Science.gov

Sample records for linear viscoelastic composites

  1. Geometrically-linear and nonlinear analysis of linear viscoelastic composites using the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerand, Daniel C.

    Over the past several decades, the use of composite materials has grown considerably. Typically, fiber-reinforced polymer-matrix composites are modeled as being linear elastic. However, it is well-known that polymers are viscoelastic in nature. Furthermore, the analysis of complex structures requires a numerical approach such as the finite element method. In the present work, a triangular flat shell element for linear elastic composites is extended to model linear viscoelastic composites. Although polymers are usually modeled as being incompressible, here they are modeled as compressible. Furthermore, the macroscopic constitutive properties for fiber-reinforced composites are assumed to be known and are not determined using the matrix and fiber properties along with the fiber volume fraction. Hygrothermo-rheologically simple materials are considered for which a change in the hygrothermal environment results in a horizontal shifting of the relaxation moduli curves on a log time scale, in addition to the usual hygrothermal loads. Both the temperature and moisture are taken to be prescribed. Hence, the heat energy generated by the viscoelastic deformations is not considered. When the deformations and rotations are small under an applied load history, the usual engineering stress and strain measures can be used and the time history of a viscoelastic deformation process is determined using the original geometry of the structure. If, however, sufficiently large loads are applied, the deflections and rotations will be large leading to changes in the structural stiffness characteristics and possibly the internal loads carried throughout the structure. Hence, in such a case, nonlinear effects must be taken into account and the appropriate stress and strain measures must be used. Although a geometrically-nonlinear finite element code could always be used to compute geometrically-linear deformation processes, it is inefficient to use such a code for small deformations, due to

  2. Micromechanics of transformation fields in ageing linear viscoelastic composites: effects of phase dissolution or precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honorio, Tulio

    2017-02-01

    Transformation fields, in an affine formulation characterizing mechanical behavior, describe a variety of physical phenomena regardless their origin. Different composites, notably geomaterials, present a viscoelastic behavior, which is, in some cases of industrial interest, ageing, i.e. it evolves independently with respect to time and loading time. Here, a general formulation of the micromechanics of prestressed or prestrained composites in Ageing Linear Viscoelasticity (ALV) is presented. Emphasis is put on the estimation of effective transformation fields in ALV. The result generalizes Ageing Linear Thermo- and Poro-Viscoelasticity and it can be used in approaches coping with a phase transformation. Additionally, the results are extended to the case of locally transforming materials due to non-coupled dissolution and/or precipitation of a given (elastic or viscoelastic) phase. The estimations of locally transforming composites can be made with respect to different morphologies. As an application, estimations of the coefficient of thermal expansion of a hydrating alite paste are presented.

  3. A geometrically nonlinear shell element for hygrothermorheologically simple linear viscoelastic composites

    SciTech Connect

    HAMMERAND,DANIEL C.; KAPANIA,RAKESH K.

    2000-05-01

    A triangular flat shell element for large deformation analysis of linear viscoelastic laminated composites is presented. Hygrothermorheologically simple materials are considered for which a change in the hygrothermal environment results in a horizontal shifting of the relaxation moduli curves on a log time scale, in addition to the usual hygrothermal loads. Recurrence relations are developed and implemented for the evaluation of the viscoelastic memory loads. The nonlinear deformation process is computed using an incremental/iterative approach with the Newton-Raphson Method used to find the incremental displacements in each step. The presented numerical examples consider the large deformation and stability of linear viscoelastic structures under deformation-independent mechanical loads, deformation-dependent pressure loads, and thermal loads. Unlike elastic structures that have a single critical load value associated with a given snapping of buckling instability phenomenon, viscoelastic structures will usually exhibit a particular instability for a range of applied loads over a range of critical times. Both creep buckling and snap-through examples are presented here. In some cases, viscoelastic results are also obtained using the quasielastic method in which load-history effects are ignored, and time-varying viscoelastic properties are simply used in a series of elastic problems. The presented numerical examples demonstrate the capability and accuracy of the formulation.

  4. Physical aging effects on the compressive linear viscoelastic creep of IM7/K3B composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veazie, David R.; Gates, Thomas S.

    1995-01-01

    An experimental study was undertaken to establish the viscoelastic behavior of 1M7/K3B composite in compression at elevated temperature. Creep compliance, strain recovery and the effects of physical aging on the time dependent response was measured for uniaxial loading at several isothermal conditions below the glass transition temperature (T(g)). The IM7/K3B composite is a graphite reinforced thermoplastic polyimide with a T(g) of approximately 240 C. In a composite, the two matrix dominated compliance terms associated with time dependent behavior occur in the transverse and shear directions. Linear viscoelasticity was used to characterize the creep/recovery behavior and superposition techniques were used to establish the physical aging related material constants. Creep strain was converted to compliance and measured as a function of test time and aging time. Results included creep compliance master curves, physical aging shift factors and shift rates. The description of the unique experimental techniques required for compressive testing is also given.

  5. Non linear viscoelasticity applied for the study of durability of polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardon, A.; Brinson, H. F.; Hiel, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    A methodology is described for the durability analysis of polymer matrix composites, based on nonlinear viscoelasticity theory. The durability analysis is performed on the basis of a certain number of tests carried out on limited and, if possible, short time scale by the use of accelerating factors. The method was applied to thermomatrix composites under uniaxial and biaxial loadings, showing satisfactory agreement between the life-time predictions and the published data on real-time behavior.

  6. Influence of composition fluctuations on the linear viscoelastic properties of symmetric diblock copolymers near the order-disorder transition

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, Robert J.; Gillard, Timothy M.; Lodge, Timothy P.; Bates, Frank S.

    2015-08-28

    Rheological evidence of composition fluctuations in disordered diblock copolymers near the order disorder transition (ODT) has been documented in the literature over the past three decades, characterized by a failure of time–temperature superposition (tTS) to reduce linear dynamic mechanical spectroscopy (DMS) data in the terminal viscoelastic regime to a temperature-independent form. However, for some materials, most notably poly(styrene-b-isoprene) (PS–PI), no signature of these rheological features has been found. We present small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) results on symmetric poly(cyclohexylethylene-b-ethylene) (PCHE–PE) diblock copolymers that confirm the presence of fluctuations in the disordered state and DMS measurements that also show no sign of the features ascribed to composition fluctuations. Assessment of DMS results published on five different diblock copolymer systems leads us to conclude that the effects of composition fluctuations can be masked by highly asymmetric block dynamics, thereby resolving a long-standing disagreement in the literature and reinforcing the importance of mechanical contrast in understanding the dynamics of ordered and disordered block polymers.

  7. A Thermodynamic Theory Of Solid Viscoelasticity. Part 1: Linear Viscoelasticity.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.; Leonov, Arkady I.

    2002-01-01

    The present series of three consecutive papers develops a general theory for linear and finite solid viscoelasticity. Because the most important object for nonlinear studies are rubber-like materials, the general approach is specified in a form convenient for solving problems important for many industries that involve rubber-like materials. General linear and nonlinear theories for non-isothermal deformations of viscoelastic solids are developed based on the quasi-linear approach of non-equilibrium thermodynamics. In this, the first paper of the series, we analyze non-isothermal linear viscoelasticity, which is applicable in a range of small strains not only to all synthetic polymers and bio-polymers but also to some non-polymeric materials. Although the linear case seems to be well developed, there still are some reasons to implement a thermodynamic derivation of constitutive equations for solid-like, non-isothermal, linear viscoelasticity. The most important is the thermodynamic modeling of thermo-rheological complexity , i.e. different temperature dependences of relaxation parameters in various parts of relaxation spectrum. A special structure of interaction matrices is established for different physical mechanisms contributed to the normal relaxation modes. This structure seems to be in accord with observations, and creates a simple mathematical framework for both continuum and molecular theories of the thermo-rheological complex relaxation phenomena. Finally, a unified approach is briefly discussed that, in principle, allows combining both the long time (discrete) and short time (continuous) descriptions of relaxation behaviors for polymers in the rubbery and glassy regions.

  8. Viscoelastic properties of polymer composites during processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Daniel James

    Residual stresses that are induced during processing of polymer matrix composites lead to warpage of structural parts and can produce microcracks and other forms of damage. Process models that track the development of residual stresses in composites during processing have received growing attention in recent years. An accurate and easy to implement simulation will help lower the manufacturing cost by enabling engineers to predict and prevent the warpage in parts due to residual stress. The critical feature of a process model is the development of an accurate material model to predict mechanical properties throughout the entire manufacturing cycle. Material models are very complex since the matrix changes from a fluid to a viscoelastic solid at the end of cure. In this work several aspects of the curing, viscoelastic, and cure shrinkage behavior of an aerospace grade epoxy resin were characterized and modeled for the purpose of composites process modeling. Measurement of matrix viscoelastic properties during cure was accomplished through two experimental approaches, each suited to a particular range of cure states. To investigate the material behavior during later stages of cure after gelation, small beam specimens were tested in three-point bending. During early stages of curing, samples were examined by shearing the material between parallel plates in a rheometer. Specimens for each configuration were manufactured at several cure states and tested at a range of temperatures. These data were used to develop a material model to predict the relaxation modulus of the matrix at any time during cure. Additionally, moire interferometry was successfully applied to the measurement of the viscoelastic Poisson's ratio of the matrix through its entire glassy-to-rubbery transition. The matrix viscoelastic material models were then used to predict composite viscoelastic properties and correlated with experimental results. In addition, the viscoelastic shrinkage behavior of the

  9. Investigating Filler Reinforcement and Nonlinear Viscoelastic Behavior in Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhiyong; Wang, Shi-Qing; von Meerwall, Ernst

    2004-03-01

    Solid fillers have been known to enhance the linear viscoelastic responses of polymer melts and elastomers. Nonlinear viscoelastic behavior of such systems is closely related to the reinforcement of the linear viscoelascity. Understanding such phenomena as the Payne effect (where the storage modulus is measured to decrease in oscillatory shear with the amplitude of the oscillation and with time for a fixed amplitude) requires a better understanding of the filler reinforcement mechanism. Recent publications, from two different groups (a) (b) prompted our present study. Using monodisperse 1,4-polybutadiene melts as the matrix and nano-silicon oxide particles of 15 nm diameter as the fillers, we carried out a variety of viscoelastic and NMR-spin-echo diffusion measurements to elucidate the important role of the filler-filler networking in controlling the observed linear and nonlinear behavior at temperatures over 100 degrees above the glass transition temperature of PBD. (a)S.S. Sternstein and A. Zhu, Macromolecules 35, 7262 (2002); Composites Sci. and Techn. 63, 1113 (2003). This work claims that the reinforcement arises primarily from the entrapped chain entanglement due to chain adsorption on filler surfaces instead of the filler-filler networking. (b) H. Montes, F. Lequeux and J. Berriot, Macromolecules, 36, 8107 (2003). This work advocates that a glassy layer formed around each filler is responsible for the enhanced linear viscoelascity and for the observed nonlinear viscoelastic behavior such as the Payne effect.

  10. Semi-analytical computation of displacement in linear viscoelastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinu, S.; Gradinaru, D.

    2015-11-01

    Prediction of mechanical contact performance based on elastic models is not accurate in case of viscoelastic materials; however, a closed-form description of the viscoelastic contact has yet to be found. This paper aims to advance a semi-analytical method for computation of displacement induced in viscoelastic materials by arbitrary surface tractions, as a prerequisite to a semi-analytical solution for the viscoelastic contact problem. The newly advanced model is expected to provide greater generality, allowing for arbitrary contact geometry and / or arbitrary loading history. While time-independent equations in the purely elastic model can be treated numerically by imposing a spatial discretization only, a viscoelastic constitutive law requires supplementary temporal discretization capable of simulating the memory effect specific to viscoelastic materials. By deriving new influence coefficients, computation of displacement induced in a viscoelastic material by a known but otherwise arbitrary history of surface tractions can be achieved via superposition authorized by the Boltzmann superposition theory applicable in the frame of linear viscoelasticity.

  11. Modeling of linear viscoelastic space structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McTavish, D. J.; Hughes, P. C.

    1993-01-01

    The GHM Method provides viscoelastic finite elements derived from the commonly used elastic finite elements. Moreover, these GHM elements are used directly and conveniently in second-order structural models just like their elastic counterparts. The forms of the GHM element matrices preserve the definiteness properties usually associated with finite element matrices (the mass matrix is positive definite, the stiffness matrix is nonnegative definite, and the damping matrix is positive semidefinite). In the Laplace domain, material properties are modeled phenomenologically as a sum of second-order rational functions dubbed 'minioscillator' terms. Developed originally as a tool for the analysis of damping in large flexible space structures, the GHM method is applicable to any structure which incorporates viscoelastic materials.

  12. Accurate prediction of the linear viscoelastic properties of highly entangled mono and bidisperse polymer melts.

    PubMed

    Stephanou, Pavlos S; Mavrantzas, Vlasis G

    2014-06-07

    We present a hierarchical computational methodology which permits the accurate prediction of the linear viscoelastic properties of entangled polymer melts directly from the chemical structure, chemical composition, and molecular architecture of the constituent chains. The method entails three steps: execution of long molecular dynamics simulations with moderately entangled polymer melts, self-consistent mapping of the accumulated trajectories onto a tube model and parameterization or fine-tuning of the model on the basis of detailed simulation data, and use of the modified tube model to predict the linear viscoelastic properties of significantly higher molecular weight (MW) melts of the same polymer. Predictions are reported for the zero-shear-rate viscosity η0 and the spectra of storage G'(ω) and loss G″(ω) moduli for several mono and bidisperse cis- and trans-1,4 polybutadiene melts as well as for their MW dependence, and are found to be in remarkable agreement with experimentally measured rheological data.

  13. Anisotropy of bituminous mixture in the linear viscoelastic domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Benedetto, Hervé; Sauzéat, Cédric; Clec'h, Pauline

    2016-08-01

    Some anisotropic properties in the linear viscoelastic domain of bituminous mixtures compacted with a French LPC wheel compactor are highlighted in this paper. Bituminous mixture is generally considered as isotropic even if the compaction process on road or in laboratory induces anisotropic properties. Tension-compression complex modulus tests have been performed on parallelepipedic specimens in two directions: (i) direction of compactor wheel movement (direction I, which is horizontal) and (ii) direction of compaction (direction II, which is vertical). These tests consist in measuring sinusoidal axial and lateral strains as well as sinusoidal axial stress, when sinusoidal axial loading is applied on the specimen. Different loading frequencies and temperatures are applied. Two complex moduli, EI ^{*} and E_{II}^{*}, and four complex Poisson's ratios, ν_{{II-I}}^{*}, ν_{{III-I}}^{*}, ν_{{I-II}}^{*} and ν_{{III-II}}^{*}, were obtained. The vertical direction appears softer than the other ones for the highest frequencies. There are very few differences between the two directions I and II for parameters concerning viscous effects (phase angles φ(EI) and φ(E_{II}), and shift factors). The four Poisson's ratios reveal anisotropic properties but rheological tensor can be considered as symmetric when considering very similar values obtained for the two measured parameters (I-II and II-I)

  14. Generalization of the ordinary state-based peridynamic model for isotropic linear viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delorme, Rolland; Tabiai, Ilyass; Laberge Lebel, Louis; Lévesque, Martin

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a generalization of the original ordinary state-based peridynamic model for isotropic linear viscoelasticity. The viscoelastic material response is represented using the thermodynamically acceptable Prony series approach. It can feature as many Prony terms as required and accounts for viscoelastic spherical and deviatoric components. The model was derived from an equivalence between peridynamic viscoelastic parameters and those appearing in classical continuum mechanics, by equating the free energy densities expressed in both frameworks. The model was simplified to a uni-dimensional expression and implemented to simulate a creep-recovery test. This implementation was finally validated by comparing peridynamic predictions to those predicted from classical continuum mechanics. An exact correspondence between peridynamics and the classical continuum approach was shown when the peridynamic horizon becomes small, meaning peridynamics tends toward classical continuum mechanics. This work provides a clear and direct means to researchers dealing with viscoelastic phenomena to tackle their problem within the peridynamic framework.

  15. A log-linearized arterial viscoelastic model for evaluation of the carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Harutoyo; Horiuchi, Tetsuya; Kutluk, Abdugheni; Kurita, Yuichi; Ukawa, Teiji; Nakamura, Ryuji; Saeki, Noboru; Higashi, Yukihito; Kawamoto, Masashi; Yoshizumi, Masao; Tsuji, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a method for qualitatively estimating the mechanical properties of arterial walls on a beat-to-beat basis through noninvasive measurement of continuous arterial pressure and arterial diameter using an ultrasonic device. First, in order to describe the nonlinear relationships linking arterial pressure waveforms and arterial diameter waveforms as well as the viscoelastic characteristics of arteries, we developed a second-order nonlinear model (called the log-linearized arterial viscoelastic model) to allow estimation of arterial wall viscoelasticity. Next, to verify the validity of the proposed method, the viscoelastic indices of the carotid artery were estimated. The results showed that the proposed model can be used to accurately approximate the mechanical properties of arterial walls. It was therefore deemed suitable for qualitative evaluation of arterial viscoelastic properties based on noninvasive measurement of arterial pressure and arterial diameter.

  16. Viscoelasticity of Epoxy nano-composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Suresh

    2013-03-01

    Nanocomposites have been modeled in a multiscale covering from molecular scale (e.g., molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo), microscale (e.g., Brownian dynamics, dissipative particle dynamics, lattice Boltzmann, time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau method, dynamic density functional theory method) to mesoscale and macroscale (e.g., micromechanics, equivalent-continuum and self-similar approaches, finite element method) The presence of layered silicates in nonaqueous polymers changes the viscoelastic behavior of the unfilled matrix from liquid-like to solid-like because of the formation of a three-dimensional percolating network of exfoliated or intercalated stacks. This gel-like behavior is a direct consequence of the highly anisotropic nature of the nanoclays which prevents their free rotation and the dissipation of stress. Particle to particle interactions is the dominant mechanism in fumed silica nanocomposites whereas particle to polymer interaction is the dominant one in colloidal silica nanocomposites at identical filler concentrations. These interactions are balanced in each nanocomposite systems by the silica surface treatments (chain grafting, silane modification) and the molecular weight of the matrix. Two different types of nanocomposite structures exist namely, intercalated nanocomposites where the polymer chains are sandwiched between silicate layers and exfoliated nanocomposites where the layers can be considered individually but remain more or less dispersed in the polymer matrix. Yield stress from Carreau-Yasuda model has been correlated to exfoliation. Also, equilibrium modulus and zero shear rate viscosity has been used to analyze percolation threshold and sol-gel transition. Nano clays organically functionalized were mixed with Epoxy in a high shear mixer.

  17. The nonlinear viscoelastic response of resin matrix composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiel, C.; Cardon, A. H.; Brinson, H. F.

    1984-01-01

    Possible treatments of the nonlinear viscoelastic behavior of materials are reviewed. A thermodynamic based approach, developed by Schapery, is discussed and used to interpret the nonlinear viscoelastic response of a graphite epoxy laminate, T300/934. Test data to verify the analysis for Fiberite 934 neat resin as well as transverse and shear properties of the unidirectional T300/934 composited are presented. Long time creep characteristics as a function of stress level and temperature are generated. Favorable comparisons between the traditional, graphical, and the current analytical approaches are shown. A free energy based rupture criterion is proposed as a way to estimate the life that remains in a structure at any time.

  18. Fractional characteristic times and dissipated energy in fractional linear viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colinas-Armijo, Natalia; Di Paola, Mario; Pinnola, Francesco P.

    2016-08-01

    In fractional viscoelasticity the stress-strain relation is a differential equation with non-integer operators (derivative or integral). Such constitutive law is able to describe the mechanical behavior of several materials, but when fractional operators appear, the elastic and the viscous contribution are inseparable and the characteristic times (relaxation and retardation time) cannot be defined. This paper aims to provide an approach to separate the elastic and the viscous phase in the fractional stress-strain relation with the aid of an equivalent classical model (Kelvin-Voigt or Maxwell). For such equivalent model the parameters are selected by an optimization procedure. Once the parameters of the equivalent model are defined, characteristic times of fractional viscoelasticity are readily defined as ratio between viscosity and stiffness. In the numerical applications, three kinds of different excitations are considered, that is, harmonic, periodic, and pseudo-stochastic. It is shown that, for any periodic excitation, the equivalent models have some important features: (i) the dissipated energy per cycle at steady-state coincides with the Staverman-Schwarzl formulation of the fractional model, (ii) the elastic and the viscous coefficients of the equivalent model are strictly related to the storage and the loss modulus, respectively.

  19. Measurement of the linear viscoelastic behavior of antimisting kerosene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferry, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements of dynamic viscoelastic properties in very small oscillating shear deformations was made on solutions of a jet fuel, Jet A, containing an antimisting polymeric additive, FM-9. A few measurements were also made on solutions of FM-9 in a mixed solvent of mineral oil, Tetralin, and 0-terphenyl. Two samples of FM-9 had approximate number-average molecular weights of 12,000,000 and 8,100,000 as deduced from analysis of the measurements. The ranges of variables were 2.42 to 4.03 g/1 in concentration (0.3 to 0.5% by weight), 1 to 35 in temperature, 1.3 to 9.4 cp in solvent viscosity, and 103 to 6100 Hz in frequency. Measurements in the Jet A solvent were made both with and without a modifying carrier. The results were compared with the Zimm theory and the viscoelastic behavior was found to resemble rather closely that of ordinary non-polar polymers in theta solvents. The relation of the results to the antithixotropic behavior of such solutions a high shear rates is discussed in terms of intramolecular and intermolecular interactions.

  20. Nonlinear simulation and linear stability analysis of viscous fingering instability of viscoelastic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokri, H.; Kayhani, M. H.; Norouzi, M.

    2017-03-01

    In this study, the viscous fingering instability of miscible displacement involving a viscoelastic fluid is investigated using both linear stability analysis and computational fluid dynamics for the first time. The Oldroyd-B model is used as the constitutive equation of a viscoelastic fluid. Here, it is assumed that one of the displacing fluids or the displaced one is viscoelastic. In linear stability analysis, the quasi-steady state approximation and six order shooting method are used to predict the growth rate of the disturbance in the flow. It is shown that the flow is more stabilized when the elasticity (Weissenberg number) of the displaced or displacing viscoelastic fluid is increased. In the nonlinear simulation, using the spectral method based on Hartley transforms and the fourth-order Adams-Bashforth technique, the effect of the viscoelastic fluid on this instability has been studied. Evaluation of concentration contours, mixing length, sweep efficiency, and transversely average concentration show that the elasticity has a significant effect on the fingering instability and the flow becomes more stable by increasing the Weissenberg number.

  1. A simple-shear rheometer for linear viscoelastic characterization of vocal fold tissues at phonatory frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Roger W.; Rodriguez, Maritza L.

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies reporting the linear viscoelastic shear properties of the human vocal fold cover or mucosa have been based on torsional rheometry, with measurements limited to low audio frequencies, up to around 80 Hz. This paper describes the design and validation of a custom-built, controlled-strain, linear, simple-shear rheometer system capable of direct empirical measurements of viscoelastic shear properties at phonatory frequencies. A tissue specimen was subjected to simple shear between two parallel, rigid acrylic plates, with a linear motor creating a translational sinusoidal displacement of the specimen via the upper plate, and the lower plate transmitting the harmonic shear force resulting from the viscoelastic response of the specimen. The displacement of the specimen was measured by a linear variable differential transformer whereas the shear force was detected by a piezoelectric transducer. The frequency response characteristics of these system components were assessed by vibration experiments with accelerometers. Measurements of the viscoelastic shear moduli (G′ and G″) of a standard ANSI S2.21 polyurethane material and those of human vocal fold cover specimens were made, along with estimation of the system signal and noise levels. Preliminary results showed that the rheometer can provide valid and reliable rheometric data of vocal fold lamina propria specimens at frequencies of up to around 250 Hz, well into the phonatory range. PMID:18681608

  2. Inverting Glacial Isostatic Adjustment beyond linear viscoelasticity using Burgers rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, L.; Greff-Lefftz, M.; Fleitout, L.; Metivier, L.; Rouby, H.

    2014-12-01

    In Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) inverse modeling, the usual assumption for the mantle rheology is the Maxwell model, which exhibits constant viscosity over time. However, mineral physics experiments and post-seismic observations show evidence of a transient component in the deformation of the shallow mantle, with a short-term viscosity lower than the long-term one. In these studies, the resulting rheology is modeled by a Burgers material: such rheology is indeed expected as the mantle is a mixture of materials with different viscosities. We propose to apply this rheology for the whole viscoelastic mantle, and, using a Bayesian MCMC inverse formalism for GIA during the last glacial cycle, study its impact on estimations of viscosity values, elastic thickness of the lithosphere, and ice distribution. To perform this inversion, we use a global dataset of sea level records, the geological constraints of ice-sheet margins, and present-day GPS data as well as satellite gravimetry. Our ambition is to present not only the best fitting model, but also the range of possible solutions (within the explored space of parameters) with their respective probability of explaining the data. Our first results indicate that compared to the Maxwell models, the Burgers models involve a larger lower mantle viscosity and thicker ice over Fennoscandia and Canada.

  3. Dynamic analysis of linear viscoelastic cylindrical and conical helicoidal rods using the mixed FEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eratlı, Nihal; Argeso, Hakan; Çalım, Faruk F.; Temel, Beytullah; Omurtag, Mehmet H.

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the influence of the rotary inertia on dynamic behavior of linear viscoelastic cylindrical and conical helixes by means of the Laplace transform-mixed finite element formulation and solution. The element matrix is based on the Timoshenko beam theory. The influence of rotary inertias is considered in the dynamic analysis, which is original in the literature. Rectangular, sine and step type of impulsive loads are applied on helices having rectangular cross-sections with various aspect ratios. The Kelvin and standard models are used for defining the linear viscoelastic material behavior; and by means of the correspondence principle (the elastic-viscoelastic analogy), the material parameters are replaced with their complex counterparts in the Laplace domain. The analysis is carried out in the Laplace domain and the results are transformed back to time space numerically by modified Durbin's algorithm. First, the solution algorithm is verified using the existing open sources in the literature and afterwards some benchmark examples such as conical viscoelastic rods are handled.

