinear observable functions to form an invariant subspace where it is possible to obtain linear reduced-order models, especially those that are useful for control, is an open challenge. Here, we investigate the choice of observable functions for Koopman analysis that enable the use of optimal linear control techniques on nonlinear problems. First, to include a cost on the state of the system, as in linear quadratic regulator (LQR) control, it is helpful to include these states in the observable subspace, as in DMD. However, we find that this is only possible when there is a single isolated fixed point, as systems with multiple fixed points or more complicated attractors are not globally topologically conjugate to a finite-dimensional linear system, and cannot be represented by a finite-dimensional linear Koopman subspace that includes the state. We then present a data-driven strategy to identify relevant observable functions for Koopman analysis by leveraging a new algorithm to determine relevant terms in a dynamical system by ℓ1-regularized regression of the data in a nonlinear function space; we also show how this algorithm is related to DMD. Finally, we demonstrate the usefulness of nonlinear observable subspaces in the design of Koopman operator optimal control laws for fully nonlinear systems using techniques from linear optimal control. PMID:26919740

  14. Integrated controls design optimization

    DOEpatents

    Lou, Xinsheng; Neuschaefer, Carl H.

    2015-09-01

    A control system (207) for optimizing a chemical looping process of a power plant includes an optimizer (420), an income algorithm (230) and a cost algorithm (225) and a chemical looping process models. The process models are used to predict the process outputs from process input variables. Some of the process in puts and output variables are related to the income of the plant; and some others are related to the cost of the plant operations. The income algorithm (230) provides an income input to the optimizer (420) based on a plurality of input parameters (215) of the power plant. The cost algorithm (225) provides a cost input to the optimizer (420) based on a plurality of output parameters (220) of the power plant. The optimizer (420) determines an optimized operating parameter solution based on at least one of the income input and the cost input, and supplies the optimized operating parameter solution to the power plant.

  15. Modeling and comparative study of linear and nonlinear controllers for rotary inverted pendulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Byron; Cajo, Ricardo; Huilcapi, Víctor; Agila, Wilton

    2017-01-01

    The rotary inverted pendulum (RIP) is a problem difficult to control, several studies have been conducted where different control techniques have been applied. Literature reports that, although problem is nonlinear, classical PID controllers presents appropriate performances when applied to the system. In this paper, a comparative study of the performances of linear and nonlinear PID structures is carried out. The control algorithms are evaluated in the RIP system, using indices of performance and power consumption, which allow the categorization of control strategies according to their performance. This article also presents the modeling system, which has been estimated some of the parameters involved in the RIP system, using computer-aided design tools (CAD) and experimental methods or techniques proposed by several authors attended. The results indicate a better performance of the nonlinear controller with an increase in the robustness and faster response than the linear controller.

  16. AESOP: An interactive computer program for the design of linear quadratic regulators and Kalman filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehtinen, B.; Geyser, L. C.

    1984-01-01

    AESOP is a computer program for use in designing feedback controls and state estimators for linear multivariable systems. AESOP is meant to be used in an interactive manner. Each design task that the program performs is assigned a "function" number. The user accesses these functions either (1) by inputting a list of desired function numbers or (2) by inputting a single function number. In the latter case the choice of the function will in general depend on the results obtained by the previously executed function. The most important of the AESOP functions are those that design,linear quadratic regulators and Kalman filters. The user interacts with the program when using these design functions by inputting design weighting parameters and by viewing graphic displays of designed system responses. Supporting functions are provided that obtain system transient and frequency responses, transfer functions, and covariance matrices. The program can also compute open-loop system information such as stability (eigenvalues), eigenvectors, controllability, and observability. The program is written in ANSI-66 FORTRAN for use on an IBM 3033 using TSS 370. Descriptions of all subroutines and results of two test cases are included in the appendixes.

  17. Lyapunov-based control designs for flexible-link manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Huang, Jen-Kuang; Yang, Li-Farn

    1989-01-01

    A feedback controller for the stabilization of closed-loop systems is proposed which is based on the Liapunov stability criterion. A feedback control law is first generated for the linear portion of the system equation using linear control theory. A feedback control is then designed for the nonlinear portion of the system equation by making negative the time derivative of a positive definite Liapunov function.

  18. Lyapunov-based control designs for flexible-link manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Huang, Jen-Kuang; Yang, Li-Farn

    1989-01-01

    A feedback controller for the stabilization of closed-loop systems is proposed which is based on the Liapunov stability criterion. A feedback control law is first generated for the linear portion of the system equation using linear control theory. A feedback control is then designed for the nonlinear portion of the system equation by making negative the time derivative of a positive definite Liapunov function.

  19. Receiver-exciter controller design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansma, P. A.

    1982-01-01

    A description of the general design of both the block 3 and block 4 receiver-exciter controllers for the Deep Space Network (DSN) Mark IV-A System is presented along with the design approach. The controllers are designed to enable the receiver-exciter subsystem (RCV) to be configured, calibrated, initialized and operated from a central location via high level instructions. The RECs are designed to be operated under the control of the DMC subsystem. The instructions are in the form of standard subsystem blocks (SSBs) received via the local area network (LAN). The centralized control provided by RECs and other DSCC controllers in Mark IV-A is intended to reduce DSN operations costs from the Mark III era.

  20. Time optimal controls of the linear Fitzhugh–Nagumo equation with pointwise control constraints

    PubMed Central

    Kunisch, Karl; Wang, Lijuan

    2012-01-01

    Time optimal control governed by the internally controlled linear Fitzhugh–Nagumo equation with pointwise control constraint is considered. Making use of Ekeland’s variational principle, we obtain Pontryagin’s maximum principle for a time optimal control problem. Using the maximum principle, the bang–bang property of the optimal controls is established under appropriate assumptions. PMID:23576818

  1. Time optimal controls of the linear Fitzhugh-Nagumo equation with pointwise control constraints.

    PubMed

    Kunisch, Karl; Wang, Lijuan

    2012-11-01

    Time optimal control governed by the internally controlled linear Fitzhugh-Nagumo equation with pointwise control constraint is considered. Making use of Ekeland's variational principle, we obtain Pontryagin's maximum principle for a time optimal control problem. Using the maximum principle, the bang-bang property of the optimal controls is established under appropriate assumptions.

  2. Simultaneous structural and control optimization via linear quadratic regulator eigenstructure assignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becus, G. A.; Lui, C. Y.; Venkayya, V. B.; Tischler, V. A.

    1987-01-01

    A method for simultaneous structural and control design of large flexible space structures (LFSS) to reduce vibration generated by disturbances is presented. Desired natural frequencies and damping ratios for the closed loop system are achieved by using a combination of linear quadratic regulator (LQR) synthesis and numerical optimization techniques. The state and control weighing matrices (Q and R) are expressed in terms of structural parameters such as mass and stiffness. The design parameters are selected by numerical optimization so as to minimize the weight of the structure and to achieve the desired closed-loop eigenvalues. An illustrative example of the design of a two bar truss is presented.

  3. Modulation linearization of a frequency-modulated voltage controlled oscillator, part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honnell, M. A.

    1975-01-01

    An analysis is presented for the voltage versus frequency characteristics of a varactor modulated VHF voltage controlled oscillator in which the frequency deviation is linearized by using the nonlinear characteristics of a field effect transistor as a signal amplifier. The equations developed are used to calculate the oscillator output frequency in terms of pertinent circuit parameters. It is shown that the nonlinearity exponent of the FET has a pronounced influence on frequency deviation linearity, whereas the junction exponent of the varactor controls total frequency deviation for a given input signal. A design example for a 250 MHz frequency modulated oscillator is presented.

  4. Global output feedback stabilisation of nonlinear systems with a unifying linear controller structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu; Lin, Yan

    2014-02-01

    We investigate the problem of global stabilisation by linear output feedback for a class of uncertain nonlinear systems with zero-dynamics. Compared with the previous works, new dilation-based assumptions are introduced that allow the system nonlinearities and its bounding functions to be coupled with all the states. The nonlinear systems of this paper can be considered as an extended form of some low triangular and feedforward systems. Dynamic gain scaling technique is applied to the controller design and stability analysis. It is proved that with a unifying linear controller structure and flexible adaptive laws for the observer gain, global stabilisation of the nonlinear systems can be achieved.

  5. Sequential Design Of Rotation Control Of Flexible Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gawronski, Wodek

    1994-01-01

    Improved procedure devised for designing and adjusting linear quadratic control system for somewhat flexible rotating structure like large radio antenna, large telescope, or robot arm. Basic purpose is making structure track desired rotation (for example, to rotate at specified rate to track celestial object or to slew to new observing direction) and suppressing vibrations, excited by wind or other external phenomena or by changes in angle and angular-velocity commands. Linear quadratic controllers for rotation tracking and suppressing vibrations designed separately.

  6. Linear Parameter Varying Control Synthesis for Actuator Failure, Based on Estimated Parameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Jong-Yeob; Wu, N. Eva; Belcastro, Christine

    2002-01-01

    The design of a linear parameter varying (LPV) controller for an aircraft at actuator failure cases is presented. The controller synthesis for actuator failure cases is formulated into linear matrix inequality (LMI) optimizations based on an estimated failure parameter with pre-defined estimation error bounds. The inherent conservatism of an LPV control synthesis methodology is reduced using a scaling factor on the uncertainty block which represents estimated parameter uncertainties. The fault parameter is estimated using the two-stage Kalman filter. The simulation results of the designed LPV controller for a HiMXT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) vehicle with the on-line estimator show that the desired performance and robustness objectives are achieved for actuator failure cases.

  7. Fuzzy attitude control of solar sail via linear matrix inequalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baculi, Joshua; Ayoubi, Mohammad A.

    2017-09-01

    This study presents a fuzzy tracking controller based on the Takagi-Sugeno (T-S) fuzzy model of the solar sail. First, the T-S fuzzy model is constructed by linearizing the existing nonlinear equations of motion of the solar sail. Then, the T-S fuzzy model is used to derive the state feedback controller gains for the Twin Parallel Distributed Compensation (TPDC) technique. The TPDC tracks and stabilizes the attitude of the solar sail to any desired state in the presence of parameter uncertainties and external disturbances while satisfying actuator constraints. The performance of the TPDC is compared to a PID controller that is tuned using the Ziegler-Nichols method. Numerical simulation shows the TPDC outperforms the PID controller when stabilizing the solar sail to a desired state.

  8. Linear Quadratic Tracking Design for a Generic Transport Aircraft with Structural Load Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burken, John J.; Frost, Susan A.; Taylor, Brian R.

    2011-01-01

    When designing control laws for systems with constraints added to the tracking performance, control allocation methods can be utilized. Control allocations methods are used when there are more command inputs than controlled variables. Constraints that require allocators are such task as; surface saturation limits, structural load limits, drag reduction constraints or actuator failures. Most transport aircraft have many actuated surfaces compared to the three controlled variables (such as angle of attack, roll rate & angle of side slip). To distribute the control effort among the redundant set of actuators a fixed mixer approach can be utilized or online control allocation techniques. The benefit of an online allocator is that constraints can be considered in the design whereas the fixed mixer cannot. However, an online control allocator mixer has a disadvantage of not guaranteeing a surface schedule, which can then produce ill defined loads on the aircraft. The load uncertainty and complexity has prevented some controller designs from using advanced allocation techniques. This paper considers actuator redundancy management for a class of over actuated systems with real-time structural load limits using linear quadratic tracking applied to the generic transport model. A roll maneuver example of an artificial load limit constraint is shown and compared to the same no load limitation maneuver.

  9. Robust multivariable controller design for flexible spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Suresh M.; Armstrong, Ernest S.

    1986-01-01

    Large, flexible spacecraft are typically characterized by a large number of significant elastic modes with very small inherent damping, low, closely spaced natural frequencies, and the lack of accurate knowledge of the structural parameters. Summarized here is some recent research on the design of robust controllers for such spacecraft, which will maintain stability, and possible performance, despite these problems. Two types of controllers are considered, the first being the linear-quadratic-Gaussian-(LQG)-type. The second type utilizes output feedback using collocated sensors and actuators. The problem of designing robust LQG-type controllers using the frequency domain loop transfer recovery (LTR) method is considered, and the method is applied to a large antenna model. Analytical results regarding the regions of stability for LQG-type controllers in the presence of actuator nonlinearities are also presented. The results obtained for the large antenna indicate that the LQG/LTR method is a promising approach for control system design for flexible spacecraft. For the second type of controllers (collocated controllers), it is proved that the stability is maintained in the presence of certain commonly encountered nonlinearities and first-order actuator dynamics. These results indicate that collocated controllers are good candidates for robust control in situations where model errors are large.

  10. ORACLS- OPTIMAL REGULATOR ALGORITHMS FOR THE CONTROL OF LINEAR SYSTEMS (CDC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, E. S.

    1994-01-01

    This control theory design package, called Optimal Regulator Algorithms for the Control of Linear Systems (ORACLS), was developed to aid in the design of controllers and optimal filters for systems which can be modeled by linear, time-invariant differential and difference equations. Optimal linear quadratic regulator theory, currently referred to as the Linear-Quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) problem, has become the most widely accepted method of determining optimal control policy. Within this theory, the infinite duration time-invariant problems, which lead to constant gain feedback control laws and constant Kalman-Bucy filter gains for reconstruction of the system state, exhibit high tractability and potential ease of implementation. A variety of new and efficient methods in the field of numerical linear algebra have been combined into the ORACLS program, which provides for the solution to time-invariant continuous or discrete LQG problems. The ORACLS package is particularly attractive to the control system designer because it provides a rigorous tool for dealing with multi-input and multi-output dynamic systems in both continuous and discrete form. The ORACLS programming system is a collection of subroutines which can be used to formulate, manipulate, and solve various LQG design problems. The ORACLS program is constructed in a manner which permits the user to maintain considerable flexibility at each operational state. This flexibility is accomplished by providing primary operations, analysis of linear time-invariant systems, and control synthesis based on LQG methodology. The input-output routines handle the reading and writing of numerical matrices, printing heading information, and accumulating output information. The basic vector-matrix operations include addition, subtraction, multiplication, equation, norm construction, tracing, transposition, scaling, juxtaposition, and construction of null and identity matrices. The analysis routines provide for the following

  11. ORACLS- OPTIMAL REGULATOR ALGORITHMS FOR THE CONTROL OF LINEAR SYSTEMS (DEC VAX VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, H.

    1994-01-01

    This control theory design package, called Optimal Regulator Algorithms for the Control of Linear Systems (ORACLS), was developed to aid in the design of controllers and optimal filters for systems which can be modeled by linear, time-invariant differential and difference equations. Optimal linear quadratic regulator theory, currently referred to as the Linear-Quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) problem, has become the most widely accepted method of determining optimal control policy. Within this theory, the infinite duration time-invariant problems, which lead to constant gain feedback control laws and constant Kalman-Bucy filter gains for reconstruction of the system state, exhibit high tractability and potential ease of implementation. A variety of new and efficient methods in the field of numerical linear algebra have been combined into the ORACLS program, which provides for the solution to time-invariant continuous or discrete LQG problems. The ORACLS package is particularly attractive to the control system designer because it provides a rigorous tool for dealing with multi-input and multi-output dynamic systems in both continuous and discrete form. The ORACLS programming system is a collection of subroutines which can be used to formulate, manipulate, and solve various LQG design problems. The ORACLS program is constructed in a manner which permits the user to maintain considerable flexibility at each operational state. This flexibility is accomplished by providing primary operations, analysis of linear time-invariant systems, and control synthesis based on LQG methodology. The input-output routines handle the reading and writing of numerical matrices, printing heading information, and accumulating output information. The basic vector-matrix operations include addition, subtraction, multiplication, equation, norm construction, tracing, transposition, scaling, juxtaposition, and construction of null and identity matrices. The analysis routines provide for the following

  12. Radiological controls integrated into design

    SciTech Connect

    Kindred, G.W.

    1995-03-01

    Radiological controls are required by law in the design of commercial nuclear power reactor facilities. These controls can be relatively minor or significant, relative to cost. To ensure that radiological controls are designed into a project, the health physicist (radiological engineer) must be involved from the beginning. This is especially true regarding keeping costs down. For every radiological engineer at a nuclear power plant there must be fifty engineers of other disciplines. The radiological engineer cannot be an expert on every discipline of engineering. However, he must be knowledgeable to the degree of how a design will impact the facility from a radiological perspective. This paper will address how to effectively perform radiological analyses with the goal of radiological controls integrated into the design package.

  13. CONDUIT: Control Designer's Unified Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, William S.; Tischler, Mark B.

    1999-01-01

    CONDUIT, which stands for control designer's unified interface, is a computer software package. Its purpose is to assist a human control system designer in designing control systems for aircraft. At the present time CONDUIT is being used by most of the major U. S. rotorcraft and fixed-wing aircraft manufacturers to assist in the design of stability and control augmentation systems. Work is also continuing on the development of additional features for CONDUIT, including tools for analyzing the sensitivity of solutions, and on further enhancements to the basic package. The purpose of this paper is to describe CONDUIT, its operation, and the sensitivity tools that are being developed for inclusion in the next release of the package.

  14. Large motion tracking control for thrust magnetic bearings with fuzzy logic, sliding mode, and direct linearization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minihan, T. P.; Lei, S.; Sun, G.; Palazzolo, A.; Kascak, A. F.; Calvert, T.

    2003-06-01

    Conventional use of magnetic bearings relies on a zero reference to keep the rotor centered in the radial and axial axes. This paper compares different control methods developed for the alternate control task of tracking an axial dynamic target. Controllers based on fuzzy logic, sliding mode, and direct linearization were designed to meet this task. Performance criteria, such as maximum axial displacement, minimum phase lag and I2R power losses were compared for each controller. The large motion, tracking problem for a rotor has utility in applications where dynamic seal clearances are required. This has a variety of potential applications in turbo-machinery, such as active stall control.

  15. Linearized aerodynamic and control law models of the X-29A airplane and comparison with flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosworth, John T.

