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Sample records for linear control design

  1. Robust Control Design via Linear Programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keel, L. H.; Bhattacharyya, S. P.

    1998-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of synthesizing or designing a feedback controller of fixed dynamic order. The closed loop specifications considered here are given in terms of a target performance vector representing a desired set of closed loop transfer functions connecting various signals. In general these point targets are unattainable with a fixed order controller. By enlarging the target from a fixed point set to an interval set the solvability conditions with a fixed order controller are relaxed and a solution is more easily enabled. Results from the parametric robust control literature can be used to design the interval target family so that the performance deterioration is acceptable, even when plant uncertainty is present. It is shown that it is possible to devise a computationally simple linear programming approach that attempts to meet the desired closed loop specifications.

  2. Reaction Wheel Control Design Using Linear Quadratic Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nubli Muhamad, Nur; Susanto, Erwin; Syihabuddin, Budi; Prasetya Dwi Wibawa, Ig.

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies the design of active attitude control system of a nanosatellite in a single axis. In this paper, we consider dc motor based reaction wheel as an actuator, because of its pointing accuracy. However, the power consumption of the dc motor is often relatively large and needed to be optimized. Linear quadratic controller is supposed to have an ability to minimize power consumption and able to enhance the system performance. To show the advantage of this method, simulation result of attitude response, state trajectory, and trajectory of DC motor voltage are presented.

  3. Powerful tool for design analysis of linear control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Maddux, Jr, A S

    1982-05-10

    The methods for designing linear controls for electronic or mechanical systems have been understood and put to practice. What has not been readily available to engineers, however, is a practical, quick and inexpensive method for analyzing these linear control (feedback) systems once they have been designed into the electronic or mechanical hardware. Now, the PET, manufactured by Commodore Business Machines (CBM), operating with several peripherals via the IEEE 488 Bus, brings to the engineer for about $4000 a complete set of office tools for analyzing these system designs.

  4. Linear tracking systems with applications to aircraft control system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, W. H.; Athans, M.; Castanon, D.; Bacchioloni, F.

    1977-01-01

    A class of optimal linear time invariant tracking systems, both in continuous time and discrete time, of which the number of inputs (which are restricted to be step functions) is equal to the number of system outputs, is studied. Along with derivation of equations and design procedures, two discretization schemes are presented, constraining either the control or its time derivative, to be a constant over each sampling period. Descriptions are given for the linearized model of the F-8C aircraft longitudinal dynamics, and the C* handling qualities criterion, which then serve as an illustration of the applications of these linear tracking designs. A suboptimal reduced state design is also presented. Numerical results are given for both the continuous time and discrete time designs.

  5. Design and performance of the Stanford Linear Collider Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Melen, R.E.

    1984-10-01

    The success of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) will be dependent upon the implementation of a very large advanced computer-based instrumentation and control system. This paper describes the architectural design of this system as well as a critique of its performance. This critique is based on experience obtained from its use in the control and monitoring of 1/3 of the SLAC linac and in support of an expensive experimental machine physics experimental program. 11 references, 3 figures.

  6. A decentralized linear quadratic control design method for flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Tzu-Jeng; Craig, Roy R., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A decentralized suboptimal linear quadratic control design procedure which combines substructural synthesis, model reduction, decentralized control design, subcontroller synthesis, and controller reduction is proposed for the design of reduced-order controllers for flexible structures. The procedure starts with a definition of the continuum structure to be controlled. An evaluation model of finite dimension is obtained by the finite element method. Then, the finite element model is decomposed into several substructures by using a natural decomposition called substructuring decomposition. Each substructure, at this point, still has too large a dimension and must be reduced to a size that is Riccati-solvable. Model reduction of each substructure can be performed by using any existing model reduction method, e.g., modal truncation, balanced reduction, Krylov model reduction, or mixed-mode method. Then, based on the reduced substructure model, a subcontroller is designed by an LQ optimal control method for each substructure independently. After all subcontrollers are designed, a controller synthesis method called substructural controller synthesis is employed to synthesize all subcontrollers into a global controller. The assembling scheme used is the same as that employed for the structure matrices. Finally, a controller reduction scheme, called the equivalent impulse response energy controller (EIREC) reduction algorithm, is used to reduce the global controller to a reasonable size for implementation. The EIREC reduced controller preserves the impulse response energy of the full-order controller and has the property of matching low-frequency moments and low-frequency power moments. An advantage of the substructural controller synthesis method is that it relieves the computational burden associated with dimensionality. Besides that, the SCS design scheme is also a highly adaptable controller synthesis method for structures with varying configuration, or varying mass

  7. PID controller design for trailer suspension based on linear model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushairi, S.; Omar, A. R.; Schmidt, R.; Isa, A. A. Mat; Hudha, K.; Azizan, M. A.

    2015-05-01

    A quarter of an active trailer suspension system having the characteristics of a double wishbone type was modeled as a complex multi-body dynamic system in MSC.ADAMS. Due to the complexity of the model, a linearized version is considered in this paper. A model reduction technique is applied to the linear model, resulting in a reduced-order model. Based on this simplified model, a Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) controller was designed in MATLAB/Simulink environment; primarily to reduce excessive roll motions and thus improving the ride comfort. Simulation results show that the output signal closely imitates the input signal in multiple cases - demonstrating the effectiveness of the controller.

  8. Control design for robust stability in linear regulators: Application to aerospace flight control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yedavalli, R. K.

    1986-01-01

    Time domain stability robustness analysis and design for linear multivariable uncertain systems with bounded uncertainties is the central theme of the research. After reviewing the recently developed upper bounds on the linear elemental (structured), time varying perturbation of an asymptotically stable linear time invariant regulator, it is shown that it is possible to further improve these bounds by employing state transformations. Then introducing a quantitative measure called the stability robustness index, a state feedback conrol design algorithm is presented for a general linear regulator problem and then specialized to the case of modal systems as well as matched systems. The extension of the algorithm to stochastic systems with Kalman filter as the state estimator is presented. Finally an algorithm for robust dynamic compensator design is presented using Parameter Optimization (PO) procedure. Applications in a aircraft control and flexible structure control are presented along with a comparison with other existing methods.

  9. Multi Objective Controller Design for Linear System via Optimal Interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozbay, Hitay

    1996-01-01

    We propose a methodology for the design of a controller which satisfies a set of closed-loop objectives simultaneously. The set of objectives consists of: (1) pole placement, (2) decoupled command tracking of step inputs at steady-state, and (3) minimization of step response transients with respect to envelope specifications. We first obtain a characterization of all controllers placing the closed-loop poles in a prescribed region of the complex plane. In this characterization, the free parameter matrix Q(s) is to be determined to attain objectives (2) and (3). Objective (2) is expressed as determining a Pareto optimal solution to a vector valued optimization problem. The solution of this problem is obtained by transforming it to a scalar convex optimization problem. This solution determines Q(O) and the remaining freedom in choosing Q(s) is used to satisfy objective (3). We write Q(s) = (l/v(s))bar-Q(s) for a prescribed polynomial v(s). Bar-Q(s) is a polynomial matrix which is arbitrary except that Q(O) and the order of bar-Q(s) are fixed. Obeying these constraints bar-Q(s) is now to be 'shaped' to minimize the step response characteristics of specific input/output pairs according to the maximum envelope violations. This problem is expressed as a vector valued optimization problem using the concept of Pareto optimality. We then investigate a scalar optimization problem associated with this vector valued problem and show that it is convex. The organization of the report is as follows. The next section includes some definitions and preliminary lemmas. We then give the problem statement which is followed by a section including a detailed development of the design procedure. We then consider an aircraft control example. The last section gives some concluding remarks. The Appendix includes the proofs of technical lemmas, printouts of computer programs, and figures.

  10. CFORM- LINEAR CONTROL SYSTEM DESIGN AND ANALYSIS: CLOSED FORM SOLUTION AND TRANSIENT RESPONSE OF THE LINEAR DIFFERENTIAL EQUATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamison, J. W.

    1994-01-01

    CFORM was developed by the Kennedy Space Center Robotics Lab to assist in linear control system design and analysis using closed form and transient response mechanisms. The program computes the closed form solution and transient response of a linear (constant coefficient) differential equation. CFORM allows a choice of three input functions: the Unit Step (a unit change in displacement); the Ramp function (step velocity); and the Parabolic function (step acceleration). It is only accurate in cases where the differential equation has distinct roots, and does not handle the case for roots at the origin (s=0). Initial conditions must be zero. Differential equations may be input to CFORM in two forms - polynomial and product of factors. In some linear control analyses, it may be more appropriate to use a related program, Linear Control System Design and Analysis (KSC-11376), which uses root locus and frequency response methods. CFORM was written in VAX FORTRAN for a VAX 11/780 under VAX VMS 4.7. It has a central memory requirement of 30K. CFORM was developed in 1987.

  11. Designing linear systolic arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, V.K.P.; Tsai, Y.C. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1989-12-01

    The authors develop a simple mapping technique to design linear systolic arrays. The basic idea of the technique is to map the computations of a certain class of two-dimensional systolic arrays onto one-dimensional arrays. Using this technique, systolic algorithms are derived for problems such as matrix multiplication and transitive closure on linearly connected arrays of PEs with constant I/O bandwidth. Compared to known designs in the literature, the technique leads to modular systolic arrays with constant hardware in each PE, few control lines, lexicographic data input/output, and improved delay time. The unidirectional flow of control and data in this design assures implementation of the linear array in the known fault models of wafer scale integration.

  12. Linear matrix inequality-based proportional-integral control design with application to F-16 aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodore, Zachary B.

    A robust proportional-integral (PI) controller was synthesized for the F-16 VISTA (Variable stability In-flight Simulator Test Aircraft) using a linear matrix inequality (LMI) approach, with the goal of eventually designing and implementing a linear parameter-varying PI controller on high performance aircraft. The combination of classical and modern control theory provides theoretically guaranteed stability and performance throughout the flight envelope and ease of implementation due to the simplicity of the PI controller structure. The controller is designed by solving a set of LMIs with pole placement constraints. This closed-loop system was simulated in MATLAB/Simulink to analyze the performance of the controller. A robust Hinfinity controller was also developed to compare performance with PI controller. The simulation results showed stability, albeit with poor performance compared to the Hinfinity controlle.

  13. ORACLS: A system for linear-quadratic-Gaussian control law design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, E. S.

    1978-01-01

    A modern control theory design package (ORACLS) for constructing controllers and optimal filters for systems modeled by linear time-invariant differential or difference equations is described. Numerical linear-algebra procedures are used to implement the linear-quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) methodology of modern control theory. Algorithms are included for computing eigensystems of real matrices, the relative stability of a matrix, factored forms for nonnegative definite matrices, the solutions and least squares approximations to the solutions of certain linear matrix algebraic equations, the controllability properties of a linear time-invariant system, and the steady state covariance matrix of an open-loop stable system forced by white noise. Subroutines are provided for solving both the continuous and discrete optimal linear regulator problems with noise free measurements and the sampled-data optimal linear regulator problem. For measurement noise, duality theory and the optimal regulator algorithms are used to solve the continuous and discrete Kalman-Bucy filter problems. Subroutines are also included which give control laws causing the output of a system to track the output of a prescribed model.

  14. Design of Linear Control System for Wind Turbine Blade Fatigue Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toft, Anders; Roe-Poulsen, Bjarke; Christiansen, Rasmus; Knudsen, Torben

    2016-09-01

    This paper proposes a linear method for wind turbine blade fatigue testing at Siemens Wind Power. The setup consists of a blade, an actuator (motor and load mass) that acts on the blade with a sinusoidal moment, and a distribution of strain gauges to measure the blade flexure. Based on the frequency of the sinusoidal input, the blade will start oscillating with a given gain, hence the objective of the fatigue test is to make the blade oscillate with a controlled amplitude. The system currently in use is based on frequency control, which involves some non-linearities that make the system difficult to control. To make a linear controller, a different approach has been chosen, namely making a controller which is not regulating on the input frequency, but on the input amplitude. A non-linear mechanical model for the blade and the motor has been constructed. This model has been simplified based on the desired output, namely the amplitude of the blade. Furthermore, the model has been linearised to make it suitable for linear analysis and control design methods. The controller is designed based on a simplified and linearised model, and its gain parameter determined using pole placement. The model variants have been simulated in the MATLAB toolbox Simulink, which shows that the controller design based on the simple model performs adequately with the non-linear model. Moreover, the developed controller solves the robustness issue found in the existent solution and also reduces the needed energy for actuation as it always operates at the blade eigenfrequency.

  15. Multivariable design of improved linear quadratic regulation control for MIMO industrial processes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ridong; Lu, Renquan; Jin, Qibing

    2015-07-01

    In this study, a multivariable linear quadratic control system using a new state space structure was developed for the chamber pressure in the industrial coke furnace. Such processes typically have complex and nonlinear dynamic behavior, which causes the performance of controllers using conventional design and tuning to be poor or to require significant effort in practice. The process model is first treated into a new state space form and the implementation of linear quadratic control is designed using this new model structure. Performance in terms of regulatory/servo, disturbance rejection and measurement noise problems were all compared with the recent model predictive control strategy. Results revealed that the control system showed more robustness and improved the closed-loop process performance under model/process mismatches.

  16. Space shuttle active-pogo-suppressor control design using linear quadratic regulator techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehtinen, B.; Lorenz, C. F.

    1979-01-01

    Two methods of active pogo suppression (stabilization) for the space shuttle vehicle were studied analytically. The basis for both approaches was the linear quadratic regulator, state space technique. The first approach minimized root-mean-square pump inlet pressure by using either fullstate feedback, partial-state feedback, or output feedback with a Kalman filter. The second approach increased the modal damping associated with the critical structural modes by using either full-state feedback or reconstructed state feedback. A number of implementable controls were found by both approaches. The designs were analyzed with respect to sensitivity, complexity, and controller energy requirements, as well as controller performance. Practical controllers resulting from the two design approaches tended to use pressure and flow as feedback variables for the minimum-rms method and structural accelerations or velocities for the modal control method. Both approaches are suitable for the design of active pogo-suppression controllers.

  17. Intelligent, Robust Control of Deteriorated Turbofan Engines via Linear Parameter Varying Quadratic Lyapunov Function Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turso, James A.; Litt, Jonathan S.

    2004-01-01

    A method for accommodating engine deterioration via a scheduled Linear Parameter Varying Quadratic Lyapunov Function (LPVQLF)-Based controller is presented. The LPVQLF design methodology provides a means for developing unconditionally stable, robust control of Linear Parameter Varying (LPV) systems. The controller is scheduled on the Engine Deterioration Index, a function of estimated parameters that relate to engine health, and is computed using a multilayer feedforward neural network. Acceptable thrust response and tight control of exhaust gas temperature (EGT) is accomplished by adjusting the performance weights on these parameters for different levels of engine degradation. Nonlinear simulations demonstrate that the controller achieves specified performance objectives while being robust to engine deterioration as well as engine-to-engine variations.

  18. ORACLS - A modern control theory design package. [Optimal Regulator Algorithms for Control of Linear Systems computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, E. S.

    1975-01-01

    A digital computer program (ORACLS) for implementing the optimal regulator theory approach to the design of controllers for linear time-invariant systems is described. The user-oriented program employs the latest numerical techniques and is applicable to both the digital and continuous control problems.

  19. Robust control design for a wheel loader using Hinfinity and feedback linearization based methods.

    PubMed

    Fales, Roger; Kelkar, Atul

    2009-07-01

    The heavy equipment industry is building more and more equipment with electro-hydraulic control systems. The existing industry practices for the design of control systems in construction machines primarily rely on classical designs coupled with ad-hoc synthesis procedures. Such practices produce desirable results, but lack a systematic procedure to account for invariably present plant uncertainties in the design process as well as coupled dynamics of the multi-input multi-output (MIMO) configuration. In this paper, two H(infinity) based robust control designs are presented for an automatic bucket leveling mechanism of a wheel loader. In one case, the controller is designed for the base plant model. In another case, the controller is designed for the plant with a feedback linearization control law applied yielding improved stability robustness. A MIMO nonlinear model for an electro-hydraulically actuated wheel loader linkage is considered. The robustness of the controller designs are validated by using analysis and by simulation using a complete nonlinear model of the wheel loader linkage and hydraulic system.

  20. Robust control design for a wheel loader using Hinfinity and feedback linearization based methods.

    PubMed

    Fales, Roger; Kelkar, Atul

    2009-07-01

    The heavy equipment industry is building more and more equipment with electro-hydraulic control systems. The existing industry practices for the design of control systems in construction machines primarily rely on classical designs coupled with ad-hoc synthesis procedures. Such practices produce desirable results, but lack a systematic procedure to account for invariably present plant uncertainties in the design process as well as coupled dynamics of the multi-input multi-output (MIMO) configuration. In this paper, two H(infinity) based robust control designs are presented for an automatic bucket leveling mechanism of a wheel loader. In one case, the controller is designed for the base plant model. In another case, the controller is designed for the plant with a feedback linearization control law applied yielding improved stability robustness. A MIMO nonlinear model for an electro-hydraulically actuated wheel loader linkage is considered. The robustness of the controller designs are validated by using analysis and by simulation using a complete nonlinear model of the wheel loader linkage and hydraulic system. PMID:19251257

  1. Controlling the wave propagation through the medium designed by linear coordinate transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yicheng; He, Chengdong; Wang, Yuzhuo; Liu, Xuan; Zhou, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Based on the principle of transformation optics, we propose to control the wave propagating direction through the homogenous anisotropic medium designed by linear coordinate transformation. The material parameters of the medium are derived from the linear coordinate transformation applied. Keeping the space area unchanged during the linear transformation, the polarization-dependent wave control through a non-magnetic homogeneous medium can be realized. Beam benders, polarization splitter, and object illusion devices are designed, which have application prospects in micro-optics and nano-optics. The simulation results demonstrate the feasibilities and the flexibilities of the method and the properties of these devices. Design details and full-wave simulation results are provided. The work in this paper comprehensively applies the fundamental theories of electromagnetism and mathematics. The method of obtaining a new solution of the Maxwell equations in a medium from a vacuum plane wave solution and a linear coordinate transformation is introduced. These have a pedagogical value and are methodologically and motivationally appropriate for physics students and teachers at the undergraduate and graduate levels.

  2. An iterative approach to the optimal co-design of linear control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yu; Wang, Yebin; Bortoff, Scott A.; Jiang, Zhong-Ping

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates the optimal co-design of both physical plants and control policies for a class of continuous-time linear control systems. The optimal co-design of a specific linear control system is commonly formulated as a nonlinear non-convex optimisation problem (NNOP), and solved by using iterative techniques, where the plant parameters and the control policy are updated iteratively and alternately. This paper proposes a novel iterative approach to solve the NNOP, where the plant parameters are updated by solving a standard semi-definite programming problem, with non-convexity no longer involved. The proposed system design is generally less conservative in terms of the system performance compared to the conventional system-equivalence-based design, albeit the range of applicability is slightly reduced. A practical optimisation algorithm is proposed to compute a sub-optimal solution ensuring the system stability, and the convergence of the algorithm is established. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithm is illustrated by its application to the optimal co-design of a physical load positioning system.

  3. Design of an integral computer-based wheelchair controller/linear synchronous motor system.

    PubMed

    Kelly, G W; Ross, D A; Bass, R M; Davey, K R

    1986-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the advantages of designing computer-based motor controllers together with innovative motors, such that maximum controller/motor system benefits are obtained. Specifically, this paper describes how a computer-based controller/drive system for powered wheelchairs has been designed and is being built and tested. This type of integral controller/drive system has been possible to build into a wheelchair only with the advent of the microprocessor-based feedback motor controller. The type of motor chosen for this project was a linear synchronous motor (LSM), which is highly efficient (90%+) and could easily be made an integral part of a wheelchair wheel, providing a "no-moving-parts" drive system. However, an LSM cannot be variable-speed-controlled without knowledge of, and controlled adjustment to, the absolute rotor versus stator position at each point in time. Microprocessor-based feedback motor controllers make precise, efficient control of LSMs possible at a reasonable cost. In addition, this combination of controller and motor provides a very flexible wheelchair control/drive system that may be easily programmed to suit the needs and necessities of the wide variety of over 200,000 persons now using powered wheelchairs. PMID:3537184

  4. Controller design approaches for large space structures using LQG control theory. [Linear Quadratic Gaussian

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, S. M.; Groom, N. J.

    1979-01-01

    The paper presents several approaches for the design of reduced order controllers for large space structures. These approaches are shown to be based on LQG control theory and include truncation, modified truncation regulators and estimators, use of higher order estimators, selective modal suppression, and use of polynomial estimators. Further, the use of direct sensor feedback, as opposed to a state estimator, is investigated for some of these approaches. Finally, numerical results are given for a long free beam.

  5. Design of an advanced non linear controller for induction motors and experimental validation on an industrial benchmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubineau, D.; Dion, J. M.; Dugard, L.; Roye, D.

    2000-02-01

    This paper mainly deals with the design of an advanced control law for induction motors and its real-time implementation on an experimental test benchmark. First, relationship between the classical field oriented control (FOC) and non linear linearizing control laws is studied. It is shown that both control laws are similar. Classical non linear linearizing control improves the performances but not in a spectacular way when the observer and the controller are designed independently. A new non linear observer based control law is designed, which is shown to be globally stable and is implemented on an experimental test-bench. The control algorithm is studied and applied in many configurations (various set-points, flux and speed profiles and torque disturbances) and is shown to be very efficient.

  6. Output-feedback sampled-data control design for linear parameter-varying systems with delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramezanifar, Amin; Mohammadpour, Javad; Grigoriadis, Karolos M.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we address the sampled-data output-feedback control design problem for continuous-time linear parameter-varying systems with time-varying delay in the system states. Due to the combination of the plant's continuous-time dynamics and the controller's discrete-time dynamics connected through A/D and D/A converter devices, the closed-loop system is a hybrid system. In order to analyse this hybrid system from stability and performance perspectives we use the input-delay approach to map the closed-loop system into the continuous-time domain with delay in the states. This results in a closed-loop system containing two types of delays, the system internal delay and the one imposed by the mapping. Next, we use delay-dependent conditions for analysis of stability and ?-norm performance which result in a sampled-data control synthesis procedure. The proposed output-feedback sampled-data controller is obtained based on the solution to a linear matrix inequality optimisation problem using a set of appropriately defined slack variables. A numerical example of a milling machine is presented to demonstrate the viability of the proposed sampled-data control design method to satisfy the stability and performance objectives even with a varying sampling rate.

  7. Linear-quadratic-regulator pointing control system design for a high-altitude balloon payload

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.E.; Etter, J.R.

    1987-11-01

    A pointing control system design for the science package of a NASA high-altitude research balloon is described. The balloon assembly consists of a single helium balloon connected to a payload recovery parachute, payload gondola, and ballast hopper. Pointing of the scientific payload is accomplished via an arrangement of drive motors and a flywheel. Linear quadratic regulator (LQR) synthesis techniques are employed to produce the azimuth and elevation controller designs. The use of LQR synthesis is motivated by the azimuthal dynamic coupling encountered between the balloon and gondola. Two control devices are employed in azimuth, one of which is a decoupler motor and the other a flywheel. The decoupler motor is intended to isolate the gondola from the balloon such that the flywheel can be accelerated or decelerated about a steady-state angular velocity to provide precise azimuthal pointing. The multiple-input/multiple-output nature of the azimuth pointing problem is best handled in a matrix synthesis procedure such as LQR. The controller design methodology is explained, and a combination of time responses and singular value analyses are used to analytically evaluate the performance of the control system. 11 refs., 17 figs.

  8. Feedback linearization based computer controlled medication design for automatic treatment of parturient paresis of cows.

    PubMed

    Padhi, Radhakant

    2006-10-01

    Based on an existing model for calcium homeostatis (dynamics) and taking the help of feedback linearization philosophy of nonlinear control theory, two control design (medication) strategies are presented for automatic treatment of parturient paresis (milk fever) disease of cows. An important advantage of the new approach is that it results in a simple and straightforward method and eliminates the necessity of a significantly more complex neural network based nonlinear optimal control technique, as proposed by the author earlier. As an added advantage, unlike the neural network technique, the new approach leads to 'closed form solution' for the nonlinear controller. Moreover, global asymptotic stability of the closed loop system is always guaranteed. Besides theoretical justifications, the resulting controllers (medication strategies) are validated from numerical simulation studies of the nonlinear system as well. Moreover, from a numerical study about the robustness of the algorithms with respect to parametric uncertainty, it was observed that the optimal control formulation is a better option over the dynamic inversion formulation.

  9. Design of a linear-motion dual-stage actuation system for precision control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, W.; Tang, J.; El Deeb, Y.

    2009-09-01

    Actuators with high linear-motion speed, high positioning resolution and a long motion stroke are needed in many precision machining systems. In some current systems, voice coil motors (VCMs) are implemented for servo control. While the voice coil motors may provide the long motion stroke needed in many applications, the main obstacle that hinders the improvement of the machining accuracy and efficiency is their limited bandwidth. To fundamentally solve this issue, we propose to develop a dual-stage actuation system that consists of a voice coil motor that covers the coarse motion, and a piezoelectric stack actuator that induces the fine motion, thus enhancing the positioning accuracy. The focus of this present research is the mechatronics design and synthesis of the new actuation system. In particular, a flexure hinge based mechanism is developed to provide a motion guide and preload to the piezoelectric stack actuator that is serially connected to the voice coil motor. This mechanism is built upon parallel plane flexure hinges. A series of numerical and experimental studies are carried out to facilitate the system design and the model identification. The effectiveness of the proposed system is demonstrated through open-loop studies and preliminary closed-loop control practice. While the primary goal of this particular design is aimed at enhancing optical lens machining, the concept and approach outlined are generic and can be extended to a variety of applications.

  10. Analysis, design, and testing of a low cost, direct force command linear proof mass actuator for structural control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, G. L.; Shelley, Stuart; Jacobson, Mark

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, the design, analysis, and test of a low cost, linear proof mass actuator for vibration control is presented. The actuator is based on a linear induction coil from a large computer disk drive. Such disk drives are readily available and provide the linear actuator, current feedback amplifier, and power supply for a highly effective, yet inexpensive, experimental laboratory actuator. The device is implemented as a force command input system, and the performance is virtually the same as other, more sophisticated, linear proof mass systems.

  11. Parameter-dependent vibration-attenuation controller design for electro-hydraulic actuated linear structural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Falu; Mao, Weijie

    2012-03-01

    The problem of robust active vibration control for a class of electro-hydraulic actuated structural systems with time-delay in the control input channel and parameter uncertainties appearing in all the mass, damping and stiffness matrices is investigated in this paper. First, by introducing a linear varying parameter, the nonlinear system is described as a linear parameter varying (LPV) model. Second, based on this LPV model, an LMI-based condition for the system to be asymptotically stabilized is deduced. By solving these LMIs, a parameter-dependent controller is established for the closedloop system to be stable with a prescribed level of disturbance attenuation. The condition is also extended to the uncertain case. Finally, some numerical simulations demonstrate the satisfying performance of the proposed controller.

  12. AESOP: A computer-aided design program for linear multivariable control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehtinen, B.; Geyser, L. C.

    1982-01-01

    An interactive computer program (AESOP) which solves quadratic optimal control and is discussed. The program can also be used to perform system analysis calculations such as transient and frequency responses, controllability, observability, etc., in support of the control and filter design computations.

  13. The Total Synthesis Problem of linear multivariable control. II - Unity feedback and the design morphism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sain, M. K.; Antsaklis, P. J.; Gejji, R. R.; Wyman, B. F.; Peczkowski, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    Zames (1981) has observed that there is, in general, no 'separation principle' to guarantee optimality of a division between control law design and filtering of plant uncertainty. Peczkowski and Sain (1978) have solved a model matching problem using transfer functions. Taking into consideration this investigation, Peczkowski et al. (1979) proposed the Total Synthesis Problem (TSP), wherein both the command/output-response and command/control-response are to be synthesized, subject to the plant constraint. The TSP concept can be subdivided into a Nominal Design Problem (NDP), which is not dependent upon specific controller structures, and a Feedback Synthesis Problem (FSP), which is. Gejji (1980) found that NDP was characterized in terms of the plant structural matrices and a single, 'good' transfer function matrix. Sain et al. (1981) have extended this NDP work. The present investigation is concerned with a study of FSP for the unity feedback case. NDP, together with feedback synthesis, is understood as a Total Synthesis Problem.

  14. Design of Linear DC Motor Two-degree-of-freedom Positioning System using Model Reference type Sliding Mode Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urushihara, Shiro; Kamano, Takuya; Yura, Satoshi; Yasuno, Takashi; Suzuki, Takayuki

    One of fundamental problems in the factory automation is how to obtain linear motion. Linear motors produce directly the linear motion force without a motion-transform mechanism. Linear d.c. motors (LDMs) have excellent performance and controllability. However, the dynamics of small-sized LDMs is adversely affected by the dead-band due to the friction between brushes and commutators. In this paper, it is described that the design of the two-degree-of-freedom positioning system with a LDM using model reference type sliding mode controller (SMC). The proposed positioning system consists of a fixed gain feedforward controller and a SMC used as a feedback controller. The objective of the SMC is to repress the influence of nonlinear characteristics (the dead-band and parameter variations etc.). The tracking performance can be improved as the fixed gain feedforward controller makes a dynamic inverse system in the feedforward path. The effectiveness of the proposed system for improvement of the tracking performance is demonstrated by experimental results.

  15. [Log-linear model used in the hybrid design of case-parents triad/control-mother dyad].

    PubMed

    Peng, W J; Zhang, H; Li, Y X; Li, C Y; Yan, W R

    2016-06-01

    This study introduced the application of a log-linear model in the hybrid design of case-parents triad/control-mother dyad. Data related to the association between cleft lip with palate (CLP) and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene A1298C diversity was analyzed. Log-linear model based on likelihood ratio tests (LRTs) was used to analyze the relationships between mother, offspring genotypes and CLP. Data from our study noticed that children of mothers carrying the CC genotype presented a lower risk of CLP, comparing with the children of mothers carrying the AA genotype, with S2=0.45 (95%CI: 0.26-0.79). Offspring that carrying the AC genotype presented a lower risk of CLP, comparing with the offspring that carrying the AA genotype, with R1=0.69 (95% CI: 0.48-0.97). However, no other types of relationships were found. The power of hybrid design was greater than the case-parents study (0.86>0.78). MTHFR A1298C polymorphism seemed to have played an important role in the etiology on both cleft lip and palate. Data from the hybrid design and the log-linear model could help researchers to explore the effects of genotypes from both mothers and the offspring. This study design would present stronger power than the regular case-parents studies thus suitable for studies on the etiology of diseases in early lives, as birth defects. PMID:27346122

  16. Controls/CFD Interdisciplinary Research Software Generates Low-Order Linear Models for Control Design From Steady-State CFD Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, Kevin J.

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center is developing analytical methods and software tools to create a bridge between the controls and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) disciplines. Traditionally, control design engineers have used coarse nonlinear simulations to generate information for the design of new propulsion system controls. However, such traditional methods are not adequate for modeling the propulsion systems of complex, high-speed vehicles like the High Speed Civil Transport. To properly model the relevant flow physics of high-speed propulsion systems, one must use simulations based on CFD methods. Such CFD simulations have become useful tools for engineers that are designing propulsion system components. The analysis techniques and software being developed as part of this effort are an attempt to evolve CFD into a useful tool for control design as well. One major aspect of this research is the generation of linear models from steady-state CFD results. CFD simulations, often used during the design of high-speed inlets, yield high resolution operating point data. Under a NASA grant, the University of Akron has developed analytical techniques and software tools that use these data to generate linear models for control design. The resulting linear models have the same number of states as the original CFD simulation, so they are still very large and computationally cumbersome. Model reduction techniques have been successfully applied to reduce these large linear models by several orders of magnitude without significantly changing the dynamic response. The result is an accurate, easy to use, low-order linear model that takes less time to generate than those generated by traditional means. The development of methods for generating low-order linear models from steady-state CFD is most complete at the one-dimensional level, where software is available to generate models with different kinds of input and output variables. One-dimensional methods have been extended

  17. Linear control of the flywheel inverted pendulum.

    PubMed

    Olivares, Manuel; Albertos, Pedro

    2014-09-01

    The flywheel inverted pendulum is an underactuated mechanical system with a nonlinear model but admitting a linear approximation around the unstable equilibrium point in the upper position. Although underactuated systems usually require nonlinear controllers, the easy tuning and understanding of linear controllers make them more attractive for designers and final users. In a recent paper, a simple PID controller was proposed by the authors, leading to an internally unstable controlled plant. To achieve global stability, two options are developed here: first by introducing an internal stabilizing controller and second by replacing the PID controller by an observer-based state feedback control. Simulation and experimental results show the effectiveness of the design.

  18. Linear decentralized learning control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Soo C.; Longman, Richard W.; Phan, Minh

    1992-01-01

    The new field of learning control develops controllers that learn to improve their performance at executing a given task, based on experience performing this task. The simplest forms of learning control are based on the same concept as integral control, but operating in the domain of the repetitions of the task. This paper studies the use of such controllers in a decentralized system, such as a robot with the controller for each link acting independently. The basic result of the paper is to show that stability of the learning controllers for all subsystems when the coupling between subsystems is turned off, assures stability of the decentralized learning in the coupled system, provided that the sample time in the digital learning controller is sufficiently short.

  19. Robust design of feedback feed-forward iterative learning control based on 2D system theory for linear uncertain systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhifu; Hu, Yueming; Li, Di

    2016-08-01

    For a class of linear discrete-time uncertain systems, a feedback feed-forward iterative learning control (ILC) scheme is proposed, which is comprised of an iterative learning controller and two current iteration feedback controllers. The iterative learning controller is used to improve the performance along the iteration direction and the feedback controllers are used to improve the performance along the time direction. First of all, the uncertain feedback feed-forward ILC system is presented by an uncertain two-dimensional Roesser model system. Then, two robust control schemes are proposed. One can ensure that the feedback feed-forward ILC system is bounded-input bounded-output stable along time direction, and the other can ensure that the feedback feed-forward ILC system is asymptotically stable along time direction. Both schemes can guarantee the system is robust monotonically convergent along the iteration direction. Third, the robust convergent sufficient conditions are given, which contains a linear matrix inequality (LMI). Moreover, the LMI can be used to determine the gain matrix of the feedback feed-forward iterative learning controller. Finally, the simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed schemes.

  20. A direct application of the non-linear inverse transformation flight control system design on a STOVL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, W. W.; Mcneill, W. E.; Stortz, M. W.

    1993-01-01

    The nonlinear inverse transformation flight control system design method is applied to the Lockheed Ft. Worth Company's E-7D short takeoff and vertical land (STOVL) supersonic fighter/attack aircraft design with a modified General Electric F110 engine which has augmented propulsive lift capability. The system is fully augmented to provide flight path control and velocity control, and rate command attitude hold for angular axes during the transition and hover operations. In cruise mode, the flight control system is configured to provide direct thrust command, rate command attitude hold for pitch and roll axes, and sideslip command with turn coordination. A control selector based on the nonlinear inverse transformation method is designed specifically to be compatible with the propulsion system's physical configuration which has a two dimensional convergent-divergent aft nozzle, a vectorable ventral nozzle, and a thrust augmented ejector. The nonlinear inverse transformation is used to determine the propulsive forces and nozzle deflections, which in combination with the aerodynamic forces and moments (including propulsive induced contributions), and gravitational force, are required to achieve the longitudinal and vertical acceleration commands. The longitudinal control axes are fully decoupled within the propulsion system's performance envelope. A piloted motion-base flight simulation was conducted on the Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) at NASA Ames Research Center to examine the handling qualities of this design. Based on results of the simulation, refinements to the control system have been made and will also be covered in the report.

  1. Linear control of the flywheel inverted pendulum.

    PubMed

    Olivares, Manuel; Albertos, Pedro

    2014-09-01

    The flywheel inverted pendulum is an underactuated mechanical system with a nonlinear model but admitting a linear approximation around the unstable equilibrium point in the upper position. Although underactuated systems usually require nonlinear controllers, the easy tuning and understanding of linear controllers make them more attractive for designers and final users. In a recent paper, a simple PID controller was proposed by the authors, leading to an internally unstable controlled plant. To achieve global stability, two options are developed here: first by introducing an internal stabilizing controller and second by replacing the PID controller by an observer-based state feedback control. Simulation and experimental results show the effectiveness of the design. PMID:24480638

  2. Linear stochastic optimal control and estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geyser, L. C.; Lehtinen, F. K. B.

    1976-01-01

    Digital program has been written to solve the LSOCE problem by using a time-domain formulation. LSOCE problem is defined as that of designing controls for linear time-invariant system which is disturbed by white noise in such a way as to minimize quadratic performance index.

  3. Design of Linear Quadratic Regulators and Kalman Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehtinen, B.; Geyser, L.

    1986-01-01

    AESOP solves problems associated with design of controls and state estimators for linear time-invariant systems. Systems considered are modeled in state-variable form by set of linear differential and algebraic equations with constant coefficients. Two key problems solved by AESOP are linear quadratic regulator (LQR) design problem and steady-state Kalman filter design problem. AESOP is interactive. User solves design problems and analyzes solutions in single interactive session. Both numerical and graphical information available to user during the session.

  4. Linear stochastic optimal control and estimation problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geyser, L. C.; Lehtinen, F. K. B.

    1980-01-01

    Problem involves design of controls for linear time-invariant system disturbed by white noise. Solution is Kalman filter coupled through set of optimal regulator gains to produce desired control signal. Key to solution is solving matrix Riccati differential equation. LSOCE effectively solves problem for wide range of practical applications. Program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on IBM 360.

  5. Linear Parameter Varying Control for Actuator Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Jong-Yeob; Wu, N. Eva; Belcastro, Christine; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A robust linear parameter varying (LPV) control synthesis is carried out for an HiMAT vehicle subject to loss of control effectiveness. The scheduling parameter is selected to be a function of the estimates of the control effectiveness factors. The estimates are provided on-line by a two-stage Kalman estimator. The inherent conservatism of the LPV design is reducing through the use of a scaling factor on the uncertainty block that represents the estimation errors of the effectiveness factors. Simulations of the controlled system with the on-line estimator show that a superior fault-tolerance can be achieved.

  6. Designing Genetic Feedback Controllers.

    PubMed

    Harris, Andreas W K; Dolan, James A; Kelly, Ciarán L; Anderson, James; Papachristodoulou, Antonis

    2015-08-01

    By incorporating feedback around systems we wish to manipulate, it is possible to improve their performance and robustness properties to meet pre-specified design objectives. For decades control engineers have been successfully implementing feedback controllers for complex mechanical and electrical systems such as aircraft and sports cars. Natural biological systems use feedback extensively for regulation and adaptation but apart from the most basic designs, there is no systematic framework for designing feedback controllers in Synthetic Biology. In this paper we describe how classical approaches from linear control theory can be used to close the loop. This includes the design of genetic circuits using feedback control and the presentation of a biological phase lag controller. PMID:26390502

  7. Design of a helicopter autopilot by means of linearizing transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, G.; Hunt, R. L.; Su, R.

    1982-01-01

    An automatic flight control systems design methods for aircraft that have complex characteristics and operational requirements, such as the powered lift STOL and V/STOL configurations are discussed. The method is effective for a large class of dynamic systems that require multiaxis control and that have highly coupled nonlinearities, redundant controls, and complex multidimensional operational envelopes. The method exploits the possibility of linearizing the system over its operational envelope by transforming the state and control. The linear canonical forms used in the design are described, and necessary and sufficient conditions for linearizability are stated. The control logic has the structure of an exact model follower with linear decoupled model dynamics and possibly nonlinear plant dynamics. The design method is illustrated with an application to a helicopter autopilot design.

  8. Linear control of oscillator and amplifier flows*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Peter J.; Sipp, Denis

    2016-08-01

    Linear control applied to fluid systems near an equilibrium point has important applications for many flows of industrial or fundamental interest. In this article we give an exposition of tools and approaches for the design of control strategies for globally stable or unstable flows. For unstable oscillator flows a feedback configuration and a model-based approach is proposed, while for stable noise-amplifier flows a feedforward setup and an approach based on system identification is advocated. Model reduction and robustness issues are addressed for the oscillator case; statistical learning techniques are emphasized for the amplifier case. Effective suppression of global and convective instabilities could be demonstrated for either case, even though the system-identification approach results in a superior robustness to off-design conditions.

  9. SLAC linear collider conceptual design report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    The linear collider system is described in detail, including the transport system, the collider lattice, final focusing system, positron production, beam damping and compression, high current electron source, instrumentation and control, and the beam luminosity. The experimental facilities and the experimental uses are discussed along with the construction schedule and estimated costs. Appendices include a discussion of space charge effects in the linear accelerator, emittance growth in the collider, the final focus system, beam-beam instabilities and pinch effects, and detector backgrounds. (GHT)

  10. Progress in the Next Linear Collider Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raubenheimer, T. O.

    2001-07-01

    An electron/positron linear collider with a center-of-mass energy between 0.5 and 1 TeV would be an important complement to the physics program of the LHC. The Next Linear Collider (NLC) is being designed by a US collaboration (FNAL, LBNL, LLNL, and SLAC) which is working closely with the Japanese collaboration that is designing the Japanese Linear Collider (JLC). The NLC main linacs are based on normal conducting 11 GHz rf. This paper will discuss the technical difficulties encountered as well as the many changes that have been made to the NLC design over the last year. These changes include improvements to the X-band rf system as well as modifications to the injector and the beam delivery system. They are based on new conceptual solutions as well as results from the R&D programs which have exceeded initial specifications. The net effect has been to reduce the length of the collider from about 32 km to 25 km and to reduce the number of klystrons and modulators by a factor of two. Together these lead to significant cost savings.

  11. A free lunch in linearized experimental design?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, Darrell; Curtis, Andrew

    2011-08-01

    The No Free Lunch (NFL) theorems state that no single optimization algorithm is ideally suited for all objective functions and, conversely, that no single objective function is ideally suited for all optimization algorithms. This paper examines the influence of the NFL theorems on linearized statistical experimental design (SED). We consider four design algorithms with three different design objective functions to examine their interdependency. As a foundation for the study, we consider experimental designs for fitting ellipses to data, a problem pertinent to the study of transverse isotropy in many disciplines. Surprisingly, we find that the quality of optimized experiments, and the computational efficiency of their optimization, is generally independent of the criterion-algorithm pairing. We discuss differences in the performance of each design algorithm, providing a guideline for selecting design algorithms for other problems. As a by-product we demonstrate and discuss the principle of diminishing returns in SED, namely, that the value of experimental design decreases with experiment size. Another outcome of this study is a simple rule-of-thumb for prescribing optimal experiments for ellipse fitting, which bypasses the computational expense of SED. This is used to define a template for optimizing survey designs, under simple assumptions, for Amplitude Variations with Azimuth and Offset (AVAZ) seismics in the specialized problem of fracture characterization, such as is of interest in the petroleum industry. Finally, we discuss the scope of our conclusions for the NFL theorems as they apply to nonlinear and Bayesian SED.

  12. A free lunch in linearized experimental design?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, D.; Curtis, A.

    2009-12-01

    The No Free Lunch (NFL) theorems state that no single optimization algorithm is ideally suited for all objective functions and, conversely, that no single objective function is ideally suited for all optimization algorithms (Wolpert and Macready, 1997). It is therefore of limited use to report the performance of a particular algorithm with respect to a particular objective function because the results cannot be safely extrapolated to other algorithms or objective functions. We examine the influence of the NFL theorems on linearized statistical experimental design (SED). We are aware of no publication that compares multiple design criteria in combination with multiple design algorithms. We examine four design algorithms in concert with three design objective functions to assess their interdependency. As a foundation for the study, we consider experimental designs for fitting ellipses to data, a problem pertinent, for example, to the study of transverse isotropy in a variety of disciplines. Surprisingly, we find that the quality of optimized experiments, and the computational efficiency of their optimization, is generally independent of the criterion-algorithm pairing. This is promising for linearized SED. While the NFL theorems must generally be true, the criterion-algorithm pairings we investigated are fairly robust to the theorems, indicating that we need not account for independency when choosing design algorithms and criteria from the set examined here. However, particular design algorithms do show patterns of performance, irrespective of the design criterion, and from this we establish a rough guideline for choosing from the examined algorithms for other design problems. As a by-product of our study we demonstrate that SED is subject to the principle of diminishing returns. That is, we see that the value of experimental design decreases with survey size, a fact that must be considered when deciding whether or not to design an experiment at all. Another outcome

  13. Fuzzy control for linear plants with uncertain output backlashes.

    PubMed

    Tao, C W

    2002-01-01

    In this correspondence, a new approach to design a fuzzy controller for systems with uncertain output backlash to have good tracking performance is presented. Without using a compensation mechanism or a backlash inverse, the fuzzy control mechanism is designed to implicitly compensate the delay effect arising from an uncertain output backlash and to make the output backlash system stable without limit cycles. Also, the proposed fuzzy controller is presented to be insensitive to the variations of the backlash and system plant parameters. Moreover, the proposed approach is extended to design a fuzzy controller for a two-input two-output (TITO) linear plant with output backlash. The effectiveness of the designed fuzzy controller is illustrated by the simulation results on linear, low-order, nonlinear plants and the experimental results on an amplifier-motor system with a gear train.

  14. Linear, Parameter-Varying Control of Aeroservoelastic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno Chicunque, Claudia Patricia

    Modern aircraft designers are adopting light-weight, high-aspect ratio flexible wings to improve performance and reduce operation costs. A technical challenge associated with these designs is that the large deformations in flight of the wings lead to adverse interactions between the aircraft aerodynamic forces and structural forces. These adverse interactions produce excessive vibrations that can degrade flying qualities and may result in severe structural damages or catastrophic failure. This dissertation is focused on the application of multivariable robust control techniques for suppression of these adverse interactions in flexible aircraft. Here, the aircraft coupled nonlinear equations of motion are represented in the linear, parameter-varying framework. These equations account for the coupled aerodynamics, rigid body dynamics, and deformable body dynamics of the aircraft. Unfortunately, the inclusion of this coupled dynamics results in high-order models that increase the computational complexity of linear, parameter-varying control techniques. This dissertation addresses three key technologies for linear, parameter-varying control of flexible aircraft: (i) linear, parameter-varying model reduction; (ii) selection of actuators and sensors for vibration suppression; and (iii) design of linear, parameter-varying controllers for vibration suppression. All of these three technologies are applied to an experimental research platform located at the University of Minnesota. The objective of this dissertation is to provide to the flight control community with a set of design methodologies to safely exploit the benefits of light-weight flexible aircraft.

  15. Design of a transverse-flux permanent-magnet linear generator and controller for use with a free-piston stirling engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jigui; Huang, Yuping; Wu, Hongxing; Zheng, Ping

    2016-06-01

    Transverse-flux with high efficiency has been applied in Stirling engine and permanent magnet synchronous linear generator system, however it is restricted for large application because of low and complex process. A novel type of cylindrical, non-overlapping, transverse-flux, and permanent-magnet linear motor(TFPLM) is investigated, furthermore, a high power factor and less process complexity structure research is developed. The impact of magnetic leakage factor on power factor is discussed, by using the Finite Element Analysis(FEA) model of stirling engine and TFPLM, an optimization method for electro-magnetic design of TFPLM is proposed based on magnetic leakage factor. The relation between power factor and structure parameter is investigated, and a structure parameter optimization method is proposed taking power factor maximum as a goal. At last, the test bench is founded, starting experimental and generating experimental are performed, and a good agreement of simulation and experimental is achieved. The power factor is improved and the process complexity is decreased. This research provides the instruction to design high-power factor permanent-magnet linear generator.

  16. Design of a transverse-flux permanent-magnet linear generator and controller for use with a free-piston stirling engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jigui; Huang, Yuping; Wu, Hongxing; Zheng, Ping

    2016-07-01

    Transverse-flux with high efficiency has been applied in Stirling engine and permanent magnet synchronous linear generator system, however it is restricted for large application because of low and complex process. A novel type of cylindrical, non-overlapping, transverse-flux, and permanent-magnet linear motor(TFPLM) is investigated, furthermore, a high power factor and less process complexity structure research is developed. The impact of magnetic leakage factor on power factor is discussed, by using the Finite Element Analysis(FEA) model of stirling engine and TFPLM, an optimization method for electro-magnetic design of TFPLM is proposed based on magnetic leakage factor. The relation between power factor and structure parameter is investigated, and a structure parameter optimization method is proposed taking power factor maximum as a goal. At last, the test bench is founded, starting experimental and generating experimental are performed, and a good agreement of simulation and experimental is achieved. The power factor is improved and the process complexity is decreased. This research provides the instruction to design high-power factor permanent-magnet linear generator.

  17. Optimal second order sliding mode control for linear uncertain systems.

    PubMed

    Das, Madhulika; Mahanta, Chitralekha

    2014-11-01

    In this paper an optimal second order sliding mode controller (OSOSMC) is proposed to track a linear uncertain system. The optimal controller based on the linear quadratic regulator method is designed for the nominal system. An integral sliding mode controller is combined with the optimal controller to ensure robustness of the linear system which is affected by parametric uncertainties and external disturbances. To achieve finite time convergence of the sliding mode, a nonsingular terminal sliding surface is added with the integral sliding surface giving rise to a second order sliding mode controller. The main advantage of the proposed OSOSMC is that the control input is substantially reduced and it becomes chattering free. Simulation results confirm superiority of the proposed OSOSMC over some existing.

  18. International linear collider reference design report

    SciTech Connect

    Aarons, G.

    2007-06-22

    The International Linear Collider will give physicists a new cosmic doorway to explore energy regimes beyond the reach of today's accelerators. A proposed electron-positron collider, the ILC will complement the Large Hadron Collider, a proton-proton collider at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, together unlocking some of the deepest mysteries in the universe. With LHC discoveries pointing the way, the ILC -- a true precision machine -- will provide the missing pieces of the puzzle. Consisting of two linear accelerators that face each other, the ILC will hurl some 10 billion electrons and their anti-particles, positrons, toward each other at nearly the speed of light. Superconducting accelerator cavities operating at temperatures near absolute zero give the particles more and more energy until they smash in a blazing crossfire at the centre of the machine. Stretching approximately 35 kilometres in length, the beams collide 14,000 times every second at extremely high energies -- 500 billion-electron-volts (GeV). Each spectacular collision creates an array of new particles that could answer some of the most fundamental questions of all time. The current baseline design allows for an upgrade to a 50-kilometre, 1 trillion-electron-volt (TeV) machine during the second stage of the project. This reference design provides the first detailed technical snapshot of the proposed future electron-positron collider, defining in detail the technical parameters and components that make up each section of the 31-kilometer long accelerator. The report will guide the development of the worldwide R&D program, motivate international industrial studies and serve as the basis for the final engineering design needed to make an official project proposal later this decade.

  19. Nanoscale control designs for systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung-Yue

    2014-02-01

    Nanoscale control is the science of the control of objects at dimensions with 100 nm or less and the manipulation of them at this level of precision. The desired attributes of systems under nanoscale control design are extreme high resolution, accuracy, stability, and fast response. An important perspective of investigation in nanoscale control design includes system modeling and precision control devices and materials at a nanoscale dimension, i.e., design of nanopositioners. Nanopositioners are mechatronic systems with an ultraprecise resolution down to a fraction of an atomic diameter and developed to move objects over a small range in nanoscale dimension. After reviewing a lot of existing literatures for nanoscale control designs, the way to successful nanoscale control is accurate position sensing and feedback control of the motion. An overview of nanoscale identification, linear, and nonlinear control technologies, and devices that are playing a key role in improving precision, accuracy, and response of operation of these systems are introduced in this research.

  20. Development of a digital adaptive optimal linear regulator flight controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, P.; Kaufman, H.

    1975-01-01

    Digital adaptive controllers have been proposed as a means for retaining uniform handling qualities over the flight envelope of a high-performance aircraft. Towards such an implementation, an explicit adaptive controller, which makes direct use of online parameter identification, has been developed and applied to the linearized lateral equations of motion for a typical fighter aircraft. The system is composed of an online weighted least-squares parameter identifier, a Kalman state filter, and a model following control law designed using optimal linear regulator theory. Simulation experiments with realistic measurement noise indicate that the proposed adaptive system has the potential for onboard implementation.

  1. Efficient Modeling Method of Vehicle Dynamics Operating at a Low Speed and Its Application to Non-Linear Optimal Controller Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Woo; Matsuzaki, Sinya; Narikiyo, Tatsuo

    In this paper, we propose a non-analytical but effective self-organizing modeling method, where system dynamics of interest are constructed in a polynomial affine formation with high granularity. The conventional data mining technique has the assessment scheme for representativeness of the developed model. However, if the model is applied to extract the desired values without considering the structural peculiarities such as input pattern used for constructing the dynamics, hardware specification used for data acquisition, and so on, it possibly shows substantial margin of modeling error. In order to correspond this type of control paradigm, we define the permissible set of state and input variables in order to characterize the data used for developing the model. The developed model is then applied to the programming based optimal control scheme where the optimal inputs are selected among the permissible set of the input variable, considering all the limitations specified by linear inequalities.