  4. Frequency-dependent scaling from mesoscale to macroscale in viscoelastic random composites

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the scaling from a statistical volume element (SVE; i.e. mesoscale level) to representative volume element (RVE; i.e. macroscale level) of spatially random linear viscoelastic materials, focusing on the quasi-static properties in the frequency domain. Requiring the material statistics to be spatially homogeneous and ergodic, the mesoscale bounds on the RVE response are developed from the Hill–Mandel homogenization condition adapted to viscoelastic materials. The bounds are obtained from two stochastic initial-boundary value problems set up, respectively, under uniform kinematic and traction boundary conditions. The frequency and scale dependencies of mesoscale bounds are obtained through computational mechanics for composites with planar random chessboard microstructures. In general, the frequency-dependent scaling to RVE can be described through a complex-valued scaling function, which generalizes the concept originally developed for linear elastic random composites. This scaling function is shown to apply for all different phase combinations on random chessboards and, essentially, is only a function of the microstructure and mesoscale. PMID:27274689

  5. Frequency-dependent scaling from mesoscale to macroscale in viscoelastic random composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates the scaling from a statistical volume element (SVE; i.e. mesoscale level) to representative volume element (RVE; i.e. macroscale level) of spatially random linear viscoelastic materials, focusing on the quasi-static properties in the frequency domain. Requiring the material statistics to be spatially homogeneous and ergodic, the mesoscale bounds on the RVE response are developed from the Hill-Mandel homogenization condition adapted to viscoelastic materials. The bounds are obtained from two stochastic initial-boundary value problems set up, respectively, under uniform kinematic and traction boundary conditions. The frequency and scale dependencies of mesoscale bounds are obtained through computational mechanics for composites with planar random chessboard microstructures. In general, the frequency-dependent scaling to RVE can be described through a complex-valued scaling function, which generalizes the concept originally developed for linear elastic random composites. This scaling function is shown to apply for all different phase combinations on random chessboards and, essentially, is only a function of the microstructure and mesoscale.

  6. Dynamics of a supercritical composite shaft mounted on viscoelastic supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagnier, O.; Hochard, C.

    2014-01-01

    The damping in a carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) laminate is greater than that which occurs in most metallic materials. In the supercritical regime, the damping can trigger unstable whirl oscillations, which can have catastrophic effects. The vibrations occurring in a supercritical composite drive shaft are investigated here in order to predict instabilities of this kind. A simply supported carbon/epoxy composite tube mounted on viscoelastic supports is studied, using an approximation of the Rayleigh-Timoshenko equation. The damping process is assumed to be hysteretic. The composite behavior is described in terms of modulus and loss factor, taking homogenized values. The critical speeds are obtained in several analytical forms in order to determine the effects of factors such as the rotatory inertia, the gyroscopic forces, the transverse shear and the supports stiffness. Assuming that the hysteretic damping can be expressed in terms of the equivalent viscous model, the threshold speed is obtained in the form of an analytical criterion. The influence of the various factors involved is quantified at the first critical speed of a subcritical composite shaft previously described in the literature. The influence of the coupling mechanisms on the unsymmetrical composite laminate and the end fittings is also investigated using a finite element model. None of these parameters were found to have a decisive influence in this case. Those having the greatest effects were the transverse shear and the supports stiffness. The effects of the composite stacking sequence, the shaft length and the supports stiffness on the threshold speed were then investigated. In particular, drive shafts consisting only of ±45° or ±30° plies can be said to be generally unstable in the supercritical regime due to their very high loss factors.

  7. Linear orthotropic viscoelasticity model for fiber reinforced thermoplastic material based on Prony series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Vitor Takashi; de Carvalho Pereira, José Carlos

    2016-09-01

    Material properties description and understanding are essential aspects when computational solid mechanics is applied to product development. In order to promote injected fiber reinforced thermoplastic materials for structural applications, it is very relevant to develop material characterization procedures, considering mechanical properties variation in terms of fiber orientation and loading time. Therefore, a methodology considering sample manufacturing, mechanical tests and data treatment is described in this study. The mathematical representation of the material properties was solved by a linear viscoelastic constitutive model described by Prony series, which was properly adapted to orthotropic materials. Due to the large number of proposed constitutive model coefficients, a parameter identification method was employed to define mathematical functions. This procedure promoted good correlation among experimental tests, and analytical and numerical creep models. Such results encourage the use of numerical simulations for the development of structural components with the proposed linear viscoelastic orthotropic constitutive model. A case study was presented to illustrate an industrial application of proposed methodology.

  8. Mapping Viscoelastic and Plastic Properties of Polymers and Polymer-Nanotube Composites using Instrumented Indentation.

    PubMed

    Gayle, Andrew J; Cook, Robert F

    An instrumented indentation method is developed for generating maps of time-dependent viscoelastic and time-independent plastic properties of polymeric materials. The method is based on a pyramidal indentation model consisting of two quadratic viscoelastic Kelvin-like elements and a quadratic plastic element in series. Closed-form solutions for indentation displacement under constant load and constant loading-rate are developed and used to determine and validate material properties. Model parameters are determined by point measurements on common monolithic polymers. Mapping is demonstrated on an epoxy-ceramic interface and on two composite materials consisting of epoxy matrices containing multi-wall carbon nanotubes. A fast viscoelastic deformation process in the epoxy was unaffected by the inclusion of the nanotubes, whereas a slow viscoelastic process was significantly impeded, as was the plastic deformation. Mapping revealed considerable spatial heterogeneity in the slow viscoelastic and plastic responses in the composites, particularly in the material with a greater fraction of nanotubes.

  9. Constitutive models for linear compressible viscoelastic flows of simple liquids at nanometer length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Debadi; Sader, John E.

    2015-05-01

    Simple bulk liquids such as water are commonly assumed to be Newtonian. While this assumption holds widely, the fluid-structure interaction of mechanical devices at nanometer scales can probe the intrinsic molecular relaxation processes in a surrounding liquid. This was recently demonstrated through measurement of the high frequency (20 GHz) linear mechanical vibrations of bipyramidal nanoparticles in simple liquids [Pelton et al., "Viscoelastic flows in simple liquids generated by vibrating nanostructures," Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 244502 (2013)]. In this article, we review and critically assess the available constitutive equations for compressible viscoelastic flows in their linear limits—such models are required for analysis of the above-mentioned measurements. We show that previous models, with the exception of a very recent proposal, do not reproduce the required response at high frequency. We explain the physical origin of this recent model and show that it recovers all required features of a linear viscoelastic flow. This constitutive equation thus provides a rigorous foundation for the analysis of vibrating nanostructures in simple liquids. The utility of this model is demonstrated by solving the fluid-structure interaction of two common problems: (1) a sphere executing radial oscillations in liquid, which depends strongly on the liquid compressibility and (2) the extensional mode vibration of bipyramidal nanoparticles in liquid, where the effects of liquid compressibility are negligible. This highlights the importance of shear and compressional relaxation processes, as a function of flow geometry, and the impact of the shear and bulk viscosities on nanometer scale flows.

  10. Linear oscillation of gas bubbles in a viscoelastic material under ultrasound irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hamaguchi, Fumiya; Ando, Keita

    2015-11-15

    Acoustically forced oscillation of spherical gas bubbles in a viscoelastic material is studied through comparisons between experiments and linear theory. An experimental setup has been designed to visualize bubble dynamics in gelatin gels using a high-speed camera. A spherical gas bubble is created by focusing an infrared laser pulse into (gas-supersaturated) gelatin gels. The bubble radius (up to 150 μm) under mechanical equilibrium is controlled by gradual mass transfer of gases across the bubble interface. The linearized bubble dynamics are studied from the observation of spherical bubble oscillation driven by low-intensity, planar ultrasound driven at 28 kHz. It follows from the experiment for an isolated bubble that the frequency response in its volumetric oscillation was shifted to the high frequency side and its peak was suppressed as the gelatin concentration increases. The measurement is fitted to the linearized Rayleigh–Plesset equation coupled with the Voigt constitutive equation that models the behavior of linear viscoelastic solids; the fitting yields good agreement by tuning unknown values of the viscosity and rigidity, indicating that more complex phenomena including shear thinning, stress relaxation, and retardation do not play an important role for the small-amplitude oscillations. Moreover, the cases for bubble-bubble and bubble-wall systems are studied. The observed interaction effect on the linearized dynamics can be explained as well by a set of the Rayleigh–Plesset equations coupled through acoustic radiation among these systems. This suggests that this experimental setup can be applied to validate the model of bubble dynamics with more complex configuration such as a cloud of bubbles in viscoelastic materials.

  11. Linear oscillation of gas bubbles in a viscoelastic material under ultrasound irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, Fumiya; Ando, Keita

    2015-11-01

    Acoustically forced oscillation of spherical gas bubbles in a viscoelastic material is studied through comparisons between experiments and linear theory. An experimental setup has been designed to visualize bubble dynamics in gelatin gels using a high-speed camera. A spherical gas bubble is created by focusing an infrared laser pulse into (gas-supersaturated) gelatin gels. The bubble radius (up to 150 μm) under mechanical equilibrium is controlled by gradual mass transfer of gases across the bubble interface. The linearized bubble dynamics are studied from the observation of spherical bubble oscillation driven by low-intensity, planar ultrasound driven at 28 kHz. It follows from the experiment for an isolated bubble that the frequency response in its volumetric oscillation was shifted to the high frequency side and its peak was suppressed as the gelatin concentration increases. The measurement is fitted to the linearized Rayleigh-Plesset equation coupled with the Voigt constitutive equation that models the behavior of linear viscoelastic solids; the fitting yields good agreement by tuning unknown values of the viscosity and rigidity, indicating that more complex phenomena including shear thinning, stress relaxation, and retardation do not play an important role for the small-amplitude oscillations. Moreover, the cases for bubble-bubble and bubble-wall systems are studied. The observed interaction effect on the linearized dynamics can be explained as well by a set of the Rayleigh-Plesset equations coupled through acoustic radiation among these systems. This suggests that this experimental setup can be applied to validate the model of bubble dynamics with more complex configuration such as a cloud of bubbles in viscoelastic materials.

  12. New effective moduli of isotropic viscoelastic composites. Part I. Theoretical justification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svetashkov, A. A.; Vakurov, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    According to the approach based on the commonality of problems of determining effective moduli of composites and viscoelastic solids, which properties are time-inhomogeneous, it is assumed that a viscoelastic solid is a two-component composite. One component displays temporal properties defined by a pair of Castiglianian-type effective moduli, and the other is defined by a pair of Lagrangian-type effective moduli. The Voigt and Reuss averaging is performed for the obtained two-composite solid with the introduction of a time function of volume fraction. In order to determine closer estimates, a method of iterative transformation of time effective moduli is applied to the viscoelastic Voigt-Reuss model. The physical justification of the method is provided. As a result, new time effective moduli of the viscoelastic solid are obtained which give a closer estimate of temporal properties as compared to the known models.

  13. Kinetic viscoelasticity modeling applied to degradation during carbon-carbon composite processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drakonakis, Vassilis M.; Seferis, James C.; Wardle, Brian L.; Nam, Jae-Do; Papanicolaou, George C.; Doumanidis, Charalambos C.

    2010-04-01

    Kinetic viscoelasticity modeling has been successfully utilized to describe phenomena during cure of thermoset based carbon fiber reinforced matrices. The basic difference from classic viscoelasticity is that the fundamental material descriptors change as a result of reaction kinetics. Accordingly, we can apply the same concept for different kinetic phenomena with simultaneous curing and degradation. The application of this concept can easily be utilized in processing and manufacturing of carbon-carbon composites, where phenolic resin matrices are cured degraded and reinfused in a carbon fiber bed. This work provides a major step towards understanding complex viscoelastic phenomena that go beyond simple thermomechanical descriptors.

  14. Attenuation and Shock Waves in Linear Hereditary Viscoelastic Media; Strick-Mainardi, Jeffreys-Lomnitz-Strick and Andrade Creep Compliances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanyga, Andrzej

    2014-09-01

    Dispersion, attenuation and wavefronts in a class of linear viscoelastic media proposed by Strick and Mainardi (Geophys J R Astr Soc 69:415-429, 1982) and a related class of models due to Lomnitz, Jeffreys and Strick are studied by a new method due to the author. Unlike the previously studied explicit models of relaxation modulus or creep compliance, these two classes support propagation of discontinuities. Due to an extension made by Strick, either of these two classes of models comprise both viscoelastic solids and fluids. We also discuss the Andrade viscoelastic media. The Andrade media do not support discontinuity waves and exhibit the pedestal effect.

  15. Pre-Stressed Viscoelastic Composites: Effective Incremental Moduli and Band-Gap Tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Parnell, William J.

    2010-09-30

    We study viscoelastic wave propagation along pre-stressed nonlinear elastic composite bars. In the pre-stressed state we derive explicit forms for the effective incremental storage and loss moduli with dependence on the pre-stress. We also derive a dispersion relation for the effective wavenumber in the case of arbitrary frequency, hence permitting a study of viscoelastic band-gap tuning via pre-stress.

  16. Determining the parameters of the fractional exponential heredity kernels of linear viscoelastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golub, V. P.; Fernati, P. V.; Lyashenko, Ya. G.

    2008-09-01

    The parameters of the fractional exponential creep and relaxation kernels of linear viscoelastic materials are determined. Methods that approximate the kernel by using the Mittag-Leffler function, the Laplace-Carson transform, and direct approximation of the creep function by the original equation are analyzed. The parameters of fractional exponential kernels are determined for aramid fibers, parapolyamide fibers, glass-reinforced plastic, and polymer concrete. It is shown that the kernel parameters calculated through the direct approximation of the creep function provide the best agreement between theory and experiment. The methods are experimentally validated for constant-stress and variable-stress loading in the modes of additional loading and complete unloading

  17. Cast dielectric composite linear accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Sanders, David M.; Sampayan, Stephen; Slenes, Kirk; Stoller, H. M.

    2009-11-10

    A linear accelerator having cast dielectric composite layers integrally formed with conductor electrodes in a solventless fabrication process, with the cast dielectric composite preferably having a nanoparticle filler in an organic polymer such as a thermosetting resin. By incorporating this cast dielectric composite the dielectric constant of critical insulating layers of the transmission lines of the accelerator are increased while simultaneously maintaining high dielectric strengths for the accelerator.

  18. Dynamic finite element simulations of composite stiffened panels with a transverse-isotropic viscoelastic energy dissipation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Thomas; Doreille, Mathias; Merazzi, Silvio; Vescovini, Riccardo; Bisagni, Chiara

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a methodology for predicting the damped response and energy dissipation of laminated composite structures, subjected to dynamic loads. Starting from simple coupon tests to characterize the material, the numerical simulation of damping properties is made possible by a novel linear viscoelastic model that has been developed and implemented in the finite element code B2000++. A nonlinear optimization procedure is adopted to fit experimental data and define the exponential Maxwell parameter model. To illustrate the potentialities of the method, the post-buckling analysis of a relatively complex aeronautical panel is presented, accounting not only for geometric nonlinearities, but also for viscoelastic effects. The results illustrate the effects due to material dissipation, their relation to the effects of inertia, and the influence of geometric imperfections on the response of the panel.

  19. Small strain vibration of a continuous, linearized viscoelastic rod of expanded polymer cushion material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batt, Gregory S.; Gibert, James M.; Daqaq, Mohammed

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, the free and forced vibration response of a linearized, distributed-parameter model of a viscoelastic rod with an applied tip-mass is investigated. A nonlinear model is developed from constitutive relations and is linearized about a static equilibrium position for analysis. A classical Maxwell-Weichert model, represented via a Prony series, is used to model the viscoelastic system. The exact solution to both the free and forced vibration problem is derived and used to study the behavior of an idealized packaging system containing Nova Chemicals' Arcel® foam. It is observed that, although three Prony series terms are deemed sufficient to fit the static test data, convergence of the dynamic response and study of the storage and loss modulii necessitate the use of additional Prony series terms. It is also shown that the model is able to predict the modal frequencies and the primary resonance response at low acceleration excitation, both with reasonable accuracy given the non-homogeneity and density variation observed in the specimens. Higher acceleration inputs result in softening nonlinear responses highlighting the need for a nonlinear elastic model that extends beyond the scope of this work. Solution analysis and experimental data indicate little material vibration energy dissipation close to the first modal frequency of the mass/rod system.

  20. Non-linear analysis and the design of Pumpkin Balloons: stress, stability and viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rand, J. L.; Wakefield, D. S.

    Tensys have a long-established background in the shape generation and load analysis of architectural stressed membrane structures Founded upon their inTENS finite element analysis suite these activities have broadened to encompass lighter than air structures such as aerostats hybrid air-vehicles and stratospheric balloons Winzen Engineering couple many years of practical balloon design and fabrication experience with both academic and practical knowledge of the characterisation of the non-linear viscoelastic response of the polymeric films typically used for high-altitude scientific balloons Both companies have provided consulting services to the NASA Ultra Long Duration Balloon ULDB Program Early implementations of pumpkin balloons have shown problems of geometric instability characterised by improper deployment and these difficulties have been reproduced numerically using inTENS The solution lies in both the shapes of the membrane lobes and also the need to generate a biaxial stress field in order to mobilise in-plane shear stiffness Balloons undergo significant temperature and pressure variations in flight The different thermal characteristics between tendons and film can lead to significant meridional stress Fabrication tolerances can lead to significant local hoop stress concentrations particularly adjacent to the base and apex end fittings The non-linear viscoelastic response of the envelope film acts positively to help dissipate stress concentrations However creep over time may produce lobe geometry variations that may

  1. An axisymmetric boundary integral model for incompressible linear viscoelasticity: application to the micropipette aspiration contact problem.

    PubMed

    Haider, M A; Guilak, F

    2000-06-01

    The micropipette aspiration test has been used extensively in recent years as a means of quantifying cellular mechanics and molecular interactions at the microscopic scale. However, previous studies have generally modeled the cell as an infinite half-space in order to develop an analytical solution for a viscoelastic solid cell. In this study, an axisymmetric boundary integral formulation of the governing equations of incompressible linear viscoelasticity is presented and used to simulate the micropipette aspiration contact problem. The cell is idealized as a homogeneous and isotropic continuum with constitutive equation given by three-parameter (E, tau 1, tau 2) standard linear viscoelasticity. The formulation is used to develop a computational model via a "correspondence principle" in which the solution is written as the sum of a homogeneous (elastic) part and a nonhomogeneous part, which depends only on past values of the solution. Via a time-marching scheme, the solution of the viscoelastic problem is obtained by employing an elastic boundary element method with modified boundary conditions. The accuracy and convergence of the time-marching scheme are verified using an analytical solution. An incremental reformulation of the scheme is presented to facilitate the simulation of micropipette aspiration, a nonlinear contact problem. In contrast to the halfspace model (Sato et al., 1990), this computational model accounts for nonlinearities in the cell response that result from a consideration of geometric factors including the finite cell dimension (radius R), curvature of the cell boundary, evolution of the cell-micropipette contact region, and curvature of the edges of the micropipette (inner radius a, edge curvature radius epsilon). Using 60 quadratic boundary elements, a micropipette aspiration creep test with ramp time t* = 0.1 s and ramp pressure p*/E = 0.8 is simulated for the cases a/R = 0.3, 0.4, 0.5 using mean parameter values for primary chondrocytes

  2. Mapping Viscoelastic and Plastic Properties of Polymers and Polymer-Nanotube Composites using Instrumented Indentation

    PubMed Central

    Gayle, Andrew J.; Cook, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    An instrumented indentation method is developed for generating maps of time-dependent viscoelastic and time-independent plastic properties of polymeric materials. The method is based on a pyramidal indentation model consisting of two quadratic viscoelastic Kelvin-like elements and a quadratic plastic element in series. Closed-form solutions for indentation displacement under constant load and constant loading-rate are developed and used to determine and validate material properties. Model parameters are determined by point measurements on common monolithic polymers. Mapping is demonstrated on an epoxy-ceramic interface and on two composite materials consisting of epoxy matrices containing multi-wall carbon nanotubes. A fast viscoelastic deformation process in the epoxy was unaffected by the inclusion of the nanotubes, whereas a slow viscoelastic process was significantly impeded, as was the plastic deformation. Mapping revealed considerable spatial heterogeneity in the slow viscoelastic and plastic responses in the composites, particularly in the material with a greater fraction of nanotubes. PMID:27563168

  3. High-temperature viscoelastic creep constitutive equations for polymer composites: Homogenization theory and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Skontorp, A.; Wang, S.S.; Shibuya, Y.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper, a homogenization theory is developed to determine high-temperature effective viscoelastic constitutive equations for fiber-reinforced polymer composites. The homogenization theory approximates the microstructure of a fiber composite, and determine simultaneously effective macroscopic constitutive properties of the composite and the associated microscopic strain and stress in the heterogeneous material. The time-temperature dependent homogenization theory requires that the viscoelastic constituent properties of the matrix phase at elevated temperatures, the governing equations for the composites, and the boundary conditions of the problem be Laplace transformed to a conjugate problem. The homogenized effective properties in the transformed domain are determined, using a two-scale asymptotic expansion of field variables and an averaging procedure. Field solutions in the unit cell are determined from basic and first-order governing equations with the aid of a boundary integral method (BIM). Effective viscoelastic constitutive properties of the composite at elevated temperatures are determined by an inverse transformation, as are the microscopic stress and deformation in the composite. Using this method, interactions among fibers and between the fibers and the matrix can be evaluated explicitly, resulting in accurate solutions for composites with high-volume fraction of reinforcing fibers. Examples are given for the case of a carbon-fiber reinforced thermoplastic polyamide composite in an elevated temperature environment. The homogenization predictions are in good agreement with experimental data available for the composite.

  4. A finite element modeling of a multifunctional hybrid composite beam with viscoelastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ya; Inman, Daniel J.

    2013-04-01

    The multifunctional hybrid composite structure studied here consists of a ceramic outer layer capable of withstanding high temperatures, a functionally graded ceramic layer combining shape memory alloy (SMA) properties of NiTi together with Ti2AlC (called Graded Ceramic/Metal Composite, or GCMeC), and a high temperature sensor patch, followed by a polymer matrix composite laced with vascular cooling channels all held together with various epoxies. Due to the recoverable nature of SMA and adhesive properties of Ti2AlC, the damping behavior of the GCMeC is largely viscoelastic. This paper presents a finite element formulation for this multifunctional hybrid structure with embedded viscoelastic material. In order to implement the viscoelastic model into the finite element formulation, a second order three parameter Golla-Hughes-McTavish (GHM) method is used to describe the viscoelastic behavior. Considering the parameter identification, a strategy to estimate the fractional order of the time derivative and the relaxation time is outlined. The curve-fitting aspects of both GHM and ADF show good agreement with experimental data obtained from dynamic mechanics analysis. The performance of the finite element of the layered multifunctional beam is verified through experimental model analysis.

  5. Linear viscoelastic properties of transient networks formed by associating polymers with multiple stickers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indei, Tsutomu; Takimoto, Jun-ichi

    2010-11-01

    We have developed a single-chain theory that describes dynamics of associating polymer chains carrying multiple associative groups (or stickers) in the transient network formed by themselves and studied linear viscoelastic properties of this network. It is shown that if the average number N¯ of stickers associated with the network junction per chain is large, the terminal relaxation time τA that is proportional to τXN¯2 appears. The time τX is the interval during which an associated sticker goes back to its equilibrium position by one or more dissociation steps. In this lower frequency regime ω <1/τX, the moduli are well described in terms of the Rouse model with the longest relaxation time τA. The large value of N¯ is realized for chains carrying many stickers whose rate of association with the network junction is much larger than the dissociation rate. This associative Rouse behavior stems from the association/dissociation processes of stickers and is different from the ordinary Rouse behavior in the higher frequency regime, which is originated from the thermal segmental motion between stickers. If N¯ is not large, the dynamic shear moduli are well described in terms of the Maxwell model characterized by a single relaxation time τX in the moderate and lower frequency regimes. Thus, the transition occurs in the viscoelastic relaxation behavior from the Maxwell-type to the Rouse-type in ω <1/τX as N¯ increases. All these results are obtained under the affine deformation assumption for junction points. We also studied the effect of the junction fluctuations from the affine motion on the plateau modulus by introducing the virtual spring for bound stickers. It is shown that the plateau modulus is not affected by the junction fluctuations.

  6. Interface transferring mechanism and error modification of FRP-OFBG strain sensor based on standard linear viscoelastic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jilong; Zhou, Zhi; Ou, Jinping

    2006-03-01

    This paper presents the interface transferring mechanism and error modification of the Fiber Reinforced Polymer-Optical Fiber Bragg Grating (FRP-OFBG) sensing tendons, which including GFRP (Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer) and CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer), using standard linear viscoelastic model. The optical fiber is made up of glass, quartz or plastic, et al, which creep strain is very small at room temperature. So the tensile creep compliance of optical fiber is independent of time at room temperature. On the other hand, the FRP (GFRP or CFRP) is composed of a kind of polymeric matrix (epoxy resins or the others) with glass, carbon or aramid fibers, which shear creep strain is dependent of time at room temperature. Hence, the standard linear viscoelastic model is employed to describe the shear creep compliance of FRP along the fiber direction. The expression of interface strain transferring mechanism of FRP-OFBG sensors is derived based on the linear viscoelastic theory and the analytic solution of the error rate is given by the inverse Laplace transform. The effects of FRP viscoelasticity on the error rate of FRP-OFBG sensing tendons are included in the above expression. And the transient and steady-state error modified coefficient of FRP-OFBG sensors are obtained using initial value and final value theorems. Finally, a calculated example is given to explain the correct of theoretical prediction.