    1992-01-01

    Flight control system design and analysis for aircraft rely on mathematical models of the vehicle dynamics. In addition to a six degree of freedom nonlinear simulation, the X-29A flight controls group developed a set of programs that calculate linear perturbation models throughout the X-29A flight envelope. The models include the aerodynamics as well as flight control system dynamics and were used for stability, controllability, and handling qualities analysis. These linear models were compared to flight test results to help provide a safe flight envelope expansion. A description is given of the linear models at three flight conditions and two flight control system modes. The models are presented with a level of detail that would allow the reader to reproduce the linear results if desired. Comparison between the response of the linear model and flight measured responses are presented to demonstrate the strengths and weaknesses of the linear models' ability to predict flight dynamics.

  16. A Non-Linear Approach to Spacecraft Trajectory Control in the Vicinity of a Libration Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luquette, Richard J.; Sanner, Robert M.

    2001-01-01

    An expanding interest in mission design strategies that exploit libration point regions demands the continued development of enhanced, efficient, control algorithms for station-keeping and formation maintenance. This paper discusses the development of a non-linear, station-keeping, control algorithm for trajectories in the vicinity of a libration point. The control law guarantees exponential convergence, based on a Lyaponov analysis. Controller performance is evaluated using FreeFlyer(R) and MATLAB(R) for a spacecraft stationed near the L2 libration point in the Earth-Moon system, tracking a pre-defined reference trajectory. Evaluation metrics are fuel usage and tracking accuracy. Simulation results are compared with a linear-based controller for a spacecraft tracking the same reference trajectory. Although the analysis is framed in the context of station-keeping, the control algorithm is equally applicable to a formation flying problem with an appropriate definition of the reference trajectory.

  17. Hybrid Invariance and Stability of a Feedback Linearizing Controller for Powered Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Anne E.; Gregg, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    The development of powered lower-limb prostheses has the potential to significantly improve amputees’ quality of life. By applying advanced control schemes, such as hybrid zero dynamics (HZD), to prostheses, more intelligent prostheses could be designed. Originally developed to control bipedal robots, HZD-based control specifies the motion of the actuated degrees of freedom using output functions to be zeroed, and the required torques are calculated using feedback linearization. Previous work showed that an HZD-like prosthesis controller can successfully control the stance period of gait. This paper shows that an HZD-based prosthesis controller can be used for the entire gait cycle and that feedback linearization can be performed using only information measured with on-board sensors. An analytic metric for orbital stability of a two-step periodic gait is developed. The results are illustrated in simulation. PMID:26604427

  18. Robust and reconfigurable flight control system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siwakosit, Wichai

    2001-07-01

    A reconfigurable flight control system is a control system which can automatically adapt itself to maintain the performance of a damaged aircraft to be as close as possible to that of the normal or undamaged one. This research focuses mainly on Multi-Input, Multi-Output (MIMO) reconfigurable flight control for an aircraft with damaged actuator(s) which may greatly affect the performance and control of the aircraft, and also pose a challenging flight control problem. The foundation of the control system is a baseline controller and an adaptive module which constitutes a reconfigurable part. The baseline controller ensures that the aircraft has acceptable performance and handling qualities throughout the flight envelope. The combination of a Quantitative Feedback Theory (QFT) Pre-Design Technique (PDT) and a Reduced-order, Linear, Dynamic Inversion (RLDI) control strategy yields a flight control system with good tracking performance and handling qualities with no Pilot Induced Oscillation (PIO) tendencies throughout the designated set of flight conditions. In addition, the system is highly immune to large uncertainties in the aircraft dynamics. The modified filtered-ɛ adaptive algorithm is developed and utilized in the adaptive module of the system. This adaptive algorithm performs well with MIMO system with the added advantage of not having to pre-identify the dynamics of the damaged aircraft, provided that the conditions of reconfigurability are met. An example of the proposed control system with the NASA F-18 HARV vehicle model and a damaged actuator demonstrates the effectiveness of the concept.

  19. Gain scheduling of aircraft pitch attitude and control of discrete, affine, linear parametrically varying systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhe

    This research is motivated by gain scheduling, a technique which has been successfully applied to many nonlinear control problems. In flight controls, the wide variations in the characteristics of the aircraft dynamics throughout the flight envelope make gain scheduling a particularly suitable design strategy. This research consists of two parts: (1) aircraft pitch attitude scheduling scheme designs, and (2) control of a class of linear parametrically varying (LPV) systems. In the first part, the classical gain scheduling technique and the single quadratic Lyapunov function (SQLF) based LPV technique are investigated. In the classical gain scheduling design, the Hinfinity mixed sensitivity GS/T method is chosen for local linear time invariant (LTI) designs to provide robustness to unmodeled dynamics and parametric uncertainties. Following a model reduction procedure that exploits the optimal controller structure, LTI controllers designed at the selected equilibrium points are reduced to second order controllers and realized in a feedback path configuration. Such controllers are shown to retain the superior robust performance at each flight condition, while having a low order that is amenable to scheduling. A gain-scheduling law is developed and simulation results verify that the closed-loop performance specifications are met. In the LPV design, the mixed sensitivity S/KS/T design setup is used. An approximation to the original LPV controller using the linear fractional transformation (LFT) representation is constructed. Our design exhibits potential applications of the LPV technique to commercial aircraft gain scheduling designs. In the second part, we consider a class of discrete, affine, linear parametrically varying (DALPV) systems. For this type of systems, the parameters are assumed to vary in a polytope and the state space matrices are assumed to depend affinely on the varying parameters. A sufficient condition is derived to analyze the stability and the

  20. Approximate Controllability for Linear Stochastic Differential Equations in Infinite Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Goreac, D.

    2009-08-15

    The objective of the paper is to investigate the approximate controllability property of a linear stochastic control system with values in a separable real Hilbert space. In a first step we prove the existence and uniqueness for the solution of the dual linear backward stochastic differential equation. This equation has the particularity that in addition to an unbounded operator acting on the Y-component of the solution there is still another one acting on the Z-component. With the help of this dual equation we then deduce the duality between approximate controllability and observability. Finally, under the assumption that the unbounded operator acting on the state process of the forward equation is an infinitesimal generator of an exponentially stable semigroup, we show that the generalized Hautus test provides a necessary condition for the approximate controllability. The paper generalizes former results by Buckdahn, Quincampoix and Tessitore (Stochastic Partial Differential Equations and Applications, Series of Lecture Notes in Pure and Appl. Math., vol. 245, pp. 253-260, Chapman and Hall, London, 2006) and Goreac (Applied Analysis and Differential Equations, pp. 153-164, World Scientific, Singapore, 2007) from the finite dimensional to the infinite dimensional case.

  1. Bimanual coordination as task-dependent linear control policies.

    PubMed

    Diedrichsen, Jörn; Dowling, Noreen

    2009-06-01

    When we perform actions with two hands in everyday life, coordination has to change very quickly depending on task goals. Here, we study these task-dependent changes using a bimanual reaching task in which participants move two separate cursors to two visual targets, or move a single cursor, displayed at the average position of the two hands, to a single target. During the movement, one of the hands is perturbed in a random direction using a viscous curl field. We have previously shown that feedback control, the structure of noise, and adaptation change between these two tasks as predicted by optimal control theory: feedback control is independent when the hands control two cursors, but becomes dependent when they move one cursor together. The same changes are observed even on trials in which no visual feedback about the cursor position is given. One assumption in this model is that coordinative motor commands can be described as a linear function of the state of the left and right hands. Here we test the assumption by studying the feedback corrections for 25 combinations of force fields applied to the two hands. Our study shows that feedback gains are constant across all levels of force fields strength, providing strong evidence that intermanual coordination for this task can accurately be explained by optimal task-dependent linear feedback gains.

  2. Spacecraft Design Thermal Control Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyake, Robert N.

    2003-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the functions of the thermal control subsystem engineers in the design of spacecraft. The goal of the thermal control subsystem that will be used in a spacecraft is to maintain the temperature of all spacecraft components, subsystems, and all the flight systems within specified limits for all flight modes from launch to the end of the mission. For most thermal control subsystems the mass, power and control and sensing systems must be kept below 10% of the total flight system resources. This means that the thermal control engineer is involved in all other flight systems designs. The two concepts of thermal control, passive and active are reviewed and the use of thermal modeling tools are explained. The testing of the thermal control is also reviewed.

  3. Control And Containment Design Report

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    his work plan (571-pages) is called the “SWMU-3-1 and 3-4 Control and Containment Design Report” was written to be in compliance with new FEMA requirements that the design must not create any positive change in the 100 year flood elevation.

  4. Output feedback control of linear fractional transformation systems subject to actuator saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Xiaojun; Wu, Fen

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, the control problem for a class of linear parameter varying (LPV) plant subject to actuator saturation is investigated. For the saturated LPV plant depending on the scheduling parameters in linear fractional transformation (LFT) fashion, a gain-scheduled output feedback controller in the LFT form is designed to guarantee the stability of the closed-loop LPV system and provide optimised disturbance/error attenuation performance. By using the congruent transformation, the synthesis condition is formulated as a convex optimisation problem in terms of a finite number of LMIs for which efficient optimisation techniques are available. The nonlinear inverted pendulum problem is employed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach. Moreover, the comparison between our LPV saturated approach with an existing linear saturated method reveals the advantage of the LPV controller when handling nonlinear plants.

  5. A method for linearizing a nonlinear system with six state variables and three control variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsia, W. S.

    1986-01-01

    A nonlinear system governed by x = f(x,u) with six state variables and three control variables is considered in this project. A set of transformations from (x,u) - space to (z,v) - space is defined such that the linear tangent model is independent of the operating point in the z-space. Therefore, it is possible to design a control law satisfying all operating points in the transformed space. An algorithm to construct the above transformations and to obtain the associated linearized system is described in this report. This method is applied to a rigid body using pole placement for the control law. Results are verified by numerical simulation. Closed loop poles in x-space using traditional local linearization are compared with those pole placements in the z-space.

  6. The design of digital-adaptive controllers for VTOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengel, R. F.; Broussard, J. R.; Berry, P. W.

    1976-01-01

    Design procedures for VTOL automatic control systems have been developed and are presented. Using linear-optimal estimation and control techniques as a starting point, digital-adaptive control laws have been designed for the VALT Research Aircraft, a tandem-rotor helicopter which is equipped for fully automatic flight in terminal area operations. These control laws are designed to interface with velocity-command and attitude-command guidance logic, which could be used in short-haul VTOL operations. Developments reported here include new algorithms for designing non-zero-set-point digital regulators, design procedures for rate-limited systems, and algorithms for dynamic control trim setting.

  7. Application of Design Methodologies for Feedback Compensation Associated with Linear Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Monty J.

    1996-01-01

    The work that follows is concerned with the application of design methodologies for feedback compensation associated with linear systems. In general, the intent is to provide a well behaved closed loop system in terms of stability and robustness (internal signals remain bounded with a certain amount of uncertainty) and simultaneously achieve an acceptable level of performance. The approach here has been to convert the closed loop system and control synthesis problem into the interpolation setting. The interpolation formulation then serves as our mathematical representation of the design process. Lifting techniques have been used to solve the corresponding interpolation and control synthesis problems. Several applications using this multiobjective design methodology have been included to show the effectiveness of these techniques. In particular, the mixed H 2-H performance criteria with algorithm has been used on several examples including an F-18 HARV (High Angle of Attack Research Vehicle) for sensitivity performance.

  8. Multivariable control of the Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System using linearization by state feedback. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gettman, Chang-Ching LO

    1993-01-01

    This thesis develops and demonstrates an approach to nonlinear control system design using linearization by state feedback. The design provides improved transient response behavior allowing faster maneuvering of payloads by the SRMS. Modeling uncertainty is accounted for by using a second feedback loop designed around the feedback linearized dynamics. A classical feedback loop is developed to provide the easy implementation required for the relatively small on board computers. Feedback linearization also allows the use of higher bandwidth model based compensation in the outer loop, since it helps maintain stability in the presence of the nonlinearities typically neglected in model based designs.

  9. International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (Volumes 1 through 4)

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison M.

    2013-03-27

    The design report consists of four volumes: Volume 1, Executive Summary; Volume 2, Physics; Volume 3, Accelerator (Part I, R and D in the Technical Design Phase, and Part II, Baseline Design); and Volume 4, Detectors.

  10. Feedback Control Systems Loop Shaping Design with Practical Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopsakis, George

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes loop shaping control design in feedback control systems, primarily from a practical stand point that considers design specifications. Classical feedback control design theory, for linear systems where the plant transfer function is known, has been around for a long time. But it s still a challenge of how to translate the theory into practical and methodical design techniques that simultaneously satisfy a variety of performance requirements such as transient response, stability, and disturbance attenuation while taking into account the capabilities of the plant and its actuation system. This paper briefly addresses some relevant theory, first in layman s terms, so that it becomes easily understood and then it embarks into a practical and systematic design approach incorporating loop shaping design coupled with lead-lag control compensation design. The emphasis is in generating simple but rather powerful design techniques that will allow even designers with a layman s knowledge in controls to develop effective feedback control designs.

  11. Linear quadratic Gaussian and feedforward controllers for the DSS-13 antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gawronski, W. K.; Racho, C. S.; Mellstrom, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    The controller development and the tracking performance evaluation for the DSS-13 antenna are presented. A trajectory preprocessor, linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) controller, feedforward controller, and their combination were designed, built, analyzed, and tested. The antenna exhibits nonlinear behavior when the input to the antenna and/or the derivative of this input exceeds the imposed limits; for slewing and acquisition commands, these limits are typically violated. A trajectory preprocessor was designed to ensure that the antenna behaves linearly, just to prevent nonlinear limit cycling. The estimator model for the LQG controller was identified from the data obtained from the field test. Based on an LQG balanced representation, a reduced-order LQG controller was obtained. The feedforward controller and the combination of the LQG and feedforward controller were also investigated. The performance of the controllers was evaluated with the tracking errors (due to following a trajectory) and the disturbance errors (due to the disturbances acting on the antenna). The LQG controller has good disturbance rejection properties and satisfactory tracking errors. The feedforward controller has small tracking errors but poor disturbance rejection properties. The combined LQG and feedforward controller exhibits small tracking errors as well as good disturbance rejection properties. However, the cost for this performance is the complexity of the controller.

  12. Linear quadratic optimal controller for cable-driven parallel robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdolshah, Saeed; Shojaei Barjuei, Erfan

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, various cable-driven parallel robots have been investigated for their advantages, such as low structural weight, high acceleration, and large work-space, over serial and conventional parallel systems. However, the use of cables lowers the stiffness of these robots, which in turn may decrease motion accuracy. A linear quadratic (LQ) optimal controller can provide all the states of a system for the feedback, such as position and velocity. Thus, the application of such an optimal controller in cable-driven parallel robots can result in more efficient and accurate motion compared to the performance of classical controllers such as the proportional- integral-derivative controller. This paper presents an approach to apply the LQ optimal controller on cable-driven parallel robots. To employ the optimal control theory, the static and dynamic modeling of a 3-DOF planar cable-driven parallel robot (Feriba-3) is developed. The synthesis of the LQ optimal control is described, and the significant experimental results are presented and discussed.

  13. Fluid loss control differences of crosslinked and linear fracturing fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Zigrye, J.L.; Sievert, J.A.; Whitfill, D.L.

    1983-10-01

    Three fracturing fluids-a cross-linked guar, a delayed hydrating guar and a linear guar-were tested for fluid loss control at set time intervals while being conditioned in a heated, pressurized flow loop. Each fluid was tested with three different fluid loss additive systems: diesel, silica flour, and a combination of diesel and silica flour. The cross-linked system was also tested with two additional fluid loss additive systems. They were diesel plus an anionic surfactant and the combination of diesel/silica flour plus the anionic surfactant. These tests show that the fluid loss of cross-linked fracturing fluids is best controlled by using diesel in combination with a surfactant or a properly sized particulate material. The fluid loss of linear fluids is controlled best with particulate additives. Therefore, it is important to take into account the type of fracturing fluid that is being used for a particular job when planning which fluid loss additives to use.

  14. Networked Robust Predictive Control Systems Design with Packet Loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Quang T.; Veselý, Vojtech; Kozáková, Alena; Pakshin, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    The paper addresses problem of designing a robust output feedback model predictive control for uncertain linear systems over networks with packet-loss. The packet-loss process is arbitrary and bounded by the control horizon of model predictive control. Networked predictive control systems with packet loss are modeled as switched linear systems. This enables us to apply the theory of switched systems to establish the stability condition. The stabilizing controller design is based on sufficient robust stability conditions formulated as a solution of bilinear matrix inequality. Finally, a benchmark numerical example-double integrator is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  15. Adaptive Predictor-Based Output Feedback Control for a Class of Unknown MIMO Linear Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Chuong Hoang; Leonessa, Alexander

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, the problem of characterizing adaptive output feedback control laws for a general class of unknown MIMO linear systems is considered. Specifically, the presented control approach relies on three components, i.e., a predictor, a reference model and a controller. The predictor is designed to predict the system's output with arbitrary accuracy, for any admissible control input. Subsequently, a full state feedback control law is designed to control the predictor output to approach the reference system, while the reference system tracks the desired trajectory. Ultimately, the control objective of driving the actual system output to track the desired trajectories is achieved by showing that the system output, the predictor output and the reference system trajectories all converge to each other.

  16. Adaptive Predictor-Based Output Feedback Control for a Class of Unknown MIMO Linear Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Chuong Hoang; Leonessa, Alexander

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, the problem of characterizing adaptive output feedback control laws for a general class of unknown MIMO linear systems is considered. Specifically, the presented control approach relies on three components, i.e., a predictor, a reference model and a controller. The predictor is designed to predict the system's output with arbitrary accuracy, for any admissible control input. Subsequently, a full state feedback control law is designed to control the predictor output to approach the reference system, while the reference system tracks the desired trajectory. Ultimately, the control objective of driving the actual system output to track the desired trajectories is achieved by showing that the system output, the predictor output and the reference system trajectories all converge to each other.

  17. Steering of Frequency Standards by the Use of Linear Quadratic Gaussian Control Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koppang, Paul; Leland, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Linear quadratic Gaussian control is a technique that uses Kalman filtering to estimate a state vector used for input into a control calculation. A control correction is calculated by minimizing a quadratic cost function that is dependent on both the state vector and the control amount. Different penalties, chosen by the designer, are assessed by the controller as the state vector and control amount vary from given optimal values. With this feature controllers can be designed to force the phase and frequency differences between two standards to zero either more or less aggressively depending on the application. Data will be used to show how using different parameters in the cost function analysis affects the steering and the stability of the frequency standards.