  2. Extended Decentralized Linear-Quadratic-Gaussian Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. Russell

    2000-01-01

    A straightforward extension of a solution to the decentralized linear-Quadratic-Gaussian problem is proposed that allows its use for commonly encountered classes of problems that are currently solved with the extended Kalman filter. This extension allows the system to be partitioned in such a way as to exclude the nonlinearities from the essential algebraic relationships that allow the estimation and control to be optimally decentralized.

  3. Distributed control using linear momentum exchange devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharkey, J. P.; Waites, Henry; Doane, G. B., III

    1987-01-01

    MSFC has successfully employed the use of the Vibrational Control of Space Structures (VCOSS) Linear Momentum Exchange Devices (LMEDs), which was an outgrowth of the Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratory (AFWAL) program, in a distributed control experiment. The control experiment was conducted in MSFC's Ground Facility for Large Space Structures Control Verification (GF/LSSCV). The GF/LSSCV's test article was well suited for this experiment in that the LMED could be judiciously placed on the ASTROMAST. The LMED placements were such that vibrational mode information could be extracted from the accelerometers on the LMED. The LMED accelerometer information was processed by the control algorithms so that the LMED masses could be accelerated to produce forces which would dampen the vibrational modes of interest. Experimental results are presented showing the LMED's capabilities.

  4. Design and investigation of a linear smart actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Chaitanya, S.; Dhanalakshmi, K.

    2015-04-01

    Motors are nearly the sole constituents for actuation and driving applications, but there exist cases where their use proves to be impractical. Shape memory alloy (SMA), then revolutionized the actuator technology, thereby opening the door for new ideas and designs and with it what seemed unfeasible in the past have now become challenging. Many conventional actuators and sensors could be substituted with SMA, obtaining advantages in terms of reduction of weight, dimensions and its cost. SMAs are a group of metallic materials that revert to a predefined shape via phase transformation induced by a thermal procedure. Unlike metals that exhibit thermal expansion, SMA exhibits contraction when heated, which is larger by a hundredfold and exerts tremendous force for its small size. The focus of this work is to realize SMA wire as actuator which finds suitable applications (space, aerospace, biomechanics, etc.) where minimizing space, weight and cost are prime objectives. The accomplishments reported in this paper represent a significant development in the design of SMA actuator configurations for linear actuation. Report on design, fabrication and characterisation of the proposed system is presented. The design took advantage of converting the small linear displacement of the SMA wire into a large linear elastic motion under the influence of biasing element. From the results with control it is aspired that with further improvements on the design, the actuator can be utilized in enabling practical SMA technologies for potential robotic and commercial applications.

  5. Design of nonlinear observer by augmented linear system based on formal linearization using fourier expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Kazuo; Takata, Hitoshi

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we consider an observer design by using a formal linearization based on Fourier expansion for nonlinear dynamic and measurement systems. A non-linear dynamic system is given by a nonlinear ordinary differential equation, and a measurement sysetm is done by a nonlinear equation. Defining a linearization function which consists of the trigonometric functions considered up to the higher-order, a nonlinear dynamic system is transformed into an augmented linear one with respect to this linearization function by using Fourier expansion. Introducing an augmented measurement vector which consists of polynomials of measurement data, a measurement equation is transformed into an augmented linear one with respect to the linearization function in the same way. To these augmented linearized systems, a linear estimation theory is applied to design a new non-linear observer.

  6. Nutrient Control Design Manual

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Nutrient Control Design Manual will present an extensive state-of-the-technology review of the engineering design and operation of nitrogen and phosphorous control technologies and techniques applied at municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). This manual will present ...

  7. Design of an Internal Model Control strategy for single-phase grid-connected PWM inverters and its performance analysis with a non-linear local load and weak grid.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Eric N; Coelho, Ernane A A; Carvalho, Henrique T M; Freitas, Luiz C G; Júnior, João B V; Freitas, Luiz C

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the design of a controller based on Internal Model Control (IMC) applied to a grid-connected single-phase PWM inverter. The mathematical modeling of the inverter and the LCL output filter, used to project the 1-DOF IMC controller, is presented and the decoupling of grid voltage by a Feedforward strategy is analyzed. A Proportional - Resonant Controller (P+Res) was used for the control of the same plant in the running of experimental results, thus moving towards the discussion of differences regarding IMC and P+Res performances, which arrived at the evaluation of the proposed control strategy. The results are presented for typical conditions, for weak-grid and for non-linear local load, in order to verify the behavior of the controller against such situations. PMID:27236535

  8. Design of an Internal Model Control strategy for single-phase grid-connected PWM inverters and its performance analysis with a non-linear local load and weak grid.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Eric N; Coelho, Ernane A A; Carvalho, Henrique T M; Freitas, Luiz C G; Júnior, João B V; Freitas, Luiz C

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the design of a controller based on Internal Model Control (IMC) applied to a grid-connected single-phase PWM inverter. The mathematical modeling of the inverter and the LCL output filter, used to project the 1-DOF IMC controller, is presented and the decoupling of grid voltage by a Feedforward strategy is analyzed. A Proportional - Resonant Controller (P+Res) was used for the control of the same plant in the running of experimental results, thus moving towards the discussion of differences regarding IMC and P+Res performances, which arrived at the evaluation of the proposed control strategy. The results are presented for typical conditions, for weak-grid and for non-linear local load, in order to verify the behavior of the controller against such situations.

  9. Control system design guide

    SciTech Connect

    Sellers, David; Friedman, Hannah; Haasl, Tudi; Bourassa, Norman; Piette, Mary Ann

    2003-05-01

    The ''Control System Design Guide'' (Design Guide) provides methods and recommendations for the control system design process and control point selection and installation. Control systems are often the most problematic system in a building. A good design process that takes into account maintenance, operation, and commissioning can lead to a smoothly operating and efficient building. To this end, the Design Guide provides a toolbox of templates for improving control system design and specification. HVAC designers are the primary audience for the Design Guide. The control design process it presents will help produce well-designed control systems that achieve efficient and robust operation. The spreadsheet examples for control valve schedules, damper schedules, and points lists can streamline the use of the control system design concepts set forth in the Design Guide by providing convenient starting points from which designers can build. Although each reader brings their own unique questions to the text, the Design Guide contains information that designers, commissioning providers, operators, and owners will find useful.

  10. Designing case-control studies.

    PubMed Central

    Yanagawa, T

    1979-01-01

    Identification of confounding factors, evaluation of their influence on cause-effect associations, and the introduction of appropriate ways to account for these factors are important considerations in designing case-control studies. This paper presents designs useful for these purposes, after first providing a statistical definition of a confounding factor. Differences in the ability to identify and evaluate confounding factors and estimate disease risk between designs employing stratification (matching) and designs randomly sampling cases and controls are noted. Linear logistic models for the analysis of data from such designs are described and are shown to liberalize design requirements and to increase relative risk estimation efficiency. The methods are applied to data from a multiple factor investigation of lung cancer patients and controls. PMID:540588

  11. Propulsion control of superconducting linear synchronous motor vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Tetsuzo; Shiromizu, Tsunehiro

    1997-09-01

    The armature current of a superconducting Linear Synchronous Motor (LSM) for a maglev vehicle is controlled to produce a suitable propulsion force so that the vehicle follows the reference speed signal sent from a control station. Besides the power is supplied from some inverters to the LSM armature sections where the vehicle exists. This paper shows an exact mathematical modeling of the propulsion control system to treat the system analytically, which is used for designing controllers and performance computer simulations. The calculated results include the simulations when the vehicle goes through power feeder section borders and tunnels that have a large aerodynamic drag force with taking account of an inverter failure.

  12. H2 control of linear uncertain systems considering input quantization with encoder/decoder mismatch.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Bo-Chao; Yang, Guang-Hong

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, an H2 control design for linear uncertain systems with input quantization in the presence of more general encoder/decoder mismatch is investigated. The construction of the control law includes two parts: linear part and nonlinear part. The gain of the linear part is derived from linear matrix inequalities (LMIs), and the linear part of the control law is designed for achieving the H2 performance against system characteristic matrix uncertainty and encoder/decoder mismatch. The nonlinear part is designed to eliminate the influence of external disturbance and quantization error. Finally, examples are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  13. A non-linear programming approach to the computer-aided design of regulators using a linear-quadratic formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, P.

    1985-01-01

    A design technique is proposed for linear regulators in which a feedback controller of fixed structure is chosen to minimize an integral quadratic objective function subject to the satisfaction of integral quadratic constraint functions. Application of a non-linear programming algorithm to this mathematically tractable formulation results in an efficient and useful computer-aided design tool. Particular attention is paid to computational efficiency and various recommendations are made. Two design examples illustrate the flexibility of the approach and highlight the special insight afforded to the designer.

  14. Application of linear gauss pseudospectral method in model predictive control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liang; Zhou, Hao; Chen, Wanchun

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a model predictive control(MPC) method aimed at solving the nonlinear optimal control problem with hard terminal constraints and quadratic performance index. The method combines the philosophies of the nonlinear approximation model predictive control, linear quadrature optimal control and Gauss Pseudospectral method. The current control is obtained by successively solving linear algebraic equations transferred from the original problem via linearization and the Gauss Pseudospectral method. It is not only of high computational efficiency since it does not need to solve nonlinear programming problem, but also of high accuracy though there are a few discrete points. Therefore, this method is suitable for on-board applications. A design of terminal impact with a specified direction is carried out to evaluate the performance of this method. Augmented PN guidance law in the three-dimensional coordinate system is applied to produce the initial guess. And various cases for target with straight-line movements are employed to demonstrate the applicability in different impact angles. Moreover, performance of the proposed method is also assessed by comparison with other guidance laws. Simulation results indicate that this method is not only of high computational efficiency and accuracy, but also applicable in the framework of guidance design.

  15. Linear quadratic servo control of a reusable rocket engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musgrave, Jeffrey L.

    1991-01-01

    A design method for a servo compensator is developed in the frequency domain using singular values. The method is applied to a reusable rocket engine. An intelligent control system for reusable rocket engines was proposed which includes a diagnostic system, a control system, and an intelligent coordinator which determines engine control strategies based on the identified failure modes. The method provides a means of generating various linear multivariable controllers capable of meeting performance and robustness specifications and accommodating failure modes identified by the diagnostic system. Command following with set point control is necessary for engine operation. A Kalman filter reconstructs the state while loop transfer recovery recovers the required degree of robustness while maintaining satisfactory rejection of sensor noise from the command error. The approach is applied to the design of a controller for a rocket engine satisfying performance constraints in the frequency domain. Simulation results demonstrate the performance of the linear design on a nonlinear engine model over all power levels during mainstage operation.

  16. Recursive Deadbeat Controller Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Phan, Minh Q.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a recursive algorithm for a deadbeat predictive controller design. The method combines together the concepts of system identification and deadbeat controller designs. It starts with the multi-step output prediction equation and derives the control force in terms of past input and output time histories. The formulation thus derived satisfies simultaneously system identification and deadbeat controller design requirements. As soon as the coefficient matrices are identified satisfying the output prediction equation, no further work is required to compute the deadbeat control gain matrices. The method can be implemented recursively just as any typical recursive system identification techniques.

  17. Linear and non-linear control techniques applied to actively lubricated journal bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicoletti, R.; Santos, I. F.

    2003-03-01

    The main objectives of actively lubricated bearings are the simultaneous reduction of wear and vibration between rotating and stationary machinery parts. For reducing wear and dissipating vibration energy until certain limits, one can use the conventional hydrodynamic lubrication. For further reduction of shaft vibrations one can use the active lubrication action, which is based on injecting pressurized oil into the bearing gap through orifices machined in the bearing sliding surface. The design and efficiency of some linear (PD, PI and PID) and a non-linear controller, applied to a tilting-pad journal bearing, are analysed and discussed. Important conclusions about the application of integral controllers, responsible for changing the rotor-bearing equilibrium position and consequently the "passive" oil film damping coefficients, are achieved. Numerical results show an effective vibration reduction of unbalance response of a rigid rotor, where the PD and the non-linear P controllers show better performance for the frequency range of study (0-80 Hz). The feasibility of eliminating rotor-bearing instabilities (phenomena of whirl) by using active lubrication is also investigated, illustrating clearly one of its most promising applications.

  18. Extensibility of a linear rapid robust design methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinfeldt, Bradley A.; Braun, Robert D.

    2016-05-01

    The extensibility of a linear rapid robust design methodology is examined. This analysis is approached from a computational cost and accuracy perspective. The sensitivity of the solution's computational cost is examined by analysing effects such as the number of design variables, nonlinearity of the CAs, and nonlinearity of the response in addition to several potential complexity metrics. Relative to traditional robust design methods, the linear rapid robust design methodology scaled better with the size of the problem and had performance that exceeded the traditional techniques examined. The accuracy of applying a method with linear fundamentals to nonlinear problems was examined. It is observed that if the magnitude of nonlinearity is less than 1000 times that of the nominal linear response, the error associated with applying successive linearization will result in ? errors in the response less than 10% compared to the full nonlinear error.

  19. The Control System for the X-33 Linear Aerospike Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Jerry E.; Espenschied, Erich; Klop, Jeffrey

    1998-01-01

    The linear aerospike engine is being developed for single-stage -to-orbit (SSTO) applications. The primary advantages of a linear aerospike engine over a conventional bell nozzle engine include altitude compensation, which provides enhanced performance, and lower vehicle weight resulting from the integration of the engine into the vehicle structure. A feature of this integration is the ability to provide thrust vector control (TVC) by differential throttling of the engine combustion elements, rather than the more conventional approach of gimballing the entire engine. An analysis of the X-33 flight trajectories has shown that it is necessary to provide +/- 15% roll, pitch and yaw TVC authority with an optional capability of +/- 30% pitch at select times during the mission. The TVC performance requirements for X-33 engine became a major driver in the design of the engine control system. The thrust level of the X-33 engine as well as the amount of TVC are managed by a control system which consists of electronic, instrumentation, propellant valves, electro-mechanical actuators, spark igniters, and harnesses. The engine control system is responsible for the thrust control, mixture ratio control, thrust vector control, engine health monitoring, and communication to the vehicle during all operational modes of the engine (checkout, pre-start, start, main-stage, shutdown and post shutdown). The methodology for thrust vector control, the health monitoring approach which includes failure detection, isolation, and response, and the basic control system design are the topic of this paper. As an additional point of interest a brief description of the X-33 engine system will be included in this paper.

  20. Control system design method

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David G.; Robinett, III, Rush D.

    2012-02-21

    A control system design method and concomitant control system comprising representing a physical apparatus to be controlled as a Hamiltonian system, determining elements of the Hamiltonian system representation which are power generators, power dissipators, and power storage devices, analyzing stability and performance of the Hamiltonian system based on the results of the determining step and determining necessary and sufficient conditions for stability of the Hamiltonian system, creating a stable control system based on the results of the analyzing step, and employing the resulting control system to control the physical apparatus.

  1. Robust control design for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yedavalli, Rama K.

    1989-01-01

    Time-domain control design for stability robustness of linear systems with structured uncertainty is addressed. Upper bounds on the linear perturbation of an asymptotically stable linear system are obtained, making it possible to maintain stability by using the structural information of the uncertainty. A quantitative measure called the stability robustness index is introduced and used to design controllers for robust stability. The proposed state feedback control design algorithm can be used, for a given set of perturbations, to select the range of control effort for which the system is stability-robust. Conversely it can be used, for a given control effort, to determine the size of the tolerable perturbation. The algorithm is illustrated with examples from aircraft control and large-space-structure control problems.

  2. Identification and robust control of linear parameter-varying systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Lawton Hubert

    This dissertation deals with linear parameter-varying (LPV) systems: linear dynamic systems that depend on time-varying parameters. These systems appear in gain scheduling problems, and much recent research has been devoted to their prospective usefulness for systematic gain scheduling. We primarily focus on robust control of uncertain LPV systems and identification of LPV systems that are modelable as linear-fractional transformations (LFTs). Using parameter-dependent quadratic Lyapunov functions, linear matrix inequalities (LMIs), and scaled small-gain arguments, we define notions of stability and induced-{cal L}sb2 performance for uncertain LPV systems whose parameters and rates of parameter variation satisfy given bounds. The performance criterion involves integral quadratic constraints and implies naturally parameter-dependent induced-{cal L}sb2 norm bounds. We formulate and solve an {cal H}sb{infty}-like control problem for an LPV plant with measurable parameters and an "Output/State Feedback" structure: the feedback outputs include some noiselessly measured states. Necessary and sufficient solvability conditions reduce to LMIs that can be solved approximately using finite-dimensional convex programming. Reduced-order LPV controllers are constructed from the LMI solutions. A D-K iteration-like procedure provides robustness to structured, time-varying, parametric uncertainty. The design method is applied to a motivating example: flight control for the F-16 VISTA throughout its subsonic flight envelope. Parameter-dependent weights and {cal H}sb{infty} design principles describe the performance objectives. Closed-loop responses exhibited by nonlinear simulations indicate satisfactory flying qualities. Identification of linear-fractional LPV systems is treated using maximum-likelihood parameter estimation. Computing the gradient and Hessian of a maximum-likelihood cost function reduces to simulating one LPV filter per identified parameter. We use nonlinear

  3. Nutrient Control Design Manual

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this EPA design manual is to provide updated, state‐of‐the‐technology design guidance on nitrogen and phosphorus control at municipal Wastewater Treatment Plants (WWTPs). Similar to previous EPA manuals, this manual contains extensive information on the principles ...

  4. Design and optimization of a modal- independent linear ultrasonic motor.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shengli; Yao, Zhiyuan

    2014-03-01

    To simplify the design of the linear ultrasonic motor (LUSM) and improve its output performance, a method of modal decoupling for LUSMs is proposed in this paper. The specific embodiment of this method is decoupling of the traditional LUSM stator's complex vibration into two simple vibrations, with each vibration implemented by one vibrator. Because the two vibrators are designed independently, their frequencies can be tuned independently and frequency consistency is easy to achieve. Thus, the method can simplify the design of the LUSM. Based on this method, a prototype modal- independent LUSM is designed and fabricated. The motor reaches its maximum thrust force of 47 N, maximum unloaded speed of 0.43 m/s, and maximum power of 7.85 W at applied voltage of 200 Vpp. The motor's structure is then optimized by controlling the difference between the two vibrators' resonance frequencies to reach larger output speed, thrust, and power. The optimized results show that when the frequency difference is 73 Hz, the output force, speed, and power reach their maximum values. At the input voltage of 200 Vpp, the motor reaches its maximum thrust force of 64.2 N, maximum unloaded speed of 0.76 m/s, maximum power of 17.4 W, maximum thrust-weight ratio of 23.7, and maximum efficiency of 39.6%.

  5. Drive Control of an Electric Vehicle by a Non-linear Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mubin, Marizan; Ouchi, Shigeto; Anabuki, Masatoshi; Hirata, Hiroshi

    The driving force of automobiles is transmitted by the frictional force between the tires and the road surface. This frictional force is a function of the weight of the car-body and the friction coefficient μ between the tires and the road surface. The friction coefficient μ is also a function of the following parameters: the slip ratio λ determined by the car-body speed and the wheel speed, and the condition of the road surface. Slippage of automobiles which causes much damage often occurs during accelerating and braking. In this paper, we propose a new drive control system which has an effect on acceleration and braking. In the drive control system, a non-linear controller designed by using a Lyapunov function is used. This non-linear controller has two functions: first one is μ control which moves the car-body, another one is λ control. The controller is designed in order that μ and λ work at noslip and with slip respectively. As another controller, a disturbance observer is used for estimating the car-body speed which is difficult to be measured. Then, this lead to the proof of the stability condition of the combined system which consists of two controllers: the non-linear controller and the disturbance observer. Finally, the effectiveness of this control system is proved by a very satisfactory simulation and experimental results for two cases.

  6. Digitally gain controlled linear high voltage amplifier for laboratory applications.

    PubMed

    Koçum, C

    2011-08-01

    The design of a digitally gain controlled high-voltage non-inverting bipolar linear amplifier is presented. This cost efficient and relatively simple circuit has stable operation range from dc to 90 kHz under the load of 10 kΩ and 39 pF. The amplifier can swing up to 360 V(pp) under these conditions and it has 2.5 μs rise time. The gain can be changed by the aid of JFETs. The amplifiers have been realized using a combination of operational amplifiers and high-voltage discrete bipolar junction transistors. The circuit details and performance characteristics are discussed.

  7. Transverse wakefield control and feedback in the SLC (SLAC Linear Collider) linear

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, J.T.; Campisi, I.E.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.; Lee, M.; Petersen, A.; Phinney, N.; Ross, M.; Abrams, G.S.; Adolphsen, C.; Soderstrom, E.

    1987-01-01

    Transverse wakefields in the linac of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) have been observed to enlarge the effective emittance of beams which are not properly centered in the accelerating structure. A fast feedback system has been constructed to minimize the enlargement under changing conditions by controlling the beam launching parameters. Theoretical aspects of this transverse feedback system are reviewed as well as the design of the beam sensors, launch controllers, communication equipment and data processing micro-computer. A variety of beam observations have been made. They show that dispersion as well as wakefield effects are important. In the near future the fast transverse feedback system will be beam tested, and algorithms tailored to the noise environment of the SLC will be tried.

  8. Approximate Linearization Control of 2-DOF Underactuated-by-1 Systems Using Higher Order Linearization Coordinate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Tasuku

    This paper deals with an approximate linearization control of 2-DOF underactuated-by-1 nonlinear systems, proposing a novel linearization coordinate which reduces the approximation error over the state space around the operating point. The coordinate is analytically constructed in a systematic way by solving two first order linear partial differential equations and the solution is given in an infinite series of configuration variables. The resulting linearization feedback is highly nonlinear and the basin of attraction of the stabilized system using proposed coordinate is large, comparing with those of a conventional first order or other lower order linearization coordinates. The approximate linearization control based on the proposed coordinate is applied to the stabilization of a rotational inverted pendulum; the advantage is verified in simulations and experiments. Some perspectives on availability of the linearization coordinate are discussed and they are computed also for a mobile inverted pendulum, Acrobot, and for Pendubot as examples.

  9. A Riccati approach for constrained linear quadratic optimal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sideris, Athanasios; Rodriguez, Luis A.

    2011-02-01

    An active-set method is proposed for solving linear quadratic optimal control problems subject to general linear inequality path constraints including mixed state-control and state-only constraints. A Riccati-based approach is developed for efficiently solving the equality constrained optimal control subproblems generated during the procedure. The solution of each subproblem requires computations that scale linearly with the horizon length. The algorithm is illustrated with numerical examples.

  10. Linear, multivariable robust control with a mu perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, Andy; Doyle, John; Balas, Gary

    1993-01-01

    The structured singular value is a linear algebra tool developed to study a particular class of matrix perturbation problems arising in robust feedback control of multivariable systems. These perturbations are called linear fractional, and are a natural way to model many types of uncertainty in linear systems, including state-space parameter uncertainty, multiplicative and additive unmodeled dynamics uncertainty, and coprime factor and gap metric uncertainty. The structured singular value theory provides a natural extension of classical SISO robustness measures and concepts to MIMO systems. The structured singular value analysis, coupled with approximate synthesis methods, make it possible to study the tradeoff between performance and uncertainty that occurs in all feedback systems. In MIMO systems, the complexity of the spatial interactions in the loop gains make it difficult to heuristically quantify the tradeoffs that must occur. This paper examines the role played by the structured singular value (and its computable bounds) in answering these questions, as well as its role in the general robust, multivariable control analysis and design problem.

  11. String Stability of a Linear Formation Flight Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Michael J.; Ryan, Jack; Hanson, Curtis E.; Parle, James F.

    2002-01-01

    String stability analysis of an autonomous formation flight system was performed using linear and nonlinear simulations. String stability is a measure of how position errors propagate from one vehicle to another in a cascaded system. In the formation flight system considered here, each i(sup th) aircraft uses information from itself and the preceding ((i-1)(sup th)) aircraft to track a commanded relative position. A possible solution for meeting performance requirements with such a system is to allow string instability. This paper explores two results of string instability and outlines analysis techniques for string unstable systems. The three analysis techniques presented here are: linear, nonlinear formation performance, and ride quality. The linear technique was developed from a worst-case scenario and could be applied to the design of a string unstable controller. The nonlinear formation performance and ride quality analysis techniques both use nonlinear formation simulation. Three of the four formation-controller gain-sets analyzed in this paper were limited more by ride quality than by performance. Formations of up to seven aircraft in a cascaded formation could be used in the presence of light gusts with this string unstable system.

  12. Linear quadratic stochastic control of atomic hydrogen masers.

    PubMed

    Koppang, P; Leland, R

    1999-01-01

    Data are given showing the results of using the linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) technique to steer remote hydrogen masers to Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) as given by the United States Naval Observatory (USNO) via two-way satellite time transfer and the Global Positioning System (GPS). Data also are shown from the results of steering a hydrogen maser to the real-time USNO mean. A general overview of the theory behind the LQG technique also is given. The LQG control is a technique that uses Kalman filtering to estimate time and frequency errors used as input into a control calculation. A discrete frequency steer is calculated by minimizing a quadratic cost function that is dependent on both the time and frequency errors and the control effort. Different penalties, chosen by the designer, are assessed by the controller as the time and frequency errors and control effort vary from zero. With this feature, controllers can be designed to force the time and frequency differences between two standards to zero, either more or less aggressively depending on the application.

  13. 2002 Controls Design Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Ronald A.; Vetter, T. K.; Wells, S. R.

    2002-01-01

    This document is intended to provide the specifications and requirements for a flight control system design challenge. The response to the challenge will involve documenting whether the particular design has met the stated requirements through analysis and computer simulation. The response should be written in the general format of a technical publication with corresponding length limits, e.g., an approximate maximum length of 45 units, with each full-size figure and double-spaced typewritten page constituting one unit.

  14. Ensemble control of linear systems with parameter uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Kit Ian; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Dandan; Tu, Yanshuai

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we study the optimal control problem for a class of four-dimensional linear systems based on quaternionic and Fourier analysis. When the control is unconstrained, the optimal ensemble controller for this linear ensemble control systems is given in terms of prolate spheroidal wave functions. For the constrained convex optimisation problem of such systems, the quadratic programming is presented to obtain the optimal control laws. Simulations are given to verity the effectiveness of the proposed theory.

  15. Novel final focus design for future linear colliders.

    PubMed

    Raimondi, P; Seryi, A

    2001-04-23

    The length, complexity, and cost of the present final focus designs for linear colliders grow very quickly with the beam energy. In this Letter, a novel final focus system is presented and compared with the one proposed for the Next Linear Collider (NLC Zeroth-Order Design Report, edited by T. O. Raubenheimer, SLAC Report No. 474, 1996). This new design has fewer optical elements and is much shorter, nonetheless achieving better chromatic properties. Moreover, the new system is more suitable for operation over a larger energy range.

  16. Electronically Tunable Differential Integrator: Linear Voltage Controlled Quadrature Oscillator.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Rabindranath; Pattanayak, Sandhya; Venkateswaran, Palaniandavar; Das, Sagarika

    2015-01-01

    A new electronically tunable differential integrator (ETDI) and its extension to voltage controlled quadrature oscillator (VCQO) design with linear tuning law are proposed; the active building block is a composite current feedback amplifier with recent multiplication mode current conveyor (MMCC) element. Recently utilization of two different kinds of active devices to form a composite building block is being considered since it yields a superior functional element suitable for improved quality circuit design. The integrator time constant (τ) and the oscillation frequency (ω o ) are tunable by the control voltage (V) of the MMCC block. Analysis indicates negligible phase error (θ e ) for the integrator and low active ω o -sensitivity relative to the device parasitic capacitances. Satisfactory experimental verifications on electronic tunability of some wave shaping applications by the integrator and a double-integrator feedback loop (DIFL) based sinusoid oscillator with linear f o variation range of 60 KHz~1.8 MHz at low THD of 2.1% are verified by both simulation and hardware tests. PMID:27347537

  17. Design Techniques for Uniform-DFT, Linear Phase Filter Banks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Honglin; DeLeon, Phillip

    1999-01-01

    Uniform-DFT filter banks are an important class of filter banks and their theory is well known. One notable characteristic is their very efficient implementation when using polyphase filters and the FFT. Separately, linear phase filter banks, i.e. filter banks in which the analysis filters have a linear phase are also an important class of filter banks and desired in many applications. Unfortunately, it has been proved that one cannot design critically-sampled, uniform-DFT, linear phase filter banks and achieve perfect reconstruction. In this paper, we present a least-squares solution to this problem and in addition prove that oversampled, uniform-DFT, linear phase filter banks (which are also useful in many applications) can be constructed for perfect reconstruction. Design examples are included illustrate the methods.

  18. Singular linear-quadratic control problem for systems with linear delay

    SciTech Connect

    Sesekin, A. N.

    2013-12-18

    A singular linear-quadratic optimization problem on the trajectories of non-autonomous linear differential equations with linear delay is considered. The peculiarity of this problem is the fact that this problem has no solution in the class of integrable controls. To ensure the existence of solutions is required to expand the class of controls including controls with impulse components. Dynamical systems with linear delay are used to describe the motion of pantograph from the current collector with electric traction, biology, etc. It should be noted that for practical problems fact singularity criterion of quality is quite commonly occurring, and therefore the study of these problems is surely important. For the problem under discussion optimal programming control contained impulse components at the initial and final moments of time is constructed under certain assumptions on the functional and the right side of the control system.

  19. Next linear collider test accelerator injector design and status

    SciTech Connect

    Yeremian, A.D.; Miller, R.H.; Wang, J.W.

    1994-08-01

    The Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) being built at SLAC will integrate the new technologies of X-band accelerator structures and RF systems for the Next Linear Collider, demonstrate multibunch beam-loading energy compensation and suppression of higher-order deflecting modes, measure transverse components of the accelerating field, and measure the dark current generated by RF field emission in the accelerator Injector design and simulation results for the NLCTA injector are discussed.

  20. Bounded Linear Stability Margin Analysis of Nonlinear Hybrid Adaptive Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Boskovic, Jovan D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a bounded linear stability analysis for a hybrid adaptive control that blends both direct and indirect adaptive control. Stability and convergence of nonlinear adaptive control are analyzed using an approximate linear equivalent system. A stability margin analysis shows that a large adaptive gain can lead to a reduced phase margin. This method can enable metrics-driven adaptive control whereby the adaptive gain is adjusted to meet stability margin requirements.

  1. Linear Equating for the NEAT Design: Parameter Substitution Models and Chained Linear Relationship Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Michael T.; Mroch, Andrew A.; Suh, Youngsuk; Ripkey, Douglas R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyzes five linear equating models for the "nonequivalent groups with anchor test" (NEAT) design with internal anchors (i.e., the anchor test is part of the full test). The analysis employs a two-dimensional framework. The first dimension contrasts two general approaches to developing the equating relationship. Under a "parameter…

  2. Stochastic robustness of linear control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengel, Robert F.; Ryan, Laura E.

    1990-01-01

    A simple numerical procedure for estimating the stochastic robustness of a linear, time-invariant system is described. Monte Carlo evaluation of the system's eigenvalues allows the probability of instability and the related stochastic root locus to be estimated. This definition of robustness is an alternative to existing deterministic definitions that address both structured and unstructured parameter variations directly. This analysis approach treats not only Gaussian parameter uncertainties but non-Gaussian cases, including uncertain-but-bounded variations. Trivial extensions of the procedure admit alternate discriminants to be considered. Thus, the probabilities that stipulated degrees of instability will be exceeded or that closed-loop roots will leave desirable regions also can be estimated. Results are particularly amenable to graphical presentation.

  3. H(2)- and H(infinity)-design tools for linear time-invariant systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ly, Uy-Loi

    1989-01-01

    Recent advances in optimal control have brought design techniques based on optimization of H(2) and H(infinity) norm criteria, closer to be attractive alternatives to single-loop design methods for linear time-variant systems. Significant steps forward in this technology are the deeper understanding of performance and robustness issues of these design procedures and means to perform design trade-offs. However acceptance of the technology is hindered by the lack of convenient design tools to exercise these powerful multivariable techniques, while still allowing single-loop design formulation. Presented is a unique computer tool for designing arbitrary low-order linear time-invarient controllers than encompasses both performance and robustness issues via the familiar H(2) and H(infinity) norm optimization. Application to disturbance rejection design for a commercial transport is demonstrated.

  4. To study the emittance dilution in Superconducting Linear Accelerator Design for International Linear Collider (ILC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, Kirti; Solyak, Nikolay; Tenenbaum, Peter

    2005-04-01

    Recently the particle physics community has chosen a single technology for the new accelerator, opening the way for the world community to unite and concentrate resources on the design of an International Linear collider (ILC) using superconducting technology. One of the key operational issues in the design of the ILC will be the preservation of the small beam emittances during passage through the main linear accelerator (linac). Sources of emittance dilution include incoherent misalignments of the quadrupole magnets and rf-structure misalignments. In this work, the study of emittance dilution for the 500-GeV center of mass energy main linac of the Superconducting Linear Accelerator design, based on adaptation of the TESLA TDR design is performed using LIAR simulation program. Based on the tolerances of the present design, effect of two important Beam-Based steering algorithms, Flat Steering and Dispersion Free Steering, are compared with respect to the emittance dilution in the main linac. We also investigated the effect of various misalignments on the emittance dilution for these two steering algorithms.

  5. Embodied linearity of speed control in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Medici, V.; Fry, S. N.

    2012-01-01

    Fruitflies regulate flight speed by adjusting their body angle. To understand how low-level posture control serves an overall linear visual speed control strategy, we visually induced free-flight acceleration responses in a wind tunnel and measured the body kinematics using high-speed videography. Subsequently, we reverse engineered the transfer function mapping body pitch angle onto flight speed. A linear model is able to reproduce the behavioural data with good accuracy. Our results show that linearity in speed control is realized already at the level of body posture-mediated speed control and is therefore embodied at the level of the complex aerodynamic mechanisms of body and wings. Together with previous results, this study reveals the existence of a linear hierarchical control strategy, which can provide relevant control principles for biomimetic implementations, such as autonomous flying micro air vehicles. PMID:22933185

  6. Embodied linearity of speed control in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Medici, V; Fry, S N

    2012-12-01

    Fruitflies regulate flight speed by adjusting their body angle. To understand how low-level posture control serves an overall linear visual speed control strategy, we visually induced free-flight acceleration responses in a wind tunnel and measured the body kinematics using high-speed videography. Subsequently, we reverse engineered the transfer function mapping body pitch angle onto flight speed. A linear model is able to reproduce the behavioural data with good accuracy. Our results show that linearity in speed control is realized already at the level of body posture-mediated speed control and is therefore embodied at the level of the complex aerodynamic mechanisms of body and wings. Together with previous results, this study reveals the existence of a linear hierarchical control strategy, which can provide relevant control principles for biomimetic implementations, such as autonomous flying micro air vehicles. PMID:22933185

  7. Embodied linearity of speed control in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Medici, V; Fry, S N

    2012-12-01

    Fruitflies regulate flight speed by adjusting their body angle. To understand how low-level posture control serves an overall linear visual speed control strategy, we visually induced free-flight acceleration responses in a wind tunnel and measured the body kinematics using high-speed videography. Subsequently, we reverse engineered the transfer function mapping body pitch angle onto flight speed. A linear model is able to reproduce the behavioural data with good accuracy. Our results show that linearity in speed control is realized already at the level of body posture-mediated speed control and is therefore embodied at the level of the complex aerodynamic mechanisms of body and wings. Together with previous results, this study reveals the existence of a linear hierarchical control strategy, which can provide relevant control principles for biomimetic implementations, such as autonomous flying micro air vehicles.

  8. All covariance controllers for linear discrete-time systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, Chen; Skelton, Robert E.

    1990-01-01

    The set of covariances that a linear discrete-time plant with a specified-order controller can have is characterized. The controllers that assign such covariances to any linear discrete-time system are given explicitly in closed form. The freedom in these covariance controllers is explicit and is parameterized by two orthogonal matrices. By appropriately choosing these free parameters, additional system objectives can be achieved without altering the state covariance, and the stability of the closed-loop system is guaranteed.

  9. Distributed adaptive output consensus control of second-order systems containing unknown non-linear control gains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang; Wang, Chaoli; Du, Qinghui; Cai, Xuan

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we address the output consensus problem of tracking a desired trajectory for a group of second-order agents on a directed graph with a fixed topology. Each agent is modelled by a second-order non-linear system with unknown non-linear dynamics and unknown non-linear control gains. Only a subset of the agents is given access to the desired trajectory information directly. A distributed adaptive consensus protocol driving all agents to track the desired trajectory is presented using the backstepping technique and approximation technique of Fourier series (FSs). The FS structure is taken not only for tracking the non-linear dynamics but also the unknown portion in the controller design procedure, which can avoid virtual controllers containing the uncertain terms. Stability analysis and parameter convergence of the proposed algorithm are conducted based on the Lyapunov theory and the algebraic graph theory. It is also demonstrated that arbitrary small tracking errors can be achieved by appropriately choosing design parameters. Though the proposed work is applicable for second-order non-linear systems containing unknown non-linear control gains, the proposed controller design can be easily extended to higher-order non-linear systems containing unknown non-linear control gains. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed schemes.

  10. LMI-based controller design for dynamic variable structure systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtake, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Kazuo

    2005-12-01

    This paper presents controller design conditions for dynamic variable structure systems in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). In our previous paper, we proposed the dynamic variable structure system and derived its controller design conditions using switching fuzzy model-based control approach. However, the controller design conditions were given in terms of bilinear matrix inequalities (BMIs). In this paper, by introducing the augmented system which consists of the switching fuzzy model and a stable linear system, we derive new controller design conditions in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) for the dynamic variable structure systems. A simulation result shows the utility of this control approach.

  11. Design considerations for a laser-plasma linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Toth, Cs.; Leemans, W. P.

    2009-01-22

    Design considerations for a next-generation electron-positron linear collider based on laser-plasma-accelerators are discussed. Several of the advantages and challenges of laser-plasma-based accelerator technology are addressed. An example of the parameters for a 1 TeV laser-plasma-based collider is presented.

  12. Asymptotic Linearity of Optimal Control Modification Adaptive Law with Analytical Stability Margins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2010-01-01

    Optimal control modification has been developed to improve robustness to model-reference adaptive control. For systems with linear matched uncertainty, optimal control modification adaptive law can be shown by a singular perturbation argument to possess an outer solution that exhibits a linear asymptotic property. Analytical expressions of phase and time delay margins for the outer solution can be obtained. Using the gradient projection operator, a free design parameter of the adaptive law can be selected to satisfy stability margins.

  13. Approach to control moment gyroscope steering using feedback linearization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dzielski, John; Bergmann, Edward; Paradiso, Joseph A.; Rowell, Derek; Wormley, David

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents an approach for controlling spacecraft equipped with control moment gyroscopes. A technique from feedback linearization theory is used to transform the original nonlinear problem to an equivalent linear form without approximating assumptions. In this form, the spacecraft dynamics appear linearly, and are decoupled from redundancy in the system of gyroscopes. A general approach to distributing control effort among the available actuators is described which includes provisions for redistribution of rotors, explicit bounds in gimbal rates, and guaranteed operation at or near singular configurations. A particular algorithm is developed for systems of double-gimbal devices, and demonstrated in two examples for which existing approaches fail to give adequate performance.

  14. Application of linear stability theory in laminar flow design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyer, Venkit; Spall, Robert

    1991-01-01

    The linear stability of fully three-dimensional supersonic boundary layers formed over swept-wing configurations is investigated using a modified version of the linear stability code COSAL. Configurations studied include a highly swept leading-edge model to be utilized for transition studies in the LARC Low-disturbance Mach 3.5 Pilot Tunnel. The model is a representation of the leading edge of a laminar flow control wing for the F-16XL aircraft. In addition, the region over a laminar flow control glove fitted on the midportion of an F-16XL wing was studied. For each configuration, estimates of the location of the onset of transition were computed using linear stability theory and the e exp N method. The effectiveness of suction in stabilizing the boundary layer over the F-16XL wing glove was also investigated.

  15. Design and testing of a coaxial linear magnetic spring with integral linear motor. [for spacecraft energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patt, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    The design of a coaxial linear magnetic spring which incorporates a linear motor to control axial motion and overcome system damping is presented, and the results of static and dynamic tests are reported. The system has nominal stiffness 25,000 N/m and is designed to oscillate a 900-g component over a 4.6-mm stroke in a Stirling-cycle cryogenic refrigerator being developed for long-service (5-10-yr) space applications (Stolfi et al., 1983). Mosaics of 10 radially magnetized high-coercivity SmCO5 segments enclosed in Ti cans are employed, and the device is found to have quality factor 70-100, corresponding to energy-storage efficiency 91-94 percent. Drawings, diagrams, and graphs are provided.

  16. A minimum time control algorithm for linear and nonlinear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, J.; Desrochers, A. A.

    1985-01-01

    The minimum time control problem with bounded control has long been of interest to control engineers. Much of the theoretical study of this problem has been limited to linear systems and the results are usually problem-specific. This paper presents a new computational method for solving the minimum-time control problem when the control action is assumed to be bang-bang. A gradient-based algorithm is developed where the switching times are updated to minimize the final state missed distance. The algorithm is applicable to linear and nonlinear problems, including multi-input systems.

  17. Design tradeoffs for a Multispectral Linear Array (MLA) instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mika, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    The heart of the multispectral linear array (MLA) design problem is to develop an instrument concept which concurrently provides a wide field-of-view with high resolution, spectral separation with precise band-to band registration, and excellent radiometric accuracy. Often, these requirements have conflicting design implications which can only be resolved by careful tradeoffs that consider performance, cost, fabrication feasibility and development risk. The key design tradeoffs for an MLA instrument are addressed, and elements of a baseline instrument concept are presented.

  18. A design methodology for nonlinear systems containing parameter uncertainty: Application to nonlinear controller design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, G.

    1982-01-01

    A design methodology capable of dealing with nonlinear systems, such as a controlled ecological life support system (CELSS), containing parameter uncertainty is discussed. The methodology was applied to the design of discrete time nonlinear controllers. The nonlinear controllers can be used to control either linear or nonlinear systems. Several controller strategies are presented to illustrate the design procedure.

  19. Linear Test Bed. Volume 2: Test Bed No. 2. [linear aerospike test bed for thrust vector control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Test bed No. 2 consists of 10 combustors welded in banks of 5 to 2 symmetrical tubular nozzle assemblies, an upper stationary thrust frame, a lower thrust frame which can be hinged, a power package, a triaxial combustion wave ignition system, a pneumatic control system, pneumatically actuated propellant valves, a purge and drain system, and an electrical control system. The power package consists of the Mark 29-F fuel turbopump, the Mark 29-0 oxidizer turbopump, a gas generator assembly, and propellant ducting. The system, designated as a linear aerospike system, was designed to demonstrate the feasibility of the concept and to explore technology related to thrust vector control, thrust vector optimization, improved sequencing and control, and advanced ignition systems. The propellants are liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen. The system was designed to operate at 1200-psia chamber pressure at an engine mixture ratio of 5.5. With 10 combustors, the sea level thrust is 95,000 pounds.

  20. Spacecraft flight control with the new phase space control law and optimal linear jet select

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergmann, E. V.; Croopnick, S. R.; Turkovich, J. J.; Work, C. C.

    1977-01-01

    An autopilot designed for rotation and translation control of a rigid spacecraft is described. The autopilot uses reaction control jets as control effectors and incorporates a six-dimensional phase space control law as well as a linear programming algorithm for jet selection. The interaction of the control law and jet selection was investigated and a recommended configuration proposed. By means of a simulation procedure the new autopilot was compared with an existing system and was found to be superior in terms of core memory, central processing unit time, firings, and propellant consumption. But it is thought that the cycle time required to perform the jet selection computations might render the new autopilot unsuitable for existing flight computer applications, without modifications. The new autopilot is capable of maintaining attitude control in the presence of a large number of jet failures.

  1. A damping ring design for the SLAC Next Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Raubenheimer, T.O.; Byrd, J.; Corlett, J.

    1995-05-01

    In this paper, we describe the design of the main damping rings and the positron pre-damping ring for the SLAC Next Linear Collider, a future linear collider with a center-of-mass energy of 0.5 to 1.5 TeV. The rings will operate at an energy of 2 GeV with a maximum repetition rate of 180 Hz. The normalized extracted beam emittances are {gamma}{epsilon}{sub x} = 3 mm-mrad and {gamma}{epsilon}{sub y} = 0.03 mm-mrad. To provide the necessary damping, the rings must damp multiple trains of bunches. Thus, the beam current is large, roughly 1 A. We will present the optical layout, magnet designs, and RF systems, along with the dynamic aperture and required alignment tolerances; collective effects will be discussed in another paper.

  2. Simultaneously stabilising controllers for time-varying linear systems within the framework of nest algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongzhu; Yu, Tianqiu; Xiao, Jinmei

    2016-08-01

    From the perspective of strong transitivity, a controller design method is provided to simultaneously stabilise a collection of time-varying linear systems within the framework of nest algebras. In particular, all simultaneously stabilising controllers for a class of linear plants are characterised based on the doubly coprime factorisations. These results hold as well in the time-invariant case. An illustrative example is given to demonstrate the validity of the method.

  3. A RECIPE FOR LINEAR COLLIDER FINAL FOCUS SYSTEM DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    Seryi, Andrei

    2003-05-27

    The design of Final Focus systems for linear colliders is challenging because of the large demagnifications needed to produce nanometer-sized beams at the interaction point. Simple first- and second-order matrix matching have proven insufficient for this task, and minimization of third- and higher-order aberrations is essential. An appropriate strategy is required for the latter to be successful. A recipe for Final Focus design, and a set of computational tools used to implement this approach, are described herein. An example of the use of this procedure is given.

  4. Steady-state decoupling and design of linear multivariable systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaler, G. J.

    1974-01-01

    A constructive criterion for decoupling the steady states of a linear time-invariant multivariable system is presented. This criterion consists of a set of inequalities which, when satisfied, will cause the steady states of a system to be decoupled. Stability analysis and a new design technique for such systems are given. A new and simple connection between single-loop and multivariable cases is found. These results are then applied to the compensation design for NASA STOL C-8A aircraft. Both steady-state decoupling and stability are justified through computer simulations.

  5. Users manual for flight control design programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalbandian, J. Y.

    1975-01-01

    Computer programs for the design of analog and digital flight control systems are documented. The program DIGADAPT uses linear-quadratic-gaussian synthesis algorithms in the design of command response controllers and state estimators, and it applies covariance propagation analysis to the selection of sampling intervals for digital systems. Program SCHED executes correlation and regression analyses for the development of gain and trim schedules to be used in open-loop explicit-adaptive control laws. A linear-time-varying simulation of aircraft motions is provided by the program TVHIS, which includes guidance and control logic, as well as models for control actuator dynamics. The programs are coded in FORTRAN and are compiled and executed on both IBM and CDC computers.

  6. Feedback Linearized Aircraft Control Using Dynamic Cell Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, C. C.

    1998-01-01

    A Dynamic Cell Structure (DCS ) Neural Network was developed which learns a topology representing network (TRN) of F-15 aircraft aerodynamic stability and control derivatives. The network is combined with a feedback linearized tracking controller to produce a robust control architecture capable of handling multiple accident and off-nominal flight scenarios. This paper describes network and its performance for accident scenarios including differential stabilator lock, soft sensor failure, control, stability derivative variation, and turbulence.

  7. Design of H(infinity) robust fault detection filter for linear uncertain time-delay systems.

    PubMed

    Bai, Leishi; Tian, Zuohua; Shi, Songjiao

    2006-10-01

    In this paper, the robust fault detection filter design problem for linear time-delay systems with both unknown inputs and parameter uncertainties is studied. Using a multiobjective optimization technique, a new performance index is introduced, which takes into account the robustness of the fault detection filter against disturbances and sensitivity to faults simultaneously. The reference residual model is then designed based on this performance index to formulate the robust fault detection filter design problem as an H(infinity) model-matching problem. By applying robust H(infinity) optimization control technique, the existence condition of the robust fault detection filter for linear time-delay systems with both unknown inputs and parameter uncertainties is presented in terms of linear matrix inequality formulation, independently of time delay. In order to detect the fault, an adaptive threshold which depends on the inputs is finally determined. An illustrative design example is used to demonstrate the validity of the proposed approach.

  8. Use of probabilistic weights to enhance linear regression myoelectric control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Lauren H.; Kuiken, Todd A.; Hargrove, Levi J.

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Clinically available prostheses for transradial amputees do not allow simultaneous myoelectric control of degrees of freedom (DOFs). Linear regression methods can provide simultaneous myoelectric control, but frequently also result in difficulty with isolating individual DOFs when desired. This study evaluated the potential of using probabilistic estimates of categories of gross prosthesis movement, which are commonly used in classification-based myoelectric control, to enhance linear regression myoelectric control. Approach. Gaussian models were fit to electromyogram (EMG) feature distributions for three movement classes at each DOF (no movement, or movement in either direction) and used to weight the output of linear regression models by the probability that the user intended the movement. Eight able-bodied and two transradial amputee subjects worked in a virtual Fitts’ law task to evaluate differences in controllability between linear regression and probability-weighted regression for an intramuscular EMG-based three-DOF wrist and hand system. Main results. Real-time and offline analyses in able-bodied subjects demonstrated that probability weighting improved performance during single-DOF tasks (p < 0.05) by preventing extraneous movement at additional DOFs. Similar results were seen in experiments with two transradial amputees. Though goodness-of-fit evaluations suggested that the EMG feature distributions showed some deviations from the Gaussian, equal-covariance assumptions used in this experiment, the assumptions were sufficiently met to provide improved performance compared to linear regression control. Significance. Use of probability weights can improve the ability to isolate individual during linear regression myoelectric control, while maintaining the ability to simultaneously control multiple DOFs.

  9. Design and Analysis of Tubular Permanent Magnet Linear Wave Generator

    PubMed Central

    Si, Jikai; Feng, Haichao; Su, Peng; Zhang, Lufeng

    2014-01-01

    Due to the lack of mature design program for the tubular permanent magnet linear wave generator (TPMLWG) and poor sinusoidal characteristics of the air gap flux density for the traditional surface-mounted TPMLWG, a design method and a new secondary structure of TPMLWG are proposed. An equivalent mathematical model of TPMLWG is established to adopt the transformation relationship between the linear velocity of permanent magnet rotary generator and the operating speed of TPMLWG, to determine the structure parameters of the TPMLWG. The new secondary structure of the TPMLWG contains surface-mounted permanent magnets and the interior permanent magnets, which form a series-parallel hybrid magnetic circuit, and their reasonable structure parameters are designed to get the optimum pole-arc coefficient. The electromagnetic field and temperature field of TPMLWG are analyzed using finite element method. It can be included that the sinusoidal characteristics of air gap flux density of the new secondary structure TPMLWG are improved, the cogging force as well as mechanical vibration is reduced in the process of operation, and the stable temperature rise of generator meets the design requirements when adopting the new secondary structure of the TPMLWG. PMID:25050388

  10. Design and analysis of tubular permanent magnet linear wave generator.

    PubMed

    Si, Jikai; Feng, Haichao; Su, Peng; Zhang, Lufeng

    2014-01-01

    Due to the lack of mature design program for the tubular permanent magnet linear wave generator (TPMLWG) and poor sinusoidal characteristics of the air gap flux density for the traditional surface-mounted TPMLWG, a design method and a new secondary structure of TPMLWG are proposed. An equivalent mathematical model of TPMLWG is established to adopt the transformation relationship between the linear velocity of permanent magnet rotary generator and the operating speed of TPMLWG, to determine the structure parameters of the TPMLWG. The new secondary structure of the TPMLWG contains surface-mounted permanent magnets and the interior permanent magnets, which form a series-parallel hybrid magnetic circuit, and their reasonable structure parameters are designed to get the optimum pole-arc coefficient. The electromagnetic field and temperature field of TPMLWG are analyzed using finite element method. It can be included that the sinusoidal characteristics of air gap flux density of the new secondary structure TPMLWG are improved, the cogging force as well as mechanical vibration is reduced in the process of operation, and the stable temperature rise of generator meets the design requirements when adopting the new secondary structure of the TPMLWG.

  11. The design of linear algebra libraries for high performance computers

    SciTech Connect

    Dongarra, J.J. |; Walker, D.W.