  7. Non-linear dynamics of viscoelastic liquid trilayers subjected to an electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karapetsas, George; Bontozoglou, Vasilis

    2014-11-01

    The scope of this work is to investigate the non-linear dynamics of the electro-hydrodynamic instability of a trilayer of immiscible liquids. We consider the case of a polymer film which is separated from the top electrode by two viscous fluids. We develop a computational model and carry out 2D numerical simulations fully accounting for the flow and electric field in all phases. For the numerical solution of the governing equations we employ the mixed finite element method combined with a quasi-elliptic mesh generation scheme which is capable of following the large deformations of the liquid-liquid interface. We model the viscoelastic behavior using the Phan-Thien and Tanner (PTT) constitutive equation taking fully into account the non-linear elastic effects as well as a varying shear and extensional viscosity. We perform a thorough parametric study and investigate the influence of the electric properties of fluids, applied voltage and various rheological parameters. The authors acknowledge the support by the General Secretariat of Research and Technology of Greece under the action ``Supporting Postdoctoral Researchers'' (Grant Number PE8/906), co-funded by the European Social Fund and National Resources.

  8. Viscoelastic Properties of Advanced Polymer Composites for Ballistic Protective Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    of stainless steel-toughened NiAl composite plate. Author: Nardone , Vincent C. Corporate Source: United Technologies Research Cent, Hartford, CT, USA...toughened composites. Author: Nardone , Vincent C; Strife, James R, Corporate Source: United Technologies Research Cent, E. Hartford, CT, USA Source...matrix composites. Author: Nardone , Vincent C; Strife, James R.; Pre wo, K. M. Corporate Source: United Technologies Research Cent, E. Hartford, CT

  9. Identification of the Hereditary Kernels of Isotropic Linear Viscoelastic Materials in Combined Stress State. 2. Proportional deviators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golub, V. P.; Maslov, B. P.; Fernati, P. V.

    2016-11-01

    The relationships between the hereditary and creep kernels are established. The hereditary kernels define the scalar properties of isotropic linear viscoelastic materials in a combined stress state. The creep kernels are obtained in uniaxial-tension and pure-torsion tests. The constitutive equations are chosen so as to meet the hypothesis of proportional deviators. The problems of analyzing the creep deformation and stress relaxation of thin-walled tubular specimens under combined tension and torsion are solved and tested experimentally

  10. Study of rheological, viscoelastic and vulcanization behavior of sponge EPDM/NR blended nano- composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshad Bashir, M.; Shahid, M.; Ahmed, Riaz; Yahya, A. G.

    2014-06-01

    In this research paper the effect of blending ratio of natural rubber (NR) with Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer (EPDM) were investigated. Different samples of EPDM/NR ratio were prepared to study the variation of NR in EPDM on rheology, curing characteristics, tangent δ, and viscosity variation during vulcanization of sponge nano composites.The main aim of present research is to develop elastomeric based sponge composites with the blending ratio of base elastomers along with the carbon nano particles for high energy absorbing and damping applications. The curing characteristics, rheology and viscoelastic nature of the composite is remarkably influenced with the progressive blending ratio of the base elastomeric matrix.

  11. Viscoelasticity of Axisymmetric Composite Structures: Analysis and Experimental Validation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    circumferential directions. Since the composite rotors are mainly circumferentially reinforced ( filament - wound cylinders), the radial tensile stress is...Consider a filament - wound , axisymmetric, thick composite cylinder consisting of N layers with the axial coordinate z, the radial coordinate r, and...were wet- filament - wound with a programmed bandwidth of 0.15 in (3.81 mm) and a fiber architecture of [842/902]5. Note that each 84° ply is

  12. Linear and Nonlinear Viscoelastic Modeling of Aorta and Carotid Pressure-Area Dynamics under in vivo and ex vivo Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Valdez-Jasso, Daniela; Bia, Daniel; Zócalo, Yanina; Armentano, Ricardo L.; Haider, Mansoor A.; Olufsen, Mette S.

    2013-01-01

    A better understanding of the biomechanical properties of the arterial wall provides important insight into arterial vascular biology under normal (healthy) and pathological conditions. This insight has potential to improve tracking of disease progression and to aid in vascular graft design and implementation. In this study, we use linear and nonlinear viscoelastic models to predict biomechanical properties of the thoracic descending aorta and the carotid artery under ex vivo and in vivo conditions in ovine and human arteries. Models analyzed include a four-parameter (linear) Kelvin viscoelastic model and two five-parameter nonlinear viscoelastic models (an arctangent and a sigmoid model) that relate changes in arterial blood pressure to the vessel cross-sectional area (via estimation of vessel strain). These models were developed using the framework of Quasilinear Viscoelasticity (QLV) theory and were validated using measurements from the thoracic descending aorta and the carotid artery obtained from human and ovine arteries. In vivo measurements were obtained from ten ovine aortas and ten human carotid arteries. Ex vivo measurements (from both locations) were made in eleven male Merino sheep. Biomechanical properties were obtained through constrained estimation of model parameters. To further investigate the parameter estimates we computed standard errors and confidence intervals and we used analysis of variance to compare results within and between groups. Overall, our results indicate that optimal model selection depends on the arterial type. Results showed that for the thoracic descending aorta (under both experimental conditions) the best predictions were obtained with the nonlinear sigmoid model, while under healthy physiological pressure loading the carotid arteries nonlinear stiffening with increasing pressure is negligible, and consequently, the linear (Kelvin) viscoelastic model better describes the pressure-area dynamics in this vessel. Results

  13. Finite element analysis and experimental study on dynamic properties of a composite beam with viscoelastic damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ya; Inman, Daniel J.

    2013-11-01

    This paper investigates the frequency dependent viscoelastic dynamics of a multifunctional composite structure from finite element analysis and experimental validation. The frequency-dependent behavior of the stiffness and damping of a viscoelastic material directly affects the system's modal frequencies and damping, and results in complex vibration modes and differences in the relative phase of vibration. A second order three parameter Golla-Hughes-McTavish (GHM) method and a second order three fields Anelastic Displacement Fields (ADF) approach are used to implement the viscoelastic material model, enabling the straightforward development of time domain and frequency domain finite elements, and describing the frequency dependent viscoelastic behavior. Considering the parameter identification a strategy to estimate the fractional order of the time derivative and the relaxation time is outlined. Agreement between the curve fits using both the GHM and ADF and experiment is within 0.001 percent error. Continuing efforts are addressing the material modulus comparison of the GHM and the ADF model. There may be a theoretical difference between viscoelastic degrees of freedom at nodes and elements, but their numerical results are very close to each other in the specific frequency range of interest. With identified model parameters, numerical simulation is carried out to predict the damping behavior in its first two vibration modes. The experimental testing on the layered composite beam validates the numerical predication. Experimental results also show that elastic modulus measured from dynamic response yields more accurate results than static measurement, such as tensile testing, especially for elastomers. The viscoelatic layer is augmented with the inclusion of a shear angle associated with transverse shear in addition to Euler-Bernoulli hypotheses. >The other four layers are assumed to be elastic; Euler-Bernoulli bending assumption applies; Transverse and rotatory

  14. Dynamic viscoelasticities for short fiber-thermoplastic elastomer composites

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Wuyun; Ashida, Michio . Graduate School of Science and Technology)

    1993-11-20

    Dynamic moduli, E[prime] and E[double prime], and loss tangent tan [delta] were investigated for thermoplastic elastomers (TPEs), styrene-isoprene-styrene copolymers (SISs), styrene-butadiene-styrene copolymer (SBS), and Hytrel and composites reinforced by poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) short fibers. The styrenic TPEs have a typical rubbery behavior and the Hytrel TPE has medial characteristics between rubber and plastic. Both E[prime] and E[double prime] of the composites depended on the matrix as well as the fiber loading and fiber length. Based on the viewpoint of different extensibility between the fiber and the matrix elastomer, a triblock model was considered for estimating the storage modulus of the short fiber-TPE composites as follows: E[sub c] = [alpha] V[sub f]E[sub f] + [beta](1 [minus] V[sub f])E[sub m], where [alpha] and [beta] are the effective deformation coefficients for the fiber and the matrix elastomer, respectively. They can be quantitatively represented by modulus ratio M (= E[sub m]/E[sub f]) and fiber length L: [alpha] = (L[sup n] + k)M/(L[sup n]M + k), [beta] = (1 [minus] [alpha]V[sub f])/(1 [minus] V[sub f]), where the constants n and k are obtained experimentally. When k = 0.0222 and n = 0.45, E[sub c] of the TPE composites agreed well with the prediction of the proposed model. The relaxation spectrum of the composites showed a distinct main peak ascribed to the matrix elastomer, but no peak to the PET fiber.

  15. Viscoelastic properties of kenaf reinforced unsaturated polyester composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman, Ekhlas A.; Mutasher, Saad A.

    2014-03-01

    In order to quantify the effect of temperature on the mechanical and dynamic properties of kenaf fiber unsaturated polyester composites, formulations containing 10 wt.% to 40 wt.% kenaf fiber were produced and tested at two representative temperatures of 30°C and 50°C. Dynamic mechanical analysis was performed, to obtain the strain and creep compliance for kenaf composites at various styrene concentrations. It is possible to obtain creep curves at different temperature levels which can be shifted along the time axis to generate a single curve known as a master curve. This technique is known as the time-temperature superposition principle. Shift factors conformed to a William-Landel-Ferry (WLF) equation. However, more long term creep data was needed in order to further validate the applicability of time-temperature superposition principle (TTSP) to this material. The primary creep strain model was fitted to 60 min creep data. The resulting equation was then extrapolated to 5.5 days; the creep strain model of power-law was successfully used to predict the long-term creep behavior of natural fiber/thermoset composites.

  16. Long-Term Viscoelastic Response of E-glass/Bismaleimide Composite in Seawater Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yian, Zhao; Zhiying, Wang; Keey, Seah Leong; Boay, Chai Gin

    2015-12-01

    The effect of seawater absorption on the long-term viscoelastic response of E-glass/BMI composite is presented in this paper. The diffusion of seawater into the composite shows a two-stage behavior, dominated by Fickian diffusion initially and followed by polymeric relaxation. The Glass transition temperature (Tg) of the composite with seawater absorption is considerably lowered due to the plasticization effect. However the effect of water absorption at 50 °C is found to be reversible after drying process. The time-temperature superposition (TTS) was performed based on the results of Dynamic Mechanical Analysis to construct the master curve of storage modulus. The shift factors exhibit Arrhenius behavior when temperature is well below Tg and Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann (VFT) like behavior when temperature gets close to glass transition region. As a result, a semi-empirical formulation is proposed to account for the seawater absorption effect in predicting long-term viscoelastic response of BMI composites based on temperature dependent storage modulus and TTS. The predicted master curves show that the degradation of storage modulus accelerates with both seawater exposure and increasing temperature. The proposed formulation can be applied to predict the long-term durability of any thermorheologically simple composite materials in seawater environment.

  17. The viscoelastic behavior of a composite in a thermal environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, D. H.; Brinson, H. F.; Griffith, W. I.; Yeow, Y. T.

    1979-01-01

    A proposed method for the accelerated predictions of modulus and life times for time dependent polymer matrix composite laminates is presented. The method, based on the time temperature superposition principle and lamination theory, is described in detail. Unidirectional reciprocal of compliance master curves and the shift functions needed are presented and discussed. Master curves for arbitrarily oriented unidirectional laminates are predicted and compared with experimantal results obtained from master curves generated from 15 minute tests and with 25 hour tests. Good agreement is shown. Predicted 30 deg and 60 deg unidirectional strength master curves are presented and compared to results of creep rupture tests. Reasonable agreement is demonstrated. In addition, creep rupture results for a (90 deg + or - 60 deg/90 deg) sub 2s laminate are presented.

  18. Piezoelectric generation of extensional waves in a viscoelastic bar by use of a linear power amplifier: Theoretical basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansson, A.; Lundberg, B.

    2007-09-01

    A system consisting of a linear power amplifier driving a piezoelectric actuator pair attached to a long viscoelastic bar is analysed. Coupled piezoelectric theory is used, and allowance is made for the dynamics of the amplifier and of the actuators. Formulae are derived for the relation between the input voltage to the amplifier and the normal force associated with extensional waves generated in the bar and for the load impedance constituted by the actuator-bar assembly. It is established that the mechanical work performed on the external parts of the bar at the actuator/bar interfaces is at most equal to the electrical energy supplied by the amplifier. The results are applied to a three-parameter viscoelastic bar and to an elastic bar, and the effects of the cut-off frequency, without load, and the output impedance of the amplifier are examined. For the elastic bar, sharp response minima occur at frequencies that are integral multiples of the inverse transit time through the actuator region. For the viscoelastic bar, the corresponding minima are less sharp and deep. The input voltage to the amplifier required to produce a desired output wave at the actuator/bar interfaces can be determined provided that the spectrum of this wave is not too broad.

  19. Environmental effects and viscoelastic behavior of laminated graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillard, D. A.; Morris, D. H.; Brinson, H. F.

    1983-01-01

    Primarily because of the polymeric matrix, graphite/epoxy composites are viscoelastic materials which exhibit creep and delayed failures. Guided by the time-temperature superposition principle, the authors are developing accelerated characterization techniques to predict the long term compliance behavior and creep rupture strength of composite materials based on short term tests at elevated temperatures. The effect of a post-cure cycle on the compliance and creep rupture strength of composite materials is discussed. The Zhurkov type failure law is applied to experimental creep rupture data of a typical laminate and is shown to correlate the data. A beneficial mechanical strengthening effect is described which significantly affects the failure strengths of specimens which have been under creep loading for a period of time. This aging effect is reversible if the specimen is allowed to recover before being loaded to failure. Other environmental aspects of composite materials are also reviewed.

  20. Laser-Generated Lamb Waves Propagation in Multilayered Plates Composed of Viscoelastic Fiber-reinforced Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hong-xiang; Zhang, Shu-yi; Yuan, Shou-qi; Guan, Yi-jun; Ge, Yong

    2016-07-01

    The propagation characteristics of laser-generated Lamb waves in multilayered fiber-reinforced composite plates with different fiber orientations and number of layers have been investigated quantitatively. Considering the viscoelasticity of the composite materials, we have set up finite element models for simulating the laser-generated Lamb waves in two types of the multilayered composite plates. In the first type, different fiber orientations are adopted. In the second one, different number of layers are considered. The results illustrate the occurrence of attenuation and dispersion, which is induced by the viscoelasticity and multilayer structure, respectively.

  1. Composite Linear Models | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    By Stuart G. Baker The composite linear models software is a matrix approach to compute maximum likelihood estimates and asymptotic standard errors for models for incomplete multinomial data. It implements the method described in Baker SG. Composite linear models for incomplete multinomial data. Statistics in Medicine 1994;13:609-622. The software includes a library of thirty examples from the literature. |

  2. Viscoelastic behaviour of hydrogel-based composites for tissue engineering under mechanical load.

    PubMed

    Kocen, Rok; Gasik, Michael; Gantar, Ana; Novak, Saša

    2017-03-06

    Along with biocompatibility, bioinductivity and appropriate biodegradation, mechanical properties are also of crucial importance for tissue engineering scaffolds. Hydrogels, such as gellan gum (GG), are usually soft materials, which may benefit from the incorporation of inorganic particles, e.g. bioactive glass, not only due to the acquired bioactivity, but also due to improved mechanical properties. They exhibit complex viscoelastic properties, which can be evaluated in various ways. In this work, to reliably evaluate the effect of the bioactive glass (BAG) addition on viscoelastic properties of the composite hydrogel, we employed and compared the three most commonly used techniques, analyzing their advantages and limitations: monotonic uniaxial unconfined compression, small amplitude oscillatory shear (SAOS) rheology and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Creep and small amplitude dynamic strain-controlled tests in DMA are suggested as the best ways for the characterization of mechanical properties of hydrogel composites, whereas the SAOS rheology is more useful for studying the hydrogel's processing kinetics, as it does not induce volumetric changes even at very high strains. Overall, the results confirmed a beneficial effect of BAG (nano)particles on the elastic modulus of the GG-BAG composite hydrogel. The Young's modulus of 6.6 ± 0.8 kPa for the GG hydrogel increased by two orders of magnitude after the addition of 2 wt.% BAG particles (500-800 kPa).

  3. Nonlinear Visco-Elastic Response of Composites via Micro-Mechanical Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.; Sridharan, Srinivasan

    2005-01-01

    Micro-mechanical models for a study of nonlinear visco-elastic response of composite laminae are developed and their performance compared. A single integral constitutive law proposed by Schapery and subsequently generalized to multi-axial states of stress is utilized in the study for the matrix material. This is used in conjunction with a computationally facile scheme in which hereditary strains are computed using a recursive relation suggested by Henriksen. Composite response is studied using two competing micro-models, viz. a simplified Square Cell Model (SSCM) and a Finite Element based self-consistent Cylindrical Model (FECM). The algorithm is developed assuming that the material response computations are carried out in a module attached to a general purpose finite element program used for composite structural analysis. It is shown that the SSCM as used in investigations of material nonlinearity can involve significant errors in the prediction of transverse Young's modulus and shear modulus. The errors in the elastic strains thus predicted are of the same order of magnitude as the creep strains accruing due to visco-elasticity. The FECM on the other hand does appear to perform better both in the prediction of elastic constants and the study of creep response.

  4. Monitoring of peripheral vascular condition using a log-linearized arterial viscoelastic index during endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Hiroki; Horiuchi, Tetsuya; Hirano, Harutoyo; Kurita, Yuichi; Ukawa, Teiji; Nakamura, Ryuji; Saeki, Noboru; Yoshizumi, Masao; Kawamoto, Masashi; Tsuji, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel technique to support the monitoring of peripheral vascular conditions using biological signals such as electrocardiograms, arterial pressure values and pulse oximetry plethysmographic waveforms. In this approach, a second-order log-linearized model (referred to here as a log-linearized peripheral arterial viscoelastic model) is used to describe the non-linear viscoelastic relationship between blood pressure waveforms and photo-plethysmographic waveforms. The proposed index enables estimation of peripheral arterial wall stiffness changes induced by sympathetic nerve activity. The validity of the method is discussed here based on the results of peripheral vascular condition monitoring conducted during endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS). The results of ETS monitoring showed significant changes in stiffness variations between the periods before and during the procedures observed (p < 0.01) as well as during and after them (p < 0.01), so that it was confirmed that sympathetic nerve activity is drastically decreased in the area around the monitoring site after the thoracic sympathetic nerve trunk on the monitoring side is successfully blocked. In addition, no change was observed in the values of the proposed index during the ETS procedure on the side opposite that of the monitoring site. The experimental results obtained clearly show the proposed method can be used to assess changes in sympathetic nerve activity during ETS.

  5. Modeling and Testing of the Viscoelastic Properties of a Graphite Nanoplatelet/Epoxy Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, Gregory M.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2005-01-01

    In order to facilitate the interpretation of experimental data, a micromechanical modeling procedure is developed to predict the viscoelastic properties of a graphite nanoplatelet/epoxy composite as a function of volume fraction and nanoplatelet diameter. The predicted storage and loss moduli for the composite are compared to measured values from the same material using three test methods; Dynamical Mechanical Analysis, nanoindentation, and quasi-static tensile tests. In most cases, the model and experiments indicate that for increasing volume fractions of nanoplatelets, both the storage and loss moduli increase. Also, the results indicate that for nanoplatelet sizes above 15 microns, nanoindentation is capable of measuring properties of individual constituents of a composite system. Comparison of the predicted values to the measured data helps illustrate the relative similarities and differences between the bulk and local measurement techniques.

  6. Explicit causal relations between material damping ratio and phase velocity from exact solutions of the dispersion equations of linear viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meza-Fajardo, Kristel C.; Lai, Carlo G.

    2007-12-01

    The theory of linear viscoelasticity is the simplest constitutive model that can be adopted to accurately predict the small-strain mechanical response of materials exhibiting the ability to both store and dissipate strain energy. An important result implied by this theory is the relationship existing between material attenuation and the velocity of propagation of a mechanical disturbance. The functional dependence of these important parameters is represented by the Kramers-Kronig (KK) equations, also known as dispersion equations, which are nothing but a statement of the necessary and sufficient conditions to satisfy physical causality. This paper illustrates the derivation of exact solutions of the KK equations to provide explicit relations between frequency-dependent phase velocity and material damping ratio (or equivalently, quality factor). The assumptions that form the basis of the derivation are not beyond those established by the standard theory of viscoelasticity for a viscoelastic solid. The explicit expression for phase velocity as a function of damping ratio was derived by means of the theory of linear singular integral equations, and in particular by the solution of the associated Homogeneous Riemann Boundary Value Problem. It is shown that the same solution may be obtained also by using the implications of physical causality on the Fourier Transform. On the other hand, the explicit solution for damping ratio as a function of phase velocity was found through the components of the complex wavenumber. The exact solutions make it possible to obtain frequency-dependent material damping ratio solely from phase velocity measurements, and conversely. Hence, these relations provide an innovative and inexpensive tool to determine the small-strain dynamic properties of geomaterials. It is shown that the obtained rigorous solutions are in good agreement with well-known solutions based on simplifying assumptions that have been developed in the fields of seismology

  7. Characterization and modeling of performance of Polymer Composites Reinforced with Highly Non-Linear Cellulosic Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozite, L.; Joffe, R.; Varna, J.; Nyström, B.

    2012-02-01

    The behaviour of highly non-linear cellulosic fibers and their composite is characterized. Micro-mechanisms occurring in these materials are identified. Mechanical properties of regenerated cellulose fibers and composites are obtained using simple tensile test. Material visco-plastic and visco-elastic properties are analyzed using creep tests. Two bio-based resins are used in this study - Tribest and EpoBioX. The glass and flax fiber composites are used as reference materials to compare with Cordenka fiber laminates.

  8. The accelerated characterization of viscoelastic composite materials. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffith, W. I.; Morris, D. H.; Brinson, H. F.

    1980-01-01

    Necessary fundamentals relative to composite materials and viscoelasticity are reviewed. The accelerated characterization techniques of time temperature superposition and time temperature stress superposition are described. An experimental procedure for applying the latter to composites is given along with results obtained on a particular T300/934 graphite/epoxy. The accelerated characterization predictions are found in good agreement with actual long term tests. A postcuring phenomenon is discussed that necessitates thermal conditioning of the specimen prior to testing. A closely related phenomenon of physical aging is described as well as the effect of each on the glass transition temperature and strength. Creep rupture results are provided for a variety of geometries and temperatures for T300/934 graphite/epoxy. The results are found to compare reasonably with a modified kinetic rate theory.

  9. In-situ measurement of viscoelastic effects in composite tape springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makuch, Alessa J.; Reynolds, Whitney D.

    2012-04-01

    Bi-stable composite tape springs present several volume efficient solutions for deployable structures in small satellites. Viscoelastic changes within the composite matrix of these materials caused by their long term storage and exposure to varying temperatures can negatively impact the ability to deploy the structure. This study investigates a method for developing an in situ sensor for structural health monitoring in space structures employing tape springs. A method is developed by employing a custom load cell to detect stress relaxation in a bent tape spring over a period of time and two tests of this method were conducted. Results from the first test reveal the correct trend for stress relaxation but with significant noise. The second test showed the cause of the noise to be material behavior changes due to temperature fluctuations. The results show the expected decreasing exponential trend in the strain data as stress relaxation occurs, proving the feasibility of the approach.

  10. Calculation by iterative method of linear viscoelastic plate under biaxial tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svetashkov, A. A.; Miciński, J.; Manabaev, K. K.; Vakurov, A. A.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we used the iterative solution algorithm, proposed in the work of Pavlov and Svetashkova. This algorithm results in a complete separation of spatial and temporal variables, if we set up the boundary loads and (or) volumetric forces in the same kind. In this paper, we have examined the stress-strain state of a viscoelastic plate, and the results of the calculation displacements, stresses are given. In addition, we made a comparison of the calculation indices rate of convergence for the iterative process with their theoretical values.

  11. Viscoelastic Properties of Collagen-Adhesive Composites under Water Saturated and Dry Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Viraj; Misra, Anil; Parthasarathy, Ranganathan; Ye, Qiang; Spencer, Paulette

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the time and rate dependent mechanical properties of collagen-adhesive composites, creep and monotonic experiments are performed under dry and wet conditions. The composites are prepared by infiltration of dentin adhesive into a demineralized bovine dentin. Experimental results show that for small stress level under dry conditions, both the composite and neat adhesive have similar behavior. On the other hand, in wet conditions, the composites are significantly soft and weak compared to the neat adhesives. The behavior in the wet condition is found to be affected by the hydrophilicity of both the adhesive and collagen. Since the adhesive-collagen composites area part of the complex construct that forms the adhesive-dentin interface, their presence will affect the overall performance of the restoration. We find that Kelvin-Voigt model with at least 4-elements is required to fit the creep compliance data, indicating that the adhesive-collagen composites are complex polymers with several characteristics time-scales whose mechanical behavior will be significantly affected by loading rates and frequencies. Such mechanical properties have not been investigated widely for these types of materials. The derived model provides an additional advantage that it can be exploited to extract other viscoelastic properties which are, generally, time consuming to obtain experimentally. The calibrated model is utilized to obtain stress relaxation function, frequency-dependent storage and loss modulus, and rate dependent elastic modulus. PMID:24753362

  12. Single-Specimen Technique to Establish the J-Resistance of Linear Viscoelastic Solids with Constant Poisson's Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez-Lemini, Danton; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A method is developed to establish the J-resistance function for an isotropic linear viscoelastic solid of constant Poisson's ratio using the single-specimen technique with constant-rate test data. The method is based on the fact that, for a test specimen of fixed crack size under constant rate, the initiation J-integral may be established from the crack size itself, the actual external load and load-point displacement at growth initiation, and the relaxation modulus of the viscoelastic solid, without knowledge of the complete test record. Since crack size alone, of the required data, would be unknown at each point of the load-vs-load-point displacement curve of a single-specimen test, an expression is derived to estimate it. With it, the physical J-integral at each point of the test record may be established. Because of its basis on single-specimen testing, not only does the method not require the use of multiple specimens with differing initial crack sizes, but avoids the need for tracking crack growth as well.

