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Sample records for linear plasmid vector

  1. Designing plasmid vectors.

    PubMed

    Tolmachov, Oleg

    2009-01-01

    Nonviral gene therapy vectors are commonly based on recombinant bacterial plasmids or their derivatives. The plasmids are propagated in bacteria, so, in addition to their therapeutic cargo, they necessarily contain a bacterial replication origin and a selection marker, usually a gene conferring antibiotic resistance. Structural and maintenance plasmid stability in bacteria is required for the plasmid DNA production and can be achieved by carefully choosing a combination of the therapeutic DNA sequences, replication origin, selection marker, and bacterial strain. The use of appropriate promoters, other regulatory elements, and mammalian maintenance devices ensures that the therapeutic gene or genes are adequately expressed in target human cells. Optimal immune response to the plasmid vectors can be modulated via inclusion or exclusion of DNA sequences containing immunostimulatory CpG sequence motifs. DNA fragments facilitating construction of plasmid vectors should also be considered for inclusion in the design of plasmid vectors. Techniques relying on site-specific or homologous recombination are preferred for construction of large plasmids (>15 kb), while digestion of DNA by restriction enzymes with subsequent ligation of the resulting DNA fragments continues to be the mainstream approach for generation of small- and medium-size plasmids. Rapid selection of a desired recombinant plasmid against a background of other plasmids continues to be a challenge. In this chapter, the emphasis is placed on efficient and flexible versions of DNA cloning protocols using selection of recombinant plasmids by restriction endonucleases directly in the ligation mixture.

  2. Building mosaics of therapeutic plasmid gene vectors.

    PubMed

    Tolmachov, Oleg E

    2011-12-01

    Plasmids are circular or linear DNA molecules propagated extra-chromosomally in bacteria. Evolution shaped plasmids are inherently mosaic structures with individual functional units represented by distinct segments in the plasmid genome. The patchwork of plasmid genetic modules is a convenient template and a model for the generation of artificial plasmids used as vehicles for gene delivery into human cells. Plasmid gene vectors are an important tool in gene therapy and in basic biomedical research, where these vectors offer efficient transgene expression in many settings in vitro and in vivo. Plasmid vectors can be attached to nuclear directing ligands or transferred by electroporation as naked DNA to deliver the payload genes to the nuclei of the target cells. Transgene expression silencing by plasmid sequences of bacterial origin and immune stimulation by bacterial unmethylated CpG motifs can be avoided by the generation of plasmid-based minimized DNA vectors, such as minicircles. Systems of efficient site-specific integration into human chromosomes and stable episomal maintenance in human cells are being developed for further reduction of the chances for transgene silencing. The successful generation of plasmid vectors is governed by a number of vector design rules, some of which are common to all gene vectors, while others are specific to plasmid vectors. This review is focused both on the guiding principles and on the technical know-how of plasmid gene vector design.

  3. Extranuclear expression of the bacterial xylose isomerase (xylA) and the UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (hasB) genes in yeast with Kluyveromyces lactis linear killer plasmids as vectors.

    PubMed

    Schründer, J; Gunge, N; Meinhardt, F

    1996-11-01

    On the basis of the linear killer plasmid pGKL1 from Kluyveromyces lactis, two new linear hybrid plasmids were constructed. One of these, pRSC126, carried the xylA gene from Streptomyces rubiginosus encoding the xylose isomerase. The other linear hybrid molecule, pRSC128, carried the hasB gene of Streptococcus pyogenes encoding the UDP glucose dehydrogenase. Construction was performed in a way that the putative cytoplasmic promoter element of ORF5 of pGKL2 was fused to the coding region of the heterologous genes. After transformation, in vivo recombination led to the establishment of linear hybrid vectors. Though efficiency of expression was low when compared with bacterial systems, cytoplasmic expression of both genes was clearly demonstrated.

  4. Electrotransfer of Plasmid Vector DNA into Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Satsuki; Miyazaki, Jun-Ichi

    Wolff et al. (1990) first reported that plasmid DNA injected into skeletal muscle is taken up by muscle cells and the genes in the plasmid are expressed for more than two months thereafter, although the transfected DNA does not usually undergo chromosomal integration (Wolff et al., 1991, 1992). However, the relatively low expression levels attained by this method have hampered its applications for uses other than as a DNA vaccine (Davis et al., 1995). There are a number of reports analyzing the conditions that affect the efficiency of gene transfer by intramuscular DNA injection and assessing the fine structures of expression plasmid vectors that may affect expression levels (Davis et al., 1993; Liang et al., 1996; Norman et al., 1997). Furthermore, various attempts were done to improve the efficiency of gene transfer by intramus cular DNA injection. Consequently, regenerating muscle was shown to produce 80-fold or more protein than did normal muscle, following injection of an expression plas-mid. Muscle regeneration was induced by treatment with cardiotoxin or bupivacaine (Wells, 1993; Vitadello et al., 1994). We previously demonstrated that by combining a strong promoter and bupivacaine pretreatment intramuscular injection of an IL-5 expression plasmid results in IL-5 production in muscle at a level sufficient to induce marked proliferation of eosinophils in the bone marrow and eosinophil infiltration of various organs (Tokui et al., 1997). It was also reported that a single intramuscular injection of an erythropoietin expression plasmid produced physiologically significant elevations in serum erythropoietin levels and increased hematocrits in adult mice (Tripathy et al., 1996). Hematocrits in these animals remained elevated at >60% for at least 90 days after a single injection. However, improvements to this method have not been sufficient to extend its applications including clinical use.

  5. N15: the linear phage-plasmid.

    PubMed

    Ravin, Nikolai V

    2011-03-01

    The lambdoid phage N15 of Escherichia coli is very unusual among temperate phages in that its prophage is not integrated into chromosome but is a linear plasmid molecule with covalently closed ends. Upon infection the phage DNA circularises via cohesive ends, then phage-encoded enzyme, protelomerase, cuts at an inverted repeat site and forms hairpin ends (telomeres) of the linear plasmid prophage. Replication of the N15 prophage is initiated at an internally located ori site and proceeds bidirectionally resulting in formation of duplicated telomeres. Then the N15 protelomerase cuts duplicated telomeres generating two linear plasmid molecules with hairpin telomeres. Stable inheritance of the plasmid prophage is ensured by partitioning operon similar to the F factor sop operon. Unlike F sop, the N15 centromere consists of four inverted repeats dispersed in the genome. The multiplicity and dispersion of centromeres are required for efficient partitioning of a linear plasmid. The centromeres are located in N15 genome regions involved in phage replication and control of lysogeny, and binding of partition proteins at these sites regulates these processes. Two N15-related lambdoid Siphoviridae phages, φKO2 in Klebsiella oxytoca and pY54 in Yersinia enterocolitica, also lysogenize their hosts as linear plasmids, as well as Myoviridae marine phages VP882 and VP58.5 in Vibrio parahaemolyticus and ΦHAP-1 in Halomonas aquamarina. The genomes of all these phages contain similar protelomerase genes, lysogeny modules and replication genes, as well as plasmid-partitioning genes, suggesting that these phages may belong to a group diverged from a common ancestor.

  6. Manipulating yeast genome using plasmid vectors.

    PubMed

    Stearns, T; Ma, H; Botstein, D

    1990-01-01

    The vectors and techniques described here enable one to manipulate the yeast genome to meet specific needs. Genes can be cloned, and the clone used to delete the wild-type gene from the chromosome, or replace it with mutant versions. Mutants derived by classical methods, such as mutagenesis of whole cells, or by reversion of a phenotype, can be cloned and analyzed in vitro. Yeast genes and foreign genes can either be inserted into autonomously replicating plasmid vectors that are reasonably stable or integrated into a yeast chromosome where they are maintained at one copy per genome. The combination of these techniques with the characterized promoter systems available in yeast make it possible to express almost any gene in yeast. Once this is achieved, the entire repertoire of yeast genetics is available to probe the function of the gene, or to engineer the expression in useful ways.

  7. pLS101 plasmid vector

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, S.A.; Balganesh, T.S.

    1985-02-19

    Disclosed is recombinant plasmid pLS101, consisting essentially of a 2.0 Kb ma1M gene fragment ligated to a 4.4 Kb Tcr DNA fragment, which is particularly useful for transforming Gram-positive bacteria. This plasmid contains at least four restriction sites suitable for inserting exogeneous gene sequences. Also disclosed is a method for plasmid isolation by penicillin selection, as well as processes for enrichment of recombinant plasmids in Gram-positive bacterial systems. 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. pLS010 plasmid vector

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, Sanford A.; Balganesh, Tanjore S.

    1988-01-01

    Disclosed is recombinant plasmid pLS101, consisting essentially of a 2.0 Kb malM gene fragment ligated to a 4.4 Kb T.sub.c r DNA fragment, which is particularly useful for transforming Gram-positive bacteria. This plasmid contains at least four restriction sites suitable for inserting exogeneous gene sequences. Also disclosed is a method for plasmid isolation by penicillin selection, as well as processes for enrichment of recombinant plasmids in Gram-positive bacterial systems.

  9. Linear plasmid in the genome of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus.

    PubMed

    Brown, Susan E; Knudson, Dennis L; Ishimaru, Carol A

    2002-05-01

    Contour-clamped homogeneous electric field gel analysis of genomic DNA of the plant pathogen Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus revealed the presence of a previously unreported extrachromosomal element. This new element was demonstrated to be a linear plasmid. Of 11 strains evaluated, all contained either a 90-kb (pCSL1) or a 140-kb (pCSL2) linear plasmid.

  10. Linear Plasmid in the Genome of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Susan E.; Knudson, Dennis L.; Ishimaru, Carol A.

    2002-01-01

    Contour-clamped homogeneous electric field gel analysis of genomic DNA of the plant pathogen Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus revealed the presence of a previously unreported extrachromosomal element. This new element was demonstrated to be a linear plasmid. Of 11 strains evaluated, all contained either a 90-kb (pCSL1) or a 140-kb (pCSL2) linear plasmid. PMID:11976316

  11. Large linear plasmids of Borrelia species that cause relapsing fever.

    PubMed

    Miller, Shelley Campeau; Porcella, Stephen F; Raffel, Sandra J; Schwan, Tom G; Barbour, Alan G

    2013-08-01

    Borrelia species of relapsing fever (RF) and Lyme disease (LD) lineages have linear chromosomes and both linear and circular plasmids. Unique to RF species, and little characterized to date, are large linear plasmids of ∼160 kb, or ∼10% of the genome. By a combination of Sanger and next-generation methods, we determined the sequences of large linear plasmids of two New World species: Borrelia hermsii, to completion of its 174-kb length, and B. turicatae, partially to 114 kb of its 150 kb. These sequences were then compared to corresponding sequences of the Old World species B. duttonii and B. recurrentis and to plasmid sequences of LD Borrelia species. The large plasmids were largely colinear, except for their left ends, about 27 kb of which was inverted in New World species. Approximately 60% of the B. hermsii lp174 plasmid sequence was repetitive for 6 types of sequence, and half of its open reading frames encoded hypothetical proteins not discernibly similar to proteins in the database. The central ∼25 kb of all 4 linear plasmids was syntenic for orthologous genes for plasmid maintenance or partitioning in Borrelia species. Of all the sequenced linear and circular plasmids in Borrelia species, the large plasmid's putative partition/replication genes were most similar to those of the 54-kb linear plasmids of LD species. Further evidence for shared ancestry was the observation that two of the hypothetical proteins were predicted to be structurally similar to the LD species' CspA proteins, which are encoded on the 54-kb plasmids.

  12. Large Linear Plasmids of Borrelia Species That Cause Relapsing Fever

    PubMed Central

    Porcella, Stephen F.; Raffel, Sandra J.; Schwan, Tom G.; Barbour, Alan G.

    2013-01-01

    Borrelia species of relapsing fever (RF) and Lyme disease (LD) lineages have linear chromosomes and both linear and circular plasmids. Unique to RF species, and little characterized to date, are large linear plasmids of ∼160 kb, or ∼10% of the genome. By a combination of Sanger and next-generation methods, we determined the sequences of large linear plasmids of two New World species: Borrelia hermsii, to completion of its 174-kb length, and B. turicatae, partially to 114 kb of its 150 kb. These sequences were then compared to corresponding sequences of the Old World species B. duttonii and B. recurrentis and to plasmid sequences of LD Borrelia species. The large plasmids were largely colinear, except for their left ends, about 27 kb of which was inverted in New World species. Approximately 60% of the B. hermsii lp174 plasmid sequence was repetitive for 6 types of sequence, and half of its open reading frames encoded hypothetical proteins not discernibly similar to proteins in the database. The central ∼25 kb of all 4 linear plasmids was syntenic for orthologous genes for plasmid maintenance or partitioning in Borrelia species. Of all the sequenced linear and circular plasmids in Borrelia species, the large plasmid's putative partition/replication genes were most similar to those of the 54-kb linear plasmids of LD species. Further evidence for shared ancestry was the observation that two of the hypothetical proteins were predicted to be structurally similar to the LD species' CspA proteins, which are encoded on the 54-kb plasmids. PMID:23749977

  13. Replication and Maintenance of Linear Phage-Plasmid N15.

    PubMed

    Ravin, Nikolai V

    2015-02-01

    The lambdoid phage N15 of Escherichia coli is very unusual among temperate phages in that its prophage is not integrated into the chromosome but is a linear plasmid molecule with covalently closed ends (telomeres). Upon infection, the phage DNA circularizes via cohesive ends, and then a special phage enzyme of the tyrosine recombinase family, protelomerase, cuts at another site and joins the ends, forming hairpin telomeres of the linear plasmid prophage. Replication of the N15 prophage is initiated at an internally located ori site and proceeds bidirectionally, resulting in the formation of duplicated telomeres. The N15 protelomerase cuts them, generating two linear plasmid molecules with hairpin telomeres. Stable inheritance of the plasmid prophage is ensured by a partitioning operon similar to the F factor sop operon. Unlike the F centromere, the N15 centromere consists of four inverted repeats dispersed in the genome. The multiplicity and dispersion of centromeres are required for efficient partitioning of a linear plasmid. The centromeres are located in the N15 genome regions involved in phage replication and control of lytic development, and binding of partition proteins at these sites regulates these processes. The family of N15-like linear phage-plasmids includes lambdoid phages ɸKO2 and pY54, as well as Myoviridae phages ΦHAP-1, VHML, VP882, Vp58.5, and vB_VpaM_MAR of marine gamma-proteobacteria. The genomes of these phages contain similar protelomerase genes, lysogeny control modules, and replication genes, suggesting that these phages may belong to a group diverged from a common ancestor.

  14. Development of plasmid cloning vectors for Thermus thermophilus HB8: Expression of a heterologous, plasmid-borne kanamycin nucleotidyltransferase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Mather, M.W.; Fee, J.A. )

    1992-01-01

    While several thermus genes have been cloned and T. thermophilus has been shown to be transformable, molecular genetic studies of these thermophiles have been hampered by the absence of selectable cloning vectors. The authors have constructed a selectable plasmid by random insertion of a heterologous gene encoding a thermostable kanamycin nucleotidyltransferase activity into a cryptic, multicopy plasmid from T. thermophilus HB8. This plasmid should serve as a suitable starting point for the development of a gene expression system for T. thermophilus.

  15. Comprehensive set of integrative plasmid vectors for copper-inducible gene expression in Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Santos, Nuria; Treuner-Lange, Anke; Moraleda-Muñoz, Aurelio; García-Bravo, Elena; García-Hernández, Raquel; Martínez-Cayuela, Marina; Pérez, Juana; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte; Muñoz-Dorado, José

    2012-04-01

    Myxococcus xanthus is widely used as a model system for studying gliding motility, multicellular development, and cellular differentiation. Moreover, M. xanthus is a rich source of novel secondary metabolites. The analysis of these processes has been hampered by the limited set of tools for inducible gene expression. Here we report the construction of a set of plasmid vectors to allow copper-inducible gene expression in M. xanthus. Analysis of the effect of copper on strain DK1622 revealed that copper concentrations of up to 500 μM during growth and 60 μM during development do not affect physiological processes such as cell viability, motility, or aggregation into fruiting bodies. Of the copper-responsive promoters in M. xanthus reported so far, the multicopper oxidase cuoA promoter was used to construct expression vectors, because no basal expression is observed in the absence of copper and induction linearly depends on the copper concentration in the culture medium. Four different plasmid vectors have been constructed, with different marker selection genes and sites of integration in the M. xanthus chromosome. The vectors have been tested and gene expression quantified using the lacZ gene. Moreover, we demonstrate the functional complementation of the motility defect caused by lack of PilB by the copper-induced expression of the pilB gene. These versatile vectors are likely to deepen our understanding of the biology of M. xanthus and may also have biotechnological applications.

  16. Linear prediction of stationary vector sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baram, Yoram

    1988-01-01

    The class of all linear predictors of minimal order for a stationary vector-valued process is specified in terms of linear transformations on the associated Hankel covariance matrix. Two particular transformations, yielding computationally efficient construction schemes, are proposed.

  17. The critical role of the linear plasmid lp36 in the infectious cycle of Borrelia burgdorferi

    PubMed Central

    Jewett, Mollie W; Lawrence, Kevin; Bestor, Aaron C; Tilly, Kit; Grimm, Dorothee; Shaw, Pamela; VanRaden, Mark; Gherardini, Frank; Rosa, Patricia A

    2007-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the aetiological agent of Lyme disease, follows a life cycle that involves passage between the tick vector and the mammalian host. To investigate the role of the 36 kb linear plasmid, lp36 (also designated the B. burgdorferi K plasmid), in the infectious cycle of B. burgdorferi, we examined a clone lacking this plasmid, but containing all other plasmids known to be required for infectivity. Our results indicated that lp36 was not required for spirochete survival in the tick, but the clone lacking lp36 demonstrated low infectivity in the mammal. Restoration of lp36 to the mutant strain confirmed that the infectivity defect was due to loss of lp36. Moreover, spirochetes lacking lp36 exhibited a nearly 4-log increase in ID50 relative to the isogenic lp36+ clone. The infectivity defect of lp36-minus spirochetes was localized, in part, to loss of the bbk17 (adeC) gene, which encodes an adenine deaminase. This work establishes a vital role for lp36 in the infectious cycle of B. burgdorferi and identifies the bbk17 gene as a component of this plasmid that contributes to mammalian infectivity. PMID:17542926

  18. Plasmid-Chromosome Recombination of Irradiated Shuttle Vector DNA in African Green Monkey Kidney Cells.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudgett, John Stuart

    1987-09-01

    An autonomously replicating shuttle vector was used to investigate the enhancement of plasmid-chromosome recombination in mammalian host cells by ultraviolet light and gamma radiation. Sequences homologous to the shuttle vector were stably inserted into the genome of African Green Monkey kidney cells to act as the target substrate for these recombination events. The SV40- and pBR322-derived plasmid DNA was irradiated with various doses of radiation before transfection into the transformed mammalian host cells. The successful homologous transfer of the bacterial ampicillin resistance (amp^{rm r}) gene from the inserted sequences to replace a mutant amp^->=ne on the shuttle vector was identified by plasmid extraction and transformation into E. coli host cells. Ultraviolet light (UV) was found not to induce homologous plasmid-chromosome recombination, while gamma radiation increased the frequency of recombinant plasmids detected. The introduction of specific double -strand breaks in the plasmid or prolonging the time of plasmid residence in the mammalian host cells also enhanced plasmid-chromosome recombination. In contrast, plasmid mutagenesis was found to be increased by plasmid UV irradiation, but not to change with time. Plasmid survival, recombination, and mutagenesis were not affected by treating the mammalian host cells with UV light prior to plasmid transfection. The amp^{rm r} recombinant plasmid molecules analyzed were found to be mostly the result of nonconservative exchanges which appeared to involve both homologous and possibly nonhomologous interactions with the host chromosome. The observation that these recombinant structures were obtained from all of the plasmid alterations investigated suggests a common mechanistic origin for plasmid -chromosome recombination in these mammalian cells.

  19. Rearrangement and mutagenesis of a shuttle vector plasmid after passage in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Razzaque, A; Mizusawa, H; Seidman, M M

    1983-01-01

    A shuttle vector plasmid that contains sequences from simian virus 40, pBR322, and a bacterial marker gene, galactokinase, has been constructed. After replication in cells permissive for virus progeny, plasmid DNA was introduced into a galactokinase-deficient bacterial strain and the relative frequency of colonies with plasmids but without galactokinase activity was determined. This assay showed that 1% of the plasmids were defective after passage in the mammalian cells. Individual mutant plasmids were examined and found to contain deletions, duplications, point mutations, and insertions of cell DNA. Images PMID:6304690

  20. Plasmid vectors for Xylella fastidiosa utilizing a toxin-antitoxin system for plasmid stability in the absence of antibiotic selection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa causes disease in a variety of important crop and landscape plants. Functional genetic studies have led to a broader understanding of virulence mechanisms used by this pathogen in the grapevine host. Plasmid shuttle vectors are important tools in studies of bacte...

  1. Remarkable stability of an instability-prone lentiviral vector plasmid in Escherichia coli Stbl3.

    PubMed

    Al-Allaf, Faisal A; Tolmachov, Oleg E; Zambetti, Lia Paola; Tchetchelnitski, Viktoria; Mehmet, Huseyin

    2013-02-01

    Large-scale production of plasmid DNA to prepare therapeutic gene vectors or DNA-based vaccines requires a suitable bacterial host, which can stably maintain the plasmid DNA during industrial cultivation. Plasmid loss during bacterial cell divisions and structural changes in the plasmid DNA can dramatically reduce the yield of the desired recombinant plasmid DNA. While generating an HIV-based gene vector containing a bicistronic expression cassette 5'-Olig2cDNA-IRES-dsRed2-3', we encountered plasmid DNA instability, which occurred in homologous recombination deficient recA1 Escherichia coli strain Stbl2 specifically during large-scale bacterial cultivation. Unexpectedly, the new recombinant plasmid was structurally changed or completely lost in 0.5 L liquid cultures but not in the preceding 5 mL cultures. Neither the employment of an array of alternative recA1 E. coli plasmid hosts, nor the lowering of the culture incubation temperature prevented the instability. However, after the introduction of this instability-prone plasmid into the recA13E. coli strain Stbl3, the transformed bacteria grew without being overrun by plasmid-free cells, reduction in the plasmid DNA yield or structural changes in plasmid DNA. Thus, E. coli strain Stbl3 conferred structural and maintenance stability to the otherwise instability-prone lentivirus-based recombinant plasmid, suggesting that this strain can be used for the faithful maintenance of similar stability-compromised plasmids in large-scale bacterial cultivations. In contrast to Stbl2, which is derived wholly from the wild type isolate E. coli K12, E. coli Stbl3 is a hybrid strain of mixed E. coli K12 and E. coli B parentage. Therefore, we speculate that genetic determinants for the benevolent properties of E. coli Stbl3 for safe plasmid propagation originate from its E. coli B ancestor.

  2. Molecular cloning of complementary DNA: preparation of a plasmid vector with low transformation background.

    PubMed

    Leriche, A; Christophe, D; Brocas, H; Vassart, G

    1983-02-15

    A simple method that allows the rapid preparation of oligo dG-tailed plasmid vectors is presented. The procedure involves purification of the tailed molecules by hybridization to oligo dC-cellulose followed by a stepwise thermal elution. The resulting plasmid is virtually devoid of transformation activity in the absence of oligo dC-tailed DNA fragments. It allows construction of cDNA libraries with as low as 1% of colonies harboring wild-type plasmids.

  3. 8-Methoxypsoralen photoinduced plasmid-chromosome recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a centromeric vector.

    PubMed Central

    Meira, L B; Henriques, J A; Magaña-Schwencke, N

    1995-01-01

    The characterization of a new system to study the induction of plasmid-chromosome recombination is described. Single-stranded and double-stranded centromeric vectors bearing 8-methoxypsoralen photoinduced lesions were used to transform a wild-type yeast strain bearing the leu2-3,112 marker. Using the SSCP methodology and DNA sequencing, it was demonstrated that repair of the lesions in plasmid DNA was mainly due to conversion of the chromosomal allele to the plasmid DNA. Images PMID:7784218

  4. The 2-micron plasmid as a nonselectable, stable, high copy number yeast vector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, D. L.; Bruschi, C. V.

    1991-01-01

    The endogenous 2-microns plasmid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used extensively for the construction of yeast cloning and expression plasmids because it is a native yeast plasmid that is able to be maintained stably in cells at high copy number. Almost invariably, these plasmid constructs, containing some or all 2-microns sequences, exhibit copy number levels lower than 2-microns and are maintained stably only under selective conditions. We were interested in determining if there was a means by which 2-microns could be utilized for vector construction, without forfeiting either copy number or nonselective stability. We identified sites in the 2-microns plasmid that could be used for the insertion of genetic sequences without disrupting 2-microns coding elements and then assessed subsequent plasmid constructs for stability and copy number in vivo. We demonstrate the utility of a previously described 2-microns recombination chimera, pBH-2L, for the manipulation and transformation of 2-microns as a pure yeast plasmid vector. We show that the HpaI site near the STB element in the 2-microns plasmid can be utilized to clone yeast DNA of at least 3.9 kb with no loss of plasmid stability. Additionally, the copy number of these constructs is as high as levels reported for the endogenous 2-microns.

  5. The 2-micron plasmid as a nonselectable, stable, high copy number yeast vector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, D. L.; Bruschi, C. V.

    1991-01-01

    The endogenous 2-microns plasmid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used extensively for the construction of yeast cloning and expression plasmids because it is a native yeast plasmid that is able to be maintained stably in cells at high copy number. Almost invariably, these plasmid constructs, containing some or all 2-microns sequences, exhibit copy number levels lower than 2-microns and are maintained stably only under selective conditions. We were interested in determining if there was a means by which 2-microns could be utilized for vector construction, without forfeiting either copy number or nonselective stability. We identified sites in the 2-microns plasmid that could be used for the insertion of genetic sequences without disrupting 2-microns coding elements and then assessed subsequent plasmid constructs for stability and copy number in vivo. We demonstrate the utility of a previously described 2-microns recombination chimera, pBH-2L, for the manipulation and transformation of 2-microns as a pure yeast plasmid vector. We show that the HpaI site near the STB element in the 2-microns plasmid can be utilized to clone yeast DNA of at least 3.9 kb with no loss of plasmid stability. Additionally, the copy number of these constructs is as high as levels reported for the endogenous 2-microns.

  6. Engineering of bacterial strains and vectors for the production of plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Bower, Diana M; Prather, Kristala L J

    2009-04-01

    The demand for plasmid DNA (pDNA) is anticipated to increase significantly as DNA vaccines and non-viral gene therapies enter phase 3 clinical trials and are approved for use. This increased demand, along with renewed interest in pDNA as a therapeutic vector, has motivated research targeting the design of high-yield, cost-effective manufacturing processes. An important aspect of this research is engineering bacterial strains and plasmids that are specifically suited to the production of plasmid biopharmaceuticals. This review will survey recent innovations in strain and vector engineering that aim to improve plasmid stability, enhance product safety, increase yield, and facilitate downstream purification. While these innovations all seek to enhance pDNA production, they can vary in complexity from subtle alterations of the host genome or vector backbone to the investigation of non-traditional host strains for higher pDNA yields.

  7. Development of small high-copy-number plasmid vectors for gene expression in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Umelo-Njaka, E; Nomellini, J F; Yim, H; Smit, J

    2001-07-01

    Caulobacter crescentus is a bacterium with a distinctive life cycle and so it is studied as a cell development model. In addition, we have adapted this bacterium for recombinant protein production and display based on the crystalline surface protein (S)-layer and its C-terminal secretion signal. We report here the development of small, high-copy-number plasmid vectors and methods for producing an obligate expression host. The vectors are based on a narrow-host-range colE1-replicon-based plasmid commonly used in Escherichia coli, to which was added the replication origin of the IncQ plasmid RSF1010. C. crescentus strains were modified to enable plasmid replication by introduction of the RSF1010 repBAC genes at the recA locus. The small (4.0-4.5 kb) plasmids were in high copy numbers in both C. crescentus and E. coli and amenable to rapid methods for plasmid isolation and DNA sequencing. The method for introducing repBAC is suitable for other C. crescentus strains or any bacterium with an adequately homologous recA gene. Application of the vector for protein expression, based on the type I secretion system of the S-layer protein, when compared to constructs in broad-host-range plasmids, resulted in reduced time and steps required from clone construction to recombinant protein recovery and increased protein yield.

  8. Versatile gene cassette plasmids to facilitate the construction of generalized and specialized cloning vectors.

    PubMed

    Mongkolsuk, S; Vattanaviboon, P; Rabibhadana, S; Kiatpapan, P

    1993-02-14

    We have built a series of useful gene cassette plasmids to facilitate the construction of generalized and specialized cloning vectors. The gene cassettes consist of two promoter-less genes, cat and gus, a selectable marker gene (tet) and an IncP mob sequence. All of these genes in the cassette vectors are flanked by many unique restriction sites to facilitate their use in the construction of cloning vectors.

  9. 3G vector-primer plasmid for constructing full-length-enriched cDNA libraries.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dong; Zhou, Yanna; Zhang, Zidong; Li, Zaiyu; Liu, Xuedong

    2008-09-01

    We designed a 3G vector-primer plasmid for the generation of full-length-enriched complementary DNA (cDNA) libraries. By employing the terminal transferase activity of reverse transcriptase and the modified strand replacement method, this plasmid (assembled with a polydT end and a deoxyguanosine [dG] end) combines priming full-length cDNA strand synthesis and directional cDNA cloning. As a result, the number of steps involved in cDNA library preparation is decreased while simplifying downstream gene manipulation, sequencing, and subcloning. The 3G vector-primer plasmid method yields fully represented plasmid primed libraries that are equivalent to those made by the SMART (switching mechanism at 5' end of RNA transcript) approach.

  10. DNA-based methods to prepare helper virus-free herpes amplicon vectors and versatile design of amplicon vector plasmids.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Kazue; Saeki, Yoshinaga

    2006-06-01

    The herpes simplex virus (HSV) amplicon vector is a versatile plasmid-based gene delivery vehicle with a large transgene capacity (up to 150 kb) and the ability to infect a broad range of cell types. The vector system was originally developed by Frenkel and her colleagues in 1980. Ever since, a great deal of effort by various investigators has been directed at minimizing the toxicity associated with the inevitable contamination by helper virus. In 1996, Fraefel and his colleagues successfully devised a cosmid-based packaging system that was free of contamination by helper virus (so-called helper virus-free packaging), which utilized as helper a set of 5 overlapping cosmid clones that covered the entire HSV genome, which lacked the DNA packaging/cleavage signals. With the helper virus-free system, broader applications of the vector became possible. Cloning of the entire HSV genome in bacteria artificial chromosome (BAC) plasmids enabled stable maintenance and propagation of the helper HSV genome in bacteria. It also allowed for the development of BAC-based helper virus-free packaging systems. In this article, we review various versions of DNA-based methods to prepare HSV amplicon vectors free of helper virus contamination. We also examine recent advances in vector design, including methods of vector construction, hybrid amplicon vectors, and the infectious BAC system. Future directions in improving packaging systems and vector designs are discussed.

  11. A new plasmid vector for DNA delivery using lactococci

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Valeria; Innocentin, Sylvia; Chatel, Jean-Marc; Lefèvre, François; Langella, Philippe; Azevedo, Vasco; Miyoshi, Anderson

    2009-01-01

    Background The use of food-grade lactococci as bacterial carriers to DNA delivery into epithelial cells is a new strategy to develop live oral DNA vaccine. Our goal was to develop a new plasmid, named pValac, for antigen delivery for use in lactococci. The pValac plasmid was constructed by the fusion of: i) a eukaryotic region, allowing the cloning of an antigen of interest under the control of the pCMV eukaryotic promoter to be expressed by a host cell and ii) a prokaryotic region allowing replication and selection of bacteria. In order to evaluate pValac functionality, the gfp ORF was cloned into pValac (pValac:gfp) and was analysed by transfection in PK15 cells. The applicability of pValac was demonstrated by invasiveness assays of Lactococcus lactis inlA+ strains harbouring pValac:gfp into Caco-2 cells. Results After transfection with pValac:gfp, we observed GFP expression in PK15 cells. L. lactis inlA+ were able to invade Caco-2 cells and delivered a functional expression cassette (pCMV:gfp) into epithelial cells. Conclusion We showed the potential of an invasive L. lactis harbouring pValac to DNA delivery and subsequent triggering DNA expression by epithelial cells. Further work will be to examine whether these strains are able to deliver DNA in intestinal cells in vivo. PMID:19208231

  12. Vectorization of linear discrete filtering algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiess, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Linear filters, including the conventional Kalman filter and versions of square root filters devised by Potter and Carlson, are studied for potential application on streaming computers. The square root filters are known to maintain a positive definite covariance matrix in cases in which the Kalman filter diverges due to ill-conditioning of the matrix. Vectorization of the filters is discussed, and comparisons are made of the number of operations and storage locations required by each filter. The Carlson filter is shown to be the most efficient of the filters on the Control Data STAR-100 computer.

  13. MAR-mediated integration of plasmid vectors for in vivo gene transfer and regulation.

    PubMed

    Puttini, Stefania; van Zwieten, Ruthger W; Saugy, Damien; Lekka, Małgorzata; Hogger, Florence; Ley, Deborah; Kulik, Andrzej J; Mermod, Nicolas

    2013-12-02

    The in vivo transfer of naked plasmid DNA into organs such as muscles is commonly used to assess the expression of prophylactic or therapeutic genes in animal disease models. In this study, we devised vectors allowing a tight regulation of transgene expression in mice from such non-viral vectors using a doxycycline-controlled network of activator and repressor proteins. Using these vectors, we demonstrate proper physiological response as consequence of the induced expression of two therapeutically relevant proteins, namely erythropoietin and utrophin. Kinetic studies showed that the induction of transgene expression was only transient, unless epigenetic regulatory elements termed Matrix Attachment Regions, or MAR, were inserted upstream of the regulated promoters. Using episomal plasmid rescue and quantitative PCR assays, we observed that similar amounts of plasmids remained in muscles after electrotransfer with or without MAR elements, but that a significant portion had integrated into the muscle fiber chromosomes. Interestingly, the MAR elements were found to promote plasmid genomic integration but to oppose silencing effects in vivo, thereby mediating long-term expression. This study thus elucidates some of the determinants of transient or sustained expression from the use of non-viral regulated vectors in vivo.

  14. MAR-mediated integration of plasmid vectors for in vivo gene transfer and regulation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The in vivo transfer of naked plasmid DNA into organs such as muscles is commonly used to assess the expression of prophylactic or therapeutic genes in animal disease models. Results In this study, we devised vectors allowing a tight regulation of transgene expression in mice from such non-viral vectors using a doxycycline-controlled network of activator and repressor proteins. Using these vectors, we demonstrate proper physiological response as consequence of the induced expression of two therapeutically relevant proteins, namely erythropoietin and utrophin. Kinetic studies showed that the induction of transgene expression was only transient, unless epigenetic regulatory elements termed Matrix Attachment Regions, or MAR, were inserted upstream of the regulated promoters. Using episomal plasmid rescue and quantitative PCR assays, we observed that similar amounts of plasmids remained in muscles after electrotransfer with or without MAR elements, but that a significant portion had integrated into the muscle fiber chromosomes. Interestingly, the MAR elements were found to promote plasmid genomic integration but to oppose silencing effects in vivo, thereby mediating long-term expression. Conclusions This study thus elucidates some of the determinants of transient or sustained expression from the use of non-viral regulated vectors in vivo. PMID:24295286

  15. Stable plasmid vectors for complementation of Xylella fastidiosa mutants in planta

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Current understanding of the mechanisms of Pierce’s Disease development has been significantly advanced by molecular genetic studies of the causal agent, Xylella fastidiosa (Xf). Plasmid vectors are an essential tool for studies of bacterial genetics and pathogenesis. However, most commonly used pla...

  16. Optimizing a Method for the Quantification by Quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction of Host Cell DNA in Plasmid Vector Batches Used in Human Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Serge; Fabre, Isabelle; Chenivesse, Xavier

    2016-08-01

    Gene therapy products are very complex advanced therapy medicinal products produced using different processes that require many chemical and biological reagents and production intermediates, such as producing cells. The quantification of residual impurities in gene therapy vectors is a major quality control step when these vectors are used for therapeutic purposes, whether or not they are derived from viruses. Indeed, in nonviral gene therapy products, particularly plasmid vectors used to transfer genetic material, the presence of host-cell DNA (HCDNA) from the bacterial cells used for the vector production is an important concern because of the risk of immunogenicity and insertional mutagenesis. Several methods have been developed to quantify residual HCDNA, but real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) seems to be most suitable because it allows detecting traces of "contaminating" DNA. The French National Agency for Medicines and Health Products Safety (ANSM) ensures the quality and safety of gene transfer medicinal products and must be able to quantify, in its own laboratories, the amount of HCDNA present in plasmid vector batches. Therefore, we developed and validated a qPCR method to quantify at the femtogram level the presence of Escherichia coli residual DNA in plasmid vectors. This approach uses the capillary-based LightCycler 1.5 System (Roche) with SYBR Green I, a primer pair against the E. coli 23S ribosomal RNA gene and different concentrations of a linearized plasmid that contains the 23S target sequence, as standard. This qPCR method is linear on an 8-decade logarithmic scale, accurate, reproducible, and sensitive (quantification of up to 10 copies of 23S target sequence per reaction, or 1.4 E. coli genome, or 7 fg of bacterial DNA). This technique allows ensuring that batches of plasmid vectors to be used in clinical trials comply with the specifications on HCDNA content.

  17. Strategies and approaches in plasmidome studies—uncovering plasmid diversity disregarding of linear elements?

    PubMed Central

    Dib, Julián R.; Wagenknecht, Martin; Farías, María E.; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2015-01-01

    The term plasmid was originally coined for circular, extrachromosomal genetic elements. Today, plasmids are widely recognized not only as important factors facilitating genome restructuring but also as vehicles for the dissemination of beneficial characters within bacterial communities. Plasmid diversity has been uncovered by means of culture-dependent or -independent approaches, such as endogenous or exogenous plasmid isolation as well as PCR-based detection or transposon-aided capture, respectively. High-throughput-sequencing made possible to cover total plasmid populations in a given environment, i.e., the plasmidome, and allowed to address the quality and significance of self-replicating genetic elements. Since such efforts were and still are rather restricted to circular molecules, here we put equal emphasis on the linear plasmids which—despite their frequent occurrence in a large number of bacteria—are largely neglected in prevalent plasmidome conceptions. PMID:26074886

  18. Strategies and approaches in plasmidome studies-uncovering plasmid diversity disregarding of linear elements?

    PubMed

    Dib, Julián R; Wagenknecht, Martin; Farías, María E; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2015-01-01

    The term plasmid was originally coined for circular, extrachromosomal genetic elements. Today, plasmids are widely recognized not only as important factors facilitating genome restructuring but also as vehicles for the dissemination of beneficial characters within bacterial communities. Plasmid diversity has been uncovered by means of culture-dependent or -independent approaches, such as endogenous or exogenous plasmid isolation as well as PCR-based detection or transposon-aided capture, respectively. High-throughput-sequencing made possible to cover total plasmid populations in a given environment, i.e., the plasmidome, and allowed to address the quality and significance of self-replicating genetic elements. Since such efforts were and still are rather restricted to circular molecules, here we put equal emphasis on the linear plasmids which-despite their frequent occurrence in a large number of bacteria-are largely neglected in prevalent plasmidome conceptions.

  19. Optimization of Plasmid Maintenance in the Attenuated Live Vector Vaccine Strain Salmonella typhi CVD 908-htrA†

    PubMed Central

    Galen, James E.; Nair, Jay; Wang, Jin Yuang; Wasserman, Steven S.; Tanner, Michael K.; Sztein, Marcelo B.; Levine, Myron M.

    1999-01-01

    The broad objective of the research presented here is to develop a noncatalytic plasmid maintenance system for the stabilization of multicopy expression plasmids encoding foreign antigens in a Salmonella typhi live-vector vaccine strain such as CVD 908-htrA. We have enhanced the maintenance of expression plasmids at two independent levels. First, we removed dependence upon balanced-lethal maintenance systems that involve catalytic enzymes expressed from multicopy plasmids; we accomplished this through incorporation into expression plasmids of a postsegregational killing system based on the noncatalytic hok-sok plasmid addiction system from the antibiotic resistance factor pR1. We also included at least one naturally occurring plasmid partition function in our expression plasmids, which eliminates random segregation of these plasmids, thereby enhancing their inheritance and stability; to accomplish this, we incorporated either the par locus from pSC101, the parA locus from pR1, or both. We monitored the stability of optimized expression plasmids within CVD 908-htrA by quantitating expression of a variant of green fluorescent protein (GFPuv) by using flow cytometry. In this report, we demonstrate the utility of this novel plasmid maintenance system in enhancing the stability of our expression plasmids and go on to show that as the copy number of stabilized plasmids increases, the toxicity of GFPuv synthesis also increases. The implications of these observations for the rational design of immunogenic and protective bacterial live vector vaccines are discussed. PMID:10569759

  20. Linear Plasmids and the Rate of Sequence Evolution in Plant Mitochondrial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Jessica M.; Simmons, Mark P.; Wu, Zhiqiang; Sloan, Daniel B.

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial genomes of flowering plants experience frequent insertions of foreign sequences, including linear plasmids that also exist in standalone forms within mitochondria, but the history and phylogenetic distribution of plasmid insertions is not well known. Taking advantage of the increased availability of plant mitochondrial genome sequences, we performed phylogenetic analyses to reconstruct the evolutionary history of these plasmids and plasmid-derived insertions. Mitochondrial genomes from multiple land plant lineages (including liverworts, lycophytes, ferns, and gymnosperms) include fragmented remnants from ancient plasmid insertions. Such insertions are much more recent and widespread in angiosperms, in which approximately 75% of sequenced mitochondrial genomes contain identifiable plasmid insertions. Although conflicts between plasmid and angiosperm phylogenies provide clear evidence of repeated horizontal transfers, we were still able to detect significant phylogenetic concordance, indicating that mitochondrial plasmids have also experienced sustained periods of (effectively) vertical transmission in angiosperms. The observed levels of sequence divergence in plasmid-derived genes suggest that nucleotide substitution rates in these plasmids, which often encode their own viral-like DNA polymerases, are orders of magnitude higher than in mitochondrial chromosomes. Based on these results, we hypothesize that the periodic incorporation of mitochondrial genes into plasmids contributes to the remarkable heterogeneity in substitution rates among genes that has recently been discovered in some angiosperm mitochondrial genomes. In support of this hypothesis, we show that the recently acquired ψtrnP-trnW gene region in a maize linear plasmid is evolving significantly faster than homologous sequences that have been retained in the mitochondrial chromosome in closely related grasses. PMID:26759362

  1. Plasmid DNA Vaccine vector design: impact on efficacy, safety and upstream production

    PubMed Central

    Williams, James A; Carnes, Aaron E; Hodgson, Clague P

    2009-01-01

    Critical molecular and cellular biological factors impacting design of licensable DNA vaccine vectors that combine high yield and integrity during bacterial production with increased expression in mammalian cells are reviewed. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), World Health Organization (WHO) and European Medical Agencies (EMEA) regulatory guidance’s are discussed, as they relate to vector design and plasmid fermentation. While all new vectors will require extensive preclinical testing to validate safety and performance prior to clinical use, regulatory testing burden for follow-on products can be reduced by combining carefully designed synthetic genes with existing validated vector backbones. A flowchart for creation of new synthetic genes, combining rationale design with bioinformatics, is presented. The biology of plasmid replication is reviewed, and process engineering strategies that reduce metabolic burden discussed. Utilizing recently developed low metabolic burden seed stock and fermentation strategies, optimized vectors can now be manufactured in high yields exceeding 2 g/L, with specific plasmid yields of 5% total dry cell weight. PMID:19233255

  2. A plasmid cloning vector with precisely regulatable copy number in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Herman-Antosiewicz, A; Obuchowski, M; Wegrzyn, G

    2001-03-01

    We have developed a genetic system allowing for precise regulation of plasmid copy number in Escherichia coli cells. A cloning vector based on this system is described in this article. The pTC lambda 3 plasmid is a lambda replicon, but transcription controlling initiation of plasmid DNA replication starts from the PtetA promoter instead of phage lambda PR promoter. Additionally, activity of PtetA promoter is negatively controlled by the TetR repressor whose gene is located on the same plasmid vector and is induced by an analog of tetracycline, autoclaved chlortetracycline (aCT). Using different concentrations of the inducer it is possible to strictly regulate the copy number of pTC lambda 3 and thus the copy number of a cloned gene. The usefulness of the system for the regulatable production of a protein encoded by a gene inserted into pTC lambda 3 plasmid is demonstrated by dependence of beta-galactosidase activity on the lacZ gene dosage.

  3. An efficient plasmid vector for constitutive high-level expression of foreign genes in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jeong-Woo; Hong, Won-kyung; Rairakhwada, Dina; Seo, Pil-Soo; Choi, Min Ho; Song, Ki-Bang; Rhee, Sang-Ki; Kim, Chul Ho

    2009-06-01

    The levansucrase gene (lsrA) from Rahnella aquatilis was strongly expressed in a constitutive manner in Escherichia coli when cloned into a pBluescript KS-based pRL1CP plasmid vector. The native promoter upstream of lsrA and the lacZ promoter cooperatively enhanced the expression of lsrA to a level that was comparable to that of the T7 promoter, which is used in commercial pET expression vector system. A putative rho-independent transcription termination signal downstream of lsrA was crucial for gene expression. This plasmid vector also proved to be applicable for efficient expression of other foreign genes in E. coli.

  4. Broad-host-range plasmid vectors for gene expression in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lale, Rahmi; Brautaset, Trygve; Valla, Svein

    2011-01-01

    This chapter provides methods and insights into the use of broad-host-range plasmid vectors useful for expression of genes in a variety of bacteria. The main focus is on IncQ, IncW, IncP, and pBBR1-based plasmids which have all been used for such applications. The specific design of each vector is adapted to its use, and here we describe, as an example, a protocol for construction (in Escherichia coli) of large insert DNA libraries in an IncP type vector and transfer of the library to the desired host. The genes of interest will in this case have to be expressed from their own promoters and the libraries will be screened by a method that best fits the functions of the gene or gene clusters searched for.

  5. Interspecific Transfer of Streptomyces Giant Linear Plasmids in Sterile Amended Soil Microcosms†

    PubMed Central

    Ravel, Jacques; Wellington, Elizabeth M. H.; Hill, Russell T.

    2000-01-01

    The interspecific transfer of two giant linear plasmids was investigated in sterile soil microcosms. Plasmids pRJ3L (322 kb) and pRJ28 (330 kb), both encoding mercury resistance, were successfully transferred in amended soil microcosms from their streptomycete hosts, the isolates CHR3 and CHR28, respectively, to a plasmidless and mercury-sensitive strain, Streptomyces lividans TK24. Transconjugants of S. lividans TK24 were first observed after 2 to 3 days of incubation at 30°C, which corresponded to the time taken for the formation of mycelia in soil. Transfer frequencies were 4.8 × 10−4 and 3.6 × 10−5 CFU/donor genome for pRJ3L and pRJ28, respectively. Transconjugants were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis for the presence of plasmids, and plasmid identity was confirmed by restriction digests. Total genomic DNA digests confirmed that transconjugants were S. lividans TK24. The mercury resistance genes were shown to be on the plasmid in the transconjugants by hybridization analysis and were still functional. This is the first demonstration of transfer of giant linear plasmids in sterile soil microcosms. Giant linear plasmids were detected in many Streptomyces spp. isolated from mercury-contaminated sediments from Boston Harbor (United States), Townsville Harbor (Australia), and the Sali River (Tucuman, Argentina). Mercury resistance genes were shown to be present on some of these plasmids. Our findings that giant linear plasmids can be transferred between Streptomyces spp. and are common in environmental Streptomyces isolates suggest that these plasmids are important in gene transfer between streptomycetes in the environment. PMID:10653714

  6. Plasmid Vectors for Xylella fastidiosa Utilizing a Toxin-Antitoxin System for Stability in the Absence of Antibiotic Selection.

    PubMed

    Burbank, Lindsey P; Stenger, Drake C

    2016-08-01

    The phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa causes disease in a variety of important crop and landscape plants. Functional genetic studies have led to a broader understanding of virulence mechanisms used by this pathogen in the grapevine host. Plasmid shuttle vectors are important tools in studies of bacterial genetics but there are only a limited number of plasmid vectors available that replicate in X. fastidiosa, and even fewer that are retained without antibiotic selection. Two plasmids are described here that show stable replication in X. fastidiosa and are effective for gene complementation both in vitro and in planta. Plasmid maintenance is facilitated by incorporation of the PemI/PemK plasmid addiction system, consisting of PemK, an endoribonuclease toxin, and its cognate antitoxin, PemI. Vector pXf20pemIK utilizes a native X. fastidiosa replication origin as well as a high-copy-number pUC origin for propagation in Escherichia coli cloning strains. Broad-host-range vector pBBR5pemIK is a medium- to low-copy-number plasmid based on the pBBR1 backbone. Both plasmids are maintained for extended periods of time in the absence of antibiotic selection, as well as up to 14 weeks in grapevine, without affecting bacterial fitness. These plasmids present an alternative to traditional complementation and expression vectors which rely on antibiotic selection for plasmid retention.

  7. Transformation of Mycoplasma gallisepticum with Tn916, Tn4001, and integrative plasmid vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Cao, J.; Kapke, P. A.; Minion, F. C.

    1994-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum causes respiratory disease in avian species, but little is known about its mechanism(s) of pathogenesis. These studies were undertaken in order to develop genetic systems for analysis of potential virulence factors. M. gallisepticum was transformed with plasmids containing one of the gram-positive transposons Tn916 or Tn4001, which inserted randomly into the mycoplasmal chromosome. Plasmids containing cloned chromosomal DNA were also constructed and tested for integration into regions of DNA homology derived either from chromosomal fragments or from the gentamicin resistance marker from Tn4001. These studies demonstrate that M. gallisepticum is amenable to transformation with both transposons and integrative vectors. Images PMID:8021232

  8. Construction and Characterization of an in-vivo Linear Covalently Closed DNA Vector Production System

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background While safer than their viral counterparts, conventional non-viral gene delivery DNA vectors offer a limited safety profile. They often result in the delivery of unwanted prokaryotic sequences, antibiotic resistance genes, and the bacterial origins of replication to the target, which may lead to the stimulation of unwanted immunological responses due to their chimeric DNA composition. Such vectors may also impart the potential for chromosomal integration, thus potentiating oncogenesis. We sought to engineer an in vivo system for the quick and simple production of safer DNA vector alternatives that were devoid of non-transgene bacterial sequences and would lethally disrupt the host chromosome in the event of an unwanted vector integration event. Results We constructed a parent eukaryotic expression vector possessing a specialized manufactured multi-target site called “Super Sequence”, and engineered E. coli cells (R-cell) that conditionally produce phage-derived recombinase Tel (PY54), TelN (N15), or Cre (P1). Passage of the parent plasmid vector through R-cells under optimized conditions, resulted in rapid, efficient, and one step in vivo generation of mini lcc—linear covalently closed (Tel/TelN-cell), or mini ccc—circular covalently closed (Cre-cell), DNA constructs, separated from the backbone plasmid DNA. Site-specific integration of lcc plasmids into the host chromosome resulted in chromosomal disruption and 105 fold lower viability than that seen with the ccc counterpart. Conclusion We offer a high efficiency mini DNA vector production system that confers simple, rapid and scalable in vivo production of mini lcc DNA vectors that possess all the benefits of “minicircle” DNA vectors and virtually eliminate the potential for undesirable vector integration events. PMID:23216697

  9. An extranuclear expression system for analysis of cytoplasmic promoters of yeast linear killer plasmids.

    PubMed

    Schründer, J; Meinhardt, F

    1995-03-01

    Based on the cytoplasmically localized killer plasmids pGKL1 and pGKL2 of Kluyveromyces lactis two new linear hybrid plasmids were constructed which consist of pGKL1, into which in addition to the previously developed cytoplasmically expressible LEU2* selectable marker a glucose dehydrogenase-encoding bacterial gene (gdh A) has been integrated. One of the hybrid plasmids carries the bacterial gene preceded by an arbitrarily placed cytoplasmic promoter (upstream conserved sequence) in front of the coding region (pRKL121). The other plasmid was constructed in such a way that the ATG start codon of the gdh A gene was fused in frame to the ATG start codon of the killer plasmid's open reading frame 5 (pRKL122). The structures of both linear hybrid plasmids were confirmed by restriction analysis, Southern hybridization, and sequencing of the junction sites. Yeast strains carrying either of the plasmids expressed the glucose dehydrogenase gene; however, expression of the in phase fused gene was 40-fold higher compared to the arbitrarily placed cytoplasmic promoter. In general, an in phase fusion was not required for expression, but efficiency is dramatically enhanced when the 5' noncoding sequences in front of the heterologous genes are the same as those found on the native killer plasmids. The developed system can serve as a reporter for determining the efficiency of the different cytoplasmic promoters present on both linear plasmids. Hybrid plasmids were stably maintained without selective pressure in K. lactis and they were transferred and expressed also in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  10. pFiD188, the linear virulence plasmid of Rhodococcus fascians D188.

    PubMed

    Francis, Isolde; De Keyser, Annick; De Backer, Philippe; Simón-Mateo, Carmen; Kalkus, Jutta; Pertry, Ine; Ardiles-Diaz, Wilson; De Rycke, Riet; Vandeputte, Olivier M; El Jaziri, Mondher; Holsters, Marcelle; Vereecke, Danny

    2012-05-01

    Rhodococcus fascians is currently the only phytopathogen of which the virulence genes occur on a linear plasmid. To get insight into the origin of this replicon and into the virulence strategy of this broad-spectrum phytopathogen, the sequence of the linear plasmid of strain D188, pFiD188, was determined. Analysis of the 198,917 bp revealed four syntenic regions with linear plasmids of R. erythropolis, R. jostii, and R. opacus, suggesting a common origin of these replicons. Mutational analysis of pFi_086 and pFi_102, similar to cutinases and type IV peptidases, respectively, showed that conserved region R2 was involved in plasmid dispersal and pointed toward a novel function for actinobacterial cutinases in conjugation. Additionally, pFiD188 had three regions that were unique for R. fascians. Functional analysis of the stk and nrp loci of regions U2 and U3, respectively, indicated that their role in symptom development was limited compared with that of the previously identified fas, att, and hyp virulence loci situated in region U1. Thus, pFiD188 is a typical rhodococcal linear plasmid with a composite structure that encodes core functions involved in plasmid maintenance and accessory functions, some possibly acquired through horizontal gene transfer, implicated in virulence and the interaction with the host.

  11. Recombination and deletion of sequences in shuttle vector plasmids in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, S; Joffe, S; Seidman, M M

    1985-09-01

    Shuttle vector plasmids were constructed with directly repeated sequences flanking a marker gene. African green monkey kidney (AGMK) cells were infected with the constructions, and after a period of replication, the progeny plasmids were recovered and introduced into bacteria. Those colonies with plasmids that had lost the marker gene were identified, and the individual plasmids were purified and characterized by restriction enzyme digestion. Recombination between the repeated elements generated a plasmid with a precise deletion and a characteristic restriction pattern, which distinguished the recombined molecules from those with other defects in the marker gene. Recombination among the following different sequences was measured in this assay: (i) the simian virus 40 origin and enhancer region, (ii) the AGMK Alu sequence, and (iii) a sequence from plasmid pBR322. Similar frequencies of recombination among these sequences were found. Recombination occurred more frequently in Cos1 cells than in CV1 cells. In these experiments, the plasmid population with defective marker genes consisted of the recombined molecules and of the spontaneous deletion-insertion mutants described earlier. The frequency of the latter class was unaffected by the presence of the option for recombination represented by the direct repeats. Both recombination and deletion-insertion mutagenesis were stimulated by double-strand cleavage between the repeated sequences and adjacent to the marker, and the frequency of the deletion-insertion mutants in this experiment was again independent of the presence of the direct repeats. We concluded that although recombination and deletion-insertion mutagenesis were both stimulated by double-strand cleavage, the molecules which underwent the two types of change were drawn from separate pools.

  12. Recombination and deletion of sequences in shuttle vector plasmids in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, S; Joffe, S; Seidman, M M

    1985-01-01

    Shuttle vector plasmids were constructed with directly repeated sequences flanking a marker gene. African green monkey kidney (AGMK) cells were infected with the constructions, and after a period of replication, the progeny plasmids were recovered and introduced into bacteria. Those colonies with plasmids that had lost the marker gene were identified, and the individual plasmids were purified and characterized by restriction enzyme digestion. Recombination between the repeated elements generated a plasmid with a precise deletion and a characteristic restriction pattern, which distinguished the recombined molecules from those with other defects in the marker gene. Recombination among the following different sequences was measured in this assay: (i) the simian virus 40 origin and enhancer region, (ii) the AGMK Alu sequence, and (iii) a sequence from plasmid pBR322. Similar frequencies of recombination among these sequences were found. Recombination occurred more frequently in Cos1 cells than in CV1 cells. In these experiments, the plasmid population with defective marker genes consisted of the recombined molecules and of the spontaneous deletion-insertion mutants described earlier. The frequency of the latter class was unaffected by the presence of the option for recombination represented by the direct repeats. Both recombination and deletion-insertion mutagenesis were stimulated by double-strand cleavage between the repeated sequences and adjacent to the marker, and the frequency of the deletion-insertion mutants in this experiment was again independent of the presence of the direct repeats. We concluded that although recombination and deletion-insertion mutagenesis were both stimulated by double-strand cleavage, the molecules which underwent the two types of change were drawn from separate pools. Images PMID:3869955

  13. Construction of a shuttle vector and transformation of Xylella fastidiosa with plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Qin, X; Hartung, J S

    2001-09-01

    We have isolated, cloned, and sequenced a 5823-bp cryptic plasmid from a strain of Xylella fastidiosa. This plasmid encodes five open reading frames (ORF) greater than 400 nucleotides each. ORF 2 encodes a protein with 37% amino acid identity to the replication initiator protein of plasmid pECB2 from Pseudomonas alcaligenes. This RepA protein from X. fastidiosa contains both a leucine zipper and helix turn helix motif characteristic of proteins involved in DNA replication. The sequence 5' of ORF 2 has all of the features characteristic of plasmid origins of replication as well as regulatory elements required for transcription of ORF 2. Open reading frame 2, along with the upstream origin of replication, was cloned as an EcoRI fragment into pUC19 to create a shuttle vector. This construct was introduced into Xylella fastidiosa by electroporation, with selection for carbenicillin resistance. Transformation was verified by both PCR and Southern hybridization experiments. Frequency of transformation was low, but increased ten-fold when the plasmid was grown in X. fastidiosa rather than Escherichia coli prior to transformation. This work represents the first step towards the development of a system for genetic analysis of this important plant pathogen of citrus, grapevines, and other horticultural crops.

  14. Development of a plasmid vector for easy selection of strong promoters.

    PubMed

    Piñeiro, S A; Sordelli, D O; Centrón, D

    2000-05-01

    A promoter vector pACPR33 for Escherichia coli based on the promotorless ampicillin-resistance gene from pBR322 has been constructed. The promoter of the ampicillin-resistance gene was deleted and replaced by a suitable multiple cloning site. Molecular cloning of promoters into the polylinker resulted in activation of the ampicillin resistance in E. coli. The plasmid contains a functional origin of DNA replication and a tetracycline resistance gene for E. coli, and a chloramphenicol resistance gene for S. aureus. The vector permitted direct detection of promoter activity, especially strong promoters, by easy iodometric determination of beta-lactamase activity in liquid or solid media.

  15. Exploration of BAC versus plasmid expression vectors in recombinant CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Mader, Alexander; Prewein, Bernhard; Zboray, Katalin; Casanova, Emilio; Kunert, Renate

    2013-05-01

    Vector engineering approaches are commonly used to increase recombinant protein production in mammalian cells, and among various concepts, bacterial artificial chromosomes (BAC) have been proposed to serve as open chromatin regions to omit chromosome positional effects. For proof of concept, we developed stable recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines using different expression vector systems: the plasmid vectors contained the identical expression cassette as the BAC constructs. Two anti-HIV1 antibody derivates served as model proteins (3D6scFc and 2F5scFc) for generation of four stable recombinant CHO cell lines. The BAC-derived clones showed three to four times higher specific productivity, and therefore, gene copy numbers and transcript level were quantified. The active chromatin region provided with the BAC environment significantly improved transcription evidenced with both model proteins. Specific transcription was approximately six times higher from BAC-based vectors compared to the corresponding plasmid vectors for both single-chain fragment crystallizable (scFc) proteins. Our accurate investigations elucidated also differences between translational activities related to the protein of choice. 3D6scFc expressed specifically three to four times more product than 2F5scFc indicating that the product by itself also contributes to enhanced productivity. This study indicated comparable increase of transcription level for both scFc proteins when using the BAC system, but translation, maturation, and secretion of individual proteins seem to be protein specific.

  16. Ultrasound enhances the transfection of plasmid DNA by non-viral vectors.

    PubMed

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein; Aoyama, Teruyoshi; Ogawa, Osamu; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2003-04-01

    Increasing attention has been paid to technology used for the delivery of genetic materials into cells for gene therapy and the generation of genetically engineered cells. So far, viral vectors have been mainly used because of their inherently high transfection efficiency of gene. However, there are some problems to be resolved for the clinical applications, such as the pathogenicity and immunogenicity of viral vectors themselves. Therefore, many research trials with non-viral vectors have been performed to enhance their efficiency to a level comparable to the viral vector. Two directions of these trials exist: material improvement of non-viral vectors and their combination with various external physical stimuli. This paper reviews the latter research trials, with special attention paid to the enhancement of gene expression by ultrasound (US). The expression level of plasmid DNA by various cationized polymers and liposomes is promoted by US irradiation in vitro as well as in vivo. This US-enhanced expression of plasmid DNA will be discussed to emphasize the technical feasibility of US in gene therapy and biotechnology.

  17. Separation of topological forms of plasmid DNA by anion-exchange HPLC: shifts in elution order of linear DNA.

    PubMed

    Smith, Clara R; DePrince, Randolph B; Dackor, Jennifer; Weigl, Debra; Griffith, Jack; Persmark, Magnus

    2007-07-01

    We sought to establish a single anion-exchange HPLC method for the separation of linear, open circular and supercoiled plasmid topoisomers using purified topoisomeric forms of three plasmids (3.0, 5.5 and 7.6 kb). However, finding one condition proved elusive as the topoisomer elution order was determined to depend on salt gradient slope. The observed change in selectivity increased with plasmid size and was most pronounced for the linear form. Indeed, the elution order of the linear 7.6 kb plasmid was reversed relative to the supercoiled form. This observation may have implications for methods used in quality control of plasmid DNA.

  18. Construction of small plasmid vectors for use in genetic improvement of the extremely acidophilic Acidithiobacillus caldus.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jianzhou; Wang, Huiyan; Liu, Xiangmei; Lin, Jianqun; Pang, Xin; Lin, Jianqiang

    2013-10-01

    The genetic improvement of biomining bacteria including Acidithiobacillus caldus could facilitate the bioleaching process of sulfur-containing minerals. However, the available vectors for use in A. caldus are very scanty and limited to relatively large broad-host-range IncQ plasmids. In this study, a set of small, mobilizable plasmid vectors (pBBR1MCS-6, pMSD1 and pMSD2) were constructed based on plasmid pBBR1MCS-2, which does not belong to the IncQ, IncW, or IncP groups. The function of the tac promoter on 5.8-kb pMSD2 was determined by inserting a kanamycin-resistant reporter gene. The resulting recombinant pMSD2-Km was successfully transferred by conjugation into A. caldus MTH-04 with transfer frequency of 1.38±0.64×10(-5). The stability and plasmid copy number of pMSD2-Km in A. caldus MTH-04 were 75±2.7% and 5-6 copies per cell, respectively. By inserting an arsABC operon into pMSD2, an arsenic-resistant recombinant pMSD2-As was constructed and transferred into A. caldus MTH-04 by conjugation. The arsenic tolerance of A. caldus MTH-04 containing pMSD2-As was obviously increased up to 45mM of NaAsO2. These vectors could be applied in genetic improvement of A. caldus as well as other bioleaching bacteria.

  19. Advances in host and vector development for the production of plasmid DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Mairhofer, Juergen; Lara, Alvaro R

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments in DNA vaccine research provide a new momentum for this rather young and potentially disruptive technology. Gene-based vaccines are capable of eliciting protective immunity in humans to persistent intracellular pathogens, such as HIV, malaria, and tuberculosis, for which the conventional vaccine technologies have failed so far. The recent identification and characterization of genes coding for tumor antigens has stimulated the development of DNA-based antigen-specific cancer vaccines. Although most academic researchers consider the production of reasonable amounts of plasmid DNA (pDNA) for immunological studies relatively easy to solve, problems often arise during this first phase of production. In this chapter we review the current state of the art of pDNA production at small (shake flasks) and mid-scales (lab-scale bioreactor fermentations) and address new trends in vector design and strain engineering. We will guide the reader through the different stages of process design starting from choosing the most appropriate plasmid backbone, choosing the right Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain for production, and cultivation media and scale-up issues. In addition, we will address some points concerning the safety and potency of the produced plasmids, with special focus on producing antibiotic resistance-free plasmids. The main goal of this chapter is to make immunologists aware of the fact that production of the pDNA vaccine has to be performed with as much as attention and care as the rest of their research.

  20. Mercury resistance is encoded by transferable giant linear plasmids in two chesapeake bay Streptomyces strains.

    PubMed

    Ravel, J; Schrempf, H; Hill, R T

    1998-09-01

    The Streptomyces strains CHR3 and CHR28, isolated from the Baltimore Inner Harbor, contained two and one, respectively, giant linear plasmids which carry terminally bound proteins. The plasmids pRJ3L (322 kb), from CHR3, and pRJ28 (330 kb), from CHR28, carry genes homologous to the previously characterized chromosomal Streptomyces lividans 66 operon encoding resistance against mercuric compounds. Both plasmids are transmissible (without any detectable rearrangement) to the chloramphenicol-resistant S. lividans TK24 strain lacking plasmids and carrying a chromosomal deletion of the mer operon. S. lividans TK24 conjugants harboring pRJ3L or pRJ28 exhibited profiles of mercury resistance to mercuric compounds similar to those of Streptomyces strains CHR3 and CHR28.

  1. Mercury Resistance Is Encoded by Transferable Giant Linear Plasmids in Two Chesapeake Bay Streptomyces Strains†

    PubMed Central

    Ravel, Jacques; Schrempf, Hildgund; Hill, Russell T.

    1998-01-01

    The Streptomyces strains CHR3 and CHR28, isolated from the Baltimore Inner Harbor, contained two and one, respectively, giant linear plasmids which carry terminally bound proteins. The plasmids pRJ3L (322 kb), from CHR3, and pRJ28 (330 kb), from CHR28, carry genes homologous to the previously characterized chromosomal Streptomyces lividans 66 operon encoding resistance against mercuric compounds. Both plasmids are transmissible (without any detectable rearrangement) to the chloramphenicol-resistant S. lividans TK24 strain lacking plasmids and carrying a chromosomal deletion of the mer operon. S. lividans TK24 conjugants harboring pRJ3L or pRJ28 exhibited profiles of mercury resistance to mercuric compounds similar to those of Streptomyces strains CHR3 and CHR28. PMID:9726886

  2. Embryonic stem cell gene targeting using bacteriophage lambda vectors generated by phage-plasmid recombination.

    PubMed Central

    Tsuzuki, T; Rancourt, D E

    1998-01-01

    Targeted mutagenesis is an extremely useful experimental approach in molecular medicine, allowing the generation of specialized animals that are mutant for any gene of interest. Currently the rate determining step in any gene targeting experiment is construction of the targeting vector (TV). In order to streamline gene targeting methods and avoid problems encountered with plasmid TVs, we describe the direct application of lambda phage in targeted mutagenesis. The recombination-proficient phage vector lambda2TK permits generation of TVs by conventional restriction-ligation or recombination-mediated methods. The resulting lambdaTV DNA can then be cleaved with restriction endonucleases to release the bacteriophage arms and can subsequently be electroporated directly into ES cells to yield gene targets. We demonstrate that in vivo phage-plasmid recombination can be used to introduce neo and lacZ - neo mutations into precise positions within a lambda2TK subclone via double crossover recombination. We describe two methods for eliminating single crossover recombinants, spi selection and size restriction, both of which result in phage TVs bearing double crossover insertions. Thus TVs can be easily and quickly generated in bacteriophage without plasmid subcloning and with little genomic sequence or restriction site information. PMID:9461458

  3. High-throughput recombinant gene expression systems in Pichia pastoris using newly developed plasmid vectors.

    PubMed

    Sasagawa, Takahiro; Matsui, Makoto; Kobayashi, Yuki; Otagiri, Masato; Moriya, Shigeharu; Sakamoto, Yasuharu; Ito, Yukishige; Lee, Charles C; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko; Arioka, Manabu

    2011-01-01

    We describe here the construction of Gateway-compatible vectors, pBGP1-DEST and pPICZα-DEST, for rapid and convenient preparation of expression plasmids for production of secretory proteins in Pichia pastoris. Both vectors direct the synthesis of fusion proteins consisting of the N-terminal signal and pro-sequences of Saccharomyces cerevisiae α-factor, the recognition sites for Kex2 and Ste13 processing proteases, the mature region of a foreign protein flanked by attB1- and attB2-derived sequences at N- and C-termini, respectively, and myc plus hexahistidine tags added at the extreme C-terminus. To test the usefulness of these vectors, production of endo-glucanases and xylanases from termite symbionts, as well as a fungal glucuronoyl esterase, was performed. Enzyme activities were detected in the culture supernatants, indicating that the chimeric proteins were synthesized and secreted as designed.

  4. A Mini-intronic Plasmid (MIP): A Novel Robust Transgene Expression Vector In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jiamiao; Zhang, Feijie; Kay, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial backbone (BB) sequences contained within a canonical plasmid DNA dampen exogenous transgene expression by tenfold to 1,000-fold over a period of a few weeks following transfection into quiescent tissues such as the liver. Minicircle DNA vectors devoid of bacterial plasmid backbone sequences overcome transgene silencing providing persistent transgene expression. Because, we recently established that the length rather than sequence of the DNA flanking the transgene expression cassette is the major parameter affecting transgene silencing, we developed an alternative plasmid propagation process in which the essential bacterial elements for plasmid replication and selection are placed within an engineered intron contained within the eukaryotic expression cassette. As with the minicircle vector, the mini-intronic plasmid (MIP) vector system overcomes transgene silencing observed with plasmids but in addition provides between 2 and often 10 times or higher levels of transgene expression compared with minicircle vectors containing the same expression cassette in vivo and in vitro. These improved plasmids will benefit all studies involving gene transfer/therapy approaches. PMID:23459514

  5. Plasmid vectors and molecular building blocks for the development of genetic manipulation tools for Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Bouvier, León A; Cámara, María de los Milagros; Canepa, Gaspar E; Miranda, Mariana R; Pereira, Claudio A

    2013-01-01

    The post genomic era revealed the need for developing better performing, easier to use and more sophisticated genetic manipulation tools for the study of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease. In this work a series of plasmids that allow genetic manipulation of this protozoan parasite were developed. First of all we focused on useful tools to establish selection strategies for different strains and which can be employed as expression vectors. On the other hand molecular building blocks in the form of diverse selectable markers, modifiable fluorescent protein and epitope-tag coding sequences were produced. Both types of modules were harboured in backbone molecules conceived to offer multiple construction and sub-cloning strategies. These can be used to confer new properties to already available genetic manipulation tools or as starting points for whole novel designs. The performance of each plasmid and building block was determined independently. For illustration purposes, some simple direct practical applications were conducted.