    1993-08-01

    This paper discusses the design of linear algebra libraries for high performance computers. Particular emphasis is placed on the development of scalable algorithms for MIMD distributed memory concurrent computers. A brief description of the EISPACK, LINPACK, and LAPACK libraries is given, followed by an outline of ScaLAPACK, which is a distributed memory version of LAPACK currently under development. The importance of block-partitioned algorithms in reducing the frequency of data movement between different levels of hierarchical memory is stressed. The use of such algorithms helps reduce the message startup costs on distributed memory concurrent computers. Other key ideas in our approach are the use of distributed versions of the Level 3 Basic Linear Algebra Subprograms (BLAS) as computational building blocks, and the use of Basic Linear Algebra Communication Subprograms (BLACS) as communication building blocks. Together the distributed BLAS and the BLACS can be used to construct higher-level algorithms, and hide many details of the parallelism from the application developer. The block-cyclic data distribution is described, and adopted as a good way of distributing block-partitioned matrices. Block-partitioned versions of the Cholesky and LU factorizations are presented, and optimization issues associated with the implementation of the LU factorization algorithm on distributed memory concurrent computers are discussed, together with its performance on the Intel Delta system. Finally, approaches to the design of library interfaces are reviewed.

  12. Feedback Linearization approach for Standard and Fault Tolerant control: Application to a Quadrotor UAV Testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghandour, J.; Aberkane, S.; Ponsart, J.-C.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper the control problem of a quadrotor vehicle experiencing a rotor failure is investigated. We develop a Feedback linearization approach to design a controller whose task is to make the vehicle performs trajectory following. Then we use the same approach to design a controller whose task is to make the vehicle enter a stable spin around its vertical axis, while retaining zero angular velocities around the other axis when a rotor failure is present. These conditions can be exploited to design a second control loop, which is used to perform trajectory following. The proposed double control loop architecture allows the vehicle to perform both trajectory and roll/pitch control. At last, to test the robustness of the feedback linearization technique, we applied wind to the quadrotor in mid flight.

  13. Attitude control with realization of linear error dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paielli, Russell A.; Bach, Ralph E.

    1993-01-01

    An attitude control law is derived to realize linear unforced error dynamics with the attitude error defined in terms of rotation group algebra (rather than vector algebra). Euler parameters are used in the rotational dynamics model because they are globally nonsingular, but only the minimal three Euler parameters are used in the error dynamics model because they have no nonlinear mathematical constraints to prevent the realization of linear error dynamics. The control law is singular only when the attitude error angle is exactly pi rad about any eigenaxis, and a simple intuitive modification at the singularity allows the control law to be used globally. The forced error dynamics are nonlinear but stable. Numerical simulation tests show that the control law performs robustly for both initial attitude acquisition and attitude control.

  14. Neighboring extremal guidance for systems with a piecewise linear control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, David G.; Helfrich, Clifford E.

    1991-01-01

    The neighboring extremal feedback control law is developed for systems with a piecewise linear control for the case where the optimal control is obtained by nonlinear programming techniques. To develop the control perturbation for a given deviation from the nominal path, the second variation is minimized subject to the constraint that the final conditions be satisfied. This process leads to a feedback relationship between the control perturbation and the measured deviation from the nominal state. A simple example, the lunar launch problem, is used to demonstrate the validity of the guidance law. For model errors on the order of 5 percent, the results indicate that 5 percent errors occur in the final conditions.

  15. Beam Dynamics Design and Simulation in Ion Linear Accelerators (

    2006-08-01

    Orginally, the ray tracing code TRACK has been developed to fulfill the many special requirements for the Rare Isotope Accelerator Facility known as RIA. Since no available beam-dynamics code met all the necessary requirements, modifications to the code TRACK were introduced to allow end-to-end (from the ion souce to the production target) simulations of the RIA machine, TRACK is a general beam-dynamics code and can be applied for the design, commissioning and operation of modernmore » ion linear accelerators and beam transport systems.« less

  16. Beam Dynamics Design and Simulation in Ion Linear Accelerators (

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, Peter N.; Asseev, Vladislav N.; Mustapha, and Brahim

    2006-08-01

    Orginally, the ray tracing code TRACK has been developed to fulfill the many special requirements for the Rare Isotope Accelerator Facility known as RIA. Since no available beam-dynamics code met all the necessary requirements, modifications to the code TRACK were introduced to allow end-to-end (from the ion souce to the production target) simulations of the RIA machine, TRACK is a general beam-dynamics code and can be applied for the design, commissioning and operation of modern ion linear accelerators and beam transport systems.

  17. Linear-Parameter-Varying Antiwindup Compensation for Enhanced Flight Control Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Bei; Wu, Fen; Kim, Sung Wan

    2005-01-01

    Actuator saturation is one of the major issues of flight control in the high angle-of-attack region. This paper presents a saturation control scheme for linear parameter varyjing (LPV) systems from an antiwindup control perspective. The proposed control approach is advantageous from the implementation standpoint because it can be thought of as an augmented control algorithm to the existing control system. Moreover, the synthesis condition for an antiwindup compensator is formulated as a linear matrix inequality (LMI) optimization problem and can be solved efficiently. We have applied te LPV antiwindup controller to an F-16 longitudinal autopilot control system design and compared it with the thrust vectoring control scheme. The nonlinear simulations show that an LPV antiwindup controller improves flight quality and offers advantages over thrust vectoring in a high angle-of-attack region.

  18. Integrated control-structure design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunziker, K. Scott; Kraft, Raymond H.; Bossi, Joseph A.

    1991-01-01

    A new approach for the design and control of flexible space structures is described. The approach integrates the structure and controller design processes thereby providing extra opportunities for avoiding some of the disastrous effects of control-structures interaction and for discovering new, unexpected avenues of future structural design. A control formulation based on Boyd's implementation of Youla parameterization is employed. Control design parameters are coupled with structural design variables to produce a set of integrated-design variables which are selected through optimization-based methodology. A performance index reflecting spacecraft mission goals and constraints is formulated and optimized with respect to the integrated design variables. Initial studies have been concerned with achieving mission requirements with a lighter, more flexible space structure. Details of the formulation of the integrated-design approach are presented and results are given from a study involving the integrated redesign of a flexible geostationary platform.

  19. Multi-mode sliding mode control for precision linear stage based on fixed or floating stator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jiwen; Long, Zhili; Wang, Michael Yu; Zhang, Lufan; Dai, Xufei

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the control performance of a linear motion stage driven by Voice Coil Motor (VCM). Unlike the conventional VCM, the stator of this VCM is regulated, which means it can be adjusted as a floating-stator or fixed-stator. A Multi-Mode Sliding Mode Control (MMSMC), including a conventional Sliding Mode Control (SMC) and an Integral Sliding Mode Control (ISMC), is designed to control the linear motion stage. The control is switched between SMC and IMSC based on the error threshold. To eliminate the chattering, a smooth function is adopted instead of a signum function. The experimental results with the floating stator show that the positioning accuracy and tracking performance of the linear motion stage are improved with the MMSMC approach.

  20. Multi-mode sliding mode control for precision linear stage based on fixed or floating stator.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jiwen; Long, Zhili; Wang, Michael Yu; Zhang, Lufan; Dai, Xufei

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the control performance of a linear motion stage driven by Voice Coil Motor (VCM). Unlike the conventional VCM, the stator of this VCM is regulated, which means it can be adjusted as a floating-stator or fixed-stator. A Multi-Mode Sliding Mode Control (MMSMC), including a conventional Sliding Mode Control (SMC) and an Integral Sliding Mode Control (ISMC), is designed to control the linear motion stage. The control is switched between SMC and IMSC based on the error threshold. To eliminate the chattering, a smooth function is adopted instead of a signum function. The experimental results with the floating stator show that the positioning accuracy and tracking performance of the linear motion stage are improved with the MMSMC approach.

  1. Active vibration control for nonlinear vehicle suspension with actuator delay via I/O feedback linearization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jing; Jiang, Zuo; Li, Ya-Li; Li, Wu-Xin

    2014-10-01

    The problem of nonlinear vibration control for active vehicle suspension systems with actuator delay is considered. Through feedback linearization, the open-loop nonlinearity is eliminated by the feedback nonlinear term. Based on the finite spectrum assignment, the quarter-car suspension system with actuator delay is converted into an equivalent delay-free one. The nonlinear control includes a linear feedback term, a feedforward compensator, and a control memory term, which can be derived from a Riccati equation and a Sylvester equation, so that the effects produced by the road disturbances and the actuator delay are compensated, respectively. A predictor is designed to implement the predictive state in the designed control. Moreover, a reduced-order observer is constructed to solve its physical unrealisability problem. The stability proofs for the zero dynamics and the closed-loop system are provided. Numerical simulations illustrate the effectiveness and the simplicity of the designed control.

  2. Tunneling control using classical non-linear oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Kar, Susmita; Bhattacharyya, S. P.

    2014-04-24

    A quantum particle is placed in symmetric double well potential which is coupled to a classical non-linear oscillator via a coupling function. With different spatial symmetry of the coupling and under various controlling fashions, the tunneling of the quantum particle can be enhanced or suppressed, or totally destroyed.

  3. Alternative methods for the design of jet engine control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sain, M. K.; Leake, R. J.; Basso, R.; Gejji, R.; Maloney, A.; Seshadri, V.

    1976-01-01

    Various alternatives to linear quadratic design methods for jet engine control systems are discussed. The main alternatives are classified into two broad categories: nonlinear global mathematical programming methods and linear local multivariable frequency domain methods. Specific studies within these categories include model reduction, the eigenvalue locus method, the inverse Nyquist method, polynomial design, dynamic programming, and conjugate gradient approaches.

  4. Stochastic Stability of Sampled Data Systems with a Jump Linear Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, Oscar R.; Herencia-Zapana, Heber; Gray, W. Steven

    2004-01-01

    In this paper an equivalence between the stochastic stability of a sampled-data system and its associated discrete-time representation is established. The sampled-data system consists of a deterministic, linear, time-invariant, continuous-time plant and a stochastic, linear, time-invariant, discrete-time, jump linear controller. The jump linear controller models computer systems and communication networks that are subject to stochastic upsets or disruptions. This sampled-data model has been used in the analysis and design of fault-tolerant systems and computer-control systems with random communication delays without taking into account the inter-sample response. This paper shows that the known equivalence between the stability of a deterministic sampled-data system and the associated discrete-time representation holds even in a stochastic framework.

  5. Linear active disturbance rejection control of underactuated systems: the case of the Furuta pendulum.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Neria, M; Sira-Ramírez, H; Garrido-Moctezuma, R; Luviano-Juárez, A

    2014-07-01

    An Active Disturbance Rejection Control (ADRC) scheme is proposed for a trajectory tracking problem defined on a nonfeedback linearizable Furuta Pendulum example. A desired rest to rest angular position reference trajectory is to be tracked by the horizontal arm while the unactuated vertical pendulum arm stays around its unstable vertical position without falling down during the entire maneuver and long after it concludes. A linear observer-based linear controller of the ADRC type is designed on the basis of the flat tangent linearization of the system around an arbitrary equilibrium. The advantageous combination of flatness and the ADRC method makes it possible to on-line estimate and cancels the undesirable effects of the higher order nonlinearities disregarded by the linearization. These effects are triggered by fast horizontal arm tracking maneuvers driving the pendulum substantially away from the initial equilibrium point. Convincing experimental results, including a comparative test with a sliding mode controller, are presented.

  6. Digital program for solving the linear stochastic optimal control and estimation problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geyser, L. C.; Lehtinen, B.

    1975-01-01

    A computer program is described which solves the linear stochastic optimal control and estimation (LSOCE) problem by using a time-domain formulation. The LSOCE problem is defined as that of designing controls for a linear time-invariant system which is disturbed by white noise in such a way as to minimize a performance index which is quadratic in state and control variables. The LSOCE problem and solution are outlined; brief descriptions are given of the solution algorithms, and complete descriptions of each subroutine, including usage information and digital listings, are provided. A test case is included, as well as information on the IBM 7090-7094 DCS time and storage requirements.

  7. Novel fuzzy feedback linearization strategy for control via differential geometry approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Tzuu-Hseng S; Huang, Chiou-Jye; Chen, Chung-Cheng

    2010-07-01

    The study investigates a novel fuzzy feedback linearization strategy for control. The main contributions of this study are to construct a control strategy such that the resulting closed-loop system is valid for any initial condition with almost disturbance decoupling performance, and develop the feedback linearization design for some class of nonlinear control systems. The feedback linearization control guarantees the almost disturbance decoupling performance and the uniform ultimate bounded stability of the tracking error system. Once the tracking errors are driven to touch the global final attractor with the desired radius, the fuzzy logic control is immediately applied via a human expert's knowledge to improve the convergence rate. One example, which cannot be solved by the first paper on the almost disturbance decoupling problem, is proposed in this paper to exploit the fact that the almost disturbance decoupling and the convergence rate performances are easily achieved by the proposed approach.

  8. Novel fuzzy feedback linearization strategy for control via differential geometry approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Tzuu-Hseng S; Huang, Chiou-Jye; Chen, Chung-Cheng

    2010-07-01

    The study investigates a novel fuzzy feedback linearization strategy for control. The main contributions of this study are to construct a control strategy such that the resulting closed-loop system is valid for any initial condition with almost disturbance decoupling performance, and develop the feedback linearization design for some class of nonlinear control systems. The feedback linearization control guarantees the almost disturbance decoupling performance and the uniform ultimate bounded stability of the tracking error system. Once the tracking errors are driven to touch the global final attractor with the desired radius, the fuzzy logic control is immediately applied via a human expert's knowledge to improve the convergence rate. One example, which cannot be solved by the first paper on the almost disturbance decoupling problem, is proposed in this paper to exploit the fact that the almost disturbance decoupling and the convergence rate performances are easily achieved by the proposed approach. PMID:20347083

  9. Fault-tolerant control for a class of non-linear systems with dead-zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mou; Jiang, Bin; Guo, William W.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a fault-tolerant control scheme is proposed for a class of single-input and single-output non-linear systems with the unknown time-varying system fault and the dead-zone. The non-linear state observer is designed for the non-linear system using differential mean value theorem, and the non-linear fault estimator that estimates the unknown time-varying system fault is developed. On the basis of the designed fault estimator, the observer-based fault-tolerant tracking control is then developed using the backstepping technique for non-linear systems with the dead-zone. The stability of the whole closed-loop system is rigorously proved via Lyapunov analysis and the satisfactory tracking control performance is guaranteed in the presence of the unknown time-varying system fault and the dead-zone. Numerical simulation results are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed backstepping fault-tolerant control scheme for non-linear systems.

  10. Circulation control STOL aircraft design aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loth, John L.

    1987-01-01

    Since Davidson patented Circulation Control Airfoils in 1960, there have been only 2 aircraft designed and flown with circulation control (CC). Designing with CC is complex for the following reasons: the relation between lift increase and blowing momentum is nonlinear; for good cruise performance one must change the wing geometry in flight from a round to a sharp trailing edge. The bleed air from the propulsion engines or an auxiliary compressor, must be used efficiently. In designing with CC, the propulsion and control aspects are just as important as aerodynamics. These design aspects were examined and linearized equations are presented in order to facilitate a preliminary analysis of the performance potential of CC. The thrust and lift requirements for takeoff make the calculated runway length very sensitive to the bleed air ratio. Thrust vectoring improves performance and can offset nose down pitching moments. The choice of blowing jet to free stream velocity ratio determines the efficiency of applying bleed air power.

  11. Design of turbofan engine controls using output feedback regulator theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    A multivariable control design procedure based on output feedback regulator (OFR) theory is applied to the F100 turbofan engine. Results for the OFR design are compared to a design based on linear quadratic regulator (LQR) theory. The OFR feedback control is designed in the full order state space and thus eliminates any need for model reduction techniques. Using the performance measure and control structure of the LQR design, an equivalent OFR feedback control is obtained. The flexibility of the OFR as a control design procedure is demonstrated, and differing feedback control structures are evaluated.

  12. Self-shielded electron linear accelerators designed for radiation technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belugin, V. M.; Rozanov, N. E.; Pirozhenko, V. M.

    2009-09-01

    This paper describes self-shielded high-intensity electron linear accelerators designed for radiation technologies. The specific property of the accelerators is that they do not apply an external magnetic field; acceleration and focusing of electron beams are performed by radio-frequency fields in the accelerating structures. The main characteristics of the accelerators are high current and beam power, but also reliable operation and a long service life. To obtain these characteristics, a number of problems have been solved, including a particular optimization of the accelerator components and the application of a variety of specific means. The paper describes features of the electron beam dynamics, accelerating structure, and radio-frequency power supply. Several compact self-shielded accelerators for radiation sterilization and x-ray cargo inspection have been created. The introduced methods made it possible to obtain a high intensity of the electron beam and good performance of the accelerators.

  13. Shielding design for multiple-energy linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Barish, Robert J

    2014-05-01

    The introduction of medical linear accelerators (linacs) capable of producing three different x-ray energies has complicated the process of designing shielding for these units. The conventional approach for the previous generation of dual-energy linacs relied on the addition of some amount of supplementary shielding to that calculated for the higher-energy beam, where the amount of that supplement followed the historical "two-source" rule, also known as the "add one HVL rule," a practice derived from other two-source shielding considerations. The author describes an iterative approach that calculates shielding requirements accurately for any number of multiple beam energies assuming the workload at each energy can be specified at the outset. This method is particularly useful when considering the requirements for possible modifications to an existing vault when new equipment is to be installed as a replacement for a previous unit.

  14. The Advanced Photon Source (APS) Linear Accelerator: design and performance

    SciTech Connect

    White, M.M.

    1996-06-01

    The Advanced Photon Source linear accelerator (linac) system consists of a 200-MeV, 2856-MHz S-band electron linac and a 2-radiation-length- thick tungsten target followed by a 450-MeV positron linac. The linac system has operated 24 hours per day for the past two years to support accelerator commissioning and beam studies, and to provide beam for the experimental program. It achieves the design goal for positron current of 8 mA, and produces electron energies up to 650 MeV without the target in place. The linac is described, and its operation and performance are discussed. 9 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Linear Time Invariant Models for Integrated Flight and Rotor Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olcer, Fahri Ersel

    2011-12-01

    Recent developments on individual blade control (IBC) and physics based reduced order models of various on-blade control (OBC) actuation concepts are opening up opportunities to explore innovative rotor control strategies for improved rotor aerodynamic performance, reduced vibration and BVI noise, and improved rotor stability, etc. Further, recent developments in computationally efficient algorithms for the extraction of Linear Time Invariant (LTI) models are providing a convenient framework for exploring integrated flight and rotor control, while accounting for the important couplings that exist between body and low frequency rotor response and high frequency rotor response. Formulation of linear time invariant (LTI) models of a nonlinear system about a periodic equilibrium using the harmonic domain representation of LTI model states has been studied in the literature. This thesis presents an alternative method and a computationally efficient scheme for implementation of the developed method for extraction of linear time invariant (LTI) models from a helicopter nonlinear model in forward flight. The fidelity of the extracted LTI models is evaluated using response comparisons between the extracted LTI models and the nonlinear model in both time and frequency domains. Moreover, the fidelity of stability properties is studied through the eigenvalue and eigenvector comparisons between LTI and LTP models by making use of the Floquet Transition Matrix. For time domain evaluations, individual blade control (IBC) and On-Blade Control (OBC) inputs that have been tried in the literature for vibration and noise control studies are used. For frequency domain evaluations, frequency sweep inputs are used to obtain frequency responses of fixed system hub loads to a single blade IBC input. The evaluation results demonstrate the fidelity of the extracted LTI models, and thus, establish the validity of the LTI model extraction process for use in integrated flight and rotor control

  16. Koopman Invariant Subspaces and Finite Linear Representations of Nonlinear Dynamical Systems for Control.

    PubMed

    Brunton, Steven L; Brunton, Bingni W; Proctor, Joshua L; Kutz, J Nathan

    2016-01-01

    In this wIn this work, we explore finite-dimensional linear representations of nonlinear dynamical systems by restricting the Koopman operator to an invariant subspace spanned by specially chosen observable functions. The Koopman operator is an infinite-dimensional linear operator that evolves functions of the state of a dynamical system. Dominant terms in the Koopman expansion are typically computed using dynamic mode decomposition (DMD). DMD uses linear measurements of the state variables, and it has recently been shown that this may be too restrictive for nonlinear systems. Choosing the right nonlinear observable functions to form an invariant subspace where it is possible to obtain linear reduced-order models, especially those that are useful for control, is an open challenge. Here, we investigate the choice of observable functions for Koopman analysis that enable the use of optimal linear control techniques on nonlinear problems. First, to include a cost on the state of the system, as in linear quadratic regulator (LQR) control, it is helpful to include these states in the observable subspace, as in DMD. However, we find that this is only possible when there is a single isolated fixed point, as systems with multiple fixed points or more complicated attractors are not globally topologically conjugate to a finite-dimensional linear system, and cannot be represented by a finite-dimensional linear Koopman subspace that includes the state. We then present a data-driven strategy to identify relevant observable functions for Koopman analysis by leveraging a new algorithm to determine relevant terms in a dynamical system by ℓ1-regularized regression of the data in a nonlinear function space; we also show how this algorithm is related to DMD. Finally, we demonstrate the usefulness of nonlinear observable subspaces in the design of Koopman operator optimal control laws for fully nonlinear systems using techniques from linear optimal control.ork, we explore finite

  17. Aircraft digital control design methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. D.; Parsons, E.; Tashker, M. G.

    1976-01-01

    Variations in design methods for aircraft digital flight control are evaluated and compared. The methods fall into two categories; those where the design is done in the continuous domain (or s plane) and those where the design is done in the discrete domain (or z plane). Design method fidelity is evaluated by examining closed loop root movement and the frequency response of the discretely controlled continuous aircraft. It was found that all methods provided acceptable performance for sample rates greater than 10 cps except the uncompensated s plane design method which was acceptable above 20 cps. A design procedure based on optimal control methods was proposed that provided the best fidelity at very slow sample rates and required no design iterations for changing sample rates.

  18. Linear and Nonlinear Schemes Applied to Pitch Control of Wind Turbines

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Geng

    2014-01-01

    Linear controllers have been employed in industrial applications for many years, but sometimes they are noneffective on the system with nonlinear characteristics. This paper discusses the structure, performance, implementation cost, advantages, and disadvantages of different linear and nonlinear schemes applied to the pitch control of the wind energy conversion systems (WECSs). The linear controller has the simplest structure and is easily understood by the engineers and thus is widely accepted by the industry. In contrast, nonlinear schemes are more complicated, but they can provide better performance. Although nonlinear algorithms can be implemented in a powerful digital processor nowadays, they need time to be accepted by the industry and their reliability needs to be verified in the commercial products. More information about the system nonlinear feature is helpful to simplify the controller design. However, nonlinear schemes independent of the system model are more robust to the uncertainties or deviations of the system parameters. PMID:25295299

  19. Linear and nonlinear schemes applied to pitch control of wind turbines.

    PubMed

    Geng, Hua; Yang, Geng

    2014-01-01

    Linear controllers have been employed in industrial applications for many years, but sometimes they are noneffective on the system with nonlinear characteristics. This paper discusses the structure, performance, implementation cost, advantages, and disadvantages of different linear and nonlinear schemes applied to the pitch control of the wind energy conversion systems (WECSs). The linear controller has the simplest structure and is easily understood by the engineers and thus is widely accepted by the industry. In contrast, nonlinear schemes are more complicated, but they can provide better performance. Although nonlinear algorithms can be implemented in a powerful digital processor nowadays, they need time to be accepted by the industry and their reliability needs to be verified in the commercial products. More information about the system nonlinear feature is helpful to simplify the controller design. However, nonlinear schemes independent of the system model are more robust to the uncertainties or deviations of the system parameters. PMID:25295299

  20. Linear and nonlinear schemes applied to pitch control of wind turbines.

    PubMed

    Geng, Hua; Yang, Geng

    2014-01-01

    Linear controllers have been employed in industrial applications for many years, but sometimes they are noneffective on the system with nonlinear characteristics. This paper discusses the structure, performance, implementation cost, advantages, and disadvantages of different linear and nonlinear schemes applied to the pitch control of the wind energy conversion systems (WECSs). The linear controller has the simplest structure and is easily understood by the engineers and thus is widely accepted by the industry. In contrast, nonlinear schemes are more complicated, but they can provide better performance. Although nonlinear algorithms can be implemented in a powerful digital processor nowadays, they need time to be accepted by the industry and their reliability needs to be verified in the commercial products. More information about the system nonlinear feature is helpful to simplify the controller design. However, nonlinear schemes independent of the system model are more robust to the uncertainties or deviations of the system parameters.

  1. Koopman Invariant Subspaces and Finite Linear Representations of Nonlinear Dynamical Systems for Control

    PubMed Central

    Brunton, Steven L.; Brunton, Bingni W.; Proctor, Joshua L.; Kutz, J. Nathan

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we explore finite-dimensional linear representations of nonlinear dynamical systems by restricting the Koopman operator to an invariant subspace spanned by specially chosen observable functions. The Koopman operator is an infinite-dimensional linear operator that evolves functions of the state of a dynamical system. Dominant terms in the Koopman expansion are typically computed using dynamic mode decomposition (DMD). DMD uses linear measurements of the state variables, and it has recently been shown that this may be too restrictive for nonlinear systems. Choosing the right nonlinear observable functions to form an invariant subspace where it is possible to obtain linear reduced-order models, especially those that are useful for control, is an open challenge. Here, we investigate the choice of observable functions for Koopman analysis that enable the use of optimal linear control techniques on nonlinear problems. First, to include a cost on the state of the system, as in linear quadratic regulator (LQR) control, it is helpful to include these states in the observable subspace, as in DMD. However, we find that this is only possible when there is a single isolated fixed point, as systems with multiple fixed points or more complicated attractors are not globally topologically conjugate to a finite-dimensional linear system, and cannot be represented by a finite-dimensional linear Koopman subspace that includes the state. We then present a data-driven strategy to identify relevant observable functions for Koopman analysis by leveraging a new algorithm to determine relevant terms in a dynamical system by ℓ1-regularized regression of the data in a nonlinear function space; we also show how this algorithm is related to DMD. Finally, we demonstrate the usefulness of nonlinear observable subspaces in the design of Koopman operator optimal control laws for fully nonlinear systems using techniques from linear optimal control. PMID:26919740

  2. Nonaxisymmetric turbine end wall design: Part 1 -- Three-dimensional linear design system

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, N.W.; Rose, M.G.; Taylor, M.D.; Shahpar, S.; Hartland, J.; Gregory-Smith, D.G.

    2000-04-01

    A linear design system, already in use for the forward and inverse design of three-dimensional turbine aerofoils, has been extended for the design of their end walls. This paper shows how this method has been applied to the design of a nonaxisymmetric end wall for a turbine rotor blade in linear cascade. The calculations show that nonaxisymmetric end wall profiling is a powerful tool for reducing secondary flows, in particular the secondary kinetic energy and exit angle deviations. Simple end wall profiling is shown to be at least as beneficial aerodynamically as the now standard techniques of differentially skewing aerofoil sections up the span, and (compound) leaning of the aerofoil. A design is presented that combines a number of end wall features aimed at reducing secondary loss and flow deviation. The experimental study of this geometry, aimed at validating the design method, is the subject of the second part of this paper. The effects of end wall perturbations on the flow field are calculated using a three-dimensional pressure correction based Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes CFD code. These calculations are normally performed overnight on a cluster of work stations. The design system then calculates the relationships between perturbations in the end wall and resulting changes in the flow field. With these available, linear superposition theory is used to enable the designer to investigate quickly the effect on the flow field of many combinations of end wall shapes (a matter of minutes for each shape).

  3. Modular design attitude control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chichester, F. D.

    1984-01-01

    A sequence of single axismodels and a series of reduced state linear observers of minimum order are used to reconstruct inaccessible variables pertaining to the modular attitude control of a rigid body flexible suspension model of a flexible spacecraft. The single axis models consist of two, three, four, and five rigid bodies, each interconnected by a flexible shaft passing through the mass centers of the bodies. Modal damping is added to each model. Reduced state linear observers are developed for synthesizing the inaccessible modal state variables for each modal model.

  4. Modulation linearization of a frequency-modulated voltage controlled oscillator, part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honnell, M. A.

    1975-01-01

    An analysis is presented for the voltage versus frequency characteristics of a varactor modulated VHF voltage controlled oscillator in which the frequency deviation is linearized by using the nonlinear characteristics of a field effect transistor as a signal amplifier. The equations developed are used to calculate the oscillator output frequency in terms of pertinent circuit parameters. It is shown that the nonlinearity exponent of the FET has a pronounced influence on frequency deviation linearity, whereas the junction exponent of the varactor controls total frequency deviation for a given input signal. A design example for a 250 MHz frequency modulated oscillator is presented.

  5. Integrated controls design optimization

    DOEpatents

    Lou, Xinsheng; Neuschaefer, Carl H.

    2015-09-01

    A control system (207) for optimizing a chemical looping process of a power plant includes an optimizer (420), an income algorithm (230) and a cost algorithm (225) and a chemical looping process models. The process models are used to predict the process outputs from process input variables. Some of the process in puts and output variables are related to the income of the plant; and some others are related to the cost of the plant operations. The income algorithm (230) provides an income input to the optimizer (420) based on a plurality of input parameters (215) of the power plant. The cost algorithm (225) provides a cost input to the optimizer (420) based on a plurality of output parameters (220) of the power plant. The optimizer (420) determines an optimized operating parameter solution based on at least one of the income input and the cost input, and supplies the optimized operating parameter solution to the power plant.

  6. Linear Parameter Varying Control Synthesis for Actuator Failure, Based on Estimated Parameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Jong-Yeob; Wu, N. Eva; Belcastro, Christine

    2002-01-01

    The design of a linear parameter varying (LPV) controller for an aircraft at actuator failure cases is presented. The controller synthesis for actuator failure cases is formulated into linear matrix inequality (LMI) optimizations based on an estimated failure parameter with pre-defined estimation error bounds. The inherent conservatism of an LPV control synthesis methodology is reduced using a scaling factor on the uncertainty block which represents estimated parameter uncertainties. The fault parameter is estimated using the two-stage Kalman filter. The simulation results of the designed LPV controller for a HiMXT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) vehicle with the on-line estimator show that the desired performance and robustness objectives are achieved for actuator failure cases.

  7. Hybrid Invariance and Stability of a Feedback Linearizing Controller for Powered Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Anne E.; Gregg, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    The development of powered lower-limb prostheses has the potential to significantly improve amputees’ quality of life. By applying advanced control schemes, such as hybrid zero dynamics (HZD), to prostheses, more intelligent prostheses could be designed. Originally developed to control bipedal robots, HZD-based control specifies the motion of the actuated degrees of freedom using output functions to be zeroed, and the required torques are calculated using feedback linearization. Previous work showed that an HZD-like prosthesis controller can successfully control the stance period of gait. This paper shows that an HZD-based prosthesis controller can be used for the entire gait cycle and that feedback linearization can be performed using only information measured with on-board sensors. An analytic metric for orbital stability of a two-step periodic gait is developed. The results are illustrated in simulation. PMID:26604427

  8. Design, evaluation and test of an electronic, multivariable control for the F100 turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skira, C. A.; Dehoff, R. L.; Hall, W. E., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A digital, multivariable control design procedure for the F100 turbofan engine is described. The controller is based on locally linear synthesis techniques using linear, quadratic regulator design methods. The control structure uses an explicit model reference form with proportional and integral feedback near a nominal trajectory. Modeling issues, design procedures for the control law and the estimation of poorly measured variables are presented.

  9. Integrated structure/control law design by multilevel optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Michael G.; Schmidt, David K.

    1989-01-01

    A new approach to integrated structure/control law design based on multilevel optimization is presented. This new approach is applicable to aircraft and spacecraft and allows for the independent design of the structure and control law. Integration of the designs is achieved through use of an upper level coordination problem formulation within the multilevel optimization framework. The method requires the use of structure and control law design sensitivity information. A general multilevel structure/control law design problem formulation is given, and the use of Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) control law design and design sensitivity methods within the formulation is illustrated. Results of three simple integrated structure/control law design examples are presented. These results show the capability of structure and control law design tradeoffs to improve controlled system performance within the multilevel approach.

  10. Output feedback control of linear fractional transformation systems subject to actuator saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Xiaojun; Wu, Fen

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, the control problem for a class of linear parameter varying (LPV) plant subject to actuator saturation is investigated. For the saturated LPV plant depending on the scheduling parameters in linear fractional transformation (LFT) fashion, a gain-scheduled output feedback controller in the LFT form is designed to guarantee the stability of the closed-loop LPV system and provide optimised disturbance/error attenuation performance. By using the congruent transformation, the synthesis condition is formulated as a convex optimisation problem in terms of a finite number of LMIs for which efficient optimisation techniques are available. The nonlinear inverted pendulum problem is employed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach. Moreover, the comparison between our LPV saturated approach with an existing linear saturated method reveals the advantage of the LPV controller when handling nonlinear plants.

  11. A method for linearizing a nonlinear system with six state variables and three control variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsia, W. S.

    1986-01-01

    A nonlinear system governed by x = f(x,u) with six state variables and three control variables is considered in this project. A set of transformations from (x,u) - space to (z,v) - space is defined such that the linear tangent model is independent of the operating point in the z-space. Therefore, it is possible to design a control law satisfying all operating points in the transformed space. An algorithm to construct the above transformations and to obtain the associated linearized system is described in this report. This method is applied to a rigid body using pole placement for the control law. Results are verified by numerical simulation. Closed loop poles in x-space using traditional local linearization are compared with those pole placements in the z-space.

  12. Dynamics and linear quadratic optimal control of flexible multibody systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Chin-Wei

    1994-12-01

    An efficient algorithm for the modeling, dynamic analysis, and optimal control of flexible multibody systems (FMBS) is presented. The cantilevered Bernoulli-Euler beam model and the assumed mode method are used to represent flexibility of elastic bodies in 3D vibration problems. Centrifugal stiffening effects are introduced to correctly represent the dynamic response. The governing equations of motion are based on Kane's equations, adopting a recursive formulation and strategic positioning of the generalized coordinates. The linear quadratic optimization scheme is employed to formulate the vibration control problem. The solutions to the Riccati equation and the use of Kalman gain as optimal control feedbacks to the control of flexibility are also introduced. Based on the optimal control theory and the property of the built-in redundancy for flexible multibody systems, the performance index measure in the optimization control of such systems can be classified into two manifolds: (1) using the extra degrees of freedom resulting from redundancy as control inputs and choosing an integral-type performance index which results in a global optimization scheme and (2) using the joint forces and torques as control inputs and allowing the system output state to keep close track to a reference state while the performance index is kept minimum. Several numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the methodologies developed.

  13. Computer-aided design of flight control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengel, Robert F.; Sircar, Subrata

    1991-01-01

    A computer program is presented for facilitating the development and assessment of flight control systems, and application to a control design is discussed. The program is a computer-aided control-system design program based on direct digital synthesis of a proportional-integral-filter controller with scheduled linear-quadratic-Gaussian gains and command generator tracking of pilot inputs. The FlightCAD system concentrates on aircraft dynamics, flight-control systems, stability and performance, and has practical engineering applications.

  14. Real-time non-linear flight control of a fixed-wing UAV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, Mario

    In this thesis we studied the implementation and design of a typical configuration fixed-wing research UAV. The ultimate goal being the flight test of an advanced control technique. This objective was achieved through the achievement of several milestones that are also the subject of each chapter of this thesis. Among these include: modeling of the UAV and its experimental parameters for the realization of a non-linear simulation close to reality, the design of the non-linear flight control, the development of the control card and its software, development of the ground station's software with LabVIEW and ultimately the achievement of the flight tests. The ultimate goal which was the application of an advanced control technique in an experimental flight was successfully completed. Indeed, the experimentation of the UAV's fast dynamics inversion yielded very good results without using the classic longitudinal and lateral movements decoupling technique along with a gain scheduling based controller. Furthermore, the final system remains easy to use and completely eliminates the time between a control technique design's completion with the non-linear simulation and its implementation in the real UAV for a flight test.

  15. Design of a biochemical circuit motif for learning linear functions.

    PubMed

    Lakin, Matthew R; Minnich, Amanda; Lane, Terran; Stefanovic, Darko

    2014-12-01

    Learning and adaptive behaviour are fundamental biological processes. A key goal in the field of bioengineering is to develop biochemical circuit architectures with the ability to adapt to dynamic chemical environments. Here, we present a novel design for a biomolecular circuit capable of supervised learning of linear functions, using a model based on chemical reactions catalysed by DNAzymes. To achieve this, we propose a novel mechanism of maintaining and modifying internal state in biochemical systems, thereby advancing the state of the art in biomolecular circuit architecture. We use simulations to demonstrate that the circuit is capable of learning behaviour and assess its asymptotic learning performance, scalability and robustness to noise. Such circuits show great potential for building autonomous in vivo nanomedical devices. While such a biochemical system can tell us a great deal about the fundamentals of learning in living systems and may have broad applications in biomedicine (e.g. autonomous and adaptive drugs), it also offers some intriguing challenges and surprising behaviours from a machine learning perspective. PMID:25401175

  16. Design of a biochemical circuit motif for learning linear functions

    PubMed Central

    Lakin, Matthew R.; Minnich, Amanda; Lane, Terran; Stefanovic, Darko

    2014-01-01

    Learning and adaptive behaviour are fundamental biological processes. A key goal in the field of bioengineering is to develop biochemical circuit architectures with the ability to adapt to dynamic chemical environments. Here, we present a novel design for a biomolecular circuit capable of supervised learning of linear functions, using a model based on chemical reactions catalysed by DNAzymes. To achieve this, we propose a novel mechanism of maintaining and modifying internal state in biochemical systems, thereby advancing the state of the art in biomolecular circuit architecture. We use simulations to demonstrate that the circuit is capable of learning behaviour and assess its asymptotic learning performance, scalability and robustness to noise. Such circuits show great potential for building autonomous in vivo nanomedical devices. While such a biochemical system can tell us a great deal about the fundamentals of learning in living systems and may have broad applications in biomedicine (e.g. autonomous and adaptive drugs), it also offers some intriguing challenges and surprising behaviours from a machine learning perspective. PMID:25401175

  17. AESOP: An interactive computer program for the design of linear quadratic regulators and Kalman filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehtinen, B.; Geyser, L. C.

    1984-01-01

    AESOP is a computer program for use in designing feedback controls and state estimators for linear multivariable systems. AESOP is meant to be used in an interactive manner. Each design task that the program performs is assigned a "function" number. The user accesses these functions either (1) by inputting a list of desired function numbers or (2) by inputting a single function number. In the latter case the choice of the function will in general depend on the results obtained by the previously executed function. The most important of the AESOP functions are those that design,linear quadratic regulators and Kalman filters. The user interacts with the program when using these design functions by inputting design weighting parameters and by viewing graphic displays of designed system responses. Supporting functions are provided that obtain system transient and frequency responses, transfer functions, and covariance matrices. The program can also compute open-loop system information such as stability (eigenvalues), eigenvectors, controllability, and observability. The program is written in ANSI-66 FORTRAN for use on an IBM 3033 using TSS 370. Descriptions of all subroutines and results of two test cases are included in the appendixes.

  18. Linear quadratic Gaussian and feedforward controllers for the DSS-13 antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gawronski, W. K.; Racho, C. S.; Mellstrom, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    The controller development and the tracking performance evaluation for the DSS-13 antenna are presented. A trajectory preprocessor, linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) controller, feedforward controller, and their combination were designed, built, analyzed, and tested. The antenna exhibits nonlinear behavior when the input to the antenna and/or the derivative of this input exceeds the imposed limits; for slewing and acquisition commands, these limits are typically violated. A trajectory preprocessor was designed to ensure that the antenna behaves linearly, just to prevent nonlinear limit cycling. The estimator model for the LQG controller was identified from the data obtained from the field test. Based on an LQG balanced representation, a reduced-order LQG controller was obtained. The feedforward controller and the combination of the LQG and feedforward controller were also investigated. The performance of the controllers was evaluated with the tracking errors (due to following a trajectory) and the disturbance errors (due to the disturbances acting on the antenna). The LQG controller has good disturbance rejection properties and satisfactory tracking errors. The feedforward controller has small tracking errors but poor disturbance rejection properties. The combined LQG and feedforward controller exhibits small tracking errors as well as good disturbance rejection properties. However, the cost for this performance is the complexity of the controller.

  19. The design of digital-adaptive controllers for VTOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengel, R. F.; Broussard, J. R.; Berry, P. W.

    1976-01-01

    Design procedures for VTOL automatic control systems have been developed and are presented. Using linear-optimal estimation and control techniques as a starting point, digital-adaptive control laws have been designed for the VALT Research Aircraft, a tandem-rotor helicopter which is equipped for fully automatic flight in terminal area operations. These control laws are designed to interface with velocity-command and attitude-command guidance logic, which could be used in short-haul VTOL operations. Developments reported here include new algorithms for designing non-zero-set-point digital regulators, design procedures for rate-limited systems, and algorithms for dynamic control trim setting.

  20. Multivariable control of the Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System using linearization by state feedback. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gettman, Chang-Ching LO

    1993-01-01

    This thesis develops and demonstrates an approach to nonlinear control system design using linearization by state feedback. The design provides improved transient response behavior allowing faster maneuvering of payloads by the SRMS. Modeling uncertainty is accounted for by using a second feedback loop designed around the feedback linearized dynamics. A classical feedback loop is developed to provide the easy implementation required for the relatively small on board computers. Feedback linearization also allows the use of higher bandwidth model based compensation in the outer loop, since it helps maintain stability in the presence of the nonlinearities typically neglected in model based designs.

  1. Steering of Frequency Standards by the Use of Linear Quadratic Gaussian Control Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koppang, Paul; Leland, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Linear quadratic Gaussian control is a technique that uses Kalman filtering to estimate a state vector used for input into a control calculation. A control correction is calculated by minimizing a quadratic cost function that is dependent on both the state vector and the control amount. Different penalties, chosen by the designer, are assessed by the controller as the state vector and control amount vary from given optimal values. With this feature controllers can be designed to force the phase and frequency differences between two standards to zero either more or less aggressively depending on the application. Data will be used to show how using different parameters in the cost function analysis affects the steering and the stability of the frequency standards.

  2. Linear Quadratic Tracking Design for a Generic Transport Aircraft with Structural Load Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burken, John J.; Frost, Susan A.; Taylor, Brian R.

    2011-01-01

    When designing control laws for systems with constraints added to the tracking performance, control allocation methods can be utilized. Control allocations methods are used when there are more command inputs than controlled variables. Constraints that require allocators are such task as; surface saturation limits, structural load limits, drag reduction constraints or actuator failures. Most transport aircraft have many actuated surfaces compared to the three controlled variables (such as angle of attack, roll rate & angle of side slip). To distribute the control effort among the redundant set of actuators a fixed mixer approach can be utilized or online control allocation techniques. The benefit of an online allocator is that constraints can be considered in the design whereas the fixed mixer cannot. However, an online control allocator mixer has a disadvantage of not guaranteeing a surface schedule, which can then produce ill defined loads on the aircraft. The load uncertainty and complexity has prevented some controller designs from using advanced allocation techniques. This paper considers actuator redundancy management for a class of over actuated systems with real-time structural load limits using linear quadratic tracking applied to the generic transport model. A roll maneuver example of an artificial load limit constraint is shown and compared to the same no load limitation maneuver.

  3. Feedback Control Systems Loop Shaping Design with Practical Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopsakis, George

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes loop shaping control design in feedback control systems, primarily from a practical stand point that considers design specifications. Classical feedback control design theory, for linear systems where the plant transfer function is known, has been around for a long time. But it s still a challenge of how to translate the theory into practical and methodical design techniques that simultaneously satisfy a variety of performance requirements such as transient response, stability, and disturbance attenuation while taking into account the capabilities of the plant and its actuation system. This paper briefly addresses some relevant theory, first in layman s terms, so that it becomes easily understood and then it embarks into a practical and systematic design approach incorporating loop shaping design coupled with lead-lag control compensation design. The emphasis is in generating simple but rather powerful design techniques that will allow even designers with a layman s knowledge in controls to develop effective feedback control designs.

  4. Robust stability and control of linear and multilinear interval systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, S. P.; Keel, L. H.

    1992-01-01

    This paper is a survey of recent results obtained by the authors and their coworkers on the robust stability and control of systems containing parametric uncertainty. The starting point is a generalization of Kharitonov's theorem obtained by Chapellat and Bhattacharyya in 1989. This theorem, called the Linear CB theorem, its generalization to the multilinear case, the singling out of extremal stability subsets, and other ramifications now constitute an extensive and coherent theory of robust parametric stability that is summarized in the results contained here.

  5. Modelling human balance using switched systems with linear feedback control.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Piotr; Glendinning, Paul; Brown, Martin; Medrano-Cerda, Gustavo; Dallali, Houman; Shapiro, Jonathan

    2012-02-01

    We are interested in understanding the mechanisms behind and the character of the sway motion of healthy human subjects during quiet standing. We assume that a human body can be modelled as a single-link inverted pendulum, and the balance is achieved using linear feedback control. Using these assumptions, we derive a switched model which we then investigate. Stable periodic motions (limit cycles) about an upright position are found. The existence of these limit cycles is studied as a function of system parameters. The exploration of the parameter space leads to the detection of multi-stability and homoclinic bifurcations. PMID:21697168

  6. Modelling human balance using switched systems with linear feedback control.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Piotr; Glendinning, Paul; Brown, Martin; Medrano-Cerda, Gustavo; Dallali, Houman; Shapiro, Jonathan

    2012-02-01

    We are interested in understanding the mechanisms behind and the character of the sway motion of healthy human subjects during quiet standing. We assume that a human body can be modelled as a single-link inverted pendulum, and the balance is achieved using linear feedback control. Using these assumptions, we derive a switched model which we then investigate. Stable periodic motions (limit cycles) about an upright position are found. The existence of these limit cycles is studied as a function of system parameters. The exploration of the parameter space leads to the detection of multi-stability and homoclinic bifurcations.

  7. Worst-case analysis and linear parameter-varying gain-scheduled control of aerospace systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jong-Yeob

    In this thesis, two main subjects are discussed. The first is a worst-case performance analysis, the second is a linear parameter varying (LPV) synthesis using a blending approach. On the first subject, a linear fractional transformation (LFT) model of the linearized X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) has been developed to facilitate the analysis of its flight control system. The LFT model represents uncertainty in nine aerodynamic stability derivatives at a given flight condition. The X-38 LFT model, combined with a controller at specific flight conditions, is used to determine the aerodynamic coefficients within a predefined set that result in the worst-case performance and worst-case gain/phase margins of the closed-loop system. LPV and mu controllers are synthesized for the X-38 CRV lateral-directional axes over the candidate flight envelope and compared with the baseline gain-scheduled classical control design. Worst-case analysis of the LPV and mu controllers are compared with the baseline gain-scheduled classical control design. Analysis and time simulations show that the LPV controller achieves significant performance and robustness improvements when compared to a linear mu controller and the baseline gain-scheduled controller. On the second subject, a quasi-LPV model of the F-16 longitudinal axes was developed using three methods: Jacobian linearization, state transformation and function substitution. Time simulations of quasi-LPV models show that the quasi-LPV models developed using state transformation and function substitution accurately represent the nonlinear dynamics of the F-16 longitudinal axes. In designing an LPV controller for the F-16 longitudinal axes, the function substitution quasi-LPV models are used since these quasi-LPV models can represent the nonlinear dynamics at non-trim points. Two LPV controllers are synthesized for the F-16 longitudinal axes for two separated flight envelopes: low and high altitude regions. Blending these controllers

  8. Field testing of linear individual pitch control on the two-bladed controls advanced research turbine

    DOE PAGESBeta

    van Solingen, Edwin; Fleming, Paul A.; Scholbrock, Andrew; van Wingerden, Jan-Willem

    2015-04-17

    This paper presents the results of field tests using linear individual pitch control (LIPC) on the two-bladed Controls Advanced Research Turbine 2 (CART2) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). LIPC has recently been introduced as an alternative to the conventional individual pitch control (IPC) strategy for two-bladed wind turbines. The main advantage of LIPC over conventional IPC is that it requires, at most, only two feedback loops to potentially reduce the periodic blade loads. In previous work, LIPC was designed to implement blade pitch angles at a fixed frequency (e.g., the once-per-revolution (1P) frequency), which made it only applicablemore » in above-rated wind turbine operating conditions. In this study, LIPC is extended to below-rated operating conditions by gain scheduling the controller on the rotor speed. With this extension, LIPC and conventional IPC are successfully applied to the NREL CART2 wind turbine. Lastly, the field-test results obtained during the measurement campaign indicate that LIPC significantly reduces the wind turbine loads for both below-rated and above-rated operation.« less

  9. Field testing of linear individual pitch control on the two-bladed controls advanced research turbine

    SciTech Connect

    van Solingen, Edwin; Fleming, Paul A.; Scholbrock, Andrew; van Wingerden, Jan-Willem

    2015-04-17

    This paper presents the results of field tests using linear individual pitch control (LIPC) on the two-bladed Controls Advanced Research Turbine 2 (CART2) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). LIPC has recently been introduced as an alternative to the conventional individual pitch control (IPC) strategy for two-bladed wind turbines. The main advantage of LIPC over conventional IPC is that it requires, at most, only two feedback loops to potentially reduce the periodic blade loads. In previous work, LIPC was designed to implement blade pitch angles at a fixed frequency (e.g., the once-per-revolution (1P) frequency), which made it only applicable in above-rated wind turbine operating conditions. In this study, LIPC is extended to below-rated operating conditions by gain scheduling the controller on the rotor speed. With this extension, LIPC and conventional IPC are successfully applied to the NREL CART2 wind turbine. Lastly, the field-test results obtained during the measurement campaign indicate that LIPC significantly reduces the wind turbine loads for both below-rated and above-rated operation.

  10. Finite-time quantised feedback asynchronously switched control of sampled-data switched linear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ronghao; Xing, Jianchun; Li, Juelong; Xiang, Zhengrong

    2016-10-01

    This paper studies the problem of stabilising a sampled-data switched linear system by quantised feedback asynchronously switched controllers. The idea of a quantised feedback asynchronously switched control strategy originates in earlier work reflecting actual system characteristic of switching and quantising, respectively. A quantised scheme is designed depending on switching time using dynamic quantiser. When sampling time, system switching time and controller switching time are all not uniform, the proposed switching controllers guarantee the system to be finite-time stable by a piecewise Lyapunov function and the average dwell-time method. Simulation examples are provided to show the effectiveness of the developed results.

  11. Time-delay control of a magnetic levitated linear positioning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarn, J. H.; Juang, K. Y.; Lin, C. E.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, a high accuracy linear positioning system with a linear force actuator and magnetic levitation is proposed. By locating a permanently magnetized rod inside a current-carrying solenoid, the axial force is achieved by the boundary effect of magnet poles and utilized to power the linear motion, while the force for levitation is governed by Ampere's Law supplied with the same solenoid. With the levitation in a radial direction, there is hardly any friction between the rod and the solenoid. The high speed motion can hence be achieved. Besides, the axial force acting on the rod is a smooth function of rod position, so the system can provide nanometer resolution linear positioning to the molecule size. Since the force-position relation is highly nonlinear, and the mathematical model is derived according to some assumptions, such as the equivalent solenoid of the permanently magnetized rod, so there exists unknown dynamics in practical application. Thus 'robustness' is an important issue in controller design. Meanwhile the load effect reacts directly on the servo system without transmission elements, so the capability of 'disturbance rejection; is also required. With the above consideration, a time-delay control scheme is chosen and applied. By comparing the input-output relation and the mathematical model, the time-delay controller calculates an estimation of unmodeled dynamics and disturbances and then composes the desired compensation into the system. Effectiveness of the linear positioning system and control scheme are illustrated with simulation results.

  12. Sliding Mode Control Applied to Reconfigurable Flight Control Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. A.; Wells, S. R.; Bacon, Barton (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Sliding mode control is applied to the design of a flight control system capable of operating with limited bandwidth actuators and in the presence of significant damage to the airframe and/or control effector actuators. Although inherently robust, sliding mode control algorithms have been hampered by their sensitivity to the effects of parasitic unmodeled dynamics, such as those associated with actuators and structural modes. It is known that asymptotic observers can alleviate this sensitivity while still allowing the system to exhibit significant robustness. This approach is demonstrated. The selection of the sliding manifold as well as the interpretation of the linear design that results after introduction of a boundary layer is accomplished in the frequency domain. The design technique is exercised on a pitch-axis controller for a simple short-period model of the High Angle of Attack F-18 vehicle via computer simulation. Stability and performance is compared to that of a system incorporating a controller designed by classical loop-shaping techniques.

  13. Integrated Aeropropulsion Control System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. -F.; Hurley, Francis X.; Huang, Jie; Hadaegh, F. Y.

