Science.gov

Sample records for linear impedance vibrator

  1. Linearly tapered slot antenna impedance characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Lee, Richard Q.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents for the first time an experimental technique to de-embed the input impedance of a LTSA from the measured reflection coefficient. The results show that the input impedance is dependent on the semi-flare angle and the length of the LTSA. The Re(Z(sub in)) is large when the electrical length of the LTSA is small and is on the order of few thousand ohms. However for an electrically large LTSA the Re(Z(sub in)) is in the range of 55 to 130 ohms. These results have potential applications in the design of broad band impedance matching networks for LTSA.

  2. Effect of External Vibration on PZT Impedance Signature.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yaowen; Miao, Aiwei

    2008-11-01

    Piezoelectric ceramic Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) transducers, working on the principle of electromechanical impedance (EMI), are increasingly applied for structural health monitoring (SHM) in aerospace, civil and mechanical engineering. The PZT transducers are usually surface bonded to or embedded in a structure and subjected to actuation so as to interrogate the structure at the desired frequency range. The interrogation results in the electromechanical admittance (inverse of EMI) signatures which can be used to estimate the structural health or integrity according to the changes of the signatures. In the existing EMI method, the monitored structure is only excited by the PZT transducers for the interrogating of EMI signature, while the vibration of the structure caused by the external excitations other than the PZT actuation is not considered. However, many structures work under vibrations in practice. To monitor such structures, issues related to the effects of vibration on the EMI signature need to be addressed because these effects may lead to misinterpretation of the structural health. This paper develops an EMI model for beam structures, which takes into account the effect of beam vibration caused by the external excitations. An experimental study is carried out to verify the theoretical model. A lab size specimen with different external excitations is tested and the effect of vibration on EMI signature is discussed.

  3. Impact self-excited vibrations of linear motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuravlev, V. Ph.

    2010-08-01

    Impact self-exciting vibration modes in a linear motor of a monorail car are studied. Existence and stability conditions of self-exciting vibrations are found. Ways of avoiding the vibrations are discussed.

  4. A linear parametric approach for analysis of mouse respiratory impedance.

    PubMed

    Hanifi, Arezoo; Goplen, Nicholas; Matin, Mohammad; Salters, Roger E; Alam, Rafeul

    2012-06-01

    Assessment of the lung mechanics is crucial in lung function studies. Commonly lung mechanics is achieved through measurement of the input impedance of the lung where the experimental data is ideal for the application of system identification techniques. This study proposes a new approach for investigating the severity of lung conditions and also evaluating the treatment progression. The proposed method is established based on linear parametric identification of lung input impedance in mice and is applied to normal and asthmatic models (including acute, tolerant and chronic asthma) as well as a pharmacological intervention model. Experimental findings confirm the effectiveness of the analysis technique applied here. We discuss the potential application of this method to analyses of human lung mechanics.

  5. Linear lateral vibration of axisymmetric liquid briges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrera, C.; Montanero, J. M.; Cabezas, M. G.

    A liquid bridge is a mass of liquid sustained by the action of the surface tension force between two parallel supporting disks Apart from their basic scientific interest a liquid bridge can be considered as the simplest idealization of the configuration appearing in the floating zone technique used for crystal growth and purification of high melting point materials footnote Messeguer et al emph Crystal Growth Res bf 5 27 1999 This has conferred considerable interest on the study of liquid bridges not only in fluid mechanics but also in the field of material engineering The axisymmetric dynamics of an isothermal liquid bridge has been frequently analysed over the past years The studies have considered different phenomena such as free oscillations footnote Montanero emph E J Mech B Fluids bf 22 169 2003 footnote Acero and Montanero emph Phys Fluids bf 17 078105 2005 forced vibrations footnote Perales and Messeguer emph Phys Fluids A bf 4 1110 1992 g-jitter effects footnote Messeguer and Perales emph Phys Fluids A bf 3 2332 1991 extensional deformation footnote Zhang et al emph J Fluid Mech bf 329 207 1996 and breakup process footnote Espino et al emph Phys Fluids bf 14 3710 2002 among others Works considering the nonaxisymmetric dynamical behaviour of a liquid bridge has been far less common footnote Sanz and Diez emph J Fluid Mech bf 205 503 1989 In the present study the linear vibration of an axisymmetric liquid

  6. Non-Linear Vibration Characteristics of Clamped Laminated Shallow Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ABE, A.; KOBAYASHI, Y.; YAMADA, G.

    2000-07-01

    This paper examines non-linear free vibration characteristics of first and second vibration modes of laminated shallow shells with rigidly clamped edges. Non-linear equations of motion for the shells based on the first order shear deformation and classical shell theories are derived by means of Hamilton's principle. We apply Galerkin's procedure to the equations of motion in which eigenvectors for first and second modes of linear vibration obtained by the Ritz method are employed as trial functions. Then simultaneous non-linear ordinary differential equations are derived in terms of amplitudes of the first and second vibration modes. Backbone curves for the first and second vibration modes are solved numerically by the Gauss-Legendre integration method and the shooting method respectively. The effects of lamination sequences and transverse shear deformation on the behavior are discussed. It is also shown that the motion of the first vibration mode affects the response for the second vibration mode.

  7. Calculation of rotor impedance for use in design analysis of helicopter airframe vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nygren, Kip P.

    1990-01-01

    Excessive vibration is one of the most prevalent technical obstacles encountered in the development of new rotorcraft. The inability to predict these vibrations is primarily due to deficiencies in analysis and simulation tools. The Langley Rotorcraft Structural Dynamics Program was instituted in 1984 to meet long term industry needs in the area of rotorcraft vibration prediction. As a part of the Langley program, this research endeavors to develop an efficient means of coupling the rotor to the airframe for preliminary design analysis of helicopter airframe vibrations. The main effort was to modify the existing computer program for modeling the dynamic and aerodynamic behavior of rotorcraft called DYSCO (DYnamic System COupler) to calculate the rotor impedance. DYSCO was recently developed for the U.S. Army and has proven to be adaptable for the inclusion of new solution methods. The solution procedure developed to use DYSCO for the calculation of rotor impedance is presented. Verification of the procedure by comparison with a known solution for a simple wind turbine model is about 75 percent completed, and initial results are encouraging. After the wind turbine impedance is confirmed, the verification effort will continue by comparison to solutions of a more sophisticated rotorcraft model. Future work includes determination of the sensitivity of the rotorcraft airframe vibrations to helicopter flight conditions and rotor modeling assumptions. When completed, this research will ascertain the feasibility and efficiency of the impedance matching method of rotor-airframe coupling for use in the analysis of airframe vibrations during the preliminary rotorcraft design process.

  8. Measurement of cantilever vibration using impedance-loaded surface acoustic wave sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, Masaki; Hamashima, Hiromitsu; Kondoh, Jun

    2016-07-01

    In this study, an impedance-loaded surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor was demonstrated to monitor the vibration frequency. Commercialized pressure sensors and a variable capacitor were chosen as external sensors, which were connected to a reflector on a SAW device. As the reflection coefficient of the reflector depended on the impedance, the echo amplitude was influenced by changes in the impedance of the external sensor. The vibration frequency of the cantilever was determined by monitoring the echo amplitude of the SAW device. Moreover, the attenuation constant of an envelope was estimated. The results of our feasibility study indicate that the impedance-loaded SAW sensor can be applied as a detector for structural health monitoring.

  9. LDV measurement of bird ear vibrations to determine inner ear impedance and middle ear power flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muyshondt, Pieter G. G.; Pires, Felipe; Dirckx, Joris J. J.

    2016-06-01

    The mechanical behavior of the middle ear structures in birds and mammals is affected by the fluids in the inner ear (IE) that are present behind the oval window. In this study, the aim was to gather knowledge of the acoustic impedance of the IE in the ostrich, to be able to determine the effect on vibrations and power flow in the single-ossicle bird middle ear for future studies. To determine the IE impedance, vibrations of the ossicle were measured for both the quasi-static and acoustic stimulus frequencies. In the acoustic regime, vibrations were measured with a laser Doppler vibrometer and electromagnetic stimulation of the ossicle. The impedance of the inner ear could be determined by means of a simple RLC model in series, which resulted in a stiffness reactance of KIE = 0.20.1012 Pa/m3, an inertial impedance of MIE = 0.652.106 Pa s2/m3, and a resistance of RIE = 1.57.109 Pa s/m. The measured impedance is found to be considerably smaller than what is found for the human IE.

  10. Radiation impedance and equivalent circuit for piezoelectric ultrasonic composite transducers of vibrational mode-conversion.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuyu

    2012-01-01

    The piezoelectric ultrasonic composite transducer, which can be used in either gas or liquid media, is studied in this paper. The composite transducer is composed of a longitudinal sandwich piezoelectric transducer, a mechanical transformer, and a metal circular plate in flexural vibration. Acoustic radiation is produced by the flexural circular plate, which is excited by the longitudinal sandwich transducer and transformer. Based on the classic flexural theory of plates, the equivalent lumped parameters for a plate in axially symmetric flexural vibration with free boundary conditions are obtained. The radiation impedance of the plate is derived and the relationship between the radiation impedance and the frequency is analyzed. The equivalent circuits for the plate in flexural vibration and the composite transducer are given. The vibrational modes and the harmonic response of the composite piezoelectric transducer are simulated by the numerical method. Based on the theoretical and numerical analysis, two composite piezoelectric ultrasonic transducers are designed and manufactured, their admittance-frequency curves are measured, and the resonance frequency is obtained. The flexural vibrational displacement distribution of the transducer is measured with a laser scanning vibrometer. It is shown that the theoretical results are in good agreement with the measured resonance frequency and the displacement distribution.

  11. Multiscale wireless sensor node for impedance-based SHM and low-frequency vibration data acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Stuart G; Farinholt, Kevin M; Park, Gyuhae; Farrar, Charles R; Todd, Michael D

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents recent developments in an extremely compact, wireless impedance sensor node (WID3, Wireless Impedance Device) at Los Alamos National Laboratory for use in impedance-based structural health monitoring (SHM), Sensor diagnostics and low-frequency vibrational data acquisition. The current generation WID3 is equipped with an Analog Devices AD5933 impedance chip that can resolve measurements up to 100 kHz, a frequency range ideal for many SHM applications. An integrated set of multiplexers allows the end user to monitor seven piezoelectric sensors from a single sensor node. The WID3 combines on-board processing using an Atmega1281 microcontroller, data storage using flash memory, wireless communications capabilities, and a series of internal and external triggering options into a single package to realize a truly comprehensive, self-contained wireless active-sensor node for SHM applications. Furthermore, we recently extended the capability of this device by implementing low-frequency analog to digital and digital and analog converters so that the same device can measure structural vibration data. The WID3 requires less than 70 mW of power to operate, and it can operate in various wireless network paradigms. The performance of this miniaturized and portable device is compared to our previous results and its broader capabilities are demonstrated.

  12. Optimal design of linear and non-linear dynamic vibration absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordanov, I. N.; Cheshankov, B. I.

    1988-05-01

    An efficient numerical method is applied to obtain optimal parameters for both linear and non-linear damped dynamic vibration absorbers. The minimization of the vibration response has been carried out for damped as well as undamped force excited primary systems with linear and non-linear spring characteristics. Comparison is made with the optimum absorber parameters that are determined by using Den Hartog's classical results in the linear case. Six optimization criteria by which the response is minimized over narrow and broad frequency bands are examined. Pareto optimal solutions of the multi-objective decision making problem are obtained.

  13. Non-linear optical crystal vibration sensing device

    DOEpatents

    Kalibjian, R.

    1994-08-09

    A non-linear optical crystal vibration sensing device including a photorefractive crystal and a laser is disclosed. The laser produces a coherent light beam which is split by a beam splitter into a first laser beam and a second laser beam. After passing through the crystal the first laser beam is counter-propagated back upon itself by a retro-mirror, creating a third laser beam. The laser beams are modulated, due to the mixing effect within the crystal by vibration of the crystal. In the third laser beam, modulation is stable and such modulation is converted by a photodetector into a usable electrical output, intensity modulated in accordance with vibration applied to the crystal. 3 figs.

  14. Non-linear optical crystal vibration sensing device

    DOEpatents

    Kalibjian, Ralph

    1994-01-11

    A non-linear optical crystal vibration sensing device (10) including a photorefractive crystal (26) and a laser (12). The laser (12 ) produces a coherent light beam (14) which is split by a beam splitter (18) into a first laser beam (20) and a second laser beam (22). After passing through the crystal (26) the first laser beam (20) is counter-propagated back upon itself by a retro-mirror (32), creating a third laser beam (30). The laser beams (20, 22, 30) are modulated, due to the mixing effect within the crystal (26) by vibration of the crystal (30). In the third laser beam (30), modulation is stable and such modulation is converted by a photodetector (34) into a usable electrical output, intensity modulated in accordance with vibration applied to the crystal (26).

  15. Free vibration analysis of Mindlin plates with linearly varying thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksu, G.; Al-Kaabi, S. A.

    1987-12-01

    A method based on the variational principles in conjunction with the finite difference technique is applied to examine the free vibration characteristics of isotropic rectangular plates of linearly varying thickness by including the effects of transverse shear deformation and rotary inertia. The validity of the present approach is demonstrated by comparing the results with other solutions proposed for plates with uniform and linearly varying thickness. Natural frequencies and mode shapes of Mindlin plates with simply supported and clamped edges are determined for various values of relative thickness ratio and the taper thickness constant.

  16. An improved statistical model for linear antenna input impedance in an electrically large cavity.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, William Arthur; Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Lee, Kelvin S. H.

    2005-03-01

    This report presents a modification of a previous model for the statistical distribution of linear antenna impedance. With this modification a simple formula is determined which yields accurate results for all ratios of modal spectral width to spacing. It is shown that the reactance formula approaches the known unit Lorentzian in the lossless limit.

  17. Vibration and chaos control of non-linear torsional vibrating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Bassiouny, A. F.

    2006-07-01

    Vibration of a mechanical system is often an undesirable phenomenon, as it may cause damage, disturbance, discomfort and, sometimes, destruction of systems and structures. To reduce vibration, many methods can be used. The most famous method is using dynamic absorbers or dampers. In the present work, a non-linear elastomeric damper or absorber is used to control the torsional vibrations of the crankshaft in internal combustion engines, when subjected to both external and parametric excitation torques. The multiple time scale perturbation method is applied to determine the equations governing the modulation of both amplitudes and phases of the crankshaft and the absorber. These equations are used to determine the steady-state amplitudes and system stability. Numerical integration of the basic equations is applied to investigate the effects of the different parameters on system behavior. A comparison is made with the available published work. Some recommendations are given at the end of the work.

  18. Non-linear analysis of vibrations of irregular plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lobitz, D. W.; Nayfeh, A. H.; Mook, D. T.

    1977-01-01

    A numerical perturbation method is used to investigate the forced vibrations of irregular plates. Nonlinear terms associated with the midplane stretching are retained in the analysis. The numerical part of the method involves the use of linear, finite element techniques to determine the free oscillation mode shapes and frequencies and to obtain the linear midplane stress resultants caused by the midplane stretching. Representing the solution as an expansion in terms of these linear mode shapes, these modes and the resultants are used to determine the equations governing the time-dependent coefficients of this expansion. These equations are solved by using the method of multiple scales. Specific solutions are given for the main-resonant vibrations of an elliptical plate in the presence of internal resonances. The results indicate that modes other than the driven mode can be drawn into the steady state response. Though the excitation is composed of a single harmonic, the response may not be periodic. Moreover, the particular types of responses that can occur are highly dependent on the mode being excited and are sensitive to small geometrical changes.

  19. [Theory study on glycine linear oligopeptide vibrational spectrum frequency shift].

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhi-Peng; Li, Xin; Yang, Meng-Shi; Chen, Liang; Xu, Can; Chu, Xiu-Xiang

    2014-04-01

    By using the density functional theory, glycine linear oligopeptide of different lengths was geometrically optimized on the 6-31G (d) basis set level, their growth processes were simulated, and the average binding energy and vibration frequency were calculated with geometry. The results showed that the average binding energies tend to change in a regular pattern and stabilize with the number of residues increasing; With the oligopeptide chain bond length analysis it was found that the chain to the radial direction there is a opposite trend for chain and radial direction, which is anisotropic. It was found by the IR spectrum analysis that red shifts and blue shifts occur respectively when the same group of peptide bond vibrate, which is anisotropic; These phenomena originate from that quasi one-dimensional nanostructures lead to the anisotropy of the bond length; the induced effects, coupling effects and hydrogen bonding etc. between the same groups lead to the vibration frequency red shifts and blue shifts. The authors conclude that the growth of glycine linear oligopeptide is conducive to stability of the structure, and the authors infer that the oligopeptide has the tendency of self-assembled growth; Through the conformation and spectrum, the authors infer that there is a size effect in physical and chemical properties. The physical and chemical properties of peptide chain end group are extremely stable and unaffected by the impact of the oligopeptide chain length The results are significant to measuring the length and the number of residue of peptide, and to manufacturing the special features oligopeptide chain.

  20. Linearity of electrical impedance tomography during maximum effort breathing and forced expiration maneuvers.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Chuong; Leonhardt, Steffen; Zhang, Tony; Lüken, Markus; Misgeld, Berno; Vollmer, Thomas; Tenbrock, Klaus; Lehmann, Sylvia

    2017-01-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) provides global and regional information about ventilation by means of relative changes in electrical impedance measured with electrodes placed around the thorax. In combination with lung function tests, e.g. spirometry and body plethysmography, regional information about lung ventilation can be achieved. Impedance changes strictly correlate with lung volume during tidal breathing and mechanical ventilation. Initial studies presumed a correlation also during forced expiration maneuvers. To quantify the validity of this correlation in extreme lung volume changes during forced breathing, a measurement system was set up and applied on seven lung-healthy volunteers. Simultaneous measurements of changes in lung volume using EIT imaging and pneumotachography were obtained with different breathing patterns. Data was divided into a synchronizing phase (spontaneous breathing) and a test phase (maximum effort breathing and forced maneuvers). The EIT impedance changes correlate strictly with spirometric data during slow breathing with increasing and maximum effort ([Formula: see text]) and during forced expiration maneuvers ([Formula: see text]). Strong correlations in spirometric volume parameters [Formula: see text] ([Formula: see text]), [Formula: see text]/FVC ([Formula: see text]), and flow parameters PEF, [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] ([Formula: see text]) were observed. According to the linearity during forced expiration maneuvers, EIT can be used during pulmonary function testing in combination with spirometry for visualisation of regional lung ventilation.

  1. The apparent mass and mechanical impedance of the hand and the transmission of vibration to the fingers, hand, and arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concettoni, Enrico; Griffin, Michael

    2009-08-01

    Although hand-transmitted vibration causes injury and disease, most often evident in the fingers, the biodynamic responses of the fingers, hand, and arm are not yet well understood. A method of investigating the motion of the entire finger-hand-arm system, based on the simultaneous measurement of the biodynamic response at the driving point and the transmissibility to many points on the finger-hand-arm system, is illustrated. Fourteen male subjects participated in an experiment in which they pushed down on a vertically vibrating metal plate with their right forearm pronated and their elbow bent at 90°. The apparent mass and mechanical impedance of the finger-hand-arm system were measured for each of seven different contact conditions between the plate and the fingers and hand. Simultaneously, the vibration of the fingers, hand, and arm was measured at 41 locations using a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer. Transmissibilities showed how the vibration was transmitted along the arm and allowed the construction of spectral operating deflection shapes showing the vibration pattern of the fingers, hand, and arm for each of the seven contact conditions. The vibration patterns at critical frequencies for each contact condition have been used to explain features in the driving point biodynamic responses and the vibration behaviour of the hand-arm system. Spectral operating deflection shapes for the upper limb assist the interpretation of driving point biodynamic responses and help to advance understanding required to predict, explain, and control the various effects of hand-transmitted vibration.

  2. Vibration power generator for a linear MR damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapiński, Bogdan

    2010-10-01

    The paper describes the structure and the results of numerical calculations and experimental tests of a newly developed vibration power generator for a linear magnetorheological (MR) damper. The generator consists of permanent magnets and coil with foil winding. The device produces electrical energy according to Faraday's law of electromagnetic induction. This energy is applied to vary the damping characteristics of the MR damper attached to the generator by the input current produced by the device. The objective of the numerical calculations was to determine the magnetic field distribution in the generator as well as the electric potential and current density in the generator's coil during the idle run and under the load applied to the MR damper control coil. The results of the calculations were used during the design and manufacturing stages of the device. The objective of the experimental tests carried out on a dynamic testing machine was to evaluate the generator's efficiency and to compare the experimental and predicted data. The experimental results demonstrate that the engineered device enables a change in the kinetic energy of the reciprocal motion of the MR damper which leads to variations in the damping characteristics. That is why the generator may be used to build up MR damper based vibration control systems which require no external power.

  3. Validated linear dynamic model of electrically-shunted magnetostrictive transducers with application to structural vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheidler, Justin J.; Asnani, Vivake M.

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents a linear model of the fully-coupled electromechanical behavior of a generally-shunted magnetostrictive transducer. The impedance and admittance representations of the model are reported. The model is used to derive the effect of the shunt’s electrical impedance on the storage modulus and loss factor of the transducer without neglecting the inherent resistance of the transducer’s coil. The expressions are normalized and then shown to also represent generally-shunted piezoelectric materials that have a finite leakage resistance. The generalized expressions are simplified for three shunts: resistive, series resistive-capacitive, and inductive, which are considered for shunt damping, resonant shunt damping, and stiffness tuning, respectively. For each shunt, the storage modulus and loss factor are plotted for a wide range of the normalized parameters. Then, important trends and their impact on different applications are discussed. An experimental validation of the transducer model is presented for the case of resistive and resonant shunts. The model closely predicts the measured response for a variety of operating conditions. This paper also introduces a model for the dynamic compliance of a vibrating structure that is coupled to a magnetostrictive transducer for shunt damping and resonant shunt damping applications. This compliance is normalized and then shown to be analogous to that of a structure that is coupled to a piezoelectric material. The derived analogies allow for the observations and equations in the existing literature on structural vibration control using shunted piezoelectric materials to be directly applied to the case of shunted magnetostrictive transducers.

  4. Effect of impedance and higher order chromaticity on the measurement of linear chromaticity

    SciTech Connect

    Ranjbar, V.H.; Tan, C.Y.; /Fermilab

    2011-08-01

    The combined effect of impedance and higher order chromaticity can act on the beam in a nontrivial manner which can cause a tune shift which depends on the relative momenta with respect to the 'on momentum' particle ({Delta}p/p). Experimentally, this tune shift affects the measurement of the linear chromaticity which is traditionally measured with a change of {Delta}p/p. The theory behind this effect will be derived in this paper. Computer simulations and experimental data from the Tevatron will be used to support the theory.

  5. Linear unsteady aerodynamic forces on vibrating annular cascade blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasaki, Taketo; Yamasaki, Nobuhiko

    2003-05-01

    The paper presents the formulation to compute numerically the unsteady aerodynamic forces on the vibrating annular cascade blades. The formulation is based on the finite volume method. By applying the TVD scheme to the linear unsteady calculations, the precise calculation of the peak of unsteady aerodynamic forces at the shock wave location like the delta function singularity becomes possible without empirical constants. As a further feature of the present paper, results of the present numerical calculation are compared with those of the double linearization theory (DLT), which assumes small unsteady and steady disturbances but the unsteady disturbances are much smaller than the steady disturbances. Since DLT requires far less computational resources than the present numerical calculation, the validation of DLT is quite important from the engineering point of view. Under the conditions of small steady disturbances, a good agreement between these two results is observed, so that the two codes are cross-validated. The comparison also reveals the limitation on the applicability of DLT.

  6. Tissue characterization using electrical impedance spectroscopy data: a linear algebra approach.

    PubMed

    Laufer, Shlomi; Solomon, Stephen B; Rubinsky, Boris

    2012-06-01

    In this study, we use a new linear algebra manipulation on electrical impedance spectroscopy measurements to provide real-time information regarding the nature of the tissue surrounding the needle in minimal invasive procedures. Using a Comsol Multiphysics three-dimensional model, a phantom based on ex vivo animal tissue and in vivo animal data, we demonstrate how tissue inhomogeneity can be characterized without any previous knowledge of the electrical properties of the different tissues, except that they should not be linearly dependent on a certain frequency range. This method may have applications in needle biopsies, radiation seeds, or minimally invasive surgery and can reduce the number of computer tomography or magnetic resonance imaging images. We conclude by demonstrating how this mathematical approach can be useful in other applications.

  7. Free vibration analysis of linear particle chain impact damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharib, Mohamed; Ghani, Saud

    2013-11-01

    Impact dampers have gained much research interest over the past decades that resulted in several analytical and experimental studies being conducted in that area. The main emphasis of such research was on developing and enhancing these popular passive control devices with an objective of decreasing the three parameters of contact forces, accelerations, and noise levels. To that end, the authors of this paper have developed a novel impact damper, called the Linear Particle Chain (LPC) impact damper, which mainly consists of a linear chain of spherical balls of varying sizes. The LPC impact damper was designed utilizing the kinetic energy of the primary system through placing, in the chain arrangement, a small-sized ball between each two large-sized balls. The concept of the LPC impact damper revolves around causing the small-sized ball to collide multiple times with the larger ones upon exciting the primary system. This action is believed to lead to the dissipation of part of the kinetic energy at each collision with the large balls. This paper focuses on the outcome of studying the free vibration of a single degree freedom system that is equipped with the LPC impact damper. The proposed LPC impact damper is validated by means of comparing the responses of a single unit conventional impact damper with those resulting from the LPC impact damper. The results indicated that the latter is considerably more efficient than the former impact damper. In order to further investigate the LPC impact damper effective number of balls and efficient geometry when used in a specific available space in the primary system, a parametric study was conducted and its result is also explained herein. Single unit impact damper [14-16]. Multiunit impact damper [17,18]. Bean bag impact damper [19,20]. Particle/granular impact damper [21,23,22]. Resilient impact damper [24]. Buffered impact damper [25-27]. Multiunit impact damper consists of multiple masses instead of a single mass. This

  8. Low-impedance internal linear inductive antenna for large-area flat panel display plasma processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.N.; Jung, S.J.; Lee, Y.J.; Yeom, G.Y.; Lee, S.H.; Lee, J.K.

    2005-03-15

    An internal-type linear inductive antenna, that is, a double-comb-type antenna, was developed for a large-area plasma source having the size of 1020 mmx830 mm, and high density plasmas on the order of 2.3x10{sup 11} cm{sup -3} were obtained with 15 mTorr Ar at 5000 W of inductive power with good plasma stability. This is higher than that for the conventional serpentine-type antenna, possibly due to the low impedance, resulting in high efficiency of power transfer for the double-comb antenna type. In addition, due to the remarkable reduction of the antenna length, a plasma uniformity of less than 8% was obtained within the substrate area of 880 mmx660 mm at 5000 W without having a standing-wave effect.

  9. Linearized image reconstruction method for ultrasound modulated electrical impedance tomography based on power density distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xizi; Xu, Yanbin; Dong, Feng

    2017-04-01

    Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) is a promising measurement technique with important industrial and clinical applications. However, with limited effective measurements, it suffers from poor spatial resolution due to the ill-posedness of the inverse problem. Recently, there has been an increasing research interest in hybrid imaging techniques, utilizing couplings of physical modalities, because these techniques obtain much more effective measurement information and promise high resolution. Ultrasound modulated electrical impedance tomography (UMEIT) is one of the newly developed hybrid imaging techniques, which combines electric and acoustic modalities. A linearized image reconstruction method based on power density is proposed for UMEIT. The interior data, power density distribution, is adopted to reconstruct the conductivity distribution with the proposed image reconstruction method. At the same time, relating the power density change to the change in conductivity, the Jacobian matrix is employed to make the nonlinear problem into a linear one. The analytic formulation of this Jacobian matrix is derived and its effectiveness is also verified. In addition, different excitation patterns are tested and analyzed, and opposite excitation provides the best performance with the proposed method. Also, multiple power density distributions are combined to implement image reconstruction. Finally, image reconstruction is implemented with the linear back-projection (LBP) algorithm. Compared with ERT, with the proposed image reconstruction method, UMEIT can produce reconstructed images with higher quality and better quantitative evaluation results.

  10. The role of rotor impedance in the vibration analysis of rotorcraft, part 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohenemser, K. H.

    1978-01-01

    A method for a strongly idealized case of vertical excitation and for rolling and pitching moment excitation of a four bladed hingeless rotor on an up-focussing flexible mount is developed. The aeroelastic rotor impedances are computed directly with a finite blade element method that includes aerodynamics. The rotor impedance matrix for three or more blades is determined from the root moment impedance for a single blade by a simple multiblade transformation rule. Force and moment amplitudes transferred from the rotor to support are found to be critically dependent on the support dynamics.

  11. On the non-linear vibrations of a projectile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, P. C.; Sharma, S. M.

    1981-08-01

    The Nonlinear Magnus effect on the nutational oscillations of a missile has been studied. In particular the existence of self-sustained vibrations has been proved. A numerical method is suggested to obtain the limit cycles wherever they exist.

  12. Minimax design of vibration absorbers for linear damped systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Brandon; Singh, Tarunraj

    2011-05-01

    This paper addresses the issue of design of a passive vibration absorber in the presence of uncertainties in the forcing frequency. A minimax problem is formulated to determine the parameters of a vibration absorber which minimize the maximum motion of the primary mass over the domain of the forcing frequency. The limiting solutions corresponding to the forcing frequency being unrestricted and to that where the forcing frequency is known exactly, are shown to match those available in the literature. The transition of the optimal vibration absorber parameters between the extreme two cases is presented and the solutions are generalized by permitting the mass ratio of the absorber mass and the primary mass to be design parameters. For the specific case where the primary system is undamped, detailed analysis is presented to determine the transition of the optimal vibration absorber parameters between three distinct domains of solutions.

  13. Vibration Model Validation for Linear Collider Detector Platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Bertsche, Kirk; Amann, J.W.; Markiewicz, T.W.; Oriunno, M.; Weidemann, A.; White, G.; /SLAC

    2012-05-16

    The ILC and CLIC reference designs incorporate reinforced-concrete platforms underneath the detectors so that the two detectors can each be moved onto and off of the beamline in a Push-Pull configuration. These platforms could potentially amplify ground vibrations, which would reduce luminosity. In this paper we compare vibration models to experimental data on reinforced concrete structures, estimate the impact on luminosity, and summarize implications for the design of a reinforced concrete platform for the ILC or CLIC detectors.

  14. The role of rotor impedance in the vibration analysis of rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohenemser, K. H.; Yin, S.-K.

    1978-01-01

    In an improved method which retains the advantage of separate treatment of rotor and airframe, the rotor impedance is used to correct the input to the airframe. This improved method is illustrated for a strongly idealized case of vertical excitation and then for rolling and pitching moment excitation of a four bladed hingeless rotor on an up-focussing flexible mount. Contrary to the usual approach that represents aeroelastic blade motions by a series of normal blade modes in vacuum, the aeroelastic rotor impedances are computed directly with a finite blade element method that includes aerodynamics. The rotor impedance matrix for three or more blades is determined from the root moment impedance for a single blade by a simple multiblade transformation rule. Force and moment amplitudes transferred from the rotor to the support are found to be critically dependent on the support dynamics.

  15. The direct field boundary impedance of two-dimensional periodic structures with application to high frequency vibration prediction.

    PubMed

    Langley, Robin S; Cotoni, Vincent

    2010-04-01

    Large sections of many types of engineering construction can be considered to constitute a two-dimensional periodic structure, with examples ranging from an orthogonally stiffened shell to a honeycomb sandwich panel. In this paper, a method is presented for computing the boundary (or edge) impedance of a semi-infinite two-dimensional periodic structure, a quantity which is referred to as the direct field boundary impedance matrix. This terminology arises from the fact that none of the waves generated at the boundary (the direct field) are reflected back to the boundary in a semi-infinite system. The direct field impedance matrix can be used to calculate elastic wave transmission coefficients, and also to calculate the coupling loss factors (CLFs), which are required by the statistical energy analysis (SEA) approach to predicting high frequency vibration levels in built-up systems. The calculation of the relevant CLFs enables a two-dimensional periodic region of a structure to be modeled very efficiently as a single subsystem within SEA, and also within related methods, such as a recently developed hybrid approach, which couples the finite element method with SEA. The analysis is illustrated by various numerical examples involving stiffened plate structures.

  16. On Forced Vibration in the Linear Theory of Micropolar Elasticity.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The present work is concerned with the problem of determining the dynamic response of a finite micropolar elastic body subject to time-dependent...properties of the general theory of micropolar elasticity. As a specific example of this theory, the forced thickness-shear vibrations of an infinite plate

  17. Force Sensor-less Workspace Virtual Impedance Control Considering Resonant Vibration for Industrial Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tungpataratanawong, Somsawas; Ohishi, Kiyoshi; Miyazaki, Toshimasa; Katsura, Seiichiro

    The motion control paradigm provides sufficient performance in many elementary industrial tasks. However, only stiff motion the robot cannot accommodate the interaction force under constrained motion. In such situation, the robot is required to perform interaction behavior with the environment. The conventional impedance control schemes require force-sensing devices to feedback force signals to the controllers. The force-sensing device is therefore indispensable and the performance of the system also depends on the quality of this device. This paper proposes a novel strategy for force sensor-less impedance control using disturbance observer and dynamic model of the robot to estimate the external force. In motion task, the robust D-PD (derivative-PD) control is used with feedforward inverse-dynamic torque compensation to ensure robustness and high-speed response with flexible joint model. When robot is in contact with environment, the proposed force sensor-less scheme impedance control with inner-loop D-PD control is utilized. D-PD control uses both position and speed as the references to implement the damping and stiffness characteristic of the virtual impedance model. In addition, the gravity and friction force-feedback compensation is computed by the same dynamic model, which is used in external force estimation. The flexible-joint robot model is utilized in both disturbance observer and motion control design. The workspace impedance control for robot interaction with human operator is implemented on the experimental setup three-degree-of-freedom (3-DOF) robot manipulator to assure the ability and performance of the proposed force sensor-less scheme for flexible-joint industrial robot.

  18. Non-linear system identification in flow-induced vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Spanos, P.D.; Zeldin, B.A.; Lu, R.

    1996-12-31

    The paper introduces a method of identification of non-linear systems encountered in marine engineering applications. The non-linearity is accounted for by a combination of linear subsystems and known zero-memory non-linear transformations; an equivalent linear multi-input-single-output (MISO) system is developed for the identification problem. The unknown transfer functions of the MISO system are identified by assembling a system of linear equations in the frequency domain. This system is solved by performing the Cholesky decomposition of a related matrix. It is shown that the proposed identification method can be interpreted as a {open_quotes}Gram-Schmidt{close_quotes} type of orthogonal decomposition of the input-output quantities of the equivalent MISO system. A numerical example involving the identification of unknown parameters of flow (ocean wave) induced forces on offshore structures elucidates the applicability of the proposed method.

  19. Linearization of scan velocity of resonant vibrating-mirror beam deflectors

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Chen, S.L.

    1991-01-15

    A means and method for producing linearization of scan velocity of resonant vibrating-mirror beam deflectors in laser scanning system including presenting an elliptical convex surface to the scanning beam to reflect the scanning beam to the focal plane of the scanning line. The elliptical surface is shaped to produce linear velocity of the reflective scanning beam at the focal plane. Maximization of linearization is accomplished by considering sets of criteria for different scanning applications. 6 figures.

  20. A comparison of power output from linear and nonlinear kinetic energy harvesters using real vibration data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeby, Stephen P.; Wang, Leran; Zhu, Dibin; Weddell, Alex S.; Merrett, Geoff V.; Stark, Bernard; Szarka, Gyorgy; Al-Hashimi, Bashir M.

    2013-07-01

    The design of vibration energy harvesters (VEHs) is highly dependent upon the characteristics of the environmental vibrations present in the intended application. VEHs can be linear resonant systems tuned to particular frequencies or nonlinear systems with either bistable operation or a Duffing-type response. This paper provides detailed vibration data from a range of applications, which has been made freely available for download through the Energy Harvesting Network’s online data repository. In particular, this research shows that simulation is essential in designing and selecting the most suitable vibration energy harvester for particular applications. This is illustrated through C-based simulations of different types of VEHs, using real vibration data from a diesel ferry engine, a combined heat and power pump, a petrol car engine and a helicopter. The analysis shows that a bistable energy harvester only has a higher output power than a linear or Duffing-type nonlinear energy harvester with the same Q-factor when it is subjected to white noise vibration. The analysis also indicates that piezoelectric transduction mechanisms are more suitable for bistable energy harvesters than electromagnetic transduction. Furthermore, the linear energy harvester has a higher output power compared to the Duffing-type nonlinear energy harvester with the same Q factor in most cases. The Duffing-type nonlinear energy harvester can generate more power than the linear energy harvester only when it is excited at vibrations with multiple peaks and the frequencies of these peaks are within its bandwidth. Through these new observations, this paper illustrates the importance of simulation in the design of energy harvesting systems, with particular emphasis on the need to incorporate real vibration data.

  1. Single-Phase Drive Linear Ultrasonic Motor with Perpendicular Electrode Vibrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih-Wei Hsiao,; Mi-Ching Tsai,

    2010-02-01

    Unlike most ultrasonic motor designs, in this study, we employ a pair of perpendicular electrodes to energize a piezoelectric vibrator, in which the angle between the direction of polarization and the electric field is purposely set at neither 0 nor 90° so that both the longitudinal and shear effects of the vibrator can be generated simultaneously by a single-phase voltage source. Such a vibrator can generate oblique line trajectories on the contact surface to push a slider for movement, while its moving direction can be easily controlled by switching the excitation sequence of the pair of perpendicular electrodes. In this study, the finite element analysis method was first employed to simulate the oscillatory behavior of the vibrator and then simulation results were verified by single-point, noncontact measurement on the surface of the vibrator. The newly designed linear ultrasonic motor, which can offer identical performance in both forward and backward motions, can maintain its attractive characteristics of simple structure, quiet operation, and single-phase drive. A prototype of the single-phase drive linear ultrasonic motor was fabricated to confirm the feasibility of the proposed vibrator design. The illustrated bidirectional linear ultrasonic motor is shown to be capable of generating a sliding velocity of 84.2 mm/s and a sliding force of 1.79 N.

  2. Powering pacemakers from heartbeat vibrations using linear and nonlinear energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin Karami, M.; Inman, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Linear and nonlinear piezoelectric devices are introduced to continuously recharge the batteries of the pacemakers by converting the vibrations from the heartbeats to electrical energy. The power requirement of a pacemaker is very low. However, after few years, patients require another surgical operation just to replace their pacemaker battery. Linear low frequency and nonlinear mono-stable and bi-stable energy harvesters are designed according to the especial signature of heart vibrations. The proposed energy harvesters are robust to variation of heart rate and can meet the power requirement of pacemakers.

  3. H∞ optimization of dynamic vibration absorber variant for vibration control of damped linear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Semin; Lee, Youngil; Kim, Tae-Hyoung

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the H∞ optimal design of a dynamic vibration absorber (DVA) variant for suppressing high-amplitude vibrations of damped primary systems. Unlike traditional DVA configurations, the damping element in this type of DVA is connected directly to the ground instead of the primary mass. First, a thorough graphical analysis of the variations in the maximum amplitude magnification factor depending on two design parameters, natural frequency and absorber damping ratios, is performed. The results of this analysis clearly show that any fixed-points-theory-based conventional method could provide, at best, only locally but not globally optimal parameters. Second, for directly handling the H∞ optimization for its optimal design, a novel meta-heuristic search engine, called the diversity-guided cyclic-network-topology-based constrained particle swarm optimization (Div-CNT-CPSO), is developed. The variant DVA system developed using the proposed Div-CNT-CPSO scheme is compared with those reported in the literature. The results of this comparison verified that the proposed system is better than the existing methods for suppressing the steady-state vibration amplitude of a controlled primary system.

  4. A U-shaped linear ultrasonic motor using longitudinal vibration transducers with double feet.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingxiang; Liu, Junkao; Chen, Weishan; Shi, Shengjun

    2012-05-01

    A U-shaped linear ultrasonic motor using longitudinal vibration transducers with double feet was proposed in this paper. The proposed motor contains a horizontal transducer and two vertical transducers. The horizontal transducer includes two exponential shape horns located at the leading ends, and each vertical transducer contains one exponential shape horn. The horns of the horizontal transducer and the vertical transducer intersect at the tip ends where the driving feet are located. Longitudinal vibrations are superimposed in the motor and generate elliptical motions at the driving feet. The two vibration modes of the motor are discussed, and the motion trajectories of driving feet are deduced. By adjusting the structural parameters, the resonance frequencies of two vibration modes were degenerated. A prototype motor was fabricated and measured. Typical output of the prototype is no-load speed of 854 mm/s and maximum thrust force of 40 N at a voltage of 200 V(rms).

  5. Vibration Stabilization of a Mechanical Model of a X-Band Linear Collider Final Focus Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, Josef; Chang, Allison; Decker, Valentin; Doyle, Eric; Eriksson, Leif; Hendrickson, Linda; Himel, Thomas; Markiewicz, Thomas; Partridge, Richard; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2006-09-28

    The small beam sizes at the interaction point of a X-band linear collider require mechanical stabilization of the final focus magnets at the nanometer level. While passive systems provide adequate performance at many potential sites, active mechanical stabilization is useful if the natural or cultural ground vibration is higher than expected. A mechanical model of a room temperature linear collider final focus magnet has been constructed and actively stabilized with an accelerometer based system.

  6. A Simple Reduction Process for the Normal Vibrational Modes Occurring in Linear Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInerny, William

    2005-01-01

    The students in molecular spectroscopy courses are often required to determine the permitted normal vibrations for linear molecules that belong to particular groups. The reducible group representations generated by the use of Cartesian coordinates can be reduced by the use of a simple algebraic process applied to the group representations. The…

  7. Optimization of Passive and Active Non-Linear Vibration Mounting Systems Based on Vibratory Power Transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royston, T. J.; Singh, R.

    1996-07-01

    While significant non-linear behavior has been observed in many vibration mounting applications, most design studies are typically based on the concept of linear system theory in terms of force or motion transmissibility. In this paper, an improved analytical strategy is presented for the design optimization of complex, active of passive, non-linear mounting systems. This strategy is built upon the computational Galerkin method of weighted residuals, and incorporates order reduction and numerical continuation in an iterative optimization scheme. The overall dynamic characteristics of the mounting system are considered and vibratory power transmission is minimized via adjustment of mount parameters by using both passive and active means. The method is first applied through a computational example case to the optimization of basic passive and active, non-linear isolation configurations. It is found that either active control or intentionally introduced non-linearity can improve the mount's performance; but a combination of both produces the greatest benefit. Next, a novel experimental, active, non-linear isolation system is studied. The effect of non-linearity on vibratory power transmission and active control are assessed via experimental measurements and the enhanced Galerkin method. Results show how harmonic excitation can result in multiharmonic vibratory power transmission. The proposed optimization strategy offers designers some flexibility in utilizing both passive and active means in combination with linear and non-linear components for improved vibration mounts.

  8. A high-power linear ultrasonic motor using longitudinal vibration transducers with single foot.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingxiang; Chen, Weishan; Liu, Junkao; Shi, Shengjun

    2010-08-01

    A high-power linear ultrasonic motor using longitudinal vibration transducers with single foot was proposed in this paper. The stator of proposed motor contains a horizontal transducer and a vertical transducer. Longitudinal vibrations are superimposed in the stator and generate an elliptical trajectory at the driving foot. The sensitivity analysis of structural parameters to the resonance frequencies of two working modes of the stator was performed using the finite element method. The resonance frequencies of two working modes were degenerated by adjusting the structural parameters. The vibration characteristics of stator were studied and discussed. A prototype motor was fabricated and measured. Typical output of the prototype is a no-load speed of 1160 mm/s and maximum thrust force of 20 N at a voltage of 200 V(rms).

  9. Modeling and Simulation of Linear and Nonlinear MEMS Scale Electromagnetic Energy Harvesters for Random Vibration Environments

    PubMed Central

    Sassani, Farrokh

    2014-01-01

    The simulation results for electromagnetic energy harvesters (EMEHs) under broad band stationary Gaussian random excitations indicate the importance of both a high transformation factor and a high mechanical quality factor to achieve favourable mean power, mean square load voltage, and output spectral density. The optimum load is different for random vibrations and for sinusoidal vibration. Reducing the total damping ratio under band-limited random excitation yields a higher mean square load voltage. Reduced bandwidth resulting from decreased mechanical damping can be compensated by increasing the electrical damping (transformation factor) leading to a higher mean square load voltage and power. Nonlinear EMEHs with a Duffing spring and with linear plus cubic damping are modeled using the method of statistical linearization. These nonlinear EMEHs exhibit approximately linear behaviour under low levels of broadband stationary Gaussian random vibration; however, at higher levels of such excitation the central (resonant) frequency of the spectral density of the output voltage shifts due to the increased nonlinear stiffness and the bandwidth broadens slightly. Nonlinear EMEHs exhibit lower maximum output voltage and central frequency of the spectral density with nonlinear damping compared to linear damping. Stronger nonlinear damping yields broader bandwidths at stable resonant frequency. PMID:24605063

  10. Modeling and simulation of linear and nonlinear MEMS scale electromagnetic energy harvesters for random vibration environments.

    PubMed

    Khan, Farid; Stoeber, Boris; Sassani, Farrokh

    2014-01-01

    The simulation results for electromagnetic energy harvesters (EMEHs) under broad band stationary Gaussian random excitations indicate the importance of both a high transformation factor and a high mechanical quality factor to achieve favourable mean power, mean square load voltage, and output spectral density. The optimum load is different for random vibrations and for sinusoidal vibration. Reducing the total damping ratio under band-limited random excitation yields a higher mean square load voltage. Reduced bandwidth resulting from decreased mechanical damping can be compensated by increasing the electrical damping (transformation factor) leading to a higher mean square load voltage and power. Nonlinear EMEHs with a Duffing spring and with linear plus cubic damping are modeled using the method of statistical linearization. These nonlinear EMEHs exhibit approximately linear behaviour under low levels of broadband stationary Gaussian random vibration; however, at higher levels of such excitation the central (resonant) frequency of the spectral density of the output voltage shifts due to the increased nonlinear stiffness and the bandwidth broadens slightly. Nonlinear EMEHs exhibit lower maximum output voltage and central frequency of the spectral density with nonlinear damping compared to linear damping. Stronger nonlinear damping yields broader bandwidths at stable resonant frequency.

  11. Optimization of linear zigzag insert metastructures for low-frequency vibration attenuation using genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdeljaber, Osama; Avci, Onur; Kiranyaz, Serkan; Inman, Daniel J.

    2017-02-01

    Vibration suppression remains a crucial issue in the design of structures and machines. Recent studies have shown that with the use of metamaterial inspired structures (or metastructures), considerable vibration attenuation can be achieved. Optimization of the internal geometry of metastructures maximizes the suppression performance. Zigzag inserts have been reported to be efficient for vibration attenuation. It has also been reported that the geometric parameters of the inserts affect the vibration suppression performance in a complex manner. In an attempt to find out the most efficient parameters, an optimization study has been conducted on the linear zigzag inserts and is presented here. The research reported in this paper aims at developing an automated method for determining the geometry of zigzag inserts through optimization. This genetic algorithm based optimization process searches for optimal zigzag designs which are properly tuned to suppress vibrations when inserted in a specific host structure (cantilever beam). The inserts adopted in this study consist of a cantilever zigzag structure with a mass attached to its unsupported tip. Numerical simulations are carried out to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed zigzag optimization approach.

  12. A rectangle-type linear ultrasonic motor using longitudinal vibration transducers with four driving feet.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingxiang; Chen, Weishan; Liu, Junkao; Shi, Shengjun

    2013-04-01

    To make full use of the vibrational energy of a longitudinal transducer, a rectangle-type linear ultrasonic motor with four driving feet is proposed in this paper. This new motor consists of four longitudinal vibration transducers which are arranged in a rectangle and form an enclosed construction. Lead zirconate titanate ceramics are embedded into the middle of the transducer and fastened by a wedge-caulking mechanism. Each transducer includes an exponentially shaped horn located on each end. The horns of the vertical transducers intersect at the base of the horizontal transducers' horns; the tip ends of the horizontal transducers' horns are used as the driving feet. Longitudinal vibrations are superimposed in the motor and generate elliptical movements at the tip ends of the horns. The working principle of the proposed motor is analyzed. The resonance frequencies of two working modes are tuned to be close to each other by adjusting the structural parameters. Transient analysis is developed to gain the vibration characteristics of the motor. A prototype motor is fabricated and measured. The vibration test results verify the feasibility of the proposed design. Typical output of the prototype is a no-load speed of 928 mm/s and maximum thrust force of 60 N at a voltage of 200 Vrms.

  13. a Normal Mode Expansion Method for the Undamped Forced Vibration of Linear Piezoelectric Solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LIU, D.-C.

    2000-06-01

    A normal mode expansion method for the vibrational responses of non-homogeneous linear piezoelectric materials without damping is presented. It can be applied directly to arbitrary piezoelectric composites, which are widely used in vibrational and acoustic sensor/actuator/transmitter applications. In the present article it is shown that if the normal modes are given, the displacement field can be expanded as the linear superposition of normal modes, while the modal coefficients can be represented in terms of surface and volume integrals directly over the six types of distributed excitations without solving the quasi-static solution explicitly. The present treatment is a modification of an earlier work by Liu [11] using a different definition of the so-called quasi-static solution, and the damping effect has been neglected for simplicity. A simple example is given to exemplify the application of the present formulation.

  14. On the linear elastic, isotropic modeling of poroelastic distributed vibration absorbers at low frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harne, R. L.

    2013-07-01

    Several past works have considered a passive vibration absorber device utilizing distributed mass and spring layers. The thickness of the poroelastic foam spring and the area density of the mass layer are modified to achieve a target natural frequency of the device while the foam itself provides adequate dissipation of energy as the mass dynamically compresses it at resonance. A model of the device earlier developed is briefly reviewed and validated by new experiments. The dependence of the absorber natural frequency and damping on the poroelastic spring thickness is observed in detail and is found to be consistent with past work on poroelastic material elastic characteristics outside of the linear dynamic regime. The results set a practical limit on the applicability of linearity assumptions in the present modeling of the distributed poroelastic vibration absorbers and thus determine a design parameter range for which the computationally efficient model is accurate.

  15. Linearization of scan velocity of resonant vibrating-mirror beam deflectors

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Chen, Shun-Le

    1991-01-15

    A means and method for producing linerization of scan velocity of resonant vibrating-mirror beam deflectors in laser scanning system including presenting an elliptical convex surface to the scanning beam to reflect the scanning beam to the focal plane of the scanning line. The elliptical surface is shaped to produce linear velocity of the reflective scanning beam at the focal plane. Maximization of linerization is accomplished by considering sets of criteria for different scanning applications.

  16. On the nonlinear normal modes of free vibration of piecewise linear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uspensky, B. V.; Avramov, K. V.

    2014-07-01

    A modification of the Shaw-Pierre nonlinear normal modes is suggested in order to analyze the vibrations of a piecewise linear mechanical systems with finite degrees of freedom. The use of this approach allows one to reduce to twice the dimension of the nonlinear algebraic equations system for nonlinear normal modes calculations in comparison with systems obtained by previous researchers. Two degrees of freedom and fifteen degrees of freedom nonlinear dynamical systems are investigated numerically by using nonlinear normal modes.

  17. Development of a Non-Magnetic Inertial Sensor for Vibration Stabilization in a Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, Josef; Decker, Valentin; Doyle, Eric; Hendrickson, Linda; Himel, Thomas; Markiewicz, Thomas; Seryi, Andrei; Chang, Allison; Partridge, Richard; /Brown U.

    2006-09-01

    One of the options for controlling vibration of the final focus magnets in a linear collider is to use active feedback based on accelerometers. While commercial geophysics sensors have noise performance that substantially exceeds the requirements for a linear collider, they are physically large, and cannot operate in the strong magnetic field of the detector. Conventional nonmagnetic sensors have excessive noise for this application. We report on the development of a non-magnetic inertial sensor, and on a novel commercial sensor both of which have demonstrated the required noise levels for this application.

  18. Quantitative non-linear ultrasonic imaging of targets with significant acoustic impedance contrast--an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Guillermin, Régine; Lasaygues, Philippe; Rabau, Guy; Lefebvre, Jean-Pierre

    2013-08-01

    This study deals with the reconstruction, from ultrasonic measured data, of the sound speed profile of a penetrable two-dimensional target of arbitrary cross-section embedded in an infinite medium. Green's theorem is used to obtain a domain integral representation of the acoustical scattered field, and a discrete formulation of the inverse problem is obtained using a moment method. An iterative non-linear algorithm minimizing the discrepancy between the measured and computed scattered fields is used to reconstruct the sound speed profile in the region of interest. The minimization process is performed using a conjugated-gradient method. An experimental study with significant acoustical impedance contrast targets immersed in water was performed. Images of the sound speed profile obtained by inversion of experimental data are presented.

  19. Small strain vibration of a continuous, linearized viscoelastic rod of expanded polymer cushion material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batt, Gregory S.; Gibert, James M.; Daqaq, Mohammed

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, the free and forced vibration response of a linearized, distributed-parameter model of a viscoelastic rod with an applied tip-mass is investigated. A nonlinear model is developed from constitutive relations and is linearized about a static equilibrium position for analysis. A classical Maxwell-Weichert model, represented via a Prony series, is used to model the viscoelastic system. The exact solution to both the free and forced vibration problem is derived and used to study the behavior of an idealized packaging system containing Nova Chemicals' Arcel® foam. It is observed that, although three Prony series terms are deemed sufficient to fit the static test data, convergence of the dynamic response and study of the storage and loss modulii necessitate the use of additional Prony series terms. It is also shown that the model is able to predict the modal frequencies and the primary resonance response at low acceleration excitation, both with reasonable accuracy given the non-homogeneity and density variation observed in the specimens. Higher acceleration inputs result in softening nonlinear responses highlighting the need for a nonlinear elastic model that extends beyond the scope of this work. Solution analysis and experimental data indicate little material vibration energy dissipation close to the first modal frequency of the mass/rod system.

  20. A New Stochastic Equivalent Linearization Implementation for Prediction of Geometrically Nonlinear Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muravyov, Alexander A.; Turner, Travis L.; Robinson, Jay H.; Rizzi, Stephen A.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of random vibration of geometrically nonlinear MDOF structures is considered. The solutions obtained by application of two different versions of a stochastic linearization method are compared with exact (F-P-K) solutions. The formulation of a relatively new version of the stochastic linearization method (energy-based version) is generalized to the MDOF system case. Also, a new method for determination of nonlinear sti ness coefficients for MDOF structures is demonstrated. This method in combination with the equivalent linearization technique is implemented in a new computer program. Results in terms of root-mean-square (RMS) displacements obtained by using the new program and an existing in-house code are compared for two examples of beam-like structures.

  1. Linear and nonlinear impedance spectroscopy for the study of electrode/solution interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peck, John R.

    We develop and demonstrate techniques to produce stable, electrically nonlinear conditions at electrode/solution interfaces in the absence of charge-transfer (faradaic) reactions for application to electrochemical biosensors. We introduce random-pulse AC voltammetry for the study of interfacial nonlinearities, and apply the technique to studies of pH-active self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). These studies show that interfacial nonlinearities can be an order of magnitude more sensitive to the charge state of the surface than its linear properties. Furthermore, the use of these nonlinearities will allow isolation of the interface from a linear background due to fixture or equipment parasitics---a background that becomes severe as electrode sizes shrink for microarray applications. We make arguments for the use of radio frequencies in these systems, and present techniques to extend the use of conventional electrochemical equipment to these frequencies. Finally, we simulate the use of a slot antenna resonator for the detection of DNA hybridization at GHz frequencies, and find that shifts in the system resonances upon hybridization should be easily seen if the high frequency fields are confined to the surface region.

  2. Characteristics of 10 mm Multilayer L1-F2 Mode Vibrator and Application to a Linear Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funakubo, Tomoki; Tomikawa, Yoshiro

    2003-05-01

    In the present paper we discuss a small-sized multilayer L1-F2 mode vibrator and its application to an ultrasonic linear motor. In an attempt to reduce both the size and the driving voltage of an L1-F2 mode vibrator, we constructed a multilayer L1-F2 mode vibrator whose inner electrodes are simply divided into two. Test results clarified that the multilayer L1-F2 mode vibrator exhibits two resonance modes; namely, a first longitudinal mode and a second flexural mode, and that an amplitude of vibration velocity is sufficiently large for application to a linear motor. Specific merits of our multilayer L1-F2 mode vibrator are that the driving voltage is low (5 Vrms), owing to multilayer construction, and that the vibrator is small (10 × 2.5 × 2 mm: W×H×D), owing to the simple construction of the inner electrodes. Additionally, the present study revealed that an ultrasonic linear motor using the multilayer L1-F2 mode vibrator exhibits superior performance in practical application.

  3. Linear thermoelastic buckling and free vibration behavior of functionally graded truncated conical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhangale, Rajesh K.; Ganesan, N.; Padmanabhan, Chandramouli

    2006-04-01

    In recent years, structures made up of functionally graded materials (FGMs) have received considerable attention for use in high-temperature applications. In this article, a finite element formulation based on First-Order Shear Deformation Theory (FSDT) is used to study the thermal buckling and vibration behavior of truncated FGM conical shells in a high-temperature environment. A Fourier series expansion for the displacement variable in the circumferential direction is used to model the FGM conical shell. The material properties of the truncated FGM conical shells are functionally graded in the thickness direction according to a volume fraction power law distribution. Temperature-dependent material properties are considered to carry out a linear thermal buckling and free vibration analysis. The conical shell is assumed to be clamped-clamped and has a high temperature specified on the inner surface while the outer surface is at ambient temperature. The one-dimensional heat conduction equation is used across the thickness of the conical shell to determine the temperature distribution and thereby the material properties. In addition, the influence of initial stresses on the frequency behavior of FGM shells has also been investigated. Numerical studies involving the understanding of the role of power law index, r/h ratios, and semi-vertex angle on the thermal buckling temperature as well as on vibration have been carried out.