  6. A gel-less isolation of untagged plasmid DNA insert from vector backbone in homogeneous format.

    PubMed

    Kalinichenko, Svetlana V; Shepelev, Mikhail V; Korobko, Igor V

    2017-03-15

    Agarose gel electrophoresis with subsequent DNA extraction from gel is routinely used for DNA fragment isolation after plasmid DNA digestion. We describe a gel-less method for DNA fragment isolation after plasmid DNA digestion which is based on in-solution negative selection through depletion of vector backbone bearing LoxP sites by sorption on solid phase-immobilized mutated Cre recombinase. The method might be especially useful in preparation of DNA fragments for transgenic animal generation where residual agarose presence is a concern, and DNA fragments are frequently large in size and thus might be mechanically damaged during purification with conventional affinity-based gel extraction methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Multiple shRNA expressions in a single plasmid vector improve RNAi against the XPA gene

    SciTech Connect

    Nagao, Akihiro; Zhao, Xia; Takegami, Tsutomu; Nakagawa, Hideaki; Matsui, Shinobu; Matsunaga, Tsukasa; Ishigaki, Yasuhito

    2008-05-30

    To improve the efficiency of stable knockdown with short hairpin RNA (shRNA), we inserted multiple shRNA expression sequences into a single plasmid vector. In this study, the DNA repair factor XPA was selected as a target gene since it is not essential for cell viability and it is easy to check the functional knockdown of this gene. The efficiency of knockdown was compared among single and triple expression vectors. The single shRNA-expressing vector caused limited knockdown of the target protein in stable transfectants, however, the multiple expression vectors apparently increased the frequency of knockdown transfectants. There were correlations between the knockdown level and marker expression in multiple-expressing transfectants, whereas poorer correlations were observed in single vector transfectants. Multiple-transfectants exhibited reduced efficiency of repair of UV-induced DNA damage and an increased sensitivity to ultraviolet light-irradiation. We propose that multiple shRNA expression vectors might be a useful strategy for establishing knockdown cells.

  8. A Novel Adenoviral Hybrid-vector System Carrying a Plasmid Replicon for Safe and Efficient Cell and Gene Therapeutic Applications.

    PubMed

    Voigtlander, Richard; Haase, Rudolf; Mück-Hausl, Martin; Zhang, Wenli; Boehme, Philip; Lipps, Hans-Joachim; Schulz, Eric; Baiker, Armin; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2013-04-02

    In dividing cells, the two aims a gene therapeutic approach should accomplish are efficient nuclear delivery and retention of therapeutic DNA. For stable transgene expression, therapeutic DNA can either be maintained by somatic integration or episomal persistence of which the latter approach would diminish the risk of insertional mutagenesis. As most monosystems fail to fulfill both tasks with equal efficiency, hybrid-vector systems represent promising alternatives. Our hybrid-vector system synergizes high-capacity adenoviral vectors (HCAdV) for efficient delivery and the scaffold/matrix attachment region (S/MAR)-based pEPito plasmid replicon for episomal persistence. After proving that this plasmid replicon can be excised from adenovirus in vitro, colony forming assays were performed. We found an increased number of colonies of up to sevenfold in cells that received the functional plasmid replicon proving that the hybrid-vector system is functional. Transgene expression could be maintained for 6 weeks and the extrachromosomal plasmid replicon was rescued. To show efficacy in vivo, the adenoviral hybrid-vector system was injected into C57Bl/6 mice. We found that the plasmid replicon can be released from adenoviral DNA in murine liver resulting in long-term transgene expression. In conclusion, we demonstrate the efficacy of our novel HCAdV-pEPito hybrid-vector system in vitro and in vivo.Molecular Therapy-Nucleic Acids (2013) 2, e83; doi:10.1038/mtna.2013.11; published online 2 April 2013.

  9. Physical Characterization of Gemini Surfactant-Based Synthetic Vectors for the Delivery of Linear Covalently Closed (LCC) DNA Ministrings

    PubMed Central

    Sum, Chi Hong; Nafissi, Nafiseh; Slavcev, Roderick A.; Wettig, Shawn

    2015-01-01

    In combination with novel linear covalently closed (LCC) DNA minivectors, referred to as DNA ministrings, a gemini surfactant-based synthetic vector for gene delivery has been shown to exhibit enhanced delivery and bioavailability while offering a heightened safety profile. Due to topological differences from conventional circular covalently closed (CCC) plasmid DNA vectors, the linear topology of LCC DNA ministrings may present differences with regards to DNA interaction and the physicochemical properties influencing DNA-surfactant interactions in the formulation of lipoplexed particles. In this study, N,N-bis(dimethylhexadecyl)-α,ω-propanediammonium(16-3-16)gemini-based synthetic vectors, incorporating either CCC plasmid or LCC DNA ministrings, were characterized and compared with respect to particle size, zeta potential, DNA encapsulation, DNase sensitivity, and in vitro transgene delivery efficacy. Through comparative analysis, differences between CCC plasmid DNA and LCC DNA ministrings led to variations in the physical properties of the resulting lipoplexes after complexation with 16-3-16 gemini surfactants. Despite the size disparities between the plasmid DNA vectors (CCC) and DNA ministrings (LCC), differences in DNA topology resulted in the generation of lipoplexes of comparable particle sizes. The capacity for ministring (LCC) derived lipoplexes to undergo complete counterion release during lipoplex formation contributed to improved DNA encapsulation, protection from DNase degradation, and in vitro transgene delivery. PMID:26561857

  10. Promising plasmid DNA vector based on APTES-modified silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cheang, Tuck-yun; Tang, Bing; Xu, An-wu; Chang, Guang-qi; Hu, Zuo-jun; He, Wei-ling; Xing, Zhou-hao; Xu, Jian-bo; Wang, Mian; Wang, Shen-ming

    2012-01-01

    Nanoparticles have an enormous potential for development in biomedical applications, such as gene or drug delivery. We developed and characterized aminopropyltriethoxysilane-functionalized silicon dioxide nanoparticles (APTES-SiNPs) for gene therapy. Lipofectamine(®) 2000, a commonly used agent, served as a contrast. We showed that APTES-SiNPs had a gene transfection efficiency almost equal to that of Lipofectamine 2000, but with lower cytotoxicity. Thus, these novel APTES-SiNPs can achieve highly efficient transfection of plasmid DNA, and to some extent reduce cytotoxicity, which might overcome the critical drawbacks in vivo of conventional carriers, such as viral vectors, organic polymers, and liposomes, and seem to be a promising nonviral gene therapy vector.

  11. Robust RNAi enhancement via human Argonaute-2 overexpression from plasmids, viral vectors and cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Börner, Kathleen; Niopek, Dominik; Cotugno, Gabriella; Kaldenbach, Michaela; Pankert, Teresa; Willemsen, Joschka; Zhang, Xian; Schürmann, Nina; Mockenhaupt, Stefan; Serva, Andrius; Hiet, Marie-Sophie; Wiedtke, Ellen; Castoldi, Mirco; Starkuviene, Vytaute; Erfle, Holger; Gilbert, Daniel F.; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Boutros, Michael; Binder, Marco; Streetz, Konrad; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Grimm, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    As the only mammalian Argonaute protein capable of directly cleaving mRNAs in a small RNA-guided manner, Argonaute-2 (Ago2) is a keyplayer in RNA interference (RNAi) silencing via small interfering (si) or short hairpin (sh) RNAs. It is also a rate-limiting factor whose saturation by si/shRNAs limits RNAi efficiency and causes numerous adverse side effects. Here, we report a set of versatile tools and widely applicable strategies for transient or stable Ago2 co-expression, which overcome these concerns. Specifically, we engineered plasmids and viral vectors to co-encode a codon-optimized human Ago2 cDNA along with custom shRNAs. Furthermore, we stably integrated this Ago2 cDNA into a panel of standard human cell lines via plasmid transfection or lentiviral transduction. Using various endo- or exogenous targets, we demonstrate the potential of all three strategies to boost mRNA silencing efficiencies in cell culture by up to 10-fold, and to facilitate combinatorial knockdowns. Importantly, these robust improvements were reflected by augmented RNAi phenotypes and accompanied by reduced off-targeting effects. We moreover show that Ago2/shRNA-co-encoding vectors can enhance and prolong transgene silencing in livers of adult mice, while concurrently alleviating hepatotoxicity. Our customizable reagents and avenues should broadly improve future in vitro and in vivo RNAi experiments in mammalian systems. PMID:24049077

  12. New families of single integration vectors and gene tagging plasmids for genetic manipulations in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Wosika, Victoria; Durandau, Eric; Varidel, Clémence; Aymoz, Delphine; Schmitt, Marta; Pelet, Serge

    2016-12-01

    The tractability of the budding yeast genome has provided many insights into the fundamental mechanisms regulating cellular life. With the advent of synthetic biology and single-cell measurements, novel tools are required to manipulate the yeast genome in a more controlled manner. We present, here, a new family of yeast shuttle vectors called single integration vectors (pSIV). Upon transformation in yeast, these plasmids replace the entire deficient auxotrophy marker locus by a cassette containing an exogenous marker. As shown using flow cytometry, this complete replacement results in a unique integration of the desired DNA fragment at the marker locus. In addition, a second transcriptional unit can be inserted to achieve the simultaneous integration of two constructs. The selection marker cassettes, present in the pSIV, were also used to generate a complete set of gene tagging plasmids (pGT) encompassing a large palette of fluorescent proteins, from a cyan fluorescent protein to a near-infrared tandem dimer red fluorescent protein. These tagging cassettes are orthogonal to each other thanks to the use of different TEF promoter and terminator couples, thereby avoiding marker cassette switching and favoring integration in the desired locus. In summary, we have created two sets of robust molecular tools for the precise genetic manipulation of the budding yeast.

  13. Cloning vectors based on cryptic plasmids isolated from lactic acid bacteria: their characteristics and potential applications in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Shareck, Julie; Choi, Young; Lee, Byong; Miguez, Carlos B

    2004-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are Gram positive bacteria, widely distributed in nature, and industrially important as they are used in a variety of industrial food fermentations. The use of genetic engineering techniques is an effective means of enhancing the industrial applicability of LAB. However, when using genetic engineering technology, safety becomes an essential factor for the application of improved LAB to the food industry. Cloning and expression systems should be derived preferably from LAB cryptic plasmids that generally encode genes for which functions can be proposed, but no phenotypes can be observed. However, some plasmid-encoded functions have been discovered in cryptic plasmids originating from Lactobacillus, Streptococcus thermophilus, and Pediococcus spp. and can be used as selective marker systems in vector construction. This article presents information concerning LAB cryptic plasmids, and their structures, functions, and applications. A total of 134 cryptic plasmids collated are discussed.

  14. A yeast intron as a translational terminator in a plasmid shuttle vector.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Moreland D; Reeves, Rosalind A; Sunna, Anwar; Bergquist, Peter L

    2004-03-01

    Plasmid shuttle vectors that contain both prokaryotic (Escherichia coli) and eukaryotic origins of replication are routinely used in molecular biology since E. coli is generally the organism of choice for manipulation of recombinant DNA. Initial transformation of the shuttle vector into E. coli allows production of microgram quantities of DNA suitable for transformation of low-transformation-efficiency hosts. A shuttle/expression vector for the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, pCWK1, allows recombinant protein fused to the killer toxin signal sequence to be secreted to the medium. The heterologous genes are transcribed under the control of the K. lactis LAC4 promoter, which is tightly regulated in K. lactis. However, in E. coli the LAC4 promoter functions constitutively, and as a result, uncontrolled transcription and translation of genes that are toxic in E. coli can result in cell death, and subsequent failure to recover intact E. coli transformants. We have constructed and tested a modified shuttle vector that contains a K. lactis ribosomal intron that acts as a translational terminator in E. coli, preventing or reducing the expression of recombinant proteins and avoiding toxicity. When transcribed in K. lactis, the intron is spliced from the mRNA allowing the translation of intact full-length, active recombinant gene product.

  15. Extended function of plasmid partition genes: the Sop system of linear phage-plasmid N15 facilitates late gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ravin, Nikolai V; Rech, Jérôme; Lane, David

    2008-05-01

    The mitotic stability of the linear plasmid-prophage N15 of Escherichia coli depends on a partition system closely related to that of the F plasmid SopABC. The two Sop systems are distinguished mainly by the arrangement of their centromeric SopB-binding sites, clustered in F (sopC) and dispersed in N15 (IR1 to IR4). Because two of the N15 inverted repeat (IR) sites are located close to elements presumed (by analogy with phage lambda) to regulate late gene expression during the lytic growth of N15, we asked whether Sop partition functions play a role in this process. In N15, a putative Q antiterminator gene is located 6 kb upstream of the probable major late promoter and two intrinsic terminator-like sequences, in contrast to lambda, where the Q gene is adjacent to the late promoter. Northern hybridization and lacZ reporter activity confirmed the identity of the N15 late promoter (p52), demonstrated antiterminator activity of the Q analogue, and located terminator sequences between p52 and the first open reading frame. Following prophage induction, N15 mutated in IR2 (downstream from gene Q) or IR3 (upstream of p52) showed a pronounced delay in lysis relative to that for wild-type N15. Expression of ir3(-)-p52::lacZ during N15 wild-type lytic growth was strongly reduced relative to the equivalent ir3(+) fusion. The provision of Q protein and the IR2 and SopAB proteins in trans to ir3(+)-p52::lacZ increased expression beyond that seen in the absence of any one of these factors. These results indicate that the N15 Sop system has a dual role: partition and regulation of late gene transcription during lytic growth.

  16. Cloning of linear DNAs in vivo by overexpressed T4 DNA ligase: construction of a T4 phage hoc gene display vector.

    PubMed

    Ren, Z J; Baumann, R G; Black, L W

    1997-08-22

    A method was developed to clone linear DNAs by overexpressing T4 phage DNA ligase in vivo, based upon recombination deficient E. coli derivatives that carry a plasmid containing an inducible T4 DNA ligase gene. Integration of this ligase-plasmid into the chromosome of such E. coli allows standard plasmid isolation following linear DNA transformation of the strains containing high levels of T4 DNA ligase. Intramolecular ligation allows high efficiency recircularization of cohesive and blunt-end terminated linear plasmid DNAs following transformation. Recombinant plasmids could be constructed in vivo by co-transformation with linearized vector plus insert DNAs, followed by intermolecular ligation in the T4 ligase strains to yield clones without deletions or rearrangements. Thus, in vitro packaged lox-site terminated plasmid DNAs injected from phage T4 were recircularized by T4 ligase in vivo with an efficiency comparable to CRE recombinase. Clones that expressed a capsid-binding 14-aa N-terminal peptide extension derivative of the HOC (highly antigenic outer capsid) protein for T4 phage hoc gene display were constructed by co-transformation with a linearized vector and a PCR-synthesized hoc gene. Therefore, the T4 DNA ligase strains are useful for cloning linear DNAs in vivo by transformation or transduction of DNAs with nonsequence-specific but compatible DNA ends.

  17. Rapid and simultaneous detection of linear chromosome and large plasmids in Proteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Bahena, Martha Helena; Nesme, Xavier; Muller, Daniel

    2012-12-01

    Bacterial genomic architectures are complex and play important roles in genome evolution. While most bacterial lineage genomes contain a single chromosome often accompanied by plasmids, more and more genomes are described as harboring a linear or a second chromosome. Thus, the development of bacterial genomics leads to the study of bacterial genome architectures. In order to avoid laborious techniques combining several methods, we developed an original plug-free pulsed field gel electrophoresis procedure, that enabled us to co-characterize reproducibly the presence of linear chromosomes and plasmids ranging between 30 kb and 2000 kb in various proteobacterial lineages. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Transformation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with linear DNA killer plasmids from Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed Central

    Gunge, N; Murata, K; Sakaguchi, K

    1982-01-01

    Protoplasts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were mixed with linear DNA plasmids, pGKl1 and pGKl2, isolated from a Kluyveromyces lactis killer strain and treated with polyethylene glycol. Out of 2,000 colonies regenerated on a nonselective medium, two killer transformants were obtained. The pGKl plasmids and the killer character were stably maintained in one (Pdh-1) of them. Another transformant, Pdl-1, was a weak killer, and the subclones consisted of a mixture of weak and nonkiller cells. The weak killers were characterized by the presence of pGKl1 in a decreased amount, and nonkillers were characterized by the absence of pGKl1. The occurrence of two new plasmids which migrated faster than pGKl1 in an agarose gel was observed in Pdl-1 and its subclones, whether weak or nonkillers. Staining with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole revealed that the pGKl plasmids exist in the cytosol of transformant cells with numerous copy numbers. Images PMID:7045080

  19. Stability of plasmid vector plJ303 in Streptomyces lividans TK24 during laboratory-scale fermentations.

    PubMed

    Wrigley-Jones, C A; Richards, H; Thomas, C R; Ward, J

    1993-01-05

    Plasmid plJ303 stability in Streptomyces lividans cultures has been studied by measuring plasmid copy number under various growth conditions. An increase in mean plasmid copy number was normally seen during early rapid growth in both shaken culture and stirred vessel fermentations at 28 degrees C. Maximum copy numbers were consistently attained in early stationary phase followed by a decline (of variable amount) upon further incubation. The imposition of environmental stress (high growth temperature, i.e., 37 degrees C, and low dissolved oxygen tension, i.e., <5% air saturation) led to a plasmid copy number of zero and a 50% reduction, respectively. Interestingly, the relative proportions of plasmid topoisomers changed with time since progressively more supercoiled forms were observed throughout the stationary phase. Plasmid dimers were also observed in some cultures, and no evidence of structural plasmid instability was found. In general, this host-vector system seemed remarkably stable under normal growth conditions. However, copious organic acid production by the host was observed and was thought to be undesirable for good heterologous gene expression of a secreted protein.

  20. Development of plasmid vector and electroporation condition for gene transfer in sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Mun Su; Kim, Jin-Woo; Qian, Yilei; Ingram, L O; Shanmugam, K T

    2007-07-01

    Bacillus coagulans is a sporogenic lactic acid bacterium that ferments glucose and xylose, major components of plant biomass, a potential feedstock for cellulosic ethanol. The temperature and pH for optimum rate of growth of B. coagulans (50 to 55 degrees C, pH 5.0) are very similar to that of commercially developed fungal cellulases (50 degrees C; pH 4.8). Due to this match, simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of cellulose to products by B. coagulans is expected to require less cellulase than needed if the SSF is conducted at a sub-optimal temperature, such as 30 degrees C, the optimum for yeast, the main biocatalyst used by the ethanol industry. To fully exploit B. coagulans as a platform organism, we have developed an electroporation method to transfer plasmid DNA into this genetically recalcitrant bacterium. We also constructed a B. coagulans/E. coli shuttle vector, plasmid pMSR10 that contains the rep region from a native plasmid (pMSR0) present in B. coagulans strain P4-102B. The native plasmid, pMSR0 (6823bp), has 9 ORFs, and replicates by rolling-circle mode of replication. Plasmid pNW33N, developed for Geobacillus stearothermophilus, was also transformed into this host and stably maintained while several other Bacillus/Escherichia coli shuttle vector plasmids were not transformed into B. coagulans. The transformation efficiency of B. coagulans strain P4-102B using the plasmids pNW33N or pMSR10 was about 1.5x10(16) per mole of DNA. The availability of shuttle vectors and an electroporation method is expected to aid in genetic and metabolic engineering of B. coagulans.

  1. Distributed Estimation for Vector Signal in Linear Coherent Sensor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chien-Hsien; Lin, Ching-An

    We introduce the distributed estimation of a random vector signal in wireless sensor networks that follow coherent multiple access channel model. We adopt the linear minimum mean squared error fusion rule. The problem of interest is to design linear coding matrices for those sensors in the network so as to minimize mean squared error of the estimated vector signal under a total power constraint. We show that the problem can be formulated as a convex optimization problem and we obtain closed form expressions of the coding matrices. Numerical results are used to illustrate the performance of the proposed method.

  2. Analysis of comparative efficiencies of different transformation methods of E. coli using two common plasmid vectors.

    PubMed

    Roychoudhury, Aryadeep; Basu, Supratim; Sengupta, Dibyendu N

    2009-10-01

    The efficiencies of different transformation methods of E. coli DH5Qalpha train, induced by several cations like Mg2+, Mn2+ Rb+ and especially Ca2+, with or without polyethylene glycol (PEG) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) were compared using the two commonly used plasmid vectors pCAMBIA1201 and pBI121. The widely used calcium chloride (CaCl2) method appeared to be the most efficient procedure, while rubidium chloride (RbCl) method was the least effective. The improvements in the classical CaCl2 method were found to further augment the transformation efficiency (TR)E for both the vectors like repeated alternate cycles of heat shock, followed by immediate cold, at least up to the third cycle; replacement of the heat shock step by a single microwave pulse and even more by double microwave treatment and administration of combined heat shock-microwave treatments. The pre-treatment of CaCl2-competent cells with 5% (v/v) ethanol, accompanied by single heat shock also triggered the (TR)E, which was further enhanced, when combined heat shock-microwave was applied. The minor alterations or improved approaches in CaCl2 method suggested in the present study may thus find use in more efficient E. coli transformation.

  3. Vector analyses of linearly and circularly polarized Bessel beams using Hertz vector potentials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanxun; Dou, Wenbin; Meng, Hongfu

    2014-04-07

    Using the transverse Hertz vector potentials, vector analyses of linearly and circularly polarized Bessel beams of arbitrary orders are presented in this paper. Expressions for the electric and magnetic fields of vector Bessel beams in free space that are rigorous solutions to the vector Helmholtz equation are derived. Their respective time averaged energy density and Poynting vector are also obtained, in order to exhibit their non-diffracting properties. Polarization patterns and magnitude profiles with different parameters are displayed. Particular emphasis is placed on the cases where the ratio of wave number over its transverse component k/kt approximately equals to one and largely exceeds it, which corresponding to the nonparaxial and paraxial condition, respectively. These results allow us to recognize that the vector Bessel beams exhibit new and important features, compared with the scalar fields.

  4. Elucidation of Insertion Elements Carried on Plasmids and In Vitro Construction of Shuttle Vectors from the Toxic Cyanobacterium Planktothrix

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Guntram; Goesmann, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Several gene clusters that are responsible for toxin synthesis in bloom-forming cyanobacteria have been found to be associated with transposable elements (TEs). In particular, insertion sequence (IS) elements were shown to play a role in the inactivation or recombination of the genes responsible for cyanotoxin synthesis. Plasmids have been considered important vectors of IS element distribution to the host. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the IS elements propagated on the plasmids and the chromosome of the toxic cyanobacterium Planktothrix agardhii NIVA-CYA126/8 by means of high-throughput sequencing. In total, five plasmids (pPA5.5, pPA14, pPA50, pPA79, and pPA115, of 5, 6, 50, 79, and 120 kbp, respectively) were elucidated, and two plasmids (pPA5.5, pPA115) were found to propagate full IS element copies. Large stretches of shared DNA information between plasmids were constituted of TEs. Two plasmids (pPA5.5, pPA14) were used as candidates to engineer shuttle vectors (named pPA5.5SV and pPA14SV, respectively) in vitro by PCR amplification and the subsequent transposition of the Tn5 cat transposon containing the R6Kγ origin of replication of Escherichia coli. While pPA5.5SV was found to be fully segregated, pPA14SV consistently co-occurred with its wild-type plasmid even under the highest selective pressure. Interestingly, the Tn5 cat transposon became transferred by homologous recombination into another plasmid, pPA50. The availability of shuttle vectors is considered to be of relevance in investigating genome plasticity as a consequence of homologous recombination events. Combining the potential of high-throughput sequencing and in vitro production of shuttle vectors makes it simple to produce species-specific shuttle vectors for many cultivable prokaryotes. PMID:24907328

  5. Yeast DNA plasmids.

    PubMed

    Gunge, N

    1983-01-01

    The study of yeast DNA plasmids has been initiated with the discovery of the 2-micron DNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This multiple copy plasmid, organized into chromatin structure in vivo, probably exists in the nucleus and provides a good system to obtain information on eukaryotic DNA replication. Yeast transformation with the 2-micron DNA or artificially constructed chimeric plasmids had contributed significantly to the study of the molecular biology of yeast and eukaryotes, allowing the isolation and characterization of various genes, ars, centromeres, and telomeres, and also serving as a tool to study the expression of various heterologous genes. Encouraged by these fruitful results, new yeast plasmids have been screened among phylogenetically distant yeasts. The linear DNA plasmids (pGKl1 and pGKl2) from Kluyveromyces lactis are the first case of yeast plasmids associated with biological function (killer phenotype). This plasmid system would be ideal as a model to study the structure and function of eukaryotic linear chromosomes. The extracellular secretion of protein toxin suggests the plasmids to be an excellent candidate for a secretion vector. The importance of yeasts as suitable materials for the study of eukaryotic cell biology would be much enhanced by the advent of new transformation systems with diverse host yeasts of genetically and phylogenetically distinct properties.

  6. Repeated capture of a cytoplasmic linear plasmid by the host nucleus in Debaryomyces hansenii.

    PubMed

    Satwika, Dhira; Klassen, Roland; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2012-03-01

    Debaryomyces hansenii is a halotolerant yeast species that has been shown to carry various nuclear genes of plasmid or viral origin (NUPAVs). However, a recent ancestor of such NUPAVs has not been identified. Here we determined for the first time the molecular structure of an entire cytoplasmic linear plasmid, pDH1A, indigenous to this species. The element is related to non-autonomous killer plasmids from Kluyveromyces lactis and Pichia acaciae and carries a B-type DNA polymerase as well as remnants of a killer toxin system, a secreted chitin-binding protein. Other essential toxin subunits or an immunity function, however, appear to be lost, while two additional small open reading frames are present. Transcripts for all four genes located on pDH1A could be verified by RT-PCR. Interestingly, all genes from pDH1A could be identified as ancestors of NUPAVs located at different chromosomes within the nucleus of D. hansenii, suggesting repeated nuclear capture of fragments originating from pDH1A. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. The linear plasmid pMC3-2 from Morchella conica is structurally related to adenoviruses.

    PubMed

    Rohe, M; Schrage, K; Meinhardt, F

    1991-12-01

    pMC3-2, one of two linear plasmids localised in the mitochondria of the ascomycete Morchella conica, was completely sequenced. It is 6044 bp in size, contains terminal inverted repeats of 713 and 710 bp length and two open reading frames, ORF1 and ORF2, spanning 2706 bp and 918 bp, respectively. ORF1 probably encodes a viral B-type DNA-polymerase. Concerning ORF2, no homology to any other published protein- or DNA-sequence could be detected. According to the structure of DNA-polymerases, linear plasmids can be grouped into two classes reflecting their localisation either in the cytoplasm or within the mitochondria. In general, the structure of plasmid pMC3-2, as well as of other linear plasmids from filamentous fungi, indicates a close relationship of these genetic elements to adenoviruses.

  8. Identification of a thermophilic plasmid origin and its cloning within a new Thermus-E. coli shuttle vector.

    PubMed

    Wayne, J; Xu, S Y

    1997-08-22

    A pUC19-based vector has been generated for selecting functional thermophilic origins (oris) of Thermus ssp. Once combined with thermophilic DNA, the vector can be amplified in ampicillin resistant (Ap(R)) E. coli, prior to transformation and kanamycin (Km) selection in Thermus thermophilus. The Km(R) Thermus transformants replicate any newly-formed shuttle vectors via introduced thermophilic oris. Using this "ori-selecting" vector, three novel thermophilic oris were cloned from randomly digested Thermus cryptic plasmid DNA. These shuttle vectors are useful for genetic analyses, as well as protein engineering within thermophiles. The smallest ori-containing sequence of 4.2 kb has been subcloned, sequenced, and further refined to 2.3 kb. A significant ORF of 341 amino acids (aa), with a Thermus promoter and RBS, is found within the thermophilic ori. Deleting part of this ORF abolishes the shuttle vector's ability to replicate in T. thermophilus. Therefore, we postulate that this ORF encodes a replication protein (Rep) necessary for thermophilic plasmid replication. The thermophilic ori also contains two sequences which resemble DnaA boxes.

  9. Deletion formation mutations in plasmid expression vectors are unfavored by runaway amplification conditions and differentially selected under kanamycin stress.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Pedro H; Prazeres, Duarte M F; Monteiro, Gabriel A

    2009-09-25

    Plasmid pCIneo is a ColE1-like mammalian expression vector also used as backbone for DNA vaccine development. We have recently shown that pCIneo spontaneously recombines due to the presence of two 28bp direct repeats. The persistence of low-frequency recombinants led us to evaluate the impact of environmental stresses typically found during plasmid production on plasmid copy number and recombination frequency. We observed an increase in pCIneo amplification (2.6-4.3-fold) in Escherichia coli cultures grown at 42 degrees C and also in minimal medium (at both 37 degrees C and 42 degrees C). These conditions fit to the smallest ratio between recombinant molecules and total plasmids. Conversely, increasing the dissolved oxygen tension from 20% to 40% in rich media did not have a significant impact on both plasmid copy number and recombination frequency, independently of the temperature used. We have also shown recently that the neomycin resistance (neo(r)) gene of pCIneo becomes actively transcribed as a result of recombination between the repeats. This prompted us to gain some insight into plasmid adaptation and competition by evaluating the impact of distinct concentrations of kanamycin on the differential selection of plasmid recombinant forms: monomer and heterodimers (1+2 and 1+3). We found the monomeric form to be predominantly recovered at lower concentrations of antibiotic whilst higher concentrations led to an increase in the percentage of the 1+2 form. The 1+3 heterodimeric form was invariably found at low percentages, independently of the concentration used.

  10. Construction and evaluation of plasmid vectors optimized for constitutive and regulated gene expression in Burkholderia cepacia complex isolates.

    PubMed

    Lefebre, Matthew D; Valvano, Miguel A

    2002-12-01

    Genetic studies with Burkholderia cepacia complex isolates are hampered by the limited availability of cloning vectors and by the inherent resistance of these isolates to the most common antibiotics used for genetic selection. Also, some of the promoters widely employed for gene expression in Escherichia coli are inefficient in B. cepacia. In this study, we have utilized the backbone of the vector pME6000, a derivative of the pBBR1 plasmid that was originally isolated from Bordetella bronchiseptica, to construct a set of vectors useful for gene expression in B. cepacia. These vectors contain either the constitutive promoter of the S7 ribosomal protein gene from Burkholderia sp. strain LB400 or the arabinose-inducible P(BAD) promoter from E. coli. Promoter sequences were placed immediately upstream of multiple cloning sites in combination with the minimal sequence of pME6000 required for plasmid maintenance and mobilization. The functionality of both vectors was assessed by cloning the enhanced green fluorescent protein gene (e-gfp) and determining the levels of enhanced green fluorescent protein expression and fluorescence emission for a variety of clinical and environmental isolates of the B. cepacia complex. We also demonstrate that B. cepacia carrying these constructs can readily be detected intracellularly by fluorescence microscopy following the infection of Acanthamoeba polyphaga.

  11. pncA and bptA Are Not Sufficient To Complement Ixodes scapularis Colonization and Persistence by Borrelia burgdorferi in a Linear Plasmid lp25-Deficient Background

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, Robert D.; Brandt, Kevin S.

    2014-01-01

    The complex segmented genome of Borrelia burgdorferi is comprised of a linear chromosome along with numerous linear and circular plasmids essential for tick and/or mammalian infectivity. The pathogenic necessity for specific borrelial plasmids has been identified; most notably, infections of the tick vector and mammalian host both require linear plasmid 25 (lp25). Genes carried on lp25, specifically bptA and pncA, are postulated to play a role for B. burgdorferi to infect and persist in Ixodes ticks. In this study, we complemented an lp25-deficient borrelial strain with pncA alone or pncA accompanied by bptA to evaluate the ability of the complemented strains to restore larval colonization and persistence through transstadial transmission relative to that of wild-type B. burgdorferi. The acquisition of the complemented strains by tick larvae from infected mice and/or the survival of these strains was significantly decreased when assayed by cultivation and quantitative PCR (qPCR). Only 10% of the pncA-complemented strain organisms were found by culture to survive 17 days following larval feeding, while 45% of the pncA- and bptA-complemented strain organisms survived, with similar results by PCR. However, neither of the complemented B. burgdorferi strains was capable of persisting through the molt to the nymphal stage as analyzed by culture. qPCR analyses of unfed nymphs detected B. burgdorferi genomes in several nymphs at low copy numbers, likely indicating the presence of DNA from dead or dying cells. Overall, the data indicate that pncA and bptA cannot independently support infection, suggesting that lp25 carries additional gene(s) or regulatory elements critical for B. burgdorferi survival and pathogenesis in the Ixodes vector. PMID:25245809

  12. A Simple and Inexpensive Method for Sending Binary Vector Plasmid DNA by Mail

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We describe a simple cost-effective technique for the transport of plasmid DNA by mail. Our results demonstrate that common multipurpose printing paper is a satisfactory substrate and superior to the more absorbent 3MM chromatography paper for the transport of plasmid DNA through the U.S. first clas...

  13. Highly linear high-density vector quantiser and vector-matrix multiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedroni, V. A.

    1994-06-01

    Simplicity is a key factor in the development of high-density systems. The authors discuss a balanced, four-quadrant, fully-analogue vector-matrix multiplier (VMM) and a vector quantiser (VQ) which require very small silicon area for their implementations, while presenting high linearity, a totally flexible input dynamic range, a symmetric power consumption behaviour, and are inherently suitable for parallel operation. The circuits require only four transistors per synapse in the VMM and two in the VQ, plus two (small) refresh transistors.

  14. Fasciation induction by the phytopathogen Rhodococcus fascians depends upon a linear plasmid encoding a cytokinin synthase gene.

    PubMed

    Crespi, M; Messens, E; Caplan, A B; van Montagu, M; Desomer, J

    1992-03-01

    Rhodococcus fascians is a nocardiform bacteria that induces leafy galls (fasciation) on dicotyledonous and several monocotyledonous plants. The wild-type strain D188 contained a conjugative, 200 kb linear extrachromosomal element, pFiD188. Linear plasmid-cured strains were avirulent and reintroduction of this linear element restored virulence. Pulsed field electrophoresis indicated that the chromosome might also be a linear molecule of 4 megabases. Three loci involved in phytopathogenicity have been identified by insertion mutagenesis of this Fi plasmid. Inactivation of the fas locus resulted in avirulent strains, whereas insertions in the two other loci affected the degree of virulence, yielding attenuated (att) and hypervirulent (hyp) bacteria. One of the genes within the fas locus encoded an isopentenyltranferase (IPT) with low homology to analogous proteins from Gram-negative phytopathogenic bacteria. IPT activity was detected after expression of this protein in Escherichia coli cells. In R.fascians, ipt expression could only be detected in bacteria induced with extracts from fasciated tissue. R.fascians strains without the linear plasmid but containing this fas locus alone could not provoke any phenotype on plants, indicating additional genes from the linear plasmid were also essential for virulence. These studies, the first genetic analysis of the interaction of a Gram-positive bacterium with plants, suggest that a novel mechanism for plant tumour induction has evolved in R.fascians independently from the other branches of the eubacteria.

  15. Reducing the immunostimulatory activity of CpG-containing plasmid DNA vectors for non-viral gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Yew, Nelson S; Cheng, Seng H

    2004-11-01

    The mammalian innate immune system has the ability to recognise and direct a response against incoming foreign DNA. The primary signal that triggers this response is unmethylated CpG motifs present in the DNA sequence of various disease-causing pathogens. These motifs are rare in vertebrate DNA, but abundant in bacterial and some viral DNAs. Because gene therapy generally involves the delivery of DNA from either plasmids of bacterial origin or recombinant viruses, an acute inflammatory response of variable severity inevitably results. The response is most serious for non-viral gene delivery vectors composed of cationic lipid-DNA complexes, producing adverse effects at lower doses and lethality at higher doses of complex. This review examines the role of immunostimulatory CpG motifs in the acute inflammatory response to non-viral gene therapy vectors. Strategies to neutralise or eliminate CpG motifs within plasmid DNA vectors, and the existing limitations of CpG reduction on improving the safety profile of non-viral vectors, will be discussed.

  16. Partition of the linear plasmid N15: interactions of N15 partition functions with the sop locus of the F plasmid.

    PubMed

    Ravin, N; Lane, D

    1999-11-01

    A locus close to one end of the linear N15 prophage closely resembles the sop operon which governs partition of the F plasmid; the promoter region contains similar operator sites, and the two putative gene products have extensive amino acid identity with the SopA and -B proteins of F. Our aim was to ascertain whether the N15 sop homologue functions in partition, to identify the centromere site, and to examine possible interchangeability of function with the F Sop system. When expressed at a moderate level, N15 SopA and -B proteins partly stabilize mini-F which lacks its own sop operon but retains the sopC centromere. The stabilization does not depend on increased copy number. Likewise, an N15 mutant with most of its sop operon deleted is partly stabilized by F Sop proteins and fully stabilized by its own. Four inverted repeat sequences similar to those of sopC were located in N15. They are distant from the sop operon and from each other. Two of these were shown to stabilize a mini-F sop deletion mutant when N15 Sop proteins were provided. Provision of the SopA homologue to plasmids with a sopA deletion resulted in further destabilization of the plasmid. The N15 Sop proteins exert effective, but incomplete, repression at the F sop promoter. We conclude that the N15 sop locus determines stable inheritance of the prophage by using dispersed centromere sites. The SopB-centromere and SopA-operator interactions show partial functional overlap between N15 and F. SopA of each plasmid appears to interact with SopB of the other, but in a way that is detrimental to plasmid maintenance.

  17. Genomic Sequence and Transcriptional Analysis of a 23-Kilobase Mycobacterial Linear Plasmid: Evidence for Horizontal Transfer and Identification of Plasmid Maintenance Systems

    PubMed Central

    Le Dantec, Corinne; Winter, Nathalie; Gicquel, Brigitte; Vincent, Véronique; Picardeau, Mathieu

    2001-01-01

    Linear plasmids were unknown in mycobacteria until recently. Here, we report the complete nucleotide sequence of 23-kb linear plasmid pCLP from Mycobacterium celatum, an opportunistic pathogen. The sequence of pCLP revealed at least 19 putative open reading frames (ORFs). Expression of pCLP genes in exponential-phase cultures was determined by reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR). Twelve ORFs were expressed, whereas no transcription of the 7 other ORFs of pCLP was detected. Five of the 12 transcribed ORFs detected by RT-PCR are of unknown function. Sequence analysis revealed similar loci in both M. celatum pCLP and the Mycobacterium tuberculosis chromosome, including transposase-related sequences. This result suggests horizontal transfer between these two organisms. pCLP also contains ORFs that are similar to genes of bacterial circular plasmids involved in partition (par operon) and postsegregational (pem operon) mechanisms. Functional analysis of these ORFs suggests that they probably carry out similar maintenance roles in pCLP. PMID:11244052

  18. Structural and physiological studies of the Escherichia coli histidine operon inserted into plasmid vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Bruni, C B; Musti, A M; Frunzio, R; Blasi, F

    1980-01-01

    A fragment of deoxyribonucleic acid 5,300 base paris long and containing the promoter-proximal portion of the histidine operon of Escherichia coli K-12, has been cloned in plasmid pBR313 (plasmids pCB2 and pCB3). Restriction mapping, partial nucleotide sequencing, and studies on functional expression in vivo and on protein synthesis in minicells have shown that the fragment contains the regulatory region of the operon, the hisG, hisD genes, and part of the hisC gene. Another plasmid (pCB5) contained the hisG gene and part of the hisD gene. Expression of the hisG gene in the latter plasmid was under control of the tetracycline promoter of the pBR313 plasmid. The in vivo expression of the two groups of plasmids described above, as well as their effect on the expression of the histidine genes not carried by the plasmids but present on the host chromosome, has been studied. The presence of multiple copies of pCB2 or pCB3, but not of pCB5, prevented derepression of the chromosomal histidine operon. Possible interpretations of this phenomenon are discussed. Images PMID:6246067

  19. Large-scale linear nonparallel support vector machine solver.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yingjie; Ping, Yuan

    2014-02-01

    Twin support vector machines (TWSVMs), as the representative nonparallel hyperplane classifiers, have shown the effectiveness over standard SVMs from some aspects. However, they still have some serious defects restricting their further study and real applications: (1) They have to compute and store the inverse matrices before training, it is intractable for many applications where data appear with a huge number of instances as well as features; (2) TWSVMs lost the sparseness by using a quadratic loss function making the proximal hyperplane close enough to the class itself. This paper proposes a Sparse Linear Nonparallel Support Vector Machine, termed as L1-NPSVM, to deal with large-scale data based on an efficient solver-dual coordinate descent (DCD) method. Both theoretical analysis and experiments indicate that our method is not only suitable for large scale problems, but also performs as good as TWSVMs and SVMs.

  20. Sequence analysis of two cryptic plasmids from Bifidobacterium longum DJO10A and construction of a shuttle cloning vector.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju-Hoon; O'Sullivan, Daniel J

    2006-01-01

    Escherichia coli-B. longum shuttle cloning vector was constructed from pDOJH10S and the E. coli ori region of p15A, a lacZ gene with a multiple cloning site of pUC18, and a chloramphenicol resistance gene (CAT) of pCI372 and was transformed successfully into E. coli and B. longum. It could not be introduced into lactic acid bacteria (Lactococcus and Lactobacillus), showing it was not very promiscuous. It was stably maintained in B. longum in the absence of antibiotic pressure for 92 generations, which is consistent with the segregational stability of theta-replicating plasmids in gram-positive bacteria. This is the first cloning vector for bifidobacteria that does not utilize RCR and should be useful for the stable introduction of heterologous genes into these dominant inhabitants of the large intestine.

  1. A novel peptide delivers plasmids across blood-brain barrier into neuronal cells as a single-component transfer vector.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ailing; Zhang, Miaomiao; Gao, Feiyan; Xu, Xingran; Chen, Zhangbao

    2013-01-01

    There is no data up to now to show that peptide can deliver plasmid into brain as a single-component transfer vector. Here we show that a novel peptide, RDP (consisted of 39 amino acids), can be exploited as an efficient plasmid vector for brain-targeting delivery. The plasmids containing Lac Z reporter gene (pVAX-Lac Z) and BDNF gene (pVAX-BDNF) are complexed with RDP and intravenously injected into mice. The results of gel retardation assay show that RDP enables to bind DNA in a dose-dependent manner, and the X-Gal staining identity that Lac Z is specifically expressed in the brain. Also, the results of Western blot and immunofluorescence staining of BDNF indicate that pVAX-BDNF complexed with RDP can be delivered into brain, and show neuroprotective properties in experimental Parkinson's disease (PD) model. The results demonstrate that RDP enables to bind and deliver DNA into the brain, resulting in specific gene expression in the neuronal cells. This strategy provides a novel, simple and effective approach for non-viral gene therapy of brain diseases.

  2. Complete Nucleotide Sequence and Genetic Organization of the 210-Kilobase Linear Plasmid of Rhodococcus erythropolis BD2

    PubMed Central

    Stecker, Christiane; Johann, Andre; Herzberg, Christina; Averhoff, Beate; Gottschalk, Gerhard

    2003-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the linear plasmid pBD2 from Rhodococcus erythropolis BD2 comprises 210,205 bp. Sequence analyses of pBD2 revealed 212 putative open reading frames (ORFs), 97 of which had an annotatable function. These ORFs could be assigned to six functional groups: plasmid replication and maintenance, transport and metalloresistance, catabolism, transposition, regulation, and protein modification. Many of the transposon-related sequences were found to flank the isopropylbenzene pathway genes. This finding together with the significant sequence similarities of the ipb genes to genes of the linear plasmid-encoded biphenyl pathway in other rhodococci suggests that the ipb genes were acquired via transposition events and subsequently distributed among the rhodococci via horizontal transfer. PMID:12923100

  3. A new approach to produce amino-carbon nanotubes as plasmid transfection vector by [2 + 1] cycloaddition of nitrenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yongjian; Jin, Chen; Yang, Feng; Yu, Xianjun; Wang, Guojian; Cheng, Si; Di, Yang; Li, Ji; Fu, Deliang; Ni, Quanxing

    2011-01-01

    Amino-carbon nanotubes (amino-CNTs) can conjugate with the DNA by electrostatic interactions and shuttle the DNA to the cell cytoplasm or even the nucleus. Here we report a new approach to produce amino-CNTs by cycloaddition of nitrenes. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to verify the success of the functionalization, and the functionalization degree was calculated by thermal gravity analysis. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) was used to observe the solubility of the CNTs and the interactions of the amino-CNTs with the plasmids. Cell ultrathin sections were made and observed under the TEM to confirm the amino-CNTs enter the cells. Transfection experiments ultimately verify the amino-CNTs produced through cycloadditions of nitrenes can serve as plasmid vector.

  4. Self-replicating shuttle vectors based on pANS, a small endogenous plasmid of the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942.

    PubMed

    Chen, You; Taton, Arnaud; Go, Michaela; London, Ross E; Pieper, Lindsey M; Golden, Susan S; Golden, James W

    2016-12-01

    To facilitate development of synthetic biology tools for genetic engineering of cyanobacterial strains, we constructed pANS-derived self-replicating shuttle vectors that are based on the minimal replication element of the Synechococcus elongatus strain PCC 7942 plasmid pANS. To remove the possibility of homologous recombination events between the shuttle plasmids and the native pANS plasmid, the endogenous pANS was cured through plasmid incompatibility-mediated spontaneous loss. A heterologous toxin-antitoxin cassette was incorporated into the shuttle vectors for stable plasmid maintenance in the absence of antibiotic selection. The pANS-based shuttle vectors were shown to be able to carry a large 20 kb DNA fragment containing a gene cluster for biosynthesis of the omega-3 fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid. Based on quantitative PCR analysis, there are about 10 copies of pANS and 3 copies of the large native plasmid pANL per chromosome in S. elongatus. Fluorescence levels of GFP reporter genes in a pANS-based vector were about 2.5-fold higher than when in pANL or integrated into the chromosome. In addition to its native host, pANS-based shuttle vectors were also found to replicate stably in the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. There were about 27 copies of a pANS-based shuttle vector, 9 copies of a pDU1-based shuttle vector and 3 copies of an RSF1010-based shuttle vector per genome when these three plasmids co-existed in Anabaena cells. The endogenous pANS from our S. elongatus laboratory strain was cloned in Escherichia coli, re-sequenced and re-annotated to update previously published sequencing data.

  5. Linear forms of plasmid DNA are superior to supercoiled structures as active templates for gene expression in plant protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Ballas, N; Zakai, N; Friedberg, D; Loyter, A

    1988-07-01

    Introduction of the plasmids pUC8CaMVCAT and pNOSCAT into plant protoplasts is known to result in transient expression of the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene. Also, transfection with the plasmid pDO432 results in transient appearance of the luciferase enzyme. In the present work we have used these systems to study the effect of DNA topology on the expression of the above recombinant genes. Linear forms of the above plasmids exhibited much higher activity in supporting gene expression than their corresponding super-coiled structures. CAT activity in protoplasts transfected with the linear forms of pUC8CaMVCAT and pNOSCAT was up to ten-fold higher than that observed in protoplasts transfected by the supercoiled template of these plasmids. This effect was observed in protoplasts derived from two different lines of Petunia hybrida and from a Nicotiana tabacum cell line. Transfection with the relaxed form of pUC8CaMVCAT resulted in very low expression of the CAT gene.Northern blot analysis revealed that the amount of poly(A)(+) RNA extracted from protoplasts transformed with the linear forms of the DNA was about 10-fold higher than that found in protoplasts transformed with supercoiled DNA.Southern blot analysis revealed that about the same amounts of supercoiled and linear DNA molecules were present in nuclei of transfected protoplasts. No significant quantitative differences have been observed between the degradation rates of the various DNA templates used.

  6. An Invertron-Like Linear Plasmid Mediates Intracellular Survival and Virulence in Bovine Isolates of Rhodococcus equi

    PubMed Central

    Valero-Rello, Ana; Hapeshi, Alexia; Anastasi, Elisa; Alvarez, Sonsiray; Scortti, Mariela; Meijer, Wim G.; MacArthur, Iain

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel host-associated virulence plasmid in Rhodococcus equi, pVAPN, carried by bovine isolates of this facultative intracellular pathogenic actinomycete. Surprisingly, pVAPN is a 120-kb invertron-like linear replicon unrelated to the circular virulence plasmids associated with equine (pVAPA) and porcine (pVAPB variant) R. equi isolates. pVAPN is similar to the linear plasmid pNSL1 from Rhodococcus sp. NS1 and harbors six new vap multigene family members (vapN to vapS) in a vap pathogenicity locus presumably acquired via en bloc mobilization from a direct predecessor of equine pVAPA. Loss of pVAPN rendered R. equi avirulent in macrophages and mice. Mating experiments using an in vivo transconjugant selection strategy demonstrated that pVAPN transfer is sufficient to confer virulence to a plasmid-cured R. equi recipient. Phylogenetic analyses assigned the vap multigene family complement from pVAPN, pVAPA, and pVAPB to seven monophyletic clades, each containing plasmid type-specific allelic variants of a precursor vap gene carried by the nearest vap island ancestor. Deletion of vapN, the predicted “bovine-type” allelic counterpart of vapA, essential for virulence in pVAPA, abrogated pVAPN-mediated intramacrophage proliferation and virulence in mice. Our findings support a model in which R. equi virulence is conferred by host-adapted plasmids. Their central role is mediating intracellular proliferation in macrophages, promoted by a key vap determinant present in the common ancestor of the plasmid-specific vap islands, with host tropism as a secondary trait selected during coevolution with specific animal species. PMID:25895973

  7. An Invertron-Like Linear Plasmid Mediates Intracellular Survival and Virulence in Bovine Isolates of Rhodococcus equi.

    PubMed

    Valero-Rello, Ana; Hapeshi, Alexia; Anastasi, Elisa; Alvarez, Sonsiray; Scortti, Mariela; Meijer, Wim G; MacArthur, Iain; Vázquez-Boland, José A

    2015-07-01

    We report a novel host-associated virulence plasmid in Rhodococcus equi, pVAPN, carried by bovine isolates of this facultative intracellular pathogenic actinomycete. Surprisingly, pVAPN is a 120-kb invertron-like linear replicon unrelated to the circular virulence plasmids associated with equine (pVAPA) and porcine (pVAPB variant) R. equi isolates. pVAPN is similar to the linear plasmid pNSL1 from Rhodococcus sp. NS1 and harbors six new vap multigene family members (vapN to vapS) in a vap pathogenicity locus presumably acquired via en bloc mobilization from a direct predecessor of equine pVAPA. Loss of pVAPN rendered R. equi avirulent in macrophages and mice. Mating experiments using an in vivo transconjugant selection strategy demonstrated that pVAPN transfer is sufficient to confer virulence to a plasmid-cured R. equi recipient. Phylogenetic analyses assigned the vap multigene family complement from pVAPN, pVAPA, and pVAPB to seven monophyletic clades, each containing plasmid type-specific allelic variants of a precursor vap gene carried by the nearest vap island ancestor. Deletion of vapN, the predicted "bovine-type" allelic counterpart of vapA, essential for virulence in pVAPA, abrogated pVAPN-mediated intramacrophage proliferation and virulence in mice. Our findings support a model in which R. equi virulence is conferred by host-adapted plasmids. Their central role is mediating intracellular proliferation in macrophages, promoted by a key vap determinant present in the common ancestor of the plasmid-specific vap islands, with host tropism as a secondary trait selected during coevolution with specific animal species. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Construction of an Escherichia coli-rhodococcus shuttle vector and plasmid transformation in Rhodococcus spp

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, M.E.V.; Finnerty, W.R.

    1988-02-01

    A plasmid transformation system for Rhodococcus sp. strain H13-A was developed by using an Escherichia coli-Rhodococcus shuttle plasmid constructed in this study. Rhodococcus sp. strain H13-A contains three cryptic indigenous plasmids, designated pMVS100, pMVS200, and pMVS300, of 75, 19.5, and 13.4 kilobases (kb), respectively. A 3.8-kb restriction fragment of pMVS300 was cloned into pIJ30, a 6.3-kb pBR322 derivative, containing the E. coli origin of replication (ori) and ampicillin resistance determinant (bla), as well as a Streptomyces gene for thiostrepton resistance, tsr. The resulting 10.1-kb recombinant plasmid, designated pMVS301, was isolated from E. coli DH1 (pMVS301) and transformed into Rhodococccus sp. strain AS-50, a derivative of strain H13-A. The cloned 3.8-kb fragment of Rhodococcus DNA in pMVS301 contains a Rhodococcus origin of replication, since the hybrid plasmid was capable of replication in both genera. The plasmid was identical in E. coli and Rhodococcus transformants as determined by restriction analysis and was maintained as a stable, independent replicon in both organisms. A restriction map demonstrated 14 unique restriction sites in pMVS301, some of which are potentially useful for molecular cloning in Rhodococcus spp. and other actinomycetes. This is the first report of plasmid transformation and of heterologous gene expression in a Rhodococcus sp.

  9. Fuzzy support vector machines based on linear clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Shengwu; Liu, Hongbing; Niu, Xiaoxiao

    2005-10-01

    A new Fuzzy Support Vector Machines (FSVMs) based on linear clustering is proposed in this paper. Its concept comes from the idea of linear clustering, selecting the data points near to the preformed hyperplane, which is formed on the training set including one positive and one negative training samples respectively. The more important samples near to the preformed hyperplane are selected by linear clustering technique, and the new FSVMs are formed on the more important data set. It integrates the merit of two kinds of FSVMs. The membership functions are defined using the relative distance between the data points and the preformed hyperplane during the training process. The fuzzy membership decision functions of multi-class FSVMs adopt the minimal value of all the decision functions of two-class FSVMs. To demonstrate the superiority of our methods, the benchmark data sets of machines learning databases are selected to verify the proposed FSVMs. The experimental results indicate that the proposed FSVMs can reduce the training data and running time, and its recognition rate is greater than or equal to that of FSVMs through selecting a suitable linear clustering parameter.

  10. Construction of an Escherichia coli-Rhodococcus shuttle vector and plasmid transformation in Rhodococcus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Singer, M E; Finnerty, W R

    1988-01-01

    A plasmid transformation system for Rhodococcus sp. strain H13-A was developed by using an Escherichia coli-Rhodococcus shuttle plasmid constructed in this study. Rhodococcus sp. strain H13-A contains three cryptic indigenous plasmids, designated pMVS100, pMVS200, and pMVS300, of 75, 19.5, and 13.4 kilobases (kb), respectively. A 3.8-kb restriction fragment of pMVS300 was cloned into pIJ30, a 6.3-kb pBR322 derivative, containing the E. coli origin of replication (ori) and ampicillin resistance determinant (bla), as well as a Streptomyces gene for thiostrepton resistance, tsr. The resulting 10.1-kb recombinant plasmid, designated pMVS301, was isolated from E. coli DH1(pMVS301) and transformed into Rhodococcus sp. strain AS-50, a derivative of strain H13-A, by polyethylene glycol-assisted transformation of Rhodococcus protoplasts and selection for thiostrepton-resistant transformants. Thiostrepton-resistant transformants were also ampicillin resistant and were shown to contain pMVS301, which was subsequently isolated and transformed back into E. coli. The cloned 3.8-kb fragment of Rhodococcus DNA in pMVS301 contains a Rhodococcus origin of replication, since the hybrid plasmid was capable of replication in both genera. The plasmid was identical in E. coli and Rhodococcus transformants as determined by restriction analysis and was maintained as a stable, independent replicon in both organisms. Optimization of the transformation procedure resulted in transformation frequencies in the range of 10(5) transformants per micrograms of pMVS301 DNA in Rhodococcus sp. strain H13-A and derivative strains. The plasmid host range extends to strains of Rhodococcus erythropolis, R. globulerus, and R. equi, whereas stable transformants were not obtained with R. rhodochrous or with several coryneform bacteria tested as recipients. A restriction map demonstrated 14 unique restriction sites in pMVS301, some of which are potentially useful for molecular cloning in Rhodococcus spp. and

  11. A single-plasmid vector for transgene amplification using short hairpin RNA targeting the 3'-UTR of amplifiable dhfr.

    PubMed

    Kang, Shin-Young; Kim, Yeon-Gu; Lee, Hong Weon; Lee, Eun Gyo

    2015-12-01

    Gene amplification using dihydrofolate reductase gene (dhfr) and methotrexate (MTX) is widely used for recombinant protein production in mammalian cells and is typically conducted in DHFR-deficient Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines. Generation of DHFR-deficient cells can be achieved by an expression vector incorporating short hairpin RNA (shRNA) that targets the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of endogenous dhfr. Thus, shRNAs were designed to target the 3'-UTR of endogenous dhfr, and shRNA-2 efficiently down-regulated dhfr expression in CHO-K1 cells. A single gene copy of shRNA-2 also decreased the translational level of DHFR by 80% in Flp-In CHO cells. shRNA-2 was then incorporated into a plasmid vector expressing human erythropoietin (EPO) and an exogenous DHFR to develop EPO-producing cells in the Flp-In system. The specific EPO productivity (q EPO) was enhanced by stepwise increments of MTX concentration, and differences in the amplification rate were observed in Flp-In CHO cells that expressed shRNA-2. In addition, the q EPO increased by more than 2.5-fold in the presence of 500 nM MTX. The mRNA expression level and gene copy numbers of dhfr were correlated with increased productivity in the cells, which is influenced by inhibition of endogenous dhfr. This study reveals that an expression vector including shRNA that targets the 3'-UTR of endogenous dhfr can enhance the transgene amplification rate and productivity by generating DHFR-deficient cells. This approach may be applied for amplifying the foreign gene in wild-type cell lines as a versatile single-plasmid vector.

  12. A plasmid toolkit for cloning chimeric cDNAs encoding customized fusion proteins into any Gateway destination expression vector.

    PubMed

    Buj, Raquel; Iglesias, Noa; Planas, Anna M; Santalucía, Tomàs

    2013-08-20

    Valuable clone collections encoding the complete ORFeomes for some model organisms have been constructed following the completion of their genome sequencing projects. These libraries are based on Gateway cloning technology, which facilitates the study of protein function by simplifying the subcloning of open reading frames (ORF) into any suitable destination vector. The expression of proteins of interest as fusions with functional modules is a frequent approach in their initial functional characterization. A limited number of Gateway destination expression vectors allow the construction of fusion proteins from ORFeome-derived sequences, but they are restricted to the possibilities offered by their inbuilt functional modules and their pre-defined model organism-specificity. Thus, the availability of cloning systems that overcome these limitations would be highly advantageous. We present a versatile cloning toolkit for constructing fully-customizable three-part fusion proteins based on the MultiSite Gateway cloning system. The fusion protein components are encoded in the three plasmids integral to the kit. These can recombine with any purposely-engineered destination vector that uses a heterologous promoter external to the Gateway cassette, leading to the in-frame cloning of an ORF of interest flanked by two functional modules. In contrast to previous systems, a third part becomes available for peptide-encoding as it no longer needs to contain a promoter, resulting in an increased number of possible fusion combinations. We have constructed the kit's component plasmids and demonstrate its functionality by providing proof-of-principle data on the expression of prototype fluorescent fusions in transiently-transfected cells. We have developed a toolkit for creating fusion proteins with customized N- and C-term modules from Gateway entry clones encoding ORFs of interest. Importantly, our method allows entry clones obtained from ORFeome collections to be used without prior

  13. Bovine papillomavirus vector that propagates as a plasmid in both mouse and bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    DiMaio, D; Treisman, R; Maniatis, T

    1982-07-01

    We report the construction of a bovine papillomavirus (BPV)-derived recombinant plasmid that propagates as an extrachromosomal element in both mouse and bacterial cells. Plasmids composed of a subgenomic transforming fragment of BPV DNA, a deletion derivative of pBR322, and a 7.6-kilobase fragment of DNA from the human beta-globin gene cluster efficiently induce focus formation on mouse C127 cells. BPV-beta-globin hybrids are maintained in the transformed cells as plasmids with a copy number of about 10-30 per cell. Plasmids indistinguishable from the input DNA have been recovered by transformation of bacteria with low molecular weight DNA from transformed mouse cells. The human beta-globin gene linked to BPV DNA is transcribed from its own promoter at a high level in these cells. The expression of BPV-linked cellular genes in conjunction with the ability to shuttle DNA between bacteria and mammalian cells may provide a rapid means of analyzing and recovering genes that confer an identifiable phenotype upon mammalian cells.

  14. Transcriptional Profiling the 150 kb Linear Megaplasmid of Borrelia turicatae Suggests a Role in Vector Colonization and Initiating Mammalian Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wilder, Hannah K.; Raffel, Sandra J.; Barbour, Alan G.; Porcella, Stephen F.; Sturdevant, Daniel E.; Vaisvil, Benjamin; Kapatral, Vinayak; Schmitt, Daniel P.; Schwan, Tom G.; Lopez, Job E.

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation is key for survival as vector-borne pathogens transmit between the arthropod and vertebrate, and temperature change is an environmental signal inducing alterations in gene expression of tick-borne spirochetes. While plasmids are often associated with adaptation, complex genomes of relapsing fever spirochetes have hindered progress in understanding the mechanisms of vector colonization and transmission. We utilized recent advances in genome sequencing to generate the most complete version of the Borrelia turicatae 150 kb linear megaplasmid (lp150). Additionally, a transcriptional analysis of open reading frames (ORFs) in lp150 was conducted and identified regions that were up-regulated during in vitro cultivation at tick-like growth temperatures (22°C), relative to bacteria grown at 35°C and infected murine blood. Evaluation of the 3’ end of lp150 identified a cluster of ORFs that code for putative surface lipoproteins. With a microbe’s surface proteome serving important roles in pathogenesis, we confirmed the ORFs expression in vitro and in the tick compared to spirochetes infecting murine blood. Transcriptional evaluation of lp150 indicates the plasmid likely has essential roles in vector colonization and/or initiating mammalian infection. These results also provide a much needed transcriptional framework to delineate the molecular mechanisms utilized by relapsing fever spirochetes during their enzootic cycle. PMID:26845332

  15. IncP-1ε Plasmids are Important Vectors of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Agricultural Systems: Diversification Driven by Class 1 Integron Gene Cassettes

    PubMed Central

    Heuer, Holger; Binh, Chu T. T.; Jechalke, Sven; Kopmann, Christoph; Zimmerling, Ute; Krögerrecklenfort, Ellen; Ledger, Thomas; González, Bernardo; Top, Eva; Smalla, Kornelia

    2011-01-01

    The role of broad-host range IncP-1ε plasmids in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance in agricultural systems has not yet been investigated. These plasmids were detected in total DNA from all of 16 manure samples and in arable soil based on a novel 5′-nuclease assay for real-time PCR. A correlation between IncP-1ε plasmid abundance and antibiotic usage was revealed. In a soil microcosm experiment the abundance of IncP-1ε plasmids was significantly increased even 127 days after application of manure containing the antibiotic compound sulfadiazine, compared to soil receiving only manure, only sulfadiazine, or water. Fifty IncP-1ε plasmids that were captured in E. coli CV601gfp from bacterial communities of manure and arable soil were characterized by PCR and hybridization. All plasmids carried class 1 integrons with highly varying sizes of the gene cassette region and the sul1 gene. Three IncP-1ε plasmids captured from soil bacteria and one from manure were completely sequenced. The backbones were nearly identical to that of the previously described IncP-1ε plasmid pKJK5. The plasmids differed mainly in the composition of a Tn402-like transposon carrying a class 1 integron with varying gene cassettes, IS1326, and in three of the plasmids the tetracycline resistance transposon Tn1721 with various truncations. Diverse Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria were revealed as hosts of one of the IncP-1ε plasmids in soil microcosms. Our data suggest that IncP-1ε plasmids are important vectors for horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance in agricultural systems. PMID:22279444

  16. IncP-1ε Plasmids are Important Vectors of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Agricultural Systems: Diversification Driven by Class 1 Integron Gene Cassettes.

    PubMed

    Heuer, Holger; Binh, Chu T T; Jechalke, Sven; Kopmann, Christoph; Zimmerling, Ute; Krögerrecklenfort, Ellen; Ledger, Thomas; González, Bernardo; Top, Eva; Smalla, Kornelia

    2012-01-01

    The role of broad-host range IncP-1ε plasmids in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance in agricultural systems has not yet been investigated. These plasmids were detected in total DNA from all of 16 manure samples and in arable soil based on a novel 5'-nuclease assay for real-time PCR. A correlation between IncP-1ε plasmid abundance and antibiotic usage was revealed. In a soil microcosm experiment the abundance of IncP-1ε plasmids was significantly increased even 127 days after application of manure containing the antibiotic compound sulfadiazine, compared to soil receiving only manure, only sulfadiazine, or water. Fifty IncP-1ε plasmids that were captured in E. coli CV601gfp from bacterial communities of manure and arable soil were characterized by PCR and hybridization. All plasmids carried class 1 integrons with highly varying sizes of the gene cassette region and the sul1 gene. Three IncP-1ε plasmids captured from soil bacteria and one from manure were completely sequenced. The backbones were nearly identical to that of the previously described IncP-1ε plasmid pKJK5. The plasmids differed mainly in the composition of a Tn402-like transposon carrying a class 1 integron with varying gene cassettes, IS1326, and in three of the plasmids the tetracycline resistance transposon Tn1721 with various truncations. Diverse Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria were revealed as hosts of one of the IncP-1ε plasmids in soil microcosms. Our data suggest that IncP-1ε plasmids are important vectors for horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance in agricultural systems.

  17. [Structural organization and control of expression of the sop-operon of linear plasmid prophage N15].

    PubMed

    Ravin, N V; Dorokhov, B D; Lane, D

    2004-01-01

    Stable inheritance of bacterial chromosomes and low-copy-number plasmids depends on the active partition of replicated molecules between daughter cells. The partition mechanism is well known for circular plasmids F and P1. The mechanism of partition of linear replicons was studied with the example of bacteriophage N15, which persists as a linear plasmid with covalently closed ends on lysogeny, rather than integrating into the Escherichia coli chromosome. Since stable inheritance of N15 is due to the sop operon homologous to sop of the F plasmid, the control of expression of the N15 sop genes was analyzed. The sop promoter (Psop) contains a binding site for bacterial IHF and five CTTTGC copies, which overlap the -35 and -10 elements. The Sop proteins were shown to interact with a Psop-containing DNA fragment in vitro. Transcription of the sop operon is regulated by the Sop proteins: SopA represses Psop, and SopB enhances the repression, having no effect on the promoter activity in the absence of SopA. In N15 lysogenic cells, Psop proved to be repressed. This regulatory mechanism was assumed to ensure production of SopA and SopB in amounts required for the segregation stability of N15 and to neutralize occasional fluctuations of their concentration in the cell.

  18. Locally weighted linear combination in a vector geographic information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Brad; Rinner, Claus

    2014-07-01

    Weighted linear combination is a multi-criteria decision analysis technique that can be used by decision-makers to select an optimal location from a collection of alternative locations. Its local form takes into account the range of attribute values within a user-defined neighbourhood in accordance with the range-sensitivity principle. This research explores locally weighted linear combination in a vector-based geographic information system. A custom application in ArcGIS 10 allows the user to select a neighbourhood definition from a standard set including contiguity, distance, and k-nearest neighbours, for which local weights are generated. A case study on vulnerability to heat-related illness in Toronto is used to illustrate the technique. The impact of local weighting on the heat vulnerability index is examined using visual analysis of the spatial patterns of heat vulnerability under the global and local approaches, as well as the sensitivity of the local approach to the selected neighbourhood definition. A trade-off analysis of the local weights is also presented. The combination of socio-demographic and environmental determinants in a locally weighted index results in patterns of heat vulnerability that could support targeted hot weather response at a micro-geographic level within urban neighbourhoods.

  19. The tra locus of streptomycete plasmid pIJ101 mediates efficient transfer of a circular but not a linear version of the same replicon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Pettis, Gregg S

    2010-09-01

    Conjugal transfer of circular plasmids in Streptomyces involves a unique mechanism employing few plasmid-encoded loci and the transfer of double-stranded DNA by an as yet uncharacterized intercellular route. Efficient transfer of the circular streptomycete plasmid pIJ101 requires only two plasmid loci: the pIJ101 tra gene, and as a cis-acting function known as clt. Here, we compared the ability of the pIJ101 transfer apparatus to promote conjugal transfer of circular versus linear versions of the same replicon. While the pIJ101 tra locus readily transferred the circular form of the replicon, the linear version was transferred orders of magnitude less efficiently and all plasmids isolated from the transconjugants were circular, regardless of their original configuration in the donor. Additionally, relatively rare circularization of linear plasmids was detectable in the donor cells, which is consistent with the notion that this event was a prerequisite for transfer by TraB(pIJ101). Linear versions of this same replicon did transfer efficiently, in that configuration, from strains containing the conjugative linear plasmid SLP2. Our data indicate that functions necessary and sufficient for transfer of circular DNA were insufficient for transfer of a related linear DNA molecule. The results here suggest that the conjugation mechanisms of linear versus circular DNA in Streptomyces spp. are inherently different and/or that efficient transfer of linear DNA requires additional components.

  20. Small multicopy, non-integrative shuttle vectors based on the plasmid pRN1 for Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and Sulfolobus solfataricus, model organisms of the (cren-)archaea.

    PubMed

    Berkner, Silvia; Grogan, Dennis; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Lipps, Georg

    2007-01-01

    The extreme thermoacidophiles of the genus Sulfolobus are among the best-studied archaea but have lacked small, reliable plasmid vectors, which have proven extremely useful for manipulating and analyzing genes in other microorganisms. Here we report the successful construction of a series of Sulfolobus-Escherichia coli shuttle vectors based on the small multicopy plasmid pRN1 from Sulfolobus islandicus. Selection in suitable uracil auxotrophs is provided through inclusion of pyrEF genes in the plasmid. The shuttle vectors do not integrate into the genome and do not rearrange. The plasmids allow functional overexpression of genes, as could be demonstrated for the beta-glycosidase (lacS) gene of S. solfataricus. In addition, we demonstrate that this beta-glycosidase gene could function as selectable marker in S. solfataricus. The shuttle plasmids differ in their interruption sites within pRN1 and allowed us to delineate functionally important regions of pRN1. The orf56/orf904 operon appears to be essential for pRN1 replication, in contrast interruption of the highly conserved orf80/plrA gene is tolerated. The new vector system promises to facilitate genetic studies of Sulfolobus and to have biotechnological uses, such as the overexpression or optimization of thermophilic enzymes that are not readily performed in mesophilic hosts.