    1996-01-01

    %T Integrated Aeropropulsion Control System Design%A C-F. Lin%A Francis X. Hurley%A Jie Huang%A F. Y. Hadaegh%J International Conference on Control and Information(psi)995%C Hong Kong%D June 1995%K aeropropulsion, control, system%U http://jpltrs.jpl.nasa.gov/1995/95-0658.pdfAn integrated intelligent control approach is proposed to design a high performance control system for aeropropulsion systems based on advanced sensor processing, nonlinear control and neural fuzzy control integration. Our approach features the following innovations:??e complexity and uncertainty issues are addressed via the distributed parallel processing, learning, and online reoptimization properties of neural networks.??e nonlinear dynamics and the severe coupling can be naturally incorporated into the design framework.??e knowledge base and decision making logic furnished by fuzzy systems leads to a human intelligence enhanced control scheme.In addition, fault tolerance, health monitoring and reconfigurable control strategies will be accommodated by this approach to ensure stability, graceful degradation and reoptimization in the case of failures, malfunctions and damage.!.

  14. Decoupled control analysis of a large flexible space antenna with linear quadratic regulator comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, J. W.; Hamer, H. A.; Johnson, K. G.

    1984-01-01

    A decoupled-control analysis was performed for a large flexible space antenna. Control involved commanding changes in the rigid-body modes or nulling disturbances in the flexible modes. The study provides parametric-type data which could be useful in the final design of a large space antenna control system. Results are presented to illustrate the effect on control requirements of (1) the number of modes controlled; (2) the number, type, and location of control actuators; and (3) variations in the closed-loop dynamics of the control system. Comparisons are given between the decoupled-control results and those obtained by using a linear quadratic regulator approach. Time history responses are presented to illustrate the effects of the control procedures.

  15. Ground motion optimized orbit feedback design for the future linear collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfingstner, J.; Snuverink, J.; Schulte, D.

    2013-03-01

    The future linear collider has strong stability requirements on the position of the beam along the accelerator and at the interaction point (IP). The beam position will be sensitive to dynamic imperfections in particular ground motion. A number of mitigation techniques have been proposed to be deployed in parallel: active and passive quadrupole stabilization and positioning as well as orbit and IP feedback. This paper presents a novel design of the orbit controller in the main linac and beam delivery system. One global feedback controller is proposed based on an SVD-controller (Singular Value Decomposition) that decouples the large multi-input multi-output system into many independent single-input single-output systems. A semi-automatic procedure is proposed for the controller design of the independent systems by exploiting numerical models of ground motion and measurement noise to minimize a target parameter, e.g. luminosity loss. The novel design for the orbit controller is studied for the case of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) in integrated simulations, which include all proposed mitigation methods. The impact of the ground motion on the luminosity performance is examined in detail. It is shown that with the proposed orbit controller the tight luminosity budget for ground motion effects is fulfilled and accordingly, an essential feasibility issue of CLIC has been addressed. The orbit controller design is robust and allows for a relaxed BPM resolution, while still maintaining a strong ground motion suppression performance compared to traditional methods. We believe that the described method could easily be applied to other accelerators and light sources.

  16. Active disturbance rejection based trajectory linearization control for hypersonic reentry vehicle with bounded uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xingling; Wang, Honglun

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates a novel compound control scheme combined with the advantages of trajectory linearization control (TLC) and alternative active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) for hypersonic reentry vehicle (HRV) attitude tracking system with bounded uncertainties. Firstly, in order to overcome actuator saturation problem, nonlinear tracking differentiator (TD) is applied in the attitude loop to achieve fewer control consumption. Then, linear extended state observers (LESO) are constructed to estimate the uncertainties acting on the LTV system in the attitude and angular rate loop. In addition, feedback linearization (FL) based controllers are designed using estimates of uncertainties generated by LESO in each loop, which enable the tracking error for closed-loop system in the presence of large uncertainties to converge to the residual set of the origin asymptotically. Finally, the compound controllers are derived by integrating with the nominal controller for open-loop nonlinear system and FL based controller. Also, comparisons and simulation results are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the control strategy.

  17. Computational models of signalling networks for non-linear control.

    PubMed

    Fuente, Luis A; Lones, Michael A; Turner, Alexander P; Stepney, Susan; Caves, Leo S; Tyrrell, Andy M

    2013-05-01

    Artificial signalling networks (ASNs) are a computational approach inspired by the signalling processes inside cells that decode outside environmental information. Using evolutionary algorithms to induce complex behaviours, we show how chaotic dynamics in a conservative dynamical system can be controlled. Such dynamics are of particular interest as they mimic the inherent complexity of non-linear physical systems in the real world. Considering the main biological interpretations of cellular signalling, in which complex behaviours and robust cellular responses emerge from the interaction of multiple pathways, we introduce two ASN representations: a stand-alone ASN and a coupled ASN. In particular we note how sophisticated cellular communication mechanisms can lead to effective controllers, where complicated problems can be divided into smaller and independent tasks.

  18. Decentralized control of the COFS-I Mast using linear dc motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Douglas K.; Celano, Tom; Ide, Eric

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to a decentralized control design for vibration suppression in the COFS-I Mast using linear dc motors for actuators. The decentralized control design is based results from power systems using root locus techniques that are not well known. The approach is effective because the loop gain is low due to low actuator authority. The frequency-dependent nonlinearities of the actuator are taken into account. Because of the tendency of the transients to saturate the the stroke length of the actuator, its effectiveness is limited.

  19. Control law design to meet constraints using SYNPAC-synthesis package for active controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, W. M., Jr.; Tiffany, S. H.

    1982-01-01

    Major features of SYNPAC (Synthesis Package for Active Controls) are described. SYNPAC employs constrained optimization techniques which allow explicit inclusion of design criteria (constraints) in the control law design process. Interrelationships are indicated between this constrained optimization approach, classical and linear quadratic Gaussian design techniques. Results are presented that were obtained by applying SYNPAC to the design of a combined stability augmentation/gust load alleviation control law for the DAST ARW-2.

  20. Modeling and design of a normal stress electromagnetic actuator with linear characteristics for fast steering mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yongjun; Wei, Xiaohui; Wang, Chunlei; Dai, Xin; Wang, Shigang

    2014-05-01

    A new rotary normal stress electromagnetic actuator for fast steering mirror (FSM) is presented. The study includes concept design, actuating torque modeling, actuator design, and validation with numerical simulation. To achieve an FSM with compact structure and high bandwidth, the actuator is designed with a cross armature magnetic topology. By introducing bias flux generated by four permanent magnets (PMs), the actuator has high-force density similar to a solenoid but also has essentially linear characteristics similar to a voice coil actuator, leading to a simply control algorithm. The actuating torque output is a linear function of both driving current and rotation angle and is formulated with equivalent magnetic circuit method. To improve modeling accuracy, both the PM flux and coil flux leakages are taken into consideration through finite element simulation. Based on the established actuator model, optimal design of the actuator is presented to meet the requirement of our FSM. Numerical simulation is then presented to validate the concept design, established actuator model, and designed actuator. It is shown that the calculated results are in a good agreement with the simulation results.

  1. A fail-safe, bi-linear liquid spring controllable magnetorheological fluid damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maus, Nicholas; Gordaninejad, Faramarz

    2014-04-01

    The goal of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of a fail-safe, bi-linear spring controllable magnetorheological fluid damper (BLS-CMRD). This research introduces a new device with independently pre-set spring forces in compression and rebound combined with a controllable MR fluid damping. In this work, a BLS-CMRD is designed, fabricated, tested and evaluated. Experiments are performed for sinusoidal displacements in the quasistatic and dynamic ranges to evaluate the performance of the BLS-CMRD under different magnetic fields. The experimental results prove that the device reacts with significantly different spring forces from the compression to rebound regions, while providing passive viscous and controllable MR fluid damping. With this first of a kind system it is demonstrated that the utility of a bi-linear liquid spring can be combined with the reliability of passive viscous fluid damping and the capabilities of controllable MR fluid damping into one compact and versatile device.

  2. An framework for robust flight control design using constrained optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palazoglu, A.; Yousefpor, M.; Hess, R. A.

    1992-01-01

    An analytical framework is described for the design of feedback control systems to meet specified performance criteria in the presence of structured and unstructured uncertainty. Attention is focused upon the linear time invariant, single-input, single-output problem for the purposes of exposition. The framework provides for control of the degree of the stabilizing compensator or controller.

  3. Structural control design based on reduced-order observer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Tzu-Jeng; Craig, Roy R., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    An observer-based structural control design method is proposed in this paper. The method is a semi-inverse design procedure in that the control law is not designed before the observer system, but is a result that comes from the observer design. However, the observer design is not completely independent of the control design either, but seeks to yield a control law that is close to a prescribed control law. First, the observer design problem is considered as the reconstruction of a linear function of the state vector. The linear state function to be reconstructed is the given control law. Then, based on the derivation for linear state function observers, the observer design is formulated as a parameter optimization problem. The optimization objective is to generate a matrix that is close to the optimal feedback gain matrix. Based on that matrix, the form of the observer and a new control law can be determined. The semi-inverse design procedure can yield a reduced-order observer with dimension considerably smaller than that of the system. Two examples are used to demonstrate the proposed design procedure.

  4. Predictive IP controller for robust position control of linear servo system.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shaowu; Zhou, Fengxing; Ma, Yajie; Tang, Xiaoqi

    2016-07-01

    Position control is a typical application of linear servo system. In this paper, to reduce the system overshoot, an integral plus proportional (IP) controller is used in the position control implementation. To further improve the control performance, a gain-tuning IP controller based on a generalized predictive control (GPC) law is proposed. Firstly, to represent the dynamics of the position loop, a second-order linear model is used and its model parameters are estimated on-line by using a recursive least squares method. Secondly, based on the GPC law, an optimal control sequence is obtained by using receding horizon, then directly supplies the IP controller with the corresponding control parameters in the real operations. Finally, simulation and experimental results are presented to show the efficiency of proposed scheme.

  5. International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (Volumes 1 through 4)

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison M.

    2013-03-27

    The design report consists of four volumes: Volume 1, Executive Summary; Volume 2, Physics; Volume 3, Accelerator (Part I, R and D in the Technical Design Phase, and Part II, Baseline Design); and Volume 4, Detectors.

  6. Closed-form solutions for linear regulator design of mechanical systems including optimal weighting matrix selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanks, Brantley R.; Skelton, Robert E.

    1991-01-01

    Vibration in modern structural and mechanical systems can be reduced in amplitude by increasing stiffness, redistributing stiffness and mass, and/or adding damping if design techniques are available to do so. Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) theory in modern multivariable control design, attacks the general dissipative elastic system design problem in a global formulation. The optimal design, however, allows electronic connections and phase relations which are not physically practical or possible in passive structural-mechanical devices. The restriction of LQR solutions (to the Algebraic Riccati Equation) to design spaces which can be implemented as passive structural members and/or dampers is addressed. A general closed-form solution to the optimal free-decay control problem is presented which is tailored for structural-mechanical system. The solution includes, as subsets, special cases such as the Rayleigh Dissipation Function and total energy. Weighting matrix selection is a constrained choice among several parameters to obtain desired physical relationships. The closed-form solution is also applicable to active control design for systems where perfect, collocated actuator-sensor pairs exist.

  7. A new linear quadratic optimal controller for the 34-meter high efficiency antenna position loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickerson, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    The design of a new position loop controller for the 34-meter High Efficiency Deep Space antennas using linear quadratic (LQ) optimal control techniques is discussed. The LQ optimal control theory is reviewed, and model development and verification are discussed. Families of optimal gain vectors are generated by varying weight parameters. Performance specifications were used to select a final gain vector. Estimator dynamics were selected and the corresponding gain vectors were computed. Final estimator selection was based on position, commanded rate, and estimator error responses.

  8. Arbitrary eigenvalue assignments for linear time-varying multivariable control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Charles C.

    1987-01-01

    The problem of eigenvalue assignments for a class of linear time-varying multivariable systems is considered. Using matrix operators and canonical transformations, it is shown that a time-varying system that is 'lexicography-fixedly controllable' can be made via state feedback to be equivalent to a time-invariant system whose eigenvalues are arbitrarily assignable. A simple algorithm for the design of the state feedback is provided.

  9. The design and analysis of a novel brushless dc linear motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basak, A.; Filho, A. F. Flores

    1994-05-01

    A novel brushless dc linear motor was designed, with two armature cores and seven high energy product magnets. It was then built and tested. Both the design and the analysis were carried out assuming a linear magnetic circuit. The design procedure and the test results are presented and discussed in this paper. The new motor can also be used as a slotless linear stepping motor.

  10. Automated control of linear constricted plasma source array

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre; Maschwitz, Peter A.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for controlling an array of constricted glow discharge chambers are disclosed. More particularly a linear array of constricted glow plasma sources whose polarity and geometry are set so that the contamination and energy of the ions discharged from the sources are minimized. The several sources can be mounted in parallel and in series to provide a sustained ultra low source of ions in a plasma with contamination below practical detection limits. The quality of film along deposition "tracks" opposite the plasma sources can be measured and compared to desired absolute or relative values by optical and/or electrical sensors. Plasma quality can then be adjusted by adjusting the power current values, gas feed pressure/flow, gas mixtures or a combination of some or all of these to improve the match between the measured values and the desired values.

  11. Linear transformation method to control flexural waves in thin plates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongquan; Ma, Zhaoyang; Su, Xianyue

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the linear transformation method (LTM) to control flexural waves propagating in thin plates is presented. Unlike earlier studies, only a small number of homogeneous materials with no requirement of in-plane forces or pre-stress are needed, which tremendously simplifies the implementation of devices for flexural waves. An invisibility cloak with homogeneous materials is studied to confirm the validity of the present approach, and to show its imperfection due to impedance mismatch at interfaces. Required materials can be further simplified as layered isotropic materials using the effective medium theory. Finally, the LTM can be extended to the case of flexural waves propagating in anisotropic thin plates. The present method opens a promising avenue toward the realization of advanced structured shields and other devices. PMID:27586744

  12. Evolutionary Design of Controlled Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, Brett P.; Crawley, Edward F.

    1997-01-01

    Basic physical concepts of structural delay and transmissibility are provided for simple rod and beam structures. Investigations show the sensitivity of these concepts to differing controlled-structures variables, and to rational system modeling effects. An evolutionary controls/structures design method is developed. The basis of the method is an accurate model formulation for dynamic compensator optimization and Genetic Algorithm based updating of sensor/actuator placement and structural attributes. One and three dimensional examples from the literature are used to validate the method. Frequency domain interpretation of these controlled structure systems provide physical insight as to how the objective is optimized and consequently what is important in the objective. Several disturbance rejection type controls-structures systems are optimized for a stellar interferometer spacecraft application. The interferometric designs include closed loop tracking optics. Designs are generated for differing structural aspect ratios, differing disturbance attributes, and differing sensor selections. Physical limitations in achieving performance are given in terms of average system transfer function gains and system phase loss. A spacecraft-like optical interferometry system is investigated experimentally over several different optimized controlled structures configurations. Configurations represent common and not-so-common approaches to mitigating pathlength errors induced by disturbances of two different spectra. Results show that an optimized controlled structure for low frequency broadband disturbances achieves modest performance gains over a mass equivalent regular structure, while an optimized structure for high frequency narrow band disturbances is four times better in terms of root-mean-square pathlength. These results are predictable given the nature of the physical system and the optimization design variables. Fundamental limits on controlled performance are discussed

  13. Non-linear controls on the persistence of La Nina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Nezio, P. N.; Deser, C.

    2013-12-01

    Non-linear controls on the persistence of La Nina Pedro DiNezio and Clara Deser Up to half of the observed La Nina events last for two years or more. Most El Nino events, in contrast, last no longer than one year. The physical processes causing this asymmetry in the duration of warm and cold ENSO events is unknown. The persistence of La Nina, not only exacerbates the climate impacts, especially in regions prone to drought, but also is highly unpredictable. In this talk we will explore the nonlinear processes that generate the persistence of La Nina in observations and in CCSM4 - a coupled climate model that simulates this feature realistically. First, we develop a non-linear delayed-oscillator model (nonlinDO) based on CCSM4's heat budget. All positive and negative feedbacks of nonlinDO capture the nonlinear and seasonal dependence exhibited by CCSM4. The nonlinear behavior is due to: 1) weaker atmospheric damping of cold events with respect to warm events, 2) stronger wind response for large warm events, and 3) weaker coupling between thermocline and sea-surface temperature anomalies when the thermocline deepens. We force the simple model with white Gaussian noise resulting in seasonal modulation of variance and skewness, and a spectral peak, that are in agreement with CCSM4. Sensitivity experiments with nonlinDO show that the thermocline nonlinearity (3) is the sole process controlling the duration of La Nina events. Linear ENSO theory indicates that La Nina events drive a delayed thermocline deepening that leads to their demise. However, the thermocline nonlinearity (3) renders this response ineffective as La Nina events become stronger. This diminishing of the delayed-thermocline feedback prevents the equatorial Pacific from returning to neutral or warm conditions and cold conditions persist for a second year. Observations show evidence for this thermocline nonlinearity suggesting that this process could be at work in the real world. Last, we show evidence that

  14. Cockpit control system conceptual design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meholic, Greg; Brown, Rhonda; Hall, Melissa; Harvey, Robert; Singer, Michael; Tella, Gustavo

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to provide a means for operating the ailerons, elevator, elevator trim, rudder, nosewheel steering, and brakes in the Triton primary flight trainer. The main design goals under consideration were to illustrate system and subsystem integration, control function ability, and producibility. Weight and maintenance goals were addressed.

  15. Aerodynamic design via control theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, Antony

    1988-01-01

    The question of how to modify aerodynamic design in order to improve performance is addressed. Representative examples are given to demonstrate the computational feasibility of using control theory for such a purpose. An introduction and historical survey of the subject is included.

  16. An analysis method for control reconfigurability of linear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dayi; Duan, Wenjie; Liu, Chengrui

    2016-01-01

    The reconfigurability of control systems is further researched based on the function-objective model (FOM). The establishment of the FOM has been published in the authors' former paper, solving the problem whether the system is reconfigurable without losing the desired control objective. Based on the FOM, the importance factor, the risk factor and the k th reconfigurability factor are proposed to evaluate the fault risks of all components and the system reconfigurability with k faults. These factors show which components should be improved and which faults cannot be tolerated. The analysis results are very useful for enhancing the fault-tolerance performances of the control systems by improving system designs. A satellite model is utilized to illustrate the proposed method.

  17. A line-of-sight performance criterion for controller design of a proposed laboratory model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Kyong B.; Horta, Lucas G.

    1990-01-01

    A line-of-sight performance criterion is derived for a proposed Controls Structures Interaction model, and its many uses in the control design process for fine pointing control are illustrated. A linearized line-of-sight (LOS) criterion is used for direct controller design and as a performance measure to judge different control methodologies. Numerical simulation results are shown where the three approaches: linear quadratic Gaussian theory, robust eigensystem assignment, and local velocity feedback are used for vibration control. Results indicate that the linear quadratic Gaussian controller, which incorporates a linearized LOS weighting matrix directly, yields good performance without wasting energy to control motions that have no influence on the LOS.

  18. Output-feedback control for switched linear systems subject to actuator saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Chang; Wu, Fen

    2012-10-01

    This article is devoted to the output-feedback ℋ∞ control problem for switched linear systems subject to actuator saturation. We consider both continuous- and discrete-time switched systems. Using the minimal switching rule, nonlinear output feedbacks expressed in the form of quasi-linear parameter varying system are designed to satisfy a pre-specified disturbance attenuation level defined by the regional ℒ2 (ℓ2)-gains over a class of energy-bounded disturbances. The conditions are expressed in bilinear matrix inequalities and can be solved by line search coupled with linear matrix inequalities optimisation. A spherical inverted pendulum example is used to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  19. Role of symbolic computation in linear and model-based controller development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Sumit

    Model based controllers for articulated-mechanical-systems are gaining popularity among control system designers by virtue of their significant performance gains. However a critical precursor to deployment is availability of plant-model-equations together with a systematic means for generating them, typically by applying the postulates of physics. The complexity and tractability of first generating and then analyzing models often serves to limit the type and complexity of the example systems. However, using simpler examples alone may sometimes fail to capture important physical phenomena (e.g. gyroscopic, coriolis). Larger systems nevertheless remain intractable which restricts the exploration of non-linear controller design techniques. Hence, we examine the use of some contemporary symbolic- and numeric-computation tools to assist with the automated symbolic equation generation and subsequent analysis. The principal underlying goal of this thesis is to establish linkage between traditional approach and block diagram modeling, controller development. The inverted Furuta Pendulum example allows us to showcase the emergence of model-complexity even in relatively-simple two-jointed mechanical system. Advanced concepts, e.g. manipulator singularity and constraint system modeling, are studied with a 6 Degree of Freedom manipulator. We will focus on various aspects of model-creation, model-linearization as well as study development and performance of both model-independent and model-based controller designs.

  20. Computational methods of robust controller design for aerodynamic flutter suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, L. R.

    1981-01-01

    The development of Riccati iteration, a tool for the design and analysis of linear control systems is examined. First, Riccati iteration is applied to the problem of pole placement and order reduction in two-time scale control systems. Order reduction, yielding a good approximation to the original system, is demonstrated using a 16th order linear model of a turbofan engine. Next, a numerical method for solving the Riccati equation is presented and demonstrated for a set of eighth order random examples. A literature review of robust controller design methods follows which includes a number of methods for reducing the trajectory and performance index sensitivity in linear regulators. Lastly, robust controller design for large parameter variations is discussed.

  1. Neural network application to aircraft control system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troudet, Terry; Garg, Sanjay; Merrill, Walter C.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of using artificial neural networks as control systems for modern, complex aerospace vehicles is investigated via an example aircraft control design study. The problem considered is that of designing a controller for an integrated airframe/propulsion longitudinal dynamics model of a modern fighter aircraft to provide independent control of pitch rate and airspeed responses to pilot command inputs. An explicit model following controller using H infinity control design techniques is first designed to gain insight into the control problem as well as to provide a baseline for evaluation of the neurocontroller. Using the model of the desired dynamics as a command generator, a multilayer feedforward neural network is trained to control the vehicle model within the physical limitations of the actuator dynamics. This is achieved by minimizing an objective function which is a weighted sum of tracking errors and control input commands and rates. To gain insight in the neurocontrol, linearized representations of the nonlinear neurocontroller are analyzed along a commanded trajectory. Linear robustness analysis tools are then applied to the linearized neurocontroller models and to the baseline H infinity based controller. Future areas of research are identified to enhance the practical applicability of neural networks to flight control design.

  2. Quantum optimal control theory in the linear response formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, Alberto; Tokatly, I. V.

    2011-09-15

    Quantum optimal control theory (QOCT) aims at finding an external field that drives a quantum system in such a way that optimally achieves some predefined target. In practice, this normally means optimizing the value of some observable, a so-called merit function. In consequence, a key part of the theory is a set of equations, which provides the gradient of the merit function with respect to parameters that control the shape of the driving field. We show that these equations can be straightforwardly derived using the standard linear response theory, only requiring a minor generalization: the unperturbed Hamiltonian is allowed to be time dependent. As a result, the aforementioned gradients are identified with certain response functions. This identification leads to a natural reformulation of QOCT in terms of the Keldysh contour formalism of the quantum many-body theory. In particular, the gradients of the merit function can be calculated using the diagrammatic technique for nonequilibrium Green's functions, which should be helpful in the application of QOCT to computationally difficult many-electron problems.

  3. Modern digital flight control system design for VTOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broussard, J. R.; Berry, P. W.; Stengel, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    Methods for and results from the design and evaluation of a digital flight control system (DFCS) for a CH-47B helicopter are presented. The DFCS employed proportional-integral control logic to provide rapid, precise response to automatic or manual guidance commands while following conventional or spiral-descent approach paths. It contained altitude- and velocity-command modes, and it adapted to varying flight conditions through gain scheduling. Extensive use was made of linear systems analysis techniques. The DFCS was designed, using linear-optimal estimation and control theory, and the effects of gain scheduling are assessed by examination of closed-loop eigenvalues and time responses.

  4. Experimental Validation of an Integrated Controls-Structures Design Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maghami, Peiman G.; Gupta, Sandeep; Elliot, Kenny B.; Walz, Joseph E.

    1996-01-01

    The first experimental validation of an integrated controls-structures design methodology for a class of large order, flexible space structures is described. Integrated redesign of the controls-structures-interaction evolutionary model, a laboratory testbed at NASA Langley, was described earlier. The redesigned structure was fabricated, assembled in the laboratory, and experimentally tested against the original structure. Experimental results indicate that the structure redesigned using the integrated design methodology requires significantly less average control power than the nominal structure with control-optimized designs, while maintaining the required line-of-sight pointing performance. Thus, the superiority of the integrated design methodology over the conventional design approach is experimentally demonstrated. Furthermore, amenability of the integrated design structure to other control strategies is evaluated, both analytically and experimentally. Using Linear-Quadratic-Guassian optimal dissipative controllers, it is observed that the redesigned structure leads to significantly improved performance with alternate controllers as well.

  5. FPGA-based Elman neural network control system for linear ultrasonic motor.

    PubMed

    Lin, Faa-Jeng; Hung, Ying-Chih

    2009-01-01

    A field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based Elman neural network (ENN) control system is proposed to control the mover position of a linear ultrasonic motor (LUSM) in this study. First, the structure and operating principle of the LUSM are introduced. Because the dynamic characteristics and motor parameters of the LUSM are nonlinear and time-varying, an ENN control system is designed to achieve precision position control. The network structure and online learning algorithm using delta adaptation law of the ENN are described in detail. Then, a piecewise continuous function is adopted to replace the sigmoid function in the hidden layer of the ENN to facilitate hardware implementation. In addition, an FPGA chip is adopted to implement the developed control algorithm for possible low-cost and high-performance industrial applications. The effectiveness of the proposed control scheme is verified by some experimental results.

  6. Design of freeform imaging systems with linear field-of-view using a construction and iteration process.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tong; Zhu, Jun; Jin, Guofan

    2014-02-10

    In this paper, a design method based on a construction and iteration process is proposed for designing freeform imaging systems with linear field-of-view (FOV). The surface contours of the desired freeform surfaces in the tangential plane are firstly designed to control the tangential rays of multiple field angles and different pupil coordinates. Then, the image quality is improved with an iterative process. The design result can be taken as a good starting point for further optimization. A freeform off-axis scanning system is designed as an example of the proposed method. The convergence ability of the construction and iteration process to design a freeform system from initial planes is validated. The MTF of the design result is close to the diffraction limit and the scanning error is less than 1 μm. This result proves that good image quality and scanning linearity were achieved.

  7. Stochastic Stability of Nonlinear Sampled Data Systems with a Jump Linear Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, Oscar R.; Herencia-Zapana, Heber; Gray, W. Steven

    2004-01-01

    This paper analyzes the stability of a sampled- data system consisting of a deterministic, nonlinear, time- invariant, continuous-time plant and a stochastic, discrete- time, jump linear controller. The jump linear controller mod- els, for example, computer systems and communication net- works that are subject to stochastic upsets or disruptions. This sampled-data model has been used in the analysis and design of fault-tolerant systems and computer-control systems with random communication delays without taking into account the inter-sample response. To analyze stability, appropriate topologies are introduced for the signal spaces of the sampled- data system. With these topologies, the ideal sampling and zero-order-hold operators are shown to be measurable maps. This paper shows that the known equivalence between the stability of a deterministic, linear sampled-data system and its associated discrete-time representation as well as between a nonlinear sampled-data system and a linearized representation holds even in a stochastic framework.

  8. Linear Approximation to Optimal Control Allocation for Rocket Nozzles with Elliptical Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Jeb S.; Wall, Johnm W.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a straightforward technique for assessing and realizing the maximum control moment effectiveness for a launch vehicle with multiple constrained rocket nozzles, where elliptical deflection limits in gimbal axes are expressed as an ensemble of independent quadratic constraints. A direct method of determining an approximating ellipsoid that inscribes the set of attainable angular accelerations is derived. In the case of a parameterized linear generalized inverse, the geometry of the attainable set is computationally expensive to obtain but can be approximated to a high degree of accuracy with the proposed method. A linear inverse can then be optimized to maximize the volume of the true attainable set by maximizing the volume of the approximating ellipsoid. The use of a linear inverse does not preclude the use of linear methods for stability analysis and control design, preferred in practice for assessing the stability characteristics of the inertial and servoelastic coupling appearing in large boosters. The present techniques are demonstrated via application to the control allocation scheme for a concept heavy-lift launch vehicle.

  9. Linear parameter-varying control of an F-16 aircraft at high angle of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bei

    To improve the aircraft capability at high angle of attack and expand the flight envelope, advanced linear parameter-varying (LPV) control methodologies are studied in this thesis with particular applications of actuator saturation control and switching control. A standard two-step LPV antiwindup control scheme and a systematic switching LPV control approach are derived, and the advantages of LPV control techniques are demonstrated through nonlinear simulations of an F-16 longitudinal autopilot control system. The aerodynamic surface saturation is one of the major issues of flight control in the high angle of attack region. The incorporated unconventional actuators such as thrust vectoring can provide additional control power, but may have a potentially significant pay-off. The proposed LPV antiwindup control scheme is advantageous from the implementation standpoint because it can be thought of as an augmented control algorithm to the existing control system. Moreover, the synthesis condition for an antiwindup compensator is formulated as a linear matrix inequality (LMI) optimization problem and can be solved efficiently. By treating the input saturation as a sector bounded nonlinearity with a tight sector bound, the synthesized antiwindup compensator can stabilize the open-loop exponentially unstable systems. The LPV antiwindup control scheme is applied to the nonlinear F-16 longitudinal model, and compared with the thrust vectoring control approach. The simulation results show that the LPV antiwindup compensator improves the flight quality, and offers advantages over thrust vectoring in a high angle of attack region. For a thrust vectoring augmented aircraft, the actuator sets may be different at low and high angles of attack. Also due to different control objectives, a single controller may not exist over a wide angle of attack region. The proposed switching LPV control approach based on multiple parameter-dependent Lyapunov functions provides a flexible design

  10. Analog Pre-Distortion Linearizer Using Self Base Bias Controlled Amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinjo, Shintaro; Mori, Kazutomi; Yamada, Keiki; Suematsu, Noriharu; Shimozawa, Mitsuhiro

    An analog pre-distortion linearizer employing a radio frequency (RF) transistor with a self base bias control circuit is proposed. The self base bias control circuit extracts the envelope from the modulated input RF signal of the RF transistor and automatically controls its base current according to the extracted envelope. As a result, the proposed linearizer realizes positive gain deviation at high input power level. By adding a resistor between the RF transistor and the self base bias control circuit, the negative gain deviation can be derived. The design of the proposed lineaizer is described with taking the envelope frequency response of the self base bias control circuit into consideration. The fabricated linearizer achieves the adjacent channel power leakage ratio (ACLR) improvement of 8.1dB for a 2GHz-band, 10W-class GaAs FET high-power amplifier (HPA) with negative gain deviation for W-CDMA base stations. It also achieves the ACLR improvement of 8.3dB for a LDMOS HPA with positive gain deviation for the same application.

  11. Developing a (Non-Linear) Practice of Design Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teal, Randall

    2010-01-01

    Design thinking can be a powerful way to engage the world, allowing interactive understandings that are both analytic and experiential. When fully functioning, design thinking necessarily calls upon faculties often considered a-rational, a-causal and a-logical. Unfortunately, such faculties often give rise to academic suspicion. That is to say,…

  12. Non-linear control of the ''clam'' wave energy device. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-09-01

    A promising wave energy device being currently investigated is the ''clam'' device. The clam extracts energy by pumping air through a specially designed (Wells) turbine. Although operation of the Wells turbine does not require a rectified air flow, some additional control will be necessary to optimize the phase of the clam motion for good efficiencies. An examination of the equation of motion in the time domain suggests the possibility of non-linear phase control by mechanical, power take-off, or pneumatic latching. Latching can be shown to increase the efficiency of the device in the longer wavelengths of the wave spectrum, i.e. those of high incident wave power.

  13. A Unified Approach to Linear Equating for the Nonequivalent Groups Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Davier, Alina A.; Kong, Nan

    2005-01-01

    This article describes a new, unified framework for linear equating in a non-equivalent groups anchor test (NEAT) design. The authors focus on three methods for linear equating in the NEAT design--Tucker, Levine observed-score, and chain--and develop a common parameterization that shows that each particular equating method is a special case of the…

  14. Utilizing the Zero-One Linear Programming Constraints to Draw Multiple Sets of Matched Samples from a Non-Treatment Population as Control Groups for the Quasi-Experimental Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Yuan H.; Yang, Yu N.; Tompkins, Leroy J.; Modarresi, Shahpar

    2005-01-01

    The statistical technique, "Zero-One Linear Programming," that has successfully been used to create multiple tests with similar characteristics (e.g., item difficulties, test information and test specifications) in the area of educational measurement, was deemed to be a suitable method for creating multiple sets of matched samples to be used as…

  15. Sensitivity Analysis of Linear Programming and Quadratic Programming Algorithms for Control Allocation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Susan A.; Bodson, Marc; Acosta, Diana M.

    2009-01-01

    The Next Generation (NextGen) transport aircraft configurations being investigated as part of the NASA Aeronautics Subsonic Fixed Wing Project have more control surfaces, or control effectors, than existing transport aircraft configurations. Conventional flight control is achieved through two symmetric elevators, two antisymmetric ailerons, and a rudder. The five effectors, reduced to three command variables, produce moments along the three main axes of the aircraft and enable the pilot to control the attitude and flight path of the aircraft. The NextGen aircraft will have additional redundant control effectors to control the three moments, creating a situation where the aircraft is over-actuated and where a simple relationship does not exist anymore between the required effector deflections and the desired moments. NextGen flight controllers will incorporate control allocation algorithms to determine the optimal effector commands and attain the desired moments, taking into account the effector limits. Approaches to solving the problem using linear programming and quadratic programming algorithms have been proposed and tested. It is of great interest to understand their relative advantages and disadvantages and how design parameters may affect their properties. In this paper, we investigate the sensitivity of the effector commands with respect to the desired moments and show on some examples that the solutions provided using the l2 norm of quadratic programming are less sensitive than those using the l1 norm of linear programming.

  16. Iterative LQG Controller Design Through Closed-Loop Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsiao, Min-Hung; Huang, Jen-Kuang; Cox, David E.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an iterative Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) controller design approach for a linear stochastic system with an uncertain open-loop model and unknown noise statistics. This approach consists of closed-loop identification and controller redesign cycles. In each cycle, the closed-loop identification method is used to identify an open-loop model and a steady-state Kalman filter gain from closed-loop input/output test data obtained by using a feedback LQG controller designed from the previous cycle. Then the identified open-loop model is used to redesign the state feedback. The state feedback and the identified Kalman filter gain are used to form an updated LQC controller for the next cycle. This iterative process continues until the updated controller converges. The proposed controller design is demonstrated by numerical simulations and experiments on a highly unstable large-gap magnetic suspension system.

  17. Non-linear feedback control of the p53 protein-mdm2 inhibitor system using the derivative-free non-linear Kalman filter.

    PubMed

    Rigatos, Gerasimos G

    2016-06-01

    It is proven that the model of the p53-mdm2 protein synthesis loop is a differentially flat one and using a diffeomorphism (change of state variables) that is proposed by differential flatness theory it is shown that the protein synthesis model can be transformed into the canonical (Brunovsky) form. This enables the design of a feedback control law that maintains the concentration of the p53 protein at the desirable levels. To estimate the non-measurable elements of the state vector describing the p53-mdm2 system dynamics, the derivative-free non-linear Kalman filter is used. Moreover, to compensate for modelling uncertainties and external disturbances that affect the p53-mdm2 system, the derivative-free non-linear Kalman filter is re-designed as a disturbance observer. The derivative-free non-linear Kalman filter consists of the Kalman filter recursion applied on the linearised equivalent of the protein synthesis model together with an inverse transformation based on differential flatness theory that enables to retrieve estimates for the state variables of the initial non-linear model. The proposed non-linear feedback control and perturbations compensation method for the p53-mdm2 system can result in more efficient chemotherapy schemes where the infusion of medication will be better administered. PMID:27187988

  18. Non-linear feedback control of the p53 protein-mdm2 inhibitor system using the derivative-free non-linear Kalman filter.

    PubMed

    Rigatos, Gerasimos G

    2016-06-01

    It is proven that the model of the p53-mdm2 protein synthesis loop is a differentially flat one and using a diffeomorphism (change of state variables) that is proposed by differential flatness theory it is shown that the protein synthesis model can be transformed into the canonical (Brunovsky) form. This enables the design of a feedback control law that maintains the concentration of the p53 protein at the desirable levels. To estimate the non-measurable elements of the state vector describing the p53-mdm2 system dynamics, the derivative-free non-linear Kalman filter is used. Moreover, to compensate for modelling uncertainties and external disturbances that affect the p53-mdm2 system, the derivative-free non-linear Kalman filter is re-designed as a disturbance observer. The derivative-free non-linear Kalman filter consists of the Kalman filter recursion applied on the linearised equivalent of the protein synthesis model together with an inverse transformation based on differential flatness theory that enables to retrieve estimates for the state variables of the initial non-linear model. The proposed non-linear feedback control and perturbations compensation method for the p53-mdm2 system can result in more efficient chemotherapy schemes where the infusion of medication will be better administered.

  19. Electrical linear control of the electronic structure of graphene quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Qing-Rui

    2013-06-01

    The tight-binding method is employed to investigate the single-electron electronic structure of triangular graphene quantum dots subject to non-uniform electric fields. The specially designed non-uniform electric fields can provide the equal or opposite electrostatic potentials for all edge carbon atoms. The low-energy eigenstates do not vary significantly with the non-uniform electric fields, which allows electrical linear control of the low-energy states. Moreover, the levels of degenerate zero-energy states can be adjusted electrically independently while the levels of nonzero-energy states almost do not vary. This linear control by non-uniform electric fields can be a more efficient way to tune the degenerate zero-energy states. Our findings may be useful for the application of graphene quantum dots to electronic and photovoltaic devices.

  20. Design and Stability of an On-Orbit Attitude Control System Using Reaction Control Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Robert A.; Hough, Steven; Orphee, Carolina; Clements, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Principles for the design and stability of a spacecraft on-orbit attitude control system employing on-off Reaction Control System (RCS) thrusters is presented. Both the vehicle dynamics and the control system actuators are inherently nonlinear, hence traditional linear control system design approaches are not directly applicable. This paper has three main aspects: It summarizes key RCS control System design principles from the Space Shuttle and Space Station programs, it demonstrates a new approach to develop a linear model of a phase plane control system using describing functions, and applies each of these to the initial development of the NASA's next generation of upper stage vehicles. Topics addressed include thruster hardware specifications, phase plane design and stability, jet selection approaches, filter design metrics, and automaneuver logic.

  1. SSME digital control design characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, W. T.; Searle, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    To protect against a latent programming error (software fault) existing in an untried branch combination that would render the space shuttle out of control in a critical flight phase, the Backup Flight System (BFS) was chartered to provide a safety alternative. The BFS is designed to operate in critical flight phases (ascent and descent) by monitoring the activities of the space shuttle flight subsystems that are under control of the primary flight software (PFS) (e.g., navigation, crew interface, propulsion), then, upon manual command by the flightcrew, to assume control of the space shuttle and deliver it to a noncritical flight condition (safe orbit or touchdown). The problems associated with the selection of the PFS/BFS system architecture, the internal BFS architecture, the fault tolerant software mechanisms, and the long term BFS utility are discussed.

  2. Design and development of a large range linear encoder with subnanometer resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yanan; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2006-10-01

    This article presents the design and development of a large range linear encoder system, in which a displacement transducer is controlled to achieve a stable oscillation over the moving reference grating so as to modulate the motion being measured. Utilizing a special demodulating signal and according to linear control theory, a phase-locked feedback loop is designed to extract motion from the transducer's measurement signal. The measurement dynamics, limited by the sinusoidal nonlinearity in the loop, is analyzed. A method that compensates the effect of the reference grating's geometric error and that improves the measurement accuracy is also proposed. A prototype system, using an optical pickup unit as the displacement transducer and a holographic grating as the reference, is implemented. The performance of the system is tested to verify its resolution, bandwidth, and accuracy. A measurement resolution of 0.06nm rms with 140Hz bandwidth is achieved, and the measurement range is only limited by the size of the reference grating employed. All the experimental results confirm the theoretical analysis. Calibration of the system shows that after compensation the measurement accuracy is in the nanometer order.

  3. On the controllability and observability of discrete-time linear time-delay systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan-Ming; Fong, I.-Kong

    2012-04-01

    This article studies the controllability and observability of discrete-time linear time-delay systems, so that the two properties can play a more fundamental role in system analysis before controller and observer design is engaged. Complete definitions of controllability and observability, which imply the stabilisability and detectability, respectively, and determine the feasibility of eigenvalue assignment, are proposed for systems with delays in both state variables and input/output signals. Necessary and sufficient criteria are developed to check the controllability and observability efficiently. The proofs are based on the equivalent expanded system, but the criteria only involve the delays and matrices of the same dimension as the original system. Finally, the duality between the suggested controllability and observability is presented.

  4. A direct approach to the design of linear multivariable systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, B. L.

    1974-01-01

    Design of multivariable systems is considered and design procedures are formulated in the light of the most recent work on model matching. The word model matching is used exclusively to mean matching the input-output behavior of two systems. The term is used in the frequency domain to indicate the comparison of two transfer matrices containing transfer functions as elements. Design methods where non-interaction is not used as a criteria were studied. Two design methods are considered. The first method of design is based solely upon the specification of generalized error coefficients for each individual transfer function of the overall system transfer matrix. The second design method is called the pole fixing method because all the system poles are fixed at preassigned positions. The zeros of terms either above or below the diagonal are partially fixed via steady state error coefficients. The advantages and disadvantages of each method are discussed and an example is worked to demonstrate their uses. The special cases of triangular decoupling and minimum constraints are discussed.

  5. Application and flight test of linearizing transformations using measurement feedback to the nonlinear control problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antoniewicz, Robert F.; Duke, Eugene L.; Menon, P. K. A.

    1991-01-01

    The design of nonlinear controllers has relied on the use of detailed aerodynamic and engine models that must be associated with the control law in the flight system implementation. Many of these controllers were applied to vehicle flight path control problems and have attempted to combine both inner- and outer-loop control functions in a single controller. An approach to the nonlinear trajectory control problem is presented. This approach uses linearizing transformations with measurement feedback to eliminate the need for detailed aircraft models in outer-loop control applications. By applying this approach and separating the inner-loop and outer-loop functions two things were achieved: (1) the need for incorporating detailed aerodynamic models in the controller is obviated; and (2) the controller is more easily incorporated into existing aircraft flight control systems. An implementation of the controller is discussed, and this controller is tested on a six degree-of-freedom F-15 simulation and in flight on an F-15 aircraft. Simulation data are presented which validates this approach over a large portion of the F-15 flight envelope. Proof of this concept is provided by flight-test data that closely matches simulation results. Flight-test data are also presented.

  6. James Webb Space Telescope optical simulation testbed III: first experimental results with linear-control alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egron, Sylvain; Lajoie, Charles-Philippe; Leboulleux, Lucie; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Pueyo, Laurent; Choquet, Élodie; Perrin, Marshall D.; Ygouf, Marie; Michau, Vincent; Bonnefois, Aurélie; Fusco, Thierry; Escolle, Clément; Ferrari, Marc; Hugot, Emmanuel; Soummer, Rémi

    2016-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Simulation Testbed (JOST) is a tabletop experiment designed to study wavefront sensing and control for a segmented space telescope, including both commissioning and maintenance activities. JOST is complementary to existing testbeds for JWST (e.g. the Ball Aerospace Testbed Telescope TBT) given its compact scale and flexibility, ease of use, and colocation at the JWST Science and Operations Center. The design of JOST reproduces the physics of JWST's three-mirror anastigmat (TMA) using three custom aspheric lenses. It provides similar quality image as JWST (80% Strehl ratio) over a field equivalent to a NIRCam module, but at 633 nm. An Iris AO segmented mirror stands for the segmented primary mirror of JWST. Actuators allow us to control (1) the 18 segments of the segmented mirror in piston, tip, tilt and (2) the second lens, which stands for the secondary mirror, in tip, tilt and x, y, z positions. We present the full linear control alignment infrastructure developed for JOST, with an emphasis on multi-field wavefront sensing and control. Our implementation of the Wavefront Sensing (WFS) algorithms using phase diversity is experimentally tested. The wavefront control (WFC) algorithms, which rely on a linear model for optical aberrations induced by small misalignments of the three lenses, are tested and validated on simulations.

  7. Linear parameter varying switching attitude control for a near space hypersonic vehicle with parametric uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yiqing; Sun, Changyin; Qian, Chengshan; Wang, Li

    2015-12-01

    This paper deals with the problem of linear parameter varying (LPV) switching attitude control for a near space hypersonic vehicle (NSHV) with parametric uncertainties. First, due to the enormous complexity of the NSHV nonlinear attitude dynamics, a slow-fast loop polytopic LPV attitude model is developed by using Jacobian linearisation and the tensor product model transformation approach. Second, for the purpose of less conservative attitude controller design, the flight envelope is divided into four subregions. For each parameter subregion, slow-loop and fast-loop LPV controllers are designed. By the defined switching character function, these slow-fast loop LPV controllers are then switched in order to guarantee the closed-loop NSHV system to be asymptotically stable and satisfy a specified tracking performance criterion. The condition of LPV switching attitude controller synthesis is given in terms of linear matrix inequalities, which can be readily solved via standard numerical software, and the robust stability analysis of the closed-loop NSHV system is verified based on multiple Lypapunov functions. Finally, numerical simulations have demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  8. Design and performance testing of an ultrasonic linear motor with dual piezoelectric actuators.

    PubMed

    Smithmaitrie, Pruittikorn; Suybangdum, Panumas; Laoratanakul, Pitak; Muensit, Nantakan

    2012-05-01

    In this work, design and performance testing of an ultrasonic linear motor with dual piezoelectric actuator patches are studied. The motor system consists of a linear stator, a pre-load weight, and two piezoelectric actuator patches. The piezoelectric actuators are bonded with the linear elastic stator at specific locations. The stator generates propagating waves when the piezoelectric actuators are subjected to harmonic excitations. Vibration characteristics of the linear stator are analyzed and compared with finite element and experimental results. The analytical, finite element, and experimental results show agreement. In the experiments, performance of the ultrasonic linear motor is tested. Relationships between velocity and pre-load weight, velocity and applied voltage, driving force and applied voltage, and velocity and driving force are reported. The design of the dual piezoelectric actuators yields a simpler structure with a smaller number of actuators and lower stator stiffness compared with a conventional design of an ultrasonic linear motor with fully laminated piezoelectric actuators.

  9. A Non-Linear Approach to Spacecraft Formation Control in the Vicinity of a Collinear Libration Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luquette, Richard J.; Sanner, Robert M.; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An expanding interest in mission design strategies that exploit libration point regions, demands the continued development of enhanced, efficient, control algorithms for station-keeping and formation maintenance. Linear control strategies have been developed for station-keeping. However, their region of stability is bounded by the assumptions required for linearizing the governing equations of motion. For example, reference [I] discusses the development of a linear control design for maintaining a halo orbit about the Earth-Moon L2 libration point. Trial runs indicated the trajectory was unstable for starting points exceeding 45,000 km from the L2 point. Also, there was significant growth in the control effort required to maintain the orbit as the nominal radius increased. This result is a consequence of the increased influence of the system non-linearities, as the trajectory deviated from the linearization point, L2. As an alternative, this paper presents the development of a non-linear control strategy, based on a Hamiltonian formulation of the equations of motion. The control strategy is applied to the problem of formation maintenance, rather than simple station

  10. Adaptive iterative learning control for a class of non-linearly parameterised systems with input saturations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruikun; Hou, Zhongsheng; Ji, Honghai; Yin, Chenkun

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, an adaptive iterative learning control scheme is proposed for a class of non-linearly parameterised systems with unknown time-varying parameters and input saturations. By incorporating a saturation function, a new iterative learning control mechanism is presented which includes a feedback term and a parameter updating term. Through the use of parameter separation technique, the non-linear parameters are separated from the non-linear function and then a saturated difference updating law is designed in iteration domain by combining the unknown parametric term of the local Lipschitz continuous function and the unknown time-varying gain into an unknown time-varying function. The analysis of convergence is based on a time-weighted Lyapunov-Krasovskii-like composite energy function which consists of time-weighted input, state and parameter estimation information. The proposed learning control mechanism warrants a L2[0, T] convergence of the tracking error sequence along the iteration axis. Simulation results are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the adaptive iterative learning control scheme.

  11. Wavelet-based ECG data compression system with linear quality control scheme.

    PubMed

    Ku, Cheng-Tung; Hung, King-Chu; Wu, Tsung-Ching; Wang, Huan-Sheng

    2010-06-01

    Maintaining reconstructed signals at a desired level of quality is crucial for lossy ECG data compression. Wavelet-based approaches using a recursive decomposition process are unsuitable for real-time ECG signal recoding and commonly obtain a nonlinear compression performance with distortion sensitive to quantization error. The sensitive response is caused without compromising the influences of word-length-growth (WLG) effect and unfavorable for the reconstruction quality control of ECG data compression. In this paper, the 1-D reversible round-off nonrecursive discrete periodic wavelet transform is applied to overcome the WLG magnification effect in terms of the mechanisms of error propagation resistance and significant normalization of octave coefficients. The two mechanisms enable the design of a multivariable quantization scheme that can obtain a compression performance with the approximate characteristics of linear distortion. The quantization scheme can be controlled with a single control variable. Based on the linear compression performance, a linear quantization scale prediction model is presented for guaranteeing reconstruction quality. Following the use of the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database, the experimental results show that the proposed system, with lower computational complexity, can obtain much better reconstruction quality control than other wavelet-based methods.

  12. A user oriented microcomputer facility for designing linear quadratic Gaussian feedback compensators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houpt, P. K.; Wahid, J.; Johnson, T. L.; Ward, S. A.

    1978-01-01

    A laboratory design facility for digital microprocessor implementation of linear-quadratic-Gaussian feedback compensators is described. Outputs from user interactive programs for solving infinite time horizon LQ regulator and Kalman filter problems were conditioned for implementation on the laboratory microcomputer system. The software consisted of two parts: an offline high-level program for solving the LQ Ricatti equations and generating associated feedback and filter gains and a cross compiler/macro assembler which generates object code for the target microprocessor system. A PDP 11/70 with a UNIX operating system was used for all high level program and data management, and the target microprocessor system is an Intel MDS (8080-based processor). Application to the control of a two dimensional inverted pendulum is presented and issues in expanding the design/prototyping system to other target machine architectures are discussed.

  13. Dynamics for Linear Feedback Controlled Two-Dimensional Benard Equations with Distributed Controls

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyung-Chun; Shin, Byeong Chun

    2001-07-01

    The long-time behavior of solutions for some feedback distributed control problems associated with the Benard equations is studied. Some linear feedback solutions for the Benard equations are constructed. Then we prove that these feedback solutions possess the decay (in time) properties.

  14. Control of nonlinear processes by using linear model predictive control algorithms.

    PubMed

    Gu, Bingfeng; Gupta, Yash P

    2008-04-01

    Most chemical processes are inherently nonlinear. However, because of their simplicity, linear control algorithms have been used for the control of nonlinear processes. In this study, the use of the dynamic matrix control algorithm and a simplified model predictive control algorithm for control of a bench-scale pH neutralization process is investigated. The nonlinearity is handled by dividing the operating region into sub-regions and by switching the controller model as the process moves from one sub-region to another. A simple modification for model predictive control algorithms is presented to handle the switching. The simulation and experimental results show that the modification can provide a significant improvement in the control of nonlinear processes. PMID:18255068

  15. Linear design considerations for TO-10 candidate experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Atchison, Walter A; Rousculp, Christopher L

    2011-01-12

    As part of the LANL/VNIIEF collaboration a high velocity cylindrical liner driven Hugoniot experiment is being designed to be driven by a VNIEF Disk Explosive Magnetic (flux compression) Generator (DEMG). Several variations in drive current and liner thickness have been proposed. This presentation will describe the LANL 1D and 2D simulations used to evaluate those designs. The presentation will also propose an analysis technique to assess a high current drive systems ability to stably and optimally drive a cylindrical aluminum liner for this type of experiment.

  16. Neural network-based nonlinear model predictive control vs. linear quadratic gaussian control

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cho, C.; Vance, R.; Mardi, N.; Qian, Z.; Prisbrey, K.

    1997-01-01

    One problem with the application of neural networks to the multivariable control of mineral and extractive processes is determining whether and how to use them. The objective of this investigation was to compare neural network control to more conventional strategies and to determine if there are any advantages in using neural network control in terms of set-point tracking, rise time, settling time, disturbance rejection and other criteria. The procedure involved developing neural network controllers using both historical plant data and simulation models. Various control patterns were tried, including both inverse and direct neural network plant models. These were compared to state space controllers that are, by nature, linear. For grinding and leaching circuits, a nonlinear neural network-based model predictive control strategy was superior to a state space-based linear quadratic gaussian controller. The investigation pointed out the importance of incorporating state space into neural networks by making them recurrent, i.e., feeding certain output state variables into input nodes in the neural network. It was concluded that neural network controllers can have better disturbance rejection, set-point tracking, rise time, settling time and lower set-point overshoot, and it was also concluded that neural network controllers can be more reliable and easy to implement in complex, multivariable plants.