  18. Modelling human balance using switched systems with linear feedback control

    PubMed Central

    Kowalczyk, Piotr; Glendinning, Paul; Brown, Martin; Medrano-Cerda, Gustavo; Dallali, Houman; Shapiro, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    We are interested in understanding the mechanisms behind and the character of the sway motion of healthy human subjects during quiet standing. We assume that a human body can be modelled as a single-link inverted pendulum, and the balance is achieved using linear feedback control. Using these assumptions, we derive a switched model which we then investigate. Stable periodic motions (limit cycles) about an upright position are found. The existence of these limit cycles is studied as a function of system parameters. The exploration of the parameter space leads to the detection of multi-stability and homoclinic bifurcations. PMID:21697168

  19. Linear optimal control of continuous time chaotic systems.

    PubMed

    Merat, Kaveh; Abbaszadeh Chekan, Jafar; Salarieh, Hassan; Alasty, Aria

    2014-07-01

    In this research study, chaos control of continuous time systems has been performed by using dynamic programming technique. In the first step by crossing the response orbits with a selected Poincare section and subsequently applying linear regression method, the continuous time system is converted to a discrete type. Then, by solving the Riccati equation a sub-optimal algorithm has been devised for the obtained discrete chaotic systems. In the next step, by implementing the acquired algorithm on the quantized continuous time system, the chaos has been suppressed in the Rossler and AFM systems as some case studies.

  20. Observer-based robust-H-infinity control laws for uncertain linear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shieh, Leang S.; Sunkel, J. W.; Wang, Yeih J.

    1991-01-01

    Based on the algebraic Riccati equation approach, this paper presents a simple and flexible method for designing observer-based robust-H-infinity control laws for linear systems with structured parameter uncertainty. The observer-based robust-H-infinity output-feedback control law, obtained by solving three augmented algebraic Riccati equations, provides both robust stability and disturbance attenuation with H-infinity-norm bound for the closed-loop uncertain linear system. Several tuning parameters are embedded into the augmented algebraic Riccati equations so that flexibility in finding the symmetric positive-definite solutions (and hence, the robust-H-infinity control laws) is significantly increased. A benchmark problem associated with a mass-spring system, which approximates the dynamics of a flexible structure, is used to illustrate the design methodologies, and simulation results are presented.

  1. Observer-based robust-H-infinity control laws for uncertain linear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shieh, Leang S.; Sunkel, J. W.; Wang, Yeih J.

    1991-01-01

    Based on the algebraic Riccati equation approach, this paper presents a simple and flexible method for designing observer-based robust-H-infinity control laws for linear systems with structured parameter uncertainty. The observer-based robust-H-infinity output-feedback control law, obtained by solving three augmented algebraic Riccati equations, provides both robust stability and disturbance attenuation with H-infinity-norm bound for the closed-loop uncertain linear system. Several tuning parameters are embedded into the augmented algebraic Riccati equations so that flexibility in finding the symmetric positive-definite solutions (and hence, the robust-H-infinity control laws) is significantly increased. A benchmark problem associated with a mass-spring system, which approximates the dynamics of a flexible structure, is used to illustrate the design methodologies, and simulation results are presented.

  2. Integrated Aeropropulsion Control System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. -F.; Hurley, Francis X.; Huang, Jie; Hadaegh, F. Y.

    1996-01-01

    %T Integrated Aeropropulsion Control System Design%A C-F. Lin%A Francis X. Hurley%A Jie Huang%A F. Y. Hadaegh%J International Conference on Control and Information(psi)995%C Hong Kong%D June 1995%K aeropropulsion, control, system%U http://jpltrs.jpl.nasa.gov/1995/95-0658.pdfAn integrated intelligent control approach is proposed to design a high performance control system for aeropropulsion systems based on advanced sensor processing, nonlinear control and neural fuzzy control integration. Our approach features the following innovations:??e complexity and uncertainty issues are addressed via the distributed parallel processing, learning, and online reoptimization properties of neural networks.??e nonlinear dynamics and the severe coupling can be naturally incorporated into the design framework.??e knowledge base and decision making logic furnished by fuzzy systems leads to a human intelligence enhanced control scheme.In addition, fault tolerance, health monitoring and reconfigurable control strategies will be accommodated by this approach to ensure stability, graceful degradation and reoptimization in the case of failures, malfunctions and damage.!.

  3. Integrated Aeropropulsion Control System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. -F.; Hurley, Francis X.; Huang, Jie; Hadaegh, F. Y.

    1996-01-01

    %T Integrated Aeropropulsion Control System Design%A C-F. Lin%A Francis X. Hurley%A Jie Huang%A F. Y. Hadaegh%J International Conference on Control and Information(psi)995%C Hong Kong%D June 1995%K aeropropulsion, control, system%U http://jpltrs.jpl.nasa.gov/1995/95-0658.pdfAn integrated intelligent control approach is proposed to design a high performance control system for aeropropulsion systems based on advanced sensor processing, nonlinear control and neural fuzzy control integration. Our approach features the following innovations:??e complexity and uncertainty issues are addressed via the distributed parallel processing, learning, and online reoptimization properties of neural networks.??e nonlinear dynamics and the severe coupling can be naturally incorporated into the design framework.??e knowledge base and decision making logic furnished by fuzzy systems leads to a human intelligence enhanced control scheme.In addition, fault tolerance, health monitoring and reconfigurable control strategies will be accommodated by this approach to ensure stability, graceful degradation and reoptimization in the case of failures, malfunctions and damage.!.

  4. Closed-form solutions for linear regulator design of mechanical systems including optimal weighting matrix selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanks, Brantley R.; Skelton, Robert E.

    1991-01-01

    Vibration in modern structural and mechanical systems can be reduced in amplitude by increasing stiffness, redistributing stiffness and mass, and/or adding damping if design techniques are available to do so. Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) theory in modern multivariable control design, attacks the general dissipative elastic system design problem in a global formulation. The optimal design, however, allows electronic connections and phase relations which are not physically practical or possible in passive structural-mechanical devices. The restriction of LQR solutions (to the Algebraic Riccati Equation) to design spaces which can be implemented as passive structural members and/or dampers is addressed. A general closed-form solution to the optimal free-decay control problem is presented which is tailored for structural-mechanical system. The solution includes, as subsets, special cases such as the Rayleigh Dissipation Function and total energy. Weighting matrix selection is a constrained choice among several parameters to obtain desired physical relationships. The closed-form solution is also applicable to active control design for systems where perfect, collocated actuator-sensor pairs exist.

  5. Finite-time quantised feedback asynchronously switched control of sampled-data switched linear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ronghao; Xing, Jianchun; Li, Juelong; Xiang, Zhengrong

    2016-10-01

    This paper studies the problem of stabilising a sampled-data switched linear system by quantised feedback asynchronously switched controllers. The idea of a quantised feedback asynchronously switched control strategy originates in earlier work reflecting actual system characteristic of switching and quantising, respectively. A quantised scheme is designed depending on switching time using dynamic quantiser. When sampling time, system switching time and controller switching time are all not uniform, the proposed switching controllers guarantee the system to be finite-time stable by a piecewise Lyapunov function and the average dwell-time method. Simulation examples are provided to show the effectiveness of the developed results.

  6. Field testing of linear individual pitch control on the two-bladed controls advanced research turbine

    SciTech Connect

    van Solingen, Edwin; Fleming, Paul A.; Scholbrock, Andrew; van Wingerden, Jan-Willem

    2015-04-17

    This paper presents the results of field tests using linear individual pitch control (LIPC) on the two-bladed Controls Advanced Research Turbine 2 (CART2) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). LIPC has recently been introduced as an alternative to the conventional individual pitch control (IPC) strategy for two-bladed wind turbines. The main advantage of LIPC over conventional IPC is that it requires, at most, only two feedback loops to potentially reduce the periodic blade loads. In previous work, LIPC was designed to implement blade pitch angles at a fixed frequency (e.g., the once-per-revolution (1P) frequency), which made it only applicable in above-rated wind turbine operating conditions. In this study, LIPC is extended to below-rated operating conditions by gain scheduling the controller on the rotor speed. With this extension, LIPC and conventional IPC are successfully applied to the NREL CART2 wind turbine. Lastly, the field-test results obtained during the measurement campaign indicate that LIPC significantly reduces the wind turbine loads for both below-rated and above-rated operation.

  7. Field testing of linear individual pitch control on the two-bladed controls advanced research turbine

    DOE PAGES

    van Solingen, Edwin; Fleming, Paul A.; Scholbrock, Andrew; ...

    2015-04-17

    This paper presents the results of field tests using linear individual pitch control (LIPC) on the two-bladed Controls Advanced Research Turbine 2 (CART2) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). LIPC has recently been introduced as an alternative to the conventional individual pitch control (IPC) strategy for two-bladed wind turbines. The main advantage of LIPC over conventional IPC is that it requires, at most, only two feedback loops to potentially reduce the periodic blade loads. In previous work, LIPC was designed to implement blade pitch angles at a fixed frequency (e.g., the once-per-revolution (1P) frequency), which made it only applicablemore » in above-rated wind turbine operating conditions. In this study, LIPC is extended to below-rated operating conditions by gain scheduling the controller on the rotor speed. With this extension, LIPC and conventional IPC are successfully applied to the NREL CART2 wind turbine. Lastly, the field-test results obtained during the measurement campaign indicate that LIPC significantly reduces the wind turbine loads for both below-rated and above-rated operation.« less

  8. Sliding Mode Control Applied to Reconfigurable Flight Control Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. A.; Wells, S. R.; Bacon, Barton (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Sliding mode control is applied to the design of a flight control system capable of operating with limited bandwidth actuators and in the presence of significant damage to the airframe and/or control effector actuators. Although inherently robust, sliding mode control algorithms have been hampered by their sensitivity to the effects of parasitic unmodeled dynamics, such as those associated with actuators and structural modes. It is known that asymptotic observers can alleviate this sensitivity while still allowing the system to exhibit significant robustness. This approach is demonstrated. The selection of the sliding manifold as well as the interpretation of the linear design that results after introduction of a boundary layer is accomplished in the frequency domain. The design technique is exercised on a pitch-axis controller for a simple short-period model of the High Angle of Attack F-18 vehicle via computer simulation. Stability and performance is compared to that of a system incorporating a controller designed by classical loop-shaping techniques.

  9. Time-delay control of a magnetic levitated linear positioning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarn, J. H.; Juang, K. Y.; Lin, C. E.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, a high accuracy linear positioning system with a linear force actuator and magnetic levitation is proposed. By locating a permanently magnetized rod inside a current-carrying solenoid, the axial force is achieved by the boundary effect of magnet poles and utilized to power the linear motion, while the force for levitation is governed by Ampere's Law supplied with the same solenoid. With the levitation in a radial direction, there is hardly any friction between the rod and the solenoid. The high speed motion can hence be achieved. Besides, the axial force acting on the rod is a smooth function of rod position, so the system can provide nanometer resolution linear positioning to the molecule size. Since the force-position relation is highly nonlinear, and the mathematical model is derived according to some assumptions, such as the equivalent solenoid of the permanently magnetized rod, so there exists unknown dynamics in practical application. Thus 'robustness' is an important issue in controller design. Meanwhile the load effect reacts directly on the servo system without transmission elements, so the capability of 'disturbance rejection; is also required. With the above consideration, a time-delay control scheme is chosen and applied. By comparing the input-output relation and the mathematical model, the time-delay controller calculates an estimation of unmodeled dynamics and disturbances and then composes the desired compensation into the system. Effectiveness of the linear positioning system and control scheme are illustrated with simulation results.

  10. Dual adaptive control: Design principles and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mookerjee, Purusottam

    1988-01-01

    The design of an actively adaptive dual controller based on an approximation of the stochastic dynamic programming equation for a multi-step horizon is presented. A dual controller that can enhance identification of the system while controlling it at the same time is derived for multi-dimensional problems. This dual controller uses sensitivity functions of the expected future cost with respect to the parameter uncertainties. A passively adaptive cautious controller and the actively adaptive dual controller are examined. In many instances, the cautious controller is seen to turn off while the latter avoids the turn-off of the control and the slow convergence of the parameter estimates, characteristic of the cautious controller. The algorithms have been applied to a multi-variable static model which represents a simplified linear version of the relationship between the vibration output and the higher harmonic control input for a helicopter. Monte Carlo comparisons based on parametric and nonparametric statistical analysis indicate the superiority of the dual controller over the baseline controller.

  11. Computational models of signalling networks for non-linear control.

    PubMed

    Fuente, Luis A; Lones, Michael A; Turner, Alexander P; Stepney, Susan; Caves, Leo S; Tyrrell, Andy M

    2013-05-01

    Artificial signalling networks (ASNs) are a computational approach inspired by the signalling processes inside cells that decode outside environmental information. Using evolutionary algorithms to induce complex behaviours, we show how chaotic dynamics in a conservative dynamical system can be controlled. Such dynamics are of particular interest as they mimic the inherent complexity of non-linear physical systems in the real world. Considering the main biological interpretations of cellular signalling, in which complex behaviours and robust cellular responses emerge from the interaction of multiple pathways, we introduce two ASN representations: a stand-alone ASN and a coupled ASN. In particular we note how sophisticated cellular communication mechanisms can lead to effective controllers, where complicated problems can be divided into smaller and independent tasks.

  12. Decoupled control analysis of a large flexible space antenna with linear quadratic regulator comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, J. W.; Hamer, H. A.; Johnson, K. G.

    1984-01-01

    A decoupled-control analysis was performed for a large flexible space antenna. Control involved commanding changes in the rigid-body modes or nulling disturbances in the flexible modes. The study provides parametric-type data which could be useful in the final design of a large space antenna control system. Results are presented to illustrate the effect on control requirements of (1) the number of modes controlled; (2) the number, type, and location of control actuators; and (3) variations in the closed-loop dynamics of the control system. Comparisons are given between the decoupled-control results and those obtained by using a linear quadratic regulator approach. Time history responses are presented to illustrate the effects of the control procedures.

  13. Gain scheduled control of linear systems with unsymmetrical saturation actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wen-Juan; Duan, Guang-Ren

    2016-11-01

    The problem of stabilisation of a class of nonlinear continuous-time systems with asymmetric saturations on the control is studied in this paper. By combining the parametric Lyapunov equation approach and gain scheduling technique, a state feedback gain scheduling controller is proposed to solve the stabilisation problem of systems with unsymmetrical saturated control. The proposed gain scheduled approach is to increase the value of the design parameter so that the convergence rate of the closed-loop system can be increased. Numerical simulations show the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  14. Active disturbance rejection based trajectory linearization control for hypersonic reentry vehicle with bounded uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xingling; Wang, Honglun

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates a novel compound control scheme combined with the advantages of trajectory linearization control (TLC) and alternative active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) for hypersonic reentry vehicle (HRV) attitude tracking system with bounded uncertainties. Firstly, in order to overcome actuator saturation problem, nonlinear tracking differentiator (TD) is applied in the attitude loop to achieve fewer control consumption. Then, linear extended state observers (LESO) are constructed to estimate the uncertainties acting on the LTV system in the attitude and angular rate loop. In addition, feedback linearization (FL) based controllers are designed using estimates of uncertainties generated by LESO in each loop, which enable the tracking error for closed-loop system in the presence of large uncertainties to converge to the residual set of the origin asymptotically. Finally, the compound controllers are derived by integrating with the nominal controller for open-loop nonlinear system and FL based controller. Also, comparisons and simulation results are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the control strategy.

  15. Decentralized control of the COFS-I Mast using linear dc motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Douglas K.; Celano, Tom; Ide, Eric

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to a decentralized control design for vibration suppression in the COFS-I Mast using linear dc motors for actuators. The decentralized control design is based results from power systems using root locus techniques that are not well known. The approach is effective because the loop gain is low due to low actuator authority. The frequency-dependent nonlinearities of the actuator are taken into account. Because of the tendency of the transients to saturate the the stroke length of the actuator, its effectiveness is limited.

  16. Decentralized control of the COFS-I Mast using linear dc motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Douglas K.; Celano, Tom; Ide, Eric

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to a decentralized control design for vibration suppression in the COFS-I Mast using linear dc motors for actuators. The decentralized control design is based results from power systems using root locus techniques that are not well known. The approach is effective because the loop gain is low due to low actuator authority. The frequency-dependent nonlinearities of the actuator are taken into account. Because of the tendency of the transients to saturate the the stroke length of the actuator, its effectiveness is limited.

  17. Feasibility of Decentralized Linear-Quadratic-Gaussian Control of Autonomous Distributed Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. Russell

    1999-01-01

    A distributed satellite formation, modeled as an arbitrary number of fully connected nodes in a network, could be controlled using a decentralized controller framework that distributes operations in parallel over the network. For such problems, a solution that minimizes data transmission requirements, in the context of linear-quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) control theory, was given by Speyer. This approach is advantageous because it is non-hierarchical, detected failures gracefully degrade system performance, fewer local computations are required than for a centralized controller, and it is optimal with respect to the standard LQG cost function. Disadvantages of the approach are the need for a fully connected communications network, the total operations performed over all the nodes are greater than for a centralized controller, and the approach is formulated for linear time-invariant systems. To investigate the feasibility of the decentralized approach to satellite formation flying, a simple centralized LQG design for a spacecraft orbit control problem is adapted to the decentralized framework. The simple design uses a fixed reference trajectory (an equatorial, Keplerian, circular orbit), and by appropriate choice of coordinates and measurements is formulated as a linear time-invariant system.