  1. Small multicopy, non-integrative shuttle vectors based on the plasmid pRN1 for Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and Sulfolobus solfataricus, model organisms of the (cren-)archaea

    PubMed Central

    Berkner, Silvia; Grogan, Dennis; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Lipps, Georg

    2007-01-01

    The extreme thermoacidophiles of the genus Sulfolobus are among the best-studied archaea but have lacked small, reliable plasmid vectors, which have proven extremely useful for manipulating and analyzing genes in other microorganisms. Here we report the successful construction of a series of Sulfolobus–Escherichia coli shuttle vectors based on the small multicopy plasmid pRN1 from Sulfolobus islandicus. Selection in suitable uracil auxotrophs is provided through inclusion of pyrEF genes in the plasmid. The shuttle vectors do not integrate into the genome and do not rearrange. The plasmids allow functional overexpression of genes, as could be demonstrated for the β-glycosidase (lacS) gene of S. solfataricus. In addition, we demonstrate that this β-glycosidase gene could function as selectable marker in S. solfataricus. The shuttle plasmids differ in their interruption sites within pRN1 and allowed us to delineate functionally important regions of pRN1. The orf56/orf904 operon appears to be essential for pRN1 replication, in contrast interruption of the highly conserved orf80/plrA gene is tolerated. The new vector system promises to facilitate genetic studies of Sulfolobus and to have biotechnological uses, such as the overexpression or optimization of thermophilic enzymes that are not readily performed in mesophilic hosts. PMID:17576673

  2. Adsorption kinetics and reversibility of linear plasmid DNA on silica surfaces: influence of alkaline earth and transition metal ions.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thanh H; Chen, Kai Loon; Elimelech, Menachem

    2010-05-10

    A quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring is used to study the adsorption of linear plasmid DNA on silica surfaces and silica surfaces coated with poly-L-lysine (PLL) in solutions containing either alkaline earth (calcium and magnesium) or transition (cobalt, copper, and zinc) metals. Our results show that electrostatic attraction alone does not fully explain the significantly higher adsorption rate of DNA on the positively charged PLL layer in Cu(2+) solution compared to solutions containing Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Co(2+), or Zn(2+). Diffusion coefficients measured by dynamic light scattering reveal that the compactness of plasmid DNA molecules is greater in solutions containing Cu(2+) compared to that of DNA in other divalent electrolyte solutions. When the adsorption rate of plasmid DNA on silica is normalized to the corresponding adsorption rate on PLL-coated surfaces at the same solution condition, the attachment (adsorption) efficiencies are about 0.01 for Ca(2+) or Mg(2), but close to unity for Co(2+), Cu(2+), or Zn(2+). Results from viscoelastic modeling of adsorbed DNA layers suggest that the DNA layer formed in Cu(2+) solutions is thicker and more viscous compared to that formed in Co(2+) solutions. This study demonstrates that plasmid DNA has a strong affinity to Cu(2+), which results in a more compact conformation of DNA molecules compared to the case with the other divalent cations investigated.

  3. Plasmid Biopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Prazeres, Duarte Miguel F; Monteiro, Gabriel A

    2014-12-01

    Plasmids are currently an indispensable molecular tool in life science research and a central asset for the modern biotechnology industry, supporting its mission to produce pharmaceutical proteins, antibodies, vaccines, industrial enzymes, and molecular diagnostics, to name a few key products. Furthermore, plasmids have gradually stepped up in the past 20 years as useful biopharmaceuticals in the context of gene therapy and DNA vaccination interventions. This review provides a concise coverage of the scientific progress that has been made since the emergence of what are called today plasmid biopharmaceuticals. The most relevant topics are discussed to provide researchers with an updated overview of the field. A brief outline of the initial breakthroughs and innovations is followed by a discussion of the motivation behind the medical uses of plasmids in the context of therapeutic and prophylactic interventions. The molecular characteristics and rationale underlying the design of plasmid vectors as gene transfer agents are described and a description of the most important methods used to deliver plasmid biopharmaceuticals in vivo (gene gun, electroporation, cationic lipids and polymers, and micro- and nanoparticles) is provided. The major safety issues (integration and autoimmunity) surrounding the use of plasmid biopharmaceuticals is discussed next. Aspects related to the large-scale manufacturing are also covered, and reference is made to the plasmid products that have received marketing authorization as of today.

  4. Development of electrochemical reporter assay using HeLa cells transfected with vector plasmids encoding various responsive elements.

    PubMed

    Shiku, Hitoshi; Takeda, Michiaki; Murata, Tatsuya; Akiba, Uichi; Hamada, Fumio; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2009-04-27

    Electrochemical assay using HeLa cell lines transfected with various plasmid vectors encoding SEAP (secreted alkaline phosphatase) as the reporter has been performed by using SECM (scanning electrochemical microscopy). The plasmid vector contains different responsive elements that include GRE (glucocorticoid response elements), CRE (cAMP responsive elements), or kappaB (binding site for NFkappaB (nuclear factor kappa B)) upstream of the SEAP sequence. The transfected HeLa cells were patterned on a culture dish in a 4x4 array of circles of diameter 300 microm by using the PDMS (poly(dimethylsiloxane)) stencil technique. The cellular array was first exposed to 100 ng mL(-1) dexamethasone, 10 ng mL(-1) forskolin, or 100 ng mL(-1) TNF-alpha (tumor necrosis factor alpha) after which it was further cultured in an RPMI culture medium for 6 h. After incubation, the cellular array was soaked in a measuring solution containing 4.7 mM PAPP (p-aminophenylphosphate) at pH 9.5, following which electrochemical measurements were performed immediately within 40 min. The SECM method allows parallel evaluation of different cell lines transfected with pGRE-SEAP, pCRE-SEAP, and pNFkappaB-SEAP patterned on the same solid support for detection of the oxidation current of PAP (p-aminophenol) flux produced from only 300 HeLa cells in each stencil pattern. The results of the SECM method were highly sensitive as compared to those obtained from the conventional CL (chemiluminescence) protocol with at least 5x10(4) cells per well.

  5. Plasmids for increased efficiency of vector construction and genetic engineering in filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Schoberle, Taylor J; Nguyen-Coleman, C Kim; May, Gregory S

    2013-01-01

    Fungal species are continuously being studied to not only understand disease in humans and plants but also to identify novel antibiotics and other metabolites of industrial importance. Genetic manipulations, such as gene deletion, gene complementation, and gene over-expression, are common techniques to investigate fungal gene functions. Although advances in transformation efficiency and promoter usage have improved genetic studies, some basic steps in vector construction are still laborious and time-consuming. Gateway cloning technology solves this problem by increasing the efficiency of vector construction through the use of λ phage integrase proteins and att recombination sites. We developed a series of Gateway-compatible vectors for use in genetic studies in a range of fungal species. They contain nutritional and drug-resistance markers and can be utilized to manipulate different filamentous fungal genomes.

  6. A plasmid toolkit for cloning chimeric cDNAs encoding customized fusion proteins into any Gateway destination expression vector

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Valuable clone collections encoding the complete ORFeomes for some model organisms have been constructed following the completion of their genome sequencing projects. These libraries are based on Gateway cloning technology, which facilitates the study of protein function by simplifying the subcloning of open reading frames (ORF) into any suitable destination vector. The expression of proteins of interest as fusions with functional modules is a frequent approach in their initial functional characterization. A limited number of Gateway destination expression vectors allow the construction of fusion proteins from ORFeome-derived sequences, but they are restricted to the possibilities offered by their inbuilt functional modules and their pre-defined model organism-specificity. Thus, the availability of cloning systems that overcome these limitations would be highly advantageous. Results We present a versatile cloning toolkit for constructing fully-customizable three-part fusion proteins based on the MultiSite Gateway cloning system. The fusion protein components are encoded in the three plasmids integral to the kit. These can recombine with any purposely-engineered destination vector that uses a heterologous promoter external to the Gateway cassette, leading to the in-frame cloning of an ORF of interest flanked by two functional modules. In contrast to previous systems, a third part becomes available for peptide-encoding as it no longer needs to contain a promoter, resulting in an increased number of possible fusion combinations. We have constructed the kit’s component plasmids and demonstrate its functionality by providing proof-of-principle data on the expression of prototype fluorescent fusions in transiently-transfected cells. Conclusions We have developed a toolkit for creating fusion proteins with customized N- and C-term modules from Gateway entry clones encoding ORFs of interest. Importantly, our method allows entry clones obtained from ORFeome

  7. Longevity of rAAV vector and plasmid DNA in blood after intramuscular injection in nonhuman primates: implications for gene doping.

    PubMed

    Ni, W; Le Guiner, C; Gernoux, G; Penaud-Budloo, M; Moullier, P; Snyder, R O

    2011-07-01

    Legitimate uses of gene transfer technology can benefit from sensitive detection methods to determine vector biodistribution in pre-clinical studies and in human clinical trials, and similar methods can detect illegitimate gene transfer to provide sports-governing bodies with the ability to maintain fairness. Real-time PCR assays were developed to detect a performance-enhancing transgene (erythropoietin, EPO) and backbone sequences in the presence of endogenous cellular sequences. In addition to developing real-time PCR assays, the steps involved in DNA extraction, storage and transport were investigated. By real-time PCR, the vector transgene is distinguishable from the genomic DNA sequence because of the absence of introns, and the vector backbone can be identified by heterologous gene expression control elements. After performance of the assays was optimized, cynomolgus macaques received a single dose by intramuscular (IM) injection of plasmid DNA, a recombinant adeno-associated viral vector serotype 1 (rAAV1) or a rAAV8 vector expressing cynomolgus macaque EPO. Macaques received a high plasmid dose intended to achieve a significant, but not life-threatening, increase in hematocrit. rAAV vectors were used at low doses to achieve a small increase in hematocrit and to determine the limit of sensitivity for detecting rAAV sequences by single-step PCR. DNA extracted from white blood cells (WBCs) was tested to determine whether WBCs can be collaterally transfected by plasmid or transduced by rAAV vectors in this context, and can be used as a surrogate marker for gene doping. We demonstrate that IM injection of a conventional plasmid and rAAV vectors results in the presence of DNA that can be detected at high levels in blood before rapid elimination, and that rAAV genomes can persist for several months in WBCs.

  8. Optimization of a new non-viral vector for transfection: Eudragit nanoparticles for the delivery of a DNA plasmid.

    PubMed

    Gargouri, M; Sapin, A; Bouli, S; Becuwe, P; Merlin, J L; Maincent, P

    2009-12-01

    The development of new vectors to deliver DNA into cells for therapy of cancers or genetic diseases has been a major area of research for many years. However, the clinical application of this technology requires the development of efficient, reliable and sterile vectors enabling the transfer of genes in vivo. Non viral, polymer or lipid-based vectors offer a new impetus to gene therapy because they are less toxic than viral vectors (no endogenous recombination, fewer immunological reactions, easy production and delivery of large-sized plasmid). The aim of this study is to develop a new tool for DNA delivery composed of methacrylic polymeric (Eudragit RS and RL) nanoparticles. These nanoparticles were prepared by two methods: nanoprecipitation and double emulsion. The nanoparticles were characterized by their size, zeta potential and amount of DNA adsorption. Cytotoxicity tests based on mitochondrial activity (MTT test) revealed that the nanoparticles had limited cytotoxicity and that this depended on both the cell type and the nanoparticle concentration. Transgene expression was observed using the Green Fluorescence Protein gene as reporter gene, and was evaluated by flow cytometry in FaDu, MDA-MB 231 and MCF-7 cell lines. The results showed that transfection rates ranging between 4 and 7% were achieved in FaDu and MDA-MB 231 cells with nanoparticles prepared by the nanoprecipitation method. In MCF-7 cells transfected with nanoparticles prepared by either the double emulsion or the nanoprecipitation method, the transfection efficiency was between 2 and 4%. Nanoparticles prepared by nanoprecipitation were slightly more efficient than nanoparticles prepared from a double emulsion. Particle size was not an important factor for transfection, since no significant difference was observed with size between 50 and 350 nm. We showed that Eudragit RS and RL nanoparticles could introduce the transgene into different types of cells, but were generally less effective than the

  9. The mean-square error optimal linear discriminant function and its application to incomplete data vectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, H. F.

    1979-01-01

    In many pattern recognition problems, data vectors are classified although one or more of the data vector elements are missing. This problem occurs in remote sensing when the ground is obscured by clouds. Optimal linear discrimination procedures for classifying imcomplete data vectors are discussed.

  10. Plasmid Vectors for Proteomic Analyses in Giardia: Purification of Virulence Factors and Analysis of the Proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Stadelmann, Britta; Birkestedt, Sandra; Hellman, Ulf; Svärd, Staffan G.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, proteomics has come of age with the development of efficient tools for purification, identification, and characterization of gene products predicted by genome projects. The intestinal protozoan Giardia intestinalis can be transfected, but there is only a limited set of vectors available, and most of them are not user friendly. This work delineates the construction of a suite of cassette-based expression vectors for use in Giardia. Expression is provided by the strong constitutive ornithine carbamoyltransferase (OCT) promoter, and tagging is possible in both N- and C-terminal configurations. Taken together, the vectors are capable of providing protein localization and production of recombinant proteins, followed by efficient purification by a novel affinity tag combination, streptavidin binding peptide–glutathione S-transferase (SBP-GST). The option of removing the tags from purified proteins was provided by the inclusion of a PreScission protease site. The efficiency and feasibility of producing and purifying endogenous recombinant Giardia proteins with the developed vectors was demonstrated by the purification of active recombinant arginine deiminase (ADI) and OCT from stably transfected trophozoites. Moreover, we describe the tagging, purification by StrepTactin affinity chromatography, and compositional analysis by mass spectrometry of the G. intestinalis 26S proteasome by employing the Strep II-FLAG–tandem affinity purification (SF-TAP) tag. This is the first report of efficient production and purification of recombinant proteins in and from Giardia, which will allow the study of specific parasite proteins and protein complexes. PMID:22611020

  11. Hawking radiation of massive vector particles from the linear dilaton black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ran; Zhao, Junkun

    2016-07-01

    By using the tunneling formalism, we calculated the massive vector particles' Hawking radiation from the non-rotating and rotating linear dilaton black holes. By applying the WKB approximation to the Proca field equation that govern the dynamics of massive vector bosons, we derive the tunneling probabilities and radiation spectrums of the emitted vector particles from the linear dilaton black holes. The Hawking temperatures of the linear dilaton black holes have been recovered, which are consistent with the previous results in the literature. This means that the vector particles' tunneling method can also be used in studying the Hawking radiation of asymptotically non-flat and non-AdS black holes.

  12. LCR-mediated, long-term tissue-specific gene expression within replicating episomal plasmid and cosmid vectors.

    PubMed

    Chow, C-M; Athanassiadou, A; Raguz, S; Psiouri, L; Harland, L; Malik, M; Aitken, M A; Grosveld, F; Antoniou, M

    2002-03-01

    Locus control regions (LCRs) are transcriptional regulatory elements, which possess a dominant chromatin remodelling and transcriptional activating capability conferring full physiological levels of expression on a gene linked in cis, when integrated into the host cell genome. Using the human beta-globin LCR (betaLCR) as a model, we show that this class of control element can drive high levels of tissue-specific gene expression in stably transfected cultured cells from within an Epstein-Barr virus-based plasmid REV. Furthermore, a 38-kb betaLCR minilocus-REV cosmid vector was efficiently retained and maintained therapeutic levels of beta-globin transgene expression in the absence of drug selective pressure over a 2-month period of continuous culture equivalent to at least 60 generations. This demonstrates for the first time the feasibility of using REVs for gene therapy of the haemoglobinopathies. Importantly, our results demonstrate that as in the case of integrated transgenes, expression from within REVs is prone to silencing but that the inclusion of the betaLCR prevented this repression of gene function. Therefore, appropriate control elements to provide and maintain tissue-specific gene expression, as well as the episomal status of REVs is a crucial feature in vector design. Our data suggest that LCRs can contribute to this vital function.

  13. Delivery of plasmid DNA expression vector for keratinocyte growth factor-1 using electroporation to improve cutaneous wound healing in a septic rat model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Michael P; Marti, Guy P; Dieb, Rami; Wang, Jiaai; Ferguson, Mark; Qaiser, Rabia; Bonde, Pramod; Duncan, Mark D; Harmon, John W

    2006-01-01

    We have previously shown that wound healing was improved in a diabetic mouse model of impaired wound healing following transfection with keratinocyte growth factor-1 (KGF-1) cDNA. We now extend these findings to the characterization of the effects of DNA plasmid vectors delivered to rats using electroporation (EP) in vivo in a sepsis-based model of impaired wound healing. To assess plasmid transfection and wound healing, gWIZ luciferase and PCDNA3.1/KGF-1 expression vectors were used, respectively. Cutaneous wounds were produced using an 8 mm-punch biopsy in Sprague-Dawley rats in which healing was impaired by cecal ligation-induced sepsis. We used National Institutes of Health image analysis software and histologic assessment to analyze wound closure and found that EP increased expression of gWIZ luciferase vector up to 53-fold compared with transfection without EP (p < 0.001). EP-assisted plasmid transfection was found to be localized to skin. Septic rats had a 4.7 times larger average wound area on day 9 compared with control (p < 0.001). Rats that underwent PCDNA3.1/KGF-1 transfection with EP had 60% smaller wounds on day 12 compared with vector without EP (p < 0.009). Quality of healing with KGF-1 vector plus EP scored 3.0 +/- 0.3 and was significantly better than that of 1.8 +/- 0.3 for treatment with vector alone (p < 0.05). We conclude that both the rate and quality of healing were improved with DNA plasmid expression vector for growth factor delivered with EP to septic rats.

  14. Safe two-plasmid production for the first clinical lentivirus vector that achieves >99% transduction in primary cells using a one-step protocol.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaobin; Humeau, Laurent; Slepushkin, Vladimir; Binder, Gwendolyn; Yu, Qiao; Slepushkina, Tatiana; Chen, Ziping; Merling, Randall; Davis, Brian; Chang, Yung-Nien; Dropulic, Boro

    2004-09-01

    We report the design of a unique two-plasmid production system for the first lentiviral vector to be evaluated in humans, VRX496. VRX496 is an optimized VSV-G pseudotyped vector derived from HIV-1 that expresses antisense to the HIV envelope gene. We found that a two-plasmid approach to production resulted in higher vector production titers when compared with a three-plasmid approach, which is particularly important for vector production at the large scale. Therefore, we carefully designed a single packaging construct, VIRPAC, for safety by reducing its homology with VRX496 and by insertion of functionally validated genetic elements designed to reduce the risk of generation of a replication-competent lentivirus (RCL). A native cis-acting ribozyme is used to prevent read through into the envelope gene from the upstream gag-pol genes in the packaging vector, thus preventing RNAs containing gag-pol and env together for comparable safety to a three-plasmid system. We demonstrate that there is no significant in vivo vector mobilization using a primary SCID-hu mouse transplantation model, which correlates with the presence of an anti-HIV payload and suggests that inclusion of antisense may be a useful tool to restrict mobilization in other vector constructs. Gene transfer is achieved using a one-step transduction procedure that is simple and clinically translatable, which reaches stable transduction efficiencies of >99% in CD4+ T lymphocytes within 3 days of culture initiation. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Optimized and enhanced DNA plasmid vector based in vivo construction of a neutralizing anti-HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein Fab.

    PubMed

    Muthumani, Kar; Flingai, Seleeke; Wise, Megan; Tingey, Colleen; Ugen, Kenneth E; Weiner, David B

    2013-10-01

    Monoclonal antibody preparations have demonstrated considerable clinical utility in the treatment of specific malignancies, as well as inflammatory and infectious diseases. Antibodies are conventionally delivered by passive administration, typically requiring costly large-scale laboratory development and production. Additional limitations include the necessity for repeat administrations, and the length of in vivo potency. Therefore, the development of methods to generate therapeutic antibodies and antibody like molecules in vivo, distinct from an active antigen-based immunization strategy, would have considerable clinical utility. In fact, adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector mediated delivery of immunoglobulin genes with subsequent generation of functional antibodies has recently been developed. As well, anon-viral vector mediated nucleic acid based delivery technology could permit the generation of therapeutic/prophylactic antibodies in vivo, obviating potential safety issues associated with viral vector based gene delivery. This delivery strategy has limitations as well, mainly due to very low in vivo production and expression of protein from the delivered gene. In the study reported here we have constructed an "enhanced and optimized" DNA plasmid technology to generate immunoglobulin heavy and light chains (i.e., Fab fragments) from an established neutralizing anti-HIV envelope glycoprotein monoclonal antibody (VRC01). This "enhanced" DNA (E-DNA) plasmid technology includes codon/RNA optimization, leader sequence utilization, as well as targeted potentiation of delivery and expression of the Fab immunoglobulin genes through use of "adaptive" in vivo electroporation. The results demonstrate that delivery by this method of a single administration of the optimized Fab expressing constructs resulted in generation of Fab molecules in mouse sera possessing high antigen specific binding and HIV neutralization activity for at least 7 d after injection, against diverse

  16. [Sop proteins can cause transcriptional silencing of genes located close to the centromere sites of linear plasmid N15].

    PubMed

    Mardanov, A V; Lane, D; Ravin, N V

    2010-01-01

    Stable inheritance of bacterial chromosomes and low copy number plasmids is ensured by accurate partitioning of replicated molecules between the daughter cells at division. Partitioning of the prophage of the temperate bacteriophage N15, which exists as a linear plasmid molecule with covalently closed ends, depends on the sop locus, comprising genes sopA and sopB, as well as four centromere sites located in different regions of the N15 genome essential for replication and the control of lysogeny. We found that binding of SopB to the centromere can silence centromere-proximal promoters, presumably due to subsequent polymerizing of SopB along the DNA. Close to the IR4 centromere site we identified a promoter, P59, able to drive expression of phage late genes encoding the structural proteins of virion. We found that following binding to IR4 the N15 Sop proteins can cause repression of this promoter. The repression depends on SopB and became stronger in the presence of SopA. Sop-dependent silencing of centromere-proximal promoters control gene expression in phage N15, particularly preventing undesired expression of late genes in the N15 prophage. Thus, the phage N15 sop system not only ensures plasmid partitioning but is also involved in the genetic network controlling prophage replication and the maintenance of lysogeny.

  17. The Agrocybe aegerita mitochondrial genome contains two inverted repeats of the nad4 gene arisen by duplication on both sides of a linear plasmid integration site.

    PubMed

    Ferandon, C; Chatel, S El Kirat; Castandet, B; Castroviejo, M; Barroso, G

    2008-03-01

    The Agrocybe aegerita mitochondrial genome possesses two polB genes with linear plasmid origin. The cloning and sequencing of the regions flanking Aa-polB P1 revealed two large inverted repeats (higher than 2421 nt) separated by a single copy region of 5834 nt. Both repeats contain identical copies of the nad4 gene. The single copy region contains two disrupted genes with plasmid origin Aa-polB P1 and a small ORF homologous to a small gene described in two basidiomycete linear plasmids. The phylogenetic analyses argue in favor of a same plasmid origin for both genes but, surprisingly, these genes were separated by a mitochondrial tRNA-Met. Both strands of the complete region containing the two nad4 inverted copies and the tRNA-Met appear to be transcribed on large polycistronic mRNAs. A model summarizing the events that would have occurred is proposed: (1) capture of the tRNA by the plasmid before its integration in the mtDNA or acquisition of the tRNA gene by recombination after the plasmid integration, (2) integration of the plasmid in the mtDNA, accompanied by a large duplication containing the nad4 gene and (3) erosion of the plasmid sequences by large deletions and mutations.

  18. Dynamic Model Based Vector Control of Linear Induction Motor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    reference frame. In Section III, the basic structure of vector control is introduced. Proportional-Integral ( PI ) control is incorporated into vector...The load mass is then released from the slider. The performed simulation is based on selected PI control gains of Kp = 35 and KI = 75. Fig. 12 shows...controlled separately to maintain a desired flux level in the machine. The force current Isq is proportional to the load which is regulated using a PI

  19. Ultraviolet mutagenesis in a plasmid vector replicated in lymphoid cells from patient with the melanoma-prone disorder dysplastic nevus syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Seetharam, S.; Waters, H.L.; Seidman, M.M.; Kraemer, K.H. )

    1989-11-01

    The hereditary dysplastic nevus syndrome (DNS) is an autosomal dominant disorder in which affected individuals have increased numbers of dysplastic (premalignant) nevi and a greater than 100-fold increased risk of developing cutaneous melanoma. Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines from patients with hereditary DNS have been shown to be hypermutable to UV radiation. To examine the mechanism involved in this UV hypermutability, we used a shuttle vector plasmid, pZ189, which carries a 160-base pair marker gene, supF, and can replicate in human cells. pZ189 was treated with UV radiation and transfected into DNS6BE, a lymphoblastoid cell line from a patient with hereditary DNS. Plasmid survival after UV was similar with the DNS6BE line and with a lymphoblastoid cell line from a normal donor. Plasmid mutation frequency was greater with the DNS line in accord with the DNS cellular hypermutability. Base sequence analysis was performed on 69 mutated plasmids recovered from the DNS line. There were significantly more plasmids with single base substitution mutations (P less than 0.01) in comparison to UV-treated plasmids passed through normal fibroblasts. pZ189 hypermutability and an increased frequency of single base substitutions was previously found with a cell line from a melanoma-prone xeroderma pigmentosum patient. These differences may be related to the increased melanoma susceptibility in both DNS and xeroderma pigmentosum.

  20. Elimination of indigenous linear plasmids in Streptomyces hygroscopicus var. jinggangensis and Streptomyces sp. FR008 to increase validamycin A and candicidin productivities.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chenyang; Wu, Hang; Su, Xiurong; Bai, Linquan

    2017-02-25

    Giant linear plasmids, which replicate independently of the chromosomes, widely exist in actinobacteria. Previous studies mostly focused on the replication and evolution of the linear plasmids or the secondary metabolite gene clusters and the resistance gene clusters therein. However, the relationships of the linear plasmids to the productivities of secondary metabolites have not been studied. In this work, we developed a method to eliminate the indigenous linear plasmid pSHJG1 in Streptomyces hygroscopicus var. jinggangensis, and validamycin A titer increased by 12.5% (from 19.16 ± 1.93 to 21.56 ± 2.25 g/L) in the high-yielding strain TL01 and 43.7% (from 4.67 ± 0.05 to 6.71 ± 0.21 g/L) in the wild-type strain 5008, whereas the cellular growth of the plasmid-cured mutant was reduced. Subsequently, the plasmid-cured mutant was complemented with three structure genes involved in cellular growth in pSHJG1 under the control of a strong PvalA promoter. Among them, the complementation of genes pSHJG1.069 and pSHJG1.072, encoding a putative hydrolase and putative P-loop ATPase, respectively, resulted in the restoration of cellular growth and validamycin A titer. Furthermore, the elimination of indigenous linear plasmid pHZ228 in the candicidin producer Streptomyces sp. FR008 also led to enhanced candicidin production and reduced cellular growth. Because of the wide distribution of indigenous linear plasmids in actinobacteria, the engineering strategy described here could be implemented in a variety of strains for the overproduction of various natural products.

  1. Characterization of the Minimal Replicon of a Cryptic Deinococcus radiodurans SARK Plasmid and Development of Versatile Escherichia coli-D. radiodurans Shuttle Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Meima, Rob; Lidstrom, Mary E.

    2000-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a 12-kb fragment of the cryptic Deinococcus radiodurans SARK plasmid pUE10 was determined, in order to direct the development of small, versatile cloning systems for Deinococcus. Annotation of the sequence revealed 12 possible open reading frames. Among these are the repU and resU genes, the predicted products of which share similarity with replication proteins and site-specific resolvases, respectively. The products of both genes were demonstrated using an overexpression system in Escherichia coli. RepU was found to be required for replication, and ResU was found to be required for stable maintenance of pUE10 derivatives. Gel shift analysis using purified His-tagged RepU identified putative binding sites and suggested that RepU may be involved in both replication initiation and autoregulation of repU expression. In addition, a gene encoding a possible antirestriction protein was found, which was shown to be required for high transformation frequencies. The arrangement of the replication region and putative replication genes for this plasmid from D. radiodurans strain SARK is similar to that for plasmids found in Thermus but not to that for the 45.7-kb plasmid found in D. radiodurans strain R1. The minimal region required for autonomous replication in D. radiodurans was determined by sequential deletion of segments from the 12-kb fragment. The resulting minimal replicon, which consists of approximately 2.6 kb, was used for the construction of a shuttle vector for E. coli and D. radiodurans. This vector, pRAD1, is a convenient general-purpose cloning vector. In addition, pRAD1 was used to generate a promoter probe vector, and a plasmid containing lacZ and a Deinococcus promoter was shown to efficiently express LacZ. PMID:10966401

  2. [Selection and construction of cell line stably expressing survivin gene in lower level through eukaryotic plasmid vector of shRNA].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Xia; Sun, Shan-Zhen; Song, Ying

    2008-06-01

    To construct a short hairpin RNA(shRNA) interference expression plasmid vector of survivin gene, transfect tongue squamous cell carcinoma line Tca8113 which expressed survivin gene in a high level, and choose the cells whose survivin gene were suppressed significantly. Two pairs of oligonucleotide sequences specific for survivin gene were designed and synthesized, and cloned into pSilencer-2.1U6-neo plasmid. The recombinant plasmids (named PS1 and PS2) were amplified in Ecoli. DH5alpha was identified by restriction digestion, PCR and sequencing. The vectors were transfected into Tca8113 cells with lipofectamine 2000. After selection with G418, the stable cell clones were attained. Survivn expression was assayed with real-time quantitative PCR and Western blotting. SAS8.0 software package was used for Student t test. Two vectors were constructed successfully and stable cell clones with PS1 or PS2 plasmid were obtained. As compared with those of control, survivin expression of transfected cell with PS1 or PS2 in mRNA level was significantly suppressed (P<0.05). In protein level, only those of transfected cell with PS2 was significantly suppressed (P<0.01). The shRNA interference expression plasmid vectors of survivin gene are successfully constructed, and Tca8113 cells which express survivin gene in a stable lower level are attained, which enable us to carry out further research on gene therapy of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No.30572056).

  3. JANUS neutron irradiation of a mouse cell line containing a shuttle vector plasmid

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, B. ); Grdina, D.J. ); Ashman, C.R. )

    1989-01-01

    The study presented here represents the initial steps of our attempt to characterize JANUS neutron induced mutagenesis in mammalian cells. The approach which we are taking is to use a mammalian cell system which allows one to determine the actual changes in DNA base sequence which occur when a gene mutates. Recently, several systems have been described which make possible the rapid and unambiguous determination of DNA base sequence changes in genes of eukaryotic cells. In some of these systems, a target gene is introduced into the mammalian cells as part of a shuttle vector which is capable of replication in both mammalian cells and bacteria. In this study we have used such a system for the analysis of neutron-induced mutations in the presence and absence of the radioprotector N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-diaminopropane, WR1065. 20 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Unveiling locally linearly polarized vector fields with broken axial symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xilin; Lou Kai; Chen Jing; Gu Bing; Li Yongnan; Wang Huitian

    2011-06-15

    We explore how the focusing of axial-symmetry-broken vector fields is associated with a sector aperture whose apex coincides with the field axis. Its focused field is azimuthally split into a pair of orthogonal right- and left-handed circularly polarized partial rings which are rotated by angles of {+-}{pi}/2 with respect to the input vector field carrying no orbital angular momentum (OAM) and no spin angular momentum (SAM), respectively. Each member of the pair of partial rings carries not only the opposite OAM but also the opposite SAM. We unveil the underlying physics behind such an effect.

  5. Structural analysis of the 6 kb cryptic plasmid pFAJ2600 from Rhodococcus erythropolis NI86/21 and construction of Escherichia coli-Rhodococcus shuttle vectors.

    PubMed

    De Mot, R; Nagy, I; De Schrijver, A; Pattanapipitpaisal, P; Schoofs, G; Vanderleyden, J

    1997-10-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the 5936 bp cryptic plasmid pFAJ2600 from Rhodococcus erythropolis NI86/21 was determined. Based on the characteristics of its putative replication genes, repA and repB, pFAJ2600 was assigned to the family of pAL5000-related small replicons identified in Mycobacterium (pAL5000), Corynebacterium (pXZ10142), Brevibacterium (pRBL1), Bifidobacterium (pMB1) and Neisseria (pJD1). The replication systems of these plasmids show striking similarities to the ones used by the ColE2 family of plasmids from Enterobacteria with respect to both trans-acting factors and ori sequences. Two possible plasmid stabilization systems are encoded on pFAJ2600: a site-specific recombinase (PmrA) related to the Escherichia coli Xer proteins for plasmid multimer resolution and an ATPase (ParA) related to the A-type of proteins in sop/par partitioning systems. The proposed replication termination region of pFAJ2600 has features in common with the Ter loci of Bacillus subtilis. Chimeras composed of a pUC18-Cmr derivative inserted in the parA-repA intergenic region of vector pFAJ2600 produced vectors that could be shuttled between Escherichia coli and several Rhodococcus species (R. erythropolis, R. fascians, R. rhodochrous, R. ruber). The pFAJ2600-based shuttle vector pFAJ2574 was stably maintained in R. erythropolis and R. fascians growing under non-selective conditions.

  6. Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation by novel mini-T vectors in conjunction with a high-copy vir region helper plasmid.

    PubMed

    Zyprian, E; Kado, C I

    1990-08-01

    A new binary vector system for Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation was developed. A set of four mini-T vectors comprised of T-DNA border sequences from nopaline-type Ti-plasmid pTiC58 flanking a chimaeric hygromycin-resistance gene for selection of transformants and up to eight unique restriction sites for cloning foreign DNA was constructed on a broad-host replicon containing the oriV of plasmid pSa. In two of the constructs these multiple cloning sites are flanked by a strong promoter to activate transcription of inserted DNA in planta. High-efficiency transformation was prompted by a high-copy, stable virulence helper plasmid pUCD2614, which contains a cloned virulence region of pTiC58 and tandem copies of the par locus of plasmid pTAR. Southern blot hybridization and genetic analyses of the progeny of transformed plants showed that the hygromycin resistance gene was stably inherited.

  7. Construction of a stable plasmid vector for industrial production of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) by a recombinant Cupriavidus necator H16 strain.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shunsuke; Fujiki, Tetsuya; Matsumoto, Keiji

    2013-12-01

    A new stable plasmid vector (pCUP3) was developed for high and stable production of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) (PHBH) using Cupriavidus necator H16 as the host strain. In pCUP3, it was found that the plasmid partition and replication region of the megaplasmid pMOL28 in the Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 strain plays an important role in plasmid stability in C. necator H16. Moreover, the partition locus (comprising parA28 and parB28 and the parS28 region) is essential for plasmid maintenance under high-PHBH-accumulation. PHBH productivity by the C. necator H16/ds strain (phaC1 deactivated mutant strain) harboring a phaCAc NSDG within pCUP3 was identical to the productivity of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) by the C. necator H16 strain when palm kernel oil was used as the sole carbon source without any antibiotics. This new vector is important for industrial mass production of polyhydroxyalkanoates using the C. necator H16 strain as the host, dispensing the necessity of the application of selective pressure such as antibiotics. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Bifurcation diagrams for Hamiltonian nilpotent centers of linear plus cubic homogeneous polynomial vector fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colak, Ilker E.; Llibre, Jaume; Valls, Claudia

    2017-06-01

    Following the work done in [8] we provide the bifurcation diagrams for the global phase portraits in the Poincaré disk of all Hamiltonian nilpotent centers of linear plus cubic homogeneous planar polynomial vector fields.

  9. Plasmid Vector-Linked Maturation of Natural Killer (NK) Cells Is Coupled to Antigen-Dependent NK Cell Activation during DNA-Based Immunization in Mice ▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ren; Mancini-Bourgine, Maryline; Zhang, Xiao Ming; Bayard, Florence; Deng, Qiang; Michel, Marie-Louise

    2011-01-01

    Plasmid DNA vaccines serve in a wide array of applications ranging from prophylactic vaccines to potential therapeutic tools against infectious diseases and cancer. In this study, we analyzed the mechanisms underlying the activation of natural killer (NK) cells and their potential role in adaptive immunity during DNA-based immunization against hepatitis B virus surface antigen in mice. We observed that the mature Mac-1+ CD27− NK cell subset increased in the liver of mice early after DNA injection, whereas the number of the less mature Mac-1+ CD27+ NK cells in the liver and spleen was significantly reduced. This effect was attributed to bacterial sequences present in the plasmid backbone rather than to the encoded antigen and was not observed in immunized MyD88-deficient mice. The activation of NK cells by plasmid-DNA injection was associated with an increase in their effector functions that depended on the expressed antigen. Maturation of NK cells was abrogated in the absence of T cells, suggesting that cross talk exists between NK cells and antigen-specific T cells. Taken together, our data unravel the mechanics of plasmid vector-induced maturation of NK cells and plasmid-encoded antigen-dependent activation of NK cells required for a crucial role of NK cells in DNA vaccine-induced immunogenicity. PMID:21775455

  10. Binding and condensation of plasmid DNA onto functionalized carbon nanotubes: toward the construction of nanotube-based gene delivery vectors.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ravi; Pantarotto, Davide; McCarthy, David; Chaloin, Olivier; Hoebeke, Johan; Partidos, Charalambos D; Briand, Jean-Paul; Prato, Maurizio; Bianco, Alberto; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2005-03-30

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) constitute a class of nanomaterials that possess characteristics suitable for a variety of possible applications. Their compatibility with aqueous environments has been made possible by the chemical functionalization of their surface, allowing for exploration of their interactions with biological components including mammalian cells. Functionalized CNTs (f-CNTs) are being intensively explored in advanced biotechnological applications ranging from molecular biosensors to cellular growth substrates. We have been exploring the potential of f-CNTs as delivery vehicles of biologically active molecules in view of possible biomedical applications, including vaccination and gene delivery. Recently we reported the capability of ammonium-functionalized single-walled CNTs to penetrate human and murine cells and facilitate the delivery of plasmid DNA leading to expression of marker genes. To optimize f-CNTs as gene delivery vehicles, it is essential to characterize their interactions with DNA. In the present report, we study the interactions of three types of f-CNTs, ammonium-functionalized single-walled and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (SWNT-NH3+; MWNT-NH3+), and lysine-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT-Lys-NH3+), with plasmid DNA. Nanotube-DNA complexes were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, surface plasmon resonance, PicoGreen dye exclusion, and agarose gel shift assay. The results indicate that all three types of cationic carbon nanotubes are able to condense DNA to varying degrees, indicating that both nanotube surface area and charge density are critical parameters that determine the interaction and electrostatic complex formation between f-CNTs with DNA. All three different f-CNT types in this study exhibited upregulation of marker gene expression over naked DNA using a mammalian (human) cell line. Differences in the levels of gene expression were correlated with the structural and biophysical data obtained for the f

  11. Site-specific integration of CAR gene into Jurkat T cells with a linear close-ended AAV-based DNA vector for CAR-T engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun; Liu, Xiaomei; Zhang, Jinju; Zhang, Chun

    2016-09-01

    To develop a site-specific integration strategy for CAR-T engineering by using a non-viral vector dependent on adeno-associated viral (AAV) genome, which tends to be integrated into AAVS1 site with the help of its Rep proteins. AAV-dependent vectors were produced in Sf9 cells. Structural analyses revealed the vector as covalently close-ended, linear duplex molecules, which was termed "CELiD" DNA. A plasmid CMV-Rep was constructed to express the integrases Rep78 and Rep68. Jurkat cells were co-electroporated with "CELiD" DNA and plasmid CMV-Rep in order to specifically integrate CAR gene into AAVS1 site. We examined 71 stably transfected Jurkat clones by nested PCR, sequencing and southern blotting, of which 30 clones bore CAR gene within AAVS1 site. The site-specific integration efficiency was nearly 42.2 %. The AAV-dependent vector preferentially integrated CAR into AAVS1 site, which could be further used in human T cell modification and enhance the security of CAR-T therapy.

  12. Linear matrix inequalities for analysis and control of linear vector second-order systems

    SciTech Connect

    Adegas, Fabiano D.; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2014-10-06

    Many dynamical systems are modeled as vector second-order differential equations. This paper presents analysis and synthesis conditions in terms of LMI with explicit dependence in the coefficient matrices of vector second-order systems. These conditions benefit from the separation between the Lyapunov matrix and the system matrices by introducing matrix multipliers, which potentially reduce conservativeness in hard control problems. Multipliers facilitate the usage of parameter-dependent Lyapunov functions as certificates of stability of uncertain and time-varying vector second-order systems. The conditions introduced in this work have the potential to increase the practice of analyzing and controlling systems directly in vector second-order form.

  13. Construction of a plasmid vector based on the pMV158 replicon for cloning and inducible gene expression in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Masó, José A; López-Aguilar, Celeste; Nieto, Concha; Sanz, Marta; Burón, Patricia; Espinosa, Manuel; del Solar, Gloria

    2012-01-01

    We report the construction of a plasmid vector designed for regulated gene expression in Streptococcus pneumoniae. The new vector, pLS1ROM, is based on the replicon of the streptococcal promiscuous rolling circle replication (RCR) plasmid pMV158. We inserted the controllable promoter P(M) of the S. pneumoniaemalMP operon, followed by a multi-cloning site sequence aimed to facilitate the insertion of target genes. The expression from P(M) is negatively regulated by the transcriptional repressor MalR, which is released from the DNA operator sequence by growing the cells in maltose-containing media. To get a highly regulated expression of the target gene, MalR was provided in cis by inserting the malR gene under control of the constitutive P(tet) promoter, which in pMV158 directs expression of the tetL gene. To test the functionality of the system, we cloned the reporter gene gfp from Aequorea victoria, encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFP). Pneumococcal cells harboring the recombinant plasmid rendered GFP fluorescence in a maltose-dependent mode with undetectable background levels in the absence of the inducer. The new vector, pLS1ROM, exhibits full structural and segregational stability and constitutes a valuable tool for genetic manipulation and regulated gene expression in S. pneumoniae. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Partition operon expression in the linear plasmid prophage N15 is controlled by both Sop proteins and protelomerase.

    PubMed

    Dorokhov, Boris D; Lane, David; Ravin, Nikolai V

    2003-10-01

    The temperate coliphage N15, unlike most low copy-number prokaryotic replicons, is maintained as a linear DNA molecule with covalently closed ends. Accurate partitioning of the plasmid prophage is assured by a close homologue of the sop locus of the F plasmid. However, the region upstream of the N15 sopAB genes contains multiple putative promoters, in contrast to F sop whose expression is driven by one negatively autoregulated promoter. In addition, the centromere of N15 is represented by four inverted repeats located at widely separated sites within the region essential for replication and control of lytic functions. We have analysed expression of N15 sop genes. We find that transcription of N15 sop is driven by two major promoters. The first, P1, is similar in sequence and function to the F sop promoter; it is repressed by Sop proteins. The second promoter, P2, is upstream of P1 and is several times stronger. It is insensitive to regulation by Sop proteins but is tightly repressed by protelomerase, the N15 enzyme that completes prophage replication by generating hairpin telomeres. These results establish a regulatory link between the partition system and other processes of N15 maintenance.

  15. Linearization of baculovirus DNA enhances the recovery of recombinant virus expression vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Kitts, P A; Ayres, M D; Possee, R D

    1990-01-01

    Engineered derivatives of Autographa californica multiple nucleocapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) possessing a unique restriction site provide a source of viral DNA that can be linearized by digestion with a specific endonuclease. Circular or linearized DNA from two such viruses were compared in terms of their infectivity and recombinogenic activities. The linear forms were 15- to 150-fold less infectious than the corresponding circular forms, when transfected into Spodoptera frugiperda cells using the calcium phosphate method. Linear viral DNA was, however, proficient at recombination on co-transfection with an appropriate transfer vector. Up to 30% of the progeny viruses were recombinant, a 10-fold higher fraction of recombinants than was obtained from co-transfections with circular AcMNPV DNA. The isolation of a recombinant baculovirus expression vector from any of the AcMNPV transfer vectors currently in use can thus be facilitated by linearization of the viral DNA at the appropriate location. Images PMID:2216760

  16. “Direct cloning in Lactobacillus plantarum: Electroporation with non-methylated plasmid DNA enhances transformation efficiency and makes shuttle vectors obsolete”

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) play an important role in agricultural as well as industrial biotechnology. Development of improved LAB strains using e.g. library approaches is often limited by low transformation efficiencies wherefore one reason could be differences in the DNA methylation patterns between the Escherichia coli intermediate host for plasmid amplification and the final LAB host. In the present study, we examined the influence of DNA methylation on transformation efficiency in LAB and developed a direct cloning approach for Lactobacillus plantarum CD033. Therefore, we propagated plasmid pCD256 in E. coli strains with different dam/dcm-methylation properties. The obtained plasmid DNA was purified and transformed into three different L. plantarum strains and a selection of other LAB species. Results Best transformation efficiencies were obtained using the strain L. plantarum CD033 and non-methylated plasmid DNA. Thereby we achieved transformation efficiencies of ~ 109 colony forming units/μg DNA in L. plantarum CD033 which is in the range of transformation efficiencies reached with E. coli. Based on these results, we directly transformed recombinant expression vectors received from PCR/ligation reactions into L. plantarum CD033, omitting plasmid amplification in E. coli. Also this approach was successful and yielded a sufficient number of recombinant clones. Conclusions Transformation efficiency of L. plantarum CD033 was drastically increased when non-methylated plasmid DNA was used, providing the possibility to generate expression libraries in this organism. A direct cloning approach, whereby ligated PCR-products where successfully transformed directly into L. plantarum CD033, obviates the construction of shuttle vectors containing E. coli-specific sequences, as e.g. a ColEI origin of replication, and makes amplification of these vectors in E. coli obsolete. Thus, plasmid constructs become much smaller and occasional structural instability or

  17. Structure of Vector Mesons in Holographic Model with Linear Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Anatoly Radyushkin; Hovhannes Grigoryan

    2007-11-01

    We investigate wave functions and form factors of vector mesons in the holographic dual model of QCD with oscillator-like infrared cutoff. We introduce wave functions conjugate to solutions of the 5D equation of motion and develop a formalism based on these wave functions, which are very similar to those of a quantum-mechanical oscillator. For the lowest bound state (rho-meson), we show that all its elastic form factors can be built from the basic form factor which, in this model, exhibits a perfect vector meson dominance, i.e., is given by the rho-pole contribution alone. We calculate the electric radius of the rho-meson and find the value _C = 0.655 fm, which is larger than in the case of the hard-wall cutoff. We calculate the coupling constant f_rho and find that the experimental value is in the middle between the values given by the oscillator and hard-wall models.

  18. Recombinational cloning of the antibiotic biosynthetic gene clusters in linear plasmid SCP1 of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ran; Xia, Haiyang; Xu, Qingyu; Dang, Fujun; Qin, Zhongjun

    2013-08-01

    The model organism Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) harbors a 356-kb linear plasmid, SCP1. We report here development of a recombinational cloning method for deleting large segment from one telomere of SCP1 followed by replacing with the telomere of pSLA2 and sequentially inserting with the overlapping cosmids in vivo. The procedure depends on homologous recombination coupled with cleavage at telomere termini by telomere terminal protein. Using this procedure, we cloned the 81-kb avermectin and the 76-kb spinosad biosynthetic gene clusters into SCP1. Heterologous expression of avermectin production in S. coelicolor was detected. These results demonstrate the utility of SCP1 for cloning large DNA segments such as antibiotic biosynthetic gene clusters. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Characterization of the cryptic plasmid pBGR1 from Bartonella grahamii and construction of a versatile Escherichia coli-Bartonella spp. shuttle cloning vector.

    PubMed

    Seubert, Anja; Falch, Christine; Birtles, Richard J; Schulein, Ralf; Dehio, Christoph

    2003-01-01

    We report herein the isolation and molecular characterization of pBGR1, the first native plasmid isolated from the genus Bartonella. Cloning and sequencing revealed a 2725-base pair (bp) cryptic plasmid comprising two open reading frames of considerable length, which were designated rep and mob. The regions containing rep and mob are separated by 140-bp inverted repeat sequences and display a difference in G + C content from one another. A 1435-bp SacI-BclI fragment containing the rep gene is sufficient to mediate replication in the species Bartonella henselae and Bartonella tribocorum, while this replicon does not appear to be functional in Escherichia coli. The Rep protein of 190 amino acids (aa) shares homology to putative replication proteins of cryptic plasmids of Gram-negative origin, which form a subgroup of the rolling-circle replication proteins of the pSN2 plasmid superfamily of Gram-positive bacteria. The Mob protein of 333 aa is related to mobilization proteins of several cryptic plasmids and is associated with a conserved recombination site A. The tra functions of RP4 can mobilize pBGR1 derivatives in a mob-dependent manner. Mobilizable pBGR1-based E. coli-Bartonella spp. shuttle vectors were constructed and were shown to be maintained in B. tribocorum during in vivo passage in a rat model in the absence of antibiotic selection. The small size and stability of these shuttle cloning vectors should render them particularly valuable for genetic studies in Bartonella spp.

  20. Description of two new plasmids isolated from Francisella philomiragia strains and construction of shuttle vectors for the study of Francisella tularensis.

    PubMed

    Le Pihive, E; Blaha, D; Chenavas, S; Thibault, F; Vidal, D; Valade, E

    2009-11-01

    Francisella tularensis is the causative agent of tularemia, a zoonotic disease often transmitted to humans by infected animals. The lack of useful specific genetic tools has long hampered the study of F. tularensis subspecies. We identified and characterized two new plasmids, pF242 and pF243, isolated from Francisella philomiragia strains ATCC 25016 and ATCC 25017, respectively. Sequence analysis revealed that pF242 and pF243 are closely related to pC194 and pFNL10 plasmids, respectively. Two generations of pF242- and pF243-based shuttle vectors, harboring several antibiotic resistance markers, were developed. We used the first generation to compare transformation efficiencies in two virulent F. tularensis subspecies. We found that electroporation was more efficient than cryotransformation: almost all vectors tested were successfully introduced by electroporation into Francisella strains with a high level of efficiency. The second generation of shuttle vectors, containing a multiple cloning site and/or gfp gene downstream of Francisella groES promotor, was used for GFP production in F. tularensis. The development of new shuttle vectors offers new perspectives in the genetic manipulation of F. tularensis, helping to elucidate the mechanisms underlying its virulence.

  1. Construction and use of a broad-host-range plasmid expressing the lamB gene for utilization of bacteriophage lambda vectors in the marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed

    Jasiecki, J; Czy, A; Gabig, M; Wegrzyn, G

    2001-07-01

    The remarkable success of Escherichia coli as a model organism in molecular genetics was dependent, among other things, on its susceptibility to genetic manipulation. Many versatile and sophisticated genetic tools for molecular biology studies are derived from bacteriophage lambda. However, this bacteriophage is specific for E. coli, and thus lambda-based techniques have been restricted to this bacterium. Plasmids expressing the E. coli gene coding for bacteriophage lambda receptor were reported previously, and introduction of such plasmids into cells of some other bacteria made them sensitive to phage lambda infection. However, we found that these systems were not efficient for Vibrio harveyi, one of the most frequently investigated species of marine bacteria. Here we describe construction of a broad-host-range plasmid expressing the lamB gene. Introduction of this plasmid to V. harveyi cells and expression of lamB made this strain susceptible to bacteriophage lambda adsorption and lambda DNA injection. Foreign genetic material could be introduced into cells of this strain using a cosmid vector.

  2. Construction of a novel shuttle vector based on an RCR-plasmid from a haloalkaliphilic archaeon and transformation into other haloarchaea.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Meixian; Xiang, Hua; Sun, Chaomin; Tan, Huarong

    2004-07-01

    The pNB101 is the first plasmid to be isolated from an haloalkaliphilic archaea. With insertion of the ColE1 replicon of Escherichia coli, as well as two antibiotic resistance genes at its unique Hin dIII site, a novel shuttle vector between haloarchaea and E. coli was developed. This vector, named pNB102, was successfully transformed into two non-alkaliphilic haloarchaea, Halobacterium salinarum SNOB and Haloarcula hispanica ATCC33960. The presence and stability of pNB102 in the transformants were confirmed by PCR identification, Southern blotting and restriction endonuclease digestion. Results also indicated that the presence of restriction-modification (R-M) systems in some Halobacterium species prevented this transformation. It is the first report that the replicon of pNB101 has such a wide host range, and has taken the first step for construction of the vector/host system in haloalkaliphilic archaea.

  3. Masses of Axial-Vector Resonances in a Linear Sigma Model with N{sub f} = 3

    SciTech Connect

    Parganlija, Denis; Giacosa, Francesco; Kovacs, Peter; Wolf, Gyoergy

    2011-05-23

    We discuss an N{sub f} = 3 linear sigma model with vector and axial-vector mesons (extended Linear Sigma Model-eLSM). We present first results regarding the masses of axial-vector mesons determined from the extended model.

  4. Development of safe and effective nonviral gene therapy by eliminating CpG motifs from plasmid DNA vector.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yuki; Nishikawa, Makiya; Takakura, Yoshinobu

    2012-01-01

    Nonviral gene therapy is expected to become a regular treatment for a variety of difficult-to-treat diseases, such as cancer and virus infection. Plasmid DNA, which is used in most nonviral gene delivery systems, usually contains, unmethylated cytosine-guanine dinucleotides, so called CpG motifs. CpG motifs are recognized by immune cells as a danger signal, leading to an inflammatory response. Such inflammatory responses could affect the safety and effectiveness of nonviral gene therapy. Therefore, reducing the number of CpG motifs in plasmid DNA has been used to increase the potency of plasmid DNA-based gene therapy. Previous studies have demonstrated that CpG reduction can extend the time period of transgene expression from plasmid DNA after in vivo gene transfer. In this review, the biological functions of the CpG motif are briefly summarized. Then, safety issues of nonviral gene therapy are discussed from the viewpoint of the inflammatory response to the CpG motif in plasmid DNA, and the effects of the CpG motif in plasmid DNA on the transgene expression profile of nonviral gene transfer are reviewed.

  5. Development of a fed-batch fermentation process to overproduce phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase using an expression vector with promoter and plasmid copy number controllable by heat.

    PubMed

    Chao, Yun-Peng; Chern, Jong-Tzer; Lin, Wei Shing; Wang, Zei Wen

    2003-11-20

    To effectively achieve tight regulation and high-level expression of cloned genes, a novel expression plasmid has been developed to contain the promoter and allow the plasmid copy number to be controlled by heat. The feasibility of the plasmid was tested by overproducing the pck gene product (Pck), a protein responsible for cell growth on gluconeogenic carbons and with potential toxicity. By fusing the pck gene with the promoter on the plasmid, the Escherichia coli strain harboring the composite vector was shown to produce various amounts of Pck in response to different degrees of heat shock. With the use of a 30 degrees -->41 degrees C stepwise upshift, the shake-flask culture of recombinant cells enabled production of maximal Pck in soluble form accounting for 20% of total cell protein. In sharp contrast, Pck production was undetectable in the uninduced cell, and this was further confirmed by the failed growth of strain JCL1305, defective in the essential genes for gluconeogenesis, carrying the composite vector on succinate at 30 degrees C. By exploiting the fed-batch fermentation approach, the recombinant cell batch initially kept at 30 degrees C in a lab-scale fermentor was exposed to 41 degrees C for 2 h at the batch fermentation stage, followed by a reduction in temperature to 37 degrees C throughout the remainder of the culturing process. Consequently, this resulted in Pck production equivalent to 15% of total cell protein. The total Pck yield thus calculated was amplified 1880-fold over that obtained at the shake-flask scale. Overall, there is great promise for this expression system due to its tight control, high production, simple thermomodulation, and feasible scale-up of recombinant proteins.

  6. The use of the replication region of plasmid pRS7 from Oenococcus oeni as a putative tool to generate cloning vectors for lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, M Carmen; Alegre, M Teresa; Martín, M Cruz; Mesas, Juan M

    2015-01-01

    A chimeric plasmid, pRS7Rep (6.1 kb), was constructed using the replication region of pRS7, a large plasmid from Oenococcus oeni, and pEM64, a plasmid derived from pIJ2925 and containing a gene for resistance to chloramphenicol. pRS7Rep is a shuttle vector that replicates in Escherichia coli using its pIJ2925 component and in lactic acid bacteria (LAB) using the replication region of pRS7. High levels of transformants per µg of DNA were obtained by electroporation of pRS7Rep into Pediococcus acidilactici (1.5 × 10(7)), Lactobacillus plantarum (5.7 × 10(5)), Lactobacillus casei (2.3 × 10(5)), Leuconostoc citreum (2.7 × 10(5)), and Enterococcus faecalis (2.4 × 10(5)). A preliminary optimisation of the technical conditions of electrotransformation showed that P. acidilactici and L. plantarum are better transformed at a later exponential phase of growth, whereas L. casei requires the early exponential phase for better electrotransformation efficiency. pRS7Rep contains single restriction sites useful for cloning purposes, BamHI, XbaI, SalI, HincII, SphI and PstI, and was maintained at an acceptable rate (>50%) over 100 generations without selective pressure in L. plantarum, but was less stable in L. casei and P. acidilactici. The ability of pRS7Rep to accept and express other genes was assessed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that the replication region of a plasmid from O. oeni has been used to generate a cloning vector.

  7. A Complex Insertion Sequence Cluster at a Point of Interaction between the Linear Plasmid SCP1 and the Linear Chromosome of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2)

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, Masayuki; Miyashita, Kiyotaka; Cullum, John; Kinashi, Haruyasu

    2000-01-01

    The giant linear plasmid SCP1 can integrate into the central region of the linear chromosome of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). Nucleotide sequence analysis around the target site for SCP1 integration in strain M145 identified a total of five copies of four insertion sequences (ISs) in a 6.5-kb DNA stretch. Three of the four (IS468, IS469, and IS470) are new IS elements, and the other is IS466. All of these elements contain one open reading frame which encodes a transposase-like protein. Two copies of IS468 (IS468A and -B) are tandemly aligned at the left end of the cluster. Following these, IS469 and IS466 are located in a tail-to-tail orientation with 69.3% identity to each other. IS470 is located at the right end of the cluster. The activities of IS466 and IS468 were demonstrated by transposition experiments and sequence comparison of several copies, respectively. PMID:10809688

  8. Recruitment of terminal protein to the ends of Streptomyces linear plasmids and chromosomes by a novel telomere-binding protein essential for linear DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Kai; Cohen, Stanley N.

    2003-01-01

    Bidirectional replication of Streptomyces linear plasmids and chromosomes from a central origin produces unpaired 3′-leading-strand overhangs at the telomeres of replication intermediates. Filling in of these overhangs leaves a terminal protein attached covalently to the 5′ DNA ends of mature replicons. We report here the essential role of a novel 80-kD DNA-binding protein (telomere-associated protein, Tap) in this process. Biochemical studies, yeast two-hybrid analysis, and immunoprecipitation/immunodepletion experiments indicate that Tap binds tightly to specific sequences in 3′ overhangs and also interacts with Tpg, bringing Tpg to telomere termini. Using DNA microarrays to analyze the chromosomes of tap mutant bacteria, we demonstrate that survivors of Tap ablation undergo telomere deletion, chromosome circularization, and amplification of subtelomeric DNA. Microarray-based chromosome mapping at single-ORF resolution revealed common endpoints for independent deletions, identified amplified chromosomal ORFs adjacent to these endpoints, and quantified the copy number of these ORFs. Sequence analysis confirmed chromosome circularization and revealed the insertion of adventitious DNA between joined chromosome ends. Our results show that Tap is required for linear DNA replication in Streptomyces and suggest that it functions to recruit and position Tpg at the telomeres of replication intermediates. They also identify hotspots for the telomeric deletions and subtelomeric DNA amplifications that accompany chromosome circularization. PMID:12651895

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of pAP13, a Large Linear Plasmid of a Brevibacterium Strain Isolated from a Saline Lake at 4,200 Meters above Sea Level in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Schuldes, Jörg; Thürmer, Andrea; Farias, María E.; Daniel, Rolf; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2013-01-01

    pAP13 is an 89-kb linear plasmid hosted by Brevibacterium sp. strain Ap13, an actinobacterium isolated from the feces of a flamingo from an extremely high-altitude lake in Argentina. Because of the ecological importance of the genus Brevibacterium, the absolute lack of information concerning Brevibacterium linear plasmids, and the possible ecological significance of this unusual plasmid, pAP13 was completely sequenced, including the inversely oriented termini. PMID:24285657

  10. Analysis of point mutations in an ultraviolet-irradiated shuttle vector plasmid propagated in cells from Japanese xeroderma pigmentosum patients in complementation groups A and F

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, T.; Tatsumi-Miyajima, J.; Sato, M.; Kraemer, K.H.; Takebe, H. )

    1991-06-15

    To assess the contribution to mutagenesis by human DNA repair defects, a UV-treated shuttle vector plasmid, pZ189, was passed through fibroblasts derived from Japanese xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients in two different DNA repair complementation groups (A and F). Patients with XP have clinical and cellular UV hypersensitivity, increased frequency of skin cancer, and defects in DNA repair. The XP DNA repair defects represented by complementation groups A (XP-A) and F (XP-F) are more common in Japan than in Europe or the United States. In comparison to results with DNA repair-proficient human cells (W138-VA13), UV-treated pZ189 passed through the XP-A (XP2OS(SV)) or XP-F (XP2YO(SV)) cells showed fewer surviving plasmids (XP-A less than XP-F) and a higher frequency of mutated plasmids (XP-A greater than XP-F). Base sequence analysis of more than 200 mutated plasmids showed the major type of base substitution mutation to be the G:C----A:T transition with all three cell lines. The XP-A and XP-F cells revealed a higher frequency of G:C----A:T transitions and a lower frequency of transversions among plasmids with single or tandem mutations and a lower frequency of plasmids with multiple point mutations compared to the normal line. The spectrum of mutations in pZ189 with the XP-A cells was similar to that with the XP-F cells. Seventy-six to 91% of the single base substitution mutations occurred at G:C base pairs in which the 5{prime}-neighboring base of the cytosine was thymine or cytosine. These studies indicate that the DNA repair defects in Japanese XP patients in complementation groups A and F result in different frequencies of plasmid survival and mutagenesis but in similar types of mutagenic abnormalities despite marked differences in clinical features.

  11. Rapid Delivery of Foreign Genes into Plants by Direct Rub-Inoculation with Intact Plasmid DNA of a Tomato Bushy Stunt Virus Gene Vector

    PubMed Central

    Scholthof, Herman B.

    1999-01-01

    Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) cDNA, positioned between a modified cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and the hepatitis delta virus antigenomic ribozyme with a downstream nopaline synthase gene polyadenylation signal, established infections upon rub-inoculation of plants with intact plasmids. Application of this methodology produced a TBSV DNA-based gene vector which yielded readily detectable levels of localized foreign gene expression in inoculated leaves. This is the first demonstration of an infectious DNA from a member of the Tombusviridae which permits rapid TBSV-mediated foreign-gene expression upon direct rub-inoculation of miniprep DNA onto a variety of plant species. PMID:10438874

  12. Both open reading frames of the linear plasmid pMC3-2 from the ascomycete Morchella conica are transcribed in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rohe, M; Meinhardt, F

    1992-12-01

    Mitochondrial RNA was isolated from the morel strain Morchella conica 3 harbouring the linear plasmid pMC3-2 and subjected to gel electrophoresis followed by a Northern analysis using cloned fragments of the plasmid pMC3-2 as probes. Hybridization was obtained only with central parts of pMC3-2 and specific bands of mtRNA. The hybridization bands (2.8 kb and 1.0 kb) correspond in size to the length of the two ORFs of pMC3-2 which were deduced from nucleotide-sequence data. Thus, both ORFs, one encoding a DNA polymerase and the other a yet unknown protein, are transcribed in the mitochondria of the plasmid-bearing Morchella conica strain.

  13. Two-plasmid vector system for independently controlled expression of green and red fluorescent fusion proteins in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Brzoska, Anthony J; Firth, Neville

    2013-05-01

    We have constructed a system for the regulated coexpression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and red fluorescent protein (RFP) fusions in Staphylococcus aureus. It was validated by simultaneous localization of cell division proteins FtsZ and Noc and used to detect filament formation by an actin-like ParM plasmid partitioning protein in its native coccoid host.

  14. Gene Amplification by PCR and Subcloning into a GFP-Fusion Plasmid Expression Vector as a Molecular Biology Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornhorst, Joshua A.; Deibel, Michael A.; Mulnix, Amy B.

    2004-01-01

    A novel experimental sequence for the advanced undergraduate laboratory course has been developed at Earlham College. Utilizing recent improvements in molecular techniques for a time-sensitive environment, undergraduates were able to create a chimera of a selected gene and green fluorescent protein (GFP) in a bacterial expression plasmid over the…

  15. Gene Amplification by PCR and Subcloning into a GFP-Fusion Plasmid Expression Vector as a Molecular Biology Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornhorst, Joshua A.; Deibel, Michael A.; Mulnix, Amy B.

    2004-01-01

    A novel experimental sequence for the advanced undergraduate laboratory course has been developed at Earlham College. Utilizing recent improvements in molecular techniques for a time-sensitive environment, undergraduates were able to create a chimera of a selected gene and green fluorescent protein (GFP) in a bacterial expression plasmid over the…

  16. Linear Test Bed. Volume 2: Test Bed No. 2. [linear aerospike test bed for thrust vector control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Test bed No. 2 consists of 10 combustors welded in banks of 5 to 2 symmetrical tubular nozzle assemblies, an upper stationary thrust frame, a lower thrust frame which can be hinged, a power package, a triaxial combustion wave ignition system, a pneumatic control system, pneumatically actuated propellant valves, a purge and drain system, and an electrical control system. The power package consists of the Mark 29-F fuel turbopump, the Mark 29-0 oxidizer turbopump, a gas generator assembly, and propellant ducting. The system, designated as a linear aerospike system, was designed to demonstrate the feasibility of the concept and to explore technology related to thrust vector control, thrust vector optimization, improved sequencing and control, and advanced ignition systems. The propellants are liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen. The system was designed to operate at 1200-psia chamber pressure at an engine mixture ratio of 5.5. With 10 combustors, the sea level thrust is 95,000 pounds.

  17. Feline neural progenitor cells II: use of novel plasmid vector and hybrid promoter to drive expression of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor transgene.

    PubMed

    You, X Joann; Yang, Jing; Gu, Ping; Liew, Chee Gee; Klassen, Henry J

    2012-01-01

    Sustained transgene expression is required for the success of cell transplant-based gene therapy. Most widely used are lentiviral-based vectors which integrate into the host genome and thereby maintain sustained transgene expression. This requires integration into the nuclear genome, and potential risks include activation of oncogenes and inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. Plasmids have been used; however lack of sustained expression presents an additional challenge. Here we used the pCAG-PyF101-eGFP plasmid to deliver the human GDNF gene to cat neural progenitor cells (cNPCs). This vector consists of a CAGG composite promoter linked to the polyoma virus mutant enhancer PyF101. Expression of an episomal eGFP reporter and GDNF transgene were stably maintained by the cells, even following induction of differentiation. These genetically modified cells appear suitable for use in allogeneic models of cell-based delivery of GDNF in the cat and may find veterinary applications should such strategies prove clinically beneficial.

  18. Cloning and expression of transgenes using linear vectors in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Curto, María de Los Ángeles; Lorenzi, Hernán A; Moraes Barros, Roberto R; Souza, Renata T; Levin, Mariano J; Da Silveira, José Franco; Schijman, Alejandro G

    2014-06-01

    The identification of new targets for vaccine and drug development for the treatment of Chagas' disease is dependent on deepening our understanding of the parasite genome. Vectors for genetic manipulation in Trypanosoma cruzi basically include those that remain as circular episomes and those that integrate into the parasite's genome. Artificial chromosomes are alternative vectors to overcome problematic transgene expression often occurring with conventional vectors in this parasite. We have constructed a series of vectors named pTACs (Trypanosome Artificial Chromosomes), all of them carrying telomeric and subtelomeric sequences and genes conferring resistance to different selection drugs. In addition, one pTAC harbours a modified GFP gene (pTAC-gfp), and another one carries the ornithine decarboxilase gene from Crithidia fasciculata (pTAC-odc). We have encountered artificial chromosomes generated from pTACs in transformed T. cruzi epimastigotes for every version of the designed vectors. These extragenomic elements, in approximately 6-8 copies per cell, remained as linear episomes, contained telomeres and persisted after 150 and 60 generations with or without selection drugs, respectively. The linear molecules remained stable through the different T. cruzi developmental forms. Furthermore, derived artificial chromosomes from pTAC-odc could complement the auxotrophy of T. cruzi for polyamines. Our results show that pTACs constitute useful tools for reverse functional genetics in T. cruzi that will contribute to a better understanding of T. cruzi biology. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Removal of Inserted BAC after linearizatiON (RIBON)-a novel strategy to excise the mini-F sequences from viral BAC vectors.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Yukari; Esaki, Motoyuki; Yasuda, Atsushi

    2016-08-01

    The bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) technology has been a mainstay approach for generating recombinant viruses, and several methods for excision of the mini-F sequences from the viral BAC vectors have been developed. However, these strategies either require complicated procedures or leave scars of inserted sequences. To overcome these problems, a new method to excise the mini-F sequences from viral BAC vectors based on the Removal of Inserted BAC after linearizatiON (RIBON) strategy was developed in this study for herpesvirus of turkeys (HVT). Enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) DNA and the mini-F sequences were inserted into the gene encoding HVT thymidine kinase (TK) by homologous recombination in chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEFs), and the constructed HVT-BAC vector was used to transform Escherichia coli (pHVT-BAC). To remove the inserted eGFP and mini-F sequences, pHVT-BAC was linearized using a homing endonuclease I-SceI and used to cotransfect CEFs together with a plasmid containing the TK gene of HVT. The obtained viruses (44%) did not express eGFP, and DNA sequencing of isolated clones revealed that they were completely free of the inserted BAC sequences. Moreover, growth kinetics and plaque morphology of reconstituted viruses were comparable with those of the parental HVT. The results of this study demonstrate that the novel RIBON approach to remove mini-F sequences from the viral genome is simple and effective.

  20. Scalar mesons in a linear sigma model with (axial-)vector mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Parganlija, D.; Kovacs, P.; Wolf, Gy.; Giacosa, F.; Rischke, D. H.

    2013-03-25

    The structure of the scalar mesons has been a subject of debate for many decades. In this work we look for qq states among the physical resonances using an extended Linear Sigma Model that contains scalar, pseudoscalar, vector, and axial-vector mesons both in the non-strange and strange sectors. We perform global fits of meson masses, decay widths and amplitudes in order to ascertain whether the scalar qq states are below or above 1 GeV. We find the scalar states above 1 GeV to be preferred as qq states.

  1. Scalar mesons in a linear sigma model with (axial-)vector mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parganlija, D.; Kovács, P.; Wolf, Gy.; Giacosa, F.; Rischke, D. H.

    2013-03-01

    The structure of the scalar mesons has been a subject of debate for many decades. In this work we look for qq states among the physical resonances using an extended Linear Sigma Model that contains scalar, pseudoscalar, vector, and axial-vector mesons both in the non-strange and strange sectors. We perform global fits of meson masses, decay widths and amplitudes in order to ascertain whether the scalar qq states are below or above 1 GeV. We find the scalar states above 1 GeV to be preferred as qq states.

  2. Multiscale asymmetric orthogonal wavelet kernel for linear programming support vector learning and nonlinear dynamic systems identification.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhao; Sun, Jing; Butts, Kenneth

    2014-05-01

    Support vector regression for approximating nonlinear dynamic systems is more delicate than the approximation of indicator functions in support vector classification, particularly for systems that involve multitudes of time scales in their sampled data. The kernel used for support vector learning determines the class of functions from which a support vector machine can draw its solution, and the choice of kernel significantly influences the performance of a support vector machine. In this paper, to bridge the gap between wavelet multiresolution analysis and kernel learning, the closed-form orthogonal wavelet is exploited to construct new multiscale asymmetric orthogonal wavelet kernels for linear programming support vector learning. The closed-form multiscale orthogonal wavelet kernel provides a systematic framework to implement multiscale kernel learning via dyadic dilations and also enables us to represent complex nonlinear dynamics effectively. To demonstrate the superiority of the proposed multiscale wavelet kernel in identifying complex nonlinear dynamic systems, two case studies are presented that aim at building parallel models on benchmark datasets. The development of parallel models that address the long-term/mid-term prediction issue is more intricate and challenging than the identification of series-parallel models where only one-step ahead prediction is required. Simulation results illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed multiscale kernel learning.