  4. Non-linear vibrational modes in biomolecules: A periodic orbits description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampanarakis, Alexandros; Farantos, Stavros C.; Daskalakis, Vangelis; Varotsis, Constantinos

    2012-05-01

    The vibrational harmonic normal modes of a molecule, which are valid at energies close to an equilibrium point (a minimum, maximum or saddle of the potential energy surface), are extended by periodic orbits to high energies where anharmonicity and coupling of the degrees of freedom are significant. In this way the assignment of the spectra, and thus the extraction of dynamics in highly excited molecules, can be obtained. New vibrational modes emanating from bifurcations of periodic orbits and long living localized trajectories signal the birth and localization of new quantum states. In this article we review and further study non-linear vibrational modes for model biomolecules such as alanine dipeptide and the active site in the oxoferryl oxidation state of the enzyme cytochrome c oxidase. We locate periodic orbits which exhibit high anhamonicity and lead to center-saddle bifurcations. These modes are associated to an isomerization process in alanine dipeptide and to frequency shifts in the oxoferryl observed by modifying the Coulomb field around the Imidazole-FeIV = O species.

  5. A hybrid-stress finite element approach for stress and vibration analysis in linear anisotropic elasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. Tinsley; Fly, Gerald W.; Mahadevan, L.

    1987-01-01

    A hybrid stress finite element method is developed for accurate stress and vibration analysis of problems in linear anisotropic elasticity. A modified form of the Hellinger-Reissner principle is formulated for dynamic analysis and an algorithm for the determination of the anisotropic elastic and compliance constants from experimental data is developed. These schemes were implemented in a finite element program for static and dynamic analysis of linear anisotropic two dimensional elasticity problems. Specific numerical examples are considered to verify the accuracy of the hybrid stress approach and compare it with that of the standard displacement method, especially for highly anisotropic materials. It is that the hybrid stress approach gives much better results than the displacement method. Preliminary work on extensions of this method to three dimensional elasticity is discussed, and the stress shape functions necessary for this extension are included.

  6. Development, implementation, and characterization of a standalone embedded viscosity measurement system based on the impedance spectroscopy of a vibrating wire sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, José; Janeiro, Fernando M.; Ramos, Pedro M.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents an embedded liquid viscosity measurement system based on a vibrating wire sensor. Although multiple viscometers based on different working principles are commercially available, there is still a market demand for a dedicated measurement system capable of performing accurate, fast measurements and requiring little or no operator training for simple systems and solution monitoring. The developed embedded system is based on a vibrating wire sensor that works by measuring the impedance response of the sensor, which depends on the viscosity and density of the liquid in which the sensor is immersed. The core of the embedded system is a digital signal processor (DSP) which controls the waveform generation and acquisitions for the measurement of the impedance frequency response. The DSP also processes the acquired waveforms and estimates the liquid viscosity. The user can interact with the measurement system through a keypad and an LCD or through a computer with a USB connection for data logging and processing. The presented system is tested on a set of viscosity standards and the estimated values are compared with the standard manufacturer specified viscosity values. A stability study of the measurement system is also performed.

  7. Parallel simulations of vortex-induced vibrations in turbulent flow: Linear and nonlinear models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelinos, Constantinos

    1999-11-01

    In this work unstructured spectral/hp element based direct numerical simulation (DNS) techniques are used to simulate vortex-induced vibrations (VIV) of flexible cylinders. Linear structural models are employed for tension- dominated structures (cables) and bending stiffness- dominated structures (beams). Flow-structure interactions are studied in transitional (200-300) and turbulent (1000) Reynolds numbers. Structural responses as well as hydrodynamic forces are analyzed and their relationship with the near wake flow structures is examined. The following conclusions were reached: (1)A Reynolds number effect exists for the observed oscillation amplitude. (2)The phase relationship between cross- flow displacement and coefficient of lift is correlated with both the magnitudes of lift forces and displacement. (3)Cables enhance transition to turbulent flow, while beams (and rigidly vibrating cylinders) delay it. In the transition regime beams oscillate with 70% of the amplitude of cables. (4)Oblique and parallel shedding appear to coexist in the turbulent wake of cables and beams with a traveling wave structural response. The corresponding wake structure behind a cylinder with pinned ends vibrating as a standing wave, displays lambda-type vortices similar to those seen at lower (laminar) Reynolds numbers. (5)Cables and beams at a Reynolds number of 1000 give: (a)extremely similar velocity spectra, (b)differing autocorrelation profiles and large flow structures, and (c)differing structural responses. (6)The empirical formula for the coefficient of drag due to Skop et al. (1977) is shown to be in disagreement with the experimental data; a modified formula fits the results much better. A non-linear set of equations for the finite amplitude vibrations of a string are also derived and investigated. It is combined with an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) flow solver and applied to model simulations of low Reynolds number (100) flow past flexible cylinders with pinned ends

  8. Finite element analysis of the non-linear vibrations of moderately thick unsymmetrically laminated composite plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gajbir; Venkateswara Rao, G.; Iyengar, N. G. R.

    1995-03-01

    The influence of finite amplitudes on the free flexural vibration response of moderately thick laminated plates is investigated. For this purpose, a simple higher order theory involving only four unknowns and satisfying the stress free conditions at the top and bottom surface of the composite plate is proposed. The proposed theory eliminates the use of shear correction factors which are otherwise required in Mindlin's plate theory. A rectangular four-node[formula]continuous finite element is developed based on this theory. The non-linear finite element equations are reduced to two non-linear ordinary differential equations governing the response of positive and negative deflection cycles. Direct numerical integration method is then employed to obtain the periods or non-linear frequencies. The finite element developed and the direct numerical integration method employed are validated for the case of isotropic rectangular plates. It is found that unsymmetrically laminated rectangular plates with hinged-hinged edge conditions oscillate with different amplitudes in the positive and negative deflection cycles. Furthermore, such plates would oscillate with a frequency less than the fundamental frequency for finite small amplitudes of oscillation. It is shown that this behaviour is strongly influenced by the boundary conditions. Results are presented for many configurations of composite plates.

  9. Vibration reduction of a three DOF non-linear spring pendulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eissa, M.; Sayed, M.

    2008-03-01

    The dynamic response of mechanical and civil structures subject to high-amplitude vibration is often dangerous and undesirable. Vibrations and dynamic chaos should be controlled or eliminated in both structures and machines. This can be employed via passive and active control methods. In this paper, a tuned absorber, in the transversally direction, is connected to an externally excited spring-pendulum system (three degree of freedom), subjected to harmonic excitation. The tuned absorber is usually designed to control one frequency at primary resonance where system damage is probable. Active control is also applied to the considered system via negative displacement feedback to change the linear frequency of the system and to shift it away from the resonating one. Also active control is applied to improve the behavior of the spring-pendulum at the primary resonance via negative velocity feedback or its square or cubic value. The multiple time scale perturbation technique is applied throughout. The stability of the system is investigated applying both frequency response function and phase-plane method. The effects of the absorber and different parameters on system behavior are studied numerically. Optimum working conditions of the system are extracted applying both passive and active control methods, to be used in the design of such systems.

  10. A biresonant plasma source based on a gapped linear microwave vibrator

    SciTech Connect

    Gritsinin, S. I.; Davydov, A. M.; Kossyi, I. A.; Arapov, K. A.; Chapkevich, A. A.

    2011-03-15

    The operating principle of a novel microwave plasma source-a linear microwave vibrator with a gap-is discussed. The source is placed on a microwave-transparent window of a chamber filled with a plasma-forming gas (argon or methane). The device operation is based on the combination of two resonances-geometric and plasma ones. The results of experimental tests of the source are presented. For a microwave frequency of 2.45 GHz, microwave power of {<=}1 kW, and plasma-forming gas pressure in the range 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2}-10{sup -1} Torr, the source is capable of filling the reactor volume with a plasma having an electron density of about 10{sup 12} cm{sup -3} and electron temperature of a few electronvolts.

  11. Equivalent Linearization Analysis of Geometrically Nonlinear Random Vibrations Using Commercial Finite Element Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Muravyov, Alexander A.

    2002-01-01

    Two new equivalent linearization implementations for geometrically nonlinear random vibrations are presented. Both implementations are based upon a novel approach for evaluating the nonlinear stiffness within commercial finite element codes and are suitable for use with any finite element code having geometrically nonlinear static analysis capabilities. The formulation includes a traditional force-error minimization approach and a relatively new version of a potential energy-error minimization approach, which has been generalized for multiple degree-of-freedom systems. Results for a simply supported plate under random acoustic excitation are presented and comparisons of the displacement root-mean-square values and power spectral densities are made with results from a nonlinear time domain numerical simulation.

  12. Modeling vibrational resonance in linear hydrocarbon chain with a mixed quantum-classical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelman, David; Schwartz, Steven D.

    2009-04-01

    The quantum dynamics of a vibrational excitation in a linear hydrocarbon model system is studied with a new mixed quantum-classical method. The method is suited to treat many-body systems consisting of a low dimensional quantum primary part coupled to a classical bath. The dynamics of the primary part is governed by the quantum corrected propagator, with the corrections defined in terms of matrix elements of zeroth order propagators. The corrections are taken to the classical limit by introducing the frozen Gaussian approximation for the bath degrees of freedom. The ability of the method to describe dynamics of multidimensional systems has been tested. The results obtained by the method have been compared to previous quantum simulations performed with the quasiadiabatic path integral method.

  13. Calculating vibrational spectra without determining excited eigenstates: Solving the complex linear equations of damped response theory for vibrational configuration interaction and vibrational coupled cluster states.

    PubMed

    Godtliebsen, Ian H; Christiansen, Ove

    2015-10-07

    It is demonstrated how vibrational IR and Raman spectra can be calculated from damped response functions using anharmonic vibrational wave function calculations, without determining the potentially very many eigenstates of the system. We present an implementation for vibrational configuration interaction and vibrational coupled cluster, and describe how the complex equations can be solved using iterative techniques employing only real trial vectors and real matrix-vector transformations. Using this algorithm, arbitrary frequency intervals can be scanned independent of the number of excited states. Sample calculations are presented for the IR-spectrum of water, Raman spectra of pyridine and a pyridine-silver complex, as well as for the infra-red spectrum of oxazole, and vibrational corrections to the polarizability of formaldehyde.

  14. Calculating vibrational spectra without determining excited eigenstates: Solving the complex linear equations of damped response theory for vibrational configuration interaction and vibrational coupled cluster states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godtliebsen, Ian H.; Christiansen, Ove

    2015-10-01

    It is demonstrated how vibrational IR and Raman spectra can be calculated from damped response functions using anharmonic vibrational wave function calculations, without determining the potentially very many eigenstates of the system. We present an implementation for vibrational configuration interaction and vibrational coupled cluster, and describe how the complex equations can be solved using iterative techniques employing only real trial vectors and real matrix-vector transformations. Using this algorithm, arbitrary frequency intervals can be scanned independent of the number of excited states. Sample calculations are presented for the IR-spectrum of water, Raman spectra of pyridine and a pyridine-silver complex, as well as for the infra-red spectrum of oxazole, and vibrational corrections to the polarizability of formaldehyde.

  15. Improved assumed-stress hybrid shell element with drilling degrees of freedom for linear stress, buckling, and free vibration analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rengarajan, Govind; Aminpour, Mohammad A.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    An improved four-node quadrilateral assumed-stress hybrid shell element with drilling degrees of freedom is presented. The formulation is based on Hellinger-Reissner variational principle and the shape functions are formulated directly for the four-node element. The element has 12 membrane degrees of freedom and 12 bending degrees of freedom. It has nine independent stress parameters to describe the membrane stress resultant field and 13 independent stress parameters to describe the moment and transverse shear stress resultant field. The formulation encompasses linear stress, linear buckling, and linear free vibration problems. The element is validated with standard tests cases and is shown to be robust. Numerical results are presented for linear stress, buckling, and free vibration analyses.

  16. Influence of Defects on Vibrational Characteristics of Linear Chains of Inert Gases Atoms Adsorbed on Carbon Nanobundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzhelii, E. V.

    2017-04-01

    The study of vibrational characteristics of chains of rare gas atoms adsorbed in the grooves between nanotubes in nanobundles is reduced to the analyses of the phonon spectrum and the vibrational characteristics of linear chains of atoms in an external field. Atoms in the chain have three degrees of freedom. The analytical expressions for the vibrational characteristics of the atoms in the chain, depending on the ratio between the interatomic distance in the chain r and the equilibrium distance between atoms in the chain r_0, are obtained. It is shown that at rvibrations frequencies, is negative. As a result, while the quasi-continuous spectrum band shifts to lower frequencies, the linear part of the temperature dependence of the heat capacity shifts to lower temperatures. The distance within only one pair of atoms is modified. It is the defect that can entail discrete states split off from the quasi-continuous spectrum band. The discrete levels with frequencies below the quasi-continuous spectrum band shift the linear part of the temperature dependence of the heat capacity to lower temperatures. The conditions for appearing of discrete frequency levels are obtained, and their characteristics are found.

  17. Influence of Defects on Vibrational Characteristics of Linear Chains of Inert Gases Atoms Adsorbed on Carbon Nanobundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzhelii, E. V.

    2016-11-01

    The study of vibrational characteristics of chains of rare gas atoms adsorbed in the grooves between nanotubes in nanobundles is reduced to the analyses of the phonon spectrum and the vibrational characteristics of linear chains of atoms in an external field. Atoms in the chain have three degrees of freedom. The analytical expressions for the vibrational characteristics of the atoms in the chain, depending on the ratio between the interatomic distance in the chain r and the equilibrium distance between atoms in the chain r_0 , are obtained. It is shown that at rvibrations frequencies, is negative. As a result, while the quasi-continuous spectrum band shifts to lower frequencies, the linear part of the temperature dependence of the heat capacity shifts to lower temperatures. The distance within only one pair of atoms is modified. It is the defect that can entail discrete states split off from the quasi-continuous spectrum band. The discrete levels with frequencies below the quasi-continuous spectrum band shift the linear part of the temperature dependence of the heat capacity to lower temperatures. The conditions for appearing of discrete frequency levels are obtained, and their characteristics are found.

  18. Elastic buckling, stability, and vibration of linear and geometrically nonlinear behavior of structures

    SciTech Connect

    Sabir, A.B.

    1995-09-01

    The present paper explores the physical and fundamental way of obtaining buckling loads of structures as well as their natural frequencies. The resulting mathematical formulations are shown, in both cases, to lead to the determination of the eigenvalues and vectors for similar transcendental equations. The analysis of a axially loaded straight member is first considered to show that when the axial load is tensile the corresponding natural frequencies are larger than when their is no applied axial load. Conversely when the axial load is compressive a decrease in the natural frequencies will take place and in the limit the natural frequencies become zero when the applied axial load is equal to the buckling load of the member. The paper will also present the results for a finite element analysis for the large deflection geometrically non-linear behavior of arches. The resulting complex relationships between load and deflection are discussed in terms of instability and snap through phenomena. The large-amplitude vibration of arches are then considered and the relationship between frequency and amplitude is discussed by inferring to the previously obtained statical loading cases.

  19. Single-Phase Drive Ultrasonic Linear Motor Using a Linked Twin Square Plate Vibrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Keiji; Tamura, Hideki; Masuda, Kentaro; Takano, Takehiro

    2013-07-01

    A novel linear motion ultrasonic motor, which uses a single resonance mode driven by a single phase and has the same motor characteristics for operation in reverse directions, is developed. An in-plane breathing mode in the square plate is strongly driven by the transverse effect of a piezoelectric ceramic. A stator resonator consists of twin square plates linked by V-shaped beams. Only one side of the square plate can be excited by the resonance of the breathing mode, when the other passive side plate is electrically opened so that the effective elasticities and the resonant frequencies between both plates are different; as a result, the friction edge of the resonator vibrates in a slant locus to move a load slider. The reverse operation is easily obtained by switching the driving side of the square plates. We designed the stator resonator by FEM analysis and fabricated a prototype for our experiment. The prototype motor showed good characteristics, for example, a moving slider velocity of 100 mm/s, a thrust force of 3.5 N, and an efficiency of 30% when the preload was 10 N, the input effective voltage was 5 V, and the input power was 1.2 W.

  20. Optimum vibration absorber (tuned mass damper) design for linear damped systems subjected to random loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tigli, Omer F.

    2012-06-01

    Optimum design of dynamic vibration absorbers (DVAs) installed on linear damped systems that are subjected to random loads is studied and closed-form design formulas are provided. Three cases are considered in the optimization process: Minimizing the variance of the displacement, velocity and acceleration of the main mass. Exact optimum design parameters for the velocity case, which to the best knowledge of the author do not exist in the literature, are derived for the first time. Exact solutions are found to be directly applicable for practical use with no simplification needed. For displacement and acceleration cases, a solution for the optimum absorber frequency ratio is obtained as a function of optimum absorber damping ratio. Numerical simulations indicate that optimum absorber damping ratio is not significantly related to the structural damping, especially when the displacement variance is minimized. Therefore, optimum damping ratio derived for undamped systems is proposed for damped systems for the displacement case. When acceleration variance is minimized, however, the optimum damping ratio derived for undamped systems is found not as accurate for damped systems. Therefore, a more accurate approximate expression is derived. Numerical comparisons with published approximate expressions at the same level of complexity indicated that proposed design formula yield more accurate estimates. Another important finding of the paper is that for specific applications where all of the response parameters are desired to be minimized simultaneously, DVAs designed per velocity criteria provide the best overall performance with the least complexity in the design equations.

  1. Vibrational absorption spectra from vibrational coupled cluster damped linear response functions calculated using an asymmetric Lanczos algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, Bo; Hansen, Mikkel Bo; Seidler, Peter; Christiansen, Ove

    2012-03-01

    We report the theory and implementation of vibrational coupled cluster (VCC) damped response functions. From the imaginary part of the damped VCC response function the absorption as function of frequency can be obtained, requiring formally the solution of the now complex VCC response equations. The absorption spectrum can in this formulation be seen as a matrix function of the characteristic VCC Jacobian response matrix. The asymmetric matrix version of the Lanczos method is used to generate a tridiagonal representation of the VCC response Jacobian. Solving the complex response equations in the relevant Lanczos space provides a method for calculating the VCC damped response functions and thereby subsequently the absorption spectra. The convergence behaviour of the algorithm is discussed theoretically and tested for different levels of completeness of the VCC expansion. Comparison is made with results from the recently reported [P. Seidler, M. B. Hansen, W. Györffy, D. Toffoli, and O. Christiansen, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 164105 (2010)] vibrational configuration interaction damped response function calculated using a symmetric Lanczos algorithm. Calculations of IR spectra of oxazole, cyclopropene, and uracil illustrate the usefulness of the new VCC based method.

  2. Vibrational absorption spectra from vibrational coupled cluster damped linear response functions calculated using an asymmetric Lanczos algorithm.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Bo; Hansen, Mikkel Bo; Seidler, Peter; Christiansen, Ove

    2012-03-28

    We report the theory and implementation of vibrational coupled cluster (VCC) damped response functions. From the imaginary part of the damped VCC response function the absorption as function of frequency can be obtained, requiring formally the solution of the now complex VCC response equations. The absorption spectrum can in this formulation be seen as a matrix function of the characteristic VCC Jacobian response matrix. The asymmetric matrix version of the Lanczos method is used to generate a tridiagonal representation of the VCC response Jacobian. Solving the complex response equations in the relevant Lanczos space provides a method for calculating the VCC damped response functions and thereby subsequently the absorption spectra. The convergence behaviour of the algorithm is discussed theoretically and tested for different levels of completeness of the VCC expansion. Comparison is made with results from the recently reported [P. Seidler, M. B. Hansen, W. Györffy, D. Toffoli, and O. Christiansen, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 164105 (2010)] vibrational configuration interaction damped response function calculated using a symmetric Lanczos algorithm. Calculations of IR spectra of oxazole, cyclopropene, and uracil illustrate the usefulness of the new VCC based method.

  3. Highly Accurate Quartic Force Fields, Vibrational Frequencies, and Spectroscopic Constants for Cyclic and Linear C3H3(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Xinchuan; Taylor, Peter R.; Lee, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    High levels of theory have been used to compute quartic force fields (QFFs) for the cyclic and linear forms of the C H + molecular cation, referred to as c-C H + and I-C H +. Specifically the 33 3333 singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of connected triple excitations, CCSD(T), has been used in conjunction with extrapolation to the one-particle basis set limit and corrections for scalar relativity and core correlation have been included. The QFFs have been used to compute highly accurate fundamental vibrational frequencies and other spectroscopic constants using both vibrational 2nd-order perturbation theory and variational methods to solve the nuclear Schroedinger equation. Agreement between our best computed fundamental vibrational frequencies and recent infrared photodissociation experiments is reasonable for most bands, but there are a few exceptions. Possible sources for the discrepancies are discussed. We determine the energy difference between the cyclic and linear forms of C H +, 33 obtaining 27.9 kcal/mol at 0 K, which should be the most reliable available. It is expected that the fundamental vibrational frequencies and spectroscopic constants presented here for c-C H + 33 and I-C H + are the most reliable available for the free gas-phase species and it is hoped that 33 these will be useful in the assignment of future high-resolution laboratory experiments or astronomical observations.

  4. Vibrational resonance and implementation of dynamic logic gate in a piecewise-linear Murali-Lakshmanan-Chua circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesh, P. R.; Venkatesan, A.

    2016-10-01

    We report the occurrence of vibrational resonance in piecewise-linear non-autonomous system. Especially, we show that an optimal amplitude of the high frequency second harmonic driving enhances the response of a piece-wise linear non-autonomous Murali-Lakshmanan-Chua (MLC) system to a low frequency first harmonic signal. This phenomenon is illustrated with the analytical solutions of circuit equations characterising the system and finally compared with the numerical method. Further, it has been enunciated explicitly, the implementation of the fundamental NOR/NAND gate via vibrational resonance, both by numerical and analytical solutions. In addition, these logical behaviours (AND/NAND/OR/NOR) can be decided by the amplitude of the input square waves without altering the system parameters.

  5. Improved design of linear electromagnetic transducers for large-scale vibration energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiudong; Zuo, Lei; Lin, Teng; Zhang, Peisheng

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents the design and optimization of tubular Linear Electromagnetic Transducers (LETs) with applications to large-scale vibration energy harvesting, such as from vehicle suspensions, tall buildings or long bridges. Four types of LETs are considered and compared, namely, single-layer configuration using axial magnets, double-layer configuration using axial magnets, single-layer configuration using both axial and radial magnets, double-layer configuration using both axial and radial magnets. In order to optimize the LETs, the parameters investigated in this paper include the thickness of the magnets in axial direction and the thickness of the coils in the radial direction. Finite element method is used to analyze the axisymmetric two-dimensional magnetic fields. Both magnetic flux densities Br [T] in the radial direction and power density [W/m3] are calculated. It is found that the parameter optimization can increase the power density of LETs to 2.7 times compared with the initial design [Zuo et al, Smart Materials and Structures, v19 n4, 2010], and the double-layer configuration with both radial and axial magnets can improve the power density to 4.7 times, approaching to the energy dissipation rate of traditional oil dampers. As a case study, we investigate its application to energy-harvesting shock absorbers. For a reasonable retrofit size, the LETs with double-layer configuration and both axial and radial NdFeB magnets can provide a damping coefficient of 1138 N.s/m while harvesting 35.5 W power on the external electric load at 0.25 m/s suspension velocity. If the LET is shorten circuit, it can dissipate energy at the rate of 142.0 W, providing of a damping coefficient of 2276 N.s/m. Practical consideration of number of coil phases is also discussed.

  6. An Intelligent Sensor Array Distributed System for Vibration Analysis and Acoustic Noise Characterization of a Linear Switched Reluctance Actuator

    PubMed Central

    Salvado, José; Espírito-Santo, António; Calado, Maria

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a distributed system for analysis and monitoring (DSAM) of vibrations and acoustic noise, which consists of an array of intelligent modules, sensor modules, communication bus and a host PC acting as data center. The main advantages of the DSAM are its modularity, scalability, and flexibility for use of different type of sensors/transducers, with analog or digital outputs, and for signals of different nature. Its final cost is also significantly lower than other available commercial solutions. The system is reconfigurable, can operate either with synchronous or asynchronous modes, with programmable sampling frequencies, 8-bit or 12-bit resolution and a memory buffer of 15 kbyte. It allows real-time data-acquisition for signals of different nature, in applications that require a large number of sensors, thus it is suited for monitoring of vibrations in Linear Switched Reluctance Actuators (LSRAs). The acquired data allows the full characterization of the LSRA in terms of its response to vibrations of structural origins, and the vibrations and acoustic noise emitted under normal operation. The DSAM can also be used for electrical machine condition monitoring, machine fault diagnosis, structural characterization and monitoring, among other applications. PMID:22969364

  7. Efficient algorithms for solving the non-linear vibrational coupled-cluster equations using full and decomposed tensors.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Niels K; Godtliebsen, Ian H; Christiansen, Ove

    2017-04-07

    Vibrational coupled-cluster (VCC) theory provides an accurate method for calculating vibrational spectra and properties of small to medium-sized molecules. Obtaining these properties requires the solution of the non-linear VCC equations which can in some cases be hard to converge depending on the molecule, the basis set, and the vibrational state in question. We present and compare a range of different algorithms for solving the VCC equations ranging from a full Newton-Raphson method to approximate quasi-Newton models using an array of different convergence-acceleration schemes. The convergence properties and computational cost of the algorithms are compared for the optimization of VCC states. This includes both simple ground-state problems and difficult excited states with strong non-linearities. Furthermore, the effects of using tensor-decomposed solution vectors and residuals are investigated and discussed. The results show that for standard ground-state calculations, the conjugate residual with optimal trial vectors algorithm has the shortest time-to-solution although the full Newton-Raphson method converges in fewer macro-iterations. Using decomposed tensors does not affect the observed convergence rates in our test calculations as long as the tensors are decomposed to sufficient accuracy.

  8. Controller design for delay-independent stability of linear time-invariant vibration systems with multiple delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoodi Nia, Payam; Sipahi, Rifat

    2013-07-01

    One of the critical parameters that can deteriorate the effectiveness of active vibration control (AVC) is the delay in sensors. Especially, in remote sensing where delays are large, and in high-speed applications with even small delays, instability can be inevitable. This paper presents algebraic approaches to design controllers in order to achieve stability regardless of the amount of delays for AVC applications modeled by linear time-invariant systems with "multiple" constant delays. The approaches are based on a nonconservative framework, and can identify the regions in the controller gain space where delay-independent stability (DIS) is achievable. With these controllers, we demonstrate via simulations that vibration suppression, within certain excitation frequency bands, can be improved or be as effective as those in AVC applications without delays.

  9. Ab initio investigation of electronic and vibrational contributions to linear and nonlinear dielectric properties of ice

    SciTech Connect

    Casassa, S.; Baima, J.; Mahmoud, A.; Kirtman, B.

    2014-06-14

    Electronic and vibrational contributions to the static and dynamic (hyper)polarizability tensors of ice XI and model structures of ordinary hexagonal ice have been theoretically investigated. Calculations were carried out by the finite field nuclear relaxation method for periodic systems (FF-NR) recently implemented in the CRYSTAL code, using the coupled-perturbed Kohn-Sham approach (CPKS) for evaluating the required electronic properties. The effect of structure on the static electronic polarizabilities (dielectric constants) and second-hyperpolarizabilities is minimal. On the other hand, the vibrational contributions to the polarizabilities were found to be significant. A reliable evaluation of these (ionic) contributions allows one to discriminate amongst ice phases characterized by different degrees of proton-order, primarily through differences caused by librational motions. Transverse static and dynamic vibrational (hyper)polarizabilities were found by extrapolating calculations for slabs of increasing size, in order to eliminate substantial surface contributions.

  10. Vibration transmissibility and damping behaviour for auxetic and conventional foams under linear and nonlinear regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Matteo; Scarpa, Fabrizio

    2013-08-01

    This work describes the vibration transmissibility behaviour in conventional and auxetic (negative Poisson’s ratio) foams under low and high amplitude vibrations. Auxetic foam pads were manufactured from conventional open cell PU-PE based blocks using an alternative manufacturing process to the one currently used in the mainstream literature. The dynamic behaviour of both conventional and auxetic porous materials was assessed within the frequency bandwidth 5-500 Hz using a base excitation technique with a calibrated seismic mass. The foam pads were subjected to white noise broadband excitation at low dynamic strain, followed by a sine sweep around the resonance of the foam-mass system. The experimental data have been used to perform an inverse identification of the nonlinear dependence of the foam permeability versus the amplitude and frequency of excitation using a single-degree-of-freedom poroelastic vibration model. The auxetic foam shows higher dynamic stiffness and enhanced viscous dissipation characteristics, in particular when subjected to nonlinear vibration loading.

  11. Broadband and three-dimensional vibration energy harvesting by a non-linear magnetoelectric generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhiming; Chen, Jun; Li, Xiaoshi; Li, Jun; Liu, Jun; Awais, Qasim; Yang, Jin

    2016-12-01

    Vibration, widely existing in an ambient environment with a variety of forms and wide-range of scales, recently becomes an attractive target for energy harvesting. However, its time-varying directions and frequencies render a lack of effective energy technology to scavenge it. Here, we report a rationally designed nonlinear magnetoelectric generator for broadband and multi-directional vibration energy harvesting. By using a stabilized three-dimensional (3D) magnetic interaction and spring force, the device working bandwidth was largely broadened, which was demonstrated both experimentally and theoretically. The multidirectional vibration energy harvesting was enabled by three identical suspended springs with equal intersection angles, which are all connected to a cylindrical magnet. Numerical simulations and experimental results show that the nonlinear harvester can sustain large-amplitude oscillations over a wide frequency range, and it can generate power efficiently in an arbitrary direction. Moreover, the experimental data suggest that the proposed nonlinear energy harvester has the potential to scavenge vibrational energy over a broad range of ambient frequencies in 3D space.

  12. Effect of flexibility on liquid-vapor coexistence and surface properties of tangent linear vibrating square well chains in two and three dimensions.

    PubMed

    Chapela, Gustavo A; Díaz-Herrera, Enrique; Armas-Pérez, Julio C; Quintana-H, Jacqueline

    2013-06-14

    The effect of flexibility on liquid-vapor and interfacial properties of tangent linear vibrating square well chains is studied. Surface tension, orthobaric densities, vapor pressures, and interfacial thicknesses are reported and analyzed using corresponding states principles. Discontinuous molecular dynamics simulations in two and three dimensions are performed on rigid tangent linear vibrating square well chains of different lengths. In the case of two dimensions, simulation results of completely flexible tangent linear vibrating square well chains are also reported. Properties are calculated for chains of 2-12 monomers. Rigidity is controlled by trapping the first and last monomer in the chain in a vibrating well at half of the distance of the whole chain. Critical property values are reported as obtained from orthobaric densities, surface tensions, and vapor pressures. For the fully flexible chains, the critical temperatures increase with chain length but the effect saturates. In contrast, the critical temperatures increase for the rigid chains until no more critical point is found.

  13. Local vibrational mode of an impurity in a monatomic linear chain under open and periodic boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Qiang

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we revisit the lattice vibration of a one-dimensional monatomic linear chain under open and periodic boundary conditions, and give the exact conditions for the emergence of the local vibration mode when one of the atoms is replaced by an impurity. Our motivation is twofold. Firstly, in deriving the dispersion relation of the atoms, the periodic boundary condition is overwhelmingly utilized while the open boundary condition is seldom used. Therefore we manage to obtain the dispersion relation under both boundary conditions simultaneously by the Molinari formula. Secondly, in the presence of an impurity, the local vibration mode can emerge as long as the mass of the impurity m\\prime is smaller than the mass of the perfect atom m to a certain degree, which can be measured by the mass ratio δ =\\tfrac{m-m\\prime }{m}. At the periodic boundary condition, the critical mass ratio is 0 or \\tfrac{1}{N}, depending on whether the length N of the chain is even or odd. At the open boundary condition, the critical mass ratio is \\tfrac{N}{2N-1} if the impurity locates at the end of the chain, while it is \\tfrac{N}{(2{N}{{l}}+1)(2{N}{{r}}+1)} with N l and N r the number of atoms at the left- and right-hand sides of the impurity if the impurity locates at the middle.

  14. Vibrational spectroscopic and non-linear optical activity studies on nicotinanilide : A DFT approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Premkumar, S.; Jawahar, A.; Mathavan, T.; Dhas, M. Kumara; Benial, A. Milton Franklin

    2015-06-01

    The molecular structure of nicotinanilide was optimized by the DFT/B3LYP method with cc-pVTZ basis set using Gaussian 09 program. The first order hyperpolarizability of the molecule was calculated, which exhibits the higher nonlinear optical activity. The natural bond orbital analysis confirms the presence of intramolecular charge transfer and the hydrogen bonding interaction, which leads to the higher nonlinear optical activity of the molecule. The Frontier molecular orbitals analysis of the molecule shows that the delocalization of electron density occurs within the molecule. The lower energy gap indicates that the hydrogen bond formation between the charged species. The vibrational frequencies were calculated and assigned on the basis of potential energy distribution calculation using the VEDA 4.0 program and the corresponding vibrational spectra were simulated. Hence, the nicotinanilide molecule can be a good candidate for second-order NLO material.

  15. Vibrational spectroscopic and non-linear optical activity studies on nicotinanilide : A DFT approach

    SciTech Connect

    Premkumar, S.; Mathavan, T.; Dhas, M. Kumara; Benial, A. Milton Franklin; Jawahar, A.

    2015-06-24

    The molecular structure of nicotinanilide was optimized by the DFT/B3LYP method with cc-pVTZ basis set using Gaussian 09 program. The first order hyperpolarizability of the molecule was calculated, which exhibits the higher nonlinear optical activity. The natural bond orbital analysis confirms the presence of intramolecular charge transfer and the hydrogen bonding interaction, which leads to the higher nonlinear optical activity of the molecule. The Frontier molecular orbitals analysis of the molecule shows that the delocalization of electron density occurs within the molecule. The lower energy gap indicates that the hydrogen bond formation between the charged species. The vibrational frequencies were calculated and assigned on the basis of potential energy distribution calculation using the VEDA 4.0 program and the corresponding vibrational spectra were simulated. Hence, the nicotinanilide molecule can be a good candidate for second-order NLO material.

  16. Random vibration of nonlinear beams by the new stochastic linearization technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, J.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, the beam under general time dependent stationary random excitation is investigated, when exact solution is unavailable. Numerical simulations are carried out to compare its results with those yielded by the conventional linearization techniques. It is found that the modified version of the stochastic linearization technique yields considerably more accurate results for the mean square displacement of the beam than the conventional equivalent linearization technique, especially in the case of large nonlinearity.

  17. Balancing Vibrations at Harmonic Frequencies by Injecting Harmonic Balancing Signals into the Armature of a Linear Motor/Alternator Coupled to a Stirling Machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holliday, Ezekiel S. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Vibrations at harmonic frequencies are reduced by injecting harmonic balancing signals into the armature of a linear motor/alternator coupled to a Stirling machine. The vibrations are sensed to provide a signal representing the mechanical vibrations. A harmonic balancing signal is generated for selected harmonics of the operating frequency by processing the sensed vibration signal with adaptive filter algorithms of adaptive filters for each harmonic. Reference inputs for each harmonic are applied to the adaptive filter algorithms at the frequency of the selected harmonic. The harmonic balancing signals for all of the harmonics are summed with a principal control signal. The harmonic balancing signals modify the principal electrical drive voltage and drive the motor/alternator with a drive voltage component in opposition to the vibration at each harmonic.

  18. Effect of Muscle Tension on Non-Linearities in the Apparent Masses of Seated Subjects Exposed to Vertical Whole-Body Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MATSUMOTO, Y.; GRIFFIN, M. J.

    2002-05-01

    In subjects exposed to whole-body vibration, the cause of non-linear dynamic characteristics with changes in vibration magnitude is not understood. The effect of muscle tension on the non-linearity in apparent mass has been investigated in this study. Eight seated male subjects were exposed to random and sinusoidal vertical vibration at five magnitudes (0·35-1·4 m/s2 r.m.s.). The random vibration was presented for 60 s over the frequency range 2·0-20 Hz; the sinusoidal vibration was presented for 10 s at five frequencies (3·15, 4·0, 5·0, 6·3 and 8·0 Hz). Three sitting conditions were adopted such that, in two conditions, muscle tension in the buttocks and the abdomen was controlled. It was assumed that, in these two conditions, involuntary changes in muscle tension would be minimized. The force and acceleration at the seat surface were used to obtain apparent masses of subjects. With both sinusoidal and random vibration, there was statistical support for the hypothesis that non-linear characteristics were less clear when muscle tension in the buttocks and the abdomen was controlled. With increases in the magnitude of random vibration from 0·35 to 1·4 m/s2 r.m.s., the apparent mass resonance frequency decreased from 5·25 to 4·25 Hz with normal muscle tension, from 5·0 to 4·38 Hz with the buttocks muscles tensed, and from 5·13 to 4·5 Hz with the abdominal muscles tensed. Involuntary changes in muscle tension during whole-body vibration may be partly responsible for non-linear biodynamic responses.

  19. Vibration generators

    SciTech Connect

    Lerwill, W.E.

    1980-09-16

    Apparatus for generating vibrations in a medium, such as the ground, comprises a first member which contacts the medium, means , preferably electromagnetic, which includes two relatively movable members for generating vibrations in the apparatus and means operatively connecting the said two members to said first member such that the relatively amplitudes of the movements of said three members can be adjusted to match the impedances of the apparatus and the medium.

  20. Vortex-induced vibrations of a square cylinder under linear shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wenjuan; Zhou, Dai; Tu, Jiahuang; Han, Zhaolong

    2017-04-01

    This paper investigates the numerical vortex-induced vibration (VIV) of a square cylinder which is connected to a 2-DOF mass-spring system and is immersed in the planar shear flow by employing a characteristic-based split (CBS) finite element method (FEM). The reduced mass of the square cylinder is M r = 2, while the reduced velocity, U r, is changed from 3 to 12 with an increment of ΔU r = 1. The effects of some key parameters on the cylinder dynamic responses, vibrating frequencies, the flow patterns as well as the energy transferred between the fluid and cylinder are revealed. In this study, the key parameters are selected as follows: shear ratio (k = 0, 0.05 and 0.1) and Reynolds numbers (Re = 80 and 160). Numerical results demonstrate that the X-Y trajectories of the cylinder mainly appear as a symmetrical figure ‘8’ in uniform flow (k = 0) and an unsymmetrical figure ‘8’ and ‘O’ in shear flows (k = 0.05 and 0.1). The maximum oscillation amplitudes of the square cylinder in both the inline and transverse directions have distinct characteristics compared to that of a circular cylinder. Two kinds of flow patterns, ‘2S’ and ‘P + S’, are mainly observed under the shear flow. Also, the mean values of the energy of the cylinder system increase with the reduced velocity, while the root mean square (rms) of the energy reaches its peak value at reduced velocity U r = 5.

  1. First-order optimal linear and nonlinear detuning of centrifugal pendulum vibration absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayet, J.; Ulbrich, H.

    2015-01-01

    Centrifugal pendulum vibration absorbers are used to attenuate steady-state torsional vibrations in rotating and reciprocating machines. In most practical implementations, a set of multiple absorbers is symmetrically arranged on a rotor. Typically, each absorber mass is bifilar suspended, which allows the absorber mass to be moved along a prescribed path. Previous studies have considered how to determine absorber paths in order to obtain absorbers with amplitude-independent frequency known as tautochronic absorbers. It is known that a tautochronic absorber is highly desirable if only one absorber is installed on the rotor. However, in most applications multiple interacting absorbers are installed and as a result symmetry-induced nonlinear instabilities or localization caused by relative imperfections among the absorbers may occur. An effective strategy to avoid such situations is to perturb the tautochronic tuning which has been confirmed in practice and by previous theoretical investigations. This paper presents an approach for detuning a recently developed general tautochronic absorber design. The general design makes it possible to consider a wide class of tautochronic absorbers, e.g. absorbers without bifilar suspensions. The intent of this paper is to extend the existing tautochronic design guideline to non-tautochronic designs. As a result, different absorber designs can be addressed by one uniform theoretical approach, and existing absorber designs are included as special cases. Former studies on detuning of bifilar tautochronic absorbers use a one-parameter family of curves on which the absorber mass rides. Here, however, the detuning is not restricted to a one-parameter family of curves, which makes it possible to either optimize system performance or to avoid asynchronous absorber responses. In the case of synchronously responding equal absorbers, a necessary condition for optimal performance is derived analytically. Further, it is shown that asynchronous

  2. A fully consistent linearized model for vibration analysis of rotating beams in the framework of geometrically exact theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Invernizzi, Davide; Dozio, Lorenzo

    2016-05-01

    The equations of motions governing the free vibrations of prismatic slender beams rotating in a plane at constant angular velocity are derived according to a geometrically exact approach. Compared to other modeling methods, additional stiffening terms induced by pre-stress are found in the dynamic equations after fully consistent linearization about the deformed equilibrium configuration. These terms include axial, bending and torsional stiffening effects which arise when second-order generalized strains are retained. It is shown that their contribution becomes relevant at moderate to high angular speeds, where high means that the equilibrium state is subject to strains close to the limit where a physically linear constitutive law still applies. In particular, the importance of the axial stiffening is specifically investigated. The natural frequencies as a function of the angular velocity and other system parameters are computed and compared with benchmark cases available in the literature. Finally, the error on the modal characteristics of the rotating beam is evaluated when the linearization is carried out about the undeformed configuration.

  3. Linear and third- and fifth-order nonlinear spectroscopies of a charge transfer system coupled to an underdamped vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Dijkstra, Arend G. E-mail: tanimura@kuchem.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Tanimura, Yoshitaka E-mail: tanimura@kuchem.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2015-06-07

    We study hole, electron, and exciton transports in a charge transfer system in the presence of underdamped vibrational motion. We analyze the signature of these processes in the linear and third-, and fifth-order nonlinear electronic spectra. Calculations are performed with a numerically exact hierarchical equations of motion method for an underdamped Brownian oscillator spectral density. We find that combining electron, hole, and exciton transfers can lead to non-trivial spectra with more structure than with excitonic coupling alone. Traces taken during the waiting time of a two-dimensional (2D) spectrum are dominated by vibrational motion and do not reflect the electron, hole, and exciton dynamics directly. We find that the fifth-order nonlinear response is particularly sensitive to the charge transfer process. While third-order 2D spectroscopy detects the correlation between two coherences, fifth-order 2D spectroscopy (2D population spectroscopy) is here designed to detect correlations between the excited states during two different time periods.

  4. Adsorption of linear alkanes on Cu(111): Temperature and chain-length dependence of the softened vibrational mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fosser, Kari A.; Kang, Joo H.; Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Wöll, Christof

    2007-05-01

    The vibrational spectra of linear alkanes, with lengths ranging from n-propane to n-octane, were examined on a copper surface by reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy. The appearance and frequency of the "soft mode," a feature routinely seen in studies of saturated hydrocarbons adsorbed on metals, were examined and compared between the different adsorbates. The frequency of the mode was found to be dependent on both the number of methylene units of each alkane as well as specific aspects of the order of the monolayer phase. Studies of monolayer coverages at different temperatures provide insights into the nature of the two-dimensional (2D) melting transitions of these adlayer structures, ones that can be inferred from observed shifts in the soft vibrational modes appearing in the C-H stretching region of the infrared spectrum. These studies support recently reported hypotheses as to the origins of such soft modes: the metal-hydrogen interactions that mediate them and the dynamics that underlay their pronounced temperature dependencies. The present data strongly support a model for the 2D to one-dimensional order-order phase transition arising via a continuous rather than discrete first-order process.

  5. Linear precision inertial actuator built for low-impact in-situ installation on structures with vibration problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Updike, Clark A.; Greeley, Scott W.; King, James A.

    1998-10-01

    In the process of designing a control actuator for a vibration cancellation system demonstration on a large, precision optical testbed, it was discovered that the support struts on which the control actuators attach could not be disassembled. This led to the development of a Linear Precision ACTuator (LPACT) with a novel two piece design which could be clamped around the strut in-situ. The design requirements, LPACT characteristics, and LPACT test results are fully described and contrasted with other earlier LPACT designs. Cancellation system performance results are presented for a 3 tone disturbance case. Excellent results, on the order of 40 dB of attenuation per tone (down to the noise floor on two disturbances), are achieved using an Adaptive Neural Controller (ANC).

  6. Accurate Modelling of a Flexible-Link Planar Mechanism by Means of a Linearized Model in the State-Space Form for Design of a Vibration Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GASPARETTO, A.

    2001-02-01

    Vibration control of flexible link mechanisms with more than two flexible links is still an open question, mainly because defining a model that is adequate for the designing of a controller is a rather difficult task. In this work, an accurate dynamic non-linear model of a flexible-link planar mechanism is presented. In order to bring the system into a form that is suitable for the design of a vibration controller, the model is then linearized about an operating point, so as to achieve a linear model of the system in the standard state-space form of system theory. The linear model obtained, which is valid for whatever planar mechanism with any number of flexible link, is then applied to a four-bar planar linkage. Extensive simulation is carried out, aimed at comparing the system dynamic evolution, both in the open- and in the closed-loop case, using the non-linear model and the linearized one. The results prove that the error made by using the linearized system instead of the non-linear one is small. Therefore, it can be concluded that the model proposed in this work can constitute an effective basis for designing and testing many types of vibration controllers for flexible planar mechanisms.

  7. Thin Rotary and Linear Ultrasonic Motors Using a Double-Mode Piezoelectric Vibrator of the First Longitudinal and Second Bending Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomikawa, Yoshiro; Takano, Takehiro; Umeda, Hidenobu

    1992-09-01

    This paper deals with thin rotary and linear ultrasonic motors using a double-mode piezoelectric ceramic vibrator; a rectangular plate vibrator of the first longitudinal and second bending modes is utilized. A specific merit of the motors is that their thickness can meet the restriction of 10 mm, which is one of the practical requirements of a light load gearless motor. The rotary motor is intended for application in card forwarding, and the linear motor, in magnetic-head traveling and so on. Construction and characteristics of the motors are described herein.

  8. Alignment and vibration issues in TeV linear collider design

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, G.E.

    1989-07-01

    The next generation of linear colliders will require alignment accuracies and stabilities of component placement at least one, perhaps two, orders of magnitude better than can be achieved by the conventional methods and procedures in practice today. The magnitudes of these component-placement tolerances for current designs of various linear collider subsystems are tabulated. In the micron range, long-term ground motion is sufficiently rapid that on-line reference and mechanical correction systems are called for. Some recent experiences with the upgraded SLAC laser alignment systems and examples of some conceivable solutions for the future are described. The so called ''girder'' problem is discussed in the light of ambient and vibratory disturbances. The importance of the quality of the underlying geology is stressed. The necessity and limitations of public-beam-derived placement information are mentioned. 40 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Alighment and Vibration Issues in TeV Linear Collider Design

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, G.E.; /SLAC

    2005-08-12

    The next generation of linear colliders will require alignment accuracies and stabilities of component placement at least one, perhaps two, orders of magnitude better than can be achieved by the conventional methods and procedures in practice today. The magnitudes of these component-placement tolerances for current designs of various linear collider subsystems are tabulated. In the micron range, long-term ground motion is sufficiently rapid that on-line reference and mechanical correction systems are called for. Some recent experiences with the upgraded SLAC laser alignment systems and examples of some conceivable solutions for the future are described. The so called ''girder'' problem is discussed in the light of ambient and vibratory disturbances. The importance of the quality of the underlying geology is stressed. The necessity and limitations of particle-beam-derived placement information are mentioned.

  10. Electron Impedances

    SciTech Connect

    P Cameron

    2011-12-31

    It is only recently, and particularly with the quantum Hall effect and the development of nanoelectronics, that impedances on the scale of molecules, atoms and single electrons have gained attention. In what follows the possibility that characteristic impedances might be defined for the photon and the single free electron is explored is some detail, the premise being that the concepts of electrical and mechanical impedances are relevant to the elementary particle. The scale invariant quantum Hall impedance is pivotal in this exploration, as is the two body problem and Mach's principle.

  11. Nucleic acid vibrational circular dichroism, absorption, and linear dichroism spectra. I. A DeVoe theory approach.

    PubMed Central

    Self, B D; Moore, D S

    1997-01-01

    Infrared (IR) vibrational circular dichroism (VCD), absorption, and linear dichroism (LD) spectra of four homopolyribonucleotides, poly(rA), poly(rG), poly(rC), and poly(rU), have been calculated, in the 1750-1550 cm-1 spectral region, using the DeVoe polarizability theory. A newly derived algorithm, which approximates the Hilbert transform of imaginaries to reals, was used in the calculations to obtain real parts of oscillator polarizabilities associated with each normal mode. The calculated spectra of the polynucleotides were compared with previously measured solution spectra. The good agreement between calculated and measured polynucleotide spectra indicates, for the first time, that the DeVoe theory is a useful means of calculating the VCD and IR absorption spectra of polynucleotides. For the first time, calculated DeVoe theory VCD and IR absorption spectra of oriented polynucleotides are presented. The calculated VCD spectra for the oriented polynucleotides are used to predict the spectra for such measurements made in the future. The calculated IR spectra for the oriented polynucleotides are useful in interpreting the linear dichroism of the polynucleotides. PMID:9199798

  12. Self-assembly of kagome lattices, entangled webs and linear fibers with vibrating patchy particles in two dimensions.

    PubMed

    Chapela, Gustavo A; Guzmán, Orlando; Martínez-González, José Adrián; Díaz-Leyva, Pedro; Quintana-H, Jacqueline

    2014-12-07

    A vibrating version of patchy particles in two dimensions is introduced to study self-assembly of kagome lattices, disordered networks of looping structures, and linear arrays. Discontinuous molecular dynamics simulations in the canonical ensemble are used to characterize the molecular architectures and thermodynamic conditions that result in each of those morphologies, as well as the time evolution of lattice formation. Several versions of the new model are tested and analysed in terms of their ability to produce kagome lattices. Due to molecular flexibility, particles with just attractive sites adopt a polarized-like configuration and assemble into linear arrays. Particles with additional repulsive sites are able to form kagome lattices, but at low temperature connect as entangled webs. Abundance of hexagonal motifs, required for the kagome lattice, is promoted even for very small repulsive sites but hindered when the attractive range is large. Differences in behavior between the new flexible model and previous ones based on rigid bodies offer opportunities to test and develop theories about the relative stability, kinetics of formation and mechanical response of the observed morphologies.

  13. A non-linear 3D printed electromagnetic vibration energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantinou, P.; Roy, S.

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes a novel electromagnetic energy harvester that exploits the low flexural modulus of ABS and comprises of a nonlinear mechanism to enhance the generated power and bandwidth. The device is printed using desktop additive manufacturing techniques (3D printing) that use thermoplastics. It has a ‘V’ spring topology and exhibits a softening spring non-linearity introduced through the magnetic arrangement, which introduces a monostable potential well. A model is presented and measurements correspond favourably. The produced prototype generates a peak power of approximately 2.5mW at a frame acceleration of 1g and has a power bandwidth of approximately 1.2→1.5Hz and 3.5→3.9Hz during up and down sweeps respectively. The device has a power density of 0.4mW/cm3 at a frame acceleration of 1g and a density of 0.04mW/cm3 from a generated power of 25μW at 0.1g.

  14. Amplitude modulation drive to rectangular-plate linear ultrasonic motors with vibrators dimensions 8 mm x 2.16 mm X 1 mm.

    PubMed

    Ming, Yang; Hanson, Ben; Levesley, Martin C; Walker, Peter G; Watterson, Kevin G

    2006-12-01

    In this paper, to exploit the contribution from not only the stators but also from other parts of miniature ultrasonic motors, an amplitude modulation drive is proposed to drive a miniature linear ultrasonic motor consisting of two rectangular piezoelectric ceramic plates. Using finite-element software, the first longitudinal and second lateral-bending frequencies of the vibrator are shown to be very close when its dimensions are 8 mm x 2.16 mm x 1 mm. So one single frequency power should be able to drive the motor. However, in practice the motor is found to be hard to move with a single frequency power because of its small vibration amplitudes and big frequency difference between its longitudinal and bending resonance, which is induced by the boundary condition variation. To drive the motor effectively, an amplitude modulation drive is used by superimposing two signals with nearly the same frequencies, around the resonant frequency of the vibrators of the linear motor. When the amplitude modulation frequency is close to the resonant frequency of the vibrator's surroundings, experimental results show that the linear motor can move back and forward with a maximum thrust force (over 0.016 N) and a maximum velocity (over 50 mm/s).

  15. OH Vibrational Prompt Emission and Water Hot-Band Fluorescent Emission in C/2000 WM1 (LINEAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonev, B. P.; Mumma, M. J.; Dello Russo, N.; DiSanti, M. A.; Gibb, E. L.; Magee-Sauer, K.; Weaver, H. A.; Chin, G.

    2004-11-01

    Two methods for deriving cometary water production rates from ground-based high-resolution near-infrared spectra have now been developed. The water molecule can be directly sampled through "hot-band" fluorescent emission near 2.0, 2.9, 4.6, and 5.0 μ m [1]. Knowledge of the H2O rotational temperature and ortho-to-para ratio is needed to fully constrain its production rate via this method. More recently, vibrational prompt emission from OH has also been used as a proxy for water production. This method depends on the accuracy of the OH emission efficiencies derived from simultaneous observations of H2O and OH in comets C/1999 H1 (Lee) and C/2001 A2 (Linear) [2]. We report water production rates for a third comet (C/2000 WM1) based on independent analyses of H2O hot-band lines near 2.9 μ m and of OH prompt emission lines near 3046 cm-1, observed with NIRSPEC at the W. M. Keck Observatory. This comparison further reveals the capabilities and potential limitations of the two methods, while placing a special emphasis on the newer OH-based method. This work was supported by grants to M. J. Mumma (RTOP 344-32-30-07) and to H. A. Weaver and G. Chin (NAG5-12230) under NASA's Planetary Astronomy Program, and to N. Dello Russo (NAG5-10795) under NASA's Planetary Atmospheres Program. [1] Dello Russo et al. 2002, JGR, 107 (E11) 5095. [2] Bonev et al. 2004, ApJ, in press.

  16. [A vertical vibration model of human body in supine position].

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing-gong; Niu, Fu; Qi, Jian-cheng; Li, Ruo-xin

    2002-12-01

    Objective. To establish the models of head, abdomen, and chest of supine human body respectively under vertical vibration. Method. The mechanical impedance of 12 healthy volunteers aged 24-56 was measured under vertical white noise stimulus in the frequency range of 2-35 Hz. To explain these findings, the model of head was proposed, the models of abdomen and chest were computed by way of an optimization procedure. Result. The models of abdomen and chest are three-degree-of-freedom and the head is rigid. Conclusion. The mechanical impedance of the supine human body is linear and sole. The established models of head, abdomen and chest of supine human body when subjected to vertical vibration are useful for calculating and evaluating the comfort of supine human body under whole-body vibration.

  17. Impeded Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, Joachim; Liu, Jia; Slatyer, Tracy R.; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Xue, Wei

    2016-12-01

    We consider dark matter models in which the mass splitting between the dark matter particles and their annihilation products is tiny. Compared to the previously proposed Forbidden Dark Matter scenario, the mass splittings we consider are much smaller, and are allowed to be either positive or negative. To emphasize this modification, we dub our scenario "Impeded Dark Matter". We demonstrate that Impeded Dark Matter can be easily realized without requiring tuning of model parameters. For negative mass splitting, we demonstrate that the annihilation cross-section for Impeded Dark Matter depends linearly on the dark matter velocity or may even be kinematically forbidden, making this scenario almost insensitive to constraints from the cosmic microwave background and from observations of dwarf galaxies. Accordingly, it may be possible for Impeded Dark Matter to yield observable signals in clusters or the Galactic center, with no corresponding signal in dwarfs. For positive mass splitting, we show that the annihilation cross-section is suppressed by the small mass splitting, which helps light dark matter to survive increasingly stringent constraints from indirect searches. As specific realizations for Impeded Dark Matter, we introduce a model of vector dark matter from a hidden SU(2) sector, and a composite dark matter scenario based on a QCD-like dark sector.

  18. Non-Linear Thermal Lens Signal of the (Δυ = 6) C-H Vibrational Overtone of Benzene in Liquid Solutions of Hexane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyaupane, Parashu R.; Manzanares, Carlos

    2016-06-01

    The thermal lens technique is applied to vibrational overtone spectroscopy of solutions of benzene. The pump and probe thermal lens technique has been found to be very sensitive for detecting samples of low concentration in transparent solvents. The C-H fifth vibrational (Δυ = 6) overtone spectrum of benzene is detected at room temperature for compositions per volume in the range (1 to 1× 10-4) using n-C_6H14 as the solvent. By detecting the absorption band in a 100 ppm solution, the peak absorption of the signal is approximately (2.2 ± 0.3)× 10-7 cm-1. The parameters that determine the magnitude of the thermal lens signal such as the pump laser power and the thermodynamic properties of the solvent and solute are discussed. A plot of normalized integrated intensity as a function of composition of benzene in solution reveals a non-linear behavior. The non-linearity cannot be explained assuming solvent enhancement at low concentrations. A two color absorption model that includes the simultaneous absorption of the pump and probe lasers could explain the enhanced magnitude and the non-linear behavior of the thermal lens signal for solutions of composition below 0.01.

  19. NEW REACTOR DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF NON LINEAR VIBRATIONS OF DOUBLY CURVED SHALLOW SHELL UNDER A THERMAL GRADIENT

    SciTech Connect

    Chanda, S.