  18. Feasibility of Decentralized Linear-Quadratic-Gaussian Control of Autonomous Distributed Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. Russell

    1999-01-01

    A distributed satellite formation, modeled as an arbitrary number of fully connected nodes in a network, could be controlled using a decentralized controller framework that distributes operations in parallel over the network. For such problems, a solution that minimizes data transmission requirements, in the context of linear-quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) control theory, was given by Speyer. This approach is advantageous because it is non-hierarchical, detected failures gracefully degrade system performance, fewer local computations are required than for a centralized controller, and it is optimal with respect to the standard LQG cost function. Disadvantages of the approach are the need for a fully connected communications network, the total operations performed over all the nodes are greater than for a centralized controller, and the approach is formulated for linear time-invariant systems. To investigate the feasibility of the decentralized approach to satellite formation flying, a simple centralized LQG design for a spacecraft orbit control problem is adapted to the decentralized framework. The simple design uses a fixed reference trajectory (an equatorial, Keplerian, circular orbit), and by appropriate choice of coordinates and measurements is formulated as a linear time-invariant system.

  19. Design of nonlinear PID controller and nonlinear model predictive controller for a continuous stirred tank reactor.

    PubMed

    Prakash, J; Srinivasan, K

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, the authors have represented the nonlinear system as a family of local linear state space models, local PID controllers have been designed on the basis of linear models, and the weighted sum of the output from the local PID controllers (Nonlinear PID controller) has been used to control the nonlinear process. Further, Nonlinear Model Predictive Controller using the family of local linear state space models (F-NMPC) has been developed. The effectiveness of the proposed control schemes has been demonstrated on a CSTR process, which exhibits dynamic nonlinearity.

  20. Linear optimum trim solution for aircraft with three longitudinal control effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, Kenneth H.; Sliwa, Steven M.

    1987-01-01

    A simple and fast linear optimum method for trimming aircraft with a combination of three longitudinal aerodynamic or propulsive control effectors is developed, with application to preliminary design or in-flight scheduling. A Lagrangian formulation is used to determine the longitudinal load distribution which minimizes trim drag. Trim drag results obtained with the linear optimum method are similar to those obtained with a nonlinear optimum method, and significant trim drag reductions are found using either optimum method, in comparison with results obtained using various ad hoc methods.

  1. Control law design to meet constraints using SYNPAC-synthesis package for active controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, W. M., Jr.; Tiffany, S. H.

    1982-01-01

    Major features of SYNPAC (Synthesis Package for Active Controls) are described. SYNPAC employs constrained optimization techniques which allow explicit inclusion of design criteria (constraints) in the control law design process. Interrelationships are indicated between this constrained optimization approach, classical and linear quadratic Gaussian design techniques. Results are presented that were obtained by applying SYNPAC to the design of a combined stability augmentation/gust load alleviation control law for the DAST ARW-2.

  2. An framework for robust flight control design using constrained optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palazoglu, A.; Yousefpor, M.; Hess, R. A.

    1992-01-01

    An analytical framework is described for the design of feedback control systems to meet specified performance criteria in the presence of structured and unstructured uncertainty. Attention is focused upon the linear time invariant, single-input, single-output problem for the purposes of exposition. The framework provides for control of the degree of the stabilizing compensator or controller.

  3. The synthesis of optimal controls for linear, time-optimal problems with retarded controls.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Jacobs, M. Q.; Latina, M. R.

    1971-01-01

    Optimization problems involving linear systems with retardations in the controls are studied in a systematic way. Some physical motivation for the problems is discussed. The topics covered are: controllability, existence and uniqueness of the optimal control, sufficient conditions, techniques of synthesis, and dynamic programming. A number of solved examples are presented.

  4. A Comparison of Multivariable Control Design Techniques for a Turbofan Engine Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Sanjay; Watts, Stephen R.

    1995-01-01

    This paper compares two previously published design procedures for two different multivariable control design techniques for application to a linear engine model of a jet engine. The two multivariable control design techniques compared were the Linear Quadratic Gaussian with Loop Transfer Recovery (LQG/LTR) and the H-Infinity synthesis. The two control design techniques were used with specific previously published design procedures to synthesize controls which would provide equivalent closed loop frequency response for the primary control loops while assuring adequate loop decoupling. The resulting controllers were then reduced in order to minimize the programming and data storage requirements for a typical implementation. The reduced order linear controllers designed by each method were combined with the linear model of an advanced turbofan engine and the system performance was evaluated for the continuous linear system. Included in the performance analysis are the resulting frequency and transient responses as well as actuator usage and rate capability for each design method. The controls were also analyzed for robustness with respect to structured uncertainties in the unmodeled system dynamics. The two controls were then compared for performance capability and hardware implementation issues.

  5. Design and implementation of non-contact detection system for catenary based on double linear array cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peng; Xu, Cheng; Li, Zhiqi; Xu, Zisang

    2017-04-01

    The detection of catenary geometric parameters is a very important problem in railway infrastructure measurement. In this paper, a high resolution linear array CCD is used as the photosensitive element, and FPGA is used as the main controller to design the data acquisition system of linear array camera, and a non-contact detection system of catenary geometry parameters based on double linear array cameras is implemented. According to the intensity of linear array CCD output signal, and the adaptive adjustment algorithm of exposure intensity is achieved, so the optical integration time is changed in real time. In order to improve the bandwidth limitation of data transmission, the calibration algorithm of pixel position in the system is completed by FPGA, which improved the response speed of the system. The experimental results show that the scan frequency of linear array camera can reach 6MHz, the measurement error is controlled at mm level, and it has good accuracy and stability.

  6. A fail-safe, bi-linear liquid spring controllable magnetorheological fluid damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maus, Nicholas; Gordaninejad, Faramarz

    2014-04-01

    The goal of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of a fail-safe, bi-linear spring controllable magnetorheological fluid damper (BLS-CMRD). This research introduces a new device with independently pre-set spring forces in compression and rebound combined with a controllable MR fluid damping. In this work, a BLS-CMRD is designed, fabricated, tested and evaluated. Experiments are performed for sinusoidal displacements in the quasistatic and dynamic ranges to evaluate the performance of the BLS-CMRD under different magnetic fields. The experimental results prove that the device reacts with significantly different spring forces from the compression to rebound regions, while providing passive viscous and controllable MR fluid damping. With this first of a kind system it is demonstrated that the utility of a bi-linear liquid spring can be combined with the reliability of passive viscous fluid damping and the capabilities of controllable MR fluid damping into one compact and versatile device.

  7. Flatness-based active disturbance rejection control for linear systems with unknown time-varying coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Congzhi; Sira-Ramírez, Hebertt

    2015-12-01

    A flatness-based active disturbance rejection control approach is proposed to deal with the linear systems with unknown time-varying coefficients and external disturbances. By selecting appropriate nominal values for the parameters of the system, all the deviation between the nominal and actual dynamics of the controlled process, as well as all the external disturbances can be viewed as a total disturbance. Based on the accurately estimated total disturbance with the aid of the proposed extended state observer, a linear proportional derivative feedback control law taking into account the derivatives of the desired output is designed to eliminate the effect of the total disturbance on the system performance. Finally, the load frequency control problem of a single-area power system with non-reheated unit is employed as an illustrative example to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  8. On optimal control of linear systems in the presence of multiplicative noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, S. M.

    1976-01-01

    This correspondence considers the problem of optimal regulator design for discrete time linear systems subjected to white state-dependent and control-dependent noise in addition to additive white noise in the input and the observations. A pseudo-deterministic problem is first defined in which multiplicative and additive input disturbances are present, but noise-free measurements of the complete state vector are available. This problem is solved via discrete dynamic programming. Next is formulated the problem in which the number of measurements is less than that of the state variables and the measurements are contaminated with state-dependent noise. The inseparability of control and estimation is brought into focus, and an 'enforced separation' solution is obtained via heuristic reasoning in which the control gains are shown to be the same as those in the pseudo-deterministic problem. An optimal linear state estimator is given in order to implement the controller.

  9. Automated design and optimization of flexible booster autopilots via linear programming, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, F. D.

    1972-01-01

    A nonlinear programming technique was developed for the automated design and optimization of autopilots for large flexible launch vehicles. This technique, which resulted in the COEBRA program, uses the iterative application of linear programming. The method deals directly with the three main requirements of booster autopilot design: to provide (1) good response to guidance commands; (2) response to external disturbances (e.g. wind) to minimize structural bending moment loads and trajectory dispersions; and (3) stability with specified tolerances on the vehicle and flight control system parameters. The method is applicable to very high order systems (30th and greater per flight condition). Examples are provided that demonstrate the successful application of the employed algorithm to the design of autopilots for both single and multiple flight conditions.

  10. Nonlinear control of linear parameter varying systems with applications to hypersonic vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, Zachary Donald

    The focus of this dissertation is to design a controller for linear parameter varying (LPV) systems, apply it specifically to air-breathing hypersonic vehicles, and examine the interplay between control performance and the structural dynamics design. Specifically a Lyapunov-based continuous robust controller is developed that yields exponential tracking of a reference model, despite the presence of bounded, nonvanishing disturbances. The hypersonic vehicle has time varying parameters, specifically temperature profiles, and its dynamics can be reduced to an LPV system with additive disturbances. Since the HSV can be modeled as an LPV system the proposed control design is directly applicable. The control performance is directly examined through simulations. A wide variety of applications exist that can be effectively modeled as LPV systems. In particular, flight systems have historically been modeled as LPV systems and associated control tools have been applied such as gain-scheduling, linear matrix inequalities (LMIs), linear fractional transformations (LFT), and mu-types. However, as the type of flight environments and trajectories become more demanding, the traditional LPV controllers may no longer be sufficient. In particular, hypersonic flight vehicles (HSVs) present an inherently difficult problem because of the nonlinear aerothermoelastic coupling effects in the dynamics. HSV flight conditions produce temperature variations that can alter both the structural dynamics and flight dynamics. Starting with the full nonlinear dynamics, the aerothermoelastic effects are modeled by a temperature dependent, parameter varying state-space representation with added disturbances. The model includes an uncertain parameter varying state matrix, an uncertain parameter varying non-square (column deficient) input matrix, and an additive bounded disturbance. In this dissertation, a robust dynamic controller is formulated for a uncertain and disturbed LPV system. The developed

  11. Wavelet neural network control for linear ultrasonic motor drive via adaptive sliding-mode technique.

    PubMed

    Lin, Faa-Jeng; Wai, Rong-Jong; Chen, Mu-Ping

    2003-06-01

    A wavelet neural network (WNN) control system is proposed to control the moving table of a linear ultrasonic motor (LUSM) drive system to track periodic reference trajectories in this study. The design of the WNN control system is based on an adaptive sliding-mode control technique. The structure and operating principle of the LUSM are introduced, and the driving circuit of the LUSM, which is a voltage source inverter using two-inductance two capacitance (LLCC) resonant technique, is introduced. Because the dynamic characteristics and motor parameters of the LUSM are nonlinear and time varying, a WNN control system is designed based on adaptive sliding-mode control technique to achieve precision position control. In the WNN control system, a WNN is used to learn the ideal equivalent control law, and a robust controller is designed to meet the sliding condition. Moreover, the adaptive learning algorithms of the WNN and the bound estimation algorithm of the robust controller are derived from the sense of Lyapunov stability analysis. The effectiveness of the proposed WNN control system is verified by some experimental results in the presence of uncertainties.

  12. Boiler-turbine control system design using a genetic algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Dimeo, R.; Lee, K.Y.

    1995-12-01

    This paper discusses the application of a genetic algorithm to control system design for a boiler-turbine plant. In particular the authors study the ability of the genetic algorithm to develop a proportional-integral (PI) controller and a state feedback controller for a non-linear multi-input/multi-output (MIMO) plant model. The plant model is presented along with a discussion of the inherent difficulties in such controller development. A sketch of the genetic algorithm (GA) is presented and its strategy as a method of control system design is discussed. Results are presented for two different control systems that have been designed with the genetic algorithm.

  13. Robust control of linear ceramic motor drive with LLCC resonant technique.

    PubMed

    Wai, Rong-Jong

    2003-07-01

    This study presents a robust control system for a linear ceramic motor (LCM) that is driven by a high-frequency voltage source inverter using two-inductance two-capacitance (LLCC) resonant technique. The structure and driving principle of the LCM are introduced. Because the dynamic characteristics and motor parameters of the LCM are nonlinear and time varying, a robust control system is designed based on the hypothetical dynamic model to achieve high-precision position control. The presentation of robust control for the LCM drive system is divided into three parts, which comprise state feedback controller, feed-forward controller, and uncertainty controller. The adaptation laws of control gains in the robust control system are derived in the sense of Lyapunov stability theorem such that the stability of the control system can be guaranteed. It not only has the learning ability similar to intelligent control, but also its control framework is more simple than intelligent control. With the proposed robust control system, the controlled LCM drive possesses the advantages of good tracking control performance and robustness to uncertainties. The effectiveness of the proposed robust control system is verified by experimental results in the presence of uncertainties. In addition, the advantages of the proposed control system are indicated in comparison with the traditional integral-proportional (IP) position control system.

  14. Evolutionary Design of Controlled Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, Brett P.; Crawley, Edward F.

    1997-01-01

    Basic physical concepts of structural delay and transmissibility are provided for simple rod and beam structures. Investigations show the sensitivity of these concepts to differing controlled-structures variables, and to rational system modeling effects. An evolutionary controls/structures design method is developed. The basis of the method is an accurate model formulation for dynamic compensator optimization and Genetic Algorithm based updating of sensor/actuator placement and structural attributes. One and three dimensional examples from the literature are used to validate the method. Frequency domain interpretation of these controlled structure systems provide physical insight as to how the objective is optimized and consequently what is important in the objective. Several disturbance rejection type controls-structures systems are optimized for a stellar interferometer spacecraft application. The interferometric designs include closed loop tracking optics. Designs are generated for differing structural aspect ratios, differing disturbance attributes, and differing sensor selections. Physical limitations in achieving performance are given in terms of average system transfer function gains and system phase loss. A spacecraft-like optical interferometry system is investigated experimentally over several different optimized controlled structures configurations. Configurations represent common and not-so-common approaches to mitigating pathlength errors induced by disturbances of two different spectra. Results show that an optimized controlled structure for low frequency broadband disturbances achieves modest performance gains over a mass equivalent regular structure, while an optimized structure for high frequency narrow band disturbances is four times better in terms of root-mean-square pathlength. These results are predictable given the nature of the physical system and the optimization design variables. Fundamental limits on controlled performance are discussed

  15. Adaptive Control for Linear Uncertain Systems with Unmodeled Dynamics Revisited via Optimal Control Modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the optimal control modification for linear uncertain plants. The Lyapunov analysis shows that the modification parameter has a limiting value depending on the nature of the uncertainty. The optimal control modification exhibits a linear asymptotic property that enables it to be analyzed in a linear time invariant framework for linear uncertain plants. The linear asymptotic property shows that the closed-loop plants in the limit possess a scaled input-output mapping. Using this property, we can derive an analytical closed-loop transfer function in the limit as the adaptive gain tends to infinity. The paper revisits the Rohrs counterexample problem that illustrates the nature of non-robustness of model-reference adaptive control in the presence of unmodeled dynamics. An analytical approach is developed to compute exactly the modification parameter for the optimal control modification that stabilizes the plant in the Rohrs counterexample. The linear asymptotic property is also used to address output feedback adaptive control for non-minimum phase plants with a relative degree 1.

  16. Aerodynamic design via control theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, Antony

    1988-01-01

    The question of how to modify aerodynamic design in order to improve performance is addressed. Representative examples are given to demonstrate the computational feasibility of using control theory for such a purpose. An introduction and historical survey of the subject is included.

  17. Cockpit control system conceptual design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meholic, Greg; Brown, Rhonda; Hall, Melissa; Harvey, Robert; Singer, Michael; Tella, Gustavo

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to provide a means for operating the ailerons, elevator, elevator trim, rudder, nosewheel steering, and brakes in the Triton primary flight trainer. The main design goals under consideration were to illustrate system and subsystem integration, control function ability, and producibility. Weight and maintenance goals were addressed.

  18. A new linear quadratic optimal controller for the 34-meter high efficiency antenna position loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickerson, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    The design of a new position loop controller for the 34-meter High Efficiency Deep Space antennas using linear quadratic (LQ) optimal control techniques is discussed. The LQ optimal control theory is reviewed, and model development and verification are discussed. Families of optimal gain vectors are generated by varying weight parameters. Performance specifications were used to select a final gain vector. Estimator dynamics were selected and the corresponding gain vectors were computed. Final estimator selection was based on position, commanded rate, and estimator error responses.

  19. Linear-parameter-varying gain-scheduled control of aerospace systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Jeffrey Michael

    The dynamics of many aerospace systems vary significantly as a function of flight condition. Robust control provides methods of guaranteeing performance and stability goals across flight conditions. In mu-syntthesis, changes to the dynamical system are primarily treated as uncertainty. This method has been successfully applied to many control problems, and here is applied to flutter control. More recently, two techniques for generating robust gain-scheduled controller have been developed. Linear fractional transformation (LFT) gain-scheduled control is an extension of mu-synthesis in which the plant and controller are explicit functions of parameters measurable in real-time. This LFT gain-scheduled control technique is applied to the Benchmark Active Control Technology (BACT) wing, and compared with mu-synthesis control. Linear parameter-varying (LPV) gain-scheduled control is an extension of Hinfinity control to parameter varying systems. LPV gain-scheduled control directly incorporates bounds on the rate of change of the scheduling parameters, and often reduces conservatism inherent in LFT gain-scheduled control. Gain-scheduled LPV control of the BACT wing compares very favorably with the LFT controller. Gain-scheduled LPV controllers are generated for the lateral-directional and longitudinal axes of the Innovative Control Effectors (ICE) aircraft and implemented in nonlinear simulations and real-time piloted nonlinear simulations. Cooper-Harper and pilot-induced oscillation ratings were obtained for an initial design, a reference aircraft and a redesign. Piloted simulation results for the initial LPV gain-scheduled control of the ICE aircraft are compared with results for a conventional fighter aircraft in discrete pitch and roll angle tracking tasks. The results for the redesigned controller are significantly better than both the previous LPV controller and the conventional aircraft.