  13. Bending and stretching finite element analysis of anisotropic viscoelastic composite plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilton, Harry H.; Yi, Sung

    1990-01-01

    Finite element algorithms have been developed to analyze linear anisotropic viscoelastic plates, with or without holes, subjected to mechanical (bending, tension), temperature, and hygrothermal loadings. The analysis is based on Laplace transforms rather than direct time integrations in order to improve the accuracy of the results and save on extensive computational time and storage. The time dependent displacement fields in the transverse direction for the cross ply and angle ply laminates are calculated and the stacking sequence effects of the laminates are discussed in detail. Creep responses for the plates with or without a circular hole are also studied. The numerical results compare favorably with analytical solutions, i.e. within 1.8 percent for bending and 10(exp -3) 3 percent for tension. The tension results of the present method are compared with those using the direct time integration scheme.

  14. Identification of the Hereditary Kernels of Isotropic Linear Viscoelastic Materials in Combined Stress state. 1. Superposition of Shear and Bulk creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golub, V. P.; Maslov, B. P.; Fernati, P. V.

    2016-03-01

    Relations between the shear and bulk creep kernels of an isotropic linear viscoelastic material in combined stress state and the longitudinal and shear creep kernels constructed from data of creep tests under uniaxial tension and pure torsion are formulated. The constitutive equations of viscoelasticity for the combined stress state are chosen in the form of a superposition of the equation for shear strains and the equation for bulk strains. The hereditary kernels are described by Rabotnov's fractional-exponential functions. The creep strains of thin-walled pipes under a combination of tension and torsion or tension and internal pressure are calculated

  15. Embedding viscoelastic damping materials in low-cost VARTM composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, M. J.; Kosmatka, J. B.

    2005-05-01

    It has been well established that using viscoelastic damping materials in structural applications can greatly reduce the dynamic response and thus improve structural fatigue life. Previously these materials have been used to solve vibration problems in metallic structures, where the damping material is attached to the structure and then a stiff outer layer is attached to promote shear deformation in the damping material. More recently, these materials have been used successfully in expensive aerospace composite structures, where the damping material is embedded between plies of prepreg graphite/epoxy prior to being cured in a high-temperature, high-pressure autoclave. The current research involves embedding these damping layers into low-cost composite structures fabricated using the Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) process. The damping layers are perforated with a series of small holes to allow the resin to flow through the damping layer and completely wet-out the structure. Experimental fabrication, vibration testing, and stiffness testing investigate the effect of hole diameter versus hole spacing. Results show that the damping and stiffness can be very sensitive to perforation spacing and size. It is shown that for closely spaced perforations (95% damping area) that damping increases by only a factor of 2.2 over the undamped plate. However, for greater perforation spacing (99.7% damping area) the damping is increased by a factor of 14.3. Experimental results as well as practical design considerations for fabricating damped composite structures using the VARTM process are presented.

  16. Inverting Glacial Isostatic Adjustment beyond linear viscoelasticity using the Burgers rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, Lambert; Greff-Lefftz, Marianne; Fleitout, Luce; Métivier, Laurent; Rouby, Hélène

    2015-04-01

    In Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) inverse modeling, the usual assumption for the mantle rheology is the Maxwell model, which exhibits constant viscosity over time. However, mineral physics experiments and post-seismic observations show evidence of a transient component in the deformation of the shallow mantle, with a short-term viscosity lower than the long-term one. In these studies, the resulting rheology is modeled by a Burgers material: such rheology is indeed expected as the mantle is a mixture of materials with different viscosities. We propose to apply this rheology for the whole viscoelastic mantle, and, using a Bayesian MCMC inverse formalism for GIA during the last glacial cycle, study its impact on estimations of viscosity values, elastic thickness of the lithosphere, and ice distribution. To perform this inversion, we use a global dataset of sea level records, the geological constraints of ice-sheet margins, and present-day GPS data as well as satellite gravimetry. Our ambition is to present not only the best fitting model, but also the range of possible solutions (within the explored space of parameters) with their respective probability of explaining the data. Our results show that the Burgers model is able to fit the dataset as well as the Maxwell model, but would imply a larger lower mantle viscosity, thicker ice sheets over Fennoscandia and Canada, and thinner ice sheets over Antarctica and Greenland.

  17. Viscoelastic cationic polymers containing the urethane linkage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A. (Inventor)

    1972-01-01

    A method for the synthesis and manufacturing of elastomeric compositions and articles containing quaternary nitrogen centers and condensation residues along the polymeric backbone of the centers is presented. Linear and cross-linked straight chain and block polymers having a wide damping temperature range were synthesized. Formulae for the viscoelastic cationic polymers are presented.

  18. Probing viscoelastic surfaces with bimodal tapping-mode atomic force microscopy: Underlying physics and observables for a standard linear solid model.

    PubMed

    Solares, Santiago D

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents computational simulations of single-mode and bimodal atomic force microscopy (AFM) with particular focus on the viscoelastic interactions occurring during tip-sample impact. The surface is modeled by using a standard linear solid model, which is the simplest system that can reproduce creep compliance and stress relaxation, which are fundamental behaviors exhibited by viscoelastic surfaces. The relaxation of the surface in combination with the complexities of bimodal tip-sample impacts gives rise to unique dynamic behaviors that have important consequences with regards to the acquisition of quantitative relationships between the sample properties and the AFM observables. The physics of the tip-sample interactions and its effect on the observables are illustrated and discussed, and a brief research outlook on viscoelasticity measurement with intermittent-contact AFM is provided.

  19. Viscoelastic processing and characterization of high-performance polymeric composite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buehler, Frederic Ulysse

    2000-10-01

    Fiber reinforced composites, a combination of reinforcing fiber and resin matrix, offer many advantages over traditional materials, and have therefore found wide application in the aerospace and sporting goods industry. Among the advantages that composite materials offer, the most often cited are weight saving, high modulus, high strength-to-weight ratio, corrosion resistance, and fatigue resistance. As much as their attributes are desirable, composites are difficult to process due to their heterogeneous, anisotropic, and viscoelastic nature. It is therefore not surprising that the interrelationship between structure, property, and process is not fully understood. Consequently, the major purpose of this research work was to investigate this interrelationship, and ways to scale it to utilization. First, four prepreg materials, which performed differently in the manufacturing of composite parts, but were supposedly identical, were characterized. The property variations that were found among these prepregs in terms of tack and frictional resistance assessed the need for improved understanding of the prepregging process. Therefore, the influence of the processing parameters on final prepreg quality were investigated, and led to the definition of more adequate process descriptors. Additionally, one of the characterization techniques used in this work, temperature modulated differential scanning calorimetry, was examined in depth with the development of a mathematical model. This model, which enabled the exploration of the relationship between user parameters, sample thermophysical properties, and final results, was then compared to literature data. Collectively, this work explored and identified the key connectors between process, structure, and property as they relate to the manufacturing, design, and performance of composite materials.

  20. Non-linear cord-rubber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, S. K.; Dodge, R. N.

    1989-01-01

    A method is presented for calculating the stress-strain relations in a multi-layer composite made up of materials whose individual stress-strain characteristics are non-linear and possibly different. The method is applied to the case of asymmetric tubes in tension, and comparisons with experimentally measured data are given.

  1. The time-dependent magneto-visco-elastic behavior of a magnetostrictive fiber actuated viscoelastic polymer matrix composite.

    PubMed

    Hogea, Cosmina S; Armstrong, William D

    2002-11-01

    The paper develops a one-dimensional magneto-elastic model of a magnetostrictive fiber actuated polymer matrix composite material which accounts for a strong viscoelastic response in the polymer matrix. The viscoelastic behavior of the composite polymer matrix is modeled with a three parallel Maxwell element viscoelastic model, the magnetoelastic behavior of the composite fibers is modeled with an anhysteric directional potential based domain occupation theory. Example calculations are performed to identify and explain the dynamical behavior of the composite. These calculations assume that a constant stress and the oscillating magnetic field are applied in the fiber longitudinal direction. The inclusion of matrix viscosity results in an apparent hysteresis loop in the magnetization and magnetostriction curves even though the model does not include magnetoelastic hysteresis in the fibers. The apparent hysteresis is a consequence of the interaction of the time varying fiber stress caused by matrix viscosity with a multidomain state in the fiber. The small increase in fiber longitudinal compressive stress due to matrix viscosity under increasing field inhibits the occupation of domains with magnetization orientations near the fiber longitudinal [112] direction. As a consequence, the summed longitudinal magnetization and magnetostriction is reduced as compared to the decreasing field limb.

  2. Non-linear visco-elastic analysis and the design of super-pressure balloons : stress, strain and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakefield, David

    Tensys have a long-established background in the shape generation and load analysis of architectural stressed membrane structures. Founded upon their inTENS finite element analysis suite, these activities have broadened to encompass ‘lighter than air' structures such as aerostats, hybrid air-vehicles and stratospheric balloons. Since 2004 Tensys have acted as consultants to the NASA Ultra Long Duration Balloon (ULDB) Program. Early implementations of the super-pressure balloon design chosen for ULDB have shown problems of geometric instability, characterised by improper deployment and the potential for overall geometric instability once deployed. The latter has been reproduced numerically using inTENS, and the former are better understood following a series of large-scale hangar tests simulating launch and ascent. In both cases the solution lies in minimising the film lobing between the tendons. These tendons, which span between base and apex end fittings, cause the characteristic pumpkin shape of the balloons and also provide valuable constraint against excessive film deformation. There is also the requirement to generate a biaxial stress field in order to mobilise in-plane shear stiffness. A consequence of reduced lobing between tendons is the development of higher stresses in the balloon film under pressure. The different thermal characteristics between tendons and film lead to further significant meridional stress under low temperature flight conditions. The non-linear viscoelastic response of the envelope film acts positively to help dissipate excessive stress and local concentrations. However, creep over time may produce lobe geometry variations sufficient to compromise the geometric stability of the balloon. The design of a balloon requires an analysis approach that addresses the questions of stress and stability over the duration of a flight by time stepping analyses using an appropriate material model. This paper summarises the Dynamic Relaxation

  3. A nonlinear viscoelastic approach to durability predictions for polymer based composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinson, Hal F.

    1991-01-01

    Current industry approaches for the durability assessment of metallic structures are briefly reviewed. For polymer based composite structures, it is suggested that new approaches must be adopted to include memory or viscoelastic effects which could lead to delayed failures that might not be predicted using current techniques. A durability or accelerated life assessment plan for fiber reinforced plastics (FRP) developed and documented over the last decade or so is reviewed and discussed. Limitations to the plan are outlined and suggestions to remove the limitations are given. These include the development of a finite element code to replace the previously used lamination theory code and the development of new specimen geometries to evaluate delamination failures. The new DCB model is reviewed and results are presented. Finally, it is pointed out that new procedures are needed to determine interfacial properties and current efforts underway to determine such properties are reviewed. Suggestions for additional efforts to develop a consistent and accurate durability predictive approach for FRP structures are outlined.

  4. A nonlinear viscoelastic approach to durability predictions for polymer based composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinson, Hal F.; Hiel, C. C.

    1990-01-01

    Current industry approaches for the durability assessment of metallic structures are briefly reviewed. For polymer based composite structures, it is suggested that new approaches must be adopted to include memory or viscoelastic effects which could lead to delayed failures that might not be predicted using current techniques. A durability or accelerated life assessment plan for fiber reinforced plastics (FRP) developed and documented over the last decade or so is reviewed and discussed. Limitations to the plan are outlined and suggestions to remove the limitations are given. These include the development of a finite element code to replace the previously used lamination theory code and the development of new specimen geometries to evaluate delamination failures. The new DCB model is reviewed and results are presented. Finally, it is pointed out that new procedures are needed to determine interfacial properties and current efforts underway to determine such properties are reviewed. Suggestions for additional efforts to develop a consistent and accurate durability predictive approach for FRP structures is outlined.

  5. A self-consistent estimate for linear viscoelastic polycrystals with internal variables inferred from the collocation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Q. H.; Brenner, R.; Castelnau, O.; Moulinec, H.; Suquet, P.

    2012-03-01

    The correspondence principle is customarily used with the Laplace-Carson transform technique to tackle the homogenization of linear viscoelastic heterogeneous media. The main drawback of this method lies in the fact that the whole stress and strain histories have to be considered to compute the mechanical response of the material during a given macroscopic loading. Following a remark of Mandel (1966 Mécanique des Milieux Continus(Paris, France: Gauthier-Villars)), Ricaud and Masson (2009 Int. J. Solids Struct. 46 1599-1606) have shown the equivalence between the collocation method used to invert Laplace-Carson transforms and an internal variables formulation. In this paper, this new method is developed for the case of polycrystalline materials with general anisotropic properties for local and macroscopic behavior. Applications are provided for the case of constitutive relations accounting for glide of dislocations on particular slip systems. It is shown that the method yields accurate results that perfectly match the standard collocation method and reference full-field results obtained with a FFT numerical scheme. The formulation is then extended to the case of time- and strain-dependent viscous properties, leading to the incremental collocation method (ICM) that can be solved efficiently by a step-by-step procedure. Specifically, the introduction of isotropic and kinematic hardening at the slip system scale is considered.

  6. From Brittle to Pliant Viscoelastic Materials with Solid State Linear Polyphosphonium - Carboxylate Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Godeau, Guilhem; Navailles, Laurence; Nallet, Frédéric; Lin, Xinrong; McIntosh, Thomas J.; Grinstaff, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    A polystyrenylphosphonium polymer was synthesized and complexed with various carboxylic acid derivatives to form new solid-state polyelectrolyte-surfactant assemblies. The properties of these ionic materials were highly dependent on the nature of the anion and included a brittle material, a rubbery ball that bounces, or a sticky fiber. The values for the equilibrium modulus, storage modulus, and loss modulus were dependent on the composition of the carboxylic acid and the number of electrostatic interactions. Small-angle X-ray scattering studies on the supramolecular assemblies confirmed a bilayer structure for two of the assemblies. PMID:24511156

  7. Linear dependencies between composite fermion states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, M. L.; Liabøtrø, O.; Viefers, S.

    2016-09-01

    The formalism of composite fermions (CFs) has been one of the most prominent and successful approaches to describing the fractional quantum Hall effect, in terms of trial many-body wave functions. Testing the accuracy of the latter typically involves rather heavy numerical comparison to exact diagonalization results. Thus, optimizing computational efficiency has been an important technical issue in this field. One generic (and not yet fully understood) property of the CF approach is that it tends to overcount the number of linearly independent candidate states for fixed sets of quantum numbers. Technically speaking, CF Slater determinants that are orthogonal before projection to the lowest Landau level, may lead to wave functions that are identical, or possess linear dependencies, after projection. This leads to unnecessary computations, and has been pointed out in the literature both for fermionic and bosonic systems. We here present a systematic approach that enables us to reveal all linear dependencies between bosonic compact states in the lowest CF ‘cyclotron energy’ sub-band, and almost all dependencies in higher sub-bands, at the level of the CF Slater determinants, i.e. before projection, which implies a major computational simplification. Our approach is introduced for so-called simple states of two-species rotating bosons, and then generalized to generic compact bosonic states, both one- and two-species. Some perspectives also apply to fermionic systems. The identities and linear dependencies we find, are analytically exact for ‘brute force’ projection in the disk geometry.

  8. Viscoelastic Timoshenko beam theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, Harry H.

    2009-03-01

    The concept of elastic Timoshenko shear coefficients is used as a guide for linear viscoelastic Euler-Bernoulli beams subjected to simultaneous bending and twisting. It is shown that the corresponding Timoshenko viscoelastic functions now depend not only on material properties and geometry as they do in elasticity, but also additionally on stresses and their time histories. Possible viscoelastic definitions are formulated and evaluated. In general, the viscoelastic relations are sufficiently complicated so that the elastic-viscoelastic correspondence principle (analogy) cannot be applied. This is particularly true for, but not limited to, elastic shear coefficients which are Poisson ratio dependent. Expressions for equivalent viscoelastic Timoshenko shear functions must, therefore, be derived de novo on a case by case basis, taking in to account specific relaxation moduli, stresses, temperatures and their time histories. Thus the elastic simplicity and generality is lost and hence rendering the use of viscoelastic Timoshenko shear functions as highly impractical. Consequently, it is necessary to directly solve the coupled viscoelastic beam governing relations for bending and twisting deflections by using appropriate solution protocols as discussed herein.

  9. Finite element implementation of a thermo-damage-viscoelastic constitutive model for hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene composite propellant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jinsheng; Han, Long; Zheng, Jian; Chen, Xiong; Zhou, Changsheng

    2017-02-01

    A thermo-damage-viscoelastic model for hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) composite propellant with consideration for the effect of temperature was implemented in ABAQUS. The damage evolution law of the model has the same form as the crack growth equation for viscoelastic materials, and only a single damage variable S is considered. The HTPB propellant was considered as an isotropic material, and the deviatoric and volumetric strain-stress relations are decoupled and described by the bulk and shear relaxation moduli, respectively. The stress update equations were expressed by the principal stresses σ_{ii}R and the rotation tensor M, the Jacobian matrix in the global coordinate system J_{ijkl} was obtained according to the fourth-order tensor transformation rules. Two models having complex stress states were used to verify the accuracy of the constitutive model. The test results showed good agreement with the strain responses of characteristic points measured by a contactless optical deformation test system, which illustrates that the thermo-damage-viscoelastic model perform well at describing the mechanical properties of an HTPB propellant.

  10. Influence of jet-cooking Prowashonupana barley flour on phenolic composition, antioxidant activities, and viscoelastic properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The influence of jet-cooking Prowashonupana barley flour on total phenolic contents, antioxidant activities, water holding capacities, and viscoelastic properties was studied. Barley flour was jet-cooked without or with pH adjustment at 7, 9, or 11. Generally, the free phenolic content and antioxi...

  11. Numerical solution methods for viscoelastic orthotropic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gramoll, K. C.; Dillard, D. A.; Brinson, H. F.

    1988-01-01

    Numerical solution methods for viscoelastic orthotropic materials, specifically fiber reinforced composite materials, are examined. The methods include classical lamination theory using time increments, direction solution of the Volterra Integral, Zienkiewicz's linear Prony series method, and a new method called Nonlinear Differential Equation Method (NDEM) which uses a nonlinear Prony series. The criteria used for comparison of the various methods include the stability of the solution technique, time step size stability, computer solution time length, and computer memory storage. The Volterra Integral allowed the implementation of higher order solution techniques but had difficulties solving singular and weakly singular compliance function. The Zienkiewicz solution technique, which requires the viscoelastic response to be modeled by a Prony series, works well for linear viscoelastic isotropic materials and small time steps. The new method, NDEM, uses a modified Prony series which allows nonlinear stress effects to be included and can be used with orthotropic nonlinear viscoelastic materials. The NDEM technique is shown to be accurate and stable for both linear and nonlinear conditions with minimal computer time.

  12. Simplified Bulk Experiments and Hygrothermal Nonlinear Viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Soo Jae; Liechti, Kenneth M.; Roy, Samit

    2004-12-01

    Bulk and shear linear viscoelastic functions were simultaneously determined using confined compression experiments on an epoxy primer, one component of a concrete/fiber-reinforced polymer composite bond line. The results were validated with data from separately conducted bulk creep compliance experiments. The transition region of the bulk modulus was as wide as those of the tensile and shear relaxation moduli. Thermal and hygral expansions were measured and used to calibrate a hybrid nonlinear viscoelastic constitutive model which represented the hygrothermal nonlinear viscoelastic response of the material. This model was a combination of Schapery’s (Further Development of a Thermodynamic Constitutive Theory: Stress Formulation, AA {&} ES Report (69 2), 1969a, Purdue University, West Lafayette; Schapery, R.A., ‘On the characterization of nolinear viscoelastic materials’, Polym. Eng. Sci. 9 1969b, 295 310.) and Popelar’s (K., ‘Multiaxial nonlinear viscoelastic characterization and modeling of a structural adhesive’, J. Eng. Mater. Technol. Trans. ASME 119, 1997, 205 210.) shear modified free volume model, which was calibrated ramp using torsion and tension experiments at various temperature and humidity levels. Using free volume concepts to accomplish time shifting as a function of strain, temperature and humidity levels did not create the extent of the softening behavior that was observed in the experiments, particularly at high humidity levels. The vertical shifting concepts of Schapery were required to capture the extraordinarily strong hygral effect.

  13. Micromechanical modeling of viscoelastic voided composites in the low-frequency approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberman, Michael R.; Berthelot, Yves H.; Jarzynski, J.; Cherkaoui, Mohammed

    2002-11-01

    The self-consistent model of Cherkaoui [et al.] [J. Eng. Mater. Technol. 116, 274-278 (1994)] is used to compute the effective material moduli of a viscoelastic material containing coated spherical inclusions. Losses are taken into account by introducing the frequency-dependent, complex shear modulus of the viscoelastic matrix. Mode conversion appears through the localization tensors that govern the micromechanical behavior near the inclusions. The results are compared with the scattering model and the data of Baird [et al.] [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 105, 1527-1538 (1999)]. The two models are in good agreement. the advantage of the self-consistent model is that it is applicable to the case of nonspherical inclusions embedded in anisotropic materials. copyright 2002 Acoustical Society of America.

  14. Viscoelastic/damage modeling of filament-wound spherical pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackett, Robert M.; Dozier, Jan D.

    1987-01-01

    A model of the viscoelastic/damage response of a filament-wound spherical vessel used for long-term pressure containment is developed. The matrix material of the composite system is assumed to be linearly viscoelastic. Internal accumulated damage based upon a quadratic relationship between transverse modulus and maximum circumferential strain is postulated. The resulting nonlinear problem is solved by an iterative routine. The elastic-viscoelastic correspondence is employed to produce, in the Laplace domain, the associated elastic solution for the maximum circumferential strain which is inverted by the method of collocation to yield the time-dependent solution. Results obtained with the model are compared to experimental observations.

  15. Viscoelastic Properties of Rubber Composites Reinforced by Wheat Gluten and Starch Co-filler

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to different abilities of wheat gluten (WG) and wheat starch (WS) to increase the modulus of rubber composites, the composite properties can be adjusted by varying the ratio of WG to WS as a co-filler. This study shows that the co-filler composites became more temperature dependent as the WG co...

  16. Effect of Hydrolyzed Wheat Gluten and Starch Ratio on the Viscoelastic Properties of Rubber Composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The hydrolyzed wheat gluten (WG) and wheat starch (WS) showed substantial reinforcement effects in rubber composites. Due to different abilities of WG and WS to increase the modulus of rubber composites, the composite properties can be adjusted by varying the ratio of WG and WS as a co-filler. The...

  17. Viscoelastic Properties of Rubber Composites Reinforced by Wheat Gluten and Wheat Starch Co-filler

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to different abilities of wheat gluten (WG) and wheat starch (WS) to increase the modulus of rubber composites, the composite properties can be adjusted by varying the ratio of WG to WS as a co-filler. This study shows that the co-filler composites became more temperature dependent as the WG co...

  18. Modeling and experimental verification of frequency-, amplitude-, and magneto-dependent viscoelasticity of magnetorheological elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Fu-Long; Bai, Xian-Xu; Qian, Li-Jun

    2016-10-01

    Magnetorheological elastomers (MREs), a smart composite, exhibit dual characteristics of both MR materials and particle reinforced composites, i.e., the viscoelasticity of MREs depends on external magnetic field as well as strain amplitude and excitation frequency. In this article, the principle of a frequency-, amplitude-, and magneto-dependent linear dynamic viscoelastic model for isotropic MREs is proposed and investigated. The viscoelasticity of MREs is divided into frequency- and amplitude-dependent mechanical viscoelasticity and frequency-, amplitude-, and magneto-dependent magnetic viscoelasticity. Based on the microstructures of ferrous particles and matrix, the relationships between mechanical shear modulus corresponding to the mechanical viscoelasticity and strain amplitude and excitation frequency are obtained. The relationships between magnetic shear modulus corresponding to the magnetic viscoelasticity with strain amplitude, excitation frequency, and further external magnetic field are derived using the magneto-elastic theory. The influence of magnetic saturation on the MR effect is also considered. The dynamic characteristics of a fabricated isotropic MRE sample under different strain amplitudes, excitation frequencies and external magnetic fields are tested. The parameters of the proposed model are identified with the experimental data and the theoretical expressions of shear storage modulus and shear loss modulus of the MRE sample are obtained. In the light of the theoretical expressions, the loss factors of the MRE sample under different loading conditions are analyzed and compared with the test results to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed model.