  3. Interpreting linear support vector machine models with heat map molecule coloring.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Lars; Hinselmann, Georg; Jahn, Andreas; Zell, Andreas

    2011-03-25

    Model-based virtual screening plays an important role in the early drug discovery stage. The outcomes of high-throughput screenings are a valuable source for machine learning algorithms to infer such models. Besides a strong performance, the interpretability of a machine learning model is a desired property to guide the optimization of a compound in later drug discovery stages. Linear support vector machines showed to have a convincing performance on large-scale data sets. The goal of this study is to present a heat map molecule coloring technique to interpret linear support vector machine models. Based on the weights of a linear model, the visualization approach colors each atom and bond of a compound according to its importance for activity. We evaluated our approach on a toxicity data set, a chromosome aberration data set, and the maximum unbiased validation data sets. The experiments show that our method sensibly visualizes structure-property and structure-activity relationships of a linear support vector machine model. The coloring of ligands in the binding pocket of several crystal structures of a maximum unbiased validation data set target indicates that our approach assists to determine the correct ligand orientation in the binding pocket. Additionally, the heat map coloring enables the identification of substructures important for the binding of an inhibitor. In combination with heat map coloring, linear support vector machine models can help to guide the modification of a compound in later stages of drug discovery. Particularly substructures identified as important by our method might be a starting point for optimization of a lead compound. The heat map coloring should be considered as complementary to structure based modeling approaches. As such, it helps to get a better understanding of the binding mode of an inhibitor.

  4. Interpreting linear support vector machine models with heat map molecule coloring

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Model-based virtual screening plays an important role in the early drug discovery stage. The outcomes of high-throughput screenings are a valuable source for machine learning algorithms to infer such models. Besides a strong performance, the interpretability of a machine learning model is a desired property to guide the optimization of a compound in later drug discovery stages. Linear support vector machines showed to have a convincing performance on large-scale data sets. The goal of this study is to present a heat map molecule coloring technique to interpret linear support vector machine models. Based on the weights of a linear model, the visualization approach colors each atom and bond of a compound according to its importance for activity. Results We evaluated our approach on a toxicity data set, a chromosome aberration data set, and the maximum unbiased validation data sets. The experiments show that our method sensibly visualizes structure-property and structure-activity relationships of a linear support vector machine model. The coloring of ligands in the binding pocket of several crystal structures of a maximum unbiased validation data set target indicates that our approach assists to determine the correct ligand orientation in the binding pocket. Additionally, the heat map coloring enables the identification of substructures important for the binding of an inhibitor. Conclusions In combination with heat map coloring, linear support vector machine models can help to guide the modification of a compound in later stages of drug discovery. Particularly substructures identified as important by our method might be a starting point for optimization of a lead compound. The heat map coloring should be considered as complementary to structure based modeling approaches. As such, it helps to get a better understanding of the binding mode of an inhibitor. PMID:21439031

  5. Compound gravity receptor polarization vectors evidenced by linear vestibular evoked potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, S. M.; Jones, T. A.; Bell, P. L.; Taylor, M. J.

    2001-01-01

    The utricle and saccule are gravity receptor organs of the vestibular system. These receptors rely on a high-density otoconial membrane to detect linear acceleration and the position of the cranium relative to Earth's gravitational vector. The linear vestibular evoked potential (VsEP) has been shown to be an effective non-invasive functional test specifically for otoconial gravity receptors (Jones et al., 1999). Moreover, there is some evidence that the VsEP can be used to independently test utricular and saccular function (Taylor et al., 1997; Jones et al., 1998). Here we characterize compound macular polarization vectors for the utricle and saccule in hatchling chickens. Pulsed linear acceleration stimuli were presented in two axes, the dorsoventral (DV, +/- Z axis) to isolate the saccule, and the interaural (IA, +/- Y axis) to isolate the utricle. Traditional signal averaging was used to resolve responses recorded from the surface of the skull. Latency and amplitude of eighth nerve components of the linear VsEP were measured. Gravity receptor responses exhibited clear preferences for one stimulus direction in each axis. With respect to each utricular macula, lateral translation in the IA axis produced maximum ipsilateral response amplitudes with substantially greater amplitude intensity (AI) slopes than medially directed movement. Downward caudal motions in the DV axis produced substantially larger response amplitudes and AI slopes. The results show that the macula lagena does not contribute to the VsEP compound polarization vectors of the sacculus and utricle. The findings suggest further that preferred compound vectors for the utricle depend on the pars externa (i.e. lateral hair cell field) whereas for the saccule they depend on pars interna (i.e. superior hair cell fields). These data provide evidence that maculae saccule and utricle can be selectively evaluated using the linear VsEP.

  6. Meson vacuum phenomenology in a three-flavor linear sigma model with (axial-)vector mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parganlija, D.; Kovács, P.; Wolf, Gy.; Giacosa, F.; Rischke, D. H.

    2013-01-01

    We study scalar, pseudoscalar, vector, and axial-vector mesons with nonstrange and strange quantum numbers in the framework of a linear sigma model with global chiral U(Nf)L×U(Nf)R symmetry. We perform a global fit of meson masses, decay widths, as well as decay amplitudes. The quality of the fit is, for a hadronic model that does not consider isospin-breaking effects, surprisingly good. We also investigate the question whether the scalar q¯q states lie below or above 1 GeV and find the scalar states above 1 GeV to be preferred as q¯q states. Additionally, we also describe the axial-vector resonances as q¯q states.

  7. Sequence analysis and characterization of pOM1, a small cryptic plasmid from Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens, and its use in construction of a new family of cloning vectors for Butyrivibrios.

    PubMed Central

    Hefford, M A; Kobayashi, Y; Allard, S E; Forster, R J; Teather, R M

    1997-01-01

    As a preliminary step in the development of vector systems, we have isolated and begun to characterize small, cryptic plasmids from several strains of the rumen bacterium Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens. We present here the complete nucleotide sequence of Butyrivibrio plasmid pOM1, which was isolated from B. fibrisolvens Bu49. While it is very similar in size to the previously characterized Butyrivibrio plasmids pRJF1 and pRJF2, pOM1 exhibits a restriction pattern which is quite distinct. Analysis of sequence data reveals that pOM1 contains only two open reading frames of significant length (ORF1 and ORF2), both of which are required for self-replication and maintenance. The protein encoded in ORF1 shows homologies with Pre (plasmid recombination enzyme) proteins encoded in plasmids from gram-positive organisms such as Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Lactobacillus plantarum, and Bacillus thuringiensis. The putative translation product of ORF2, on the other hand, resembles Rep (replication) proteins of a different group of gram-positive plasmids, for which the Staphylococcus plasmid pSN2 is a prototype. Unlike the other characterized-Butyrivibrio plasmids, pOM1 appears to replicate via a rolling-circle mechanism. Experimental evidence showing the presence of a single-stranded replication intermediate consistent with this mechanism is presented. pOM1 has been used in the construction of a new Escherichia coli-B. fibrisolvens shuttle vector, pSMerm1, which has been successfully used to introduce a cloned gene into B. fibrisolvens harboring the pRJF1 plasmid. PMID:9143105

  8. A Bivalent Typhoid Live Vector Vaccine Expressing both Chromosome- and Plasmid-Encoded Yersinia pestis Antigens Fully Protects against Murine Lethal Pulmonary Plague Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin Yuan; Carrasco, Jose A.; Lloyd, Scott A.; Mellado-Sanchez, Gabriela; Diaz-McNair, Jovita; Franco, Olga; Buskirk, Amanda D.; Nataro, James P.; Pasetti, Marcela F.

    2014-01-01

    Live attenuated bacteria hold great promise as multivalent mucosal vaccines against a variety of pathogens. A major challenge of this approach has been the successful delivery of sufficient amounts of vaccine antigens to adequately prime the immune system without overattenuating the live vaccine. Here we used a live attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi strain to create a bivalent mucosal plague vaccine that produces both the protective F1 capsular antigen of Yersinia pestis and the LcrV protein required for secretion of virulence effector proteins. To reduce the metabolic burden associated with the coexpression of F1 and LcrV within the live vector, we balanced expression of both antigens by combining plasmid-based expression of F1 with chromosomal expression of LcrV from three independent loci. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of this novel vaccine were assessed in mice by using a heterologous prime-boost immunization strategy and compared to those of a conventional strain in which F1 and LcrV were expressed from a single low-copy-number plasmid. The serum antibody responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced by the optimized bivalent vaccine were indistinguishable from those elicited by the parent strain, suggesting an adequate immunogenic capacity maintained through preservation of bacterial fitness; in contrast, LPS titers were 10-fold lower in mice immunized with the conventional vaccine strain. Importantly, mice receiving the optimized bivalent vaccine were fully protected against lethal pulmonary challenge. These results demonstrate the feasibility of distributing foreign antigen expression across both chromosomal and plasmid locations within a single vaccine organism for induction of protective immunity. PMID:25332120

  9. A bivalent typhoid live vector vaccine expressing both chromosome- and plasmid-encoded Yersinia pestis antigens fully protects against murine lethal pulmonary plague infection.

    PubMed

    Galen, James E; Wang, Jin Yuan; Carrasco, Jose A; Lloyd, Scott A; Mellado-Sanchez, Gabriela; Diaz-McNair, Jovita; Franco, Olga; Buskirk, Amanda D; Nataro, James P; Pasetti, Marcela F

    2015-01-01

    Live attenuated bacteria hold great promise as multivalent mucosal vaccines against a variety of pathogens. A major challenge of this approach has been the successful delivery of sufficient amounts of vaccine antigens to adequately prime the immune system without overattenuating the live vaccine. Here we used a live attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi strain to create a bivalent mucosal plague vaccine that produces both the protective F1 capsular antigen of Yersinia pestis and the LcrV protein required for secretion of virulence effector proteins. To reduce the metabolic burden associated with the coexpression of F1 and LcrV within the live vector, we balanced expression of both antigens by combining plasmid-based expression of F1 with chromosomal expression of LcrV from three independent loci. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of this novel vaccine were assessed in mice by using a heterologous prime-boost immunization strategy and compared to those of a conventional strain in which F1 and LcrV were expressed from a single low-copy-number plasmid. The serum antibody responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced by the optimized bivalent vaccine were indistinguishable from those elicited by the parent strain, suggesting an adequate immunogenic capacity maintained through preservation of bacterial fitness; in contrast, LPS titers were 10-fold lower in mice immunized with the conventional vaccine strain. Importantly, mice receiving the optimized bivalent vaccine were fully protected against lethal pulmonary challenge. These results demonstrate the feasibility of distributing foreign antigen expression across both chromosomal and plasmid locations within a single vaccine organism for induction of protective immunity. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Characterization of a cryptic plasmid from a Greenland ice core Arthrobacter isolate and construction of a shuttle vector that replicates in psychrophilic high G+C Gram-positive recipients.

    PubMed

    Miteva, Vanya; Lantz, Sarah; Brenchley, Jean

    2008-05-01

    Over 60 Greenland glacial isolates were screened for plasmids and antibiotic resistance/sensitivity as the first step in establishing a genetic system. Sequence analysis of a small, cryptic, 1,950 bp plasmid, p54, from isolate GIC54, related to Arthrobacter agilis, showed a region similar to that found in theta replicating Rhodococcus plasmids. A 6,002 bp shuttle vector, pSVJ21, was constructed by ligating p54 and pUC18 and inserting a chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) cassette conferring chloramphenicol resistance. Candidate Gram-positive recipients were chosen among glacial isolates based on phylogenetic relatedness, relatively short doubling times at low temperatures, sensitivity to antibiotics, and absence of indigenous plasmids. We developed an electroporation protocol and transformed seven isolates related to members of the Arthrobacter, Microbacterium, Curtobacterium, and Rhodoglobus genera with pSVJ21. Plasmid stability was demonstrated by successive transformation into Escherichia coli and four Gram-positive isolates, growth without antibiotic, and plasmid re-isolation. This shuttle vector and our transformation protocol provide the basis for genetic experiments with different high G+C Gram-positive hosts to study cold adaptation and expression of cold-active enzymes at low temperatures.

  11. From elementary flux modes to elementary flux vectors: Metabolic pathway analysis with arbitrary linear flux constraints

    PubMed Central

    Klamt, Steffen; Gerstl, Matthias P.; Jungreuthmayer, Christian; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan; Müller, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Elementary flux modes (EFMs) emerged as a formal concept to describe metabolic pathways and have become an established tool for constraint-based modeling and metabolic network analysis. EFMs are characteristic (support-minimal) vectors of the flux cone that contains all feasible steady-state flux vectors of a given metabolic network. EFMs account for (homogeneous) linear constraints arising from reaction irreversibilities and the assumption of steady state; however, other (inhomogeneous) linear constraints, such as minimal and maximal reaction rates frequently used by other constraint-based techniques (such as flux balance analysis [FBA]), cannot be directly integrated. These additional constraints further restrict the space of feasible flux vectors and turn the flux cone into a general flux polyhedron in which the concept of EFMs is not directly applicable anymore. For this reason, there has been a conceptual gap between EFM-based (pathway) analysis methods and linear optimization (FBA) techniques, as they operate on different geometric objects. One approach to overcome these limitations was proposed ten years ago and is based on the concept of elementary flux vectors (EFVs). Only recently has the community started to recognize the potential of EFVs for metabolic network analysis. In fact, EFVs exactly represent the conceptual development required to generalize the idea of EFMs from flux cones to flux polyhedra. This work aims to present a concise theoretical and practical introduction to EFVs that is accessible to a broad audience. We highlight the close relationship between EFMs and EFVs and demonstrate that almost all applications of EFMs (in flux cones) are possible for EFVs (in flux polyhedra) as well. In fact, certain properties can only be studied with EFVs. Thus, we conclude that EFVs provide a powerful and unifying framework for constraint-based modeling of metabolic networks. PMID:28406903

  12. A linear-dendritic cationic vector for efficient DNA grasp and delivery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Sun, Yun-xia; Yi, Wen-jie; Yang, Juan; Liu, Chen-wei; Cheng, Han; Feng, Jun; Zhang, Xian-zheng; Zhuo, Ren-xi

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents an attempt to design an efficient and biocompatible cationic gene vector via structural optimization that favors the efficient utilization of amine groups for DNA condensation. To this end, a linear-dendritic block copolymer of methoxyl-poly(ethylene glycol)-dendritic polyglycerol-graft-tris(2-aminoethyl)amine (mPEG-DPG-g-TAEA) was prepared with specially designed multiple functions including strong DNA affinity, endosomal buffering and expected serum-tolerance. Based on the transfection in serum-free and serum-conditioned media, the influences of the polymer structures including the degree of polymerization of DPG and TAEA substitution degree were explored. As compared to polyethylenimine (M(w)=5 kDa) (PEI5k) with similar molecular weight and higher amine density, mPEG-DPG-g-TAEA displayed comparably high DNA affinity due to the special linear-dendritic architecture. Consequently, at very low N/P ratio, mPEG-DPG-g-TAEA vectors could mediate efficient in vitro luciferase expression at levels that are comparable with or even superior to the commercially available Lipofectamine™ 2000, while being apparently higher than PEI5k. The designed vectors exhibit considerably higher cell biocompatibility and better resistance against bovine serum albumin adsorption than PEI5k. The stability of the complexes on coincubation with heparin was found to be largely dependent on the polymer structure. As concluded from the comparative transfection study in the absence/presence of chloroquine, it is likely that the polycation itself could produce endosomal buffering. This linear-dendritic vector shows promising potential for the application of gene delivery.

  13. From elementary flux modes to elementary flux vectors: Metabolic pathway analysis with arbitrary linear flux constraints.

    PubMed

    Klamt, Steffen; Regensburger, Georg; Gerstl, Matthias P; Jungreuthmayer, Christian; Schuster, Stefan; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan; Zanghellini, Jürgen; Müller, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    Elementary flux modes (EFMs) emerged as a formal concept to describe metabolic pathways and have become an established tool for constraint-based modeling and metabolic network analysis. EFMs are characteristic (support-minimal) vectors of the flux cone that contains all feasible steady-state flux vectors of a given metabolic network. EFMs account for (homogeneous) linear constraints arising from reaction irreversibilities and the assumption of steady state; however, other (inhomogeneous) linear constraints, such as minimal and maximal reaction rates frequently used by other constraint-based techniques (such as flux balance analysis [FBA]), cannot be directly integrated. These additional constraints further restrict the space of feasible flux vectors and turn the flux cone into a general flux polyhedron in which the concept of EFMs is not directly applicable anymore. For this reason, there has been a conceptual gap between EFM-based (pathway) analysis methods and linear optimization (FBA) techniques, as they operate on different geometric objects. One approach to overcome these limitations was proposed ten years ago and is based on the concept of elementary flux vectors (EFVs). Only recently has the community started to recognize the potential of EFVs for metabolic network analysis. In fact, EFVs exactly represent the conceptual development required to generalize the idea of EFMs from flux cones to flux polyhedra. This work aims to present a concise theoretical and practical introduction to EFVs that is accessible to a broad audience. We highlight the close relationship between EFMs and EFVs and demonstrate that almost all applications of EFMs (in flux cones) are possible for EFVs (in flux polyhedra) as well. In fact, certain properties can only be studied with EFVs. Thus, we conclude that EFVs provide a powerful and unifying framework for constraint-based modeling of metabolic networks.

  14. The primer vector in linear, relative-motion equations. [spacecraft trajectory optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Primer vector theory is used in analyzing a set of linear, relative-motion equations - the Clohessy-Wiltshire equations - to determine the criteria and necessary conditions for an optimal, N-impulse trajectory. Since the state vector for these equations is defined in terms of a linear system of ordinary differential equations, all fundamental relations defining the solution of the state and costate equations, and the necessary conditions for optimality, can be expressed in terms of elementary functions. The analysis develops the analytical criteria for improving a solution by (1) moving any dependent or independent variable in the initial and/or final orbit, and (2) adding intermediate impulses. If these criteria are violated, the theory establishes a sufficient number of analytical equations. The subsequent satisfaction of these equations will result in the optimal position vectors and times of an N-impulse trajectory. The solution is examined for the specific boundary conditions of (1) fixed-end conditions, two-impulse, and time-open transfer; (2) an orbit-to-orbit transfer; and (3) a generalized rendezvous problem. A sequence of rendezvous problems is solved to illustrate the analysis and the computational procedure.

  15. Vector magnetometry based on electromagnetically induced transparency in linearly polarized light

    SciTech Connect

    Yudin, V. I.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Dudin, Y. O.; Velichansky, V. L.; Zibrov, A. S.; Zibrov, S. A.

    2010-09-15

    We develop a generalized principle of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) vector magnetometry based on high-contrast EIT resonances and the symmetry of atom-light interaction in the linearly polarized bichromatic fields. Operation of such vector magnetometer on the D{sub 1} line of {sup 87}Rb has been demonstrated. The proposed compass-magnetometer has an increased immunity to shifts produced by quadratic Zeeman and ac-Stark effects, as well as by atom-buffer gas and atom-atom collisions. In our proof-of-principle experiment the detected angular sensitivity to magnetic field orientation is 10{sup -3} deg/Hz{sup 1/2}, which is limited by laser intensity fluctuations, light polarization quality, and magnitude of the magnetic field.

  16. Analysis of chromosomal integration and deletions of yeast plasmids.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, J R; Philippsen, P; Davis, R W

    1977-01-01

    Plasmid DNAs from six strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were compared. Three different plasmids were found, designated Scp 1, Scp 2 and Scp 3, with monomer lengths of 6.19, 6.06 and 5.97 kilobases as referenced to sequenced phiX174 DNA. DNA from each of the plasmids was inserted into a lambda vector DNA. Hybrid phage containing inserted DNA of the desired size were enriched by genetic selection and their DNAs analysed by rapid techniques. All three plasmids share the same organization, two unique sequences separated by two inverted repeats, and share basically the same DNA sequences. Scp 2 and Scp 3 differ from Scp 1 by missing a unique HpaI site and by having small overlapping deletions in the same region. The HpaI site in Scp 1 is, therefore, in a nonessential region and suitable for insertion of foreign DNA in the potential use of the yeast plasmid as a vector. Hybridization of labelled cloned plasmid DNA to restriction fragments of linear yeast DNA separated on agarose gels showed that the plasmid DNA was not stably integrated into the yeast chromosomal DNA. Images PMID:331256

  17. Iteron Plasmids.

    PubMed

    Konieczny, Igor; Bury, Katarzyna; Wawrzycka, Aleksandra; Wegrzyn, Katarzyna

    2014-12-01

    Iteron-containing plasmids are model systems for studying the metabolism of extrachromosomal genetic elements in bacterial cells. Here we describe the current knowledge and understanding of the structure of iteron-containing replicons, the structure of the iteron plasmid encoded replication initiation proteins, and the molecular mechanisms for iteron plasmid DNA replication initiation. We also discuss the current understanding of control mechanisms affecting the plasmid copy number and how host chaperone proteins and proteases can affect plasmid maintenance in bacterial cells.

  18. Characterization of a linear DNA plasmid from the filamentous fungal plant pathogen Glomerella musae [Anamorph: Colletotrichum musae (Berk. and Curt.) arx.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Freeman, S.; Redman, R.S.; Grantham, G.; Rodriguez, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    A 7.4-kilobase (kb) DNA plasmid was isolated from Glomerella musae isolate 927 and designated pGML1. Exonuclease treatments indicated that pGML1 was a linear plasmid with blocked 5' termini. Cell-fractionation experiments combined with sequence-specific PCR amplification revealed that pGML1 resided in mitochondria. The pGML1 plasmid hybridized to cesium chloride-fractionated nuclear DNA but not to A + T-rich mitochondrial DNA. An internal 7.0-kb section of pGML1 was cloned and did not hybridize with either nuclear or mitochondrial DNA from G. musae. Sequence analysis revealed identical terminal inverted repeats (TIR) of 520 bp at the ends of the cloned 7.0-kb section of pGML1. The occurrence of pGML1 did not correspond with the pathogenicity of G. musae on banana fruit. Four additional isolates of G. musae possessed extrachromosomal DNA fragments similar in size and sequence to pGML1.

  19. Linear Vector Quantisation and Uniform Circular Arrays based decoupled two-dimensional angle of arrival estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ndaw, Joseph D.; Faye, Andre; Maïga, Amadou S.

    2017-05-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANN)-based models are efficient ways of source localisation. However very large training sets are needed to precisely estimate two-dimensional Direction of arrival (2D-DOA) with ANN models. In this paper we present a fast artificial neural network approach for 2D-DOA estimation with reduced training sets sizes. We exploit the symmetry properties of Uniform Circular Arrays (UCA) to build two different datasets for elevation and azimuth angles. Linear Vector Quantisation (LVQ) neural networks are then sequentially trained on each dataset to separately estimate elevation and azimuth angles. A multilevel training process is applied to further reduce the training sets sizes.

  20. High-frequency transformation of Brevibacterium lactofermentum protoplasts by plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Santamaria, R I; Gil, J A; Martin, J F

    1985-04-01

    An efficient polyethylene glycol-assisted method for transformation of Brevibacterium lactofermentum protoplasts that uses plasmid vectors has been developed. Two small plasmids, pUL330 (5.2 kilobases) and pUL340 (5.8 kilobases), both containing the kanamycin resistance gene from transposon Tn5 and the replication origin of the natural plasmid pBL1 of B. lactofermentum, were selected as vectors. Supercoiled forms of the plasmids yielded a 100-fold higher transformation frequency than did linear forms. The optimal transformation frequency was achieved with 10 ng of DNA in 1 ml of transformation buffer. Higher concentrations of plasmid DNA resulted in a decrease in transformation frequency per microgram of DNA. Optimal transformation was obtained with 25 to 35% polyethylene glycol 6000. Under optimal conditions, 10(6) transformants per microgram of DNA were obtained.

  1. Invertrons, a class of structurally and functionally related genetic elements that includes linear DNA plasmids, transposable elements, and genomes of adeno-type viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Sakaguchi, K

    1990-01-01

    Invertrons are genetic elements composed of DNA with inverted terminal repeats at both ends, covalently bonded to terminal proteins involved in the initiation of DNA replication at both their 5' termini when they exist in the cytoplasm of their host in free form. They function as viruses, linear DNA plasmids, transposable elements, and sometimes combinations of two of these properties. They differ from retroviruses and related retro-type transposons which have direct repeats on both their genomic ends and exploit RNA intermediates for replication of their DNA. A model for replication and integration of invertrons is presented, as well as a model for transposition of transposable elements. PMID:2157134

  2. Multi-cavity complex controller with vector simulator for TESLA technology linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarski, Tomasz; Pozniak, Krzysztof T.; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.; Szewinski, Jaroslaw

    2008-01-01

    A digital control, as the main part of the Low Level RF system, for superconducting cavities of a linear accelerator is presented. The FPGA based controller, supported by MATLAB system, was developed to investigate a novel firmware implementation. The complex control algorithm based on the non-linear system identification is the proposal verified by the preliminary experimental results. The general idea is implemented as the Multi-Cavity Complex Controller (MCC) and is still under development. The FPGA based controller executes procedure according to the prearranged control tables: Feed-Forward, Set-Point and Corrector unit, to fulfill the required cavity performance: driving in the resonance during filling and field stabilization for the flattop range. Adaptive control algorithm is applied for the feed-forward and feedback modes. The vector Simulator table has been introduced for an efficient verification of the FPGA controller structure. Experimental results of the internal simulation, are presented for a cavity representative condition.

  3. Vector Sum Excited Linear Prediction (VSELP) speech coding at 4.8 kbps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerson, Ira A.; Jasiuk, Mark A.

    1990-01-01

    Code Excited Linear Prediction (CELP) speech coders exhibit good performance at data rates as low as 4800 bps. The major drawback to CELP type coders is their larger computational requirements. The Vector Sum Excited Linear Prediction (VSELP) speech coder utilizes a codebook with a structure which allows for a very efficient search procedure. Other advantages of the VSELP codebook structure is discussed and a detailed description of a 4.8 kbps VSELP coder is given. This coder is an improved version of the VSELP algorithm, which finished first in the NSA's evaluation of the 4.8 kbps speech coders. The coder uses a subsample resolution single tap long term predictor, a single VSELP excitation codebook, a novel gain quantizer which is robust to channel errors, and a new adaptive pre/postfilter arrangement.

  4. Safety and immunogenicity in humans of an attenuated Salmonella typhi vaccine vector strain expressing plasmid-encoded hepatitis B antigens stabilized by the Asd-balanced lethal vector system.

    PubMed Central

    Tacket, C O; Kelly, S M; Schödel, F; Losonsky, G; Nataro, J P; Edelman, R; Levine, M M; Curtiss, R

    1997-01-01

    Attenuated Salmonella typhi organisms which express genes encoding protective antigens of other pathogens have been developed for use as experimental oral vaccines. A delta asd S. typhi strain attenuated by deletions in cya, crp, and cdt which contains hepatitis B core (HBc) and pre-S genes encoded on an Asd+ pBR-based plasmid vector was constructed. Healthy adult volunteers ingested a single dose of 5 x 10(5) to 5 x 10(8) CFU of strain chi4073 (delta cya delta crp delta cdt S. typhi Ty2), 6 x 10(7) or 1 x 10(9) CFU of strain chi4632(pYA3149), a further derivative of chi4073 deleted in asd and containing the Asd+ vector without the HBc-pre-S fusion, or 3 x 10(7) or 7 x 10(8) CFU of strain X4632(pYA3167), a derivative containing the vector with the HBc-pre-S fusion. Chi4073 was generally well tolerated by 22 volunteers. No volunteer had fever or positive blood cultures; 4 of 22 volunteers shed vaccine organisms in the stool in the first 48 h only. Two of 18 volunteers who received one of the plasmid-containing derivatives of chi4073 developed low-grade fevers on day 10 or 12 after ingestion. One of these volunteers had positive blood cultures on days 7 and 8. Seven of these 18 volunteers had vaccine organisms detected in their stools in the first 48 h only. Most volunteers developed S. typhi-specific serum responses and developed S. typhi-specific antibody-secreting cells. However, no volunteer developed serum antibody to hepatitis pre-S or pre-S-specific antibody-secreting cells. Although the parent strain chi4073 was well tolerated, induced immunoglobulin G seroconversion to S. typhi lipopolysaccharide in 80 to 100% of vaccinees and stimulated specific IgA-secreting lymphocytes in 80 to 100% of vaccinees given a single oral dose of 2 x 10(7) and 5 x 10(8) CFU, chi4073 derivatives containing the Asd+ vector with and without sequences encoding the HBc-pre-S fusion caused occasional febrile reactions at high doses and did not stimulate detectable immune responses to

  5. Magnetic field vector and electron density diagnostics from linear polarization measurements in 14 solar prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bommier, V.

    1986-01-01

    The Hanle effect is the modification of the linear polarization parameters of a spectral line due to the effect of the magnetic field. It has been successfully applied to the magnetic field vector diagnostic in solar prominences. The magnetic field vector is determined by comparing the measured polarization to the polarization computed, taking into account all the polarizing and depolarizing processes in line formation and the depolarizing effect of the magnetic field. The method was applied to simultaneous polarization measurements in the Helium D3 line and in the hydrogen beta line in 14 prominences. Four polarization parameters are measured, which lead to the determination of the three coordinates of the magnetic field vector and the electron density, owing to the sensitivity of the hydrogen beta line to the non-negligible effect of depolarizing collisions with electrons and protons of the medium. A mean value of 1.3 x 10 to the 10th power cu. cm. is derived in 14 prominences.

  6. Two-dimensional vector solitons stabilized by a linear or nonlinear lattice acting in one component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovkova, O. V.; Malomed, B. A.; Kartashov, Y. V.

    2010-12-01

    The subject of the work is the stabilization of two-dimensional (2D) two-component (vector) solitons, in media with the attractive cubic nonlinearity, against the collapse by a linear lattice (LL, which is induced by a periodic modulation of the refractive index in optics, or created as an optical lattice in BEC), or by a nonlinear lattice (NL, induced by a periodic modulation of the nonlinearity coefficient). We demonstrate that, due to the XPM (cross-phase-modulation) coupling between the components, the LL or NL acting on a single component is sufficient for the stabilization of vector solitons, that include a component for which the self-focusing medium is uniform. In the case of the LL, the vector solitons are stable almost in their entire existence domain, while the NL can only stabilize the solitons in which the component affected by the lattice carries a norm which is comparable to, or larger than the norm of the component in the uniform medium.

  7. Peaceful coexistence amongst Borrelia plasmids: getting by with a little help from their friends?

    PubMed

    Chaconas, George; Norris, Steven J

    2013-09-01

    Borrelia species comprise a unique genus of bacterial pathogens. These organisms contain a segmented genome with up to two dozen plasmids ranging in size from 5 kb up to about 200 kb. The plasmids have also been referred to as mini-chromosomes or essential genetic elements, as some of them carry information important for infection of vertebrates or for survival in the tick vector. Most of the plasmids are linear with covalently closed hairpin telomeres and these linear plasmids are in a constant state of genetic rearrangement. The mechanisms of plasmid replication, maintenance and partitioning remain largely obscure and are complicated by a long doubling time, the requirement for expensive media and inefficient genetic manipulation. A set of five parologous protein families (PFs) are believed to confer the ability for autonomous replication and plasmid maintenance. The number of plasmids also complicates analyses because of the possibility that PFs from one plasmid may sometimes function in trans on other plasmids. Two papers in the last year have moved the field forward and their combined data suggest that trans complementation amongst Borrelia plasmids may sometimes occur.

  8. Highly Effective Non-Viral Antitumor Gene Therapy System Comprised of Biocompatible Small Plasmid Complex Particles Consisting of pDNA, Anionic Polysaccharide, and Fully Deprotected Linear Polyethylenimine

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Yoshiyuki; Sugiura, Kikuya; Yoshihara, Chieko; Inaba, Toshio; Ito, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    We have reported that ternary complexes of plasmid DNA with conventional linear polyethylenimine (l-PEI) and certain polyanions were very stably dispersed, and, with no cryoprotectant, they could be freeze-dried and re-hydrated without the loss of transfection ability. These properties enabled the preparation of a concentrated suspension of very small pDNA complex, by preparing the complexes at highly diluted conditions, followed by condensation via lyophilization-and-rehydration procedure. Recently, a high potency linear polyethylenimine having no residual protective groups, i.e., Polyethylenimine “Max” (PEI “Max”), is available, which has been reported to induce much higher gene expression than conventional l-PEI. We tried to prepare the small DNA/PEI “Max”/polyanion complexes by a similar freeze-drying method. Small complex particles could be obtained without apparent aggregation, but transfection activity of the rehydrated complexes was severely reduced. Complex-preparation conditions were investigated in details to achieve the freeze-dried DNA/PEI “Max”/polyanion small ternary complexes with high transfection efficiency. DNA/PEI “Max”/polyanion complexes containing cytokine-coding plasmids were then prepared, and their anti-tumor therapeutic efficacy was examined in tumor-bearing mice. PMID:26213961

  9. Differential salt-induced dissociation of the p53 protein complexes with circular and linear plasmid DNA substrates suggest involvement of a sliding mechanism.

    PubMed

    Šebest, Peter; Brázdová, Marie; Fojta, Miroslav; Pivoňková, Hana

    2015-01-30

    A study of the effects of salt conditions on the association and dissociation of wild type p53 with different ~3 kbp long plasmid DNA substrates (supercoiled, relaxed circular and linear, containing or lacking a specific p53 binding site, p53CON) using immunoprecipitation at magnetic beads is presented. Salt concentrations above 200 mM strongly affected association of the p53 protein to any plasmid DNA substrate. Strikingly different behavior was observed when dissociation of pre-formed p53-DNA complexes in increased salt concentrations was studied. While contribution from the p53CON to the stability of the p53-DNA complexes was detected between 100 and 170 mM KCl, p53 complexes with circular DNAs (but not linear) exhibited considerable resistance towards salt treatment for KCl concentrations as high as 2 M provided that the p53 basic C-terminal DNA binding site (CTDBS) was available for DNA binding. On the contrary, when the CTDBS was blocked by antibody used for immunoprecipitation, all p53-DNA complexes were completely dissociated from the p53 protein in KCl concentrations≥200 mM under the same conditions. These observations suggest: (a) different ways for association and dissociation of the p53-DNA complexes in the presence of the CTDBS; and (b) a critical role for a sliding mechanism, mediated by the C-terminal domain, in the dissociation process.

  10. Co-delivery of small interfering RNA and plasmid DNA using a polymeric vector incorporating endosomolytic oligomeric sulfonamide

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Han Chang; Bae, You Han

    2011-01-01

    Cationic polymers are potential intracellular carriers for small interfering RNA (siRNA). The short and rigid nature of an siRNA chain often results in larger and more loosely packed particles compared to plasmid DNA (pDNA) after complexing with carrier polycations, and in turn, poor silencing effects are seen against the target mRNAs. A helper polyanion, pDNA, was incorporated along with siRNA to form compact nanosized polyplexes. At C/A (cation/anion) ratios of 2 and 5, poly(L-lysine) (PLL)/siRNA-pGFP and PLL/siRNA-pGFP-OSDZ (oligomeric sulfadiazine (OSDZ) for endosomolysis) complexes produced particles 90–150 nm in size with a 15–45 mV surface charge, while PLL/siRNA complexes yielded particles 1–2 μm in size at the same C/A ratios. The PLL/siRNA-pGFP (C/A 2) complexes showed significantly higher specific gene silencing (50–90% vs. 10–25%) than the complexes formed at C/A 5. PLL/siRNA-pGFP-OSDZ (C/A 2) complexes improved the specific gene silencing (90%) more dramatically than PLL/siRNA-pGFP (C/A 2) complexes (50%), demonstrating a potential role for OSDZ. PLL/siRNA-pGFP-OSDZ (C/A 2) complexes sustained higher specific gene silencing compared with PLL/siRNA-pGFP (C/A 2) complexes. Other oligomeric sulfonamides (OSA) with varying pKa used in PLL/siRNA-pGFP-OSA complexes also caused effective gene silencing. The pGFP in the PLL/siRNA-pGFP complexes successfully expressed GFP protein without interfering with the siRNA. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that long pDNA helps effectively form nanosized siRNA particles and that OSA enhances specific gene silencing. In a single nucleic acid carrier formulation, co-delivery of siRNA and pDNA is feasible to maximize therapeutic effects or to include therapeutic or diagnostic functionalities. PMID:21489622

  11. Complete genome sequence of the actinobacterium Streptomyces glaucescens GLA.O (DSM 40922) consisting of a linear chromosome and one linear plasmid.

    PubMed

    Ortseifen, Vera; Winkler, Anika; Albersmeier, Andreas; Wendler, Sergej; Pühler, Alfred; Kalinowski, Jörn; Rückert, Christian

    2015-01-20

    Here we report the complete and finished genome sequence of Streptomyces glaucescens GLA.O (DSM 40922), a natural producer of the alpha-glucosidase inhibitor acarbose, which is used in the treatment of type-2 diabetes mellitus. The genome of S. glaucescens GLA.O consists of two replicons, the chromosome with a size of 7,453,200bp and a G+C content of 73.0% as well as a plasmid named pSglau1 with a size of 170,574bp and a G+C content of 69.06%.

  12. Mobility of plasmids.

    PubMed

    Smillie, Chris; Garcillán-Barcia, M Pilar; Francia, M Victoria; Rocha, Eduardo P C; de la Cruz, Fernando

    2010-09-01

    Plasmids are key vectors of horizontal gene transfer and essential genetic engineering tools. They code for genes involved in many aspects of microbial biology, including detoxication, virulence, ecological interactions, and antibiotic resistance. While many studies have decorticated the mechanisms of mobility in model plasmids, the identification and characterization of plasmid mobility from genome data are unexplored. By reviewing the available data and literature, we established a computational protocol to identify and classify conjugation and mobilization genetic modules in 1,730 plasmids. This allowed the accurate classification of proteobacterial conjugative or mobilizable systems in a combination of four mating pair formation and six relaxase families. The available evidence suggests that half of the plasmids are nonmobilizable and that half of the remaining plasmids are conjugative. Some conjugative systems are much more abundant than others and preferably associated with some clades or plasmid sizes. Most very large plasmids are nonmobilizable, with evidence of ongoing domestication into secondary chromosomes. The evolution of conjugation elements shows ancient divergence between mobility systems, with relaxases and type IV coupling proteins (T4CPs) often following separate paths from type IV secretion systems. Phylogenetic patterns of mobility proteins are consistent with the phylogeny of the host prokaryotes, suggesting that plasmid mobility is in general circumscribed within large clades. Our survey suggests the existence of unsuspected new relaxases in archaea and new conjugation systems in cyanobacteria and actinobacteria. Few genes, e.g., T4CPs, relaxases, and VirB4, are at the core of plasmid conjugation, and together with accessory genes, they have evolved into specific systems adapted to specific physiological and ecological contexts.

  13. [Construction of genomic library of L. interrogans serovar lai using lambda gt11 as the vector and a study of recombiant plasmid pDL121].

    PubMed

    Liu, H; Dai, B; Jing, B; Wu, W; Li, S; Fang, Z; Zhao, H; Ye, D; Yan, R; Liu, J; Song, S; Yang, Y; Zhang, Y; Liu, F; Tu, Y; Yang, H; Huang, Z; Liang, L; Hu, L; Zhao, M

    1997-03-01

    A genomic library of L. interrogans serovar lai strain 017 has been constructed using lambda gt11 as the vector. DNA was partially digested by two blunt-end restriction enzymes, then methylated with EcoR I methylase; after EcoR I linker was added to the DNA, the linker-ended DNA was ligated to the dephosphorylated EcoR I digested lambda gt11 arms. The recombined DNA was packaged in vitro, and used to transduct E. coli Y1090 for amplification. There were 2.1 x 10(6) recombinant bacteriophages as recognized by their ability to form white plaques plated on Lac host in the presence of both IPTG and X-Ga1. A positive clone, designated lambda DL12, was screened with a rabbit anti-serum against L. interrogans serovar lai from the genomic library. The DNA from lambda DL12 was subcloned into plasmid pUC18. A recombinant (designated as pDL121) was obtained. SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that a 23 kd was expressed in E. coli JM 103 harboring pDL121. Western blotting analysis showed that a specific protein band molecular weight of 23 kd could be recognized by the rabbit antiserum against L. interrogans serovar lai strain 017.

  14. Hybrid cytomegalovirus-U6 promoter-based plasmid vectors improve efficiency of RNA interference in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Su, Jianguo; Zhu, Zuoyan; Xiong, Feng; Wang, Yaping

    2008-01-01

    Short hairpin RNA (shRNA) directed by RNA polymerase III (Pol III) or Pol II promoter was shown to be capable of silencing gene expression, which should permit analyses of gene functions or as a potential therapeutic tool. However, the inhibitory effect of shRNA remains problematic in fish. We demonstrated that silencing efficiency by shRNA produced from the hybrid construct composed of the CMV enhancer or entire CMV promoter placed immediately upstream of a U6 promoter. When tested the exogenous gene, silencing of an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) target gene was 89.18 +/- 5.06% for CMVE-U6 promoter group and 88.26 +/- 6.46% for CMV-U6 promoter group. To test the hybrid promoters driving shRNA efficiency against an endogenous gene, we used shRNA against no tail (NTL) gene. When vectorized in the zebrafish, the hybrid constructs strongly repressed NTL gene expression. The NTL phenotype occupied 52.09 +/- 3.06% and 51.56 +/- 3.68% for CMVE-U6 promoter and CMV-U6 promoter groups, respectively. The NTL gene expression reduced 82.17 +/- 2.96% for CMVE-U6 promoter group and 83.06 +/- 2.38% for CMV-U6 promoter group. We concluded that the CMV enhancer or entire CMV promoter locating upstream of the U6-promoter could significantly improve inhibitory effect induced by the shRNA for both exogenous and endogenous genes compared with the CMV promoter or U6 promoter alone. In contrast, the two hybrid promoter constructs had similar effects on driving shRNA.

  15. Linearly polarized vector modes: enabling MIMO-free mode-division multiplexing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lixian; Nejad, Reza Mirzaei; Corsi, Alessandro; Lin, Jiachuan; Messaddeq, Younès; Rusch, Leslie; LaRochelle, Sophie

    2017-05-15

    We experimentally investigate mode-division multiplexing in an elliptical ring core fiber (ERCF) that supports linearly polarized vector modes (LPV). Characterization show that the ERCF exhibits good polarization maintaining properties over eight LPV modes with effective index difference larger than 1 × 10(-4). The ERCF further displays stable mode power and polarization extinction ratio when subjected to external perturbations. Crosstalk between the LPV modes, after propagating through 0.9 km ERCF, is below -14 dB. By using six LPV modes as independent data channels, we achieved the transmission of 32 Gbaud QPSK over 0.9 km ERCF without any multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) or polarization-division multiplexing (PDM) signal processing.

  16. Bounded solutions of fermions in the background of mixed vector-scalar inversely linear potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, Antonio S. de . E-mail: castro@feg.unesp.br

    2005-04-01

    The problem of a fermion subject to a general mixing of vector and scalar potentials in a two-dimensional world is mapped into a Sturm-Liouville problem. Isolated bounded solutions are also searched. For the specific case of an inversely linear potential, which gives rise to an effective Kratzer potential in the Sturm-Liouville problem, exact bounded solutions are found in closed form. The case of a pure scalar potential with their isolated zero-energy solutions, already analyzed in a previous work, is obtained as a particular case. The behavior of the upper and lower components of the Dirac spinor is discussed in detail and some unusual results are revealed. The nonrelativistic limit of our results adds a new support to the conclusion that even-parity solutions to the nonrelativistic one-dimensional hydrogen atom do not exist.

  17. A review of vector convergence acceleration methods, with applications to linear algebra problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brezinski, C.; Redivo-Zaglia, M.

    In this article, in a few pages, we will try to give an idea of convergence acceleration methods and extrapolation procedures for vector sequences, and to present some applications to linear algebra problems and to the treatment of the Gibbs phenomenon for Fourier series in order to show their effectiveness. The interested reader is referred to the literature for more details. In the bibliography, due to space limitation, we will only give the more recent items, and, for older ones, we refer to Brezinski and Redivo-Zaglia, Extrapolation methods. (Extrapolation Methods. Theory and Practice, North-Holland, 1991). This book also contains, on a magnetic support, a library (in Fortran 77 language) for convergence acceleration algorithms and extrapolation methods.

  18. A Vector Study of Linearized Supersonic Flow Applications to Nonplanar Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, John C

    1953-01-01

    A vector study of the partial-differential equation of steady linearized supersonic flow is presented. General expressions which relate the velocity potential in the stream to the conditions on the disturbing surfaces, are derived. In connection with these general expressions the concept of the finite part of an integral is discussed. A discussion of problems dealing with planar bodies is given and the conditions for the solution to be unique are investigated. Problems concerning nonplanar systems are investigated, and methods are derived for the solution of some simple nonplanar bodies. The surface pressure distribution and the damping in roll are found for rolling tails consisting of four, six, and eight rectangular fins for the Mach number range where the region of interference between adjacent fins does not affect the fin tips.

  19. Semi-Automatic Classification of Birdsong Elements Using a Linear Support Vector Machine

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, Ryosuke O.; Oosugi, Naoya; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Birdsong provides a unique model for understanding the behavioral and neural bases underlying complex sequential behaviors. However, birdsong analyses require laborious effort to make the data quantitatively analyzable. The previous attempts had succeeded to provide some reduction of human efforts involved in birdsong segment classification. The present study was aimed to further reduce human efforts while increasing classification performance. In the current proposal, a linear-kernel support vector machine was employed to minimize the amount of human-generated label samples for reliable element classification in birdsong, and to enable the classifier to handle highly-dimensional acoustic features while avoiding the over-fitting problem. Bengalese finch's songs in which distinct elements (i.e., syllables) were aligned in a complex sequential pattern were used as a representative test case in the neuroscientific research field. Three evaluations were performed to test (1) algorithm validity and accuracy with exploring appropriate classifier settings, (2) capability to provide accuracy with reducing amount of instruction dataset, and (3) capability in classifying large dataset with minimized manual labeling. The results from the evaluation (1) showed that the algorithm is 99.5% reliable in song syllables classification. This accuracy was indeed maintained in evaluation (2), even when the instruction data classified by human were reduced to one-minute excerpt (corresponding to 300–400 syllables) for classifying two-minute excerpt. The reliability remained comparable, 98.7% accuracy, when a large target dataset of whole day recordings (∼30,000 syllables) was used. Use of a linear-kernel support vector machine showed sufficient accuracies with minimized manually generated instruction data in bird song element classification. The methodology proposed would help reducing laborious processes in birdsong analysis without sacrificing reliability, and therefore can help

  20. Chemical adjuvants for plasmid DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Greenland, John R; Letvin, Norman L

    2007-05-10

    Plasmid DNA vaccines are a promising modality for immunization against a variety of human pathogens. Immunization via multiple routes with plasmid DNA can elicit potent cellular immune responses, and these immunogens can be administered repeatedly without inducing anti-vector immunity. Nonetheless, the immunogenicity of plasmid DNA vaccines has been limited by problems associated with delivery. A number of adjuvants have been designed to improve plasmid DNA immunogenicity, either by directly stimulating the immune system or by enhancing plasmid DNA expression. Chemical adjuvants for enhancing plasmid DNA expression include liposomes, polymers, and microparticles, all of which have shown promise for enhancing the expression and immunogenicity of plasmid DNA vaccines in animal models. Micro- and nanoparticles have not been shown to enhance immune responses to plasmid DNA vaccines. However, formulation of plasmid DNA with some non-particulate polymeric adjuvants has led to a statistically significant enhancement of immune responses. Further development of these technologies will significantly improve the utility of plasmid DNA vaccination.

  1. Nonadiabatic coupling vectors within linear response time-dependent density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavernelli, Ivano; Tapavicza, Enrico; Rothlisberger, Ursula

    2009-03-01

    A method is developed to compute the nonadiabatic coupling vectors (NACVs) between electronic ground and excited states as well as between any possible pair of excited states within the framework of linear response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) in the adiabatic approximation. The development is an extension to our previous work on surface hopping dynamics [E. Tapavicza et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 023001 (2007)] for which we improve the description of the TDDFT approximation of the excited state wavefunctions by means of linear response orbitals. The method is first validated on the H +H2 system that has a region of strong coupling near the conical intersection at the equilateral geometry. These results confirm the quality and the numerical efficiency of the approach, which has an accuracy comparable to the one achieved with wavefunction-based methods. Finally, we apply the method to the calculation of the NACVs of protonated formaldimine (NH2CH2+) along a surface hopping trajectory initiated in the second excited state.

  2. Vector meson and associated strangeness production using a linearly polarized photon beam at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Philip L. Cole

    2004-09-01

    The set of experiments forming the g8a run took place in the summer of 2001 in Hall B of Jefferson Lab. The g8a run was the commissioning experiment for the linearly-polarized photon beam at CLAS. The aim of these experiments is to improve the understanding of the underlying symmetry of the quark degrees of freedom in the nucleon, the nature of the parity exchange between the incident photon and the target nucleon, and the mechanism of associated strangeness production in electromagnetic reactions. A beam of tagged and collimated linearly polarized photons (energy range 1.8-2.2 GeV) in conjunction with the large solid angle coverage of CLAS make possible the extraction of the differential cross-sections and polarization observables for the photoproduction of vector mesons and kaons. The reaction channels are under investigation to search for possibly missing nucleon resonances. An overview of the experiment and preliminary results on the measurement of the photon asymmetries of the aforementioned reactions will be presented in this paper.

  3. A cloning vector for creation of Escherichia coli lacZ translational fusions and generation of linear template for chromosomal integrations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A novel cloning vector to aid in the construction of ß-galactosidase reporter systems for gene expression studies in lactose metabolizing strains of Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli is described. The plasmid allows construction of translational fusions of cloned gene promoters with a short seg...

  4. Linear FMCW Laser Radar for Precision Range and Vector Velocity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierrottet, Diego; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Petway, Larry; Barnes, Bruce; Lockhard, George; Rubio, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    An all fiber linear frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) coherent laser radar system is under development with a goal to aide NASA s new Space Exploration initiative for manned and robotic missions to the Moon and Mars. By employing a combination of optical heterodyne and linear frequency modulation techniques and utilizing state-of-the-art fiber optic technologies, highly efficient, compact and reliable laser radar suitable for operation in a space environment is being developed. Linear FMCW lidar has the capability of high-resolution range measurements, and when configured into a multi-channel receiver system it has the capability of obtaining high precision horizontal and vertical velocity measurements. Precision range and vector velocity data are beneficial to navigating planetary landing pods to the preselected site and achieving autonomous, safe soft-landing. The all-fiber coherent laser radar has several important advantages over more conventional pulsed laser altimeters or range finders. One of the advantages of the coherent laser radar is its ability to measure directly the platform velocity by extracting the Doppler shift generated from the motion, as opposed to time of flight range finders where terrain features such as hills, cliffs, or slopes add error to the velocity measurement. Doppler measurements are about two orders of magnitude more accurate than the velocity estimates obtained by pulsed laser altimeters. In addition, most of the components of the device are efficient and reliable commercial off-the-shelf fiber optic telecommunication components. This paper discusses the design and performance of a second-generation brassboard system under development at NASA Langley Research Center as part of the Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance (ALHAT) project.

  5. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Shuttle vectors.

    PubMed

    Gnügge, Robert; Rudolf, Fabian

    2017-01-10

    Yeast shuttle vectors are indispensable tools in yeast research. They enable cloning of defined DNA sequences in Escherichia coli and their direct transfer into Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. There are three types of commonly used yeast shuttle vectors: centromeric plasmids, episomal plasmids and integrating plasmids. In this review, we discuss the different plasmid systems and their characteristic features. We focus on their segregational stability and copy number and indicate how to modify these properties. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Production of Plasmid DNA as Pharmaceutical.

    PubMed

    Schmeer, Marco; Schleef, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Pharmaceutical applications of plasmid DNA require certain quality standards, depending on the intended use of the plasmids. That is, for direct gene transfer into human, GMP Grade is mandatory, however, for GMP production of for example viral vectors (AAV or mRNA etc.), the plasmid DNA used has not to be produced under GMP necessarily. Here we summarize important features of producing plasmid DNA, ensuring the required quality for the intended (pharmaceutical) application.

  7. [Integration of soft and hard classifications using linear spectral mixture model and support vector machines].

    PubMed

    Hu, Tan-Gao; Pan, Yao-Zhong; Zhang, Jin-Shui; Li, Ling-Ling; Le, Li

    2011-02-01

    This paper presents a new soft and hard classification. By analyzing the target objects in the image distribution, and calculating the adaptive threshold automatically, the image is divided into three regions: pure regions, non-target objects regions and mixed regions. For pure regions and non-target objects regions, hard classification method (support vector machine) is used to quickly extract classified results; For mixed regions, soft classification method (selective endmember for linear spectral mixture model) is used to extract the abundance of target objects. Finally, it generates an integrated soft and hard classification map. In order to evaluate the accuracy of this new method, it is compared with SVM and LSMM using ALOS image. The RMSE value of new method is 0.203, and total accuracy is 95.48%. Both overall accuracies and RMSE show that integration of hard and soft classification has a higher accuracy than single hard or soft classification. Experimental results prove that the new method can effectively solve the problem of mixed pixels, and can obviously improve image classification accuracy.

  8. Choosing and using Schizosaccharomyces pombe plasmids.

    PubMed

    Siam, Rania; Dolan, William P; Forsburg, Susan L

    2004-07-01

    A wide range of plasmids has been developed for molecular studies in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. This includes general purpose episomes, expression vectors, epitope tagging plasmids, and integration vectors. This review describes the typical features of S. pombe vectors, including replication origins, positive and negative selection markers, and constitutive and inducible promoter systems. We will also discuss vectors with epitope tags and how these can be used to modify episomal or endogenous gene sequences. Considerations for choosing and using a plasmid are presented and specialized methods are described.

  9. Characterization of the transgene expression generated by branched and linear polyethylenimine-plasmid DNA nanoparticles in vitro and after intraperitoneal injection in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Intra, Janjira; Salem, Aliasger K.

    2008-01-01

    Polyethylenimine (PEI) is a cationic polymer that has shown significant potential for delivering genes in vitro and in vivo. Mixing cationic PEI with negatively charged plasmid DNA (pDNA) results in the spontaneous electrostatic formation of stable nanoparticle complexes. The structure of PEI can be branched or linear. In this study, we show that branched PEI has a stronger electrostatic interaction with pDNA than linear PEI, which accounts for greater compaction, higher zeta potentials and smaller nanoparticle sizes at equivalent pDNA concentrations. For both linear and branched PEI, increasing the concentration of pDNA mixed in the same volume and at the same nitrogen to phosphate (N:P) ratio results in larger average particle sizes. Increasing the N:P ratio increases luciferase activity generated by branched PEI-pDNA nanoparticles and linear PEI-pDNA nanoparticles in HEK293, COS7 and HeLa cell lines. Increasing the N:P ratio at which branched PEI-pDNA nanoparticles are prepared also increases luciferase expression in HepG2 cells but does not increase luciferase expression generated by linear PEI-pDNA nanoparticles. In all of the cell lines, branched PEI-pDNA nanoparticles prepared at N:P ratios of 10 and above generated significantly higher luciferase activity than linear PEI-pDNA nanoparticles. Luciferase activity was highest in the HEK293 cells and luciferase expression in each of the cell lines followed the order of HEK293

  10. Plasmid DNA linearization in the antibacterial action of a new fluorescent Ag nanoparticle-paracetamol dimer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Amaresh Kumar; Sk, Md Palashuddin; Ghosh, Siddhartha Sankar; Chattopadhyay, Arun

    2011-10-01

    Herein, we report the generation of a composite comprised of p-hydroxyacetanilide dimer and Ag nanoparticles (NPs) by reaction of AgNO3 and p-hydroxyacetanilide. The formation of the composite was established by UV-vis, FTIR and NMR spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction along with substantiation by mass spectrometry. Interestingly, the composite exhibited an emission spectrum with a peak at 435 nm when excited by light of wavelength 320 nm. The composite showed superior antimicrobial activity with respect to its individual components against a wide range of Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria at relatively low concentrations of Ag NPs and at which there was no apparent cytotoxicity against mammalian cells. Our results suggest that the composite strongly interacted with the bacterial cell walls leading to cell bursting. Interestingly, enhancement in the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in bacteria was observed in the presence of the composite. It is proposed that the ROS generation led to oxidation of the dimer to N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI). The generated NAPQI acted as a DNA gyrase inhibitor causing cell death following linearization of DNA.Herein, we report the generation of a composite comprised of p-hydroxyacetanilide dimer and Ag nanoparticles (NPs) by reaction of AgNO3 and p-hydroxyacetanilide. The formation of the composite was established by UV-vis, FTIR and NMR spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction along with substantiation by mass spectrometry. Interestingly, the composite exhibited an emission spectrum with a peak at 435 nm when excited by light of wavelength 320 nm. The composite showed superior antimicrobial activity with respect to its individual components against a wide range of Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria at relatively low concentrations of Ag NPs and at which there was no apparent cytotoxicity against mammalian cells. Our results suggest that the

  11. Dynamic plasmonic beam shaping by vector beams with arbitrary locally linear polarization states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Zhongsheng; Du, Luping; Min, Changjun; Zhang, Yuquan; Zhang, Chonglei; Zhu, Siwei; Paul Urbach, H.; Yuan, X.-C.

    2014-07-01

    Vector beams, which have space-variant state of polarization (SOP) comparing with scalar beams with spatially homogeneous SOP, are used to manipulate surface plasmon polarizations (SPPs). We find that the excitation, orientation, and distribution of the focused SPPs excited in a high numerical aperture microscopic configuration highly depend on the space-variant polarization of the incident vector beam. When it comes to vector beam with axial symmetry, multi-foci of SPPs with the same size and uniform intensity can be obtained, and the number of foci is depending on the polarization order n. Those properties can be of great value in biological sensor and plasmonic tweezers applications.

  12. Dynamic plasmonic beam shaping by vector beams with arbitrary locally linear polarization states

    SciTech Connect

    Man, Zhongsheng; Zhang, Yuquan; Zhang, Chonglei; Du, Luping; Min, Changjun E-mail: xcyuan@szu.edu.cn; Yuan, X.-C. E-mail: xcyuan@szu.edu.cn; Zhu, Siwei; Paul Urbach, H.

    2014-07-07

    Vector beams, which have space-variant state of polarization (SOP) comparing with scalar beams with spatially homogeneous SOP, are used to manipulate surface plasmon polarizations (SPPs). We find that the excitation, orientation, and distribution of the focused SPPs excited in a high numerical aperture microscopic configuration highly depend on the space-variant polarization of the incident vector beam. When it comes to vector beam with axial symmetry, multi-foci of SPPs with the same size and uniform intensity can be obtained, and the number of foci is depending on the polarization order n. Those properties can be of great value in biological sensor and plasmonic tweezers applications.

  13. f(R) gravity on non-linear scales: the post-Friedmann expansion and the vector potential

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, D.B.; Bruni, M.; Koyama, K.; Li, B.; Zhao, G.-B. E-mail: marco.bruni@port.ac.uk E-mail: baojiu.li@durham.ac.uk

    2015-07-01

    Many modified gravity theories are under consideration in cosmology as the source of the accelerated expansion of the universe and linear perturbation theory, valid on the largest scales, has been examined in many of these models. However, smaller non-linear scales offer a richer phenomenology with which to constrain modified gravity theories. Here, we consider the Hu-Sawicki form of f(R) gravity and apply the post-Friedmann approach to derive the leading order equations for non-linear scales, i.e. the equations valid in the Newtonian-like regime. We reproduce the standard equations for the scalar field, gravitational slip and the modified Poisson equation in a coherent framework. In addition, we derive the equation for the leading order correction to the Newtonian regime, the vector potential. We measure this vector potential from f(R) N-body simulations at redshift zero and one, for two values of the f{sub R{sub 0}} parameter. We find that the vector potential at redshift zero in f(R) gravity can be close to 50% larger than in GR on small scales for |f{sub R{sub 0}}|=1.289 × 10{sup −5}, although this is less for larger scales, earlier times and smaller values of the f{sub R{sub 0}} parameter. Similarly to in GR, the small amplitude of this vector potential suggests that the Newtonian approximation is highly accurate for f(R) gravity, and also that the non-linear cosmological behaviour of f(R) gravity can be completely described by just the scalar potentials and the f(R) field.

  14. f(R) gravity on non-linear scales: the post-Friedmann expansion and the vector potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, D. B.; Bruni, M.; Koyama, K.; Li, B.; Zhao, G.-B.

    2015-07-01

    Many modified gravity theories are under consideration in cosmology as the source of the accelerated expansion of the universe and linear perturbation theory, valid on the largest scales, has been examined in many of these models. However, smaller non-linear scales offer a richer phenomenology with which to constrain modified gravity theories. Here, we consider the Hu-Sawicki form of f(R) gravity and apply the post-Friedmann approach to derive the leading order equations for non-linear scales, i.e. the equations valid in the Newtonian-like regime. We reproduce the standard equations for the scalar field, gravitational slip and the modified Poisson equation in a coherent framework. In addition, we derive the equation for the leading order correction to the Newtonian regime, the vector potential. We measure this vector potential from f(R) N-body simulations at redshift zero and one, for two values of the fR0 parameter. We find that the vector potential at redshift zero in f(R) gravity can be close to 50% larger than in GR on small scales for |fR0|=1.289 × 10-5, although this is less for larger scales, earlier times and smaller values of the fR0 parameter. Similarly to in GR, the small amplitude of this vector potential suggests that the Newtonian approximation is highly accurate for f(R) gravity, and also that the non-linear cosmological behaviour of f(R) gravity can be completely described by just the scalar potentials and the f(R) field.

  15. An improved stability test and stabilisation of linear time-varying systems governed by second-order vector differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Shen-Lung; Juang, Yau-Tarng; Wu, Wei-Ying; Shieh, Wern-Yarng

    2011-12-01

    In this article, the problems of exponential stability analysis and stabilisation of linear time-varying systems described by a class of second-order vector differential equations are considered. Using bounding techniques on the trajectories of a linear time-varying system, the stability problem of the time-varying system is transformed to that of a time-invariant system and a new sufficient condition for the exponential stability is obtained. Moreover, the new criterion is proven to be superior to a test presented in the recent literature. Finally, the proposed criterion is applied to the exponential stabilisation problem via state feedback. The results are illustrated by several numerical examples.

  16. Measuring the Higgs-vector boson couplings at linear e+e- collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Sukanta; Hagiwara, Kaoru; Matsumoto, Yu

    2008-12-01

    We estimate the accuracy with which the coefficient of the CP even dimension-six operators involving Higgs and two vector bosons (HVV) can be measured at linear e+e- colliders. Using the optimal observables method for the kinematic distributions, our analysis is based on the five different processes. First is the WW fusion process in the t-channel (e+e-→ν¯eνeH), where we use the rapidity y and the transverse momentum pT of the Higgs boson as observables. Second is the ZH pair production process in the s channel, where we use the scattering angle of the Z and the Z decay angular distributions, reproducing the results of the previous studies. Third is the t-channel ZZ, fusion processes (e+e-→e+e-H), where we use the energy and angular distributions of the tagged e+ and e-. In the fourth, we consider the rapidity distribution of the untagged e+e-H events, which can be approximated well as the γγ fusion of the bremsstrahlung photons from e+ and e- beams. As the last process, we consider the single-tagged e+e-H events, which probe the γe±→He± process. All the results are presented in such a way that statistical errors of the constraints on the effective couplings and their correlations are read off when all of them are allowed to vary simultaneously, for each of the above processes, for mH=120GeV, at s=250GeV, 350 GeV, 500 GeV, and 1 TeV, with and without e- beam polarization of 80%. We find, for instance, that the HZZ and HWW couplings can be measured with 0.6% and 0.9% accuracy, respectively, for the integrated luminosity of L=100fb-1 at s=250GeV, 350 GeV, and L=500fb-1 at s=500GeV, 1 TeV, for the luminosity uncertainty of 1% at each energy. We find that the luminosity uncertainty affects only one combination of the nonstandard couplings, which are proportional to the standard HWW and HZZ couplings, while it does not affect the errors of the other independent combinations of the couplings. As a consequence, we observe that a few combinations of the eight

  17. Plasmid Rolling-Circle Replication.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Masó, J A; MachóN, C; Bordanaba-Ruiseco, L; Espinosa, M; Coll, M; Del Solar, G

    2015-02-01

    Plasmids are DNA entities that undergo controlled replication independent of the chromosomal DNA, a crucial step that guarantees the prevalence of the plasmid in its host. DNA replication has to cope with the incapacity of the DNA polymerases to start de novo DNA synthesis, and different replication mechanisms offer diverse solutions to this problem. Rolling-circle replication (RCR) is a mechanism adopted by certain plasmids, among other genetic elements, that represents one of the simplest initiation strategies, that is, the nicking by a replication initiator protein on one parental strand to generate the primer for leading-strand initiation and a single priming site for lagging-strand synthesis. All RCR plasmid genomes consist of a number of basic elements: leading strand initiation and control, lagging strand origin, phenotypic determinants, and mobilization, generally in that order of frequency. RCR has been mainly characterized in Gram-positive bacterial plasmids, although it has also been described in Gram-negative bacterial or archaeal plasmids. Here we aim to provide an overview of the RCR plasmids' lifestyle, with emphasis on their characteristic traits, promiscuity, stability, utility as vectors, etc. While RCR is one of the best-characterized plasmid replication mechanisms, there are still many questions left unanswered, which will be pointed out along the way in this review.

  18. Mechanisms of Theta Plasmid Replication.

    PubMed

    Lilly, Joshua; Camps, Manel

    2015-02-01

    Plasmids are autonomously replicating pieces of DNA. This article discusses theta plasmid replication, which is a class of circular plasmid replication that includes ColE1-like origins of replication popular with expression vectors. All modalities of theta plasmid replication initiate synthesis with the leading strand at a predetermined site and complete replication through recruitment of the host's replisome, which extends the leading strand continuously while synthesizing the lagging strand discontinuously. There are clear differences between different modalities of theta plasmid replication in mechanisms of DNA duplex melting and in priming of leading- and lagging-strand synthesis. In some replicons duplex melting depends on transcription, while other replicons rely on plasmid-encoded trans-acting proteins (Reps); primers for leading-strand synthesis can be generated through processing of a transcript or in other replicons by the action of host- or plasmid-encoded primases. None of these processes require DNA breaks. The frequency of replication initiation is tightly regulated to facilitate establishment in permissive hosts and to achieve a steady state. The last section of the article reviews how plasmid copy number is sensed and how this feedback modulates the frequency of replication.

  19. Design of vaccination and fumigation on Host-Vector Model by input-output linearization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugraha, Edwin Setiawan; Naiborhu, Janson; Nuraini, Nuning

    2017-03-01

    Here, we analyze the Host-Vector Model and proposed design of vaccination and fumigation to control infectious population by using feedback control especially input-output liniearization method. Host population is divided into three compartments: susceptible, infectious and recovery. Whereas the vector population is divided into two compartment such as susceptible and infectious. In this system, vaccination and fumigation treat as input factors and infectious population as output result. The objective of design is to stabilize of the output asymptotically tend to zero. We also present the examples to illustrate the design model.

  20. The Linear Plasmid Prophage Vp58.5 of Vibrio parahaemolyticus Is Closely Related to the Integrating Phage VHML and Constitutes a New Incompatibility Group of Telomere Phages▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Zabala, Beatriz; Hammerl, Jens A.; Espejo, Romilio T.; Hertwig, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus O3:K6 pandemic strains recovered in Chile frequently possess a 42-kb plasmid which is the prophage of a myovirus. We studied the prototype phage VP58.5 and show that it does not integrate into the host cell chromosome but replicates as a linear plasmid (Vp58.5) with covalently closed ends (telomeres). The Vp58.5 replicon coexists with other plasmid prophages (N15, PY54, and ΦKO2) in the same cell and thus belongs to a new incompatibility group of telomere phages. We determined the complete nucleotide sequence (42,612 nucleotides) of the VP58.5 phage DNA and compared it with that of the plasmid prophage. The two molecules share the same nucleotide sequence but are 35% circularly permuted to each other. In contrast to the hairpin ends of the plasmid, VP58.5 phage DNA contains 5′-protruding ends. The VP58.5 sequence is 92% identical to the sequence of phage VHML, which was reported to integrate into the host chromosome. However, the gene order and termini of the phage DNAs are different. The VHML genome exhibits the same gene order as does the Vp58.5 plasmid. VHML phage DNA has been reported to contain terminal inverted repeats. This repetitive sequence is similar to the telomere resolution site (telRL) of VP58.5 which, after processing by the phage protelomerase, forms the hairpin ends of the Vp58.5 prophage. It is discussed why these closely related phages may be so different in terms of their genome ends and their lifestyle. PMID:19587034

  1. Yeast telomere repeat sequence (TRS) improves circular plasmid segregation, and TRS plasmid segregation involves the RAP1 gene product.

    PubMed Central

    Longtine, M S; Enomoto, S; Finstad, S L; Berman, J

    1992-01-01

    Telomere repeat sequences (TRSs) can dramatically improve the segregation of unstable circular autonomously replicating sequence (ARS) plasmids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Deletion analysis demonstrated that yeast TRSs, which conform to the general sequence (C(1-3)A)n, are able to stabilize circular ARS plasmids. A number of TRS clones of different primary sequence and C(1-3)A tract length confer the plasmid stabilization phenotype. TRS sequences do not appear to improve plasmid replication efficiency, as determined by plasmid copy number analysis and functional assays for ARS activity. Pedigree analysis confirms that TRS-containing plasmids are missegregated at low frequency and that missegregated TRS-containing plasmids, like ARS plasmids, are preferentially retained by the mother cell. Plasmids stabilized by TRSs have properties that distinguish them from centromere-containing plasmids and 2 microns-based recombinant plasmids. Linear ARS plasmids, which include two TRS tracts at their termini, segregate inefficiently, while circular plasmids with one or two TRS tracts segregate efficiently, suggesting that plasmid topology or TRS accessibility interferes with TRS segregation function on linear plasmids. In strains carrying the temperature-sensitive mutant alleles rap1grc4 and rap1-5, TRS plasmids are not stable at the semipermissive temperature, suggesting that RAP1 protein is involved in TRS plasmid stability. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, an ARS plasmid was stabilized by the addition of S. pombe telomere sequence, suggesting that the ability to improve the segregation of ARS plasmids is a general property of telomere repeats. PMID:1569937

  2. Primer vector theory applied to the linear relative-motion equations. [for N-impulse space trajectory optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jezewski, D.

    1980-01-01

    Prime vector theory is used in analyzing a set of linear relative-motion equations - the Clohessy-Wiltshire (C/W) equations - to determine the criteria and necessary conditions for an optimal N-impulse trajectory. The analysis develops the analytical criteria for improving a solution by: (1) moving any dependent or independent variable in the initial and/or final orbit, and (2) adding intermediate impulses. If these criteria are violated, the theory establishes a sufficient number of analytical equations. The subsequent satisfaction of these equations will result in the optimal position vectors and times of an N-impulse trajectory. The solution is examined for the specific boundary conditions of: (1) fixed-end conditions, two impulse, and time-open transfer; (2) an orbit-to-orbit transfer; and (3) a generalized renezvous problem.

  3. Linear Look-Ahead in Conjunctive Cells: An Entorhinal Mechanism for Vector-Based Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Kubie, John L.; Fenton, André A.