  20. Design of freeform imaging systems with linear field-of-view using a construction and iteration process.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tong; Zhu, Jun; Jin, Guofan

    2014-02-10

    In this paper, a design method based on a construction and iteration process is proposed for designing freeform imaging systems with linear field-of-view (FOV). The surface contours of the desired freeform surfaces in the tangential plane are firstly designed to control the tangential rays of multiple field angles and different pupil coordinates. Then, the image quality is improved with an iterative process. The design result can be taken as a good starting point for further optimization. A freeform off-axis scanning system is designed as an example of the proposed method. The convergence ability of the construction and iteration process to design a freeform system from initial planes is validated. The MTF of the design result is close to the diffraction limit and the scanning error is less than 1 μm. This result proves that good image quality and scanning linearity were achieved.

  1. Developing a (Non-Linear) Practice of Design Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teal, Randall

    2010-01-01

    Design thinking can be a powerful way to engage the world, allowing interactive understandings that are both analytic and experiential. When fully functioning, design thinking necessarily calls upon faculties often considered a-rational, a-causal and a-logical. Unfortunately, such faculties often give rise to academic suspicion. That is to say,…

  2. Developing a (Non-Linear) Practice of Design Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teal, Randall

    2010-01-01

    Design thinking can be a powerful way to engage the world, allowing interactive understandings that are both analytic and experiential. When fully functioning, design thinking necessarily calls upon faculties often considered a-rational, a-causal and a-logical. Unfortunately, such faculties often give rise to academic suspicion. That is to say,…

  3. Automated control of linear constricted plasma source array

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre; Maschwitz, Peter A.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for controlling an array of constricted glow discharge chambers are disclosed. More particularly a linear array of constricted glow plasma sources whose polarity and geometry are set so that the contamination and energy of the ions discharged from the sources are minimized. The several sources can be mounted in parallel and in series to provide a sustained ultra low source of ions in a plasma with contamination below practical detection limits. The quality of film along deposition "tracks" opposite the plasma sources can be measured and compared to desired absolute or relative values by optical and/or electrical sensors. Plasma quality can then be adjusted by adjusting the power current values, gas feed pressure/flow, gas mixtures or a combination of some or all of these to improve the match between the measured values and the desired values.

  4. Edge enhancement control in linear arrays of ungated field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, J. R.; Jensen, K. L.; Shiffler, D. A.

    2016-01-01

    In arrays of ungated field emitters, the field enhancement factor of each emitter decreases as the distance between the emitters decreases, an effect known as screening. At the edge of these arrays, emitters experience reduced screening, leading to higher field enhancement factors than emitters at the array center, causing nonuniform emission across the array. Here, we consider this effect in linear arrays of ungated field emitters spaced at distances comparable to their heights, which is the regime that generally maximizes their average current density. A Line Charge Model is used to assess the degree to which these edge effects propagate into the array interior, and to study the impact of varying the height, location, and tip radius of emitters at the ends of an array on the edge enhancement. It is shown that each of these techniques can accomplish this edge enhancement control, but each has advantages and disadvantages that will be discussed.

  5. Carleman Estimates and Controllability of Linear Stochastic Heat Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Barbu, V.; Rascanu, A.; E-mail: barbu@uaic.ro,rascanu@uaic.ro; Tessitore, G.

    2003-03-12

    This work is concerned with Carleman inequalities and controllability properties for the following stochastic linear heat equation (with Dirichlet boundary conditions in the bounded domain D subset of R{sup d} and multiplicative noise):d{sub t}y{sup u}-{delta}y{sup u}+ay{sup u}dt = f dt+1{sup D{sup 0}}u dt+by d{beta}{sub t} in ]0,T]xD, y{sup u}=0 on ]0,T]x{partial_derivative}D, y{sup u}(0)=y{sub 0} in D, and for the corresponding backward dual equation:d{sub t}p{sup v}+{delta}p{sup v}dt-ap{sup v}dt+bk{sup v}dt 1{sub D{sub 0}}v dt+k{sup v}d{beta}{sub t} in [0,T[xD, p{sup v}=0 on [0,T[x{partial_derivative}D, p{sup v}(T)={eta} in D. We prove the null controllability of the backward equation and obtain partial results for the controllability of the forward equation.

  6. BBU design of linear induction accelerator cells for radiography application

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, C.C.; Chen, Y.J.; Gaporaso, G.J.; Houck, T.L.; Molau, N.E.; Focklen, J.; Gregory, S.

    1997-05-06

    There is an ongoing effort to develop accelerating modules for high-current electron accelerators for advanced radiography application. Accelerating modules with low beam-cavity coupling impedances along with gap designs with acceptable field stresses comprise a set of fundamental design criteria. We examine improved cell designs which have been developed for accelerator application in several radiographic operating regimes. We evaluate interaction impedances, analyze the effects of beam structure coupling on beam dynamics (beam break-up instability and corkscrew motion). We also provide estimates of coupling through interesting new high-gradient insulators and evaluate their potential future application in induction cells.

  7. Improved electron collimation system design for Elekta linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Pitcher, Garrett M; Hogstrom, Kenneth R; Carver, Robert L

    2017-09-01

    Prototype 10 × 10 and 20 × 20-cm(2) electron collimators were designed for the Elekta Infinity accelerator (MLCi2 treatment head), with the goal of reducing the trimmer weight of excessively heavy current applicators while maintaining acceptable beam flatness (±3% major axes, ±4% diagonals) and IEC leakage dose. Prototype applicators were designed initially using tungsten trimmers of constant thickness (1% electron transmission) and cross-sections with inner and outer edges positioned at 95% and 2% off-axis ratios (OARs), respectively, cast by the upstream collimating component. Despite redefining applicator size at isocenter (not 5 cm upstream) and reducing the energy range from 4-22 to 6-20 MeV, the designed 10 × 10 and 20 × 20-cm(2) applicator trimmers weighed 6.87 and 10.49 kg, respectively, exceeding that of the current applicators (5.52 and 8.36 kg, respectively). Subsequently, five design modifications using analytical and/or Monte Carlo (MC) calculations were applied, reducing trimmer weight while maintaining acceptable in-field flatness and mean leakage dose. Design Modification 1 beveled the outer trimmer edges, taking advantage of only low-energy beams scattering primary electrons sufficiently to reach the outer trimmer edge. Design Modification 2 optimized the upper and middle trimmer distances from isocenter for minimal trimmer weights. Design Modification 3 moved inner trimmer edges inward, reducing trimmer weight. Design Modification 4 determined optimal X-ray jaw positions for each energy. Design Modification 5 adjusted middle and lower trimmer shapes and reduced upper trimmer thickness by 50%. Design Modifications 1→5 reduced trimmer weights from 6.87→5.86→5.52→5.87→5.43→3.73 kg for the 10 × 10-cm(2) applicator and 10.49→9.04→8.62→7.73→7.35→5.09 kg for the 20 × 20-cm(2) applicator. MC simulations confirmed these final designs produced acceptable in-field flatness and met IEC-specified leakage dose at 7, 13, and 20 Me

  8. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 3.I: Accelerator \\& in the Technical Design Phase

    SciTech Connect

    Adolphsen, Chris

    2013-06-26

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to increase significantly our understanding of the fundamental processes that govern the evolution of the Universe.

  9. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 3.II: Accelerator Baseline Design

    SciTech Connect

    Adolphsen, Chris

    2013-06-26

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to increase significantly our understanding of the fundamental processes that govern the evolution of the Universe.

  10. Application of orthogonal eigenstructure control to flight control design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastgaar Aagaah, M. A.; Ahmadian, M.; Southward, S. C.

    2008-03-01

    Orthogonal eigenstructure control is used for designing a control law that decouples the dynamic modes of a flying vehicle. Orthogonal eigenstructure control is a feedback control method for linear time invariant multi-input multi-output systems. This method has been recently developed by authors. The advantage of this control method over eigenstructure assignment methods is that there is no need for defining the closed-loop poles or shaping the closed-loop eigenvectors. This method eliminates the error due to the difference between achievable and desirable eigenvectors, by finding vectors orthogonal to the open-loop eigenvectors within the achievable eigenvectors set and replacing the open-loop eigenvectors with them. This method is also applicable to the systems with non-collocated actuators and sensors. Application of this method for designing a flight control law for the lateral directional dynamics of an F-18 HARV is presented, and compared to the results of an eigenstructure assignment method. In this case study, the actuators and sensors are not collocated. It is shown that the application of the orthogonal eigenstructure control results in a more significant dynamic modes decoupling in comparison to the application of the eigenstructure assignment technique.

  11. A 2D systems approach to iterative learning control for discrete linear processes with zero Markov parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hladowski, Lukasz; Galkowski, Krzysztof; Cai, Zhonglun; Rogers, Eric; Freeman, Chris T.; Lewin, Paul L.

    2011-07-01

    In this article a new approach to iterative learning control for the practically relevant case of deterministic discrete linear plants with uniform rank greater than unity is developed. The analysis is undertaken in a 2D systems setting that, by using a strong form of stability for linear repetitive processes, allows simultaneous consideration of both trial-to-trial error convergence and along the trial performance, resulting in design algorithms that can be computed using linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). Finally, the control laws are experimentally verified on a gantry robot that replicates a pick and place operation commonly found in a number of applications to which iterative learning control is applicable.

  12. Computational methods of robust controller design for aerodynamic flutter suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, L. R.

    1981-01-01

    The development of Riccati iteration, a tool for the design and analysis of linear control systems is examined. First, Riccati iteration is applied to the problem of pole placement and order reduction in two-time scale control systems. Order reduction, yielding a good approximation to the original system, is demonstrated using a 16th order linear model of a turbofan engine. Next, a numerical method for solving the Riccati equation is presented and demonstrated for a set of eighth order random examples. A literature review of robust controller design methods follows which includes a number of methods for reducing the trajectory and performance index sensitivity in linear regulators. Lastly, robust controller design for large parameter variations is discussed.

  13. Helicopter flight control compensator design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaici, Malika; Hariche, Kamel; Clarke, Tim

    2017-01-01

    In a precedent paper a design process is described to achieve eigenstructure assignment using block poles. Systems described in state space equations are transformed to systems in matrix fractions description (MFD) and its desired eigenstructure is transformed to a desired latent structure, which is used to construct desired block poles. In this paper, the proposed design method is applied for attitude stabilization of a Lynx helicopter in hover. An input-output feedback configuration has been chosen for more generality, and to validate the results the output responses are compared to state and output feedback control responses.

  14. Neural network application to aircraft control system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troudet, Terry; Garg, Sanjay; Merrill, Walter C.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of using artificial neural networks as control systems for modern, complex aerospace vehicles is investigated via an example aircraft control design study. The problem considered is that of designing a controller for an integrated airframe/propulsion longitudinal dynamics model of a modern fighter aircraft to provide independent control of pitch rate and airspeed responses to pilot command inputs. An explicit model following controller using H infinity control design techniques is first designed to gain insight into the control problem as well as to provide a baseline for evaluation of the neurocontroller. Using the model of the desired dynamics as a command generator, a multilayer feedforward neural network is trained to control the vehicle model within the physical limitations of the actuator dynamics. This is achieved by minimizing an objective function which is a weighted sum of tracking errors and control input commands and rates. To gain insight in the neurocontrol, linearized representations of the nonlinear neurocontroller are analyzed along a commanded trajectory. Linear robustness analysis tools are then applied to the linearized neurocontroller models and to the baseline H infinity based controller. Future areas of research are identified to enhance the practical applicability of neural networks to flight control design.

  15. Neural network application to aircraft control system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troudet, Terry; Garg, Sanjay; Merrill, Walter C.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of using artificial neural network as control systems for modern, complex aerospace vehicles is investigated via an example aircraft control design study. The problem considered is that of designing a controller for an integrated airframe/propulsion longitudinal dynamics model of a modern fighter aircraft to provide independent control of pitch rate and airspeed responses to pilot command inputs. An explicit model following controller using H infinity control design techniques is first designed to gain insight into the control problem as well as to provide a baseline for evaluation of the neurocontroller. Using the model of the desired dynamics as a command generator, a multilayer feedforward neural network is trained to control the vehicle model within the physical limitations of the actuator dynamics. This is achieved by minimizing an objective function which is a weighted sum of tracking errors and control input commands and rates. To gain insight in the neurocontrol, linearized representations of the nonlinear neurocontroller are analyzed along a commanded trajectory. Linear robustness analysis tools are then applied to the linearized neurocontroller models and to the baseline H infinity based controller. Future areas of research identified to enhance the practical applicability of neural networks to flight control design.

  16. Neural network application to aircraft control system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troudet, Terry; Garg, Sanjay; Merrill, Walter C.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of using artificial neural network as control systems for modern, complex aerospace vehicles is investigated via an example aircraft control design study. The problem considered is that of designing a controller for an integrated airframe/propulsion longitudinal dynamics model of a modern fighter aircraft to provide independent control of pitch rate and airspeed responses to pilot command inputs. An explicit model following controller using H infinity control design techniques is first designed to gain insight into the control problem as well as to provide a baseline for evaluation of the neurocontroller. Using the model of the desired dynamics as a command generator, a multilayer feedforward neural network is trained to control the vehicle model within the physical limitations of the actuator dynamics. This is achieved by minimizing an objective function which is a weighted sum of tracking errors and control input commands and rates. To gain insight in the neurocontrol, linearized representations of the nonlinear neurocontroller are analyzed along a commanded trajectory. Linear robustness analysis tools are then applied to the linearized neurocontroller models and to the baseline H infinity based controller. Future areas of research identified to enhance the practical applicability of neural networks to flight control design.

  17. LCAP2 (Linear Controls Analysis Program). Volume 3. Source Code Description.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-15

    The computer program LCAP2 (Linear Controls Analysis Program) provides the analyst with the capability to numerically perform classical linear ... control analysis techniques such as transfer function manipulation, transfer function evaluation, frequency response, root locus, time response and sampled

  18. LCAP2 (Linear Controls Analysis Program). Volume 2. Interactive LCAP2 User’s Guide.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-15

    The computer program LCAP2 (Linear Controls Analysis Program) provides the analyst with the capability to numerically perform classical linear ... control analysis techniques such as transfer function manuipulation, transfer function evaluation, frequency response, root locus, time response and sampled

  19. LCAP2 (Linear Control Analysis Program). Volume 1. Batch LCAP2 User’s Guide.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-15

    The computer program LCAP2 (Linear Controls Analysis Program) provides the analyst with the capability to numerically perform classical linear ... control analysis techniques such as transfer function manipulation, transfer function evaluation, frequency response, root locus, time response and sampled

  20. Distributed consensus observer-based H∞ control for linear systems with sensor and actuator networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong-Du; Wu, Huai-Ning

    2015-04-01

    This paper proposed a distributed consensus observer (DCO) based H∞ control method for a class of linear time-invariant (LTI) continuous systems with a sensor and actuator network (SAN). The communication topology of the SAN under consideration is represented by a directed graph, in which the sensor nodes are not able to acquire all the control inputs applied to the target system from the actuator nodes. To overcome this difficulty, a set of novel DCOs embedded in the sensor nodes and a set of DCO-based controllers embedded in the actuator nodes are initially constructed to estimate and control the state of the target system in a fully distributed way, respectively. The constructed DCOs take full advantage of their consensus property and replace the unavailable control inputs with the approximate ones computed on the basis of the state estimates of the underlying sensor node and its neighboring sensor nodes. Subsequently, a design method of DCO-based H∞ control is proposed in terms of bilinear matrix inequality (BMI) to ensure that the closed-loop system is exponentially stable while satisfying a prescribed overall H∞ performance of disturbance attenuation. Moreover, in order to make attenuation level as small as possible, a suboptimal H∞ control design problem is formulated as a BMI optimization problem, and a modified path-following method is provided for solving this problem by using the existing linear matrix inequality (LMI) optimization techniques. Finally, simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  1. Speedy standing wave design, optimization, and scaling rules of simulated moving bed systems with linear isotherms.

    PubMed

    Weeden, George S; Wang, Nien-Hwa Linda

    2017-04-14

    Simulated Moving Bed (SMB) systems with linear adsorption isotherms have been used for many different separations, including large-scale sugar separations. While SMBs are much more efficient than batch operations, they are not widely used for large-scale production because there are two key barriers. The methods for design, optimization, and scale-up are complex for non-ideal systems. The Speedy Standing Wave Design (SSWD) is developed here to reduce these barriers. The productivity (PR) and the solvent efficiency (F/D) are explicitly related to seven material properties and 13 design parameters. For diffusion-controlled systems, the maximum PR or F/D is controlled by two key dimensionless material properties, the selectivity (α) and the effective diffusivity ratio (η), and two key dimensionless design parameters, the ratios of step time/diffusion time and pressure-limited convection time/diffusion time. The optimum column configuration for maximum PR or F/D is controlled by the weighted diffusivity ratio (η/α(2)). In general, high α and low η/α(2) favor high PR and F/D. The productivity is proportional to the ratio of the feed concentration to the diffusion time. Small particles and high diffusivities favor high productivity, but do not affect solvent efficiency. Simple scaling rules are derived from the two key dimensionless design parameters. The separation of acetic acid from glucose in biomass hydrolysate is used as an example to show how the productivity and the solvent efficiency are affected by the key dimensionless material and design parameters. Ten design parameters are optimized for maximum PR or minimum cost in one minute on a laptop computer. If the material properties are the same for different particle sizes and the dimensionless groups are kept constant, then lab-scale testing consumes less materials and can be done four times faster using particles with half the particle size.

  2. Modern digital flight control system design for VTOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broussard, J. R.; Berry, P. W.; Stengel, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    Methods for and results from the design and evaluation of a digital flight control system (DFCS) for a CH-47B helicopter are presented. The DFCS employed proportional-integral control logic to provide rapid, precise response to automatic or manual guidance commands while following conventional or spiral-descent approach paths. It contained altitude- and velocity-command modes, and it adapted to varying flight conditions through gain scheduling. Extensive use was made of linear systems analysis techniques. The DFCS was designed, using linear-optimal estimation and control theory, and the effects of gain scheduling are assessed by examination of closed-loop eigenvalues and time responses.

  3. A scheme to design power controller in wireless network systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Shulan; Zhang, Huanshui; Zhang, Zhaosheng

    2007-02-01

    In this Letter, power control problem is firstly studied at an angle of LQG measurement-feedback control problem. A stochastic uplink power control problem is considered for CDMA systems. An effective distributed algorithm is proposed based on stochastic linear quadratic optimal control theory assuming SIR measurements contain white noise. The presented scheme minimizes the sum of the power and the error of SIR. A measurement-feedback power controller is designed by constructing an optimization problem of a stochastic linear quadratic type in Krein space and solving the Kalman filter problem for the systems.