  19. Characterization of viscoelastic response and damping of composite materials used in flywheel rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianmin

    The long-term goal for spacecraft flywheel systems with higher energy density at the system level requires new and innovative composite material concepts. Multi-Direction Composite (MDC) offers significant advantages over traditional filament-wound and multi-ring press-fit filament-wound wheels in providing higher energy density (i.e., less mass), better crack resistance, and enhanced safety. However there is a lack of systematic characterization for dynamic properties of MDC composite materials. In order to improve the flywheel materials reliability, durability and life time, it is very important to evaluate the time dependent aging effects and damping properties of MDC material, which are significant dynamic parameter for vibration and sound control, fatigue endurance, and impact resistance. The physical aging effects are quantified based on a set of creep curves measured at different aging time or different aging temperature. One parameter (tau) curve fit was proposed to represent the relationship of aging time and aging temperature between different master curves. The long term mechanical behavior was predicted by obtained master curves. The time and temperature shift factors of matrix were obtained from creep curves and the aging time shift rate were calculated. The aging effects on composite are obtained from experiments and compared with prediction. The mechanical quasi-behavior of MDC composite was analyzed. The correspondence principle was used to relate quasi-static elastic properties of composite materials to time-dependent properties of its constituent materials (i.e., fiber and matrix). The Prony series combined with the multi-data fitting method was applied to inverse Laplace transform and to calculate the time dependent stiffness matrix effectively. Accelerated time-dependent deformation of two flywheel rim designs were studied for a period equivalent to 31 years and are compared with hoop reinforcement only composite. Damping of pure resin and T700

  20. Influence of the combined effect of magnetic field and rotation on the onset of a non-Newtonian viscoelastic nanofluid layer: Linear and nonlinear analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurana, Meenakshi; Rana, Puneet; Srivastava, Sangeet

    2016-12-01

    In the present paper, we present both linear and nonlinear analyses to investigate thermal instability on a rotating non-Newtonian viscoelastic nanofluid layer under the influence of a magnetic field. In the linear stability analysis, the stationary and oscillatory modes of convection are obtained for various controlling parameters using the normal mode technique. Both Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are calculated after employing the minimal truncated Fourier series to steady and unsteady state. The main findings conclude that rotation and strain retardation parameter increase the value of the critical Rayleigh number in the neutral stability curve which delays the onset of convection in the nanofluid layer while the stress relaxation parameter enhances the convection. The magnetic field stabilizes the system for low values of the Taylor number (rotation) but an inverse trend is observed for high Taylor number. Both Nusselt and Sherwood numbers initially oscillate with time until the steady state prevails and they decrease with both Chandrasekhar and Taylor numbers. The magnitude of the streamlines and the contours of both isotherms and iso-nanohalines concentrate near the boundaries for large values of Ra, indicating an increase in convection.

  1. EFFECT OF SOY PROTEIN AND CARBOHYDRATE RATIO ON THE VISCOELASTIC PROPERTIES OF STYRENE-BUTADIENE COMPOSITES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When soy products including soy protein isolate, defatted soy flour, soy protein concentrate, and soy spent flakes were incorporated into rubber latex to form composites, they showed substantial reinforcement effects as measured by rheological and mechanical methods. It was observed that different ...

  2. Effect of Phthalic Anhydride Modified Soy Protein on Viscoelastic Properties of Polymer Composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phthalic anhydride (PA) modified soy protein isolates (SPI), both hydrolyzed and un-hydrolyzed, are investigated as reinforcement fillers in styrene-butadiene (SB) composites. The modification of SPI by PA increases the number of carboxylic acid functional groups on the protein surface and therefor...

  3. Effect of soy protein and carbohydrate ratio on the viscoelastic properties of styrene-butadiene composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When soy products including soy protein isolate (SPI), defatted soy flour, soy protein concentrate, and soy spent flakes (SSF) were incorporated into rubber latex to form composites, they showed substantial reinforcement effects as measured by rheological and mechanical methods. It was observed tha...

  4. Enhanced studies on a composite time integration scheme in linear and non-linear dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klarmann, S.; Wagner, W.

    2015-03-01

    In Bathe and Baig (Comput Struct 83:2513-2524, 2005), Bathe (Comput Struct 85:437-445, 2007), Bathe and Noh (Comput Struct 98-99:1-6, 2012) Bathe et al. have proposed a composite implicit time integration scheme for non-linear dynamic problems. This paper is aimed at the further investigation of the scheme's behaviour for use in case of linear and non-linear problems. Therefore, the examination of the amplification matrix of the scheme will be extended in order to get in addition the properties for linear calculations. Besides, it will be demonstrated that the integration scheme also has an impact on some of these properties when used for non-linear calculations. In conclusion, a recommendation for the only selectable parameter of the scheme will be given for application in case of geometrically non-linear calculations.

  5. Viscoelastic Characterization of a Nonlinear, Glass/Epoxy Composite Including the Effects of Damage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-10-01

    Schapery Isothermal creep and recovery tests were conducted on an epoxy resin and a glass fiber-reiiforced composite made from the same bulk resin ...Contracted Notations ... ......... ... 43 2 Ingredients of Shell 58-68R Epoxy Resin [181]. . 9 3 Fiber Content of S-901 Glass/Shell 58-68R Epoxy Resin ...Epoxy Resin .......... ................... 154 i0 Shift Factors, aT, for Shell 58-68R Epoxy Resin .......... ................... 164 11 Shell 58-68R

  6. Viscoelastic properties of high solids softwood kraft black liquors

    SciTech Connect

    Zaman, A.A.; Fricke, A.L. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1995-01-01

    The linear viscoelastic functions of several softwood slash pine kraft black liquors from a two level, four variable factorially designed pulping experiment were determined for solids concentrations from 65% to 81% and temperatures from 40 to 85 C. At high solids and lower temperatures, black liquors behave like un-cross-linked polymers.The exact level of dynamic viscosity and storage modulus at any given condition is dependent upon the solids composition which will vary from liquor to liquor. The linear viscoelastic functions were described using Cross and Carreau-Yasuda models. Superposition principles developed for polymer melts and concentrated polymer solutions were applied to obtain reduced correlations for dynamic viscosity and storage modulus. The data for dynamic viscosity were shifted over the whole range of temperature, solids concentrations, and frequency, and a single curve for dynamic viscosity behavior of every liquor was obtained. The data for storage modulus did not superimpose into a single curve for the effects of solids concentration. The reduced correlations were used to estimate the viscoelasticity of the liquors near normal firing conditions and found that black liquors will not have any problem in droplet formation for concentrations up to 81% solids and temperatures above 120 C. The viscometric and linear viscoelastic functions of black liquors were compared (Cox-Merz rule), and it was shown that at sufficiently low shear rates and frequencies both shear viscosity and the magnitude of the complex viscosity approach zero shear rate viscosity.

  7. Wave dispersion of carbon nanotubes conveying fluid supported on linear viscoelastic two-parameter foundation including thermal and small-scale effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sina, Nima; Moosavi, Hassan; Aghaei, Hosein; Afrand, Masoud; Wongwises, Somchai

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, for the first time, a nonlocal Timoshenko beam model is employed for studying the wave dispersion of a fluid-conveying single-walled carbon nanotube on Viscoelastic Pasternak foundation under high and low temperature change. In addition, the phase and group velocity for the nanotube are discussed, respectively. The influences of Winkler and Pasternak modulus, homogenous temperature change, steady flow velocity and damping factor of viscoelastic foundation on wave dispersion of carbon nanotubes are investigated. It was observed that the characteristic of the wave for carbon nanotubes conveying fluid is the normal dispersion. Moreover, implying viscoelastic foundation leads to increasing the wave frequencies.

  8. Mechanically Viscoelastic Properties of Cellulose Nanocrystals Skeleton Reinforced Hierarchical Composite Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Han, ChunRui

    2016-09-28

    With inspiration from the concept of natural dynamic materials, binary-component composite hydrogels with excellent mechanical properties and recovery capability were prepared from the cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) skeleton reinforced covalently cross-linked polyacrylamide (PAAm) networks. The hierarchical skeleton obtained by freeze-drying of CNC aqueous suspension was directly impregnated into acrylamide (AAm) monomer solution, and in situ polymerization occurred in the presence of hydrophilic cross-linker PEGDA575. Under stress, hydrogen bonds at the interface between CNC and PAAm as well as inside the CNC skeleton acted as sacrificial bonds to dissipate energy, while the covalently cross-linked PAAm chains bind the network together by providing adhesion to CNC and thereby suppress the catastrophic craze propagation. The above synergistic effects of the CNC skeleton and the elastic PAAm network enabled the composite hydrogels to withstand up to 181 kPa of tensile stress, 1.01 MPa of compressive strength, and 1392% elongation at break with the fracture energy as high as 2.82 kJ/m(2). Moreover, the hydrogels recovered more than 70% elasticity after eight loading-unloading cycles, revealing excellent fatigue resistance. The depth-sensing instrumentation by indentation test corroborated that the CNC skeleton contributed simultaneous improvements in hardness and elasticity by as much as 500% in comparison with the properties of the pristine PAAm hydrogels. This elegant strategy by using the CNC skeleton as a reinforcing template offers a new perspective for the fabrication of robust hydrogels with exceptional mechanical properties that may be important for biomedical applications where high strength is required, such as scaffolds for tissue engineering.

  9. The effects of residual stress, viscoelastic and thermodynamic parameters on apparent fracture toughness of dental bilayer ceramic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taskonak, Burak

    Bilayer dental ceramic composites used for fixed partial dentures are becoming more widely used in dental practices because of their biocompatibility, aesthetic properties, and chemical durability. However, large statistical variations in the strength of ceramics are associated with the structural flaws as a result of processing and complex stress states within the surfaces of the materials because of thermal properties of each layer. In addition, partial delaminations of the veneer layer and connector fractures of bilayer ceramic fixed partial dentures (FPDs) have been observed in a clinical study which is a part of this dissertation. Analysis of fracture surfaces of failed FPDs reveals that such fractures of the veneering ceramic are most likely caused by lateral crack growth. Global residual stresses associated with the coefficient of thermal expansion differences between core and veneering ceramics can cause lateral crack initiation. Also, rapid cooling of bilayer ceramics from the sintering temperature of the glass veneer may not allow the interfacial stresses in the viscoelastic glass to relax to equilibrium values. This can further contribute to the propagation of lateral cracks. Furthermore, local residual stresses that develop in the plastic deformation zone below sharp contact areas on the occlusal surface are another contributor to lateral crack growth. Superposition of global residual stresses and a Boussinesq stress field can incrementally increase the possibility of lateral crack growth. The long-range goals of this study are to critically analyze the lateral crack growth mechanisms associated with residual stresses, to modify residual tensile stress distributions by controlled heat treatment, and to minimize the probability of veneering ceramic fractures. Four approaches were used to accomplish these goals: (1) clinical evaluation of a bilayer ceramic fixed partial denture system; (2) fracture surface analysis of clinically failed FPDs; (3

  10. OREGANO_VE: a new parallelised 3D solver for the general (non-)linear Maxwell visco-elastic problem: validation and application to the calculation of surface deformation in the earthquake cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, Tadashi; Houseman, Gregory; Hamling, Ian; Postek, Elek

    2010-05-01

    We have developed a new parallelized 3-D numerical code, OREGANO_VE, for the solution of the general visco-elastic problem in a rectangular block domain. The mechanical equilibrium equation is solved using the finite element method for a (non-)linear Maxwell visco-elastic rheology. Time-dependent displacement and/or traction boundary conditions can be applied. Matrix assembly is based on a tetrahedral element defined by 4 vertex nodes and 6 nodes located at the midpoints of the edges, and within which displacement is described by a quadratic interpolation function. For evaluating viscoelastic relaxation, an explicit time-stepping algorithm (Zienkiewicz and Cormeau, Int. J. Num. Meth. Eng., 8, 821-845, 1974) is employed. We test the accurate implementation of the OREGANO_VE by comparing numerical and analytic (or semi-analytic half-space) solutions to different problems in a range of applications: (1) equilibration of stress in a constant density layer after gravity is switched on at t = 0 tests the implementation of spatially variable viscosity and non-Newtonian viscosity; (2) displacement of the welded interface between two blocks of differing viscosity tests the implementation of viscosity discontinuities, (3) displacement of the upper surface of a layer under applied normal load tests the implementation of time-dependent surface tractions (4) visco-elastic response to dyke intrusion (compared with the solution in a half-space) tests the implementation of all aspects. In each case, the accuracy of the code is validated subject to use of a sufficiently small time step, providing assurance that the OREGANO_VE code can be applied to a range of visco-elastic relaxation processes in three dimensions, including post-seismic deformation and post-glacial uplift. The OREGANO_VE code includes a capability for representation of prescribed fault slip on an internal fault. The surface displacement associated with large earthquakes can be detected by some geodetic observations

  11. Viscoelastic properties of a synthetic meniscus implant.

    PubMed

    Shemesh, Maoz; Asher, Roy; Zylberberg, Eyal; Guilak, Farshid; Linder-Ganz, Eran; Elsner, Jonathan J

    2014-01-01

    There are significant potential advantages for restoration of meniscal function using a bio-stable synthetic implant that combines long-term durability with a dependable biomechanical performance resembling that of the natural meniscus. A novel meniscus implant made of a compliant polycarbonate-urethane matrix reinforced with high modulus ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene fibers was designed as a composite structure that mimics the structural elements of the natural medial meniscus. The overall success of such an implant is linked on its capability to replicate the stress distribution in the knee over the long-term. As this function of the device is directly dependent on its mechanical properties, changes to the material due to exposure to the joint environment and repeated loading could have non-trivial influences on the viscoelastic properties of the implant. Thus, the goal of this study was to measure and characterize the strain-rate response, as well as the viscoelastic properties of the implant as measured by creep, stress relaxation, and hysteresis after simulated use, by subjecting the implant to realistic joint loads up to 2 million cycles in a joint-like setting. The meniscus implant behaved as a non-linear viscoelastic material. The implant underwent minimal plastic deformation after 2 million fatigue loading cycles. Under low compressive loads, the implant was fairly flexible, and able to deform relatively easily (E=120-200 kPa). However as the compressive load applied on the implant was increased, the implant became stiffer (E=3.8-5.2 MPa), to resist deformation. The meniscus implant appears well-matched to the viscoelastic properties of the natural meniscus, and importantly, these properties were found to remain stable and minimally affected by potentially degradative and loading conditions associated with long-term use.

  12. The Role of Viscoelasticity on the Fatigue of Angle-ply Polymer Matrix Composites at High and Room Temperatures- A Micromechanical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayyidmousavi, Alireza; Bougherara, Habiba; Fawaz, Zouheir

    2015-06-01

    A micromechanical approach is adopted to study the role of viscoelasticity on the fatigue behavior of polymer matrix composites. In particular, the study examines the interaction of fatigue and creep in angle ply carbon/epoxy at 25 and 114 °C. The matrix phase is modeled as a vicoelastic material using Schapery's single integral constitutive equation. Taking viscoelsticity into account allows the study of creep strain evolution during the fatigue loading. The fatigue failure criterion is expressed in terms of the fatigue failure functions of the constituent materials. The micromechanical model is also used to calculate these fatigue failure functions from the knowledge of the S-N diagrams of the composite material in longitudinal, transverse and shear loadings thus eliminating the need for any further experimentation. Unlike the previous works, the present study can distinguish between the strain evolution due to fatigue and creep. The results can clearly show the contribution made by the effect of viscoelasticity to the total strain evolution during the fatigue life of the specimen. Although the effect of viscoelsticity is found to increase with temperature, its contribution to strain development during fatigue is compromised by the shorter life of the specimen when compared to lower temperatures.

  13. The advantage of linear viscoelastic material behavior in passive damper design-with application in broad-banded resonance dampers for industrial high-precision motion stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbaan, Cornelis A. M.; Peters, Gerrit W. M.; Steinbuch, Maarten

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the advantage of applying viscoelastic materials instead of purely viscous materials as damping medium in mechanical dampers. Although the loss modulus decreases as function of frequency in case of viscoelastic behavior, which can be interpreted as a decrease of damping, the viscoelastic behavior still leads to an increased modal damping for mechanical structures. This advantage holds for inertial-mass-type dampers that are tuned for broad-banded resonance damping. It turns out that an increase of the storage modulus as function of frequency contributes to the effectiveness of mechanical dampers with respect to energy dissipation at different mechanical resonance frequencies. It is shown that this phenomenon is medium specific and is independent of the amount of damper mass.

  14. Viscoelastic nematodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turzi, Stefano S.

    2016-12-01

    Nematic liquid crystals exhibit both crystallike and fluidlike features. In particular, the propagation of an acoustic wave shows an interesting occurrence of some of the solidlike features at the hydrodynamic level, namely, the frequency-dependent anisotropy of sound velocity and acoustic attenuation. The non-Newtonian behavior of nematics also emerges from the frequency-dependent viscosity coefficients. To account for these phenomena, we put forward a viscoelastic model of nematic liquid crystals, and we extend our previous theory to fully include the combined effects of compressibility, anisotropic elasticity, and dynamic relaxation, at any shear rate. The low-frequency limit agrees with the compressible Ericksen-Leslie theory, while at intermediate frequencies the model correctly captures the relaxation mechanisms underlying finite shear and bulk elastic moduli. We show that there are only four relaxation times allowed by the uniaxial symmetry.

  15. Linear versus nonlinear theories for laminated composite plates and shells

    SciTech Connect

    Qatu, M.S.

    1995-11-01

    Linear and nonlinear shear-deformation theories for laminated composite plates and shells are discussed in this paper. The emphasis here is on the range of validity for each class of theories. The finite element method is used to determine the maximum stresses for a wide range of statically loaded plate and shell panels with various thickness ratios. This paper concludes that for the vast majority of composite materials and for moderately thick plates and shells, stresses normally reach the maximum allowable stress before nonlinear terms can become important. This has been demonstrated by showing that for the limiting case of shear deformation theories (in which the minimum span length (or radius) to thickness ratio is 20), the material usually fails before the maximum deflection reaches the magnitude of the thickness (where nonlinear terms start to become significant).

  16. Numerical analysis of some problems related to the mechanics of pneumatic tires: Finite deformation/rolling contact of a viscoelastic cylinder and finite deformation of cord-reinforced rubber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. T.; Becker, E. B.; Lin, T. L.; Hsieh, K. T.

    1984-01-01

    The formulation and numerical analysis of several problems related to the behavior of pneumatic tires are considered. These problems include the general rolling contact problem of a rubber-like viscoelastic cylinder undergoing finite deformations and the finite deformation of cord-reinforced rubber composites. New finite element models are developed for these problems. Numerical results obtained for several representative cases are presented.

  17. Development of a viscoelastic continuum damage model for cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, R. W.

    2008-12-01

    A previously developed spectrum model for linear viscoelastic behavior of solids is used to describe the rate-dependent damage growth of a time dependent material under cyclic loading. Through the use of the iterative solution of a special Volterra integral equation, the cyclic strain history is described. The spectrum-based model is generalized for any strain rate and any uniaxial load history to formulate the damage function. Damage evolution in the body is described through the use of a rate-type evolution law which uses a pseudo strain to express the viscoelastic constitutive equation with damage. The resulting damage function is used to formulate a residual strength model. The methodology presented is demonstrated by comparing the peak values of the computed cyclic strain history as well as the residual strength model predictions to the experimental data of a polymer matrix composite.

  18. Relativistic viscoelastic fluid mechanics.

    PubMed

    Fukuma, Masafumi; Sakatani, Yuho

    2011-08-01

    A detailed study is carried out for the relativistic theory of viscoelasticity which was recently constructed on the basis of Onsager's linear nonequilibrium thermodynamics. After rederiving the theory using a local argument with the entropy current, we show that this theory universally reduces to the standard relativistic Navier-Stokes fluid mechanics in the long time limit. Since effects of elasticity are taken into account, the dynamics at short time scales is modified from that given by the Navier-Stokes equations, so that acausal problems intrinsic to relativistic Navier-Stokes fluids are significantly remedied. We in particular show that the wave equations for the propagation of disturbance around a hydrostatic equilibrium in Minkowski space-time become symmetric hyperbolic for some range of parameters, so that the model is free of acausality problems. This observation suggests that the relativistic viscoelastic model with such parameters can be regarded as a causal completion of relativistic Navier-Stokes fluid mechanics. By adjusting parameters to various values, this theory can treat a wide variety of materials including elastic materials, Maxwell materials, Kelvin-Voigt materials, and (a nonlinearly generalized version of) simplified Israel-Stewart fluids, and thus we expect the theory to be the most universal description of single-component relativistic continuum materials. We also show that the presence of strains and the corresponding change in temperature are naturally unified through the Tolman law in a generally covariant description of continuum mechanics.

  19. Viscoelasticity of the sarcomere matrix of skeletal muscles. The titin-myosin composite filament is a dual-stage molecular spring.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, K; McCarter, R; Wright, J; Beverly, J; Ramirez-Mitchell, R

    1993-01-01

    The mechanical roles of sarcomere-associated cytoskeletal lattices were investigated by studying the resting tension-sarcomere length curves of mechanically skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers over a wide range of sarcomere strain. Correlative immunoelectron microscopy of the elastic titin filaments of the endosarcomeric lattice revealed biphasic extensibility behaviors and provided a structural interpretation of the multiphasic tension-length curves. We propose that the reversible change of contour length of the extensible segment of titin between the Z line and the end of thick filaments underlies the exponential rise of resting tension. At and beyond an elastic limit near 3.8 microns, a portion of the anchored titin segment that adheres to thick filaments is released from the distal ends of thick filament. This increase in extensible length of titin results in a net length increase in the unstrained extensible segment, thereby lowering the stiffness of the fiber, lengthening the slack sarcomere length, and shifting the yield point in postyield sarcomeres. Thus, the titin-myosin composite filament behaves as a dual-stage molecular spring, consisting of an elastic connector segment for normal response and a longer latent segment that is recruited at and beyond the elastic limit of the sarcomere. Exosarcomeric intermediate filaments contribute to resting tension only above 4.5 microns. We conclude that the interlinked endo- and exosarcomeric lattices are both viscoelastic force-bearing elements. These distinct cytoskeletal lattices appear to operate over two ranges of sarcomere strains and collectively enable myofibrils to respond viscoelastically over a broad range of sarcomere and fiber lengths. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 PMID:8494977

  20. Deformation and relaxation of an incompressible viscoelastic body with surface viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liping; Yu, Miao; Lin, Hao; Foty, Ramsey

    2017-01-01

    Measuring mechanical properties of cells or cell aggregates has proven to be an involved process due to their geometrical and structural complexity. Past measurements are based on material models that completely neglect the elasticity of either the surface membrane or the interior bulk. In this work, we consider general material models to account for both surface and bulk viscoelasticity. The boundary value problems are formulated for deformations and relaxations of a closed viscoelastic surface coupled with viscoelastic media inside and outside of the surface. The linearized surface elasticity models are derived for the constant surface tension model and the Helfrich-Canham bending model for coupling with the bulk viscoelasticity. For quasi-spherical surfaces, explicit solutions are obtained for the deformation, stress-strain and relaxation behaviors under a variety of loading conditions. These solutions can be applied to extract the intrinsic surface and bulk viscoelastic properties of biological cells or cell aggregates in the indentation, electro-deformation and relaxation experiments.

  1. Nanoscale effects in the characterization of viscoelastic materials with atomic force microscopy: coupling of a quasi-three-dimensional standard linear solid model with in-plane surface interactions

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary Significant progress has been accomplished in the development of experimental contact-mode and dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods designed to measure surface material properties. However, current methods are based on one-dimensional (1D) descriptions of the tip–sample interaction forces, thus neglecting the intricacies involved in the material behavior of complex samples (such as soft viscoelastic materials) as well as the differences in material response between the surface and the bulk. In order to begin to address this gap, a computational study is presented where the sample is simulated using an enhanced version of a recently introduced model that treats the surface as a collection of standard-linear-solid viscoelastic elements. The enhanced model introduces in-plane surface elastic forces that can be approximately related to a two-dimensional (2D) Young’s modulus. Relevant cases are discussed for single- and multifrequency intermittent-contact AFM imaging, with focus on the calculated surface indentation profiles and tip–sample interaction force curves, as well as their implications with regards to experimental interpretation. A variety of phenomena are examined in detail, which highlight the need for further development of more physically accurate sample models that are specifically designed for AFM simulation. A multifrequency AFM simulation tool based on the above sample model is provided as supporting information. PMID:27335746

  2. Nanoscale effects in the characterization of viscoelastic materials with atomic force microscopy: Coupling of a quasi-three-dimensional standard linear solid model with in-plane surface interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Solares, Santiago D.

    2016-04-15

    Significant progress has been accomplished in the development of experimental contact-mode and dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods designed to measure surface material properties. However, current methods are based on one-dimensional (1D) descriptions of the tip-sample interaction forces, thus neglecting the intricacies involved in the material behavior of complex samples (such as soft viscoelastic materials) as well as the differences in material response between the surface and the bulk. In order to begin to address this gap, a computational study is presented where the sample is simulated using an enhanced version of a recently introduced model that treats the surface as a collection of standard-linear-solid viscoelastic elements. The enhanced model introduces in-plane surface elastic forces that can be approximately related to a two-dimensional (2D) Young's modulus. Relevant cases are discussed for single-and multifrequency intermittent-contact AFM imaging, with focus on the calculated surface indentation profiles and tip-sample interaction force curves, as well as their implications with regards to experimental interpretation. A variety of phenomena are examined in detail, which highlight the need for further development of more physically accurate sample models that are specifically designed for AFM simulation. As a result, a multifrequency AFM simulation tool based on the above sample model is provided as supporting information.

  3. Nanoscale effects in the characterization of viscoelastic materials with atomic force microscopy: Coupling of a quasi-three-dimensional standard linear solid model with in-plane surface interactions

    DOE PAGES

    Solares, Santiago D.

    2016-04-15

    Significant progress has been accomplished in the development of experimental contact-mode and dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods designed to measure surface material properties. However, current methods are based on one-dimensional (1D) descriptions of the tip-sample interaction forces, thus neglecting the intricacies involved in the material behavior of complex samples (such as soft viscoelastic materials) as well as the differences in material response between the surface and the bulk. In order to begin to address this gap, a computational study is presented where the sample is simulated using an enhanced version of a recently introduced model that treats the surfacemore » as a collection of standard-linear-solid viscoelastic elements. The enhanced model introduces in-plane surface elastic forces that can be approximately related to a two-dimensional (2D) Young's modulus. Relevant cases are discussed for single-and multifrequency intermittent-contact AFM imaging, with focus on the calculated surface indentation profiles and tip-sample interaction force curves, as well as their implications with regards to experimental interpretation. A variety of phenomena are examined in detail, which highlight the need for further development of more physically accurate sample models that are specifically designed for AFM simulation. As a result, a multifrequency AFM simulation tool based on the above sample model is provided as supporting information.« less

  4. Nanoscale effects in the characterization of viscoelastic materials with atomic force microscopy: coupling of a quasi-three-dimensional standard linear solid model with in-plane surface interactions.