    2004-10-06

    The present study concerns with the effects of material orthotropy,curvature, shear ratio and circumferential modulus under the influence of a temperature distribution throughout the shell structure. Here analysis is restricted to the study of nonlinear vibration of a doubly curved shell structure considering the periodic response of a simple bending mode due to curtailment of pages. Solutions of the problems with suitable illustrations are also presented.

  20. Evans hole and non linear optical activity in Bis(melaminium) sulphate dihydrate: A vibrational spectral study.

    PubMed

    Suresh Kumar, V R; Binoy, J; Dawn Dharma Roy, S; Marchewka, M K; Jayakumar, V S

    2015-01-01

    Bis(melaminium) sulphate dihydrate (BMSD), an interesting melaminium derivative for nonlinear optical activity, has been subjected to vibrational spectral analysis using FT IR and FT Raman spectra. The analysis has been aided by the Potential Energy Distribution (PED) of vibrational spectral bands, derived using density functional theory (DFT) at B3LYP/6-31G(d) level. The geometry is found to correlate well with the XRD structure and the band profiles for certain vibrations in the finger print region have been theoretically explained using Evans hole. The detailed Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis of the hydrogen bonding in BMSD has also been carried out to understand the correlation between the stabilization energy of hyperconjugation of the lone pair of donor with the σ(∗) orbital of hydrogen-acceptor bond and the strength of hydrogen bond. The theoretical calculation shows that BMSD has NLO efficiency, 2.66 times that of urea. The frontier molecular orbital analysis points to a charge transfer, which contributes to NLO activity, through N-H…O intermolecular hydrogen bonding between the melaminium ring and the sulphate. The molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) mapping has also been performed for the detailed analysis of the mutual interactions between melaminium ring and sulphate ion.

  1. Every Nucleus, When Created, Will Exhibit No Motion or Linear, Rotational and/or Vibrational Motion Which May Later Become Modified By Outside Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brekke, Stewart

    2012-10-01

    Due to the excess energy of creation a newly created nucleus may exhibit linear, rotational and/or vibrational motion. For example, in nuclear decay mPc^2 + 1/2mPvP^2 + 1/2IPφP^2 + 1/2kPxP^2 = mDc^2 + 1/2mDvD^2 + 1/2IDφD^2 + 1/2kDxD^2 + (particle mass-energy equivalence, linear, rotational and vibrational energies). In another nuclear reaction m1c^2 + 1/2I1φ1^2 + 1/2k1x1^2 + m2c^2 + 1/2m2v2^2 + 1/2I2φ2^2 + 1/2k2x2^2 = m3c^2 + 1/2m3v3^2 + 1/2k3x3^2 +...+mnc^2 + 1/2mnvn^2 + 1/2Inφn^2 + 1/2knxn^2.

  2. A wavelet-based method for the forced vibration analysis of piecewise linear single- and multi-DOF systems with application to cracked beam dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joglekar, D. M.; Mitra, M.

    2015-12-01

    The present investigation outlines a method based on the wavelet transform to analyze the vibration response of discrete piecewise linear oscillators, representative of beams with breathing cracks. The displacement and force variables in the governing differential equation are approximated using Daubechies compactly supported wavelets. An iterative scheme is developed to arrive at the optimum transform coefficients, which are back-transformed to obtain the time-domain response. A time-integration scheme, solving a linear complementarity problem at every time step, is devised to validate the proposed wavelet-based method. Applicability of the proposed solution technique is demonstrated by considering several test cases involving a cracked cantilever beam modeled as a bilinear SDOF system subjected to a harmonic excitation. In particular, the presence of higher-order harmonics, originating from the piecewise linear behavior, is confirmed in all the test cases. Parametric study involving the variations in the crack depth, and crack location is performed to bring out their effect on the relative strengths of higher-order harmonics. Versatility of the method is demonstrated by considering the cases such as mixed-frequency excitation and an MDOF oscillator with multiple bilinear springs. In addition to purporting the wavelet-based method as a viable alternative to analyze the response of piecewise linear oscillators, the proposed method can be easily extended to solve inverse problems unlike the other direct time integration schemes.

  3. Non-linear control logics for vibrations suppression: a comparison between model-based and non-model-based techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripamonti, Francesco; Orsini, Lorenzo; Resta, Ferruccio

    2015-04-01

    Non-linear behavior is present in many mechanical system operating conditions. In these cases, a common engineering practice is to linearize the equation of motion around a particular operating point, and to design a linear controller. The main disadvantage is that the stability properties and validity of the controller are local. In order to improve the controller performance, non-linear control techniques represent a very attractive solution for many smart structures. The aim of this paper is to compare non-linear model-based and non-model-based control techniques. In particular the model-based sliding-mode-control (SMC) technique is considered because of its easy implementation and the strong robustness of the controller even under heavy model uncertainties. Among the non-model-based control techniques, the fuzzy control (FC), allowing designing the controller according to if-then rules, has been considered. It defines the controller without a system reference model, offering many advantages such as an intrinsic robustness. These techniques have been tested on the pendulum nonlinear system.

  4. Generalized Vibrational Perturbation Theory for Rotovibrational Energies of Linear, Symmetric and Asymmetric Tops: Theory, Approximations, and Automated Approaches to Deal with Medium-to-Large Molecular Systems

    PubMed Central

    Piccardo, Matteo; Bloino, Julien; Barone, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Models going beyond the rigid-rotor and the harmonic oscillator levels are mandatory for providing accurate theoretical predictions for several spectroscopic properties. Different strategies have been devised for this purpose. Among them, the treatment by perturbation theory of the molecular Hamiltonian after its expansion in power series of products of vibrational and rotational operators, also referred to as vibrational perturbation theory (VPT), is particularly appealing for its computational efficiency to treat medium-to-large systems. Moreover, generalized (GVPT) strategies combining the use of perturbative and variational formalisms can be adopted to further improve the accuracy of the results, with the first approach used for weakly coupled terms, and the second one to handle tightly coupled ones. In this context, the GVPT formulation for asymmetric, symmetric, and linear tops is revisited and fully generalized to both minima and first-order saddle points of the molecular potential energy surface. The computational strategies and approximations that can be adopted in dealing with GVPT computations are pointed out, with a particular attention devoted to the treatment of symmetry and degeneracies. A number of tests and applications are discussed, to show the possibilities of the developments, as regards both the variety of treatable systems and eligible methods. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26345131

  5. Generalized Vibrational Perturbation Theory for Rotovibrational Energies of Linear, Symmetric and Asymmetric Tops: Theory, Approximations, and Automated Approaches to Deal with Medium-to-Large Molecular Systems.

    PubMed

    Piccardo, Matteo; Bloino, Julien; Barone, Vincenzo

    2015-08-05

    Models going beyond the rigid-rotor and the harmonic oscillator levels are mandatory for providing accurate theoretical predictions for several spectroscopic properties. Different strategies have been devised for this purpose. Among them, the treatment by perturbation theory of the molecular Hamiltonian after its expansion in power series of products of vibrational and rotational operators, also referred to as vibrational perturbation theory (VPT), is particularly appealing for its computational efficiency to treat medium-to-large systems. Moreover, generalized (GVPT) strategies combining the use of perturbative and variational formalisms can be adopted to further improve the accuracy of the results, with the first approach used for weakly coupled terms, and the second one to handle tightly coupled ones. In this context, the GVPT formulation for asymmetric, symmetric, and linear tops is revisited and fully generalized to both minima and first-order saddle points of the molecular potential energy surface. The computational strategies and approximations that can be adopted in dealing with GVPT computations are pointed out, with a particular attention devoted to the treatment of symmetry and degeneracies. A number of tests and applications are discussed, to show the possibilities of the developments, as regards both the variety of treatable systems and eligible methods.

  6. Inertial Linear Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, Darren

    1995-01-01

    Inertial linear actuators developed to suppress residual accelerations of nominally stationary or steadily moving platforms. Function like long-stroke version of voice coil in conventional loudspeaker, with superimposed linear variable-differential transformer. Basic concept also applicable to suppression of vibrations of terrestrial platforms. For example, laboratory table equipped with such actuators plus suitable vibration sensors and control circuits made to vibrate much less in presence of seismic, vehicular, and other environmental vibrational disturbances.

  7. ADVANCES IN IMPEDANCE THEORY

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.; /SLAC

    2009-06-05

    We review recent progress in the following areas of the impedance theory: calculation of impedance of tapers and small angle collimators; optical approximation and parabolic equation for the high-frequency impedance; impedance due to resistive inserts in a perfectly conducting pipe.

  8. Optimal virtual mechanical impedances for the vibroacoustic active control of a thin plate.

    PubMed

    Michau, M; Berry, A; Micheau, Ph; Herzog, Ph

    2015-01-01

    In order to reduce the acoustic power radiated by a flexible panel, dual colocated actuator / sensor pairs are used to modify its vibration. The control strategy implemented for harmonic disturbances leads to locally impose a virtual mechanical impedance to the structure, using the linear relation between the actuator input and the control output of each pair. This virtual mechanical impedance is computed in order to minimize the radiated acoustic power. The proposed approach consists in two steps: (1) the matrix of optimal virtual mechanical impedance is calculated by measuring the primary disturbance and the transfer functions between actuators and structural/acoustic sensors and (2) the virtual mechanical impedance objective is achieved using a real-time integral controller. It is shown that such an optimal control approach leads to better sound power reduction than a classical active damping strategy where the virtual mechanical impedance is defined as real positive. Theoretical and experimental results are compared, also showing that the method proposed here is robust regarding variations of the primary disturbance.

  9. Biodynamic response of the human body in the sitting position when subjected to vertical vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donati, P. M.; Bonthoux, C.

    1983-10-01

    Previous studies of the location of those areas in which the sensation of vibration is perceived under whole body vertical vibration have underlined the predominance of the relative movement between thorax and pelvis. Experiments were designed to explore systematically the transmissibility between the pelvis and thorax. These were supplemented by measurements of mechanical impedance of the body and absorbed power. To determine the body impedance, a procedure was developed to remove the effect of the load platform itself. Fifteen subjects were presented first with a swept sinusoidal vibration, and then with a broad band random vibration, to see how the wave form of the motion might affect the mechanical response of the body. The results obtained for the seat to thorax transmissibility suggest that within the range of vertical vibration investigated (1-10 Hz, 1·6 m/s 2 r.m.s.) the human body in the sitting position can be modelled by a linear system with one or two degrees of freedom according to the subject. Data from the impedance function, which is a more complete description of the response of the body as a mechanical system, lead to systems with one further degree of freedom.

  10. Transient Vibration Prediction for Rotors on Ball Bearings Using Load-dependent Non-linear Bearing Stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, David P.; Poplawski, J. V.

    2002-01-01

    Rolling-element bearing forces vary nonlinearly with bearing deflection. Thus an accurate rotordynamic transient analysis requires bearing forces to be determined at each step of the transient solution. Analyses have been carried out to show the effect of accurate bearing transient forces (accounting for non-linear speed and load dependent bearing stiffness) as compared to conventional use of average rolling-element bearing stiffness. Bearing forces were calculated by COBRA-AHS (Computer Optimized Ball and Roller Bearing Analysis - Advanced High Speed) and supplied to the rotordynamics code ARDS (Analysis of Rotor Dynamic Systems) for accurate simulation of rotor transient behavior. COBRA-AHS is a fast-running 5 degree-of-freedom computer code able to calculate high speed rolling-element bearing load-displacement data for radial and angular contact ball bearings and also for cylindrical and tapered roller beatings. Results show that use of nonlinear bearing characteristics is essential for accurate prediction of rotordynamic behavior.

  11. Ab initio anharmonic vibrational frequency predictions for linear proton-bound complexes OC-H(+)-CO and N(2)-H(+)-N(2).

    PubMed

    Terrill, Kasia; Nesbitt, David J

    2010-08-01

    Ab initio anharmonic transition frequencies are calculated for strongly coupled (i) asymmetric and (ii) symmetric proton stretching modes in the X-H(+)-X linear ionic hydrogen bonded complexes for OCHCO(+) and N(2)HN(2)(+). The optimized potential surface is calculated in these two coordinates for each molecular ion at CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVnZ (n = 2-4) levels and extrapolated to the complete-basis-set limit (CBS). Slices through both 2D surfaces reveal a relatively soft potential in the asymmetric proton stretching coordinate at near equilibrium geometries, which rapidly becomes a double minimum potential with increasing symmetric proton acceptor center of mass separation. Eigenvalues are obtained by solution of the 2D Schrödinger equation with potential/kinetic energy coupling explicity taken into account, converged in a distributed Gaussian basis set as a function of grid density. The asymmetric proton stretch fundamental frequency for N(2)HN(2)(+) is predicted at 848 cm(-1), with strong negative anharmonicity in the progression characteristic of a shallow "particle in a box" potential. The corresponding proton stretch fundamental for OCHCO(+) is anomalously low at 386 cm(-1), but with a strong alternation in the vibrational spacing due to the presence of a shallow D(infinityh) transition state barrier (Delta = 398 cm(-1)) between the two equivalent minimum geometries. Calculation of a 2D dipole moment surface and transition matrix elements reveals surprisingly strong combination and difference bands with appreciable intensity throughout the 300-1500 cm(-1) region. Corrected for zero point (DeltaZPE) and thermal vibrational excitation (DeltaE(vib)) at 300 K, the single and double dissociation energies in these complexes are in excellent agreement with thermochemical gas phase ion data.

  12. The frequency dependent impedance of an HVdc converter

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, A.R.; Arrillaga, J.

    1995-07-01

    A linear and direct method of determining the frequency dependent impedance of a 12 pulse HVdc converter is presented. Terms are developed for both the dc and ac side impedances of the converter, including the effect of the firing angle control system, the commutation period, and the variability of the commutation period. The impedance predictions are verified by dynamic simulation.

  13. Determination of in vivo mechanical properties of long bones from their impedance response curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borders, S. G.

    1981-01-01

    A mathematical model consisting of a uniform, linear, visco-elastic, Euler-Bernoulli beam to represent the ulna or tibia of the vibrating forearm or leg system is developed. The skin and tissue compressed between the probe and bone is represented by a spring in series with the beam. The remaining skin and tissue surrounding the bone is represented by a visco-elastic foundation with mass. An extensive parametric study is carried out to determine the effect of each parameter of the mathematical model on its impedance response. A system identification algorithm is developed and programmed on a digital computer to determine the parametric values of the model which best simulate the data obtained from an impedance test.

  14. Biodynamic response of the seated human body to single-axis and dual-axis vibration: effect of backrest and non-linearity.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yi; Griffin, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    The biodynamic responses to the human body give an understanding of why human responses to vibration (changes in health, comfort, and performance) vary with the frequency and direction of vibration. Studies have shown that biodynamic responses also vary with the magnitude of vibration and that the backrests of seats influence the transmission of vibration to the seated human body. There has been little study of the nonlinearity in the biodynamic responses of the body to dual-axis excitation and no study of the influence of backrests during dual-axis excitation. This study investigated the apparent mass and cross-axis apparent mass of the human body exposed to random vibration (0.2 to 20 Hz) in all 15 possible combinations of four magnitudes (0, 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 ms(-2) r.m.s.) of fore-and-aft vibration and the same four magnitudes of vertical vibration. Nonlinearity was evident, with the body softening with increasing magnitude of vibration when using a fixed magnitude of vibration in one direction and varying the magnitude of vibration in the other direction. The fore-and-aft apparent mass on the seat was greater without a backrest at the lower frequencies but greater with a backrest at the higher frequencies. The vertical apparent mass on the seat was decreased by the backrest at low frequencies. Cross-axis coupling was evident, with excitation in one axis producing a response in the other axis. It is concluded that the nonlinearity of the body evident during single-axis and multi-axis vibration, and the influence of backrests, should be taken into account when determining frequency weightings for predicting human responses to vibration and when optimising the dynamics of seating to minimise exposure to vibration.

  15. Non-Gaussian statistics of amide I mode frequency fluctuation of N-methylacetamide in methanol solution: linear and nonlinear vibrational spectra.

    PubMed

    Kwac, Kijeong; Lee, Hochan; Cho, Minhaeng

    2004-01-15

    By carrying out molecular dynamics simulations of an N-methylacetamide (NMA) in methanol solution, the amide I mode frequency fluctuation and hydrogen bonding dynamics were theoretically investigated. Combining an extrapolation formula developed from systematic ab initio calculation studies of NMA-(CH3OH)n clusters with a classical molecular dynamics simulation method, we were able to quantitatively describe the solvatochromic vibrational frequency shift induced by the hydrogen-bonding interaction between NMA and solvent methanol. It was found that the fluctuating amide I mode frequency distribution is notably non-Gaussian and it can be decomposed into two Gaussian peaks that are associated with two distinctively different solvation structures. The ensemble-average-calculated linear response function associated with the IR absorption is found to be oscillating, which is in turn related to the doublet amide I band shape. Numerically calculated infrared absorption spectra are directly compared with experiment and the agreement was found to be excellent. By using the Onsager's regression hypothesis, the rate constants of the interconversion process between the two solvation structures were obtained. Then, the nonlinear response functions associated with two-dimensional infrared pump-probe spectroscopy were simulated. The physics behind the two-dimensional line shape and origin of the cross peaks in the time-resolved pump-probe spectra is explained and the result is compared with 2D spectra experimentally measured recently by Woutersen et al.

  16. Mechanical Impedance of the Human Body in the Horizontal Direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmlund, P.; Lundström, R.

    1998-08-01

    The mechanical impedance of the seated human body in horizontal directions (fore-and-aft and lateral) was measured during different experimental conditions, such as vibration level (0·25-1·4 m/s2r.m.s.), frequency (1·13-80 Hz), body weight (54-93 kg), upper body posture (relaxed and erect) and gender. The outcome showed that impedance, normalized by the sitting weight, varies with direction, level, posture and gender. Generally the impedance spectra show one peak for the fore-and-aft (X) direction while two peaks are found in the lateral (Y) direction. Males showed a lower normalized impedance than females. Increasing fore-and-aft vibration decreases the frequency at which maximum impedance occurs but also reduces the overall magnitude. For the lateral direction a more complex pattern was found. The frequency of impedance peaks are constant with increasing vibration level. The magnitude of the second peak decreases when changing posture from erect to relaxed. Males showed a higher impedance magnitude than females and a greater dip between the two peaks. The impedance spectra for the two horizontal directions have different shapes. This supports the idea of treating them differently; such as with respect to risk assessments and development of preventative measures.

  17. Compact Vibration Damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanco, Thomas G. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A vibration damper includes a rigid base with a mass coupled thereto for linear movement thereon. Springs coupled to the mass compress in response to the linear movement along either of two opposing directions. A converter coupled to the mass converts the linear movement to a corresponding rotational movement. A rotary damper coupled to the converter damps the rotational movement.

  18. Impedance match for Stirling type cryocoolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Wei; Luo, Ercang; Wang, Xiaotao; Wu, Zhanghua

    Impedance match in Stirling type cryocoolers is important for the compressor efficiency and available acoustic power. This paper generalizes the basic principles concerning the efficiency and acoustic power output of the linear compressor. Starting from basic governing equations and mainly from the viewpoint of energy balance, the physical mechanisms behind the principles are clearly shown. Specially, this paper focuses on the impedance match for an existing compressor, where the current limit and displacement limit should also be taken into consideration when selecting a suitable impedance. Some case studies based on a commercial compressor are also provided for a deep understanding.

  19. An Accurate Method for Free Vibration Analysis of Structures with Application to Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KEVORKIAN, S.; PASCAL, M.

    2001-10-01

    In this work, the continuous element method which has been used as an alternative to the finite element method of vibration analysis of frames is applied to more general structures like 3-D continuum and rectangular plates. The method is based on the concept of the so-called impedance matrix giving in the frequency domain, the linear relation between the generalized displacements of the boundaries and the generalized forces exerted on these boundaries. For a 3-D continuum, the concept of impedance matrix is introduced assuming a particular kind of boundary conditions. For rectangular plates, this new development leads to the solution of vibration problems for boundary conditions other than the simply supported ones.

  20. Anisotropic Artificial Impedance Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarfoth, Ryan Gordon

    Anisotropic artificial impedance surfaces are a group of planar materials that can be modeled by the tensor impedance boundary condition. This boundary condition relates the electric and magnetic field components on a surface using a 2x2 tensor. The advantage of using the tensor impedance boundary condition, and by extension anisotropic artificial impedance surfaces, is that the method allows large and complex structures to be modeled quickly and accurately using a planar boundary condition. This thesis presents the theory of anisotropic impedance surfaces and multiple applications. Anisotropic impedance surfaces are a generalization of scalar impedance surfaces. Unlike the scalar version, anisotropic impedance surfaces have material properties that are dependent on the polarization and wave vector of electromagnetic radiation that interacts with the surface. This allows anisotropic impedance surfaces to be used for applications that scalar surfaces cannot achieve. Three of these applications are presented in this thesis. The first is an anisotropic surface wave waveguide which allows propagation in one direction, but passes radiation in the orthogonal direction without reflection. The second application is a surface wave beam shifter which splits a surface wave beam in two directions and reduces the scattering from an object placed on the surface. The third application is a patterned surface which can alter the scattered radiation pattern of a rectangular shape. For each application, anisotropic impedance surfaces are constructed using periodic unit cells. These unit cells are designed to give the desired surface impedance characteristics by modifying a patterned metallic patch on a grounded dielectric substrate. Multiple unit cell geometries are analyzed in order to find the setup with the best performance in terms of impedance characteristics and frequency bandwidth.

  1. On the vibrational linear and nonlinear optical properties of compounds involving noble gas atoms: HXeOXeH, HXeOXeF, and FXeOXeF.

    PubMed

    Avramopoulos, Aggelos; Reis, Heribert; Luis, Josep M; Papadopoulos, Manthos G

    2013-06-30

    The vibrational (hyper)polarizabilities of some selected Xe derivatives are studied in the context of Bishop-Kirtman perturbation theory (BKPT) and numerical finite field methodology. It was found that for this set of rare gas compounds, the static vibrational properties are quite large, in comparison to the corresponding electronic ones, especially those of the second hyperpolarizability. This also holds for the dc-Pockels β(-ω;ω,0), Kerr γ(-ω;ω,0,0) and electric field second harmonic generation γ (-2ω;ω,ω,0) effects, although the computed nuclear relaxation (nr) vibrational contributions are smaller in magnitude than the static ones. HXeOXeH was used to study the effects of electron correlation, basis set, and geometry. Geometry effects were found to lead to noticeable changes of the vibrational and electronic second hyperpolarizability. A limited study of the effect of Xe insertion to the nr vibrational properties is also reported. Assessment of the results revealed that Xe insertion has a remarkable effect on the nr (hyper)polarizabilities. In terms of the BKPT, this is associated with a remarkable increase of the electrical and mechanical anharmonicity terms. The latter is consistent with the anharmonic character of several vibrational modes reported for rare gas compounds.

  2. Change in resonance parameters of a linear molecule as it bends: Evidence in electron-impact vibrational transitions of hot COS and CO2 molecules*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Masamitsu; Ishijima, Yohei; Kato, Hidetoshi; Mogi, Daisuke; Takahashi, Yoshinao; Fukae, Katsuya; Limão-Vieira, Paulo; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Shimamura, Isao

    2016-04-01

    Inelastic and superelastic electron-impact vibrational excitation functions of hot carbonyl sulphide COS (and hot CO2) are measured for electron energies from 0.5 to 3.0 eV (1.5 to 6.0 eV) and at a scattering angle of 90°. Based on the vibrational populations and the principle of detailed balance, these excitation functions are decomposed into contributions from state-to-state vibrational transitions involving up to the second bending overtone (030) in the electronically ground state. Both the 2Π resonance for COS around 1.2 eV and the 2Πu resonance for CO2 around 3.8 eV are shifted to lower energies as the initial vibrational state is excited in the bending mode. The width of the resonance hump for COS changes only little as the molecule bends, whereas that of the overall boomerang resonance for CO2 becomes narrower. The angular distribution of the electrons resonantly scattered by hot COS and hot CO2 is also measured. The different shapes depending on the vibrational transitions and gas temperatures are discussed in terms of the symmetry of the vibrational wave functions. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  3. Vibration manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, C.

    1971-01-01

    Guidelines of the methods and applications used in vibration technology at the MSFC are presented. The purpose of the guidelines is to provide a practical tool for coordination and understanding between industry and government groups concerned with vibration of systems and equipments. Topics covered include measuring, reducing, analyzing, and methods for obtaining simulated environments and formulating vibration specifications. Methods for vibration and shock testing, theoretical aspects of data processing, vibration response analysis, and techniques of designing for vibration are also presented.

  4. Overview Of Impedance Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abele, John E.

    1989-08-01

    Electrical impedance has been one of the many "tools of great promise" that physicians have employed in their quest to measure and/or monitor body function or physiologic events. So far, the expectations for its success have always exceeded its performance. In simplistic terms, physiologic impedance is a measure of the resistance in the volume between electrodes which changes as a function of changes in that volume, the relative impedance of that volume, or a combination of these two. The history and principles of electrical impedance are very nicely reviewed by Geddes and Baker in their textbook "Principles of Applied Biomedical Instrumentation". It is humbling, however, to note that Cremer recorded variations in electrical impedance in frog hearts as early as 1907. The list of potential applications includes the measurement of thyroid function, estrogen activity, galvanic skin reflex, respiration, blood flow by conductivity dilution, nervous activity and eye movement. Commercial devices employing impedance have been and are being used to measure respiration (pneumographs and apneamonitors), pulse volume (impedance phlebographs) and even noninvasive cardiac output.

  5. Microfabricated AC impedance sensor

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter; Ackler, Harold D.; Becker, Frederick; Boser, Bernhard E.; Eldredge, Adam B.; Fuller, Christopher K.; Gascoyne, Peter R. C.; Hamilton, Julie K.; Swierkowski, Stefan P.; Wang, Xiao-Bo

    2002-01-01

    A microfabricated instrument for detecting and identifying cells and other particles based on alternating current (AC) impedance measurements. The microfabricated AC impedance sensor includes two critical elements: 1) a microfluidic chip, preferably of glass substrates, having at least one microchannel therein and with electrodes patterned on both substrates, and 2) electrical circuits that connect to the electrodes on the microfluidic chip and detect signals associated with particles traveling down the microchannels. These circuits enable multiple AC impedance measurements of individual particles at high throughput rates with sufficient resolution to identify different particle and cell types as appropriate for environmental detection and clinical diagnostic applications.

  6. Energy-storage of a prescribed impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. E.

    1969-01-01

    General mathematical expression found for energy storage shows that for linear, passive networks there is a minimum possible energy storage corresponding to a prescribed impedance. The electromagnetic energy storage is determined at different excitation frequencies through analysis of the networks terminal and reactance characteristics.

  7. A mixed quantum-classical description of pheophorbide a linear absorption spectra: Quantum-corrections of the Qy- and Qx-absorption vibrational satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megow, Jörg; Kulesza, Alexander; May, Volkhard

    2016-01-01

    The ground-state classical path approximation is utilized to compute molecular absorption spectra in a mixed quantum-classical frame. To improve the description for high-frequency vibrational satellites, related quantum correction factors are introduced. The improved method is demonstrated for the Qy- and Qx-bands of pheophorbide a.

  8. On Impedance Spectroscopy of Supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchaikin, V. V.; Sibatov, R. T.; Ambrozevich, A. S.

    2016-10-01

    Supercapacitors are often characterized by responses measured by methods of impedance spectroscopy. In the frequency domain these responses have the form of power-law functions or their linear combinations. The inverse Fourier transform leads to relaxation equations with integro-differential operators of fractional order under assumption that the frequency response is independent of the working voltage. To compare long-term relaxation kinetics predicted by these equations with the observed one, charging-discharging of supercapacitors (with nominal capacitances of 0.22, 0.47, and 1.0 F) have been studied by means of registration of the current response to a step voltage signal. It is established that the reaction of devices under study to variations of the charging regime disagrees with the model of a homogeneous linear response. It is demonstrated that relaxation is well described by a fractional stretched exponent.

  9. Vibration control in accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Montag, C.

    2011-01-01

    In the vast majority of accelerator applications, ground vibration amplitudes are well below tolerable magnet jitter amplitudes. In these cases, it is necessary and sufficient to design a rigid magnet support structure that does not amplify ground vibration. Since accelerator beam lines are typically installed at an elevation of 1-2m above ground level, special care has to be taken in order to avoid designing a support structure that acts like an inverted pendulum with a low resonance frequency, resulting in untolerable lateral vibration amplitudes of the accelerator components when excited by either ambient ground motion or vibration sources within the accelerator itself, such as cooling water pumps or helium flow in superconducting magnets. In cases where ground motion amplitudes already exceed the required jiter tolerances, for instance in future linear colliders, passive vibration damping or active stabilization may be considered.

  10. Aircraft panel with sensorless active sound power reduction capabilities through virtual mechanical impedances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulandet, R.; Michau, M.; Micheau, P.; Berry, A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with an active structural acoustic control approach to reduce the transmission of tonal noise in aircraft cabins. The focus is on the practical implementation of the virtual mechanical impedances method by using sensoriactuators instead of conventional control units composed of separate sensors and actuators. The experimental setup includes two sensoriactuators developed from the electrodynamic inertial exciter and distributed over an aircraft trim panel which is subject to a time-harmonic diffuse sound field. The target mechanical impedances are first defined by solving a linear optimization problem from sound power measurements before being applied to the test panel using a complex envelope controller. Measured data are compared to results obtained with sensor-actuator pairs consisting of an accelerometer and an inertial exciter, particularly as regards sound power reduction. It is shown that the two types of control unit provide similar performance, and that here virtual impedance control stands apart from conventional active damping. In particular, it is clear from this study that extra vibrational energy must be provided by the actuators for optimal sound power reduction, mainly due to the high structural damping in the aircraft trim panel. Concluding remarks on the benefits of using these electrodynamic sensoriactuators to control tonal disturbances are also provided.

  11. vapor phase lubrication of SiO2 surfaces via adsorption of short chain linear alcohols & a sum frequency generation vibration spectroscopy study of crystalline cellulose in biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnette, Anna Lorraine

    The use of silicon oxide with its native oxide layer for the fabrication of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) with contacting sliding parts requires the need for innovative lubrication methods to extend device lifetimes. The most promising method to date involves the equilibrium vapor phase lubrication (VPL) of MEMS using short chain linear alcohols in ambient conditions. Still, some questions remain regarding the effectiveness of this lubrication method, these include (1) whether or not the adsorbed n-alcohol molecules are the primary lubricant and (2) is this lubrication method effective in humid environments. This study investigates the vapor phase lubrication of SiO2 surfaces using short chain linear alcohols, more specifically n-propanol and n-pentanol. Macro-scale ball-on-flat tribometer tests are used to evaluate the lubriciousness of n-pentanol vapor under a series of contact loads/ pressures. Wear reduction of the SiO2 surfaces is achieved when there is complete coverage of the SiO2 surfaces with the adsorbed n-pentanol molecules. This occurs when the partial pressure relative to the saturation pressure (P/Psat) of n-pentanol was kept above 20% P/Psat which corresponds to approximately monolayer coverage of the SiO2 surface. In contrast to the lubricious effect of n-pentanol vapor, water vapor proves to enhance wear of the SiO2 surfaces when compared to dry (low moisture) conditions. This study also demonstrates that the primary lubrication method of the SiO 2 surfaces is most likely the adsorbed n-pentanol molecules and not the tribochemical reaction species produced during the sliding contact. Although this reaction species is always present within the wear tested regions, the production of the tribochemical reaction species is enhanced when more severe wear is observed. So, the adsorbed n-pentanol molecules are the primary method of lubrication. The effectiveness of the lubrication method in environments containing water vapor is also investigated

  12. Time-Domain Impedance Boundary Conditions for Computational Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Auriault, Laurent

    1996-01-01

    It is an accepted practice in aeroacoustics to characterize the properties of an acoustically treated surface by a quantity known as impedance. Impedance is a complex quantity. As such, it is designed primarily for frequency-domain analysis. Time-domain boundary conditions that are the equivalent of the frequency-domain impedance boundary condition are proposed. Both single frequency and model broadband time-domain impedance boundary conditions are provided. It is shown that the proposed boundary conditions, together with the linearized Euler equations, form well-posed initial boundary value problems. Unlike ill-posed problems, they are free from spurious instabilities that would render time-marching computational solutions impossible.

  13. Vibration interaction in a multiple flywheel system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firth, Jordan; Black, Jonathan

    2012-03-01

    This paper investigates vibration interaction in a multiple flywheel system. Flywheels can be used for kinetic energy storage in a satellite Integrated Power and Attitude Control System (IPACS). One hitherto unstudied problem with IPACS is vibration interaction between multiple unbalanced wheels. This paper uses a linear state-space dynamics model to study the impact of vibration interaction. Specifically, imbalance-induced vibration inputs in one flywheel rotor are used to cause a resonant whirling vibration in another rotor. Extra-synchronous resonant vibrations are shown to exist, but with damping modeled the effect is minimal. Vibration is most severe when both rotors are spinning in the same direction.

  14. Coal storage hopper with vibrating screen agitator

    SciTech Connect

    Daw, C.S.; Lackey, M.E.; Sy, R.L.

    1984-09-11

    The present invention is directed to a vibrating screen agitator in a coal storage hopper for assuring the uniform feed of coal having sufficient moisture content to effect agglomeration and bridging thereof in the coal hopper from the latter onto a conveyor mechanism. The vibrating screen agitator is provided by a plurality of transversely oriented and vertically spaced apart screens in the storage hopper with a plurality of vertically oriented rods attached to the screens. The rods are vibrated to effect the vibration of the screens and the breaking up of agglomerates in the coal which might impede the uniform flow of the coal from the hopper onto a conveyer.

  15. Coal storage hopper with vibrating screen agitator

    DOEpatents

    Daw, Charles S.; Lackey, Mack E.; Sy, Ronald L.

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a vibrating screen agitator in a coal storage hopper for assuring the uniform feed of coal having sufficient moisture content to effect agglomeration and bridging thereof in the coal hopper from the latter onto a conveyor mechanism. The vibrating screen agitator is provided by a plurality of transversely oriented and vertically spaced apart screens in the storage hopper with a plurality of vertically oriented rods attached to the screens. The rods are vibrated to effect the vibration of the screens and the breaking up of agglomerates in the coal which might impede the uniform flow of the coal from the hopper onto a conveyer.

  16. Superconducting active impedance converter

    DOEpatents

    Ginley, David S.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Martens, Jon S.

    1993-01-01

    A transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductor allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10-80 K. temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology.

  17. Superconducting active impedance converter

    DOEpatents

    Ginley, D.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.

    1993-11-16

    A transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductors allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10-80 K. temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology. 12 figures.

  18. Force Limited Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry; Chang, Kurng Y.

    2005-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the concept and applications of Force Limited Vibration Testing. The goal of vibration testing of aerospace hardware is to identify problems that would result in flight failures. The commonly used aerospace vibration tests uses artificially high shaker forces and responses at the resonance frequencies of the test item. It has become common to limit the acceleration responses in the test to those predicted for the flight. This requires an analysis of the acceleration response, and requires placing accelerometers on the test item. With the advent of piezoelectric gages it has become possible to improve vibration testing. The basic equations have are reviewed. Force limits are analogous and complementary to the acceleration specifications used in conventional vibration testing. Just as the acceleration specification is the frequency spectrum envelope of the in-flight acceleration at the interface between the test item and flight mounting structure, the force limit is the envelope of the in-flight force at the interface . In force limited vibration tests, both the acceleration and force specifications are needed, and the force specification is generally based on and proportional to the acceleration specification. Therefore, force limiting does not compensate for errors in the development of the acceleration specification, e.g., too much conservatism or the lack thereof. These errors will carry over into the force specification. Since in-flight vibratory force data are scarce, force limits are often derived from coupled system analyses and impedance information obtained from measurements or finite element models (FEM). Fortunately, data on the interface forces between systems and components are now available from system acoustic and vibration tests of development test models and from a few flight experiments. Semi-empirical methods of predicting force limits are currently being developed on the basis of the limited flight and system test

  19. Longitudinal impedance of RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J. M.; Mernick, K.

    2015-05-03

    The longitudinal impedance of the two RHIC rings has been measured using the effect of potential well distortion on longitudinal Schottky measurements. For the blue RHIC ring Im(Z/n) = 1.5±0.2Ω. For the yellow ring Im(Z/n) = 5.4±1Ω.

  20. Recycler short kicker beam impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Crisp, Jim; Fellenz, Brian; /Fermilab

    2009-07-01

    Measured longitudinal and calculated transverse beam impedance is presented for the short kicker magnets being installed in the Fermilab Recycler. Fermi drawing number ME-457159. The longitudinal impedance was measured with a stretched wire and the Panofsky equation was used to estimate the transverse impedance. The impedance of 3319 meters (the Recycler circumference) of stainless vacuum pipe is provided for comparison. Although measurements where done to 3GHz, impedance was negligible above 30MHz. The beam power lost to the kicker impedance is shown for a range of bunch lengths. The measurements are for one kicker assuming a rotation frequency of 90KHz. Seven of these kickers are being installed.

  1. Theoretical investigation on the non-linear optical properties, vibrational spectroscopy and frontier molecular orbital of (E)-2-cyano-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)acrylamide molecule.

    PubMed

    Xiao-Hong, Li; Hong-Ling, Cui; Rui-Zhou, Zhang; Xian-Zhou, Zhang

    2015-02-25

    The vibrational frequencies of (E)-2-cyano-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)acrylamide (HB-CA) in the ground state have been calculated using density functional method (B3LYP) with B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The analysis of natural bond orbital was also performed. The IR spectra were obtained and interpreted by means of potential energies distributions (PEDs) using MOLVIB program. In addition, the results show that there exists C-H⋯O hydrogen bond in the title compound, which is confirmed by the natural bond orbital analysis. The predicted NLO properties show that the title compound is a good candidate as nonlinear optical material. The analysis of frontier molecular orbitals shows that HB-CA has high excitation energies, good stability and high chemical hardness. The analysis of MEP map shows the negative and the positive potential sites.

  2. Experiences with active damping and impedance-matching compensators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betros, Robert S.; Alvarez, Oscar S.; Bronowicki, Allen J.

    1993-09-01

    TRW has been implementing active damping compensators on smart structures for the past five years. Since that time there have been numerous publications on the use of impedance matching techniques for structural damping augmentation. The idea of impedance matching compensators came about by considering the flow of power in a structure undergoing vibration. The goal of these compensators is to electronically dissipate as much of this flowing power as possible. This paper shows the performance of impedance matching compensators used in smart structures to be comparable to that of active damping compensators. Theoretical comparisons between active damping and impedance matching methods are made using PZT actuators and sensors. The effects of these collocated and non-collocated PZT sensors and actuators on the types of signals they sense and actuate are investigated. A method for automatically synthesizing impedance matching compensators is presented. Problems with implementing broad band active damping and impedance matching compensators on standard Digital Signal Processing (DSP) chips are discussed. Simulations and measurements that compare the performance of active damping and impedance matching techniques for a lightly damped cantilevered beam are shown.

  3. Ground Vibration Measurements at LHC Point 4

    SciTech Connect

    Bertsche, Kirk; Gaddi, Andrea; /CERN

    2012-09-17

    Ground vibration was measured at Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Point 4 during the winter shutdown in February 2012. This report contains the results, including power and coherence spectra. We plan to collect and analyze vibration data from representative collider halls to inform specifications for future linear colliders, such as ILC and CLIC. We are especially interested in vibration correlations between final focus lens locations.

  4. Non-Linear Dynamics and Stability of Circular Cylindrical Shells Containing Flowing Fluid. Part Iv: Large-Amplitude Vibrations with Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AMABILI, M.; PELLICANO, F.; PAÏDOUSSIS, M. P.

    2000-11-01

    The response of a shell conveying fluid to harmonic excitation, in the spectral neighbourhood of one of the lowest natural frequencies, is investigated for different flow velocities. The theoretical model has already been presented in Part I of the present study. Non-linearities due to moderately large-amplitude shell motion are considered by using Donnell's non-linear shallow-shell theory. Linear potential flow theory is applied to describe the fluid-structure interaction by using the model proposed by Paı̈doussis and Denise. For different amplitudes and frequencies of the excitation and for different flow velocities, the following are investigated numerically: (1) periodic response of the system; (2) unsteady and stochastic motion; (3) loss of stability by jumps to bifurcated branches. The effect of the flow velocity on the non-linear periodic response of the system has also been investigated. Poincaré maps and bifurcation diagrams are used to study the unsteady and stochastic dynamics of the system. Amplitude modulated motions, multi-periodic solutions, chaotic responses, cascades of bifurcations as the route to chaos and the so-called “blue sky catastrophe” phenomenon have all been observed for different values of the system parameters; the latter two have been predicted here probably for the first time for the dynamics of circular cylindrical shells.

  5. Monoclinic and triclinic polymorphs of 2-{5,5-dimethyl-3-[2-(2,4,6-trimethoxyphenyl)vinyl]cyclohex-2-enylidene}malononitrile-solid-state linear-polarized IR-spectroscopy, DFT calculations and vibrational analysis.

    PubMed

    Koleva, Bojidarka B; Kolev, Tsonko

    2008-12-01

    The linear-dichroic infrared (IR-LD) spectroscopy of oriented solid samples as suspension in nematic liquid crystal have been carried out for experimental IR-band assignment and structural information of 2-{5,5-dimethyl-3-[2-(2,4,6-trimethoxyphenyl)vinyl]cyclohex-2-enylidene} malononitrile polymorphs. The last data have been compared with known crystallographic ones, thus determining the validity of IR-LD spectral conclusions as well as its possibility to determination of Davydov's splitting effect and separation of pairs of maxima corresponding to non-equivalent molecules included in the unit cell of given compound. The experimental structural and spectroscopic data in our case are supported with theoretical DFT ones, obtaining both the electronic structure and vibrational frequencies in gas phase.

  6. Impedance calculation for ferrite inserts

    SciTech Connect

    Breitzmann, S.C.; Lee, S.Y.; Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    Passive ferrite inserts were used to compensate the space charge impedance in high intensity space charge dominated accelerators. They study the narrowband longitudinal impedance of these ferrite inserts. they find that the shunt impedance and the quality factor for ferrite inserts are inversely proportional to the imaginary part of the permeability of ferrite materials. They also provide a recipe for attaining a truly passive space charge impedance compensation and avoiding narrowband microwave instabilities.

  7. Impedance Measurement Box

    ScienceCinema

    Christophersen, Jon

    2016-07-12

    Energy storage devices, primarily batteries, are now more important to consumers, industries and the military. With increasing technical complexity and higher user expectations, there is also a demand for highly accurate state-of-health battery assessment techniques. IMB incorporates patented, proprietary, and tested capabilities using control software and hardware that can be part of an embedded monitoring system. IMB directly measures the wideband impedance spectrum in seconds during battery operation with no significant impact on service life. It also can be applied to batteries prior to installation, confirming health before entering active service, as well as during regular maintenance. For more information about this project, visit http://www.inl.gov/rd100/2011/impedance-measurement-box/

  8. Impedance Measurement Box

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, William

    2014-11-20

    The IMB 50V software provides functionality for design of impedance measurement tests or sequences of tests, execution of these tests or sequences, processing measured responses and displaying and saving of the results. The software consists of a Graphical User Interface that allows configuration of measurement parameters and test sequencing, a core engine that controls test sequencing, execution of measurements, processing and storage of results and a hardware/software data acquisition interface with the IMB hardware system.

  9. The Physics of Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pippard, A. B.

    1989-11-01

    The study of vibration in physical systems is an important part of almost all fields in physics and engineering. This work, originally published in two volumes, examines the classical aspects in Part I and the quantum oscillator in Part II. The classical linear vibrator is treated first and the underlying unity of all linear oscillations in electrical, mechanical and acoustic systems is emphasized. Following this the book turns to the treatment of nonlinear vibrations, a field with which engineers and physicists are generally less familiar. In Part II the emphasis turns to quantum systems, that is those systems which can only be adequately described by quantum mechanics. The treatment concentrates on vibrations in atoms and molecules and their interaction with electromagnetic radiation. The similarities of classical and quantum methods are stressed and the limits of the classical treatment are examined. Throughout the book, each phenomenon discussed is illustrated with many examples and theory and experiment are compared. Although the reader may find that the physics discussed is demanding and the concepts are subtle in places, all mathematics used is familiar to both engineers and experimental scientists. Although not a textbook this is a useful introduction to the more advanced mathematical treatment of vibrations as it bridges the gap between the basic principles and more specialized concepts. It will be of great interest to advanced undergraduates and postgraduates as well as applied mathematicians, physicists and engineers in university and industry.

  10. High input impedance amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, Leonard L.

    1995-01-01

    High input impedance amplifiers are provided which reduce the input impedance solely to a capacitive reactance, or, in a somewhat more complex design, provide an extremely high essentially infinite, capacitive reactance. In one embodiment, where the input impedance is reduced in essence, to solely a capacitive reactance, an operational amplifier in a follower configuration is driven at its non-inverting input and a resistor with a predetermined magnitude is connected between the inverting and non-inverting inputs. A second embodiment eliminates the capacitance from the input by adding a second stage to the first embodiment. The second stage is a second operational amplifier in a non-inverting gain-stage configuration where the output of the first follower stage drives the non-inverting input of the second stage and the output of the second stage is fed back to the non-inverting input of the first stage through a capacitor of a predetermined magnitude. These amplifiers, while generally useful, are very useful as sensor buffer amplifiers that may eliminate significant sources of error.

  11. Gynecologic electrical impedance tomograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korjenevsky, A.; Cherepenin, V.; Trokhanova, O.; Tuykin, T.

    2010-04-01

    Electrical impedance tomography extends to the new and new areas of the medical diagnostics: lungs, breast, prostate, etc. The feedback from the doctors who use our breast EIT diagnostic system has induced us to develop the 3D electrical impedance imaging device for diagnostics of the cervix of the uterus - gynecologic impedance tomograph (GIT). The device uses the same measuring approach as the breast imaging system: 2D flat array of the electrodes arranged on the probe with handle is placed against the body. Each of the 32 electrodes of the array is connected in turn to the current source while the rest electrodes acquire the potentials on the surface. The current flows through the electrode of the array and returns through the remote electrode placed on the patient's limb. The voltages are measured relative to another remote electrode. The 3D backprojection along equipotential surfaces is used to reconstruct conductivity distribution up to approximately 1 cm in depth. Small number of electrodes enables us to implement real time imaging with a few frames per sec. rate. The device is under initial testing and evaluation of the imaging capabilities and suitability of usage.

  12. Chemical synthesis, crystal structure, vibrational spectroscopy, non-linear optical properties and DFT calculation of bis (2,6-diaminopyridinium) sulfate monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Hassen, Chaouki; Dammak, Thameur; Chniba-Boudjada, Nassira; Mhiri, Tahar; Boujelbene, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    Single crystals of a new organic inorganic hybrid compound "bis (2,6-diaminopyridinium) sulfate monohydrate [C5H8N3]2SO4·H2O ([2,6-HDAP]2SO4·H2O)" was synthesized by slow evaporation method at room temperature and characterized by X-ray single crystal diffraction, infrared spectroscopy and DFT calculation. The new hybrid compound crystallizes in the orthorhombic system with the non-centro symmetric space group Pna21 and the following parameters a = 14.759(2) Å, b = 7.076 (2) Å and c = 28.159 (2) Å. The atomic arrangement can be described as inorganic chains following the b axis connected with the organic groups by means of Nsbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds to form 3D network. Antiparallelly π-π stacked 2,6-HDAP cations form molecular columns in the spaces between the chains. The optimized molecular structure, vibrational spectra and the optical properties were calculated by the density functional theory (DFT) method using the B3LYP function with the LanL2DV basis set. The wavenumber calculated are in good agreement with the observed frequency values. The calculated hyperpolarizability βtot is about 4.5 times more than that of the reference crystal KDP. Hence, the large β value shows that the title compound is an attractive object for future studies of nonlinear optical properties.

  13. Computational study of the vibrational spectroscopic studies, natural bond orbital, frontier molecular orbital and second-order non-linear optical properties of acetophenone thiosemicarbazone molecule.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Hong; Mei, Zheng; Zhang, Xian-Zhou

    2014-01-24

    The vibrational frequencies of acetophenone thiosemicarbazone in the ground state have been calculated using density functional method (B3LYP) with 6-31G(d), 6-31G(d,p) and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets. The analysis of natural bond orbital was also performed. The IR spectra were obtained and interpreted by means of potential energies distributions (PEDs) using MOLVIB program. In addition, the results show that there exist N-H…N and N-H…S hydrogen bonds in the title compound, which play a major role in stabilizing the molecule and are confirmed by the natural bond orbital analysis. The predicted NLO properties show that the title compound is a good candidate as second-order NLO material. In addition, the frontier molecular orbitals were analyzed and the crystal structure obtained by molecular mechanics belongs to the Pbca space group, with lattice parameters Z=8, a=16.0735 Å, b=7.1719 Å, c=7.8725 Å, ρ=0.808 g/cm(3).

  14. Non-Linear Dynamics and Stability of Circular Cylindrical Shells Containing Flowing Fluid, Part II: Large-Amplitude Vibrations Without Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AMABILI, M.; PELLICANO, F.; PAÏDOUSSIS, M. P.

    1999-12-01

    The non-linear response of empty and fluid-filled circular cylindrical shells to harmonic excitations is investigated. Both modal and point excitations have been considered. The model is suitable to study simply supported shells with and without axial constraints. Donnell's non-linear shallow-shell theory is used. The boundary conditions on radial displacement and the continuity of circumferential displacement are exactly satisfied. The radial deflection of the shell is expanded by using a basis of seven linear modes. The effect of internal quiescent, incompressible and inviscid fluid is investigated. The equations of motion, obtained in Part I of this study, are studied by using a code based on the collocation method. The validation of the present model is obtained by comparison with other authoritative results. The effect of the number of axisymmetric modes used in the expansion on the response of the shell is investigated, clarifying questions open for a long time. The results show the occurrence of travelling wave response in the proximity of the resonance frequency, the fundamental role of the first and third axisymmetric modes in the expansion of the radial deflection with one longitudinal half-wave, and limit cycle responses. Modes with two longitudinal half-waves are also investigated.

  15. Acoustic input impedance of the avian inner ear measured in ostrich (Struthio camelus).

    PubMed

    Muyshondt, Pieter G G; Aerts, Peter; Dirckx, Joris J J

    2016-09-01

    In both mammals and birds, the mechanical behavior of the middle ear structures is affected by the mechanical impedance of the inner ear. In this study, the aim was to quantify the acoustic impedance of the avian inner ear in the ostrich, which allows us to determine the effect on columellar vibrations and middle ear power flow in future studies. To determine the inner ear impedance, vibrations of the columella were measured for both the quasi-static and acoustic stimulus frequencies. In the frequency range of 0.3-4 kHz, we used electromagnetic stimulation of the ossicle and a laser Doppler vibrometer to measure the vibration response. At low frequencies, harmonic displacements were imposed on the columella using piezo stimulation and the resulting force response was measured with a force sensor. From these measurement data, the acoustic impedance of the inner ear could be determined. A simple RLC model in series of the impedance measurements resulted in a stiffness reactance of KIE = 0.20·10(12) Pa/m³, an inertial impedance of MIE = 0.652·10(6) Pa s(2)/m³, and a resistance of RIE = 1.57·10(9) Pa s/m. We found that values of the inner ear impedance in the ostrich are one to two orders in magnitude smaller than what is found in mammal ears.

  16. VIBRATION COMPACTION

    DOEpatents

    Hauth, J.J.

    1962-07-01

    A method of compacting a powder in a metal container is described including the steps of vibrating the container at above and below the resonant frequency and also sweeping the frequency of vibration across the resonant frequency several times thereby following the change in resonant frequency caused by compaction of the powder. (AEC)

  17. Impedance-based damage assessment using piezoelectric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rim, Mi-Sun; Yoo, Seung-Jae; Lee, In; Song, Jae-Hoon; Yang, Jae-Won

    2011-04-01

    Recently structural health monitoring (SHM) systems are being focused because they make it possible to assess the health of structures at real-time in many application fields such as aircraft, aerospace, civil and so on. Piezoelectric materials are widely used for sensors of SHM system to monitor damage of critical parts such as bolted joints. Bolted joints could be loosened by vibration, thermal cycling, shock, corrosion, and they cause serious mechanical failures. In this paper, impedance-based method using piezoelectric sensors was applied for real-time SHM. A steel beam specimen fastened by bolts was tested, and polymer type piezoelectric materials, PVDFs were used for sensors to monitor the condition of bolted joint connections. When structure has some damage, for example loose bolts, the impedance of PVDF sensors showed different tendency with normal structure which has no loose bolts. In the case of loose bolts, impedance values are decreased and admittance values are increased.

  18. Theoretical explanation of the low-lying ν(6) vibrational fundamental of the FSO3 radical by the linear vibronic coupling approach.

    PubMed

    Uhlíková, Tereza; Urban, Štěpán

    2013-06-21

    The first attempt for a theoretical explanation of the ν6 fundamental energy levels of the fluorosulfate radical (FSO3) electronic ground state has been made. The vibronic interaction of the two lowest electronic states of the radical (X̃ (2)A2 and à (2)E) has been taken into consideration in the basis of the linear vibronic coupling (LVC) approximation. The strengths of the intrastate and interstate vibronic couplings have been calculated within the framework of the Köppel, Domcke, and Cederbaum (KDC) model Hamiltonian. Already this simple KDC-LVC model provides the ν6 fundamental energy, which is in very good agreement with the experimental results. From the inclusion of vibronic interactions such as the pseudo-Jahn-Teller and Jahn-Teller effects into the calculation of the fundamental energy of the ν6 mode, it can be said that mainly the interstate coupling with the electronic excited state E causes the unexpectedly low fundamental energy ν6 of the FSO3 radical.

  19. Ionospheric effects to antenna impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bethke, K. H.

    1986-01-01

    The reciprocity between high power satellite antennas and the surrounding plasma are examined. The relevant plasma states for antenna impedance calculations are presented and plasma models, and hydrodynamic and kinetic theory, are discussed. A theory from which a variation in antenna impedance with regard to the radiated power can be calculated for a frequency range well above the plasma resonance frequency is give. The theory can include photo and secondary emission effects in antenna impedance calculations.

  20. Optically stimulated differential impedance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Maxey, Lonnie C; Parks, II, James E; Lewis, Sr., Samuel A; Partridge, Jr., William P

    2014-02-18

    Methods and apparatuses for evaluating a material are described. Embodiments typically involve use of an impedance measurement sensor to measure the impedance of a sample of the material under at least two different states of illumination. The states of illumination may include (a) substantially no optical stimulation, (b) substantial optical stimulation, (c) optical stimulation at a first wavelength of light, (d) optical stimulation at a second wavelength of light, (e) a first level of light intensity, and (f) a second level of light intensity. Typically a difference in impedance between the impedance of the sample at the two states of illumination is measured to determine a characteristic of the material.

  1. Impedance matching at arterial bifurcations.

    PubMed

    Brown, N

    1993-01-01

    Reflections of pulse waves will occur in arterial bifurcations unless the impedance is matched continuously through changing geometric and elastic properties. A theoretical model is presented which minimizes pulse wave reflection through bifurcations. The model accounts for the observed linear changes in area within the bifurcation, generalizes the theory to asymmetrical bifurcations, characterizes changes in elastic properties from parent to daughter arteries, and assesses the effect of branch angle on the mechanical properties of daughter vessels. In contradistinction to previous models, reflections cannot be minimized without changes in elastic properties through bifurcations. The theoretical model predicts that in bifurcations with area ratios (beta) less than 1.0 Young's moduli of daughter vessels may be less than that in the parent vessel if the Womersley parameter alpha in the parent vessel is less than 5. Larger area ratios in bifurcations are accompanied by greater increases in Young's moduli of branches. For an idealized symmetric aortic bifurcation (alpha = 10) with branching angles theta = 30 degrees (opening angle 60 degrees) Young's modulus of common iliac arteries relative to that of the distal abdominal aorta has an increase of 1.05, 1.68 and 2.25 for area ratio of 0.8, 1.0 and 1.15, respectively. These predictions are consistent with the observed increases in Young's moduli of peripheral vessels.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Development on electromagnetic impedance function modeling and its estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Sutarno, D.

    2015-09-30

    Today the Electromagnetic methods such as magnetotellurics (MT) and controlled sources audio MT (CSAMT) is used in a broad variety of applications. Its usefulness in poor seismic areas and its negligible environmental impact are integral parts of effective exploration at minimum cost. As exploration was forced into more difficult areas, the importance of MT and CSAMT, in conjunction with other techniques, has tended to grow continuously. However, there are obviously important and difficult problems remaining to be solved concerning our ability to collect process and interpret MT as well as CSAMT in complex 3D structural environments. This talk aim at reviewing and discussing the recent development on MT as well as CSAMT impedance functions modeling, and also some improvements on estimation procedures for the corresponding impedance functions. In MT impedance modeling, research efforts focus on developing numerical method for computing the impedance functions of three dimensionally (3-D) earth resistivity models. On that reason, 3-D finite elements numerical modeling for the impedances is developed based on edge element method. Whereas, in the CSAMT case, the efforts were focused to accomplish the non-plane wave problem in the corresponding impedance functions. Concerning estimation of MT and CSAMT impedance functions, researches were focused on improving quality of the estimates. On that objective, non-linear regression approach based on the robust M-estimators and the Hilbert transform operating on the causal transfer functions, were used to dealing with outliers (abnormal data) which are frequently superimposed on a normal ambient MT as well as CSAMT noise fields. As validated, the proposed MT impedance modeling method gives acceptable results for standard three dimensional resistivity models. Whilst, the full solution based modeling that accommodate the non-plane wave effect for CSAMT impedances is applied for all measurement zones, including near-, transition

  3. Monolithically compatible impedance measurement

    DOEpatents

    Ericson, Milton Nance; Holcomb, David Eugene

    2002-01-01

    A monolithic sensor includes a reference channel and at least one sensing channel. Each sensing channel has an oscillator and a counter driven by the oscillator. The reference channel and the at least one sensing channel being formed integrally with a substrate and intimately nested with one another on the substrate. Thus, the oscillator and the counter have matched component values and temperature coefficients. A frequency determining component of the sensing oscillator is formed integrally with the substrate and has an impedance parameter which varies with an environmental parameter to be measured by the sensor. A gating control is responsive to an output signal generated by the reference channel, for terminating counting in the at least one sensing channel at an output count, whereby the output count is indicative of the environmental parameter, and successive ones of the output counts are indicative of changes in the environmental parameter.