    2012-01-01

    The crisp organization of the “firing bumps” of entorhinal grid cells and conjunctive cells leads to the notion that the entorhinal cortex may compute linear navigation routes. Specifically, we propose a process, termed “linear look-ahead,” by which a stationary animal could compute a series of locations in the direction it is facing. We speculate that this computation could be achieved through learned patterns of connection strengths among entorhinal neurons. This paper has three sections. First, we describe the minimal grid cell properties that will be built into our network. Specifically, the network relies on “rigid modules” of neurons, where all members have identical grid scale and orientation, but differ in spatial phase. Additionally, these neurons must be densely interconnected with synapses that are modifiable early in the animal’s life. Second, we investigate whether plasticity during short bouts of locomotion could induce patterns of connections amongst grid cells or conjunctive cells. Finally, we run a simulation to test whether the learned connection patterns can exhibit linear look-ahead. Our results are straightforward. A simulated 30-min walk produces weak strengthening of synapses between grid cells that do not support linear look-ahead. Similar training in a conjunctive cell module produces a small subset of very strong connections between cells. These strong pairs have three properties: the pre- and post-synaptic cells have similar heading direction. The cell pairs have neighboring grid bumps. Finally, the spatial offset of firing bumps of the cell pair is in the direction of the common heading preference. Such a module can produce strong and accurate linear look-ahead starting in any location and extending in any direction. We speculate that this process may: (1) compute linear paths to goals; (2) update grid cell firing during navigation; and (3) stabilize the rigid modules of grid cells and conjunctive cells. PMID:22557948

  4. Walking Drosophila align with the e-vector of linearly polarized light through directed modulation of angular acceleration

    PubMed Central

    Velez, Mariel M.; Wernet, Mathias F.; Clark, Damon A.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that link sensory stimuli to animal behavior is a central challenge in neuroscience. The quantitative description of behavioral responses to defined stimuli has led to a rich understanding of different behavioral strategies in many species. One important navigational cue perceived by many vertebrates and insects is the e-vector orientation of linearly polarized light. Drosophila manifests an innate orientation response to this cue (‘polarotaxis’), aligning its body axis with the e-vector field. We have established a population-based behavioral paradigm for the genetic dissection of neural circuits guiding polarotaxis to both celestial as well as reflected polarized stimuli. However, the behavioral mechanisms by which flies align with a linearly polarized stimulus remain unknown. Here, we present a detailed quantitative description of Drosophila polarotaxis, systematically measuring behavioral parameters that are modulated by the stimulus. We show that angular acceleration is modulated during alignment, and this single parameter may be sufficient for alignment. Furthermore, using monocular deprivation, we show that each eye is necessary for modulating turns in the ipsilateral direction. This analysis lays the foundation for understanding how neural circuits guide these important visual behaviors. PMID:24810784

  5. Walking Drosophila align with the e-vector of linearly polarized light through directed modulation of angular acceleration.

    PubMed

    Velez, Mariel M; Wernet, Mathias F; Clark, Damon A; Clandinin, Thomas R

    2014-06-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that link sensory stimuli to animal behavior is a central challenge in neuroscience. The quantitative description of behavioral responses to defined stimuli has led to a rich understanding of different behavioral strategies in many species. One important navigational cue perceived by many vertebrates and insects is the e-vector orientation of linearly polarized light. Drosophila manifests an innate orientation response to this cue ('polarotaxis'), aligning its body axis with the e-vector field. We have established a population-based behavioral paradigm for the genetic dissection of neural circuits guiding polarotaxis to both celestial as well as reflected polarized stimuli. However, the behavioral mechanisms by which flies align with a linearly polarized stimulus remain unknown. Here, we present a detailed quantitative description of Drosophila polarotaxis, systematically measuring behavioral parameters that are modulated by the stimulus. We show that angular acceleration is modulated during alignment, and this single parameter may be sufficient for alignment. Furthermore, using monocular deprivation, we show that each eye is necessary for modulating turns in the ipsilateral direction. This analysis lays the foundation for understanding how neural circuits guide these important visual behaviors.

  6. Historical Events That Spawned the Field of Plasmid Biology.

    PubMed

    Kado, Clarence I

    2014-10-01

    This chapter revisits the historical development and outcome of studies focused on the transmissible, extrachromosomal genetic elements called plasmids. Early work on plasmids involved structural and genetic mapping of these molecules, followed by the development of an understanding of how plasmids replicate and segregate during cell division. The intriguing property of plasmid transmission between bacteria and between bacteria and higher cells has received considerable attention. The utilitarian aspects of plasmids are described, including examples of various plasmid vector systems. This chapter also discusses the functional attributes of plasmids needed for their persistence and survival in nature and in man-made environments. The term plasmid biology was first conceived at the Fallen Leaf Lake Conference on Promiscuous Plasmids, 1990, Lake Tahoe, California. The International Society for Plasmid Biology was established in 2004 (www.ISPB.org).

  7. Reinterpreting the application of gabor filters as a manipulation of the margin in linear support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Ahmed Bilal; Lucey, Simon; Chen, Tsuhan

    2010-07-01

    Linear filters are ubiquitously used as a preprocessing step for many classification tasks in computer vision. In particular, applying Gabor filters followed by a classification stage, such as a support vector machine (SVM), is now common practice in computer vision applications like face identity and expression recognition. A fundamental problem occurs, however, with respect to the high dimensionality of the concatenated Gabor filter responses in terms of memory requirements and computational efficiency during training and testing. In this paper, we demonstrate how the preprocessing step of applying a bank of linear filters can be reinterpreted as manipulating the type of margin being maximized within the linear SVM. This new interpretation leads to sizable memory and computational advantages with respect to existing approaches. The reinterpreted formulation turns out to be independent of the number of filters, thereby allowing the examination of the feature spaces derived from arbitrarily large number of linear filters, a hitherto untestable prospect. Further, this new interpretation of filter banks gives new insights, other than the often cited biological motivations, into why the preprocessing of images with filter banks, like Gabor filters, improves classification performance.

  8. A Plasmodium vivax plasmid DNA- and adenovirus-vectored malaria vaccine encoding blood stage antigens AMA1 and MSP142 in a prime/boost heterologous immunization regimen partially protects Aotus monkeys against blood stage challenge.

    PubMed

    Obaldia, Nicanor; Stockelman, Michael G; Otero, William; Cockrill, Jennifer A; Ganeshan, Harini; Abot, Esteban N; Zhang, Jianfeng; Limbach, Keith; Charoenvit, Yupin; Doolan, Denise L; Tang, De-Chu C; Richie, Thomas L

    2017-02-08

    Malaria is caused by parasites of the genus Plasmodium that are transmitted to humans by the bites of Anopheles mosquitoes. After the elimination of P. falciparum it is predicted that Plasmodium vivax will remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality outside of Africa, stressing the importance of developing a vaccine against malaria. In this study we assess the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of two P. vivax antigens, AMA1 and MSP142 in a recombinant DNA plasmid prime/adenoviral vector (Ad) boost regimen in Aotus monkeys. Groups of 4 to 5 monkeys were immunized with DNA alone, Ad alone, prime/boost regimens of each antigen, prime/boost with both antigens, and empty vector controls, and then subjected to blood stage challenge. The heterologous immunization regimen with the antigen pair was more protective than either antigen alone or both antigens delivered with a single vaccine platform, based on their ability to induced the longest pre-patent period and time to peak parasitemia; the lowest peak and mean parasitemia; the smallest area under the parasitemia curve and the highest self-cured rate. Overall, pre-challenge MSP1 antibody titers strongly correlated with decreased parasite burden. Nevertheless, a significant proportion of immunized animals developed anemia. In conclusion, P. vivax plasmid DNA/Ad5 vaccine encoding blood stage parasite antigens AMA1 and MSP142 in a heterologous prime/boost immunization regimen, provided significant protection against blood-stage challenge in Aotus monkeys, indicating the suitability of these antigens and regimen for further development.

  9. Acoustic Biometric System Based on Preprocessing Techniques and Linear Support Vector Machines.

    PubMed

    del Val, Lara; Izquierdo-Fuente, Alberto; Villacorta, Juan J; Raboso, Mariano

    2015-06-17

    Drawing on the results of an acoustic biometric system based on a MSE classifier, a new biometric system has been implemented. This new system preprocesses acoustic images, extracts several parameters and finally classifies them, based on Support Vector Machine (SVM). The preprocessing techniques used are spatial filtering, segmentation-based on a Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) to separate the person from the background, masking-to reduce the dimensions of images-and binarization-to reduce the size of each image. An analysis of classification error and a study of the sensitivity of the error versus the computational burden of each implemented algorithm are presented. This allows the selection of the most relevant algorithms, according to the benefits required by the system. A significant improvement of the biometric system has been achieved by reducing the classification error, the computational burden and the storage requirements.

  10. Acoustic Biometric System Based on Preprocessing Techniques and Linear Support Vector Machines

    PubMed Central

    del Val, Lara; Izquierdo-Fuente, Alberto; Villacorta, Juan J.; Raboso, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on the results of an acoustic biometric system based on a MSE classifier, a new biometric system has been implemented. This new system preprocesses acoustic images, extracts several parameters and finally classifies them, based on Support Vector Machine (SVM). The preprocessing techniques used are spatial filtering, segmentation—based on a Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) to separate the person from the background, masking—to reduce the dimensions of images—and binarization—to reduce the size of each image. An analysis of classification error and a study of the sensitivity of the error versus the computational burden of each implemented algorithm are presented. This allows the selection of the most relevant algorithms, according to the benefits required by the system. A significant improvement of the biometric system has been achieved by reducing the classification error, the computational burden and the storage requirements. PMID:26091392

  11. Cercosporin-deficient mutants by plasmid tagging in the asexual fungus Cercospora nicotianae.

    PubMed

    Chung, K-R; Ehrenshaft, M; Wetzel, D K; Daub, M E

    2003-11-01

    We have successfully adapted plasmid insertion and restriction enzyme-mediated integration (REMI) to produce cercosporin toxin-deficient mutants in the asexual phytopathogenic fungus Cercospora nicotianae. The use of pre-linearized plasmid or restriction enzymes in the transformation procedure significantly decreased the transformation frequency, but promoted a complicated and undefined mode of plasmid integration that leads to mutations in the C. nicotianae genome. Vector DNA generally integrated in multiple copies, and no increase in single-copy insertion was observed when enzymes were added to the transformation mixture. Out of 1873 transformants tested, 39 putative cercosporin toxin biosynthesis ( ctb) mutants were recovered that showed altered levels of cercosporin production. Seven ctb mutants were recovered using pre-linearized plasmids without the addition of enzymes, and these were considered to be non-REMI mutants. The correlation between a specific insertion and a mutant phenotype was confirmed using rescued plasmids as gene disruption vectors in the wild-type strain. Six out of fifteen rescued plasmids tested yielded cercosporin-deficient transformants when re-introduced into the wild-type strain, suggesting a link between the insertion site and the cercosporin-deficient phenotype. Sequence analysis of a fragment flanking the insert site recovered from one insertion mutant showed it to be disrupted in sequences with high homology to the acyl transferase domain of polyketide synthases from other fungi. Disruption of this polyketide synthase gene ( CTB1) using a rescued plasmid resulted in mutants that were defective in cercosporin production. Thus, we provide the first molecular evidence that cercosporin is synthesized via a polyketide pathway as previously hypothesized.

  12. Mean Field Limit of Interacting Filaments and Vector Valued Non-linear PDEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessaih, Hakima; Coghi, Michele; Flandoli, Franco

    2017-01-01

    Families of N interacting curves are considered, with long range, mean field type, interaction. They generalize models based on classical interacting point particles to models based on curves. In this new set-up, a mean field result is proven, as N→ ∞. The limit PDE is vector valued and, in the limit, each curve interacts with a mean field solution of the PDE. This target is reached by a careful formulation of curves and weak solutions of the PDE which makes use of 1-currents and their topologies. The main results are based on the analysis of a nonlinear Lagrangian-type flow equation. Most of the results are deterministic; as a by-product, when the initial conditions are given by families of independent random curves, we prove a propagation of chaos result. The results are local in time for general interaction kernel, global in time under some additional restriction. Our main motivation is the approximation of 3D-inviscid flow dynamics by the interacting dynamics of a large number of vortex filaments, as observed in certain turbulent fluids; in this respect, the present paper is restricted to smoothed interaction kernels, instead of the true Biot-Savart kernel.

  13. Mean Field Limit of Interacting Filaments and Vector Valued Non-linear PDEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessaih, Hakima; Coghi, Michele; Flandoli, Franco

    2017-03-01

    Families of N interacting curves are considered, with long range, mean field type, interaction. They generalize models based on classical interacting point particles to models based on curves. In this new set-up, a mean field result is proven, as N→ ∞. The limit PDE is vector valued and, in the limit, each curve interacts with a mean field solution of the PDE. This target is reached by a careful formulation of curves and weak solutions of the PDE which makes use of 1-currents and their topologies. The main results are based on the analysis of a nonlinear Lagrangian-type flow equation. Most of the results are deterministic; as a by-product, when the initial conditions are given by families of independent random curves, we prove a propagation of chaos result. The results are local in time for general interaction kernel, global in time under some additional restriction. Our main motivation is the approximation of 3D-inviscid flow dynamics by the interacting dynamics of a large number of vortex filaments, as observed in certain turbulent fluids; in this respect, the present paper is restricted to smoothed interaction kernels, instead of the true Biot-Savart kernel.

  14. Moving Kriging shape function modeling of vector TARMA models for modal identification of linear time-varying structural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wu; Liu, Li; Zhou, Si-Da; Ma, Zhi-Sai

    2015-10-01

    This work proposes a Moving Kriging (MK) shape function modeling method for modal identification of linear time-varying (LTV) structural systems based on vector time-dependent autoregressive moving average (VTARMA) models. It aims to avoid the functional subspaces selection of the conventional functional series VTARMA (FS-VTARMA) models. Instead of the common basis functions, it constructs the time-varying coefficients on the time nodes with the MK shape functions in a compact support domain. The merit of the MK shape function is to determine its shape parameters upon vector random vibration signals adaptively. Model identification is effectively dealt with through an optimization scheme that decomposes the identification problem into two subproblems: estimating model parameters via two-stage least squares (2SLS) method and estimating shape function parameters via a discrete-continuous-variable hybrid optimization. In addition, the model order selection is achieved by the optimization scheme. This method has been validated by a Monte Carlo study of simulation case and further by an experimental test case, and the performance and potential advantages are illustrated.

  15. Targeted therapy via oral administration of attenuated Salmonella expression plasmid-vectored Stat3-shRNA cures orthotopically transplanted mouse HCC

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Y; Guo, B; Jia, H; Ji, K; Sun, Y; Li, Y; Zhao, T; Gao, L; Meng, Y; Kalvakolanu, DV; Kopecko, DJ; Zhao, X; Zhang, L; Xu, D

    2013-01-01

    The development of RNA interference-based cancer gene therapies has been delayed due to the lack of effective tumor-targeting delivery systems. Attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) has a natural tropism for solid tumors. We report here the use of attenuated S. Typhimurium as a vector to deliver shRNA directly into tumor cells. Constitutively activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) is a key transcription factor involved in both hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) growth and metastasis. In this study, attenuated S. Typhimurium was capable of delivering shRNA-expressing vectors to the targeted cancer cells and inducing RNA interference in vivo. More importantly, a single oral dose of attenuated S. Typhimurium carrying shRNA-expressing vectors targeting Stat3 induced remarkably delayed and reduced HCC (in 70% of mice). Cancer in these cured mice did not recur over 2 years following treatment. These data demonstrated that RNA interference combined with Salmonella as a delivery system may offer a novel clinical approach for cancer gene therapy. PMID:22555509

  16. Targeted therapy via oral administration of attenuated Salmonella expression plasmid-vectored Stat3-shRNA cures orthotopically transplanted mouse HCC.

    PubMed

    Tian, Y; Guo, B; Jia, H; Ji, K; Sun, Y; Li, Y; Zhao, T; Gao, L; Meng, Y; Kalvakolanu, D V; Kopecko, D J; Zhao, X; Zhang, L; Xu, D

    2012-06-01

    The development of RNA interference-based cancer gene therapies has been delayed due to the lack of effective tumor-targeting delivery systems. Attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) has a natural tropism for solid tumors. We report here the use of attenuated S. Typhimurium as a vector to deliver shRNA directly into tumor cells. Constitutively activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) is a key transcription factor involved in both hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) growth and metastasis. In this study, attenuated S. Typhimurium was capable of delivering shRNA-expressing vectors to the targeted cancer cells and inducing RNA interference in vivo. More importantly, a single oral dose of attenuated S. Typhimurium carrying shRNA-expressing vectors targeting Stat3 induced remarkably delayed and reduced HCC (in 70% of mice). Cancer in these cured mice did not recur over 2 years following treatment. These data demonstrated that RNA interference combined with Salmonella as a delivery system may offer a novel clinical approach for cancer gene therapy.

  17. Varying the chain length in N4,N9-diacyl spermines: non-viral lipopolyamine vectors for efficient plasmid DNA formulation.

    PubMed

    Ghonaim, Hassan M; Ahmed, Osama A A; Pourzand, Charareh; Blagbrough, Ian S

    2008-01-01

    The aims of this work are to study the effect of varying the chain length in synthesized N4,N9-diacyl spermines on DNA condensation and then to compare their transfection efficiencies in cell lines. The five novel N4,N9-diacyl lipopolyamines: N4,N9-[didecanoyl, dilauroyl, dimyristoyl, dimyristoleoyl, and dipalmitoyl]-1,12-diamino-4,9-diazadodecane were synthesized from the naturally occurring polyamine spermine. The abilities of these novel compounds to condense DNA and to form nanoparticles were studied using ethidium bromide fluorescence quenching and nanoparticle characterization techniques. Transfection efficiency was studied in FEK4 primary skin cells and in an immortalized cancer cell line (HtTA), and compared with a saturated (distearoyl) analogue and also with the non-liposomal transfection formulation Lipogen, N4,N9-dioleoyl-1,12-diamino-4,9-diazadodecane. By incorporating two aliphatic chains and changing their length in a stepwise manner, we show efficient circular plasmid DNA (pEGFP) formulation and transfection of primary skin and cancer cell lines. Two C14 chains (both saturated or both cis-monounsaturated) were efficient transfecting agents, even in the presence of serum, but they were too toxic. N4,N9-Dioleoyl spermine efficiently condenses pDNA and achieves the highest transfection levels with the highest cell viability among the studied lipopolyamines in cultured cells even in the presence of serum.

  18. Enhancing immune responses of EV71 VP1 DNA vaccine by co-inoculating plasmid IL-12 or GM-CSF expressing vector in mice.

    PubMed

    Peng, X; Fang, X; Li, J; Kong, L; Li, B; Ding, X

    2016-04-30

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a major causative viral agent for large outbreaks of hand, foot, and mouth disease in children and infants, yet there is no vaccine or effective antiviral treatment for severe EV71 infection. The immunogenicity of EV71 VP1 DNA vaccine and the immunoregulatory activity of interleukin-12 (IL-12) or granulocyte-monocyte colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) were investigated. DNA vaccine plasmids, pcDNA-VP1, pcDNA-IL-12 and pcDNA-GM-CSF were constructed and inoculated into BALB/c mice with or without pcDNA-IL-12 or pcDNA-GM-CSF by intramuscular injection. Cellular and humoral immune responses were assessed by indirect ELISA, lymphocyte proliferation assays, cytokine release assay and FACS. The VP1 DNA vaccine had good immunogenicity and can induce specific humoral and cellular immunity in BALB/c mice, while IL-2 or GM-CSF plays an immunoadjuvant role and enhances specific immune responses. This study provides a frame of reference for the design of DNA vaccines against EV71.

  19. Segregated and synchronized vector solutions to linearly coupled systems of Schrödinger equations

    PubMed Central

    Long, Wei; Wang, Qingfang

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we study the following linearly coupled system −ε2Δui+Pi(x)ui=ui3+∑j≠iNλijuj,ui∈H1(R3),i=1,…,N, where ε > 0 is a small parameter, Pi(x) are positive potentials, and λij = λji > 0 (i ≠ j) are coupling constants for i, j = 1, …, N. We investigate the effect of potentials to the structure of the solutions. More precisely, we construct multi-spikes solutions concentrating near the local maximum point x0i of Pi(x). When x0i=x0j, Pi(x0i)=Pj(x0j)=a,i≠j, i,j=1,…,N, the components have spikes clustering at the same point as ε → 0+. When x0i≠x0j, i≠j, the components have spikes clustering at the different points as ε → 0+. PMID:26396438

  20. Particle velocity gradient based acoustic mode beamforming for short linear vector sensor arrays.

    PubMed

    Gur, Berke

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, a subtractive beamforming algorithm for short linear arrays of two-dimensional particle velocity sensors is described. The proposed method extracts the highly directional acoustic modes from the spatial gradients of the particle velocity field measured at closely spaced sensors along the array. The number of sensors in the array limits the highest order of modes that can be extracted. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations indicate that the acoustic mode beamformer achieves directivity comparable to the maximum directivity that can be obtained with differential microphone arrays of equivalent aperture. When compared to conventional delay-and-sum beamformers for pressure sensor arrays, the proposed method achieves comparable directivity with 70%-85% shorter apertures. Moreover, the proposed method has additional capabilities such as high front-back (port-starboard) discrimination, frequency and steer direction independent response, and robustness to correlated ambient noise. Small inter-sensor spacing that results in very compact apertures makes the proposed beamformer suitable for space constrained applications such as hearing aids and short towed arrays for autonomous underwater platforms.

  1. Plasmids in diatom species.

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrand, M; Corey, D K; Ludwig, J R; Kukel, A; Feng, T Y; Volcani, B E

    1991-01-01

    We have discovered plasmids in 5 of 18 diatom species surveyed. In several species, more than one type of plasmid is present. Several of the plasmids show similarity by hybridization previously characterized plasmids in Cylindrotheca fusiformis (J. D. Jacobs et al., unpublished data). Additionally, there is similarity between the plasmids found in C. fusiformis and chloroplast DNA in three diatom species. These results add to the evidence that the plasmids have features of mobile genetic elements. Images PMID:1885558

  2. Complete nucleotide sequence of plasmid pNA6 reveals the high plasticity of IncU family plasmids.

    PubMed

    Dang, Bingjun; Xu, Yan; Mao, Daqing; Luo, Yi

    2016-10-10

    Antibiotic resistance is a serious problem in health care and is of widespread public concern. Conjugative plasmids are the most important vectors in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes. In this study, we determined the complete sequence of plasmid pNA6, a plasmid which was isolated from the sediments of Haihe River. This plasmid confers reduced susceptibility to ampicillin, erythromycin and sulfamethoxazole. The complete sequence of plasmid pNA6 was 52,210bp in length with an average G+C content of 52.70%. Plasmid pNA6 belongs to the IncU group by sequence queries against the GenBank database. This plasmid has a typical IncU backbone and shows the highest similarities with plasmid RA3 and plasmid pFBAOT6. Plasmid pNA6 carries a class 1 integron consisting of aacA4, ereA and dfrA1 genes. Moreover, plasmid pNA6 also harbors a blaTEM-1-containing complex structure which inserted into the replication region and maintenance region. This insertion site has never been found on other IncU plasmids. The sequencing of plasmid pNA6 will add new sequence information to IncU family plasmids and enhance our understanding of the plasticity of IncU family plasmids.

  3. The mechanism of plasmid curing in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Spengler, Gabriella; Molnár, Annamária; Schelz, Zsuzsanna; Amaral, Leonard; Sharples, Derek; Molnár, Joseph

    2006-07-01

    Bacterial plasmids have a major impact on metabolic function. Lactose fermentation of E. coli or hemolysin B transporter expressed by the plasmids that carry these respective genes could be readily obviated by heterocyclic compounds that readily bind to plasmid DNA. These compounds could also reverse the resistance to antibiotics of E. coli, Enterobacter, Proteus, Staphylococcus and Yersinia strains by eliminating plasmids. However, the frequency and extent of this effect was significantly less than might have been expected based on a complex interaction with plasmid DNA. The effects of heterocyclic compounds on the plasmids responsible for the virulence of Yersinia and A. tumefaciens, or on nodulation, nitrogen fixation of Rhizobia accounted for the elimination of 0.1 to 1.0 % of plasmids present in the populations studied. Bacterial plasmids can be eliminated from bacterial species grown as pure or mixed bacterial cultures in the presence of sub-inhibitory concentrations of non-mutagenic heterocyclic compounds. The antiplasmid action of the compounds depends on the chemical structure of amphiphillic compounds having a planar ring system with substitution in the L-molecular region. A symmetrical pi-electron conjugation at the highest occupied molecular orbitals favours the antiplasmid effect. The antiplasmid effect of heterocyclic compounds is expressed differentially in accordance with the structural form of the DNA to which they bind. In this manner "extrachromosomal" plasmid DNA that exists in a superhelical state binds more compound than its linear or open-circular form; and least to the chromosomal DNA of the bacterium, that carries the plasmid. It can also be noted that these compounds are not mutagenic and their antiplasmid effects correlate with the energy of HOMO-orbitals. Plasmid elimination is considered also to take place in ecosystems containing numerous bacterial species. This opens up a new perspective in rational drug design against bacterial

  4. Plasmid-encoded trimethoprim resistance in staphylococci.

    PubMed Central

    Archer, G L; Coughter, J P; Johnston, J L

    1986-01-01

    High-level (greater than 1,000 micrograms/ml) resistance to the antimicrobial agent trimethoprim was found in 17 of 101 (17%) coagulase-negative staphylococci and 5 of 51 (10%) Staphylococcus aureus from a number of different hospitals in the United States. Resistance was plasmid encoded and could be transferred by conjugation in 4 of the 17 (24%) Tpr coagulase-negative staphylococci and 3 of the 5 (60%) Tpr S. aureus. A 1.2-kilobase segment of plasmid DNA from one of the plasmids (pG01) was cloned on a high-copy-number vector in Escherichia coli and expressed high-level Tpr (MIC, 1,025 micrograms/ml) in the gram-negative host. In situ filter hybridization demonstrated homology between the cloned Tpr gene probe and plasmid DNA from each conjugative Tpr plasmid, a single nonconjugative plasmid from a United States Staphylococcus epidermidis isolate, a nonconjugative plasmid from an Australian methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolate, and chromosomal DNA from three Tpr S. epidermidis isolates that did not contain any plasmid DNA that was homologous with the probe. No homology was seen between the probe and staphylococcal plasmids not mediating Tpr, plasmid DNA from 12 Tpr S. epidermidis isolates not transferring Tpr by conjugation, or plasmid-encoded Tpr genes derived from gram-negative bacteria. Plasmid-encoded Tpr appears to be a relatively new gene in staphylococci and, because it can be transferred by conjugation, could become more prevalent in nonsocomial isolates. Images PMID:3729338

  5. In vivo cloning strategy for Rhizobium plasmids.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Lucas, I; Mavingui, P; Finan, T; Chain, P; Martínez-Romero, E

    2002-10-01

    We have developed a simple system to clone indigenous Rhizobium plasmids into E. coli. The strategy consists of three matings: the first is to insert Tn5 in the plasmid to be cloned, the second incorporates the integrative vector into the inserted Tn5 in the native Rhizobium plasmid, and the last mating transfers the target plasmid directly into E. coli. This mating-based system was successfully used to clone plasmids of Rhizobium species with sizes ranging from 150 to 270 kb. In addition, a 500-kb fragment of a 600-kb megaplasmid was also cloned. This strategy could be used for cloning indigenous replicons of other gram-negative bacteria into a different host.

  6. Plasmid DNA manufacturing technology.

    PubMed

    Carnes, Aaron E; Williams, James A

    2007-01-01

    Today, plasmid DNA is becoming increasingly important as the next generation of biotechnology products (gene medicines and DNA vaccines) make their way into clinical trials, and eventually into the pharmaceutical marketplace. This review summarizes recent patents and patent applications relating to plasmid manufacturing, in the context of a comprehensive description of the plasmid manufacturing intellectual property landscape. Strategies for plasmid manufacturers to develop or in-license key plasmid manufacturing technologies are described with the endpoint of efficiently producing kg quantities of plasmid DNA of a quality that meets anticipated European and FDA quality specifications for commercial plasmid products.

  7. Methylglyoxal induces G:C to C:G and G:C to T:A transversions in the supF gene on a shuttle vector plasmid replicated in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Murata-Kamiya, N; Kamiya, H; Kaji, H; Kasai, H

    2000-07-10

    We previously reported that the majority of base-pair substitutions induced by an endogenous mutagen, methylglyoxal, were G:C-->T:A transversions and G:C-->A:T transitions in wild-type and nucleotide excision repair (NER)-deficient (uvrA or uvrC) Escherichia coli strains. To investigate the mutation spectrum of methylglyoxal in mammalian cells and to compare the spectrum with those detected in other experimental systems, we analyzed mutations in a bacterial suppressor tRNA (supF) gene in the shuttle vector plasmid pMY189. We treated pMY189 with methylglyoxal and immediately transfected it into simian COS-7 cells. The cytotoxicity and the mutation frequency (MF) increased according to the dose of methylglyoxal. In the mutants induced by methylglyoxal, multi-base deletions were predominant (50%), followed by base-pair substitutions (35%), in which 89% of the substitutions occurred at G:C sites. Among them, G:C-->C:G and G:C-->T:A transversions were predominant. The overall distribution of methylglyoxal-induced mutations detected in the supF gene was different from that for the spontaneous mutations. These results suggest that methylglyoxal may take part in causing G:C-->C:G and G:C-->T:A transversions in vivo.

  8. PEG-b-PPS-b-PEI micelles and PEG-b-PPS/PEG-b-PPS-b-PEI mixed micelles as non-viral vectors for plasmid DNA: tumor immunotoxicity in B16F10 melanoma.

    PubMed

    Velluto, Diana; Thomas, Susan N; Simeoni, Eleonora; Swartz, Melody A; Hubbell, Jeffrey A

    2011-12-01

    Cationic micelles formed from poly(ethylene glycol)-bl-poly(propylene sulfide)-bl-poly(ethylene imine) (PEG-b-PPS-b-PEI) and from mixtures of poly(ethylene glycol)-bl-poly(propylene sulfide) (PEG-b-PPS) with PEG-b-PPS-b-PEI were explored as non-viral vectors for plasmid DNA (pDNA) transfection in a tumor immunotoxicity model. Complexes with pDNA were found to be templated exclusively by the size of the pDNA-free micelles and ranged from 240 nm (for PEG-b-PPS-b-PEI) to 30 nm (for mixed micelles of PEG-b-PPS/PEG-b-PPS-b-PEI). Both formulations transfected melanoma cells well in vitro. As a model with a functional read-out of tumor cell death, one with likely only small bystander effects, tumors were transfected with an antigen transgene, using an antigen to which the recipient animals had been previously vaccinated with a Th1-biasing adjuvant. Reduction in tumor growth, increase in intratumoral infiltration of cytotoxic T lymphocytes and accumulation of Th1-biasing cytokines indicated that both micelle formulations transfected efficiently compared with naked pDNA and with low cytotoxicity.

  9. Determination of Cefoperazone Sodium in Presence of Related Impurities by Linear Support Vector Regression and Partial Least Squares Chemometric Models

    PubMed Central

    Naguib, Ibrahim A.; Abdelaleem, Eglal A.; Zaazaa, Hala E.; Hussein, Essraa A.

    2015-01-01

    A comparison between partial least squares regression and support vector regression chemometric models is introduced in this study. The two models are implemented to analyze cefoperazone sodium in presence of its reported impurities, 7-aminocephalosporanic acid and 5-mercapto-1-methyl-tetrazole, in pure powders and in pharmaceutical formulations through processing UV spectroscopic data. For best results, a 3-factor 4-level experimental design was used, resulting in a training set of 16 mixtures containing different ratios of interfering moieties. For method validation, an independent test set consisting of 9 mixtures was used to test predictive ability of established models. The introduced results show the capability of the two proposed models to analyze cefoperazone in presence of its impurities 7-aminocephalosporanic acid and 5-mercapto-1-methyl-tetrazole with high trueness and selectivity (101.87 ± 0.708 and 101.43 ± 0.536 for PLSR and linear SVR, resp.). Analysis results of drug products were statistically compared to a reported HPLC method showing no significant difference in trueness and precision, indicating the capability of the suggested multivariate calibration models to be reliable and adequate for routine quality control analysis of drug product. SVR offers more accurate results with lower prediction error compared to PLSR model; however, PLSR is easy to handle and fast to optimize. PMID:26664764

  10. Simulation of groundwater level variations using wavelet combined with neural network, linear regression and support vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Hadi; Rajaee, Taher

    2017-01-01

    Simulation of groundwater level (GWL) fluctuations is an important task in management of groundwater resources. In this study, the effect of wavelet analysis on the training of the artificial neural network (ANN), multi linear regression (MLR) and support vector regression (SVR) approaches was investigated, and the ANN, MLR and SVR along with the wavelet-ANN (WNN), wavelet-MLR (WLR) and wavelet-SVR (WSVR) models were compared in simulating one-month-ahead of GWL. The only variable used to develop the models was the monthly GWL data recorded over a period of 11 years from two wells in the Qom plain, Iran. The results showed that decomposing GWL time series into several sub-time series, extremely improved the training of the models. For both wells 1 and 2, the Meyer and Db5 wavelets produced better results compared to the other wavelets; which indicated wavelet types had similar behavior in similar case studies. The optimal number of delays was 6 months, which seems to be due to natural phenomena. The best WNN model, using Meyer mother wavelet with two decomposition levels, simulated one-month-ahead with RMSE values being equal to 0.069 m and 0.154 m for wells 1 and 2, respectively. The RMSE values for the WLR model were 0.058 m and 0.111 m, and for WSVR model were 0.136 m and 0.060 m for wells 1 and 2, respectively.

  11. The effect of spatial smoothing on fMRI decoding of columnar-level organization with linear support vector machine

    PubMed Central

    Misaki, Masaya; Luh, Wen-Ming; Bandettini, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    We examined how spatial smoothing affects the result of multivariate classification analysis using the linear support vector machine (SVM) for decoding columnar-level organization. It has been suggested that the effect of spatial smoothing on decoding performance is minor because smoothing operation is an invertible data transformation and such invertible transformation does not remove information in multivariate pattern. Our theoretical consideration, however, revealed that generalization score (performance for test samples unused during classifier training) was susceptible to non-uniform scaling of input data; SVM classifier became less sensitive to variability in shrunk dimension. This result indicates that spatial smoothing reduces sensitivity of SVM classifier to high spatial frequency pattern so that the effect of smoothing implies the amount of information distributed in spatial frequencies. We also examined the effect of smoothing in an fMRI experiment of decoding ocular dominance responses. The results of group statistic showed that large smoothing reduced decoding accuracies while the smoothing effect at individual subject were not the same for all subjects. These results suggest that spatial smoothing can have major effect on decoding performance and the informative pattern for columnar level decoding resides in higher frequencies on average across subjects while it may distribute multiple frequencies at individual subject level. PMID:23174092

  12. Plasmids of Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed Central

    Maia, M; Sanchez, J M; Vela, G R

    1988-01-01

    Four laboratory strains and two isolates of Azotobacter vinelandii were found to contain plasmids. Twenty-five laboratory strains which could fix nitrogen did not have free, covalently closed circular plasmid DNA. The plasmids varied in size from 9 to 52 megadaltons, and each strain yielded only one plasmid. No discernible differences in ability to fix nitrogen were found between plasmid-bearing and cured cultures. PMID:3350795

  13. Plasmids from Euryarchaeota.

    PubMed

    Forterre, Patrick; Krupovic, Mart; Raymann, Kasie; Soler, Nicolas

    2014-12-01

    Many plasmids have been described in Euryarchaeota, one of the three major archaeal phyla, most of them in salt-loving haloarchaea and hyperthermophilic Thermococcales. These plasmids resemble bacterial plasmids in terms of size (from small plasmids encoding only one gene up to large megaplasmids) and replication mechanisms (rolling circle or theta). Some of them are related to viral genomes and form a more or less continuous sequence space including many integrated elements. Plasmids from Euryarchaeota have been useful for designing efficient genetic tools for these microorganisms. In addition, they have also been used to probe the topological state of plasmids in species with or without DNA gyrase and/or reverse gyrase. Plasmids from Euryarchaeota encode both DNA replication proteins recruited from their hosts and novel families of DNA replication proteins. Euryarchaeota form an interesting playground to test evolutionary hypotheses on the origin and evolution of viruses and plasmids, since a robust phylogeny is available for this phylum. Preliminary studies have shown that for different plasmid families, plasmids share a common gene pool and coevolve with their hosts. They are involved in gene transfer, mostly between plasmids and viruses present in closely related species, but rarely between cells from distantly related archaeal lineages. With few exceptions (e.g., plasmids carrying gas vesicle genes), most archaeal plasmids seem to be cryptic. Interestingly, plasmids and viral genomes have been detected in extracellular membrane vesicles produced by Thermococcales, suggesting that these vesicles could be involved in the transfer of viruses and plasmids between cells.

  14. Self-entanglement of long linear DNA vectors using transient non-B-DNA attachment points: a new concept for improvement of non-viral therapeutic gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Tolmachov, Oleg E

    2012-05-01

    The cell-specific and long-term expression of therapeutic transgenes often requires a full array of native gene control elements including distal enhancers, regulatory introns and chromatin organisation sequences. The delivery of such extended gene expression modules to human cells can be accomplished with non-viral high-molecular-weight DNA vectors, in particular with several classes of linear DNA vectors. All high-molecular-weight DNA vectors are susceptible to damage by shear stress, and while for some of the vectors the harmful impact of shear stress can be minimised through the transformation of the vectors to compact topological configurations by supercoiling and/or knotting, linear DNA vectors with terminal loops or covalently attached terminal proteins cannot be self-compacted in this way. In this case, the only available self-compacting option is self-entangling, which can be defined as the folding of single DNA molecules into a configuration with mutual restriction of molecular motion by the individual segments of bent DNA. A negatively charged phosphate backbone makes DNA self-repulsive, so it is reasonable to assume that a certain number of 'sticky points' dispersed within DNA could facilitate the entangling by bringing DNA segments into proximity and by interfering with the DNA slipping away from the entanglement. I propose that the spontaneous entanglement of vector DNA can be enhanced by the interlacing of the DNA with sites capable of mutual transient attachment through the formation of non-B-DNA forms, such as interacting cruciform structures, inter-segment triplexes, slipped-strand DNA, left-handed duplexes (Z-forms) or G-quadruplexes. It is expected that the non-B-DNA based entanglement of the linear DNA vectors would consist of the initial transient and co-operative non-B-DNA mediated binding events followed by tight self-ensnarement of the vector DNA. Once in the nucleoplasm of the target human cells, the DNA can be disentangled by type II

  15. Sample displacement chromatography of plasmid DNA isoforms.

    PubMed

    Černigoj, Urh; Martinuč, Urška; Cardoso, Sara; Sekirnik, Rok; Krajnc, Nika Lendero; Štrancar, Aleš

    2015-10-02

    Sample displacement chromatography (SDC) is a chromatographic technique that utilises different relative binding affinities of components in a sample mixture and has been widely studied in the context of peptide and protein purification. Here, we report a use of SDC to separate plasmid DNA (pDNA) isoforms under overloading conditions, where supercoiled (sc) isoform acts as a displacer of open circular (oc) or linear isoform. Since displacement is more efficient when mass transfer between stationary and mobile chromatographic phases is not limited by diffusion, we investigated convective interaction media (CIM) monoliths as stationary phases for pDNA isoform separation. CIM monoliths with different hydrophobicities and thus different binding affinities for pDNA (CIM C4 HLD, CIM-histamine and CIM-pyridine) were tested under hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) conditions. SD efficiency for pDNA isoform separation was shown to be dependent on column selectivity for individual isoform, column efficiency and on ammonium sulfate (AS) concentration in loading buffer (binding strength). SD and negative mode elution often operate in parallel, therefore negative mode elution additionally influences the efficiency of the overall purification process. Optimisation of chromatographic conditions achieved 98% sc pDNA homogeneity and a dynamic binding capacity of over 1mg/mL at a relatively low concentration of AS. SDC was successfully implemented for the enrichment of sc pDNA for plasmid vectors of different sizes, and for separation of linear and and sc isoforms, independently of oc:sc isoform ratio, and flow-rate used. This study therefore identifies SDC as a promising new approach to large-scale pDNA purification, which is compatible with continuous, multicolumn chromatography systems, and could therefore be used to increase productivity of pDNA production in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluating metabolic stress and plasmid stability in plasmid DNA production by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Silva, Filomena; Queiroz, João A; Domingues, Fernanda C

    2012-01-01

    In the context of recombinant DNA technology, the development of feasible and high-yielding plasmid DNA production processes has regained attention as more evidence for its efficacy as vectors for gene therapy and DNA vaccination arise. When producing plasmid DNA in Escherichia coli, a number of biological restraints, triggered by plasmid maintenance and replication as well as culture conditions are responsible for limiting final biomass and product yields. This termed "metabolic burden" can also cause detrimental effects on plasmid stability and quality, since the cell machinery is no longer capable of maintaining an active metabolism towards plasmid synthesis and the stress responses elicited by plasmid maintenance can also cause increased plasmid instability. The optimization of plasmid DNA production bioprocesses is still hindered by the lack of information on the host metabolic responses as well as information on plasmid instability. Therefore, systematic and on-line approaches are required not only to characterise this "metabolic burden" and plasmid stability but also for the design of appropriate metabolic engineering and culture strategies. The monitoring tools described to date rapidly evolve from laborious, off-line and at-line monitoring to online monitoring, at a time-scale that enables researchers to solve these bioprocessing problems as they occur. This review highlights major E. coli biological alterations caused by plasmid maintenance and replication, possible causes for plasmid instability and discusses the ability of currently employed bioprocess monitoring techniques to provide information in order to circumvent metabolic burden and plasmid instability, pointing out the possible evolution of these methods towards online bioprocess monitoring.

  17. Validation of non-REM sleep stage decoding from resting state fMRI using linear support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Altmann, A; Schröter, M S; Spoormaker, V I; Kiem, S A; Jordan, D; Ilg, R; Bullmore, E T; Greicius, M D; Czisch, M; Sämann, P G

    2016-01-15

    A growing body of literature suggests that changes in consciousness are reflected in specific connectivity patterns of the brain as obtained from resting state fMRI (rs-fMRI). As simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG) is often unavailable, decoding of potentially confounding sleep patterns from rs-fMRI itself might be useful and improve data interpretation. Linear support vector machine classifiers were trained on combined rs-fMRI/EEG recordings from 25 subjects to separate wakefulness (S0) from non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep stages 1 (S1), 2 (S2), slow wave sleep (SW) and all three sleep stages combined (SX). Classifier performance was quantified by a leave-one-subject-out cross-validation (LOSO-CV) and on an independent validation dataset comprising 19 subjects. Results demonstrated excellent performance with areas under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUCs) close to 1.0 for the discrimination of sleep from wakefulness (S0|SX), S0|S1, S0|S2 and S0|SW, and good to excellent performance for the classification between sleep stages (S1|S2:~0.9; S1|SW:~1.0; S2|SW:~0.8). Application windows of fMRI data from about 70 s were found as minimum to provide reliable classifications. Discrimination patterns pointed to subcortical-cortical connectivity and within-occipital lobe reorganization of connectivity as strongest carriers of discriminative information. In conclusion, we report that functional connectivity analysis allows valid classification of NREM sleep stages.

  18. COMSAT: Residue contact prediction of transmembrane proteins based on support vector machines and mixed integer linear programming.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huiling; Huang, Qingsheng; Bei, Zhendong; Wei, Yanjie; Floudas, Christodoulos A

    2016-03-01

    In this article, we present COMSAT, a hybrid framework for residue contact prediction of transmembrane (TM) proteins, integrating a support vector machine (SVM) method and a mixed integer linear programming (MILP) method. COMSAT consists of two modules: COMSAT_SVM which is trained mainly on position-specific scoring matrix features, and COMSAT_MILP which is an ab initio method based on optimization models. Contacts predicted by the SVM model are ranked by SVM confidence scores, and a threshold is trained to improve the reliability of the predicted contacts. For TM proteins with no contacts above the threshold, COMSAT_MILP is used. The proposed hybrid contact prediction scheme was tested on two independent TM protein sets based on the contact definition of 14 Å between Cα-Cα atoms. First, using a rigorous leave-one-protein-out cross validation on the training set of 90 TM proteins, an accuracy of 66.8%, a coverage of 12.3%, a specificity of 99.3% and a Matthews' correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.184 were obtained for residue pairs that are at least six amino acids apart. Second, when tested on a test set of 87 TM proteins, the proposed method showed a prediction accuracy of 64.5%, a coverage of 5.3%, a specificity of 99.4% and a MCC of 0.106. COMSAT shows satisfactory results when compared with 12 other state-of-the-art predictors, and is more robust in terms of prediction accuracy as the length and complexity of TM protein increase. COMSAT is freely accessible at http://hpcc.siat.ac.cn/COMSAT/.

  19. Use of multivariate linear regression and support vector regression to predict functional outcome after surgery for cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Haydn; Lee, Sunghoon Ivan; Garst, Jordan H.; Lu, Derek S.; Li, Charles H.; Nagasawa, Daniel T.; Ghalehsari, Nima; Jahanforouz, Nima; Razaghy, Mehrdad; Espinal, Marie; Ghavamrezaii, Amir; Paak, Brian H.; Wu, Irene; Sarrafzadeh, Majid; Lu, Daniel C.

    2016-01-01

    This study introduces the use of multivariate linear regression (MLR) and support vector regression (SVR) models to predict postoperative outcomes in a cohort of patients who underwent surgery for cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Currently, predicting outcomes after surgery for CSM remains a challenge. We recruited patients who had a diagnosis of CSM and required decompressive surgery with or without fusion. Fine motor function was tested preoperatively and postoperatively with a handgrip-based tracking device that has been previously validated, yielding mean absolute accuracy (MAA) results for two tracking tasks (sinusoidal and step). All patients completed Oswestry disability index (ODI) and modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association questionnaires preoperatively and postoperatively. Preoperative data was utilized in MLR and SVR models to predict postoperative ODI. Predictions were compared to the actual ODI scores with the coefficient of determination (R2) and mean absolute difference (MAD). From this, 20 patients met the inclusion criteria and completed follow-up at least 3 months after surgery. With the MLR model, a combination of the preoperative ODI score, preoperative MAA (step function), and symptom duration yielded the best prediction of postoperative ODI (R2 = 0.452; MAD = 0.0887; p = 1.17 × 10−3). With the SVR model, a combination of preoperative ODI score, preoperative MAA (sinusoidal function), and symptom duration yielded the best prediction of postoperative ODI (R2 = 0.932; MAD = 0.0283; p = 5.73 × 10−12). The SVR model was more accurate than the MLR model. The SVR can be used preoperatively in risk/benefit analysis and the decision to operate. PMID:26115898

  20. Use of multivariate linear regression and support vector regression to predict functional outcome after surgery for cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Haydn; Lee, Sunghoon I; Garst, Jordan H; Lu, Derek S; Li, Charles H; Nagasawa, Daniel T; Ghalehsari, Nima; Jahanforouz, Nima; Razaghy, Mehrdad; Espinal, Marie; Ghavamrezaii, Amir; Paak, Brian H; Wu, Irene; Sarrafzadeh, Majid; Lu, Daniel C

    2015-09-01

    This study introduces the use of multivariate linear regression (MLR) and support vector regression (SVR) models to predict postoperative outcomes in a cohort of patients who underwent surgery for cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Currently, predicting outcomes after surgery for CSM remains a challenge. We recruited patients who had a diagnosis of CSM and required decompressive surgery with or without fusion. Fine motor function was tested preoperatively and postoperatively with a handgrip-based tracking device that has been previously validated, yielding mean absolute accuracy (MAA) results for two tracking tasks (sinusoidal and step). All patients completed Oswestry disability index (ODI) and modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association questionnaires preoperatively and postoperatively. Preoperative data was utilized in MLR and SVR models to predict postoperative ODI. Predictions were compared to the actual ODI scores with the coefficient of determination (R(2)) and mean absolute difference (MAD). From this, 20 patients met the inclusion criteria and completed follow-up at least 3 months after surgery. With the MLR model, a combination of the preoperative ODI score, preoperative MAA (step function), and symptom duration yielded the best prediction of postoperative ODI (R(2)=0.452; MAD=0.0887; p=1.17 × 10(-3)). With the SVR model, a combination of preoperative ODI score, preoperative MAA (sinusoidal function), and symptom duration yielded the best prediction of postoperative ODI (R(2)=0.932; MAD=0.0283; p=5.73 × 10(-12)). The SVR model was more accurate than the MLR model. The SVR can be used preoperatively in risk/benefit analysis and the decision to operate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Plasmid diversity in neisseriae.

    PubMed

    van Passel, Mark W J; van der Ende, Arie; Bart, Aldert

    2006-08-01

    Horizontal gene transfer constitutes an important force in prokaryotic genome evolution, and it is well-known that plasmids are vehicles for DNA transfer. Chromosomal DNA is frequently exchanged between pathogenic and commensal neisseriae, but relatively little is known about plasmid diversity and prevalence among these nasopharyngeal inhabitants. We investigated the plasmid contents of 18 Neisseria lactamica isolates and 20 nasopharyngeal Neisseria meningitidis isolates. Of 18 N. lactamica strains, 9 harbored one or more plasmids, whereas only one N. meningitidis isolate contained a plasmid. Twelve plasmids were completely sequenced, while five plasmid sequences from the public databases were also included in the analyses. On the basis of nucleic acid sequences, mobilization, and replicase protein alignments, we distinguish six different plasmid groups (I to VI). Three plasmids from N. lactamica appeared to be highly similar on the nucleotide level to the meningococcal plasmids pJS-A (>99%) and pJS-B (>75%). The genetic organizations of two plasmids show a striking resemblance with that of the recently identified meningococcal disease-associated (MDA) phage, while four putative proteins encoded by these plasmids show 25% to 39% protein identity to those encoded by the MDA phage. The putative promoter of the gene encoding the replicase on these plasmids contains a polycytidine tract, suggesting that replication is subjected to phase variation. In conclusion, extensive plasmid diversity is encountered among commensal neisseriae. Members of three plasmid groups are found in both pathogenic and commensal neisseriae, indicating plasmid exchange between these species. Resemblance between plasmids and MDA phage may be indicative of dissemination of phage-related sequences among pathogenic and commensal neisseriae.

  2. Characterization of lesions induced in linear-formed plasmid DNA by valence ionization and Auger decay at carbon, nitrogen and oxygen.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Ken; Fujii, Kentaro; Yokoya, Akinari

    2008-12-01

    To study the DNA lesions induced by the Auger decay of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen using ultrasoft X-rays (USX) that are expected to be important with the DNA repair system of living cells. pUC19 plasmid DNA dry samples were irradiated with USX photons at 270 and 560 eV and (60)Co gamma-rays in vacuum at room temperature. The amounts of unaltered base release by the direct radiation effects were quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography. To quantify and characterize the strand break termini the rate at which snake venom phosphodiesterase (SVPD) digested irradiated DNA pretreated with and without calf intestine alkaline phosphatase was measured. Moreover, the piperidine-labile base lesions and abasic sites of the irradiated DNA were estimated using the SVPD method. The yields of unaltered base release for 270, 560 eV photons and (60)Co gamma-rays were 0.016, 0.014, and 0.018 micromol/J, respectively. The total 3' termini for the three kinds of photons were around 0.1 micromol/J. The production of 3' termini with phosphate was found to be predominant with respect to that of 3'OH termini for the three kinds of radiation. The yield of piperidine-labile sites for 270 eV ( approximately 0.1 micromol/J) was slightly larger than that for 560 eV ( approximately 0.07 micromol/J) and also for gamma-rays ( approximately 0.082 micromol/J). Although the Auger process in DNA-constituent atoms was expected to induce Auger-specific lesions in the molecule the chemical endpoints would have been covered with a large number of lesions produced from secondary electrons in the surrounding bulk DNA molecules. The present results, however, suggest that a low-energy electron field produced by the USX photons in the bulk DNA is basically not at all specific to DNA damage being produced when compared with the high-energy electron field produced by (60)Co gamma-rays.

  3. The design and implementation of cost-effective algorithms for direct solution of banded linear systems on the vector processor system 32 supercomputer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samba, A. S.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of solving banded linear systems by direct (non-iterative) techniques on the Vector Processor System (VPS) 32 supercomputer is considered. Two efficient direct methods for solving banded linear systems on the VPS 32 are described. The vector cyclic reduction (VCR) algorithm is discussed in detail. The performance of the VCR on a three parameter model problem is also illustrated. The VCR is an adaptation of the conventional point cyclic reduction algorithm. The second direct method is the Customized Reduction of Augmented Triangles' (CRAT). CRAT has the dominant characteristics of an efficient VPS 32 algorithm. CRAT is tailored to the pipeline architecture of the VPS 32 and as a consequence the algorithm is implicitly vectorizable.

  4. Isolation and physical characterization of streptomycete plasmids.

    PubMed

    Pernodet, J L; Guerineau, M

    1981-01-01

    Covalently closed circular DNA was isolated from a strain of Streptomyces coelicolor ATCC 10147 and from a strain of Streptomyces coelicolor subspecies flavus ATCC 19894, using two different methods. The two plasmids were of uniform monomer size: 8.9 kb for pS 10147, the plasmid from S. coelicolor ATCC 10147, and around 125 kb for the plasmid from S. coelicolor ATCC 19894. A restriction enzyme map was constructed for pS 10147, using seven enzymes. Four of the enzymes, (BamHI, Bgl,II, PvuII, and XhoI) cut pS 10147 once while PstI made two cuts. The GC content of this plasmid was calculated to be 72%. The possible utilisation of pS 10147 as a cloning vector in Streptomyces is discussed.

  5. Transposon insertion reveals pRM, a plasmid of Rickettsia monacensis.

    PubMed

    Baldridge, Gerald D; Burkhardt, Nicole Y; Felsheim, Roderick F; Kurtti, Timothy J; Munderloh, Ulrike G

    2007-08-01

    Until the recent discovery of pRF in Rickettsia felis, the obligate intracellular bacteria of the genus Rickettsia (Rickettsiales: Rickettsiaceae) were thought not to possess plasmids. We describe pRM, a plasmid from Rickettsia monacensis, which was detected by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and Southern blot analyses of DNA from two independent R. monacensis populations transformed by transposon-mediated insertion of coupled green fluorescent protein and chloramphenicol acetyltransferase marker genes into pRM. Two-dimensional electrophoresis showed that pRM was present in rickettsial cells as circular and linear isomers. The 23,486-nucleotide (31.8% G/C) pRM plasmid was cloned from the transformant populations by chloramphenicol marker rescue of restriction enzyme-digested transformant DNA fragments and PCR using primers derived from sequences of overlapping restriction fragments. The plasmid was sequenced. Based on BLAST searches of the GenBank database, pRM contained 23 predicted genes or pseudogenes and was remarkably similar to the larger pRF plasmid. Two of the 23 genes were unique to pRM and pRF among sequenced rickettsial genomes, and 4 of the genes shared by pRM and pRF were otherwise found only on chromosomes of R. felis or the ancestral group rickettsiae R. bellii and R. canadensis. We obtained pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and Southern blot evidence for a plasmid in R. amblyommii isolate WB-8-2 that contained genes conserved between pRM and pRF. The pRM plasmid may provide a basis for the development of a rickettsial transformation vector.

  6. Complement resistance of Borrelia burgdorferi correlates with the expression of BbCRASP-1, a novel linear plasmid-encoded surface protein that interacts with human factor H and FHL-1 and is unrelated to Erp proteins.

    PubMed

    Kraiczy, Peter; Hellwage, Jens; Skerka, Christine; Becker, Heiko; Kirschfink, Michael; Simon, Markus M; Brade, Volker; Zipfel, Peter F; Wallich, Reinhard

    2004-01-23

    The etiologic agent of Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, is capable of circumventing the immune defense of a variety of potential vertebrate hosts. Previous work has shown that interaction of host-derived complement regulators, factor H and factor H-like protein 1 (FHL-1), with up to five complement regulator-acquiring surface proteins (CRASPs) expressed by resistant B. burgdorferi sensu lato isolates conferred complement resistance. In addition expression of CRASP-1 is directly correlated with complement resistance of Borrelia species. This work describes the functional characterization of BbCRASP-1 as the dominant factor H and FHL-1-binding protein of B. burgdorferi. The corresponding gene, zs7.a68, is located on the linear plasmid lp54 and is different from factor H-binding Erp proteins that are encoded by genes localized on circular plasmids (cp32). Deletion mutants of BbCRASP-1 were generated, and a high affinity binding site for factor H and FHL-1 was mapped to the C terminus of BbCRASP-1. Similarly, the predominant binding site of factor H and FHL-1 was localized to the short consensus repeat 7. Factor H and FHL-1 maintain their cofactor activity for factor I-mediated C3b inactivation when bound to BbCRASP-1, and factor H is up to 6-fold more efficient in mediating C3b conversion than FHL-1. In conclusion, BbCRASP-1 (i). binds the host complement regulators factor H and FHL-1 with high affinity, (ii). is the key molecule of the complement resistance of spirochetes, and (iii). is distinct from the Erp protein family. Thus, BbCRASP-1 most likely contributes to persistence of B. burgdorferi and to pathogenesis of Lyme disease.

  7. The SXT Conjugative Element and Linear Prophage N15 Encode Toxin-Antitoxin-Stabilizing Systems Homologous to the tad-ata Module of the Paracoccus aminophilus Plasmid pAMI2▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Dziewit, Lukasz; Jazurek, Magdalena; Drewniak, Lukasz; Baj, Jadwiga; Bartosik, Dariusz

    2007-01-01

    A group of proteic toxin-antitoxin (TA) cassettes whose representatives are widely distributed among bacterial genomes has been identified. These cassettes occur in chromosomes, plasmids, bacteriophages, and noncomposite transposons, as well as in the SXT conjugative element of Vibrio cholerae. The following four homologous loci were subjected to detailed comparative studies: (i) tad-ata from plasmid pAMI2 of Paracoccus aminophilus (the prototype of this group), (ii) gp49-gp48 from the linear bacteriophage N15 of Escherichia coli, (iii) s045-s044 from SXT, and (iv) Z3230-Z3231 from the genomic island of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 strain EDL933. Functional analysis revealed that all but one of these loci (Z3230-Z3231) are able to stabilize heterologous replicons, although the host ranges varied. The TA cassettes analyzed have the following common features: (i) the toxins are encoded by the first gene of each operon; (ii) the antitoxins contain a predicted helix-turn-helix motif of the XRE family; and (iii) the cassettes have two promoters that are different strengths, one which is located upstream of the toxin gene and one which is located upstream of the antitoxin gene. All four toxins tested are functional in E. coli; overexpression of the toxins (in the absence of antitoxin) results in a bacteriostatic effect manifested by elongation of bacterial cells and growth arrest. The toxins have various effects on cell viability, which suggests that they may recognize different intracellular targets. Preliminary data suggest that different cellular proteases are involved in degradation of antitoxins encoded by the loci analyzed. PMID:17158670

  8. Broad host range plasmids.

    PubMed

    Jain, Aayushi; Srivastava, Preeti

    2013-11-01

    Plasmids are and will remain important cloning vehicles for biotechnology. They have also been associated with the spread of a number of diseases and therefore are a subject of environmental concern. With the advent of sequencing technologies, the database of plasmids is increasing. It will be of immense importance to identify the various bacterial hosts in which the plasmid can replicate. The present review article describes the features that confer broad host range to the plasmids, the molecular basis of plasmid host range evolution, and applications in recombinant DNA technology and environment.

  9. Marker-free plasmids for biotechnological applications - implications and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Pedro H; Mairhofer, Juergen

    2013-09-01

    Nonviral gene therapy and DNA vaccines have become the first promising approaches to treat, cure, or ultimately prevent disease by providing genetic information encoded on a plasmid. Since 1989, more than 1800 clinical trials have been approved worldwide, and approximately 20% of them are using plasmid DNA (pDNA) as a vector system. Although much safer than viral approaches, DNA vectors generally do encode antibiotic resistance genes in the plasmid backbone. These antibiotic resistance markers constitute a possible safety risk, and they are associated with structural plasmid instabilities and decreased gene delivery efficiency. These drawbacks have initiated the development of various antibiotic marker-free selection approaches. We provide an overview on the potential implications of marker-free plasmids and perspectives for their successful biotechnological use in the future.

  10. Responses to rotating linear acceleration vectors considered in relation to a model of the otolith organs. [human oculomotor response to transverse acceleration stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, A. J.; Barnes, G. R.

    1973-01-01

    Human subjects were exposed to a linear acceleration vector that rotated in the transverse plane of the skull without angular counterrotation. Lateral eye movements showed a sinusoidal change in slow phase velocity and an asymmetry or bias in the same direction as vector rotation. A model is developed that attributes the oculomotor response to otolithic mechanisms. It is suggested that the bias component is the manifestation of torsion of the statoconial plaque relative to the base of the utricular macula and that the sinusoidal component represents the translational oscillation of the statoconia. The model subsumes a hypothetical neural mechanism which allows x- and y-axis accelerations to be resolved. Derivation of equations of motion for the statoconial plaque in torsion and translation, which take into account forces acting in shear and normal to the macula, yield estimates of bias and sinusoidal components that are in qualitative agreement with the diverse experimental findings.

  11. Responses to rotating linear acceleration vectors considered in relation to a model of the otolith organs. [human oculomotor response to transverse acceleration stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, A. J.; Barnes, G. R.

    1973-01-01

    Human subjects were exposed to a linear acceleration vector that rotated in the transverse plane of the skull without angular counterrotation. Lateral eye movements showed a sinusoidal change in slow phase velocity and an asymmetry or bias in the same direction as vector rotation. A model is developed that attributes the oculomotor response to otolithic mechanisms. It is suggested that the bias component is the manifestation of torsion of the statoconial plaque relative to the base of the utricular macula and that the sinusoidal component represents the translational oscillation of the statoconia. The model subsumes a hypothetical neural mechanism which allows x- and y-axis accelerations to be resolved. Derivation of equations of motion for the statoconial plaque in torsion and translation, which take into account forces acting in shear and normal to the macula, yield estimates of bias and sinusoidal components that are in qualitative agreement with the diverse experimental findings.

  12. Degradative plasmids from sphingomonads.

    PubMed

    Stolz, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Large plasmids ('megaplasmids') are commonly found in members of the Alphaproteobacterial family Sphingomonadaceae ('sphingomonads'). These plasmids contribute to the extraordinary catabolic flexibility of this group of organisms, which degrade a broad range of recalcitrant xenobiotic compounds. The genomes of several sphingomonads have been sequenced during the last years. In the course of these studies, also the sequences of several plasmids have been determined. The analysis of the published information and the sequences deposited in the public databases allowed a first classification of these plasmids into a restricted number of groups according to the proteins involved in the initiation of replication, plasmid partition and conjugation. The sequence comparisons demonstrated that the plasmids from sphingomonads encode for four main groups of replication initiation (Rep) proteins. These Rep proteins belong to the protein superfamilies RepA_C (Pfam 04796), Rep_3 (Pfam 01051), RPA (Pfam 10134) and HTH-36 (Pfam 13730). The 'degradative megaplasmids' pNL2, pCAR3, pSWIT02, pCHQ1, pISP0, and pISP1, which code for genes involved in the degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons, carbazole, dibenzo-p-dioxin and γ-hexachlorocyclohexane, carry Rep proteins which either belong to the RepA_C- (plasmids pNL2, pCAR3, pSWIT02), Rep-3- (plasmids pCHQ1, pISP0) or RPA-superfamily (pISP1). The classification of these 'degradative megaplasmids' into three groups is also supported by sequence comparisons of the proteins involved in plasmid partition (ParAB) and the organization of the three genes on the respective plasmids. All analysed 'degradative megaplasmids' carry genes, which might allow a conjugative transfer of the plasmids. Sequence comparisons of these genes suggest the presence of at least two types of transfer functions, which either are closer related to the tra- or vir-genes previously described for plasmids from other sources.

  13. Therapeutic option of plasmid-DNA based gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Taniyama, Yoshiaki; Azuma, Junya; Kunugiza, Yasuo; Iekushi, Kazuma; Rakugi, Hiromi; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy offers a novel approach for the prevention and treatment of a variety of diseases, but it is not yet a common method in clinical cases because of various problems. Viral vectors show high efficiency of gene transfer, but they have some problems with toxicity and immunity. On the other hand, plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-based gene transfer is very safe, but its efficiency is relatively low. Especially, plasmid DNA gene therapy is used for cardiovascular disease because plasmid DNA transfer is possible for cardiac or skeletal muscle. Clinical angiogenic gene therapy using plasmid DNA gene transfer has been attempted in patients with peripheral artery disease, but a phase III clinical trial did not show sufficient efficiency. In this situation, more efficient plasmid DNA gene transfer is needed all over the world. This review focuses on plasmid DNA gene transfer and its enhancement, including ultrasound with microbubbles, electroporation, hydrodynamic method, gene gun, jet injection, cationic lipids and cationic polymers.

  14. Plasmids with E2 epitope tags: tagging modules for N- and C-terminal PCR-based gene targeting in both budding and fission yeast, and inducible expression vectors for fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Tamm, Tiina

    2009-01-01

    A single-step PCR-based epitope tagging enables fast and efficient gene targeting with various epitope tags. This report presents a series of plasmids for the E2 epitope tagging of proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. E2Tags are 10-amino acids (epitope E2a: SSTSSDFRDR)- and 12 amino acids (epitope E2b: GVSSTSSDFRDR)-long peptides derived from the E2 protein of bovine papillomavirus type 1. The modules for C-terminal tagging with E2a and E2b epitopes were constructed by the modification of the pYM-series plasmid. The N-terminal E2a and E2b tagging modules were based on pOM-series plasmid. The pOM-series plasmids were selected for this study because of their use of the Cre-loxP recombination system. The latter enables a marker cassette to be removed after integration into the loci of interest and, thereafter, the tagged protein is expressed under its endogenous promoter. Specifically for fission yeast, high copy pREP plasmids containing the E2a epitope tag as an N-terminal or C-terminal tag were constructed. The properties of E2a and E2b epitopes and the sensitivity of two anti-E2 monoclonal antibodies (5E11 and 3F12) were tested using several S. cerevisiae and Sz. pombe E2-tagged strains.

  15. On Duffin-Kemmer-Petiau particles with a mixed minimal-nonminimal vector coupling and the nondegenerate bound-states for the one-dimensional inversely linear background

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, A. S. de

    2010-10-15

    The problem of spin-0 and spin-1 bosons in the background of a general mixing of minimal and nonminimal vector inversely linear potentials is explored in a unified way in the context of the Duffin-Kemmer-Petiau theory. It is shown that spin-0 and spin-1 bosons behave effectively in the same way. An orthogonality criterion is set up and it is used to determine uniquely the set of solutions as well as to show that even-parity solutions do not exist.

  16. Extranuclear gene expression in yeast: evidence for a plasmid-encoded RNA polymerase of unique structure.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, D W; Meacock, P A

    1988-01-01

    Strains of the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis that produce killer-toxin have been found to contain two linear dsDNA plasmids, k1 (8.9 Kb) and k2 (13.4 Kb). The four transcribed open reading frames of plasmid k1 contain no recognisable yeast nuclear expression signals. Moreover, a toxin subunit gene fused with the lacZ gene of Escherichia coli is not detectably expressed when introduced to K.lactis or Saccharomyces cerevisiae on a nuclear vector, even when native k1 and k2 are present in the cell. This and other evidence is consistent with the hypothesis that k1 and k2 reside in an extranuclear location, and do not utilise the nuclear RNA polymerases I, II or III for transcription of their genes. Sequencing of plasmid k2, which is thought to encode factors necessary for the maintenance or expression of k1, reveals an open reading frame predicted to encode a 974 amino acid polypeptide with homology to several DNA-directed RNA polymerases. We suggest that this is a component of a novel plasmid-specific extranuclear gene expression system. PMID:3138657

  17. Plasmid Partition Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Jamie C; Funnell, Barbara E

    2014-12-01

    The stable maintenance of low-copy-number plasmids in bacteria is actively driven by partition mechanisms that are responsible for the positioning of plasmids inside the cell. Partition systems are ubiquitous in the microbial world and are encoded by many bacterial chromosomes as well as plasmids. These systems, although different in sequence and mechanism, typically consist of two proteins and a DNA partition site, or prokaryotic centromere, on the plasmid or chromosome. One protein binds site-specifically to the centromere to form a partition complex, and the other protein uses the energy of nucleotide binding and hydrolysis to transport the plasmid, via interactions with this partition complex inside the cell. For plasmids, this minimal cassette is sufficient to direct proper segregation in bacterial cells. There has been significant progress in the last several years in our understanding of partition mechanisms. Two general areas that have developed are (i) the structural biology of partition proteins and their interactions with DNA and (ii) the action and dynamics of the partition ATPases that drive the process. In addition, systems that use tubulin-like GTPases to partition plasmids have recently been identified. In this chapter, we concentrate on these recent developments and the molecular details of plasmid partition mechanisms.

  18. Multiplex protein pattern unmixing using a non-linear variable-weighted support vector machine as optimized by a particle swarm optimization algorithm.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qin; Zou, Hong-Yan; Zhang, Yan; Tang, Li-Juan; Shen, Guo-Li; Jiang, Jian-Hui; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2016-01-15

    Most of the proteins locate more than one organelle in a cell. Unmixing the localization patterns of proteins is critical for understanding the protein functions and other vital cellular processes. Herein, non-linear machine learning technique is proposed for the first time upon protein pattern unmixing. Variable-weighted support vector machine (VW-SVM) is a demonstrated robust modeling technique with flexible and rational variable selection. As optimized by a global stochastic optimization technique, particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm, it makes VW-SVM to be an adaptive parameter-free method for automated unmixing of protein subcellular patterns. Results obtained by pattern unmixing of a set of fluorescence microscope images of cells indicate VW-SVM as optimized by PSO is able to extract useful pattern features by optimally rescaling each variable for non-linear SVM modeling, consequently leading to improved performances in multiplex protein pattern unmixing compared with conventional SVM and other exiting pattern unmixing methods.

  19. Ovary-drip transformation: a simple method for directly generating vector- and marker-free transgenic maize (Zea mays L.) with a linear GFP cassette transformation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Aifu; Su, Qiao; An, Lijia

    2009-03-01

    The presence of selectable marker genes and vector backbone sequences has affected the safe assessment of transgenic plants. In this study, the ovary-drip method for directly generating vector- and selectable marker-free transgenic plants was described, by which maize was transformed with a linear GFP cassette (Ubi-GFP-nos). The key features of this method center on the complete removal of the styles and the subsequent application of a DNA solution directly to the ovaries. The movement of the exogenous DNA was monitored using fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled DNA, which showed that the time taken by the exogenous DNA to enter the ovaries was shortened compared to that of the pollen-tube pathway. This led to an improved transformation frequency of 3.38% compared to 0.86% for the pollen-tube pathway as determined by PCR analysis. The use of 0.05% surfactant Silwet L-77 + 5% sucrose as a transformation solution further increased the transformation frequency to 6.47%. Southern blot analysis showed that the transgenic plants had low transgene copy number and simple integration pattern. Green fluorescence was observed in roots and immature embryos of transgenic plants by fluorescence microscopy. Progeny analysis showed that GFP insertions were inherited in T(1) generation. The ovary-drip method would become a favorable choice for directly generating vector- and marker-free transgenic maize expressing functional genes of agronomic interest.