    PubMed

    Solares, Santiago D

    2016-01-01

    Significant progress has been accomplished in the development of experimental contact-mode and dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods designed to measure surface material properties. However, current methods are based on one-dimensional (1D) descriptions of the tip-sample interaction forces, thus neglecting the intricacies involved in the material behavior of complex samples (such as soft viscoelastic materials) as well as the differences in material response between the surface and the bulk. In order to begin to address this gap, a computational study is presented where the sample is simulated using an enhanced version of a recently introduced model that treats the surface as a collection of standard-linear-solid viscoelastic elements. The enhanced model introduces in-plane surface elastic forces that can be approximately related to a two-dimensional (2D) Young's modulus. Relevant cases are discussed for single- and multifrequency intermittent-contact AFM imaging, with focus on the calculated surface indentation profiles and tip-sample interaction force curves, as well as their implications with regards to experimental interpretation. A variety of phenomena are examined in detail, which highlight the need for further development of more physically accurate sample models that are specifically designed for AFM simulation. A multifrequency AFM simulation tool based on the above sample model is provided as supporting information.

  5. Composite-step product methods for solving nonsymmetric linear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, T.F.; Szeto, T.

    1994-12-31

    The Biconjugate Gradient (BCG) algorithm is the {open_quotes}natural{close_quotes} generalization of the classical Conjugate Gradient method to nonsymmetric linear systems. It is an attractive method because of its simplicity and its good convergence properties. Unfortunately, BCG suffers from two kinds of breakdowns (divisions by 0): one due to the non-existence of the residual polynomial, and the other due to a breakdown in the recurrence relationship used. There are many look-ahead techniques in existence which are designed to handle these breakdowns. Although the step size needed to overcome an exact breakdown can be computed in principle, these methods can unfortunately be quite complicated for handling near breakdowns since the sizes of the look-ahead steps are variable (indeed, the breakdowns can be incurable). Recently, Bank and Chan introduced the Composite Step Biconjugate Gradient (CSBCG) algorithm, an alternative which cures only the first of the two breakdowns mentioned by skipping over steps for which the BCG iterate is not defined. This is done with a simple modification of BCG which needs only a maximum look-ahead step size of 2 to eliminate the (near) breakdown and to smooth the sometimes erratic convergence of BCG. Thus, instead of a more complicated (but less prone to breakdown) version, CSBCG cures only one kind of breakdown, but does so with a minimal modification to the usual implementation of BCG in the hope that its empirically observed stability will be inherited. The authors note, then, that the Composite Step idea can be incorporated anywhere the BCG polynomial is used; in particular, in product methods such as CGS, Bi-CGSTAB, and TFQMR. Doing this not only cures the breakdown mentioned above, but also takes on the advantages of these product methods, namely, no multiplications by the transpose matrix and a faster convergence rate than BCG.

  6. Theory of reciprocating contact for viscoelastic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putignano, Carmine; Carbone, Giuseppe; Dini, Daniele

    2016-04-01

    A theory of reciprocating contacts for linear viscoelastic materials is presented. Results are discussed for the case of a rigid sphere sinusoidally driven in sliding contact with a viscoelastic half-space. Depending on the size of the contact, the frequency and amplitude of the reciprocating motion, and on the relaxation time of the viscoelastic body, we establish that the contact behavior may range from the steady-state viscoelastic solution, in which traction forces always oppose the direction of the sliding rigid punch, to a more elaborate trend, which is due to the strong interaction between different regions of the path covered during the reciprocating motion. Practical implications span a number of applications, ranging from seismic engineering to biotechnology.

  7. A Thermodynamic Theory of Solid Viscoelasticity. Part II:; Nonlinear Thermo-viscoelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.; Leonov, Arkady I.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper, second in the series of three papers, develops a general, nonlinear, non-isothermal, compressible theory for finite rubber viscoelasticity and specifies it in a form convenient for solving problems important to the rubber, tire, automobile, and air-space industries, among others. Based on the quasi-linear approach of non-equilibrium thermodynamics, a general nonlinear theory of differential type has been developed for arbitrary non-isothermal deformations of viscoelastic solids. In this theory, the constitutive equations were presented as the sum of a rubber elastic (equilibrium) and a liquid type viscoelastic (non-equilibrium) terms. These equations have then been simplified using several modeling and simplicity arguments.

  8. Method for evaluating material viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yusaku; Yamaguchi, Takao

    2004-01-01

    A method for evaluating the viscoelasticity of materials under oscillation load is proposed. In the method, a material under test is connected to a mass, which generates an oscillating inertial force after the mass is manually struck using a hammer. A pneumatic linear bearing is used to realize linear motion with sufficiently small friction acting on the mass that is the moving part of the bearing. The inertial force acting on the mass is determined highly accurately by means of measuring the velocity of the mass using an optical interferometer.

  9. Electrostatic streaming instability modes in complex viscoelastic quantum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, P. K.; Goutam, H. P.

    2016-11-01

    A generalized quantum hydrodynamic model is procedurally developed to investigate the electrostatic streaming instability modes in viscoelastic quantum electron-ion-dust plasma. Compositionally, inertialess electrons are anticipated to be degenerate quantum particles owing to their large de Broglie wavelengths. In contrast, inertial ions and dust particulates are treated in the same classical framework of linear viscoelastic fluids (non-Newtonian). It considers a dimensionality-dependent Bohmian quantum correction prefactor, γ = [(D - 2)/3D], in electron quantum dynamics, with D symbolizing the problem dimensionality. Applying a regular Fourier-formulaic plane-wave analysis around the quasi-neutral hydrodynamic equilibrium, two distinct instabilities are explored to exist. They stem in ion-streaming (relative to electrons and dust) and dust-streaming (relative to electrons and ions). Their stability is numerically illustrated in judicious parametric windows in both the hydrodynamic and kinetic regimes. The non-trivial influential roles by the relative streams, viscoelasticities, and correction prefactor are analyzed. It is seen that γ acts as a stabilizer for the ion-stream case only. The findings alongside new entailments, as special cases of realistic interest, corroborate well with the earlier predictions in plasma situations. Applicability of the analysis relevant in cosmic and astronomical environments of compact dwarf stars is concisely indicated.

  10. Image indexing and retrieval using linear phase coefficient composite filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlotto, Mark J.

    1996-01-01

    Content-based retrieval techniques can be characterized in several ways: by the manner in which image data are indexed, by the level of specificity/generality of the query and response of the system, by the type of query (e.g., iconic or symbolic), and by the kind of information used (intrinsic image features or attached information such as text). The method described in this paper automatically indexes images in the database, and is intended to retrieve specific objects by image query based on inherent image content. Our method is actually quite similar to object recognition except that instead of searching a single image for a given object, an entire database of images is examined. The approach uses linear phase coefficient composite (LPCC) filters to encode and match queries consisting of multiple images (e.g., representative views of an object of interest) against multiple images in the database simultaneously. Retrieval is a two-step process that first isolates those portions of the database containing images that match the query, and then identifies the specific images. Our use of LPCC filters exploits phase information to retrieve specific images that match the query from the database. The results from the experiments suggest that phase information can be used to index and retrieve multiple images from a database in parallel, and that large numbers of operations can be performed simultaneously using a complex number representation. In one experiment well over 100 real correlations were effectively performed by a single complex correlation. Problems encountered in processing video data are discussed.

  11. Dynamic crack propagation in a viscoelastic strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popelar, C. H.; Atkinson, C.

    1980-04-01

    THE DYNAMIC PROPAGATION of a semi-infinite crack in a finite linear viscoelastic strip subjected to Mode I loading is investigated. Through the use of integral transforms the problem is reduced to solving a Wiener-Hopf equation. The asymptotic properties of the transforms are exploited to establish the stress intensity factor. Plane-stress and plane-strain stress intensity factors as a function of crack speed for both fully-clamped and shear-free lateral boundaries are presented for the standard linear viscoelastic solid. Comparisons are made with previously obtained asymptotic stress intensity factors and with stress intensity factors for the equivalent elastic strips.

  12. A model for the compressible, viscoelastic behavior of human amnion addressing tissue variability through a single parameter.

    PubMed

    Mauri, Arabella; Ehret, Alexander E; De Focatiis, Davide S A; Mazza, Edoardo

    2016-08-01

    A viscoelastic, compressible model is proposed to rationalize the recently reported response of human amnion in multiaxial relaxation and creep experiments. The theory includes two viscoelastic contributions responsible for the short- and long-term time-dependent response of the material. These two contributions can be related to physical processes: water flow through the tissue and dissipative characteristics of the collagen fibers, respectively. An accurate agreement of the model with the mean tension and kinematic response of amnion in uniaxial relaxation tests was achieved. By variation of a single linear factor that accounts for the variability among tissue samples, the model provides very sound predictions not only of the uniaxial relaxation but also of the uniaxial creep and strip-biaxial relaxation behavior of individual samples. This suggests that a wide range of viscoelastic behaviors due to patient-specific variations in tissue composition can be represented by the model without the need of recalibration and parameter identification.

  13. Fluorescent viscoelastic enhancement.

    PubMed

    Smith, K D; Burt, W L

    1992-11-01

    By inserting an Erreger 485 exciter filter into the operating microscope, translucent yellow Healon (sodium hyaluronate) transforms into a brilliant opaque green viscoelastic. We have developed this technique and termed it "fluorescent viscoelastic enhancement." Using the technique, we demonstrated that the time required to remove Healon from the anterior chamber after intraocular lens insertion varies. Healon is usually aspirated quickly, in less than 17 seconds. Otherwise it traps behind the intraocular lens and requires more time for irrigation/aspiration (I/A) and manipulation of the I/A tip. Fluorescent viscoelastic enhancement minimized I/A time, reducing excess turbulence and manipulation in the anterior chamber, and thus may reduce corneal endothelial cell loss. This study also demonstrated that fluorescent viscoelastic enhancement prevented postoperative intraocular pressure rise, compared to the conventional removal of clear Healon. Fluorescent viscoelastic enhancement assures the surgeon that a large amount of Healon is not left behind.

  14. Poly(L-lactic acid)/poly(glycolic acid) microfibrillar polymer-polymer composites: Preparation and viscoelastic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimble, L. D.; Fakirov, S.; Bhattacharyya, D.

    2015-05-01

    Microfibrillar composites (MFCs) from petrochemical-derived polymers have been investigated for several years and the technique can result in significant improvements in mechanical properties when compared with the neat matrix material of the respective composite. The current work applies the technique to biodegradable, biocompatible polymers for potential applications in bioabsorbable medical devices. MFCs were prepared from melt blended poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) and poly(glycolic acid) (PGA) via cold drawing then compression molding of extruded yarn. These MFCs were shown to have higher Young's moduli than that of neat PLLA but for load-bearing applications the creep characteristics are of interest. The MFC sheets resulting from compression molding were subjected to tensile relaxation tests at 37°C in the fiber orientation direction. Specimens were also tested via dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). Neat PLLA specimens were subjected to the same tests for comparison. Results indicate that at 37°C PLLA/PGA MFCs exhibit lower creep resistance than that of neat PLLA due to the more rapid relaxation of stress observed. DMTA results elucidate the loss modulus changes in PLLA/PGA MFCs which occur as the material approaches the glass transition temperature of PGA (˜45°C).

  15. The influence of time dependent flight and maneuver velocities and elastic or viscoelastic flexibilities on aerodynamic and stability derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochrane, Alexander P.; Merrett, Craig G.; Hilton, Harry H.

    2014-12-01

    The advent of new structural concepts employing composites in primary load carrying aerospace structures in UAVs, MAVs, Boeing 787s, Airbus A380s, etc., necessitates the inclusion of flexibility as well as viscoelasticity in static structural and aero-viscoelastic analyses. Differences and similarities between aeroelasticity and aero-viscoelasticity have been investigated in [2]. An investigation is undertaken as to the dependence and sensitivity of aerodynamic and stability derivatives to elastic and viscoelastic structural flexibility and as to time dependent flight and maneuver velocities. Longitudinal, lateral and directional stabilities are investigated. It has been a well established fact that elastic lifting surfaces are subject to loss of control effectiveness and control reversal at certain flight speeds, which depend on aerodynamic, structural and material properties [5]. Such elastic analyses are extended to linear viscoelastic materials under quasi-static, dynamic, and sudden and gradual loading conditions. In elastic wings one of the critical static parameters is the velocity at which control reversal takes place (VREVE). Since elastic formulations constitute viscoelastic initial conditions, viscoelastic reversal may occur at speeds VREV<≧VREVE, but furthermore does so in time at 0 < tREV ≤ ∞. The influence of the twin effects of viscoelastic and elastic materials and of variable flight velocities on longitudinal, lateral, directional and spin stabilities are also investigated. It has been a well established fact that elastic lifting surfaces are subject to loss of control effectiveness and control reversal at certain flight speeds, which depend on aerodynamic, structural and material properties [5]. Such elastic analyses are here extended to linear viscoelastic materials under quasi-static, dynamic, and sudden and gradual loading conditions. In elastic wings the critical parameter is the velocity at which control reversal takes place (VREVE

  16. The influence of time dependent flight and maneuver velocities and elastic or viscoelastic flexibilities on aerodynamic and stability derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrane, Alexander P.; Merrett, Craig G.; Hilton, Harry H.

    2014-12-10

    The advent of new structural concepts employing composites in primary load carrying aerospace structures in UAVs, MAVs, Boeing 787s, Airbus A380s, etc., necessitates the inclusion of flexibility as well as viscoelasticity in static structural and aero-viscoelastic analyses. Differences and similarities between aeroelasticity and aero-viscoelasticity have been investigated in [2]. An investigation is undertaken as to the dependence and sensitivity of aerodynamic and stability derivatives to elastic and viscoelastic structural flexibility and as to time dependent flight and maneuver velocities. Longitudinal, lateral and directional stabilities are investigated. It has been a well established fact that elastic lifting surfaces are subject to loss of control effectiveness and control reversal at certain flight speeds, which depend on aerodynamic, structural and material properties [5]. Such elastic analyses are extended to linear viscoelastic materials under quasi-static, dynamic, and sudden and gradual loading conditions. In elastic wings one of the critical static parameters is the velocity at which control reversal takes place (V{sub REV}{sup E}). Since elastic formulations constitute viscoelastic initial conditions, viscoelastic reversal may occur at speeds V{sub REV<}{sup ≧}V{sub REV}{sup E}, but furthermore does so in time at 0 < t{sub REV} ≤ ∞. The influence of the twin effects of viscoelastic and elastic materials and of variable flight velocities on longitudinal, lateral, directional and spin stabilities are also investigated. It has been a well established fact that elastic lifting surfaces are subject to loss of control effectiveness and control reversal at certain flight speeds, which depend on aerodynamic, structural and material properties [5]. Such elastic analyses are here extended to linear viscoelastic materials under quasi-static, dynamic, and sudden and gradual loading conditions. In elastic wings the critical parameter is the velocity at

  17. Analysis of linear elasticity and non-linearity due to plasticity and material damage in woven and biaxial braided composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Deepak

    Textile composites have a wide variety of applications in the aerospace, sports, automobile, marine and medical industries. Due to the availability of a variety of textile architectures and numerous parameters associated with each, optimal design through extensive experimental testing is not practical. Predictive tools are needed to perform virtual experiments of various options. The focus of this research is to develop a better understanding of linear elastic response, plasticity and material damage induced nonlinear behavior and mechanics of load flow in textile composites. Textile composites exhibit multiple scales of complexity. The various textile behaviors are analyzed using a two-scale finite element modeling. A framework to allow use of a wide variety of damage initiation and growth models is proposed. Plasticity induced non-linear behavior of 2x2 braided composites is investigated using a modeling approach based on Hill's yield function for orthotropic materials. The mechanics of load flow in textile composites is demonstrated using special non-standard postprocessing techniques that not only highlight the important details, but also transform the extensive amount of output data into comprehensible modes of behavior. The investigations show that the damage models differ from each other in terms of amount of degradation as well as the properties to be degraded under a particular failure mode. When compared with experimental data, predictions of some models match well for glass/epoxy composite whereas other's match well for carbon/epoxy composites. However, all the models predicted very similar response when damage factors were made similar, which shows that the magnitude of damage factors are very important. Full 3D as well as equivalent tape laminate predictions lie within the range of the experimental data for a wide variety of braided composites with different material systems, which validated the plasticity analysis. Conclusions about the effect of

  18. Investigation of multilayer printed circuit board (PCB) film warpage using viscoelastic properties measured by a vibration test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Sung-Jun; Park, Buhm; Kim, Do-Hyoung; Kwak, Dong-Ok; Song, In-Sang; Park, Junhong; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2015-03-01

    Woven glass fabric/BT (bismaleimide triazine) composite laminate (BT core), copper (Cu), and photoimageable solder resist (PSR) are the most widely used materials for semiconductors in electronic devices. Among these materials, BT core and PSR contain polymeric materials that exhibit viscoelastic behavior. For this reason, these materials are considered to have time- and temperature-dependent moduli during warpage analysis. However, the thin geometry of multilayer printed circuit board (PCB) film makes it difficult to identify viscoelastic characteristics. In this work, a vibration test method was proposed for measuring the viscoelastic properties of a multilayer PCB film at different temperatures. The beam-shaped specimens, composed of a BT core, Cu laminated on a BT core, and PSR and Cu laminated on a BT core, were used in the vibration test. The frequency-dependent variation of the complex bending stiffness was determined using a transfer function method. The storage modulus (E‧) of the BT core, Cu, and PSR as a function of temperature and frequency were obtained, and their temperature-dependent variation was identified. The obtained properties were fitted using a viscoelastic model for the BT core and the PSR, and a linear elastic model for the Cu. Warpage of a line pattern specimen due to temperature variation was measured using a shadow Moiré analysis and compared to predictions using a finite element model. The results provide information on the mechanism of warpage, especially warpage due to temperature-dependent variation in viscoelastic properties.

  19. Linear and non-linear electrical dependency of carbon nanotube reinforced composites to internal damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekas, D.; Grammatikos, S. A.; Kouimtzi, C.; Paipetis, A. S.

    2015-02-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) enhanced composite materials have attracted the interest of many scientists worldwide, especially in the aerospace industry. Fundamental to their qualification as materials in primary aircraft structures is the investigation of the relationship between their functional characteristics and their long-term behaviour under external combined loads. Conductive reinforcement at the nanoscale is by definition multifunctional as it may (i) enhance structural performance and (ii) provide structural health monitoring functionalities. It is now well established that reversible changes in the electrical resistance in nano composites are related to strain and irreversible monotonic changes are related to cumulative damage in the nano composite. In this study, the effect of damage in the hysteretic electrical behaviour of nano-enhanced reinforced composites was investigated. The nanocomposites were subjected to different levels of damage and their response to a cyclic electrical potential excitation was monitored as a function of frequency. Along with the dynamic electrical investigation, an Electrical Potential Mapping (EPM) technique was developed to pin-point artificial damage in CNT-enhanced matrix composite materials. The electrical potential field of the bulk material has shown to be characteristic of its internal structural state. The results of EPM technique were contradicted and validated with conventional C-scans.

  20. Continuous, linearly intermixed fiber tows and composite molded article thereform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMahon, Paul E. (Inventor); Chung, Tai-Shung (Inventor); Ying, Lincoln (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The instant invention involves a process used in preparing fibrous tows which may be formed into polymeric plastic composites. The process involves the steps of (a) forming a carbon fiber tow; (b) forming a thermoplastic polymeric fiber tow; (c) intermixing the two tows; and (d) withdrawing the intermixed tow for further use.

  1. Electrical analogous in viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ala, Guido; Di Paola, Mario; Francomano, Elisa; Li, Yan; Pinnola, Francesco P.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, electrical analogous models of fractional hereditary materials are introduced. Based on recent works by the authors, mechanical models of materials viscoelasticity behavior are firstly approached by using fractional mathematical operators. Viscoelastic models have elastic and viscous components which are obtained by combining springs and dashpots. Various arrangements of these elements can be used, and all of these viscoelastic models can be equivalently modeled as electrical circuits, where the spring and dashpot are analogous to the capacitance and resistance, respectively. The proposed models are validated by using modal analysis. Moreover, a comparison with numerical experiments based on finite difference time domain method shows that, for long time simulations, the correct time behavior can be obtained only with modal analysis. The use of electrical analogous in viscoelasticity can better reveal the real behavior of fractional hereditary materials.

  2. String-merging of meso- viscoelastic droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yuanze; Xu, Jianmao

    2007-03-01

    Great challenge exists in the multi-scale rheological modeling of immiscible polyblends with non-linear morphology changes, including viscoelastic drop break-up and collapse. A new type mechanism of merging and coalescence, called string-merging of meso- viscoelastic droplets was described and analyzed. By iterative stretching and relaxation in a four-roll mill rheometer, one droplet containing high molar mass PIB (polyisobutene), was separated into two droplets connected by a string in a dumbbell shape suspending in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) medium. In quiescent state, the string pulled the two spheres merging closer and collapsed into one spherical drop finally. The process exhibits interesting features, different from capillary breakup mechanism. By adding the viscoelasticity of the systems to the force balance of Laplace force and viscous drag, the phenomenon may be well analyzed. The necessity to involve the microscopic consideration of the highly oriented entangled state are discussed.

  3. Approximations of thermoelastic and viscoelastic control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, J. A.; Liu, Z. Y.; Miller, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    Well-posed models and computational algorithms are developed and analyzed for control of a class of partial differential equations that describe the motions of thermo-viscoelastic structures. An abstract (state space) framework and a general well-posedness result are presented that can be applied to a large class of thermo-elastic and thermo-viscoelastic models. This state space framework is used in the development of a computational scheme to be used in the solution of a linear quadratic regulator (LQR) control problem. A detailed convergence proof is provided for the viscoelastic model and several numerical results are presented to illustrate the theory and to analyze problems for which the theory is incomplete.

  4. Viscoelastic properties of cellular polypropylene ferroelectrets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaal, Mate; Bovtun, Viktor; Stark, Wolfgang; Erhard, Anton; Yakymenko, Yuriy; Kreutzbruck, Marc

    2016-03-01

    Viscoelastic properties of cellular polypropylene ferroelectrets (PP FEs) were studied at low frequencies (0.3-33 Hz) by dynamic mechanical analysis and at high frequencies (250 kHz) by laser Doppler vibrometry. Relaxation behavior of the in-plane Young's modulus ( Y11 ' ˜ 1500 MPa at room temperature) was observed and attributed to the viscoelastic response of polypropylene matrix. The out-of-plane Young's modulus is very small ( Y33 ' ≈ 0.1 MPa) at low frequencies, frequency- and stress-dependent, evidencing nonlinear viscoelastic response of PP FEs. The high-frequency mechanical response of PP FEs is shown to be linear viscoelastic with Y33 ' ≈ 0.8 MPa. It is described by thickness vibration mode and modeled as a damped harmonic oscillator with one degree of freedom. Frequency dependence of Y33 * in the large dynamic strain regime is described by the broad Cole-Cole relaxation with a mean frequency in kHz range attributed to the dynamics of the air flow between partially closed air-filled voids in PP FEs. Switching-off the relaxation contribution causes dynamic crossover from the nonlinear viscoelastic regime at low frequencies to the linear viscoelastic regime at high frequencies. In the small strain regime, contribution of the air flow seems to be insignificant and the power-law response, attributed to the mechanics of polypropylene cell walls and closed air voids, dominates in a broad frequency range. Mechanical relaxation caused by the air flow mechanism takes place in the sound and ultrasound frequency range (10 Hz-1 MHz) and, therefore, should be taken into account in ultrasonic applications of the PP FEs deal with strong exciting or receiving signals.

  5. 3D Viscoelastic traction force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Toyjanova, Jennet; Hannen, Erin; Bar-Kochba, Eyal; Darling, Eric M; Henann, David L; Franck, Christian

    2014-10-28

    Native cell-material interactions occur on materials differing in their structural composition, chemistry, and physical compliance. While the last two decades have shown the importance of traction forces during cell-material interactions, they have been almost exclusively presented on purely elastic in vitro materials. Yet, most bodily tissue materials exhibit some level of viscoelasticity, which could play an important role in how cells sense and transduce tractions. To expand the realm of cell traction measurements and to encompass all materials from elastic to viscoelastic, this paper presents a general, and comprehensive approach for quantifying 3D cell tractions in viscoelastic materials. This methodology includes the experimental characterization of the time-dependent material properties for any viscoelastic material with the subsequent mathematical implementation of the determined material model into a 3D traction force microscopy (3D TFM) framework. Utilizing this new 3D viscoelastic TFM (3D VTFM) approach, we quantify the influence of viscosity on the overall material traction calculations and quantify the error associated with omitting time-dependent material effects, as is the case for all other TFM formulations. We anticipate that the 3D VTFM technique will open up new avenues of cell-material investigations on even more physiologically relevant time-dependent materials including collagen and fibrin gels.

  6. Optimal composite scores for longitudinal clinical trials under the linear mixed effects model.

    PubMed

    Ard, M Colin; Raghavan, Nandini; Edland, Steven D

    2015-01-01

    Clinical trials of chronic, progressive conditions use rate of change on continuous measures as the primary outcome measure, with slowing of progression on the measure as evidence of clinical efficacy. For clinical trials with a single prespecified primary endpoint, it is important to choose an endpoint with the best signal-to-noise properties to optimize statistical power to detect a treatment effect. Composite endpoints composed of a linear weighted average of candidate outcome measures have also been proposed. Composites constructed as simple sums or averages of component tests, as well as composites constructed using weights derived from more sophisticated approaches, can be suboptimal, in some cases performing worse than individual outcome measures. We extend recent research on the construction of efficient linearly weighted composites by establishing the often overlooked connection between trial design and composite performance under linear mixed effects model assumptions and derive a formula for calculating composites that are optimal for longitudinal clinical trials of known, arbitrary design. Using data from a completed trial, we provide example calculations showing that the optimally weighted linear combination of scales can improve the efficiency of trials by almost 20% compared with the most efficient of the individual component scales. Additional simulations and analytical results demonstrate the potential losses in efficiency that can result from alternative published approaches to composite construction and explore the impact of weight estimation on composite performance.