  4. Vibration-Response Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, L. M.

    1986-01-01

    Dynamic behaviors of structures analyzed interactively. Interactive steadystate vibration-response program, VIBRA, developed. Frequency-response analyses commonly used in evaluating dynamic behaviors of structures subjected to cyclic external forces. VIBRA calculates frequency response using modalsuperposition approach. Method applicable to single or multiple forces applied to linear, proportionally damped structure in which damping is viscous or structural. VIBRA written in FORTRAN 77 for interactive execution.

  5. Impedance spectroscopy for the detection and identification of unknown toxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggs, B. C.; Plopper, G. E.; Paluh, J. L.; Phamduy, T. B.; Corr, D. T.; Chrisey, D. B.

    2012-06-01

    Advancements in biological and chemical warfare has allowed for the creation of novel toxins necessitating a universal, real-time sensor. We have used a function-based biosensor employing impedance spectroscopy using a low current density AC signal over a range of frequencies (62.5 Hz-64 kHz) to measure the electrical impedance of a confluent epithelial cell monolayer at 120 sec intervals. Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cells were grown to confluence on thin film interdigitated gold electrodes. A stable impedance measurement of 2200 Ω was found after 24 hrs of growth. After exposure to cytotoxins anthrax lethal toxin and etoposide, the impedance decreased in a linear fashion resulting in a 50% drop in impedance over 50hrs showing significant difference from the control sample (~20% decrease). Immunofluorescent imaging showed that apoptosis was induced through the addition of toxins. Similarities of the impedance signal shows that the mechanism of cellular death was the same between ALT and etoposide. A revised equivalent circuit model was employed in order to quantify morphological changes in the cell monolayer such as tight junction integrity and cell surface area coverage. This model showed a faster response to cytotoxin (2 hrs) compared to raw measurements (20 hrs). We demonstrate that herein that impedance spectroscopy of epithelial monolayers serves as a real-time non-destructive sensor for unknown pathogens.

  6. Experimental verification of the feasibility of the cardiovascular impedance simulator.

    PubMed

    Gwak, Kwan-Woong; Paden, Brad E; Antaki, James F; Ahn, Ihn-Seok

    2010-05-01

    Mock circulatory systems (MCS) are often used for the development of cardiovascular devices and for the study of the dynamics of blood flow through the cardiovascular system. However, conventional MCS suffer from the repeatability, flexibility, and precision problems because they are typically built up with passive and linear fluidic elements such as compliance chamber, manual valve, and tube. To solve these limitations, we have developed an impedance simulator, comprised of a feedback-controlled positive displacement pump that is capable of generating analogous dynamic characteristics as the conventional fluidic elements would generate, thereby replacing the conventional passive fluidic elements that often cause problems. The impedance simulator is experimentally proven to reproduce the impedance of the various discrete elements, such as resistance and compliance of the cardiovascular system model, as well as the combined impedances of them.

  7. Impedance in School Screening Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robarts, John T.

    1985-01-01

    This paper examines the controversy over use of impedance screening in public schools to identify students with hearing problems, including otitis media, a common ear condition in infants and young children. It cites research that questions the value of pure tone screening as a single test and raises critics' objections to the use of impedance,…

  8. Ultra-wideband impedance sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1999-01-01

    The ultra-wideband impedance sensor (UWBZ sensor, or Z-sensor) is implemented in differential and single-ended configurations. The differential UWBZ sensor employs a sub-nanosecond impulse to determine the balance of an impedance bridge. The bridge is configured as a differential sample-and-hold circuit that has a reference impedance side and an unknown impedance side. The unknown impedance side includes a short transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The single-ended UWBZ sensor eliminates the reference side of the bridge and is formed of a sample and hold circuit having a transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The sensing range of the transmission line is bounded by the two-way travel time of the impulse, thereby eliminating spurious Doppler modes from large distant objects that would occur in a microwave CW impedance bridge. Thus, the UWBZ sensor is a range-gated proximity sensor. The Z-sensor senses the near proximity of various materials such as metal, plastic, wood, petroleum products, and living tissue. It is much like a capacitance sensor, yet it is impervious to moisture. One broad application area is the general replacement of magnetic sensors, particularly where nonferrous materials need to be sensed. Another broad application area is sensing full/empty levels in tanks, vats and silos, e.g., a full/empty switch in water or petroleum tanks.

  9. Ultra-wideband impedance sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1999-03-16

    The ultra-wideband impedance sensor (UWBZ sensor, or Z-sensor) is implemented in differential and single-ended configurations. The differential UWBZ sensor employs a sub-nanosecond impulse to determine the balance of an impedance bridge. The bridge is configured as a differential sample-and-hold circuit that has a reference impedance side and an unknown impedance side. The unknown impedance side includes a short transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The single-ended UWBZ sensor eliminates the reference side of the bridge and is formed of a sample and hold circuit having a transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The sensing range of the transmission line is bounded by the two-way travel time of the impulse, thereby eliminating spurious Doppler modes from large distant objects that would occur in a microwave CW impedance bridge. Thus, the UWBZ sensor is a range-gated proximity sensor. The Z-sensor senses the near proximity of various materials such as metal, plastic, wood, petroleum products, and living tissue. It is much like a capacitance sensor, yet it is impervious to moisture. One broad application area is the general replacement of magnetic sensors, particularly where nonferrous materials need to be sensed. Another broad application area is sensing full/empty levels in tanks, vats and silos, e.g., a full/empty switch in water or petroleum tanks. 2 figs.

  10. Chatter suppression through variable impedance and smart fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Segalman, D.; Redmond, J.

    1996-02-01

    A novel approach to mitigating chatter vibrations in machine tools is presented. Encountered in many types of metal removal processes, chatter is a dangerous condition which results from the interaction of the cutting dynamics with the modal characteristics of the machine-workpiece assembly. Tool vibrations are recored on the surface of the workpiece during metal removal, imposing a waviness which alters the chip thickness during subsequent cutting passes. Deviations from the nominal chip thickness effect changes in the cutting force which, under certain conditions, can further excite vibrations. The chatter mitigation strategy presented is based on periodically altering the impedance of the cutting tool assembly. A cyclic electric (or magnetic) field is applied to the spindle quill which contains an electro-rheological (or magneto-rheological) fluid. The variable yield stress in the fluid affects the coupling of the spindle to the machine tool structure, changing the natural frequency of oscillation. Altering the modal characteristics in this fashion disrupts the modulation of current tool vibrations with previous tool vibrations recorded on the workpiece surface. Results from a simulated milling process reveal that significant reductions in vibration amplitude can be achieved through proper selection of fluid and excitation frequency.

  11. Electromagnetic scattering by impedance structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Griesser, Timothy

    1987-01-01

    The scattering of electromagnetic waves from impedance structures is investigated, and current work on antenna pattern calculation is presented. A general algorithm for determining radiation patterns from antennas mounted near or on polygonal plates is presented. These plates are assumed to be of a material which satisfies the Leontovich (or surface impedance) boundary condition. Calculated patterns including reflection and diffraction terms are presented for numerious geometries, and refinements are included for antennas mounted directly on impedance surfaces. For the case of a monopole mounted on a surface impedance ground plane, computed patterns are compared with experimental measurements. This work in antenna pattern prediction forms the basis of understanding of the complex scattering mechanisms from impedance surfaces. It provides the foundation for the analysis of backscattering patterns which, in general, are more problematic than calculation of antenna patterns. Further proposed study of related topics, including surface waves, corner diffractions, and multiple diffractions, is outlined.

  12. Acoustic impedance testing for aeroacoustic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Todd

    Accurate acoustic propagation models are required to characterize and subsequently reduce aircraft engine noise. These models ultimately rely on acoustic impedance measurements of candidate materials used in sound-absorbing liners. The standard two-microphone method (TMM) is widely used to estimate acoustic impedance but is limited in frequency range and does not provide uncertainty estimates, which are essential for data quality assessment and model validation. This dissertation presents a systematic framework to estimate uncertainty and extend the frequency range of acoustic impedance testing. Uncertainty estimation for acoustic impedance data using the TMM is made via two methods. The first employs a standard analytical technique based on linear perturbations and provides useful scaling information. The second uses a Monte Carlo technique that permits the propagation of arbitrarily large uncertainties. Both methods are applied to the TMM for simulated data representative of sound-hard and sound-soft acoustic materials. The results indicate that the analytical technique can lead to false conclusions about the magnitude and importance of specific error sources. Furthermore, the uncertainty in acoustic impedance is strongly dependent on the frequency and the uncertainty in the microphone locations. Next, an increased frequency range of acoustic impedance testing is investigated via two methods. The first method reduces the size of the test specimen (from 25.4 mm square to 8.5 mm square) and uses the standard TMM. This method has issues concerning specimen nonuniformity because the small specimens may not be representative of the material. The second method increases the duct cross section and, hence, the required complexity of the sound field propagation model. A comparison among all three methods is conducted for each of the three specimens: two different ceramic tubular specimens and a single degree-of-freedom liner. The results show good agreement between the

  13. Random Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messaro. Semma; Harrison, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    Ares I Zonal Random vibration environments due to acoustic impingement and combustion processes are develop for liftoff, ascent and reentry. Random Vibration test criteria for Ares I Upper Stage pyrotechnic components are developed by enveloping the applicable zonal environments where each component is located. Random vibration tests will be conducted to assure that these components will survive and function appropriately after exposure to the expected vibration environments. Methodology: Random Vibration test criteria for Ares I Upper Stage pyrotechnic components were desired that would envelope all the applicable environments where each component was located. Applicable Ares I Vehicle drawings and design information needed to be assessed to determine the location(s) for each component on the Ares I Upper Stage. Design and test criteria needed to be developed by plotting and enveloping the applicable environments using Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet Software and documenting them in a report Using Microsoft Word Processing Software. Conclusion: Random vibration liftoff, ascent, and green run design & test criteria for the Upper Stage Pyrotechnic Components were developed by using Microsoft Excel to envelope zonal environments applicable to each component. Results were transferred from Excel into a report using Microsoft Word. After the report is reviewed and edited by my mentor it will be submitted for publication as an attachment to a memorandum. Pyrotechnic component designers will extract criteria from my report for incorporation into the design and test specifications for components. Eventually the hardware will be tested to the environments I developed to assure that the components will survive and function appropriately after exposure to the expected vibration environments.

  14. Coupling between plate vibration and acoustic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Maestrello, Lucio; Bayliss, Alvin

    1992-01-01

    A detailed numerical investigation of the coupling between the vibration of a flexible plate and the acoustic radiation is performed. The nonlinear Euler equations are used to describe the acoustic fluid while the nonlinear plate equation is used to describe the plate vibration. Linear, nonlinear, and quasi-periodic or chaotic vibrations and the resultant acoustic radiation are analyzed. We find that for the linear plate response, acoustic coupling is negligible. However, for the nonlinear and chaotic responses, acoustic coupling has a significant effect on the vibration level as the loading increases. The radiated pressure from a plate undergoing nonlinear or chaotic vibrations is found to propagate nonlinearly into the far-field. However, the nonlinearity due to wave propagation is much weaker than that due to the plate vibrations. As the acoustic wave propagates into the far-field, the relative difference in level between the fundamental and its harmonics and subharmonics decreases with distance.

  15. Coupling between plate vibration and acoustic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Maestrello, Lucio; Bayliss, Alvin

    1993-01-01

    A detailed numerical investigation of the coupling between the vibration of a flexible plate and the acoustic radiation is performed. The nonlinear Euler equations are used to describe the acoustic fluid while the nonlinear plate equation is used to describe the plate vibration. Linear, nonlinear, and quasi-periodic or chaotic vibrations and the resultant acoustic radiation are analyzed. We find that for the linear plate response, acoustic coupling is negligible. However, for the nonlinear and chaotic responses, acoustic coupling has a significant effect on the vibration level as the loading increases. The radiated pressure from a plate undergoing nonlinear or chaotic vibrations is found to propagate nonlinearly into the far field. However, the nonlinearity due to wave propagation is much weaker than that due to the plate vibrations. As the acoustic wave propagates into the far field, the relative difference in level between the fundamental and its harmonics and subharmonics decreases with distance.

  16. Tunable sound transmission at an impedance-mismatched fluidic interface assisted by a composite waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Wei, Zhi; Fan, Li; Qu, Jianmin; Zhang, Shu-yi

    2016-01-01

    We report a composite waveguide fabricated by attaching a coupling aperture to a waveguide. The acoustic impedance of the composite waveguide can be regulated by merely controlling its coupling vibrations, depending on its structure size. By changing the size to adjust the acoustic impedance of the composite waveguide at an impedance-mismatched fluidic interface, tunable sound transmission at the desired frequencies is achieved. The reported composite waveguide provides a new method for sound regulation at a mismatched fluidic interface and has extensive frequency hopping and frequency agility applications in air-water sound communication. PMID:27698379

  17. Tunable sound transmission at an impedance-mismatched fluidic interface assisted by a composite waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Wei, Zhi; Fan, Li; Qu, Jianmin; Zhang, Shu-Yi

    2016-10-01

    We report a composite waveguide fabricated by attaching a coupling aperture to a waveguide. The acoustic impedance of the composite waveguide can be regulated by merely controlling its coupling vibrations, depending on its structure size. By changing the size to adjust the acoustic impedance of the composite waveguide at an impedance-mismatched fluidic interface, tunable sound transmission at the desired frequencies is achieved. The reported composite waveguide provides a new method for sound regulation at a mismatched fluidic interface and has extensive frequency hopping and frequency agility applications in air-water sound communication.

  18. Impedance-estimation methods, modeling methods, articles of manufacture, impedance-modeling devices, and estimated-impedance monitoring systems

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, John G.

    2009-11-17

    An impedance estimation method includes measuring three or more impedances of an object having a periphery using three or more probes coupled to the periphery. The three or more impedance measurements are made at a first frequency. Three or more additional impedance measurements of the object are made using the three or more probes. The three or more additional impedance measurements are made at a second frequency different from the first frequency. An impedance of the object at a point within the periphery is estimated based on the impedance measurements and the additional impedance measurements.

  19. I/O impedance controller

    DOEpatents

    Ruesch, Rodney; Jenkins, Philip N.; Ma, Nan

    2004-03-09

    There is disclosed apparatus and apparatus for impedance control to provide for controlling the impedance of a communication circuit using an all-digital impedance control circuit wherein one or more control bits are used to tune the output impedance. In one example embodiment, the impedance control circuit is fabricated using circuit components found in a standard macro library of a computer aided design system. According to another example embodiment, there is provided a control for an output driver on an integrated circuit ("IC") device to provide for forming a resistor divider network with the output driver and a resistor off the IC device so that the divider network produces an output voltage, comparing the output voltage of the divider network with a reference voltage, and adjusting the output impedance of the output driver to attempt to match the output voltage of the divider network and the reference voltage. Also disclosed is over-sampling the divider network voltage, storing the results of the over sampling, repeating the over-sampling and storing, averaging the results of multiple over sampling operations, controlling the impedance with a plurality of bits forming a word, and updating the value of the word by only one least significant bit at a time.

  20. GB-R impedances: new approach to impedance simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, L.; Carlosena, A.

    1995-04-01

    A new design procedure is presented for obtaining simulated inductors and large capacitors from classical opamp circuits. Such impedances exploit almost all of the available bandwidth of the operational amplifier.

  1. The transmission of vertical vibration through seats: Influence of the characteristics of the human body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toward, Martin G. R.; Griffin, Michael J.

    2011-12-01

    The transmission of vibration through a seat depends on the impedance of the seat and the apparent mass of the seat occupant. This study was designed to determine how factors affecting the apparent mass of the body (age, gender, physical characteristics, backrest contact, and magnitude of vibration) affect seat transmissibility. The transmission of vertical vibration through a car seat was measured with 80 adults (41 males and 39 females aged 18-65) at frequencies between 0.6 and 20 Hz with two backrest conditions (no backrest and backrest), and with three magnitudes of random vibration (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 m s -2 rms). Linear regression models were used to study the effects of subject physical characteristics (age, gender, and anthropometry) and features of their apparent mass (resonance frequency, apparent mass at resonance and at 12 Hz) on the measured seat transmissibility. The strongest predictor of both the frequency of the principal resonance in seat transmissibility and the seat transmissibility at resonance was subject age, with other factors having only marginal effects. The transmissibility of the seat at 12 Hz depended on subject age, body mass index, and gender. Although subject weight was strongly associated with apparent mass, weight was not strongly associated with seat transmissibility. The resonance frequency of the seat decreased with increases in the magnitude of the vibration excitation and increased when subjects made contact with the backrest. Inter-subject variability in the resonance frequency and transmissibility at resonance was less with greater vibration excitation, but was largely unaffected by backrest contact. A lumped parameter seat-person model showed that changes in seat transmissibility with age can be predicted from changes in apparent mass with age, and that the dynamic stiffness of the seat appeared to increase with increased loading so as to compensate for increases in subject apparent mass associated with increased sitting

  2. Detection of complex formation and determination of intermolecular geometry through electrical anharmonic coupling of molecular vibrations using electron-vibration-vibration two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Rui; Fournier, Frederic; Donaldson, Paul M; Gardner, Elizabeth M; Gould, Ian R; Klug, David R

    2009-10-14

    Electrical interactions between molecular vibrations can be non-linear and thereby produce intermolecular coupling even in the absence of a chemical bond. We use this fact to detect the formation of an intermolecular complex using electron-vibration-vibration two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (EVV 2DIR) and also to determine the distance and angle between the two molecular species.

  3. Reactanceless synthesized impedance bandpass amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, L. L. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An active R bandpass filter network is formed by four operational amplifier stages interconnected by discrete resistances. One pair of stages synthesize an equivalent input impedance of an inductance (L sub eq) in parallel with a discrete resistance (R sub o) while the second pair of stages synthesizes an equivalent input impedance of a capacitance (C sub eq) serially coupled to another discrete resistance (R sub i) coupled in parallel with the first two stages. The equivalent input impedances aggregately define a tuned resonant bandpass filter in the roll-off regions of the operational amplifiers.

  4. Coal storage hopper with vibrating-screen agitator

    DOEpatents

    Daw, C.S.; Lackey, M.E.; Sy, R.L.

    1982-04-27

    The present invention is directed to a vibrating screen agitator in a coal storage hopper for assuring the uniform feed of coal having sufficient moisture content to effect agglomeration and bridging thereof in the coal hopper from the latter onto a conveyer mechanism. The vibrating scrren agitator is provided by a plurality of transversely oriented and vertically spaced apart screens in the storage hopper with a plurality of vertically oriented rods attached to the screens. The rods are vibrated to effect the vibration of the screens and the breaking up of agglomerates in the coal which might impede the uniform flow of the coal from the hopper onto a conveyer.

  5. Efficient Simultaneous Reconstruction of Time-Varying Images and Electrode Contact Impedances in Electrical Impedance Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Boverman, Gregory; Isaacson, David; Newell, Jonathan C.; Saulnier, Gary J.; Kao, Tzu-Jen; Amm, Bruce C.; Wang, Xin; Davenport, David M.; Chong, David H.; Sahni, Rakesh; Ashe, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    In Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT), we apply patterns of currents on a set of electrodes at the external boundary of an object, measure the resulting potentials at the electrodes, and, given the aggregate data set, reconstruct the complex conductivity and permittivity within the object. It is possible to maximize sensitivity to internal conductivity changes by simultaneously applying currents and measuring potentials on all electrodes but this approach also maximizes sensitivity to changes in impedance at the interface. We have therefore developed algorithms to assess contact impedance changes at the interface as well as to efficiently and simultaneously reconstruct internal conductivity/permittivity changes within the body. We use simple linear algebraic manipulations, the generalized SVD, and a dual-mesh finite-element-based framework to reconstruct images in real time. We are also able to efficiently compute the linearized reconstruction for a wide range of regularization parameters and to compute both the Generalized Cross-Validation (GCV) parameter as well as the L-curve, objective approaches to determining the optimal regularization parameter, in a similarly efficient manner. Results are shown using data from a normal subject and from a clinical ICU patient, both acquired with the GE GENESIS prototype EIT system, demonstrating significantly reduced boundary artifacts due to electrode drift and motion artifact. PMID:27295649

  6. Active vibration control in Duffing mechanical systems using dynamic vibration absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrán-Carbajal, F.; Silva-Navarro, G.

    2014-07-01

    This paper deals with the multi-frequency harmonic vibration suppression problem in forced Duffing mechanical systems using passive and active linear mass-spring-damper dynamic vibration absorbers. An active vibration absorption scheme is proposed to extend the vibrating energy dissipation capability of a passive dynamic vibration absorber for multiple excitation frequencies and, simultaneously, to perform reference position trajectory tracking tasks planned for the nonlinear primary system. A differential flatness-based disturbance estimation scheme is also described to estimate the unknown multiple time-varying frequency disturbance signal affecting the differentially flat nonlinear vibrating mechanical system dynamics. Some numerical simulation results are provided to show the efficient performance of the proposed active vibration absorption scheme and the fast estimation of the vibration disturbance signal.

  7. IMPEDANCE ALARM SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Cowen, R.G.

    1959-09-29

    A description is given of electric protective systems and burglar alarm systems of the capacitance type in which the approach of an intruder at a place to be protected varies the capacitance in an electric circuit and the change is thereafter communicated to a remote point to actuate an alarm. According to the invention, an astable transitor multi-vibrator has the amplitude at its output voltage controlled by a change in the sensing capacitance. The sensing capacitance is effectively connected between collector and base of one stage of the multivibrator circuit through the detector-to-monitor line. The output of the detector is a small d-c voltage across the detector-to-monitor line. This d- c voltage is amplified and monitored at the other end of the line, where an appropriate alarm is actuated if a sudden change in the voltage occurs. The present system has a high degree of sensitivity and is very difficult to defeat by known techniques.

  8. Uncertainty Analysis of the Grazing Flow Impedance Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Martha C.; Jones, Michael G.; Watson, Willie R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper outlines a methodology to identify the measurement uncertainty of NASA Langley s Grazing Flow Impedance Tube (GFIT) over its operating range, and to identify the parameters that most significantly contribute to the acoustic impedance prediction. Two acoustic liners are used for this study. The first is a single-layer, perforate-over-honeycomb liner that is nonlinear with respect to sound pressure level. The second consists of a wire-mesh facesheet and a honeycomb core, and is linear with respect to sound pressure level. These liners allow for evaluation of the effects of measurement uncertainty on impedances educed with linear and nonlinear liners. In general, the measurement uncertainty is observed to be larger for the nonlinear liners, with the largest uncertainty occurring near anti-resonance. A sensitivity analysis of the aerodynamic parameters (Mach number, static temperature, and static pressure) used in the impedance eduction process is also conducted using a Monte-Carlo approach. This sensitivity analysis demonstrates that the impedance eduction process is virtually insensitive to each of these parameters.

  9. Plasma Impedance Spectrum Analyzer (PISA): an advanced impedance probe for measuring plasma density and other parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, D. E.; Pfaff, R. F.; Uribe, P.; Burchill, J.

    2006-12-01

    as close as possible to the plasma potential, collapsing the ion sheath and minimizing sheath-induced errors in the measurement of the temperature-dependent series resonance frequency. In addition, by stepping the bias voltage through a range of values, we can measure the sheath capacitance as a function of voltage and get an independent measure of the Debye length. 3) Drive voltage amplitude stepping which allows the diagnosis of sheath rectification and non-linear effects that may drive harmonics of the plasma / upper hybrid frequency. By stepping the amplitude through a range, we can also find the optimal drive voltage which provides a reasonable SNR while minimizing the impedance probe's impact on other instruments, such as high frequency electric field probes. We present flight data from representative souding rocket flights of the Goddard Impedance Probe and discuss the instrument performance, error bars, and future improvements.

  10. Evaluation of electrical impedance ratio measurements in accuracy of electronic apex locators

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Pil-Jong; Kim, Hong-Gee

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this paper was evaluating the ratios of electrical impedance measurements reported in previous studies through a correlation analysis in order to explicit it as the contributing factor to the accuracy of electronic apex locator (EAL). Materials and Methods The literature regarding electrical property measurements of EALs was screened using Medline and Embase. All data acquired were plotted to identify correlations between impedance and log-scaled frequency. The accuracy of the impedance ratio method used to detect the apical constriction (APC) in most EALs was evaluated using linear ramp function fitting. Changes of impedance ratios for various frequencies were evaluated for a variety of file positions. Results Among the ten papers selected in the search process, the first-order equations between log-scaled frequency and impedance were in the negative direction. When the model for the ratios was assumed to be a linear ramp function, the ratio values decreased if the file went deeper and the average ratio values of the left and right horizontal zones were significantly different in 8 out of 9 studies. The APC was located within the interval of linear relation between the left and right horizontal zones of the linear ramp model. Conclusions Using the ratio method, the APC was located within a linear interval. Therefore, using the impedance ratio between electrical impedance measurements at different frequencies was a robust method for detection of the APC. PMID:25984472

  11. Linear Motor With Air Slide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Bruce G.; Gerver, Michael J.; Hawkey, Timothy J.; Fenn, Ralph C.

    1993-01-01

    Improved linear actuator comprises air slide and linear electric motor. Unit exhibits low friction, low backlash, and more nearly even acceleration. Used in machinery in which positions, velocities, and accelerations must be carefully controlled and/or vibrations must be suppressed.

  12. Vibration Control of Large Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    Vibration Control of a Beam with a Proof-Mass Actuator," AIAA Guidance, Navigation and Control Conference, Monterey, CA, August, 19S7. Haviland , J. K...Conference, Monterey, CA, August, 1987. Haviland , J. K., Politansky, H., Lim, T. W., and Pilkey, W. D., "The Control of Linear Proof-Mass Dampers," Sixth

  13. Vibrational soliton: an experimental overview

    SciTech Connect

    Bigio, I.J.

    1986-03-08

    To date the most convincing evidence of vibrational solitons in biopolymers has been found in two very disparate systems: Davydov-like excitations in hydrogen-bonded linear chains (acetanilide and N-methylacetamide) which are not biopolymers but plausible structural paradigms for biopolymers, and longitudinal accoustic modes of possibly nonlinear character in biologically viable DNA. 17 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Mathematical simulation of sound propagation in a flow channel with impedance walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, A. A.; Reent, K. S.

    2012-07-01

    The paper considers the specifics of calculating tonal sound propagating in a flow channel with an installed sound-absorbing device. The calculation is performed on the basis of numerical integrating on linearized nonstationary Euler equations using a code developed by the authors based on the so-called discontinuous Galerkin method. Using the linear theory of small perturbations, the effect of the sound-absorbing lining of the channel walls is described with the modified value of acoustic impedance proposed by the authors, for which, under flow channel conditions, the traditional classification of the active and reactive types of lining in terms of the real and imaginary impedance values, respectively, remains valid. To stabilize the computation process, a generalized impedance boundary condition is proposed in which, in addition to the impedance value itself, some additional parameters are introduced characterizing certain fictitious properties of inertia and elasticity of the impedance surface.

  15. [Monitoring cervical dilatation by impedance].

    PubMed

    Salvat, J; Lassen, M; Sauze, C; Baud, S; Salvat, F

    1992-01-01

    Several different physics procedures have been tried to mechanize the recording of partograms. Can a measure of impedance of tissue Z using potential difference V, according to Ohm's law V = Z1, and 1 is a constant, be correlated with a measure of cervical dilatation using vaginal examination? This was our hypothesis. The tissue impedance meter was made to our design and applied according to a bipolar procedure. Our work was carried out on 28 patients. 10 patients were registered before labour started in order to test the apparatus and to record the impedance variations without labour taking place, and 18 patients were registered in labour to see whether there was any correlation. The level of impedance in the cervix without labour was 302.7 Ohms with a deviation of 8.2. Using student's t tests it was found that there was a significant correlation (p less than 0.001) in four measurements between the impedance measure and measures obtained by extrapolating the degrees of dilatation calculated from vaginal examination. This is a preliminary study in which we have defined the conditions that are necessary to confirm these first results and to further develop the method.

  16. Study of molecular vibration by coupled cluster method: Bosonic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banik, Subrata; Pal, Sourav; Prasad, M. Durga

    2015-01-01

    The vibrational coupled cluster method in bosonic representation is formulated to describe the molecular anharmonic vibrational spectra. The vibrational coupled cluster formalism is based on Watson Hamiltonian in normal coordinates. The vibrational excited states are described using coupled cluster linear response theory (CCLRT). The quality of the coupled cluster wave function is analyzed. Specifically, the mean displacement values of the normal coordinates and expectation values of the square of the normal coordinates of different vibrational states are calculated. A good agreement between the converged full CI results and coupled cluster results is found for the lower lying vibrational states.

  17. Symmetry impedes symmetry discrimination.

    PubMed

    Tjan, Bosco S; Liu, Zili

    2005-12-16

    Objects in the world, natural and artificial alike, are often bilaterally symmetric. The visual system is likely to take advantage of this regularity to encode shapes for efficient object recognition. The nature of encoding a symmetric shape, and of encoding any departure from it, is therefore an important matter in visual perception. We addressed this issue of shape encoding empirically, noting that a particular encoding scheme necessarily leads to a specific profile of sensitivity in perceptual discriminations. We studied symmetry discrimination using human faces and random dots. Each face stimulus was a frontal view of a three-dimensional (3-D) face model. The 3-D face model was a linearly weighted average (a morph) between the model of an original face and that of the corresponding mirror face. Using this morphing technique to vary the degree of asymmetry, we found that, for faces and analogously generated random-dot patterns alike, symmetry discrimination was worst when the stimuli were nearly symmetric, in apparent opposition to almost all studies in the literature. We analyzed the previous work and reconciled the old and new results using a generic model with a simple nonlinearity. By defining asymmetry as the minimal difference between the left and right halves of an object, we found that the visual system was disproportionately more sensitive to larger departures from symmetry than to smaller ones. We further demonstrated that our empirical and modeling results were consistent with Weber-Fechner's and Stevens's laws.

  18. Active impedance metasurface with full 360° reflection phase tuning

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bo O.; Zhao, Junming; Feng, Yijun

    2013-01-01

    Impedance metasurface is composed of electrical small scatters in two dimensional plane, of which the surface impedance can be designed to produce desired reflection phase. Tunable reflection phase can be achieved by incorporating active element into the scatters, but the tuning range of the reflection phase is limited. In this paper, an active impedance metasurface with full 360° reflection phase control is presented to remove the phase tuning deficiency in conventional approach. The unit cell of the metasurface is a multiple resonance structure with two resonance poles and one resonance zero, capable of providing 360° reflection phase variation and active tuning within a finite frequency band. Linear reflection phase tuning can also be obtained. Theoretical analysis and simulation are presented and validated by experiment at microwave frequency. The proposed approach can be applied to many cases where fine and full phase tuning is needed, such as beam steering in reflectarray antennas. PMID:24162366

  19. Uncertainties in Transfer Impedance Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schippers, H.; Verpoorte, J.

    2016-05-01

    The shielding effectiveness of metal braids of cables is governed by the geometry and the materials of the braid. The shielding effectiveness can be characterised by the transfer impedance of the metal braid. Analytical models for the transfer impedance contain in general two components, one representing diffusion of electromagnetic energy through the metal braid, and a second part representing leakage of magnetic fields through the braid. Possible sources of uncertainties in the modelling are inaccurate input data (for instance, the exact size of the braid diameter or wire diameter are not known) and imperfections in the computational model. The aim of the present paper is to estimate effects of variations of input data on the calculated transfer impedance.

  20. AC impedance analysis of polypyrrole thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penner, Reginald M.; Martin, Charles R.

    1987-01-01

    The AC impedance spectra of thin polypyrrole films were obtained at open circuit potentials from -0.4 to 0.4 V vs SCE. Two limiting cases are discussed for which simplified equivalent circuits are applicable. At very positive potentials, the predominantly nonfaradaic AC impedance of polypyrrole is very similar to that observed previously for finite porous metallic films. Modeling of the data with the appropriate equivalent circuit permits effective pore diameter and pore number densities of the oxidized film to be estimated. At potentials from -0.4 to -0.3 V, the polypyrrole film is essentially nonelectronically conductive and diffusion of polymer oxidized sites with their associated counterions can be assumed to be linear from the film/substrate electrode interface. The equivalent circuit for the polypyrrole film at these potentials is that previously described for metal oxide, lithium intercalation thin films. Using this model, counterion diffusion coefficients are determined for both semi-infinite and finite diffusion domains. In addition, the limiting low frequency resistance and capacitance of the polypyrrole thin fims was determined and compared to that obtained previously for thicker films of the polymer. The origin of the observed potential dependence of these low frequency circuit components is discussed.

  1. Wide operation frequency band magnetostrictive vibration power generator using nonlinear spring constant by permanent magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furumachi, S.; Ueno, T.

    2016-04-01

    We study magnetostrictive vibration based power generator using iron-gallium alloy (Galfenol). The generator is advantages over conventional, such as piezoelectric material in the point of high efficiency highly robust and low electrical impedance. Generally, the generator exhibits maximum power when its resonant frequency matches the frequency of ambient vibration. In other words, the mismatch of these frequencies results in significant decrease of the output. One solution is making the spring characteristics nonlinear using magnetic force, which distorts the resonant peak toward higher or lower frequency side. In this paper, vibrational generator consisting of Galfenol plate of 6 by 0.5 by 13 mm wound with coil and U shape-frame accompanied with plates and pair of permanent magnets was investigated. The experimental results show that lean of resonant peak appears attributed on the non-linear spring characteristics, and half bandwidth with magnets is 1.2 times larger than that without. It was also demonstrated that the addition of proof mass is effective to increase the sensitivity but also the bandwidth. The generator with generating power of sub mW order is useful for power source of wireless heath monitoring for bridge and factory machine.

  2. Biomechanical models for vibration feedthrough to hands and head for a semisupine pilot.

    PubMed

    Jex, H R; Magdaleno, R E

    1978-01-01

    A series of tracking experiments under vibration has been carried out on the AMRL/BBV shaker facilities covering three axes of vibration with sinusoidal and random waveforms and different control stick configurations. Based on this and other data, a lumped-parameter biomechanical model has been evolved to suit the needs of aircraft control system designers for the new generation of low-altitude, high-speed bombers and highly maneuverable fighters. This paper shows that measured vibration feedthrough to hands and head can be adequately described by this model when linearized about the appropriate configuration of display, posture, and control. The model includes effects of: semisupine torso; sliding hip, plus rocking chest supported on a compliant buttocks/seat; head bobbing on an articulated neck; upper arm and forearm links plus grip-interface compliance, driven by an active neuromuscular system; elbow rest (optional); and stick "feel system" dynamics. Examples are given of the model's application to predict effects of: a 65 degrees semisupine seat, apparent impedance increase of a control stick under pilot control, and a sliding arm rest.

  3. Radial vibrations of BPS skyrmions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, C.; Haberichter, M.; Romanczukiewicz, T.; Wereszczynski, A.

    2016-11-01

    We study radial vibrations of spherically symmetric Skyrmions in the Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield Skyrme model. Concretely, we numerically solve the linearized field equations for small fluctuations in a Skyrmion background, both for linearly stable oscillations and for (unstable) resonances. This is complemented by numerical solutions of the full nonlinear system, which confirm all the results of the linear analysis. In all cases, the resulting fundamental excitation provides a rather accurate value for the Roper resonance, supporting the hypothesis that the Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield Skyrme model already gives a reasonable approximate description of this resonance. Furthermore, for many potentials additional higher resonances appear, again in agreement with known experimental results.

  4. Nonlinear feature identification of impedance-based structural health monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherford, A. C.; Park, G. H.; Sohn, H.; Farrar, C. R.

    2004-01-01

    The impedance-based structural health monitoring technique, which utilizes electromechanical coupling properties of piezoelectric materials, has shown feasibility for use in a variety of structural health monitoring applications. Relying on high frequency local excitations (typically > 30 kHz), this technique is very sensitive to minor changes in structural integrity in the near field of piezoelectric sensors. Several damage sensitive features have been identified and used coupled with the impedance methods. Most of these methods are, however, limited to linearity assumptions of a structure. This paper presents the use of experimentally identified nonlinear features, combined with impedance methods, for structural health monitoring. Their applicability to damage detection in various frequency ranges is demonstrated using actual impedance signals measured from a portal frame structure. The performance of the nonlinear feature is compared with those of conventional impedance methods. This paper reinforces the utility of nonlinear features in structural health monitoring and suggests that their varying sensitivity in different frequency ranges may be leveraged for certain applications.

  5. Algorithmic Error Correction of Impedance Measuring Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Starostenko, Oleg; Alarcon-Aquino, Vicente; Hernandez, Wilmar; Sergiyenko, Oleg; Tyrsa, Vira

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes novel design concepts and some advanced techniques proposed for increasing the accuracy of low cost impedance measuring devices without reduction of operational speed. The proposed structural method for algorithmic error correction and iterating correction method provide linearization of transfer functions of the measuring sensor and signal conditioning converter, which contribute the principal additive and relative measurement errors. Some measuring systems have been implemented in order to estimate in practice the performance of the proposed methods. Particularly, a measuring system for analysis of C-V, G-V characteristics has been designed and constructed. It has been tested during technological process control of charge-coupled device CCD manufacturing. The obtained results are discussed in order to define a reasonable range of applied methods, their utility, and performance. PMID:22303177

  6. Sensing Estrogen with Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Kim, Byung Kun; Im, Ji-Eun; Choi, Han Nim; Kim, Dong-Hwan; Cho, Seong In

    2016-01-01

    This study demonstrates the application feasibility of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in measuring estrogen (17β-estradiol) in gas phase. The present biosensor gives a linear response (R2 = 0.999) for 17β-estradiol vapor concentration from 3.7 ng/L to 3.7 × 10−4 ng/L with a limit of detection (3.7 × 10−4 ng/L). The results show that the fabricated biosensor demonstrates better detection limit of 17β-estradiol in gas phase than the previous report with GC-MS method. This estrogen biosensor has many potential applications for on-site detection of a variety of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) in the gas phase. PMID:27803838

  7. Characteristic impedance of microstrip lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, M. C.; Deshpande, M. D.

    1989-01-01

    The dyadic Green's function for a current embedded in a grounded dielectric slab is used to analyze microstrip lines at millimeter wave frequencies. The dyadic Green's function accounts accurately for fringing fields and dielectric cover over the microstrip line. Using Rumsey's reaction concept, an expression for the characteristic impedance is obtained. The numerical results are compared with other reported results.

  8. Acoustic Ground-Impedance Meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Helmoltz resonator used in compact, portable meter measures acoustic impedance of ground or other surfaces. Earth's surface is subject of increasing acoustical investigations because of its importance in aircraft noise prediction and measurment. Meter offers several advantages. Is compact and portable and set up at any test site, irrespective of landscape features, weather or other environmental condition.

  9. The Aberdeen Impedance Imaging System.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, V; Hutchison, J M; Mallard, J R

    1989-01-01

    The Aberdeen Impedance Imaging System is designed to reconstruct 2 dimensional images of the average distribution of the amplitude and phase of the complex impedance within a 3 dimensional region. The system uses the four electrode technique in a 16 electrode split-array. The system hardware consists of task-orientated electronic modules for: driving a constant current, multiplexing the current drive, demultiplexing peripheral voltages, differential amplification, phase sensitive detection and low-pass filtration, digitisation with a 14 bit analog to digital converter (ADC), and -control logic for the ADC and multiplexors. A BBC microprocessor (Master series), initiates a controlled sequence for the collection of a number of data sets which are averaged and stored on disk. Image reconstruction is by a process of convolution-backprojection similar to the fan-beam reconstruction of computerised tomography and is also known as Equipotential Backprojection. In imaging impedance changes associated with fracture healing the changes may be large enough to allow retrieval of both the amplitude and phase of the complex impedance. Sequential imaging of these changes would necessitate monitoring electronic and electrode drift by imaging an equivalent region of the contralateral limb. Differential images could be retrieved when the image of the normal limb is the image template. Better characterisation of tissues would necessitate a cleaner retrieval of the quadrature signal.

  10. Motion of liquid drops on surfaces induced by asymmetric vibration: role of contact angle hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Mettu, Srinivas; Chaudhury, Manoj K

    2011-08-16

    Hysteresis of wetting, like the Coulombic friction at solid/solid interface, impedes the motion of a liquid drop on a surface when subjected to an external field. Here, we present a counterintuitive example, where some amount of hysteresis enables a drop to move on a surface when it is subjected to a periodic but asymmetric vibration. Experiments show that a surface either with a negligible or high hysteresis is not conducive to any drop motion. Some finite hysteresis of contact angle is needed to break the periodic symmetry of the forcing function for the drift to occur. These experimental results are consistent with simulations, in which a drop is approximated as a linear harmonic oscillator. The experiment also sheds light on the effect of the drop size on flow reversal, where drops of different sizes move in opposite directions due to the difference in the phase of the oscillation of their center of mass.

  11. Calibration of electrical impedance tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, W; Ramirez, A

    2000-05-01

    Over the past 10 years we have developed methods for imaging the electrical resistivity of soil and rock formations. These technologies have been called electrical resistance tomography of ERT (e.g. Daily and Owen, 1991). Recently we have been striving to extend this capability to include images of electric impedance--with a new nomenclature of electrical impedance tomography or EIT (Ramirez et al., 1999). Electrical impedance is simply a generalization of resistance. Whereas resistance is the zero frequency ratio of voltage and current, impedance includes both the magnitude and phase relationship between voltage and current at frequency. This phase and its frequency behavior is closely related to what in geophysics is called induced polarization or (Sumner, 1976). Why is this phase or IP important? IP is known to be related to many physical phenomena of importance so that image of IP will be maps of such things as mineralization and cation exchange IP (Marshall and Madden, 1959). Also, it is likely that IP, used in conjunction with resistivity, will yield information about the subsurface that can not be obtained by either piece of information separately. In order to define the accuracy of our technologies to image impedance we have constructed a physical model of known impedance that can be used as a calibration standard. It consists of 616 resistors, along with some capacitors to provide the reactive response, arranged in a three dimensional structure as in figure 1. Figure 2 shows the construction of the network and defines the coordinate system used to describe it. This network of components is a bounded and discrete version of the unbounded and continuous medium with which we normally work (the subsurface). The network has several desirable qualities: (1) The impedance values are known (to the accuracy of the component values). (2) The component values and their 3D distribution is easily controlled. (3) Error associated with electrode noise is eliminated. (4

  12. Rotorcraft Smoothing Via Linear Time Periodic Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    Optimal Control Methodology for Rotor Vibration Smoothing . . 30 vii Page IV. Mathematic Foundations of Linear Time Periodic Systems . . . . 33 4.1 The...62 6.3 The Maximum Likelihood Estimator . . . . . . . . . . . 63 6.4 The Cramer-Rao Inequality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 6.4.1 Statistical ...adjustments for vibration reduction. 2.2.2.4 1980’s to late 1990’s. Rotor vibrational reduction methods during the 1980’s began to adopt a mathematical

  13. On Kinetics Modeling of Vibrational Energy Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilmore, John O.; Sharma, Surendra P.; Cavolowsky, John A. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Two models of vibrational energy exchange are compared at equilibrium to the elementary vibrational exchange reaction for a binary mixture. The first model, non-linear in the species vibrational energies, was derived by Schwartz, Slawsky, and Herzfeld (SSH) by considering the detailed kinetics of vibrational energy levels. This model recovers the result demanded at equilibrium by the elementary reaction. The second model is more recent, and is gaining use in certain areas of computational fluid dynamics. This model, linear in the species vibrational energies, is shown not to recover the required equilibrium result. Further, this more recent model is inconsistent with its suggested rate constants in that those rate constants were inferred from measurements by using the SSH model to reduce the data. The non-linear versus linear nature of these two models can lead to significant differences in vibrational energy coupling. Use of the contemporary model may lead to significant misconceptions, especially when integrated in computer codes considering multiple energy coupling mechanisms.

  14. Vibrational dynamics of DNA. I. Vibrational basis modes and couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chewook; Park, Kwang-Hee; Cho, Minhaeng

    2006-09-01

    Carrying out density functional theory calculations of four DNA bases, base derivatives, Watson-Crick (WC) base pairs, and multiple-layer base pair stacks, we studied vibrational dynamics of delocalized modes with frequency ranging from 1400to1800cm-1. These modes have been found to be highly sensitive to structure fluctuation and base pair conformation of DNA. By identifying eight fundamental basis modes, it is shown that the normal modes of base pairs and multilayer base pair stacks can be described by linear combinations of these vibrational basis modes. By using the Hessian matrix reconstruction method, vibrational coupling constants between the basis modes are determined for WC base pairs and multilayer systems and are found to be most strongly affected by the hydrogen bonding interaction between bases. It is also found that the propeller twist and buckle motions do not strongly affect vibrational couplings and basis mode frequencies. Numerically simulated IR spectra of guanine-cytosine and adenine-thymine bases pairs as well as of multilayer base pair stacks are presented and described in terms of coupled basis modes. It turns out that, due to the small interlayer base-base vibrational interactions, the IR absorption spectrum of multilayer base pair system does not strongly depend on the number of base pairs.

  15. Scattering by an impedance sphere coated with a chiral layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uslenghi, Piergiorgio L. E.

    1990-01-01

    The scattering of a plane, linearly polarized electromagnetic wave by a sphere on whose surface an impedance boundary condition holds, and that is covered with a concentric layer of chiral material, is considered. Exact, explicit expressions are derived for the scattered field coefficients. The co-polarized and cross-polarized components of the far backscattered field are determined and discussed. The value of this canonical problem as a benchmark for computer codes is pointed out.

  16. Consideration of impedance matching techniques for efficient piezoelectric energy harvesting.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeoungwoo; Priya, Shashank; Stephanou, Harry; Uchino, Kenji

    2007-09-01

    This study investigates multiple levels of impedance-matching methods for piezoelectric energy harvesting in order to enhance the conversion of mechanical to electrical energy. First, the transduction rate was improved by using a high piezoelectric voltage constant (g) ceramic material having a magnitude of g33 = 40 x 10(-3) V m/N. Second, a transducer structure, cymbal, was optimized and fabricated to match the mechanical impedance of vibration source to that of the piezoelectric transducer. The cymbal transducer was found to exhibit approximately 40 times higher effective strain coefficient than the piezoelectric ceramics. Third, the electrical impedance matching for the energy harvesting circuit was considered to allow the transfer of generated power to a storage media. It was found that, by using the 10-layer ceramics instead of the single layer, the output current can be increased by 10 times, and the output load can be reduced by 40 times. Furthermore, by using the multilayer ceramics the output power was found to increase by 100%. A direct current (DC)-DC buck converter was fabricated to transfer the accumulated electrical energy in a capacitor to a lower output load. The converter was optimized such that it required less than 5 mW for operation.

  17. Modular Wideband Active Vibration Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David R.; Zewari, Wahid; Lee, Kenneth Y.

    1999-01-01

    A comparison of space experiments with previous missions shows a common theme. Some of the recent experiments are based on the scientific fundamentals of instruments of prior years. However, the main distinguishing characteristic is the embodiment of advances in engineering and manufacturing in order to extract clearer and sharper images and extend the limits of measurement. One area of importance to future missions is providing vibration free observation platforms at acceptable costs. It has been shown by researchers that vibration problems cannot be eliminated by passive isolation techniques alone. Therefore, various organizations have conducted research in the area of combining active and passive vibration control techniques. The essence of this paper is to present progress in what is believed to be a new concept in this arena. It is based on the notion that if one active element in a vibration transmission path can provide a reasonable vibration attenuation, two active elements in series may provide more control options and better results. The paper presents the functions of a modular split shaft linear actuator developed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center and University of Massachusetts Lowell. It discusses some of the control possibilities facilitated by the device. Some preliminary findings and problems are also discussed.

  18. 21 CFR 870.2750 - Impedance phlebograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Impedance phlebograph. 870.2750 Section 870.2750...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2750 Impedance phlebograph. (a) Identification. An impedance phlebograph is a device used to provide a visual display of...

  19. 21 CFR 870.2770 - Impedance plethysmograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Impedance plethysmograph. 870.2770 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2770 Impedance plethysmograph. (a) Identification. An impedance plethysmograph is a device used to estimate peripheral...

  20. 21 CFR 870.2750 - Impedance phlebograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Impedance phlebograph. 870.2750 Section 870.2750...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2750 Impedance phlebograph. (a) Identification. An impedance phlebograph is a device used to provide a visual display of...

  1. 21 CFR 870.2770 - Impedance plethysmograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Impedance plethysmograph. 870.2770 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2770 Impedance plethysmograph. (a) Identification. An impedance plethysmograph is a device used to estimate peripheral...

  2. 21 CFR 870.2750 - Impedance phlebograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Impedance phlebograph. 870.2750 Section 870.2750...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2750 Impedance phlebograph. (a) Identification. An impedance phlebograph is a device used to provide a visual display of...

  3. 21 CFR 870.2770 - Impedance plethysmograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Impedance plethysmograph. 870.2770 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2770 Impedance plethysmograph. (a) Identification. An impedance plethysmograph is a device used to estimate peripheral...

  4. 21 CFR 870.2770 - Impedance plethysmograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Impedance plethysmograph. 870.2770 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2770 Impedance plethysmograph. (a) Identification. An impedance plethysmograph is a device used to estimate peripheral...

  5. 21 CFR 870.2750 - Impedance phlebograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Impedance phlebograph. 870.2750 Section 870.2750...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2750 Impedance phlebograph. (a) Identification. An impedance phlebograph is a device used to provide a visual display of...

  6. 21 CFR 870.2750 - Impedance phlebograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Impedance phlebograph. 870.2750 Section 870.2750...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2750 Impedance phlebograph. (a) Identification. An impedance phlebograph is a device used to provide a visual display of...

  7. 21 CFR 870.2770 - Impedance plethysmograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Impedance plethysmograph. 870.2770 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2770 Impedance plethysmograph. (a) Identification. An impedance plethysmograph is a device used to estimate peripheral...

  8. Impedance analysis of acupuncture points and pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teplan, Michal; Kukučka, Marek; Ondrejkovičová, Alena

    2011-12-01

    Investigation of impedance characteristics of acupuncture points from acoustic to radio frequency range is addressed. Discernment and localization of acupuncture points in initial single subject study was unsuccessfully attempted by impedance map technique. Vector impedance analyses determined possible resonant zones in MHz region.

  9. Tapping mode microwave impedance microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, K.

    2010-02-24

    We report tapping mode microwave impedance imaging based on atomic force microscope platforms. The shielded cantilever probe is critical to localize the tip-sample interaction near the tip apex. The modulated tip-sample impedance can be accurately simulated by the finite-element analysis and the result agrees quantitatively to the experimental data on a series of thin-film dielectric samples. The tapping mode microwave imaging is also superior to the contact mode in that the thermal drift in a long time scale is totally eliminated and an absolute measurement on the dielectric properties is possible. We demonstrated tapping images on working nanodevices, and the data are consistent with the transport results.

  10. Active Vibration Damping of Solar Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinicke, Gunar; Baier, Horst; Grillebeck, Anton; Scharfeld, Frank; Hunger, Joseph; Abou-El-Ela, A.; Lohberg, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    Current generations of large solar array panels are lightweight and flexible constructions to reduce net masses. They undergo strong vibrations during launch. The active vibration damping is one convenient option to reduce vibration responses and limit stresses in facesheets. In this study, two actuator concepts are used for vibration damping. A stack interface actuator replaces a panel hold down and is decoupled from bending moments and shear forces. Piezoelectric patch actuators are used as an alternative, where the number, position and size of actuators are mainly driven by controllability analyses. Linear Quadratic Gaussian control is used to attenuate vibrations of selected mode shapes with both actuators. Simulations as well as modal and acoustic tests show the feasibility of selected actuator concepts.

  11. Constant current loop impedance measuring system that is immune to the effects of parasitic impedances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Karl F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A constant current loop measuring system is provided for measuring a characteristic of an environment. The system comprises a first impedance positionable in the environment, a second impedance coupled in series with said first impedance and a parasitic impedance electrically coupled to the first and second impedances. A current generating device, electrically coupled in series with the first and second impedances, provides a constant current through the first and second impedances to produce first and second voltages across the first and second impedances, respectively, and a parasitic voltage across the parasitic impedance. A high impedance voltage measuring device measures a voltage difference between the first and second voltages independent of the parasitic voltage to produce a characteristic voltage representative of the characteristic of the environment.

  12. Active Inertial Vibration Isolators And Dampers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, Darren; Blackburn, John; Smith, Dennis

    1994-01-01

    Report describes development of active inertial vibration isolators and dampers in which actuators electromagnet coils moving linearly within permanent magnetic fields in housings, somewhat as though massive, low-frequency voice coils in loudspeakers. Discusses principle of operation, electrical and mechanical considerations in design of actuators, characteristics of accelerometers, and frequency responses of control systems. Describes design and performance of one- and three-degree-of-freedom vibration-suppressing system based on concept.

  13. Noncontact Electromagnetic Vibration Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, Min; Fulton, James P.; Wincheski, Buzz A.

    1994-01-01

    Metal aircraft skins scanned rapidly in vibration tests. Relatively simple combination of permanent magnets and electromagnet serves as noncontact vibration source for nondestructive testing of metal aircraft skins. In test, source excites vibrations, and vibration waveforms measured, then analyzed for changes in resonances signifying cracks and other flaws.

  14. Investigation of the effect of vibration amplitude on vibration measurements of polarimetric fiber sensors embedded in composite beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, Manjusha; Rajan, Ginu; Semenova, Yuliya; Callaghan, Dean; Farrell, Gerald

    2014-04-01

    Glass fiber reinforced composite material beams embedded with two types of polarimetric sensors are fabricated by the hand layup method and characterized. Two types of polarimetric sensors, a high strain sensitive Panda type fiber and a low strain sensitive polarization maintaining photonic crystal fiber (PM-PCF), are compared for low frequency vibration measurements from 0 to 100 Hz. Different lengths of glass fiber reinforced composite samples with embedded polarimetric sensors are fabricated and compared for different vibration amplitudes and vibration frequencies. The influence of the vibration amplitude of the composite beams on the accuracy of vibration measurements using the two types of polarimetric sensors is investigated. At high amplitude vibrations the low strain sensitive PM-PCF polarimetric sensors offer a wider linear range and thus reproduce the vibration frequency and vibration amplitude accurately. However for high amplitude vibrations the high sensitivity and low dynamic strain range of Panda type fibers result in a multiple-peak intensity pattern within one vibration cycle which leads to inaccurate vibration frequency and vibration amplitude measurements. The experimental results show that the strain sensitivity of polarimetric sensors limits the vibration measurements to a certain range of vibration amplitudes. The vibration amplitude range over which the polarimetric sensors provide accurate information about the vibration frequency is experimentally investigated and the results are presented. Also, for a composite beam undergoing deflections in the ‘simply-simply supported’ configuration, a theoretical method to predict the allowable maximum measurable vibration amplitude for any type of polarimetric sensor, is derived in this paper. It is envisaged that the results from the studies will provide significant information, which can be used in composite material applications such as marine and aerospace for selecting an appropriate type and

  15. A magnetically sprung vibration harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantinou, P.; Mellor, P. H.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2010-04-01

    The use of energy harvesting systems is becoming a more prominent research topic in supplying energy to wireless sensor nodes. The paper will present an analytical 'toolbox' for designing and modeling a vibration energy harvester where the moving mass is suspended magnetically. Calculations from the presented model and measurements from a prototype are compared, and the presence of system non-linearities is shown and discussed. The use of the magnetic suspension and its equivalent hardening spring suspension leads to the system's non-linearity, demonstrating a broad band response and 'jump' phenomenon characteristic. The benefits of these are discussed and the system's performance is compared with those from literature, showing similarity.

  16. Finite element simulation of non-linear acoustic generation in a horn loudspeaker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, T.; Kagawa, Y.; Doi, M.; Tsuji, T.

    2003-10-01

    The loudspeaker is an electro-acoustic device for sound reproduction which requires the distortion as small as possible. The distortion may arise from the magnetic non-linearity of the york, the uneven magnetic field distribution, the mechanical non-linearity at the diaphragm suspension and the acoustic non-linearity due to the high sound pressure and velocity in the duct-radiation system. A horn is sometimes provided in front of the vibrating diaphragm radiator, which plays an important role to increase the efficiency by matching the acoustic impedance between the radiator and the ambient medium. The horn is in many cases folded twice or three times to shorten the length, which further degrades the reproduction quality. The sound intensity and velocity are apt to attain very high in the small cross-sectional area in the throat and in the folded regions, which may cause the distortion due to the non-linear effect of the medium. The present paper is to investigate the frequency characteristics of the loudspeaker numerically evaluating the generation of the harmonics and sub-harmonics. An axisymmetric folded horn is considered for which the wave equation with the non-linear term retained is solved by the finite element method. The solution is made in time domain in which the sound pressure calculated at the opening end of the horn is Fourier-transformed to the frequency domain to evaluate the distortion, while the wave marching in the horn is visualized.