  17. Linear matrix inequality-based nonlinear adaptive robust control with application to unmanned aircraft systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kun, David William

    Unmanned aircraft systems (UASs) are gaining popularity in civil and commercial applications as their lightweight on-board computers become more powerful and affordable, their power storage devices improve, and the Federal Aviation Administration addresses the legal and safety concerns of integrating UASs in the national airspace. Consequently, many researchers are pursuing novel methods to control UASs in order to improve their capabilities, dependability, and safety assurance. The nonlinear control approach is a common choice as it offers several benefits for these highly nonlinear aerospace systems (e.g., the quadrotor). First, the controller design is physically intuitive and is derived from well known dynamic equations. Second, the final control law is valid in a larger region of operation, including far from the equilibrium states. And third, the procedure is largely methodical, requiring less expertise with gain tuning, which can be arduous for a novice engineer. Considering these facts, this thesis proposes a nonlinear controller design method that combines the advantages of adaptive robust control (ARC) with the powerful design tools of linear matrix inequalities (LMI). The ARC-LMI controller is designed with a discontinuous projection-based adaptation law, and guarantees a prescribed transient and steady state tracking performance for uncertain systems in the presence of matched disturbances. The norm of the tracking error is bounded by a known function that depends on the controller design parameters in a known form. Furthermore, the LMI-based part of the controller ensures the stability of the system while overcoming polytopic uncertainties, and minimizes the control effort. This can reduce the number of parameters that require adaptation, and helps to avoid control input saturation. These desirable characteristics make the ARC-LMI control algorithm well suited for the quadrotor UAS, which may have unknown parameters and may encounter external

  18. Design and Stability of an On-Orbit Attitude Control System Using Reaction Control Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Robert A.; Hough, Steven; Orphee, Carolina; Clements, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Basic principles for the design and stability of a spacecraft on-orbit attitude control system employing on-off Reaction Control System (RCS) thrusters are presented. Both vehicle dynamics and the control system actuators are inherently nonlinear, hence traditional linear control system design approaches are not directly applicable. This paper has two main aspects: It summarizes key RCS design principles from earlier NASA vehicles, notably the Space Shuttle and Space Station programs, and introduces advances in the linear modelling and analyses of a phase plane control system derived in the initial development of the NASA's next upper stage vehicle, the Exploration Upper Stage (EUS). Topics include thruster hardware specifications, phase plane design and stability, jet selection approaches, filter design metrics, and RCS rotational maneuver logic.

  19. Control Law Design in a Computational Aeroelasticity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, Jerry R.; Robertshaw, Harry H.; Kapania, Rakesh K.

    2003-01-01

    A methodology for designing active control laws in a computational aeroelasticity environment is given. The methodology involves employing a systems identification technique to develop an explicit state-space model for control law design from the output of a computational aeroelasticity code. The particular computational aeroelasticity code employed in this paper solves the transonic small disturbance aerodynamic equation using a time-accurate, finite-difference scheme. Linear structural dynamics equations are integrated simultaneously with the computational fluid dynamics equations to determine the time responses of the structure. These structural responses are employed as the input to a modern systems identification technique that determines the Markov parameters of an "equivalent linear system". The Eigensystem Realization Algorithm is then employed to develop an explicit state-space model of the equivalent linear system. The Linear Quadratic Guassian control law design technique is employed to design a control law. The computational aeroelasticity code is modified to accept control laws and perform closed-loop simulations. Flutter control of a rectangular wing model is chosen to demonstrate the methodology. Various cases are used to illustrate the usefulness of the methodology as the nonlinearity of the aeroelastic system is increased through increased angle-of-attack changes.

  20. Beam dynamics design for uranium drift tube linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Wei-Ping; He, Yuan; Lu, Yuan-Rong

    2014-07-01

    KONUS beam dynamics design of uranium DTL with LORASR code is presented. The 238U34+ beam, whose current is 5.0 emA, is accelerated from injection energy of 0.35 MeV/u to output energy of 1.30 MeV/u by IH-DTL operated at 81.25 MHz in HIAF project at IMP of CAS. It achieves a transmission efficiency of 94.95% with a cavity length of 267.8 cm. The optimization aims are the reduction of emittance growth, beam loss and project costs. Because of the requirements of CW mode operation, the designed average acceleration gradient is about 2.48 MV/m. The maximum axial field is 10.2 MV/m, meanwhile the Kilpatrick breakdown field is 10.56 MV/m at 81.25 MHz.

  1. ORACLS- OPTIMAL REGULATOR ALGORITHMS FOR THE CONTROL OF LINEAR SYSTEMS (CDC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, E. S.

    1994-01-01

    This control theory design package, called Optimal Regulator Algorithms for the Control of Linear Systems (ORACLS), was developed to aid in the design of controllers and optimal filters for systems which can be modeled by linear, time-invariant differential and difference equations. Optimal linear quadratic regulator theory, currently referred to as the Linear-Quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) problem, has become the most widely accepted method of determining optimal control policy. Within this theory, the infinite duration time-invariant problems, which lead to constant gain feedback control laws and constant Kalman-Bucy filter gains for reconstruction of the system state, exhibit high tractability and potential ease of implementation. A variety of new and efficient methods in the field of numerical linear algebra have been combined into the ORACLS program, which provides for the solution to time-invariant continuous or discrete LQG problems. The ORACLS package is particularly attractive to the control system designer because it provides a rigorous tool for dealing with multi-input and multi-output dynamic systems in both continuous and discrete form. The ORACLS programming system is a collection of subroutines which can be used to formulate, manipulate, and solve various LQG design problems. The ORACLS program is constructed in a manner which permits the user to maintain considerable flexibility at each operational state. This flexibility is accomplished by providing primary operations, analysis of linear time-invariant systems, and control synthesis based on LQG methodology. The input-output routines handle the reading and writing of numerical matrices, printing heading information, and accumulating output information. The basic vector-matrix operations include addition, subtraction, multiplication, equation, norm construction, tracing, transposition, scaling, juxtaposition, and construction of null and identity matrices. The analysis routines provide for the following

  2. ORACLS- OPTIMAL REGULATOR ALGORITHMS FOR THE CONTROL OF LINEAR SYSTEMS (DEC VAX VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, H.

    1994-01-01

    This control theory design package, called Optimal Regulator Algorithms for the Control of Linear Systems (ORACLS), was developed to aid in the design of controllers and optimal filters for systems which can be modeled by linear, time-invariant differential and difference equations. Optimal linear quadratic regulator theory, currently referred to as the Linear-Quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) problem, has become the most widely accepted method of determining optimal control policy. Within this theory, the infinite duration time-invariant problems, which lead to constant gain feedback control laws and constant Kalman-Bucy filter gains for reconstruction of the system state, exhibit high tractability and potential ease of implementation. A variety of new and efficient methods in the field of numerical linear algebra have been combined into the ORACLS program, which provides for the solution to time-invariant continuous or discrete LQG problems. The ORACLS package is particularly attractive to the control system designer because it provides a rigorous tool for dealing with multi-input and multi-output dynamic systems in both continuous and discrete form. The ORACLS programming system is a collection of subroutines which can be used to formulate, manipulate, and solve various LQG design problems. The ORACLS program is constructed in a manner which permits the user to maintain considerable flexibility at each operational state. This flexibility is accomplished by providing primary operations, analysis of linear time-invariant systems, and control synthesis based on LQG methodology. The input-output routines handle the reading and writing of numerical matrices, printing heading information, and accumulating output information. The basic vector-matrix operations include addition, subtraction, multiplication, equation, norm construction, tracing, transposition, scaling, juxtaposition, and construction of null and identity matrices. The analysis routines provide for the following

  3. Adaptive hybrid control for linear piezoelectric ceramic motor drive using diagonal recurrent CMAC network.

    PubMed

    Wai, Rong-Jong; Lin, Chih-Min; Peng, Ya-Fu

    2004-11-01

    This paper presents an adaptive hybrid control system using a diagonal recurrent cerebellar-model-articulation-computer (DRCMAC) network to control a linear piezoelectric ceramic motor (LPCM) driven by a two-inductance two-capacitance (LLCC) resonant inverter. Since the dynamic characteristics and motor parameters of the LPCM are highly nonlinear and time varying, an adaptive hybrid control system is therefore designed based on a hypothetical dynamic model to achieve high-precision position control. The architecture of DRCMAC network is a modified model of a cerebellar-model-articulation-computer (CMAC) network to attain a small number of receptive-fields. The novel idea of this study is that it employs the concept of diagonal recurrent neural network (DRNN) in order to capture the system dynamics and convert the static CMAC into a dynamic one. This adaptive hybrid control system is composed of two parts. One is a DRCMAC network controller that is used to mimic a conventional computed torque control law due to unknown system dynamics, and the other is a compensated controller with bound estimation algorithm that is utilized to recover the residual approximation error for guaranteeing the stable characteristic. The effectiveness of the proposed driving circuit and control system is verified with hardware experiments under the occurrence of uncertainties. In addition, the advantages of the proposed control scheme are indicated in comparison with a traditional integral-proportional (IP) position control system.

  4. Use a linear model to achieve stable composition control in a naphtha splitter

    SciTech Connect

    Karpe, P.

    1997-01-01

    The following two points using dual composition control in a naphtha splitter are emphasized: while literature provides general guidelines for design of control systems for distillation columns, each column is unique in terms of dynamic and steady state behavior. Multivariable control analytical tools, such as RGA and SVD, coupled with rigorous steady state simulations, can be effectively employed to achieve stable control in columns beset with severe loop interactions, and often in the absence of on-line analyzers, linear models representing the first order approximations of distillation columns can yield significant benefits. Such models are simple to understand, readily acceptable to operators, do not require special expertise to maintain, and therefore, offer high degree of reliability.

  5. Uncertainty analysis and robust trajectory linearization control of a flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Zhiqiang; Tan, Xiangmin; Fan, Guoliang; Yi, Jianqiang

    2014-08-01

    Flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicles feature significant uncertainties which pose huge challenges to robust controller designs. In this paper, four major categories of uncertainties are analyzed, that is, uncertainties associated with flexible effects, aerodynamic parameter variations, external environmental disturbances, and control-oriented modeling errors. A uniform nonlinear uncertainty model is explored for the first three uncertainties which lumps all uncertainties together and consequently is beneficial for controller synthesis. The fourth uncertainty is additionally considered in stability analysis. Based on these analyses, the starting point of the control design is to decompose the vehicle dynamics into five functional subsystems. Then a robust trajectory linearization control (TLC) scheme consisting of five robust subsystem controllers is proposed. In each subsystem controller, TLC is combined with the extended state observer (ESO) technique for uncertainty compensation. The stability of the overall closed-loop system with the four aforementioned uncertainties and additional singular perturbations is analyzed. Particularly, the stability of nonlinear ESO is also discussed from a Liénard system perspective. At last, simulations demonstrate the great control performance and the uncertainty rejection ability of the robust scheme.

  6. Robust integrated flight/propulsion control design for a STOVL aircraft using H-infinity control design techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Sanjay

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented from an application of H-infinity control design methodology to a centralized integrated flight/propulsion control (IFPC) system design for a supersonic STOVL fighter aircraft in transition flight. The emphasis is on formulating the H-infinity optimal control synthesis problem such that the critical requirements for the flight and propulsion systems are adequately reflected within the linear, centralized control problem formulation and the resulting controller provides robustness to modeling uncertainties and model parameter variations with flight condition. Detailed evaluation results are presented for a reduced order controller obtained from the improved H-infinity control design showing that the control design meets the specified nominal performance objective as well as provides stability robustness for variations in plant system dynamics with changes in aircraft trim speed within the transition flight envelope.

  7. Design of a MeV, 4kA linear induction accelerator for flash radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Kulke, B.; Brier, R.; Chapin, W.

    1981-02-10

    For verifying the hydrodynamics of nuclear weapons design it is useful to have flash x-ray machines that can deliver a maximum dose in a minimum pulse length and with very high reliability. At LLNL, such a requirement was identified some years ago as 500 roentgens at one meter, in a 60 nsec pulse length. In response to this requirement, a linear induction accelerator was proposed to and funded by DOE in 1977. The design of this machine, called FXR, has now been completed and construction has begun. The FXR design extends the parameters of a similar machine that had been built and operated at LBL, Berkeley, some ten years ago. Using a cold cathode injector followed by 48 accelerator modules rated at 400 kV each, the FXR machine will accelerate a 4 kA electron beam pulse to 20 MeV final energy. Key design features are the generation and the stable transport of a low emittance (100 mr-cm) beam from a field emitter diode, the design of reliable, compact energy storage components such as Blumleins, feedlines and accelerator modules, and a computer-assisted control system.

  8. Zeroth-order design report for the next linear collider. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Raubenheimer, T.O.

    1996-05-01

    This Zeroth-Order Design Report (ZDR) for the Next Linear Collider (NLC) has been completed as a feasibility study for a TeV-scale linear collider that incorporates a room-temperature accelerator powered by rf microwaves at 11.424 GHz--similar to that presently used in the SLC, but at four times the rf frequency. The purpose of this study is to examine the complete systems of such a collider, to understand how the parts fit together, and to make certain that every required piece has been included. The ``design`` presented here is not fully engineered in any sense, but to be assured that the NLC can be built, attention has been given to a number of critical components and issues that present special challenges. More engineering and development of a number of mechanical and electrical systems remain to be done, but the conclusion of this study is that indeed the NLC is technically feasible and can be expected to reach the performance levels required to perform research at the TeV energy scale. Volume II covers the following: collimation systems; IP switch and big bend; final focus; the interaction region; multiple bunch issues; control systems; instrumentation; machine protection systems; NLC reliability considerations; NLC conventional facilities. Also included are four appendices on the following topics: An RF power source upgrade to the NLC; a second interaction region for gamma-gamma, gamma-electron; ground motion: theory and measurement; and beam-based feedback: theory and implementation.

  9. Practical gust load alleviation and flutter suppression control laws based on a LQG methodology. [Linear Quadratic Gaussian

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangsaas, D.; Ly, U.; Norman, D. C.

    1981-01-01

    A modified linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) synthesis procedure has been used to design low-order robust multiloop controllers for a flexible airplane. The introduction of properly constructed fictitious Gauss-Markov processes in the control loops allowed meeting classical frequency-domain stability criteria using the direct synthesis procedures of modern time-domain control theory. Model reduction was used to simplify the control laws to the point where they could be easily implemented on onboard flight computers. These control laws provided excellent gust load and flutter mode control with good stability margins and compared very favorably to other control laws synthesized by the classical root-locus technique.

  10. Non-linear adaptive controllers for an over-actuated pneumatic MR-compatible stepper.

    PubMed

    Hollnagel, Christoph; Vallery, Heike; Schädler, Rainer; López, Isaac Gómez-Lor; Jaeger, Lukas; Wolf, Peter; Riener, Robert; Marchal-Crespo, Laura

    2013-07-01

    Pneumatics is one of the few actuation principles that can be used in an MR environment, since it can produce high forces without affecting imaging quality. However, pneumatic control is challenging, due to the air high compliance and cylinders non-linearities. Furthermore, the system's properties may change for each subject. Here, we present novel control strategies that adapt to the subject's individual anatomy and needs while performing accurate periodic gait-like movements with an MRI compatible pneumatically driven robot. In subject-passive mode, an iterative learning controller (ILC) was implemented to reduce the system's periodic disturbances. To allow the subjects to intend the task by themselves, a zero-force controller minimized the interaction forces between subject and robot. To assist patients who may be too weak, an assist-as-needed controller that adapts the assistance based on online measurement of the subject's performance was designed. The controllers were experimentally tested. The ILC successfully learned to reduce the variability and tracking errors. The zero-force controller allowed subjects to step in a transparent environment. The assist-as-needed controller adapted the assistance based on individual needs, while still challenged the subjects to perform the task. The presented controllers can provide accurate pneumatic control in MR environments to allow assessments of brain activation. PMID:23430329

  11. Control design for future agile fighters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Patrick C.; Davidson, John B.

    1991-01-01

    The CRAFT control design methodology is presented. CRAFT stands for the design objectives addressed, namely, Control power, Robustness, Agility, and Flying Qualities Tradeoffs. The approach combines eigenspace assignment, which allows for direct specification of eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and a graphical approach for representing control design metrics that captures numerous design goals in one composite illustration. The methodology makes use of control design metrics from four design objective areas, namely, control power, robustness, agility, and flying qualities. An example of the CRAFT methodology as well as associated design issues are presented.

  12. Control via interconnection and damping assignment of linear time-invariant systems: a tutorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Romeo; Liu, Zhitao; Su, Hongye

    2012-05-01

    Interconnection and damping assignment is a controller design methodology that regulates the behaviour of dynamical systems assigning a desired port-Hamiltonian structure to the closed-loop. A key step for the application of the method is the solution of the so-called matching equation that, in the case of nonlinear systems, is a partial differential equation. It has recently been shown that for linear systems the problem boils down to the solution of a linear matrix inequality that, moreover, is feasible if and only if the system is stabilisable - making the method universally applicable. It has also been shown that if we narrow the class of assignable structures - e.g. to mechanical instead of the larger port-Hamiltonian - the problem is still translated to a linear matrix inequality, but now stabilisability is not sufficient to ensure its feasibility. It is additionally required that the uncontrolled modes are simple and lie on the jω axis, which is consistent with the considered scenario of mechanical systems without friction. The purpose of this article is to present these important results in a tutorial, self-contained form - invoking only basic linear algebra methods.

  13. Design and analysis of an unconventional permanent magnet linear machine for energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Peng

    This Ph.D. dissertation proposes an unconventional high power density linear electromagnetic kinetic energy harvester, and a high-performance two-stage interface power electronics to maintain maximum power abstraction from the energy source and charge the Li-ion battery load with constant current. The proposed machine architecture is composed of a double-sided flat type silicon steel stator with winding slots, a permanent magnet mover, coil windings, a linear motion guide and an adjustable spring bearing. The unconventional design of the machine is that NdFeB magnet bars in the mover are placed with magnetic fields in horizontal direction instead of vertical direction and the same magnetic poles are facing each other. The derived magnetic equivalent circuit model proves the average air-gap flux density of the novel topology is as high as 0.73 T with 17.7% improvement over that of the conventional topology at the given geometric dimensions of the proof-of-concept machine. Subsequently, the improved output voltage and power are achieved. The dynamic model of the linear generator is also developed, and the analytical equations of output maximum power are derived for the case of driving vibration with amplitude that is equal, smaller and larger than the relative displacement between the mover and the stator of the machine respectively. Furthermore, the finite element analysis (FEA) model has been simulated to prove the derived analytical results and the improved power generation capability. Also, an optimization framework is explored to extend to the multi-Degree-of-Freedom (n-DOF) vibration based linear energy harvesting devices. Moreover, a boost-buck cascaded switch mode converter with current controller is designed to extract the maximum power from the harvester and charge the Li-ion battery with trickle current. Meanwhile, a maximum power point tracking (MPPT) algorithm is proposed and optimized for low frequency driving vibrations. Finally, a proof

  14. Dissipative rendering and neural network control system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, Oscar R.

    1995-01-01

    Model-based control system designs are limited by the accuracy of the models of the plant, plant uncertainty, and exogenous signals. Although better models can be obtained with system identification, the models and control designs still have limitations. One approach to reduce the dependency on particular models is to design a set of compensators that will guarantee robust stability to a set of plants. Optimization over the compensator parameters can then be used to get the desired performance. Conservativeness of this approach can be reduced by integrating fundamental properties of the plant models. This is the approach of dissipative control design. Dissipative control designs are based on several variations of the Passivity Theorem, which have been proven for nonlinear/linear and continuous-time/discrete-time systems. These theorems depend not on a specific model of a plant, but on its general dissipative properties. Dissipative control design has found wide applicability in flexible space structures and robotic systems that can be configured to be dissipative. Currently, there is ongoing research to improve the performance of dissipative control designs. For aircraft systems that are not dissipative active control may be used to make them dissipative and then a dissipative control design technique can be used. It is also possible that rendering a system dissipative and dissipative control design may be combined into one step. Furthermore, the transformation of a non-dissipative system to dissipative can be done robustly. One sequential design procedure for finite dimensional linear time-invariant systems has been developed. For nonlinear plants that cannot be controlled adequately with a single linear controller, model-based techniques have additional problems. Nonlinear system identification is still a research topic. Lacking analytical models for model-based design, artificial neural network algorithms have recently received considerable attention. Using

  15. PHELIX: design of transformer-driven linear implosion system

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, Peter J; Atchison, Walter L; Rousculp, Chris L; Reinovsky, Robert E

    2008-01-01

    Experiments involving electromagnetically-imploded, solid-density liners can be achieved at reduced cost and energy if we start with a scale-size based on diagnostic resolution, rather than on the largest capacitor bank or generator we could bring to bear. For minimum resolution of 100 microns or less, many useful experiments could be performed with initial liner diameters that are factors of two to three smaller than used on high-energy systems, such as Atlas, thereby reducing energy requirements to sub-megajoule levels. Reduction in scale-size, however, also decreases the inductance change associated with liner motion relative to other inductances in the circuit. To improve coupling efficiency to liner kinetic energy, we invoke a current step-up transformer. Scaling relations have been developed for reducing the size and energy of such systems and compared with detailed numerical simulations. We discuss these calculations and describe the engineering embodiment of the resulting design for a system called PHELIX (Precision High Energy-density Liner Implosion eXperiment).

  16. Control system design for nano-positioning using piezoelectric actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Jinjun; Liu, Yanfang; Gabbert, Ulrich; Cui, Naigang

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a systematic control system design for nano-positioning of a piezoelectric actuator (PEA). PEAs exhibit hysteresis nonlinearity, which can dramatically limit the application and performance of linear feedback control theory. Thus the hysteresis is compensated for based on the Maxwell resistive capacitor (MRC) model first. Then a proportional plus integral (PI) controller and a proportional double integral plus lead compensation (PII&L) controller are designed for the hysteresis-compensated PEA to account for model uncertainty, disturbance, and noise. The robust stability of both controllers is proved. The effectiveness of the proposed control scheme is demonstrated experimentally. Both controllers achieve fast precise positioning. The 2% settling times for the PI controller and the PII&L controller are 1.5 ms and 4.7 ms, respectively. The positioning resolution is upto 1 nm for both controllers.

  17. Thermodynamically modulated partially double-stranded linear DNA probe design for homogeneous real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shihai; Salituro, John; Tang, Ning; Luk, Ka-Cheung; Hackett, John; Swanson, Priscilla; Cloherty, Gavin; Mak, Wai-Bing; Robinson, John; Abravaya, Klara

    2007-01-01

    Real-time PCR assays have recently been developed for diagnostic and research purposes. Signal generation in real-time PCR is achieved with probe designs that usually depend on exonuclease activity of DNA polymerase (e.g. TaqMan probe) or oligonucleotide hybridization (e.g. molecular beacon). Probe design often needs to be specifically tailored either to tolerate or to differentiate between sequence variations. The conventional probe technologies offer limited flexibility to meet these diverse requirements. Here, we introduce a novel partially double-stranded linear DNA probe design. It consists of a hybridization probe 5'-labeled with a fluorophore and a shorter quencher oligo of complementary sequence 3'-labeled with a quencher. Fluorescent signal is generated when the hybridization probe preferentially binds to amplified targets during PCR. This novel class of probe can be thermodynamically modulated by adjusting (i) the length of hybridization probe, (ii) the length of quencher oligo, (iii) the molar ratio between the two strands and (iv) signal detection temperature. As a result, pre-amplification signal, signal gain and the extent of mismatch discrimination can be reliably controlled and optimized. The applicability of this design strategy was demonstrated in the Abbott RealTime HIV-1 assay.

  18. ATOPS B-737 inner-loop control system linear model construction and verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broussard, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    Nonlinear models and block diagrams of an inner-loop control system for the ATOPS B-737 Research Aircraft are presented. Continuous time linear model representations of the nonlinear inner-loop control systems are derived. Closed-loop aircraft simulations comparing nonlinear and linear dynamic responses to step inputs are used to verify the inner-loop control system models.

  19. Approximating the linear quadratic optimal control law for hereditary systems with delays in the control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milman, Mark H.

    1987-01-01

    The fundamental control synthesis issue of establishing a priori convergence rates of approximation schemes for feedback controllers for a class of distributed parameter systems is addressed within the context of hereditary systems. Specifically, a factorization approach is presented for deriving approximations to the optimal feedback gains for the linear regulator-quadratic cost problem associated with time-varying functional differential equations with control delays. The approach is based on a discretization of the state penalty which leads to a simple structure for the feedback control law. General properties of the Volterra factors of Hilbert-Schmidt operators are then used to obtain convergence results for the controls, trajectories and feedback kernels. Two algorithms are derived from the basic approximation scheme, including a fast algorithm, in the time-invariant case. A numerical example is also considered.

  20. Design of reduced-order state estimators for linear time-varying multivariable systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Charles C.

    1987-01-01

    The design of reduced-order state estimators for linear time-varying multivariable systems is considered. Employing the concepts of matrix operators and the method of canonical transformations, this paper shows that there exists a reduced-order state estimator for linear time-varying systems that are 'lexicography-fixedly observable'. In addition, the eigenvalues of the estimator can be arbitrarily assigned. A simple algorithm is proposed for the design of the state estimator.

  1. Non-linear modelling and control of semi-active suspensions with variable damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huang; Long, Chen; Yuan, Chao-Chun; Jiang, Hao-Bin

    2013-10-01

    Electro-hydraulic dampers can provide variable damping force that is modulated by varying the command current; furthermore, they offer advantages such as lower power, rapid response, lower cost, and simple hardware. However, accurate characterisation of non-linear f-v properties in pre-yield and force saturation in post-yield is still required. Meanwhile, traditional linear or quarter vehicle models contain various non-linearities. The development of a multi-body dynamics model is very complex, and therefore, SIMPACK was used with suitable improvements for model development and numerical simulations. A semi-active suspension was built based on a belief-desire-intention (BDI)-agent model framework. Vehicle handling dynamics were analysed, and a co-simulation analysis was conducted in SIMPACK and MATLAB to evaluate the BDI-agent controller. The design effectively improved ride comfort, handling stability, and driving safety. A rapid control prototype was built based on dSPACE to conduct a real vehicle test. The test and simulation results were consistent, which verified the simulation.

  2. Linear dynamic analysis of the Space Station Freedom thermal/environmental control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tandler, John; Russ, Thomas

    1992-01-01

    A methodology for dynamic analysis of the Space Station Freedom thermal/environmental control system is described which uses linear system analysis techniques to determine the ability of the system to accommodate thermal load transients. A nonlinear integrated model of the system as it exists at Stage 6, Man Tended Capability (MTC), is described which encompasses the cabin air cooling system, avionics air cooling system, internal and external thermal control systems. The nonlinear model is linearized at an assumed design operating point, and the linear model is evaluated by comparison with the nonlinear model. Transfer functions are derived to determine the response of the heat rejection system to time-varying thermal loads applied at various points in the heat acquisition system. The frequency response calculated from the transfer functions is used to determine allowable operating envelopes of thermal load magnitude and frequency for each point of application of thermal load. The dynamic operating envelopes provide a quantitative indication of the degree and duration of peak loads which the thermal/environmental system is able to transport and reject.

  3. Overall non-linear correction of phase shifting mechanism in white light interferometry system based on displacement feedback control combined with fuzzy PID control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ningfang; Luo, Xinkai; Li, Huipeng; Li, Jiao

    2015-10-01

    The non-linearity of the phase shifting mechanism in white light interferometry system can seriously affect the measuring accuracy of the system. In this paper, the correcting method is to combine the displacement feedback control technology with the fuzzy PID control technology. Displacement feedback control mechanism and fuzzy PID controller are designed and then try to figure it out through Matlab simulation and experiment.. The result shows that combining the displacement feedback control technology with the fuzzy PID control technology can fulfill decent overall non-linear correction in the white light interferometry measuring system. Meanwhile, the accuracy of the correction is high and the non-linearity drop from 2% to 0.1%.

  4. Tracking control of a class of non-linear systems with applications to cruise control of air-breathing hypersonic vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hongfei; Yang, Zhiling; Meng, Bin

    2015-05-01

    A new tracking-control method for general non-linear systems is proposed. A virtual controller and some command references are introduced to asymptotically stabilise the system of the tracking error dynamics. Then, the actual controller and command references are derived by solving a system of linear algebraic equations. Compared with other tracking-control methods in the literature, the tracking-controller design in this paper is simple because it needs only to solve a system of linear algebraic equations. The boundedness of the tracking controller and command references is guaranteed by the solvability of the terminal value problem (TVP) of an ordinary differential equation. For non-linear systems with minimum-phase properties, the TVP is automatically solvable. A numerical example shows that the tracking-control method is still available for some systems with non-minimum-phase properties. To enhance the robustness of the tracking controller, a non-linear disturbance observer (NDO) is introduced to estimate the disturbance. The combination of the tracking controller and the NDO is applied to the tracking control of an air-breathing hypersonic vehicle.

  5. A general linear mathematical model of power flow analysis and control for integrated structure-control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Y. P.; Xing, J. T.; Price, W. G.

    2003-10-01

    Generalized integrated structure-control dynamical systems consisting of any number of active/passive controllers and three-dimensional rigid/flexible substructures are investigated. The developed mathematical model assessing the behaviour of these complex systems includes description of general boundary conditions, the interaction mechanisms between structures, power flows and control characteristics. Three active control strategies are examined. That is, multiple channel absolute/relative velocity feedback controllers, their hybrid combination and an existing passive control system to which the former control systems are attached in order to improve overall control efficiency. From the viewpoint of continuum mechanics, an analytical solution of this generalized structure-control system has been developed allowing predictions of the dynamic responses at any point on or in substructures of the coupled system. Absolute or relative dynamic response or receptance, transmissibility, mobility, transfer functions have been derived to evaluate complex dynamic interaction mechanisms through various transmission paths. The instantaneous and time-averaged power flow of energy input, transmission and dissipation or absorption within and between the source substructure, control subsystems and controlled substructure are presented. The general theory developed provides an integrated framework to solve various vibration isolation and control problems and provides a basis to develop a general algorithm that may allow the user to build arbitrarily complex linear control models using simple commands and inputs. The proposed approach is applied to a practical example to illustrate and validate the mathematical model as well as to assess control effectiveness and to provide important guidelines to assist vibration control designers.

  6. Linear matrix inequalities for analysis and control of linear vector second-order systems

    SciTech Connect

    Adegas, Fabiano D.; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2014-10-06

    Many dynamical systems are modeled as vector second-order differential equations. This paper presents analysis and synthesis conditions in terms of LMI with explicit dependence in the coefficient matrices of vector second-order systems. These conditions benefit from the separation between the Lyapunov matrix and the system matrices by introducing matrix multipliers, which potentially reduce conservativeness in hard control problems. Multipliers facilitate the usage of parameter-dependent Lyapunov functions as certificates of stability of uncertain and time-varying vector second-order systems. The conditions introduced in this work have the potential to increase the practice of analyzing and controlling systems directly in vector second-order form.

  7. Control design for the SERC experimental testbeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacques, Robert; Blackwood, Gary; Macmartin, Douglas G.; How, Jonathan; Anderson, Eric

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on control design for the Space Engineering Research Center experimental testbeds are presented. Topics covered include: SISO control design and results; sensor and actuator location; model identification; control design; experimental results; preliminary LAC experimental results; active vibration isolation problem statement; base flexibility coupling into isolation feedback loop; cantilever beam testbed; and closed loop results.

  8. Model Reduction for Control System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enns, D. F.

    1985-01-01

    An approach and a technique for effectively obtaining reduced order mathematical models of a given large order model for the purposes of synthesis, analysis and implementation of control systems is developed. This approach involves the use of an error criterion which is the H-infinity norm of a frequency weighted error between the full and reduced order models. The weightings are chosen to take into account the purpose for which the reduced order model is intended. A previously unknown error bound in the H-infinity norm for reduced order models obtained from internally balanced realizations was obtained. This motivated further development of the balancing technique to include the frequency dependent weightings. This resulted in the frequency weighted balanced realization and a new model reduction technique. Two approaches to designing reduced order controllers were developed. The first involves reducing the order of a high order controller with an appropriate weighting. The second involves linear quadratic Gaussian synthesis based on a reduced order model obtained with an appropriate weighting.

  9. Design of a valved moving magnet type linear compressor for a Joule-Thomson cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. W.; Wang, L. Y.; Gan, Z. H.

    2014-01-01

    For temperatures around 4-6 K, Joule-Thomson (J-T) cryocoolers can achieve a higher efficiency than Stirling or pulse tube cryocoolers thus have been widely used in space. It is crucial for a J-T compressor to obtain a relatively high pressure ratio. With this concept, a valved moving magnet type linear compressor has been designed. This paper describes the design method and component structure of the linear compressor in detail. The electromagnetic force of linear motor, stiffness and stress distribution of flexure springs were calculated based on finite element method (FEM). System resonance was specially considered to achieve a high efficiency, and system vibration and heat dissipation problems were discussed. The design goal of the linear compressor is to achieve an efficiency of 80% and a lifetime longer than 5 years.

  10. Passive dynamic controllers for non-linear mechanical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Wu, Shih-Chin; Phan, Minh; Longman, Richard W.

    1992-01-01

    The objective is to develop active model-independent controllers for slewing and vibration control of nonlinear multibody flexible systems, including flexible robots. The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include: passive stabilization; work-energy rate principle; Liapunov theory; displacement feedback; dynamic controller; displacement and acceleration feedback; velocity feedback; displacement feedback; physical interaction; a 6-DOF robot; and simulation results.

  11. Design of a novel integrated position sensor based on Hall effects for linear oscillating actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tianyi; Yan, Liang; Jiao, Zongxia

    2015-07-01

    Linear oscillating actuator provides linear reciprocate motion directly without other auxiliary components, which is suitable for high integration applications in aerospace industry. Accurate position control is essential for linear oscillating motor and relies on concise measurement of mover position. However, most position measurements are dependent on external complicated sensors, which hinders further integration of linear oscillating actuation system. In this paper, a novel position sensing system for linear oscillating actuator based on Hall effects is proposed to achieve accurate and high integration measurement simultaneously. Axial sensing magnetic field with approximately linear relationship with position is created for direct and convenient measurement. Analytical model of sensing magnetic field is set up for optimization and validated by finite element method and experimental results. Finally, sensing magnets are integrated into motor prototype for experiments. Dynamic position results are tested in experiments and prove to be effective and accurate for position sensing with short-stroke.

  12. Design of a novel integrated position sensor based on Hall effects for linear oscillating actuator.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianyi; Yan, Liang; Jiao, Zongxia

    2015-07-01

    Linear oscillating actuator provides linear reciprocate motion directly without other auxiliary components, which is suitable for high integration applications in aerospace industry. Accurate position control is essential for linear oscillating motor and relies on concise measurement of mover position. However, most position measurements are dependent on external complicated sensors, which hinders further integration of linear oscillating actuation system. In this paper, a novel position sensing system for linear oscillating actuator based on Hall effects is proposed to achieve accurate and high integration measurement simultaneously. Axial sensing magnetic field with approximately linear relationship with position is created for direct and convenient measurement. Analytical model of sensing magnetic field is set up for optimization and validated by finite element method and experimental results. Finally, sensing magnets are integrated into motor prototype for experiments. Dynamic position results are tested in experiments and prove to be effective and accurate for position sensing with short-stroke.

  13. On-Off Minimum-Time Control With Limited Fuel Usage: Global Optima Via Linear Programming

    SciTech Connect

    DRIESSEN,BRIAN

    1999-09-01

    A method for finding a global optimum to the on-off minimum-time control problem with limited fuel usage is presented. Each control can take on only three possible values: maximum, zero, or minimum. The simplex method for linear systems naturally yields such a solution for the re-formulation presented herein because it always produces an extreme point solution to the linear program. Numerical examples for the benchmark linear flexible system are presented.

  14. Fractional representation theory - Robustness results with applications to finite dimensional control of a class of linear distributed systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nett, C. N.; Jacobson, C. A.; Balas, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    This paper reviews and extends the fractional representation theory. In particular, new and powerful robustness results are presented. This new theory is utilized to develop a preliminary design methodology for finite dimensional control of a class of linear evolution equations on a Banach space. The design is for stability in an input-output sense, but particular attention is paid to internal stability as well.

  15. Design of Life Extending Controls Using Nonlinear Parameter Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Holmes, Michael S.; Ray, Asok

    1998-01-01

    This report presents the conceptual development of a life extending control system where the objective is to achieve high performance and structural durability of the plant. A life extending controller is designed for a reusable rocket engine via damage mitigation in both the fuel and oxidizer turbines while achieving high performance for transient responses of the combustion chamber pressure and the O2/H2 mixture ratio. This design approach makes use of a combination of linear and nonlinear controller synthesis techniques and also allows adaptation of the life extending controller module to augment a conventional performance controller of a rocket engine. The nonlinear aspect of the design is achieved using nonlinear parameter optimization of a prescribed control structure.

  16. Robust iterative learning control for linear systems with multiple time-invariant parametric uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoa Nguyen, Dinh; Banjerdpongchai, David

    2010-12-01

    This article presents a novel robust iterative learning control algorithm (ILC) for linear systems in the presence of multiple time-invariant parametric uncertainties.The robust design problem is formulated as a min-max problem with a quadratic performance criterion subject to constraints of the iterative control input update. Then, we propose a new methodology to find a sub-optimal solution of the min-max problem. By finding an upper bound of the worst-case performance, the min-max problem is relaxed to be a minimisation problem. Applying Lagrangian duality to this minimisation problem leads to a dual problem which can be reformulated as a convex optimisation problem over linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). An LMI-based ILC algorithm is given afterward and the convergence of the control input as well as the system error are proved. Finally, we apply the proposed ILC to a generic example and a distillation column. The numerical results reveal the effectiveness of the LMI-based algorithm.

  17. Approximation theory for LQG (Linear-Quadratic-Gaussian) optimal control of flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, J. S.; Adamian, A.

    1988-01-01

    An approximation theory is presented for the LQG (Linear-Quadratic-Gaussian) optimal control problem for flexible structures whose distributed models have bounded input and output operators. The main purpose of the theory is to guide the design of finite dimensional compensators that approximate closely the optimal compensator. The optimal LQG problem separates into an optimal linear-quadratic regulator problem and an optimal state estimation problem. The solution of the former problem lies in the solution to an infinite dimensional Riccati operator equation. The approximation scheme approximates the infinite dimensional LQG problem with a sequence of finite dimensional LQG problems defined for a sequence of finite dimensional, usually finite element or modal, approximations of the distributed model of the structure. Two Riccati matrix equations determine the solution to each approximating problem. The finite dimensional equations for numerical approximation are developed, including formulas for converting matrix control and estimator gains to their functional representation to allow comparison of gains based on different orders of approximation. Convergence of the approximating control and estimator gains and of the corresponding finite dimensional compensators is studied. Also, convergence and stability of the closed-loop systems produced with the finite dimensional compensators are discussed. The convergence theory is based on the convergence of the solutions of the finite dimensional Riccati equations to the solutions of the infinite dimensional Riccati equations. A numerical example with a flexible beam, a rotating rigid body, and a lumped mass is given.

  18. An Empirical Comparison of Five Linear Equating Methods for the NEAT Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suh, Youngsuk; Mroch, Andrew A.; Kane, Michael T.; Ripkey, Douglas R.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, a data base containing the responses of 40,000 candidates to 90 multiple-choice questions was used to mimic data sets for 50-item tests under the "nonequivalent groups with anchor test" (NEAT) design. Using these smaller data sets, we evaluated the performance of five linear equating methods for the NEAT design with five levels of…

  19. Nonlinear control via approximate input-output linearization - The ball and beam example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, John; Sastry, Shankar; Kokotovic, Petar

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents an approach for the approximate input-output linearization of nonlinear systems, particularly those for which relative degree is not well defined. It is shown that there is a great deal of freedom in the selection of an approximation and that, by designing a tracking controller based on the approximating system, tracking of reasonable trajectories can be achieved with small error. The approximating system is itself a nonlinear system, with the difference that it is input-output linearizable by state feedback. Some properties of the accuracy of the approximation are demonstrated and, in the context of the ball and beam example, it is shown to be far superior to the Jacobian approximation. The results are focused on finding regular SISO systems which are close to systems which are not regular and controlling these approximate regular systems.

  20. Robust fault tolerant control based on sliding mode method for uncertain linear systems with quantization.

    PubMed

    Hao, Li-Ying; Yang, Guang-Hong

    2013-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of robust fault-tolerant compensation control problem for uncertain linear systems subject to both state and input signal quantization. By incorporating novel matrix full-rank factorization technique with sliding surface design successfully, the total failure of certain actuators can be coped with, under a special actuator redundancy assumption. In order to compensate for quantization errors, an adjustment range of quantization sensitivity for a dynamic uniform quantizer is given through the flexible choices of design parameters. Comparing with the existing results, the derived inequality condition leads to the fault tolerance ability stronger and much wider scope of applicability. With a static adjustment policy of quantization sensitivity, an adaptive sliding mode controller is then designed to maintain the sliding mode, where the gain of the nonlinear unit vector term is updated automatically to compensate for the effects of actuator faults, quantization errors, exogenous disturbances and parameter uncertainties without the need for a fault detection and isolation (FDI) mechanism. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed design method is illustrated via a model of a rocket fairing structural-acoustic.

  1. A quasi-linear control theory analysis of timesharing skills

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agarwal, G. C.; Gottlieb, G. L.

    1977-01-01

    The compliance of the human ankle joint is measured by applying 0 to 50 Hz band-limited gaussian random torques to the foot of a seated human subject. These torques rotate the foot in a plantar-dorsal direction about a horizontal axis at a medial moleolus of the ankle. The applied torques and the resulting angular rotation of the foot are measured, digitized and recorded for off-line processing. Using such a best-fit, second-order model, the effective moment of inertia of the ankle joint, the angular viscosity and the stiffness are calculated. The ankle joint stiffness is shown to be a linear function of the level of tonic muscle contraction, increasing at a rate of 20 to 40 Nm/rad/Kg.m. of active torque. In terms of the muscle physiology, the more muscle fibers that are active, the greater the muscle stiffness. Joint viscosity also increases with activation. Joint stiffness is also a linear function of the joint angle, increasing at a rate of about 0.7 to 1.1 Nm/rad/deg from plantar flexion to dorsiflexion rotation.

  2. Multi-objective control of a full-car model using linear-matrix-inequalities and fixed-order optimisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Türkay, Semiha; Akçay, Hüseyin

    2014-03-01

    This paper studies multi-objective control of a full-vehicle suspension excited by random road disturbances. The control problem is first formulated as a mixed ℋ2/ℋ∞ synthesis problem and an output-feedback solution is obtained by using linear-matrix-inequalities. Next, the multi-objective control problem is re-formulated as a non-convex and non-smooth optimisation problem with controller order restricted to be less than the vehicle model order. For a range of orders, controllers are synthesised by using the HIFOO toolbox. The efficacy of the presented procedures are demonstrated by several design examples.

  3. Missile guidance law design using adaptive cerebellar model articulation controller.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Min; Peng, Ya-Fu

    2005-05-01

    An adaptive cerebellar model articulation controller (CMAC) is proposed for command to line-of-sight (CLOS) missile guidance law design. In this design, the three-dimensional (3-D) CLOS guidance problem is formulated as a tracking problem of a time-varying nonlinear system. The adaptive CMAC control system is comprised of a CMAC and a compensation controller. The CMAC control is used to imitate a feedback linearization control law and the compensation controller is utilized to compensate the difference between the feedback linearization control law and the CMAC control. The online adaptive law is derived based on the Lyapunov stability theorem to learn the weights of receptive-field basis functions in CMAC control. In addition, in order to relax the requirement of approximation error bound, an estimation law is derived to estimate the error bound. Then the adaptive CMAC control system is designed to achieve satisfactory tracking performance. Simulation results for different engagement scenarios illustrate the validity of the proposed adaptive CMAC-based guidance law.

  4. Linear motion device and method for inserting and withdrawing control rods

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jay E.

    1984-01-01

    A linear motion device, more specifically a control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) for inserting and withdrawing control rods into a reactor core, is capable of independently and sequentially positioning two sets of control rods with a single motor stator and rotor. The CRDM disclosed can control more than one control rod lead screw without incurring a substantial increase in the size of the mechanism.

  5. A High-Order, Linear Time-Invariant Model for Application to Higher Harmonic Control and Flight Control System Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Rendy P.; Tischler, Mark B.; Celi, Roberto

    2006-01-01

    This research describes a new methodology for the extraction of a high-order, linear time invariant model, which allows the periodicity of the helicopter response to be accurately captured. This model provides the needed level of dynamic fidelity to permit an analysis and optimization of the AFCS and HHC algorithms. The key results of this study indicate that the closed-loop HHC system has little influence on the AFCS or on the vehicle handling qualities, which indicates that the AFCS does not need modification to work with the HHC system. However, the results show that the vibration response to maneuvers must be considered during the HHC design process, and this leads to much higher required HHC loop crossover frequencies. This research also demonstrates that the transient vibration responses during maneuvers can be reduced by optimizing the closed-loop higher harmonic control algorithm using conventional control system analyses.

  6. Control design variable linking for optimization of structural/control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Ik Min; Schmit, Lucien A.

    1993-01-01

    A method is presented to integrate the design space of structural/control system optimization problems in the case of linear state feedback control. Conventional structural sizing variables and elements of the feedback gain matrix are both treated as strictly independent design variables in optimization by extending design variable linking concepts to the control gains. Several approximation concepts including new control design variable linking schemes are used to formulate the integrated structural/control optimization problem as a sequence of explicit nonlinear mathematical programming problems. Examples which involve a variety of behavior constraints, including constraints on dynamic stability, damped frequencies, control effort, peak transient displacement, acceleration, and control force limits, are effectively solved by using the method presented.

  7. Parvalbumin-expressing interneurons linearly control olfactory bulb output

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Hiroyuki K.; Gillet, Shea N.; Peters, Andrew J.; Isaacson, Jeffry S.; Komiyama, Takaki

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY In the olfactory bulb, odor representations by principal mitral cells are modulated by local inhibitory circuits. While dendrodendritic synapses between mitral and granule cells are typically thought to be a major source of this modulation, the contributions of other inhibitory neurons remain unclear. Here we demonstrate the functional properties of olfactory bulb parvalbumin-expressing interneurons (PV cells) and identify their important role in odor coding. Using paired recordings, we find that PV cells form reciprocal connections with the majority of nearby mitral cells, in contrast to the sparse connectivity between mitral and granule cells. In vivo calcium imaging in awake mice reveals that PV cells are broadly tuned to odors. Furthermore, selective PV cell inactivation enhances mitral cell responses in a linear fashion while maintaining mitral cell odor preferences. Thus, dense connections between mitral and PV cells underlie an inhibitory circuit poised to modulate the gain of olfactory bulb output. PMID:24239124

  8. Parvalbumin-expressing interneurons linearly control olfactory bulb output.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hiroyuki K; Gillet, Shea N; Peters, Andrew J; Isaacson, Jeffry S; Komiyama, Takaki

    2013-12-01

    In the olfactory bulb, odor representations by principal mitral cells are modulated by local inhibitory circuits. While dendrodendritic synapses between mitral and granule cells are typically thought to be a major source of this modulation, the contributions of other inhibitory neurons remain unclear. Here we demonstrate the functional properties of olfactory bulb parvalbumin-expressing interneurons (PV cells) and identify their important role in odor coding. Using paired recordings, we find that PV cells form reciprocal connections with the majority of nearby mitral cells, in contrast to the sparse connectivity between mitral and granule cells. In vivo calcium imaging in awake mice reveals that PV cells are broadly tuned to odors. Furthermore, selective PV cell inactivation enhances mitral cell responses in a linear fashion while maintaining mitral cell odor preferences. Thus, dense connections between mitral and PV cells underlie an inhibitory circuit poised to modulate the gain of olfactory bulb output. PMID:24239124

  9. Design and simulation of a novel impact piezoelectric linear-rotary motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Liling; Zhao, Yahui; Pan, Chengliang; Yu, Liandong

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel impact piezoelectric linear-rotary motor which is driven by a single piezoceramic tube with two parts of electrodes. From the inner and outer electrodes, longitudinal displacement of the tube is generated and used to actuate the shaft with linear motion ability. From the grooved helical interdigitated electrodes, torsional displacement is generated and used to actuate the shaft with rotary motion ability. Working principle and structural design of the motor are introduced and quasi-static longitudinal and torsional displacements of the tube are estimated. With established kinematics model of the motor, the working behaviors of the motor are investigated numerically with MATLAB/Simulink software. The stepping characteristics of the linear and rotary motions are analyzed, compared, and discussed. With optimized material selection, structural design, and driving parameters, the proposed linear-rotary motor will provide remarkable performances as a miniaturized multi-degree driving device for complex positioning and manipulation applications.

  10. Apparatus for electrode current control in linear MHD generators

    DOEpatents

    Demirjian, Ara M.; Solbes, Albert

    1984-01-01

    Apparatus for controlling a plurality of opposing, electrode, direct-currents at pre-set locations across a channel that comprises a converter for converting each electrode current into first and second periodic control signals which are 180.degree. out of phase with respect to each other and which have equal magnitudes corresponding to the magnitude of the associated electrode current; and couplers for magnetically coupling individual ones of the first control signals and for magnetically coupling individual ones of the second signals such that the corresponding electrode currents are equalized or rendered proportional by balancing the same in the same or constant ratios in accordance with the locations of the electrode currents.

  11. Aperiodic Linear Networked Control Considering Variable Channel Delays: Application to Robots Coordination

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Carlos; Espinosa, Felipe; Santiso, Enrique; Mazo, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    One of the main challenges in wireless cyber-physical systems is to reduce the load of the communication channel while preserving the control performance. In this way, communication resources are liberated for other applications sharing the channel bandwidth. The main contribution of this work is the design of a remote control solution based on an aperiodic and adaptive triggering mechanism considering the current network delay of multiple robotics units. Working with the actual network delay instead of the maximum one leads to abandoning this conservative assumption, since the triggering condition is fixed depending on the current state of the network. This way, the controller manages the usage of the wireless channel in order to reduce the channel delay and to improve the availability of the communication resources. The communication standard under study is the widespread IEEE 802.11g, whose channel delay is clearly uncertain. First, the adaptive self-triggered control is validated through the TrueTime simulation tool configured for the mentioned WiFi standard. Implementation results applying the aperiodic linear control laws on four P3-DX robots are also included. Both of them demonstrate the advantage of this solution in terms of network accessing and control performance with respect to periodic and non-adaptive self-triggered alternatives. PMID:26024415

  12. Aperiodic linear networked control considering variable channel delays: application to robots coordination.

    PubMed

    Santos, Carlos; Espinosa, Felipe; Santiso, Enrique; Mazo, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    One of the main challenges in wireless cyber-physical systems is to reduce the load of the communication channel while preserving the control performance. In this way, communication resources are liberated for other applications sharing the channel bandwidth. The main contribution of this work is the design of a remote control solution based on an aperiodic and adaptive triggering mechanism considering the current network delay of multiple robotics units. Working with the actual network delay instead of the maximum one leads to abandoning this conservative assumption, since the triggering condition is fixed depending on the current state of the network. This way, the controller manages the usage of the wireless channel in order to reduce the channel delay and to improve the availability of the communication resources. The communication standard under study is the widespread IEEE 802.11g, whose channel delay is clearly uncertain. First, the adaptive self-triggered control is validated through the TrueTime simulation tool configured for the mentioned WiFi standard. Implementation results applying the aperiodic linear control laws on four P3-DX robots are also included. Both of them demonstrate the advantage of this solution in terms of network accessing and control performance with respect to periodic and non-adaptive self-triggered alternatives. PMID:26024415

  13. Aperiodic linear networked control considering variable channel delays: application to robots coordination.

    PubMed

    Santos, Carlos; Espinosa, Felipe; Santiso, Enrique; Mazo, Manuel

    2015-05-27

    One of the main challenges in wireless cyber-physical systems is to reduce the load of the communication channel while preserving the control performance. In this way, communication resources are liberated for other applications sharing the channel bandwidth. The main contribution of this work is the design of a remote control solution based on an aperiodic and adaptive triggering mechanism considering the current network delay of multiple robotics units. Working with the actual network delay instead of the maximum one leads to abandoning this conservative assumption, since the triggering condition is fixed depending on the current state of the network. This way, the controller manages the usage of the wireless channel in order to reduce the channel delay and to improve the availability of the communication resources. The communication standard under study is the widespread IEEE 802.11g, whose channel delay is clearly uncertain. First, the adaptive self-triggered control is validated through the TrueTime simulation tool configured for the mentioned WiFi standard. Implementation results applying the aperiodic linear control laws on four P3-DX robots are also included. Both of them demonstrate the advantage of this solution in terms of network accessing and control performance with respect to periodic and non-adaptive self-triggered alternatives.