  7. Viscoelastic properties of the false vocal fold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Roger W.

    2004-05-01

    The biomechanical properties of vocal fold tissues have been the focus of many previous studies, as vocal fold viscoelasticity critically dictates the acoustics and biomechanics of phonation. However, not much is known about the viscoelastic response of the ventricular fold or false vocal fold. It has been shown both clinically and in computer simulations that the false vocal fold may contribute significantly to the aerodynamics and sound generation processes of human voice production, with or without flow-induced oscillation of the false fold. To better understand the potential role of the false fold in phonation, this paper reports some preliminary measurements on the linear and nonlinear viscoelastic behavior of false vocal fold tissues. Linear viscoelastic shear properties of human false fold tissue samples were measured by a high-frequency controlled-strain rheometer as a function of frequency, and passive uniaxial tensile stress-strain response of the tissue samples was measured by a muscle lever system as a function of strain and loading rate. Elastic moduli (Young's modulus and shear modulus) of the false fold tissues were calculated from the measured data. [Work supported by NIH.

  8. Viscoelastic properties of oat ß-glucan-rich aqueous dispersions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    C-trim is a healthy food product containing the dietary of soluble fiber ß-glucan. The suspension of C-trim in water is a hydrocolloid biopolymer. The linear and non-linear rheological properties for suspensions of C-trim biopolymers were investigated. The linear viscoelastic behaviors for C-trim...

  9. Effect of cellulosic fiber scale on linear and non-linear mechanical performance of starch-based composites.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Samaneh; Abdulkhani, Ali; Tahir, Paridah Md; Dufresne, Alain

    2016-10-01

    Cellulosic nanofibers (NFs) from kenaf bast were used to reinforce glycerol plasticized thermoplastic starch (TPS) matrices with varying contents (0-10wt%). The composites were prepared by casting/evaporation method. Raw fibers (RFs) reinforced TPS films were prepared with the same contents and conditions. The aim of study was to investigate the effects of filler dimension and loading on linear and non-linear mechanical performance of fabricated materials. Obtained results clearly demonstrated that the NF-reinforced composites had significantly greater mechanical performance than the RF-reinforced counterparts. This was attributed to the high aspect ratio and nano dimension of the reinforcing agents, as well as their compatibility with the TPS matrix, resulting in strong fiber/matrix interaction. Tensile strength and Young's modulus increased by 313% and 343%, respectively, with increasing NF content from 0 to 10wt%. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) revealed an elevational trend in the glass transition temperature of amylopectin-rich domains in composites. The most eminent record was +18.5°C shift in temperature position of the film reinforced with 8% NF. This finding implied efficient dispersion of nanofibers in the matrix and their ability to form a network and restrict mobility of the system.

  10. Viscoelastic behavior of stock indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gündüz, Güngör; Gündüz, Yalin

    2010-12-01

    The scattering diagram of a stock index results in a complex network structure, which can be used to analyze the viscoelastic properties of the index. The change along x- or y-direction of the diagram corresponds to purely elastic (or spring like) movement whereas the diagonal change at an angle of 45° corresponds to purely viscous (or dashpot like) movement. The viscous component pushes the price from its current value to any other value, while the elastic component acts like a restoring force. Four indices, namely, DJI, S&P-500, NASDAQ-100, and NASDAQ-composite were studied for the period of 2001-2009. NASDAQ-composite displayed very high elasticity while NASDAQ-100 displayed the highest fluidity in the time period considered. The fluidity of DJI and S&P-500 came out to be close to each other, and they are almost the same in the second half of the period.

  11. Model for bubble pulsation in liquid between parallel viscoelastic layers

    PubMed Central

    Hay, Todd A.; Ilinskii, Yurii A.; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A.; Hamilton, Mark F.

    2012-01-01

    A model is presented for a pulsating spherical bubble positioned at a fixed location in a viscous, compressible liquid between parallel viscoelastic layers of finite thickness. The Green’s function for particle displacement is found and utilized to derive an expression for the radiation load imposed on the bubble by the layers. Although the radiation load is derived for linear harmonic motion it may be incorporated into an equation for the nonlinear radial dynamics of the bubble. This expression is valid if the strain magnitudes in the viscoelastic layer remain small. Dependence of bubble pulsation on the viscoelastic and geometric parameters of the layers is demonstrated through numerical simulations. PMID:22779461

  12. Time Domain Viscoelastic Full Waveform Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabien-Ouellet, Gabriel; Gloaguen, Erwan; Giroux, Bernard

    2017-03-01

    Viscous attenuation can have a strong impact on seismic wave propagation, but it is rarely taken into account in full waveform inversion (FWI). When viscoelasticity is considered in time domain FWI, the displacement formulation of the wave equation is usually used instead of the popular velocity-stress formulation. However, inversion schemes rely on the adjoint equations, which are quite different for the velocity-stress formulation than for the displacement formulation. In this paper, we apply the adjoint state method to the isotropic viscoelastic wave equation in the velocity-stress formulation based on the generalized standard linear solid rheology. By applying linear transformations to the wave equation before deriving the adjoint state equations, we obtain two symmetric sets of partial differential equations for the forward and adjoint variables. The resulting sets of equations only differ by a sign change and can be solved by the same numerical implementation. We also investigate the crosstalk between parameter classes (velocity and attenuation) of the viscoelastic equation. More specifically, we show that the attenuation levels can be used to recover the quality factors of P- and S- waves, but that they are very sensitive to velocity errors. Finally, we present a synthetic example of viscoelastic FWI in the context of monitoring CO2 geological sequestration. We show that FWI based on our formulation can indeed recover P- and S- wave velocities and their attenuation levels when attenuation is high enough. Both changes in velocity and attenuation levels recovered with FWI can be used to track the CO2 plume during and after injection. Further studies are required to evaluate the performance of viscoelastic FWI on real data.

  13. Exposing the nonlinear viscoelastic behavior of asphalt-aggregate mixes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levenberg, Eyal; Uzan, Jacob

    2012-05-01

    In this study asphalt-aggregate mixes are treated as both viscoelastic and viscoplastic. Following a damage mechanics approach, a nonlinear viscoelastic constitutive formulation is generated from a linear formulation by replacing `applied stresses' with `effective viscoelastic stresses'. A non-dimensional scalar entity called `relative viscoelastic stiffness' is introduced; it is defined as the ratio of applied to effective viscoelastic stress and encapsulates different types of nonlinearities. The paper proposes a computational scheme for exposing these nonlinearities by uncovering, through direct analysis of any test data, changes experienced by the `relative viscoelastic stiffness'. In general terms, the method is based on simultaneous application of creep and relaxation formulations while preserving the interrelationship between the corresponding time functions. The proposed scheme is demonstrated by analyzing a uniaxial tension test and a uniaxial compression test (separately). Results are presented and discussed, unveiling and contrasting the character of viscoelastic nonlinearities in both cases. A conceptual viewpoint is offered to explain the observations, illustrating the requirements from any candidate constitutive theory.

  14. Measurement of viscoelastic properties at small length scales for heterogeneous and nonlinear materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fang

    In this dissertation, advances in linear and non-linear viscoelastic analysis and experimentation have been employed to investigate the properties of materials using nanoindentation. In the first study, a general linear-viscoelastic model was developed to measure the properties of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) using a flat punch indenter. Subsequently, linear viscoelastic nanoindentation was used to measure the young's relaxation modulus of a locally-heterogeneous thermally-aged bismaleimide resin using a Berkovich indenter. Nanoindentation measurements were conducted on both surface and cross section of aged bismaleimide resin specimens with different aging time at 200°C and 300°C respectively to extract the oxidation effect of sample under high temperatures. Finally, nanoindentation measurements were made on human tympanic membrane specimens with using a spherical nanoindenter tip in direct contact with the collagen fiber layer. Linear viscoelastic analysis was conducted to extract the Young's relaxation modulus distributions. The study also focused on the development of non-linear viscoelastic analysis of indentation experiments. Despite the fact that the nanoindentation technique is well established for the characterization of elasto-plastic materials, nanoindentation on viscoelastic materials is not fully understood especially in nonlinear viscoelastic region. In the dissertation, a nonlinear viscoelastic model was developed and implemented in Abaqus/Implicit Code to analyze the nonlinear visceoelastic behavior of polyvinyl acetate (PVA) under nanoindentation.

  15. Organic composition of C/1999 S4 (LINEAR): a comet formed near Jupiter?

    PubMed

    Mumma, M J; Dello Russo, N; DiSanti, M A; Magee-Sauer, K; Novak, R E; Brittain, S; Rettig, T; McLean, I S; Reuter, D C; Xu, L H

    2001-05-18

    In the current paradigm, Oort cloud comets formed in the giant planets' region of the solar nebula, where temperatures and other conditions varied greatly. The measured compositions of four such comets (Halley, Hyakutake, Hale-Bopp, and Lee) are consistent with formation from interstellar ices in the cold nebular region beyond Uranus. The composition of comet C/1999 S4 (LINEAR) differs greatly, which suggests that its ices condensed from processed nebular gas, probably in the Jupiter-Saturn region. Its unusual organic composition may require reevaluation of the prebiotic organic material delivered to the young Earth by comets.

  16. Tapanuli Organoclay Addition Into Linear Low Density Polyethylene-Pineapple Fiber Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Adawiyah, Robiatul; Juwono, Ariadne L.; Roseno, Seto

    2010-12-23

    Linear low density polyethylene-Tapanuli organoclay-pineapple fiber composites were succesfully synthesized by a melt intercalation method. The clay was modified as an organoclay by a cation exchange reaction using hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (HDTMABr) surfactant. The X-ray diffraction results of the organoclay exhibited a higher basal spacing of 1.87 nm compared to the unmodified clay of 1.46 nm. The composite tensile strength was enhanced up to 46.4% with the 1 wt% organoclay addition. Both tensile and flexural moduli increased up to 150.6% and 43% with the 3 wt% organoclay addition to the composites. However, the flexural strength of the composites was not improved with the organoclay addition. The addition of organoclay has also decreased the heat deflection temperature of the composites.

  17. Tapanuli Organoclay Addition Into Linear Low Density Polyethylene-Pineapple Fiber Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adawiyah, Robiatul; Juwono, Ariadne L.; Roseno, Seto

    2010-12-01

    Linear low density polyethylene-Tapanuli organoclay-pineapple fiber composites were succesfully synthesized by a melt intercalation method. The clay was modified as an organoclay by a cation exchange reaction using hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (HDTMABr) surfactant. The X-ray diffraction results of the organoclay exhibited a higher basal spacing of 1.87 nm compared to the unmodified clay of 1.46 nm. The composite tensile strength was enhanced up to 46.4% with the 1 wt% organoclay addition. Both tensile and flexural moduli increased up to 150.6% and 43% with the 3 wt% organoclay addition to the composites. However, the flexural strength of the composites was not improved with the organoclay addition. The addition of organoclay has also decreased the heat deflection temperature of the composites.

  18. High-frequency viscoelastic shear properties of vocal fold tissues: implications for vocal fold tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Teller, Sean S; Farran, Alexandra J E; Xiao, Longxi; Jiao, Tong; Duncan, Randall L; Clifton, Rodney J; Jia, Xinqiao

    2012-10-01

    The biomechanical function of the vocal folds (VFs) depends on their viscoelastic properties. Many conditions can lead to VF scarring that compromises voice function and quality. To identify candidate replacement materials, the structure, composition, and mechanical properties of native tissues need to be understood at phonation frequencies. Previously, the authors developed the torsional wave experiment (TWE), a stress-wave-based experiment to determine the linear viscoelastic shear properties of small, soft samples. Here, the viscoelastic properties of porcine and human VFs were measured over a frequency range of 10-200 Hz. The TWE utilizes resonance phenomena to determine viscoelastic properties; therefore, the specimen test frequency is determined by the sample size and material properties. Viscoelastic moduli are reported at resonance frequencies. Structure and composition of the tissues were determined by histology and immunochemistry. Porcine data from the TWE are separated into two groups: a young group, consisting of fetal and newborn pigs, and an adult group, consisting of 6-9-month olds and 2+-year olds. Adult tissues had an average storage modulus of 2309±1394 Pa and a loss tangent of 0.38±0.10 at frequencies of 36-200 Hz. The VFs of young pigs were significantly more compliant, with a storage modulus of 394±142 Pa and a loss tangent of 0.40±0.14 between 14 and 30 Hz. No gender dependence was observed. Histological staining showed that adult porcine tissues had a more organized, layered structure than the fetal tissues, with a thicker epithelium and a more structured lamina propria. Elastin fibers in fetal VF tissues were immature compared to those in adult tissues. Together, these structural changes in the tissues most likely contributed to the change in viscoelastic properties. Adult human VF tissues, recovered postmortem from adult patients with a history of smoking or disease, had an average storage modulus of 756±439 Pa and a loss tangent of 0

  19. Nonlinear Viscoelastic Mechanics of Cross-linked Rubbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.; Leonov, Arkady I.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The paper develops a general theory for finite rubber viscoelasticity, and specifies it in the form, convenient for solving problems important for rubber, tire and space industries. Based on the quasi-linear approach of non-equilibrium thermodynamics, a general nonlinear theory has been developed for arbitrary nonisothermal deformations of viscoelastic solids. In this theory, the constitutive equations are presented as the sum of known equilibrium (rubber elastic) and non-equilibrium (liquid polymer viscoelastic) terms. These equations are then simplified using several modeling arguments. Stability constraints for the proposed constitutive equations are also discussed. It is shown that only strong ellipticity criteria are applicable for assessing stability of the equations governing viscoelastic solids.

  20. Evaluation of fatigue damage accumulation in composites via linear and nonlinear guided wave methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jinling; Chillara, Vamshi; Cho, Hwanjeong; Qiu, Jinhao; Lissenden, Cliff

    2016-02-01

    For non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of fatigue damage accumulation in composites, this research proposed a combined linear and a nonlinear ultrasonic guided wave method. For the linear Lamb waves approach, a laser-generation based imaging system (LGBI) is utilized to measure the phase velocities of guided waves in composites. The elastic moduli of the specimen are then obtained by inverting the measured phase velocities using genetic algorithms (GAs). The variation of the above two parameters (phase velocity and elastic moduli), together with the guided wave amplitudes, are then observed during the fatigue process. Nonlinear second harmonics in composites are studied theoretically and numerically. A third-order strain energy function of transversely isotropic materials is expressed by five invariants of the Green-Lagrange strain tensor. Results enable intelligent selection of primary modes for cumulative second harmonics generation. Meanwhile, finite element simulations are conducted to characterize second harmonics in light of the theory.

  1. A viscoelastic-viscoplastic model for short-fibre reinforced polymers with complex fibre orientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nciri, M.; Notta-Cuvier, D.; Lauro, F.; Chaari, F.; Zouari, B.; Maalej, Y.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents an innovative approach for the modelling of viscous behaviour of short-fibre reinforced composites (SFRC) with complex distributions of fibre orientations and for a wide range of strain rates. As an alternative to more complex homogenisation methods, the model is based on an additive decomposition of the state potential for the computation of composite's macroscopic behaviour. Thus, the composite material is seen as the assembly of a matrix medium and several linear elastic fibre media. The division of short fibres into several families means that complex distributions of orientation or random orientation can be easily modelled. The matrix behaviour is strain-rate sensitive, i.e. viscoelastic and/or viscoplastic. Viscoelastic constitutive laws are based on a generalised linear Maxwell model and the modelling of the viscoplasticity is based on an overstress approach. The model is tested for the case of a polypropylene reinforced with short-glass fibres with distributed orientations and subjected to uniaxial tensile tests, in different loading directions and under different strain rates. Results demonstrate the efficiency of the model over a wide range of strain rates.

  2. Flow properties of natural rubber composites filled with defatted soy flour

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The linear and nonlinear viscoelastic properties of natural rubber composites reinforced with defatted soy flour were studied. Defatted soy flour is an abundant, renewable commodity, and its rigid nature makes it suitable as a reinforcement phase in rubber composites. At small strain, the elastic ...

  3. NDT and SHM of Carbon Fiber Composites using Linear Drive MWM-Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washabaugh, Andrew; Martin, Christopher; Lyons, Robert; Grundy, David; Goldfine, Neil; Russell, Richard; Wincheski, Russell

    2012-01-01

    Carbon fiber composites are used in a wide range of structural applications due to their excellent specific strength and stiffness. However, the anisotropic mechanical and electrical properties associated with the fibers within each composite layer present challenges, and opportunities, for Nondestructive Testing (NDT) methods used to characterize and assess the structure condition. This includes composite condition after manufacture (such as fiber orientation and density, porosity, delamination, and bond strength) and during usage (such as damage from impact, fiber breakage, thermal exposure or applied stress). Ultrasonic and thermographic methods can address some of these challenges, but eddy current methods provide an alternative method for composite structures that contain a conducting material, such as carbon fibers or a metallic liner. This presentation reviews recent advances in the development of eddy current sensors and arrays for carbon fiber composite NDT and Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) applications. The focus is on eddy current sensor constructs with linear drive windings, such as MWM -Arrays, that induce currents primarily within the linear fibers of the composite. By combining this type of sensor construct with micromechanical models that relate composite constituent properties to measurable sensor responses, insight is obtained into the volumetric distribution of electrical properties within the composite and the associated manufacturing, damage, or strain conditions. With knowledge of the fiber layup, this MWM-Array technology is able to detect damage and strain/stress as a function of depth and fiber orientation. This work has been funded by NASA, NA V AIR and the Army for applications ranging from composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) to aircraft structures and rotorcraft blades. This presentation will specifically present background on the MWM-Array technology, results from the micromechanical modeling effort, and results from

  4. Viscoelasticity of a homeotropic nematic slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswald, Patrick

    2015-12-01

    The viscoelastic behavior of a homeotropic nematic slab is studied when it is subjected to a (dilation-compression) sinusoidal deformation of small amplitude (linear regime). I show that the nematic phase behaves as an isotropic liquid of viscosity ηc (ν3) at low (high) frequency, where ηc is the third Miesowicz viscosity and ν3 a smaller viscosity first introduced by Martin, Parodi, and Pershan. The crossover frequency f⊙ between these two asymptotic regimes scales as h2/D , where h is the sample thickness and D =K3/γ1 is the orientational diffusivity (with K3 the bend constant and γ1 the rotational viscosity). Between these two limits the sample behaves as a viscoelastic fluid whose elastic and loss moduli G' and G'' are calculated. These predictions are tested experimentally with a piezoelectric rheometer.

  5. Enhanced diffusion for oscillatory viscoelastic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manopoulos, C.; Tsangaris, S.

    2014-08-01

    This paper examines the enhanced axial solute dispersion of a linear viscoelastic fluid, subjected to a longitudinal pressure gradient sinusoidal oscillation, in a duct between parallel walls. The viscoelastic fluid follows the material law of the Jeffrey fluid. An extension of Watson’s theory, developed in 1983, is used to solve the problem analytically. The diffusivity enhancement results are shown in dimensionless form and are presented as functions of the dimensionless group β = h(2ω/ν)1/2 as defined by Watson, the dimensionless retardation time, and the Schmidt, elasticity, and Euler dimensionless numbers. This paper compares the dispersion enhancement of the Jeffrey fluid, in relation to the Newtonian one, for several intervals of the dimensionless parameters. The results indicate very high dispersion enhancement in several cases, especially for high realistic Schmidt number values, and peaks appear at certain dimensionless parameter β values.

  6. Viscoelastic study of an adhesively bonded joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, P. F.

    1983-01-01

    The plane strain problem of two dissimilar orthotropic plates bonded with an isotropic, linearly viscoelastic adhesive is considered. Both the shear and the normal stresses in the adhesive are calculated for various geometries and loading conditions. Transverse shear deformations of the adherends are taken into account, and their effect on the solution is shown in the results. All three inplane strains of the adhesive are included. Attention is given to the effect of temperature, both in the adhesive joint problem and to the heat generation in a viscoelastic material under cyclic loading. This separate study is included because heat generation and or spatially varying temperature are at present too difficult to account for in the analytical solution of the bonded joint, but whose effect can not be ignored in design.

  7. A Viscoelastic Constitutive Law For FRP Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascione, Luigi; Berardi, Valentino Paolo; D'Aponte, Anna

    2011-09-01

    The present study deals with the long-term behavior of fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) materials in civil engineering. More specifically, the authors propose a mechanical model capable of predicting the viscoelastic behavior of FRP laminates in the field of linear viscoelasticity, starting from that of the matrix material and fiber. The model is closely connected with the low FRP stress levels in civil engineering applications. The model is based on a micromechanical approach which assumes that there is a perfect adhesion between the matrix and fiber. The long-term behavior of the phases is described through a four-parameter rheological law. A validation of the model has also been developed by matching the predicted behavior with an experimental one available in the literature.

  8. Ferromagnetic viscoelastic liquid crystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlesier, Cristina; Shibaev, Petr; McDonald, Scott

    2012-02-01

    Novel ferromagnetic liquid crystalline materials were designed by mixing ferromagnetic nanoparticles with glass forming oligomers and low molar mass liquid crystals. The matrix in which nanoparticles are embedded is highly viscous that reduces aggregation of nanoparticles and stabilizes the whole composition. Mechanical and optical properties of the composite material are studied in the broad range of nanoparticle concentrations. The mechanical properties of the viscoelastic composite material resemble those of chemically crosslinked elastomers (elasticity and reversibility of deformations). The optical properties of ferromagnetic cholesteric materials are discussed in detail. It is shown that application of magnetic field leads to the shift of the selective reflection band of the cholesteric material and dramatically change its color. Theoretical model is suggested to account for the observed effects; physical properties of the novel materials and liquid crystalline elastomers are compared and discussed. [1] P.V. Shibaev, C. Schlesier, R. Uhrlass, S. Woodward, E. Hanelt, Liquid Crystals, 37, 1601 (2010) [2] P.V. Shibaev, R. Uhrlass, S. Woodward, C. Schlesier, Md R. Ali, E. Hanelt, Liquid Crystals, 37, 587 (2010)

  9. Influence of Structure and Composition on Dynamic Viscoelastic Property of Cartilaginous Tissue: Criteria for Classification between Hyaline Cartilage and Fibrocartilage Based on Mechanical Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyata, Shogo; Tateishi, Tetsuya; Furukawa, Katsuko; Ushida, Takashi

    Recently, many types of methodologies have been developed to regenerate articular cartilage. It is important to assess whether the reconstructed cartilaginous tissue has the appropriate mechanical functions to qualify as hyaline (articular) cartilage. In some cases, the reconstructed tissue may become fibrocartilage and not hyaline cartilage. In this study, we determined the dynamic viscoelastic properties of these two types of cartilage by using compression and shear tests, respectively. Hyaline cartilage specimens were harvested from the articular surface of bovine knee joints and fibrocartilage specimens were harvested from the meniscus tissue of the same. The results of this study revealed that the compressive energy dissipation of hyaline cartilage showed a strong dependence on testing frequency at low frequencies, while that of fibrocartilage did not. Therefore, the compressive energy dissipation that is indicated by the loss tangent could become the criterion for the in vitro assessment of the mechanical function of regenerated cartilage.

  10. Polyphasic screening, homopolysaccharide composition, and viscoelastic behavior of wheat Sourdough from a Leuconostoc lactis and Lactobacillus curvatus exopolysaccharide-producing starter culture.

    PubMed

    Palomba, Simona; Cavella, Silvana; Torrieri, Elena; Piccolo, Alessandro; Mazzei, Pierluigi; Blaiotta, Giuseppe; Ventorino, Valeria; Pepe, Olimpia

    2012-04-01

    After isolation from different doughs and sourdoughs, 177 strains of lactic acid bacteria were screened at the phenotypic level for exopolysaccharide production on media containing different carbohydrate sources. Two exopolysaccharide-producing lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus curvatus 69B2 and Leuconostoc lactis 95A) were selected through quantitative analysis on solid media containing sucrose and yeast extract. The PCR detection of homopolysaccharide (gtf and lev) and heteropolysaccharide (epsA, epsB, epsD and epsE, and epsEFG) genes showed different distributions within species and strains of the lactic acid bacteria studied. Moreover, in some strains both homopolysaccharide and heteropolysaccharide genes were detected. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra suggest that Lactobacillus curvatus 69B2 and Leuconostoc lactis 95A produced the same exopolysaccharide, which was constituted by a single repeating glucopyranosyl unit linked by an α-(1→6) glycosidic bond in a dextran-type carbohydrate. Microbial growth, acidification, and viscoelastic properties of sourdoughs obtained by exopolysaccharide-producing and nonproducing lactic acid bacterial strains were evaluated. Sourdough obtained after 15 h at 30°C with exopolysaccharide-producing lactic acid bacteria reached higher total titratable acidity as well as elastic and dissipative modulus curves with respect to the starter not producing exopolysaccharide, but they showed similar levels of pH and microbial growth. On increasing the fermentation time, no difference in the viscoelastic properties of exopolysaccharide-producing and nonproducing samples was observed. This study suggests that dextran-producing Leuconostoc lactis 95A and Lactobacillus curvatus 69B2 can be employed to prepare sourdough, and this would be particularly useful to improve the quality of baked goods while avoiding the use of commercially available hydrocolloids as texturizing additives.

  11. Thermo-compression of pyrope-grossular garnet solid solutions: non-linear compositional dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, S. M.; Du, W.; Walker, D.