  17. Multivariable Dynamic Ankle Mechanical Impedance With Active Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunglae; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Hogan, Neville

    2015-01-01

    Multivariable dynamic ankle mechanical impedance in two coupled degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) was quantified when muscles were active. Measurements were performed at five different target activation levels of tibialis anterior and soleus, from 10% to 30% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) with increments of 5% MVC. Interestingly, several ankle behaviors characterized in our previous study of the relaxed ankle were observed with muscles active: ankle mechanical impedance in joint coordinates showed responses largely consistent with a second-order system consisting of inertia, viscosity, and stiffness; stiffness was greater in the sagittal plane than in the frontal plane at all activation conditions for all subjects; and the coupling between dorsiflexion–plantarflexion and inversion–eversion was small—the two DOF measurements were well explained by a strictly diagonal impedance matrix. In general, ankle stiffness increased linearly with muscle activation in all directions in the 2-D space formed by the sagittal and frontal planes, but more in the sagittal than in the frontal plane, resulting in an accentuated “peanut shape.” This characterization of young healthy subjects’ ankle mechanical impedance with active muscles will serve as a baseline to investigate pathophysiological ankle behaviors of biomechanically and/or neurologically impaired patients. PMID:25203497

  18. Tunable nanogap devices for ultra-sensitive electrochemical impedance biosensing.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yong; Guo, Zheng; Song, Jing-Jing; Huang, Qin-An; Zhu, Si-Wei; Huang, Xing-Jiu; Wei, Yan

    2016-01-28

    A wealth of research has been available discussing nanogap devices for detecting very small quantities of biomolecules by observing their electrical behavior generally performed in dry conditions. We report that a gold nanogapped electrode with tunable gap length for ultra-sensitive detection of streptavidin based on electrochemical impedance technique. The gold nanogap is fabricated using simple monolayer film deposition and in-situ growth of gold nanoparticles in a traditional interdigitated array (IDA) microelectrode. The electrochemical impedance biosensor with a 25-nm nanogap is found to be ultra-sensitive to the specific binding of streptavidin to biotin. The binding of the streptavidin hinder the electron transfer between two electrodes, resulting in a large increase in electron-transfer resistance (Ret) for operating the impedance. A linear relation between the relative Ret and the logarithmic value of streptavidin concentration is observed in the concentration range from 1 pM (picomolar) to 100 nM (nanomolar). The lowest detectable concentration actually measured reaches 1 pM. We believe that such an electrochemical impedance nanogap biosensor provides a useful approach towards biomolecular detection that could be extended to a number of other systems.

  19. Three-dimensional electrical impedance tomography: a topology optimization approach.

    PubMed

    Mello, Luís Augusto Motta; de Lima, Cícero Ribeiro; Amato, Marcelo Britto Passos; Lima, Raul Gonzalez; Silva, Emílio Carlos Nelli

    2008-02-01

    Electrical impedance tomography is a technique to estimate the impedance distribution within a domain, based on measurements on its boundary. In other words, given the mathematical model of the domain, its geometry and boundary conditions, a nonlinear inverse problem of estimating the electric impedance distribution can be solved. Several impedance estimation algorithms have been proposed to solve this problem. In this paper, we present a three-dimensional algorithm, based on the topology optimization method, as an alternative. A sequence of linear programming problems, allowing for constraints, is solved utilizing this method. In each iteration, the finite element method provides the electric potential field within the model of the domain. An electrode model is also proposed (thus, increasing the accuracy of the finite element results). The algorithm is tested using numerically simulated data and also experimental data, and absolute resistivity values are obtained. These results, corresponding to phantoms with two different conductive materials, exhibit relatively well-defined boundaries between them, and show that this is a practical and potentially useful technique to be applied to monitor lung aeration, including the possibility of imaging a pneumothorax.

  20. Investigating the sources of variability in the dynamic response of built-up structures through a linear analytical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abolfathi, Ali; O'Boy, Dan J.; Walsh, Stephen J.; Fisher, Stephen A.

    2017-01-01

    It is well established that the dynamic response of a number of nominally identical built-up structures are often different and the variability increases with increasing complexity of the structure. Furthermore, the effects of the different parameters, for example the variation in joint locations or the range of the Young's modulus, on the dynamic response of the system are not the same. In this paper, the effects of different material and geometric parameters on the variability of a vibration transfer function are compared using an analytical model of a simple linear built-up structure that consist of two plates connected by a single mount. Similar results can be obtained if multiple mounts are used. The scope of this paper is limited to a low and medium frequency range where usually deterministic models are used for vibrational analysis. The effect of the mount position and also the global variation in the properties of the plate, such as modulus of elasticity or thickness, is higher on the variability of vibration transfer function than the effect of the mount properties. It is shown that the vibration transfer function between the plates is independent of the mount property if a stiff enough mount with a small mass is implemented. For a soft mount, there is a direct relationship between the mount impedance and the variation in the vibration transfer function. Furthermore, there are a range of mount stiffnesses between these two extreme cases at which the vibration transfer function is more sensitive to changes in the stiffness of the mount than when compared to a soft mount. It is found that the effect of variation in the mount damping and the mount mass on the variability is negligible. Similarly, the effect of the plate damping on the variability is not significant.

  1. Wave impedance selection for passivity-based bilateral teleoperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amore, Nicholas John

    When a task must be executed in a remote or dangerous environment, teleoperation systems may be employed to extend the influence of the human operator. In the case of manipulation tasks, haptic feedback of the forces experienced by the remote (slave) system is often highly useful in improving an operator's ability to perform effectively. In many of these cases (especially teleoperation over the internet and ground-to-space teleoperation), substantial communication latency exists in the control loop and has the strong tendency to cause instability of the system. The first viable solution to this problem in the literature was based on a scattering/wave transformation from transmission line theory. This wave transformation requires the designer to select a wave impedance parameter appropriate to the teleoperation system. It is widely recognized that a small value of wave impedance is well suited to free motion and a large value is preferable for contact tasks. Beyond this basic observation, however, very little guidance exists in the literature regarding the selection of an appropriate value. Moreover, prior research on impedance selection generally fails to account for the fact that in any realistic contact task there will simultaneously exist contact considerations (perpendicular to the surface of contact) and quasi-free-motion considerations (parallel to the surface of contact). The primary contribution of the present work is to introduce an approximate linearized optimum for the choice of wave impedance and to apply this quasi-optimal choice to the Cartesian reality of such a contact task, in which it cannot be expected that a given joint will be either perfectly normal to or perfectly parallel to the motion constraint. The proposed scheme selects a wave impedance matrix that is appropriate to the conditions encountered by the manipulator. This choice may be implemented as a static wave impedance value or as a time-varying choice updated according to the

  2. Impedance adaptation methods of the piezoelectric energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyeoungwoo

    In this study, the important issues of energy recovery were addressed and a comprehensive investigation was performed on harvesting electrical power from an ambient mechanical vibration source. Also discussed are the impedance matching methods used to increase the efficiency of energy transfer from the environment to the application. Initially, the mechanical impedance matching method was investigated to increase mechanical energy transferred to the transducer from the environment. This was done by reducing the mechanical impedance such as damping factor and energy reflection ratio. The vibration source and the transducer were modeled by a two-degree-of-freedom dynamic system with mass, spring constant, and damper. The transmissibility employed to show how much mechanical energy that was transferred in this system was affected by the damping ratio and the stiffness of elastic materials. The mechanical impedance of the system was described by electrical system using analogy between the two systems in order to simply the total mechanical impedance. Secondly, the transduction rate of mechanical energy to electrical energy was improved by using a PZT material which has a high figure of merit and a high electromechanical coupling factor for electrical power generation, and a piezoelectric transducer which has a high transduction rate was designed and fabricated. The high g material (g33 = 40 [10-3Vm/N]) was developed to improve the figure of merit of the PZT ceramics. The cymbal composite transducer has been found as a promising structure for piezoelectric energy harvesting under high force at cyclic conditions (10--200 Hz), because it has almost 40 times higher effective strain coefficient than PZT ceramics. The endcap of cymbal also enhances the endurance of the ceramic to sustain ac load along with stress amplification. In addition, a macro fiber composite (MFC) was employed as a strain component because of its flexibility and the high electromechanical coupling

  3. Sensing fluid viscosity and density through mechanical impedance measurement using a whisker transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Feng; Ling, Shih-Fu

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a new technique for fluid viscosity and density sensing through measuring the mechanical impedance of the fluid load applied on a sphere. A piezoelectric whisker transducer (WT) is proposed which acts simultaneously as both the actuator to excite the sphere tip to oscillate in the fluid and the sensor to measure the force, velocity and mechanical impedance. The relationship between mechanical impedance of the fluid load and electrical impedance of the WT is derived based on a transduction matrix model which characterizes the electro-mechanical transduction process of the WT in both directions. The mechanical impedance is further related to the fluid viscosity and density using a theoretical model. The establishment of this fluid-mechanical-electrical relationship allows the WT to extract the fluid viscosity and density conveniently and accurately just from its electrical impedance. Experimental studies are carried out to calibrate the WT and test its performance using glycerol-water mixtures. It is concluded that the WT is capable of providing results comparable to those of standard viscometers within a wide measurement range due to its low working frequency and large vibration amplitude. Its unique self-actuation-and-sensing feature makes it a suitable solution for online fluid sensing.

  4. Impedance spectroscopy of food mycotoxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilyy, Oleksandr I.; Yaremyk, Roman Ya.; Kotsyumbas, Ihor Ya.; Kotsyumbas, Halyna I.

    2012-01-01

    A new analytical method of high-selective detection of mycotoxins in food and feed are considered. A method is based on optical registration the changes of conduct of the electric polarized bacterial agents in solution at the action of the external gradient electric fields. Measuring are conducted in integrated electrode-optical cuvette of the special construction, which provides the photometric analysis of forward motion of the objects registration in liquid solution under act of the enclosed electric field and simultaneous registration of kinetics of change of electrical impedance parameters solution and electrode system.

  5. Bilateral Impedance Control For Telemanipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Christopher L.

    1993-01-01

    Telemanipulator system includes master robot manipulated by human operator, and slave robot performing tasks at remote location. Two robots electronically coupled so slave robot moves in response to commands from master robot. Teleoperation greatly enhanced if forces acting on slave robot fed back to operator, giving operator feeling he or she manipulates remote environment directly. Main advantage of bilateral impedance control: enables arbitrary specification of desired performance characteristics for telemanipulator system. Relationship between force and position modulated at both ends of system to suit requirements of task.

  6. DIFFERENTIAL SOIL IMPEDANCE OBSTACLE DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Maximillian J. Kieba; Christopher J. Ziolkowski

    2005-01-17

    This project aimed at developing a new and unique obstacle detection sensor for horizontal directional drilling (HDD) equipment. The development of this new technology will greatly improve the reliability and safety of natural gas HDD construction practices. This sensor utilizes a differential soil impedance measurement technique that will be sensitive to the presence of plastic and ceramic, as well as metallic obstacles. The use of HDD equipment has risen significantly in the gas industry because HDD provides a much more cost-effective and less disruptive method for gas pipe installation than older, trenching methods. However, there have been isolated strikes of underground utilities by HDD equipment, which may have been avoided if methods were available to detect other underground obstacles when using HDD systems. GTI advisors from the gas industry ranked the value of solving the obstacle detection problem as the most important research and development project for GTI to pursue using Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) funds available through its industry partner, GTI. GTI proposed to develop a prototype down-hole sensor system that is simple and compact. The sensor utilizes an impedance measurement technique that is sensitive to the presence of metallic or non-metallic objects in the proximity of the HDD head. The system will use a simple sensor incorporated into the drill head. The impedance of the soil will be measured with a low frequency signal injected through the drill head itself. A pair of bridge type impedance sensors, mounted orthogonal to one another, is coupled to the soil. Inclusions in the soil will cause changes to the sensor balance distinguishable from homogeneous soil. The sensor will provide range and direction data for obstacles near the HDD head. The goal is to provide a simple, robust system that provides the information required to avoid obstacles. This must be done within the size and ruggedness constraints of the HDD equipment

  7. DIFFERENTIAL SOIL IMPEDANCE OBSTACLE DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Maximillian J. Kieba

    2002-08-30

    This project develops a new and unique obstacle detection sensor for horizontal directional drilling (HDD) equipment. The development of this new technology will greatly improve the reliability and safety of natural gas HDD construction practices. This sensor utilizes a differential soil impedance measurement technique that will be sensitive to the presence of plastic and ceramic, as well as metallic obstacles. The use of HDD equipment has risen significantly in the gas industry because HDD provides a much more cost-effective and less disruptive method for gas pipe installation than older, trenching methods. However, there have been isolated strikes of underground utilities by HDD equipment, which may have been avoided if methods were available to detect other underground obstacles when using HDD systems. GTI advisors from the gas industry have ranked the value of solving the obstacle detection problem as the most important research and development project for GTI to pursue using Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) funds available through its industry partner, GRI. GTI proposes to develop a prototype down-hole sensor system that is simple and compact. The sensor utilizes an impedance measurement technique that is sensitive to the presence of metallic or nonmetallic objects in the proximity of the HDD head. The system will use a thin film sensor conformal with the drill head. The impedance of the soil will be measured with a low frequency signal injected through the drill head itself. A pair of bridge type impedance sensors, mounted orthogonal to one another, is capacitively coupled to the soil. Inclusions in the soil will cause changes to the sensor balance distinguishable from homogeneous soil. The sensor will provide range and direction data for obstacles near the HDD head. The goal is to provide a simple, robust system that provides the information required to avoid obstacles. This must be done within the size and ruggedness constraints of the HDD

  8. DIFFERENTIAL SOIL IMPEDANCE OBSTACLE DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Maximillian J. Kieba

    2003-10-01

    This project develops a new and unique obstacle detection sensor for horizontal directional drilling (HDD) equipment. The development of this new technology will greatly improve the reliability and safety of natural gas HDD construction practices. This sensor utilizes a differential soil impedance measurement technique that will be sensitive to the presence of plastic and ceramic, as well as metallic obstacles. The use of HDD equipment has risen significantly in the gas industry because HDD provides a much more cost-effective and less disruptive method for gas pipe installation than older, trenching methods. However, there have been isolated strikes of underground utilities by HDD equipment, which may have been avoided if methods were available to detect other underground obstacles when using HDD systems. GTI advisors from the gas industry have ranked the value of solving the obstacle detection problem as the most important research and development project for GTI to pursue using Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) funds available through its industry partner, GRI. GTI proposes to develop a prototype down-hole sensor system that is simple and compact. The sensor utilizes an impedance measurement technique that is sensitive to the presence of metallic or nonmetallic objects in the proximity of the HDD head. The system will use a simple sensor incorporated into the drill head. The impedance of the soil will be measured with a low frequency signal injected through the drill head itself. A pair of bridge type impedance sensors, mounted orthogonal to one another, is coupled to the soil. Inclusions in the soil will cause changes to the sensor balance distinguishable from homogeneous soil. The sensor will provide range and direction data for obstacles near the HDD head. The goal is to provide a simple, robust system that provides the information required to avoid obstacles. This must be done within the size and ruggedness constraints of the HDD equipment. Imaging

  9. DIFFERENTIAL SOIL IMPEDANCE OBSTACLE DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Maximillian J. Kieba

    2004-02-01

    This project develops a new and unique obstacle detection sensor for horizontal directional drilling (HDD) equipment. The development of this new technology will greatly improve the reliability and safety of natural gas HDD construction practices. This sensor utilizes a differential soil impedance measurement technique that will be sensitive to the presence of plastic and ceramic, as well as metallic obstacles. The use of HDD equipment has risen significantly in the gas industry because HDD provides a much more cost-effective and less disruptive method for gas pipe installation than older, trenching methods. However, there have been isolated strikes of underground utilities by HDD equipment, which may have been avoided if methods were available to detect other underground obstacles when using HDD systems. GTI advisors from the gas industry have ranked the value of solving the obstacle detection problem as the most important research and development project for GTI to pursue using Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) funds available through its industry partner, GRI. GTI proposes to develop a prototype down-hole sensor system that is simple and compact. The sensor utilizes an impedance measurement technique that is sensitive to the presence of metallic or nonmetallic objects in the proximity of the HDD head. The system will use a simple sensor incorporated into the drill head. The impedance of the soil will be measured with a low frequency signal injected through the drill head itself. A pair of bridge type impedance sensors, mounted orthogonal to one another, is coupled to the soil. Inclusions in the soil will cause changes to the sensor balance distinguishable from homogeneous soil. The sensor will provide range and direction data for obstacles near the HDD head. The goal is to provide a simple, robust system that provides the information required to avoid obstacles. This must be done within the size and ruggedness constraints of the HDD equipment. Imaging

  10. DIFFERENTIAL SOIL IMPEDANCE OBSTACLE DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Maximillian J. Kieba; Christopher J. Ziolkowski

    2004-06-30

    This project develops a new and unique obstacle detection sensor for horizontal directional drilling (HDD) equipment. The development of this new technology will greatly improve the reliability and safety of natural gas HDD construction practices. This sensor utilizes a differential soil impedance measurement technique that will be sensitive to the presence of plastic and ceramic, as well as metallic obstacles. The use of HDD equipment has risen significantly in the gas industry because HDD provides a much more cost-effective and less disruptive method for gas pipe installation than older, trenching methods. However, there have been isolated strikes of underground utilities by HDD equipment, which may have been avoided if methods were available to detect other underground obstacles when using HDD systems. GTI advisors from the gas industry have ranked the value of solving the obstacle detection problem as the most important research and development project for GTI to pursue using Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) funds available through its industry partner, GRI. GTI proposes to develop a prototype down-hole sensor system that is simple and compact. The sensor utilizes an impedance measurement technique that is sensitive to the presence of metallic or nonmetallic objects in the proximity of the HDD head. The system will use a simple sensor incorporated into the drill head. The impedance of the soil will be measured with a low frequency signal injected through the drill head itself. A pair of bridge type impedance sensors, mounted orthogonal to one another, is coupled to the soil. Inclusions in the soil will cause changes to the sensor balance distinguishable from homogeneous soil. The sensor will provide range and direction data for obstacles near the HDD head. The goal is to provide a simple, robust system that provides the information required to avoid obstacles. This must be done within the size and ruggedness constraints of the HDD equipment. Imaging

  11. ONERA-NASA Cooperative Effort on Liner Impedance Eduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Primus, Julien; Piot, Estelle; Simon, Frank; Jones, Michael G.; Watson, Willie R

    2013-01-01

    As part of a cooperation between ONERA and NASA, the liner impedance eduction methods developed by the two research centers are compared. The NASA technique relies on an objective function built on acoustic pressure measurements located on the wall opposite the test liner, and the propagation code solves the convected Helmholtz equation in uniform ow using a finite element method that implements a continuous Galerkin discretization. The ONERA method uses an objective function based either on wall acoustic pressure or on acoustic velocity acquired above the liner by Laser Doppler Anemometry, and the propagation code solves the linearized Euler equations by a discontinuous Galerkin discretization. Two acoustic liners are tested in both ONERA and NASA ow ducts and the measured data are treated with the corresponding impedance eduction method. The first liner is a wire mesh facesheet mounted onto a honeycomb core, designed to be linear with respect to incident sound pressure level and to grazing ow velocity. The second one is a conventional, nonlinear, perforate-over-honeycomb single layer liner. Configurations without and with ow are considered. For the nonlinear liner, the comparison of liner impedance educed by NASA and ONERA shows a sensitivity to the experimental conditions, namely to the nature of the source and to the sample width.

  12. Noninvasive measurement of transdermal drug delivery by impedance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Arpaia, Pasquale; Cesaro, Umberto; Moccaldi, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    The effectiveness in transdermal delivery of skin permeation strategies (e.g., chemical enhancers, vesicular carrier systems, sonophoresis, iontophoresis, and electroporation) is poorly investigated outside of laboratory. In therapeutic application, the lack of recognized techniques for measuring the actually-released drug affects the scientific concept itself of dosage for topically- and transdermally-delivered drugs. Here we prove the suitability of impedance measurement for assessing the amount of drug penetrated into the skin after transdermal delivery. In particular, the measured amount of drug depends linearly on the impedance magnitude variation normalized to the pre-treated value. Three experimental campaigns, based on the electrical analysis of the biological tissue behavior due to the drug delivery, are reported: (i) laboratory emulation on eggplants, (ii) ex-vivo tests on pig ears, and finally (iii) in-vivo tests on human volunteers. Results point out that the amount of delivered drug can be assessed by reasonable metrological performance through a unique measurement of the impedance magnitude at one single frequency. In particular, in-vivo results point out sensitivity of 23 ml−1, repeatability of 0.3%, non-linearity of 3.3%, and accuracy of 5.7%. Finally, the measurement resolution of 0.20 ml is compatible with clinical administration standards. PMID:28338008

  13. Soil amplification with a strong impedance contrast: Boston, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baise, Laurie G.; Kaklamanos, James; Berry, Bradford M; Thompson, Eric

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we evaluate the effect of strong sediment/bedrock impedance contrasts on soil amplification in Boston, Massachusetts, for typical sites along the Charles and Mystic Rivers. These sites can be characterized by artificial fill overlying marine sediments overlying glacial till and bedrock, where the depth to bedrock ranges from 20 to 80 m. The marine sediments generally consist of organic silts, sand, and Boston Blue Clay. We chose these sites because they represent typical foundation conditions in the city of Boston, and the soil conditions are similar to other high impedance contrast environments. The sediment/bedrock interface in this region results in an impedance ratio on the order of ten, which in turn results in a significant amplification of the ground motion. Using stratigraphic information derived from numerous boreholes across the region paired with geologic and geomorphologic constraints, we develop a depth-to-bedrock model for the greater Boston region. Using shear-wave velocity profiles from 30 locations, we develop average velocity profiles for sites mapped as artificial fill, glaciofluvial deposits, and bedrock. By pairing the depth-to-bedrock model with the surficial geology and the average shear-wave velocity profiles, we can predict soil amplification in Boston. We compare linear and equivalent-linear site response predictions for a soil layer of varying thickness over bedrock, and assess the effects of varying the bedrock shear-wave velocity (VSb) and quality factor (Q). In a moderate seismicity region like Boston, many earthquakes will result in ground motions that can be modeled with linear site response methods. We also assess the effect of bedrock depth on soil amplification for a generic soil profile in artificial fill, using both linear and equivalent-linear site response models. Finally, we assess the accuracy of the model results by comparing the predicted (linear site response) and observed site response at the Northeastern

  14. Model Parameterization and P-wave AVA Direct Inversion for Young's Impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Zhaoyun; Yin, Xingyao

    2017-03-01

    AVA inversion is an important tool for elastic parameters estimation to guide the lithology prediction and "sweet spot" identification of hydrocarbon reservoirs. The product of the Young's modulus and density (named as Young's impedance in this study) is known as an effective lithology and brittleness indicator of unconventional hydrocarbon reservoirs. Density is difficult to predict from seismic data, which renders the estimation of the Young's impedance inaccurate in conventional approaches. In this study, a pragmatic seismic AVA inversion approach with only P-wave pre-stack seismic data is proposed to estimate the Young's impedance to avoid the uncertainty brought by density. First, based on the linearized P-wave approximate reflectivity equation in terms of P-wave and S-wave moduli, the P-wave approximate reflectivity equation in terms of the Young's impedance is derived according to the relationship between P-wave modulus, S-wave modulus, Young's modulus and Poisson ratio. This equation is further compared to the exact Zoeppritz equation and the linearized P-wave approximate reflectivity equation in terms of P- and S-wave velocities and density, which illustrates that this equation is accurate enough to be used for AVA inversion when the incident angle is within the critical angle. Parameter sensitivity analysis illustrates that the high correlation between the Young's impedance and density render the estimation of the Young's impedance difficult. Therefore, a de-correlation scheme is used in the pragmatic AVA inversion with Bayesian inference to estimate Young's impedance only with pre-stack P-wave seismic data. Synthetic examples demonstrate that the proposed approach is able to predict the Young's impedance stably even with moderate noise and the field data examples verify the effectiveness of the proposed approach in Young's impedance estimation and "sweet spots" evaluation.

  15. Vibration characterisation of cymbal transducers for power ultrasonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejarano, F.; Feeney, A.; Lucas, M.

    2012-08-01

    A Class V cymbal flextensional transducer is composed of a piezoceramic disc or ring sandwiched between two cymbal-shaped shell end-caps. These end-caps act as mechanical transformers to convert high impedance, low radial displacement of the piezoceramic into low impedance, large axial motion of the end-cap. The cymbal transducer was developed in the early 1990's at Penn State University, and is an improvement of the moonie transducer which has been in use since the 1980's. Despite the fact that cymbal transducers have been used in many fields, both as sensors and actuators, due to its physical limitations its use has been mainly at low power intensities. It is only very recently that its suitability for high amplitude and high power applications has been studied, and consequently implementation in this area of research remains undeveloped. This paper employs experimental modal analysis (EMA), vibration response measurements and electrical impedance measurements to characterise two variations of the cymbal transducer design, both aimed at incorporation in ultrasonic cutting devices. The transducers are fabricated using the commercial Eccobond 45LV epoxy adhesive as the bonding agent. The first cymbal transducer is of the classic design where the piezoceramic disc is bonded directly to the end-caps. The second cymbal transducer includes a metal ring bonded to the outer edge of the piezoceramic disc. The reason for the inclusion of this metal ring is to improve the mechanical coupling with the end-caps. This would therefore make this design particularly suitable for power ultrasonic applications, reducing the possibility of debonding at the higher ultrasonic amplitudes. The experimental results demonstrate that the second cymbal design is a significant improvement on the more classic design, allowing the transducer to operate at higher voltages and higher amplitudes, exhibiting a linear response over a practical power ultrasonic device driving voltage range. The

  16. Appraisal of broadband acoustic impedances from first principles and band-limited seismic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, A.; Ghosh, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic derived acoustic impedance is an essential output for the quantitative interpretation of seismic data. However, the band limitation of seismic data leads to a nonunique estimate of the acoustic impedance profile. The prevalent methods counter the nonuniqueness either by stabilizing the answer with respect to an initial model or by resorting to an assumption of certain criterion such as sparsity of the reflection coefficients. Making a nominal assumption of a homogeneous layered earth model, we formulate a set of linear equations where the reflection coefficients are the unknowns and the recursively integrated seismic trace constitutes the data. The approach makes a frontal assault on the problem of reconstructing reflection coefficients from band-limited data and stems from first principles, i.e., Zöppritz's equation in this case. Nonuniqueness is countered in part by the layercake assumption, and in part by the adoption of the singular value decomposition (SVD) method of finding an optimal solution to the set of linear equations, provided the objective is to reconstruct a smoothed version of the impedance profile that includes only its coarser structures. The efficacy of the method has been tested with synthetic data added with significant noise and generated from rudimentary earth models as well as from measured logs of acoustic impedance. Emergence of consistent estimates of impedance from synthetic data generated for several frequency bands increases the confidence in the method. The study also proves the successfulness of the method for (a) an accurate estimate of the impedance mean, (b) an accurate reconstruction of the direct-current (dc) frequency of the reflectivity, and (c) an acceptable reconstruction of the broad trend of the original impedance profile. All these outputs can serve as significant constraints for either more refined inversions or geological interpretations. (Keywords: Reflection data, Acoustic impedance, Broadband, Linear

  17. Electrical Impedance Tomography of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    SUBJECT TERMS Diagnosis of Metastatic Cancer, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Electrical Impedance Imaging, Electrical Impedance Scanning, MRI current...1) To develop and optimize the necessary hardware and software for Magnetic Resonance Electrical Impedance Tomography (MREIT) and interface it with...of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) conference and included in the appendix for reference. 2.2.2. Second Year: A series of new phantom studies

  18. Application of short linear transformers in multifrequency matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Joshua A.

    In microwave circuits the source and load impedance must match for maximum power transfer. This can be achieved using an impedance matching network utilizing several different techniques. The short linear transformer (SLT) is a method which uses transmission lines of alternating impedances with calculated lengths for the desired frequency. This method has been expanded for multi-band applications of up to four frequencies. These designs are demonstrated in this project. The SLT proves to be shorter than comparable methods with a preferred response. Also, the design only requires transmission lines of the same impedance as the source and load.

  19. Evaluation of Wall Boundary Conditions for Impedance Eduction Using a Dual-Source Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, W. R.; Jones, M. G.

    2012-01-01

    The accuracy of the Ingard-Myers boundary condition and a recently proposed modified Ingard-Myers boundary condition is evaluated for use in impedance eduction under the assumption of uniform mean flow. The evaluation is performed at three centerline Mach numbers, using data acquired in a grazing flow impedance tube, using both upstream and downstream propagating sound sources, and on a database of test liners for which the expected behavior of the impedance spectra is known. The test liners are a hard-wall insert consisting of 12.6 mm thick aluminum, a linear liner without a facesheet consisting of a number of small diameter but long cylindrical channels embedded in a ceramic material, and two conventional nonlinear liners consisting of a perforated facesheet bonded to a honeycomb core. The study is restricted to a frequency range for which only plane waves are cut on in the hard-wall sections of the flow impedance tube. The metrics used to evaluate each boundary condition are 1) how well it educes the same impedance for upstream and downstream propagating sources, and 2) how well it predicts the expected behavior of the impedance spectra over the Mach number range. The primary conclusions of the study are that the same impedance is educed for upstream and downstream propagating sources except at the highest Mach number, that an effective impedance based on both the upstream and downstream measurements is more accurate than an impedance based on the upstream or downstream data alone, and that the Ingard-Myers boundary condition with an effective impedance produces results similar to that achieved with the modified Ingard-Myers boundary condition.

  20. Development of an innovative device for ultrasonic elliptical vibration cutting.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ming; Hu, Linhua

    2015-07-01

    An innovative ultrasonic elliptical vibration cutting (UEVC) device with 1st resonant mode of longitudinal vibration and 3rd resonant mode of bending vibration was proposed in this paper, which can deliver higher output power compared to previous UEVC devices. Using finite element method (FEM), resonance frequencies of the longitudinal and bending vibrations were tuned to be as close as possible in order to excite these two vibrations using two-phase driving voltages at a single frequency, while wave nodes of the longitudinal and bending vibrations were also adjusted to be as coincident as possible for mounting the device at a single fixed point. Based on the simulation analysis results a prototype device was fabricated, then its vibration characteristics were evaluated by an impedance analyzer and a laser displacement sensor. With two-phase sinusoidal driving voltages both of 480 V(p-p) at an ultrasonic frequency of 20.1 kHz, the developed prototype device achieved an elliptical vibration with a longitudinal amplitude of 8.9 μm and a bending amplitude of 11.3 μm. The performance of the developed UEVC device is assessed by the cutting tests of hardened steel using single crystal diamond tools. Experimental results indicate that compared to ordinary cutting process, the tool wear is reduced significantly by using the proposed device.

  1. Low impedance printed circuit radiating element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahm, James K. (Inventor); Frankievich, Robert H. (Inventor); Martinko, John D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A printed circuit radiating element comprises a geometrically symmetric planar area of a conducting material separated from a ground plane by a dielectric medium. The driving point of the radiating element is at the base of a notch in one side thereof so that the driving impedance is reduced from that obtained when the element is driven at its edge. Symmetrically disposed on opposite sides of an axis of symmetry of the element along which the driving point lies are two notches which restore the electrical symmetry of the radiating element thereby to suppress higher order modes. The suppression of these higher order modes results in a radiation pattern with minimal cross-polarized energy in the principal planes and high port-to-port isolation which could not be achieved with an asymmetrical element. Two driving points may be employed with the radiating element to produce a dual linearly polarized antenna and a reactive combiner or hybrid may be employed to obtain circularly-polarized radiations. The shape of the radiating element may be square, rectangular or circular, for example, in accordance with the desired characteristics. A plurality of radiating elements may be interconnected via appropriate transmission paths to form an antenna array.

  2. Linear Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-01

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  3. Random Vibrations: Assessment of the State of the Art

    SciTech Connect

    Paez, T.L.

    1999-02-23

    Random vibration is the phenomenon wherein random excitation applied to a mechanical system induces random response. We summarize the state of the art in random vibration analysis and testing, commenting on history, linear and nonlinear analysis, the analysis of large-scale systems, and probabilistic structural testing.

  4. Function generator for synthesizing complex vibration mode patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, E. C.; Hagood, G. J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A simple highly flexible device for synthesizing complex vibration mode patterns is described. These mode patterns can be used to identify vibration mode data. This device sums selected sine and cosine functions and then plots the sum against a linear function.

  5. Insect sound production: transduction mechanisms and impedance matching.

    PubMed

    Bennet-Clark, H C

    1995-01-01

    The chain of sound production in insects can be summarised as: (1) muscle power-->(2) mechanical vibration of the sound-producing structure-->(3) acoustic loading of this source-->(4) sound radiation. At each link (-->) optimal impedance matching is desirable but, to meet other acoustic requirements, each stage has special properties. The properties of sound waves are discussed in the context of impedance matching between sources of different sizes or configurations and the surrounding fluid medium. Muscles produce high pressures over small areas, but sound sources produce low pressures over large areas. Link 1-->2 requires a change in the force: area ratio between the muscle and the sound source. Because the source size is necessarily small, sounds tend to be produced at a higher frequency than that of the driving muscle contraction, so link 1-->2 may involve a frequency multiplication mechanism. This can also be regarded as a mechanism of impedance matching between the aqueous muscle and the structure from which the insect produces sound. Stage 2 typically involves a resonant structure that determines the song frequency and is excited by link 1-->2. If link 2-->3 provides good impedance matching, the mechanical resonance is likely to be damped, with loss of song purity. So it is desirable for the stage 2 resonance to be sustained by coherent excitation and for the acoustic loading (link 2-->3) to maintain the dominant frequency between stages 2 and 4. Examples where this occurs are cricket wings and cicadas. At stage 3, the source size or configuration should allow impedance matching between the sound source (3) and its load (4). A variety of acoustic devices are exploited, leading to loud, efficient sound production. Examples that use resonant loads, tuned to the insects' song frequency, are the burrows of mole crickets and the abdomens of cicadas. Overall, the mechanisms of sound production of many insects are capable of producing songs of high species

  6. Impedance Spectroscopy of Human Blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesa, Francisco; Bernal, José J.; Sosa, Modesto A.; Villagómez, Julio C.; Palomares, Pascual

    2004-09-01

    The blood is one of the corporal fluids more used with analytical purposes. When the blood is extracted, immediately it is affected by agents that act on it, producing transformations in its elements. Among the effects of these transformations the hemolysis phenomenon stands out, which consists of the membrane rupture and possible death of the red blood cells. The main purpose of this investigation was the quantification of this phenomenon. A Solartron SI-1260 Impedance Spectrometer was used, which covers a frequency range of work from 1 μHz to 10 MHz, and its accuracy has been tested in the accomplishment of several applications. Measurements were performed on 3 mL human blood samples, from healthy donors. Reactive strips for sugar test of 2 μL, from Bayer, were used as electrodes, which allow gathering a portion of the sample, to be analyzed by the spectrometer. Preliminary results of these measurements are presented.

  7. Electrical impedance tomography of electrolysis.

    PubMed

    Meir, Arie; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-01-01

    The primary goal of this study is to explore the hypothesis that changes in pH during electrolysis can be detected with Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT). The study has relevance to real time control of minimally invasive surgery with electrolytic ablation. To investigate the hypothesis, we compare EIT reconstructed images to optical images acquired using pH-sensitive dyes embedded in a physiological saline agar gel phantom treated with electrolysis. We further demonstrate the biological relevance of our work using a bacterial E.Coli model, grown on the phantom. The results demonstrate the ability of EIT to image pH changes in a physiological saline phantom and show that these changes correlate with cell death in the E.coli model. The results are promising, and invite further experimental explorations.

  8. Portable vibration exciter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beecher, L. C.; Williams, F. T.

    1970-01-01

    Gas-driven vibration exciter produces a sinusoidal excitation function controllable in frequency and in amplitude. It allows direct vibration testing of components under normal loads, removing the possibility of component damage due to high static pressure.

  9. Motion and force controlled vibration testing. [of aerospace hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry D.; Boatman, David J.; Kern, Dennis L.

    1990-01-01

    A technique for controlling both the input acceleration and force in vibration tests is proposed to alleviate the overtesting risks and the problems associated with response limiting in conventional vibration tests of aerospace hardware. Previous research on impedance and force controlled vibration tests is reviewed and a simple equation governing the dual control of acceleration and force is derived. A practical method for implementing the dual control technique in random vibration tests has been demonstrated in JPL's environmental test facility using a conventional digital controller operating in the extremal mode. The dual control technique provides appropriate real-time notching of the input acceleration and a corresponding reduction of the test item response at resonances. Issues concerning the need for force and acceleration phase information, the adequacy of specifying the blocked force, and the derivation of the total force for multipoint supports are discussed.

  10. Active Suppression Of Vibrations On Elastic Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silcox, Richard J.; Fuller, Chris R.; Gibbs, Gary P.

    1993-01-01

    Pairs of colocated piezoelectric transducers, independently controlled by multichannel adaptive controller, employed as actuators and sensors to achieve simultaneous attenuation of both extensional and flexural motion. Single pair used to provide simultaneous control of flexural and extensional waves, or two pairs used to control torsional motion also. Capability due to nature of piezoelectric transducers, when bonded to surfaces of structures and activated by oscillating voltages, generate corresponding oscillating distributions of stresses in structures. Phases and amplitudes of actuator voltages adjusted by controller to impede flow of vibrational energy simultaneously, in waves of various forms, beyond locations of actuators. Concept applies equally to harmonic or random response of structure and to multiple responses of structure to transverse bending, torsion, and compression within structural element. System has potential for many situations in which predominant vibration transmission path through framelike structure.

  11. Acoustic Treatment Design Scaling Methods. Volume 2; Advanced Treatment Impedance Models for High Frequency Ranges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, R. E.; Yu, J.; Kwan, H. W.

    1999-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study is to develop improved models for the acoustic impedance of treatment panels at high frequencies, for application to subscale treatment designs. Effects that cause significant deviation of the impedance from simple geometric scaling are examined in detail, an improved high-frequency impedance model is developed, and the improved model is correlated with high-frequency impedance measurements. Only single-degree-of-freedom honeycomb sandwich resonator panels with either perforated sheet or "linear" wiremesh faceplates are considered. The objective is to understand those effects that cause the simple single-degree-of- freedom resonator panels to deviate at the higher-scaled frequency from the impedance that would be obtained at the corresponding full-scale frequency. This will allow the subscale panel to be designed to achieve a specified impedance spectrum over at least a limited range of frequencies. An advanced impedance prediction model has been developed that accounts for some of the known effects at high frequency that have previously been ignored as a small source of error for full-scale frequency ranges.

  12. Tunable Passive Vibration Suppressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boechler, Nicholas (Inventor); Dillon, Robert Peter (Inventor); Daraio, Chiara (Inventor); Davis, Gregory L. (Inventor); Shapiro, Andrew A. (Inventor); Borgonia, John Paul C. (Inventor); Kahn, Daniel Louis (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An apparatus and method for vibration suppression using a granular particle chain. The granular particle chain is statically compressed and the end particles of the chain are attached to a payload and vibration source. The properties of the granular particles along with the amount of static compression are chosen to provide desired filtering of vibrations.

  13. Hermetically sealed vibration damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheatley, D. G.

    1969-01-01

    Simple fluidic vibration damper for installation at each pivotal mounting between gimbals isolates inertial measuring units from external vibration and other disruptive forces. Installation between each of the three gimbal axes can dampen vibration and shock in any direction while permitting free rotation of the gimbals.

  14. FDTD modeling of thin impedance sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luebbers, Raymond J.; Kunz, Karl S.

    1991-01-01

    Thin sheets of resistive or dielectric material are commonly encountered in radar cross section calculations. Analysis of such sheets is simplified by using sheet impedances. In this paper it is shown that sheet impedances can be modeled easily and accurately using Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) methods.

  15. Behind the (impedance) baseline in children.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, S; Salvatoni, A; Van Steen, K; Ummarino, D; Hauser, B; Vandenplas, Y

    2014-01-01

    Impedance baseline is a new parameter recently related to esophageal integrity. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of different factors on impedance baseline in pediatric patients. We analyzed the impedance baseline of 800 children with symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux. Mean impedance baseline was automatically calculated throughout 24-hour tracings. The presence of different age groups and of esophagitis was evaluated. Unpaired t-test, Spearman rank correlation, polynomial, and regression plot were used for statistical analysis. Age-related percentile curves were created. We considered a P-value<0.05 as statistically significant. Impedance baseline was significantly (P<0.001) lower in younger compared to older children up to 48 months. The mean increase of baseline per month was much higher in the first 36 months of life (47.5 vs. 2.9 Ohm in Channel 1 and 29.9 vs. 2.3 Ohm in Channel 6, respectively) than in older ages. Patients with esophagitis showed significantly decreased impedance baseline (P<0.05). Infants (especially in the first months of life) and young children present a significantly lower impedance baseline compared to older children both in proximal and distal esophagus. The presence of esophagitis may also determine a decreased impedance baseline regardless of the age of the patients.

  16. Active impedance matching of complex structural systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macmartin, Douglas G.; Miller, David W.; Hall, Steven R.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on active impedance matching of complex structural systems are presented. Topics covered include: traveling wave model; dereverberated mobility model; computation of dereverberated mobility; control problem: optimal impedance matching; H2 optimal solution; statistical energy analysis (SEA) solution; experimental transfer functions; interferometer actuator and sensor locations; active strut configurations; power dual variables; dereverberation of complex structure; dereverberated transfer function; compensators; and relative power flow.

  17. Beam impedance of a split cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Lambertson, G.

    1990-04-01

    A common geometry for position electrodes at moderately low frequencies is the capacitive pickup consisting of a diagonally- divided cylinder that encloses the beam trajectory. For the simplified system here, a relatively direct approach will given the longitudinal and transverse beam impedances (Z{parallel}and Z{perpendicular}) at low frequencies. This paper discusses the determination of this impedance.

  18. Transverse impedance localization using intensity dependent optics

    SciTech Connect

    Calaga,R.; Arduini, G.; Metral, E.; Papotti, G.; Quatraro, D.; Rumolo, G.; Salvant, B.; Tomas, R.

    2009-05-04

    Measurements of transverse impedance in the SPS to track the evolution over the last few years show discrepancies compared to the analytical estimates of the major contributors. Recent measurements to localize the major sources of the transverse impedance using intensity dependent optics are presented. Some simulations using HEADTAIL to understand the limitations of the reconstruction and related numerical aspects are also discussed.

  19. Possibilities of electrical impedance tomography in gynecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    V, Trokhanova O.; A, Chijova Y.; B, Okhapkin M.; V, Korjenevsky A.; S, Tuykin T.

    2013-04-01

    The paper describes results of comprehensive EIT diagnostics of mammary glands and cervix. The data were obtained from examinations of 170 patients by EIT system MEM (multi-frequency electrical impedance mammograph) and EIT system GIT (gynecological impedance tomograph). Mutual dependence is discussed.

  20. LHC Kicker Beam-Impedance Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Lambertson, G.R.

    1998-10-01

    Longitudinal and transverse beam impedances are calculated for the injection kickers designed for use in the CERN large hadron col- Iider. These combine the contributions of a ceramic beam tube with conducting stripes and a traveling-wave kicker magnet. The results show peak impedances of 1300 ohm longitudinal and 8 Mfl/m trans- verse for four units per ring.

  1. Full dimensional Franck-Condon factors for the acetylene à (1)A(u)-X̃ (1)Σ(g)(+) transition. I. Method for calculating polyatomic linear-bent vibrational intensity factors and evaluation of calculated intensities for the gerade vibrational modes in acetylene.

    PubMed

    Park, G Barratt

    2014-10-07

    Franck-Condon vibrational overlap integrals for the à Au1-X̃ 1Σg+ transition in acetylene have been calculated in full dimension in the harmonic normal mode basis. The calculation uses the method of generating functions first developed for polyatomic Franck-Condon factors by Sharp and Rosenstock [J. Chem. Phys. 41(11), 3453-3463 (1964)], and previously applied to acetylene by Watson [J. Mol. Spectrosc. 207(2), 276-284 (2001)] in a reduced-dimension calculation. Because the transition involves a large change in the equilibrium geometry of the electronic states, two different types of corrections to the coordinate transformation are considered to first order: corrections for axis-switching between the Cartesian molecular frames and corrections for the curvilinear nature of the normal modes at large amplitude. The angular factor in the wavefunction for the out-of-plane component of the trans bending mode, ν4(″), is treated as a rotation, which results in an Eckart constraint on the polar coordinates of the bending modes. To simplify the calculation, the other degenerate bending mode, ν5(″), is integrated in the Cartesian basis and later transformed to the constrained polar coordinate basis, restoring the conventional v and l quantum numbers. An updated Ã-state harmonic force field obtained recently in the R. W. Field research group is evaluated. The results for transitions involving the gerade vibrational modes are in qualitative agreement with experiment. Calculated results for transitions involving ungerade modes are presented in Paper II of this series [G. B. Park, J. H. Baraban, and R. W. Field, "Full dimensional Franck-Condon factors for the acetylene à Au1-X̃ 1Σg+ transition. II. Vibrational overlap factors for levels involving excitation in ungerade modes," J. Chem. Phys. 141, 134305 (2014)].

  2. Acoustic vibrations of single suspended gold nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, Todd A.

    The acoustic vibrations for single gold nanowires and gold plates were studied using time-resolved ultrafast transient absorption. The objective of this work was to remove the contribution of the supporting substrate from the damping of the acoustic vibrations of the metal nano-objects. This was achieved by suspending the nano-objects across trenches created by photolithography and reactive ion etching. Transient absorption measurements for single suspended gold nanowires were initially completed in air and water environments. The acoustic vibrations for gold nanowires over the trench in air last typically for several nanoseconds, whereas gold nanowires in water are damped more quickly. Continuum mechanics models suggest that the acoustic impedance mismatch between air and water dominates the damping rate. Later transient absorption studies on single suspended gold nanowires were completed in glycerol and ethylene glycol environments. However, our continuum mechanical model suggests nearly complete damping in glycerol due to its high viscosity, but similar damping rates are seen between the two liquids. The continuum mechanics model thus incorrectly addresses high viscosity effects on the lifetimes of the acoustic vibrations, and more complicated viscoelastic interactions occur for the higher viscosity liquids. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  3. Wave based optimization of distributed vibration absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Marty; Batton, Brad

    2005-09-01

    The concept of distributed vibration absorbers or DVAs has been investigated in recent years as a method of vibration control and sound radiation control for large flexible structures. These devices are comprised of a distributed compliant layer with a distributed mass layer. When such a device is placed onto a structure it forms a sandwich panel configuration with a very soft core. With this configuration the main effect of the DVA is to create forces normal to the surface of the structure and can be used at low frequencies to either add damping, where constrain layer damper treatments are not very effective, or to pin the structure over a narrow frequency bandwidth (i.e., large input impedance/vibration absorber approach). This paper analyses the behavior of these devices using a wave based approach and finds an optimal damping level for the control of broadband disturbances in panels. The optimal design is calculated by solving the differential equations for waves propagating in coupled plates. It is shown that the optimal damping calculated using the infinite case acts as a good ``rule of thumb'' for designing DVAs to control the vibration of finite panels. This is bourn out in both numerical simulations and experiments.

  4. Feedforward control of bending waves in frequency domain at structural junctions using an impedance formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensson, Jonas L.; Andersson, Patrik B. U.; Scheuren, Joachim; Kropp, Wolfgang

    2009-06-01

    This paper presents an active impedance-matching technique for vibrating structures described by Euler-Bernoulli theory. Full 2×2 impedance matrices are included in the derivation of the reflection matrix of an arbitrary structural junction. This implies that the effects of both bending waves and bending near-fields are included. An active impedance load is introduced in order to match a discontinuity at the junction, i.e. to force the reflection matrix to zero. The impedance-matching technique is applied to two theoretical examples. First, maximum power transfer at a free end is investigated under the condition of incident bending wave and bending near-field; second, the approach is used to match the junction between an Euler-Bernoulli beam and a sandwich composite for an incident bending wave. The latter example proposes an active-passive damping configuration which employs active control to enclose all incident wave power in a dissipative sandwich-type structure. Results show that for this configuration, the active impedance load is responsible for the main part of the power absorption over a broad frequency range.

  5. Structural health monitoring using piezoelectric impedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Park, Gyuhae; Inman, Daniel J

    2007-02-15

    This paper presents an overview and recent advances in impedance-based structural health monitoring. The basic principle behind this technique is to apply high-frequency structural excitations (typically greater than 30kHz) through surface-bonded piezoelectric transducers, and measure the impedance of structures by monitoring the current and voltage applied to the piezoelectric transducers. Changes in impedance indicate changes in the structure, which in turn can indicate that damage has occurred. An experimental study is presented to demonstrate how this technique can be used to detect structural damage in real time. Signal processing methods that address damage classifications and data compression issues associated with the use of the impedance methods are also summarized. Finally, a modified frequency-domain autoregressive model with exogenous inputs (ARX) is described. The frequency-domain ARX model, constructed by measured impedance data, is used to diagnose structural damage with levels of statistical confidence.

  6. PREFACE: XV International Conference on Electrical Bio-Impedance (ICEBI) & XIV Conference on Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pliquett, Uwe

    2013-04-01

    . Structures down to sub-micrometer range and complex impedance measurements tools integrated at single chips are now affordable. Moreover, the introduction of alternative signals and data processing algorithms focuses on very fast and parallel electrical characterization which in turn pushes this technique to new applications and markets. Electrical impedance tomography today yields pictures in real time with a resolution that was impossible 10 years ago. The XVth International Conference on Electrical Bio-Impedance in conjunction with the XIVth Electrical Impedance Tomography ICEBI/EIT 2013 organized by the Institute for Bioprocessing and Analytical Measurement Techniques, Heilbad Heiligenstadt, Germany, together with the EIT-group at the University of Göttingen, Germany, brings world leading scientists in these fields together. It is a platform to present the latest developments in instrumentation and signal processing but also points to new applications, especially in the field of biosensors and non-linear phenomena. Two Keynote lectures will extend the view of the participants above the mainstream of bio-impedance measurement. Friederich Kremer (University of Leipzig) delivers the plenary lecture on broad bandwidth dielectric spectroscopy. New achievements in the research of ligand gated ionic channels will be presented by Klaus Benndorf (University of Jena). Leading scientists in the field of bio-impedance measurement, such as, Sverre Grimnes, Orjan Martinsen, Andrea Robitzki, Richard Bayford, Jan Gimsa and Mart Min will give lectures for students but also more experienced scientists in a pre-conference tutorial which is a good opportunity to learn or refresh the basics. List of committees Conference Chair Dr Uwe Pliquett Professor Dieter Beckmann Institut für Bioprozess- und Analysenmesstechnik eV, Rosenhof, Heilbad Heiligenstadt, Germany Technical Program Chair Maik Hiller Conventus Congressmanagement & Marketing GmbH, Carl-Pulfrich-Str. 1 - 07745 Jena Pre

  7. Electric impedance microflow cytometry for characterization of cell disease states.

    PubMed

    Du, E; Ha, Sungjae; Diez-Silva, Monica; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra; Chandrakasan, Anantha P

    2013-10-07

    The electrical properties of biological cells have connections to their pathological states. Here we present an electric impedance microflow cytometry (EIMC) platform for the characterization of disease states of single cells. This platform entails a microfluidic device for a label-free and non-invasive cell-counting assay through electric impedance sensing. We identified a dimensionless offset parameter δ obtained as a linear combination of a normalized phase shift and a normalized magnitude shift in electric impedance to differentiate cells on the basis of their pathological states. This paper discusses a representative case study on red blood cells (RBCs) invaded by the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Invasion by P. falciparum induces physical and biochemical changes on the host cells throughout a 48-h multi-stage life cycle within the RBC. As a consequence, it also induces progressive changes in electrical properties of the host cells. We demonstrate that the EIMC system in combination with data analysis involving the new offset parameter allows differentiation of P. falciparum infected RBCs from uninfected RBCs as well as among different P. falciparum intraerythrocytic asexual stages including the ring stage. The representative results provided here also point to the potential of the proposed experimental and analysis platform as a valuable tool for non-invasive diagnostics of a wide variety of disease states and for cell separation.

  8. Electric Impedance Microflow Cytometry for Characterization of Cell Disease States†

    PubMed Central

    Diez-Silva, Monica; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra; Chandrakasan, Anantha P.

    2013-01-01

    The electrical properties of biological cells have connections to their pathological states. Here we present an electric impedance microflow cytometry (EIMC) platform for the characterization of disease states of single cells. This platform entails a microfluidic device for a label-free and non-invasive cell-counting assay through electric impedance sensing. We identified a dimensionless offset parameter δ obtained as a linear combination of a normalized phase shift and a normalized magnitude shift in electric impedance to differentiate cells on the basis of their pathological states. This paper discusses a representative case study on red blood cells (RBCs) invaded by Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites. Invasion of P. falciparum induces physical and biochemical changes on the host cells throughout a 48-h multi-stage life cycle within the RBC. As a consequence, it also induces progressive changes in electrical properties of the host cells .We demonstrate that the EIMC system in combination with data analysis involving the new offset parameter allows differentiation of Pf–invaded RBCs from uninfected RBCs as well as among different P. falciparum intraerythrocytic asexual stages including the ring stage. The representative results provided here also point to the potential of the proposed experimental and analysis platform as a valuable tool for non-invasive diagnostics of a wide variety of disease states and for cell separation. PMID:23925122

  9. Anti-vibration gloves?

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Sue; Dong, Ren G; Welcome, Daniel E; McDowell, Thomas W

    2015-03-01

    For exposure to hand-transmitted vibration (HTV), personal protective equipment is sold in the form of anti-vibration (AV) gloves, but it remains unclear how much these gloves actually reduce vibration exposure or prevent the development of hand-arm vibration syndrome in the workplace. This commentary describes some of the issues that surround the classification of AV gloves, the assessment of their effectiveness and their applicability in the workplace. The available information shows that AV gloves are unreliable as devices for controlling HTV exposures. Other means of vibration control, such as using alternative production techniques, low-vibration machinery, routine preventative maintenance regimes, and controlling exposure durations are far more likely to deliver effective vibration reductions and should be implemented. Furthermore, AV gloves may introduce some adverse effects such as increasing grip force and reducing manual dexterity. Therefore, one should balance the benefits of AV gloves and their potential adverse effects if their use is considered.

  10. Comparison of a Convected Helmholtz and Euler Model for Impedance Eduction in Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.

    2006-01-01

    Impedances educed from a well-tested convected Helmholtz model are compared to that of a recently developed linearized Euler model using two ceramic test liners under the assumed conditions or uniform flow and a plane wave source. The convected Helmholtz model is restricted to uniform mean flow whereas the linearized Euler model can account for the effect or the shear layer. Test data to educe the impedance is acquired from measurements obtained in the NASA Langley Research Center Grazing Incidence Tube for mean flow Mach numbers ranging from 0.0 to 0.5 and source frequencies ranging from 0.5 kHz to 3.0 kHz. The unknown impedance of the liner b educed by judiciously chooingth e impedance via an optimization method to match the measured acoustic pressure on the wall opposite the test liner. Results are presented on four spatial grids using three different optimization methods (contour deformation, Davidon-Fletcher Powell, and the Genetic Algorithm). All three optimization methods converge to the same impedance when used with the same model and to nearly identical impedances when used on different models. h anomaly was observed only at 0.5 kHz for high mean flow speeds. The anomaly is likely due to the use of measured data in a flow regime where shear layer effects are important but are neglected in the math models. Consistency between the impedances educed using the two models provides confidence that the linearized Euler model is ready For application to more realistic flows, such as those containing shear layers.

  11. Design of a nonlinear torsional vibration absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Ammaar Bin

    Tuned mass dampers (TMD) utilizing linear spring mechanisms to mitigate destructive vibrations are commonly used in practice. A TMD is usually tuned for a specific resonant frequency or an operating frequency of a system. Recently, nonlinear vibration absorbers attracted attention of researchers due to some potential advantages they possess over the TMDs. The nonlinear vibration absorber, or the nonlinear energy sink (NES), has an advantage of being effective over a broad range of excitation frequencies, which makes it more suitable for systems with several resonant frequencies, or for a system with varying excitation frequency. Vibration dissipation mechanism in an NES is passive and ensures that there is no energy backflow to the primary system. In this study, an experimental setup of a rotational system has been designed for validation of the concept of nonlinear torsional vibration absorber with geometrically induced cubic stiffness nonlinearity. Dimensions of the primary system have been optimized so as to get the first natural frequency of the system to be fairly low. This was done in order to excite the dynamic system for torsional vibration response by the available motor. Experiments have been performed to obtain the modal parameters of the system. Based on the obtained modal parameters, the design optimization of the nonlinear torsional vibration absorber was carried out using an equivalent 2-DOF modal model. The optimality criterion was chosen to be maximization of energy dissipation in the nonlinear absorber attached to the equivalent 2-DOF system. The optimized design parameters of the nonlinear absorber were tested on the original 5-DOF system numerically. A comparison was made between the performance of linear and nonlinear absorbers using the numerical models. The comparison showed the superiority of the nonlinear absorber over its linear counterpart for the given set of primary system parameters as the vibration energy dissipation in the former is

  12. Vibration and noise analysis of a gear transmission system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choy, F. K.; Qian, W.; Zakrajsek, J. J.; Oswald, F. B.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive procedure to predict both the vibration and noise generated by a gear transmission system under normal operating conditions. The gearbox vibrations were obtained from both numerical simulation and experimental studies using a gear noise test rig. In addition, the noise generated by the gearbox vibrations was recorded during the experimental testing. A numerical method was used to develop linear relationships between the gearbox vibration and the generated noise. The hypercoherence function is introduced to correlate the nonlinear relationship between the fundamental noise frequency and its harmonics. A numerical procedure was developed using both the linear and nonlinear relationships generated from the experimental data to predict noise resulting from the gearbox vibrations. The application of this methodology is demonstrated by comparing the numerical and experimental results from the gear noise test rig.