  20. Plasmid DNA Manufacturing for Indirect and Direct Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Schmeer, Marco; Buchholz, Tatjana; Schleef, Martin

    2017-10-01

    Plasmid DNA is currently gaining increasing importance for clinical research applications in gene therapy and genetic vaccination. For direct gene transfer into humans, good manufacturing practice (GMP)-grade plasmid DNA is mandatory. The same holds true if the drug substance contains a genetically modified cell, for example chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells, where these cells as well as the contained plasmids are used. According to the responsible regulatory agencies, they have to be produced under full GMP. On the other hand, for GMP production of, for example, mRNA or viral vectors (lentiviral vectors, adeno-associated virus vectors, etc.), in many cases, High Quality Grade plasmid DNA is accepted as a starting material. The manufacturing process passes through different production steps. To ensure the right conditions are used for the plasmid, a pilot run must be conducted at the beginning. In this step, a followed upscaling with respect to reproducibility and influences on product quality is performed. Subsequently, a cell bank of the transformed productions strain is established and characterized. This cell bank is used for the cultivation process. After cell harvesting and lysis, several chromatography steps are conducted to receive a pure plasmid product. Depending on the respective required quality grade, the plasmid product is subject to several quality controls. The last step consists of formulation and filling of the product.

  1. Unveiling the nature of post-linear response Z-vector method for time-dependent density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastore, Mariachiara; Assfeld, Xavier; Mosconi, Edoardo; Monari, Antonio; Etienne, Thibaud

    2017-07-01

    We report a theoretical study on the analysis of the relaxed one-particle difference density matrix characterizing the passage from the ground to the excited state of a molecular system, as obtained from time-dependent density functional theory. In particular, this work aims at using the physics contained in the so-called Z-vector, which differentiates between unrelaxed and relaxed difference density matrices to analyze excited states' nature. For this purpose, we introduce novel quantum-mechanical quantities, based on the detachment/attachment methodology, for analysing the Z-vector transformation for different molecules and density functional theory functionals. A derivation pathway of these novel descriptors is reported, involving a numerical integration to be performed in the Euclidean space on the density functions. This topological analysis is then applied to two sets of chromophores, and the correlation between the level of theory and the behavior of our descriptors is properly rationalized. In particular, the effect of range-separation on the relaxation amplitude is discussed. The relaxation term is finally shown to be system-specific (for a given level of theory) and independent of the number of electrons (i.e., the relaxation amplitude is not simply the result of a collective phenomenon).

  2. Unveiling the nature of post-linear response Z-vector method for time-dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Pastore, Mariachiara; Assfeld, Xavier; Mosconi, Edoardo; Monari, Antonio; Etienne, Thibaud

    2017-07-14

    We report a theoretical study on the analysis of the relaxed one-particle difference density matrix characterizing the passage from the ground to the excited state of a molecular system, as obtained from time-dependent density functional theory. In particular, this work aims at using the physics contained in the so-called Z-vector, which differentiates between unrelaxed and relaxed difference density matrices to analyze excited states' nature. For this purpose, we introduce novel quantum-mechanical quantities, based on the detachment/attachment methodology, for analysing the Z-vector transformation for different molecules and density functional theory functionals. A derivation pathway of these novel descriptors is reported, involving a numerical integration to be performed in the Euclidean space on the density functions. This topological analysis is then applied to two sets of chromophores, and the correlation between the level of theory and the behavior of our descriptors is properly rationalized. In particular, the effect of range-separation on the relaxation amplitude is discussed. The relaxation term is finally shown to be system-specific (for a given level of theory) and independent of the number of electrons (i.e., the relaxation amplitude is not simply the result of a collective phenomenon).

  3. The Agrobacterium Ti Plasmids.

    PubMed

    Christie, Peter J; Gordon, Jay E

    2014-12-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a plant pathogen with the capacity to deliver a segment of oncogenic DNA carried on a large plasmid called the tumor-inducing or Ti plasmid to susceptible plant cells. A. tumefaciens belongs to the class Alphaproteobacteria, whose members include other plant pathogens (Agrobacterium rhizogenes), plant and insect symbionts (Rhizobium spp. and Wolbachia spp., respectively), human pathogens (Brucella spp., Bartonella spp., Rickettsia spp.), and nonpathogens (Caulobacter crescentus, Rhodobacter sphaeroides). Many species of Alphaproteobacteria carry large plasmids ranging in size from ∼100 kb to nearly 2 Mb. These large replicons typically code for functions essential for cell physiology, pathogenesis, or symbiosis. Most of these elements rely on a conserved gene cassette termed repABC for replication and partitioning, and maintenance at only one or a few copies per cell. The subject of this review is the ∼200-kb Ti plasmids carried by infectious strains of A. tumefaciens. We will summarize the features of this plasmid as a representative of the repABC family of megaplasmids. We will also describe novel features of this plasmid that enable A. tumefaciens cells to incite tumor formation in plants, sense and respond to an array of plant host and bacterial signal molecules, and maintain and disseminate the plasmid among populations of agrobacteria. At the end of this review, we will describe how this natural genetic engineer has been adapted to spawn an entire industry of plant biotechnology and review its potential for use in future therapeutic applications of plant and nonplant species.

  4. Does Nonlinear Modeling Play a Role in Plasmid Bioprocess Monitoring using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectra?

    PubMed

    Lopes, Marta B; Calado, Cecília R C; Figueiredo, Mário A T; Bioucas-Dias, José M

    2016-11-16

    The monitoring of biopharmaceutical products using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy relies on calibration techniques involving the acquisition of spectra of bioprocess samples along the process. The most commonly used method for that purpose is partial least squares (PLS) regression, under the assumption that a linear model is valid. Despite being successful in the presence of small nonlinearities, linear methods may fail in the presence of strong nonlinearities. This paper studies the potential usefulness of nonlinear regression methods for predicting, from in situ near-infrared (NIR) and mid-infrared (MIR) spectra acquired in high-throughput mode, biomass and plasmid concentrations in Escherichia coli DH5-α cultures producing the plasmid model pVAX-LacZ. The linear methods PLS and ridge regression (RR) are compared with their kernel (nonlinear) versions, kPLS and kRR, as well as with the (also nonlinear) relevance vector machine (RVM) and Gaussian process regression (GPR). For the systems studied, RR provided better predictive performances compared to the remaining methods. Moreover, the results point to further investigation based on larger data sets whenever differences in predictive accuracy between a linear method and its kernelized version could not be found. The use of nonlinear methods, however, shall be judged regarding the additional computational cost required to tune their additional parameters, especially when the less computationally demanding linear methods herein studied are able to successfully monitor the variables under study.

  5. Synapsis-Mediated Fusion of Free DNA Ends Forms Inverted Dimer Plasmids in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Kunes, S.; Botstein, D.; Fox, M. S.

    1990-01-01

    When yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) is transformed with linearized plasmid DNA and the ends of the plasmid do not share homology with the yeast genome, circular inverted (head-to-head) dimer plasmids are the principal product of repair. By measurements of the DNA concentration dependence of transformation with a linearized plasmid, and by transformation with mixtures of genetically marked plasmids, we show that two plasmid molecules are required to form an inverted dimer plasmid. Several observations suggest that homologous pairing accounts for the head-to-head joining of the two plasmid molecules. First, an enhanced frequency of homologous recombination is detected when genetically marked plasmids undergo end-to-end fusion. Second, when a plasmid is linearized within an inverted repeat, such that its ends could undergo head-to-tail homologous pairing, it is repaired by intramolecular head-to-tail joining. Last, in the joining of homologous linearized plasmids of different length, a shorter molecule can acquire a longer plasmid end by homologous recombination. The formation of inverted dimer plasmids may be related to some forms of chromosomal rearrangement. These might include the fusion of broken sister chromatids in the bridge-breakage-fusion cycle and the head-to-head duplication of genomic DNA at the sites of gene amplifications. PMID:2407606

  6. Recombination-dependent concatemeric plasmid replication.

    PubMed Central

    Viret, J F; Bravo, A; Alonso, J C

    1991-01-01

    The replication of covalently closed circular supercoiled (form I) DNA in prokaryotes is generally controlled at the initiation level by a rate-limiting effector. Once initiated, replication proceeds via one of two possible modes (theta or sigma replication) which do not rely on functions involved in DNA repair and general recombination. Recently, a novel plasmid replication mode, leading to the accumulation of linear multigenome-length plasmid concatemers in both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, has been described. Unlike form I DNA replication, an intermediate recombination step is most probably involved in the initiation of concatemeric plasmid DNA replication. On the basis of structural and functional studies, we infer that recombination-dependent plasmid replication shares important features with phage late replication modes and, in several aspects, parallels the synthesis of plasmid concatemers in phage-infected cells. The characterization of the concatemeric plasmid replication mode has allowed new insights into the mechanisms of DNA replication and recombination in prokaryotes. PMID:1779931

  7. Electrotransformation of Yersinia ruckeri by plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Cutrín, J M; Conchas, R F; Barja, J L; Toranzo, A E

    1994-01-01

    Yersinia ruckeri, a fish pathogenic bacterium in aquaculture, was used to evaluate the electroporation as a new transformation method for this species. DNA used for the electrotransformation were plasmids of molecular mass ranging from 2.3 kb to 33 kb, and diverse replicons. To optimize this method we used Y. ruckeri 11.29 strain (from serotype 02) and pSU2718 DNA. The best transformation efficiency (6.0 x 10(5) transformants/micrograms DNA) was obtained with 12.5 kV/cm, 25 microF, 400 omega and 2 hours of incubation after pulse. When these conditions were applied to other strains belonging to different serotypes and other plasmids, we obtained transformants in all strains assayed, but only when using low molecular weight plasmids. Plasmid vectors and resident plasmid were not modified in host strains after electrotransformation. In studies of conformation we confirmed that only circular DNA was able for transformation. The utilization of this technique for direct cloning in Y. ruckeri makes possible further studies on recombinant DNA.

  8. PCG: A software package for the iterative solution of linear systems on scalar, vector and parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Joubert, W.; Carey, G.F.

    1994-12-31

    A great need exists for high performance numerical software libraries transportable across parallel machines. This talk concerns the PCG package, which solves systems of linear equations by iterative methods on parallel computers. The features of the package are discussed, as well as techniques used to obtain high performance as well as transportability across architectures. Representative numerical results are presented for several machines including the Connection Machine CM-5, Intel Paragon and Cray T3D parallel computers.

  9. Pathway of plasmid transformation in pneumococcus

    SciTech Connect

    Guild, W.R.; Saunders, C.W.

    1981-01-01

    Plasmids transform Streptococcus pneumoniae by a process involving low efficiency assembly of replicons from fragments of single strands that have entered the cell separately. Transformation of preexisting replicons is much more efficient. We have cloned the erm gene of pIP501 into pMV158, which so far as we know is the first example of cloning in a pneumococcus host-vector system.

  10. Incorporation of 2,3-diaminopropionic acid into linear cationic amphipathic peptides produces pH-sensitive vectors.

    PubMed

    Lan, Yun; Langlet-Bertin, Bérangère; Abbate, Vincenzo; Vermeer, Louic S; Kong, Xiaole; Sullivan, Kelly E; Leborgne, Christian; Scherman, Daniel; Hider, Robert C; Drake, Alex F; Bansal, Sukhvinder S; Kichler, Antoine; Mason, A James

    2010-06-14

    Nonviral vectors that harness the change in pH in endosomes, are increasingly being used to deliver cargoes, including nucleic acids, into mammalian cells. Here we present evidence that the pK(a) of the beta-NH(2) in 2,3-diaminopropionic acid (Dap) is sufficiently lowered, when Dap is incorporated into peptides, that its protonation state is sensitive to the pH changes that occur during endosomal acidification. The lowered pK(a) of around 6.3 is stabilized by the increased electron-withdrawing effect of the peptide bonds, by intermolecular hydrogen bonding and from contributions arising from the peptide conformation. These include mixed polar/apolar environments, Coulombic interactions and intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Changes in the charged state are therefore expected between pH 5 and 7, and large-scale conformational changes are observed in Dap-rich peptides, in contrast to analogues containing lysine or ornithine, when the pH is altered through this range. These physical properties confer a robust gene-delivery capability on designed cationic amphipathic peptides that incorporate Dap.

  11. Chlamydial plasmids and bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Pawlikowska-Warych, Małgorzata; Śliwa-Dominiak, Joanna; Deptuła, Wiesław

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydia are absolute pathogens of humans and animals; despite being rather well recognised, they are still open for discovery. One such discovery is the occurrence of extrachromosomal carriers of genetic information. In prokaryotes, such carriers include plasmids and bacteriophages, which are present only among some Chlamydia species. Plasmids were found exclusively in Chlamydia (C.) trachomatis, C. psittaci, C. pneumoniae, C. suis, C. felis, C. muridarum and C. caviae. In prokaryotic organisms, plasmids usually code for genes that facilitate survival of the bacteria in the environment (although they are not essential). In chlamydia, their role has not been definitely recognised, apart from the fact that they participate in the synthesis of glycogen and encode proteins responsible for their virulence. Furthermore, in C. suis it was evidenced that the plasmid is integrated in a genomic island and contains the tetracycline-resistance gene. Bacteriophages specific for chlamydia (chlamydiaphages) were detected only in six species: C. psittaci, C. abortus, C. felis, C. caviae C. pecorum and C. pneumoniae. These chlamydiaphages cause inhibition of the developmental cycle, and delay transformation of reticulate bodies (RBs) into elementary bodies (EBs), thus reducing the possibility of infecting other cells in time. Plasmids and bacteriophages can be used in the diagnostics of chlamydioses; although especially in the case of plasmids, they are already used for detection of chlamydial infections. In addition, bacteriophages could be used as therapeutic agents to replace antibiotics, potentially addressing the problem of increasing antibiotic-resistance among chlamydia.

  12. Plasmid partitioning systems of conjugative plasmids from Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Adams, Vicki; Watts, Thomas D; Bulach, Dieter M; Lyras, Dena; Rood, Julian I

    2015-07-01

    Many pathogenic strains of Clostridium perfringens carry several highly similar toxin or antibiotic resistance plasmids that have 35 to 40 kb of very closely related syntenous sequences, including regions that carry the genes encoding conjugative transfer, plasmid replication and plasmid maintenance functions. Key questions are how are these closely related plasmids stably maintained in the same cell and what is the basis for plasmid incompatibility in C. perfringens. Comparative analysis of the Rep proteins encoded by these plasmids suggested that this protein was not the basis for plasmid incompatibility since plasmids carried in a single strain often encoded an almost identical Rep protein. These plasmids all carried a similar, but not identical, parMRC plasmid partitioning locus. Phylogenetic analysis of the deduced ParM proteins revealed that these proteins could be divided into ten separate groups. Importantly, in every strain that carried more than one of these plasmids, the respective ParM proteins were from different phylogenetic groups. Similar observations were made from the analysis of phylogenetic trees of the ParR proteins and the parC loci. These findings provide evidence that the basis for plasmid incompatibility in the conjugative toxin and resistance plasmid family from C. perfringens resides in subtle differences in the parMRC plasmid partitioning loci carried by these plasmids.

  13. Quantitative shearing linear amplification polymerase chain reaction: an improved method for quantifying lentiviral vector insertion sites in transplanted hematopoietic cell systems.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Sheng; Bonner, Melissa A; Wang, Yong-Dong; Rapp, Samuel; De Ravin, Suk See; Malech, Harry L; Sorrentino, Brian P

    2015-02-01

    In gene therapy trials targeting blood disorders, it is important to detect dominance of transduced hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) clones arising from vector insertion site (VIS) effects. Current methods for VIS analysis often do not have defined levels of quantitative accuracy and therefore can fail to detect early clonal dominance. We have developed a rapid and inexpensive method for measuring clone size based on random shearing of genomic DNA, minimal exponential PCR amplification, and shear site counts as a quantitative endpoint. This quantitative shearing linear amplification PCR (qsLAM PCR) assay utilizes an internal control sample containing 19 lentiviral insertion sites per cell that is mixed with polyclonal samples derived from transduced human CD34+ cells. Samples were analyzed from transplanted pigtail macaques and from a participant in our X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID) lentiviral vector trial and yielded controlled and quantitative results in all cases. One case of early clonal dominance was detected in a monkey transplanted with limiting numbers of transduced HSCs, while the clinical samples from the XSCID trial participant showed highly diverse clonal representation. These studies demonstrate that qsLAM PCR is a facile and quantitative assay for measuring clonal repertoires in subjects enrolled in human gene therapy trials using lentiviral-transduced HSCs.

  14. General method for plasmid construction using homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Raymond, C K; Pownder, T A; Sexson, S L

    1999-01-01

    We describe a general method for plasmid assembly that uses yeast and extends beyond yeast-specific research applications. This technology exploits the homologous recombination, double-stranded break repair pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to join DNA fragments. Synthetic, double-stranded "recombination linkers" were used to "subclone" a DNA fragment into a plasmid with > 80% efficiency. Quantitative data on the influence of DNA concentration and overlap length on the efficiency of recombination are presented. Using a simple procedure, plasmids were shuttled from yeast into E. coli for subsequent screening and large-scale plasmid preps. This simple method for plasmid construction has several advantages. (i) It bypasses the need for extensive PCR amplification and for purification, modification and/or ligation techniques routinely used for plasmid constructions. (ii) The method does not rely on available restriction sites, thus fragment and vector DNA can be joined within any DNA sequence. This enables the use of multifunctional cloning vectors for protein expression in mammalian cells, other yeast species, E. coli and other expression systems as discussed. (iii) Finally, the technology exploits yeast strains, plasmids and microbial techniques that are inexpensive and readily available.

  15. Plasmids encoding therapeutic agents

    DOEpatents

    Keener, William K.

    2007-08-07

    Plasmids encoding anti-HIV and anti-anthrax therapeutic agents are disclosed. Plasmid pWKK-500 encodes a fusion protein containing DP178 as a targeting moiety, the ricin A chain, an HIV protease cleavable linker, and a truncated ricin B chain. N-terminal extensions of the fusion protein include the maltose binding protein and a Factor Xa protease site. C-terminal extensions include a hydrophobic linker, an L domain motif peptide, a KDEL ER retention signal, another Factor Xa protease site, an out-of-frame buforin II coding sequence, the lacZ.alpha. peptide, and a polyhistidine tag. More than twenty derivatives of plasmid pWKK-500 are described. Plasmids pWKK-700 and pWKK-800 are similar to pWKK-500 wherein the DP178-encoding sequence is substituted by RANTES- and SDF-1-encoding sequences, respectively. Plasmid pWKK-900 is similar to pWKK-500 wherein the HIV protease cleavable linker is substituted by a lethal factor (LF) peptide-cleavable linker.

  16. Definition of Linear Color Models in the RGB Vector Color Space to Detect Red Peaches in Orchard Images Taken under Natural Illumination

    PubMed Central

    Teixidó, Mercè; Font, Davinia; Pallejà, Tomàs; Tresanchez, Marcel; Nogués, Miquel; Palacín, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    This work proposes the detection of red peaches in orchard images based on the definition of different linear color models in the RGB vector color space. The classification and segmentation of the pixels of the image is then performed by comparing the color distance from each pixel to the different previously defined linear color models. The methodology proposed has been tested with images obtained in a real orchard under natural light. The peach variety in the orchard was the paraguayo (Prunus persica var. platycarpa) peach with red skin. The segmentation results showed that the area of the red peaches in the images was detected with an average error of 11.6%; 19.7% in the case of bright illumination; 8.2% in the case of low illumination; 8.6% for occlusion up to 33%; 12.2% in the case of occlusion between 34 and 66%; and 23% for occlusion above 66%. Finally, a methodology was proposed to estimate the diameter of the fruits based on an ellipsoidal fitting. A first diameter was obtained by using all the contour pixels and a second diameter was obtained by rejecting some pixels of the contour. This approach enables a rough estimate of the fruit occlusion percentage range by comparing the two diameter estimates. PMID:22969369

  17. Definition of linear color models in the RGB vector color space to detect red peaches in orchard images taken under natural illumination.

    PubMed

    Teixidó, Mercè; Font, Davinia; Pallejà, Tomàs; Tresanchez, Marcel; Nogués, Miquel; Palacín, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    This work proposes the detection of red peaches in orchard images based on the definition of different linear color models in the RGB vector color space. The classification and segmentation of the pixels of the image is then performed by comparing the color distance from each pixel to the different previously defined linear color models. The methodology proposed has been tested with images obtained in a real orchard under natural light. The peach variety in the orchard was the paraguayo (Prunus persica var. platycarpa) peach with red skin. The segmentation results showed that the area of the red peaches in the images was detected with an average error of 11.6%; 19.7% in the case of bright illumination; 8.2% in the case of low illumination; 8.6% for occlusion up to 33%; 12.2% in the case of occlusion between 34 and 66%; and 23% for occlusion above 66%. Finally, a methodology was proposed to estimate the diameter of the fruits based on an ellipsoidal fitting. A first diameter was obtained by using all the contour pixels and a second diameter was obtained by rejecting some pixels of the contour. This approach enables a rough estimate of the fruit occlusion percentage range by comparing the two diameter estimates.

  18. Plasmid-Mediated Antimicrobial Resistance in Staphylococci and Other Firmicutes.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Stefan; Shen, Jianzhong; Wendlandt, Sarah; Fessler, Andrea T; Wang, Yang; Kadlec, Kristina; Wu, Cong-Ming

    2014-12-01

    In staphylococci and other Firmicutes, resistance to numerous classes of antimicrobial agents, which are commonly used in human and veterinary medicine, is mediated by genes that are associated with mobile genetic elements. The gene products of some of these antimicrobial resistance genes confer resistance to only specific members of a certain class of antimicrobial agents, whereas others confer resistance to the entire class or even to members of different classes of antimicrobial agents. The resistance mechanisms specified by the resistance genes fall into any of three major categories: active efflux, enzymatic inactivation, and modification/replacement/protection of the target sites of the antimicrobial agents. Among the mobile genetic elements that carry such resistance genes, plasmids play an important role as carriers of primarily plasmid-borne resistance genes, but also as vectors for nonconjugative and conjugative transposons that harbor resistance genes. Plasmids can be exchanged by horizontal gene transfer between members of the same species but also between bacteria belonging to different species and genera. Plasmids are highly flexible elements, and various mechanisms exist by which plasmids can recombine, form cointegrates, or become integrated in part or in toto into the chromosomal DNA or into other plasmids. As such, plasmids play a key role in the dissemination of antimicrobial resistance genes within the gene pool to which staphylococci and other Firmicutes have access. This chapter is intended to provide an overview of the current knowledge of plasmid-mediated antimicrobial resistance in staphylococci and other Firmicutes.

  19. Construction, production, and purification of recombinant adenovirus vectors.

    PubMed

    Miravet, Susana; Ontiveros, Maria; Piedra, Jose; Penalva, Cristina; Monfar, Mercè; Chillón, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant adenoviruses provide a versatile system for gene expression studies and therapeutic applications. In this chapter, a standard procedure for their generation and small-scale production is described. Homologous recombination in E. coli between shuttle plasmids and full-length adenovirus backbones (E1-deleted) is used for the generation of recombinant adenoviral vectors genomes. The adenovirus genomes are then analyzed to confirm their identity and integrity, and further linearized and transfected to generate a recombinant adenoviral vector in permissive human cells. These vectors are then purified by two sequential CsCl gradient centrifugations and subjected to a chromatography step in order to eliminate the CsCl and exchange buffers. Finally, the viral stock is characterized through the quantification of its viral particle content and its infectivity.

  20. Requirements for Borrelia burgdorferi plasmid maintenance.

    PubMed

    Tilly, Kit; Checroun, Claire; Rosa, Patricia A

    2012-07-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi has multiple linear and circular plasmids that are faithfully replicated and partitioned as the bacterium grows and divides. The low copy number of these replicons implies that active partitioning contributes to plasmid stability. Analyzing the requirements for plasmid replication and partition in B. burgdorferi is complicated by the complexity of the genome and the possibility that products may act in trans. Consequently, we have studied the replication-partition region (bbb10-13) of the B. burgdorferi 26kb circular plasmid (cp26) in Escherichia coli, by fusion with a partition-defective miniF plasmid. Our analysis demonstrated that bbb10, bbb11, and bbb13 are required for stable miniF maintenance, whereas bbb12 is dispensable. To validate these results, we attempted to inactivate two of these genes in B. burgdorferi. bbb12 mutants were obtained at a typical frequency, suggesting that the bbb12 product is dispensable for cp26 maintenance as well. We could not directly measure cp26 stability in the bbb12 mutant, because cp26 carries essential genes, and bacteria that have lost cp26 are inviable. Conversely, we were unable to inactivate bbb10 on cp26 of B. burgdorferi. Our results suggest that bbb12 is dispensable for cp26 maintenance, whereas bbb10, bbb11, and bbb13 play crucial roles in that process. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. A 1.83 μJ/Classification, 8-Channel, Patient-Specific Epileptic Seizure Classification SoC Using a Non-Linear Support Vector Machine.

    PubMed

    Bin Altaf, Muhammad Awais; Yoo, Jerald

    2016-02-01

    A non-linear support vector machine (NLSVM) seizure classification SoC with 8-channel EEG data acquisition and storage for epileptic patients is presented. The proposed SoC is the first work in literature that integrates a feature extraction (FE) engine, patient specific hardware-efficient NLSVM classification engine, 96 KB SRAM for EEG data storage and low-noise, high dynamic range readout circuits. To achieve on-chip integration of the NLSVM classification engine with minimum area and energy consumption, the FE engine utilizes time division multiplexing (TDM)-BPF architecture. The implemented log-linear Gaussian basis function (LL-GBF) NLSVM classifier exploits the linearization to achieve energy consumption of 0.39 μ J/operation and reduces the area by 28.2% compared to conventional GBF implementation. The readout circuits incorporate a chopper-stabilized DC servo loop to minimize the noise level elevation and achieve noise RTI of 0.81 μ Vrms for 0.5-100 Hz bandwidth with an NEF of 4.0. The 5 × 5 mm (2) SoC is implemented in a 0.18 μm 1P6M CMOS process consuming 1.83 μ J/classification for 8-channel operation. SoC verification has been done with the Children's Hospital Boston-MIT EEG database, as well as with a specific rapid eye-blink pattern detection test, which results in an average detection rate, average false alarm rate and latency of 95.1%, 0.94% (0.27 false alarms/hour) and 2 s, respectively.

  2. Plasmid diversity and phylogenetic consistency in the Lyme disease agent Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Casjens, Sherwood R; Gilcrease, Eddie B; Vujadinovic, Marija; Mongodin, Emmanuel F; Luft, Benjamin J; Schutzer, Steven E; Fraser, Claire M; Qiu, Wei-Gang

    2017-02-15

    Bacteria from the genus Borrelia are known to harbor numerous linear and circular plasmids. We report here a comparative analysis of the nucleotide sequences of 236 plasmids present in fourteen independent isolates of the Lyme disease agent B. burgdorferi. We have sequenced the genomes of 14 B. burgdorferi sensu stricto isolates that carry a total of 236 plasmids. These individual isolates carry between seven and 23 plasmids. Their chromosomes, the cp26 and cp32 circular plasmids, as well as the lp54 linear plasmid, are quite evolutionarily stable; however, the remaining plasmids have undergone numerous non-homologous and often duplicative recombination events. We identify 32 different putative plasmid compatibility types among the 236 plasmids, of which 15 are (usually) circular and 17 are linear. Because of past rearrangements, any given gene, even though it might be universally present in these isolates, is often found on different linear plasmid compatibility types in different isolates. For example, the arp gene and the vls cassette region are present on plasmids of four and five different compatibility types, respectively, in different isolates. A majority of the plasmid types have more than one organizationally different subtype, and the number of such variants ranges from one to eight among the 18 linear plasmid types. In spite of this substantial organizational diversity, the plasmids are not so variable that every isolate has a novel version of every plasmid (i.e., there appears to be a limited number of extant plasmid subtypes). Although there have been many past recombination events, both homologous and nonhomologous, among the plasmids, particular organizational variants of these plasmids correlate with particular chromosomal genotypes, suggesting that there has not been rapid horizontal transfer of whole linear plasmids among B. burgdorferi lineages. We argue that plasmid rearrangements are essentially non-revertable and are present at a frequency of

  3. Phytoplasma plasmid DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Mark T; Liefting, Lia W

    2013-01-01

    Phytoplasma plasmids have generally been detected from DNA extracted from plants and insects using methods designed for the purification of total phytoplasma DNA. Methods include extraction from tissues that are high in phytoplasma titre, such as the phloem of plants, with the use of CsCl-bisbenzimide gradients that exploit the low G+C content of phytoplasma DNA. Many of the methods employed for phytoplasma purification have been described elsewhere in this book. Here we describe in detail two methods that are specifically aimed at isolating plasmid DNA.

  4. Practical utilization of recombinant AAV vector reference standards: focus on vector genomes titration by free ITR qPCR.

    PubMed

    D'Costa, Susan; Blouin, Veronique; Broucque, Frederic; Penaud-Budloo, Magalie; François, Achille; Perez, Irene C; Le Bec, Christine; Moullier, Philippe; Snyder, Richard O; Ayuso, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    Clinical trials using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors have demonstrated efficacy and a good safety profile. Although the field is advancing quickly, vector analytics and harmonization of dosage units are still a limitation for commercialization. AAV reference standard materials (RSMs) can help ensure product safety by controlling the consistency of assays used to characterize rAAV stocks. The most widely utilized unit of vector dosing is based on the encapsidated vector genome. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is now the most common method to titer vector genomes (vg); however, significant inter- and intralaboratory variations have been documented using this technique. Here, RSMs and rAAV stocks were titered on the basis of an inverted terminal repeats (ITRs) sequence-specific qPCR and we found an artificial increase in vg titers using a widely utilized approach. The PCR error was introduced by using single-cut linearized plasmid as the standard curve. This bias was eliminated using plasmid standards linearized just outside the ITR region on each end to facilitate the melting of the palindromic ITR sequences during PCR. This new "Free-ITR" qPCR delivers vg titers that are consistent with titers obtained with transgene-specific qPCR and could be used to normalize in-house product-specific AAV vector standards and controls to the rAAV RSMs. The free-ITR method, including well-characterized controls, will help to calibrate doses to compare preclinical and clinical data in the field.

  5. Practical utilization of recombinant AAV vector reference standards: focus on vector genomes titration by free ITR qPCR

    PubMed Central

    D’Costa, Susan; Blouin, Veronique; Broucque, Frederic; Penaud-Budloo, Magalie; François, Achille; Perez, Irene C; Le Bec, Christine; Moullier, Philippe; Snyder, Richard O; Ayuso, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    Clinical trials using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors have demonstrated efficacy and a good safety profile. Although the field is advancing quickly, vector analytics and harmonization of dosage units are still a limitation for commercialization. AAV reference standard materials (RSMs) can help ensure product safety by controlling the consistency of assays used to characterize rAAV stocks. The most widely utilized unit of vector dosing is based on the encapsidated vector genome. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is now the most common method to titer vector genomes (vg); however, significant inter- and intralaboratory variations have been documented using this technique. Here, RSMs and rAAV stocks were titered on the basis of an inverted terminal repeats (ITRs) sequence-specific qPCR and we found an artificial increase in vg titers using a widely utilized approach. The PCR error was introduced by using single-cut linearized plasmid as the standard curve. This bias was eliminated using plasmid standards linearized just outside the ITR region on each end to facilitate the melting of the palindromic ITR sequences during PCR. This new “Free-ITR” qPCR delivers vg titers that are consistent with titers obtained with transgene-specific qPCR and could be used to normalize in-house product-specific AAV vector standards and controls to the rAAV RSMs. The free-ITR method, including well-characterized controls, will help to calibrate doses to compare preclinical and clinical data in the field. PMID:27069952

  6. Plasmid Detection, Characterization, and Ecology.

    PubMed

    Smalla, Kornelia; Jechalke, Sven; Top, Eva M

    2015-02-01

    Plasmids are important vehicles for rapid adaptation of bacterial populations to changing environmental conditions. It is thought that to reduce the cost of plasmid carriage, only a fraction of a local population carries plasmids or is permissive to plasmid uptake. Plasmids provide various accessory traits which might be beneficial under particular conditions. The genetic variation generated by plasmid carriage within populations ensures the robustness toward environmental changes. Plasmid-mediated gene transfer plays an important role not only in the mobilization and dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes but also in the spread of degradative pathways and pathogenicity determinants of pathogens. Here we summarize the state-of-the-art methods to study the occurrence, abundance, and diversity of plasmids in environmental bacteria. Increasingly, cultivation-independent total-community DNA-based methods are being used to characterize and quantify the diversity and abundance of plasmids in relation to various biotic and abiotic factors. An improved understanding of the ecology of plasmids and their hosts is crucial in the development of intervention strategies for antibiotic-resistance-gene spread. We discuss the potentials and limitations of methods used to determine the host range of plasmids, as the ecology of plasmids is tightly linked to their hosts. The recent advances in sequencing technologies provide an enormous potential for plasmid classification, diversity, and evolution studies, but numerous challenges still exist.

  7. Plasmid interference for curing antibiotic resistance plasmids in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kamruzzaman, Muhammad; Shoma, Shereen; Thomas, Christopher M; Partridge, Sally R; Iredell, Jonathan R

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance increases the likelihood of death from infection by common pathogens such as Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae in developed and developing countries alike. Most important modern antibiotic resistance genes spread between such species on self-transmissible (conjugative) plasmids. These plasmids are traditionally grouped on the basis of replicon incompatibility (Inc), which prevents coexistence of related plasmids in the same cell. These plasmids also use post-segregational killing ('addiction') systems, which poison any bacterial cells that lose the addictive plasmid, to guarantee their own survival. This study demonstrates that plasmid incompatibilities and addiction systems can be exploited to achieve the safe and complete eradication of antibiotic resistance from bacteria in vitro and in the mouse gut. Conjugative 'interference plasmids' were constructed by specifically deleting toxin and antibiotic resistance genes from target plasmids. These interference plasmids efficiently cured the corresponding antibiotic resistant target plasmid from different Enterobacteriaceae in vitro and restored antibiotic susceptibility in vivo to all bacterial populations into which plasmid-mediated resistance had spread. This approach might allow eradication of emergent or established populations of resistance plasmids in individuals at risk of severe sepsis, enabling subsequent use of less toxic and/or more effective antibiotics than would otherwise be possible, if sepsis develops. The generalisability of this approach and its potential applications in bioremediation of animal and environmental microbiomes should now be systematically explored.

  8. Mechanisms of plasmid segregation: have multicopy plasmids been overlooked?

    PubMed

    Million-Weaver, Samuel; Camps, Manel

    2014-09-01

    Plasmids are self-replicating pieces of DNA typically bearing non-essential genes. Given that plasmids represent a metabolic burden to the host, mechanisms ensuring plasmid transmission to daughter cells are critical for their stable maintenance in the population. Here we review these mechanisms, focusing on two active partition strategies common to low-copy plasmids: par systems type I and type II. Both involve three components: an adaptor protein, a motor protein, and a centromere, which is a sequence area in the plasmid that is recognized by the adaptor protein. The centromere-bound adaptor nucleates polymerization of the motor, leading to filament formation, which can pull plasmids apart (par I) or push them towards opposite poles of the cell (par II). No such active partition mechanisms are known to occur in high copy number plasmids. In this case, vertical transmission is generally considered stochastic, due to the random distribution of plasmids in the cytoplasm. We discuss conceptual and experimental lines of evidence questioning the random distribution model and posit the existence of a mechanism for segregation in high copy number plasmids that moves plasmids to cell poles to facilitate transmission to daughter cells. This mechanism would involve chromosomally-encoded proteins and the plasmid origin of replication. Modulation of this proposed mechanism of segregation could provide new ways to enhance plasmid stability in the context of recombinant gene expression, which is limiting for large-scale protein production and for bioremediation.

  9. Chemotherapy of Bacterial Plasmids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-01-29

    multiresistance to chemotherapeutic drugs, mediated drug resistance are the emergence of strains determined by R-plasmids, causes treatment failures of Haemophilus ... influenzae , resistant to ampicillin [8] of hospital infections, foremost in patients with a or chloramphenicol [9] and of Neisseria gonorrhoeae

  10. Plasmids of Legionella Species.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-18

    these organisms could support the replication of other plasmids. In recent years, there have been epidemics of typhoid fever in Vietnam and Mexico due...and M. Pollack. 1973. Chloram- phenicol-resistant typhoid fever in Vietnam associated with R factor. Lancet ii:983-985. IA I~ ! l -- +t.-t, lo. re

  11. Thermostable DNA ligase-mediated PCR production of circular plasmid (PPCP) and its application in directed evolution via in situ error-prone PCR.

    PubMed

    Le, Yilin; Chen, Huayou; Zagursky, Robert; Wu, J H David; Shao, Weilan

    2013-08-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a powerful method to produce linear DNA fragments. Here we describe the Tma thermostable DNA ligase-mediated PCR production of circular plasmid (PPCP) and its application in directed evolution via in situ error-prone PCR. In this thermostable DNA ligase-mediated whole-plasmid amplification method, the resultant DNA nick between the 5' end of the PCR primer and the extended newly synthesized DNA 3' end of each PCR cycle is ligated by Tma DNA ligase, resulting in circular plasmid DNA product that can be directly transformed. The template plasmid DNA is eliminated by 'selection marker swapping' upon transformation. When performed under an error-prone condition with Taq DNA polymerase, PPCP allows one-step construction of mutagenesis libraries based on in situ error-prone PCR so that random mutations are introduced into the target gene without altering the expression vector plasmid. A significant difference between PPCP and previously published methods is that PPCP allows exponential amplification of circular DNA. We used this method to create random mutagenesis libraries of a xylanase gene and two cellulase genes. Screening of these libraries resulted in mutant proteins with desired properties, demonstrating the usefulness of in situ error-prone PPCP for creating random mutagenesis libraries for directed evolution.

  12. Thermostable DNA Ligase-Mediated PCR Production of Circular Plasmid (PPCP) and Its Application in Directed Evolution via In situ Error-Prone PCR

    PubMed Central

    Le, Yilin; Chen, Huayou; Zagursky, Robert; Wu, J.H. David; Shao, Weilan

    2013-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a powerful method to produce linear DNA fragments. Here we describe the Tma thermostable DNA ligase-mediated PCR production of circular plasmid (PPCP) and its application in directed evolution via in situ error-prone PCR. In this thermostable DNA ligase-mediated whole-plasmid amplification method, the resultant DNA nick between the 5′ end of the PCR primer and the extended newly synthesized DNA 3′ end of each PCR cycle is ligated by Tma DNA ligase, resulting in circular plasmid DNA product that can be directly transformed. The template plasmid DNA is eliminated by ‘selection marker swapping’ upon transformation. When performed under an error-prone condition with Taq DNA polymerase, PPCP allows one-step construction of mutagenesis libraries based on in situ error-prone PCR so that random mutations are introduced into the target gene without altering the expression vector plasmid. A significant difference between PPCP and previously published methods is that PPCP allows exponential amplification of circular DNA. We used this method to create random mutagenesis libraries of a xylanase gene and two cellulase genes. Screening of these libraries resulted in mutant proteins with desired properties, demonstrating the usefulness of in situ error-prone PPCP for creating random mutagenesis libraries for directed evolution. PMID:23633530

  13. Cloning in Streptococcus lactis of plasmid-mediated UV resistance and effect on prophage stability

    SciTech Connect

    Chopin, M.C.; Chopin, A.; Rouault, A.; Simon, D.

    1986-02-01

    Plasmid pIL7 (33 kilobases) from Streptococcus lactis enhances UV resistance and prophage stability. A 5.4-kilobase pIL7 fragment carrying genes coding for both characters was cloned into S. lactis, using plasmid pHV1301 as the cloning vector. The recombinant plasmid was subsequently transferred to three other S. lactis strains by transformation or protoplast fusion. Cloned genes were expressed in all tested strains.

  14. Transformation of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by electroporation, utilizing constructed shuttle plasmids.

    PubMed Central

    Sreenivasan, P K; LeBlanc, D J; Lee, L N; Fives-Taylor, P

    1991-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, a periodontal pathogen, has been strongly implicated in human periodontal disease. Advances in the molecular analysis of A. actinomycetemcomitans virulence factors have been limited due to the unavailability of systems for genetic transfer, transposon mutagenesis, and gene complementation. Slow progress can be traced almost exclusively to the lack of gene vector systems and methods for the introduction of DNA into A. actinomycetemcomitans. An electrotransformation system that allowed at least five strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans to be transformed with stable shuttle plasmids which efficiently replicated in both Escherichia coli and A. actinomycetemcomitans was developed. One plasmid, a potential shuttle vector designated pDL282, is 5.7 kb in size, has several unique restriction enzyme sites, and codes for resistance to spectinomycin and ampicillin. E. coli and A. actinomycetemcomitans were transformed with equal efficiencies of approximately 10(5) transformants per micrograms of DNA. Similar transformation efficiencies were obtained whether the plasmid DNA was isolated from A. actinomycetemcomitans or E. coli. In addition, frozen competent cells of A. actinomycetemcomitans yielded comparable efficiencies of transformation. Restriction enzyme analysis of pDL282 isolated after transformation confirmed the presence of intact donor plasmids. A plasmid isolated from A. pleuropneumoniae was also capable of transforming some isolates of A. actinomycetemcomitans, although generally at a lower frequency. The availability of these shuttle plasmids and an efficient transformation procedure should significantly facilitate the molecular analysis of virulence factors of A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:1937823

  15. Plasmid interference for curing antibiotic resistance plasmids in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kamruzzaman, Muhammad; Shoma, Shereen; Thomas, Christopher M.; Partridge, Sally R.

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance increases the likelihood of death from infection by common pathogens such as Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae in developed and developing countries alike. Most important modern antibiotic resistance genes spread between such species on self-transmissible (conjugative) plasmids. These plasmids are traditionally grouped on the basis of replicon incompatibility (Inc), which prevents coexistence of related plasmids in the same cell. These plasmids also use post-segregational killing (‘addiction’) systems, which poison any bacterial cells that lose the addictive plasmid, to guarantee their own survival. This study demonstrates that plasmid incompatibilities and addiction systems can be exploited to achieve the safe and complete eradication of antibiotic resistance from bacteria in vitro and in the mouse gut. Conjugative ‘interference plasmids’ were constructed by specifically deleting toxin and antibiotic resistance genes from target plasmids. These interference plasmids efficiently cured the corresponding antibiotic resistant target plasmid from different Enterobacteriaceae in vitro and restored antibiotic susceptibility in vivo to all bacterial populations into which plasmid-mediated resistance had spread. This approach might allow eradication of emergent or established populations of resistance plasmids in individuals at risk of severe sepsis, enabling subsequent use of less toxic and/or more effective antibiotics than would otherwise be possible, if sepsis develops. The generalisability of this approach and its potential applications in bioremediation of animal and environmental microbiomes should now be systematically explored. PMID:28245276

  16. Complete nucleotide sequence of a native plasmid from Brevibacterium linens.

    PubMed

    Moore, Mathew; Svenson, Charles; Bowling, David; Glenn, Dianne

    2003-03-01

    Brevibacterium linens has commercial significance in the dairy industry and potential application in the production of bacteriocins and carotenoids. Strain development of these industrially significant organisms would be facilitated by the use of vectors, yet few are available. In this study we report the isolation of four novel plasmids from the Gram-positive coryneform B. linens, and determine the first complete nucleotide sequence of a native plasmid of B. linens. The cryptic plasmid pLIM is 7610 bp in length, and belongs to a subfamily of theta replicating ColE2-related plasmids. Initial investigation suggests that replication in pLIM requires two replicases, a primase (RepA) and a DNA binding protein (RepB), encoded by a single operon repAB. The origin of replication is located upstream of repAB transcription.

  17. DKK1 eukaryotic expression plasmid and expression product identification.

    PubMed

    Bao, G Y; Lu, K Y; Cui, S F; Xu, L

    2015-06-11

    We constructed the human dickkopf 1 (DKK1) eukaryotic expression plasmid and expressed, purified, and identified its expression product. We extracted cancer cells from cervical cancer tissue, followed by extraction of mRNA. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was conducted to obtain DKK1 gene fragments. Using these fragments, we prepared the recombinant plasmid pCMV-HA2/DKK1. The recombinant plasmid was restriction enzyme-digested and sequenced, and using liposome vectors, was transiently transfected into Free-Style 293-F cells (serum-free medium). DKK1 protein was detected by western blotting. The amplification product showed the expected size. Restriction enzyme digestion and sequence analysis showed that the recombinant plasmid was PCMV-HA2/DKK1. The expression product was verified properly by western blotting using an anti-DKKI antibody. The successful cloning of the DKKI gene and expression of DKKI protein will be useful for studying the biological activity of tumorigenesis.

  18. A series of template plasmids for Escherichia coli genome engineering.

    PubMed

    Deb, Shalini S; Reshamwala, Shamlan M S; Lali, Arvind M

    2016-06-01

    Metabolic engineering strategies often employ multi-copy episomal vectors to overexpress genes. However, chromosome-based overexpression is preferred as it avoids the use of selective pressure and reduces metabolic burden on the cell. We have constructed a series of template plasmids for λ Red-mediated Escherichia coli genome engineering. The template plasmids allow construction of genome integrating cassettes that can be used to integrate single copies of DNA sequences at predetermined sites or replace promoter regions. The constructed cassettes provide flexibility in terms of expression levels achieved and antibiotics used for selection, as well as allowing construction of marker-free strains. The modular design of the template plasmids allows replacement of genetic parts to construct new templates. Gene integration and promoter replacement using the template plasmids are illustrated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Development of a microfluidic chip-based plasmid miniprep.

    PubMed

    Northrup, Victoria A; Backhouse, Christopher J; Glerum, D Moira

    2010-07-15

    Plasmids are the workhorse of contemporary molecular biology, serving as vectors in the multitude of molecular cloning approaches now available. Plasmid minipreps are a routine and essential means of extracting plasmid DNA from bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, for identification, characterization, and further manipulation. Although there have been many approaches described and miniprep kits are commercially available, traditional minipreps typically require more than 16h, including the time needed for bacterial cell culture. Here we describe the development of a microfluidic chip (MFC)-based miniprep that uses on-chip lysis and trapping of large DNA in agarose to differentially separate plasmid DNA from the bacterial chromosome. Our approach greatly decreases both the time required for the miniprep itself and the time required for growth of the bacterial cultures because our on-chip miniprep uses 10(5) times fewer E. coli cells. Because the quality of the isolated plasmid is comparable to that obtained using conventional miniprep protocols, this approach allows growth of E. coli and isolation of plasmid within hours, thereby making it ideal for rapid screening approaches. This MFC-based miniprep, coupled with recently demonstrated on-chip transfection capabilities, lays the groundwork for seamless manipulation of plasmids on MFC platforms.

  20. Plasmid-associated sensitivity of Bacillus thuringiensis to UV light

    SciTech Connect

    Benoit, T.G.; Wilson, G.R.; Bull, D.L.; Aronson, A.I. )

    1990-08-01

    Spores and vegetative cells of Bacillus thuringiensis were more sensitive to UV light than were spores or cells of plasmid-cured B. thuringiensis strains or of the closely related Bacillus cereus. Introduction of B. thuringiensis plasmids into B. cereus by cell mating increased the UV sensitivity of the cells and spores. Protoxins encoded by one or more B. thuringiensis plasmids were not involved in spore sensitivity, since a B. thuringiensis strain conditional for protoxin accumulation was equally sensitive at the permissive and nonpermissive temperatures. In addition, introduction of either a cloned protoxin gene, the cloning vector, or another plasmid not containing a protoxin gene into a plasmid-cured strain of B. thuringiensis all increased the UV sensitivity of the spores. Although the variety of small, acid-soluble proteins was the same in the spores of all strains examined, the quantity of dipicolinic acid was about twice as high in the plasmid-containing strains, and this may account for the differences in UV sensitivity of the spores. The cells of some strains harboring only B. thuringiensis plasmids were much more sensitive than cells of any of the other strains, and the differences were much greater than observed with spores.

  1. Efficient generation of recombinant adenoviral vectors by Cre-lox recombination in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, K.; Barker, C.; Danthinne, X.; Imperiale, M. J.; Nabel, G. J.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although recombinant adenovirus vectors are attractive for use in gene expression studies and therapeutic applications, the construction of these vectors remains relatively time-consuming. We report here a strategy that simplifies the production of adenoviruses using the Cre-loxP system. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Full-length recombinant adenovirus DNA was generated in vitro by Cre-mediated recombination between loxP sites in a linearized shuttle plasmid containing a transgene and adenovirus genomic DNA. RESULTS: After transfection of Cre-treated DNA into 293 cells, replication-defective viral vectors were rapidly obtained without detectable wild-type virus. CONCLUSION: This system facilitates the development of recombinant adenoviral vectors for basic and clinical research. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:10448644

  2. Plasmid Copy Number Determination by Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    PubMed

    Anindyajati; Artarini, A Anita; Riani, Catur; Retnoningrum, Debbie S

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant therapeutic proteins are biopharmaceutical products that develop rapidly for years. Recombinant protein production in certain hosts requires vector expression harboring the gene encoding the corresponding protein. Escherichia coli is the prokaryote organism mostly used in recombinant protein production, commonly using a plasmid as the expression vector. Recombinant protein production is affected by plasmid copy number harboring the encoded gene, hence the determination of plasmid copy number also plays an important role in establishing a recombinant protein production system. On the industrial scale, a low copy number of plasmids are more suitable due to their better stability. In the previous study we constructed pCAD, a plasmid derived from the low copy number pBR322 plasmid. This study was aimed to confirm pCAD's copy number by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Plasmid copy number was determined by comparing the quantification signal from the plasmid to those from the chromosome. Copy number was then calculated by using a known copy number plasmid as a standard. Two pairs of primers, called tdk and ori, were designed for targeting a single gene tdk in the chromosome and a conserved domain in the plasmid's ori, respectively. Primer quality was analyzed in silico using PrimerSelect DNASTAR and PraTo software prior to in vitro evaluation on primer specificity and efficiency as well as optimization of qPCR conditions. Plasmid copy number determination was conducted on E. coli lysates harboring each plasmid, with the number of cells ranging from 10(2)-10(5) cells/μL. Cells were lysed by incubation at 95ºC for 10 minutes, followed by immediate freezing at -4°C. pBR322 plasmid with the copy number of ~19 copies/cell was used as the standard, while pJExpress414-sod plasmid possessing the high copy number pUC ori was also determined to test the method being used. In silico analysis based on primer-primer and primer-template interactions showed

  3. Characterization of the Lactobacillus plantarum plasmid pCD033 and generation of the plasmid free strain L. plantarum 3NSH.

    PubMed

    Heiss, Silvia; Grabherr, Reingard; Heinl, Stefan

    2015-09-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum CD033, a strain isolated from grass silage in Austria, harbors a 7.9 kb plasmid designated pCD033. Sequence analysis identified 14 open reading frames and 8 of these were supposed to be putative coding sequences. Gene annotation revealed no putative essential genes being plasmid encoded, but a plasmid addiction system based on a PemI/PemK-like toxin-antitoxin system, able to stabilize plasmid maintenance. Absence of a replication initiation protein, a double strand origin as well as a single strand origin on plasmid pCD033 suggests replication via a new type of theta mechanism, whereby plasmid replication is potentially initiated and regulated by non-coding RNA. Detailed examination of segregational stability of plasmid vectors consisting of pCD033-fragments, combined with a selection marker, resulted in definition of a stably maintained minimal replicon. A gene encoding a RepB/OrfX-like protein was found to be not essential for plasmid replication. Alignment of the amino acid sequence of this protein with related proteins unveiled a highly conserved amino acid motif (LLDQQQ). L. plantarum CD033 was cured of pCD033 resulting in the novel plasmid free strain L. plantarum 3NSH. Plasmid curing demonstrated that no essential features are provided by pCD033 under laboratory conditions.

  4. Gene therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma using non-viral vectors composed of bis guanidinium-tren-cholesterol and plasmids encoding the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases TIMP-2 and TIMP-3.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phuong-Lan; Vigneron, Jean-Pierre; Pericat, David; Dubois, Sylvie; Cazals, Dominique; Hervy, Martial; DeClerck, Yves A; Degott, Claude; Auclair, Christian

    2003-06-01

    Metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their natural inhibitors (TIMPs) contribute to the regulation of tumor microenvironment. Their expressions are deregulated in almost all human cancers. We report a novel approach to gene therapy of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), using repeated injections of DNA plasmids encoding the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) TIMP-2 or TIMP-3, and a novel competent formulation of gene transfer based on nontoxic cationic cholesterol derivatives. The new gene delivery system was efficient in demonstrating the antitumor efficiency of TIMP-2 or TIMP-3 in inhibiting tumor growth of human HuH7 HCC cells xenografted into nude mice. We show, for the first time, an in vivo effect of TIMP-3 in delaying HCC tumor growth. No treatment-related toxicity was noted. An inhibition of angiogenesis and tumor necrosis accompanied the inhibitory effects of TIMP-2 or TIMP-3 on tumor expansion and invasion. We also report a bystander effect produced by transfected HuH7 tumor cells mixed with untransfected cells in 1:1 ratio in culture that resulted in killing 98% of cells within 96 h. In addition, the soluble forms of TIMP-2 and TIMP-3 expressed by transfected cells exerted a cytotoxic effect on untransfected HuH7 cell cultures. Taken together, these results demonstrate the potential efficacy of repeated treatment of secreted TIMP-2 and TIMP-3 for the design of nonviral gene therapy for hepatocarcinoma.

  5. Use of FabV-Triclosan Plasmid Selection System for Efficient Expression and Production of Recombinant Proteins in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Syed A.; Chew, Yik Wei; Omar, Tasyriq Che; Azman, Nizuwan

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of recombinant plasmid vectors in host bacteria relies on the presence of selection antibiotics in the growth media to suppress plasmid -free segregants. However, presence of antibiotic resistance genes and antibiotics themselves is not acceptable in several applications of biotechnology. Previously, we have shown that FabV-Triclosan selection system can be used to select high and medium copy number plasmid vectors in E. coli. Here, we have extended our previous work and demonstrated that expression vectors containing FabV can be used efficiently to express heterologous recombinant proteins in similar or better amounts in E. coli host when compared with expression vectors containing β-lactamase. Use of small amount of non-antibiotic Triclosan as selection agent in growth medium, enhanced plasmid stability, applicability in various culture media, and compatibility with other selection systems for multiple plasmid maintenance are noteworthy features of FabV-Triclosan selection system. PMID:26642325

  6. Bacillus stearothermophilus contains a plasmid-borne gene for alpha-amylase.

    PubMed Central

    Mielenz, J R

    1983-01-01

    The gene for thermostable alpha-amylase from the thermophilic bacterium Bacillus stearothermophilus has been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Each alpha-amylase-producing colony contained at least a 9.7-kilobase-pair (kb) chimeric plasmid composed of the vector pBR322 and a common 5.4-kb HindIII fragment of DNA. B. stearothermophilus contains four plasmids with sizes from 12 kb to over 108 kb. Restriction endonuclease analysis of these naturally occurring plasmids showed they also contain a 5.4-kb HindIII fragment of DNA. Cloning experiments with the four plasmids yielded alpha-amylase-producing E. coli that contained the same 9.7-kb chimeric plasmid. Restriction endonuclease analysis and further recombinant DNA experiments identified a 26-kb plasmid that contains the gene for alpha-amylase. A spontaneous mutant of B. stearothermophilus unable to produce alpha-amylase was missing the 26-kb plasmid but contained a 20-kb plasmid. A 6-kb deletion within the region of the 5.4-kb HindIII fragment yielded the 20-kb plasmid unable to code for alpha-amylase. A nick-translated probe for the alpha-amylase coding region did not hybridize to either plasmid or total cellular DNA from this mutant strain of B. stearothermophilus. These results demonstrate the gene for alpha-amylase is located exclusively on a 26-kb plasmid in B. stearothermophilus with no genetic counterpart present on the chromosome. Images PMID:6193526

  7. The Alliance for Cellular Signaling Plasmid Collection

    PubMed Central

    Zavzavadjian, Joelle R.; Couture, Sam; Park, Wei Sun; Whalen, James; Lyon, Stephen; Lee, Genie; Fung, Eileen; Mi, Qingli; Liu, Jamie; Wall, Estelle; Santat, Leah; Dhandapani, Kavitha; Kivork, Christine; Driver, Adrienne; Zhu, Xiaocui; Chang, Mi Sook; Randhawa, Baljinder; Gehrig, Elizabeth; Bryan, Heather; Verghese, Mary; Maer, Andreia; Saunders, Brian; Ning, Yuhong; Subramaniam, Shankar; Meyer, Tobias; Simon, Melvin I.; O’Rourke, Nancy; Chandy, Grischa; Fraser, Iain D. C.

    2012-01-01

    Cellular responses to inputs that vary both temporally and spatially are determined by complex relationships between the components of cell signaling networks. Analysis of these relationships requires access to a wide range of experimental reagents and techniques, including the ability to express the protein components of the model cells in a variety of contexts. As part of the Alliance for Cellular Signaling, we developed a robust method for cloning large numbers of signaling ORFs into Gateway® entry vectors, and we created a wide range of compatible expression platforms for proteomics applications. To date, we have generated over 3000 plasmids that are available to the scientific community via the American Type Culture Collection. We have established a website at www.signaling-gateway.org/data/plasmid/ that allows users to browse, search, and blast Alliance for Cellular Signaling plasmids. The collection primarily contains murine signaling ORFs with an emphasis on kinases and G protein signaling genes. Here we describe the cloning, databasing, and application of this proteomics resource for large scale subcellular localization screens in mammalian cell lines. PMID:17192258

  8. Inhibition of corneal neovascularization with the combination of bevacizumab and plasmid pigment epithelium-derived factor-synthetic amphiphile INTeraction-18 (p-PEDF-SAINT-18) vector in a rat corneal experimental angiogenesis model.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chien-Neng; Chen, Chung-Yi; Chen, San-Ni; Yang, Lin-Cheng; Lai, Li-Ju; Lai, Chien-Hsiung; Chen, Miao-Fen; Hung, Chia-Hui; Chen, Ching-Hsein

    2013-04-16

    Bevacizumab, a 149-kDa protein, is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody to VEGF. PEDF, a 50-kDa glycoprotein, has demonstrated anti-vasopermeability properties. In this study, we demonstrated that the combination of bevacizumab and plasmid pigment epithelium-derived factor-synthetic amphiphile INTeraction-18(p-PEDF-SAINT-18) has a favorable antiangiogenic effect on corneal NV. Four groups(Group A: 0 μg + 0 μg, B: 0.1 μg + 0.1 μg, C: 1 μg + 1 μg, and D: 10 μg + 10 μg) of bevacizumab + p-PEDF-SAINT-18 were prepared and implanted into the rat subconjunctival substantia propria 1.5 mm from the limbus on the temporal side. Then, 1 μgof p-bFGF-SAINT-18 was prepared and implanted into the rat corneal stroma 1.5 mm from the limbus on the same side. The inhibition of NV was observed and quantified from days 1 to 60. Biomicroscopic examination, western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry were used to analyze the 18-kDa bFGF, 50-kDa PEDF and VEGF protein expression. No inhibition activity for normal limbal vessels was noted. Subconjunctival injection with the combination of bevacizumab and p-PEDF-SAINT-18 successfully inhibited corneal NV.The bFGF and PEDF genes were successfully expressed as shown by western blot analysis,and a mild immune response to HLA-DR was shown by immunohistochemistry. We concluded that the combination of bevacizumab and p-PEDF-SAINT-18 may have more potent and prolonged antiangiogenic effects, making it possible to reduce the frequency of subconjunctival bevacizumab administration combined with a relatively safe profile and low toxicity.

  9. Bacterial plasmid transfer under space flight conditions: The Mobilisatsia experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boever, P.; Ilyin, V.; Mahillon, J.; Mergeay, M.

    Background Microorganisms are subject to a genetic evolution which may lead to the capacity to colonize new environments and to cause infections Central players in this evolutionary process are mobile genetic elements phages plasmids and transposons The latter help to mobilize and reorganize genes be it within a given genome intragenomic mobility or between bacterial cells intercellular mobility Confined environment and space flight related factors such as microgravity and cosmic radiation may influence the frequency with which mobile genetic elements are exchanged between microorganisms Aim Within the frame of the Mobilisatsia experiment a triparental microbial plasmid transfer was promoted aboard the International Space Station ISS The efficiency of the plasmid exchange process was compared with a synchronously performed ground control experiment An experiment was carried out with well-characterized Gram-negative test strains and one experiment was done with Gram-positive test strains Results The experiment took place during the Soyouz Mission 8 to the ISS from April 19th until April 30th 2004 Liquid cultures of the bacterial strains Cupriavidus metallidurans AE815 final recipient Escherichia coli CM1962 carrying a mobilisable vector with a nickel-resistance marker and E coli CM140 carrying the Broad Host Range plasmid RP4 for the Gram-negative experiment and Bacillus thuringiensis Bti AND931 carrying the conjugative plasmid pXO16 Bti 4Q7 with mobilisable vector pC194 carrying a resistance to chloramphenicol and Bti GBJ002

  10. Transformation of Azotobacter vinelandii with plasmid DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Glick, B R; Brooks, H E; Pasternak, J J

    1985-01-01

    Azotobacter vinelandii cells can be transformed at high frequencies with the broad-host-range plasmids pRK2501, RSF1010, and pGSS15, using a modification of the procedure developed by Page and von Tigerstrom (J. Bacteriol. 139:1058-1061, 1979) for chromosomal DNA-mediated transformation. The frequency of transformation per microgram of plasmid DNA per viable cell with pRK2501 and pGSS15 was about 5 X 10(-2) and 2 X 10(-2), respectively. With RSF1010, transformation frequencies ranged from 3 X 10(-4) to 4 X 10(-2). With each plasmid, the frequency of transformation was independent of the phase of the growth cycle. When concentrations of pRK2501 ranging from 0.1 to 51 micrograms of DNA were tested, the frequency of transformation was directly proportional to the amount of DNA. This linear response indicated that, although the uptake of plasmid DNA with this procedure may be inefficient, there is a high probability that once inside a cell the plasmid will be stably maintained. Cells that have been transformed with pRK2501 did not grow well on transforming medium which lacks iron and contains fixed nitrogen. However, on growth medium which contains iron and lacks fixed nitrogen, transformants produced distinctive colonies larger than those of nontransformed cells. Resistance to kanamycin due to transformation by pRK2501 was stably maintained for at least 10 successive generations in the absence of selective pressure. The present protocol should facilitate the molecular cloning of genes in Azotobacter spp. Images PMID:3980437

  11. Characterization and application of a rolling-circle-type plasmid from Cupriavidus taiwanensis.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Shih-Yi; Chen, Wen-Ming; Lin, Guang-Huey

    2007-05-01

    Two small cryptic plasmids, pTJ86-1 and pTJ86-2, identified in Cupriavidus taiwanensis strain TJ86, were detected and characterized. Complete sequencing of pTJ86-1 and pTJ86-2 revealed these plasmids to be 2221 and 2229bp in length with a GC content of 61.7% and 61.6%, respectively. Both plasmids harbored four open reading frames (ORF1, 2, 3 and 4). Only the predicted ORF1 gene product of both plasmids (436 amino acids) was homologous to Rep proteins previously identified on plasmids replicated using a rolling-circle replication (RCR). A double-stranded origin (DSO) of replication, highly conserved in the group III (cluster III) RCR plasmids, was identified and located immediately upstream of this putative Rep gene. In addition, both plasmids contained a putative single-stranded origin of replication (SSO) exhibiting similarity to the ssoA-type. Detection of single-stranded plasmid DNA by Southern analysis and S1 nuclease digestion confirmed that the cryptic plasmid replicated via an RCR mechanism. A potential shuttle vector, pS4-tet(R), was constructed by ligation of pTJ86-1 to the cloning vector pBluescript II SK(+) along with the insertion of a tetracycline-resistance (tet(R)) gene. It was successfully used for the transformation of genera Burkholderia and Cupriavidus.

  12. Toxin Plasmids of Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jihong; Adams, Vicki; Bannam, Trudi L.; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Garcia, Jorge P.; Uzal, Francisco A.; Rood, Julian I.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY In both humans and animals, Clostridium perfringens is an important cause of histotoxic infections and diseases originating in the intestines, such as enteritis and enterotoxemia. The virulence of this Gram-positive, anaerobic bacterium is heavily dependent upon its prolific toxin-producing ability. Many of the ∼16 toxins produced by C. perfringens are encoded by large plasmids that range in size from ∼45 kb to ∼140 kb. These plasmid-encoded toxins are often closely associated with mobile elements. A C. perfringens strain can carry up to three different toxin plasmids, with a single plasmid carrying up to three distinct toxin genes. Molecular Koch's postulate analyses have established the importance of several plasmid-encoded toxins when C. perfringens disease strains cause enteritis or enterotoxemias. Many toxin plasmids are closely related, suggesting a common evolutionary origin. In particular, most toxin plasmids and some antibiotic resistance plasmids of C. perfringens share an ∼35-kb region containing a Tn916-related conjugation locus named tcp (transfer of clostridial plasmids). This tcp locus can mediate highly efficient conjugative transfer of these toxin or resistance plasmids. For example, conjugative transfer of a toxin plasmid from an infecting strain to C. perfringens normal intestinal flora strains may help to amplify and prolong an infection. Therefore, the presence of toxin genes on conjugative plasmids, particularly in association with insertion sequences that may mobilize these toxin genes, likely provides C. perfringens with considerable virulence plasticity and adaptability when it causes diseases originating in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23699255

  13. Homologous Recombination between Autonomously Replicating Plasmids in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ayares, David; Spencer, James; Schwartz, Faina; Morse, Brian; Kucherlapati, Raju

    1985-01-01

    The ability of autonomously replicating plasmids to recombine in mammalian cells was investigated. Two deletion plasmids of the eukaryotic-prokaryotic shuttle vector pSV2neo were cotransfected into transformed monkey COS cells. Examination of the low molecular weight DNA isolated after 48 hr of incubation revealed that recombination between the plasmids had occurred. The DNA was also used to transform recA- E. coli. Yield of neo R colonies signified homologous recombination. Examination of the plasmid DNA from these colonies confirmed this view. Double-strand breaks in one or both of the input plasmids at the sites of deletion resulted in an enhancement of recombination frequency. The recombination process yielded monomeric and dimeric molecules. Examination of these molecules revealed that reciprocal recombination as well as gene conversion events were involved in the generation of plasmids bearing an intact neo gene. The COS cell system we describe is analogous to study of bacteriophage recombination and yeast random-spore analysis. PMID:2996980

  14. The Addgene repository: an international nonprofit plasmid and data resource

    PubMed Central

    Kamens, Joanne

    2015-01-01

    The Addgene Repository (http://www.addgene.org) was founded to accelerate research and discovery by improving access to useful, high-quality research materials and information. The repository archives plasmids generated by scientists, conducts quality control, annotates the associated data and makes the plasmids and their data available to the scientific community. Plasmid associated data undergoes ongoing curation by members of the scientific community and by Addgene scientists. The growing database contains information on >31 000 unique plasmids spanning most experimental biological systems and organisms. The library includes a large number of plasmid tools for use in a wide variety of research areas, such as empty backbones, lentiviral resources, fluorescent protein vectors and genome engineering tools. The Addgene Repository database is always evolving with new plasmid deposits so it contains currently pertinent resources while ensuring the information on earlier deposits is still available. Custom search and browse features are available to access information on the diverse collection. Extensive educational materials and information are provided by the database curators to support the scientists that are accessing the repository's materials and data. PMID:25392412

  15. Sequence-Modified Antibiotic Resistance Genes Provide Sustained Plasmid-Mediated Transgene Expression in Mammals.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jiamiao; Zhang, Feijie; Fire, Andrew Z; Kay, Mark A

    2017-03-30

    Conventional plasmid vectors are incapable of achieving sustained levels of transgene expression in vivo even in quiescent mammalian tissues because the transgene expression cassette is silenced. Transcriptional silencing results from the presence of the bacterial plasmid backbone or virtually any DNA sequence of >1 kb in length placed outside of the expression cassette. Here, we show that transcriptional silencing can be substantially forestalled by increasing the An/Tn sequence composition in the plasmid bacterial backbone. Increasing numbers of An/Tn sequences increased sustained transcription of both backbone sequences and adjacent expression cassettes. In order to recapitulate these expression profiles in compact and portable plasmid DNA backbones, we engineered the standard kanamycin or ampicillin antibiotic resistance genes, optimizing the number of An/Tn sequence without altering the encoded amino acids. The resulting vector backbones yield sustained transgene expression from mouse liver, providing generic DNA vectors capable of sustained transgene expression without additional genes or mammalian regulatory elements.

  16. Rapid modification of the pET-28 expression vector for ligation independent cloning using homologous recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Gay, Glen; Wagner, Drew T; Keatinge-Clay, Adrian T; Gay, Darren C

    2014-11-01

    The ability to rapidly customize an expression vector of choice is a valuable tool for any researcher involved in high-throughput molecular cloning for protein overexpression. Unfortunately, it is common practice to amend or neglect protein targets if the gene that encodes the protein of interest is incompatible with the multiple-cloning region of a preferred expression vector. To address this issue, a method was developed to quickly exchange the multiple-cloning region of the popular expression plasmid pET-28 with a ligation-independent cloning cassette, generating pGAY-28. This cassette contains dual inverted restriction sites that reduce false positive clones by generating a linearized plasmid incapable of self-annealing after a single restriction-enzyme digest. We also establish that progressively cooling the vector and insert leads to a significant increase in ligation-independent transformation efficiency, demonstrated by the incorporation of a 10.3 kb insert into the vector. The method reported to accomplish plasmid reconstruction is uniquely versatile yet simple, relying on the strategic placement of primers combined with homologous recombination of PCR products in yeast.

  17. A new method for rapidly generating gene-targeting vectors by engineering BACs through homologous recombination in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Cotta-de-Almeida, Vinicius; Schonhoff, Susan; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Leiter, Andrew; Snapper, Scott B

    2003-09-01

    Generating knockout mice is still an expensive and highly time-consuming process. Target construct generation, the first labor-intensive step in this process, requires the manipulation of large fragments of DNA and numerous, and often cumbersome, cloning steps. Here we show the development of a rapid approach for generating targeting constructs that capitalizes on efficient homologous recombination between linear DNA fragments and circular plasmids in Escherichia coli ("recombineering"), the availability of bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs), and the accessibility of the sequence of the mouse genome. Employing recombineering, we demonstrate with only 1-2 template plasmids, short homologies (40-50bp) between donor and target DNA, and one subcloning step that we can efficiently manipulate BACs in situ to generate a complicated targeting vector. This procedure avoids the need to construct or screen genomic libraries and permits the generation of most standard, conditional, or knock-in targeting vectors, often within two weeks.

  18. Baculovirus Transfer Vectors.

    PubMed

    Possee, Robert D; King, Linda A

    2016-01-01

    The production of a recombinant baculovirus expression vector normally involves mixing infectious virus DNA with a plasmid-based transfer vector and then co-transfecting insect cells to initiate virus infection. The aim of this chapter is to provide an update on the range of baculovirus transfer vectors currently available. Some of the original transfer vectors developed are now difficult to obtain but generally have been replaced by superior reagents. We focus on those that are available commercially and should be easy to locate. These vectors permit the insertion of single or multiple genes for expression, or the production of proteins with specific peptide tags that aid subsequent protein purification. Others have signal peptide coding regions permitting protein secretion or plasma membrane localization. A table listing the transfer vectors also includes information on the parental virus that should be used with each one. Methods are described for the direct insertion of a recombinant gene into the virus genome without the requirement for a transfer vector. The information provided should enable new users of the system to choose those reagents most suitable for their purposes.