  4. The linear boom actuator designed for the Galileo spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, E. F.

    1983-01-01

    Because the linear boom actuator is to be used on a flight spacecraft, as opposed to a ground based application, there is a comprehensive set of requirements. First, of course, the actuator must be capable of positioning and holding the load. Initially the load as predicted to be 4448 N (1000 lb) but with subsequent spacecraft configuration changes the load has been greatly reduced to a constant tensile pull of 1477 N (332 lb) due to centrifugal force. Lesser compressive loads of 1317 N (296 centrifugal lb) may be experienced during launch and deployment. This actuator must have the maximum redundancy possible. Life requirements were defined by the 10.16 to 15.24 cm (4 to 6 in.) total liner travel expected during the five-year flight duration. Liner range required of the actuator was set at plus and minus 5.08 cm to accommodate configuration changes.

  5. Quantum optimal control theory in the linear response formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, Alberto; Tokatly, I. V.

    2011-09-15

    Quantum optimal control theory (QOCT) aims at finding an external field that drives a quantum system in such a way that optimally achieves some predefined target. In practice, this normally means optimizing the value of some observable, a so-called merit function. In consequence, a key part of the theory is a set of equations, which provides the gradient of the merit function with respect to parameters that control the shape of the driving field. We show that these equations can be straightforwardly derived using the standard linear response theory, only requiring a minor generalization: the unperturbed Hamiltonian is allowed to be time dependent. As a result, the aforementioned gradients are identified with certain response functions. This identification leads to a natural reformulation of QOCT in terms of the Keldysh contour formalism of the quantum many-body theory. In particular, the gradients of the merit function can be calculated using the diagrammatic technique for nonequilibrium Green's functions, which should be helpful in the application of QOCT to computationally difficult many-electron problems.

  6. Central suboptimal H ∞ filter design for linear time-varying systems with state and measurement delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basin, Michael; Shi, Peng; Calderon-Alvarez, Dario

    2010-04-01

    This article presents the central finite-dimensional H ∞ filters for linear systems with state and measurement delay that are suboptimal for a given threshold γ with respect to a modified Bolza-Meyer quadratic criterion including the attenuation control term with the opposite sign. In contrast to the results previously obtained for linear time delay systems, this article reduces the original H ∞ filtering problem to H 2 (optimal mean-square) filtering problem using the technique proposed in Doyle, Glover, Khargonekar, and Francis (1989 'State-space Solutions to Standard H 2 and H ∞ Control Problems', IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, 34, 831-847). Application of the reduction technique becomes possible, since the optimal closed-form filtering equations solving the H 2 (mean-square) filtering problem have been obtained for linear systems with state and measurement delays. This article first presents the central suboptimal H ∞ filter for linear systems with state and measurement delays, based on the optimal H 2 filter from Basin, Alcorta-Garcia, and Rodriguez-Gonzalez (2005, 'Optimal Filtering for Linear Systems with State and Observation Delays', International Journal of Robust and Nonlinear Control, 15, 859-871), which consists, in the general case, of an infinite set of differential equations. Then, the finite-dimensional central suboptimal H ∞ filter is designed in case of linear systems with commensurable state and measurement delays, which contains a finite number of equations for any fixed filtering horizon; however, this number still grows unboundedly as time goes to infinity. To overcome that difficulty, the alternative central suboptimal H ∞ filter is designed for linear systems with state and measurement delays, which is based on the alternative optimal H 2 filter from Basin, Perez, and Martinez-Zuniga (2006, 'Alternative Optimal Filter for Linear State Delay Systmes', International Journal of Adaptive Control and Signal Processing, 20

  7. A linear actuator system with 1-angstrom closed-loop control resolution and 50-millimeter travel range.

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, D.; Han, Y.; Toellner, T. S.; Alp, E. E.

    2002-08-12

    We have designed and tested a novel linear actuator system with 1-angstrom closed-loop control resolution and 50-mm travel range. There are two major ultraprecision motion control techniques that have been applied to this actuator: A novel laser Doppler encoder system with multiple-reflection optics; and A specially designed high-stiffness weak-link mechanism with stacked thin metal sheets having sub-angstrom driving sensitivity with excellent stability. In this paper, we present the system design and test results of this linear actuator. Applications of this new actuator system are also discussed.

  8. Design and evaluation of small, linear QWERTY keyboards.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Han-Chi; Wu, Fong-Gong; Chen, Chien-Hsu

    2014-05-01

    Miniature keyboard design is motivated by the need for smaller mobile devices with maximum user display area. Thus, this study developed four miniature keyboard designs which varied from conventional keyboard design in terms of their configuration and layout. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the input speed, accuracy, comfort, likability and learnability of four miniature keyboards. Sixteen fast typists and 16 slow typists were recruited to use these four miniature keyboards. The results showed that the rectangular-shaped keycaps of 3 letters with separated keycaps of numerals obtained the best proficiency speed, highest comfort and greatest user acceptance among the four keyboards. Moreover, the keyboards with square-shaped keycaps had better input accuracy compared to rectangular-shaped keycaps. Finally, the proposed keyboards were smaller than current keyboards, and the performance for all of the small keyboards was worse than that of the conventional keyboard. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Non-linear control logics for vibrations suppression: a comparison between model-based and non-model-based techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripamonti, Francesco; Orsini, Lorenzo; Resta, Ferruccio

    2015-04-01

    Non-linear behavior is present in many mechanical system operating conditions. In these cases, a common engineering practice is to linearize the equation of motion around a particular operating point, and to design a linear controller. The main disadvantage is that the stability properties and validity of the controller are local. In order to improve the controller performance, non-linear control techniques represent a very attractive solution for many smart structures. The aim of this paper is to compare non-linear model-based and non-model-based control techniques. In particular the model-based sliding-mode-control (SMC) technique is considered because of its easy implementation and the strong robustness of the controller even under heavy model uncertainties. Among the non-model-based control techniques, the fuzzy control (FC), allowing designing the controller according to if-then rules, has been considered. It defines the controller without a system reference model, offering many advantages such as an intrinsic robustness. These techniques have been tested on the pendulum nonlinear system.

  10. Utilizing the Zero-One Linear Programming Constraints to Draw Multiple Sets of Matched Samples from a Non-Treatment Population as Control Groups for the Quasi-Experimental Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Yuan H.; Yang, Yu N.; Tompkins, Leroy J.; Modarresi, Shahpar

    2005-01-01

    The statistical technique, "Zero-One Linear Programming," that has successfully been used to create multiple tests with similar characteristics (e.g., item difficulties, test information and test specifications) in the area of educational measurement, was deemed to be a suitable method for creating multiple sets of matched samples to be…

  11. Linear design considerations for TO-10 candidate experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Atchison, Walter A; Rousculp, Christopher L

    2011-01-12

    As part of the LANL/VNIIEF collaboration a high velocity cylindrical liner driven Hugoniot experiment is being designed to be driven by a VNIEF Disk Explosive Magnetic (flux compression) Generator (DEMG). Several variations in drive current and liner thickness have been proposed. This presentation will describe the LANL 1D and 2D simulations used to evaluate those designs. The presentation will also propose an analysis technique to assess a high current drive systems ability to stably and optimally drive a cylindrical aluminum liner for this type of experiment.

  12. Design and performance testing of an ultrasonic linear motor with dual piezoelectric actuators.

    PubMed

    Smithmaitrie, Pruittikorn; Suybangdum, Panumas; Laoratanakul, Pitak; Muensit, Nantakan

    2012-05-01

    In this work, design and performance testing of an ultrasonic linear motor with dual piezoelectric actuator patches are studied. The motor system consists of a linear stator, a pre-load weight, and two piezoelectric actuator patches. The piezoelectric actuators are bonded with the linear elastic stator at specific locations. The stator generates propagating waves when the piezoelectric actuators are subjected to harmonic excitations. Vibration characteristics of the linear stator are analyzed and compared with finite element and experimental results. The analytical, finite element, and experimental results show agreement. In the experiments, performance of the ultrasonic linear motor is tested. Relationships between velocity and pre-load weight, velocity and applied voltage, driving force and applied voltage, and velocity and driving force are reported. The design of the dual piezoelectric actuators yields a simpler structure with a smaller number of actuators and lower stator stiffness compared with a conventional design of an ultrasonic linear motor with fully laminated piezoelectric actuators.

  13. A user oriented microcomputer facility for designing linear quadratic Gaussian feedback compensators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houpt, P. K.; Wahid, J.; Johnson, T. L.; Ward, S. A.

    1978-01-01

    A laboratory design facility for digital microprocessor implementation of linear-quadratic-Gaussian feedback compensators is described. Outputs from user interactive programs for solving infinite time horizon LQ regulator and Kalman filter problems were conditioned for implementation on the laboratory microcomputer system. The software consisted of two parts: an offline high-level program for solving the LQ Ricatti equations and generating associated feedback and filter gains and a cross compiler/macro assembler which generates object code for the target microprocessor system. A PDP 11/70 with a UNIX operating system was used for all high level program and data management, and the target microprocessor system is an Intel MDS (8080-based processor). Application to the control of a two dimensional inverted pendulum is presented and issues in expanding the design/prototyping system to other target machine architectures are discussed.

  14. Stochastic Stability of Nonlinear Sampled Data Systems with a Jump Linear Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, Oscar R.; Herencia-Zapana, Heber; Gray, W. Steven

    2004-01-01

    This paper analyzes the stability of a sampled- data system consisting of a deterministic, nonlinear, time- invariant, continuous-time plant and a stochastic, discrete- time, jump linear controller. The jump linear controller mod- els, for example, computer systems and communication net- works that are subject to stochastic upsets or disruptions. This sampled-data model has been used in the analysis and design of fault-tolerant systems and computer-control systems with random communication delays without taking into account the inter-sample response. To analyze stability, appropriate topologies are introduced for the signal spaces of the sampled- data system. With these topologies, the ideal sampling and zero-order-hold operators are shown to be measurable maps. This paper shows that the known equivalence between the stability of a deterministic, linear sampled-data system and its associated discrete-time representation as well as between a nonlinear sampled-data system and a linearized representation holds even in a stochastic framework.

  15. Linear Approximation to Optimal Control Allocation for Rocket Nozzles with Elliptical Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Jeb S.; Wall, Johnm W.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a straightforward technique for assessing and realizing the maximum control moment effectiveness for a launch vehicle with multiple constrained rocket nozzles, where elliptical deflection limits in gimbal axes are expressed as an ensemble of independent quadratic constraints. A direct method of determining an approximating ellipsoid that inscribes the set of attainable angular accelerations is derived. In the case of a parameterized linear generalized inverse, the geometry of the attainable set is computationally expensive to obtain but can be approximated to a high degree of accuracy with the proposed method. A linear inverse can then be optimized to maximize the volume of the true attainable set by maximizing the volume of the approximating ellipsoid. The use of a linear inverse does not preclude the use of linear methods for stability analysis and control design, preferred in practice for assessing the stability characteristics of the inertial and servoelastic coupling appearing in large boosters. The present techniques are demonstrated via application to the control allocation scheme for a concept heavy-lift launch vehicle.

  16. A new look at the robust control of discrete-time Markov jump linear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorov, M. G.; Fragoso, M. D.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we make a foray in the role played by a set of four operators on the study of robust H2 and mixed H2/H∞ control problems for discrete-time Markov jump linear systems. These operators appear in the study of mean square stability for this class of systems. By means of new linear matrix inequality (LMI) characterisations of controllers, which include slack variables that, to some extent, separate the robustness and performance objectives, we introduce four alternative approaches to the design of controllers which are robustly stabilising and at the same time provide a guaranteed level of H2 performance. Since each operator provides a different degree of conservatism, the results are unified in the form of an iterative LMI technique for designing robust H2 controllers, whose convergence is attained in a finite number of steps. The method yields a new way of computing mixed H2/H∞ controllers, whose conservatism decreases with iteration. Two numerical examples illustrate the applicability of the proposed results for the control of a small unmanned aerial vehicle, and for an underactuated robotic arm.

  17. Parameter-dependent Lyapunov functions for state-derivative feedback control in polytopic linear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, E. R. P.; Assunção, E.; Teixeira, M. C. M.; Faria, F. A.; Buzachero, L. F. S.

    2011-08-01

    In some practical problems, for instance, the suppression of vibration in mechanical systems, the state-derivative signals are easier to obtain than the state signals. Using Linear Matrix Inequalities (LMIs), and applying the reciprocal projection lemma in a Parameter-dependent Lyapunov Function (PDLF), this article proposes a method for the design of state-derivative feedback applied to uncertain linear systems. The control design aims the system stabilisation without and with decay rate restriction. When considering only the system stability, the proposed methodology becomes practically equivalent to the Common Quadratic Lyapunov Function (CQLF) technique. Otherwise, when the decay rate is taken in account, the proposed methodology is shown to be less conservative. Numerical examples illustrate its efficiency.

  18. Minimax design of vibration absorbers for linear damped systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Brandon; Singh, Tarunraj

    2011-05-01

    This paper addresses the issue of design of a passive vibration absorber in the presence of uncertainties in the forcing frequency. A minimax problem is formulated to determine the parameters of a vibration absorber which minimize the maximum motion of the primary mass over the domain of the forcing frequency. The limiting solutions corresponding to the forcing frequency being unrestricted and to that where the forcing frequency is known exactly, are shown to match those available in the literature. The transition of the optimal vibration absorber parameters between the extreme two cases is presented and the solutions are generalized by permitting the mass ratio of the absorber mass and the primary mass to be design parameters. For the specific case where the primary system is undamped, detailed analysis is presented to determine the transition of the optimal vibration absorber parameters between three distinct domains of solutions.

  19. Beam dynamics design for uranium drift tube linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Wei-Ping; He, Yuan; Lu, Yuan-Rong

    2014-07-01

    KONUS beam dynamics design of uranium DTL with LORASR code is presented. The 238U34+ beam, whose current is 5.0 emA, is accelerated from injection energy of 0.35 MeV/u to output energy of 1.30 MeV/u by IH-DTL operated at 81.25 MHz in HIAF project at IMP of CAS. It achieves a transmission efficiency of 94.95% with a cavity length of 267.8 cm. The optimization aims are the reduction of emittance growth, beam loss and project costs. Because of the requirements of CW mode operation, the designed average acceleration gradient is about 2.48 MV/m. The maximum axial field is 10.2 MV/m, meanwhile the Kilpatrick breakdown field is 10.56 MV/m at 81.25 MHz.

  20. Non-linear analysis in Light Water Reactor design

    SciTech Connect

    Rashid, Y.R.; Sharabi, M.N.; Nickell, R.E.; Esztergar, E.P.; Jones, J.W.

    1980-03-01

    The results obtained from a scoping study sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Light Water Reactor (LWR) Safety Technology Program at Sandia National Laboratories are presented. Basically, this project calls for the examination of the hypothesis that the use of nonlinear analysis methods in the design of LWR systems and components of interest include such items as: the reactor vessel, vessel internals, nozzles and penetrations, component support structures, and containment structures. Piping systems are excluded because they are being addressed by a separate study. Essentially, the findings were that nonlinear analysis methods are beneficial to LWR design from a technical point of view. However, the costs needed to implement these methods are the roadblock to readily adopting them. In this sense, a cost-benefit type of analysis must be made on the various topics identified by these studies and priorities must be established. This document is the complete report by ANATECH International Corporation.

  1. Who Needs Linear Equating under the NEAT Design?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maris, Gunter; Schmittmann, Verena D.; Borsboom, Denny

    2010-01-01

    Test equating under the NEAT design is, at best, a necessary evil. At bottom, the procedure aims to reach a conclusion on what a tested person would have done, if he or she were administered a set of items that were in fact never administered. It is not possible to infer such a conclusion from the data, because one simply has not made the required…

  2. Advanced Design Linear Noise-Attenuating Earphone-Earcup System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    actual earcup. Provision is made to include values fnr stiffness, mass, compliance of the earcushions, compliance of the skin and other measurable...Ce = Compliance of earcup Rc = Damping of earcushion ( Ignores damping of skin as earcushion value is much larger Cc = Compliance of earcushion Cs...Compliance of skin Cca = Compliance of earcup cavity ELECTRICAL CIRCUIT SIMULATION OF SINGLE EARCUP SYSTEM Figure 3 -6- In addition, the designers kept

  3. Advanced Control Considerations for Turbofan Engine Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Joseph W.; Csank, Jeffrey T.; Chicatelli, Amy

    2016-01-01

    This paper covers the application of a model-based engine control (MBEC) methodology featuring a self tuning on-board model for an aircraft turbofan engine simulation. The nonlinear engine model is capable of modeling realistic engine performance, allowing for a verification of the advanced control methodology over a wide range of operating points and life cycle conditions. The on-board model is a piece-wise linear model derived from the nonlinear engine model and updated using an optimal tuner Kalman Filter estimation routine, which enables the on-board model to self-tune to account for engine performance variations. MBEC is used here to show how advanced control architectures can improve efficiency during the design phase of a turbofan engine by reducing conservative operability margins. The operability margins that can be reduced, such as stall margin, can expand the engine design space and offer potential for efficiency improvements. Application of MBEC architecture to a nonlinear engine simulation is shown to reduce the thrust specific fuel consumption by approximately 1% over the baseline design, while maintaining safe operation of the engine across the flight envelope.

  4. Analog Pre-Distortion Linearizer Using Self Base Bias Controlled Amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinjo, Shintaro; Mori, Kazutomi; Yamada, Keiki; Suematsu, Noriharu; Shimozawa, Mitsuhiro

    An analog pre-distortion linearizer employing a radio frequency (RF) transistor with a self base bias control circuit is proposed. The self base bias control circuit extracts the envelope from the modulated input RF signal of the RF transistor and automatically controls its base current according to the extracted envelope. As a result, the proposed linearizer realizes positive gain deviation at high input power level. By adding a resistor between the RF transistor and the self base bias control circuit, the negative gain deviation can be derived. The design of the proposed lineaizer is described with taking the envelope frequency response of the self base bias control circuit into consideration. The fabricated linearizer achieves the adjacent channel power leakage ratio (ACLR) improvement of 8.1dB for a 2GHz-band, 10W-class GaAs FET high-power amplifier (HPA) with negative gain deviation for W-CDMA base stations. It also achieves the ACLR improvement of 8.3dB for a LDMOS HPA with positive gain deviation for the same application.