  14. Robust Control Design for Uncertain Nonlinear Dynamic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Sean P.; Crespo, Luis G.; Andrews, Lindsey; Giesy, Daniel P.

    2012-01-01

    Robustness to parametric uncertainty is fundamental to successful control system design and as such it has been at the core of many design methods developed over the decades. Despite its prominence, most of the work on robust control design has focused on linear models and uncertainties that are non-probabilistic in nature. Recently, researchers have acknowledged this disparity and have been developing theory to address a broader class of uncertainties. This paper presents an experimental application of robust control design for a hybrid class of probabilistic and non-probabilistic parametric uncertainties. The experimental apparatus is based upon the classic inverted pendulum on a cart. The physical uncertainty is realized by a known additional lumped mass at an unknown location on the pendulum. This unknown location has the effect of substantially altering the nominal frequency and controllability of the nonlinear system, and in the limit has the capability to make the system neutrally stable and uncontrollable. Another uncertainty to be considered is a direct current motor parameter. The control design objective is to design a controller that satisfies stability, tracking error, control power, and transient behavior requirements for the largest range of parametric uncertainties. This paper presents an overview of the theory behind the robust control design methodology and the experimental results.

  15. A broadband polygonal cloak for acoustic wave designed with linear coordinate transformation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Rongrong; Zheng, Bin; Ma, Chu; Xu, Jun; Fang, Nicholas; Chen, Hongsheng

    2016-07-01

    Previous acoustic cloaks designed with transformation acoustics always involve inhomogeneous material. In this paper, a design of acoustic polygonal cloak is proposed using linear polygonal transformation method. The designed acoustic polygonal cloak has homogeneous and anisotropic parameters, which is much easier to realize in practice. Furthermore, a possible acoustic metamaterial structure to realize the cloak is proposed. Simulation results on the real structure show that the metamaterial acoustic cloak is effective to reduce the scattering of the object. PMID:27475135

  16. Comparing Linear and Nonlinear Methods for More Reliable Predictive Uncertainty Quantification and Optimal Design of Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wöhling, T.; Geiges, A.; Gosses, M.; Nowak, W.

    2014-12-01

    Data acquisition in complex environmental systems is typically expensive. Therefore, experimental designs should be optimized such that most can be learned about the system at least costs. In the past, optimal design (OD) analyses were mainly restricted to linear or linearized problems and methods. Nonlinear OD methods offer more efficient data collection strategies, because they can better handle the non-linearity exhibited by most coupled environmental systems. However, the much higher computational demand restricts their applicability to models with comparatively low run-times. Our goal is to compare the trade-off between computational efficiency and the obtainable design quality between linear and nonlinear OD methods. In our study, a steady-state model for a section of the river Steinlach (South Germany) was set up and calibrated to measured groundwater head data and on estimated groundwater exchange fluxes. The model involves a Pilot Point parameterization scheme for hydraulic conductivity and six zones with uncertain river bed conductivities. In the linear OD approach, the initial predictive uncertainty of groundwater exchange fluxes and mean travel times are estimated using the PREDUNC utility (Moore and Doherty 2005) of PEST. The parameter calibration was performed with a non-linear global search. A discrete global search method and PREDUNC was then utilized to identify augmented monitoring strategies (additional n measurement locations and data types) that reduce the predictive uncertainty the most. For the nonlinear assessment, a conditional ensemble obtained with Markov-chain Monte Carlo represents the initial state of uncertainty and is used as input to a nonlinear OD framework called PreDIA (Leube et al. 2012). PreDIA can consider any kind of uncertainties and non-linear (statistical) dependencies in data, models, parameters and system drivers during the OD process. The linear and non-linear approaches are compared thoroughly during each step of the

  17. Design, test, and evaluation of three active flutter suppression controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, William M., Jr.; Christhilf, David M.; Waszak, Martin R.; Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Srinathkumar, S.

    1992-01-01

    Three control law design techniques for flutter suppression are presented. Each technique uses multiple control surfaces and/or sensors. The first method uses traditional tools (such as pole/zero loci and Nyquist diagrams) for producing a controller that has minimal complexity and which is sufficiently robust to handle plant uncertainty. The second procedure uses linear combinations of several accelerometer signals and dynamic compensation to synthesize the model rate of the critical mode for feedback to the distributed control surfaces. The third technique starts with a minimum-energy linear quadratic Gaussian controller, iteratively modifies intensity matrices corresponding to input and output noise, and applies controller order reduction to achieve a low-order, robust controller. The resulting designs were implemented digitally and tested subsonically on the active flexible wing wind-tunnel model in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. Only the traditional pole/zero loci design was sufficiently robust to errors in the nominal plant to successfully suppress flutter during the test. The traditional pole/zero loci design provided simultaneous suppression of symmetric and antisymmetric flutter with a 24-percent increase in attainable dynamic pressure. Posttest analyses are shown which illustrate the problems encountered with the other laws.

  18. Design of feedback control systems for unstable plants with saturating actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapasouris, Petros; Athans, Michael; Stein, Gunter

    1988-01-01

    A new control design methodology is introduced for multi-input/multi-output systems with unstable open loop plants and saturating actuators. A control system is designed using well known linear control theory techniques and then a reference prefilter is introduced so that when the references are sufficiently small, the control system operates linearly as designated. For signals large enough to cause saturations, the control law is modified in such a way to ensure stability and to preserve, to the extent possible, the behavior of the linear control design. Key benefits of this methodology are: the modified feedback system never produces saturating control signals, integrators and/or slow dynamics in the compensator never windup, the directionaL properties of the controls are maintained, and the closed loop system has certain guaranteed stability properties. The advantages of the new design methodology are illustrated in the simulation of an approximation of the AFTI-16 (Advanced Fighter Technology Integration) aircraft multivariable longitudinal dynamics.

  19. Exact Controllability of a Linear EULER-BERNOULLI Panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorain, G. C.; Bose, S. K.

    1998-11-01

    The problem of control of flexible vibrations of a flexible space structure (such as solar cell array) modelled by a thin uniform rectangular panel is considered here. The flexural vibrations of such a panel satisfies the one dimensional fourth order Petrowsky equation or Euler-Bernoulli equation. The panel is held at one end by a rigid hub and the other end is free. By attaching the hub to one side of the panel the dynamics create a non-standard hybrid system of equations. It is shown that the vibrations of the overall system can be driven to rest by means of an active boundary control force applied on the rigid hub only. Also an estimate of the minimum time of control is obtained. A closed form approximate result is constructed by Galerkin's residual technique to support and implement the method.

  20. Progress with the JLC/NLC X-Band Linear Collider Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raubenheimer, T. O.

    An electron/positron linear collider with a center-of-mass energy between 0.5 and 1 TeV would be an important complement to the physics program of the LHC in the next decade. The Next Linear Collider (NLC) is being designed by a US collaboration (FNAL, LBNL, LLNL, and SLAC) which is working closely with the Japanese collaboration that is designing the Japanese Linear Collider (JLC). This paper will discuss the technical difficulties encountered as well as the changes that have been made to the NLC design over the last year. These changes include improvements to the X-band rf system as well as modifications to the beam delivery system. The net effect has been to reduce the length of the collider from about 32 km to 25 km and to reduce the number of klystrons and modulators by a factor of two. Together these lead to significant cost savings.

  1. Phase and amplitude control system for Stanford Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, S.J.

    1983-09-26

    The computer controlled phase and amplitude detection system measures the instantaneous phase and amplitude of a 1 micro-second 2856 MHz rf pulse at a 180 Hz rate. This will be used for phase feedback control, and also for phase and amplitude jitter measurement. The program, which was originally written by John Fox and Keith Jobe, has been modified to improve the function of the system. The software algorithms used in the measurement are described, as is the performance of the prototype phase and amplitude detector system.

  2. ACSYNT inner loop flight control design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bortins, Richard; Sorensen, John A.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Ames Research Center developed the Aircraft Synthesis (ACSYNT) computer program to synthesize conceptual future aircraft designs and to evaluate critical performance metrics early in the design process before significant resources are committed and cost decisions made. ACSYNT uses steady-state performance metrics, such as aircraft range, payload, and fuel consumption, and static performance metrics, such as the control authority required for the takeoff rotation and for landing with an engine out, to evaluate conceptual aircraft designs. It can also optimize designs with respect to selected criteria and constraints. Many modern aircraft have stability provided by the flight control system rather than by the airframe. This may allow the aircraft designer to increase combat agility, or decrease trim drag, for increased range and payload. This strategy requires concurrent design of the airframe and the flight control system, making trade-offs of performance and dynamics during the earliest stages of design. ACSYNT presently lacks means to implement flight control system designs but research is being done to add methods for predicting rotational degrees of freedom and control effector performance. A software module to compute and analyze the dynamics of the aircraft and to compute feedback gains and analyze closed loop dynamics is required. The data gained from these analyses can then be fed back to the aircraft design process so that the effects of the flight control system and the airframe on aircraft performance can be included as design metrics. This report presents results of a feasibility study and the initial design work to add an inner loop flight control system (ILFCS) design capability to the stability and control module in ACSYNT. The overall objective is to provide a capability for concurrent design of the aircraft and its flight control system, and enable concept designers to improve performance by exploiting the interrelationships between

  3. Designing and Testing Contols to Mitigate Dynamic Loads in the Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, A.D.; Stol, K.A.

    2008-01-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory is designing, implementing, and testing advanced controls to maximize energy extraction and reduce structural dynamic loads of wind turbines. These control designs are based on a linear model of the turbine that is generated by specialized modeling software. In this paper, we show the design and simulation testing of a control algorithm to mitigate blade, tower, and drivetrain loads using advanced state-space control design methods.

  4. The role of modern control theory in the design of controls for aircraft turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeller, J.; Lehtinen, B.; Merrill, W.

    1982-01-01

    The development, applications, and current research in modern control theory (MCT) are reviewed, noting the importance for fuel-efficient operation of turbines with variable inlet guide vanes, compressor stators, and exhaust nozzle area. The evolution of multivariable propulsion control design is examined, noting a basis in a matrix formulation of the differential equations defining the process, leading to state space formulations. Reports and papers which appeared from 1970-1982 which dealt with problems in MCT applications to turbine engine control design are outlined, including works on linear quadratic regulator methods, frequency domain methods, identification, estimation, and model reduction, detection, isolation, and accommodation, and state space control, adaptive control, and optimization approaches. Finally, NASA programs in frequency domain design, sensor failure detection, computer-aided control design, and plant modeling are explored

  5. Robust linear parameter-varying control of blood pressure using vasoactive drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luspay, Tamas; Grigoriadis, Karolos

    2015-10-01

    Resuscitation of emergency care patients requires fast restoration of blood pressure to a target value to achieve hemodynamic stability and vital organ perfusion. A robust control design methodology is presented in this paper for regulating the blood pressure of hypotensive patients by means of the closed-loop administration of vasoactive drugs. To this end, a dynamic first-order delay model is utilised to describe the vasoactive drug response with varying parameters that represent intra-patient and inter-patient variability. The proposed framework consists of two components: first, an online model parameter estimation is carried out using a multiple-model extended Kalman-filter. Second, the estimated model parameters are used for continuously scheduling a robust linear parameter-varying (LPV) controller. The closed-loop behaviour is characterised by parameter-varying dynamic weights designed to regulate the mean arterial pressure to a target value. Experimental data of blood pressure response of anesthetised pigs to phenylephrine injection are used for validating the LPV blood pressure models. Simulation studies are provided to validate the online model estimation and the LPV blood pressure control using phenylephrine drug injection models representing patients showing sensitive, nominal and insensitive response to the drug.

  6. Optimal Linear Quadratic Regulators for Control of Nonlinear Mechanical Systems with Redundant Degrees-of-Freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimoto, Suguru

    An optimal regulator problem for endpoint position control of a robot arm with (or without) redundancy in its total degrees-of-freedom (DOF) is solved by combining Riemannian geometry with nonlinear control theory. Given a target point, within the task-space, that the arm endpoint should reach, a task-space position feedback with joint damping is shown to asymptotically stabilize reaching movements even if the number of DOF of the arm is greater than the dimension of the task space and thereby the inverse kinematics is ill-posed. Usually the speed of convergence of the endpoint trajectory is unsatisfactory, depending on the choice of feedback gains for joint damping. Hence, to speed up the convergence without incurring further energy consumption, an optimal control design for minimizing a performance index composed of an integral of joint dissipation energy plus a linear quadratic form of the task-space control input and output is introduced. It is then shown that the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation derived from the principle of optimality is solvable in control variables and the Hamilton-Jacobi equation itself has an explicit solution. Although the state of the original dynamics (the Euler-Lagrange equation) with DOF-redundancy contains uncontrollable and unobservable manifolds, the dynamics satisfies a nonlinear version of the Kalman-Yakubovich-Popov lemma and the task-space input-output passivity. An inverse problem of optimal regulator design for robotic arms under the effect of gravity is also tackled by combining Riemannian geometry with passivity-based control theory.

  7. Tracking control of concentration profiles in a fed-batch bioreactor using a linear algebra methodology.

    PubMed

    Rómoli, Santiago; Serrano, Mario Emanuel; Ortiz, Oscar Alberto; Vega, Jorge Rubén; Eduardo Scaglia, Gustavo Juan

    2015-07-01

    Based on a linear algebra approach, this paper aims at developing a novel control law able to track reference profiles that were previously-determined in the literature. A main advantage of the proposed strategy is that the control actions are obtained by solving a system of linear equations. The optimal controller parameters are selected through Monte Carlo Randomized Algorithm in order to minimize a proposed cost index. The controller performance is evaluated through several tests, and compared with other controller reported in the literature. Finally, a Monte Carlo Randomized Algorithm is conducted to assess the performance of the proposed controller. PMID:25627329

  8. Tracking control of concentration profiles in a fed-batch bioreactor using a linear algebra methodology.

    PubMed

    Rómoli, Santiago; Serrano, Mario Emanuel; Ortiz, Oscar Alberto; Vega, Jorge Rubén; Eduardo Scaglia, Gustavo Juan

    2015-07-01

    Based on a linear algebra approach, this paper aims at developing a novel control law able to track reference profiles that were previously-determined in the literature. A main advantage of the proposed strategy is that the control actions are obtained by solving a system of linear equations. The optimal controller parameters are selected through Monte Carlo Randomized Algorithm in order to minimize a proposed cost index. The controller performance is evaluated through several tests, and compared with other controller reported in the literature. Finally, a Monte Carlo Randomized Algorithm is conducted to assess the performance of the proposed controller.

  9. RUPERT closed loop control design.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Sivakumar; Wei, Ruihua; He, Jiping

    2008-01-01

    Rehabilitation robotics is an active area of research in the field of stroke rehabilitation. There is significant potential for improving the current physical rehabilitation methods after stroke through the use of robotic devices. RUPERT is a wearable robotic exoskeleton powered by pneumatic muscle actuators. An adaptive robot control strategy combining a PID-based feedback controller and an Iterative Learning Controller (ILC) is proposed for performing passive reaching tasks. Additionally, a fuzzy rule-base for estimating the learning rate for the ILC is also proposed. The proposed control scheme has the ability to adapt to different subject for performing different reaching tasks. The preliminary results from two able-bodied subjects demonstrate that the proposed controller can provide consistent performance for different subjects performing different reaching tasks. PMID:19163455

  10. Non-Linear Instructional Design Model: Eternal, Synergistic Design and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Caroline

    2004-01-01

    Instructional design is at the heart of each educational endeavour. This process revolves around the steps through which the thoughtful productions of superior products are created. The ADDIE generic instructional design model emphasises five basic steps within the instructional design process: analyse, design, develop, implement and evaluate. The…

  11. Integration of a Decentralized Linear-Quadratic-Gaussian Control into GSFC's Universal 3-D Autonomous Formation Flying Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folta, David C.; Carpenter, J. Russell

    1999-01-01

    A decentralized control is investigated for applicability to the autonomous formation flying control algorithm developed by GSFC for the New Millenium Program Earth Observer-1 (EO-1) mission. This decentralized framework has the following characteristics: The approach is non-hierarchical, and coordination by a central supervisor is not required; Detected failures degrade the system performance gracefully; Each node in the decentralized network processes only its own measurement data, in parallel with the other nodes; Although the total computational burden over the entire network is greater than it would be for a single, centralized controller, fewer computations are required locally at each node; Requirements for data transmission between nodes are limited to only the dimension of the control vector, at the cost of maintaining a local additional data vector. The data vector compresses all past measurement history from all the nodes into a single vector of the dimension of the state; and The approach is optimal with respect to standard cost functions. The current approach is valid for linear time-invariant systems only. Similar to the GSFC formation flying algorithm, the extension to linear LQG time-varying systems requires that each node propagate its filter covariance forward (navigation) and controller Riccati matrix backward (guidance) at each time step. Extension of the GSFC algorithm to non-linear systems can also be accomplished via linearization about a reference trajectory in the standard fashion, or linearization about the current state estimate as with the extended Kalman filter. To investigate the feasibility of the decentralized integration with the GSFC algorithm, an existing centralized LQG design for a single spacecraft orbit control problem is adapted to the decentralized framework while using the GSFC algorithm's state transition matrices and framework. The existing GSFC design uses both reference trajectories of each spacecraft in formation and

  12. Improving reliability in the SLC (Stanford Linear Collider) control system

    SciTech Connect

    Heinen, N.; Spencer, N.; Tinsman, J.

    1989-10-01

    During the past year, considerable emphasis has been placed on improving the overall reliability of the SLC control system. The Errorlog Facility has proven a useful tool to diagnose hardware and software problems. By analyzing the various error messages and their correlations, one can usually determine the software component or hardware module causing faults. Daily summaries help to identify problems so that they can be remedied before they become catastrophic; thereby bringing about a considerable increase in performance. We discuss the various tools we use and our operational experience with them. 3 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Non linear predictive control of a LEGO mobile robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merabti, H.; Bouchemal, B.; Belarbi, K.; Boucherma, D.; Amouri, A.

    2014-10-01

    Metaheuristics are general purpose heuristics which have shown a great potential for the solution of difficult optimization problems. In this work, we apply the meta heuristic, namely particle swarm optimization, PSO, for the solution of the optimization problem arising in NLMPC. This algorithm is easy to code and may be considered as alternatives for the more classical solution procedures. The PSO- NLMPC is applied to control a mobile robot for the tracking trajectory and obstacles avoidance. Experimental results show the strength of this approach.

  14. Further results on iterative learning control with convergence conditions for linear time-variant discrete systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-Dong; Ho, John K. L.

    2011-06-01

    This article is concerned with some further results on iterative learning control (ILC) algorithms with convergence conditions for linear time-variant discrete systems. By converting two-Dimensional (2-D) ILC process of the linear time-variant discrete systems into 1-D linear time-invariant discrete systems, this article presents convergent ILC algorithms with necessary and sufficient conditions for two classes of linear time-variant discrete systems. Main results in (Li, X.-D., Ho, J.K.L., and Chow, T.W.S. (2005), 'Iterative Learning Control for Linear Time-variant Discrete Systems Based on 2-D System Theory', IEE Proceedings, Control Theory and Applications, 152, 13-18 and Huang, S.N., Tan, K.K., and Lee, T.H. (2002), 'Necessary and Sufficient Condition for Convergence of Iterative Learning Algorithm', Automatica 38, 1257-1260) are extended and generalised.

  15. Designing control system information models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panin, K. I.; Zinchenko, V. P.

    1973-01-01

    Problems encountered in modeling information models are discussed, Data cover condition, functioning of the object of control, and the environment involved in the control. Other parameters needed for the model include: (1) information for forming an image of the real situation, (2) data for analyzing and evaluating an evolving situation, (3) planning actions, and (4) data for observing and evaluating the results of model realization.

  16. Linear-cyclic polymer structural transformation and its reversible control using a rational rotaxane strategy.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Takahiro; Usuki, Naoya; Nakazono, Kazuko; Koyama, Yasuhito; Takata, Toshikazu

    2015-04-01

    Linear-cyclic polymer structural transformation and its reversibility are demonstrated by a simple but rational strategy using the structural characteristics of crown ether-based rotaxanes. The structure of a polymer containing a [1]rotaxane unit at one end was controlled by conventional protection-deprotection reactions, giving rise to a reversible linear-cyclic polymer structural transformation. PMID:25531061

  17. Linear-cyclic polymer structural transformation and its reversible control using a rational rotaxane strategy.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Takahiro; Usuki, Naoya; Nakazono, Kazuko; Koyama, Yasuhito; Takata, Toshikazu

    2015-04-01

    Linear-cyclic polymer structural transformation and its reversibility are demonstrated by a simple but rational strategy using the structural characteristics of crown ether-based rotaxanes. The structure of a polymer containing a [1]rotaxane unit at one end was controlled by conventional protection-deprotection reactions, giving rise to a reversible linear-cyclic polymer structural transformation.

  18. Ares I Flight Control System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jang, Jiann-Woei; Alaniz, Abran; Hall, Robert; Bedrossian, Nazareth; Hall, Charles; Ryan, Stephen; Jackson, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The Ares I launch vehicle represents a challenging flex-body structural environment for flight control system design. This paper presents a design methodology for employing numerical optimization to develop the Ares I flight control system. The design objectives include attitude tracking accuracy and robust stability with respect to rigid body dynamics, propellant slosh, and flex. Under the assumption that the Ares I time-varying dynamics and control system can be frozen over a short period of time, the flight controllers are designed to stabilize all selected frozen-time launch control systems in the presence of parametric uncertainty. Flex filters in the flight control system are designed to minimize the flex components in the error signals before they are sent to the attitude controller. To ensure adequate response to guidance command, step response specifications are introduced as constraints in the optimization problem. Imposing these constraints minimizes performance degradation caused by the addition of the flex filters. The first stage bending filter design achieves stability by adding lag to the first structural frequency to phase stabilize the first flex mode while gain stabilizing the higher modes. The upper stage bending filter design gain stabilizes all the flex bending modes. The flight control system designs provided here have been demonstrated to provide stable first and second stage control systems in both Draper Ares Stability Analysis Tool (ASAT) and the MSFC 6DOF nonlinear time domain simulation.

  19. Pinning Control Strategies for Synchronization of Linearly Coupled Neural Networks With Reaction-Diffusion Terms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin-Liang; Wu, Huai-Ning; Huang, Tingwen; Ren, Shun-Yan

    2016-04-01

    Two types of coupled neural networks with reaction-diffusion terms are considered in this paper. In the first one, the nodes are coupled through their states. In the second one, the nodes are coupled through the spatial diffusion terms. For the former, utilizing Lyapunov functional method and pinning control technique, we obtain some sufficient conditions to guarantee that network can realize synchronization. In addition, considering that the theoretical coupling strength required for synchronization may be much larger than the needed value, we propose an adaptive strategy to adjust the coupling strength for achieving a suitable value. For the latter, we establish a criterion for synchronization using the designed pinning controllers. It is found that the coupled reaction-diffusion neural networks with state coupling under the given linear feedback pinning controllers can realize synchronization when the coupling strength is very large, which is contrary to the coupled reaction-diffusion neural networks with spatial diffusion coupling. Moreover, a general criterion for ensuring network synchronization is derived by pinning a small fraction of nodes with adaptive feedback controllers. Finally, two examples with numerical simulations are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  20. Stability and performance analysis of a jump linear control system subject to digital upsets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui; Sun, Hui; Ma, Zhen-Yang

    2015-04-01

    This paper focuses on the methodology analysis for the stability and the corresponding tracking performance of a closed-loop digital jump linear control system with a stochastic switching signal. The method is applied to a flight control system. A distributed recoverable platform is implemented on the flight control system and subject to independent digital upsets. The upset processes are used to stimulate electromagnetic environments. Specifically, the paper presents the scenarios that the upset process is directly injected into the distributed flight control system, which is modeled by independent Markov upset processes and independent and identically distributed (IID) processes. A theoretical performance analysis and simulation modelling are both presented in detail for a more complete independent digital upset injection. The specific examples are proposed to verify the methodology of tracking performance analysis. The general analyses for different configurations are also proposed. Comparisons among different configurations are conducted to demonstrate the availability and the characteristics of the design. Project supported by the Young Scientists Fund of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61403395), the Natural Science Foundation of Tianjin, China (Grant No. 13JCYBJC39000), the Scientific Research Foundation for the Returned Overseas Chinese Scholars, State Education Ministry, China, the Tianjin Key Laboratory of Civil Aircraft Airworthiness and Maintenance in Civil Aviation of China (Grant No. 104003020106), and the Fund for Scholars of Civil Aviation University of China (Grant No. 2012QD21x).

  1. Design of the beam delivery system for the international linear collider.

    SciTech Connect

    Seryi, A.; Amann, J.; Arnold, R.; Asiri, F.; Bane, K.; Carwardine, J.; Saunders, C.; Accelerator Systems Division; SLAC; FNAL

    2008-01-01

    The beam delivery system for the linear collider focuses beams to nanometer sizes at its interaction point, collimates the beam halo to provide acceptable background in the detector and has a provision for state-of-the art beam instrumentation in order to reach the ILCs physics goals. This paper describes the design details and status of the baseline configuration considered for the reference design and also lists alternatives.

  2. Linearized stability analysis and design of a flyback dc-dc boost regulator.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wester, G. W.

    1973-01-01

    Analytic expressions for the small-signal power-stage describing functions of a switched dc-dc boost regulator are derived from an approximate continuous circuit model which is developed by a time-averaging technique. Closed-loop stability is attained through the design of frequency compensation of the loop gain. Open- and closed-loop regulator output impedances are derived from the linearized models for the given configuration. The analysis and design are compared with and confirmed by breadboard measurements.

  3. Linear Equating for the NEAT Design: A Rejoinder and Some Further Comments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Michael T.; Mroch, Andrew A.; Suh, Youngsuk; Ripkey, Douglas R.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the authors' rejoinder to commentaries on linear equating and the NEAT design. The authors appreciate the insightful work of the commentary writers. Each has made a number of interesting points, many of which the authors had not considered at all. Before responding to some of those points, the authors reiterate what they see…

  4. Standard Error of Linear Observed-Score Equating for the NEAT Design with Nonnormally Distributed Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zu, Jiyun; Yuan, Ke-Hai

    2012-01-01

    In the nonequivalent groups with anchor test (NEAT) design, the standard error of linear observed-score equating is commonly estimated by an estimator derived assuming multivariate normality. However, real data are seldom normally distributed, causing this normal estimator to be inconsistent. A general estimator, which does not rely on the…

  5. Design, Simulation and Testing of a Precision Alignment Frame for the Next Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Fitsos, P

    2004-06-18

    An alignment frame is developed to support 3 Beam Position Monitors (BPM's) for detecting and ultimately aligning the electron beam from a linear accelerator. This report discusses the design details, preliminary modal analysis of the alignment frame as well as the addition of a metrology frame in the final phase of development.

  6. The design of a linear L-band high power amplifier for mobile communication satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittaker, N.; Brassard, G.; Li, E.; Goux, P.

    1990-01-01

    A linear L-band solid state high power amplifier designed for the space segment of the Mobile Satellite (MSAT) mobile communication system is described. The amplifier is capable of producing 35 watts of RF power with multitone signal at an efficiency of 25 percent and with intermodulation products better than 16 dB below carrier.

  7. Adaptive tracking control of leader-following linear multi-agent systems with external disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hanquan; Wei, Qinglai; Liu, Derong; Ma, Hongwen

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the consensus problem for leader-following linear multi-agent systems with external disturbances is investigated. Brownian motions are used to describe exogenous disturbances. A distributed tracking controller based on Riccati inequalities with an adaptive law for adjusting coupling weights between neighbouring agents is designed for leader-following multi-agent systems under fixed and switching topologies. In traditional distributed static controllers, the coupling weights depend on the communication graph. However, coupling weights associated with the feedback gain matrix in our method are updated by state errors between neighbouring agents. We further present the stability analysis of leader-following multi-agent systems with stochastic disturbances under switching topology. Most traditional literature requires the graph to be connected all the time, while the communication graph is only assumed to be jointly connected in this paper. The design technique is based on Riccati inequalities and algebraic graph theory. Finally, simulations are given to show the validity of our method.

  8. Advanced Aerodynamic Design of Passive Porosity Control Effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Craig A.; Viken, Sally A.; Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes aerodynamic design work aimed at developing a passive porosity control effector system for a generic tailless fighter aircraft. As part of this work, a computational design tool was developed and used to layout passive porosity effector systems for longitudinal and lateral-directional control at a low-speed, high angle of attack condition. Aerodynamic analysis was conducted using the NASA Langley computational fluid dynamics code USM3D, in conjunction with a newly formulated surface boundary condition for passive porosity. Results indicate that passive porosity effectors can provide maneuver control increments that equal and exceed those of conventional aerodynamic effectors for low-speed, high-alpha flight, with control levels that are a linear function of porous area. This work demonstrates the tremendous potential of passive porosity to yield simple control effector systems that have no external moving parts and will preserve an aircraft's fixed outer mold line.

  9. Linearized Model of an Actively Controlled Cable for a Carlina Diluted Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, T.; Le Coroller, H.; Owner-Petersen, M.; Dejonghe, J.

    2014-04-01

    The Carlina thinned pupil telescope has a focal unit (``gondola'') suspended by cables over the primary mirror. To predict the structural behavior of the gondola system, a simulation building block of a single cable is needed. A preloaded cable is a strongly non-linear system and can be modeled either with partial differential equations or non-linear finite elements. Using the latter, we set up an iteration procedure for determination of the static cable form and we formulate the necessary second-order differential equations for such a model. We convert them to a set of first-order differential equations (an ``ABCD''-model). Symmetrical in-plane eigenmodes and ``axial'' eigenmodes are the only eigenmodes that play a role in practice for a taut cable. Using the model and a generic suspension, a parameter study is made to find the influence of various design parameters. We conclude that the cable should be as stiff and thick as practically possible with a fairly high preload. Steel or Aramid are suitable materials. Further, placing the cable winches on the gondola and not on the ground does not provide significant advantages. Finally, it seems that use of reaction-wheels and/or reaction-masses will make the way for more accurate control of the gondola position under wind load. An adaptive stage with tip/tilt/piston correction for subapertures together with a focus and guiding system for freezing the fringes must also be studied.

  10. Ultrabroadband Design for Linear Polarization Conversion and Asymmetric Transmission Crossing X- and K- Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Linbo; Zhou, Peiheng; Chen, Haiyan; Lu, Haipeng; Xie, Haiyan; Zhang, Li; Li, En; Xie, Jianliang; Deng, Longjiang

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a high-efficiency and broadband reflective converter using ultrathin planar metamaterial (MM) composed of single-layered SRR is firstly realized. Numerical and experimental results demonstrate that the cross-polarization conversion reflectance above 0.84 is achieved from 8.6 to 18.6 GHz for linearly polarized (LP) incident waves under normal incidence. Subsequently, a multi-layered MM based on SRR enables a dramatic improvement of the recently demonstrated asymmetric transmission (AT) effect. Theoretical and measured results present that strong one-way transmission of two orthogonally polarized waves crossing C- and K- band has been observed. These two separated AT pass-bands have a function of selective polarization filter, which can be switched on/off by changing the polarization state of incident waves. The physical mechanisms are elucidated by taking advantage of electric fields and current distributions. Considering the broad bandwidth and the dual band, we believe that these two structures will be beneficial for designing polarization-controlled and selective transmission converter.

  11. Ultrabroadband Design for Linear Polarization Conversion and Asymmetric Transmission Crossing X- and K- Band

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Linbo; Zhou, Peiheng; Chen, Haiyan; Lu, Haipeng; Xie, Haiyan; Zhang, Li; Li, En; Xie, Jianliang; Deng, Longjiang

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a high-efficiency and broadband reflective converter using ultrathin planar metamaterial (MM) composed of single-layered SRR is firstly realized. Numerical and experimental results demonstrate that the cross-polarization conversion reflectance above 0.84 is achieved from 8.6 to 18.6 GHz for linearly polarized (LP) incident waves under normal incidence. Subsequently, a multi-layered MM based on SRR enables a dramatic improvement of the recently demonstrated asymmetric transmission (AT) effect. Theoretical and measured results present that strong one-way transmission of two orthogonally polarized waves crossing C- and K- band has been observed. These two separated AT pass-bands have a function of selective polarization filter, which can be switched on/off by changing the polarization state of incident waves. The physical mechanisms are elucidated by taking advantage of electric fields and current distributions. Considering the broad bandwidth and the dual band, we believe that these two structures will be beneficial for designing polarization-controlled and selective transmission converter. PMID:27658929

  12. Design, synthesis and characterization of a linear hydrogen bonded homologous series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavitha, C.; Pongali Sathya Prabu, N.; Madhu Mohan, M. L. N.

    2012-03-01

    A linear hydrogen bonded liquid crystalline homologous series has been synthesized and characterized. Hydrogen bond is formed between p-n-dodecyloxy benzoic acid and various p-n-alkyl benzoic acids whose alkyl chain vary from octyl to ethyl. Synthesized complexes are characterized by FTIR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR studies for inferring the formation of hydrogen bonds. Polarizing Optical Microscopy (POM) and DSC studies reveal various mesophases and their corresponding transition temperatures along with respective enthalpy values. All the seven synthesized complexes exhibit rich liquid crystalline mesomorphism. A new phase namely smectic X has been observed in five of the complexes with a narrow thermal range. This phase has been characterized by optical textural, DSC, tilt angle and helicoidal pitch studies. Smectic X is sandwiched between traditional smectic C and re-entrant smectic C (designated as C R) phases. Homeotropic transition in nematic phase is observed in all the mesogens and thus these materials can be used as thermally controlled optical shutters. Tilt angle in smectic C, smectic X and smectic C R phases have been experimentally elucidated for all the mesogens.

  13. Shielding design of the linear accelerator at RAON: Accelerator tunnel and utility gallery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Suna; Kang, Bo Sun; Lee, Sangjin; Nam, Shinwoo; Chung, Yeonsei

    2015-10-01

    RAON is the first Korean heavy-ion accelerator for various rare-isotope experiments and will be constructed by the year of 2021. The building for the about 550-m-long superconducting linear accelerator at RAON has three divisions in the vertical layout: accelerator tunnel, intermediate tunnel, and utility gallery. One of the requirements for the building design is that the effective dose rate in the utility gallery should be well below the dose limit for workers. Other parts of the building underground are classified as high-radiation zones where access is strictly controlled. The radiation dose distribution in the building has been calculated by using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX including the radiation streaming effects through the intermediate tunnel and penetrating holes. We have applied a point beam loss model in which the continuous beam loss along the beam line is treated as an equivalent point loss with a simple target. We describe the details of the calculation and discuss the results.

  14. Dynamic optimization and adaptive controller design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inamdar, S. R.

    2010-10-01

    In this work I present a new type of controller which is an adaptive tracking controller which employs dynamic optimization for optimizing current value of controller action for the temperature control of nonisothermal continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR). We begin with a two-state model of nonisothermal CSTR which are mass and heat balance equations and then add cooling system dynamics to eliminate input multiplicity. The initial design value is obtained using local stability of steady states where approach temperature for cooling action is specified as a steady state and a design specification. Later we make a correction in the dynamics where material balance is manipulated to use feed concentration as a system parameter as an adaptive control measure in order to avoid actuator saturation for the main control loop. The analysis leading to design of dynamic optimization based parameter adaptive controller is presented. The important component of this mathematical framework is reference trajectory generation to form an adaptive control measure.

  15. Optimal Control Using Pontryagin's Maximum Principle in a Linear Quadratic Differential Game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakestari, Marzieh; Ibragimov, Gafurjan; Suleiman, Mohamed

    This paper deals with a class of two person zero-sum linear quadratic differential games, where the control functions for both players subject to integral constraints. Also the necessary conditions of the Maximum Principle are studied. Main objective in this work is to obtain optimal control by using method of Pontryagin's Maximum Principle. This method for a time-varying linear quadratic differential game is described. Finally, we discuss about an example.

  16. The Minimum Number of Inputs Required for the Controllability of Linear Differential Algebraic Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcheglova, A. A.

    2009-09-01

    Linear control differential algebraic equations are considered. The issue of minimum dimension of the control vector necessitated for complete controllability of the system on any closed interval from the domain of definition is investigated. The problem is analyzed in connection with the time invariant systems having regular matrix pencils and also systems with real-analytic or smooth coefficients, which possess some structural forms.

  17. Application of local area networks to accelerator control systems at the Stanford Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.D.; Linstadt, E.; Melen, R.

    1983-03-01

    The history and current status of SLAC's SDLC networks for distributed accelerator control systems are discussed. These local area networks have been used for instrumentation and control of the linear accelerator. Network topologies, protocols, physical links, and logical interconnections are discussed for specific applications in distributed data acquisition and control system, computer networks and accelerator operations.

  18. Design and test of three active flutter suppression controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christhilf, David M.; Waszak, Martin R.; Adams, William M.; Srinathkumar, S.; Mukhopadhyay, Vivek

    1991-01-01

    Three flutter suppression control law design techniques are presented. Each uses multiple control surfaces and/or sensors. The first uses linear combinations of several accelerometer signals together with dynamic compensation to synthesize the modal rate of the critical mode for feedback to distributed control surfaces. The second uses traditional tools (pole/zero loci and Nyquist diagrams) to develop a good understanding of the flutter mechanism and produce a controller with minimal complexity and good robustness to plant uncertainty. The third starts with a minimum energy Linear Quadratic Gaussian controller, applies controller order reduction, and then modifies weight and noise covariance matrices to improve multi-variable robustness. The resulting designs were implemented digitally and tested subsonically on the Active Flexible Wing (AFW) wind tunnel model. Test results presented here include plant characteristics, maximum attained closed-loop dynamic pressure, and Root Mean Square control surface activity. A key result is that simultaneous symmetric and antisymmetric flutter suppression was achieved by the second control law, with a 24 percent increase in attainable dynamic pressure.

  19. Process Design Manual for Nitrogen Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Denny S.; And Others

    This manual presents theoretical and process design criteria for the implementation of nitrogen control technology in municipal wastewater treatment facilities. Design concepts are emphasized through examination of data from full-scale and pilot installations. Design data are included on biological nitrification and denitrification, breakpoint…

  20. Iterated non-linear model predictive control based on tubes and contractive constraints.

    PubMed

    Murillo, M; Sánchez, G; Giovanini, L

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a predictive control algorithm for non-linear systems based on successive linearizations of the non-linear dynamic around a given trajectory. A linear time varying model is obtained and the non-convex constrained optimization problem is transformed into a sequence of locally convex ones. The robustness of the proposed algorithm is addressed adding a convex contractive constraint. To account for linearization errors and to obtain more accurate results an inner iteration loop is added to the algorithm. A simple methodology to obtain an outer bounding-tube for state trajectories is also presented. The convergence of the iterative process and the stability of the closed-loop system are analyzed. The simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm in controlling a quadcopter type unmanned aerial vehicle.

  1. Bounded Linear Stability Analysis - A Time Delay Margin Estimation Approach for Adaptive Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Ishihara, Abraham K.; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje Srinlvas; Bakhtiari-Nejad, Maryam

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a method for estimating time delay margin for model-reference adaptive control of systems with almost linear structured uncertainty. The bounded linear stability analysis method seeks to represent the conventional model-reference adaptive law by a locally bounded linear approximation within a small time window using the comparison lemma. The locally bounded linear approximation of the combined adaptive system is cast in a form of an input-time-delay differential equation over a small time window. The time delay margin of this system represents a local stability measure and is computed analytically by a matrix measure method, which provides a simple analytical technique for estimating an upper bound of time delay margin. Based on simulation results for a scalar model-reference adaptive control system, both the bounded linear stability method and the matrix measure method are seen to provide a reasonably accurate and yet not too conservative time delay margin estimation.

  2. Iterated non-linear model predictive control based on tubes and contractive constraints.

    PubMed

    Murillo, M; Sánchez, G; Giovanini, L

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a predictive control algorithm for non-linear systems based on successive linearizations of the non-linear dynamic around a given trajectory. A linear time varying model is obtained and the non-convex constrained optimization problem is transformed into a sequence of locally convex ones. The robustness of the proposed algorithm is addressed adding a convex contractive constraint. To account for linearization errors and to obtain more accurate results an inner iteration loop is added to the algorithm. A simple methodology to obtain an outer bounding-tube for state trajectories is also presented. The convergence of the iterative process and the stability of the closed-loop system are analyzed. The simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm in controlling a quadcopter type unmanned aerial vehicle. PMID:26850752

  3. Overview of magnetic bearing control and linearization approaches for annular magnetically suspended devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, N. J.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of magnetic bearing control and linearization approaches which have been considered for annular magnetically suspended devices is presented. These devices include the Annular Momentum Control Device and the Annular Suspension and Pointing System. Two approaches were investigated for controlling the magnetic actuator. One approach involves controlling the upper and lower electromagnets differentially about a bias flux. The bias flux can either be supplied by permanent magnets in the magnetic circuit or by bias currents. In the other approach, either the upper electromagnet or the lower electromagnet is controlled depending on the direction of force required. One advantage of the bias flux is that for small gap perturbations about a fixed operating point, the force-current characteristic is linear. Linearization approaches investigated for individual element control include an analog solution of the nonlinear electromagnet force equation and a microprocessor-based table lookup method.

  4. Linear motion device and method for inserting and withdrawing control rods

    DOEpatents

    Smith, J.E.

    Disclosed is a linear motion device and more specifically a control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) for inserting and withdrawing control rods into a reactor core. The CRDM and method disclosed is capable of independently and sequentially positioning two sets of control rods with a single motor stator and rotor. The CRDM disclosed can control more than one control rod lead screw without incurring a substantial increase in the size of the mechanism.

  5. Dynamic analysis and linear control strategies for proton exchange membrane fuel cell using a distributed parameter model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Methekar, R. N.; Prasad, V.; Gudi, R. D.

    To satisfy high power density demand in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), a robust control strategy is essential. A linear ratio control strategy is examined in this work. The manipulated variables are selected using steady-state relative gain array (RGA) analysis to be the inlet molar flow rates of hydrogen and coolant, and the controlled variables are average power density and average solid temperature, respectively. By selecting proper manipulated variables, the PEMFC does not exhibit sign change in gain and hence can be controlled by using a linear controller. Transfer function models obtained from step tests on the distributed parameter PEMFC model are used to design controllers for the multiple input-multiple output (MIMO) system. In addition, a ratio control strategy is proposed and evaluated, where the inlet molar flow rate of oxygen is used as a dependent manipulated variable and changed in a constant ratio with respect to the inlet molar flow rate of hydrogen. Simulation results show that the ratio control strategy provides a faster response than a MIMO control strategy. This ratio control strategy is able to circumvent the problem of oxygen starvation, and the increase in average solid temperature is small as compared to the MIMO control strategy.

  6. A MODEL AND CONTROLLER REDUCTION METHOD FOR ROBUST CONTROL DESIGN.

    SciTech Connect

    YUE,M.; SCHLUETER,R.

    2003-10-20

    A bifurcation subsystem based model and controller reduction approach is presented. Using this approach a robust {micro}-synthesis SVC control is designed for interarea oscillation and voltage control based on a small reduced order bifurcation subsystem model of the full system. The control synthesis problem is posed by structured uncertainty modeling and control configuration formulation using the bifurcation subsystem knowledge of the nature of the interarea oscillation caused by a specific uncertainty parameter. Bifurcation subsystem method plays a key role in this paper because it provides (1) a bifurcation parameter for uncertainty modeling; (2) a criterion to reduce the order of the resulting MSVC control; and (3) a low order model for a bifurcation subsystem based SVC (BMSVC) design. The use of the model of the bifurcation subsystem to produce a low order controller simplifies the control design and reduces the computation efforts so significantly that the robust {micro}-synthesis control can be applied to large system where the computation makes robust control design impractical. The RGA analysis and time simulation show that the reduced BMSVC control design captures the center manifold dynamics and uncertainty structure of the full system model and is capable of stabilizing the full system and achieving satisfactory control performance.

  7. Resilient Control Systems: Next Generation Design Research

    SciTech Connect

    Craig Rieger

    2009-05-01

    Since digital control systems were introduced to the market more than 30 years ago, the operational efficiency and stability gained through their use have fueled our migration and ultimate dependence on them for the monitoring and control of critical infrastructure. While these systems have been designed for functionality and reliability, a hostile cyber environment and uncertainties in complex networks and human interactions have placed additional parameters on the design expectations for control systems.

  8. Design Methodology of a Dual-Halbach Array Linear Actuator with Thermal-Electromagnetic Coupling.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Paulo Roberto; Flores Filho, Aly Ferreira; Perondi, Eduardo; Ferri, Jeferson; Goltz, Evandro

    2016-03-11

    This paper proposes a design methodology for linear actuators, considering thermal and electromagnetic coupling with geometrical and temperature constraints, that maximizes force density and minimizes force ripple. The method allows defining an actuator for given specifications in a step-by-step way so that requirements are met and the temperature within the device is maintained under or equal to its maximum allowed for continuous operation. According to the proposed method, the electromagnetic and thermal models are built with quasi-static parametric finite element models. The methodology was successfully applied to the design of a linear cylindrical actuator with a dual quasi-Halbach array of permanent magnets and a moving-coil. The actuator can produce an axial force of 120 N and a stroke of 80 mm. The paper also presents a comparative analysis between results obtained considering only an electromagnetic model and the thermal-electromagnetic coupled model. This comparison shows that the final designs for both cases differ significantly, especially regarding its active volume and its electrical and magnetic loading. Although in this paper the methodology was employed to design a specific actuator, its structure can be used to design a wide range of linear devices if the parametric models are adjusted for each particular actuator.

  9. Design Methodology of a Dual-Halbach Array Linear Actuator with Thermal-Electromagnetic Coupling.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Paulo Roberto; Flores Filho, Aly Ferreira; Perondi, Eduardo; Ferri, Jeferson; Goltz, Evandro

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a design methodology for linear actuators, considering thermal and electromagnetic coupling with geometrical and temperature constraints, that maximizes force density and minimizes force ripple. The method allows defining an actuator for given specifications in a step-by-step way so that requirements are met and the temperature within the device is maintained under or equal to its maximum allowed for continuous operation. According to the proposed method, the electromagnetic and thermal models are built with quasi-static parametric finite element models. The methodology was successfully applied to the design of a linear cylindrical actuator with a dual quasi-Halbach array of permanent magnets and a moving-coil. The actuator can produce an axial force of 120 N and a stroke of 80 mm. The paper also presents a comparative analysis between results obtained considering only an electromagnetic model and the thermal-electromagnetic coupled model. This comparison shows that the final designs for both cases differ significantly, especially regarding its active volume and its electrical and magnetic loading. Although in this paper the methodology was employed to design a specific actuator, its structure can be used to design a wide range of linear devices if the parametric models are adjusted for each particular actuator. PMID:26978370

  10. Design Methodology of a Dual-Halbach Array Linear Actuator with Thermal-Electromagnetic Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, Paulo Roberto; Flores Filho, Aly Ferreira; Perondi, Eduardo; Ferri, Jeferson; Goltz, Evandro

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a design methodology for linear actuators, considering thermal and electromagnetic coupling with geometrical and temperature constraints, that maximizes force density and minimizes force ripple. The method allows defining an actuator for given specifications in a step-by-step way so that requirements are met and the temperature within the device is maintained under or equal to its maximum allowed for continuous operation. According to the proposed method, the electromagnetic and thermal models are built with quasi-static parametric finite element models. The methodology was successfully applied to the design of a linear cylindrical actuator with a dual quasi-Halbach array of permanent magnets and a moving-coil. The actuator can produce an axial force of 120 N and a stroke of 80 mm. The paper also presents a comparative analysis between results obtained considering only an electromagnetic model and the thermal-electromagnetic coupled model. This comparison shows that the final designs for both cases differ significantly, especially regarding its active volume and its electrical and magnetic loading. Although in this paper the methodology was employed to design a specific actuator, its structure can be used to design a wide range of linear devices if the parametric models are adjusted for each particular actuator. PMID:26978370

  11. Using the group of non-linear cells design metamaterial bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hongwei; Song, Xin; Hu, Xiaolei; Gu, Jinliang

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents the wave propagation in one-dimensional metamaterial bar with attached group of non-linear local oscillators by using analytical and numerical models. The focus is on the influence of group of non-linear cells on the filtering properties of the bar in the 1000Hz to 2000Hz range. Group of Periodic cells with alternating properties exhibit interesting dynamic characteristics that enable them to act as filters. Waves can propagate along bars within specific bands of frequencies called pass bands, and attenuate within bands of frequencies called gaps. Gaps in structures with group of periodic cells are located according on the frequency of cells. From the cell, we can yield the effect negative stiffness and effect negative mass. We can also design the gaps from attached oscillators or cells. In the uniform case the gap is located around the resonant frequency of the oscillators, and thus a stop band can be created in the lower frequency range. In the case with group of non-linear cells the results show that the position of the gap can be designed, and the design depends on the amplitude and the degree of non-linear cells.

  12. An airfoil pitch apparatus-modeling and control design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Daniel R.

    1989-03-01

    The study of dynamic stall of rapidly pitching airfoils is being conducted at NASA Ames Research Center. Understanding this physical phenomenon will aid in improving the maneuverability of fighter aircraft as well as civilian aircraft. A wind tunnel device which can linearly pitch and control an airfoil with rapid dynamic response is needed for such tests. To develop a mechanism capable of high accelerations, an accurate model and control system is created. The model contains mathematical representations of the mechanical system, including mass, spring, and damping characteristics for each structural element, as well as coulomb friction and servovalve saturation. Electrical components, both digital and analog, linear and nonlinear, are simulated. The implementation of such a high-performance system requires detailed control design as well as state-of-the-art components. This paper describes the system model, states the system requirements, and presents results of its theoretical performance which maximizes the structural and hydraulic aspects of this system.

  13. Design of blade-shaped-electrode linear ion traps with reduced anharmonic contributions

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, K.; Che, H.; Ge, Y. P.; Xu, Z. T.; Yuan, W. H.; Zhang, J.; Lu, Z. H.; Lan, Y.

    2015-09-21

    RF quadrupole linear Paul traps are versatile tools in quantum physics experiments. Linear Paul traps with blade-shaped electrodes have the advantages of larger solid angles for fluorescence collection. But with these kinds of traps, the existence of higher-order anharmonic terms of the trap potentials can cause large heating rate for the trapped ions. In this paper, we theoretically investigate the dependence of higher-order terms of trap potentials on the geometry of blade-shaped traps, and offer an optimized design. A modified blade electrodes trap is proposed to further reduce higher-order anharmonic terms while still retaining large fluorescence collection angle.

  14. A method of optimal design of single-sided linear induction motor for transit

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, S.B.; Hur, J.; Hyun, D.S.

    1997-09-01

    An optimal design method for a single-sided linear induction motor (SLIM) for transit is described. The authors propose the method which determines the overall parameters of SLIM for transit using only the rated mechanical output. When the optimization is carried out, the slot depth is used as the initial value so that the exact slot depth is calculated iteratively from the circuit equation. The optimization problem of a SLIM design is approached by use of the sequential quadratic programming (SQP). The influence of design variables is analyzed by the rated thrust and the rated velocity respectively.

  15. Hydraulically powered dissimilar teleoperated system controller design

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, J.F.; Kress, R.L.

    1996-04-01

    This paper will address two issues associated with the implementation of a hydraulically powered dissimilar master-slave teleoperated system. These issues are the overall system control architecture and the design of robust hydraulic servo controllers for the position control problem. Finally, a discussion of overall system performance on an actual teleoperated system will be presented.

  16. Intelligent control of non-linear dynamical system based on the adaptive neurocontroller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, E.; Kovalev, I. V.; Kobezhicov, V.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents an adaptive neuro-controller for intelligent control of non-linear dynamical system. The formed as the fuzzy selective neural net the adaptive neuro-controller on the base of system's state, creates the effective control signal under random perturbations. The validity and advantages of the proposed adaptive neuro-controller are demonstrated by numerical simulations. The simulation results show that the proposed controller scheme achieves real-time control speed and the competitive performance, as compared to PID, fuzzy logic controllers.

  17. Combining support vector machines with linear quadratic regulator adaptation for the online design of an automotive active suspension system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou, J.-S.; Liu, M.-T.

    2008-02-01

    As a powerful machine-learning approach to pattern recognition problems, the support vector machine (SVM) is known to easily allow generalization. More importantly, it works very well in a high-dimensional feature space. This paper presents a nonlinear active suspension controller which achieves a high level performance by compensating for actuator dynamics. We use a linear quadratic regulator (LQR) to ensure optimal control of nonlinear systems. An LQR is used to solve the problem of state feedback and an SVM is used to address the question of the estimation and examination of the state. These two are then combined and designed in a way that outputs feedback control. The real-time simulation demonstrates that an active suspension using the combined SVM-LQR controller provides passengers with a much more comfortable ride and better road handling.