  19. [Construction and identification of a multiple myeloma-specific APE1 siRNA expression vector].

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhen-zhou; Chen, Xing-hua; Wang, Dong; Wang, Ge; Xiang, De-bing

    2006-04-01

    To construct a multiple myeloma (MM)-specific APE1siRNA expression vector, and detect the specific knock-down effect of the siRNA on expression of APE1 protein. APE1siRNA cDNA sequence was designed, synthesized and inserted into pSilencer 2.0-U6 linear expression vector. pSilencer APE1siRNA was digested by enzyme EcoRI and BamHI, then linear vector and IgP fragments were conjugated by T4 DNA ligase. pSilencer IgP-APE1siRNA and pSilencer IE-IgP-APE1siRNA were digested by enzyme EcoRI or XhoI. Linear vector and IE or Kappa fragments were conjugated by T4 DNA ligase. Then a MM specific pSilencer K-IE-IgP-APE1siRNA was cloned. The recombinant products were identified by DNA sequencing and enzyme digestions at each step. pSilencer K-IE-IgP-APE1siRNA plasmid was transfected to KM3, HOS, MDA-231 cells by liposome. APE1 gene silence induced by RNAi was analysed by Western blot. APE1 protein in KM3 cells could be knocked down effectively and specifically by pSilencer K-IE-IgP-APE1siRNA vector. After 2 days, the level of APE1 protein in KM3 cells transfected with siRNA was 0.118 +/- 0.047, while that transfected with plasmid only was 0.988 +/- 0.029. The efficiency of gene silence was 90%. A MM specific APE1siRNA expression vector was successfully constructed.

  20. Influence of plasma-generated reactive species on the plasmid DNA structure and plasmid-mediated transformation of Escherichia coli cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Geon Joon; Choi, Min Ah; Kim, Daewook; Kim, Jun Young; Ghimire, Bhagirath; Choi, Eun Ha; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2017-09-01

    The influence of plasma-generated reactive species on the conformation of plasmid DNA (pDNA) and the transformation efficiency of Escherichia coli cells were studied. An atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was used to generate reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in an aqueous solution. When E. coli cells were transformed, the transformation efficiency of E. coli with the APPJ-treated plasmid was lower than with the APPJ-untreated plasmid. Transformation efficiency was reduced due to structural modification and degradation of the pDNA by the APPJ. Plasma treatment caused structural modification of the plasmid from the supercoiled form to the linear form, and also decreased the amount of plasmid by degrading the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) structure accompanied by disruption of nucleobases and DNA strand breakage. The formation of linear plasmid from supercoiled plasmid by the APPJ treatment was verified through electrophoretic analysis of the NdeI restriction enzyme-cut supercoiled plasmid. The structural modification and/or decrease in the amount of pDNA are attributed to the RONS from the plasma itself and to those derived from the interaction of plasma radicals with the aqueous solution. The effect of plasma treatment on the transformation efficiency of E. coli cells was more pronounced with the linear plasmid than with the supercoiled plasmid, indicating that the linear plasmid is more vulnerable to RONS. Overall, these results revealed that plasma-generated RONS can modify the structural and optical properties of bacterial pDNA, thus affecting its biological function.

  1. Conjugative Plasmids of Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Pachulec, Emilia; van der Does, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Many clinical isolates of the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae contain conjugative plasmids. The host range of these plasmids is limited to Neisseria species, but presence of a tetracycline (tetM) determinant inserted in several of these plasmids is an important cause of the rapid spread of tetracycline resistance. Previously plasmids with different backbones (Dutch and American type backbones) and with and without different tetM determinants (Dutch and American type tetM determinants) have been identified. Within the isolates tested, all plasmids with American or Dutch type tetM determinants contained a Dutch type plasmid backbone. This demonstrated that tetM determinants should not be used to differentiate between conjugal plasmid backbones. The nucleotide sequences of conjugative plasmids with Dutch type plasmid backbones either not containing the tetM determinant (pEP5233) or containing Dutch (pEP5289) or American (pEP5050) type tetM determinants were determined. Analysis of the backbone sequences showed that they belong to a novel IncP1 subfamily divergent from the IncP1α, β, γ, δ and ε subfamilies. The tetM determinants were inserted in a genetic load region found in all these plasmids. Insertion was accompanied by the insertion of a gene with an unknown function, and rearrangement of a toxin/antitoxin gene cluster. The genetic load region contains two toxin/antitoxins of the Zeta/Epsilon toxin/antitoxin family previously only found in Gram positive organisms and the virulence associated protein D of the VapD/VapX toxin/antitoxin family. Remarkably, presence of VapX of pJD1, a small cryptic neisserial plasmid, in the acceptor strain strongly increased the conjugation efficiency, suggesting that it functions as an antitoxin for the conjugative plasmid. The presence of the toxin and antitoxin on different plasmids might explain why the host range of this IncP1 plasmid is limited to Neisseria species. The isolated plasmids conjugated efficiently between

  2. A linear programming manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuey, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    Computer solutions of linear programming problems are outlined. Information covers vector spaces, convex sets, and matrix algebra elements for solving simultaneous linear equations. Dual problems, reduced cost analysis, ranges, and error analysis are illustrated.

  3. Phenotypic plasticity in bacterial plasmids.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Paul E

    2004-01-01

    Plasmid pB15 was previously shown to evolve increased horizontal (infectious) transfer at the expense of reduced vertical (intergenerational) transfer and vice versa, a key trade-off assumed in theories of parasite virulence. Whereas the models predict that susceptible host abundance should determine which mode of transfer is selectively favored, host density failed to mediate the trade-off in pB15. One possibility is that the plasmid's transfer deviates from the assumption that horizontal spread (conjugation) occurs in direct proportion to cell density. I tested this hypothesis using Escherichia coli/pB15 associations in laboratory serial culture. Contrary to most models of plasmid transfer kinetics, my data show that pB15 invades static (nonshaking) bacterial cultures only at intermediate densities. The results can be explained by phenotypic plasticity in traits governing plasmid transfer. As cells become more numerous, the plasmid's conjugative transfer unexpectedly declines, while the trade-off between transmission routes causes vertical transfer to increase. Thus, at intermediate densities the plasmid's horizontal transfer can offset selection against plasmid-bearing cells, but at high densities pB15 conjugates so poorly that it cannot invade. I discuss adaptive vs. nonadaptive causes for the phenotypic plasticity, as well as potential mechanisms that may lead to complex transfer dynamics of plasmids in liquid environments. PMID:15166133

  4. Nucleocytoplasmic transport of plasmid DNA: a perilous journey from the cytoplasm to the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Lechardeur, Delphine; Lukacs, Gergely L

    2006-09-01

    Nonviral vectors represent a promising approach for the safe delivery of therapeutic DNA in genetic and acquired human diseases. Before synthetic vector systems can be used for clinical applications, their limited efficacy must be addressed. At the cellular level, successful gene transfer is dependent on several additional factors including DNA uptake, release from the DNA-vector complex, and nucleocytoplasmic transport. This paper reviews the major metabolic and physical impediments that plasmid DNA vectorized by synthetic vectors encounters between the cytosol and the nucleus. Plasmid DNA that escapes the endolysosomal compartment encounters the diffusional and metabolic barriers of the cytoplasm, reducing the number of intact plasmids that reach the nuclear envelope. Nuclear translocation of DNA requires either the disassembly of the nuclear envelope during cell division or active nuclear transport via the nuclear pore complex. In the nucleus, plasmid DNA is relatively stable, but its transcription and its fate during cell division are still debated. A better understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of nonviral gene transfer during nucleocytoplasmic trafficking may provide strategies to overcome those obstacles that limit the efficiency of nonviral gene delivery. We review some of the current methods of gene transfer mediated by synthetic vectors, highlighting systems that exploit our actual knowledge of the nucleocytoplasmic transport of plasmid DNA.

  5. Cloning-independent plasmid construction for genetic studies in streptococci

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhoujie; Qi, Fengxia; Merritt, Justin

    2013-01-01

    Shuttle plasmids are among the few routinely utilized tools in the Streptococcus mutans genetic system that still require the use of classical cloning methodologies and intermediate hosts for genetic manipulation. Accordingly, it typically requires considerably less time and effort to introduce mutations onto the S. mutans chromosome than it does to construct shuttle vectors for expressing genes in trans. Occasionally, shuttle vector constructs also exhibit toxicity in E. coli, which prevents their proper assembly. To circumvent these limitations, we modified a prolonged overlap extension PCR (POE-PCR) protocol to facilitate direct plasmid assembly in S. mutans. Using solely PCR, we created the reporter vector pZX7, which contains a single minimal streptococcal replication origin and harbors a spectinomycin resistance cassette and the gusA gene encoding β-glucuronidase. We compared the efficiency of pZX7 assembly using multiple strains of S. mutans and were able to obtain from 5×103 – 2×105 CFU/μg PCR product. Likewise, we used pZX7 to further demonstrate that Streptococcus sanguinis and Streptococcus gordonii are also excellent hosts for cloning-independent plasmid assembly, which suggests that this system is likely to function in numerous other streptococci. Consequently, it should be possible to completely forgo the use of E. coli – Streptococcus shuttle vectors in many streptococcal species, thereby decreasing the time and effort required to assemble constructs and eliminating any toxicity issues associated with intermediate hosts. PMID:23673081

  6. Plasmid acquisition in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juergensmeyer, Margaret A.; Juergensmeyer, Elizabeth A.; Guikema, James A.

    1995-01-01

    In microgravity, bacteria often show an increased resistance to antibiotics. Bacteria can develop resistance to an antibiotic after transformation, the acquisition of DNA, usually in the form of a plasmid containing a gene for resistance to one or more antibiotics. In order to study the capacity of bacteria to become resistant to antibiotics in microgravity, we have modified the standard protocol for transformation of Escherichia coli for use in the NASA-flight-certified hardware package, The Fluid Processing Apparatus (FPA). Here we report on the ability of E. coli to remain competent for long periods of time at temperatures that are readily available on the Space Shuttle, and present some preliminary flight results.

  7. Plasmid acquisition in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juergensmeyer, Margaret A.; Juergensmeyer, Elizabeth A.; Guikema, James A.

    1995-01-01

    In microgravity, bacteria often show an increased resistance to antibiotics. Bacteria can develop resistance to an antibiotic after transformation, the acquisition of DNA, usually in the form of a plasmid containing a gene for resistance to one or more antibiotics. In order to study the capacity of bacteria to become resistant to antibiotics in microgravity, we have modified the standard protocol for transformation of Escherichia coli for use in the NASA-flight-certified hardware package, The Fluid Processing Apparatus (FPA). Here we report on the ability of E. coli to remain competent for long periods of time at temperatures that are readily available on the Space Shuttle, and present some preliminary flight results.

  8. Conjugation efficiency depends on intra and intercellular interactions between distinct plasmids: Plasmids promote the immigration of other plasmids but repress co-colonizing plasmids.

    PubMed

    Gama, João Alves; Zilhão, Rita; Dionisio, Francisco

    2017-08-24

    Conjugative plasmids encode the genes responsible for the synthesis of conjugative pili and plasmid transfer. Expression of the conjugative machinery (including conjugative pili) may be costly to bacteria, not only due to the energetic/metabolic cost associated with their expression but also because they serve as receptors for certain viruses. Consequently, the presence of two plasmids in the same cell may be disadvantageous to each plasmid, because they may impose a higher fitness cost on the host. Therefore, plasmids may encode mechanisms to cope with co-resident plasmids. Moreover, it is possible that the transfer rate of a plasmid is affected by the presence of a distinct plasmid in the recipient cell. In this work, we measured transfer rates of twelve natural plasmids belonging to seven incompatibility groups in three situations, namely when: (i) donor cells contain a plasmid and recipient cells are plasmid-free; (ii) donor cells contain two unrelated plasmids and recipient cells are plasmid-free; and (iii) half of the cells contain a given plasmid and the other half contain another, unrelated, plasmid. In the third situation, recipient cells of a plasmid are the donor cells of the other plasmid. We show that there are more negative interactions (reduction of a plasmid's conjugative efficiency) between plasmids if they reside in the same cell than if they reside in different cells. However, if plasmids interacted intercellularly, the transfer rate of one of the plasmids was often higher (when the unrelated conjugative plasmid was present in the recipient cell) than if the recipient cell was plasmid-free - a positive effect. Experimental data retrieved from the study of mutant plasmids not expressing conjugative pili on the cell surface suggest that positive effects result from a higher efficiency of mating pair formation. Overall, our results suggest that negative interactions are significantly more frequent when plasmids occupy the same cell. Such

  9. Upstream processing of plasmid DNA for vaccine and gene therapy applications.

    PubMed

    Tejeda-Mansir, Armando; Montesinos, Rosa M

    2008-01-01

    The demand for plasmid DNA has increased vastly in response to rapid advances in its use in gene therapy and vaccines. These therapies are based on the same principle, i.e. the introduction of nucleic acids in human/non-human cells receptor to restore, cancel, enhance or introduce a biochemical function. Naked plasmid DNA as a vector has attracted a lot of interest since it offers several advantages over a viral vector, especially weak immunogenicity, better safety and easy to manufacture, but low transfection efficacy. Non-viral gene therapy may require considerable amounts (milligram scale) of pharmaceutical-grade pDNA per patient since the efficacy and duration of gene expression is presently relatively low. Reliance on fermentation, which generates large lysate volumes, for producing the needed quantities of pDNA is becoming more widespread. Through optimization of the biological system, growth environment and the growth mode, improvements can be achieved in biomass productivity, plasmid yield, plasmid quality and production costs. The information on large-scale plasmid production is scarce and usually not available to the scientific community. This review summarizes recent patents and patent applications relating to plasmid upstream processing manufacturing, ranging from plasmid design to growth strategies to produce plasmid-bearing E. coli.

  10. Testing plasmid stability of Escherichia coli using the Continuously Operated Shaken BIOreactor System.

    PubMed

    Sieben, Michaela; Steinhorn, Gregor; Müller, Carsten; Fuchs, Simone; Ann Chin, Laura; Regestein, Lars; Büchs, Jochen

    2016-11-01

    Plasmids are common vectors to genetically manipulate Escherichia coli or other microorganisms. They are easy to use and considerable experience has accumulated on their application in heterologous protein production. However, plasmids can be lost during cell growth, if no selection pressure like, e.g., antibiotics is used, hampering the production of the desired protein and endangering the economic success of a biotechnological production process. Thus, in this study the Continuously Operated Shaken BIOreactor System (COSBIOS) is applied as a tool for fast parallel testing of strain stability and operation conditions and to evaluate measures to counter such plasmid loss. In specific, by applying various ampicillin concentrations, the lowest effective ampicillin dosage is investigated to secure plasmid stability while lowering adverse ecological effects. A significant difference was found in the growth rates of plasmid-bearing and plasmid-free cells. The undesired plasmid-free cells grew 30% faster than the desired plasmid-bearing cells. During the testing of plasmid stability without antibiotics, the population fraction of plasmid-bearing cells rapidly decreased in continuous culture to zero within the first 48 h. An initial single dosage of ampicillin did not prevent plasmid loss. By contrast, a continuous application of a low dosage of 10 µg/mL ampicillin in the feed medium maintained plasmid stability in the culture. Consequently, the COSBIOS is an apt reactor system for measuring plasmid stability and evaluating methods to enhance this stability. Hence, decreased production of heterologous protein can be prevented. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:1418-1425, 2016.

  11. Trans-complementable copy-number mutants of plasmid ColE1.

    PubMed

    Twigg, A J; Sherratt, D

    1980-01-10

    Plasmid ColE1, like many other small non-conjugative plasmids, is present in multiple copies (about 15 per chromsome equivalent) in Escherichia coli cells. Because of their high copy number, the replication of such plasmids has been described as 'relaxed', even though there is good evidence that it is strictly controlled: ColE1 derivatives have characteristic but different copy numbers and ColE1 copy-number mutants have been characterised. No plasmid-specified protein is essential for the replication of ColE1 and related plasmids, as extensive replication can occur in chloramphenicol-treated cells, in plasmid-free chloramphenicol-treated cells transfected with a hybrid ColE1/phage replicon and in vitro in extracts derived from plasmid-free cells. Nevertheless, it is possible that a plasmid-specified protein is involved in ColE1 replication control in viable cells. Here we show that deletion of a given non-essential region from ColE1-like plasmids results in a raised copy number. Such plasmids are stably maintained and have their copy number returned to normal when a complementing plasmid is present in the same cell, indicating that a plasmid-specified diffusible gene product regulates the plasmid content of ColE1-containing cells. Deletion of the equivalent region from the cloning vector pBR322 gives a derivative which has a raised copy number and which has also lost its origin for conjugal transfer; unlike pBR322, it cannot be mobilised.

  12. Molecular characterization of Bifidobacterium longum biovar longum NAL8 plasmids and construction of a novel replicon screening system.

    PubMed

    Guglielmetti, Simone; Karp, Matti; Mora, Diego; Tamagnini, Isabella; Parini, Carlo

    2007-04-01

    In this study, we performed molecular characterization and sequence analysis of three plasmids from the human intestinal isolate Bifidobacterium longum biovar longum NAL8 and developed a novel vector screening system. Plasmids pNAL8H (10 kb) and pNAL8M (4.9 kb) show close sequence similarity to and the same gene organization as the already characterized B. longum plasmids. The B. longum plasmid pNAC1 was identified as being most closely related to pNAL8L (3.5 kb). However, DNA sequence analysis suggested that direct repeat-rich sites could have promoted several recombination events to diversify the two plasmid molecules. We verified the likely rolling circle replication of plasmid pNAL8L and studied the phylogenetic relationship in all the Bifidobacterium plasmids fully sequenced to date based on in silico comparative sequence analysis of their replication proteins and iteron regions. Our transformation experiments confirmed that the ColE1 replication origin from high-copy-number pUC vectors could interfere with the replication apparatus of Bifidobacterium plasmids and give rise to false positive clones. As a result, we developed a system suitable for avoiding possible interference by other functional replication modules on the vector and for screening functional replicons from wild-type plasmids.

  13. Genome Sequence of Listeria monocytogenes Plasmid pLM-C-273 Carrying Genes Related to Stress Resistance.

    PubMed

    Liang, Lindsay; Gnaneshan, Saravanamuttu; Garduño, Rafael A; Mallo, Gustavo V

    2016-10-13

    Mobile genetic elements in bacteria, such as plasmids, act as important vectors for the transfer of antibiotic resistance, virulence, and metal resistance genes. Here, we report the genome sequence of a new plasmid pLM-C-273, identified in a Listeria monocytogenes strain isolated from a clinical sample in Ontario, Canada.

  14. Genome Sequence of Listeria monocytogenes Plasmid pLM-C-273 Carrying Genes Related to Stress Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Lindsay; Gnaneshan, Saravanamuttu; Garduño, Rafael A.

    2016-01-01

    Mobile genetic elements in bacteria, such as plasmids, act as important vectors for the transfer of antibiotic resistance, virulence, and metal resistance genes. Here, we report the genome sequence of a new plasmid pLM-C-273, identified in a Listeria monocytogenes strain isolated from a clinical sample in Ontario, Canada. PMID:27738039

  15. DNASU plasmid and PSI:Biology-Materials repositories: resources to accelerate biological research.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Catherine Y; Park, Jin G; Sharma, Amit; Hunter, Preston; Surapaneni, Padmini; Sedillo, Casey; Field, James; Algar, Rhys; Price, Andrea; Steel, Jason; Throop, Andrea; Fiacco, Michael; LaBaer, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    The mission of the DNASU Plasmid Repository is to accelerate research by providing high-quality, annotated plasmid samples and online plasmid resources to the research community through the curated DNASU database, website and repository (http://dnasu.asu.edu or http://dnasu.org). The collection includes plasmids from grant-funded, high-throughput cloning projects performed in our laboratory, plasmids from external researchers, and large collections from consortia such as the ORFeome Collaboration and the NIGMS-funded Protein Structure Initiative: Biology (PSI:Biology). Through DNASU, researchers can search for and access detailed information about each plasmid such as the full length gene insert sequence, vector information, associated publications, and links to external resources that provide additional protein annotations and experimental protocols. Plasmids can be requested directly through the DNASU website. DNASU and the PSI:Biology-Materials Repositories were previously described in the 2010 NAR Database Issue (Cormier, C.Y., Mohr, S.E., Zuo, D., Hu, Y., Rolfs, A., Kramer, J., Taycher, E., Kelley, F., Fiacco, M., Turnbull, G. et al. (2010) Protein Structure Initiative Material Repository: an open shared public resource of structural genomics plasmids for the biological community. Nucleic Acids Res., 38, D743-D749.). In this update we will describe the plasmid collection and highlight the new features in the website redesign, including new browse/search options, plasmid annotations and a dynamic vector mapping feature that was developed in collaboration with LabGenius. Overall, these plasmid resources continue to enable research with the goal of elucidating the role of proteins in both normal biological processes and disease.

  16. Generation of a Stable Plasmid for In Vitro and In Vivo Studies of Staphylococcus Species

    PubMed Central

    Krute, Christina N.; Krausz, Kelsey L.; Markiewicz, Mary A.; Joyner, Jason A.; Pokhrel, Srijana; Hall, Pamela R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A major shortcoming to plasmid-based genetic tools is the necessity of using antibiotics to ensure plasmid maintenance. While selectable markers are very powerful, their use is not always practical, such as during in vivo models of bacterial infection. During previous studies, it was noted that the uncharacterized LAC-p01 plasmid in Staphylococcus aureus USA300 isolates was stable in the absence of a known selection and therefore could serve as a platform for new genetic tools for Staphylococcus species. LAC-p01 was genetically manipulated into an Escherichia coli-S. aureus shuttle vector that remained stable for at least 100 generations without antibiotic selection. The double- and single-stranded (dso and sso) origins were identified and found to be essential for plasmid replication and maintenance, respectively. In contrast, deletion analyses revealed that none of the four LAC-p01 predicted open reading frames were necessary for stability. Subsequent to this, the shuttle vector was used as a platform to generate two plasmids. The first plasmid, pKK22, contains all genes native to the plasmid for use in S. aureus USA300 strains, while the second, pKK30, lacks the four predicted open reading frames for use in non-USA300 isolates. pKK30 was also determined to be stable in Staphylococcus epidermidis. Moreover, pKK22 was maintained for 7 days postinoculation during a murine model of S. aureus systemic infection and successfully complemented an hla mutant in a dermonecrosis model. These plasmids that eliminate the need for antibiotics during both in vitro and in vivo experiments are powerful new tools for studies of Staphylococcus. IMPORTANCE Plasmid stability has been problematic in bacterial studies, and historically antibiotics have been used to ensure plasmid maintenance. This has been a major limitation during in vivo studies, where providing antibiotics for plasmid maintenance is difficult and has confounding effects. Here, we have utilized the

  17. Plasmid DNA-based gene transfer with ultrasound and microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Taniyama, Yoshiaki; Azuma, Junya; Rakugi, Hiromi; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2011-12-01

    Gene therapy offers a novel approach for the prevention and treatment of a variety of diseases, but it is not yet a common option in the real world because of various problems. Viral vectors show high efficiency of gene transfer, but they have some problems with toxicity and immunity. On the other hand, plasmid DNA-based gene transfer is very safe, but its efficiency is relatively low. Especially, plasmid DNA gene therapy is used for cardiovascular disease because plasmid DNA transfer is possible for cardiac or skeletal muscle. Clinical angiogenic gene therapy using plasmid DNA gene transfer has been attempted in patients with peripheral artery disease, but a Phase III clinical trial did not show sufficient efficiency. Recently, a Phase III clinical trial of hepatocyte growth factor gene therapy in peripheral artery disease (PAD) showed improvement of ischemic ulcers, but it could not salvage limbs from amputation. In addition, a Phase I/II clinical study of fibroblast growth factor gene therapy in PAD extended amputation-free survival, but it seemed to fail in Phase III. In this situation, we and others have developed plasmid DNA-based gene transfer using ultrasound with microbubbles to enhance its efficiency while maintaining safety. Ultrasound-mediated gene transfer has been reported to augment the gene transfer efficiency and select the target organ using cationic microbubble phospholipids which bind negatively charged DNA. Ultrasound with microbubblesis likely to create new therapeutic options inavariety of diseases.

  18. The TGV transgenic vectors for single-copy gene expression from the Escherichia coli chromosome.

    PubMed

    Gumbiner-Russo, L M; Lombardo, M J; Ponder, R G; Rosenberg, S M

    2001-07-25

    Plasmid-based cloning and expression of genes in Escherichia coli can have several problems: plasmid destabilization; toxicity of gene products; inability to achieve complete repression of gene expression; non-physiological overexpression of the cloned gene; titration of regulatory proteins; and the requirement for antibiotic selection. We describe a simple system for cloning and expression of genes in single copy in the E. coli chromosome, using a non-antibiotic selection for transgene insertion. The transgene is inserted into a vector containing homology to the chromosomal region flanking the attachment site for phage lambda. This vector is then linearized and introduced into a recombination-proficient E. coli strain carrying a temperature-sensitive lambda prophage. Selection for replacement of the prophage with the transgene is performed at high temperature. Once in the chromosome, transgenes can be moved into other lysogenic E. coli strains using standard phage-mediated transduction techniques, selecting against a resident prophage. Additional vector constructs provide an arabinose-inducible promoter (P(BAD)), P(BAD) plus a translation-initiation sequence, and optional chloramphenicol-, tetracycline-, or kanamycin-resistance cassettes. These Transgenic E. coli Vectors (TGV) allow drug-free, single-copy expression of genes from the E. coli chromosome, and are useful for genetic studies of gene function.

  19. Change in the plasmid copy number in acetic acid bacteria in response to growth phase and acetic acid concentration.

    PubMed

    Akasaka, Naoki; Astuti, Wiwik; Ishii, Yuri; Hidese, Ryota; Sakoda, Hisao; Fujiwara, Shinsuke

    2015-06-01

    Plasmids pGE1 (2.5 kb), pGE2 (7.2 kb), and pGE3 (5.5 kb) were isolated from Gluconacetobacter europaeus KGMA0119, and sequence analyses revealed they harbored 3, 8, and 4 genes, respectively. Plasmid copy numbers (PCNs) were determined by real-time quantitative PCR at different stages of bacterial growth. When KGMA0119 was cultured in medium containing 0.4% ethanol and 0.5% acetic acid, PCN of pGE1 increased from 7 copies/genome in the logarithmic phase to a maximum of 12 copies/genome at the beginning of the stationary phase, before decreasing to 4 copies/genome in the late stationary phase. PCNs for pGE2 and pGE3 were maintained at 1-3 copies/genome during all phases of growth. Under a higher concentration of ethanol (3.2%) the PCN for pGE1 was slightly lower in all the growth stages, and those of pGE2 and pGE3 were unchanged. In the presence of 1.0% acetic acid, PCNs were higher for pGE1 (10 copies/genome) and pGE3 (6 copies/genome) during the logarithmic phase. Numbers for pGE2 did not change, indicating that pGE1 and pGE3 increase their PCNs in response to acetic acid. Plasmids pBE2 and pBE3 were constructed by ligating linearized pGE2 and pGE3 into pBR322. Both plasmids were replicable in Escherichia coli, Acetobacter pasteurianus and G. europaeus, highlighting their suitability as vectors for acetic acid bacteria. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Rapid plasmid library screening using RecA-coated biotinylated probes.

    PubMed

    Rigas, B; Welcher, A A; Ward, D C; Weissman, S M

    1986-12-01

    A method for the rapid physical isolation of recombinant plasmids of interest from a mixture of plasmids such as a plasmid cDNA library is presented. This method utilizes the ability of RecA protein to form stable complexes between linear single-stranded and circular double-stranded DNA molecules sharing sequence homology, and procedures allowing isolation of biotinylated nucleic acid. Biotinylated linear DNA probes coated with RecA have been used to screen reconstituted plasmid libraries consisting of two plasmid species, one homologous and the other heterologous to the probe. When the link between biotin and the nucleotide base could be cleaved by reducing agents, the complex was purified by streptavidin-agarose chromatography and the recovered plasmid was propagated in Escherichia coli. When the link was not cleavable the complex was bound to avidin in solution and purified by cupric iminodiacetic acid-agarose chromatography. The complex was then dissociated and the plasmids were propagated in E. coli. With either protocol, homologous plasmid recovery was between 10% and 20%, and enrichment was between 10(4)- and 10(5)-fold. Potential applications and extensions of this method, such as plasmid, cosmid, and phage library screening and facilitation of physical mapping of macroregions of mammalian genomes are presented and discussed.

  1. Genome Stability of Lyme Disease Spirochetes: Comparative Genomics of Borrelia burgdorferi Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Casjens, Sherwood R.; Mongodin, Emmanuel F.; Qiu, Wei-Gang; Luft, Benjamin J.; Schutzer, Steven E.; Gilcrease, Eddie B.; Huang, Wai Mun; Vujadinovic, Marija; Aron, John K.; Vargas, Levy C.; Freeman, Sam; Radune, Diana; Weidman, Janice F.; Dimitrov, George I.; Khouri, Hoda M.; Sosa, Julia E.; Halpin, Rebecca A.; Dunn, John J.; Fraser, Claire M.

    2012-01-01

    Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne human illness in North America. In order to understand the molecular pathogenesis, natural diversity, population structure and epizootic spread of the North American Lyme agent, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, a much better understanding of the natural diversity of its genome will be required. Towards this end we present a comparative analysis of the nucleotide sequences of the numerous plasmids of B. burgdorferi isolates B31, N40, JD1 and 297. These strains were chosen because they include the three most commonly studied laboratory strains, and because they represent different major genetic lineages and so are informative regarding the genetic diversity and evolution of this organism. A unique feature of Borrelia genomes is that they carry a large number of linear and circular plasmids, and this work shows that strains N40, JD1, 297 and B31 carry related but non-identical sets of 16, 20, 19 and 21 plasmids, respectively, that comprise 33–40% of their genomes. We deduce that there are at least 28 plasmid compatibility types among the four strains. The B. burgdorferi ∼900 Kbp linear chromosomes are evolutionarily exceptionally stable, except for a short ≤20 Kbp plasmid-like section at the right end. A few of the plasmids, including the linear lp54 and circular cp26, are also very stable. We show here that the other plasmids, especially the linear ones, are considerably more variable. Nearly all of the linear plasmids have undergone one or more substantial inter-plasmid rearrangements since their last common ancestor. In spite of these rearrangements and differences in plasmid contents, the overall gene complement of the different isolates has remained relatively constant. PMID:22432010

  2. Genome Stability of Lyme Disease Spirochetes: Comparative Genomics of Borrelia burgdorferi Plasmids

    SciTech Connect

    Casjens S. R.; Dunn J.; Mongodin, E. F.; Qiu, W.-G.; Luft, B. J.; Schutzer, S. E.; Gilcrease, E. B.; Huang, W. M.; Vujadinovic, M.; Aron, J. K.; Vargas, L. C.; Freeman, S.; Radune, D.; Weidman, J. F.; Dimitrov, G. I.; Khouri, H. M.; Sosa, J. E.; Halpin, R. A.; Fraser, C. M.

    2012-03-14

    Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne human illness in North America. In order to understand the molecular pathogenesis, natural diversity, population structure and epizootic spread of the North American Lyme agent, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, a much better understanding of the natural diversity of its genome will be required. Towards this end we present a comparative analysis of the nucleotide sequences of the numerous plasmids of B. burgdorferi isolates B31, N40, JD1 and 297. These strains were chosen because they include the three most commonly studied laboratory strains, and because they represent different major genetic lineages and so are informative regarding the genetic diversity and evolution of this organism. A unique feature of Borrelia genomes is that they carry a large number of linear and circular plasmids, and this work shows that strains N40, JD1, 297 and B31 carry related but non-identical sets of 16, 20, 19 and 21 plasmids, respectively, that comprise 33-40% of their genomes. We deduce that there are at least 28 plasmid compatibility types among the four strains. The B. burgdorferi {approx}900 Kbp linear chromosomes are evolutionarily exceptionally stable, except for a short {le}20 Kbp plasmid-like section at the right end. A few of the plasmids, including the linear lp54 and circular cp26, are also very stable. We show here that the other plasmids, especially the linear ones, are considerably more variable. Nearly all of the linear plasmids have undergone one or more substantial inter-plasmid rearrangements since their last common ancestor. In spite of these rearrangements and differences in plasmid contents, the overall gene complement of the different isolates has remained relatively constant.

  3. Vectors for gene expression and amplification in the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Juretzek, T; Le Dall, M; Mauersberger, S; Gaillardin, C; Barth, G; Nicaud, J

    2001-01-30

    New vector systems were developed for gene expression in Y. lipolytica. These plasmids contain: (a) as integration target sequences, either a rDNA region or the long terminal repeat zeta of the Y. lipolytica retrotransposon Ylt1; (b) the YlURA3 gene as selection marker for Y. lipolytica, either as the non-defective ura3d1 allele for single integration or the promotor truncated ura3d4 allele for multiple integration; (c) the inducible ICL1 or XPR2 promoters for gene expression; and (d) unique restriction sites for gene insertion. Multiple plasmid integration occurred as inserted tandem-repeats, which are present at 3-39 copies per cell. A correlation between gene copy number and the expressed enzyme activity was demonstrated with Escherichia coli lacZ as reporter gene under the control of the regulated ICL1 promoter. Increases in copy numbers from 5 to 13 for the lacZ expression cassettes resulted in an up to 10-11-fold linear increase of the beta-galactosidase activity in multicopy transformants during their growth on ethanol or glucose, compared with the low-copy replicative plasmid transformants (1.6 plasmid copies). These new tools will enhance the interest in Y. lipolytica as an alternative host for heterologous protein production.

  4. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance

    PubMed Central

    Jacoby, George A.; Strahilevitz, Jacob; Hooper, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Three mechanisms for plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) have been discovered since 1998. Plasmid genes qnrA, qnrB, qnrC, qnrD, qnrS, and qnrVC code for proteins of the pentapeptide repeat family that protects DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV from quinolone inhibition. The qnr genes appear to have been acquired from chromosomal genes in aquatic bacteria, are usually associated with mobilizing or transposable elements on plasmids, and are often incorporated into sul1-type integrons. The second plasmid-mediated mechanism involves acetylation of quinolones with an appropriate amino nitrogen target by a variant of the common aminoglycoside acetyltransferase AAC(6′)-Ib. The third mechanism is enhanced efflux produced by plasmid genes for pumps QepAB and OqxAB. PMQR has been found in clinical and environmental isolates around the world and appears to be spreading. The plasmid-mediated mechanisms provide only low-level resistance that by itself does not exceed the clinical breakpoint for susceptibility but nonetheless facilitates selection of higher-level resistance and makes infection by pathogens containing PMQR harder to treat. PMID:25584197

  5. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, George A; Strahilevitz, Jacob; Hooper, David C

    2014-10-01

    Three mechanisms for plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) have been discovered since 1998. Plasmid genes qnrA, qnrB, qnrC, qnrD, qnrS, and qnrVC code for proteins of the pentapeptide repeat family that protects DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV from quinolone inhibition. The qnr genes appear to have been acquired from chromosomal genes in aquatic bacteria, are usually associated with mobilizing or transposable elements on plasmids, and are often incorporated into sul1-type integrons. The second plasmid-mediated mechanism involves acetylation of quinolones with an appropriate amino nitrogen target by a variant of the common aminoglycoside acetyltransferase AAC(6')-Ib. The third mechanism is enhanced efflux produced by plasmid genes for pumps QepAB and OqxAB. PMQR has been found in clinical and environmental isolates around the world and appears to be spreading. The plasmid-mediated mechanisms provide only low-level resistance that by itself does not exceed the clinical breakpoint for susceptibility but nonetheless facilitates selection of higher-level resistance and makes infection by pathogens containing PMQR harder to treat.

  6. Transformation of Shewanella baltica with ColE1-like and P1 plasmids and their maintenance during bacterial growth in cultures.

    PubMed

    Milewska, Klaudia; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz; Szalewska-Pałasz, Agnieszka

    2015-09-01

    The presence of natural plasmids has been reported for many Shewanella isolates. However, knowledge about plasmid replication origin and segregation mechanisms is not extensive for this genus. Shewanella baltica is an important species in the marine environment due to its denitrification ability in oxygen-deficient zones and the potential role in bioremediation processes. However, no information about possible use of plasmid vectors in this species has been reported to date. Here we report that plasmids with ColE1-type and plasmid P1 origin can transform S. baltica and replicate in this bacterium. Without the antibiotic selection pressure plasmid maintenance is less efficient than in Escherichia coli. Nevertheless, cultivation of S. baltica in the presence of appropriate antibiotics caused relatively stable maintenance of ColE1-like and P1-derived plasmids. This indicates that plasmid-based genetic manipulations and gene transfer in S. baltica are possible.

  7. [Gene cloning, selection of plasmids and application of Fasciola hepatica cathepsin L1 gene].

    PubMed

    Kuk, Salih; Erensoy, Ahmet

    2008-01-01

    Gene cloning refers to the process by which a fragment of DNA is transferred from one organism to a vector. A vector is an agent that can carry a DNA fragment into a host cell. Commonly used vectors include plasmids, lambda phage, cosmid and yeast artificial chromosome (YAC). Plasmid vectors that have been extensively used in genetic engineering are derived from natural plasmids. These contain a genetic marker conferring a phenotype that can be selected for or against and a polylinker or multiple cloning site (MCS), which is a short region containing several commonly used restriction sites allowing the insertion of DNA fragments at this location easily. There are several plasmids and gene cloning kits available nowadays commercially. These kits contain an advanced positive selection system for the highest efficiency cloning of PCR products generated with any DNA polymerase. The kits offer cloning efficiencies of up to 100% positive clones, eliminating the need for tedious colony screening. We consider that researchers should choose the most suitable plasmids and cloning kits for gene cloning in view of factors such as time consumption, cost and individual laboratory options.

  8. Novel synthetic plasmid and Doggybone™ DNA vaccines induce neutralizing antibodies and provide protection from lethal influenza challenge in mice

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Veronica L; Patel, Ami; Villarreal, Daniel O; Hensley, Scott E; Ragwan, Edwin; Yan, Jian; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Rothwell, Paul J; Extance, Jonathan P; Caproni, Lisa J; Weiner, David B

    2015-01-01

    Nucleic acid-based vaccines (NAVs) are a promising alternative to conventional influenza vaccines with the potential to increase influenza vaccine availability due to their simplicity in design and rapid speed of production. NAVs can also target multiple influenza antigens and control flu variants. Traditionally NAVs have been DNA plasmids however, we are continuing to explore new methods that may enhance vaccine efficacy. Recently new focus has been on RNA cassettes as NAVs. RNA vaccines combine conceptual advantages in that they focus on delivery of only the coding cassette. However, RNA vaccines have a short half-life and cause interferon-induced fevers. Here we describe a new NAV approach where we study delivery of a linear DNA cassette [Doggybone™ linear closed DNA [(dbDNA™)] produced by an enzymatic process that yields an antigen expression cassette comprising a promoter, DNA antigen, poly A tail, and telomeric ends. This focused approach has many of the advantages of plasmid DNA as well as a minimal cassette size similar to RNA strategies. For this study, we characterized the specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses and determined the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titers induced by dbDNA™ and compared the responses with those of an optimized plasmid DNA (pDNA) vaccine encoding the same H1N1 influenza A/PR/8/34 HA gene. Immunizations with the constructs resulted in similar humoral and cellular immune responses. Both constructs induced high-titer HI antibodies and fully protected animals from lethal viral challenge. The data obtained from this study provides important validation for further development of novel vector approaches. PMID:26091432

  9. Radiosensitivity of plasmid DNA: role of topology and concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giustranti, C.; Pérez, C.; Rousset, S.; Balanzat, E.; Sage, E.

    1999-01-01

    Using the plasmid relaxation assay, the induction of single strand breaks (SSB) by ionizing radiation was investigated in two plasmids of different length, pBS and pSP189. The dose-response was linear for both plasmids but pSP189 exhibited a three times higher sensitivity than pBS. This disparity may be explained by a reduced accessibility to hydroxyl radicals due to a different topology of each plasmid, i.e. degree of compaction, as observed with electron microscopy. pBS plasmid was also exposed at various DNA concentrations to rays. The yield of SSB decreased with increasing concentration, suggesting a diminution in the amount of hydroxyl radicals efficient for radiolytic attack. This effect of concentration was also observed with densely ionizing radiation. In conclusion, the accessibility of DNA is a key-parameter in the formation of damage in vitro and in vivo as well. En utilisant la technique de relaxation de plasmide, l'induction de cassures simple brin (SSB) par les radiations ? a été comparée dans deux plasmides de taille différente, pSP189 et pBS. La relation dose-effet est linéaire pour les deux plasmides, mais il se forme trois fois plus de SSB dans pSP189 que dans pBS. Cette disparité semble pouvoir être reliée au degré de compaction différent des plasmides, observé en microscopie électronique. Elle s'expliquerait en terme d'accessibilité aux espèces radicalaires formées lors de la radiolyse de l'eau. Le plasmide pBS, à différentes concentrations, a été ensuite exposé aux radiations γ. Le taux de cassures décroit lorsque la concentration en ADN croit, suggérant une diminution du nombre de radicaux pouvant efficacement réagir avec l'ADN. Cet effet a également été mis en évidence lors d'une irradiation avec des particules de TEL élevé. En conclusion, l'accessibilité de l'ADN est un paramètre- clé dans la formation des dommages, tant in vitro que in vivo.

  10. Plasmids of Carotenoid-Producing Paracoccus spp. (Alphaproteobacteria) - Structure, Diversity and Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Maj, Anna; Dziewit, Lukasz; Czarnecki, Jakub; Wlodarczyk, Miroslawa; Baj, Jadwiga; Skrzypczyk, Grazyna; Giersz, Dorota; Bartosik, Dariusz

    2013-01-01

    Plasmids are components of many bacterial genomes. They enable the spread of a large pool of genetic information via lateral gene transfer. Many bacterial strains contain mega-sized replicons and these are particularly common in Alphaproteobacteria. Considerably less is known about smaller alphaproteobacterial plasmids. We analyzed the genomes of 14 such plasmids residing in 4 multireplicon carotenoid-producing strains of the genus Paracoccus (Alphaproteobacteria): P. aestuarii DSM 19484, P. haeundaensis LG P-21903, P. marcusii DSM 11574 and P. marcusii OS22. Comparative analyses revealed mosaic structures of the plasmids and recombinational shuffling of diverse genetic modules involved in (i) plasmid replication, (ii) stabilization (including toxin-antitoxin systems of the relBE/parDE, tad-ata, higBA, mazEF and toxBA families) and (iii) mobilization for conjugal transfer (encoding relaxases of the MobQ, MobP or MobV families). A common feature of the majority of the plasmids is the presence of AT-rich sequence islets (located downstream of exc1-like genes) containing genes, whose homologs are conserved in the chromosomes of many bacteria (encoding e.g. RelA/SpoT, SMC-like proteins and a retron-type reverse transcriptase). The results of this study have provided insight into the diversity and plasticity of plasmids of Paracoccus spp., and of the entire Alphaproteobacteria. Some of the identified plasmids contain replication systems not described previously in this class of bacteria. The composition of the plasmid genomes revealed frequent transfer of chromosomal genes into plasmids, which significantly enriches the pool of mobile DNA that can participate in lateral transfer. Many strains of Paracoccus spp. have great biotechnological potential, and the plasmid vectors constructed in this study will facilitate genetic studies of these bacteria. PMID:24260361

  11. The evolution of heart gene delivery vectors.

    PubMed

    Wasala, Nalinda B; Shin, Jin-Hong; Duan, Dongsheng

    2011-10-01

    Gene therapy holds promise for treating numerous heart diseases. A key premise for the success of cardiac gene therapy is the development of powerful gene transfer vehicles that can achieve highly efficient and persistent gene transfer specifically in the heart. Other features of an ideal vector include negligible toxicity, minimal immunogenicity and easy manufacturing. Rapid progress in the fields of molecular biology and virology has offered great opportunities to engineer various genetic materials for heart gene delivery. Several nonviral vectors (e.g. naked plasmids, plasmid lipid/polymer complexes and oligonucleotides) have been tested. Commonly used viral vectors include lentivirus, adenovirus and adeno-associated virus. Among these, adeno-associated virus has shown many attractive features for pre-clinical experimentation in animal models of heart diseases. We review the history and evolution of these vectors for heart gene transfer. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Production of lentiviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Merten, Otto-Wilhelm; Hebben, Matthias; Bovolenta, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors (LV) have seen considerably increase in use as gene therapy vectors for the treatment of acquired and inherited diseases. This review presents the state of the art of the production of these vectors with particular emphasis on their large-scale production for clinical purposes. In contrast to oncoretroviral vectors, which are produced using stable producer cell lines, clinical-grade LV are in most of the cases produced by transient transfection of 293 or 293T cells grown in cell factories. However, more recent developments, also, tend to use hollow fiber reactor, suspension culture processes, and the implementation of stable producer cell lines. As is customary for the biotech industry, rather sophisticated downstream processing protocols have been established to remove any undesirable process-derived contaminant, such as plasmid or host cell DNA or host cell proteins. This review compares published large-scale production and purification processes of LV and presents their process performances. Furthermore, developments in the domain of stable cell lines and their way to the use of production vehicles of clinical material will be presented. PMID:27110581

  13. Molecular Mechanisms That Contribute to Horizontal Transfer of Plasmids by the Bacteriophage SPP1.

    PubMed

    Valero-Rello, Ana; López-Sanz, María; Quevedo-Olmos, Alvaro; Sorokin, Alexei; Ayora, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Natural transformation and viral-mediated transduction are the main avenues of horizontal gene transfer in Firmicutes. Bacillus subtilis SPP1 is a generalized transducing bacteriophage. Using this lytic phage as a model, we have analyzed how viral replication and recombination systems contribute to the transfer of plasmid-borne antibiotic resistances. Phage SPP1 DNA replication relies on essential phage-encoded replisome organizer (G38P), helicase loader (G39P), hexameric replicative helicase (G40P), recombinase (G35P) and in less extent on the partially dispensable 5'→3' exonuclease (G34.1P), the single-stranded DNA binding protein (G36P) and the Holliday junction resolvase (G44P). Correspondingly, the accumulation of linear concatemeric plasmid DNA, and the formation of transducing particles were blocked in the absence of G35P, G38P, G39P, and G40P, greatly reduced in the G34.1P, G36P mutants, and slightly reduced in G44P mutants. In contrast, establishment of injected linear plasmid DNA in the recipient host was independent of viral-encoded functions. DNA homology between SPP1 and the plasmid, rather than a viral packaging signal, enhanced the accumulation of packagable plasmid DNA. The transfer efficiency was also dependent on plasmid copy number, and rolling-circle plasmids were encapsidated at higher frequencies than theta-type replicating plasmids.

  14. [Chromatographic separation of plasmid DNA by anion-exchange cryogel].

    PubMed

    Guo, Yantao; Shen, Shaochuan; Yun, Junxian; Yao, Kejian

    2012-08-01

    Plasmid DNA (pDNA) is used as an important vector for gene therapy, and its wide application is restricted by the purity and yield. To obtain high-purity pDNA, a chromatographic method based on anion-exchange supermacroporous cryogel was explored. The anion-exchange cryogel was prepared by grafting diethylaminoethyl-dextran to the epoxide groups of polyacrylamide-based matrix and pUC19 plasmid was used as a target to test the method. The plasmid was transferred into Escherichia coli DH5alpha, cultivated, harvested and lysed. The obtained culture was centrifuged and the supernatant was used as the plasmid feedstock, which was loaded into the anion-exchange cryogel bed for chromatographic separation. By optimizing the pH of running buffer and the elution conditions, high-purity pDNA was obtained by elution with 0.5 mol/L sodium chloride solution at pH 6.6. Compared to the traditional methods for purification of pDNA, animal source enzymes and toxic reagents were not involved in the present separation process, ensuring the safety of both the purification operations and the obtained pDNA.

  15. In vitro excision of adeno-associated virus DNA from recombinant plasmids: Isolation of an enzyme fraction from HeLa cells that cleaves DNA at poly(G) sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Gottlieb, J.; Muzyczka, N.

    1988-06-01

    When circular recombinant plasmids containing adeno-associated virus (AAV) DNA sequences are transfected into human cells, the AAV provirus is rescued. Using these circular AAV plasmids as substrates, the authors isolated an enzyme fraction from HeLa cell nuclear extracts that excises intact AAV DNA in vitro from vector DNA and produces linear DNA products. The recognition signal for the enzyme is a polypurine-polypyrimidine sequence which is at least 9 residues long and rich in G . C base pairs. Such sequences are present in AAV recombinant plasmids as part of the first 15 base pairs of the AAV terminal repeat and in some cases as the result of cloning the AAV genome by G . C tailing. The isolated enzyme fraction does not have significant endonucleolytic activity on single-stranded or double-stranded DNA. Plasmid DNA that is transfected into tissue culture cells is cleaved in vivo to produce a pattern of DNA fragments similar to that seen with purified enzyme in vitro. The activity has been called endo R for rescue, and its behavior suggests that it may have a role in recombination of cellular chromosomes.

  16. A 5' Noncoding Exon Containing Engineered Intron Enhances Transgene Expression from Recombinant AAV Vectors in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jiamiao; Williams, James A; Luke, Jeremy; Zhang, Feijie; Chu, Kirk; Kay, Mark A

    2017-01-01

    We previously developed a mini-intronic plasmid (MIP) expression system in which the essential bacterial elements for plasmid replication and selection are placed within an engineered intron contained within a universal 5' UTR noncoding exon. Like minicircle DNA plasmids (devoid of bacterial backbone sequences), MIP plasmids overcome transcriptional silencing of the transgene. However, in addition MIP plasmids increase transgene expression by 2 and often >10 times higher than minicircle vectors in vivo and in vitro. Based on these findings, we examined the effects of the MIP intronic sequences in a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector system. Recombinant AAV vectors containing an intron with a bacterial replication origin and bacterial selectable marker increased transgene expression by 40 to 100 times in vivo when compared with conventional AAV vectors. Therefore, inclusion of this noncoding exon/intron sequence upstream of the coding region can substantially enhance AAV-mediated gene expression in vivo.

  17. Increased stability and specificity through combined hybridization of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) and locked nucleic acid (LNA) to supercoiled plasmids for PNA-anchored "Bioplex" formation.

    PubMed

    Lundin, Karin E; Hasan, Maroof; Moreno, Pedro M; Törnquist, Elisabeth; Oprea, Iulian; Svahn, Mathias G; Simonson, E Oscar; Smith, C I Edvard

    2005-12-01

    Low cellular uptake and poor nuclear transfer hamper the use of non-viral vectors in gene therapy. Addition of functional entities to plasmids using the Bioplex technology has the potential to improve the efficiency of transfer considerably. We have investigated the possibility of stabilizing sequence-specific binding of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) anchored functional peptides to plasmid DNA by hybridizing PNA and locked nucleic acid (LNA) oligomers as "openers" to partially overlapping sites on the opposite DNA strand. The PNA "opener" stabilized the binding of "linear" PNA anchors to mixed-base supercoiled DNA in saline. For higher stability under physiological conditions, bisPNA anchors were used. To reduce nonspecific interactions when hybridizing highly cationic constructs and to accommodate the need for increased amounts of bisPNA when the molecules are uncharged, or negatively charged, we used both PNA and LNA oligomers as "openers" to increase binding kinetics. To our knowledge, this is the first time that LNA has been used together with PNA to facilitate strand invasion. This procedure allows hybridization at reduced PNA-to-plasmid ratios, allowing greater than 80% hybridization even at ratios as low as 2:1. Using significantly lower amounts of PNA-peptides combined with shorter incubation times reduces unspecific binding and facilitates purification.

  18. Homology of cryptic plasmid of Neisseria gonorrhoeae with plasmids from Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria lactamica.

    PubMed

    Ison, C A; Bellinger, C M; Walker, J

    1986-10-01

    DNA probe hybridisation was used to examine the relation between the cryptic plasmid from Neisseria gonorrhoeae and plasmids carried by pharyngeal isolates of Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria lactamica. The complete gonococcal cryptic plasmid and HinfI derived digestion fragments subcloned into Escherichia coli were used to probe Southern blots of plasmid extracts. Homology was found to a plasmid of approximate molecular weight 4.5 kilobase pairs (Kb) but not to plasmids of less than 3.2 Kb or 6.5 Kb. Eleven of 16 strains of N meningitidis and two of six strains of N lactamica carried plasmids that showed strong hybridisation with the 4.2 Kb gonococcal plasmid. Hybridisation of plasmids from non-gonococcal species of neisseria with the gonococcal cryptic plasmid indicates that caution should be taken when using the cryptic plasmid as a diagnostic probe for gonorrhoea.

  19. Co-resident plasmids travel together.

    PubMed

    Gama, João Alves; Zilhão, Rita; Dionisio, Francisco

    2017-08-24

    Conjugative plasmids encode genes that enable them to transfer, by conjugation, from a given host cell to another cell. Conjugative transfer, despite being an important feature of conjugative plasmids, is not constitutive for most plasmids, the reason being that genes involved in horizontal transfer are mostly repressed. Only upon their transient de-repression are plasmids able to transfer horizontally. If host cells harbour multiple plasmids, their simultaneous transfer depends on simultaneous transient de-repression of all plasmids. If de-repression of different plasmids was random and independent events, simultaneous de-repression should be a rare event because the probability of simultaneous de-repression would be the product of the probabilities of de-repression of each plasmid. Some previous observations support this hypothesis, while others show that co-transfer of plasmids is more frequent than this reasoning indicates. Here, we show that co-transfer of multiple plasmids mainly results from non-independent events: the probability that all plasmids within a cell become de-repressed is much higher than if de-repression of plasmids genes were independent. We found a simple model for the probability of co-transfer: the plasmid having the lowest conjugation rates is the one who limits co-transfer. In this sense, cells receiving the plasmid with the lower transfer rate also receive the other plasmid. If de-repression happens simultaneously on co-resident plasmids, common cues may stimulate de-repression of distinct plasmids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Plasmid- and chromosome-coded aerobactin synthesis in enteric bacteria: insertion sequences flank operon in plasmid-mediated systems.

    PubMed Central

    McDougall, S; Neilands, J B

    1984-01-01

    Large plasmids were detected in two aerobactin-producing enteric bacterial species (Aerobacter aerogenes 62-I, Salmonella arizona SA1, and S. arizona SL5301) and designated pSMN1, pSMN2, and pSMN3, respectively. Other Salmonella spp., namely, S. arizona SL5302, S. arizona SLS, Salmonella austin, and Salmonella memphis, formed aerobactin but contained no detectable large plasmids. S. arizona SL5283 made no aerobactin. A probe consisting of the aerobactin biosynthetic genes cloned on plasmid pABN5 hybridized to a HindIII digest of pSMN1 but not to digests of pSMN2 or pSMN3. A larger probe, the insert of pABN1 containing the complete aerobactin operon, hybridized to four fragments in HindIII digests of the parent plasmid, pColV-K30. A 2.0-kilobase PvuII fragment responsible for this multiple-hybridization pattern was cloned into vector pUC9 to form pSMN30. The latter was mapped and shown to correspond to either IS1 or to a closely related insertion sequence. Images PMID:6330037

  1. Quantification of Plasmid Copy Number with Single Colour Droplet Digital PCR

    PubMed Central

    Plotka, Magdalena; Wozniak, Mateusz; Kaczorowski, Tadeusz

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria can be considered as biological nanofactories that manufacture a cornucopia of bioproducts most notably recombinant proteins. As such, they must perfectly match with appropriate plasmid vectors to ensure successful overexpression of target genes. Among many parameters that correlate positively with protein productivity plasmid copy number plays pivotal role. Therefore, development of new and more accurate methods to assess this critical parameter will result in optimization of expression of plasmid-encoded genes. In this study, we present a simple and highly accurate method for quantifying plasmid copy number utilizing an EvaGreen single colour, droplet digital PCR. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this method by examining the copy number of the pBR322 vector within Escherichia coli DH5α cells. The obtained results were successfully validated by real-time PCR. However, we observed a strong dependency of the plasmid copy number on the method chosen for isolation of the total DNA. We found that application of silica-membrane-based columns for DNA purification or DNA isolation with use of bead-beating, a mechanical cell disruption lead to determination of an average of 20.5 or 7.3 plasmid copies per chromosome, respectively. We found that recovery of the chromosomal DNA from purification columns was less efficient than plasmid DNA (46.5 ± 1.9% and 87.4 ± 5.5%, respectively) which may lead to observed differences in plasmid copy number. Besides, the plasmid copy number variations dependent on DNA template isolation method, we found that droplet digital PCR is a very convenient method for measuring bacterial plasmid content. Careful determination of plasmid copy number is essential for better understanding and optimization of recombinant proteins production process. Droplet digital PCR is a very precise method that allows performing thousands of individual PCR reactions in a single tube. The ddPCR does not depend on running standard curves and is a

  2. Quantification of Plasmid Copy Number with Single Colour Droplet Digital PCR.

    PubMed

    Plotka, Magdalena; Wozniak, Mateusz; Kaczorowski, Tadeusz

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria can be considered as biological nanofactories that manufacture a cornucopia of bioproducts most notably recombinant proteins. As such, they must perfectly match with appropriate plasmid vectors to ensure successful overexpression of target genes. Among many parameters that correlate positively with protein productivity plasmid copy number plays pivotal role. Therefore, development of new and more accurate methods to assess this critical parameter will result in optimization of expression of plasmid-encoded genes. In this study, we present a simple and highly accurate method for quantifying plasmid copy number utilizing an EvaGreen single colour, droplet digital PCR. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this method by examining the copy number of the pBR322 vector within Escherichia coli DH5α cells. The obtained results were successfully validated by real-time PCR. However, we observed a strong dependency of the plasmid copy number on the method chosen for isolation of the total DNA. We found that application of silica-membrane-based columns for DNA purification or DNA isolation with use of bead-beating, a mechanical cell disruption lead to determination of an average of 20.5 or 7.3 plasmid copies per chromosome, respectively. We found that recovery of the chromosomal DNA from purification columns was less efficient than plasmid DNA (46.5 ± 1.9% and 87.4 ± 5.5%, respectively) which may lead to observed differences in plasmid copy number. Besides, the plasmid copy number variations dependent on DNA template isolation method, we found that droplet digital PCR is a very convenient method for measuring bacterial plasmid content. Careful determination of plasmid copy number is essential for better understanding and optimization of recombinant proteins production process. Droplet digital PCR is a very precise method that allows performing thousands of individual PCR reactions in a single tube. The ddPCR does not depend on running standard curves and is a

  3. Data mining methods in the prediction of Dementia: A real-data comparison of the accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of linear discriminant analysis, logistic regression, neural networks, support vector machines, classification trees and random forests

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Dementia and cognitive impairment associated with aging are a major medical and social concern. Neuropsychological testing is a key element in the diagnostic procedures of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), but has presently a limited value in the prediction of progression to dementia. We advance the hypothesis that newer statistical classification methods derived from data mining and machine learning methods like Neural Networks, Support Vector Machines and Random Forests can improve accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of predictions obtained from neuropsychological testing. Seven non parametric classifiers derived from data mining methods (Multilayer Perceptrons Neural Networks, Radial Basis Function Neural Networks, Support Vector Machines, CART, CHAID and QUEST Classification Trees and Random Forests) were compared to three traditional classifiers (Linear Discriminant Analysis, Quadratic Discriminant Analysis and Logistic Regression) in terms of overall classification accuracy, specificity, sensitivity, Area under the ROC curve and Press'Q. Model predictors were 10 neuropsychological tests currently used in the diagnosis of dementia. Statistical distributions of classification parameters obtained from a 5-fold cross-validation were compared using the Friedman's nonparametric test. Results Press' Q test showed that all classifiers performed better than chance alone (p < 0.05). Support Vector Machines showed the larger overall classification accuracy (Median (Me) = 0.76) an area under the ROC (Me = 0.90). However this method showed high specificity (Me = 1.0) but low sensitivity (Me = 0.3). Random Forest ranked second in overall accuracy (Me = 0.73) with high area under the ROC (Me = 0.73) specificity (Me = 0.73) and sensitivity (Me = 0.64). Linear Discriminant Analysis also showed acceptable overall accuracy (Me = 0.66), with acceptable area under the ROC (Me = 0.72) specificity (Me = 0.66) and sensitivity (Me = 0.64). The remaining classifiers showed

  4. Data mining methods in the prediction of Dementia: A real-data comparison of the accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of linear discriminant analysis, logistic regression, neural networks, support vector machines, classification trees and random forests.

    PubMed

    Maroco, João; Silva, Dina; Rodrigues, Ana; Guerreiro, Manuela; Santana, Isabel; de Mendonça, Alexandre

    2011-08-17

    Dementia and cognitive impairment associated with aging are a major medical and social concern. Neuropsychological testing is a key element in the diagnostic procedures of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), but has presently a limited value in the prediction of progression to dementia. We advance the hypothesis that newer statistical classification methods derived from data mining and machine learning methods like Neural Networks, Support Vector Machines and Random Forests can improve accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of predictions obtained from neuropsychological testing. Seven non parametric classifiers derived from data mining methods (Multilayer Perceptrons Neural Networks, Radial Basis Function Neural Networks, Support Vector Machines, CART, CHAID and QUEST Classification Trees and Random Forests) were compared to three traditional classifiers (Linear Discriminant Analysis, Quadratic Discriminant Analysis and Logistic Regression) in terms of overall classification accuracy, specificity, sensitivity, Area under the ROC curve and Press'Q. Model predictors were 10 neuropsychological tests currently used in the diagnosis of dementia. Statistical distributions of classification parameters obtained from a 5-fold cross-validation were compared using the Friedman's nonparametric test. Press' Q test showed that all classifiers performed better than chance alone (p < 0.05). Support Vector Machines showed the larger overall classification accuracy (Median (Me) = 0.76) an area under the ROC (Me = 0.90). However this method showed high specificity (Me = 1.0) but low sensitivity (Me = 0.3). Random Forest ranked second in overall accuracy (Me = 0.73) with high area under the ROC (Me = 0.73) specificity (Me = 0.73) and sensitivity (Me = 0.64). Linear Discriminant Analysis also showed acceptable overall accuracy (Me = 0.66), with acceptable area under the ROC (Me = 0.72) specificity (Me = 0.66) and sensitivity (Me = 0.64). The remaining classifiers showed overall

  5. Persistence of Antibiotic Resistance Plasmids in Biofilms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    useful in the care of patients with combat-related wound infections. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Antibiotic resistance, plasmid, biofilm, coevolution , bacteria...Antibiotic!resistance,!plasmid,!biofilm,! coevolution ,!bacteria,!wound!infections! ! ! ! 3! 3. OVERALL PROJECT SUMMARY: The! successful! persistence

  6. [Construction and identification of eukaryotic plasmid pGC-silencer-U6/Neo/GFP/ABCG2].

    PubMed

    Yu, Yanping; Zhang, Song; Kong, Weijia

    2010-09-01

    To construct three short hairpin RNA (shRNA) interference expression plasmid vectors of human ABCG2 gene, to assay the expression of ABCG2 in a human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cell line, CEN-2 cell line, and to detect the RNAi effect of shRNA. Targeting ABCG2 gene sequence, three plasmid expression vectors coding for shRNA and a control vector containing random DNA fragment were constructed. The recombinant plasmids were amplified in Ecoli. DH5 and then identified by restriction digestion, PCR and sequencing. The recombinant plasmids were transfected into CEN-2 cells. ABCG2 expression was assayed by real-time quantitative PCR and Western blot. The construction of pGC-silencer-U6/Neo/GFP/ABCG2 was succeed. The shRNA plasmids significantly down-regulated the ABCG2 expression in CEN-2 cells, at both mRNA level and protein level. Recombinant plasmid 1 had the strongest effect compared with plasmids 2 and 3 (P < 0.05), with an inhibition ratio of 75% at the mRNA level and 68% at the protein level. pGC-silencer-U6/Neo/GFP/ABCG2 has been successfully constructed and it can down-regulate ABCG2 expression after transfected into CEN-2 cells, which could help further studies of ABCG2 functions CEN-2 cell line and contribute to the NPC gene therapy.

  7. Effect of the atmospheric pressure nonequilibrium plasmas on the conformational changes of plasmid DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xu; Zou, Fei; Lu, Xin Pei; He, Guangyuan; Shi, Meng Jun; Xiong, Qing; Gao, Xuan; Xiong, Zilan; Li, Yin; Ma, Feng Yun; Yu, Men; Wang, Chang Dong; Wang, Yuesheng; Yang, Guangxiao

    2009-08-01

    The cold atmospheric pressure plasma, which has been widely used for biomedical applications, may potentially affect the conformation of DNA. In this letter, an atmospheric pressure plasma plume is used to investigate its effects on the conformational changes of DNA of plasmid pAHC25. It is found that the plasma plume could cause plasmid DNA topology alteration, resulting in the percentage of the supercoiled plasmid DNA form decreased while that of the open circular and linearized form of plasmid DNA increased as detected by agrose gel electrophoresis. On the other hand, further investigation by using polymerase chain reaction method shows that the atmospheric pressure plasma jet treatments under proper conditions does not affect the genes of the plasmid DNA, which may have potential application in increasing the transformation frequency by genetic engineering.

  8. Effect of the atmospheric pressure nonequilibrium plasmas on the conformational changes of plasmid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Xu; He Guangyuan; Shi Mengjun; Gao Xuan; Li Yin; Ma Fengyun; Yu Men; Wang Changdong; Wang Yuesheng; Yang Guangxiao; Zou Fei; Lu Xinpei; Xiong Qing; Xiong Zilan

    2009-08-24

    The cold atmospheric pressure plasma, which has been widely used for biomedical applications, may potentially affect the conformation of DNA. In this letter, an atmospheric pressure plasma plume is used to investigate its effects on the conformational changes of DNA of plasmid pAHC25. It is found that the plasma plume could cause plasmid DNA topology alteration, resulting in the percentage of the supercoiled plasmid DNA form decreased while that of the open circular and linearized form of plasmid DNA increased as detected by agrose gel electrophoresis. On the other hand, further investigation by using polymerase chain reaction method shows that the atmospheric pressure plasma jet treatments under proper conditions does not affect the genes of the plasmid DNA, which may have potential application in increasing the transformation frequency by genetic engineering.

  9. Dose Response in Rodents and Nonhuman Primates After Hydrodynamic Limb Vein Delivery of Naked Plasmid DNA

    PubMed Central

    Hegge, Julia O.; Zhang, Guofeng; Sebestyén, Magdolna G.; Noble, Mark; Griffin, Jacob B.; Pfannes, Loretta V.; Herweijer, Hans; Hagstrom, James E.; Braun, Serge; Huss, Thierry; Wolff, Jon A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The efficacy of gene therapy mediated by plasmid DNA (pDNA) depends on the selection of suitable vectors and doses. Using hydrodynamic limb vein (HLV) injection to deliver naked pDNA to skeletal muscles of the limbs, we evaluated key parameters that affect expression in muscle from genes encoded in pDNA. Short-term and long-term promoter comparisons demonstrated that kinetics of expression differed between cytomegalovirus (CMV), muscle creatine kinase, and desmin promoters, but all gave stable expression from 2 to 49 weeks after delivery to mouse muscle. Expression from the CMV promoter was highest. For mice, rats, and rhesus monkeys, the linear range for pDNA dose response could be defined by the mass of pDNA relative to the mass of target muscle. Correlation between pDNA dose and expression was linear between a threshold dose of 75 μg/g and maximal expression at approximately 400 μg/g. One HLV injection into rats of a dose of CMV-LacZ yielding maximal expression resulted in an average transfection of 28% of all hind leg muscle and 40% of the gastrocnemius and soleus. Despite an immune reaction to the reporter gene in monkeys, a single injection transfected an average of 10% of all myofibers in the targeted muscle of the arms and legs and an average of 15% of myofibers in the gastrocnemius and soleus. PMID:21338336

  10. Distribution and diversity of mycoplasma plasmids: lessons from cryptic genetic elements

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The evolution of mycoplasmas from a common ancestor with Firmicutes has been characterized not only by genome down-sizing but also by horizontal gene transfer between mycoplasma species sharing a common host. The mechanisms of these gene transfers remain unclear because our knowledge of the mycoplasma mobile genetic elements is limited. In particular, only a few plasmids have been described within the Mycoplasma genus. Results We have shown that several species of ruminant mycoplasmas carry plasmids that are members of a large family of elements and replicate via a rolling-circle mechanism. All plasmids were isolated from species that either belonged or were closely related to the Mycoplasma mycoides cluster; none was from the Mycoplasma bovis-Mycoplasma agalactiae group. Twenty one plasmids were completely sequenced, named and compared with each other and with the five mycoplasma plasmids previously reported. All plasmids share similar size and genetic organization, and present a mosaic structure. A peculiar case is that of the plasmid pMyBK1 from M. yeatsii; it is larger in size and is predicted to be mobilizable. Its origin of replication and replication protein were identified. In addition, pMyBK1 derivatives were shown to replicate in various species of the M. mycoides cluster, and therefore hold considerable promise for developing gene vectors. The phylogenetic analysis of these plasmids confirms the uniqueness of pMyBK1 and indicates that the other mycoplasma plasmids cluster together, apart from the related replicons found in phytoplasmas and in species of the clade Firmicutes. Conclusions Our results unraveled a totally new picture of mycoplasma plasmids. Although they probably play a limited role in the gene exchanges that participate in mycoplasma evolution, they are abundant in some species. Evidence for the occurrence of frequent genetic recombination strongly suggests they are transmitted between species sharing a common host or niche. PMID

  11. Computer Program For Linear Algebra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krogh, F. T.; Hanson, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Collection of routines provided for basic vector operations. Basic Linear Algebra Subprogram (BLAS) library is collection from FORTRAN-callable routines for employing standard techniques to perform basic operations of numerical linear algebra.

  12. Computer Program For Linear Algebra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krogh, F. T.; Hanson, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Collection of routines provided for basic vector operations. Basic Linear Algebra Subprogram (BLAS) library is collection from FORTRAN-callable routines for employing standard techniques to perform basic operations of numerical linear algebra.

  13. Linear support vector regression and partial least squares chemometric models for determination of Hydrochlorothiazide and Benazepril hydrochloride in presence of related impurities: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naguib, Ibrahim A.; Abdelaleem, Eglal A.; Draz, Mohammed E.; Zaazaa, Hala E.

    2014-09-01

    Partial least squares regression (PLSR) and support vector regression (SVR) are two popular chemometric models that are being subjected to a comparative study in the presented work. The comparison shows their characteristics via applying them to analyze Hydrochlorothiazide (HCZ) and Benazepril hydrochloride (BZ) in presence of HCZ impurities; Chlorothiazide (CT) and Salamide (DSA) as a case study. The analysis results prove to be valid for analysis of the two active ingredients in raw materials and pharmaceutical dosage form through handling UV spectral data in range (220-350 nm). For proper analysis a 4 factor 4 level experimental design was established resulting in a training set consisting of 16 mixtures containing different ratios of interfering species. An independent test set consisting of 8 mixtures was used to validate the prediction ability of the suggested models. The results presented indicate the ability of mentioned multivariate calibration models to analyze HCZ and BZ in presence of HCZ impurities CT and DSA with high selectivity and accuracy of mean percentage recoveries of (101.01 ± 0.80) and (100.01 ± 0.87) for HCZ and BZ respectively using PLSR model and of (99.78 ± 0.80) and (99.85 ± 1.08) for HCZ and BZ respectively using SVR model. The analysis results of the dosage form were statistically compared to the reference HPLC method with no significant differences regarding accuracy and precision. SVR model gives more accurate results compared to PLSR model and show high generalization ability, however, PLSR still keeps the advantage of being fast to optimize and implement.