  5. Non-linear control of the ''clam'' wave energy device. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-09-01

    A promising wave energy device being currently investigated is the ''clam'' device. The clam extracts energy by pumping air through a specially designed (Wells) turbine. Although operation of the Wells turbine does not require a rectified air flow, some additional control will be necessary to optimize the phase of the clam motion for good efficiencies. An examination of the equation of motion in the time domain suggests the possibility of non-linear phase control by mechanical, power take-off, or pneumatic latching. Latching can be shown to increase the efficiency of the device in the longer wavelengths of the wave spectrum, i.e. those of high incident wave power.

  6. SSME digital control design characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, W. T.; Searle, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    To protect against a latent programming error (software fault) existing in an untried branch combination that would render the space shuttle out of control in a critical flight phase, the Backup Flight System (BFS) was chartered to provide a safety alternative. The BFS is designed to operate in critical flight phases (ascent and descent) by monitoring the activities of the space shuttle flight subsystems that are under control of the primary flight software (PFS) (e.g., navigation, crew interface, propulsion), then, upon manual command by the flightcrew, to assume control of the space shuttle and deliver it to a noncritical flight condition (safe orbit or touchdown). The problems associated with the selection of the PFS/BFS system architecture, the internal BFS architecture, the fault tolerant software mechanisms, and the long term BFS utility are discussed.

  7. Iterative LQG Controller Design Through Closed-Loop Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsiao, Min-Hung; Huang, Jen-Kuang; Cox, David E.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an iterative Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) controller design approach for a linear stochastic system with an uncertain open-loop model and unknown noise statistics. This approach consists of closed-loop identification and controller redesign cycles. In each cycle, the closed-loop identification method is used to identify an open-loop model and a steady-state Kalman filter gain from closed-loop input/output test data obtained by using a feedback LQG controller designed from the previous cycle. Then the identified open-loop model is used to redesign the state feedback. The state feedback and the identified Kalman filter gain are used to form an updated LQC controller for the next cycle. This iterative process continues until the updated controller converges. The proposed controller design is demonstrated by numerical simulations and experiments on a highly unstable large-gap magnetic suspension system.

  8. Non-linear feedback control of the p53 protein-mdm2 inhibitor system using the derivative-free non-linear Kalman filter.

    PubMed

    Rigatos, Gerasimos G

    2016-06-01

    It is proven that the model of the p53-mdm2 protein synthesis loop is a differentially flat one and using a diffeomorphism (change of state variables) that is proposed by differential flatness theory it is shown that the protein synthesis model can be transformed into the canonical (Brunovsky) form. This enables the design of a feedback control law that maintains the concentration of the p53 protein at the desirable levels. To estimate the non-measurable elements of the state vector describing the p53-mdm2 system dynamics, the derivative-free non-linear Kalman filter is used. Moreover, to compensate for modelling uncertainties and external disturbances that affect the p53-mdm2 system, the derivative-free non-linear Kalman filter is re-designed as a disturbance observer. The derivative-free non-linear Kalman filter consists of the Kalman filter recursion applied on the linearised equivalent of the protein synthesis model together with an inverse transformation based on differential flatness theory that enables to retrieve estimates for the state variables of the initial non-linear model. The proposed non-linear feedback control and perturbations compensation method for the p53-mdm2 system can result in more efficient chemotherapy schemes where the infusion of medication will be better administered.

  9. AN INTRODUCTION TO THE APPLICATION OF DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING TO LINEAR CONTROL SYSTEMS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING APPLIED TO OPTIMIZE LINEAR CONTROL SYSTEMS WITH QUADRATIC PERFORMANCE MEASURES. MATHEMATICAL METHODS WHICH MAY BE APPLIED TO SPACE VEHICLE AND RELATED GUIDANCE AND CONTROL PROBLEMS.

  10. 21 CFR 820.30 - Design controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Design controls. 820.30 Section 820.30 Food and... QUALITY SYSTEM REGULATION Design Controls § 820.30 Design controls. (a) General. (1) Each manufacturer of..., shall establish and maintain procedures to control the design of the device in order to ensure that...

  11. 21 CFR 820.30 - Design controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Design controls. 820.30 Section 820.30 Food and... QUALITY SYSTEM REGULATION Design Controls § 820.30 Design controls. (a) General. (1) Each manufacturer of..., shall establish and maintain procedures to control the design of the device in order to ensure...

  12. Localized modelling and feedback control of linear instabilities in 2-D wall bounded shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tol, Henry; Kotsonis, Marios; de Visser, Coen

    2016-11-01

    A new approach is presented for control of instabilities in 2-D wall bounded shear flows described by the linearized Navier-Stokes equations (LNSE). The control design accounts both for spatially localized actuators/sensors and the dominant perturbation dynamics in an optimal control framework. An inflow disturbance model is proposed for streamwise instabilities that drive laminar-turbulent transition. The perturbation modes that contribute to the transition process can be selected and are included in the control design. A reduced order model is derived from the LNSE that captures the input-output behavior and the dominant perturbation dynamics. This model is used to design an optimal controller for suppressing the instability growth. A 2-D channel flow and a 2-D boundary layer flow over a flat plate are considered as application cases. Disturbances are generated upstream of the control domain and the resulting flow perturbations are estimated/controlled using wall shear measurements and localized unsteady blowing and suction at the wall. It will be shown that the controller is able to cancel the perturbations and is robust to unmodelled disturbances.

  13. Sensitivity Analysis of Linear Programming and Quadratic Programming Algorithms for Control Allocation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Susan A.; Bodson, Marc; Acosta, Diana M.

    2009-01-01

    The Next Generation (NextGen) transport aircraft configurations being investigated as part of the NASA Aeronautics Subsonic Fixed Wing Project have more control surfaces, or control effectors, than existing transport aircraft configurations. Conventional flight control is achieved through two symmetric elevators, two antisymmetric ailerons, and a rudder. The five effectors, reduced to three command variables, produce moments along the three main axes of the aircraft and enable the pilot to control the attitude and flight path of the aircraft. The NextGen aircraft will have additional redundant control effectors to control the three moments, creating a situation where the aircraft is over-actuated and where a simple relationship does not exist anymore between the required effector deflections and the desired moments. NextGen flight controllers will incorporate control allocation algorithms to determine the optimal effector commands and attain the desired moments, taking into account the effector limits. Approaches to solving the problem using linear programming and quadratic programming algorithms have been proposed and tested. It is of great interest to understand their relative advantages and disadvantages and how design parameters may affect their properties. In this paper, we investigate the sensitivity of the effector commands with respect to the desired moments and show on some examples that the solutions provided using the l2 norm of quadratic programming are less sensitive than those using the l1 norm of linear programming.

  14. Design and Stability of an On-Orbit Attitude Control System Using Reaction Control Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Robert A.; Hough, Steven; Orphee, Carolina; Clements, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Principles for the design and stability of a spacecraft on-orbit attitude control system employing on-off Reaction Control System (RCS) thrusters is presented. Both the vehicle dynamics and the control system actuators are inherently nonlinear, hence traditional linear control system design approaches are not directly applicable. This paper has three main aspects: It summarizes key RCS control System design principles from the Space Shuttle and Space Station programs, it demonstrates a new approach to develop a linear model of a phase plane control system using describing functions, and applies each of these to the initial development of the NASA's next generation of upper stage vehicles. Topics addressed include thruster hardware specifications, phase plane design and stability, jet selection approaches, filter design metrics, and automaneuver logic.

  15. Dynamic MLC leaf sequencing for integrated linear accelerator control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Popple, Richard A.; Brezovich, Ivan A.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Leaf positions for dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) intensity modulated radiation therapy must be closely synchronized with MU delivery. For the Varian C3 series MLC controller, if the planned trajectory (leaf position vs. MU) requires velocities exceeding the capability of the MLC, the leaves fall behind the planned positions, causing the controller to momentarily hold the beam and thereby introduce dosimetric errors. We investigated the merits of a new commercial linear accelerator, TrueBeam, that integrates MLC control with prospective dose rate modulation. If treatment is delivered at dose rates so high that leaves would fall behind, the controller reduces the dose rate such that harmony between MU and leaf position is preserved. Methods: For three sets of DMLC leaf trajectories, point doses and two-dimensional dose distributions were measured in phantom using an ionization chamber and film, respectively. The first set, delivered using both a TrueBeam and a conventional C3 controller, comprised a single leaf bank closing at planned velocities of 2.4, 7.1, and 14 cm/s. The maximum achievable leaf velocity for both systems was 3 cm/s. The remaining two sets were derived from clinical fluence maps using a commercial treatment planning system for a range of planned dose rates and were delivered using TrueBeam set to the maximum dose rate, 600 MU/min. Generating trajectories using a planned dose rate that is lower than the delivery dose rate effectively increased the leaf velocity constraint used by the planning system for trajectory calculation. The second set of leaf trajectories was derived from two fluence maps containing regions of zero fluence obtained from representative beams of two different patient treatment plans. The third set was obtained from all nine fields of a head and neck treatment plan. For the head and neck plan, dose-volume histograms of the spinal cord and target for each planned dose rate were obtained. Results: For the single

  16. A study of nonlinear flight control system designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Lijun

    This thesis discusses both normal aircraft flight control where the control surfaces are the primary effectors, and unconventional emergency flight control by engines only. It has long been realized that nonlinearity in aircraft dynamics is a prominent consideration in design of high-performance conventional flight control systems. The engine-only flight control problem also faces strong nonlinearity, although due to different reasons. A nonlinear predictive control method and an approximate receding-horizon control method are used for normal and engine-only flight control system designs for an F-18 aircraft. The comparison of the performance with that of linear flight controllers provides some insight into when nonlinear controllers may render a much improved performance. The concept of nonlinear flight control system design is extended to output tracking control problem. The capability of the nonlinear controller to stabilize the aircraft and accomplish output tracking control for non-minimum phase system is successfully demonstrated. Numerical simulation results of longitudinal motion based on two typical flight conditions for an F-18 aircraft is presented to illustrate some of these aspects. It is suggested in this thesis that nonlinear flight control system design, particularly the engine-only controller design and output tracking control design for non-minimum phase system by using a nonlinear method is more effective for the highly nonlinear environment. The recently developed continuous-time predictive control approach and an approximate receding-horizon control method are shown to be effective methods in the situation while the conventional linear or popular nonlinear control designs are either ineffective or inapplicable.

  17. Adaptive vision-based control of an unmanned aerial vehicle without linear velocity measurements.

    PubMed

    Jabbari Asl, Hamed; Yoon, Jungwon

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, an image-based visual servo controller is designed for an unmanned aerial vehicle. The main objective is to use flow of image features as the velocity cue to compensate for the low quality of linear velocity information obtained from accelerometers. Nonlinear observers are designed to estimate this flow. The proposed controller is bounded, which can help to keep the target points in the field of view of the camera. The main advantages over the previous full dynamic observer-based methods are that, the controller is robust with respect to unknown image depth, and also no yaw information is required. The complete stability analysis is presented and asymptotic convergence of the error signals is guaranteed. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed approach. Copyright © 2016 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Integral Sliding Mode Fault-Tolerant Control for Uncertain Linear Systems Over Networks With Signals Quantization.

    PubMed

    Hao, Li-Ying; Park, Ju H; Ye, Dan

    2016-06-13

    In this paper, a new robust fault-tolerant compensation control method for uncertain linear systems over networks is proposed, where only quantized signals are assumed to be available. This approach is based on the integral sliding mode (ISM) method where two kinds of integral sliding surfaces are constructed. One is the continuous-state-dependent surface with the aim of sliding mode stability analysis and the other is the quantization-state-dependent surface, which is used for ISM controller design. A scheme that combines the adaptive ISM controller and quantization parameter adjustment strategy is then proposed. Through utilizing H∞ control analytical technique, once the system is in the sliding mode, the nature of performing disturbance attenuation and fault tolerance from the initial time can be found without requiring any fault information. Finally, the effectiveness of our proposed ISM control fault-tolerant schemes against quantization errors is demonstrated in the simulation.

  19. James Webb Space Telescope optical simulation testbed III: first experimental results with linear-control alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egron, Sylvain; Lajoie, Charles-Philippe; Leboulleux, Lucie; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Pueyo, Laurent; Choquet, Élodie; Perrin, Marshall D.; Ygouf, Marie; Michau, Vincent; Bonnefois, Aurélie; Fusco, Thierry; Escolle, Clément; Ferrari, Marc; Hugot, Emmanuel; Soummer, Rémi

    2016-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Simulation Testbed (JOST) is a tabletop experiment designed to study wavefront sensing and control for a segmented space telescope, including both commissioning and maintenance activities. JOST is complementary to existing testbeds for JWST (e.g. the Ball Aerospace Testbed Telescope TBT) given its compact scale and flexibility, ease of use, and colocation at the JWST Science and Operations Center. The design of JOST reproduces the physics of JWST's three-mirror anastigmat (TMA) using three custom aspheric lenses. It provides similar quality image as JWST (80% Strehl ratio) over a field equivalent to a NIRCam module, but at 633 nm. An Iris AO segmented mirror stands for the segmented primary mirror of JWST. Actuators allow us to control (1) the 18 segments of the segmented mirror in piston, tip, tilt and (2) the second lens, which stands for the secondary mirror, in tip, tilt and x, y, z positions. We present the full linear control alignment infrastructure developed for JOST, with an emphasis on multi-field wavefront sensing and control. Our implementation of the Wavefront Sensing (WFS) algorithms using phase diversity is experimentally tested. The wavefront control (WFC) algorithms, which rely on a linear model for optical aberrations induced by small misalignments of the three lenses, are tested and validated on simulations.

  20. Linear parameter varying switching attitude control for a near space hypersonic vehicle with parametric uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yiqing; Sun, Changyin; Qian, Chengshan; Wang, Li

    2015-12-01

    This paper deals with the problem of linear parameter varying (LPV) switching attitude control for a near space hypersonic vehicle (NSHV) with parametric uncertainties. First, due to the enormous complexity of the NSHV nonlinear attitude dynamics, a slow-fast loop polytopic LPV attitude model is developed by using Jacobian linearisation and the tensor product model transformation approach. Second, for the purpose of less conservative attitude controller design, the flight envelope is divided into four subregions. For each parameter subregion, slow-loop and fast-loop LPV controllers are designed. By the defined switching character function, these slow-fast loop LPV controllers are then switched in order to guarantee the closed-loop NSHV system to be asymptotically stable and satisfy a specified tracking performance criterion. The condition of LPV switching attitude controller synthesis is given in terms of linear matrix inequalities, which can be readily solved via standard numerical software, and the robust stability analysis of the closed-loop NSHV system is verified based on multiple Lypapunov functions. Finally, numerical simulations have demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  1. Scheduled Controller Design of Congestion Control Considering Network Resource Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naito, Hiroyuki; Azuma, Takehito; Fujita, Masayuki

    In this paper, we consider a dynamical model of computer networks and derive a synthesis method for congestion control. First, we show a model of TCP/AQM (Transmission Control Protocol/Active Queue Management) as a dynamical model of computer networks. The dynamical model of TCP/AQM networks consists of models of TCP window size, queue length and AQM mechanisms. Second, we propose to describe the dynamical model of TCP/AQM networks as linear systems with self-scheduling parameters, which also depend on information delay. Here we focus on the constraints on the maximum queue length and TCP window-size, which are the network resources in TCP/AQM networks. We derive TCP/AQM networks as the LPV system (linear parameter varying system) with information delay and self-scheduling parameter. We design a memoryless state feedback controller of the LPV system based on a gain-scheduling method. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed method is evaluated by using MATLAB and the well-known ns-2 (Network Simulator Ver.2) simulator.

  2. Application and flight test of linearizing transformations using measurement feedback to the nonlinear control problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antoniewicz, Robert F.; Duke, Eugene L.; Menon, P. K. A.

    1991-01-01

    The design of nonlinear controllers has relied on the use of detailed aerodynamic and engine models that must be associated with the control law in the flight system implementation. Many of these controllers were applied to vehicle flight path control problems and have attempted to combine both inner- and outer-loop control functions in a single controller. An approach to the nonlinear trajectory control problem is presented. This approach uses linearizing transformations with measurement feedback to eliminate the need for detailed aircraft models in outer-loop control applications. By applying this approach and separating the inner-loop and outer-loop functions two things were achieved: (1) the need for incorporating detailed aerodynamic models in the controller is obviated; and (2) the controller is more easily incorporated into existing aircraft flight control systems. An implementation of the controller is discussed, and this controller is tested on a six degree-of-freedom F-15 simulation and in flight on an F-15 aircraft. Simulation data are presented which validates this approach over a large portion of the F-15 flight envelope. Proof of this concept is provided by flight-test data that closely matches simulation results. Flight-test data are also presented.

  3. Robust control for snake maneuver design of missile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kun, Ya; Chen, Xin; Li, Chuntao

    2017-01-01

    For the performance of missile with high Mach number and strongly nonlinear dynamics, this paper uses robust control to design maneuver controller. Robust servomechanism linear quadratic regulator (RSLQR) control is used to form the inner loop and proportional-plus-integral (PI) control is used to provide yawing tracking with no error. Contrast simulations under three types of deviation have been done to confirm robustness of the RSLQR-plus-PI control. Simulation results shows that RSLQR-plus-PI control would resist the disturbance and maintain the properties of the controller, guarantee the robustness and stability of missile more effectively than pure PI control.

  4. Zeroth-order design report for the next linear collider. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Raubenheimer, T.O.