  18. RUPERT closed loop control design.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hang; Balasubramanian, Sivakumar; Wei, Ruihua; Austin, Hiroko; Buchanan, Sharon; Herman, Richard; He, Jiping

    2010-01-01

    Robot-assisted rehabilitation is an active area of research in the field of stroke rehabilitation. RUPERT is a wearable robotic exoskeleton powered by pneumatic muscle actuators. In this study, we described the structure of the controllers for the five degrees of freedom currently used by RUPERT. We applied the RUPERT on 6 stroke patients to provide robot-assisted rehabilitation therapy in a clinical study. Statistical χ(2) test on the proportion of successfully reaching targets showed that 3 out of the 6 patients demonstrated significant improvement in reaching targets successfully, and the remaining 3 did not show performance improvement or deterioration. We plan to implement the RUPERT in the patient's house for easier access and more frequent use. More significant performance results are expected. PMID:21097049

  19. Model predictive control of non-linear systems over networks with data quantization and packet loss.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jimin; Nan, Liangsheng; Tang, Xiaoming; Wang, Ping

    2015-11-01

    This paper studies the approach of model predictive control (MPC) for the non-linear systems under networked environment where both data quantization and packet loss may occur. The non-linear controlled plant in the networked control system (NCS) is represented by a Tagaki-Sugeno (T-S) model. The sensed data and control signal are quantized in both links and described as sector bound uncertainties by applying sector bound approach. Then, the quantized data are transmitted in the communication networks and may suffer from the effect of packet losses, which are modeled as Bernoulli process. A fuzzy predictive controller which guarantees the stability of the closed-loop system is obtained by solving a set of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). A numerical example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  20. Model predictive control of non-linear systems over networks with data quantization and packet loss.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jimin; Nan, Liangsheng; Tang, Xiaoming; Wang, Ping

    2015-11-01

    This paper studies the approach of model predictive control (MPC) for the non-linear systems under networked environment where both data quantization and packet loss may occur. The non-linear controlled plant in the networked control system (NCS) is represented by a Tagaki-Sugeno (T-S) model. The sensed data and control signal are quantized in both links and described as sector bound uncertainties by applying sector bound approach. Then, the quantized data are transmitted in the communication networks and may suffer from the effect of packet losses, which are modeled as Bernoulli process. A fuzzy predictive controller which guarantees the stability of the closed-loop system is obtained by solving a set of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). A numerical example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:26341070

  1. A Signal Transmission Technique for Stability Analysis of Multivariable Non-Linear Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Mark; Zimpfer, Doug; Adams, Neil; Lindsey, K. L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Among the difficulties associated with multivariable, non-linear control systems is the problem of assessing closed-loop stability. Of particular interest is the class of non-linear systems controlled with on/off actuators, such as spacecraft thrusters or electrical relays. With such systems, standard describing function techniques are typically too conservative, and time-domain simulation analysis is prohibitively extensive, This paper presents an open-loop analysis technique for this class of non-linear systems. The technique is centered around an innovative use of multivariable signal transmission theory to quantify the plant response to worst case control commands. The technique has been applied to assess stability of thruster controlled flexible space structures. Examples are provided for Space Shuttle attitude control with attached flexible payloads.

  2. Control centers design for ergonomics and safety.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Leonardo; Lizarazo, Cesar; Bernal, Oscar; Cordoba, Jorge; Arias, Claudia; Monroy, Magda; Cotrino, Carlos; Montoya, Olga

    2012-01-01

    This paper shows the general design conditions about ergonomics and safety for control centers in the petrochemical process industry. Some of the topics include guidelines for the optimized workstation design, control room layout, building layout, and lighting, acoustical and environmental design. Also takes into account the safety parameters in the control rooms and centers design. The conditions and parameters shown in this paper come from the standards and global advances on this topic on the most recent publications. And also the work was supplemented by field visits of our team to the control center operations in a petrochemical company, and technical literature search efforts. This guideline will be useful to increase the productivity and improve the working conditions at the control rooms. PMID:22317199

  3. A Linear Programming Approach to Routing Control in Networks of Constrained Nonlinear Positive Systems with Concave Flow Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arneson, Heather M.; Dousse, Nicholas; Langbort, Cedric

    2014-01-01

    We consider control design for positive compartmental systems in which each compartment's outflow rate is described by a concave function of the amount of material in the compartment.We address the problem of determining the routing of material between compartments to satisfy time-varying state constraints while ensuring that material reaches its intended destination over a finite time horizon. We give sufficient conditions for the existence of a time-varying state-dependent routing strategy which ensures that the closed-loop system satisfies basic network properties of positivity, conservation and interconnection while ensuring that capacity constraints are satisfied, when possible, or adjusted if a solution cannot be found. These conditions are formulated as a linear programming problem. Instances of this linear programming problem can be solved iteratively to generate a solution to the finite horizon routing problem. Results are given for the application of this control design method to an example problem. Key words: linear programming; control of networks; positive systems; controller constraints and structure.

  4. Robustness of controllability and observability of linear time-varying systems with application to the emergency control of power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sastry, S. S.; Desoer, C. A.

    1980-01-01

    Fixed point methods from nonlinear anaysis are used to establish conditions under which the uniform complete controllability of linear time-varying systems is preserved under non-linear perturbations in the state dynamics and the zero-input uniform complete observability of linear time-varying systems is preserved under non-linear perturbation in the state dynamics and output read out map. Algorithms for computing the specific input to steer the perturbed systems from a given initial state to a given final state are also presented. As an application, a very specific emergency control of an interconnected power system is formulated as a steering problem and it is shown that this emergency control is indeed possible in finite time.

  5. Multi-cavity complex controller with vector simulator for TESLA technology linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarski, Tomasz; Pozniak, Krzysztof T.; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.; Szewinski, Jaroslaw

    2008-01-01

    A digital control, as the main part of the Low Level RF system, for superconducting cavities of a linear accelerator is presented. The FPGA based controller, supported by MATLAB system, was developed to investigate a novel firmware implementation. The complex control algorithm based on the non-linear system identification is the proposal verified by the preliminary experimental results. The general idea is implemented as the Multi-Cavity Complex Controller (MCC) and is still under development. The FPGA based controller executes procedure according to the prearranged control tables: Feed-Forward, Set-Point and Corrector unit, to fulfill the required cavity performance: driving in the resonance during filling and field stabilization for the flattop range. Adaptive control algorithm is applied for the feed-forward and feedback modes. The vector Simulator table has been introduced for an efficient verification of the FPGA controller structure. Experimental results of the internal simulation, are presented for a cavity representative condition.

  6. Design of Distributed Engine Control Systems with Uncertain Delay

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanxi; Sun, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Future gas turbine engine control systems will be based on distributed architecture, in which, the sensors and actuators will be connected to the controllers via a communication network. The performance of the distributed engine control (DEC) is dependent on the network performance. This study introduces a distributed control system architecture based on a networked cascade control system (NCCS). Typical turboshaft engine-distributed controllers are designed based on the NCCS framework with a H∞ output feedback under network-induced time delays and uncertain disturbances. The sufficient conditions for robust stability are derived via the Lyapunov stability theory and linear matrix inequality approach. Both numerical and hardware-in-loop simulations illustrate the effectiveness of the presented method. PMID:27669005

  7. Moving mass trim control system design

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, R.H.; Robinett, R.D.; Sturgis, B.R.

    1996-03-01

    This paper describes the design of a moving mass trim control system for maneuvering axisymmetric reentry vehicles. The moving mass trim controller is composed of three equal masses that are independently positioned in order to deliver a desired center of mass position. For a slowly spinning reentry vehicle, the mass offset creates a trim angle-of-attack to generate modest flight path corrections. The control system must maintain the desired position of each mass in the face of large disturbances. A novel algorithm for determining the desired mass positions is developed in conjunction with a preliminary controller design. The controller design is based on classical frequency domain techniques where a bound on the disturbance magnitude is used to formulate the disturbance rejection problem. Simulation results for the controller are presented for a typical reentry vehicle.

  8. A new eddy current model for magnetic bearing control system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feeley, Joseph J.; Ahlstrom, Daniel J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a new VLSI-based controller for the implementation of a Linear-Quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) theory-based control system. Use of the controller is demonstrated by design of a controller for a magnetic bearing and its performance is evaluated by computer simulation.

  9. Non-linear controls influence functions in an aircraft dynamics simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerreiro, Nelson M.; Hubbard, James E., Jr.; Motter, Mark A.

    2006-03-01

    In the development and testing of novel structural and controls concepts, such as morphing aircraft wings, appropriate models are needed for proper system characterization. In most instances, available system models do not provide the required additional degrees of freedom for morphing structures but may be modified to some extent to achieve a compatible system. The objective of this study is to apply wind tunnel data collected for an Unmanned Air Vehicle (UAV), that implements trailing edge morphing, to create a non-linear dynamics simulator, using well defined rigid body equations of motion, where the aircraft stability derivatives change with control deflection. An analysis of this wind tunnel data, using data extraction algorithms, was performed to determine the reference aerodynamic force and moment coefficients for the aircraft. Further, non-linear influence functions were obtained for each of the aircraft's control surfaces, including the sixteen trailing edge flap segments. These non-linear controls influence functions are applied to the aircraft dynamics to produce deflection-dependent aircraft stability derivatives in a non-linear dynamics simulator. Time domain analysis of the aircraft motion, trajectory, and state histories can be performed using these nonlinear dynamics and may be visualized using a 3-dimensional aircraft model. Linear system models can be extracted to facilitate frequency domain analysis of the system and for control law development. The results of this study are useful in similar projects where trailing edge morphing is employed and will be instrumental in the University of Maryland's continuing study of active wing load control.

  10. Design of a synchronization control system for lithography based on repetitive control method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Zhongyang; Peng, Guiyong; Li, Xin; Chen, Xinglin

    2013-01-01

    A repetitive control theory is proposed to solve the synchronization problem between the wafer stage and reticle stage. A macro-micro control method is used based on a macro-micro control structure in which a linear motor is combined with a voice coil motor. A synchronization controller of the reticle stage is added base on the conventional PID control system. The repetitive controller is designed based on the repeated movement of the reticle stage and the wafer stage during the scan and exposure period, and the effects of synchronization control system can be improved because of the repetitive control can effectively track and inhibit the periodicity excitation signal. The repetitive control system effectively reduces the synchronization error during the scan and exposure period,in the meanwhile keep the tracking accuracy and dynamic characters. Simulation results show that the synchronization error can be reduced effectively.

  11. Full-order observer design for linear systems with unknown inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lungu, Mihai; Lungu, Romulus

    2012-10-01

    In this article, a full-order observer without unknown inputs reconstruction is suggested in order to achieve finite-time reconstruction of the state vector for a class of linear systems with unknown inputs. The observer is a simple one, its derivation being direct and easy. It will be shown that the problem of full-order observers for linear systems with unknown inputs can be reduced in this case to a standard one (the unknown input vector will not interfere in the observer equations). The effectiveness of the suggested design algorithm is illustrated by a numerical example (aircraft longitudinal motion), and, for the same aircraft dynamics, we make a comparison between our new observer and other already existing observers from the existence conditions and dynamic characteristics' point of view; the superiority of the new designed observer is demonstrated.

  12. Remarks on Hierarchic Control for a Linearized Micropolar Fluids System in Moving Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Jesus, Isaías Pereira de

    2015-12-15

    We study a Stackelberg strategy subject to the evolutionary linearized micropolar fluids equations in domains with moving boundaries, considering a Nash multi-objective equilibrium (non necessarily cooperative) for the “follower players” (as is called in the economy field) and an optimal problem for the leader player with approximate controllability objective. We will obtain the following main results: the existence and uniqueness of Nash equilibrium and its characterization, the approximate controllability of the linearized micropolar system with respect to the leader control and the existence and uniqueness of the Stackelberg–Nash problem, where the optimality system for the leader is given.

  13. Condominium Design: Good and Bad Noise Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargens, C. W.; Schutz, Victor K.

    This paper discusses pitfalls in condominium design and the incorpoation of related noise control problems into classroom situations. Two case studies are provided, and a list of architectural noise problems found in many condominiums is included. (CP)

  14. Optimized linear motor and digital PID controller setup used in Mössbauer spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohout, Pavel; Kouřil, Lukáš; Navařík, Jakub; Novák, Petr; Pechoušek, Jiří

    2014-10-01

    Optimization of a linear motor and digital PID controller setup used in a Mössbauer spectrometer is presented. Velocity driving system with a digital PID feedback subsystem was developed in the LabVIEW graphical environment and deployed on the sbRIO real-time hardware device (National Instruments). The most important data acquisition processes are performed as real-time deterministic tasks on an FPGA chip. Velocity transducer of a double loudspeaker type with a power amplifier circuit is driven by the system. Series of calibration measurements were proceeded to find the optimal setup of the P, I, D parameters together with velocity error signal analysis. The shape and given signal characteristics of the velocity error signal are analyzed in details. Remote applications for controlling and monitoring the PID system from computer or smart phone, respectively, were also developed. The best setup and P, I, D parameters were set and calibration spectrum of α-Fe sample with an average nonlinearity of the velocity scale below 0.08% was collected. Furthermore, the width of the spectral line below 0.30 mm/s was observed. Powerful and complex velocity driving system was designed.

  15. Robust control in ultracold alkali metals using a single linearly chirped pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, T. A.; Malinovskaya, S. A.

    2013-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the population dynamics of the valence electron of elements of the alkali series induced by nanosecond linearly chirped (LC) pulses having kW cm-2 beam intensity and examine two different shapes of the pulse envelope. We demonstrate the possibility of controllable population transfer between hyperfine (HpF) levels of the S orbital through Raman transitions. We assume that the atoms are in the state of an ultracold vapor and Doppler free. Detuning slightly below the one-photon resonance condition with the lowest of the HpF states of the corresponding P orbital avoids interaction of the pulse with the other HpF levels of the P orbital and allows us to enter the adiabatic region of population transfer at very low field intensities, such that the corresponding Rabi frequencies are on the order of the hyperfine splitting of the S orbital. This methodology provides a robust way to create a specially designed superposition state in such atoms in the basis of the HpF levels and perform state manipulation controllable on the picosecond-to-nanosecond timescale.

  16. Experimental quadrotor flight performance using computationally efficient and recursively feasible linear model predictive control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffery, Mujtaba H.; Shead, Leo; Forshaw, Jason L.; Lappas, Vaios J.

    2013-12-01

    A new linear model predictive control (MPC) algorithm in a state-space framework is presented based on the fusion of two past MPC control laws: steady-state optimal MPC (SSOMPC) and Laguerre optimal MPC (LOMPC). The new controller, SSLOMPC, is demonstrated to have improved feasibility, tracking performance and computation time than its predecessors. This is verified in both simulation and practical experimentation on a quadrotor unmanned air vehicle in an indoor motion-capture testbed. The performance of the control law is experimentally compared with proportional-integral-derivative (PID) and linear quadratic regulator (LQR) controllers in an unconstrained square manoeuvre. The use of soft control output and hard control input constraints is also examined in single and dual constrained manoeuvres.

  17. Non-linear adaptive sliding mode switching control with average dwell-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lei; Zhang, Maoqing; Fei, Shumin

    2013-03-01

    In this article, an adaptive integral sliding mode control scheme is addressed for switched non-linear systems in the presence of model uncertainties and external disturbances. The control law includes two parts: a slide mode controller for the reduced model of the plant and a compensation controller to deal with the non-linear systems with parameter uncertainties. The adaptive updated laws have been derived from the switched multiple Lyapunov function method, also an admissible switching signal with average dwell-time technique is given. The simplicity of the proposed control scheme facilitates its implementation and the overall control scheme guarantees the global asymptotic stability in the Lyapunov sense such that the sliding surface of the control system is well reached. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness and the feasibility of the proposed approach.

  18. Design of a Cascade Controller for a Flexible Spray Boom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramon, H.; De Baerdemaeker, J.; van Brussel, H.

    1996-03-01

    Longitudinal accelerations and yawning angular accelerations of a tractor induce horizontal flexible spray boom deformations which cannot be reduced sufficiently by simple structural adaptations. An electro-hydraulic control system has therefore been developed in order to attenuate the negative effect of longitudinal tractor accelerations on a spray boom. The linear quadratic Gaussian theory with loop transfer recovery has been used to design the compensator. Four different variants of the compensator are implemented in an experimental set-up to test the performance and the robustness of the feedback system and to investigate the applicability of the electro-hydraulic devices in active vibration control.

  19. Progress in multirate digital control system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Martin C.; Mason, Gregory S.

    1991-01-01

    A new methodology for multirate sampled-data control design based on a new generalized control law structure, two new parameter-optimization-based control law synthesis methods, and a new singular-value-based robustness analysis method are described. The control law structure can represent multirate sampled-data control laws of arbitrary structure and dynamic order, with arbitrarily prescribed sampling rates for all sensors and update rates for all processor states and actuators. The two control law synthesis methods employ numerical optimization to determine values for the control law parameters. The robustness analysis method is based on the multivariable Nyquist criterion applied to the loop transfer function for the sampling period equal to the period of repetition of the system's complete sampling/update schedule. The complete methodology is demonstrated by application to the design of a combination yaw damper and modal suppression system for a commercial aircraft.

  20. Sensitivity method for integrated structure/active control law design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Michael G.

    1987-01-01

    The development is described of an integrated structure/active control law design methodology for aeroelastic aircraft applications. A short motivating introduction to aeroservoelasticity is given along with the need for integrated structures/controls design algorithms. Three alternative approaches to development of an integrated design method are briefly discussed with regards to complexity, coordination and tradeoff strategies, and the nature of the resulting solutions. This leads to the formulation of the proposed approach which is based on the concepts of sensitivity of optimum solutions and multi-level decompositions. The concept of sensitivity of optimum is explained in more detail and compared with traditional sensitivity concepts of classical control theory. The analytical sensitivity expressions for the solution of the linear, quadratic cost, Gaussian (LQG) control problem are summarized in terms of the linear regulator solution and the Kalman Filter solution. Numerical results for a state space aeroelastic model of the DAST ARW-II vehicle are given, showing the changes in aircraft responses to variations of a structural parameter, in this case first wing bending natural frequency.

  1. A Linear PDE Approach to the Bellman Equation of Ergodic Control with Periodic Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Y.

    2003-03-12

    In this paper we give a new proof of the existence result of Bensoussan [1, Theorem II-6.1] for the Bellman equation of ergodic control with periodic structure. This Bellman equation is a nonlinear PDE, and he constructed its solution by using the solution of a nonlinear PDE. On the contrary, our key idea is to solve two linear PDEs. Hence, we propose a linear PDE approach to this Bellman equation.

  2. Nonlinear control via approximate input-output linearization - The ball and beam example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, John; Sastry, Shankar; Kokotovic, Petar

    1992-01-01

    A study is made of approximate input-output linearization of nonlinear systems which fail to have a well defined relative degree. For such systems, a method is provided for constructing approximate systems that are input-output linearizable. The analysis presented in this note is motivated through its application to a common undergraduate control laboratory experiment, the ball and beam system, where it is shown to be more effective for trajectory tracking than the standard Jacobian linearization.

  3. The use of linearized-aerodynamics and vortex-flow methods in aircraft design /invited paper/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    This paper deals with selected linearized-aerodynamic and vortex-flow methods as applied to aircraft design problems at high subsonic speeds. In particular, the NASA Vortex Lattice and Modified Multhopp methods are the linearized techniques employed, and the suction analogy is used to provide estimates associated with vortex-flow aerodynamics. Many examples are given as to how researchers at Langley have used these methods to design the high subsonic, wing-mean-camber shapes for various configurations such as a supersonic transport, high-aspect-ratio transport, trapezoidal fighter wing, strake wing, tandem wing, joined wing, delta wing, and slender cranked wing. Many of these have been built, tested, and have had their data compared with theory. In addition, a technique for defining efficiently performing strake planforms for use in strake-wing combinations is discussed, and further improvements in wing design are outlined. The latter may be obtained by using higher-ordered linear panel methods as well as nonlinear-transonic methods.

  4. Medical linear accelerator mounted mini-beam collimator: design, fabrication and dosimetric characterization.

    PubMed

    Cranmer-Sargison, G; Crewson, C; Davis, W M; Sidhu, N P; Kundapur, V

    2015-09-01

    The goal of this work was to design, build and experimentally characterize a linear accelerator mounted mini-beam collimator for use at a nominal 6 MV beam energy. Monte Carlo simulation was used in the design and dosimetric characterization of a compact mini-beam collimator assembly mounted to a medical linear accelerator. After fabrication, experimental mini-beam dose profiles and central axis relative output were measured and the results used to validate the simulation data. The simulation data was then used to establish traceability back to an established dosimetric code of practice. The Monte Carlo simulation work revealed that changes in collimator blade width have a greater influence on the valley-to-peak dose ratio than do changes in blade height. There was good agreement between the modeled and measured profile data, with the exception of small differences on either side of the central peak dose. These differences were found to be systematic across all depths and result from limitations associated with the collimator fabrication. Experimental mini-beam relative output and simulation data agreed to better than ± 2.0%, which is well within the level of uncertainty required for dosimetric traceability of non-standard field geometries. A mini-beam collimator has now been designed, built and experimentally characterized for use with a commercial linear accelerator operated at a nominal 6 MV beam energy.

  5. Medical linear accelerator mounted mini-beam collimator: design, fabrication and dosimetric characterization.

    PubMed

    Cranmer-Sargison, G; Crewson, C; Davis, W M; Sidhu, N P; Kundapur, V

    2015-09-01

    The goal of this work was to design, build and experimentally characterize a linear accelerator mounted mini-beam collimator for use at a nominal 6 MV beam energy. Monte Carlo simulation was used in the design and dosimetric characterization of a compact mini-beam collimator assembly mounted to a medical linear accelerator. After fabrication, experimental mini-beam dose profiles and central axis relative output were measured and the results used to validate the simulation data. The simulation data was then used to establish traceability back to an established dosimetric code of practice. The Monte Carlo simulation work revealed that changes in collimator blade width have a greater influence on the valley-to-peak dose ratio than do changes in blade height. There was good agreement between the modeled and measured profile data, with the exception of small differences on either side of the central peak dose. These differences were found to be systematic across all depths and result from limitations associated with the collimator fabrication. Experimental mini-beam relative output and simulation data agreed to better than ± 2.0%, which is well within the level of uncertainty required for dosimetric traceability of non-standard field geometries. A mini-beam collimator has now been designed, built and experimentally characterized for use with a commercial linear accelerator operated at a nominal 6 MV beam energy. PMID:26305166

  6. Techniques for designing rotorcraft control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yudilevitch, Gil; Levine, William S.

    1994-01-01

    Over the last two and a half years we have been demonstrating a new methodology for the design of rotorcraft flight control systems (FCS) to meet handling qualities requirements. This method is based on multicriterion optimization as implemented in the optimization package CONSOL-OPTCAD (C-O). This package has been developed at the Institute for Systems Research (ISR) at the University of Maryland at College Park. This design methodology has been applied to the design of a FCS for the UH-60A helicopter in hover having the ADOCS control structure. The controller parameters have been optimized to meet the ADS-33C specifications. Furthermore, using this approach, an optimal (minimum control energy) controller has been obtained and trade-off studies have been performed.

  7. An object oriented design for high performance linear algebra on distributed memory architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Dongarra, J.J. |; Walker, D.W.; Pozo, R.

    1993-12-31

    We describe the design of ScaLAPACK++, an object oriented C++ library for implementing linear algebra computations on distributed memory multicomputers. This package, when complete, will support distributed dense, banded, sparse matrix operations for symmetric, positive-definite, and non-symmetric cases. In ScaLAPACK++ we have employed object oriented design methods to enchance scalability, portability, flexibility, and ease-of-use. We illustrate some of these points by describing the implementation of a right-looking LU factorization for dense systems in ScaLAPACK++.

  8. A linearized theory method of constrained optimization for supersonic cruise wing design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. S.; Carlson, H. W.; Middleton, W. D.

    1976-01-01

    A linearized theory wing design and optimization procedure which allows physical realism and practical considerations to be imposed as constraints on the optimum (least drag due to lift) solution is discussed and examples of application are presented. In addition to the usual constraints on lift and pitching moment, constraints are imposed on wing surface ordinates and wing upper surface pressure levels and gradients. The design procedure also provides the capability of including directly in the optimization process the effects of other aircraft components such as a fuselage, canards, and nacelles.

  9. A novel design measuring method based on linearly polarized laser interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yanbo; Ai, Hua; Zhao, Nan

    2013-09-01

    The interferometric method is widely used in the precision measurement, including the surface quality of the large-aperture mirror. The laser interference technology has been developing rapidly as the laser sources become more and more mature and reliable. We adopted the laser diode as the source for the sake of the short coherent wavelength of it for the optical path difference of the system is quite shorter as several wavelengths, and the power of laser diode is sufficient for measurement and safe to human eye. The 673nm linearly laser was selected and we construct a novel form of interferometric system as we called `Closed Loop', comprised of polarizing optical components, such as polarizing prism and quartz wave plate, the light from the source split by which into measuring beam and referencing beam, they've both reflected by the measuring mirror, after the two beams transforming into circular polarization and spinning in the opposite directions we induced the polarized light synchronous phase shift interference technology to get the detecting fringes, which transfers the phase shifting in time domain to space, so that we did not need to consider the precise-controlled shift of optical path difference, which will introduce the disturbance of the air current and vibration. We got the interference fringes from four different CCD cameras well-alignment, and the fringes are shifted into four different phases of 0, π/2, π, and 3π/2 in time. After obtaining the images from the CCD cameras, we need to align the interference fringes pixel to pixel from different CCD cameras, and synthesis the rough morphology, after getting rid of systematic error, we could calculate the surface accuracy of the measuring mirror. This novel design detecting method could be applied into measuring the optical system aberration, and it would develop into the setup of the portable structural interferometer and widely used in different measuring circumstances.

  10. On the design of nonlinear controllers for flight control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, John; Sastry, Shankar; Meyer, George

    1989-01-01

    A method of approximate input-output linearization by dynamic state feedback is presented, with the flight control of VTOL aircraft used as an example. It is shown that the closed loop system has a graceful degradation of performance as the moment-to-force coupling is increased. It is also demonstrated that the approach proposed here leads to an asymptotically stable closed loop system with guaranteed bounds on the tracking error caused by the nonminumum phase character of the system.

  11. Control system design for a double-prism scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Yuan, Yan; Zhao, Yanyan; Su, Lijuan

    2013-12-01

    A control system designed for a Double-Prism scanner is discussed in this paper. This control system is required to regulate the speed of prisms accurately and change the scan pattern as quickly as possible. Therefore, we designed a digital double closed-loop control system which consists of an inner loop and an outer loop to achieve that function. In this double closed-loop control system, the inner loop uses linear Proportional-Integral (PI) controller for the current control and the outer loop uses saturated Proportional-Integral controller for the speed control. To verify the feasibility and rationality of this control method, simulation based on MATLAB was performed. And the simulation results indicate that the step response of prism speed is stable and there is no steady state error. After building the digital control system, many experiments were performed to obtain key characteristics. The experiment results show that the speed regulation time is about 0.4s when the reference speed is 1rps. The accuracy of speed regulation reaches 10-4 level, and the fluctuation ratio of speed regulation reaches 10-2 level over its operation range(0rps-3rps).

  12. A feedback linearization approach to spacecraft control using momentum exchange devices. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dzielski, John Edward

    1988-01-01

    Recent developments in the area of nonlinear control theory have shown how coordiante changes in the state and input spaces can be used with nonlinear feedback to transform certain nonlinear ordinary differential equations into equivalent linear equations. These feedback linearization techniques are applied to resolve two problems arising in the control of spacecraft equipped with control moment gyroscopes (CMGs). The first application involves the computation of rate commands for the gimbals that rotate the individual gyroscopes to produce commanded torques on the spacecraft. The second application is to the long-term management of stored momentum in the system of control moment gyroscopes using environmental torques acting on the vehicle. An approach to distributing control effort among a group of redundant actuators is described that uses feedback linearization techniques to parameterize sets of controls which influence a specified subsystem in a desired way. The approach is adapted for use in spacecraft control with double-gimballed gyroscopes to produce an algorithm that avoids problematic gimbal configurations by approximating sets of gimbal rates that drive CMG rotors into desirable configurations. The momentum management problem is stated as a trajectory optimization problem with a nonlinear dynamical constraint. Feedback linearization and collocation are used to transform this problem into an unconstrainted nonlinear program. The approach to trajectory optimization is fast and robust. A number of examples are presented showing applications to the proposed NASA space station.

  13. Nonlinear control design techniques for precision formation flying at Lagrange points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luquette, Richard J.

    Precision spacecraft formation flying is an enabling technology for a variety of proposed space-based observatories, such as NASA's Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF), the Micro-Arcsecond X-Ray Imaging Mission (MAXIM), and Stellar Imager (SI). This research specifically examines the precision formation flying control architecture, characterizing the relative performance of linear and nonlinear controllers. Controller design is based on a 6DOF control architecture, characteristic of precision formation flying control. In an effort to minimize the influence of design parameters in the comparison, analysis employs "equivalent" controller gains, and incorporates an integrator in the linear control design. Controller performance is evaluated through various simulations designed to reflect a realistic space environment. The simulation architecture includes a full gravitational model and solar pressure effects. Spacecraft model properties are based on realistic mission design parameters. Control actuators are modeled as a fixed set of thrusters for both translation and attitude control. Analysis includes impact on controller performance due to omitted dynamics in the model (gravitational sources and solar pressure) and model uncertainty (mass properties, thruster placement and thruster alignment). Linearized equations of relative motion are derived for spacecraft operating in the context of the Restricted Three Body Problem. Linearization is performed with respect to a reference spacecraft within the formation. Analysis demonstrates robust stability for the Linear Quadratic Regulator controller design based on the linearized dynamics. Nonlinear controllers are developed based on Lyapunov analysis, including both non-adaptive and adaptive designs. While the linear controller demonstrates greater robustness to model uncertainty, both nonlinear controllers exhibit superior performance. The adaptive controller provides the best performance. As a key feature, the adaptive

  14. Orion Orbit Control Design and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Mark; Gonzalez, Rodolfo; Sims, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    The analysis of candidate thruster configurations for the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) is presented. Six candidate configurations were considered for the prime contractor baseline design. The analysis included analytical assessments of control authority, control precision, efficiency and robustness, as well as simulation assessments of control performance. The principles used in the analytic assessments of controllability, robustness and fuel performance are covered and results provided for the configurations assessed. Simulation analysis was conducted using a pulse width modulated, 6 DOF reaction system control law with a simplex-based thruster selection algorithm. Control laws were automatically derived from hardware configuration parameters including thruster locations, directions, magnitude and specific impulse, as well as vehicle mass properties. This parameterized controller allowed rapid assessment of multiple candidate layouts. Simulation results are presented for final phase rendezvous and docking, as well as low lunar orbit attitude hold. Finally, on-going analysis to consider alternate Service Module designs and to assess the pilot-ability of the baseline design are discussed to provide a status of orbit control design work to date.

  15. Designing robust control laws using genetic algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrison, Chris

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to create a method of finding practical, robust control laws. The robustness of a controller is judged by Stochastic Robustness metrics and the level of robustness is optimized by searching for design parameters that minimize a robustness cost function.

  16. Improve distillation-column control design

    SciTech Connect

    Fruehauf, P.S.; Mahoney, D.P.

    1994-03-01

    Steady-state process models have long been used to assist the engineer in designing control strategies for distillation columns. Yet, a large number of industrial columns still operate in manual or with ineffectual controls. So, better control design techniques using steady-state models certainly are needed. In this article, the authors introduced an improved method that already has proven itself on 33 industrial columns. This article deals exclusively with the design of single-point composition controls. The vast majority of columns have one-sided composition specifications. With such specifications, a single-point composition control scheme can keep both top and bottom product compositions at or below limits for a wide range of disturbances. The predominance of one-sided specifications means that the main incentive for dual-point control schemes is achieving energy savings. In most cases, though, the energy savings are small and do not justify the added difficulty of implementing and maintaining dual-point control. Additionally, dual-point schemes often have significantly longer recoveries from upsets due to interactions between the control loops. The design procedure can be best thought of as a general approach rather than a single detailed procedure that covers all cases. The produce must be adapted to each problem because there are many different types of distillation and almost every industrial problem has some unique requirement.

  17. Controlled air incinerator conceptual design study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    This report presents a conceptual design study for a controlled air incinerator facility for incineration of low level combustible waste at Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2). The facility design is based on the use of a Helix Process Systems controlled air incinerator. Cost estimates and associated engineering, procurement, and construction schedules are also provided. The cost estimates and schedules are presented for two incinerator facility designs, one with provisions for waste ash solidification, the other with provisions for packaging the waste ash for transport to an undefined location.

  18. Flying qualities criteria and flight control design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, D. T.

    1981-01-01

    Despite the application of sophisticated design methodology, newly introduced aircraft continue to suffer from basic flying qualities deficiencies. Two recent meetings, the DOD/NASA Workshop on Highly Augmented Aircraft Criteria and the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center/Air Force Flight Test Center/AIAA Pilot Induced Oscillation Workshop, addressed this problem. An overview of these meetings is provided from the point of view of the relationship between flying qualities criteria and flight control system design. Among the items discussed are flying qualities criteria development, the role of simulation, and communication between flying qualities specialists and control system designers.

  19. Development of a Design Methodology for Reconfigurable Flight Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Ronald A.; McLean, C.

    2000-01-01

    A methodology is presented for the design of flight control systems that exhibit stability and performance-robustness in the presence of actuator failures. The design is based upon two elements. The first element consists of a control law that will ensure at least stability in the presence of a class of actuator failures. This law is created by inner-loop, reduced-order, linear dynamic inversion, and outer-loop compensation based upon Quantitative Feedback Theory. The second element consists of adaptive compensators obtained from simple and approximate time-domain identification of the dynamics of the 'effective vehicle' with failed actuator(s). An example involving the lateral-directional control of a fighter aircraft is employed both to introduce the proposed methodology and to demonstrate its effectiveness and limitations.

  20. Some aspects of robotics calibration, design and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawfik, Hazem

    1990-01-01

    The main objective is to introduce techniques in the areas of testing and calibration, design, and control of robotic systems. A statistical technique is described that analyzes a robot's performance and provides quantitative three-dimensional evaluation of its repeatability, accuracy, and linearity. Based on this analysis, a corrective action should be taken to compensate for any existing errors and enhance the robot's overall accuracy and performance. A comparison between robotics simulation software packages that were commercially available (SILMA, IGRIP) and that of Kennedy Space Center (ROBSIM) is also included. These computer codes simulate the kinematics and dynamics patterns of various robot arm geometries to help the design engineer in sizing and building the robot manipulator and control system. A brief discussion on an adaptive control algorithm is provided.

  1. Adaptive stabilization of discrete-time systems using linear periodically time varying controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortega, Romeo; Albertos, Pedro; Lozano, Rogelio

    1988-01-01

    A direct adaptive scheme based on the use of linear time-varying periodic controllers is proposed which estimates online the periodic coefficients of the controller. It is shown that adaptive stabilization is attained for all possibly nonstably invertible plants of known order but unknown delay. Although no appeal is made to persistency of excitation arguments, a provision is needed to avoid the singularity of an estimated matrix, this property being required only for the analysis and not the control calculations.

  2. Matlab as a robust control design tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Irene M.

    1994-01-01

    This presentation introduces Matlab as a tool used in flight control research. The example used to illustrate some of the capabilities of this software is a robust controller designed for a single stage to orbit air breathing vehicles's ascent to orbit. The global requirements of the controller are to stabilize the vehicle and follow a trajectory in the presence of atmospheric disturbances and strong dynamic coupling between airframe and propulsion.

  3. Observer-based output feedback control of discrete-time linear systems with input and output delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bin

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we study observer-based output feedback control of discrete-time linear systems with both multiple input and output delays. By generalising our recently developed truncated predictor feedback approach for state feedback stabilisation of discrete-time time-delay systems to the design of observer-based output feedback, two types of observer-based output feedback controllers, one being memory and the other memoryless, are constructed. Both full-order and reduced-order observer-based controllers are established in both the memory and memoryless schemes. It is shown that the separation principle holds for the memory observer-based output feedback controllers, but does not hold for the memoryless ones. We further show that the proposed observer-based output feedback controllers solve both the l2 and l∞ semi-global stabilisation problems. A numerical example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approaches.

  4. Simple Expressions for the Design of Linear Tapers in Overmoded Corrugated Waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Schaub, S. C.; Shapiro, M. A.; Temkin, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Simple analytical formulae are presented for the design of linear tapers with very low mode conversion loss in overmoded corrugated waveguides. For tapers from waveguide radius a2 to a1, with a1 < a2, the optimal length of the taper is 3.198a1a2/λ. Here, λ is the wavelength of radiation. The fractional loss of the HE11 mode in an optimized taper is 0.0293(a2−a1)4∕a12a22. These formulae are accurate when a2 ≲ 2a1. Slightly more complex formulae, accurate for a2 ≤ 4a1, are also presented in this paper. The loss in an overmoded corrugated linear taper is less than 1 % when a2 ≤ 2.12a1 and less than 0.1 % when a2 ≤ 1.53a1. The present analytic results have been benchmarked against a rigorous mode matching code and have been found to be very accurate. The results for linear tapers are compared with the analogous expressions for parabolic tapers. Parabolic tapers may provide lower loss, but linear tapers with moderate values of a2/a1 may be attractive because of their simplicity of fabrication. PMID:27053963

  5. The design of a simulated in-line side-coupled 6 MV linear accelerator waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    St Aubin, Joel; Steciw, Stephen; Fallone, B. G.

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: The design of a 3D in-line side-coupled 6 MV linac waveguide for medical use is given, and the effect of the side-coupling and port irises on the radio frequency (RF), beam dynamics, and dosimetric solutions is examined. This work was motivated by our research on a linac-MR hybrid system, where accurate electron trajectory information for a clinical medical waveguide in the presence of an external magnetic field was needed. Methods: For this work, the design of the linac waveguide was generated using the finite element method. The design outlined here incorporates the necessary geometric changes needed to incorporate a full-end accelerating cavity with a single-coupling iris, a waveguide-cavity coupling port iris that allows power transfer into the waveguide from the magnetron, as well as a method to control the RF field magnitude within the first half accelerating cavity into which the electrons from the gun are injected. Results: With the full waveguide designed to resonate at 2998.5{+-}0.1 MHz, a full 3D RF field solution was obtained. The accuracy of the 3D RF field solution was estimated through a comparison of important linac parameters (Q factor, shunt impedance, transit time factor, and resonant frequency) calculated for one accelerating cavity with the benchmarked program SUPERFISH. It was found that the maximum difference between the 3D solution and SUPERFISH was less than 0.03%. The eigenvalue solver, which determines the resonant frequencies of the 3D side-coupled waveguide simulation, was shown to be highly accurate through a comparison with lumped circuit theory. Two different waveguide geometries were examined, one incorporating a 0.5 mm first side cavity shift and another with a 1.5 mm first side cavity shift. The asymmetrically placed side-coupling irises and the port iris for both models were shown to introduce asymmetries in the RF field large enough to cause a peak shift and skewing (center of gravity minus peak shift) of an initially

  6. Overview of control design methods for smart structural system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Vittal S.; Sana, Sridhar

    2001-08-01

    Smart structures are a result of effective integration of control system design and signal processing with the structural systems to maximally utilize the new advances in materials for structures, actuation and sensing to obtain the best performance for the application at hand. The research in smart structures is constantly driving towards attaining self adaptive and diagnostic capabilities that biological systems possess. This has been manifested in the number of successful applications in many areas of engineering such as aerospace, civil and automotive systems. Instrumental in the development of such systems are smart materials such as piezo-electric, shape memory alloys, electrostrictive, magnetostrictive and fiber-optic materials and various composite materials for use as actuators, sensors and structural members. The need for development of control systems that maximally utilize the smart actuators and sensing materials to design highly distributed and highly adaptable controllers has spurred research in the area of smart structural modeling, identification, actuator/sensor design and placement, control systems design such as adaptive and robust controllers with new tools such a neural networks, fuzzy logic, genetic algorithms, linear matrix inequalities and electronics for controller implementation such as analog electronics, micro controllers, digital signal processors (DSPs) and application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) such field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) and Multichip modules (MCMs) etc. In this paper, we give a brief overview of the state of control in smart structures. Different aspects of the development of smart structures such as applications, technology and theoretical advances especially in the area of control systems design and implementation will be covered.

  7. Design of intelligent controllers for exothermal processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, Ramachandran; Yaacob, Sazali

    2001-10-01

    Chemical Industries such as resin or soap manufacturing industries have reaction systems which work with at least two chemicals. Mixing of chemicals even at room temperature can create the process of exothermic reaction. This processes produces a sudden increase of heat energy within the mixture. The quantity of heat and the dynamics of heat generation are unknown, unpredictable and time varying. Proper control of heat has to be accomplished in order to achieve a high quality of product. Uncontrolled or poorly controlled heat causes another unusable product and the process may damage materials and systems and even human being may be harmed. Controlling of heat due to exothermic reaction cannot be achieved using conventional control methods such as PID control, identification and control etc. All of the conventional methods require at least approximate mathematical model of the exothermic process. Modeling an exothermal process is yet to be properly conceived. This paper discusses a design methodology for controlling such a process. A pilot plant of a reaction system has been constructed and utilized for designing and incorporating the proposed fuzzy logic based intelligent controller. Both the conventional and then an adaptive form of fuzzy logic control were used in testing the performance. The test results ensure the effectiveness of controllers in controlling exothermic heat.

  8. Design and development of high linearity millimeter wave traveling-wave tube for satellite communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jun; Huang, Ming-Guang; Li, Xian-Xia; Li, Hai-Qiang; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Jian-Dong; Li, Yue; Zhao, Shi-Lei

    2015-10-01

    The linearity of the traveling-wave tube is a very important characteristic for a modern communication system. To improve the linearity of the traveling-wave tube at no expense of the saturated output power and overall efficiency, a modified pitch profile combined with a small adjustment of operating parameters is proposed. The optimal design of the helix circuit is evaluated theoretically by a large signal analysis, and the experimental test is also carried out to make a comparison of performance between the novel and original designed traveling-wave tubes. The experiments show that the saturated output powers and efficiencies of these two tubes are close to each other, while the linearity of the traveling-wave tube is obviously improved. The total phase shift and AM/PM conversion at saturation of the novel tube, averaged over the operating band, are only 30.6°/dB and 2.5°/dB, respectively, which are 20.1°/dB and 1.6°/dB lower than those of the original tube, respectively. Moreover, the third-order intermodulation of the novel tube is up to 2.2 dBc lower than that of the original tube. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61401430).

  9. Add-on simple adaptive control improves performance of classical control design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Haim; Rusnak, Ilan

    2014-12-01

    The Simple Adaptive Control (SAC) controls an augmented plant that comprises the true plant with parallel feed-forward. The Almost Strictly Positive Real (ASPR) property of the augmented plant leads to asymptotic following. Prior publications have shown that, based only on the prior knowledge on stabilizability properties of systems (usually available), the parallel feed-forward configuration (PFC) allows adaptive control of realistic systems, even if they are both unstable and non-minimum phase. However, it was commonly thought that the PFC addition requires a price when compared with good linear time invariant (LTI) designs that do not use any addition to the plant. The paper shows that the use of SAC with PFC as Add-On to LTI system design improves the performance. Although SAC directly controls the augmented error, it always gives improved performance, i.e., smaller tracking error and reduced sensitivity to plant disturbance, with respect to the best LTI controller.

  10. The development of a microprocessor-controlled linearly-actuated valve assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    The development of a proportional fluid control valve assembly is presented. This electromechanical system is needed for space applications to replace the current proportional flow controllers. The flow is controlled by a microprocessor system that monitors the control parameters of upstream pressure and requested volumetric flow rate. The microprocessor achieves the proper valve stem displacement by means of a digital linear actuator. A linear displacement sensor is used to measure the valve stem position. This displacement is monitored by the microprocessor system as a feedback signal to close the control loop. With an upstream pressure between 15 and 47 psig, the developed system operates between 779 standard CU cm/sec (SCCS) and 1543 SCCS.

  11. New Directions in Asymptotically Stable Finite-dimensional Adaptive Control of Linear Distributed Parameter Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balas, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Distributed Parameter Systems (DPS), such as systems described by partial differential equations, require infinite-dimensional state space descriptions to correctly model their dynamical behavior. However, any adaptive control algorithm must be finite-dimensional in order to be implemented via on-line digital computers. Finite-dimensional adaptive control of linear DPS requires stability analysis of nonlinear, time-varying, infinite-dimensional systems. The structure of nonadaptive finite-dimensional control of linear DPS is summarized as it relates to the existence of limiting systems for adaptive control. Two candidate schemes for finite-dimensional adaptive control of DPS are described and critical issues in infinite-dimensional stability analysis are discussed, in particular, the invariance principle, center manifold theory, and relationships between input-output and internal stability.

  12. Controller Design of Quadrotor Aerial Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yali, Yu; SunFeng; Yuanxi, Wang

    This paper deduced the nonlinear dynamic model of a quadrotor aerial robot, which was a VTOL (vertical tale-off and landing) unmanned air vehicle. Since that is a complex model with the highly nonlinear multivariable strongly coupled and under-actuated property, the controller design of it was very difficult. Aimed at attaining the excellent controller, the whole system can be divided into three interconnected parts: attitude subsystem, vertical subsystem, position subsystem. Then nonlinear control strategy of them has been described, such as SDRE and Backstepping. The controller design was presented to stabilize the whole system. Through simulation result indicates, the various models have shown that the control law stabilize a quadrotor aerial robot with good tracking performance and robotness of the system.

  13. Adaptive control design for hysteretic smart systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahan, Jerry A.; Smith, Ralph C.

    2011-04-01

    Ferroelectric and ferromagnetic actuators are being considered for a range of industrial, aerospace, aeronautic and biomedical applications due to their unique transduction capabilities. However, they also exhibit hysteretic and nonlinear behavior that must be accommodated in models and control designs. If uncompensated, these effects can yield reduced system performance and, in the worst case, can produce unpredictable behavior of the control system. In this paper, we address the development of adaptive control designs for hysteretic systems. We review an MRAC-like adaptive control algorithm used to track a reference trajectory while computing online estimates for certain model parameters. This method is incorporated in a composite control algorithm to improve the tracking capabilities of the system. Issues arising in the implementation of these algorithms are addressed, and a numerical example is presented, comparing the results of each method.

  14. Towards practical control design using neural computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troudet, Terry; Garg, Sanjay; Mattern, Duane; Merrill, Walter

    1991-01-01

    The objective is to develop neural network based control design techniques which address the issue of performance/control effort tradeoff. Additionally, the control design needs to address the important issue if achieving adequate performance in the presence of actuator nonlinearities such as position and rate limits. These issues are discussed using the example of aircraft flight control. Given a set of pilot input commands, a feedforward net is trained to control the vehicle within the constraints imposed by the actuators. This is achieved by minimizing an objective function which is the sum of the tracking errors, control input rates and control input deflections. A tradeoff between tracking performance and control smoothness is obtained by varying, adaptively, the weights of the objective function. The neurocontroller performance is evaluated in the presence of actuator dynamics using a simulation of the vehicle. Appropriate selection of the different weights in the objective function resulted in the good tracking of the pilot commands and smooth neurocontrol. An extension of the neurocontroller design approach is proposed to enhance its practicality.

  15. Design of controlled elastic and inelastic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhorn, A. M.; Lavan, O.; Cimellaro, G. P.

    2009-12-01

    One of the founders of structural control theory and its application in civil engineering, Professor Emeritus Tsu T. Soong, envisioned the development of the integral design of structures protected by active control devices. Most of his disciples and colleagues continuously attempted to develop procedures to achieve such integral control. In his recent papers published jointly with some of the authors of this paper, Professor Soong developed design procedures for the entire structure using a design — redesign procedure applied to elastic systems. Such a procedure was developed as an extension of other work by his disciples. This paper summarizes some recent techniques that use traditional active control algorithms to derive the most suitable (optimal, stable) control force, which could then be implemented with a combination of active, passive and semi-active devices through a simple match or more sophisticated optimal procedures. Alternative design can address the behavior of structures using Liapunov stability criteria. This paper shows a unified procedure which can be applied to both elastic and inelastic structures. Although the implementation does not always preserve the optimal criteria, it is shown that the solutions are effective and practical for design of supplemental damping, stiffness enhancement or softening, and strengthening or weakening.

  16. Design of a superconducting linear synchronous motor with YBCO coil magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Tang, Junjie; Zhang, Ya

    2015-09-01

    The forces of the flat single-sided linear motor with four superconducting coils on the excitation system were presented by experimental method. The influences of the coil height and number of turns on the forces were investigated by the simulation method. Although the maximum thrust increased monotonically with the value of turns, the corresponding increment of the thrust decreased with the value of turns. The thrust reaches a certain saturation value with increasing the height of the superconducting coil. Continuing to increase the height of the coil could lead to an increase of the normal force. The superconducting linear motor is finally designed with the capability to generate thrust of 1 kN/m.

  17. Alighment and Vibration Issues in TeV Linear Collider Design

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, G.E.; /SLAC

    2005-08-12

    The next generation of linear colliders will require alignment accuracies and stabilities of component placement at least one, perhaps two, orders of magnitude better than can be achieved by the conventional methods and procedures in practice today. The magnitudes of these component-placement tolerances for current designs of various linear collider subsystems are tabulated. In the micron range, long-term ground motion is sufficiently rapid that on-line reference and mechanical correction systems are called for. Some recent experiences with the upgraded SLAC laser alignment systems and examples of some conceivable solutions for the future are described. The so called ''girder'' problem is discussed in the light of ambient and vibratory disturbances. The importance of the quality of the underlying geology is stressed. The necessity and limitations of particle-beam-derived placement information are mentioned.

  18. Alignment and vibration issues in TeV linear collider design

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, G.E.

    1989-07-01

    The next generation of linear colliders will require alignment accuracies and stabilities of component placement at least one, perhaps two, orders of magnitude better than can be achieved by the conventional methods and procedures in practice today. The magnitudes of these component-placement tolerances for current designs of various linear collider subsystems are tabulated. In the micron range, long-term ground motion is sufficiently rapid that on-line reference and mechanical correction systems are called for. Some recent experiences with the upgraded SLAC laser alignment systems and examples of some conceivable solutions for the future are described. The so called ''girder'' problem is discussed in the light of ambient and vibratory disturbances. The importance of the quality of the underlying geology is stressed. The necessity and limitations of public-beam-derived placement information are mentioned. 40 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Research on PID controller with input shaping algorithm for linear motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Dong, Yue; Fan, Wenchao; Fu, Zhenxian

    2015-02-01

    The reticle stage of lithography is a high precision servo motion platform, which requires using macro movement of linear motor and micro movement of voice coil motor to realize an nm-level positioning precision and tracking. In order to increase the control effect and response speed of macro movement linear motor of reticle stage of lithography, the paper presents an efficient control for linear motor. The method use input shaping technique with Proportional Integral Derivative (PID) controller to realize the high position precision in small stetting time. In the paper we firstly build the linear motor mathematical modeling which is end to velocity loop or position loop. so that we mainly focus on the tracking of speed signal. Then a PID controller is introduced in the system, which is high frequency used in industrial control. Finally, as the need of high positioning precision and small stetting time, we apply input shaping algorithm to solve the problem. The simulation of the system is performed by using MATLAB/Simulation. The evaluation of the method is the performance of input tracking capability.

  20. Use of linear programming to calculate dwell times for the design of petal tools.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Alvarado, Agustin; González-García, Jorge; Castañeda-Roldan, Cuauhtémoc; Cordero-Dávila, Alberto; Vera-Díaz, Erika; Robledo-Sánchez, Carlos Ignacio

    2007-07-20

    Two constraints in the design of a petal tool are, the angles that define it must all be positive, and wear must never be greater than the desired wear. The first constraint is equivalent to that of the positive dwell times of a small solid tool. In view of this foregoing, we present a design of petal tools that are used to generate conic surfaces from their nearest spheres and that correct the profile of a surface that is polished. We study optimal angular sizes of a petal tool, which are found after we use linear programming to calculate the optimal dwell times of a set of complete annular tools placed in different zones of the glass surface. We report numerical results of designed petal tools.

  1. Compound prism design principles, III: linear-in-wavenumber and optical coherence tomography prisms.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Nathan; Tkaczyk, Tomasz S

    2011-09-01

    We extend the work of the first two papers in this series [Appl. Opt. 50, 4998-5011 (2011), Appl. Opt. 50, 5012-5022 (2011)] to design compound prisms for linear-in-wavenumber dispersion, especially for application in spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT). These dispersive prism designs are believed to be the first to meet the requirements of high resolution OCT systems in direct-view geometry, where they can be used to shrink system size, to improve light throughput, to reduce stray light, and to reduce errors resulting from interpolating between wavelength- and wavenumber-sampled domains. We show prism designs that can be used for thermal sources or for wideband superluminescent diodes centered around wavelengths 850, 900, 1300, and 1375 nm.