  13. Vibration Control via Stiffness Switching of Magnetostrictive Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheidler, Justin J.; Asnani, Vivake M.; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a computational study of structural vibration control that is realized by switching a magnetostrictive transducer between high and low stiffness states. Switching is accomplished by either changing the applied magnetic field with a voltage excitation or changing the shunt impedance on the transducer's coil (i.e., the magnetostrictive material's magnetic boundary condition). Switched-stiffness vibration control is simulated using a lumped mass supported by a damper and the magnetostrictive transducer (mount), which is represented by a nonlinear, electromechanical model. Free vibration of the mass is calculated while varying the mount's stiffness according to a reference switched-stiffness vibration control law. The results reveal that switching the magnetic field produces the desired change in stiffness, but also an undesired actuation force that can significantly degrade the vibration control. Hence, a modified switched-stiffness control law that accounts for the actuation force is proposed and implemented for voltage-controlled stiffness switching. The influence of the magnetomechanical bias condition is also discussed. Voltage-controlled stiffness switching is found to introduce damping equivalent to a viscous damping factor up to about 0.25; this is shown to primarily result from active vibration reduction caused by the actuation force. The merit of magnetostrictive switched-stiffness vibration control is then quantified by comparing the results of voltage- and shunt-controlled stiffness switching to the performance of optimal magnetostrictive shunt damping.

  14. Estimates of Acausal Joint Impedance Models

    PubMed Central

    Perreault, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    Estimates of joint or limb impedance are commonly used in the study of how the nervous system controls posture and movement, and how that control is altered by injury to the neural or musculoskeletal systems. Impedance characterizes the dynamic relationship between an imposed perturbation of joint position and the torques generated in response. While there are many practical reasons for estimating impedance rather than its inverse, admittance, it is an acausal representation of the limb mechanics that can lead to difficulties in interpretation or use. The purpose of this study was to explore the acausal nature of nonparametric estimates of joint impedance representations to determine how they are influenced by common experimental and computational choices. This was accomplished by deriving discrete-time realizations of first-and second-order derivatives to illustrate two key difficulties in the physical interpretation of impedance impulse response functions. These illustrations were provided using both simulated and experimental data. It was found that the shape of the impedance impulse response depends critically on the selected sampling rate, and on the bandwidth and noise characteristics of the position perturbation used during the estimation process. These results provide important guidelines for designing experiments in which nonparametric estimates of impedance will be obtained, especially when those estimates are to be used in a multistep identification process. PMID:22907963

  15. Tracking of electrochemical impedance of batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piret, H.; Granjon, P.; Guillet, N.; Cattin, V.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents an evolutionary battery impedance estimation method, which can be easily embedded in vehicles or nomad devices. The proposed method not only allows an accurate frequency impedance estimation, but also a tracking of its temporal evolution contrary to classical electrochemical impedance spectroscopy methods. Taking into account constraints of cost and complexity, we propose to use the existing electronics of current control to perform a frequency evolutionary estimation of the electrochemical impedance. The developed method uses a simple wideband input signal, and relies on a recursive local average of Fourier transforms. The averaging is controlled by a single parameter, managing a trade-off between tracking and estimation performance. This normalized parameter allows to correctly adapt the behavior of the proposed estimator to the variations of the impedance. The advantage of the proposed method is twofold: the method is easy to embed into a simple electronic circuit, and the battery impedance estimator is evolutionary. The ability of the method to monitor the impedance over time is demonstrated on a simulator, and on a real Lithium ion battery, on which a repeatability study is carried out. The experiments reveal good tracking results, and estimation performance as accurate as the usual laboratory approaches.

  16. Vibrationally-resolved polyatomic photoelectron spectroscopy: Mode-specific behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathbone, G. J.; Poliakoff, E. D.; Bozek, J. D.; Lucchese, R. R.

    2002-05-01

    We report the first vibrationally-resolved photoelectron spectra for polyatomic molecules performed over a broad spectral range. Such studies elucidate vibrationally mode-specific aspects of the photoelectron scattering dynamics. Three linear triatomic systems (CO_2, N_2O, and CS_2) are studied, and the results exhibit striking differences for alternative modes. For CO_2^+(C^2Σ_g^+), a continuum resonance results in a 15 eV wide dip for the symmetric stretch branching ratio, while strong peaks are observed for vibrational branching ratios associated with the two symmetry forbidden modes. For CS_2^+(B^2Σ_u^+), mode-specific behavior is displayed, as resonance enhancement of a single quantum excitation is weak for the symmetric stretch, but strong for the bending vibration. For N_2O^+(A^2Σ^+), many vibrational excitations are observed and families of vibrational branching ratio spectra emerge.

  17. Design of a non-traditional dynamic vibration absorber.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Y L; Wong, W O

    2009-08-01

    A non-traditional dynamic vibration absorber is proposed for the minimization of maximum vibration velocity response of a vibrating structure. Unlike the traditional damped absorber configuration, the proposed absorber has a linear viscous damper connecting the absorber mass directly to the ground instead of the main mass. Optimum parameters of the proposed absorber are derived based on the fixed-point theory for minimizing the maximum vibration velocity response of a single-degree-of-freedom system under harmonic excitation. The extent of reduction in maximum vibration velocity response of the primary system when using the traditional dynamic absorber is compared with that using the proposed one. Under the optimum tuning condition of the absorbers, it is proved analytically that the proposed absorber provides a greater reduction in maximum vibration velocity response of the primary system than the traditional absorber.

  18. Modeling and analysis of circular flexural-vibration-mode piezoelectric transformer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yihua; Huang, Wei

    2010-12-01

    We propose a circular flexural-vibration-mode piezoelectric transformer and perform a theoretical analysis of the transformer. An equivalent circuit is derived from the equations of piezoelectricity and the Hamilton's principle. With this equivalent circuit, the voltage gain ratio, input impedance, and the efficiency of the circular flexural-vibration-mode piezoelectric transformer can be determined. The basic behavior of the transformer is shown by numerical results.

  19. Thermal Vibrational Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershuni, G. Z.; Lyubimov, D. V.

    1998-08-01

    Recent increasing awareness of the ways in which vibrational effects can affect low-gravity experiments have renewed interest in the study of thermal vibrational convection across a wide range of fields. For example, in applications where vibrational effects are used to provide active control of heat and mass transfer, such as in heat exchangers, stirrers, mineral separators and crystal growth, a sound understanding of the fundamental theory is required. In Thermal Vibrational Convection, the authors present the theory of vibrational effects caused by a static gravity field, and of fluid flows which appear under vibration in fluid-filled cavities. The first part of the book discusses fluid-filled cavities where the fluid motion only appears in the presence of temperature non-uniformities, while the second considers those situations where the vibrational effects are caused by a non-uniform field. Throughout, the authors concentrate on consideration of high frequency vibrations, where averaging methods can be successfully applied in the study of the phenomena. Written by two of the pioneers in this field, Thermal Vibrational Convection will be of great interest to scientists and engineers working in the many areas that are concerned with vibration, and its effect on heat and mass transfer. These include hydrodynamics, hydro-mechanics, low gravity physics and mechanics, and geophysics. The rigorous approach adopted in presenting the theory of this fascinating and highly topical area will facilitate a greater understanding of the phenomena involved, and will lead to the development of more and better-designed experiments.

  20. FDTD modeling of thin impedance sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luebbers, Raymond; Kunz, Karl

    1991-01-01

    Thin sheets of resistive or dielectric material are commonly encountered in radar cross section calculations. Analysis of such sheets is simplified by using sheet impedances. It is shown that sheet impedances can be modeled easily and accurately using Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) methods. These sheets are characterized by a discontinuity in the tangential magnetic field on either side of the sheet but no discontinuity in tangential electric field. This continuity, or single valued behavior of the electric field, allows the sheet current to be expressed in terms of an impedance multiplying this electric field.

  1. RHIC ABORT KICKER WITH REDUCED COUPLING IMPEDANCE.

    SciTech Connect

    HAHN,H.; DAVINO,D.

    2002-06-02

    Kicker magnets typically represent the most important contributors to the transverse impedance budget of accelerators and storage rings. Methods of reducing the impedance value of the SNS extraction kicker presently under construction and, in view of a future performance upgrade, that of the RHIC abort kicker have been thoroughly studied at this laboratory. In this paper, the investigation of a potential improvement from using ferrite different from the BNL standard CMD5005 is reported. Permeability measurements of several ferrite types have been performed. Measurements on two kicker magnets using CMD5005 and C2050 suggest that the impedance of a magnet without external resistive damping, such as the RHIC abort kicker, would benefit.

  2. Wearable impedance monitoring system for dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, S; Bourgerette, A; Gharbi, S; Rubeck, C; Arkouche, W; Massot, B; McAdams, E; Montalibet, A; Jallon, P

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes the development and the validation of a prototype wearable miniaturized impedance monitoring system for remote monitoring in home-based dialysis patients. This device is intended to assess the hydration status of dialysis patients using calf impedance measurements. The system is based on the low-power AD8302 component. The impedance calibration procedure is described together with the Cole parameter estimation and the hydric volume estimation. Results are given on a test cell to validate the design and on preliminary calf measurements showing Cole parameter variations during hemodialysis.

  3. Vibrational nonequilibrium effects on diatomic dissociation rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. F.

    1993-01-01

    The collision-induced dissociation rate of diatomic molecules from a ladder of rotational and anharmonic vibrational states is developed, and the correction for vibrational nonequilibrium is considered. The result is similar to an analytic correction derived by Hammerling et al. (1959) for harmonic oscillators. An empirical correction algorithm suggested by Park (1987, 1990) gives similar results when vibrational temperature is comparable to kinetic temperature but underestimates the dissociation rate when vibrational temperature is small compared with the kinetic temperature. This algorithm uses an effective temperature in the experimentally determined Arrhenius expression for the rate coefficient, which is a weighted average of the vibrational and kinetic temperature, whereas theory indicates that kinetic temperature should appear only in the exponential term of the Arrhenius expression. Nevertheless, an effective temperature can always be found that will numerically duplicate the proper rate coefficient at any given condition, but a constant weighting factor cannot be expected to provide this. However, the algorithm can he adjusted to give reasonable results over a range of conditions if the geometric weighting factor is taken to be a simple linear function of the ratio of vibrational to kinetic temperature in the gas.

  4. Directional motion of liquid under mechanical vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costalonga, Maxime; Brunet, Philippe; Peerhossaini, Hassan

    2014-11-01

    When a liquid is submitted to mechanical vibrations, steady flows or motion can be generated by non-linear effects. One example is the steady acoustic streaming one can observe when an acoustic wave propagates in a fluid. At the scale of a droplet, steady motion of the whole amount of liquid can arise from zero-mean periodic forcing. As It has been observed by Brunet et al. (PRL 2007), a drop can climb an inclined surface when submitted to vertical vibrations above a threshold in acceleration. Later, Noblin et al. (PRL 2009) showed the velocity and the direction of motion of a sessile drop submitted to both horizontal and vertical vibrations can be tuned by the phase shift between these two excitations. Here we present an experimental study of the mean motion of a sessile drop under slanted vibrations, focusing on the effects of drop properties, as well as the inclination angle of the axis of vibrations. It is shown that the volume and viscosity strongly affect the drop mean velocity, and can even change the direction of its motion. In the case of a low viscous drop, gravity can become significant and be modulated by the inclination of the axis of vibrations. Contact line dynamic during the drop oscillations is also investigated.

  5. Prediction of Ground Vibration from Freight Trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. J. C.; Block, J. R.

    1996-05-01

    Heavy freight trains emit ground vibration with predominant frequency components in the range 4-30 Hz. If the amplitude is sufficient, this may be felt by lineside residents, giving rise to disturbance and concern over possible damage to their property. In order to establish the influence of parameters of the track and rolling stock and thereby enable the design of a low vibration railway, a theoretical model of both the generation and propagation of vibration is required. The vibration is generated as a combination of the effects of dynamic forces, due to the unevenness of the track, and the effects of the track deformation under successive axle loads. A prediction scheme, which combines these effects, has been produced. A vehicle model is used to predict the dynamic forces at the wheels. This includes the non-linear effects of friction damped suspensions. The loaded track profile is measured by using a track recording coach. The dynamic loading and the effects of the moving axles are combined in a track response model. The predicted track vibration is compared to measurements. The transfer functions from the track to a point in the ground can be calculated by using a coupled track and a three-dimensional layered ground model. The propagation effects of the ground layers are important but the computation of the transfer function from each sleeper, which would be required for a phase coherent summation of the vibration in the ground, would be prohibitive. A compromise summation is used and results are compared with measurements.

  6. Quantum Monte Carlo for vibrating molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W.R. |

    1996-08-01

    Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) has successfully computed the total electronic energies of atoms and molecules. The main goal of this work is to use correlation function quantum Monte Carlo (CFQMC) to compute the vibrational state energies of molecules given a potential energy surface (PES). In CFQMC, an ensemble of random walkers simulate the diffusion and branching processes of the imaginary-time time dependent Schroedinger equation in order to evaluate the matrix elements. The program QMCVIB was written to perform multi-state VMC and CFQMC calculations and employed for several calculations of the H{sub 2}O and C{sub 3} vibrational states, using 7 PES`s, 3 trial wavefunction forms, two methods of non-linear basis function parameter optimization, and on both serial and parallel computers. In order to construct accurate trial wavefunctions different wavefunctions forms were required for H{sub 2}O and C{sub 3}. In order to construct accurate trial wavefunctions for C{sub 3}, the non-linear parameters were optimized with respect to the sum of the energies of several low-lying vibrational states. In order to stabilize the statistical error estimates for C{sub 3} the Monte Carlo data was collected into blocks. Accurate vibrational state energies were computed using both serial and parallel QMCVIB programs. Comparison of vibrational state energies computed from the three C{sub 3} PES`s suggested that a non-linear equilibrium geometry PES is the most accurate and that discrete potential representations may be used to conveniently determine vibrational state energies.

  7. Spatial feature tracking impedence sensor using multiple electric fields

    DOEpatents

    Novak, J.L.

    1998-08-11

    Linear and other features on a workpiece are tracked by measuring the fields generated between electrodes arrayed in pairs. One electrode in each pair operates as a transmitter and the other as a receiver, and both electrodes in a pair are arrayed on a carrier. By combining and subtracting fields between electrodes in one pair and between a transmitting electrode in one pair and a receiving electrode in another pair, information describing the location and orientation of the sensor relative to the workpiece in up to six degrees of freedom may be obtained. Typical applications will measure capacitance, but other impedance components may be measured as well. The sensor is designed to track a linear feature axis or a protrusion or pocket in a workpiece. Seams and ridges can be tracked by this non-contact sensor. The sensor output is useful for robotic applications. 10 figs.

  8. Spatial feature tracking impedence sensor using multiple electric fields

    DOEpatents

    Novak, James L.

    1998-01-01

    Linear and other features on a workpiece are tracked by measuring the fields generated between electrodes arrayed in pairs. One electrode in each pair operates as a transmitter and the other as a receiver, and both electrodes in a pair are arrayed on a carrier. By combining and subtracting fields between electrodes in one pair and between a transmitting electrode in one pair and a receiving electrode in another pair, information describing the location and orientation of the sensor relative to the workpiece in up to six degrees of freedom may be obtained. Typical applications will measure capacitance, but other impedance components may be measured as well. The sensor is designed to track a linear feature axis or a protrusion or pocket in a workpiece. Seams and ridges can be tracked by this non-contact sensor. The sensor output is useful for robotic applications.

  9. System characterization in nonlinear random vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Paez, T.L.; Gregory, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    Linear structural models are frequently used for structural system characterization and analysis. In most situations they can provide satisfactory results, but under some circumstances they are insufficient for system definition. The present investigation proposes a model for nonlinear structure characterization, and demonstrates how the functions describing the model can be identified using a random vibration experiment. Further, it is shown that the model is sufficient to completely characterize the stationary random vibration response of a structure that has a harmonic frequency generating form of nonlinearity. An analytical example is presented to demonstrate the plausibility of the model.

  10. Closed-loop stimulation using intracardiac impedance as a sensor principle: correlation of right ventricular dP/dtmax and intracardiac impedance during dobutamine stress test.

    PubMed

    Osswald, S; Cron, T; Grädel, C; Hilti, P; Lippert, M; Ströbel, J; Schaldach, M; Buser, P; Pfisterer, M

    2000-10-01

    Changes of the unipolar right ventricular impedance during the cardiac cycle are related to the changing content of blood (low impedance) and tissue (high impedance) around the tip of the pacing electrode. During myocardial contraction, the impedance continuously increases reaching its maximum in late systole. This impedance increase is thought to correlate with right ventricular contractility, and thus, with the inotropic state of the heart. In the new Inos2 DDDR pacemaker, integrated information from the changing ventricular impedance (VIMP) is used for closed-loop regulation of the rate response. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of increasing dobutamine challenge on RV contractility and the measured impedance signals. In 12 patients (10 men, 68 +/- 12 years) undergoing implantation of an Inos2 DDDR pacemaker (Biotronik), a right ventricular pigtail catheter was inserted for continuous measurements of RV-dP/dtmax and simultaneous VIMP signals during intrinsic and ventricular paced rhythm. Then, a stress test with a stepwise increase of intravenous dobutamine (5-20 micrograms/kg per min) was performed. To assess the relationship between RV contractility and measured sensor signals, normalized values of dP/dtmax and VIMP were compared by linear regression. There was a strong and highly significant correlation between dP/dtmax and VIMP for ventricular paced (r2 = 0.93) and intrinsic rhythm (r2 = 0.92), although the morphologies of the original impedance curves differed quite substantially between paced and intrinsic rhythm in the same patient. Furthermore, VIMP correlated well with sinus rate (r2 = 0.82), although there were at least four patients with documented chronotropic incompetence. We conclude, that for intrinsic and ventricular paced rhythms sensor signals derived from right ventricular unipolar impedance curves closely correlate with dP/dtmax, and thus, with a surrogate of right ventricular contractility during dobutamine stress testing. Our

  11. Vibrating fuel grapple. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Chertock, A.J.; Fox, J.N.; Weissinger, R.B.

    A reactor refueling method is described which utilizes a vibrating fuel grapple for removing spent fuel assemblies from a reactor core. It incorporates a pneumatic vibrator in the grapple head which allows additional withdrawal capability without exceeding the allowable axial force limit. The only moving part in the vibrator is a steel ball, pneumatically driven by a gas, such as argon, around a track, with centrifugal force created by the ball being transmitted through the grapple to the assembly handling socket.

  12. Vibrating fuel grapple

    DOEpatents

    Chertock, deceased, Alan J.; Fox, Jack N.; Weissinger, Robert B.

    1982-01-01

    A reactor refueling method utilizing a vibrating fuel grapple for removing spent fuel assemblies from a reactor core which incorporates a pneumatic vibrator in the grapple head, enabling additional withdrawal capability without exceeding the allowable axial force limit. The only moving part in the vibrator is a steel ball, pneumatically driven by a gas, such as argon, around a track, with centrifugal force created by the ball being transmitted through the grapple to the assembly handling socket.

  13. Transverse impedances of cavities and collimators

    SciTech Connect

    Kheifets, S.A.; Bane, K.L.F.; Bizek, H.

    1987-03-01

    Field matching has been used to compute the transverse impedance of simple, cylindrically symmetric, perfectly conducting structures, the subregions of which are separated by radial cuts. The method is briefly described, and some early results are presented. (LEW)

  14. Surface impedance of transversely moving microwave ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, R. S.

    1990-01-01

    A theoretical study was made of the surface impedance Z for an electromagnetic transverse magnetic wave from free space on a magnetized ferrite surface moving normal to the plane of incidence. It was found convenient to decompose the surface impedance into two transfer impedances, Z1 and Z2, which relate the hybrid reflected amplitudes to the amplitude of the incident wave. The surface impedance does not vary much with respect to the angle of incidence, so only the case of normal incidence (θi = 0°) was evaluated. Resonant poles at ƒc, [ƒc(ƒc + ƒm)]1/2, and ƒc + ƒm dominate the frequency characteristics of Z1 and Z2. The frequencies ƒc andƒm are the precessional frequency and magnetization frequency, respectively.

  15. Antenna pattern control using impedance surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Liu, Kefeng; Tirkas, Panayiotis A.

    1993-01-01

    During the period of this research project, a comprehensive study of pyramidal horn antennas was conducted. Full-wave analytical and numerical techniques were developed to analyze horn antennas with or without impedance surfaces. Based on these full-wave analytic techniques, research was conducted on the use of impedance surfaces on the walls of the horn antennas to control the antenna radiation patterns without a substantial loss of antenna gain. It was found that the use of impedance surfaces could modify the antenna radiation patterns. In addition to the analytical and numerical models, experimental models were also constructed and they were used to validate the predictions. Excellent agreement between theoretical predictions and the measured data was obtained for pyramidal horns with perfectly conducting surfaces. Very good comparisons between numerical and experimental models were also obtained for horns with impedance surfaces.

  16. Adaptive impedance control of redundant manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colbaugh, R.; Glass, K.; Seraji, H.

    1990-01-01

    A scheme for controlling the mechanical impedance of the end-effector of a kinematically redundant manipulator is presented. The proposed control system consists of two subsystems: an adaptive impedance controller which generates the Cartesian-space control input F (is a member of Rm) required to provide the desired end-effector impedance characteristics, and an algorithm that maps this control input to the joint torque T (is a member of Rn). The F to T map is constructed so that the robot redundancy is utilized to improve either the kinematic or dynamic performance of the robot. The impedance controller does not require knowledge of the complex robot dynamic model or parameter values for the robot, the payload, or the environment, and is implemented without calculation of the robot inverse kinematic transformation. As a result, the scheme is very general and is computationally efficient for on-line implementation.

  17. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Christofilos, N.C.; Polk, I.J.

    1959-02-17

    Improvements in linear particle accelerators are described. A drift tube system for a linear ion accelerator reduces gap capacity between adjacent drift tube ends. This is accomplished by reducing the ratio of the diameter of the drift tube to the diameter of the resonant cavity. Concentration of magnetic field intensity at the longitudinal midpoint of the external sunface of each drift tube is reduced by increasing the external drift tube diameter at the longitudinal center region.

  18. An impedance device for study of multisegment hemodynamic changes during orthostatic stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, L. D.; Hanish, H. M.; Marker, R. A.

    1989-11-01

    Definition of multisegment hemodynamic changes that take place in the body would provide a more complete understanding of the physiologic responses to various orthostatic stress techniques. A self-contained impedance device is described which may be used to measure the electrical transmission characteristics produced by blood flow and volume changes in six segments of the human body during head-up tilt, bed rest, and lower body negative pressure. The device consists of a module that contains the electronics for the impedance system, a separate controller/multiplexer, a personal computer interface/analog to digital conversion/power supply system, and the associated computer control softwave. The instrument is linear over a range of 0 to 200 ohms; provides analog outputs of base impedance, phase angle, pulsatile impedance change, and the first derivative of the pulsatile impedance changes; and can be used to automatically record basal impedance values into spread-sheet format with cycle times between 12 s and 1 h. Typical results are presented to illustrate its application in aerospace research.

  19. Scattering from coated structures and antenna pattern control using impedance surfaces, part A/B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Polka, Lesley A.; Liu, Kefeng

    1990-01-01

    The scattering from coated, conducting structures, specifically the coated dihedral corner reflector configuration and the coated strip/plate configuration is examined. The formulation uses impedance-wedge Uniform Theory of Diffraction scattering coefficients to calculate the diffracted fields. A finite-thickness coating is approximated using the impedance boundary condition to arrive at an equivalent impedance for the coating. The formulation of the impedance wedge coefficients is outlined. Far-field, perfectly conducting approximations are discussed. Problems with the present dihedral corner reflector model for certain angles of incidence and observation are discussed along with a potentially rectifying modification. Also, the capacity to measure the electromagnetic properties of lossy materials was developed. The effects of using multiple material coatings on the radiation pattern of the horn antenna were studied. Numerous computations were devoted toward the inverse problem of synthesizing desired radiation patterns using the impedance surfaces. Stabilizing the equivalent sheet impedance using the linear control condition was attempted, and it was found to be a very difficult task.

  20. Inversion of elastic impedance for unconsolidated sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.

    2006-01-01

    Elastic properties of gas-hydrate-bearing sediments are important for quantifying gas hydrate amounts as well as discriminating the gas hydrate effect on velocity from free gas or pore pressure. This paper presents an elastic inversion method for estimating elastic properties of gas-hydrate-bearing sediments from angle stacks using sequential inversion of P-wave impedance from the zero-offset stack and S-wave impedance from the far-offset stack without assuming velocity ratio.

  1. CSR Impedance for Non-Ultrarelativistic Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Rui; Tsai, Cheng Y.

    2015-09-01

    For the analysis of the coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR)-induced microbunching gain in the low energy regime, such as when a high-brightness electron beam is transported through a low-energy merger in an energy-recovery linac (ERL) design, it is necessary to extend the CSR impedance expression in the ultrarelativistic limit to the non-ultrarelativistic regime. This paper presents our analysis of CSR impedance for general beam energies.

  2. Acoustic impedance measurements of pulse tube refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwase, Takashi; Biwa, Tetsushi; Yazaki, Taichi

    2010-02-01

    Complex acoustic impedance is determined in a prototype refrigerator that can mimic orifice-type, inertance-type, and double inlet-type pulse tube refrigerators from simultaneous measurements of pressure and velocity oscillations at the cold end. The impedance measurements revealed the means by which the oscillatory flow condition in the basic pulse tube refrigerator is improved by additional components such as a valve and a tank. The working mechanism of pulse tube refrigerators is explained based on an electrical circuit analogy.

  3. Acoustic Impedance Measurement for Underground Surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockcroft, Paul William

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. This thesis investigates the measurement of acoustic impedance for surfaces likely to be found in underground coal mines. By introducing the concepts of industrial noise, the effects of noise on the ear and relevant legislation the need for the protection of workers can be appreciated. Representative acoustic impedance values are vital as input for existing computer models that predict sound levels in various underground environments. These enable the mining engineer to predict the noise level at any point within a mine in the vicinity of noisy machinery. The concepts of acoustic intensity and acoustic impedance are investigated and different acoustic impedance measurement techniques are detailed. The possible use of either an impedance tube or an intensity meter for these kinds of measurements are suggested. The problems with acoustic intensity and acoustic impedance measurements are discussed with reference to the restraints that an underground environment imposes on any measurement technique. The impedance tube method for work in an acoustics laboratory is shown and the theory explained, accompanied by a few representative results. The use of a Metravib intensity meter in a soundproof chamber to gain impedance values is explained in detail. The accompanying software for the analysis of the two measured pressure signals is shown as well as the actual results for a variety of test surfaces. The use of a Nagra IV-SJ tape recorder is investigated to determine the effect of recording on the measurement and subsequent analysis of the input signals, particularly with reference to the phase difference introduced between the two simultaneous pressure signals. The subsequent use of a Norwegian Electronic intensity meter, including a proposal for underground work, is shown along with results for tests completed with this piece of equipment. Finally, recommendations are made on how to link up

  4. Impedance Analysis of Surface-Bound Biomembranes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-08

    and identify by block numb (i FIELD GROUP SUB-GROLm--- AC Impedance, Biomembranes, Lipid, Electrod\\) ’CBiosensor - O ( S. &-’te ,,• J ABSTRACT...Instit-ute 57 Union St., Worcester, MA 01608 ABSTRACTElcchria isThe impedance of different electrode substratesElcharacteriz l biomemance atnactuses fomed ...T10 2), indium/tin oxide (ITO) and platinum electrodes that have been "primed" by covalent attachment of long-chained alkyl groups . The electroes were

  5. Electrical Impedance Tomography of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    Resonance Research Systems, Guildford, UK) that has broadband RF transmit and receive channels. A 16 leg, quadrature, high-pass birdcage coil with 10...metastatic cancer, magnetic resonance imaging, 43 electrical impedance imaging, electrical impedance scanning, MRI 16. PRICE CODE current density imaging...tissue with high spatial resolution, by using it in conjunction with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to improve diagnostic accuracy of screening. For

  6. Effect of shear on duct wall impedance.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M.; Rice, E.

    1973-01-01

    The solution to the equation governing the propagation of sound in a uniform shear layer is expressed in terms of parabolic cylinder functions. This result is used to develop a closed-form solution for acoustic wall impedance which accounts for both the duct liner and the presence of a boundary layer in the duct. The effective wall impedance can then be used as the boundary condition for the much simpler problem of sound propagation in uniform flow.

  7. Antenna impedance matching with neural networks.

    PubMed

    Hemminger, Thomas L

    2005-10-01

    Impedance matching between transmission lines and antennas is an important and fundamental concept in electromagnetic theory. One definition of antenna impedance is the resistance and reactance seen at the antenna terminals or the ratio of electric to magnetic fields at the input. The primary intent of this paper is real-time compensation for changes in the driving point impedance of an antenna due to frequency deviations. In general, the driving point impedance of an antenna or antenna array is computed by numerical methods such as the method of moments or similar techniques. Some configurations do lend themselves to analytical solutions, which will be the primary focus of this work. This paper employs a neural control system to match antenna feed lines to two common antennas during frequency sweeps. In practice, impedance matching is performed off-line with Smith charts or relatively complex formulas but they rarely perform optimally over a large bandwidth. There have been very few attempts to compensate for matching errors while the transmission system is in operation and most techniques have been targeted to a relatively small range of frequencies. The approach proposed here employs three small neural networks to perform real-time impedance matching over a broad range of frequencies during transmitter operation. Double stub tuners are being explored in this paper but the approach can certainly be applied to other methodologies. The ultimate purpose of this work is the development of an inexpensive microcontroller-based system.

  8. On Ultrafast Time-Domain TeraHertz Spectroscopy in the Condensed Phase: Linear Spectroscopic Measurements of Hydrogen-Bond Dynamics of Astrochemical Ice Analogs and Nonlinear TeraHertz Kerr Effect Measurements of Vibrational Quantum Beats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allodi, Marco A.

    . We tentatively observe a new feature in both amorphous solid water and crystalline water at 33 wavenumbers (1 THz). In addition, our studies of mixed and layered ices show how it is possible to identify the location of carbon dioxide as it segregates within the ice by observing its effect on the THz spectrum of water ice. The THz spectra of mixed and layered ices are further analyzed by fitting their spectra features to those of pure amorphous solid water and crystalline water ice to quantify the effects of temperature changes on structure. From the results of this work, it appears that THz spectroscopy is potentially well suited to study thermal transformations within the ice. To advance the study of liquids with THz spectroscopy, we developed a new ultrafast nonlinear THz spectroscopic technique: heterodyne-detected, ultrafast THz Kerr effect (TKE) spectroscopy. We implemented a heterodyne-detection scheme into a TKE spectrometer that uses a stilbazoium-based THz emitter, 4-N,N-dimethylamino-4-N-methyl-stilbazolium 2,4,6-trimethylbenzenesulfonate (DSTMS), and high numerical aperture optics which generates THz electric field in excess of 300 kV/cm, in the sample. This allows us to report the first measurement of quantum beats at terahertz (THz) frequencies that result from vibrational coherences initiated by the nonlinear, dipolar interaction of a broadband, high-energy, (sub)picosecond THz pulse with the sample. Our instrument improves on both the frequency coverage, and sensitivity previously reported; it also ensures a backgroundless measurement of the THz Kerr effect in pure liquids. For liquid diiodomethane, we observe a quantum beat at 3.66 THz (122 wavenumbers), in exact agreement with the fundamental transition frequency of the lowest energy vibration of the molecule. This result provides new insight into dipolar vs. Raman selection rules at terahertz frequencies. To conclude we discuss future directions for the nonlinear THz spectroscopy in the Blake lab

  9. Differences in acoustic impedance of fresh and embedded human trabecular bone samples-Scanning acoustic microscopy and numerical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ojanen, Xiaowei; Töyräs, Juha; Inkinen, Satu I; Malo, Markus K H; Isaksson, Hanna; Jurvelin, Jukka S

    2016-09-01

    Trabecular bone samples are traditionally embedded and polished for scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM). The effect of sample processing, including dehydration, on the acoustic impedance of bone is unknown. In this study, acoustic impedance of human trabecular bone samples (n = 8) was experimentally assessed before (fresh) and after embedding using SAM and two-dimensional (2-D) finite-difference time domain simulations. Fresh samples were polished with sandpapers of different grit (P1000, P2500, and P4000). Experimental results indicated that acoustic impedance of samples increased significantly after embedding [mean values 3.7 MRayl (fresh), 6.1 MRayl (embedded), p < 0.001]. After polishing with different papers, no significant changes in acoustic impedance were found, even though higher mean values were detected after polishing with finer (P2500 and P4000) papers. A linear correlation (r = 0.854, p < 0.05) was found between the acoustic impedance values of embedded and fresh bone samples polished using P2500 SiC paper. In numerical simulations dehydration increased the acoustic impedance of trabecular bone (38%), whereas changes in surface roughness of bone had a minor effect on the acoustic impedance (-1.56%/0.1 μm). Thereby, the numerical simulations corroborated the experimental findings. In conclusion, acoustic impedance measurement of fresh trabecular bone is possible and may provide realistic material values similar to those of living bone.

  10. Impedance control of flexible macro/mini manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Heidi Christine

    Construction and maintenance of on-orbit crew-operated hardware is currently done mostly by extra-vehicular astronauts. Use of robotics for some of these tasks provides the opportunity for both increased safety for the astronauts and major cost savings. An effective space robotic manipulator must be lightweight, have a large workspace, and be capable of fine dexterous control. A large lightweight manipulator will necessarily be quite flexible, limiting the achievable end-point bandwidth. One way to achieve all of the objectives is via advanced control of a macro/mini manipulator: a large lightweight manipulator carrying a small dexterous manipulator, such as is planned for the International Space Station. The goal of this work is to control a flexible-joint macro carrying a two-arm mini manipulator. For ease of use, a low-level controller should be designed such that the user or automated planner need only command the desired end-point motions and forces. Designing an end-point controller for a macro/mini manipulator presents many challenges. Such a manipulator system is non-linear, has low frequency flexibility, and has dynamic coupling between the macro and mini. A smart method for controlling manipulators is impedance control, which specifies a desired force-velocity relationship at the end-point of the manipulator, enabling smooth contact with the environment. Using operational space control, the dynamics of the manipulator are transformed into operational coordinates for implementation of the impedance law. The operational space method also enables a secondary control of the redundant degrees of freedom, without degrading the end-point impedance task. This thesis presents new theoretical advances that enable extending the concepts of operational space and impedance control to redundant joint-flexible robots. Important advances include a new method for choosing the end-point impedance and a null-space controller that performs much better. The new control

  11. Effects of ultrasonic vibrations in micro-groove turning.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen; Guo, Ping; Ehmann, Kornel F; Li, Yingguang

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasonic vibration cutting is an efficient cutting process for mechanical micro-machining. This process can generate intricate surface textures with different geometric characteristics. Micro-grooves/micro-channels are among the most frequently encountered micro-structures and, as such, are the focus of this paper. The effectiveness of both the linear and ultrasonic elliptical vibration-assisted machining technique in micro-groove turning is analyzed and discussed in the paper. The paper first investigates the mechanisms of micro-groove generation induced by the linear and elliptical vibration modes. A simplified cutting force analysis method is given to compare the effectiveness of the two modes in micro-groove turning. The surface roughness of the generated micro-grooves is analyzed next and theoretical expressions are given for the two cases. Finally, micro-groove turning experiments are conducted to compare the influences of the two vibration modes on the cutting forces and the surface roughness. The experimental results show that linear vibration-assisted micro-groove turning leads to better surface roughness as compared to the elliptical vibration-assisted case, while elliptical vibration-assisted micro-groove turning shows advantages in terms of decreasing the cutting forces.

  12. Vibration characteristics of pipe organ reed tongues and the effect of the shallot, resonator, and reed curvature.

    PubMed

    Plitnik, G R

    2000-06-01

    Pipe organ reed pipes sound when a fixed-free curved brass reed mounted on a shallot connected to a resonator is forced to vibrate by an impressed static air pressure. Five sets of experiments were performed in order to investigate the influence of the most important parameters which could affect the tone of a reed pipe. First, the phase difference between the pressure variation in the shallot and the boot, and its relationship to the motion of the reed tongue were analyzed to compare their phases and their spectra. Next, the frequency dependence of the reed on three basic parameters (reed thickness, its vibrating length, and the imposed static air pressure) was investigated in an attempt to determine an empirical equation for the frequency. For each trial, two of the variables were kept constant while the third was altered in order to construct an equation giving frequency as a function of the three variables. Third, experiments were conducted using three different types of shallots: the American (or English) style, the French style, and the German style. The results show that for each shallot, the frequency increases linearly with thickness and linearly with air pressure (over the normal operating range of the reed). For each of the shallots, frequency varies inversely with length when the other variables are held constant. The effect on the reed spectrum of using the three different types of shallot was also investigated, as was the effect of reducing the interior volume of each type. Progressively filling the shallot interior generally decreases the frequency of the vibrating reed. The effect of the resonators on frequency and spectrum was studied because the resonator is an integral part of the resulting tone; virtually every reed stop has some type of resonator. The resonator tends to raise the Q of the impedance peaks and reduce the fundamental frequency. Finally, the influence of the type and degree of curvature on reed vibration was briefly examined

  13. Mechanical vibration to electrical energy converter

    DOEpatents

    Kellogg, Rick Allen; Brotz, Jay Kristoffer

    2009-03-03

    Electromechanical devices that generate an electrical signal in response to an external source of mechanical vibrations can operate as a sensor of vibrations and as an energy harvester for converting mechanical vibration to electrical energy. The devices incorporate a magnet that is movable through a gap in a ferromagnetic circuit, wherein a coil is wound around a portion of the ferromagnetic circuit. A flexible coupling is used to attach the magnet to a frame for providing alignment of the magnet as it moves or oscillates through the gap in the ferromagnetic circuit. The motion of the magnet can be constrained to occur within a substantially linear range of magnetostatic force that develops due to the motion of the magnet. The devices can have ferromagnetic circuits with multiple arms, an array of magnets having alternating polarity and, encompass micro-electromechanical (MEM) devices.

  14. Transverse vibration of nematic elastomer Timoshenko beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dong; Liu, Ying; Liu, Chuang

    2017-01-01

    Being a rubber-like liquid crystalline elastomer, a nematic elastomer (NE) is anisotropic viscoelastic, and displays dynamic soft elasticity. In this paper, the transverse vibration of a NE Timoshenko beam is studied based on the linear viscoelasticity theory of nematic elastomers. The governing equation of motion for the transverse vibration of a NE Timoshenko beam is derived. A complex modal analysis method is used to obtain the natural frequencies and decrement coefficients of NE beams. The influences of the nematic director rotation, the rubber relaxation time, and the director rotation time on the vibration characteristic of NE Timoshenko beams are discussed in detail. The sensitivity of the dynamic performance of NE beams to director initial angle and relaxation times provides a possibility of intelligent controlling of their dynamic performance.

  15. Influence of wall vibrations on the sound of brass wind instruments.

    PubMed

    Kausel, Wilfried; Zietlow, Daniel W; Moore, Thomas R

    2010-11-01

    The results of an experimental and theoretical investigation of the influence of wall vibrations on the sound of brass wind instruments are presented. Measurements of the transmission function and input impedance of a trumpet, with the bell both heavily damped and freely vibrating, are shown to be consistent with a theory that assumes that the internal pressure causes an oscillation of the diameter of the pipe enclosing the air column. These effects are shown to be most significant in sections where there are flaring walls, which explains why damping these vibrations in cylindrical pipes normally produces no measurable effects.

  16. In situ anodization of aluminum surfaces studied by x-ray reflectivity and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bertram, F. Evertsson, J.; Messing, M. E.; Mikkelsen, A.; Lundgren, E.; Zhang, F.; Pan, J.; Carlà, F.; Nilsson, J.-O.

    2014-07-21

    We present results from the anodization of an aluminum single crystal [Al(111)] and an aluminum alloy [Al 6060] studied by in situ x-ray reflectivity, in situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and ex situ scanning electron microscopy. For both samples, a linear increase of oxide film thickness with increasing anodization voltage was found. However, the slope is much higher in the single crystal case, and the break-up of the oxide film grown on the alloy occurs at a lower anodization potential than on the single crystal. The reasons for these observations are discussed as are the measured differences observed for x-ray reflectivity and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

  17. Multiple direction vibration fixture

    DOEpatents

    Cericola, Fred; Doggett, James W.; Ernest, Terry L.; Priddy, Tommy G.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus for simulating a rocket launch environment on a test item undergoing centrifuge testing by subjecting the item simultaneously or separately to vibration along an axis of centripetal force and along an axis perpendicular to the centripetal force axis. The apparatus includes a shaker motor supported by centrifuge arms and a right angle fixture pivotally connected to one of the shaker motor mounts. When the shaker motor vibrates along the centripetal force axis, the vibrations are imparted to a first side of the right angle fixture. The vibrations are transmitted 90 degrees around the pivot and are directed to a second side of the right angle fixture which imparts vibrations perpendicular to the centripetal force axis. The test item is in contact with a third side of the right angle fixture and receives both centripetal-force-axis vibrations and perpendicular axis vibrations simultaneously. A test item can be attached to the third side near the flexible coupling or near the air bag to obtain vibrations along the centripetal force axis or transverse to the centripetal force axis.

  18. [Vibration on agricultural tractors].

    PubMed

    Peretti, Alessandro; Delvecchio, Simone; Bonomini, Francesco; di Bisceglie, Anita Pasqua; Colosio, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    In the article, details related to the diffusion of agricultural tractors in Italy are given and considerations about the effects of vibration on operators, the sources of vibration and suggestions to reduce them are presented. The acceleration values observed in Italy amongst 244 tractors and levels of worker exposure are shown by means of histograms. The relevant data variability is discussed.

  19. Vibrational Schroedinger Cats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kis, Z.; Janszky, J.; Vinogradov, An. V.; Kobayashi, T.

    1996-01-01

    The optical Schroedinger cat states are simple realizations of quantum states having nonclassical features. It is shown that vibrational analogues of such states can be realized in an experiment of double pulse excitation of vibrionic transitions. To track the evolution of the vibrational wave packet we derive a non-unitary time evolution operator so that calculations are made in a quasi Heisenberg picture.

  20. Highly linear, sensitive analog-to-digital converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, J.; Finley, W. R.

    1969-01-01

    Analog-to-digital converter converts 10 volt full scale input signal into 13 bit digital output. Advantages include high sensitivity, linearity, low quantitizing error, high resistance to mechanical shock and vibration loads, and temporary data storage capabilities.

  1. Design and performance analysis of a rotary traveling wave ultrasonic motor with double vibrators.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhaopeng; Yang, Ming; Chen, Zhangqi; Xu, Liang; Meng, Fan; Ou, Wenchu

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the development of a rotary traveling wave ultrasonic motor, in which a vibrating stator and vibrating rotor are combined in one motor. The stator and rotor are designed as similar structures an elastic body and a piezoelectric ceramic ring. In exciting of the piezoelectric ceramics, the elastic body of the stator and rotor will generate respective traveling waves, which force each other forward in the contact zone. Based on the elliptical rule of particle motion and matching principle of vibration, the design rules of two vibrators are determined. The finite element method is used to design the sizes of vibrators to ensure that they operate in resonance, and the simulation is verified by measuring the vibration with an impedance analyzer. It is found out that to maintain an appropriate contact between the stator and rotor, two vibrators need to be designed with close resonance frequencies, different vibration amplitudes, and be driven by an identical driving frequency. To analyze this innovative contact mechanism, particle velocity synthesis theory and contact force analysis using Hertz contact model are carried out. Finally, a prototype is fabricated and tested to verify the theoretical results. The test results show that the output performance of the motor driven by the two vibrators is significantly improved compared to the motor driven by a sole stator or rotor, which confirms the validity of the double-vibrator motor concept.

  2. The Shock and Vibration Bulletin. Part 4. Underwater Problems, Environments and Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-08-01

    on the source impedance, and ascertain the origin of its stiffness-damper aspect. i^fe The Navy large Floating Shock Platfora rtu -l 1; ilysical...Vibration Pickups,S2.2-1959,(Section S, Calibration by Comparison with Calibrated Pickup). 3. Instrument Society of America, 22nd Annual ISA

  3. Vibration in textile mills.

    PubMed

    Sorainen, E

    1988-12-01

    The vibration in nine halls of the six weaving mills was measured in 1978-80. The measurements were taken at regular intervals in the working area of the weavers, which was the wooden support attached to the machine or the floor of the textile mill. The accelerometer was mounted with screws onto the working area, and all vibration samples were analyzed immediately, in situ. The vibration of the floor was tangent to or exceeded slightly the "reduced comfort boundary" specified in International Standard ISO 2631/1 (1985) only in the areas where the floor was not against the ground. The greatest amount of vibration occurred on the supports which had been attached to the machines. On these supports the vibration in places exceeded the "fatigue-decreased proficiency boundary."

  4. Laser Raman and ac impedance spectroscopic studies of PVA: NH 4NO 3 polymer electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hema, M.; Selvasekarapandian, S.; Hirankumar, G.; Sakunthala, A.; Arunkumar, D.; Nithya, H.

    2010-01-01

    Ion conducting polymer electrolyte PVA:NH 4NO 3 has been prepared by solution casting technique and characterized using XRD, Raman and ac impedance spectroscopic analyses. The amorphous nature of the polymer films has been confirmed by XRD and Raman spectroscopy. An insight into the deconvoluted Raman peaks of υ1 vibration of NO 3- anion for the polymer electrolyte reveals the dominancy of ion aggregates at higher NH 4NO 3 concentration. From the ac impedance studies, the highest ion conductivity at 303 K has been found to be 7.5 × 10 -3 S cm -1 for 80PVA:20NH 4NO 3. The conductivity of the polymer electrolytes has been found to depend on the degree of dissociation of the salt in the host polymer matrix. The combination of the above-mentioned analyses has proven worth while and in fact necessary in order to achieve better understanding of these complex systems.

  5. Wire Measurement of Impedance of an X-Band Accelerating Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Baboi, N

    2004-09-02

    Several tens of thousands of accelerator structures will be needed for the next generation of normal conducting linear colliders known as the GLC/NLC (Global Linear Collider/Next Linear Collider). To prevent the beam being driven into a disruptive BBU (Beam Break-Up) mode or at the very least, the emittance being significantly diluted, it is important to damp down the wakefield left by driving bunches to a manageable level. Manufacturing errors and errors in design need to be measured and compared with prediction. In this paper a bench-top method of measuring transverse impedances in X-band accelerating structures is described. Utilizing an off-axis wire the S parameters are measured and converted to impedance. Measurements in a damped and detuned structure built for GLC/NLC are presented and the results are discussed.

  6. Effects of Liner Geometry on Acoustic Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Tracy, Maureen B.; Watson, Willie R.; Parrott, Tony L.

    2002-01-01

    Current aircraft engine nacelles typically contain acoustic liners consisting of perforated sheets bonded onto honeycomb cavities. Numerous models have been developed to predict the acoustic impedance of these liners in the presence of grazing flow, and to use that information with aeroacoustic propagation codes to assess nacelle liner noise suppression. Recent efforts have provided advances in impedance education methodologies that offer more accurate determinations of acoustic liner properties in the presence of grazing flow. The current report provides the results of a parametric study, in which a finite element method was used to assess the effects of variations of the following geometric parameters on liner impedance, with and without the presence of grazing flow: percent open area, sheet thickness, sheet thickness-to-hole diameter ratio and cavity depth. Normal incidence acoustic impedances were determined for eight acoustic liners, consisting of punched aluminum facesheets bonded to hexcell honeycomb cavities. Similar liners were tested in the NASA Langley Research Center grazing incidence tube to determine their response in the presence of grazing flow. The resultant data provide a quantitative assessment of the effects of these perforate, single-layer liner parameters on the acoustic impedance of the liner.

  7. Passive vibration tuning with neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiDomenico, Eric D.

    1994-05-01

    Neural network control of flexible structures demonstrates better settling time and energy dissipation than linear design methods. Optimal tuning of passive vibration absorbers for reduced order control is examined using linear and non-linear cases. Quasi-Newton (BFGS) and simplex optimization methods improved the Den Hartog parameters where unsupervised LMS or backpropagation techniques were unstable. Lessons on unsupervised training for dynamic system control are illustrated by examining convergence to the solution in `error space' (parameters vs. cost). Spring stiffness and passive damping of a reaction mass actuator (RMA) are `tuned' for best disturbance rejection using total energy as a cost function. A single neuron using two weights (one for damping and the other for the spring coefficient) improved beam energy over the Den Hartog parameters for the linear bi-modal case. The non-linear case demonstrates even better performance. A multiple layer network is then demonstrated for both the linear and non-linear cases. Optimization techniques improved linear system parameters when initiated at the linear solutions. Lab data for the linear single neuron case validates model fidelity.

  8. Tunable microwave impedance matching to a high impedance source using a Josephson metamaterial

    SciTech Connect

    Altimiras, Carles Parlavecchio, Olivier; Joyez, Philippe; Vion, Denis; Roche, Patrice; Esteve, Daniel; Portier, Fabien

    2013-11-18

    We report the efficient coupling of a 50  Ω microwave circuit to a high impedance conductor. We use an impedance transformer consisting of a λ/4 co-planar resonator whose inner conductor contains an array of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs), providing it with a tunable lineic inductance L∼80 μ{sub 0}, resulting in a characteristic impedance Z{sub C}∼1 kΩ. The impedance matching efficiency is characterized by measuring the shot noise power emitted by a dc biased tunnel junction connected to the resonator. We demonstrate matching to impedances in the 15 to 35 kΩ range with bandwidths above 100 MHz around a resonant frequency tunable between 4 and 6 GHz.

  9. Traceable vibration measurements--who needs them?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Norman H.

    1998-06-01

    Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) is rapidly displacing accelerometer methods in many vibration measurement applications. Although the technique may be considered by some to give an 'absolute' measure of vibration amplitude, there are certain instances in which it may be necessary to show a rigorous traceability, to primary physical standards, of measured amplitudes. In particular, where vibration measurements are made in order to show compliance or non- compliance with a clause in a contract, the measurer must be able to state uncertainties at a specified level of confidence. In such cases the calibration component of uncertainty must be known, and traceability must be shown to primary standards of length, time and voltage. In other cases, eg mode studies, only amplitude linearity may be of interest. This paper discusses the various methods currently used in national measurement institutes for primary calibration of vibration-measuring transducers, and the uncertainties in these methods. The usefulness of portable calibrators is discussed, and the practicality of using reference accelerometers to calibrate LDV measuring systems. Finally, the paper discusses the possibility of an alternative path of traceability of vibration measurements, using a LDV reference instrument.

  10. Vibration suppression of advanced space cryocoolers: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Ronald G., Jr.

    2003-07-01

    Mechanical cryocoolers represent a significant enabling technology for precision space instruments by providing cryogenic temperatures for sensitive infrared, gamma-ray, and x-ray detectors. However, the vibration generated by the cryocooler's refrigeration compressor has long been identified as a critical integration issue. The key sensitivity is the extent to which the cooler's vibration harmonics excite spacecraft resonances and prevent on-board sensors from achieving their operational goals with respect to resolution and pointing accuracy. To reduce the cryocooler's vibration signature to acceptable levels, a variety of active vibration suppression technologies have been developed and implemented over the past 15 years. At this point, nearly all space cryocoolers have active vibration suppression systems built into their drive electronics that reduce the peak unbalanced forces to less than 1% of their original levels. Typical systems of today individually control the vibration in each of the cryocoolers lowest drive harmonics, with some controlling as many as 16 harmonics. A second vibration issue associated with cryocoolers is surviving launch. Here the same pistons and coldfingers that generate vibration during operation are often the most critical elements in terms of surviving high input acceleration levels. Since electrical power is generally not available during launch, passive vibration suppression technologies have been developed. Common vibration damping techniques include electrodynamic braking via shorted motor coils and the use of particle dampers on sensitive cryogenic elements. This paper provides an overview of the vibration characteristics of typical linear-drive space cryocoolers, outlines their history of development, and presents typical performance of the various active and passive vibration suppression systems being used.

  11. Vibration amplitude and induced temperature limitation of high power air-borne ultrasonic transducers.

    PubMed

    Saffar, Saber; Abdullah, Amir

    2014-01-01

    The acoustic impedances of matching layers, their internal loss and vibration amplitude are the most important and influential parameters in the performance of high power airborne ultrasonic transducers. In this paper, the optimum acoustic impedances of the transducer matching layers were determined by using a genetic algorithm, the powerful tool for optimizating domain. The analytical results showed that the vibration amplitude increases significantly for low acoustic impedance matching layers. This enhancement is maximum and approximately 200 times higher for the last matching layer where it has the same interface with the air than the vibration amplitude of the source, lead zirconate titanate-pizo electric while transferring the 1 kW is desirable. This large amplitude increases both mechanical failure and temperature of the matching layers due to the internal loss of the matching layers. It has analytically shown that the temperature in last matching layer with having the maximum vibration amplitude is high enough to melt or burn the matching layers. To verify suggested approach, the effect of the amplitude of vibration on the induced temperature has been investigated experimentally. The experimental results displayed good agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  12. Observation and Analysis of N[subscript 2]O Rotation-Vibration Spectra: A Physical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Mark S.; Reeve, Scott W.; Burns, William A.

    2008-01-01

    The linear molecule N[subscript 2]O is presented as an alternative gas-phase species for the ubiquitous undergraduate physical chemistry rotation-vibration spectroscopy experiment. Utilizing a 0.5 cm[superscript -1] resolution teaching grade FTIR spectrometer, 15 vibrational bands, corresponding to 1229 rotation-vibration transitions, have been…

  13. Direct adaptive impedance control of manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colbaugh, R.; Seraji, H.; Glass, K.

    1991-01-01

    An adaptive scheme for controlling the end-effector impedance of robot manipulators is presented. The proposed control system consists of three subsystems: a simple filter which characterizes the desired dynamic relationship between the end-effector position error and the end-effector/environment contact force, an adaptive controller which produces the Cartesian-space control input required to provide this desired dynamic relationship, and an algorithm for mapping the Cartesian-space control input to a physically realizable joint-space control torque. The controller does not require knowledge of either the structure or the parameter values of the robot dynamics, and it is implemented without calculation of the robot inverse kinematic transformation. As a result, the scheme represents a very general and computationally efficient approach to controlling the impedance of both nonredundant and redundant manipulators. Furthermore, the method can be applied directly to trajectory tracking in free-space motion by removing the impedance filter.

  14. Propagation of waves along an impedance boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, A. R.

    1974-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the scalar wave field due to a point source above a plane impedance boundary is presented. A surface wave is found to be an essential component of the total wave field. It is shown that, as a result of ducting of energy by the surface wave, the amplitude of the total wave near the boundary can be greater than it would be if the boundary were perfectly reflecting. Asymptotic results, valid near the boundary, are obtained both for the case of finite impedance (the soft-boundary case) and for the limiting case in which the impedance becomes infinite (the hard-boundary case). In the latter, the wave amplitude in the farfield decreases essentially inversely as the horizontal propagation distance; in the former (if the surface-wave term is neglected), it decreases inversely as the square of the horizontal propagation distance.

  15. Wavelet analysis of the impedance cardiogram waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podtaev, S.; Stepanov, R.; Dumler, A.; Chugainov, S.; Tziberkin, K.

    2012-12-01

    Impedance cardiography has been used for diagnosing atrial and ventricular dysfunctions, valve disorders, aortic stenosis, and vascular diseases. Almost all the applications of impedance cardiography require determination of some of the characteristic points of the ICG waveform. The ICG waveform has a set of characteristic points known as A, B, E ((dZ/dt)max) X, Y, O and Z. These points are related to distinct physiological events in the cardiac cycle. Objective of this work is an approbation of a new method of processing and interpretation of the impedance cardiogram waveforms using wavelet analysis. A method of computer thoracic tetrapolar polyrheocardiography is used for hemodynamic registrations. Use of original wavelet differentiation algorithm allows combining filtration and calculation of the derivatives of rheocardiogram. The proposed approach can be used in clinical practice for early diagnostics of cardiovascular system remodelling in the course of different pathologies.

  16. Impedance properties of circular microstrip antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, M. D.; Bailey, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    A moment method solution to the input impedance of a circular microstrip antenna excited by either a microstrip feed or a coaxial probe is presented. Using the exact dyadic Green's function and the Fourier transform the problem is formulated in terms of Richmond's reaction integral equation from which the unknown patch current can be solved for. The patch current is expanded in terms of regular surface patch modes and an attachment mode (for probe excited case) which insures continuity of the current at probe/patch junction, proper polarization and p-dependance of patch current in the vicinity of the probe. The input impedance of a circular microstrip antenna is computed and compared with earlier results. Effect of attachment mode on the input impedance is also discussed.

  17. Vibration reduction in a tilting rotor using centrifugal pendulum vibration absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chengzhi; Shaw, Steven W.; Parker, Robert G.

    2016-12-01

    This paper investigates vibration reduction in a rigid rotor with tilting, rotational, and translational motions using centrifugal pendulum vibration absorbers (CPVAs). A linearized vibration model is derived for the system consisting of the rotor and multiple sets of absorbers tuned to different orders. Each group of absorbers lies in a given plane perpendicular to the rotor rotation axis. Gyroscopic system modal analysis is applied to derive the steady-state response of the absorbers and the rotor to external, rotor-order, periodic forces and torques with frequency mΩ, where Ω is the mean rotor speed and m is the engine order (rotor-order). It is found that an absorber group with tuning order m is effective at reducing the rotor translational, tilting, and rotational vibrations, provided certain conditions are met. When the periodic force and torque are caused by N substructures that are equally spaced around the rotor, the rotor translational and tilting vibrations at order j are addressed by two absorber groups with tuning orders jN±1. In this case, the rotor rotational vibration at order j can be attenuated by an absorber group with tuning order jN. The results show how the response depends on the load amplitudes and order, the rotor speed, and design parameters associated with the sets of absorbers, most importantly, their tuning, mass, and plane of placement. In the ideal case with zero damping and exact tuning of the absorber sets, the vibrations can be eliminated for a range of loads over which the linearized model holds. The response for systems with detuned absorbers is also determined, which is relevant to applications where small detuning is employed due to robustness issues, and to allow for a larger range of operating loads over which the absorbers are effective. The system also exhibits undesirable resonances very close to these tuning conditions, an issue that is difficult to resolve and deserves further investigation.