    1996-05-01

    This Zeroth-Order Design Report (ZDR) for the Next Linear Collider (NLC) has been completed as a feasibility study for a TeV-scale linear collider that incorporates a room-temperature accelerator powered by rf microwaves at 11.424 GHz--similar to that presently used in the SLC, but at four times the rf frequency. The purpose of this study is to examine the complete systems of such a collider, to understand how the parts fit together, and to make certain that every required piece has been included. The ``design`` presented here is not fully engineered in any sense, but to be assured that the NLC can be built, attention has been given to a number of critical components and issues that present special challenges. More engineering and development of a number of mechanical and electrical systems remain to be done, but the conclusion of this study is that indeed the NLC is technically feasible and can be expected to reach the performance levels required to perform research at the TeV energy scale. Volume II covers the following: collimation systems; IP switch and big bend; final focus; the interaction region; multiple bunch issues; control systems; instrumentation; machine protection systems; NLC reliability considerations; NLC conventional facilities. Also included are four appendices on the following topics: An RF power source upgrade to the NLC; a second interaction region for gamma-gamma, gamma-electron; ground motion: theory and measurement; and beam-based feedback: theory and implementation.

  5. A Non-Linear Approach to Spacecraft Formation Control in the Vicinity of a Collinear Libration Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luquette, Richard J.; Sanner, Robert M.; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An expanding interest in mission design strategies that exploit libration point regions, demands the continued development of enhanced, efficient, control algorithms for station-keeping and formation maintenance. Linear control strategies have been developed for station-keeping. However, their region of stability is bounded by the assumptions required for linearizing the governing equations of motion. For example, reference [I] discusses the development of a linear control design for maintaining a halo orbit about the Earth-Moon L2 libration point. Trial runs indicated the trajectory was unstable for starting points exceeding 45,000 km from the L2 point. Also, there was significant growth in the control effort required to maintain the orbit as the nominal radius increased. This result is a consequence of the increased influence of the system non-linearities, as the trajectory deviated from the linearization point, L2. As an alternative, this paper presents the development of a non-linear control strategy, based on a Hamiltonian formulation of the equations of motion. The control strategy is applied to the problem of formation maintenance, rather than simple station

  6. Adaptive iterative learning control for a class of non-linearly parameterised systems with input saturations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruikun; Hou, Zhongsheng; Ji, Honghai; Yin, Chenkun

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, an adaptive iterative learning control scheme is proposed for a class of non-linearly parameterised systems with unknown time-varying parameters and input saturations. By incorporating a saturation function, a new iterative learning control mechanism is presented which includes a feedback term and a parameter updating term. Through the use of parameter separation technique, the non-linear parameters are separated from the non-linear function and then a saturated difference updating law is designed in iteration domain by combining the unknown parametric term of the local Lipschitz continuous function and the unknown time-varying gain into an unknown time-varying function. The analysis of convergence is based on a time-weighted Lyapunov-Krasovskii-like composite energy function which consists of time-weighted input, state and parameter estimation information. The proposed learning control mechanism warrants a L2[0, T] convergence of the tracking error sequence along the iteration axis. Simulation results are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the adaptive iterative learning control scheme.

  7. PHELIX: design of transformer-driven linear implosion system

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, Peter J; Atchison, Walter L; Rousculp, Chris L; Reinovsky, Robert E

    2008-01-01

    Experiments involving electromagnetically-imploded, solid-density liners can be achieved at reduced cost and energy if we start with a scale-size based on diagnostic resolution, rather than on the largest capacitor bank or generator we could bring to bear. For minimum resolution of 100 microns or less, many useful experiments could be performed with initial liner diameters that are factors of two to three smaller than used on high-energy systems, such as Atlas, thereby reducing energy requirements to sub-megajoule levels. Reduction in scale-size, however, also decreases the inductance change associated with liner motion relative to other inductances in the circuit. To improve coupling efficiency to liner kinetic energy, we invoke a current step-up transformer. Scaling relations have been developed for reducing the size and energy of such systems and compared with detailed numerical simulations. We discuss these calculations and describe the engineering embodiment of the resulting design for a system called PHELIX (Precision High Energy-density Liner Implosion eXperiment).

  8. Application of Piecewise Linear Control Allocation to Reusable Launch Vehicle Guidance and Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    Reklaitis , et.al. [7]. Without loss of generality, we begin by considering a single variable function, f(x), defined on an interval, [a, b]. Begin by...Piecewise Linear Functions,” Journal of Guidance, Control, and Dynamics, vol. 27, no. 6, pp. 1017–1027, Nov./Dec. 2004. [7] G. Reklaitis , A. Ravindran

  9. A high-order, linear time-invariant model for application to higher harmonic control and flight control system interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Rendy Po-Ren

    Helicopters can experience high vibration levels, which reduce passenger comfort and cause progressive damage to the aircraft structure and on-board equipment. Because the primary source of excitation is typically the main rotor, special rotor control systems have been proposed to reduce these vibrations at the source. This dissertation addresses one such system, generally known as "Higher Harmonic Control" (HHC) because it consists of superimposing high frequency rotor inputs to the conventional low frequency ones used to control and maneuver the helicopter. Because both the primary flight control system and the HHC system act on the main rotor, the risk of adverse interactions between the two systems exists. This dissertation focuses on these interactions, which have never been studied before for the lack of suitable mathematical models. The key ingredient is an accurate linearized model of the helicopter, which includes the higher harmonic rotor response, and both the Automatic Flight Control System (AFCS) and the HHC system. Traditional linearization techniques lead to a system with periodic coefficients. Although Floquet theory can be used to study such periodic systems, there are far more control system design theories and software tools that are available for linear time-invariant systems than for periodic systems. Additionally, the theoretical evaluation of the handling qualities of the helicopter requires linear time-invariant systems. This research describes a new methodology for the extraction of a high-order, linear time invariant model, which allows the periodicity of the helicopter response to be accurately captured. This model provides the needed level of dynamic fidelity to permit an analysis and optimization of the AFCS and HHC algorithms. The key results of this study indicate that the closed-loop HHC system has little influence on the AFCS or on the vehicle handling qualities, which indicates that the AFCS does not need modification to work with

  10. Linear matrix inequality-based nonlinear adaptive robust control with application to unmanned aircraft systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kun, David William

    Unmanned aircraft systems (UASs) are gaining popularity in civil and commercial applications as their lightweight on-board computers become more powerful and affordable, their power storage devices improve, and the Federal Aviation Administration addresses the legal and safety concerns of integrating UASs in the national airspace. Consequently, many researchers are pursuing novel methods to control UASs in order to improve their capabilities, dependability, and safety assurance. The nonlinear control approach is a common choice as it offers several benefits for these highly nonlinear aerospace systems (e.g., the quadrotor). First, the controller design is physically intuitive and is derived from well known dynamic equations. Second, the final control law is valid in a larger region of operation, including far from the equilibrium states. And third, the procedure is largely methodical, requiring less expertise with gain tuning, which can be arduous for a novice engineer. Considering these facts, this thesis proposes a nonlinear controller design method that combines the advantages of adaptive robust control (ARC) with the powerful design tools of linear matrix inequalities (LMI). The ARC-LMI controller is designed with a discontinuous projection-based adaptation law, and guarantees a prescribed transient and steady state tracking performance for uncertain systems in the presence of matched disturbances. The norm of the tracking error is bounded by a known function that depends on the controller design parameters in a known form. Furthermore, the LMI-based part of the controller ensures the stability of the system while overcoming polytopic uncertainties, and minimizes the control effort. This can reduce the number of parameters that require adaptation, and helps to avoid control input saturation. These desirable characteristics make the ARC-LMI control algorithm well suited for the quadrotor UAS, which may have unknown parameters and may encounter external

  11. Control Law Design in a Computational Aeroelasticity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, Jerry R.; Robertshaw, Harry H.; Kapania, Rakesh K.

    2003-01-01

    A methodology for designing active control laws in a computational aeroelasticity environment is given. The methodology involves employing a systems identification technique to develop an explicit state-space model for control law design from the output of a computational aeroelasticity code. The particular computational aeroelasticity code employed in this paper solves the transonic small disturbance aerodynamic equation using a time-accurate, finite-difference scheme. Linear structural dynamics equations are integrated simultaneously with the computational fluid dynamics equations to determine the time responses of the structure. These structural responses are employed as the input to a modern systems identification technique that determines the Markov parameters of an "equivalent linear system". The Eigensystem Realization Algorithm is then employed to develop an explicit state-space model of the equivalent linear system. The Linear Quadratic Guassian control law design technique is employed to design a control law. The computational aeroelasticity code is modified to accept control laws and perform closed-loop simulations. Flutter control of a rectangular wing model is chosen to demonstrate the methodology. Various cases are used to illustrate the usefulness of the methodology as the nonlinearity of the aeroelastic system is increased through increased angle-of-attack changes.

  12. Design and analysis of an unconventional permanent magnet linear machine for energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Peng

    This Ph.D. dissertation proposes an unconventional high power density linear electromagnetic kinetic energy harvester, and a high-performance two-stage interface power electronics to maintain maximum power abstraction from the energy source and charge the Li-ion battery load with constant current. The proposed machine architecture is composed of a double-sided flat type silicon steel stator with winding slots, a permanent magnet mover, coil windings, a linear motion guide and an adjustable spring bearing. The unconventional design of the machine is that NdFeB magnet bars in the mover are placed with magnetic fields in horizontal direction instead of vertical direction and the same magnetic poles are facing each other. The derived magnetic equivalent circuit model proves the average air-gap flux density of the novel topology is as high as 0.73 T with 17.7% improvement over that of the conventional topology at the given geometric dimensions of the proof-of-concept machine. Subsequently, the improved output voltage and power are achieved. The dynamic model of the linear generator is also developed, and the analytical equations of output maximum power are derived for the case of driving vibration with amplitude that is equal, smaller and larger than the relative displacement between the mover and the stator of the machine respectively. Furthermore, the finite element analysis (FEA) model has been simulated to prove the derived analytical results and the improved power generation capability. Also, an optimization framework is explored to extend to the multi-Degree-of-Freedom (n-DOF) vibration based linear energy harvesting devices. Moreover, a boost-buck cascaded switch mode converter with current controller is designed to extract the maximum power from the harvester and charge the Li-ion battery with trickle current. Meanwhile, a maximum power point tracking (MPPT) algorithm is proposed and optimized for low frequency driving vibrations. Finally, a proof

  13. Regulation of hypnosis in Propofol anesthesia administration based on non-linear control strategy.

    PubMed

    Ilyas, Muhammad; Khaqan, Ali; Iqbal, Jamshed; Riaz, Raja Ali

    Continuous adjustment of Propofol in manual delivery of anesthesia for conducting a surgical procedure overburdens the workload of an anesthetist who is working in a multi-tasking scenario. Going beyond manual administration and Target Controlled Infusion, closed-loop control of Propofol infusion has the potential to offer several benefits in terms of handling perturbations and reducing the effect of inter-patient variability. This paper proposes a closed-loop automated drug administration approach to control Depth Of Hypnosis in anesthesia. In contrast with most of the existing research on anesthesia control which makes use of linear control strategies or their improved variants, the novelty of the present research lies in applying robust control strategy i.e. Sliding Mode Control to accurately control drug infusion. Based on the derived patient's model, the designed controller uses measurements from EEG to regulate DOH on Bispectral Index by controlling infusion rate of Propofol. The performance of the controller is investigated and characterized with real dataset of 8 patients undergoing surgery. Results of this in silico study indicate that for all the patients, with 0% overshoot observed, the steady state error lies in between ±5. Clinically, this implies that in all the cases, without any overdose, the controller maintains the desired DOH level for smooth conduction of surgical procedures. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. [Regulation of hypnosis in Propofol anesthesia administration based on non-linear control strategy].

    PubMed

    Ilyas, Muhammad; Khaqan, Ali; Iqbal, Jamshed; Riaz, Raja Ali

    Continuous adjustment of Propofol in manual delivery of anesthesia for conducting a surgical procedure overburdens the workload of an anesthetist who is working in a multi-tasking scenario. Going beyond manual administration and Target Controlled Infusion, closed-loop control of Propofol infusion has the potential to offer several benefits in terms of handling perturbations and reducing the effect of inter-patient variability. This paper proposes a closed-loop automated drug administration approach to control Depth Of Hypnosis in anesthesia. In contrast with most of the existing research on anesthesia control which makes use of linear control strategies or their improved variants, the novelty of the present research lies in applying robust control strategy i.e. Sliding Mode Control to accurately control drug infusion. Based on the derived patient's model, the designed controller uses measurements from EEG to regulate DOH on Bispectral Index by controlling infusion rate of Propofol. The performance of the controller is investigated and characterized with real dataset of 8 patients undergoing surgery. Results of this in silico study indicate that for all the patients, with 0% overshoot observed, the steady state error lies in between ±5. Clinically, this implies that in all the cases, without any overdose, the controller maintains the desired DOH level for smooth conduction of surgical procedures. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Control of nonlinear processes by using linear model predictive control algorithms.

    PubMed

    Gu, Bingfeng; Gupta, Yash P

    2008-04-01

    Most chemical processes are inherently nonlinear. However, because of their simplicity, linear control algorithms have been used for the control of nonlinear processes. In this study, the use of the dynamic matrix control algorithm and a simplified model predictive control algorithm for control of a bench-scale pH neutralization process is investigated. The nonlinearity is handled by dividing the operating region into sub-regions and by switching the controller model as the process moves from one sub-region to another. A simple modification for model predictive control algorithms is presented to handle the switching. The simulation and experimental results show that the modification can provide a significant improvement in the control of nonlinear processes.

  16. Design and Stability of an On-Orbit Attitude Control System Using Reaction Control Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Robert A.; Hough, Steven; Orphee, Carolina; Clements, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Basic principles for the design and stability of a spacecraft on-orbit attitude control system employing on-off Reaction Control System (RCS) thrusters are presented. Both vehicle dynamics and the control system actuators are inherently nonlinear, hence traditional linear control system design approaches are not directly applicable. This paper has two main aspects: It summarizes key RCS design principles from earlier NASA vehicles, notably the Space Shuttle and Space Station programs, and introduces advances in the linear modelling and analyses of a phase plane control system derived in the initial development of the NASA's next upper stage vehicle, the Exploration Upper Stage (EUS). Topics include thruster hardware specifications, phase plane design and stability, jet selection approaches, filter design metrics, and RCS rotational maneuver logic.

  17. Neural network-based nonlinear model predictive control vs. linear quadratic gaussian control

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cho, C.; Vance, R.; Mardi, N.; Qian, Z.; Prisbrey, K.

    1997-01-01

    One problem with the application of neural networks to the multivariable control of mineral and extractive processes is determining whether and how to use them. The objective of this investigation was to compare neural network control to more conventional strategies and to determine if there are any advantages in using neural network control in terms of set-point tracking, rise time, settling time, disturbance rejection and other criteria. The procedure involved developing neural network controllers using both historical plant data and simulation models. Various control patterns were tried, including both inverse and direct neural network plant models. These were compared to state space controllers that are, by nature, linear. For grinding and leaching circuits, a nonlinear neural network-based model predictive control strategy was superior to a state space-based linear quadratic gaussian controller. The investigation pointed out the importance of incorporating state space into neural networks by making them recurrent, i.e., feeding certain output state variables into input nodes in the neural network. It was concluded that neural network controllers can have better disturbance rejection, set-point tracking, rise time, settling time and lower set-point overshoot, and it was also concluded that neural network controllers can be more reliable and easy to implement in complex, multivariable plants.

  18. A novel laser doppler linear encoder using multiple-reflection optical design for high-resolution linear actuator.

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, D.

    1998-07-16

    A novel laser Doppler linear encoder system (LDLE) has been developed at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. A self-aligning 3-D multiple-reflection optical design was used for the laser Doppler displacement meter (LDDM) to extend the encoder system resolution. The encoder is compact [about 70 mm(H) x 100 mm(W) x 250 mm(L)] and it has sub-Angstrom resolution, 100 mm/sec measuring speed, and 300 mm measuring range. Because the new device affords higher resolution, as compared with commercial laser interferometer systems, and yet cost less, it will have good potential for use in scientific and industrial applications.

  19. Stable adaptive control using new critic designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werbos, Paul J.

    1999-03-01

    Classical adaptive control proves total-system stability for control of linear plants, but only for plants meeting very restrictive assumptions. Approximate Dynamic Programming (ADP) has the potential, in principle, to ensure stability without such tight restrictions. It also offers nonlinear and neural extensions for optimal control, with empirically supported links to what is seen in the brain. However, the relevant ADP methods in use today--TD, HDP, DHP, GDHP--and the Galerkin-based versions of these all have serious limitations when used here as parallel distributed real-time learning systems; either they do not possess quadratic unconditional stability (to be defined) or they lead to incorrect results in the stochastic case. (ADAC or Q- learning designs do not help.) After explaining these conclusions, this paper describes new ADP designs which overcome these limitations. It also addresses the Generalized Moving Target problem, a common family of static optimization problems, and describes a way to stabilize large-scale economic equilibrium models, such as the old long-term energy mode of DOE.

  20. Euclid NISP thermal control design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgante, G.; Maciaszek, T.; Martin, L.; Riva, M.; Bortoletto, F.; Prieto, E.; Bonoli, C.; Corcione, L.; De Caprio, V.; Grupp, F.; Ligori, S.; Trifoglio, M.; Valenziano, L.; Zerbi, F. M.

    2012-09-01

    In this paper we describe the thermal architecture of the Near Infrared Spectro-Photometer (NISP) on board the Euclid ESA mission. The instrument thermal design is based on the combination of two passive radiators coupled to cold space that, exploiting the beneficial conditions of the L2 thermal environment, provide the temperature references for the main sub-systems. One radiator serves as a 135K heat sink for the opto-mechanical structure and for the front-end cold electronics, while working as an interception stage for the conductive parasitic heat leaks through struts and harness. The second, colder, radiator provides a 95K reference for the instrument detectors. The thermal configuration has to ensure the units optimal operating temperature needed to maximize instrument performance, adopting solutions consistent with the mechanical specifications. At the same time the design has to be compliant with the stringent requirements on thermal stability of the optical and detector units. The periodical perturbation of filter and grism wheel mechanisms together with orbital variations and active loads instabilities make the temperature control one of the most critical issues of the whole design. We report here the general thermal architecture at the end of the Definition Phase, together with the first analysis results and preliminary performance predictions in terms of steady state and transient behavior. This paper is presented on behalf of the Euclid Consortium.