  2. Control/structure interaction conceptual design tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Hugh C.

    1990-01-01

    The JPL Control/Structure Interaction Program is developing new analytical methods for designing micro-precision spacecraft with controlled structures. One of these, the Conceptual Design Tool, will illustrate innovative new approaches to the integration of multi-disciplinary analysis and design methods. The tool will be used to demonstrate homogeneity of presentation, uniform data representation across analytical methods, and integrated systems modeling. The tool differs from current 'integrated systems' that support design teams most notably in its support for the new CSI multi-disciplinary engineer. The design tool will utilize a three dimensional solid model of the spacecraft under design as the central data organization metaphor. Various analytical methods, such as finite element structural analysis, control system analysis, and mechanical configuration layout, will store and retrieve data from a hierarchical, object oriented data structure that supports assemblies of components with associated data and algorithms. In addition to managing numerical model data, the tool will assist the designer in organizing, stating, and tracking system requirements.

  3. SUBSURFACE REPOSITORY INTEGRATED CONTROL SYSTEM DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    D.C. Randle

    2000-01-07

    The primary purpose of this document is to develop a preliminary high-level functional and physical control system architecture for the potential repository at Yucca Mountain. This document outlines an overall control system concept that encompasses and integrates the many diverse process and communication systems being developed for the subsurface repository design. This document presents integrated design concepts for monitoring and controlling the diverse set of subsurface operations. The Subsurface Repository Integrated Control System design will be composed of a series of diverse process systems and communication networks. The subsurface repository design contains many systems related to instrumentation and control (I&C) for both repository development and waste emplacement operations. These systems include waste emplacement, waste retrieval, ventilation, radiological and air monitoring, rail transportation, construction development, utility systems (electrical, lighting, water, compressed air, etc.), fire protection, backfill emplacement, and performance confirmation. Each of these systems involves some level of I&C and will typically be integrated over a data communications network throughout the subsurface facility. The subsurface I&C systems will also interface with multiple surface-based systems such as site operations, rail transportation, security and safeguards, and electrical/piped utilities. In addition to the I&C systems, the subsurface repository design also contains systems related to voice and video communications. The components for each of these systems will be distributed and linked over voice and video communication networks throughout the subsurface facility. The scope and primary objectives of this design analysis are to: (1) Identify preliminary system-level functions and interfaces (Section 6.2). (2) Examine the overall system complexity and determine how and on what levels the engineered process systems will be monitored, controlled, and

  4. Designing a graph-based approach to landscape ecological assessment of linear infrastructures

    SciTech Connect

    Girardet, Xavier Foltête, Jean-Christophe Clauzel, Céline

    2013-09-15

    The development of major linear infrastructures contributes to landscape fragmentation and impacts natural habitats and biodiversity in various ways. To anticipate and minimize such impacts, landscape planning needs to be capable of effective strategic environmental assessment (SEA) and of supporting environmental impact assessment (EIA) decisions. To this end, species distribution models (SDMs) are an effective way of making predictive maps of the presence of a given species. In this paper, we propose to combine SDMs and graph-based representation of landscape networks to integrate the potential long-distance effect of infrastructures on species distribution. A diachronic approach, comparing distribution before and after the linear infrastructure is constructed, leads to the design of a species distribution assessment (SDA), taking into account population isolation. The SDA makes it possible (1) to estimate the local variation in probability of presence and (2) to characterize the impact of the infrastructure in terms of global variation in presence and of distance of disturbance. The method is illustrated by assessing the impact of the construction of a high-speed railway line on the distribution of several virtual species in Franche-Comté (France). The study shows the capacity of the SDA to characterize the impact of a linear infrastructure either as a research concern or as a spatial planning challenge. SDAs could be helpful in deciding among several scenarios for linear infrastructure routes or for the location of mitigation measures. -- Highlights: • Graph connectivity metrics were integrated into a species distribution model. • SDM was performed before and after the implementation of linear infrastructure. • The local variation of presence provides spatial indicators of the impact.

  5. Quantum Process Tomography of an Optically-Controlled Kerr Non-linearity.

    PubMed

    Kupchak, Connor; Rind, Samuel; Jordaan, Bertus; Figueroa, Eden

    2015-01-01

    Any optical quantum information processing machine would be comprised of fully-characterized constituent devices for both single state manipulations and tasks involving the interaction between multiple quantum optical states. Ideally for the latter, would be an apparatus capable of deterministic optical phase shifts that operate on input quantum states with the action mediated solely by auxiliary signal fields. Here we present the complete experimental characterization of a system designed for optically controlled phase shifts acting on single-photon level probe coherent states. Our setup is based on a warm vapor of rubidium atoms under the conditions of electromagnetically induced transparency with its dispersion properties modified through the use of an optically triggered N-type Kerr non-linearity. We fully characterize the performance of our device by sending in a set of input probe states and measuring the corresponding output via time-domain homodyne tomography and subsequently performing the technique of coherent state quantum process tomography. This method provides us with the precise knowledge of how our optical phase shift will modify any arbitrary input quantum state engineered in the mode of the reconstruction. PMID:26585904

  6. Modeling and control design of a wind tunnel model support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, David A.

    1990-01-01

    The 12-Foot Pressure Wind Tunnel at Ames Research Center is being restored. A major part of the restoration is the complete redesign of the aircraft model supports and their associated control systems. An accurate trajectory control servo system capable of positioning a model (with no measurable overshoot) is needed. Extremely small errors in scaled-model pitch angle can increase airline fuel costs for the final aircraft configuration by millions of dollars. In order to make a mechanism sufficiently accurate in pitch, a detailed structural and control-system model must be created and then simulated on a digital computer. The model must contain linear representations of the mechanical system, including masses, springs, and damping in order to determine system modes. Electrical components, both analog and digital, linear and nonlinear must also be simulated. The model of the entire closed-loop system must then be tuned to control the modes of the flexible model-support structure. The development of a system model, the control modal analysis, and the control-system design are discussed.

  7. Techniques for designing rotorcraft control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, William S.; Barlow, Jewel

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the work that was done on the project from 1 Apr. 1992 to 31 Mar. 1993. The main goal of this research is to develop a practical tool for rotorcraft control system design based on interactive optimization tools (CONSOL-OPTCAD) and classical rotorcraft design considerations (ADOCS). This approach enables the designer to combine engineering intuition and experience with parametric optimization. The combination should make it possible to produce a better design faster than would be possible using either pure optimization or pure intuition and experience. We emphasize that the goal of this project is not to develop an algorithm. It is to develop a tool. We want to keep the human designer in the design process to take advantage of his or her experience and creativity. The role of the computer is to perform the calculation necessary to improve and to display the performance of the nominal design. Briefly, during the first year we have connected CONSOL-OPTCAD, an existing software package for optimizing parameters with respect to multiple performance criteria, to a simplified nonlinear simulation of the UH-60 rotorcraft. We have also created mathematical approximations to the Mil-specs for rotorcraft handling qualities and input them into CONSOL-OPTCAD. Finally, we have developed the additional software necessary to use CONSOL-OPTCAD for the design of rotorcraft controllers.

  8. Designing Control System Application Software for Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boulanger, Richard

    2001-01-01

    The Unified Modeling Language (UML) was used to design the Environmental Systems Test Stand (ESTS) control system software. The UML was chosen for its ability to facilitate a clear dialog between software designer and customer, from which requirements are discovered and documented in a manner which transposes directly to program objects. Applying the UML to control system software design has resulted in a baseline set of documents from which change and effort of that change can be accurately measured. As the Environmental Systems Test Stand evolves, accurate estimates of the time and effort required to change the control system software will be made. Accurate quantification of the cost of software change can be before implementation, improving schedule and budget accuracy.

  9. Zeroth-order design report for the next linear collider. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Raubenheimer, T.O.

    1996-05-01

    This Zeroth Order Design Report (ZDR) for the Next Linear Collider (NLC) has been completed as a feasibility study for a TeV-scale linear collider that incorporates a room-temperature accelerator powered by rf microwaves at 11.424 GHz--similar to that presently used in the SLC, but at four times the rf frequency. The purpose of this study is to examine the complete systems of such a collider, to understand how the parts fit together, and to make certain that every required piece has been included. The design presented here is not fully engineered in any sense, but to be assured that the NLC can be built, attention has been given to a number of critical components and issues that present special challenges. More engineering and development of a number of mechanical and electrical systems remain to be done, but the conclusion of this study is that indeed the NLC is technically feasible and can be expected to reach the performance levels required to perform research at the TeV energy scale. Volume one covers the following: the introduction; electron source; positron source; NLC damping rings; bunch compressors and prelinac; low-frequency linacs and compressors; main linacs; design and dynamics; and RF systems for main linacs.

  10. X-33 Attitude Control System Design for Ascent, Transition, and Entry Flight Regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Charles E.; Gallaher, Michael W.; Hendrix, Neal D.

    1998-01-01

    The Vehicle Control Systems Team at Marshall Space Flight Center, Systems Dynamics Laboratory, Guidance and Control Systems Division is designing under a cooperative agreement with Lockheed Martin Skunkworks, the Ascent, Transition, and Entry flight attitude control system for the X-33 experimental vehicle. Ascent flight control begins at liftoff and ends at linear aerospike main engine cutoff (NECO) while Transition and Entry flight control begins at MECO and concludes at the terminal area energy management (TAEM) interface. TAEM occurs at approximately Mach 3.0. This task includes not only the design of the vehicle attitude control systems but also the development of requirements for attitude control system components and subsystems. The X-33 attitude control system design is challenged by a short design cycle, the design environment (Mach 0 to about Mach 15), and the X-33 incremental test philosophy. The X-33 design-to-launch cycle of less than 3 years requires a concurrent design approach while the test philosophy requires design adaptation to vehicle variations that are a function of Mach number and mission profile. The flight attitude control system must deal with the mixing of aerosurfaces, reaction control thrusters, and linear aerospike engine control effectors and handle parasitic effects such as vehicle flexibility and propellant sloshing from the uniquely shaped propellant tanks. The attitude control system design is, as usual, closely linked to many other subsystems and must deal with constraints and requirements from these subsystems.

  11. Non-linear controls influence functions in an aircraft dynamics simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerreiro, Nelson M.; Hubbard, James E., Jr.; Motter, Mark A.

    2006-01-01

    In the development and testing of novel structural and controls concepts, such as morphing aircraft wings, appropriate models are needed for proper system characterization. In most instances, available system models do not provide the required additional degrees of freedom for morphing structures but may be modified to some extent to achieve a compatible system. The objective of this study is to apply wind tunnel data collected for an Unmanned Air Vehicle (UAV), that implements trailing edge morphing, to create a non-linear dynamics simulator, using well defined rigid body equations of motion, where the aircraft stability derivatives change with control deflection. An analysis of this wind tunnel data, using data extraction algorithms, was performed to determine the reference aerodynamic force and moment coefficients for the aircraft. Further, non-linear influence functions were obtained for each of the aircraft s control surfaces, including the sixteen trailing edge flap segments. These non-linear controls influence functions are applied to the aircraft dynamics to produce deflection-dependent aircraft stability derivatives in a non-linear dynamics simulator. Time domain analysis of the aircraft motion, trajectory, and state histories can be performed using these nonlinear dynamics and may be visualized using a 3-dimensional aircraft model. Linear system models can be extracted to facilitate frequency domain analysis of the system and for control law development. The results of this study are useful in similar projects where trailing edge morphing is employed and will be instrumental in the University of Maryland s continuing study of active wing load control.

  12. A study of the use of linear programming techniques to improve the performance in design optimization problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Katherine C.; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw

    1988-01-01

    This project has two objectives. The first is to determine whether linear programming techniques can improve performance when handling design optimization problems with a large number of design variables and constraints relative to the feasible directions algorithm. The second purpose is to determine whether using the Kreisselmeier-Steinhauser (KS) function to replace the constraints with one constraint will reduce the cost of total optimization. Comparisons are made using solutions obtained with linear and non-linear methods. The results indicate that there is no cost saving using the linear method or in using the KS function to replace constraints.

  13. A new superbright LED stimulator: photodiode-feedback design for linearizing and stabilizing emitted light.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T; Mori, N; Nakamura, F

    1992-05-01

    A new, reliable LED photic generator is described for analog stimulus presentation in vision research. A "superbright" red-emitting diode is controlled via optical feedback using a PIN-photodiode. A Maxwellian-view stimulator developed this way has been proven capable of covering intensities of retinal illuminance of over 26,000 td with a linear dynamic range of 3.7 log units. The device also has outstanding properties in linearity (distortion less than 0.12% at 100 Hz), frequency characteristics (d.c. to 2 kHz full-modulation bandwidth), stability (0.0002% fluctuation), and noise (S/N ratio greater than 76 dB). PMID:1604864

  14. A Non-Linear Approach to Spacecraft Formation Control in the Vicinity of a Collinear Libration Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luquette, Richard J.; Sanner, Robert M.; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An expanding interest in mission design strategies that exploit libration point regions demands the continued development of enhanced, efficient, control algorithms for station-keeping and formation maintenance. This paper discusses the development of a non-linear, formation maintenance, control algorithm for trajectories in the vicinity of a libration point. However, the formulation holds for any trajectory governed by the equations of motion for the restricted three body problem. The control law guarantees exponential convergence, based on a Lyaponov analysis. FreeFlyer and MATLAB provide the simulation environment for controller performance evaluation. The simulation, modeled after the MAXIM Pathfinder mission, maintains the relative position of a "follower" spacecraft with respect to a "leader" spacecraft, stationed near the L2 libration point in the Sun-Earth system. Evaluation metrics are fuel usage and tracking accuracy.

  15. Control/structure interaction design methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Hugh C.; Layman, William E.

    1989-01-01

    The Control Structure Interaction Program is a technology development program for spacecraft that exhibit interactions between the control system and structural dynamics. The program objectives include development and verification of new design concepts (such as active structure) and new tools (such as a combined structure and control optimization algorithm) and their verification in ground and possibly flight test. The new CSI design methodology is centered around interdisciplinary engineers using new tools that closely integrate structures and controls. Verification is an important CSI theme and analysts will be closely integrated to the CSI Test Bed laboratory. Components, concepts, tools and algorithms will be developed and tested in the lab and in future Shuttle-based flight experiments. The design methodology is summarized in block diagrams depicting the evolution of a spacecraft design and descriptions of analytical capabilities used in the process. The multiyear JPL CSI implementation plan is described along with the essentials of several new tools. A distributed network of computation servers and workstations was designed that will provide a state-of-the-art development base for the CSI technologies.

  16. Analysis of a Linear System for Variable-Thrust Control in the Terminal Phase of Rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hord, Richard A.; Durling, Barbara J.

    1961-01-01

    A linear system for applying thrust to a ferry vehicle in the 3 terminal phase of rendezvous with a satellite is analyzed. This system requires that the ferry thrust vector per unit mass be variable and equal to a suitable linear combination of the measured position and velocity vectors of the ferry relative to the satellite. The variations of the ferry position, speed, acceleration, and mass ratio are examined for several combinations of the initial conditions and two basic control parameters analogous to the undamped natural frequency and the fraction of critical damping. Upon making a desirable selection of one control parameter and requiring minimum fuel expenditure for given terminal-phase initial conditions, a simplified analysis in one dimension practically fixes the choice of the remaining control parameter. The system can be implemented by an automatic controller or by a pilot.

  17. Parallelization of the Volterra algorithm for linear optimal open loop control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S. K.; Utku, S.; Salama, M.

    1989-07-01

    If and when the time variation of optimal controls of a linear system subject to known forces is required, they can be obtained by the computationally advantageous open loop Volterra formulation (as opposed to the costlier Riccati formulation). For the computation, the Volterra equation is discretized in the time domain via such schemes as trapezoidal integration or SIMPSON's rule and the resulting linear system is solved to obtain the control vector values at discrete time points within the control time T. In the case of very large order systems (degrees of freedom ˜ 5000) a parallel technique is absolutely neccessary, and this paper enunciates an efficient parallel stratagem with efficiencies in the range of 80% and 100%. The algorithm uses ‘ s + 1’ processors, ‘ s’ being the number of intervals within the control time T, and typically each processor characterizes one time point.

  18. Finite linear diffusion model for design of overcharge protection for rechargeable lithium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, S. R.; Surampudi, S.; Attia, A. I.

    1991-01-01

    The overcharge condition in secondary lithium batteries employing redox additives for overcharge protection has been theoretically analyzed in terms of a finite linear diffusion model. The analysis leads to expressions relating the steady-state overcharge current density and cell voltage to the concentration, diffusion coefficient, standard reduction potential of the redox couple, and interelectrode distance. The model permits the estimation of the maximum permissible overcharge rate for any chosen set of system conditions. The model has been experimentally verified using 1,1-prime-dimethylferrocene as a redox additive. The theoretical results may be exploited in the design and optimization of overcharge protection by the redox additive approach.

  19. Monitoring and design of stormwater control basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Veenhuis, J.E.; Parrish, J.H.; Jennings, M.E.

    1989-01-01

    The City of Austin, Texas, has played a pioneering role in the control of urban nonpoint source pollution by enacting watershed and stormwater ordinances, overseeing detailed monitoring programs, and improving design criteria for stormwater control methods. The effectiveness of the methods used in Austin, and perhaps in other areas of the United States, to protect urban water resources has not yet been fully established. Therefore, detailed monitoring programs capable of quantitatively determining the effectiveness of control methods and of stormwater ordinances, are required. The purpose of this report is to present an overview of the City of Austin's stormwater monitoring program, including previous monitoring programs with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Geological Survey, and to describe the relation of monitoring to design of stormwater control basins.

  20. Quadrocopter Control Design and Flight Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karwoski, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    A limiting factor in control system design and analysis for spacecraft is the inability to physically test new algorithms quickly and cheaply. Test flights of space vehicles are costly and take much preparation. As such, EV41 recently acquired a small research quadrocopter that has the ability to be a test bed for new control systems. This project focused on learning how to operate, fly, and maintain the quadrocopter, as well as developing and testing protocols for its use. In parallel to this effort, developing a model in Simulink facilitated the design and analysis of simple control systems for the quadrocopter. Software provided by the manufacturer enabled testing of the Simulink control system on the vehicle.

  1. Preliminary demonstration of a robust controller design method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, L. R.

    1980-01-01

    Alternative computational procedures for obtaining a feedback control law which yields a control signal based on measurable quantitites are evaluated. The three methods evaluated are: (1) the standard linear quadratic regulator design model; (2) minimization of the norm of the feedback matrix, k via nonlinear programming subject to the constraint that the closed loop eigenvalues be in a specified domain in the complex plane; and (3) maximize the angles between the closed loop eigenvectors in combination with minimizing the norm of K also via the constrained nonlinear programming. The third or robust design method was chosen to yield a closed loop system whose eigenvalues are insensitive to small changes in the A and B matrices. The relationship between orthogonality of closed loop eigenvectors and the sensitivity of closed loop eigenvalues is described. Computer programs are described.

  2. SUBSURFACE REPOSITORY INTEGRATED CONTROL SYSTEM DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    C.J. Fernado

    1998-09-17

    The purpose of this document is to develop preliminary high-level functional and physical control system architectures for the proposed subsurface repository at Yucca Mountain. This document outlines overall control system concepts that encompass and integrate the many diverse systems being considered for use within the subsurface repository. This document presents integrated design concepts for monitoring and controlling the diverse set of subsurface operations. The subsurface repository design will be composed of a series of diverse systems that will be integrated to accomplish a set of overall functions and objectives. The subsurface repository contains several Instrumentation and Control (I&C) related systems including: waste emplacement systems, ventilation systems, communication systems, radiation monitoring systems, rail transportation systems, ground control monitoring systems, utility monitoring systems (electrical, lighting, water, compressed air, etc.), fire detection and protection systems, retrieval systems, and performance confirmation systems. Each of these systems involve some level of I&C and will typically be integrated over a data communication network. The subsurface I&C systems will also integrate with multiple surface-based site-wide systems such as emergency response, health physics, security and safeguards, communications, utilities and others. The scope and primary objectives of this analysis are to: (1) Identify preliminary system level functions and interface needs (Presented in the functional diagrams in Section 7.2). (2) Examine the overall system complexity and determine how and on what levels these control systems will be controlled and integrated (Presented in Section 7.2). (3) Develop a preliminary subsurface facility-wide design for an overall control system architecture, and depict this design by a series of control system functional block diagrams (Presented in Section 7.2). (4) Develop a series of physical architectures that

  3. Algorithms for adaptive stochastic control for a class of linear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toda, M.; Patel, R. V.

    1977-01-01

    Control of linear, discrete time, stochastic systems with unknown control gain parameters is discussed. Two suboptimal adaptive control schemes are derived: one is based on underestimating future control and the other is based on overestimating future control. Both schemes require little on-line computation and incorporate in their control laws some information on estimation errors. The performance of these laws is studied by Monte Carlo simulations on a computer. Two single input, third order systems are considered, one stable and the other unstable, and the performance of the two adaptive control schemes is compared with that of the scheme based on enforced certainty equivalence and the scheme where the control gain parameters are known.

  4. Prediction-driven coordination of distributed MPC controllers for linear unconstrained dynamic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcos, Natalia I.; Fraser Forbes, J.; Guay, Martin

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, a coordinated-distributed model predictive control (CDMPC) scheme is proposed for discrete-time, linear, unconstrained dynamic systems. The proposed control scheme incorporates a coordinator that communicates with local CDMPC controllers. With the assistance of the coordinator, the local CDMPC controllers adjust their calculated control actions iteratively to achieve the optimal plant-wide operation. A 'prediction-driven' algorithm is used to coordinate the local CDMPC controllers. Convergence of the prediction-driven algorithm is shown along with a stability analysis of the closed-loop system under coordinated-distributed control. A simulation example is used to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed coordinated-distributed control scheme.

  5. RKH space approximations for the feedback operator in a linear hereditary control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reneke, J. A.; Fennell, R. E.

    1987-01-01

    Computational implementation of feedback control laws for linear hereditary systems requires the approximation of infinite dimensional feedback operators with finite dimensional operators. The dense subspaces of K-polygonal functions in reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces, RKH spaces, suggest finite dimensional approximations of the matrix representations of the control operators. A convergence theorem is developed for the approximations and the numerical implementation of the approximations is discussed.

  6. System for linear control and stabilization of laser radiation power by an acousto-optic modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Poleshchuk, A.G.; Khimich, A.K.

    1980-09-01

    This paper presents the results of the development and testing of an acousto-optic modulator control system and describes the operating principle of its circuit. The range of linear light flux power control is greater by a factor of 1000, the relative error is less than 1%, the operating frequency bandwidth is 0--250 kHz, and the decrease in the amplitude of the laser power fluctuations is a factor of 100.

  7. Design Considerations for Laminar Flow Control Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturgeon, R. F.; Bennett, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate major design considerations involved in the application of laminar flow control to the wings and empennage of long range subsonic transport aircraft compatible with initial operation in 1985. For commercial transports with a design mission range of 10,186 km (5500 n mil) and a payload of 200 passengers, parametric configuration analyses were conducted to evaluate the effect of aircraft performance, operational, and geometric parameters on fuel efficiency. Study results indicate that major design goals for aircraft optimization include maximization of aspect ratio and wing loading and minimization of wing sweep consistent with wing volume and airport performance requirements.

  8. Simplified microprocessor design for VLSI control applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, K.

    1991-01-01

    A design technique for microprocessors combining the simplicity of reduced instruction set computers (RISC's) with the richer instruction sets of complex instruction set computers (CISC's) is presented. They utilize the pipelined instruction decode and datapaths common to RISC's. Instruction invariant data processing sequences which transparently support complex addressing modes permit the formulation of simple control circuitry. Compact implementations are possible since neither complicated controllers nor large register sets are required.

  9. Integrated design of structures, controls, and materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, G. L.

    1994-01-01

    In this talk we shall discuss algorithms and CAD tools for the design and analysis of structures for high performance applications using advanced composite materials. An extensive mathematical theory for optimal structural (e.g., shape) design was developed over the past thirty years. Aspects of this theory have been used in the design of components for hypersonic vehicles and thermal diffusion systems based on homogeneous materials. Enhancement of the design methods to include optimization of the microstructure of the component is a significant innovation which can lead to major enhancements in component performance. Our work is focused on the adaptation of existing theories of optimal structural design (e.g., optimal shape design) to treat the design of structures using advanced composite materials (e.g., fiber reinforced, resin matrix materials). In this talk we shall discuss models and algorithms for the design of simple structures from composite materials, focussing on a problem in thermal management. We shall also discuss methods for the integration of active structural controls into the design process.

  10. A non-linear curvature wavefront sensor reconstruction speed and the broadband design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateen, Mala; Guyon, Olivier; Sasián, José; Garrel, Vincent; Hart, Michael

    2011-10-01

    In this paper we explain why a non-linear curvature wavefront sensor (nlCWFS) is more sensitive than conventional wavefront sensors such as the Shack Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWFS) and the conventional curvature wavefront sensor (cCWFS) for sensing mV < 14 natural guide stars. The non-linear approach builds on the successful curvature wavefront sensing concept but uses a non-linear Gerchberg-Saxton (GS) phase diversity algorithm to reconstruct the wavefront. The nonlinear reconstruction algorithm is an advantage for sensitivity but a challenge for fast computation. The current speed is a factor of 10 to 100 times slower than needed for high performance groundbased AO. We present a two step strategy to increase the speed of the algorithm. In the last paper3 we presented laboratory results obtained with a monochromatic source, here we extend our experiment to incorporate a broadband source. The sensitivity of the nlCWFS depends on the ability to extract wavefront phase from diffraction limited speckles therefore it is essential that the speckles do not suffer from chromatic aberration when used with a polychromatic source. We discuss the design for the chromatic re-imaging optics, which through chromatic compensation, allow us to obtain diffraction limited speckles in Fresnel propagated planes on either side of the pupil plane.

  11. Control design for a class of nonlinear parameter varying systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xiushan; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Wei

    2015-07-01

    Stabilisation for a class of one-sided Lipschitz nonlinear parameter varying systems is dealt with in this paper. First, the nonlinear parameter varying system is represented as a subsystem of a differential inclusion. Sufficient conditions for exponential stabilisation for the differential inclusion are given by solving linear matrix inequalities. Then a continuous control law is designed to stabilise the differential inclusion. It leads to stabilising the nonlinear parameter varying system. Finally, a simulation example is presented to show the validity and advantages of the proposed method.

  12. On the design of the dissipative LQG-type controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lozano-Leal, R.; Joshi, S. M.

    1988-01-01

    The design of dissipative linear-quadratic-Gaussian-type compensators for positive real plants is considered. It is shown that if the noise covariance matrices (used as weighting matrices) satisfy certain conditions, the compensator has a strictly positive real transfer function matrix. The stability of the resulting closed-loop system is guaranteed regardless of modeling errors as long as the plant remains positive real. In view of this property, the controller is expected to be useful for vibration suppression in large, flexible space structures.

  13. Reentry Vehicle Flight Controls Design Guidelines: Dynamic Inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ito, Daigoro; Georgie, Jennifer; Valasek, John; Ward, Donald T.

    2002-01-01

    This report addresses issues in developing a flight control design for vehicles operating across a broad flight regime and with highly nonlinear physical descriptions of motion. Specifically it addresses the need for reentry vehicles that could operate through reentry from space to controlled touchdown on Earth. The latter part of controlled descent is achieved by parachute or paraglider - or by all automatic or a human-controlled landing similar to that of the Orbiter. Since this report addresses the specific needs of human-carrying (not necessarily piloted) reentry vehicles, it deals with highly nonlinear equations of motion, and then-generated control systems must be robust across a very wide range of physics. Thus, this report deals almost exclusively with some form of dynamic inversion (DI). Two vital aspects of control theory - noninteracting control laws and the transformation of nonlinear systems into equivalent linear systems - are embodied in DI. Though there is no doubt that the mathematical tools and underlying theory are widely available, there are open issues as to the practicality of using DI as the only or primary design approach for reentry articles. This report provides a set of guidelines that can be used to determine the practical usefulness of the technique.

  14. Unified control/structure design and modeling research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mingori, D. L.; Gibson, J. S.; Blelloch, P. A.; Adamian, A.

    1986-01-01

    To demonstrate the applicability of the control theory for distributed systems to large flexible space structures, research was focused on a model of a space antenna which consists of a rigid hub, flexible ribs, and a mesh reflecting surface. The space antenna model used is discussed along with the finite element approximation of the distributed model. The basic control problem is to design an optimal or near-optimal compensator to suppress the linear vibrations and rigid-body displacements of the structure. The application of an infinite dimensional Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) control theory to flexible structure is discussed. Two basic approaches for robustness enhancement were investigated: loop transfer recovery and sensitivity optimization. A third approach synthesized from elements of these two basic approaches is currently under development. The control driven finite element approximation of flexible structures is discussed. Three sets of finite element basic vectors for computing functional control gains are compared. The possibility of constructing a finite element scheme to approximate the infinite dimensional Hamiltonian system directly, instead of indirectly is discussed.

  15. Consequences of bounds on longitudinal emittance growth for the design of recirculating linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, J. S.

    2015-05-03

    Recirculating linear accelerators (RLAs) are a cost-effective method for the acceleration of muons for a muon collider in energy ranges from a couple GeV to a few 10s of GeV. Muon beams generally have longitudinal emittances that are large for the RF frequency that is used, and it is important to limit the growth of that longitudinal emittance. This has particular consequences for the arc design of the RLAs. I estimate the longitudinal emittance growth in an RLA arising from the RF nonlinearity. Given an emittance growth limitation and other design parameters, one can then compute the maximum momentum compaction in the arcs. I describe how to obtain an approximate arc design satisfying these requirements based on the deisgn in [1]. Longitudinal dynamics also determine the energy spread in the beam, and this has consequences on the transverse phase advance in the linac. This in turn has consequences for the arc design due to the need to match beta functions. I combine these considerations to discuss design parameters for the acceleration of muons for a collider in an RLA from 5 to 63 GeV.

  16. The design, testing and fabrication of an extruded, linear focus Fresnel lens

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminar, N.; Curchod, D. )

    1990-08-01

    The objective of this program is to design and fabricate an extruded, curved, linear-focus Fresnel lens for use in a photovoltaic module operating at 10X concentration. The extrusion process is the least expensive lens manufacturing process, producing a lens at approximately 10$/m{sup 2}. A goal to achieve 70% optical transmission was set. When used in a module, the housing sides are planned to be co-molded with the lens. This provides the least expensive module design available today. A 7-inch wide lens has been designed, and tooling has been fabricated. Several trial extrusions have been made, with the best to date giving a 73% transmission. A post forming tool was designed and fabricated that improves the molded tooth profile to within 0.001 inch of the design. The achievement of over 70% transmission has shown that a photovoltaic system with an installed AC buss-bar electricity cost of under $0.06/kWh can be produced. Solar Engineering Applications Corporation (SEA) is working on a second-generation extruded lens with the goal to achieve 80% transmission and incorporation into a module. 2 refs., 15 figs.

  17. General polynomial factorization-based design of sparse periodic linear arrays.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Sanjit K; Mondal, Kalyan; Tchobanou, Mikhail K; Dolecek, Gordana Jovanovic

    2010-09-01

    We have developed several methods of designing sparse periodic arrays based upon the polynomial factorization method. In these methods, transmit and receive aperture polynomials are selected such that their product results in a polynomial representing the desired combined transmit/receive (T/R) effective aperture function. A desired combined T/R effective aperture is simply an aperture with an appropriate width exhibiting a spectrum that corresponds to the desired two-way radiation pattern. At least one of the two aperture functions that constitute the combined T/R effective aperture function will be a sparse polynomial. A measure of sparsity of the designed array is defined in terms of the element reduction factor. We show that elements of a linear array can be reduced with varying degrees of beam mainlobe width to sidelobe reduction properties.

  18. Radiation calculations and shielding considerations for the design of the Next Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, W.R.; Rokni, S.H.; Vylet, V.

    1996-11-01

    The authors describe some of the work that they have done as a contribution to the Next Linear Collider (NLC) Zeroth-Order Design Report (ZDR), with specific emphasis placed on radiation-protection issues. However, because of the very nature of this machine--namely, extremely-small beam spots of high intensity--a new approach in accelerator radiation-protection philosophy appears to be warranted. Accordingly, the presentation will first take a look at recent design studies directed at protecting the machine itself, since this has resulted in a much better understanding of the very short exposure times involved whenever beam is lost and radiation sources are created. At the end of the paper, the authors suggest a Beam Containment System (BCS) that would provide an independent, redundant guarantee that exposure times are, indeed, kept very short. This, in turn, has guided them in the determination of the transverse shield thickness for the machine.

  19. Design and optimization of multi-class series-parallel linear electromagnetic array artificial muscle.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Ji, Zhenyu; Shi, Xuetao; You, Fusheng; Fu, Feng; Liu, Ruigang; Xia, Junying; Wang, Nan; Bai, Jing; Wang, Zhanxi; Qin, Xiansheng; Dong, Xiuzhen

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle exhibiting complex and excellent precision has evolved for millions of years. Skeletal muscle has better performance and simpler structure compared with existing driving modes. Artificial muscle may be designed by analyzing and imitating properties and structure of skeletal muscle based on bionics, which has been focused on by bionic researchers, and a structure mode of linear electromagnetic array artificial muscle has been designed in this paper. Half sarcomere is the minimum unit of artificial muscle and electromagnetic model has been built. The structural parameters of artificial half sarcomere actuator were optimized to achieve better movement performance. Experimental results show that artificial half sarcomere actuator possesses great motion performance such as high response speed, great acceleration, small weight and size, robustness, etc., which presents a promising application prospect of artificial half sarcomere actuator.

  20. 600 kV modulator design for the SLAC Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, K.; de Lamare, J.; Nesterov, V.; Cassel, R.

    1992-07-01

    Preliminary design for the SLAC Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) requires a pulse power source to produce a 600 kV, 600 A, 1.4 {mu}s, 0.1% flat top pulse with rise and fall times of approximately 100 ns to power an X-Band klystron with a microperveance of 1.25 at {approx} 100 MW peak RF power. The design goals for the modulator, including those previously listed, are peak modulator pulse power of 340 MW operating at 120 Hz. A three-stage darlington pulse-forming network, which produces a >100 kV, 1.4 {mu}s pulse, is coupled to the klystron load through a 6:1 pulse transformer. Careful consideration of the transformer leakage inductance, klystron capacitance, system layout, and component choice is necessary to produce the very fast rise and fall times at 600 kV operating continuously at 120 Hz.

  1. Design of 140 MW X-band Relativistic Klystron for Linear Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolbilov, G. V.; Azorsky, N. I.; Shvetsov, V. S.; Balakin, V. E.; Avrakhov, P. V.; Kazakov, S. Yu.; Teryaev, V. E.; Vogel, V. F.

    1997-05-01

    It has been reported at EPAC-96 on successful experimental results on achievement of 100 MW output rf power in a wide aperture (15 mm), high gain (80 dB) 14 GHz VLEPP klystron with distributed suppression of parasitic oscillations (G.V. Dolbilov et al., Proc. EPAC-96, Sitges (Barselona), 10-14 June, 1996, Vol. 3, p. 2143). This report presents design of an electrodynamic structure of the X-band klystron for linear collider with a higher efficiency up to 56 % which will be achieved at the same parameters of the electron beam (U = 1 MeV, I = 250 A, emittance 0.05 π cm\\cdotrad). Design rf output power of the klystron is 140 MW. Experimental investigations of electrodynamic structure of the klystron are planned to perform using the driving beam of the JINR LIA-3000 induction accelerator (E = 1 MeV, I = 250 A, τ = 250 ns).

  2. Model reduction methods for control design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunipace, K. R.

    1988-01-01

    Several different model reduction methods are developed and detailed implementation information is provided for those methods. Command files to implement the model reduction methods in a proprietary control law analysis and design package are presented. A comparison and discussion of the various reduction techniques is included.

  3. Variance Design and Air Pollution Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrar, Terry A.; Brownstein, Alan B.

    1975-01-01

    Air pollution control authorities were forced to relax air quality standards during the winter of 1972 by granting variances. This paper examines the institutional characteristics of these variance policies from an economic incentive standpoint, sets up desirable structural criteria for institutional design and arrives at policy guidelines for…

  4. Space Launch System Ascent Flight Control Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Jeb S.; Wall, John H.; VanZwieten, Tannen S.; Hall, Charles E.

    2014-01-01

    A robust and flexible autopilot architecture for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) family of launch vehicles is presented. The SLS configurations represent a potentially significant increase in complexity and performance capability when compared with other manned launch vehicles. It was recognized early in the program that a new, generalized autopilot design should be formulated to fulfill the needs of this new space launch architecture. The present design concept is intended to leverage existing NASA and industry launch vehicle design experience and maintain the extensibility and modularity necessary to accommodate multiple vehicle configurations while relying on proven and flight-tested control design principles for large boost vehicles. The SLS flight control architecture combines a digital three-axis autopilot with traditional bending filters to support robust active or passive stabilization of the vehicle's bending and sloshing dynamics using optimally blended measurements from multiple rate gyros on the vehicle structure. The algorithm also relies on a pseudo-optimal control allocation scheme to maximize the performance capability of multiple vectored engines while accommodating throttling and engine failure contingencies in real time with negligible impact to stability characteristics. The architecture supports active in-flight disturbance compensation through the use of nonlinear observers driven by acceleration measurements. Envelope expansion and robustness enhancement is obtained through the use of a multiplicative forward gain modulation law based upon a simple model reference adaptive control scheme.

  5. Space Launch System Ascent Flight Control Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZwieten, Tannen S.; Orr, Jeb S.; Wall, John H.; Hall, Charles E.

    2014-01-01

    A robust and flexible autopilot architecture for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) family of launch vehicles is presented. As the SLS configurations represent a potentially significant increase in complexity and performance capability of the integrated flight vehicle, it was recognized early in the program that a new, generalized autopilot design should be formulated to fulfill the needs of this new space launch architecture. The present design concept is intended to leverage existing NASA and industry launch vehicle design experience and maintain the extensibility and modularity necessary to accommodate multiple vehicle configurations while relying on proven and flight-tested control design principles for large boost vehicles. The SLS flight control architecture combines a digital three-axis autopilot with traditional bending filters to support robust active or passive stabilization of the vehicle's bending and sloshing dynamics using optimally blended measurements from multiple rate gyros on the vehicle structure. The algorithm also relies on a pseudo-optimal control allocation scheme to maximize the performance capability of multiple vectored engines while accommodating throttling and engine failure contingencies in real time with negligible impact to stability characteristics. The architecture supports active in-flight load relief through the use of a nonlinear observer driven by acceleration measurements, and envelope expansion and robustness enhancement is obtained through the use of a multiplicative forward gain modulation law based upon a simple model reference adaptive control scheme.

  6. Design of a high linearity and high gain accuracy analog baseband circuit for DAB receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ma; Zhigong, Wang; Jian, Xu; Yiqiang, Wu; Junliang, Wang; Mi, Tian; Jianping, Chen

    2015-02-01

    An analog baseband circuit of high linearity and high gain accuracy for a digital audio broadcasting receiver is implemented in a 0.18-μm RFCMOS process. The circuit comprises a 3rd-order active-RC complex filter (CF) and a programmable gain amplifier (PGA). An automatic tuning circuit is also designed to tune the CF's pass band. Instead of the class-A fully differential operational amplifier (FDOPA) adopted in the conventional CF and PGA design, a class-AB FDOPA is specially employed in this circuit to achieve a higher linearity and gain accuracy for its large current swing capability with lower static current consumption. In the PGA circuit, a novel DC offset cancellation technique based on the MOS resistor is introduced to reduce the settling time significantly. A reformative switching network is proposed, which can eliminate the switch resistor's influence on the gain accuracy of the PGA. The measurement result shows the gain range of the circuit is 10-50 dB with a 1-dB step size, and the gain accuracy is less than ±0.3 dB. The OIP3 is 23.3 dBm at the gain of 10 dB. Simulation results show that the settling time is reduced from 100 to 1 ms. The image band rejection is about 40 dB. It only draws 4.5 mA current from a 1.8 V supply voltage.

  7. Robust computer-aided synthesis and optimization of linear multivariable control systems with varying plant dynamics via AUTOCON

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefkowitz, C. P.; Tekawy, J. A.; Pujara, P. K.; Safonov, M. G.

    1989-01-01

    AUTOCON is an automated computer-aided design tool for the synthesis and optimization of linear multivariable control systems based upon user-defined control parameter optimization. Violations in stability and performance requirements are computed from constraints on Single Input/Single Output (SISO) open- and closed-loop transfer function frequency responses, and from constraints on the singular-value frequency responses of Multiple Input/Multiple Output (MIMO) transfer functions, for all critical plant variations. Optimum nonlinear programming algorithms are used in the search for local constrained solutions in which violations in stability and performance are caused either to vanish or be minimized for a proper selection of the control parameters. Classical control system stability and performance design can, in this way, be combined with modern multivariable robustness methods to offer general frequency response loop-shaping via a computer-aided design tool. Complete Nichols, Nyquist, Bode, singular-value Bode magnitude and transient response plots are produced, including user-defined boundary responses. AUTOCON is used to synthesize and optimize the lateral/directional flight control system for a typical high-performance aircraft.

  8. Sun Safe Mode Controller Design for LADEE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusco, Jesse C.; Swei, Sean S. M.; Nakamura, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the development of sun safe controllers which are designed to keep the spacecraft power positive and thermally balanced in the event an anomaly is detected. Employed by NASA's Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE), the controllers utilize the measured sun vector and the spacecraft body rates for feedback control. To improve the accuracy of sun vector estimation, the least square minimization approach is applied to process the sensor data, which is proven to be effective and accurate. To validate the controllers, the LADEE spacecraft model engaging the sun safe mode was first simulated and then compared with the actual LADEE orbital fight data. The results demonstrated the applicability of the proposed sun safe controllers.

  9. System identification for robust control design

    SciTech Connect

    Dohner, J.L.

    1995-04-01

    System identification for the purpose of robust control design involves estimating a nominal model of a physical system and the uncertainty bounds of that nominal model via the use of experimentally measured input/output data. Although many algorithms have been developed to identify nominal models, little effort has been directed towards identifying uncertainty bounds. Therefore, in this document, a discussion of both nominal model identification and bounded output multiplicative uncertainty identification will be presented. This document is divided into several sections. Background information relevant to system identification and control design will be presented. A derivation of eigensystem realization type algorithms will be presented. An algorithm will be developed for calculating the maximum singular value of output multiplicative uncertainty from measured data. An application will be given involving the identification of a complex system with aliased dynamics, feedback control, and exogenous noise disturbances. And, finally, a short discussion of results will be presented.

  10. Gimbal bearing design considerations and friction control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, N. R.

    1979-01-01

    The design considerations of bearing selection, bearing fits, bearing installation, and thermal control are discussed for a gimbal with a high stiffness, low friction torque requirement. Tradeoffs between a quad set of small diameter spread apart or a large diameter bearing pair resulted in a cleaner, lighter, stiffer unit with the latter selection. Bearing fits were designed to eliminate clearances with tolerances of .00127 mm 00005 in) on the bearing shafts and housings. The problems in metrology are discussed and a perferred technique for measurement of small cross-section bearings described. A technique for installation to assure proper seating of the bearing is offered. Where transient thermal conditions are involved, a method of controlling bearing friction by active control of bearing temperature gradients including the use of bearing unload test curves is described.

  11. Design principles of a cooperative robot controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayward, Vincent; Hayati, Samad

    1987-01-01

    The paper describes the design of a controller for cooperative robots being designed at McGill University in a collaborative effort with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The first part of the paper discusses the background and motivation for multiple arm control. Then, a set of programming primitives, which are based on the RCCL system and which permit a programmer to specify cooperative tasks are described. The first group of primitives are motion primitives which specify asynchronous motions, master/slave motions, and cooperative motions. In the context of cooperative robots, trajectory generation issues will be discussed and the implementation described. A second set of primitives provides for the specification of spatial relationships. The relations between programming and control in the case of multiple robot are examined. Finally, the paper describes the allocation of various tasks among a set of microprocessors sharing a common bus.

  12. Interim report on the Global Design Effort Global International Linear Collider (ILC) R&D

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, M.

    2011-04-30

    The International Linear Collider: A Technical Progress Report marks the halfway point towards the Global Design Effort fulfilling its mandate to follow up the ILC Reference Design Report with a more optimised Technical Design Report (TDR) by the end of 2012. The TDR will be based on much of the work reported here and will contain all the elements needed to propose the ILC to collaborating governments, including a technical design and implementation plan that are realistic and have been better optimised for performance, cost and risk. We are on track to develop detailed plans for the ILC, such that once results from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN establish the main science goals and parameters of the next machine, we will be in good position to make a strong proposal for this new major global project in particle physics. The two overriding issues for the ILC R&D programme are to demonstrate that the technical requirements for the accelerator are achievable with practical technologies, and that the ambitious physics goals can be addressed by realistic ILC detectors. This GDE interim report documents the impressive progress on the accelerator technologies that can make the ILC a reality. It highlights results of the technological demonstrations that are giving the community increased confidence that we will be ready to proceed with an ILC project following the TDR. The companion detector and physics report document likewise demonstrates how detector designs can meet the ambitious and detailed physics goals set out by the ILC Steering Committee. LHC results will likely affect the requirements for the machine design and the detectors, and we are monitoring that very closely, intending to adapt our design as those results become available.

  13. HETDEX tracker control system design and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beno, Joseph H.; Hayes, Richard; Leck, Ron; Penney, Charles; Soukup, Ian

    2012-09-01

    To enable the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment, The University of Texas at Austin Center for Electromechanics and McDonald Observatory developed a precision tracker and control system - an 18,000 kg robot to position a 3,100 kg payload within 10 microns of a desired dynamic track. Performance requirements to meet science needs and safety requirements that emerged from detailed Failure Modes and Effects Analysis resulted in a system of 13 precision controlled actuators and 100 additional analog and digital devices (primarily sensors and safety limit switches). Due to this complexity, demanding accuracy requirements, and stringent safety requirements, two independent control systems were developed. First, a versatile and easily configurable centralized control system that links with modeling and simulation tools during the hardware and software design process was deemed essential for normal operation including motion control. A second, parallel, control system, the Hardware Fault Controller (HFC) provides independent monitoring and fault control through a dedicated microcontroller to force a safe, controlled shutdown of the entire system in the event a fault is detected. Motion controls were developed in a Matlab-Simulink simulation environment, and coupled with dSPACE controller hardware. The dSPACE real-time operating system collects sensor information; motor commands are transmitted over a PROFIBUS network to servo amplifiers and drive motor status is received over the same network. To interface the dSPACE controller directly to absolute Heidenhain sensors with EnDat 2.2 protocol, a custom communication board was developed. This paper covers details of operational control software, the HFC, algorithms, tuning, debugging, testing, and lessons learned.

  14. A free-piston Stirling engine/linear alternator controls and load interaction test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauch, Jeffrey S.; Kankam, M. David; Santiago, Walter; Madi, Frank J.

    1992-01-01

    A test facility at LeRC was assembled for evaluating free-piston Stirling engine/linear alternator control options, and interaction with various electrical loads. This facility is based on a 'SPIKE' engine/alternator. The engine/alternator, a multi-purpose load system, a digital computer based load and facility control, and a data acquisition system with both steady-periodic and transient capability are described. Preliminary steady-periodic results are included for several operating modes of a digital AC parasitic load control. Preliminary results on the transient response to switching a resistive AC user load are discussed.

  15. A free-piston Stirling engine/linear alternator controls and load interaction test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rauch, J.S.; Kankam, M.D.; Santiago, W.; Madi, F.J.

    1992-08-01

    A test facility at LeRC was assembled for evaluating free-piston Stirling engine/linear alternator control options, and interaction with various electrical loads. This facility is based on a 'SPIKE' engine/alternator. The engine/alternator, a multi-purpose load system, a digital computer based load and facility control, and a data acquisition system with both steady-periodic and transient capability are described. Preliminary steady-periodic results are included for several operating modes of a digital AC parasitic load control. Preliminary results on the transient response to switching a resistive AC user load are discussed.

  16. Nearly data-based optimal control for linear discrete model-free systems with delays via reinforcement learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jilie; Zhang, Huaguang; Wang, Binrui; Cai, Tiaoyang

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a nearly data-based optimal control scheme is proposed for linear discrete model-free systems with delays. The nearly optimal control can be obtained using only measured input/output data from systems, by reinforcement learning technology, which combines Q-learning with value iterative algorithm. First, we construct a state estimator by using the measured input/output data. Second, the quadratic functional is used to approximate the value function at each point in the state space, and the data-based control is designed by Q-learning method using the obtained state estimator. Then, the paper states the method, that is, how to solve the optimal inner kernel matrix ? in the least-square sense, by value iteration algorithm. Finally, the numerical examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of our approach.

  17. Design of an Annular Linear Induction Pump for Nuclear Space Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Carloa O. Maidana; James E. Werner; Daniel M. Wachs

    2011-02-01

    Abstract. The United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy, Science, and Technology is supporting the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in evaluating space mission power, propulsion systems and technologies to support the implementation of the Vision for Space Exploration (VSE). NASA will need increased power for propulsion and for surface power applications to support both robotic and human space exploration missions. As part of the Fission Surface Power Technology Project for the development of nuclear reactor technologies for multi-mission spacecrafts, an Annular Linear Induction Pump, a type of Electromagnetic Pump for liquid metals, able to operate in space has to be designed. Results of such design work are described as well as the fundamental ideas behind the development of an optimized design methodology. This project, which is a collaboration between Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), involves the use of theoretical, computational and experimental tools for multi-physics analysis as well as advanced engineering design methods and techniques.

  18. Automatic design of synthetic gene circuits through mixed integer non-linear programming.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Linh; Kececioglu, John; Köppe, Matthias; Tagkopoulos, Ilias

    2012-01-01

    Automatic design of synthetic gene circuits poses a significant challenge to synthetic biology, primarily due to the complexity of biological systems, and the lack of rigorous optimization methods that can cope with the combinatorial explosion as the number of biological parts increases. Current optimization methods for synthetic gene design rely on heuristic algorithms that are usually not deterministic, deliver sub-optimal solutions, and provide no guaranties on convergence or error bounds. Here, we introduce an optimization framework for the problem of part selection in synthetic gene circuits that is based on mixed integer non-linear programming (MINLP), which is a deterministic method that finds the globally optimal solution and guarantees convergence in finite time. Given a synthetic gene circuit, a library of characterized parts, and user-defined constraints, our method can find the optimal selection of parts that satisfy the constraints and best approximates the objective function given by the user. We evaluated the proposed method in the design of three synthetic circuits (a toggle switch, a transcriptional cascade, and a band detector), with both experimentally constructed and synthetic promoter libraries. Scalability and robustness analysis shows that the proposed framework scales well with the library size and the solution space. The work described here is a step towards a unifying, realistic framework for the automated design of biological circuits. PMID:22536398

  19. Automatic design of synthetic gene circuits through mixed integer non-linear programming.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Linh; Kececioglu, John; Köppe, Matthias; Tagkopoulos, Ilias

    2012-01-01

    Automatic design of synthetic gene circuits poses a significant challenge to synthetic biology, primarily due to the complexity of biological systems, and the lack of rigorous optimization methods that can cope with the combinatorial explosion as the number of biological parts increases. Current optimization methods for synthetic gene design rely on heuristic algorithms that are usually not deterministic, deliver sub-optimal solutions, and provide no guaranties on convergence or error bounds. Here, we introduce an optimization framework for the problem of part selection in synthetic gene circuits that is based on mixed integer non-linear programming (MINLP), which is a deterministic method that finds the globally optimal solution and guarantees convergence in finite time. Given a synthetic gene circuit, a library of characterized parts, and user-defined constraints, our method can find the optimal selection of parts that satisfy the constraints and best approximates the objective function given by the user. We evaluated the proposed method in the design of three synthetic circuits (a toggle switch, a transcriptional cascade, and a band detector), with both experimentally constructed and synthetic promoter libraries. Scalability and robustness analysis shows that the proposed framework scales well with the library size and the solution space. The work described here is a step towards a unifying, realistic framework for the automated design of biological circuits.

  20. A mathematical theory of learning control for linear discrete multivariable systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phan, Minh; Longman, Richard W.

    1988-01-01

    When tracking control systems are used in repetitive operations such as robots in various manufacturing processes, the controller will make the same errors repeatedly. Here consideration is given to learning controllers that look at the tracking errors in each repetition of the process and adjust the control to decrease these errors in the next repetition. A general formalism is developed for learning control of discrete-time (time-varying or time-invariant) linear multivariable systems. Methods of specifying a desired trajectory (such that the trajectory can actually be performed by the discrete system) are discussed, and learning controllers are developed. Stability criteria are obtained which are relatively easy to use to insure convergence of the learning process, and proper gain settings are discussed in light of measurement noise and system uncertainties.