  18. Low-frequency vibration control of floating slab tracks using dynamic vibration absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shengyang; Yang, Jizhong; Yan, Hua; Zhang, Longqing; Cai, Chengbiao

    2015-09-01

    This study aims to effectively and robustly suppress the low-frequency vibrations of floating slab tracks (FSTs) using dynamic vibration absorbers (DVAs). First, the optimal locations where the DVAs are attached are determined by modal analysis with a finite element model of the FST. Further, by identifying the equivalent mass of the concerned modes, the optimal stiffness and damping coefficient of each DVA are obtained to minimise the resonant vibration amplitudes based on fixed-point theory. Finally, a three-dimensional coupled dynamic model of a metro vehicle and the FST with the DVAs is developed based on the nonlinear Hertzian contact theory and the modified Kalker linear creep theory. The track irregularities are included and generated by means of a time-frequency transformation technique. The effect of the DVAs on the vibration absorption of the FST subjected to the vehicle dynamic loads is evaluated with the help of the insertion loss in one-third octave frequency bands. The sensitivities of the mass ratio of DVAs and the damping ratio of steel-springs under the floating slab are discussed as well, which provided engineers with the DVA's adjustable room for vibration mitigation. The numerical results show that the proposed DVAs could effectively suppress low-frequency vibrations of the FST when tuned correctly and attached properly. The insertion loss due to the attachment of DVAs increases as the mass ratio increases, whereas it decreases with the increase in the damping ratio of steel-springs.

  19. Impedance Scaling for Small Angle Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.; Bane, Karl; Zagorodnov, I.; /DESY

    2010-10-27

    Based on the parabolic equation approach to Maxwell's equations we have derived scaling properties of the high frequency impedance/short bunch wakefields of structures. For the special case of small angle transitions we have shown the scaling properties are valid for all frequencies. Using these scaling properties one can greatly reduce the calculation time of the wakefield/impedance of long, small angle, beam pipe transitions, like one often finds in insertion regions of storage rings. We have tested the scaling with wakefield simulations of 2D and 3D models of such transitions, and found that the scaling works well. In modern ring-based light sources one often finds insertion devices having extremely small vertical apertures (on the order of millimeters) to allow for maximal undulator fields reaching the beam. Such insertion devices require that there be beam pipe transitions from these small apertures to the larger cross-sections (normally on the order of centimeters) found in the rest of the ring. The fact that there may be many such transitions, and that these transitions introduce beam pipe discontinuities very close to the beam path, means that their impedance will be large and, in fact, may dominate the impedance budget of the entire ring. To reduce their impact on impedance, the transitions are normally tapered gradually over a long distance. The accurate calculation of the impedance or wakefield of these long transitions, which are typically 3D objects (i.e. they do not have cylindrical symmetry), can be quite a challenging numerical task. In this report we present a method of obtaining the impedance of a long, small angle transition from the calculation of a scaled, shorter one. Normally, the actual calculation is obtained from a time domain simulation of the wakefield in the structure, where the impedance can be obtained by performing a Fourier transform. We shall see that the scaled calculation reduces the computer time and memory requirements

  20. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy Of Metal Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdowell, L. G.; Calle, L. M.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes use of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to investigate resistances of 19 alloys to corrosion under conditions similar to those of corrosive, chloride-laden seaside environment of Space Transportation System launch site. Alloys investigated: Hastelloy C-4, C-22, C-276, and B-2; Inconel(R) 600, 625, and 825; Inco(R) G-3; Monel 400; Zirconium 702; Stainless Steel 304L, 304LN, 316L, 317L, and 904L; 20Cb-3; 7Mo+N; ES2205; and Ferralium 255. Results suggest electrochemical impedance spectroscopy used to predict corrosion performances of metal alloys.

  1. Protein Aggregation Measurement through Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affanni, A.; Corazza, A.; Esposito, G.; Fogolari, F.; Polano, M.

    2013-09-01

    The paper presents a novel methodology to measure the fibril formation in protein solutions. We designed a bench consisting of a sensor having interdigitated electrodes, a PDMS hermetic reservoir and an impedance meter automatically driven by calculator. The impedance data are interpolated with a lumped elements model and their change over time can provide information on the aggregation process. Encouraging results have been obtained by testing the methodology on K-casein, a protein of milk, with and without the addition of a drug inhibiting the aggregation. The amount of sample needed to perform this measurement is by far lower than the amount needed by fluorescence analysis.

  2. Hole-Impeded-Doping-Superlattice LWIR Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maserjian, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    Hole-Impeded-Doping-Superlattice (HIDS) InAs devices proposed for use as photoconductive or photovoltaic detectors of radiation in long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) range of 8 to 17 micrometers. Array of HIDS devices fabricated on substrates GaAs or Si. Radiation incident on black surface, metal contacts for picture elements serve as reactors, effectively doubling optical path and thereby increasing absorption of photons. Photoconductive detector offers advantages of high gain and high impedance; photovoltaic detector offers lower noise and better interface to multiplexer readouts.

  3. Analysis of bio-anode performance through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    ter Heijne, Annemiek; Schaetzle, Olivier; Gimenez, Sixto; Navarro, Lucia; Hamelers, Bert; Fabregat-Santiago, Francisco

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we studied the performance of bioanodes under different experimental conditions using polarization curves and impedance spectroscopy. We have identified that the large capacitances of up to 1 mF·cm(-2) for graphite anodes have their origin in the nature of the carbonaceous electrode, rather than the microbial culture. In some cases, the separate contributions of charge transfer and diffusion resistance were clearly visible, while in other cases their contribution was masked by the high capacitance of 1 mF·cm(-2). The impedance data were analyzed using the basic Randles model to analyze ohmic, charge transfer and diffusion resistances. Increasing buffer concentration from 0 to 50mM and increasing pH from 6 to 8 resulted in decreased charge transfer and diffusion resistances; lowest values being 144 Ω·cm(2) and 34 Ω·cm(2), respectively. At acetate concentrations below 1 mM, current generation was limited by acetate. We show a linear relationship between inverse charge transfer resistance at potentials close to open circuit and saturation (maximum) current, associated to the Butler-Volmer relationship that needs further exploration.

  4. Generation of optimum pseudorandom signals for respiratory impedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Daróczy, B; Hantos, Z

    1990-02-01

    Spontaneous breathing may impair the reliability of forced oscillatory impedance estimates at low frequencies, especially when the oscillatory power is distributed among many frequency values. Since the amplitude of the external forcing is limited to avoid non-linearities, it is suggested that the total energy of a composite electrical signal driving the loudspeaker be maximized at a given amplitude by finding the optimum phase relationships of the signal components, and that the low-frequency components increase in energy at the expense of the less disturbed high-frequency region. In healthy children and adults and in obstructed patients, the coherences and the coefficients of variation of the respiratory system impedance (Zrs) at 2 and 3 Hz were studied in the case of three test signals of 2-15 Hz bandwidth. Signals T1 and T2 had a flat power spectrum, whereas the components of T3 decreased sharply between 2 and 5 Hz; T1 was generated by simple random selection of phase angles, while optimization for maximum energy was done for T2 and T3. Optimization alone (T2) increased the reliability of the Zrs estimates at all frequencies, whereas enhancement of the low-frequency power (T3) resulted in a radical improvement of the estimates at 2 and 3 Hz, without loss in reliability at higher frequencies.

  5. Compressible turbulent channel flow with impedance boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalo, Carlo; Bodart, Julien; Lele, Sanjiva

    2014-11-01

    We have performed large-eddy simulations of compressible turbulent channel flow at one bulk Reynolds number, Reb = 6900, for bulk Mach numbers Mb = 0.05, 0.2, 0.5, with linear acoustic impedance boundary conditions (IBCs). The IBCs are formulated in the time domain following Fung and Ju (2004) and coupled with a Navier-Stokes solver. The impedance model adopted is a three-parameter Helmholtz oscillator with resonant frequency tuned to the outer layer eddies. The IBC's resistance, R, has been varied in the range, R = 0.01, 0.10, 1.00. Tuned IBCs result in a noticeable drag increase for sufficiently high Mb and/or low R, exceeding 300% for Mb = 0.5 and R = 0.01, and thus represents a promising passive control technique for delaying boundary layer separation and/or enhancing wall heat transfer. Alterations to the turbulent flow structure are confined to the first 15% of the boundary layer thickness where the classical buffer-layer coherent vortical structures are replaced by an array of Kelvin-Helmholtz-like rollers. The non-zero asymptotic value of the Reynolds shear stress gradient at the wall results in the disappearance of the viscous sublayer and very early departure of the mean velocity profiles from the law of the wall.

  6. System interaction with linear and nonlinear characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C.W. ); Tseng, W.S. )

    1991-01-01

    This book is covered under some of the following topics: seismic margins in piping systems, vibrational power flow in a cylindrical shell, inelastic pipework dynamics and aseismic design, an efficient method for dynamic analysis of a linearly elastic piping system with nonlinear supports.

  7. A piezoelectric six-DOF vibration energy harvester based on parallel mechanism: dynamic modeling, simulation, and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, G.; Wang, D. H.

    2017-03-01

    Multi-directional and multi-degree-of-freedom (multi-DOF) vibration energy harvesting are attracting more and more research interest in recent years. In this paper, the principle of a piezoelectric six-DOF vibration energy harvester based on parallel mechanism is proposed to convert the energy of the six-DOF vibration to single-DOF vibrations of the limbs on the energy harvester and output voltages. The dynamic model of the piezoelectric six-DOF vibration energy harvester is established to estimate the vibrations of the limbs. On this basis, a Stewart-type piezoelectric six-DOF vibration energy harvester is developed and explored. In order to validate the established dynamic model and the analysis results, the simulation model of the Stewart-type piezoelectric six-DOF vibration energy harvester is built and tested with different vibration excitations by SimMechanics, and some preliminary experiments are carried out. The results show that the vibration of the limbs on the piezoelectric six-DOF vibration energy harvester can be estimated by the established dynamic model. The developed Stewart-type piezoelectric six-DOF vibration energy harvester can harvest the energy of multi-directional linear vibration and multi-axis rotating vibration with resonance frequencies of 17 Hz, 25 Hz, and 47 Hz. Moreover, the resonance frequencies of the developed piezoelectric six-DOF vibration energy harvester are not affected by the direction changing of the vibration excitation.

  8. Vibration-free stirling cryocooler for high definition microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riabzev, S. V.; Veprik, A. M.; Vilenchik, H. S.; Pundak, N.; Castiel, E.

    2009-12-01

    The normal operation of high definition Scanning Electronic and Helium Ion microscope tools often relies on maintaining particular components at cryogenic temperatures. This has traditionally been accomplished by using liquid coolants such as liquid Nitrogen. This inherently limits the useful temperature range to above 77 K, produces various operational hazards and typically involves elevated ownership costs, inconvenient logistics and maintenance. Mechanical coolers, over-performing the above traditional method and capable of delivering required (even below 77 K) cooling to the above cooled components, have been well-known elsewhere for many years, but their typical drawbacks, such as high purchasing cost, cooler size, low reliability and high power consumption have so far prevented their wide-spreading. Additional critical drawback is inevitable degradation of imagery performance originated from the wideband vibration export as typical for the operation of the mechanical cooler incorporating numerous movable components. Recent advances in the development of reliable, compact, reasonably priced and dynamically quiet linear cryogenic coolers gave rise to so-called "dry cooling" technologies aimed at eventually replacing the traditional use of outdated liquid Nitrogen cooling facilities. Although much improved these newer cryogenic coolers still produce relatively high vibration export which makes them incompatible with modern high definition microscopy tools. This has motivated further research activity towards developing a vibration free closed-cycle mechanical cryocooler. The authors have successfully adapted the standard low vibration Stirling cryogenic refrigerator (Ricor model K535-LV) delivering 5 W@40 K heat lift for use in vibration-sensitive high definition microscopy. This has been achieved by using passive mechanical counterbalancing of the main portion of the low frequency vibration export in combination with an active feed-forward multi

  9. An impedance matching of femoral-popliteal arterial grafts: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, H; Nishimura, T; Fukuyama, Y

    1997-05-01

    We have proposed a mathematical method to investigate the matching conditions for an arterial graft in the femoral-popliteal region from a mechanical stand-point. Pulsatory blood flow, arterial wall motions, and conservation law are expressed by linear dynamical equations based on strict mechanical and constitutional considerations. To express the physiological blood flow in an actual arterial system, the tethering effects from the surrounding tissue and wall tensions were incorporated. The physiological parameters of arterial wall and tethering were utilized from reported experimental data. By complex analysis, mathematical expressions for the local impedance and reflection coefficient were obtained. They include not only blood properties such as viscosity and density, but also arterial properties including elastic modulus, radius, Poisson ratio, wall thickness, wall tension, frequency, and tethering effects from surrounding tissue. A matching condition was defined for minimizing the local impedance and reflection coefficient. The biophysical background was to reduce any mechanical mismatches, thus minimizing the disturbance of the flow velocity profile and shear stress distribution within the artery. Impedance matching in turn diminishes the negative factors for graft substitution represented by intimal hyperplasia and thrombosis. The calculated impedance and reflection coefficient inversed parabolically to functions of the resistance of the host artery, and there was one host arterial resistance that minimized the impedance and reflection coefficient. The present analysis revealed that for matching host artery with an elevated resistance, the dynamic elastic modulus of the wall of the graft that minimizes the impedance and reflection coefficient was increased. This indicates that for a host artery with a high resistance, an impedance matched stiff wall graft is preferable. For a large radius and a compliant host artery on the other hand, a large compliant graft

  10. Interdigitated microelectrode-based microchip for electrical impedance spectroscopic study of oral cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mamouni, Jaouad; Yang, Liju

    2011-12-01

    In this study, electric/electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry were used to study the cellular activities of oral cancer cell line CAL 27, including the kinetics of cell adhesion, spreading, and cell proliferation on interdigitated microelectrodes (IMEs). Impedance spectra of CAL 27 cells on IMEs electrodes were obtained in cell growth medium and in 0.1 M PBS with 50 mM [Fe(CN)₆]³⁻/⁴⁻ as redox probe. Equivalent circuits were used to model both cases. In cell growth medium, impedance spectra allowed us to analyze the changes in capacitance and resistance due to cell attachment on the IMEs over the entire experiment period. It was found that cell spreading caused the most significant decrease in capacitance component and slight increase in resistance component. Impedance change at given frequencies (between 10 kHz to 100 kHz) was found to be linearly increased with increasing cell number of CAL 27 on the IMEs. In comparison with non-cancer oral epithelial cells (Het-1A), at equal cell number, cancer cells always generated impedance several folds higher than that of non-cancer cells. In the presence of [Fe(CN)₆]³⁻/⁴⁻, impedance spectra allowed us to analyze the change in electron transfer resistance of IMEs due to cell attachment, in which an increase trend was observed at 24 h with increasing cell number from 2500 cells to 10,000 cells on IMEs. Double layer capacitance was also affected by cell attachment, and a decrease in double layer capacitance was observed with increasing cell number on the electrodes. Cyclic voltammetric measurements correlated well with the impedance results. The results of this study demonstrated the use of electrochemical approaches to obtain and understand cellular behaviors/activities of oral cancer cells, potentially providing useful tools for cancer cell research.

  11. Investigation of straightforward impedance eduction in the presence of shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Xiaodong; Peng, Sen; Wang, Lixun; Sun, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    A straightforward impedance eduction method is proposed which combines Prony's method with the Pridmore-Brown equation to obtain the impedance of acoustic liners in the presence of shear flow. Particular attention is paid to the reported inconsistency problems associated with the boundary layer effect in the development of impedance eduction techniques. A kind of flow-insensitive acoustic liner is considered which is placed in a rectangular flow duct containing predominant grazing incidence mode. Three slip or no-slip flow profiles are examined, which are the parabola, the one-seventh power law and the uniform core flow with linear boundary layer. A shear-flow FEM model is also set up to simulate the duct acoustic field. The present impedance eduction method has been tested and validated using both the simulated and the published measured data. It is shown that, despite of their distinct boundary layers, the selected flow profiles lead to essentially the same impedance results. And also, for the impedance eduction the strict consideration of no-slip shear flow is very consistent with the use of the Ingard-Myers' boundary condition with the uniform flow assumption over the test conditions. Although not susceptible to the exact shape of flow profile, the impedance eduction critically depends on the determination of the cross-sectional average Mach number. The usual practice of approximately representing the duct flow with the midspan profile results in a slight overestimation of the average Mach number in the two-dimensional acoustic models, and thus can considerably affect the accuracy of the impedance eduction. To solve this problem, the average flow profile is introduced to account for the actual three-dimensional flow non-uniformity in the rectangular duct. It is further found that the effective Mach number, corresponding to a slightly modified average flow profile, can be used to achieve a considerable collapse of the impedance spectra educed at different Mach

  12. Vibration Analysis and the Accelerometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammer, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Have you ever put your hand on an electric motor or motor-driven electric appliance and felt it vibrate? Ever wonder why it vibrates? What is there about the operation of the motor, or the object to which it is attached, that causes the vibrations? Is there anything "regular" about the vibrations, or are they the result of random causes? In this…

  13. Vibration analysis of rotor blades with pendulum absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, V. R.; Hammond, C. E.

    1979-01-01

    A comprehensive vibration analysis of rotor blades with spherical pendulum absorbers is presented. Linearized equations of motion for small oscillations about the steady-state deflection of a spherical pendulum on elastic rotor blades undergoing coupled flapwise bending, chordwise bending, and torsional vibrations are obtained. A transmission matrix formulation is given to determine the natural vibrational characteristics of rotor blades with spherical or simple flapping pendulum absorbers. The natural frequencies and mode shapes of a hingeless rotor blade with a spherical pendulum are computed.

  14. Identification of the nonlinear vibration system of power transformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Zheng; Hai, Huang; Pan, Jie; Yanni, Zhang

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on the identification of the nonlinear vibration system of power transformers. A Hammerstein model is used to identify the system with electrical inputs and the vibration of the transformer tank as the output. The nonlinear property of the system is modelled using a Fourier neural network consisting of a nonlinear element and a linear dynamic block. The order and weights of the network are determined based on the Lipschitz criterion and the back-propagation algorithm. This system identification method is tested on several power transformers. Promising results for predicting the transformer vibration and extracting system parameters are presented and discussed.

  15. Method and apparatus for minimizing multiple degree of freedom vibration transmission between two regions of a structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silcox, Richard J. (Inventor); Fuller, Chris R. (Inventor); Gibbs, Gary P. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Arrays of actuators are affixed to structural elements to impede the transmission of vibrational energy. A single pair is used to provide control of bending and extensional waves and two pairs are used to control torsional motion. The arrays are applied to a wide variety of structural elements such as a beam structure that is part of a larger framework that may or may not support a rigid or non-rigid skin. Electrical excitation is applied to the actuators that generate forces on the structure. These electrical inputs may be adjusted in their amplitude and phase by a controller in communication with appropriate vibrational wave sensors to impede the flow of vibrational power in all of the above mentioned wave forms beyond the actuator location. Additional sensor elements can be used to monitor the performance and adjust the electrical inputs to maximize the attenuation of vibrational energy.

  16. Attenuation of cryocooler induced vibration in spaceborne infrared payloads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veprik, A.; Twitto, A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advancement of operational responsive space programs calls for a development of compact, reliable, low power and vibration free cryogenic cooling for sophisticated infrared payloads. The refrigeration in a typical closed cycle split Stirling linear cryocooler is achieved by a cyclic compression and expansion of a gaseous working agent due to a synchronized reciprocation of electro-dynamically and pneumatically actuated compressor and expander pistons. Attenuation of the cryocooler induced vibration usually relies on the concept of actively assisted momentum cancellation. In a typical dual-piston compressor this objective is achieved by actively synchronizing the motion of oppositely moving piston assemblies; a typical single-piston expander may be counterbalanced by a motorized counter-balancer. The above approach produces complexity, weight, size, high incurred costs and affects reliability. The authors analyze the case of passive attenuation the vibration export induced by the split Stirling linear cryocooler comprised of inline mounted single-piston compressor and expander. Placement of all the moving components onto a common axis results in a single axis consolidation of vibration export and enables use of single tuned dynamic absorber and low frequency vibration mount. From theoretical analysis and full-scale testing, the performance of such vibration protection arrangement is similar to known systems of active vibration cancellation.

  17. A Study of Impedance Relationships in Dual Frequency PECVD Process Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keil, Douglas; Augustyniak, Edward; Sakiyama, Yukinori; Pecvd/Ald Team

    2016-09-01

    Commercial plasma process reactors are commonly operated with a very limited suite of on-board plasma diagnostics. However, as process demands advance so has the need for detailed plasma monitoring and diagnosis. The VI probe is one of the few instruments commonly available for this task. We present a study of voltage, current, impedance and phase trends acquired by off-the-shelf VI probes in Dual Frequency (DF) 400 kHz/13.56MHz capacitively-coupled plasma (CCP) as typically used for Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD). These plasmas typically operate at pressures from 1 to 5 Torr and at RF power levels of 3 W/cm2. Interpretation of DF VI probe impedance trends is challenging. Non-linear interactions are known to exist in plasma impedance scaling with low and high frequency RF power. Simple capacitive sheath models typically do not simultaneously reproduce the impedance observed at each drive frequency. This work will compare VI probe observed DF CCP impedance tends with plasma fluid simulation. Also explored is the agreement seen with sheath models presently available in the literature. Prospects for the creation of useful equivalent circuit models is also discussed.

  18. Digital microfluidics with impedance sensing for integrated cell culture and analysis.

    PubMed

    Shih, Steve C C; Barbulovic-Nad, Irena; Yang, Xuning; Fobel, Ryan; Wheeler, Aaron R

    2013-04-15

    We report the first digital microfluidic (DMF) system capable of impedance sensing of mammalian cells. The new system was validated in three assays: calibration, proliferation, and serum sensing. In the first assay, three cell lines (HeLa, CHO-K1, and NIH-3T3) were seeded at different densities to determine the relationship between impedance and cell number, which was found to be linear for each type of cell. In the proliferation assay, cells were grown for four days and their proliferation rates were determined by regular impedance measurements. In the serum sensing assay, a dilution series of cell media containing different concentrations of serum was evaluated using impedance measurements to determine the optimum conditions for proliferation. The DMF impedance system is label-free, does not require imaging, and is compatible with long-term cell culture. We propose that this system will be useful for the growing number of scientists who are seeking methods other than fluorescence or cell sorting to analyze adherent cells in situ.

  19. Perceptual Space of Superimposed Dual-Frequency Vibrations in the Hands

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jeongil; Choi, Seungmoon

    2017-01-01

    The use of distinguishable complex vibrations that have multiple spectral components can improve the transfer of information by vibrotactile interfaces. We investigated the qualitative characteristics of dual-frequency vibrations as the simplest complex vibrations compared to single-frequency vibrations. Two psychophysical experiments were conducted to elucidate the perceptual characteristics of these vibrations by measuring the perceptual distances among single-frequency and dual-frequency vibrations. The perceptual distances of dual-frequency vibrations between their two frequency components along their relative intensity ratio were measured in Experiment I. The estimated perceptual spaces for three frequency conditions showed non-linear perceptual differences between the dual-frequency and single-frequency vibrations. A perceptual space was estimated from the measured perceptual distances among ten dual-frequency compositions and five single-frequency vibrations in Experiment II. The effect of the component frequency and the frequency ratio was revealed in the perceptual space. In a percept of dual-frequency vibration, the lower frequency component showed a dominant effect. Additionally, the perceptual difference among single-frequency and dual-frequency vibrations were increased with a low relative difference between two frequencies of a dual-frequency vibration. These results are expected to provide a fundamental understanding about the perception of complex vibrations to enrich the transfer of information using vibrotactile stimuli. PMID:28081187

  20. PREFACE: Vibrations at surfaces Vibrations at surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Talat S.

    2011-12-01

    This special issue is dedicated to the phenomenon of vibrations at surfaces—a topic that was indispensible a couple of decades ago, since it was one of the few phenomena capable of revealing the nature of binding at solid surfaces. For clean surfaces, the frequencies of modes with characteristic displacement patterns revealed how surface geometry, as well as the nature of binding between atoms in the surface layers, could be different from that in the bulk solid. Dispersion of the surface phonons provided further measures of interatomic interactions. For chemisorbed molecules on surfaces, frequencies and dispersion of the vibrational modes were also critical for determining adsorption sites. In other words, vibrations at surfaces served as a reliable means of extracting information about surface structure, chemisorption and overlayer formation. Experimental techniques, such as electron energy loss spectroscopy and helium-atom-surface scattering, coupled with infra-red spectroscopy, were continually refined and their resolutions enhanced to capture subtleties in the dynamics of atoms and molecules at surfaces. Theoretical methods, whether based on empirical and semi-empirical interatomic potential or on ab initio electronic structure calculations, helped decipher experimental observations and provide deeper insights into the nature of the bond between atoms and molecules in regions of reduced symmetry, as encountered on solid surfaces. Vibrations at surfaces were thus an integral part of the set of phenomena that characterized surface science. Dedicated workshops and conferences were held to explore the variety of interesting and puzzling features revealed in experimental and theoretical investigations of surface vibrational modes and their dispersion. One such conference, Vibrations at Surfaces, first organized by Harald Ibach in Juelich in 1980, continues to this day. The 13th International Conference on Vibrations at Surfaces was held at the University of

  1. NIF Ambient Vibration Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, C.R.; Hoehler, M.S., S.C. Sommer

    1999-11-29

    LLNL has an ongoing research and development project that includes developing data acquisition systems with remote wireless communication for monitoring the vibrations of large civil engineering structures. In order to establish the capability of performing remote sensing over an extended period of time, the researchers needed to apply this technology to a real structure. The construction of the National Ignition Facility provided an opportunity to test the data acquisition system on a large structure to monitor whether the facility is remaining within the strict ambient vibration guidelines. This document will briefly discuss the NIF ambient vibration requirements and summarize the vibration measurements performed during the Spring and Summer of 1999. In addition, a brief description of the sensors and the data acquisition systems will be provided in Appendix B.

  2. Crosstalk Compensation for a Rapid, Higher Resolution Impedance Spectrum Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Jon P. Christophersen; John L. Morrison; David M. Rose; William H. Morrison; Chester G. Motloch

    2012-03-01

    impedance at each frequency of interest can be calculated using simple linear algebra based on the error matrix and measured response from the energy storage device given the excitation signal. Analytical validation of CTC over a frequency range between 2000 and 0.1 Hz (i.e., a ten-second input signal duration) was performed using a standardized battery lumped parameter model. The results indicated that the CTC was able to successfully resolve more than 45 frequencies within a sum-of-sines excitation signal, whereas previous techniques could only resolve up to 15 frequencies. A simplified derivation of the CTC technique and its corresponding analytical validation studies using the lumped-parameter model will be presented.

  3. Experimental Analysis of a Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting System for Harmonic, Random, and Sine on Random Vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Cryns, Jackson W.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Santiago-Rojas, Emiliano; Silvers, Kurt L.

    2013-07-01

    Formal journal article Experimental analysis of a piezoelectric energy harvesting system for harmonic, random, and sine on random vibration Abstract: Harvesting power with a piezoelectric vibration powered generator using a full-wave rectifier conditioning circuit is experimentally compared for varying sinusoidal, random and sine on random (SOR) input vibration scenarios. Additionally, the implications of source vibration characteristics on harvester design are discussed. Studies in vibration harvesting have yielded numerous alternatives for harvesting electrical energy from vibrations but piezoceramics arose as the most compact, energy dense means of energy transduction. The rise in popularity of harvesting energy from ambient vibrations has made piezoelectric generators commercially available. Much of the available literature focuses on maximizing harvested power through nonlinear processing circuits that require accurate knowledge of generator internal mechanical and electrical characteristics and idealization of the input vibration source, which cannot be assumed in general application. In this manuscript, variations in source vibration and load resistance are explored for a commercially available piezoelectric generator. We characterize the source vibration by its acceleration response for repeatability and transcription to general application. The results agree with numerical and theoretical predictions for in previous literature that load optimal resistance varies with transducer natural frequency and source type, and the findings demonstrate that significant gains are seen with lower tuned transducer natural frequencies for similar source amplitudes. Going beyond idealized steady state sinusoidal and simplified random vibration input, SOR testing allows for more accurate representation of real world ambient vibration. It is shown that characteristic interactions from more complex vibrational sources significantly alter power generation and power processing

  4. [Image reconstruction in electrical impedance tomography based on genetic algorithm].

    PubMed

    Hou, Weidong; Mo, Yulong

    2003-03-01

    Image reconstruction in electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a highly ill-posed, non-linear inverse problem. The modified Newton-Raphson (MNR) iteration algorithm is deduced from the strictest theoretic analysis. It is an optimization algorithm based on minimizing the object function. The MNR algorithm with regularization technique is usually not stable, due to the serious image reconstruction model error and measurement noise. So the reconstruction precision is not high when used in static EIT. A new static image reconstruction method for EIT based on genetic algorithm (GA-EIT) is proposed in this paper. The experimental results indicate that the performance (including stability, the precision and space resolution in reconstructing the static EIT image) of the GA-EIT algorithm is better than that of the MNR algorithm.

  5. Sensitivity of PZT Impedance Sensors for Damage Detection of Concrete Structures

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yaowen; Hu, Yuhang; Lu, Yong

    2008-01-01

    Piezoelectric ceramic Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) based electro-mechanical impedance (EMI) technique for structural health monitoring (SHM) has been successfully applied to various engineering systems. However, fundamental research work on the sensitivity of the PZT impedance sensors for damage detection is still in need. In the traditional EMI method, the PZT electro-mechanical (EM) admittance (inverse of the impedance) is used as damage indicator, which is difficult to specify the effect of damage on structural properties. This paper uses the structural mechanical impedance (SMI) extracted from the PZT EM admittance signature as the damage indicator. A comparison study on the sensitivity of the EM admittance and the structural mechanical impedance to the damages in a concrete structure is conducted. Results show that the SMI is more sensitive to the damage than the EM admittance thus a better indicator for damage detection. Furthermore, this paper proposes a dynamic system consisting of a number of single-degree-of-freedom elements with mass, spring and damper components to model the SMI. A genetic algorithm is employed to search for the optimal value of the unknown parameters in the dynamic system. An experiment is carried out on a two-storey concrete frame subjected to base vibrations that simulate earthquake. A number of PZT sensors are regularly arrayed and bonded to the frame structure to acquire PZT EM admittance signatures. The relationship between the damage index and the distance of the PZT sensor from the damage is studied. Consequently, the sensitivity of the PZT sensors is discussed and their sensing region in concrete is derived. PMID:27879711

  6. 2008 Vibrational Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Philip J. Reid

    2009-09-21

    The conference focuses on using vibrational spectroscopy to probe structure and dynamics of molecules in gases, liquids, and interfaces. The goal is to bring together a collection of researchers who share common interests and who will gain from discussing work at the forefront of several connected areas. The intent is to emphasize the insights and understanding that studies of vibrations provide about a variety of systems.

  7. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Colgate, S.A.

    1958-05-27

    An improvement is presented in linear accelerators for charged particles with respect to the stable focusing of the particle beam. The improvement consists of providing a radial electric field transverse to the accelerating electric fields and angularly introducing the beam of particles in the field. The results of the foregoing is to achieve a beam which spirals about the axis of the acceleration path. The combination of the electric fields and angular motion of the particles cooperate to provide a stable and focused particle beam.

  8. Electrical Impedance Tomography Technology (EITT) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J.

    2014-01-01

    Development of a portable, lightweight device providing two-dimensional tomographic imaging of the human body using impedance mapping. This technology can be developed to evaluate health risks and provide appropriate medical care on the ISS, during space travel and on the ground.

  9. High Impedance Comparator for Monitoring Water Resistivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holewinski, Paul K.

    1984-01-01

    A high-impedance comparator suitable for monitoring the resistivity of a deionized or distilled water line supplying water in the 50 Kohm/cm-2 Mohm/cm range is described. Includes information on required circuits (with diagrams), sensor probe assembly, and calibration techniques. (JN)

  10. Impedance-matched drilling telemetry system

    DOEpatents

    Normann, Randy A.; Mansure, Arthur J.

    2008-04-22

    A downhole telemetry system that uses inductance or capacitance as a mode through which signal is communicated across joints between assembled lengths of pipe wherein efficiency of signal propagation through a drill string, for example, over multiple successive pipe segments is enhanced through matching impedances associated with the various telemetry system components.

  11. Impedance matching between ventricle and load.

    PubMed

    Piene, H

    1984-01-01

    Impedance matching in the cardiovascular system is discussed in light of two models of ventricle and load: a Thevenin equivalent consisting of a hydromotive pressure source and an internal, source resistance and compliance in parallel; and a time-varying compliance filled from a constant pressure source and ejecting into a load of three components, a central resistor, a compliance, and a peripheral resistance. According to the Thevenin analog, the energy source and the load are matched when the load resistance is T/t times the internal source resistance (T is total cycle length, t is systolic time interval). Both from this model and from the variable compliance model it appears that optimum matching between source and load depends on the compliance of the Windkessel, as low compliance shifts the matching load resistance to a low value. Animal experiments (isolated cat hearts) indicated that both left and right ventricles at normal loads work close to their maxima of output hydraulic power, and, according to experiments in the right ventricle, maximum power output is related to load resistance and compliance as predicted by the above models. From an experimentally determined relationship among instantaneous ventricular pressure and volume (right ventricle of isolated cat hearts), an optimum load impedance was calculated on the basis of the assumption that the ratio between stroke work and static, potential energy developed in the ventricular cavity is maximum. The optimum load impedance found by this procedure closely resembles the normal input impedance of the cat lung vessel bed.

  12. Bioelectrical Impedance and Body Composition Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martino, Mike

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses field tests that can be used in physical education programs. The most common field tests are anthropometric measurements, which include body mass index (BMI), girth measurements, and skinfold testing. Another field test that is gaining popularity is bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA). Each method has particular strengths…

  13. Electrical impedance spectroscopy and diagnosis of tendinitis.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Kisung; Lee, Kyeong Woo; Kim, Sang Beom; Han, Tai Ryoon; Jung, Dong Keun; Roh, Mee Sook; Lee, Jong Hwa

    2010-02-01

    There have been a number of studies that investigate the usefulness of bioelectric signals in diagnoses and treatment in the medical field. Tendinitis is a musculoskeletal disorder with a very high rate of occurrence. This study attempts to examine whether electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) can detect pathological changes in a tendon and find the exact location of the lesion. Experimental tendinitis was induced by injecting collagenase into one side of the patellar tendons in rabbits, while the other side was used as the control. After measuring the impedance in the tendinitis and intact tendon tissue, the dissipation factor was computed. The real component of impedance and the dissipation factor turned out to be lower in tendinitis than in intact tissues. Moreover, the tendinitis dissipation factor spectrum showed a clear difference from that of the intact tendon, indicating its usefulness as a tool for detecting the location of the lesion. Pathologic findings from the tissues that were obtained after measuring the impedance confirmed the presence of characteristics of tendinitis. In conclusion, EIS is a useful method for diagnosing tendinitis and detecting the lesion location in invasive treatment.

  14. Explicit expressions of impedances and wake functions

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; Bane, K,; /SLAC

    2010-10-01

    Sections 3.2.4 and 3.2.5 of the Handbook of Accelerator Physics and Engineering on Landau damping are combined and updated. The new addition includes impedances and wakes for multi-layer beam pipe, optical model, diffraction model, and cross-sectional transition.

  15. Explicit Expressions of Impedances and Wake Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; Bane, K,; /SLAC

    2012-06-11

    Sections 3.2.4 and 3.2.5 of the Handbook of Accelerator Physics and Engineering on Landau damping are combined and updated. The new addition includes impedances and wakes for multi-layer beam pipe, optical model, diffraction model, and cross-sectional transition.

  16. Landau damping with high frequency impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz,M.

    2009-05-04

    Coupled bunch longitudinal stability in the presence of high frequency impedances is considered. A frequency domain technique is developed and compared with simulations. The frequency domain technique allows for absolute stability tests and is applied to the problem of longitudinal stability in RHIC with the new 56 MHz RF system.

  17. Imaging photorefractive optical vibration measurement method and device

    DOEpatents

    Telschow, Kenneth L.; Deason, Vance A.; Hale, Thomas C.

    2000-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for characterizing a vibrating image of an object of interest. The method includes providing a sensing media having a detection resolution within a limited bandwidth and providing an object of interest having a vibrating medium. Two or more wavefronts are provided, with at least one of the wavefronts being modulated by interacting the one wavefront with the vibrating medium of the object of interest. The another wavefront is modulated such that the difference frequency between the one wavefront and the another wavefront is within a response range of the sensing media. The modulated one wavefront and another wavefront are combined in association with the sensing media to interfere and produce simultaneous vibration measurements that are distributed over the object so as to provide an image of the vibrating medium. The image has an output intensity that is substantially linear with small physical variations within the vibrating medium. Furthermore, the method includes detecting the image. In one implementation, the apparatus comprises a vibration spectrum analyzer having an emitter, a modulator, sensing media and a detector configured so as to realize such method. According to another implementation, the apparatus comprises a vibration imaging device.

  18. Linear Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03667 Linear Clouds

    These clouds are located near the edge of the south polar region. The cloud tops are the puffy white features in the bottom half of the image.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -80.1N, Longitude 52.1E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  19. Linear Rogowski coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassisi, V.; Delle Side, D.

    2017-02-01

    Nowadays, the employment and development of fast current pulses require sophisticated systems to perform measurements. Rogowski coils are used to diagnose cylindrical shaped beams; therefore, they are designed and built with a toroidal structure. Recently, to perform experiments of radiofrequency biophysical stresses, flat transmission lines have been developed. Therefore, in this work we developed a linear Rogowski coil to detect current pulses inside flat conductors. The system is first approached by means of transmission line theory. We found that, if the pulse width to be diagnosed is comparable with the propagation time of the signal in the detector, it is necessary to impose a uniform current as input pulse, or to use short coils. We further analysed the effect of the resistance of the coil and the influence of its magnetic properties. As a result, the device we developed is able to record pulses lasting for some hundreds of nanoseconds, depending on the inductance, load impedance, and resistance of the coil. Furthermore, its response is characterized by a sub-nanosecond rise time (˜100 ps). The attenuation coefficient depends mainly on the turn number of the coil, while the fidelity of the response depends both on the magnetic core characteristics and on the current distribution along the plane conductors.

  20. Linear Rogowski coil.

    PubMed

    Nassisi, V; Delle Side, D

    2017-02-01

    Nowadays, the employment and development of fast current pulses require sophisticated systems to perform measurements. Rogowski coils are used to diagnose cylindrical shaped beams; therefore, they are designed and built with a toroidal structure. Recently, to perform experiments of radiofrequency biophysical stresses, flat transmission lines have been developed. Therefore, in this work we developed a linear Rogowski coil to detect current pulses inside flat conductors. The system is first approached by means of transmission line theory. We found that, if the pulse width to be diagnosed is comparable with the propagation time of the signal in the detector, it is necessary to impose a uniform current as input pulse, or to use short coils. We further analysed the effect of the resistance of the coil and the influence of its magnetic properties. As a result, the device we developed is able to record pulses lasting for some hundreds of nanoseconds, depending on the inductance, load impedance, and resistance of the coil. Furthermore, its response is characterized by a sub-nanosecond rise time (∼100 ps). The attenuation coefficient depends mainly on the turn number of the coil, while the fidelity of the response depends both on the magnetic core characteristics and on the current distribution along the plane conductors.

  1. Effects of vibrations and shocks on lithium-ion cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Martin J.; Schuster, Simon F.; Bach, Tobias; Fleder, Elena; Stelz, Manfred; Gläser, Simon; Müller, Jana; Sextl, Gerhard; Jossen, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    Lithium-ion batteries are increasingly used in mobile applications where mechanical vibrations and shocks are a constant companion. This work shows how these mechanical loads affect lithium-ion cells. Therefore pouch and cylindrical cells are stressed with vibrational and shock profiles according to the UN 38.3 standard. Additionally, a vibration test is set up to reflect stress in real-world applications and is carried out for 186 days. The effects of the load profiles on the tested cells are investigated by capacity measurement, impedance spectroscopy, micro-X-ray computed tomography and post mortem analyses. The mechanical stress has no effect on the investigated pouch cells. Although all tested cylindrical cells would pass the standard tests, in certain cells stressed in a vertical position the mandrel dispatched itself and struck against internal components. This caused bruised active materials, short circuits, a damaged current collector and current interrupt device. The investigations are not directly transferrable to all pouch or cylindrical cells but show that the mechanical cell design, especially the fixation of the internal components, determines whether a cell withstands vibrations and shocks. Depending on the cell design and the loading direction, long-term vibrational loads can have additional detrimental effects on lithium-ion cells compared to standard tests.

  2. Aortic Input Impedance during Nitroprusside Infusion

    PubMed Central

    Pepine, Carl J.; Nichols, W. W.; Curry, R. C.; Conti, C. Richard

    1979-01-01

    Beneficial effects of nitroprusside infusion in heart failure are purportedly a result of decreased afterload through “impedance” reduction. To study the effect of nitroprusside on vascular factors that determine the total load opposing left ventricular ejection, the total aortic input impedance spectrum was examined in 12 patients with heart failure (cardiac index <2.0 liters/min per m2 and left ventricular end diastolic pressure >20 mm Hg). This input impedance spectrum expresses both mean flow (resistance) and pulsatile flow (compliance and wave reflections) components of vascular load. Aortic root blood flow velocity and pressure were recorded continuously with a catheter-tip electromagnetic velocity probe in addition to left ventricular pressure. Small doses of nitroprusside (9-19 μg/min) altered the total aortic input impedance spectrum as significant (P < 0.05) reductions in both mean and pulsatile components were observed within 60-90 s. With these acute changes in vascular load, left ventricular end diastolic pressure declined (44%) and stroke volume increased (20%, both P < 0.05). Larger nitroprusside doses (20-38 μg/min) caused additional alteration in the aortic input impedance spectrum with further reduction in left ventricular end diastolic pressure and increase in stroke volume but no additional changes in the impedance spectrum or stroke volume occurred with 39-77 μg/min. Improved ventricular function persisted when aortic pressure was restored to control values with simultaneous phenylephrine infusion in three patients. These data indicate that nitroprusside acutely alters both the mean and pulsatile components of vascular load to effect improvement in ventricular function in patients with heart failure. The evidence presented suggests that it may be possible to reduce vascular load and improve ventricular function independent of aortic pressure reduction. PMID:457874

  3. Multivariate Analysis of Ladle Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yenus, Jaefer; Brooks, Geoffrey; Dunn, Michelle

    2016-08-01

    The homogeneity of composition and uniformity of temperature of the steel melt before it is transferred to the tundish are crucial in making high-quality steel product. The homogenization process is performed by stirring the melt using inert gas in ladles. Continuous monitoring of this process is important to make sure the action of stirring is constant throughout the ladle. Currently, the stirring process is monitored by process operators who largely rely on visual and acoustic phenomena from the ladle. However, due to lack of measurable signals, the accuracy and suitability of this manual monitoring are problematic. The actual flow of argon gas to the ladle may not be same as the flow gage reading due to leakage along the gas line components. As a result, the actual degree of stirring may not be correctly known. Various researchers have used one-dimensional vibration, and sound and image signals measured from the ladle to predict the degree of stirring inside. They developed online sensors which are indeed to monitor the online stirring phenomena. In this investigation, triaxial vibration signals have been measured from a cold water model which is a model of an industrial ladle. Three flow rate ranges and varying bath heights were used to collect vibration signals. The Fast Fourier Transform was applied to the dataset before it has been analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares (PLS). PCA was used to unveil the structure in the experimental data. PLS was mainly applied to predict the stirring from the vibration response. It was found that for each flow rate range considered in this study, the informative signals reside in different frequency ranges. The first latent variables in these frequency ranges explain more than 95 pct of the variation in the stirring process for the entire single layer and the double layer data collected from the cold model. PLS analysis in these identified frequency ranges demonstrated that the latent

  4. VIBRATIONALLY EXCITED C{sub 4}H

    SciTech Connect

    Cooksy, Andrew L.; Gottlieb, C. A.; Thaddeus, P.; Patel, Nimesh A.; Young, Ken H.; McCarthy, M. C.; Killian, T. C.

    2015-02-01

    Rotational spectra in four new excited vibrational levels of the linear carbon chain radical C{sub 4}H were observed in the millimeter band between 69 and 364 GHz in a low pressure glow discharge, and two of these were observed in a supersonic molecular beam between 19 and 38 GHz. All have rotational constants within 0.4% of the X{sup 2}Σ{sup +} ground vibrational state of C{sub 4}H and were assigned to new bending vibrational levels, two each with {sup 2}Σ and {sup 2}Π vibrational symmetry. The new levels are tentatively assigned to the 1ν{sub 6} and 1ν{sub 5} bending vibrational modes (both with {sup 2}Π symmetry), and the 1ν{sub 6}+1ν{sub 7} and 1ν{sub 5}+1ν{sub 6} combination levels ({sup 2}Σ symmetry) on the basis of the derived spectroscopic constants, relative intensities in our discharge source, and published laser spectroscopic and quantum calculations. Prior spectroscopic constants in the 1ν{sub 7} and 2ν{sub 7} levels were refined. Also presented are interferometric maps of the ground state and the 1ν{sub 7} level obtained with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) near 257 GHz which show that C{sub 4}H is present near the central star in IRC+10216. We found no evidence with the SMA for the new vibrationally excited levels of C{sub 4}H at a peak flux density averaged over a 3{sup ′′} synthesized beam of ⩾0.15 Jy/beam in the 294–296 and 304–306 GHz range, but it is anticipated that rotational lines in the new levels might be observed in IRC+10216 when ALMA attains its full design capability.

  5. Response of the seated human body to whole-body vertical vibration: discomfort caused by sinusoidal vibration.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhen; Griffin, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Frequency weightings for predicting vibration discomfort assume the same frequency-dependence at all magnitudes of vibration, whereas biodynamic studies show that the frequency-dependence of the human body depends on the magnitude of vibration. This study investigated how the frequency-dependence of vibration discomfort depends on the acceleration and the force at the subject-seat interface. Using magnitude estimation, 20 males and 20 females judged their discomfort caused by sinusoidal vertical acceleration at 13 frequencies (1-16 Hz) at magnitudes from 0.1 to 4.0 ms(-2) r.m.s. The frequency-dependence of their equivalent comfort contours depended on the magnitude of vibration, but was less dependent on the magnitude of dynamic force than the magnitude of acceleration, consistent with the biodynamic non-linearity of the body causing some of the magnitude-dependence of equivalent comfort contours. There were significant associations between the biodynamic responses and subjective responses at all frequencies in the range 1-16 Hz. Practitioner Summary: Vertical seat vibration causes discomfort in many forms of transport. This study provides the frequency-dependence of vibration discomfort over a range of vibration magnitudes and shows how the frequency weightings in the current standards can be improved.

  6. Intravascular electric impedance spectroscopy of atherosclerotic lesions using a new impedance catheter system.

    PubMed

    Süselbeck, T; Thielecke, H; Köchlin, J; Cho, S; Weinschenk, I; Metz, J; Borggrefe, M; Haase, K K

    2005-09-01

    Newer techniques are required to identify atherosclerotic lesions that are prone to rupture. Electric impedance spectroscopy (EIS) can characterize biological tissues by measuring the electrical impedance over a frequency range. We tested a newly designed intravascular impedance catheter (IC) by measuring the impedance of different stages of atherosclerosis induced in an animal rabbit model. Six female New Zealand White rabbits were fed for 17 weeks with a 5% cholesterol-enriched diet to induce early forms of atherosclerotic plaques. All aortas were prepared from the aortic arch to the renal arteries and segments of 5-10 mm were marked by ink spots. A balloon catheter system with an integrated polyimide-based microelectrode structure was introduced into the aorta and the impedance was measured at each spot by using an impedance analyzer. The impedance was measured at frequencies of 1 kHz and 10 kHz and compared with the corresponding histomorphometric data of each aortic segment.Forty-four aortic segments without plaques and 48 segments with evolving atherosclerotic lesions could be exactly matched by the histomorphometric analysis. In normal aortic segments (P0) the change of the magnitude of impedance at 1 kHz and at 10 kHz (|Z|(1 kHz) - |Z|(10 kHz), = ICF) was 208.5 +/- 357.6 Omega. In the area of aortic segments with a plaque smaller than that of the aortic wall diameter (PI), the ICF was 137.7 +/- 192.8 Omega. (P 0 vs. P I; p = 0.52), whereas in aortic segments with plaque formations larger than the aortic wall (PII) the ICF was significantly lower -22.2 +/- 259.9 Omega. (P0 vs. PII; p = 0.002). Intravascular EIS could be successfully performed by using a newly designed microelectrode integrated onto a conventional coronary balloon catheter. In this experimental animal model atherosclerotic aortic lesions showed significantly higher ICF in comparison to the normal aortic tissue.

  7. Free torsional vibrations of tapered cantilever I-beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, C. Kameswara; Mirza, S.

    1988-08-01

    Torsional vibration characteristics of linearly tapered cantilever I-beams have been studied by using the Galerkin finite element method. A third degree polynomial is assumed for the angle of twist. The analysis presented is valid for long beams and includes the effect of warping. The individual as well as combined effects of linear tapers in the width of the flanges and the depth of the web on the torsional vibration of cantilever I-beams are investigated. Numerical results generated for various values of taper ratios are presented in graphical form.

  8. Vibration control via stiffness switching of magnetostrictive transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheidler, Justin J.; Asnani, Vivake M.; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a computational study is presented of structural vibration control that is realized by switching a magneto-strictive transducer between high and low stiffness states. Switching is accomplished by either changing the applied magnetic field with a voltage excitation or changing the shunt impedance on the transducer's coil (i.e., the magneto-strictive material's magnetic boundary condition). Switched-stiffness vibration control is simulated using a lumped mass supported by a damper and the magneto-strictive transducer (mount), which is represented by a nonlinear, electromechanical model. Free vibration of the mass is calculated while varying the mount's stiffness according to a reference switched-stiffness vibration control law. The results reveal that switching the magnetic field produces the desired change in stiffness, but also an undesired actuation force that can significantly degrade the vibration control. Hence, a modified switched-stiffness control law that accounts for the actuation force is proposed and implemented for voltage-controlled stiffness switching. The influence of the magneto-mechanical bias condition is also discussed. Voltage-controlled stiffness switching is found to introduce damping equivalent to a viscous damping factor up to about 0.13; this is shown to primarily result from active vibration reduction caused by the actuation force. The merit of magneto-strictive switched-stiffness vibration control is then quantified by comparing the results of voltage- and shunt-controlled stiffness switching to the performance of optimal magneto-strictive shunt damping. For the cases considered, optimal resistive shunt damping performed considerably better than both voltage- and shunt-controlled stiffness switching.

  9. Vibration Control via Stiffness Switching of Magnetostrictive Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheidler, Justin J.; Asnani, Vivake M.; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a computational study is presented of structural vibration control that is realized by switching a magnetostrictive transducer between high and low stiffness states. Switching is accomplished by either changing the applied magnetic field with a voltage excitation or changing the shunt impedance on the transducer's coil (i.e., the magnetostrictive material's magnetic boundary condition). Switched-stiffness vibration control is simulated using a lumped mass supported by a damper and the magnetostrictive transducer (mount), which is represented by a nonlinear, electromechanical model. Free vibration of the mass is calculated while varying the mount's stiffness according to a reference switched-stiffness vibration control law. The results reveal that switching the magnetic field produces the desired change in stiffness, but also an undesired actuation force that can significantly degrade the vibration control. Hence, a modified switched-stiffness control law that accounts for the actuation force is proposed and implemented for voltage-controlled stiffness switching. The influence of the magneto-mechanical bias condition is also discussed. Voltage-controlled stiffness switching is found to introduce damping equivalent to a viscous damping factor up to about 0.13; this is shown to primarily result from active vibration reduction caused by the actuation force. The merit of magnetostrictive switched-stiffness vibration control is then quantified by comparing the results of voltage- and shunt-controlled stiffness switching to the performance of optimal magnetostrictive shunt damping. For the cases considered, optimal resistive shunt damping performed considerably better than both voltage- and shunt-controlled stiffness switching.

  10. Concentric artificial impedance surface for directional sound beamforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Kyungjun; Anzan-Uz-Zaman, Md.; Kwak, Jun-Hyuk; Jung, Joo-Yun; Kim, Jedo; Hur, Shin

    2017-03-01

    Utilizing acoustic metasurfaces consisting of subwavelength resonant textures, we design an artificial impedance surface by creating a new boundary condition. We demonstrate a circular artificial impedance surface with surface impedance modulation for directional sound beamforming in three-dimensional space. This artificial impedance surface is implemented by revolving two-dimensional Helmholtz resonators with varying internal coiled path. Physically, the textured surface has inductive surface impedance on its inner circular patterns and capacitive surface impedance on its outer circular patterns. Directional receive beamforming can be achieved using an omnidirectional microphone located at the focal point formed by the gradient-impeding surface. In addition, the uniaxial surface impedance patterning inside the circular aperture can be used for steering the direction of the main lobe of the radiation pattern.

  11. Scattering by a groove in an impedance plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bindiganavale, Sunil; Volakis, John L.

    1993-01-01

    An analysis of two-dimensional scattering from a narrow groove in an impedance plane is presented. The groove is represented by a impedance surface and the problem reduces to that of scattering from an impedance strip in an otherwise uniform impedance plane. On the basis of this model, appropriate integral equations are constructed using a form of the impedance plane Green's functions involving rapidly convergent integrals. The integral equations are solved by introducing a single basis representation of the equivalent current on the narrow impedance insert. Both transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) polarizations are treated. The resulting solution is validated by comparison with results from the standard boundary integral method (BIM) and a high frequency solution. It is found that the presented solution for narrow impedance inserts can be used in conjunction with the high frequency solution for the characterization of impedance inserts of any given width.

  12. Vibration and pulsation processes in feed systems of liquid rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalnin, V. M.; Sherstiannikov, V. A.

    Pulsation and vibration process in high speed centrifugal pumps and feed lines were investigated. Linear and quadratic relations between pulsation parameters and main factors were obtained. The investigation of turbopump low frequency oscillations showed that the intensity of pulsations is proportional to the pump specific linear size. Linear mathematic models with lumped parameters fairly well demonstrate the vibration influence on low frequency flow pressure vibrations in pumps and feed lines. It is shown that, in some conditions, the pressure oscillation amplitude distribution by the vibrating feed lines length may be characterized by the presence of a node in an intermediate section. A one-dimensional mathematic model based on wave equations proved to be suitable for calculations of vibration and pulsation parameters within a wide frequency range.

  13. Analysis of real-time vibration data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, E.

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, a few structures have been instrumented to provide continuous vibration data in real time, recording not only large-amplitude motions generated by extreme loads, but also small-amplitude motions generated by ambient loads. The main objective in continuous recording is to track any changes in structural characteristics, and to detect damage after an extreme event, such as an earthquake or explosion. The Fourier-based spectral analysis methods have been the primary tool to analyze vibration data from structures. In general, such methods do not work well for real-time data, because real-time data are mainly composed of ambient vibrations with very low amplitudes and signal-to-noise ratios. The long duration, linearity, and the stationarity of ambient data, however, allow us to utilize statistical signal processing tools, which can compensate for the adverse effects of low amplitudes and high noise. The analysis of real-time data requires tools and techniques that can be applied in real-time; i.e., data are processed and analyzed while being acquired. This paper presents some of the basic tools and techniques for processing and analyzing real-time vibration data. The topics discussed include utilization of running time windows, tracking mean and mean-square values, filtering, system identification, and damage detection.

  14. Collisional deactivation of highly vibrationally excited pyrazine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Laurie A.; Barker, John R.

    1996-07-01

    The collisional deactivation of vibrationally excited pyrazine (C4N2H4) in the electronic ground state by 19 collider gases was studied using the time-resolved infrared fluorescence (IRF) technique. The pyrazine was photoexcited with a 308 nm laser and its vibrational deactivation was monitored following rapid radiationless transitions to produce vibrationally excited molecules in the electronic ground state. The IRF data were analyzed by a simple approximate inversion method, as well as with full collisional master equation simulations. The average energies transferred in deactivating collisions (<ΔE>d) exhibit a near-linear dependence on vibrational energy at lower energies and less dependence at higher energies. The deactivation of ground state pyrazine was found to be similar to that of ground state benzene [J. R. Barker and B. M. Toselli, Int. Rev. Phys. Chem. 12, 305 (1990)], but it is strikingly different from the deactivation of triplet state pyrazine [T. J. Bevilacqua and R. B. Weisman, J. Chem. Phys. 98, 6316 (1993)].

  15. Relationship between the internal friction values of the specimen and the vibration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shui, Jiapeng; Pei, Huiyuan; Liu, Yongsong

    1999-04-01

    Expressions for the low frequency internal friction of a specimen and that of the vibration system of the internal friction measuring apparatus have been deduced for six linear mechanical models. It was found that in the case of forced vibration experiments, the internal friction expressions are different for different models. The relationships between the internal friction values of specimens and the vibration systems for different models have been obtained.

  16. Ability of Impedance-Based Health Monitoring To Detect Structural Damage of Propulsion System Components Assessed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Richard E.; Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Sawicki, Jerzy T.; Baaklini, George Y.