  14. Prevalence and significance of plasmid maintenance functions in the virulence plasmids of pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Manjistha; Austin, Stuart

    2011-07-01

    Virulence functions of pathogenic bacteria are often encoded on large extrachromosomal plasmids. These plasmids are maintained at low copy number to reduce the metabolic burden on their host. Low-copy-number plasmids risk loss during cell division. This is countered by plasmid-encoded systems that ensure that each cell receives at least one plasmid copy. Plasmid replication and recombination can produce plasmid multimers that hinder plasmid segregation. These are removed by multimer resolution systems. Equitable distribution of the resulting monomers to daughter cells is ensured by plasmid partition systems that actively segregate plasmid copies to daughter cells in a process akin to mitosis in higher organisms. Any plasmid-free cells that still arise due to occasional failures of replication, multimer resolution, or partition are eliminated by plasmid-encoded postsegregational killing systems. Here we argue that all of these three systems are essential for the stable maintenance of large low-copy-number plasmids. Thus, they should be found on all large virulence plasmids. Where available, well-annotated sequences of virulence plasmids confirm this. Indeed, virulence plasmids often appear to contain more than one example conforming to each of the three system classes. Since these systems are essential for virulence, they can be regarded as ubiquitous virulence factors. As such, they should be informative in the search for new antibacterial agents and drug targets.

  15. Capacity of aquatic bacteria to act as recipients of plasmid DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Genthner, F J; Chatterjee, P; Barkay, T; Bourquin, A W

    1988-01-01

    A total of 68 gram-negative freshwater bacterial isolates were screened for their ability to receive and express plasmids from Pseudomonas aeruginosa donors. The plate mating technique identified 26 of the isolates as recipient active for the self-transmissible wide-host-range plasmid R68; 10 were recipient active by R68 mobilization for the wide-host-range plasmid cloning vector R1162. Frequencies of transfer were compared by using three conjugal transfer procedures: broth, plate, and filter mating. For every recipient tested, a solid environment was superior to a liquid environment for transfer. The broth mating technique failed to demonstrate R68 transfer in 63% of the recipient-active isolates. Filter mating, in general, yielded the highest transfer frequencies. The more-rapid plate mating procedure, however, was just as sensitive for testing the capacity of natural isolates to participate in conjugal plasmid transfer. PMID:3345074

  16. Isolation and characterization of an R-prime plasmid from Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, G B; Dobo, K; Dusha, I; Breznovits, A; Orosz, L; Vincze, E; Kondorosi, A

    1980-01-01

    Using a simple enrichment procedure, we isolated an R-prime derivative of plasmid R68.45 carrying a 17.8-megadalton segment of the Rhizobium meliloti 41 chromosome. The chromosomal segment carried on this plasmid (pGY1) includes the markers cys-24+, cys-46+, and att16-3. Plasmid pGY1 mobilized the chromosome in a polarized way starting from the region of homology, but cannot promote chromosome transfer from other sites. The att16-3 site on pGY1 allowed the integration of phage 16-3 into pGY1, and a composite plasmid of 91.8 megadaltons was formed. This vector (pGY2) is suitable for the introduction of Rhizobium bacteriophage 16-3 into other gram-negative bacteria. PMID:6986354

  17. Homology of pCS1 Plasmid Sequences with Chromosomal DNA in Clavibacter michiganense subsp. sepedonicum: Evidence for the Presence of a Repeated Sequence and Plasmid Integration †

    PubMed Central

    Mogen, Bradley D.; Oleson, Arland E.

    1987-01-01

    Restriction fragments of pCS1, a 50.6-kilobase (kb) plasmid present in many strains of Clavibacter michiganense subsp. sepedonicum (“Corynebacterium sepedonicum”), have been cloned in an M13mp11 phage vector. Radiolabeled forms of these cloned fragments have been used as Southern hybridization probes for the presence of plasmid sequences in chromosomal DNA of this organism. These studies have shown that all tested strains lacking the covalently closed circular form of pCS1 contain the plasmid in integrated form. In each case the site of integration exists on a single plasmid restriction fragment with a size of 5.1 kb. Southern hybridizations with these probes have also revealed the existence of a major repeated sequence in C. michiganense subsp. sepedonicum. Hybridizations of chromosomal DNA with deletion subclones of a 2.9-kb plasmid fragment containing the repeated sequence indicate that the size of the repeated sequence is approximately 1.3 kb. One of the copies of the repeated sequence is on the plasmid fragment containing the site of integration. Images PMID:16347464

  18. Origin and Evolution of Rickettsial Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    El Karkouri, Khalid; Pontarotti, Pierre; Raoult, Didier; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard

    2016-01-01

    Background Rickettsia species are strictly intracellular bacteria that have undergone a reductive genomic evolution. Despite their allopatric lifestyle, almost half of the 26 currently validated Rickettsia species have plasmids. In order to study the origin, evolutionary history and putative roles of rickettsial plasmids, we investigated the evolutionary processes that have shaped 20 plasmids belonging to 11 species, using comparative genomics and phylogenetic analysis between rickettsial, microbial and non-microbial genomes. Results Plasmids were differentially present among Rickettsia species. The 11 species had 1 to 4 plasmid (s) with a size ranging from 12 kb to 83 kb. We reconstructed pRICO, the last common ancestor of the current rickettsial plasmids. pRICO was vertically inherited mainly from Rickettsia/Orientia chromosomes and diverged vertically into a single or multiple plasmid(s) in each species. These plasmids also underwent a reductive evolution by progressive gene loss, similar to that observed in rickettsial chromosomes, possibly leading to cryptic plasmids or complete plasmid loss. Moreover, rickettsial plasmids exhibited ORFans, recent gene duplications and evidence of horizontal gene transfer events with rickettsial and non-rickettsial genomes mainly from the α/γ-proteobacteria lineages. Genes related to maintenance and plasticity of plasmids, and to adaptation and resistance to stress mostly evolved under vertical and/or horizontal processes. Those involved in nucleotide/carbohydrate transport and metabolism were under the influence of vertical evolution only, whereas genes involved in cell wall/membrane/envelope biogenesis, cycle control, amino acid/lipid/coenzyme and secondary metabolites biosynthesis, transport and metabolism underwent mainly horizontal transfer events. Conclusion Rickettsial plasmids had a complex evolution, starting with a vertical inheritance followed by a reductive evolution associated with increased complexity via

  19. Origin and Evolution of Rickettsial Plasmids.

    PubMed

    El Karkouri, Khalid; Pontarotti, Pierre; Raoult, Didier; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard

    2016-01-01

    Rickettsia species are strictly intracellular bacteria that have undergone a reductive genomic evolution. Despite their allopatric lifestyle, almost half of the 26 currently validated Rickettsia species have plasmids. In order to study the origin, evolutionary history and putative roles of rickettsial plasmids, we investigated the evolutionary processes that have shaped 20 plasmids belonging to 11 species, using comparative genomics and phylogenetic analysis between rickettsial, microbial and non-microbial genomes. Plasmids were differentially present among Rickettsia species. The 11 species had 1 to 4 plasmid (s) with a size ranging from 12 kb to 83 kb. We reconstructed pRICO, the last common ancestor of the current rickettsial plasmids. pRICO was vertically inherited mainly from Rickettsia/Orientia chromosomes and diverged vertically into a single or multiple plasmid(s) in each species. These plasmids also underwent a reductive evolution by progressive gene loss, similar to that observed in rickettsial chromosomes, possibly leading to cryptic plasmids or complete plasmid loss. Moreover, rickettsial plasmids exhibited ORFans, recent gene duplications and evidence of horizontal gene transfer events with rickettsial and non-rickettsial genomes mainly from the α/γ-proteobacteria lineages. Genes related to maintenance and plasticity of plasmids, and to adaptation and resistance to stress mostly evolved under vertical and/or horizontal processes. Those involved in nucleotide/carbohydrate transport and metabolism were under the influence of vertical evolution only, whereas genes involved in cell wall/membrane/envelope biogenesis, cycle control, amino acid/lipid/coenzyme and secondary metabolites biosynthesis, transport and metabolism underwent mainly horizontal transfer events. Rickettsial plasmids had a complex evolution, starting with a vertical inheritance followed by a reductive evolution associated with increased complexity via horizontal gene transfer as well as

  20. Plasmid diversity in Vibrio vulnificus biotypes.

    PubMed

    Roig, Francisco J; Amaro, Carmen

    2009-02-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is a heterogeneous bacterial species that can be virulent for humans and fish. Virulence in fish seems to rely on a recently described plasmid that can be transmitted between strains, aided by a conjugative plasmid. The main objective of this work was to analyse the plasmid content of a wide collection of strains from the three biotypes of the species, as well as to identify putative conjugative and virulence plasmids by means of Southern hybridization with specific probes and sequence analysis of selected gene markers. We found 28 different plasmid profiles in a total of 112 strains, which were relatively biotype- or serovar-specific. Biotype 1 lacked high-molecular-mass plasmids, with the exception of a putative conjugative plasmid of 48 kb that was present in 42.8% of clinical and environmental strains isolated worldwide. All biotype 2 strains possessed the virulence plasmid, whose molecular mass ranged between 68 and 70 kb, and 89.65% of these strains also had a putative conjugative plasmid with a molecular size of 52-56 kb. Finally, a 48 kb putative conjugative plasmid was present in all biotype 3 strains. Data from partial sequencing of traD, traI and the whole vep07 (a recently described plasmid-borne virulence gene) from a selection of strains suggest that the plasmids of 48-56 kb probably belong to the same family of F-plasmids as pYJ016 and that the gene vep07 is absolutely essential for fish virulence. Additional cryptic plasmids of low molecular mass were present in the three biotypes. In conclusion, plasmids are widespread among V. vulnificus species and could contribute substantially to genetic plasticity of the species.

  1. Identification of regions essential for extrachromosomal replication and maintenance of an endogenous plasmid in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed Central

    Ahern, K G; Howard, P K; Firtel, R A

    1988-01-01

    Initial experiments with the endogenous 12.3 kb Dictyostelium discoideum plasmid Ddp1 led to the generation of a large shuttle vector, Ddp1-20. In addition to Ddp1, this vector contains pBR322 and a gene fusion that confers G418 resistance in Dictyostelium cells. We have shown that Ddp1-20 replicates extrachromosomally in Dictyostelium cells and can be grown in Escherichia coli cells (1). We have now examined deletions within this vector to identify the elements essential for extrachromosomal replication and stable maintenance of the plasmid. We find that a 2.2 kb fragment is sufficient to confer stable, extrachromosomal replication with a reduction in copy number from about 40 to approximately 10-15 copies per cell. Vectors containing additional Ddp1 sequences have a higher copy number. The 2.2 kb region contains none of the complete, previously identified transcription units on Ddp1 expressed during vegetative growth or development. These results suggest that gene products expressed by Ddp1 are not essential for replication, stability, or partitioning of the plasmid between daughter cells. Vectors carrying only the 2.2 kb fragment plus the gene fusion conferring G418 resistance transform Dictyostelium cells with high efficiency using either calcium phosphate mediated transformation or electroporation. Finally, we have examined the relative levels of expression of actin promoters driving neoR genes when in extrachromosomal or integrating vectors. Images PMID:3405751

  2. Vector inflation and vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, C.M. )

    1991-09-15

    A vector field {ital A}{sub {mu}} is coupled to the Einstein equations with a linearly perturbed Friedmann-Robertson-Walker metric, constructed to generate first-order vector perturbations. A working classical chaotic vector inflation is demonstrated and then quantum fluctuations of the field are used to constrain the cosmological perturbations. In particular, the vector momentum flux {ital T}{sub 0{ital i}} is tracked to the epoch where radiation-dominated matter exists. Matching conditions using observational constraints of the cosmic microwave background radiation give rise to a peculiar cosmological velocity of the order of 10{sup {minus}100}{ital c}. Amplification of this number, e.g., by breaking the conformal invariance of the field, could be used to generate cosmic magnetic fields using a dynamo mechanism.

  3. Vectors Point Toward Pisa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Richard A.

    1971-01-01

    The author shows that the set of all sequences in which each term is the sum of the two previous terms forms a vector space of dimension two. He uses this result to obtain the formula for the Fibonacci sequence and applies the same technique to other linear recursive relations. (MM)

  4. The vector reflector.

    PubMed

    Citrin, D S

    2012-06-15

    A linearly polarized Bessel beam, whose spatial frequencies correspond to the Brewster angle, impinging at normal incidence on a higher refractive-index interface is shown to lead to a reflected field that can be used to produce an azimuthally polarized optical vector beam.

  5. A cell engineering strategy to enhance supercoiled plasmid DNA production for gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Sally; Ward, John

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT With the recent revival of the promise of plasmid DNA vectors in gene therapy, a novel synthetic biology approach was used to enhance the quantity, (yield), and quality of the plasmid DNA. Quality was measured by percentage supercoiling and supercoiling density, as well as improving segregational stability in fermentation. We examined the hypothesis that adding a Strong Gyrase binding Site (SGS) would increase DNA gyrase‐mediated plasmid supercoiling. SGS from three different replicons, (the Mu bacteriophage and two plasmids, pSC101 and pBR322) were inserted into the plasmid, pUC57. Different sizes of these variants were transformed into E. coli DH5α, and their supercoiling properties and segregational stability measured. A 36% increase in supercoiling density was found in pUC57‐SGS, but only when SGS was derived from the Mu phage and was the larger sized version of this fragment. These results were also confirmed at fermentation scale. Total percentage supercoiled monomer was maintained to 85–90%. A twofold increase in plasmid yield was also observed for pUC57‐SGS in comparison to pUC57. pUC57‐SGS displayed greater segregational stability than pUC57‐cer and pUC57, demonstrating a further potential advantage of the SGS site. These findings should augment the potential of plasmid DNA vectors in plasmid DNA manufacture. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2064–2071. © 2016 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26928284

  6. A cell engineering strategy to enhance supercoiled plasmid DNA production for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Sally; Keshavarz-Moore, Eli; Ward, John

    2016-09-01

    With the recent revival of the promise of plasmid DNA vectors in gene therapy, a novel synthetic biology approach was used to enhance the quantity, (yield), and quality of the plasmid DNA. Quality was measured by percentage supercoiling and supercoiling density, as well as improving segregational stability in fermentation. We examined the hypothesis that adding a Strong Gyrase binding Site (SGS) would increase DNA gyrase-mediated plasmid supercoiling. SGS from three different replicons, (the Mu bacteriophage and two plasmids, pSC101 and pBR322) were inserted into the plasmid, pUC57. Different sizes of these variants were transformed into E. coli DH5α, and their supercoiling properties and segregational stability measured. A 36% increase in supercoiling density was found in pUC57-SGS, but only when SGS was derived from the Mu phage and was the larger sized version of this fragment. These results were also confirmed at fermentation scale. Total percentage supercoiled monomer was maintained to 85-90%. A twofold increase in plasmid yield was also observed for pUC57-SGS in comparison to pUC57. pUC57-SGS displayed greater segregational stability than pUC57-cer and pUC57, demonstrating a further potential advantage of the SGS site. These findings should augment the potential of plasmid DNA vectors in plasmid DNA manufacture. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2064-2071. © 2016 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Plasmids containing the gene for DNA polymerase I from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, S.A.; Martinez, S.; Lopez, P.; Espinosa, M.

    1987-08-28

    A method is disclosed for cloning the gene which encodes a DNA polymerase-exonuclease of /und Streptococcus/ /und pneumoniae/. Plasmid pSM22, the vector containing the pneumococcal polA gene, facilitates the expression of 50-fold greater amounts of the PolI enzyme. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  8. Plasmids containing the gene for DNA polymerase I from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, S.A.; Martinez, S.; Lopez, P.; Espinosa, M.

    1991-03-26

    A method is disclosed for cloning the gene which encodes a DNA polymerase-exonuclease of Streptococcus pneumoniae. Plasmid pSM22, the vector containing the pneumocccal polA gene, facilitates the expression of 50-fold greater amounts of the PolI enzyme. 1 figure.

  9. Proteomic profiling of salivary gland after nonviral gene transfer mediated by conventional plasmids and minicircles

    PubMed Central

    Geguchadze, Ramaz; Wang, Zhimin; Zourelias, Lee; Perez-Riveros, Paola; Edwards, Paul C; Machen, Laurie; Passineau, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we compared gene transfer efficiency and host response to ultrasound-assisted, nonviral gene transfer with a conventional plasmid and a minicircle vector in the submandibular salivary glands of mice. Initially, we looked at gene transfer efficiency with equimolar amounts of the plasmid and minicircle vectors, corroborating an earlier report showing that minicircle is more efficient in the context of a physical method of gene transfer. We then sought to characterize the physiological response of the salivary gland to exogenous gene transfer using global proteomic profiling. Somewhat surprisingly, we found that sonoporation alone, without a gene transfer vector present, had virtually no effect on the salivary gland proteome. However, when a plasmid vector was used, we observed profound perturbations of the salivary gland proteome that compared in magnitude to that seen in a previous report after high doses of adeno-associated virus. Finally, we found that gene transfer with a minicircle induces only minor proteomic alterations that were similar to sonoporation alone. Using mass spectrometry, we assigned protein IDs to 218 gel spots that differed between plasmid and minicircle. Bioinformatic analysis of these proteins demonstrated convergence on 68 known protein interaction pathways, most notably those associated with innate immunity, cellular stress, and morphogenesis. PMID:25414909

  10. Enhanced purification of plasmid DNA isoforms by exploiting ionic strength effects during ultrafiltration.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Currie, David; Zydney, Andrew L

    2016-04-01

    The solution structure of plasmid DNA is known to be a strong function of solution conditions due to intramolecular electrostatic interactions between the charged phosphate groups along the DNA backbone. The objective of this work was to determine whether it was possible to enhance the use of ultrafiltration for separation of different plasmid isoforms by proper selection of the solution ionic strength and ion type. Experiments were performed with a 3.0 kbp plasmid using composite regenerated cellulose ultrafiltration membranes. The transmission of the linear isoform was nearly independent of solution ionic strength, but increased significantly with increasing filtrate flux due to the elongation of the highly flexible plasmid in the converging flow field into the membrane pores. In contrast, the transmission of the open-circular and supercoiled plasmids both increased with increasing NaCl or MgCl2 concentration due to the change in plasmid size and conformational flexibility. The effect of ionic strength was greatest for the supercoiled plasmid, providing opportunities for enhanced purification of this therapeutically active isoform. This behavior was confirmed using experiments performed with binary mixtures of the different isoforms. These results clearly demonstrate the potential for enhancing the performance of membrane systems for plasmid DNA separations by proper selection of the ionic conditions.

  11. A novel method for the quantification of adeno-associated virus vectors for RNA interference applications using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and purified genomic adeno-associated virus DNA as a standard.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Anke; Röhrs, Viola; Kedzierski, Radoslaw; Fechner, Henry; Kurreck, Jens

    2013-12-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors are promising tools in gene therapy, but accurate quantification of the vector dose remains a critical issue for their successful application. We therefore aimed at the precise determination of the titer of self-complementary AAV (scAAV) vectors to improve the reliability of RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdown approaches. Vector titers were initially determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) using four primer sets targeting different regions within the AAV vector genome (VG) and either coiled or linearized plasmid standards. Despite very low variability between replicates in each assay, these quantification experiments revealed up to 20-fold variation in vector titers. Therefore, we developed a novel approach for the reproducible determination of titers of scAAV vectors based on the use of purified genomic vector DNA as a standard (scAAVStd). Consistent results were obtained in qPCR assays using the four primer sets mentioned above. RNAi-mediated silencing of human cyclophilin B (hCycB) by short hairpin RNA-expressing scAAV vectors was investigated in HeLa cells using two independent vector preparations. We found that the required vector titers for efficient knockdown differed by a factor of 3.5 between both preparations. Hence, we also investigated the number of internalized scAAV vectors, termed transduction units (TUs). TUs were determined by qPCR applying the scAAVStd. Very similar values for 80% hCycB knockdown were obtained for the two AAV vector preparations. Thus, only the determination of TUs, rather than vector concentration, allows for reproducible results in functional analyses using AAV vectors.

  12. Protein Structure Initiative Material Repository: an open shared public resource of structural genomics plasmids for the biological community

    PubMed Central

    Cormier, Catherine Y.; Mohr, Stephanie E.; Zuo, Dongmei; Hu, Yanhui; Rolfs, Andreas; Kramer, Jason; Taycher, Elena; Kelley, Fontina; Fiacco, Michael; Turnbull, Greggory; LaBaer, Joshua

    2010-01-01

    The Protein Structure Initiative Material Repository (PSI-MR; http://psimr.asu.edu) provides centralized storage and distribution for the protein expression plasmids created by PSI researchers. These plasmids are a resource that allows the research community to dissect the biological function of proteins whose structures have been identified by the PSI. The plasmid annotation, which includes the full length sequence, vector information and associated publications, is stored in a freely available, searchable database called DNASU (http://dnasu.asu.edu). Each PSI plasmid is also linked to a variety of additional resources, which facilitates cross-referencing of a particular plasmid to protein annotations and experimental data. Plasmid samples can be requested directly through the website. We have also developed a novel strategy to avoid the most common concern encountered when distributing plasmids namely, the complexity of material transfer agreement (MTA) processing and the resulting delays this causes. The Expedited Process MTA, in which we created a network of institutions that agree to the terms of transfer in advance of a material request, eliminates these delays. Our hope is that by creating a repository of expression-ready plasmids and expediting the process for receiving these plasmids, we will help accelerate the accessibility and pace of scientific discovery. PMID:19906724

  13. Facile Recovery of Individual High-Molecular-Weight, Low-Copy-Number Natural Plasmids for Genomic Sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, L.E.; Detter, C,; Barrie, K.; Lapidus, A.; Summers, A.O.

    2006-06-01

    Sequencing of the large (>50 kb), low-copy-number (<5 per cell) plasmids that mediate horizontal gene transfer has been hindered by the difficulty and expense of isolating DNA from individual plasmids of this class. We report here that a kit method previously devised for purification of bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) can be adapted for effective preparation of individual plasmids up to 220 kb from wild gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. Individual plasmid DNA recovered from less than 10 ml of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus, and Corynebacterium cultures was of sufficient quantity and quality for construction of highcoverage libraries, as shown by sequencing five native plasmids ranging in size from 30 kb to 94 kb. We also report recommendations for vector screening to optimize plasmid sequence assembly, preliminary annotation of novel plasmid genomes, and insights on mobile genetic element biology derived from these sequences. Adaptation of this BAC method for large plasmid isolation removes one major technical hurdle to expanding our knowledge of the natural plasmid gene pool.

  14. Origin and direction of replication of the bacteriocinogenic plasmid Clo DF13.

    PubMed

    Stuitje, A R; Veltkamp, E; Weijers, P J; Nijkamp, H J

    1979-01-01

    Cairn's type replicative intermediates of both the wildtype Clo DF13 plasmid and the copy mutant CLO DF13 cop3 were isolated by dye-buoyant density centrifugation. Replicative intermediates were linearized at the HpaI or Sa1I cleavage site, and examined with the electron-microscope. The data show that replication of both the Clo DF13 wild type plasmid and the Clo DF13 cop3 plasmid, initiates at about 2.8% on the physical map. Replication proceeds unindirectionally and counterclockwise on this map.

  15. Origin and direction of replication of the bacteriocinogenic plasmid Clo DF13.

    PubMed Central

    Stuitje, A R; Veltkamp, E; Weijers, P J; Nijkamp, H J

    1979-01-01

    Cairn's type replicative intermediates of both the wildtype Clo DF13 plasmid and the copy mutant CLO DF13 cop3 were isolated by dye-buoyant density centrifugation. Replicative intermediates were linearized at the HpaI or Sa1I cleavage site, and examined with the electron-microscope. The data show that replication of both the Clo DF13 wild type plasmid and the Clo DF13 cop3 plasmid, initiates at about 2.8% on the physical map. Replication proceeds unindirectionally and counterclockwise on this map. Images PMID:370788

  16. Conditional gene vectors regulated in cis.

    PubMed

    Pich, Dagmar; Humme, Sibille; Spindler, Mark-Peter; Schepers, Aloys; Hammerschmidt, Wolfgang

    2008-08-01

    Non-integrating gene vectors, which are stably and extrachromosomally maintained in transduced cells would be perfect tools to support long-term expression of therapeutic genes but preserve the genomic integrity of the cellular host. Small extrachromosomal plasmids share some of these ideal characteristics but are primarily based on virus blueprints. These plasmids are dependent on viral trans-acting factors but they can replicate their DNA molecules in synchrony with the chromosome of the cellular host and segregate to daughter cells in an autonomous fashion. On the basis of the concept of the latent origin of DNA replication of Epstein-Barr virus, oriP, we devised novel derivatives, which exclusively rely on an artificial replication factor for both nuclear retention and replication of plasmid DNA. In addition, an allosteric switch regulates the fate of the plasmid molecules, which are rapidly lost upon addition of doxycycline. Conditional maintenance of these novel plasmid vectors allows the reversible transfer of genetic information into target cells for the first time.

  17. Plasmid curing of Oenococcus oeni.

    PubMed

    Mesas, Juan M; Rodríguez, M Carmen; Alegre, M Teresa

    2004-01-01

    Two strains of Oenococcus oeni, RS1 (which carries the plasmid pRS1) and RS2 (which carries the plasmids pRS2 and pRS3), were grown in the presence of different curing agents and at different temperatures. Sublethal temperature together with acriflavine generated all possible types of cured strains, i.e., lacking pRS1 (from strain RS1), and lacking pRS2, pRS3, or both (from strain RS2). Sublethal temperature together with acridine orange only generated cured strains lacking pRS3. These results suggest that acriflavine is a better curing agent than acridine orange for O. oeni, and that pRS3 is the most sensitive to these curing agents. We also observed spontaneous loss of pRS2 or both pRS2 and pRS3 by electroporation. The ability to cure O. oeni strains of plasmids provides a critical new tool for the genetic analysis and engineering of this commercially important bacterium.

  18. Plasmid Diversity and Adaptation Analyzed by Massive Sequencing of Escherichia coli Plasmids.

    PubMed

    de Toro, María; Garcilláon-Barcia, M Pilar; De La Cruz, Fernando

    2014-12-01

    Whole-genome sequencing is revolutionizing the analysis of bacterial genomes. It leads to a massive increase in the amount of available data to be analyzed. Bacterial genomes are usually composed of one main chromosome and a number of accessory chromosomes, called plasmids. A recently developed methodology called PLACNET (for plasmid constellation networks) allows the reconstruction of the plasmids of a given genome. Thus, it opens an avenue for plasmidome analysis on a global scale. This work reviews our knowledge of the genetic determinants for plasmid propagation (conjugation and related functions), their diversity, and their prevalence in the variety of plasmids found by whole-genome sequencing. It focuses on the results obtained from a collection of 255 Escherichia coli plasmids reconstructed by PLACNET. The plasmids found in E. coli represent a nonaleatory subset of the plasmids found in proteobacteria. Potential reasons for the prevalence of some specific plasmid groups will be discussed and, more importantly, additional questions will be posed.

  19. Ultrasound enhancement of in vitro transfection of plasmid DNA by a cationized gelatin.

    PubMed

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein; Aoyama, Teruyoshi; Ogawa, Osamu; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2002-05-01

    In vitro transfection efficiency of a plasmid DNA for rat gastric mucosal (RGM)-1 cells was enhanced by ultrasound (US) irradiation. Ethylenediamine was introduced to the carboxyl groups of gelatin to prepare a cationized gelatin as the vector of plasmid DNA encoding luciferase. An electrophoresis experiment revealed that the cationized gelatin was mixed with plasmid DNA at the weight ratio of 5.0 to form a cationized gelatin-plasmid DNA complex. The complex obtained was about 200nm in diameter with a positive charge. When incubated with the cationized gelatin-plasmid DNA complex and subsequently exposed to US, RGM-1 cells exhibited a significantly enhanced luciferase activity although the extent increased with an increase in the DNA concentration, in contrast to the cationized gelatin alone with or without US irradiation and US irradiation alone. US irradiation was also effective in enhancing the activity by free plasmid DNA although the extent was less than that of the complex. The US-induced enhancement of luciferase activity was influenced by the exposure time period, frequency, and intensity of US. The activity enhancement became higher to be significant at the irradiation time period of 60 s and thereafter decreased. A series of cytotoxicity experiments revealed that an increase in the irradiation time period and intensity of US decreased the viability of cells themselves. It is possible that US irradiation under an appropriate condition enables cells to accelerate the permeation of the cationized gelatin-plasmid DNA complex through the cell membrane, resulted in enhanced transfection efficiency of plasmid DNA. These findings clearly indicate that US exposure is a simple and promising method to enhance the gene expression of plasmid DNA.

  20. Handling S/MAR vectors.

    PubMed

    Hagedorn, Claudia; Baiker, Armin; Postberg, Jan; Ehrhardt, Anja; Lipps, Hans J

    2012-06-01

    Nonviral episomal vectors represent attractive alternatives to currently used virus-based expression systems. In the late 1990s, it was shown that a plasmid containing an expression cassette linked to a scaffold/matrix attached region (S/MAR) replicates as a low copy number episome in all cell lines tested, as well as primary cells, and can be used for the genetic modification of higher animals. Once established in the cell, the S/MAR vector replicates early during S-phase and, in the absence of selection, is stably retained in the cells for an unlimited period of time. This vector can therefore be regarded as a minimal model system for studying the epigenetic regulation of replication and functional nuclear architecture. In theory, this construct represents an almost "ideal" expression system for gene therapy. In practice, S/MAR-based vectors stably modify mammalian cells with efficiencies far below those of virus-based constructs. Consequently, they have not yet found application in gene therapy trials. Furthermore, S/MAR vector systems are not trivial to handle and several critical technical issues have to be considered when modifying these vectors for various applications.

  1. pBR322 vectors having tetracycline-dependent replication.

    PubMed

    Cronan, John E

    2016-01-01

    Few Escherichia coli cloning vectors are available that can both be stably maintained and efficiently cured. One such vector is pAM34, a pBR332 derivative constructed by Gil and Bouché (1991). Replication of this plasmid is driven by the lacZYA promoter under control of a gratuitous inducer. However, lac operator-repressor interactions are also used to regulate many expression systems which limit the utility of pAM34. In this report pAM34 has been modified by replacement of the lac regulatory elements with those of the transposon Tn10 tetracycline resistance module. This resulted in medium copy number plasmids that are dependent on the presence of tetracycline (or less satisfactorily, anhydrotetracycline) for replication. The tetracycline-dependent plasmids are rapidly lost in the absence of tetracycline and plasmid loss is markedly accelerated when the host strain expresses a tetracycline efflux pump. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Increased maintenance and persistence of transgenes by excision of expression cassettes from plasmid sequences in vivo.

    PubMed

    Riu, Efren; Grimm, Dirk; Huang, Zan; Kay, Mark A

    2005-05-01

    Persistence of transgene expression is a major limitation for nonvirus-mediated gene therapy approaches. We have suggested that covalent linkage of bacterial DNA to the expression cassette plays a critical role in transcriptional silencing of transgenes in vivo. To gain insight into the role of the covalent linkage of plasmid DNA to the expression cassette and transcriptional repression, and whether this silencing effect could be alleviated by altering the molecular structure of vector DNAs in vivo, we generated a scheme for converting routine plasmids into a purified expression cassette, free of bacterial DNA after gene transfer in vivo. To do this, the human alpha-1-antitrypsin (hAAT) and human clotting factor IX (hfIX) reporter genes were flanked by two ISceI endonuclease recognition sites, and coinjected together with a plasmid encoding the I-SceI cDNA or a control plasmid into mouse liver. Two weeks after DNA administration, mice injected with the reporter gene alone or with the irrelevant control plasmid showed low serum levels of hAAT or hFIX, which remained low throughout the length of the experiment. However, animals that expressed I-SceI had a 5- to 10-fold increase in serum hAAT or hFIX that persisted for at least 8 months (length of study). Expression of I-SceI resulted in cleavage and excision of the expression cassettes from the plasmid backbone, forming mostly circles devoid of bacterial DNA sequences, as established by a battery of different Southern blot and polymerase chain reaction analyses in both C57BL/6 and scid treated mice. In contrast, only the input parental circular plasmid DNA band was detected in mice injected with the reporter gene alone, or an I-SceI plasmid together with the hAAT reporter plasmid lacking the I-SceI sites. Similar results were obtained when the Flp recombinase system was used to make mini-plasmids in mouse liver in vivo. This study presents further independent evidence that removing the covalent linkage between

  3. Plasmid-Encoded Iron Uptake Systems.

    PubMed

    Di Lorenzo, Manuela; Stork, Michiel

    2014-12-01

    Plasmids confer genetic information that benefits the bacterial cells containing them. In pathogenic bacteria, plasmids often harbor virulence determinants that enhance the pathogenicity of the bacterium. The ability to acquire iron in environments where it is limited, for instance the eukaryotic host, is a critical factor for bacterial growth. To acquire iron, bacteria have evolved specific iron uptake mechanisms. These systems are often chromosomally encoded, while those that are plasmid-encoded are rare. Two main plasmid types, ColV and pJM1, have been shown to harbor determinants that increase virulence by providing the cell with essential iron for growth. It is clear that these two plasmid groups evolved independently from each other since they do not share similarities either in the plasmid backbones or in the iron uptake systems they harbor. The siderophores aerobactin and salmochelin that are found on ColV plasmids fall in the hydroxamate and catechol group, respectively, whereas both functional groups are present in the anguibactin siderophore, the only iron uptake system found on pJM1-type plasmids. Besides siderophore-mediated iron uptake, ColV plasmids carry additional genes involved in iron metabolism. These systems include ABC transporters, hemolysins, and a hemoglobin protease. ColV- and pJM1-like plasmids have been shown to confer virulence to their bacterial host, and this trait can be completely ascribed to their encoded iron uptake systems.

  4. Marker-free plasmids for gene therapeutic applications--lack of antibiotic resistance gene substantially improves the manufacturing process.

    PubMed

    Mairhofer, Jürgen; Cserjan-Puschmann, Monika; Striedner, Gerald; Nöbauer, Katharina; Razzazi-Fazeli, Ebrahim; Grabherr, Reingard

    2010-04-01

    Plasmid DNA is being considered as a promising alternative to traditional protein vaccines or viral delivery methods for gene therapeutic applications. DNA-based products are highly flexible, stable, are easily stored and can be manufactured on a large scale. Although, much safer than viral approaches, issues have been raised with regard to safety due to possible integration of plasmid DNA into cellular DNA or spread of antibiotic resistance genes to intestinal bacteria by horizontal gene transfer. Accordingly, there is interest in methods for the production of plasmid DNA that lacks the antibiotic resistance gene to further improve their safety profile. Here, we report for the first time the gram-scale manufacturing of a minimized plasmid that is devoid of any additional sequence elements on the plasmid backbone, and merely consists of the target expression cassette and the bacterial origin of replication. Three different host/vector combinations were cultivated in a fed-batch fermentation process, comparing the progenitor strain JM108 to modified strains JM108murselect, hosting a plasmid either containing the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase which provides kanamycin resistance, or a marker-free variant of the same plasmid. The metabolic load exerted by expression of the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase was monitored by measuring ppGpp- and cAMP-levels. Moreover, we revealed that JM108 is deficient of the Lon protease and thereby refined the genotype of JM108. The main consequences of Lon-deficiency with regard to plasmid DNA production are discussed herein. Additionally, we found that the expression of the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase, conferring resistance to kanamycin, was very high in plasmid DNA producing processes that actually inclusion bodies were formed. Thereby, a severe metabolic load on the host cell was imposed, detrimental for overall plasmid yield. Hence, deleting the antibiotic resistance gene from the vector backbone is not only beneficial

  5. Virulence Plasmids of Spore-Forming Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Adams, Vicki; Li, Jihong; Wisniewski, Jessica A; Uzal, Francisco A; Moore, Robert J; McClane, Bruce A; Rood, Julian I

    2014-12-01

    Plasmid-encoded virulence factors are important in the pathogenesis of diseases caused by spore-forming bacteria. Unlike many other bacteria, the most common virulence factors encoded by plasmids in Clostridium and Bacillus species are protein toxins. Clostridium perfringens causes several histotoxic and enterotoxin diseases in both humans and animals and produces a broad range of toxins, including many pore-forming toxins such as C. perfringens enterotoxin, epsilon-toxin, beta-toxin, and NetB. Genetic studies have led to the determination of the role of these toxins in disease pathogenesis. The genes for these toxins are generally carried on large conjugative plasmids that have common core replication, maintenance, and conjugation regions. There is considerable functional information available about the unique tcp conjugation locus carried by these plasmids, but less is known about plasmid maintenance. The latter is intriguing because many C. perfringens isolates stably maintain up to four different, but closely related, toxin plasmids. Toxin genes may also be plasmid-encoded in the neurotoxic clostridia. The tetanus toxin gene is located on a plasmid in Clostridium tetani, but the botulinum toxin genes may be chromosomal, plasmid-determined, or located on bacteriophages in Clostridium botulinum. In Bacillus anthracis it is well established that virulence is plasmid determined, with anthrax toxin genes located on pXO1 and capsule genes on a separate plasmid, pXO2. Orthologs of these plasmids are also found in other members of the Bacillus cereus group such as B. cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis. In B. thuringiensis these plasmids may carry genes encoding one or more insecticidal toxins.

  6. [Construction of recombinant adenovirus vector of calcitonin gene-related peptide gene and transfection to neonatal rat cardiomyocytes].

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhi-hui; Han, Jie; Shao, Lei; Wang, Li-hong; Song, Jun-xian; Wei, Zhong-hai; Zheng, Liang-rong

    2010-05-01

    To construct a recombinant adenovirus vector of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) by AdEasy system and to validate its expression in myocardial cells. The full-length of CGRP gene cDNA was acquired by RT-PCR and cloned into pShuttle-CMV. After linearization with Pme I, the recombinant plasmid (pShuttle-CMV-CGRP) was transformed into E.coli BJ5183 by electroporation to construct the recombinant adenovirus plasmid AdEasy-pShuttle-CGRP. The recombinant adenovirus plasmids were transformed into E.coli XL10-Gold cells to be amplified. Then the recombinant plasmid was digested with Pac I and transfected to 293 cells to package recombinant adenovirus particles. PCR technique was used to detect target gene. The recombinant adenovirus particles were purified by CsC1 density gradient. The purified recombinant adenovirus was transfected to neonatal rat cardiomyocytes,and the recombinant adenovirus production was observed by fluorescent microscope. Expression of CGRP in hearts 7 days after intravenous delivery of adenoviral vectors AV-CGRP was determined by radioimmunoassay. The RT-PCR products confirmed a full-length cDNA of CGRP gene in PUC(57) by sequencing. The corresponding double endonuclease and PCR analysis certified the successful cloning of the gene into the pShuttle-CMV. The recombinant adenovirus plasmid AdEasy-pShuttle-CGRP was digested by Pac I endonuclease to form the typical DNA segments, whose length was about 3 kb and 30 kb. PCR analysis and fluorescent microscope observation confirmed that the CGRP gene was inserted into the adenovirus vector with very strong power of transfection. The recombinant adenovirus particles infected neonatal rat cardiomyocytes successfully. Radioimmunoassay showed that delivery of AV-CGRP significantly increased the expression of CGRP in mice hearts. The recombinant adenovirus vector of CGRP gene has been constructed,and it can infect neonatal rat cardiomyocytes successfully. Somatic delivery of CGRP gene can significantly

  7. An Autonomously Replicating Transforming Vector for Sulfolobus solfataricus

    PubMed Central

    Cannio, Raffaele; Contursi, Patrizia; Rossi, Mosè; Bartolucci, Simonetta

    1998-01-01

    A plasmid able to transform and to be stably maintained both in Sulfolobus solfataricus and in Escherichia coli was constructed by insertion into an E. coli plasmid of the autonomously replicating sequence of the virus particle SSV1 and a suitable mutant of the hph (hygromycin phosphotransferase) gene as the transformation marker. The vector suffered no rearrangement and/or chromosome integration, and its copy number in Sulfolobus was increased by exposure of the cells to mitomycin C. PMID:9620978

  8. Enhanced gene disruption by programmable nucleases delivered by a minicircle vector.

    PubMed

    Dad, A-B K; Ramakrishna, S; Song, M; Kim, H

    2014-11-01

    Targeted genetic modification using programmable nucleases such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) is of great value in biomedical research, medicine and biotechnology. Minicircle vectors, which lack extraneous bacterial sequences, have several advantages over conventional plasmids for transgene delivery. Here, for the first time, we delivered programmable nucleases into human cells using transient transfection of a minicircle vector and compared the results with those obtained using a conventional plasmid. Surrogate reporter assays and T7 endonuclease analyses revealed that cells in the minicircle vector group displayed significantly higher mutation frequencies at the target sites than those in the conventional plasmid group. Quantitative PCR and reverse transcription-PCR showed higher vector copy number and programmable nuclease transcript levels, respectively, in 293T cells after minicircle versus conventional plasmid vector transfection. In addition, tryphan blue staining and flow cytometry after annexin V and propidium iodide staining showed that cell viability was also significantly higher in the minicircle group than in the conventional plasmid group. Taken together, our results show that gene disruption using minicircle vector-mediated delivery of ZFNs and TALENs is a more efficient, safer and less toxic method than using a conventional plasmid, and indicate that the minicircle vector could serve as an advanced delivery method for programmable nucleases.

  9. Plasmid Conjugation from Proteobacteria as Evidence for the Origin of Xenologous Genes in Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Encinas, David; Garcillán-Barcia, M. Pilar; Santos-Merino, María; Delaye, Luis; Moya, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    Comparative genomics have shown that 5% of Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 genes are of probable proteobacterial origin. To investigate the role of interphylum conjugation in cyanobacterial gene acquisition, we tested the ability of a set of prototype proteobacterial conjugative plasmids (RP4, pKM101, R388, R64, and F) to transfer DNA from Escherichia coli to S. elongatus. A series of BioBrick-compatible, mobilizable shuttle vectors was developed. These vectors were based on the putative origin of replication of the Synechococcus resident plasmid pANL. Not only broad-host-range plasmids, such as RP4 and R388, but also narrower-host-range plasmids, such as pKM101, all encoding MPFT-type IV secretion systems, were able to transfer plasmid DNA from E. coli to S. elongatus by conjugation. Neither MPFF nor MPFI could be used as interphylum DNA delivery agents. Reciprocally, pANL-derived cointegrates could be introduced in E. coli by electroporation, where they conferred a functional phenotype. These results suggest the existence of potentially ample channels of gene flow between proteobacteria and cyanobacteria and point to MPFT-based interphylum conjugation as a potential mechanism to explain the proteobacterial origin of a majority of S. elongatus xenologous genes. PMID:24509315

  10. Construction of pTM series plasmids for gene expression in Brucella species.

    PubMed

    Tian, Mingxing; Qu, Jing; Bao, Yanqing; Gao, Jianpeng; Liu, Jiameng; Wang, Shaohui; Sun, Yingjie; Ding, Chan; Yu, Shengqing

    2016-04-01

    Brucellosis, the most common widespread zoonotic disease, is caused by Brucella spp., which are facultative, intracellular, Gram-negative bacteria. With the development of molecular biology techniques, more and more virulence-associated factors have been identified in Brucella spp. A suitable plasmid system is an important tool to study virulence genes in Brucella. In this study, we constructed three constitutive replication plasmids (pTM1-Cm, pTM2-Amp, and pTM3-Km) using the replication origin (rep) region derived from the pBBR1-MCS vector. Also, a DNA fragment containing multiple cloning sites (MCSs) and a terminator sequence derived from the pCold vector were produced for complementation of the deleted genes. Besides pGH-6×His, a plasmid containing the groE promoter of Brucella spp. was constructed to express exogenous proteins in Brucella with high efficiency. Furthermore, we constructed the inducible expression plasmid pZT-6×His, containing the tetracycline-inducible promoter pzt1, which can induce expression by the addition of tetracycline in the Brucella culture medium. The constructed pTM series plasmids will play an important role in the functional investigation of Brucella spp.

  11. Microwave effects on plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Sagripanti, J L; Swicord, M L; Davis, C C

    1987-05-01

    The exposure of purified plasmid DNA to microwave radiation at nonthermal levels in the frequency range from 2.00 to 8.75 GHz produces single- and double-strand breaks that are detected by agarose gel electrophoresis. Microwave-induced damage to DNA depends on the presence of small amounts of copper. This effect is dependent upon both the microwave power and the duration of the exposure. Cuprous, but not cupric, ions were able to mimic the effects produced by microwaves on DNA.

  12. A Plasmid in Legionella pneumophila

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    13). which they were isolated and the number of the isolate The Legionnaires disease bacterium, L. pneu. from that city. The following 16... Legionnaires disease bacterium. .1. (un. Micro. biol. 8:320-:t25. appears reasonable that this organism could sup- 1:l. Fraser, D5. W., and J. F. McI~ade. 1979...INFECTION AND IMMUNITY, Sept. 1980, p. 1(92-1095 Vol. 29, No. :1 0I 9-9567/A)/- 1092/14$02.00/0. A Plasmid in Legionella pneumophila_ ( (/’ )GREGORY

  13. Microwave effects on plasmid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sagripanti, J.L.; Swicord, M.L.; Davis, C.C.

    1987-05-01

    The exposure of purified plasmid DNA to microwave radiation at nonthermal levels in the frequency range from 2.00 to 8.75 GHz produces single- and double-strand breaks that are detected by agarose gel electrophoresis. Microwave-induced damage to DNA depends on the presence of small amounts of copper. This effect is dependent upon both the microwave power and the duration of the exposure. Cuprous, but not cupric, ions were able to mimic the effects produced by microwaves on DNA.

  14. A Versatile Adeno-Associated Virus Vector Producer Cell Line Method for Scalable Vector Production of Different Serotypes

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhenhua; Qiao, Chunping; Hu, Peiqi; Li, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Application of adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector in large animal studies and clinical trials often requires high-titer and high-potency vectors. A number of currently used vector production methods, based on either transient transfection or helper virus infection of cell lines, have their advantages and limitations. We previously developed a 293-cell–based producer cell line method for high-titer and high-potency AAV2 vectors. Similar to several other methods, however, it requires multiple cloning steps for the vector and packaging plasmids and a two-step transfection and selection for stable cell lines. Here we report a simplified method with several key improvements and advantages: (1) a one-step cloning of AAV vector cassette into the serotype-specific packaging plasmid; (2) a single plasmid transfection and selection for stable AAV vector producer cell lines; (3) high vector yields of different serotypes, e.g., AAV2, 8, and 9, upon infection with an E1A/E1B-deleted helper adenovirus; (4) efficient packaging of both single-stranded and double-stranded (self-complementary) AAV vectors; and (5) efficient packaging of large AAV cassettes such as a mini-dystrophin vector (5.0 kb). All cell lines were stable with growth rates identical to the parental 293 cells. The vector yields were consistent among serotypes, with 5 × 1013 to 8 × 1013 vector genome particles per Nunc cell factory (equivalent to 40 15-cm plates). The vectors showed high potency for in vitro and in vivo transduction. In conclusion, the simple and versatile AAV producer cell line method can be useful for large scale AAV vector production in preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:21186998

  15. Survey of plasmids in various mycoplasmas.

    PubMed Central

    Harasawa, R.; Barile, M. F.

    1983-01-01

    Thirty-three strains representing 15 distinct Mycoplasma, Acholeplasma, and Spiroplasma species were examined for the presence of plasmid DNA by agarose gel electrophoresis. The electrophoretic patterns of the DNAs of three strains, Mycoplasma sp. strain 747, Spiroplasma mirum strain SMCA, and M. hominis strain 1257, suggested the presence of a plasmid with molecular weights of approximately 70, 10, and 9 megadaltons, respectively. The functions of these plasmids are currently unknown. Images FIG. 1 PMID:6679154

  16. Biofilms and the plasmid maintenance question.

    PubMed

    Imran, Mudassar; Jones, Don; Smith, Hal

    2005-02-01

    Can a conjugative plasmid encoding enhanced biofilm forming abilities for its bacterial host facilitate the persistence of the plasmid in a bacterial population despite conferring diminished growth rate and segregative plasmid loss on its bearers? We construct a mathematical model in a chemostat and in a plug flow environment to answer this question. Explicit conditions for an affirmative answer are derived. Numerical simulations support the conclusion.

  17. Comparison of two cancer vaccines targeting tyrosinase: plasmid DNA and recombinant alphavirus replicon particles.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Stacie M; Bartido, Shirley M; Gardner, Jason P; Guevara-Patiño, José A; Montgomery, Stephanie C; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Maughan, Maureen F; Dempsey, JoAnn; Donovan, Gerald P; Olson, William C; Houghton, Alan N; Wolchok, Jedd D

    2005-11-15

    Immunization of mice with xenogeneic DNA encoding human tyrosinase-related proteins 1 and 2 breaks tolerance to these self-antigens and leads to tumor rejection. Viral vectors used alone or in heterologous DNA prime/viral boost combinations have shown improved responses to certain infectious diseases. The purpose of this study was to compare viral and plasmid DNA in combination vaccination strategies in the context of a tumor antigen. Using tyrosinase as a prototypical differentiation antigen, we determined the optimal regimen for immunization with plasmid DNA. Then, using propagation-incompetent alphavirus vectors (virus-like replicon particles, VRP) encoding tyrosinase, we tested different combinations of priming with DNA or VRP followed by boosting with VRP. We subsequently followed antibody production, T-cell response, and tumor rejection. T-cell responses to newly identified mouse tyrosinase epitopes were generated in mice immunized with plasmid DNA encoding human (xenogeneic) tyrosinase. In contrast, when VRP encoding either mouse or human tyrosinase were used as single agents, antibody and T-cell responses and a significant delay in tumor growth in vivo were observed. Similarly, a heterologous vaccine regimen using DNA prime and VRP boost showed a markedly stronger response than DNA vaccination alone. Alphavirus replicon particle vectors encoding the melanoma antigen tyrosinase (self or xenogeneic) induce immune responses and tumor protection when administered either alone or in the heterologous DNA prime/VRP boost approaches that are superior to the use of plasmid DNA alone.

  18. Cyanobacterium sp. host cell and vector for production of chemical compounds in Cyanobacterial cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Piven, Irina; Friedrich, Alexandra; Duhring, Ulf; Uliczka, Frank; Baier, Kerstin; Inaba, Masami; Shi, Tuo; Wang, Kui; Enke, Heike; Kramer, Dan

    2016-04-19

    A cyanobacterial host cell, Cyanobacterium sp., that harbors at least one recombinant gene for the production of a chemical compounds is provided, as well as vectors derived from an endogenous plasmid isolated from the cell.

  19. Cyanobacterium sp. host cell and vector for production of chemical compounds in cyanobacterial cultures

    DOEpatents

    Piven, Irina; Friedrich, Alexandra; Duhring, Ulf; Uliczka, Frank; Baier, Kerstin; Inaba, Masami; Shi, Tuo; Wang, Kui; Enke, Heike; Kramer, Dan

    2014-09-30

    A cyanobacterial host cell, Cyanobacterium sp., that harbors at least one recombinant gene for the production of a chemical compounds is provided, as well as vectors derived from an endogenous plasmid isolated from the cell.

  20. Integration host factor is required for replication of pYGK-derived plasmids in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Torres-Escobar, Ascención; Juárez-Rodríguez, María D; Demuth, Donald R

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we show that integration host factor protein (IHF) is required for replication of pYGK plasmids in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. YGK plasmids were not replicated in A. actinomycetemcomitans strains lacking either the α- or β- subunit of IHF. However, the deletion mutants were complemented, and plasmid replication was restored when the promoter region and gene for either ihfA or ihfB was cloned into pYGK. We also identified two motifs that resemble the consensus IHF-binding site in a 813-bp fragment containing the pYGK origin of replication. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, purified IHFα-IHFβ protein complex was shown to bind to probes containing either of these motifs. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing that plasmid replication is IHF-dependent in the family Pasteurellaceae. In addition, using site-direct mutagenesis, the XbaI and KpnI restriction sites in the suicide vector pJT1 were modified to generate plasmid pJT10. The introduction of these new unique sites in pJT10 facilitates the transfer of transcriptional or translational lacZ fusion constructs for the generation of single-copy chromosomal insertion of the reporter construct. Plasmid pJT10 and its derivatives will be useful for genetic studies in Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) and probably other genera of Pasteurellaceae, including Haemophilus, Pasteurella, and Mannheimia.

  1. Homologous recombination between plasmids in mammalian cells can be enhanced by treatment of input DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kucherlapati, R S; Eves, E M; Song, K Y; Morse, B S; Smithies, O

    1984-01-01

    We have used the eukaryotic-prokaryotic shuttle vector pSV2Neo to demonstrate that cultured mammalian somatic cells have the enzymatic machinery to mediate homologous recombination and that the frequency of this recombination can be enhanced by pretreatment of the input DNA. Two nonoverlapping deletion mutants of pSV2Neo were constructed, each affecting the bacterial aminoglycoside 3'-phosphorylase gene (the neo gene), which confers resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics on bacteria and resistance to the antibiotic G418 on mammalian cells. Mammalian cells transfected with either deletion plasmid alone yield no G418 -resistant colonies. Cells cotransfected with both deletion plasmids yield G418 -resistant colonies with high frequency. We show that these resistant colonies result from recombination involving homologous crossing-over or gene conversion between the deletion plasmids by rescuing from the resistant cells both types of reciprocal recombinant, full-length plasmids, and doubly deleted plasmids. Cutting one of the input plasmids to generate a double-stranded gap in the neo gene considerably enhances the frequency of homologous recombination within the gene. This suggests that targeting exogenous DNA to specific sites in mammalian chromosomes could be facilitated by suitable pretreatment of the DNA. Images PMID:6328502

  2. Kluyveromyces lactis killer plasmid pGKL2: molecular analysis of an essential gene, ORF5.

    PubMed

    Schaffrath, R; Meacock, P A

    1995-06-15

    The ORF5 of Kluyveromyces lactis killer plasmid pGKL2 (k2) is capable of encoding a small neutral protein of 18 kDa of as yet unassigned function. Although this ORF is located between two larger ORFs, 4 and 6, which it overlaps, RNA analysis showed that it is transcribed monocistronically. One-step gene disruption of ORF5, via in vivo homologous recombination between native plasmid k2 and a transfer vector employing the Saccharomyces cerevisiae LEU2 gene fused to the k2 UCS5 element, yielded Leu+ transformants at high frequencies. The transformants were found to carry a new recombinant form of k2 with ORF5 replaced by the LEU2 marker, termed rk2, in addition to the wild-type plasmids k1 and k2. Northern analysis detected a plasmid-dependent LEU2 transcript distinct in size and regulation from its nuclear counterpart. Recombinant plasmid, rk2, was unable to displace native k2 during Leu+ selective growth; however rk2 was displaced by k2 during non-selective growth. Thus, ORF5 appears to be an essential gene for plasmid integrity and/or maintenance. The ORF5 product was detected by over-expression of an epitope-tagged allele in the baculovirus system. Western analysis using a monoclonal antibody specific for the epitope tag identified a protein band with apparent molecular weight of 20 kDa, corresponding in size to the predicted product.

  3. Use of human MAR elements to improve retroviral vector production.

    PubMed

    Buceta, M; Galbete, J L; Kostic, C; Arsenijevic, Y; Mermod, N

    2011-01-01

    Retroviral vectors have many favorable properties for gene therapies, but their use remains limited by safety concerns and/or by relatively lower titers for some of the safer self-inactivating (SIN) derivatives. In this study, we evaluated whether increased production of SIN retroviral vectors can be achieved from the use of matrix attachment region (MAR) epigenetic regulators. Two MAR elements of human origin were found to increase and to stabilize the expression of the green fluorescent protein transgene in stably transfected HEK-293 packaging cells. Introduction of one of these MAR elements in retroviral vector-producing plasmids yielded higher expression of the viral vector RNA. Consistently, viral titers obtained from transient transfection of MAR-containing plasmids were increased up to sixfold as compared with the parental construct, when evaluated in different packaging cell systems and transfection conditions. Thus, use of MAR elements opens new perspectives for the efficient generation of gene therapy vectors.

  4. Plasmid transfer systems in the rhizobia.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hao; Hynes, Michael F

    2009-08-01

    Rhizobia are agriculturally important bacteria that can form nitrogen-fixing nodules on the roots of leguminous plants. Agricultural application of rhizobial inoculants can play an important role in increasing leguminous crop yields. In temperate rhizobia, genes involved in nodulation and nitrogen fixation are usually located on one or more large plasmids (pSyms) or on symbiotic islands. In addition, other large plasmids of rhizobia carry genes that are beneficial for survival and competition of rhizobia in the rhizosphere. Conjugative transfer of these large plasmids thus plays an important role in the evolution of rhizobia. Therefore, understanding the mechanism of conjugative transfer of large rhizobial plasmids provides foundations for maintaining, monitoring, and predicting the behaviour of these plasmids during field release events. In this minireview, we summarize two types of known rhizobial conjugative plasmids, including quorum sensing regulated plasmids and RctA-repressed plasmids. We provide evidence for the existence of a third type of conjugative plasmid, including pRleVF39c in Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae strain VF39SM, and we provide a comparison of the different types of conjugation genes found in members of the rhizobia that have had their genomes sequenced so far.

  5. FabV/Triclosan Is an Antibiotic-Free and Cost-Effective Selection System for Efficient Maintenance of High and Medium -Copy Number Plasmids in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Syed A.; Chew, Yik Wei

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes and antibiotics are frequently used to maintain plasmid vectors in bacterial hosts such as Escherichia coli. Due to the risk of spread of antibiotic resistance, the regulatory authorities discourage the use of antibiotic resistance genes/antibiotics for the maintenance of plasmid vectors in certain biotechnology applications. Overexpression of E. coli endogenous fabI gene and subsequent selection on Triclosan has been proposed as a practical alternative to traditional antibiotic selection systems. Unfortunately, overexpression of fabI cannot be used to select medium –copy number plasmids, typically used for the expression of heterologous proteins in E. coli. Here we report that Vibrio cholera FabV, a functional homologue of E. coli FabI, can be used as a suitable marker for the selection and maintenance of both high and medium -copy number plasmid vectors in E. coli. PMID:26057251

  6. Hyperbolic-symmetry vector fields.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xu-Zhen; Pan, Yue; Cai, Meng-Qiang; Li, Yongnan; Tu, Chenghou; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2015-12-14

    We present and construct a new kind of orthogonal coordinate system, hyperbolic coordinate system. We present and design a new kind of local linearly polarized vector fields, which is defined as the hyperbolic-symmetry vector fields because the points with the same polarization form a series of hyperbolae. We experimentally demonstrate the generation of such a kind of hyperbolic-symmetry vector optical fields. In particular, we also study the modified hyperbolic-symmetry vector optical fields with the twofold and fourfold symmetric states of polarization when introducing the mirror symmetry. The tight focusing behaviors of these vector fields are also investigated. In addition, we also fabricate micro-structures on the K9 glass surfaces by several tightly focused (modified) hyperbolic-symmetry vector fields patterns, which demonstrate that the simulated tightly focused fields are in good agreement with the fabricated micro-structures.

  7. Cloning vector

    DOEpatents

    Guilfoyle, R.A.; Smith, L.M.

    1994-12-27

    A vector comprising a filamentous phage sequence containing a first copy of filamentous phage gene X and other sequences necessary for the phage to propagate is disclosed. The vector also contains a second copy of filamentous phage gene X downstream from a promoter capable of promoting transcription in a bacterial host. In a preferred form of the present invention, the filamentous phage is M13 and the vector additionally includes a restriction endonuclease site located in such a manner as to substantially inactivate the second gene X when a DNA sequence is inserted into the restriction site. 2 figures.

  8. Cloning vector

    DOEpatents

    Guilfoyle, Richard A.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    1994-01-01

    A vector comprising a filamentous phage sequence containing a first copy of filamentous phage gene X and other sequences necessary for the phage to propagate is disclosed. The vector also contains a second copy of filamentous phage gene X downstream from a promoter capable of promoting transcription in a bacterial host. In a preferred form of the present invention, the filamentous phage is M13 and the vector additionally includes a restriction endonuclease site located in such a manner as to substantially inactivate the second gene X when a DNA sequence is inserted into the restriction site.

  9. Construction and identification of multiple genes Co silence of plasmid shRNA.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jin; Wang, Liang; Dong, Ming-Min; Cao, Hua; Tian, Xiu-Fen

    2015-01-01

    Objective To construct and identify the eukaryotic vector expressing shRNA (Plasmid-1), which expressed the VEGF, C-myc, Survivin and hTERT gene at the same time. To detect its interference effects on the nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell line (CNE-2Z) compared with single gene plasmid VEFG (Plasmid-2). Methods According to the sequence of VEGF, C-myc, Survivin and hTERT gene, we designed 2 oligonucleotide sequences and synthesized a complementary DNA chain, then inserted it into the eukaryotic vector expressing pGenesil 1. The cell proliferation activity was detected by MTT method. The interference efficacy on human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell line (CNE-2Z) in the level of mRNA and protein were detected by RT-PCR and Western-bolt. The inhibitory effect of plasmid on tumor in nude mice was also observed in vivo. Results The restriction enzyme digestion and sequencing technologies confirmed the construction of recombinant eukaryotic vector expressing was correct. The plasmid was transfected into CNE-2Z cells, green fluorescence can be seen clearly in the single gene and multi gene transfected cells under fluorescent microscope. MTT showed that the proliferation of cell was inhibited, the invasive ability was decreased in vitro, and the inhibition effects of single gene plasmid on the growth and proliferation of cells were lower than multi gene. Real-time-PCR and Western-bolt confirmed that the expression of target gene was decreased in the level of mRNA and protein, and the interference effect of multi gene was better than the single gene. The nude mice experiment showed that the interference effect of shRNA plasmid on the growth of tumor cell was better than single gene plasmid Conclusion We constructed a shRNA plasmid encoded four different genes successfully. After transfected with nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells, it can interfere the expression of VEGF, C-myc, Survivin and hTERT gene at the same time. And the interference effect was better than silence VEGF alone

  10. Plasmids from Food Lactic Acid Bacteria: Diversity, Similarity, and New Developments

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yanhua; Hu, Tong; Qu, Xiaojun; Zhang, Lanwei; Ding, Zhongqing; Dong, Aijun

    2015-01-01

    Plasmids are widely distributed in different sources of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) as self-replicating extrachromosomal genetic materials, and have received considerable attention due to their close relationship with many important functions as well as some industrially relevant characteristics of the LAB species. They are interesting with regard to the development of food-grade cloning vectors. This review summarizes new developments in the area of lactic acid bacteria plasmids and aims to provide up to date information that can be used in related future research. PMID:26068451

  11. Plasmids from Food Lactic Acid Bacteria: Diversity, Similarity, and New Developments.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yanhua; Hu, Tong; Qu, Xiaojun; Zhang, Lanwei; Ding, Zhongqing; Dong, Aijun

    2015-06-10

    Plasmids are widely distributed in different sources of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) as self-replicating extrachromosomal genetic materials, and have received considerable attention due to their close relationship with many important functions as well as some industrially relevant characteristics of the LAB species. They are interesting with regard to the development of food-grade cloning vectors. This review summarizes new developments in the area of lactic acid bacteria plasmids and aims to provide up to date information that can be used in related future research.

  12. Application of least squares support vector regression and linear multiple regression for modeling removal of methyl orange onto tin oxide nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon and activated carbon prepared from Pistacia atlantica wood.

    PubMed

    Ghaedi, M; Rahimi, Mahmoud Reza; Ghaedi, A M; Tyagi, Inderjeet; Agarwal, Shilpi; Gupta, Vinod Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Two novel and eco friendly adsorbents namely tin oxide nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon (SnO2-NP-AC) and activated carbon prepared from wood tree Pistacia atlantica (AC-PAW) were used for the rapid removal and fast adsorption of methyl orange (MO) from the aqueous phase. The dependency of MO removal with various adsorption influential parameters was well modeled and optimized using multiple linear regressions (MLR) and least squares support vector regression (LSSVR). The optimal parameters for the LSSVR model were found based on γ value of 0.76 and σ(2) of 0.15. For testing the data set, the mean square error (MSE) values of 0.0010 and the coefficient of determination (R(2)) values of 0.976 were obtained for LSSVR model, and the MSE value of 0.0037 and the R(2) value of 0.897 were obtained for the MLR model. The adsorption equilibrium and kinetic data was found to be well fitted and in good agreement with Langmuir isotherm model and second-order equation and intra-particle diffusion models respectively. The small amount of the proposed SnO2-NP-AC and AC-PAW (0.015 g and 0.08 g) is applicable for successful rapid removal of methyl orange (>95%). The maximum adsorption capacity for SnO2-NP-AC and AC-PAW was 250 mg g(-1) and 125 mg g(-1) respectively.

  13. Genetic basis for retention of a critical virulence plasmid of Borrelia burgdorferi

    PubMed Central

    Jewett, Mollie W; Byram, Rebecca; Bestor, Aaron; Tilly, Kit; Lawrence, Kevin; Burtnick, Mary N; Gherardini, Frank; Rosa, Patricia A

    2007-01-01

    The genome of Borrelia burgdorferi is composed of one linear chromosome and approximately 20 linear and circular plasmids. Although some plasmids are required by B. burgdorferi in vivo, most plasmids are dispensable for growth in vitro. However, circular plasmid (cp) 26 is present in all natural isolates and has never been lost during in vitro growth. This plasmid carries ospC, which is critical for mammalian infection. We previously showed that cp26 encodes essential functions, including the telomere resolvase, ResT, and hence cannot be displaced. Here we identify two additional essential genes on cp26, bbb26 and bbb27, through a systematic attempt to inactivate each open reading frame (ORF). Furthermore, an incompatible plasmid carrying resT, bbb26 and bbb27 could displace cp26. Computational and experimental analyses suggested that both BBB26 and BBB27 are membrane-associated, periplasmic proteins. These data indicate that bbb26 and bbb27 encode essential but possibly redundant functions and that one or the other of these cp26 genes, in addition to resT, is required for bacterial viability. We conclude that the genetic linkage of critical physiological and virulence functions on cp26 is pertinent to its stable maintenance throughout the evolution of B. burgdorferi. PMID:17919281

  14. Equivalent Vectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Robert

    2004-01-01

    The cross-product is a mathematical operation that is performed between two 3-dimensional vectors. The result is a vector that is orthogonal or perpendicular to both of them. Learning about this for the first time while taking Calculus-III, the class was taught that if AxB = AxC, it does not necessarily follow that B = C. This seemed baffling. The…

  15. Vector quantization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Robert M.

    1989-01-01

    During the past ten years Vector Quantization (VQ) has developed from a theoretical possibility promised by Shannon's source coding theorems into a powerful and competitive technique for speech and image coding and compression at medium to low bit rates. In this survey, the basic ideas behind the design of vector quantizers are sketched and some comments made on the state-of-the-art and current research efforts.

  16. Recombineering linear BACs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qingwen; Narayanan, Kumaran

    2015-01-01

    Recombineering is a powerful genetic engineering technique based on homologous recombination that can be used to accurately modify DNA independent of its sequence or size. One novel application of recombineering is the assembly of linear BACs in E. coli that can replicate autonomously as linear plasmids. A circular BAC is inserted with a short telomeric sequence from phage N15, which is subsequently cut and rejoined by the phage protelomerase enzyme to generate a linear BAC with terminal hairpin telomeres. Telomere-capped linear BACs are protected against exonuclease attack both in vitro and in vivo in E. coli cells and can replicate stably. Here we describe step-by-step protocols to linearize any BAC clone by recombineering, including inserting and screening for presence of the N15 telomeric sequence, linearizing BACs in vivo in E. coli, extracting linear BACs, and verifying the presence of hairpin telomere structures. Linear BACs may be useful for functional expression of genomic loci in cells, maintenance of linear viral genomes in their natural conformation, and for constructing innovative artificial chromosome structures for applications in mammalian and plant cells.

  17. Efficient non-enzymatic cleavage of Staphylococcus aureus plasmid DNAs mediated by neodymium ions.

    PubMed

    Zovčáková, Monika; Španová, Alena; Pantůček, Roman; Doškař, Jiří; Rittich, Bohuslav

    2016-08-15

    Staphylococcus aureus plasmids are the main factor in the spreading of antibacterial resistance among bacterial strains that has emerged on a worldwide scale. Plasmids recovered from 12 clinical and food isolates of S. aureus were treated with 10 mM free lanthanide Nd(3+) ions (non-enzymatic cleavage agent) in Hepes buffer (pH 7.5) at 70 °C. Topological forms of plasmids-closed circular (ccc), open circular (oc), and linear (lin)-produced by cleavage at different times were separated using pulsed-field agarose gel electrophoresis. The method is proposed to detect and differentiate several plasmids in the same bacterial strain according to their size. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Vector fields in cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydov, E. A.

    2012-06-01

    Vector fields can arise in the cosmological context in different ways, and we discuss both abelian and nonabelian sector. In the abelian sector vector fields of the geometrical origin (from dimensional reduction and Einstein-Eddington modification of gravity) can provide a very non-trivial dynamics, which can be expressed in terms of the effective dilaton-scalar gravity with the specific potential. In the non-abelian sector we investigate the Yang-Mills SU(2) theory which admits isotropic and homogeneous configuration. Provided the non-linear dependence of the lagrangian on the invariant FμνF~μν, one can obtain the inflationary regime with the exponential growth of the scale factor. The effective amplitudes of the `electric' and `magnetic' components behave like slowly varying scalars at this regime, what allows the consideration of some realistic models with non-linear terms in the Yang-Mills lagrangian.

  19. Autotransmissible resident plasmid of Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Bedmar, E J; Olivares, J

    1980-01-01

    A resident plasmid of wild-type strains of Rhizobium meliloti of 59.6 megadaltons has been shown to be transferred at a high frequency to "cured" strains of this bacterial species. This plasmid, named pEZ1, that confers phage-sensitivity to cells carrying it is also transmissible to Escherichia coli and from it to "cured" R. meliloti strains.

  20. Microbial Evolution: Towards Resolving the Plasmid Paradox.

    PubMed

    MacLean, R Craig; San Millan, Alvaro

    2015-08-31

    Plasmids play a key role in bacterial evolution by providing bacteria with new and important functions, such as antibiotic resistance. New research shows how bacterial regulatory evolution can stabilize bacteria-plasmid associations and catalyze evolutionary innovation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Bacterial expression system with tightly regulated gene expression and plasmid copy number.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Lisa M; Lapoint, Kathleen; Anthony, Larry; Pluciennik, Anna; Filutowicz, Marcin

    2004-09-29

    A new Escherichia coli host/vector system has been engineered to allow tight and uniform modulation of gene expression and gamma origin (ori) plasmid copy number. Regulation of gamma ori plasmid copy number is achieved through arabinose-inducible expression of the necessary Rep protein, pi, whose gene was integrated into the chromosome of the host strain under control of the P(BAD) promoter. gamma ori replication can be uniformly modulated over 100-fold by changing the concentration of l-arabinose in the growth medium. This strain avoids the problem of all-or-nothing induction of P(BAD) because it is deficient in both arabinose uptake and degradation genes. Arabinose enters the cell by a mutant LacY transporter, LacYA177C, which is expressed from the host chromosome. Although this strain could be compatible with any gamma ori plasmid, we describe the utility of a gamma ori expression