    2005-01-01

    Impedance-based structural-health-monitoring uses piezoelectric (PZT) patches that are bonded onto or embedded in a structure. Each individual patch behaves as both an actuator of the surrounding structural area as well as a sensor of the structural response. The size of the excited area varies with the geometry and material composition of the structure, and an active patch is driven by a sinusoidal voltage sweep. When a PZT patch is subjected to an electric field, it produces a mechanical strain; and when it is stressed, it produces an electric charge. Since the patch is bonded to the structure, driving a patch deforms and vibrates the structure. The structure then produces a localized dynamic response. This structural system response is transferred back to the PZT patch, which in turn produces an electrical response. The electromechanical impedance method is based on the principle of electromechanical coupling between the active sensor and the structure, which allows researchers to assess local structural dynamics directly by interrogating a distributed sensor array. Because of mechanical coupling between the sensor and the host structure, this mechanical effect is picked up by the sensor and, through electromechanical coupling inside the active element, is reflected in electrical impedance measured at the sensor s terminals.

  17. Synthesis, dielectric behavior and impedance measurement studies of Cr-substituted Zn-Mn ferrites

    SciTech Connect

    Hankare, P.P.; Patil, R.P.; Garadkar, K.M.; Sasikala, R.; Chougule, B.K.

    2011-03-15

    Graphical abstract: Variation of dielectric constant with frequency. Research highlights: {yields} Sol-gel route synthesized spherical crystalline nanoparticles of ZnMn{sub 1-x}Cr{sub x}FeO{sub 4}. {yields} XRD, DTA, FTIR, SEM, dielectric and impedance study. {yields} The ferrites show concentration dependence of ac electrical conductivity. {yields} Impedance response is dominated by grain boundary behavior. -- Abstract: Nanocrystalline ZnMn{sub 1-x}Cr{sub x}FeO{sub 4} (1.0 {>=} x {>=} 0) ferrites were synthesized by sol-gel technique. X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed the formation of single phasic cubic spinel lattice for all the compositions studied. Lattice parameter shows a decreasing trend with an increase in Cr content in the compositions. Formation of spherical nanoparticles was revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. Infrared spectroscopic studies revealed two main absorption bands in the range 400-800 cm{sup -1} arising due to tetrahedral (A) and octahedral (B) site vibrations. Dielectric constant, dielectric loss tangent, ac conductivity and complex impedance were measured as a function of frequency in the range 20 Hz to 1 MHz. Frequency dependence of dielectric constant shows dielectric dispersion due to the Maxwell-Wagner type of interfacial polarization. The role of chromium in modifying structural and dielectric properties of these ferrites has been explained.

  18. Acoustic impedance characterization via numerical resolution of the inverse Helmholtz problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalo, Carlo; Patel, Danish; Gupta, Prateek

    2016-11-01

    Impedance boundary conditions (IBCs) regulate the relative phasing and amplitudes of pressure and velocity fluctuations and, therefore, the acoustic energy flux. We present a numerical method to determine the acoustic impedance at the surface of an arbitrarily shaped cavity as seen by a generically oriented incident external harmonic planar wave. The proposed method (conceptually) inverts the usual eigenvalue-solving procedure underlying Helmholtz solvers: the impedance at one or multiple (but not all) boundaries is an output of the calculation and is obtained via implicit reconstruction the linear acoustic waveform at the frequency of the incident wave. The linearized governing equations are discretized via a mixed finite-difference/finite-volume approach and are closed with a generalized equation of state. Results are validated against quasi one-dimensional cases derived via direct application of Rott's linear thermoacoustic theory and by comparison against fully compressible Navier-Stokes simulations. This work is motivated by the need to develop a comprehensive suite of predictive tools capable of performing high-fidelity simulations of compressible boundary layers over assigned IBCs, accurately representing the acoustic response of arbitrarily shaped porous cavities.

  19. The relationship between skin maturation and electrical skin impedance.

    PubMed

    Emery, M M; Hebert, A A; Aguirre Vila-Coro, A; Prager, T C

    1991-09-01

    When performing electrophysiological testing, high electrical impedance values are sometimes found in neonates. Since excessive impedance can invalidate test results, a study was conducted to delineate the relationship between skin maturation and electrical skin impedance. This study investigated the skin impedance in 72 infants ranging from 196 to 640 days of age from conception. Regression analyses demonstrated a significant relationship between impedance and age, with the highest impedance centered around full-term gestation with values falling precipitously at time points on either side. Clinically, impedance values fall to normal levels at approximately four months following full-term gestation. Skin impedance values are low in premature infants, but rapidly increase as the age approaches that of full-term neonates. Low impedance values in premature infants are attributed to greater skin hydration which results from immature skin conditions such as 1) thinner epidermal layers particularly at the transitional and cornified layers; 2) more blood flow to the skin; and 3) higher percentage of water composition. These factors facilitate the diffusion of water vapor through the skin. As the physical barrier to skin water loss matures with gestational age, the skin impedance reaches a maximum value at full term neonatal age. After this peak, a statistically significant inverse relationship exists between electrical skin impedance and age in the first year of life. This drop in skin impedance is attributed to an increase in skin hydration as a result of the greater functional maturity of eccrine sweat glands.

  20. 21 CFR 874.1090 - Auditory impedance tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Auditory impedance tester. 874.1090 Section 874...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1090 Auditory impedance tester. (a) Identification. An auditory impedance tester is a device that is intended to change the air pressure in...

  1. 21 CFR 874.1090 - Auditory impedance tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Auditory impedance tester. 874.1090 Section 874...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1090 Auditory impedance tester. (a) Identification. An auditory impedance tester is a device that is intended to change the air pressure in...

  2. Estimating the Transverse Impedance in the Fermilab Recycler

    SciTech Connect

    Ainsworth, Robert; Adamson, Philip; Burov, Alexey; Kourbanis, Ioanis; Yang, Ming-Jen

    2016-06-01

    Impedance could represent a limitation of running high intensity bunches in the Fermilab recycler. With high intensity upgrades foreseen, it is important to quantify the impedance. To do this, studies have been performed measuring the tune shift as a function of bunch intensity allowing the transverse impedance to be derived.

  3. 21 CFR 874.1090 - Auditory impedance tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Auditory impedance tester. 874.1090 Section 874...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1090 Auditory impedance tester. (a) Identification. An auditory impedance tester is a device that is intended to change the air pressure in...

  4. Valveless impedance micropump with integrated magnetic diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chia-Yen; Chen, Zgen-Hui

    2010-04-01

    This study presents a planar valveless impedance-based micropump for biomedical applications comprising a lower glass substrate patterned with a copper micro-coil, a microchannel, an upper glass cover plate, and a PDMS diaphragm with an electroplated magnet on its upper surface. When a current is passed through the micro-coil, an electromagnetic force is established between the coil and the magnet. The resulting deflection of the PDMS diaphragm creates an acoustic impedance mismatch within the microchannel, which in turn produces a net flow. The performance of the micropump is characterized experimentally. The experimental results show that a maximum diaphragm deflection of 30 microm is obtained when the micro-coil is supplied with an input current of 0.5 A. The corresponding flow rate is found to be 1.5 microl/sec when the PDMS membrane is driven by an actuating frequency of 240 Hz.

  5. Enhanced Method for Cavity Impedance Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Frank Marhauser, Robert Rimmer, Kai Tian, Haipeng Wang

    2009-05-01

    With the proposal of medium to high average current accelerator facilities the demand for cavities with extremely low Higher Order Mode (HOM) impedances is increasing. Modern numerical tools are still under development to more thoroughly predict impedances that need to take into account complex absorbing boundaries and lossy materials. With the usually large problem size it is preferable to utilize massive parallel computing when applicable and available. Apart from such computational issues, we have developed methods using available computer resources to enhance the information that can be extracted from a cavities? wakefield computed in time domain. In particular this is helpful for a careful assessment of the extracted RF power and the mitigation of potential beam break-up or emittance diluting effects, a figure of merit for the cavity performance. The method is described as well as an example of its implementation.

  6. Evaluating impedances in a Sacherer integral equation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.Y.; Weng, W.T.

    1994-08-01

    In Sacherer integral equation, the beam line density is expanded on the phase deviation {phi}, generating a Hankel spectrum, rather than on the time, which generates a Fourier spectrum. This is a natural choice to deal with the particle evolution in phase space, it however causes complications whenever the impedance corresponding to the spectrum has to be evaluated. In this article, the line density expansion on {phi} is shown to be equivalent to a beam time modulation under an acceptable condition. Therefore for a Hankel spectrum, a number of sidebands, and the corresponding impedance as well, will be involved. For wideband resonators, it is shown that the original Sacherer solution is adequate. For narrowband resonators, the solution had been compromised, therefore a modification may be needed.

  7. Microwave impedance imaging on semiconductor memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundhikanjana, Worasom; Lai, Keji; Yang, Yongliang; Kelly, Michael; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2011-03-01

    Microwave impedance microscopy (MIM) maps out the real and imaginary components of the tip-sample impedance, from which the local conductivity and dielectric constant distribution can be derived. The stray field contribution is minimized in our shielded cantilever design, enabling quantitative analysis of nano-materials and device structures. We demonstrate here that the MIM can spatially resolve the conductivity variation in a dynamic random access memory (DRAM) sample. With DC or low-frequency AC bias applied to the tip, contrast between n-doped and p-doped regions in the dC/dV images is observed, and p-n junctions are highlighted in the dR/dV images. The results can be directly compared with data taken by scanning capacitance microscope (SCM), which uses unshielded cantilevers and resonant electronics, and the MIM reveals more information of the local dopant concentration than SCM.

  8. Sound barriers from materials of inhomogeneous impedance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Mao, Dongxing; Yu, Wuzhou; Jiang, Zaixiu

    2015-06-01

    Sound barriers are extensively used in environmental noise protection. However, when barriers are placed in parallel on opposite sides of a sound source, their performance deteriorates markedly. This paper describes a barrier made from materials of inhomogeneous impedance which lacks this drawback. The nonuniform impedance affects the way sound undergoes multiple reflections, and in the process traps acoustic energy. A proposed realization of the barrier comprises a closely spaced array of progressively tuned hollow narrow tubes which create a phase gradient. The acoustics of the barrier is theoretically examined and its superiority over conventional barriers is calculated using finite element modeling. Structural parameters of the barrier can be changed to achieve the required sound insertion loss, and the barrier has the potential to be widely used in environmental noise control.

  9. Impedance of a beam tube with antechamber

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, W.; Lambertson, G.R.; Voelker, F.

    1986-08-01

    A beam vacuum chamber was proposed to allow synchrotron light to radiate from a circulating electron beam into an antechamber containing photon targets, pumps, etc. To determine the impedance such a geometry would present to the beam, electromagnetic measurements were carried out on a section of chamber using for low frequencies a current-carrying wire and for up to 16 GHz, a resonance perturbation method. Because the response of such a chamber would depend on upstream and downstream restrictions of aperture yet to be determined, the resonance studies were analyzed in some generality. The favorable conclusion of these studies is that the antechamber makes practically no contribution to either the longitudinal or the transverse impedances.

  10. Are Patents Impeding Medical Care and Innovation?

    PubMed Central

    Gold, E. Richard; Kaplan, Warren; Orbinski, James; Harland-Logan, Sarah; N-Marandi, Sevil

    2010-01-01

    Background to the debate: Pharmaceutical and medical device manufacturers argue that the current patent system is crucial for stimulating research and development (R&D), leading to new products that improve medical care. The financial return on their investments that is afforded by patent protection, they claim, is an incentive toward innovation and reinvestment into further R&D. But this view has been challenged in recent years. Many commentators argue that patents are stifling biomedical research, for example by preventing researchers from accessing patented materials or methods they need for their studies. Patents have also been blamed for impeding medical care by raising prices of essential medicines, such as antiretroviral drugs, in poor countries. This debate examines whether and how patents are impeding health care and innovation. PMID:20052274

  11. FEM electrode refinement for electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Grychtol, Bartlomiej; Adler, Andy

    2013-01-01

    Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) reconstructs images of electrical tissue properties within a body from electrical transfer impedance measurements at surface electrodes. Reconstruction of EIT images requires the solution of an inverse problem in soft field tomography, where a sensitivity matrix, J, of the relationship between internal changes and measurements is calculated, and then a pseudo-inverse of J is used to update the image estimate. It is therefore clear that a precise calculation of J is required for solution accuracy. Since it is generally not possible to use analytic solutions, the finite element method (FEM) is typically used. It has generally been recommended in the EIT literature that FEMs be refined near electrodes, since the electric field and sensitivity is largest there. In this paper we analyze the accuracy requirement for FEM refinement near electrodes in EIT and describe a technique to refine arbitrary FEMs.

  12. Readout electrode assembly for measuring biological impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, L. D.; Moody, D. L., Jr. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    The invention comprises of a pair of readout ring electrodes which are used in conjunction with apparatus for measuring the electrical impedance between different points in the body of a living animal to determine the amount of blood flow therebetween. The readout electrodes have independently adjustable diameters to permit attachment around different parts of the body between which it is desired to measure electric impedance. The axial spacing between the electrodes is adjusted by a pair of rods which have a first pair of ends fixedly attached to one electrode and a second pair of ends slidably attached to the other electrode. Indicia are provided on the outer surface of the ring electrodes and on the surface of the rods to permit measurement of the circumference and spacing between the ring electrodes.

  13. Analysis of Conductor Impedances Accounting for Skin Effect and Nonlinear Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, M P; Ong, M M; Brown, C G; Speer, R D

    2011-07-20

    It is often necessary to protect sensitive electrical equipment from pulsed electric and magnetic fields. To accomplish this electromagnetic shielding structures similar to Faraday Cages are often implemented. If the equipment is inside a facility that has been reinforced with rebar, the rebar can be used as part of a lighting protection system. Unfortunately, such shields are not perfect and allow electromagnetic fields to be created inside due to discontinuities in the structure, penetrations, and finite conductivity of the shield. In order to perform an analysis of such a structure it is important to first determine the effect of the finite impedance of the conductors used in the shield. In this paper we will discuss the impedances of different cylindrical conductors in the time domain. For a time varying pulse the currents created in the conductor will have different spectral components, which will affect the current density due to skin effects. Many construction materials use iron and different types of steels that have a nonlinear permeability. The nonlinear material can have an effect on the impedance of the conductor depending on the B-H curve. Although closed form solutions exist for the impedances of cylindrical conductors made of linear materials, computational techniques are needed for nonlinear materials. Simulations of such impedances are often technically challenging due to the need for a computational mesh to be able to resolve the skin depths for the different spectral components in the pulse. The results of such simulations in the time domain will be shown and used to determine the impedances of cylindrical conductors for lightning current pulses that have low frequency content.

  14. Externally tuned vibration absorber

    DOEpatents

    Vincent, Ronald J.

    1987-09-22

    A vibration absorber unit or units are mounted on the exterior housing of a hydraulic drive system of the type that is powered from a pressure wave generated, e.g., by a Stirling engine. The hydraulic drive system employs a piston which is hydraulically driven to oscillate in a direction perpendicular to the axis of the hydraulic drive system. The vibration absorbers each include a spring or other resilient member having one side affixed to the housing and another side to which an absorber mass is affixed. In a preferred embodiment, a pair of vibration absorbers is employed, each absorber being formed of a pair of leaf spring assemblies, between which the absorber mass is suspended.

  15. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, J.B.; Muhs, J.D.; Tobin, K.W.

    1995-01-10

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity. 2 figures.

  16. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, Joseph B.; Muhs, Jeffrey D.; Tobin, Kenneth W.

    1995-01-01

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity.

  17. Modelling chaotic vibrations using NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheerer, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    Due to the unavailability and, later, prohibitive cost of the computational power required, many phenomena in nonlinear dynamic systems have in the past been addressed in terms of linear systems. Linear systems respond to periodic inputs with periodic outputs, and may be characterized in the time domain or in the frequency domain as convenient. Reduction to the frequency domain is frequently desireable to reduce the amount of computation required for solution. Nonlinear systems are only soluble in the time domain, and may exhibit a time history which is extremely sensitive to initial conditions. Such systems are termed chaotic. Dynamic buckling, aeroelasticity, fatigue analysis, control systems and electromechanical actuators are among the areas where chaotic vibrations have been observed. Direct transient analysis over a long time period presents a ready means of simulating the behavior of self-excited or externally excited nonlinear systems for a range of experimental parameters, either to characterize chaotic behavior for development of load spectra, or to define its envelope and preclude its occurrence.

  18. Impedance Matched Absorptive Thermal Blocking Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, E. J.; Chuss, D. T.; Rostem, K.; U-Yen, K.

    2014-01-01

    We have designed, fabricated and characterized absorptive thermal blocking filters for cryogenic microwave applications. The transmission line filter's input characteristic impedance is designed to match 50O and its response has been validated from 0-to-50GHz. The observed return loss in the 0-to-20GHz design band is greater than 20 dB and shows graceful degradation with frequency. Design considerations and equations are provided that enable this approach to be scaled and modified for use in other applications.

  19. Impedance Matched Absorptive Thermal Blocking Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, E. J.; Chuss, D. T.; U-Yen, K.; Rostem, K.

    2014-01-01

    We have designed, fabricated and characterized absorptive thermal blocking filters for cryogenic microwave applications. The transmission line filter's input characteristic impedance is designed to match 50 Omega and its response has been validated from 0-to-50GHz. The observed return loss in the 0-to-20GHz design band is greater than 20 dB and shows graceful degradation with frequency. Design considerations and equations are provided that enable this approach to be scaled and modified for use in other applications.

  20. Monitoring Polymer Curing Via Electromagnetic Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, William T.; Covington, John C.; Kranbuehl, David E.; Hoff, Melanie; Delos, Susan

    1992-01-01

    New nondestructive in-situ electromagnetic-impedance measurement technique senses cure-processing properties of high-temperature, high-performance thermostat and thermoplastic resins. Continuous frequency-dependent measurement and analysis performed during curing cycle. Monitors and measures molecular properties of polymeric resin in liquid and solid states. Applications include nondestructive means for evaluation of materials, determination of "window" boundaries of curing cycles of thermoplastics and thermoset resins, and for online, closed-loop control of curing cycles.

  1. Superconducting surface impedance under radiofrequency field

    DOE PAGES

    Xiao, Binping P.; Reece, Charles E.; Kelley, Michael J.

    2013-04-26

    Based on BCS theory with moving Cooper pairs, the electron states distribution at 0K and the probability of electron occupation with finite temperature have been derived and applied to anomalous skin effect theory to obtain the surface impedance of a superconductor under radiofrequency (RF) field. We present the numerical results for Nb and compare these with representative RF field-dependent effective surface resistance measurements from a 1.5 GHz resonant structure.

  2. Study of the Electrical Impedance Scanning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    exhibit conductive changes that cause an impedance variation between cancerous ant health tissues. Since there are very few commercial devices...contribute somehow in the evaluation of the parameters involved. Keywords – Electrical Transimpedance Scanning, Breast cancer I. INTRODUCTION The...Electrical Transimpedance Scanning (ETS) is a new technique, non-invasive, non-irradiant, used in the diagnosis of breast cancer . Combined with other

  3. Antenna pattern control using impedance surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Liu, Kefeng

    1992-01-01

    During this research period, we have effectively transferred existing computer codes from CRAY supercomputer to work station based systems. The work station based version of our code preserved the accuracy of the numerical computations while giving a much better turn-around time than the CRAY supercomputer. Such a task relieved us of the heavy dependence of the supercomputer account budget and made codes developed in this research project more feasible for applications. The analysis of pyramidal horns with impedance surfaces was our major focus during this research period. Three different modeling algorithms in analyzing lossy impedance surfaces were investigated and compared with measured data. Through this investigation, we discovered that a hybrid Fourier transform technique, which uses the eigen mode in the stepped waveguide section and the Fourier transformed field distributions across the stepped discontinuities for lossy impedances coating, gives a better accuracy in analyzing lossy coatings. After a further refinement of the present technique, we will perform an accurate radiation pattern synthesis in the coming reporting period.

  4. Force reflecting teleoperation with adaptive impedance control.

    PubMed

    Love, Lonnie J; Book, Wayne J

    2004-02-01

    Experimentation and a survey of the literature clearly show that contact stability in a force reflecting teleoperation system requires high levels of damping on the master robot. However, excessive damping increases the energy required by an operator for commanding motion. The objective of this paper is to describe a new force reflecting teleoperation methodology that reduces operator energy requirements without sacrificing stability. We begin by describing a new approach to modeling and identifying the remote environment of the teleoperation system. We combine a conventional multi-input, multi-output recursive least squares (MIMO-RLS) system identification, identifying in real-time the remote environment impedance, with a discretized representation of the remote environment. This methodology generates a time-varying, position-dependent representation of the remote environment dynamics. Next, we adapt the target impedance of the master robot with respect to the dynamic model of the remote environment. The environment estimation and impedance adaptation are executed simultaneously and in real time. We demonstrate, through experimentation, that this approach significantly reduces the energy required by an operator to execute remote tasks while simultaneously providing sufficient damping to ensure contact stability.

  5. Interior impedance wedge diffraction with surface waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Griesser, Timothy

    1988-01-01

    The exact impedance wedge solution is evaluated asymptotically using the method of steepest descents for plane wave illumination at normal incidence. Uniform but different impedances on each face are considered for both soft and hard polarizations. The asymptotic solution isolates the incident, singly reflected, multiply reflected, diffracted, and surface wave fields. Multiply reflected fields of any order are permitted. The multiply reflected fields from the exact solution are written as ratios of auxiliary Maliuzhinets functions, whereas a geometrical analysis gives the reflected fields as products of reflection coefficients. These two representations are shown to be identical in magnitude, phase and the angular range over which they exist. The diffracted field includes four Fresnel transition functions as in the perfect conductor case, and the expressions for the appropriate discontinuities at the shadow boundaries are presented. The surface wave exists over a finite angular range and only for certain surface impedances. A surface wave transition field is included to retain continuity. Computations are presented for interior wedge diffractions although the formulation is valid for both exterior and interior wedges.

  6. Application of impedance spectroscopy to SOFC research

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, G.; Mason, T.O.; Pederson, L.R.

    1996-12-31

    With the resurgence of interest in solid oxide fuel cells and other solid state electrochemical devices, techniques originally developed for characterizing aqueous systems are being adapted and applied to solid state systems. One of these techniques, three-electrode impedance spectroscopy, is particularly powerful as it allows characterization of subcomponent and interfacial properties. Obtaining accurate impedance spectra, however, is difficult as reference electrode impedance is usually non-negligible and solid electrolytes typically have much lower conductance than aqueous solutions. Faidi et al and Chechirlian et al have both identified problems associated with low conductivity media. Other sources of error are still being uncovered. Ford et al identified resistive contacts with large time constants as a possibility, while Me et al showed that the small contact capacitance of the reference electrode was at fault. Still others show that instrument limitations play a role. Using the voltage divider concept, a simplified model that demonstrates the interplay of these various factors, predicts the form of possible distortions, and offers means to minimize errors is presented.

  7. Numerical analysis of strongly nonlinear extensional vibrations in elastic rods.

    PubMed

    Vanhille, Christian; Campos-Pozuelo, Cleofé

    2007-01-01

    In the framework of transduction, nondestructive testing, and nonlinear acoustic characterization, this article presents the analysis of strongly nonlinear vibrations by means of an original numerical algorithm. In acoustic and transducer applications in extreme working conditions, such as the ones induced by the generation of high-power ultrasound, the analysis of nonlinear ultrasonic vibrations is fundamental. Also, the excitation and analysis of nonlinear vibrations is an emergent technique in nonlinear characterization for damage detection. A third-order evolution equation is derived and numerically solved for extensional waves in isotropic dissipative media. A nine-constant theory of elasticity for isotropic solids is constructed, and the nonlinearity parameters corresponding to extensional waves are proposed. The nonlinear differential equation is solved by using a new numerical algorithm working in the time domain. The finite-difference numerical method proposed is implicit and only requires the solution of a linear set of equations at each time step. The model allows the analysis of strongly nonlinear, one-dimensional vibrations and can be used for prediction as well as characterization. Vibration waveforms are calculated at different points, and results are compared for different excitation levels and boundary conditions. Amplitude distributions along the rod axis for every harmonic component also are evaluated. Special attention is given to the study of high-amplitude damping of vibrations by means of several simulations. Simulations are performed for amplitudes ranging from linear to nonlinear and weak shock.

  8. Vibrational spectroscopy of resveratrol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billes, Ferenc; Mohammed-Ziegler, Ildikó; Mikosch, Hans; Tyihák, Ernő

    2007-11-01

    In this article the authors deal with the experimental and theoretical interpretation of the vibrational spectra of trans-resveratrol (3,5,4'-trihydroxy- trans-stilbene) of diverse beneficial biological activity. Infrared and Raman spectra of the compound were recorded; density functional calculations were carried out resulting in the optimized geometry and several properties of the molecule. Based on the calculated force constants, a normal coordinate analysis yielded the character of the vibrational modes and the assignment of the measured spectral bands.

  9. Development of vibration isolation platform for low amplitude vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dae-Oen; Park, Geeyong; Han, Jae-Hung

    2014-03-01

    The performance of high precision payloads on board a satellite is extremely sensitive to vibration. Although vibration environment of a satellite on orbit is very gentle compared to the launch environment, even a low amplitude vibration disturbances generated by reaction wheel assembly, cryocoolers, etc may cause serious problems in performing tasks such as capturing high resolution images. The most commonly taken approach to protect sensitive payloads from performance degrading vibration is application of vibration isolator. In this paper, development of vibration isolation platform for low amplitude vibration is discussed. Firstly, single axis vibration isolator is developed by adapting three parameter model using bellows and viscous fluid. The isolation performance of the developed single axis isolator is evaluated by measuring force transmissibility. The measured transmissibility shows that both the low Q-factor (about 2) and the high roll-off rate (about -40 dB/dec) are achieved with the developed isolator. Then, six single axis isolators are combined to form Stewart platform in cubic configuration to provide multi-axis vibration isolation. The isolation performance of the developed multi-axis isolator is evaluated using a simple prototype reaction wheel model in which wheel imbalance is the major source of vibration. The transmitted force without vibration isolator is measured and compared with the transmitted force with vibration isolator. More than 20 dB reduction of the X and Y direction (radial direction of flywheel) disturbance is observed for rotating wheel speed of 100 Hz and higher.

  10. Optimal Design of Spring Characteristics of Damper for Subharmonic Vibration in Automatic Transmission Powertrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakae, T.; Ryu, T.; Matsuzaki, K.; Rosbi, S.; Sueoka, A.; Takikawa, Y.; Ooi, Y.

    2016-09-01

    In the torque converter, the damper of the lock-up clutch is used to effectively absorb the torsional vibration. The damper is designed using a piecewise-linear spring with three stiffness stages. However, a nonlinear vibration, referred to as a subharmonic vibration of order 1/2, occurred around the switching point in the piecewise-linear restoring torque characteristics because of the nonlinearity. In the present study, we analyze vibration reduction for subharmonic vibration. The model used herein includes the torque converter, the gear train, and the differential gear. The damper is modeled by a nonlinear rotational spring of the piecewise-linear spring. We focus on the optimum design of the spring characteristics of the damper in order to suppress the subharmonic vibration. A piecewise-linear spring with five stiffness stages is proposed, and the effect of the distance between switching points on the subharmonic vibration is investigated. The results of our analysis indicate that the subharmonic vibration can be suppressed by designing a damper with five stiffness stages to have a small spring constant ratio between the neighboring springs. The distances between switching points must be designed to be large enough that the amplitude of the main frequency component of the systems does not reach the neighboring switching point.

  11. An investigation into the simultaneous use of a resonator as an energy harvester and a vibration absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, M. J.; Tang, B.; Melo, G. Pechoto; Lopes, V.

    2014-02-01

    A mass-spring-damper system is at the core of both a vibration absorber and a harvester of energy from ambient vibrations. If such a device is attached to a structure that has a high impedance, then it will have very little effect on the vibrations of the structure, but it can be used to convert mechanical vibrations into electrical energy (act as an energy harvester). However, if the same device is attached to a structure that has a relatively low impedance, then the device may attenuate the vibrations as it may act as both a vibration absorber and an energy harvester simultaneously. In this paper such a device is discussed. Two situations are considered; the first is when the structure is excited with broadband random excitation and the second is when the structure is excited by a single frequency. The optimum parameters of the device for both energy harvesting and vibration attenuation are discussed for these two cases. For random excitation it is found that if the device is optimized for vibration suppression, then this is also adequate for maximizing the energy absorbed (harvested), and thus a single device can effectively suppress vibration and harvest energy at the same time. For single frequency excitation this is found not to be the case. To maximize the energy harvested, the natural frequency of the system (host structure and absorber) has to coincide with the forcing frequency, but to minimize vibration of the host structure, the natural frequency of the absorber has to coincide with the forcing frequency. In this case, therefore, a single resonator cannot effectively suppress vibration and harvest energy at the same time.

  12. Measurement and modelling the sensitivity of tetrapolar transfer impedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Naydenova, E; Cavendish, S; Wilson, A J

    2016-10-01

    Finite element method (FEM) modelling of a small disk in a homogeneous saline medium showed that the sensitivity distribution for tetrapolar transfer impedance measurements was dependant on the ratio, σdisk/σsaline, and not absolute conductivity values. In addition, the amplitude of the negative sensitivity regions between the drive and receive electrodes decreased non-linearly with σdisk/σsaline for σdisk/σsaline < 1, eventually becoming zero. This non-linear behaviour determined the limit of the assumption of a small change in conductivity in Geselowitz's lead theorem with 0.5 <σdisk/σsaline <1.5 for the measurements reported. The modelling supported the design of a sensitivity measurement system using an insulating support and a metal disk in a saline filled tank. Measurements were shown to give good agreement with sensitivity predictions from Geselowitz's lead theorem. Replacing the homogeneous medium in the FEM model with layers of different conductivity parallel to the plane of the electrodes changed the sensitivity distribution when the thickness of the layers adjacent to the electrodes were less than ½ the electrode spacing. A layer of greater conductivity over a layer of lesser conductivity next to the electrodes gave a peak in the sensitivity distribution and extended regions of negative sensitivity further into the tissue.

  13. Rotorcraft Transmission Noise Path Model, Including Distributed Fluid Film Bearing Impedance Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hambric, Stephen A.; Hanford, Amanda D.; Shepherd, Micah R.; Campbell, Robert L.; Smith, Edward C.

    2010-01-01

    A computational approach for simulating the effects of rolling element and journal bearings on the vibration and sound transmission through gearboxes has been demonstrated. The approach, using ARL/Penn State s CHAMP methodology, uses Component Mode Synthesis of housing and shafting modes computed using Finite Element (FE) models to allow for rapid adjustment of bearing impedances in gearbox models. The approach has been demonstrated on NASA GRC s test gearbox with three different bearing configurations: in the first condition, traditional rolling element (ball and roller) bearings were installed, and in the second and third conditions, the traditional bearings were replaced with journal and wave bearings (wave bearings are journal bearings with a multi-lobed wave pattern on the bearing surface). A methodology for computing the stiffnesses and damping in journal and wave bearings has been presented, and demonstrated for the journal and wave bearings used in the NASA GRC test gearbox. The FE model of the gearbox, along with the rolling element bearing coupling impedances, was analyzed to compute dynamic transfer functions between forces applied to the meshing gears and accelerations on the gearbox housing, including several locations near the bearings. A Boundary Element (BE) acoustic model was used to compute the sound radiated by the gearbox. Measurements of the Gear Mesh Frequency (GMF) tones were made by NASA GRC at several operational speeds for the rolling element and journal bearing gearbox configurations. Both the measurements and the CHAMP numerical model indicate that the journal bearings reduce vibration and noise for the second harmonic of the gear meshing tones, but show no clear benefit to using journal bearings to reduce the amplitudes of the fundamental gear meshing tones. Also, the numerical model shows that the gearbox vibrations and radiated sound are similar for journal and wave bearing configurations.

  14. New Approaches in Force-Limited Vibration Testing of Flight Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Kern, Dennis L.

    2012-01-01

    To qualify flight hardware for random vibration environments the following methods are used to limit the loads in the aerospace industry: (1) Response limiting and notching (2) Simple TDOF model (3) Semi-empirical force limits (4) Apparent mass, etc. and (5) Impedance method. In all these methods attempts are made to remove conservatism due to the mismatch in impedances between the test and the flight configurations of the hardware that are being qualified. Assumption is the hardware interfaces have correlated responses. A new method that takes into account the un-correlated hardware interface responses are described in this presentation.

  15. Vibration Propagation in Spider Webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatton, Ross; Otto, Andrew; Elias, Damian

    Due to their poor eyesight, spiders rely on web vibrations for situational awareness. Web-borne vibrations are used to determine the location of prey, predators, and potential mates. The influence of web geometry and composition on web vibrations is important for understanding spider's behavior and ecology. Past studies on web vibrations have experimentally measured the frequency response of web geometries by removing threads from existing webs. The full influence of web structure and tension distribution on vibration transmission; however, has not been addressed in prior work. We have constructed physical artificial webs and computer models to better understand the effect of web structure on vibration transmission. These models provide insight into the propagation of vibrations through the webs, the frequency response of the bare web, and the influence of the spider's mass and stiffness on the vibration transmission patterns. Funded by NSF-1504428.

  16. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of tethered bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Valincius, Gintaras; Meškauskas, Tadas; Ivanauskas, Feliksas

    2012-01-10

    The electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) of tethered bilayer membranes (tBLMs) were analyzed, and the analytical solution for the spectral response of membranes containing natural or artificially introduced defects was derived. The analysis carried out in this work shows that the EIS features of an individual membrane defect cannot be modeled by conventional electrical elements. The primary reason for this is the complex nature of impedance of the submembrane ionic reservoir separating the phospholipid layer and the solid support. We demonstrate that its EIS response, in the case of radially symmetric defects, is described by the Hankel functions of a complex variable. Therefore, neither the impedance of the submembrane reservoir nor the total impedance of tBLMs can be modeled using the conventional elements of the equivalent electrical circuits of interfaces. There are, however, some limiting cases in which the complexity of the EIS response of the submembrane space reduces. In the high frequency limit, the EIS response of a submembrane space that surrounds the defect transforms into a response of a constant phase element (CPE) with the exponent (α) value of 0.5. The onset of this transformation is, beside other parameters, dependent on the defect size. Large-sized defects push the frequency limit lower, therefore, the EIS spectra exhibiting CPE behavior with α ≈ 0.5, can serve as a diagnostic criterion for the presence of such defects. In the low frequency limit, the response is dependent on the density of the defects, and it transforms into the capacitive impedance if the area occupied by a defect is finite. The higher the defect density, the higher the frequency edge at which the onset of the capacitive behavior is observed. Consequently, the presented analysis provides practical tools to evaluate the defect density in tBLMs, which could be utilized in tBLM-based biosensor applications. Alternatively, if the parameters of the defects, e.g., ion channels

  17. Controlled adsorption of droplets onto anti-nodes of an ultrasonically vibrating needle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Junhui; Li, Ning; Zhou, Jinjuan

    2011-09-01

    We show that droplets adsorb onto the anti-nodes of a stainless needle in flexural vibration when the needle is lifted from a layer of liquid thin film. The adsorbed liquid includes water, saline, and olive oil, which cannot adsorb onto a stainless surface if the surface does not vibrate. The adsorbed droplets take on the shape of an ellipsoid when the needle vibration is large enough, and the size of adsorbed droplets may be controlled by the needle vibration. The properties of adsorbed liquid such as viscosity, specific acoustic impedance, and density, and the needle diameter, may affect the absorption capability. A physical model based on the hypothesis that sound pressure decreases the cohesive force among molecules of liquid has been proposed, which can explain the experimental phenomena quite well.

  18. U-shape magnetostrictive vibration based power generator for universal use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, T.

    2016-04-01

    Vibrational power generator extracts electrical energy from ambient vibration. Author invented novel configuration using magnetostrictive material. The device is based on parallel beams of iron-gallium alloy and magnetic material, and features high efficiency, high robustness, and low electrical impedance. In this paper, author proposes U-shape generator for universal use. It consists of the parallel beams and fixed and free end beams forming U-shape frame flexibly modified for variety of mechanical input. Miniature U-shape prototype using Fe-Ga rod 6 by 0.5 by 13 mm3 exhibited average power of 3.7 mW under vibration of 166 Hz and 2.5 G. L-shape type was demonstrated to generate electromotive force by two directional vibrations. In switch type, maximum energy of 0.7 mJ was retrieved by one pushing force. The performances are sufficient to drive wireless module for heath monitoring and remote control.

  19. Piezoelectric Power Requirements for Active Vibration Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennan, Matthew C.; McGowan, Anna-Maria Rivas

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a method for predicting the power consumption of piezoelectric actuators utilized for active vibration control. Analytical developments and experimental tests show that the maximum power required to control a structure using surface-bonded piezoelectric actuators is independent of the dynamics between the piezoelectric actuator and the host structure. The results demonstrate that for a perfectly-controlled system, the power consumption is a function of the quantity and type of piezoelectric actuators and the voltage and frequency of the control law output signal. Furthermore, as control effectiveness decreases, the power consumption of the piezoelectric actuators decreases. In addition, experimental results revealed a non-linear behavior in the material properties of piezoelectric actuators. The material non- linearity displayed a significant increase in capacitance with an increase in excitation voltage. Tests show that if the non-linearity of the capacitance was accounted for, a conservative estimate of the power can easily be determined.

  20. Active balance system and vibration balanced machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qiu, Songgang (Inventor); Augenblick, John E. (Inventor); Peterson, Allen A. (Inventor); White, Maurice A. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An active balance system is provided for counterbalancing vibrations of an axially reciprocating machine. The balance system includes a support member, a flexure assembly, a counterbalance mass, and a linear motor or an actuator. The support member is configured for attachment to the machine. The flexure assembly includes at least one flat spring having connections along a central portion and an outer peripheral portion. One of the central portion and the outer peripheral portion is fixedly mounted to the support member. The counterbalance mass is fixedly carried by the flexure assembly along another of the central portion and the outer peripheral portion. The linear motor has one of a stator and a mover fixedly mounted to the support member and another of the stator and the mover fixedly mounted to the counterbalance mass. The linear motor is operative to axially reciprocate the counterbalance mass.

  1. A novel wireless and temperature-compensated SAW vibration sensor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen; Xue, Xufeng; Huang, Yangqing; Liu, Xinlu

    2014-11-03

    A novel wireless and passive surface acoustic wave (SAW) based temperature-compensated vibration sensor utilizing a flexible Y-cut quartz cantilever beam with a relatively substantial proof mass and two one-port resonators is developed. One resonator acts as the sensing device adjacent to the clamped end for maximum strain sensitivity, and the other one is used as the reference located on clamped end for temperature compensation for vibration sensor through the differential approach. Vibration directed to the proof mass flex the cantilever, inducing relative changes in the acoustic propagation characteristics of the SAW travelling along the sensing device, and generated output signal varies in frequency as a function of vibration.  A theoretical mode using the Rayleigh method was established to determine the optimal dimensions of the cantilever beam. Coupling of Modes (COM) model was used to extract the optimal design parameters of the SAW devices prior to fabrication. The performance of the developed SAW sensor attached to an antenna towards applied vibration was evaluated wirelessly by using the precise vibration table, programmable incubator chamber, and reader unit.  High vibration sensitivity of ~10.4 kHz/g, good temperature stability, and excellent linearity were observed in the wireless measurements.

  2. Fault detection in railway track using piezoelectric impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremins, M.; Shuai, Qi; Xu, Jiawen; Tang, J.

    2014-04-01

    In this research, piezoelectric transducers are incorporated in an impedance-based damage detection approach for railway track health monitoring. The impedance-based damage detection approach utilizes the direct relationship between the mechanical impedance of the track and electrical impedance of the piezoelectric transducer bonded. The effect of damage is shown in the change of a healthy impedance curve to an altered, damaged curve. Using a normalized relative difference outlier analysis, the occurrences of various damages on the track are determined. Furthermore, the integration of inductive circuitry with the piezoelectric transducer is found to be able to considerably increase overall damage detection sensitivity.

  3. Broadband electrical impedance matching for piezoelectric ultrasound transducers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haiying; Paramo, Daniel

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents a systematic method for designing broadband electrical impedance matching networks for piezoelectric ultrasound transducers. The design process involves three steps: 1) determine the equivalent circuit of the unmatched piezoelectric transducer based on its measured admittance; 2) design a set of impedance matching networks using a computerized Smith chart; and 3) establish the simulation model of the matched transducer to evaluate the gain and bandwidth of the impedance matching networks. The effectiveness of the presented approach is demonstrated through the design, implementation, and characterization of impedance matching networks for a broadband acoustic emission sensor. The impedance matching network improved the power of the acquired signal by 9 times.

  4. Distributed control using linear momentum exchange devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharkey, J. P.; Waites, Henry; Doane, G. B., III

    1987-01-01

    MSFC has successfully employed the use of the Vibrational Control of Space Structures (VCOSS) Linear Momentum Exchange Devices (LMEDs), which was an outgrowth of the Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratory (AFWAL) program, in a distributed control experiment. The control experiment was conducted in MSFC's Ground Facility for Large Space Structures Control Verification (GF/LSSCV). The GF/LSSCV's test article was well suited for this experiment in that the LMED could be judiciously placed on the ASTROMAST. The LMED placements were such that vibrational mode information could be extracted from the accelerometers on the LMED. The LMED accelerometer information was processed by the control algorithms so that the LMED masses could be accelerated to produce forces which would dampen the vibrational modes of interest. Experimental results are presented showing the LMED's capabilities.

  5. Delayed resonator concept for vibration suppression using piezoelectric networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammer, Ayhan S.; Olgac, Nejat

    2016-11-01

    Delayed resonators (DR) are a class of active vibration absorbers, where resonance in the absorber is achieved through a delayed feedback control. Studies on DR theory so far, have focused on traditional mechanical absorber structures with proof masses. Both in linear and rotational vibration applications, a mechanical substructure is brought to resonance; which, in turn, absorbs vibration from the primary structure. This study is a departure from the existing literature in the sense that the mechanical absorber structure is replaced by an electrical circuit that resonates. The tuning is achieved by the use of piezoelectric elements, which introduce a coupling between the mechanical and electrical components in the system. The resonance and desired vibration absorption are still the objectives but with a distinct feature, ‘without a proof mass’. This work unites the two fronts of research from this interesting angle, namely DR theory and piezoelectric networks, to benefit from their individual strengths.

  6. The Influence of Segmental Impedance Analysis in Predicting Validity of Consumer Grade Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, Andy; Heath, Jennifer; Peterson, Janet

    2008-05-01

    Consumer grade bioelectric impedance analysis (BIA) instruments measure the body's impedance at 50 kHz, and yield a quick estimate of percent body fat. The frequency dependence of the impedance gives more information about the current pathway and the response of different tissues. This study explores the impedance response of human tissue at a range of frequencies from 0.2 - 102 kHz using a four probe method and probe locations standard for segmental BIA research of the arm. The data at 50 kHz, for a 21 year old healthy Caucasian male (resistance of 180φ±10 and reactance of 33φ±2) is in agreement with previously reported values [1]. The frequency dependence is not consistent with simple circuit models commonly used in evaluating BIA data, and repeatability of measurements is problematic. This research will contribute to a better understanding of the inherent difficulties in estimating body fat using consumer grade BIA devices. [1] Chumlea, William C., Richard N. Baumgartner, and Alex F. Roche. ``Specific resistivity used to estimate fat-free mass from segmental body measures of bioelectrical impedance.'' Am J Clin Nutr 48 (1998): 7-15.

  7. Control of Drop Motion by Mechanical Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bestehorn, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Since the first experimental observations of Michael Faraday in 1831 it is known that a vibrating liquid may show an instability of its flat free surface with respect to oscillating regular surface patterns. We study thin liquid films on a horizontal substrate in the long wave approximation. The films are parametrically excited by mechanical horizontal or inclined oscillations. Inertia effects are taken into account and the standard thin film formulation is extended by a second equation for the vertically averaged mass flux. The films can be additionally unstable by Van der Waals forces on a partially wetting substrate, leading to the formation of drops. These drops can be manipulated by the vibrations to move in a desired direction. Linear results based on a damped complex valued Mathieu equation as well as fully nonlinear results using a reduced model will be presented, for more details see.

  8. Vibrational Heat Transport in Molecular Junctions.

    PubMed

    Segal, Dvira; Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar

    2016-05-27

    We review studies of vibrational energy transfer in a molecular junction geometry, consisting of a molecule bridging two heat reservoirs, solids or large chemical compounds. This setup is of interest for applications in molecular electronics, thermoelectrics, and nanophononics, and for addressing basic questions in the theory of classical and quantum transport. Calculations show that system size, disorder, structure, dimensionality, internal anharmonicities, contact interaction, and quantum coherent effects are factors that combine to determine the predominant mechanism (ballistic/diffusive), effectiveness (poor/good), and functionality (linear/nonlinear) of thermal conduction at the nanoscale. We review recent experiments and relevant calculations of quantum heat transfer in molecular junctions. We recount the Landauer approach, appropriate for the study of elastic (harmonic) phononic transport, and outline techniques that incorporate molecular anharmonicities. Theoretical methods are described along with examples illustrating the challenge of reaching control over vibrational heat conduction in molecules.

  9. Vibrational Heat Transport in Molecular Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segal, Dvira; Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar

    2016-05-01

    We review studies of vibrational energy transfer in a molecular junction geometry, consisting of a molecule bridging two heat reservoirs, solids or large chemical compounds. This setup is of interest for applications in molecular electronics, thermoelectrics, and nanophononics, and for addressing basic questions in the theory of classical and quantum transport. Calculations show that system size, disorder, structure, dimensionality, internal anharmonicities, contact interaction, and quantum coherent effects are factors that combine to determine the predominant mechanism (ballistic/diffusive), effectiveness (poor/good), and functionality (linear/nonlinear) of thermal conduction at the nanoscale. We review recent experiments and relevant calculations of quantum heat transfer in molecular junctions. We recount the Landauer approach, appropriate for the study of elastic (harmonic) phononic transport, and outline techniques that incorporate molecular anharmonicities. Theoretical methods are described along with examples illustrating the challenge of reaching control over vibrational heat conduction in molecules.

  10. Imaging and characterizing root systems using electrical impedance tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemna, A.; Weigand, M.; Kelter, M.; Pfeifer, J.; Zimmermann, E.; Walter, A.

    2011-12-01

    Root architecture, growth, and activity play an essential role regarding the nutrient uptake of roots in soils. While in recent years advances could be achieved concerning the modeling of root systems, measurement methods capable of imaging, characterizing, and monitoring root structure and dynamics in a non-destructive manner are still lacking, in particular at the field scale. We here propose electrical impedance tomography (EIT) for the imaging of root systems. The approach takes advantage of the low-frequency capacitive electrical properties of the soil-root interface and the root tissue. These properties are based on the induced migration of ions in an externally applied electric field and give rise to characteristic impedance spectra which can be measured by means of electrical impedance spectroscopy. The latter technique was already successfully applied in the 10 Hz to 1 MHz range by Ozier-Lafontaine and Bajazet (2005) to monitor root growth of tomato. We here apply the method in the 1 mHz to 45 kHz range, requiring four-electrode measurements, and demonstrate its implementation and potential in an imaging framework. Images of real and imaginary components of complex electrical conductivity are computed using a finite-element based inversion algorithm with smoothness-constraint regularization. Results from laboratory measurements on rhizotrons with different root systems (barley, rape) show that images of imaginary conductivity delineate the spatial extent of the root system under investigation, while images of real conductivity show a less clear response. As confirmed by numerical simulations, the latter could be explained by the partly compensating electrical conduction properties of epidermis (resistive) and inner root cells (conductive), indicating the limitations of conventional electrical resistivity tomography. The captured spectral behavior exhibits two distinct relaxation processes with Cole-Cole type signatures, which we interpret as the responses

  11. Compressible turbulent channel flow with impedance boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalo, Carlo; Bodart, Julien; Lele, Sanjiva K.

    2015-03-01

    We have performed large-eddy simulations of isothermal-wall compressible turbulent channel flow with linear acoustic impedance boundary conditions (IBCs) for the wall-normal velocity component and no-slip conditions for the tangential velocity components. Three bulk Mach numbers, Mb = 0.05, 0.2, 0.5, with a fixed bulk Reynolds number, Reb = 6900, have been investigated. For each Mb, nine different combinations of IBC settings were tested, in addition to a reference case with impermeable walls, resulting in a total of 30 simulations. The adopted numerical coupling strategy allows for a spatially and temporally consistent imposition of physically realizable IBCs in a fully explicit compressible Navier-Stokes solver. The IBCs are formulated in the time domain according to Fung and Ju ["Time-domain impedance boundary conditions for computational acoustics and aeroacoustics," Int. J. Comput. Fluid Dyn. 18(6), 503-511 (2004)]. The impedance adopted is a three-parameter damped Helmholtz oscillator with resonant angular frequency, ωr, tuned to the characteristic time scale of the large energy-containing eddies. The tuning condition, which reads ωr = 2πMb (normalized with the speed of sound and channel half-width), reduces the IBCs' free parameters to two: the damping ratio, ζ, and the resistance, R, which have been varied independently with values, ζ = 0.5, 0.7, 0.9, and R = 0.01, 0.10, 1.00, for each Mb. The application of the tuned IBCs results in a drag increase up to 300% for Mb = 0.5 and R = 0.01. It is shown that for tuned IBCs, the resistance, R, acts as the inverse of the wall-permeability and that varying the damping ratio, ζ, has a secondary effect on the flow response. Typical buffer-layer turbulent structures are completely suppressed by the application of tuned IBCs. A new resonance buffer layer is established characterized by large spanwise-coherent Kelvin-Helmholtz rollers, with a well-defined streamwise wavelength λx, traveling downstream with

  12. A formulation of rotor-airframe coupling for design analysis of vibrations of helicopter airframes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvaternik, R. G.; Walton, W. C., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A linear formulation of rotor airframe coupling intended for vibration analysis in airframe structural design is presented. The airframe is represented by a finite element analysis model; the rotor is represented by a general set of linear differential equations with periodic coefficients; and the connections between the rotor and airframe are specified through general linear equations of constraint. Coupling equations are applied to the rotor and airframe equations to produce one set of linear differential equations governing vibrations of the combined rotor airframe system. These equations are solved by the harmonic balance method for the system steady state vibrations. A feature of the solution process is the representation of the airframe in terms of forced responses calculated at the rotor harmonics of interest. A method based on matrix partitioning is worked out for quick recalculations of vibrations in design studies when only relatively few airframe members are varied. All relations are presented in forms suitable for direct computer implementation.

  13. On the undamped vibration absorber with cubic stiffness characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatti, G.

    2016-09-01

    In order to improve the performance of a vibration absorber, a nonlinear spring can be used on purpose. This paper presents an analytical insight on the characteristics of an undamped nonlinear vibration absorber when it is attached to a linear spring-mass-damper oscillator. In particular, the nonlinear attachment is modelled as a Duffing's oscillator with a spring characteristics having a linear positive stiffness term plus a cubic stiffness term. The effects of the nonlinearity, mass ratio and frequency ratio are investigated based on an approximate analytical formulation of the amplitude-frequency equation. Comparisons to the linear case are shown in terms of the frequency response curves. The nonlinear absorber seems to show an improved robustness to mistuning respect to the corresponding linear device. However, such a better robustness may be limited by some instability of the expected harmonic response.

  14. Superconducting fault current-limiter with variable shunt impedance

    DOEpatents

    Llambes, Juan Carlos H; Xiong, Xuming

    2013-11-19

    A superconducting fault current-limiter is provided, including a superconducting element configured to resistively or inductively limit a fault current, and one or more variable-impedance shunts electrically coupled in parallel with the superconducting element. The variable-impedance shunt(s) is configured to present a first impedance during a superconducting state of the superconducting element and a second impedance during a normal resistive state of the superconducting element. The superconducting element transitions from the superconducting state to the normal resistive state responsive to the fault current, and responsive thereto, the variable-impedance shunt(s) transitions from the first to the second impedance. The second impedance of the variable-impedance shunt(s) is a lower impedance than the first impedance, which facilitates current flow through the variable-impedance shunt(s) during a recovery transition of the superconducting element from the normal resistive state to the superconducting state, and thus, facilitates recovery of the superconducting element under load.

  15. Bioelectrical Impedance Methods for Noninvasive Health Monitoring: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Bera, Tushar Kanti

    2014-01-01

    Under the alternating electrical excitation, biological tissues produce a complex electrical impedance which depends on tissue composition, structures, health status, and applied signal frequency, and hence the bioelectrical impedance methods can be utilized for noninvasive tissue characterization. As the impedance responses of these tissue parameters vary with frequencies of the applied signal, the impedance analysis conducted over a wide frequency band provides more information about the tissue interiors which help us to better understand the biological tissues anatomy, physiology, and pathology. Over past few decades, a number of impedance based noninvasive tissue characterization techniques such as bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), electrical impedance plethysmography (IPG), impedance cardiography (ICG), and electrical impedance tomography (EIT) have been proposed and a lot of research works have been conducted on these methods for noninvasive tissue characterization and disease diagnosis. In this paper BIA, EIS, IPG, ICG, and EIT techniques and their applications in different fields have been reviewed and technical perspective of these impedance methods has been presented. The working principles, applications, merits, and demerits of these methods has been discussed in detail along with their other technical issues followed by present status and future trends. PMID:27006932

  16. Mechanism of the formation for thoracic impedance change.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Ming-Xing; Xiao, Qiu-Jin; Cui, Chao-Ying; Kuang, Nan-Zhen; Hong, Wen-Qin; Hu, Ai-Rong

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the mechanism of the formation for thoracic impedance change. On the basis of Ohm's law and the electrical field distribution in the cylindrical volume conductor, the formula about the thoracic impedance change are deduced, and they are demonstrated with the model experiment. The results indicate that the thoracic impedance change caused by single blood vessel is directly proportional to the ratio of the impedance change to the basal impedance of the blood vessel itself, to the length of the blood vessel appearing between the current electrodes, and to the basal impedance between two detective electrodes on the chest surface, while it is inversely proportional to the distance between the blood vessel and the line joining two detective electrodes. The thoracic impedance change caused by multiple blood vessels together is equal to the algebraic addition of all thoracic impedance changes resulting from the individual blood vessels. That is, the impedance changes obey the principle of adding scalars in the measurement of the electrical impedance graph. The present study can offer the theoretical basis for the waveform reconstruction of Impedance cardiography (ICG).

  17. Three-dimensional electrical impedance tomography of human brain activity.

    PubMed

    Tidswell, T; Gibson, A; Bayford, R H; Holder, D S

    2001-02-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow and blood volume changes that occur during human brain activity will change the local impedance of that cortical area, as blood has a lower impedance than that of brain. Theoretically, such impedance changes could be measured from scalp electrodes and reconstructed into images of the internal impedance of the head. Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) is a newly developed technique by which impedance measurements from the surface of an object are reconstructed into impedance images. It is fast, portable, inexpensive, and noninvasive, but has a relatively low spatial resolution. EIT images were recorded with scalp electrodes and an EIT system, specially optimized for recording brain function, in 39 adult human subjects during visual, somatosensory, or motor activity. Reproducible impedance changes of about 0.5% occurred in 51/52 recordings, which lasted from 6 s after the stimulus onset to 41 s after stimulus cessation. When these changes were reconstructed into impedance images, using a novel 3-D reconstruction algorithm, 19 data sets demonstrated significant impedance changes in the appropriate cortical region. This demonstrates, for the first time, that significant impedance changes, which could form the basis for a novel neuroimaging technology, may be recorded in human subjects with scalp electrodes. The final images contained spatial noise and strategies to reduce this in future work are presented.

  18. Vibration of Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leissa, A. W.

    1973-01-01

    The vibrational characteristics and mechanical properties of shell structures are discussed. The subjects presented are: (1) fundamental equations of thin shell theory, (2) characteristics of thin circular cylindrical shells, (3) complicating effects in circular cylindrical shells, (4) noncircular cylindrical shell properties, (5) characteristics of spherical shells, and (6) solution of three-dimensional equations of motion for cylinders.

  19. Blade Vibration Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The Phase I project successfully demonstrated that an advanced noncontacting stress measurement system (NSMS) could improve classification of blade vibration response in terms of mistuning and closely spaced modes. The Phase II work confirmed the microwave sensor design process, modified the sensor so it is compatible as an upgrade to existing NSMS, and improved and finalized the NSMS software. The result will be stand-alone radar/tip timing radar signal conditioning for current conventional NSMS users (as an upgrade) and new users. The hybrid system will use frequency data and relative mode vibration levels from the radar sensor to provide substantially superior capabilities over current blade-vibration measurement technology. This frequency data, coupled with a reduced number of tip timing probes, will result in a system capable of detecting complex blade vibrations that would confound traditional NSMS systems. The hardware and software package was validated on a compressor rig at Mechanical Solutions, Inc. (MSI). Finally, the hybrid radar/tip timing NSMS software package and associated sensor hardware will be installed for use in the NASA Glenn spin pit test facility.

  20. Nonlinear vibrational microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Holtom, Gary R.; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Zumbusch, Andreas

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for microscopic vibrational imaging using coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering or Sum Frequency Generation. Microscopic imaging with a vibrational spectroscopic contrast is achieved by generating signals in a nonlinear optical process and spatially resolved detection of the signals. The spatial resolution is attained by minimizing the spot size of the optical interrogation beams on the sample. Minimizing the spot size relies upon a. directing at least two substantially co-axial laser beams (interrogation beams) through a microscope objective providing a focal spot on the sample; b. collecting a signal beam together with a residual beam from the at least two co-axial laser beams after passing through the sample; c. removing the residual beam; and d. detecting the signal beam thereby creating said pixel. The method has significantly higher spatial resolution then IR microscopy and higher sensitivity than spontaneous Raman microscopy with much lower average excitation powers. CARS and SFG microscopy does not rely on the presence of fluorophores, but retains the resolution and three-dimensional sectioning capability of confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Complementary to these techniques, CARS and SFG microscopy provides a contrast mechanism based on vibrational spectroscopy. This vibrational contrast mechanism, combined with an unprecedented high sensitivity at a tolerable laser power level, provides a new approach for microscopic investigations of chemical and biological samples.