    2014-12-01

    Unit cell parameters of a series of synthetic garnets with the pyrope, grossular, and four intermediate compositions were measured up to about 900K and to 10 GPa using synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction. Coefficients of thermal expansion of pyrope-grossular garnets are in the range 2.10~ 2.74 x 10-5 K-1 and uniformly increase with temperature. Values for the two end members pyrope and grossular are identical within experimental error 2.74±0.05 x 10-5 K-1 and 2.73±0.01 x 10-5 K-1 respectively. Coefficients of thermal expansion for intermediate compositions are smaller than those of end members, and are not linearly dependent on composition. Bulk modulus of grossular is Κ0=164.3(1) GPa (with Κ0' the pressure derivative of the bulk modulus fixed to 5.92) and bulk modulus of pyrope is Κ0=169.2(2) GPa (with Κ0' fixed to 4.4) using a third order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state, which are consistent with previously reported values. The bulk moduli of garnets of intermediate composition are between ~155 and ~160 GPa, smaller than those of the end-members no matter which Κ0' is chosen. The compositional dependence of bulk modulus resembles the compositional dependence of thermal expansion. Intermediate garnets on this binary have large positive excess volume, which makes them more compressible. We find that excess volumes in the pyrope-grossular series remain relatively large even at high pressure (~6GPa) and temperature (~800K), supporting the observation of crystal exsolution on this garnet join. (Ref: Wei Du, Simon Martin Clark, and David Walker (2014) Thermo-compression of pyrope-grossular garnet solid solutions:non-linear compositional dependence. American Mineralogist, In Press).

  12. One-way absorber for linearly polarized electromagnetic wave utilizing composite metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junming; Sun, Liang; Zhu, Bo; Feng, Yijun

    2015-02-23

    This paper presents the proposal and practical design of a one-way absorber for selective linearly polarized electromagnetic (EM) wave. The EM wave polarization rotation property has been combined with polarization selective absorption utilizing a composite metamaterial slab. The energy of certain linearly polarized EM wave can be absorbed along one particular incident direction, but will be fully transmitted through the opposite direction. For the cross polarized wave, the direction dependent propagation properties are totally reversed. A prototype designed with a total slab thickness of only one-sixth of the operating wavelength is verified through both full-wave simulation and experimental measurement in the microwave regime. It achieves absorption efficiency over 83% along one direction, while transmission efficiency over 83% along the opposite direction for one particular linearly polarized wave. The proposed one-way absorber can be applied in EM devices achieving asymmetric transmission for linearly polarized wave or polarization control. The composite metamaterial that combines different functionalities into one design may provide more potential in metamaterial designs for various applications.

  13. Aerobic fitness, hippocampal viscoelasticity, and relational memory performance.

    PubMed

    Schwarb, Hillary; Johnson, Curtis L; Daugherty, Ana M; Hillman, Charles H; Kramer, Arthur F; Cohen, Neal J; Barbey, Aron K

    2017-03-30

    The positive relationship between hippocampal structure, aerobic fitness, and memory performance is often observed among children and older adults; but evidence of this relationship among young adults, for whom the hippocampus is neither developing nor atrophying, is less consistent. Studies have typically relied on hippocampal volumetry (a gross proxy of tissue composition) to assess individual differences in hippocampal structure. While volume is not specific to microstructural tissue characteristics, microstructural differences in hippocampal integrity may exist even among healthy young adults when volumetric differences are not diagnostic of tissue health or cognitive function. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is an emerging noninvasive imaging technique for measuring viscoelastic tissue properties and provides quantitative measures of tissue integrity. We have previously demonstrated that individual differences in hippocampal viscoelasticity are related to performance on a relational memory task; however, little is known about health correlates to this novel measure. In the current study, we investigated the relationship between hippocampal viscoelasticity and cardiovascular health, and their mutual effect on relational memory in a group of healthy young adults (N=51). We replicated our previous finding that hippocampal viscoelasticity correlates with relational memory performance. We extend this work by demonstrating that better aerobic fitness, as measured by VO2max, was associated with hippocampal viscoelasticity that mediated the benefits of fitness on memory function. Hippocampal volume, however, did not account for individual differences in memory. Therefore, these data suggest that hippocampal viscoelasticity may provide a more sensitive measure to microstructural tissue organization and its consequences to cognition among healthy young adults.

  14. Effect of gamma irradiation on linear low density polyethylene/magnesium hydroxide/sepiolite composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafiq, Muhammad; Yasin, Tariq

    2012-01-01

    Radiation crosslinking is generally used to improve the thermo-mechanical properties of the composites. A study has been carried out to investigate the effect of gamma radiation on the thermo-mechanical properties of linear low density polyethylene containing magnesium hydroxide (MH) and sepiolite (SP) as non-halogenated flame retardant additives. The developed composites are irradiated at different doses upto maximum of 150 kGy. Infrared spectra of the irradiated composites reveal the reduction in the intensity of O-H band with increase in the absorbed doses, thus indicates a distinct structural change in MH at higher doses. The thermogravimetric analysis results of unirradiated and composites irradiated at low doses (≤75 kGy) show two steps weight loss, which is changed to single step at higher doses with lower thermal stability. The melting temperature ( Tm) and crystallization temperature ( Tc) of irradiated composites are lowered with irradiation whereas Vicat softening temperature (VST) is increased. The increasing trend in gel content with increase in the absorbed dose confirms the presence of crosslinked network. The mechanical properties, results show significant improvement in the modulus of irradiated composites. The results also confirm that MH gradually loses its OH functionality with irradiation.

  15. Bounding solutions of geometrically nonlinear viscoelastic problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stubstad, J. M.; Simitses, G. J.

    1986-01-01

    Integral transform techniques, such as the Laplace transform, provide simple and direct methods for solving viscoelastic problems formulated within a context of linear material response and using linear measures for deformation. Application of the transform operator reduces the governing linear integro-differential equations to a set of algebraic relations between the transforms of the unknown functions, the viscoelastic operators, and the initial and boundary conditions. Inversion either directly or through the use of the appropriate convolution theorem, provides the time domain response once the unknown functions have been expressed in terms of sums, products or ratios of known transforms. When exact inversion is not possible approximate techniques may provide accurate results. The overall problem becomes substantially more complex when nonlinear effects must be included. Situations where a linear material constitutive law can still be productively employed but where the magnitude of the resulting time dependent deformations warrants the use of a nonlinear kinematic analysis are considered. The governing equations will be nonlinear integro-differential equations for this class of problems. Thus traditional as well as approximate techniques, such as cited above, cannot be employed since the transform of a nonlinear function is not explicitly expressible.

  16. Wideband MR elastography for viscoelasticity model identification

    PubMed Central

    Yasar, Temel K.; Royston, Thomas J.; Magin, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    The growing clinical use of MR Elastography (MRE) requires the development of new quantitative standards for measuring tissue stiffness. Here, we examine a soft tissue mimicking phantom material (Ecoflex) over a wide frequency range (200 Hz to 7.75 kHz). The recorded data are fit to a cohort of viscoelastic models of varying complexity (integer and fractional order). This was accomplished using multiple sample sizes by employing geometric focusing of the shear wave front to compensate for the changes in wavelength and attenuation over this broad range of frequencies. The simple axisymmetric geometry and shear wave front of this experiment allows us to calculate the frequency-dependent complex-valued shear modulus of the material. The data were fit to several common models of linear viscoelasticity, including those with fractional derivative operators, and we identified the best possible matches over both a limited frequency band (often used in clinical studies) and over the entire frequency span considered. In addition to demonstrating the superior capability of the fractional order viscoelastic models, this study highlights the advantages of measuring the complex-valued shear modulus over as wide a range of frequencies as possible. PMID:23001852

  17. Finite element analysis of the non-linear vibrations of moderately thick unsymmetrically laminated composite plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gajbir; Venkateswara Rao, G.; Iyengar, N. G. R.

    1995-03-01

    The influence of finite amplitudes on the free flexural vibration response of moderately thick laminated plates is investigated. For this purpose, a simple higher order theory involving only four unknowns and satisfying the stress free conditions at the top and bottom surface of the composite plate is proposed. The proposed theory eliminates the use of shear correction factors which are otherwise required in Mindlin's plate theory. A rectangular four-node[formula]continuous finite element is developed based on this theory. The non-linear finite element equations are reduced to two non-linear ordinary differential equations governing the response of positive and negative deflection cycles. Direct numerical integration method is then employed to obtain the periods or non-linear frequencies. The finite element developed and the direct numerical integration method employed are validated for the case of isotropic rectangular plates. It is found that unsymmetrically laminated rectangular plates with hinged-hinged edge conditions oscillate with different amplitudes in the positive and negative deflection cycles. Furthermore, such plates would oscillate with a frequency less than the fundamental frequency for finite small amplitudes of oscillation. It is shown that this behaviour is strongly influenced by the boundary conditions. Results are presented for many configurations of composite plates.

  18. New low-cost dimensionally stable composite linear absolute position encoder scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassler, William L., Jr.; Nakayama, Robert K.

    1990-11-01

    A major problem in the use of standard linear position encoders is that the etched glass scales they use have a coefficient of thermal expansion (C. T. E. ) of about 1 1 . Oppm/ C. This means that their position measurements drift with changes in environmental temperature proportional to their C. T. E. . A new low cost dimensionally stable composite scale was made for use in a new absolute linear position encoder. The unidirectional Polyphenylene Sulfide/AS4 carbon fiber composite material that this scale is made of was tested for dimensional stability with respect to changes in temperature humidity and creep. The C. T. E. of the scale material was measured to be nominally 0. 29 ppm/ C with a standard deviation of 0. 12 over the operating temperature range of -2 to 62 C. The overall displacement strain due to 98 moisture absorption relative to 0 moisture absorption was measured to be 9 ppm. The strain due to stress-relief creep was found to be a maximum of 3 ppm over a period of 173 days. These results show that a linear position encoder scale made of this material is superior to those made of the standard glass currently being used and more cost effective than fused silica for most applications. 1.

  19. Viscoelasticity of Concentrated Proteoglycan Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meechai, Nispa; Jamieson, Alex; Blackwell, John; Carrino, David

    2001-03-01

    Proteoglycan Aggregate (PGA) is the principal macromolecular component of the energy-absorbing matrix of cartilage and tendon. Its brush-like supramolecular structure consists of highly-ionic subunits, non-covalently bound to a hyaluronate chain. We report viscoelastic behavior of concentrated solutions of PGA, purified by column fractionation to remove free subunits. At physiological ionic strength, these preparations exhibit a sol-to-gel transition when the concentration is increased above molecular overlap. The strain dependence of concentrated solutions shows a pronounced non-linearity above a critical strain, at which the storage modulus decreases suddenly, and the loss modulus exhibits a maximum. This response is similar to that observed for close-packed dispersions of soft spheres, when the applied strain is sufficient to move a sphere past its neighbors. At low and high ionic strength, the elasticity of solutions near the overlap concentration decreases. The former is interpreted as due to a decrease in intramolecular and intermolecular electrostatic repulsions, because of strong trapping of counterions within the PGA brush, the latter to salt-induced brush collapse.

  20. Blow-up of a hyperbolic equation of viscoelasticity with supercritical nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yanqiu; Rammaha, Mohammad A.; Sakuntasathien, Sawanya

    2017-02-01

    We investigate a hyperbolic PDE, modeling wave propagation in viscoelastic media, under the influence of a linear memory term of Boltzmann type, and a nonlinear damping modeling friction, as well as an energy-amplifying supercritical nonlinear source:

  1. Viscoelastic effective properties of two types of heterogeneous materials.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornet, Jan; Dabrowski, Marcin; Schmid, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    In the past, a lot of efforts have been put to describe two end cases of rock behaviors: elasticity and viscosity. In recent years, more focus has been brought on the intermediate viscoelastic cases which describe better the rheology of rocks such as shales. Shales are typically heterogeneous and the question arises as to how to derive their effective properties so that they can be approximated as homogeneous media. This question has already been dealt with at the elastic and viscous limit but still remains for some cases in between. Using MILAMIN, a fast finite element solver for large problems, we numerically investigate different approaches to derive the effective properties of several viscoelastic media. Two types of geometries are considered: layered and inclusion based media. We focus on two dimensional plane strain problems considering two phase composites deformed under pure shear. We start by investigating the case of transversely isotropic layered media made of two Maxwell materials. Using the Backus averaging method we discuss the degree of relevance of this averaging by considering some parameters as: layer periodicity, layer thickness and layer interface roughness. Other averaging methods are also discussed which provide a broader perspective on the performances of Backus averaging. In a second part we move on to inclusion based models. The advantage of these models compared to the previous one is that they provide a better approximation to real microstructures in rocks. The setup we consider in this part is the following: some viscous circular inclusions are embedded in an elastic matrix. Both the inclusions and the matrix are homogeneous but the inclusions are purely isotropic while the matrix can also be anisotropic. In order to derive the effective viscoelastic properties of the medium we use two approaches: the self-consistent averaging and the differential effective medium theory. The idea behind self-consistency is to assume that the inclusions

  2. The linear shrinkage and microhardness of packable composites polymerized by QTH or PAC unit.

    PubMed

    Park, Song-Ho; Noh, Byng-Duk; Cho, Yong-Sik; Kim, Su-Sun

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of a plasma arc curing (PAC) unit for packable resin composite curing. The amount and speed of polymerization shrinkage and the microhardness of packable composites were evaluated in order to compare the PAC unit's effectiveness with a quartz tungsten halogen (QTH) unit. Sure Fil (Dentsply Caulk), Pyramid (BISCO Inc) and Synergy Compact (Colténe/Whaledent) were used as the packable composites. In the case of curing with the PAC unit, the composites were light cured with Apollo 95E (DMD System Inc) for 1 second (Group 1), 2 seconds (Group 2), 3 seconds (Group 3), 6 seconds (Group 4) and 12 seconds (Group 5). For light curing with the QTH unit, the composites were light cured for 60 seconds using XL3000 (Group 6). The linear polymerization shrinkage of each composite was measured using a custom made linometer, and the data was stored in a computer every 0.5 to 0.55 seconds for a total of 60 seconds. For each composite, the amount of polymerization was compared using one-way ANOVA with Tukey at the 95% confidence level. In order to compare the speed of polymerization, the peak time (PT), showing the highest speed of polymerization and maximum speed of polymerization (Smax), were determined from the data and compared using one-way ANOVA with Tukey at the 95% confidence level for each material. Based on the statistical analysis among the PAC-cure groups (Groups 1 through 5), the group that was not statistically different from the QTH-cure group (Group 6) in the amount of linear polymerization shrinkage was determined for each material, and the corresponding curing time of the group was defined as the tentative minimum PAC-curing time (TMPT). For microhardness measurements, the samples were placed in a 2-mm thick Teflon plate. Twenty specimens, randomly divided into the PAC-cure group (Group 1) or the QTH-cure group (Group 2), were prepared for each material. In Group 1, each composite was light cured for TMPT with the PAC unit. In

  3. Microfluidic Printheads for Multimaterial 3D Printing of Viscoelastic Inks.

    PubMed

    Hardin, James O; Ober, Thomas J; Valentine, Alexander D; Lewis, Jennifer A

    2015-06-03

    Multimaterial 3D printing using microfluidic printheads specifically designed for seamless switching between two visco-elastic materials "on-the-fly" during fabrication is demonstrated. This approach opens new avenues for the digital assembly of functional matter with controlled compositional and property gradients at the microscale.

  4. Modeling viscoelastic flow in a multiflux static mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köpplmayr, T.; Miethlinger, J.

    2014-05-01

    We present a numerical and experimental study of the polymer flow in a multiflux static mixer. Various geometrical configurations are compared in terms of layer homogeneity. To evaluate the layer-forming process in different geometries, we applied a general and precise approach based on trajectory calculations for a large set of material points, followed by a statistical analysis. A simulation of viscous flow using the Carreau-Yasuda constitutive equation produced results which deviated from our experimental findings. Therefore, we used the Giesekus constitutive equation, taking into account viscoelastic effects, such as extrudate swell and secondary motions inside the mixer. Parallel plate rheometry was employed to collect dynamic mechanical data in the linear viscoelastic flow regime. Weissenberg numbers were calculated, and the maximum relaxation time in the obtained spectrum was limited to avoid divergence issues. The results of our study provide deeper insights into the layerforming process of viscoelastic melts in a multiflux static mixer.

  5. Viscoelasticity of biofilms and their recalcitrance to mechanical and chemical challenges

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Brandon W.; He, Yan; Ren, Yijin; Zerdoum, Aidan; Libera, Matthew R.; Sharma, Prashant K.; van Winkelhoff, Arie-Jan; Neut, Danielle; Stoodley, Paul; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.

    2015-01-01

    We summarize different studies describing mechanisms through which bacteria in a biofilm mode of growth resist mechanical and chemical challenges. Acknowledging previous microscopic work describing voids and channels in biofilms that govern a biofilms response to such challenges, we advocate a more quantitative approach that builds on the relation between structure and composition of materials with their viscoelastic properties. Biofilms possess features of both viscoelastic solids and liquids, like skin or blood, and stress relaxation of biofilms has been found to be a corollary of their structure and composition, including the EPS matrix and bacterial interactions. Review of the literature on viscoelastic properties of biofilms in ancient and modern environments as well as of infectious biofilms reveals that the viscoelastic properties of a biofilm relate with antimicrobial penetration in a biofilm. In addition, also the removal of biofilm from surfaces appears governed by the viscoelasticity of a biofilm. Herewith, it is established that the viscoelasticity of biofilms, as a corollary of structure and composition, performs a role in their protection against mechanical and chemical challenges. Pathways are discussed to make biofilms more susceptible to antimicrobials by intervening with their viscoelasticity, as a quantifiable expression of their structure and composition. PMID:25725015

  6. Suspended particulate composition: evolution along a river linear and influence of regime flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Meur, Mathieu; Montargès-Pelletier, Emmanuelle; Bauer, Allan; Gley, Renaud; Migot, Sylvie; Mansuy-Huault, Laurence; Lorgeoux, Catherine; Razafitianamaharavo, Angelina; Villièras, Frédéric

    2015-04-01

    Suspended Particulate Matters are recognized to play a crucial role in the transport and fate of chemicals like trace metal elements. The affinity of trace metals with natural SPM is influenced by (i) the nature of metal (ii) physical-chemical conditions of the water column (iii) SPM physical characteristics (grain size, surface area) (iiii) SPM chemical characteristics (elemental composition, mineralogy, organic composition). Some authors observed that the SPM composition was the predominant factor controlling the affinity of trace metals with natural SPM. One purpose of this work is to follow the physical and chemical characteristics of SPM along the river linear in order to better understand the affinity between SPM and heavy metals. One other purpose is to study the influence of regime flow on SPM physical and chemical composition in order to detect any variation of SPM composition with regime flow. SPM were sampled along Moselle river (North East of France) following an urbanization gradient. Two tributaries were also sampled, the Madon river which drains an agricultural catchment and the Fensch stream which flows through an ancient steel-making basin. SPM were sampled several times during high flow and low flow. Particulate matter was extracted on field using continuous flow field centrifuge. Frozen-dried samples were then characterized in terms of size distribution, elemental composition (ICP - AES, ICP - MS), mineralogy (XRD, FTIR, SEM, TEM), surface properties (gas adsorption techniques) and organic composition (Py-GC-MS and GC-MS). Grain size distribution evidenced the presence of coarser particles during high flow but no difference in the grain size distribution could be evidenced between the different stations. The grain size distribution of collected SPM appeared globally identical, although the increase of conductivity due to the junction of Meurthe river . In terms of composition, major element contents in SPM are characterized by the predominance of

  7. Theory of heterogeneous viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirmacher, Walter; Ruocco, Giancarlo; Mazzone, Valerio

    2016-03-01

    We review a new theory of viscoelasticity of a glass-forming viscous liquid near and below the glass transition. In our model, we assume that each point in the material has a specific viscosity, which varies randomly in space according to a fluctuating activation free energy. We include a Maxwellian elastic term, and assume that the corresponding shear modulus fluctuates as well with the same distribution as that of the activation barriers. The model is solved in coherent potential approximation, for which a derivation is given. The theory predicts an Arrhenius-type temperature dependence of the viscosity in the vanishing frequency limit, independent of the distribution of the activation barriers. The theory implies that this activation energy is generally different from that of a diffusing particle with the same barrier height distribution. If the distribution of activation barriers is assumed to have the Gaussian form, the finite-frequency version of the theory describes well the typical low-temperature alpha relaxation peak of glasses. Beta relaxation can be included by adding another Gaussian with centre at much lower energies than that is responsible for the alpha relaxation. At high frequencies, our theory reduces to the description of an elastic medium with spatially fluctuating elastic moduli (heterogeneous elasticity theory), which explains the occurrence of the boson peak-related vibrational anomalies of glasses.

  8. Linear and nonlinear finite element analysis of laminated composite structures at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilt, Thomas Edmund

    The use of composite materials in aerospace applications, particularly engine components, is becoming more prevalent due to the materials high strength, yet low weight. In addition to thermomechanical deformation response, life prediction and damage modeling analysis is also required to assess the component's service life. These complex and computationally intensive analyses require the development of simple, efficient and robust finite element analysis capabilities. A simple robust finite element which can effectively model the multi-layer composite material is developed. This will include thermal gradient capabilities necessary for a complete thermomechanical analysis. In order to integrate the numerically stiff rate dependent viscoplastic equations, efficient, stable numerical algorithms are developed. In addition, consistent viscoplastic/plastic tangent matrices will also be formulated. The finite element is formulated based upon a generalized mixed variational principle with independently assumed displacements and layer number independent strains. A unique scheme utilizing nodal temperatures is used to model a linear thermal gradient through the thickness of the composite. The numerical integration algorithms are formulated in the context of a fully implicit backward Euler scheme. The consistent tangent matrices arise directly from the formulation. The multi-layer composite finite element demonstrates good performance in terms of static displacement and stress predictions, and dynamic response. Also, the element appears to be relatively insensitive to mesh distortions. The robustness and efficiency of the fully implicit integration algorithms is effectively demonstrated in the numerical results. That is, large time steps and a significant reduction in global iterations, as a direct result of utilizing the consistent tangent matrices, is shown.

  9. Plate/shell topological optimization subjected to linear buckling constraints by adopting composite exponential filtering function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Hong-Ling; Wang, Wei-Wei; Chen, Ning; Sui, Yun-Kang

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a model of topology optimization with linear buckling constraints is established based on an independent and continuous mapping method to minimize the plate/shell structure weight. A composite exponential function (CEF) is selected as filtering functions for element weight, the element stiffness matrix and the element geometric stiffness matrix, which recognize the design variables, and to implement the changing process of design variables from "discrete" to "continuous" and back to "discrete". The buckling constraints are approximated as explicit formulations based on the Taylor expansion and the filtering function. The optimization model is transformed to dual programming and solved by the dual sequence quadratic programming algorithm. Finally, three numerical examples with power function and CEF as filter function are analyzed and discussed to demonstrate the feasibility and efficiency of the proposed method.

  10. Quasi-static and dynamic response of viscoelastic helical rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temel, Beytullah; Fırat Çalim, Faruk; Tütüncü, Naki

    2004-04-01

    In this study, the dynamic behaviour of cylindrical helical rods made of linear viscoelastic materials are investigated in the Laplace domain. The governing equations for naturally twisted and curved spatial rods obtained using the Timoshenko beam theory are rewritten for cylindrical helical rods. The curvature of the rod axis, effect of rotary inertia, and shear and axial deformations are considered in the formulation. The material of the rod is assumed to be homogeneous, isotropic and linear viscoelastic. In the viscoelastic material case, according to the correspondence principle, the material constants are replaced with their complex counterparts in the Laplace domain. Ordinary differential equations in scalar form obtained in the Laplace domain are solved numerically using the complementary functions method to calculate the dynamic stiffness matrix of the problem. In the solutions, the Kelvin model is employed. The solutions obtained are transformed to the real space using the Durbin's numerical inverse Laplace transform method. Numerical results for quasi-static and dynamic response of viscoelastic models are presented in the form of graphics.

  11. Interrogating the viscoelastic properties of tissue using viscoelastic response (VISR) ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selzo, Mallory Renee

    Affecting approximately 1 in 3,500 newborn males, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most common lethal genetic disorders in humans. Boys with DMD suffer progressive loss of muscle strength and function, leading to wheelchair dependence, cardiac and respiratory compromise, and death during young adulthood. There are currently no treatments that can halt or reverse the disease progression, and translating prospective treatments into clinical trials has been delayed by inadequate outcome measures. Current outcome measures, such as functional and muscle strength assessments, lack sensitivity to individual muscles, require subjective effort of the child, and are impacted by normal childhood growth and development. The goal of this research is to develop Viscoelastic Response (VisR) ultrasound which can be used to delineate compositional changes in muscle associated with DMD. In VisR, acoustic radiation force (ARF) is used to produce small, localized displacements within the muscle. Using conventional ultrasound to track the motion, the displacement response of the tissue can be evaluated against a mechanical model. In order to develop signal processing techniques and assess mechanical models, finite element method simulations are used to model the response of a viscoelastic material to ARF excitations. Results are then presented demonstrating VisR differentiation of viscoelastic changes with progressive dystrophic degeneration in a dog model of DMD. Finally, clinical feasibility of VisR imaging is demonstrated in two boys with DMD.

  12. Thermorheologically complex behavior of multi-phase viscoelastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinson, L. C.; Knauss, W. G.

    T HE DYNAMIC correspondence principle of viscoelasticity is used to study the nature of time-temperature behavior of multi-phase composites by means of finite element computation. The composite considered contains viscoelastic inclusions embedded in a viscoelastic matrix. Each phase of the composite is considered to be thermorheologically simple, but the resulting mechanical properties of the composite are thermorheologically complex. The deviation of the composite moduli from thermorheologically simple behavior of the matrix material is shown to occur at frequencies and temperatures where the glass-to-rubber transition of the included phases are reached. Properties of a styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) block copolymer are investigated based on the individual phase properties of polystyrene and polybutadiene. To achieve congruence of the results with experimental data, it is necessary to consider a transition phase of properties "intermediate" to those of polystyrene and polybutadiene. Using accurate physical information on the individual phase properties and on the interphase region, it is possible to predict properties of multiphase composites. Although detailed a priori knowledge of such an interphase is usually lacking, it is shown that the computational procedure presented here together with an extended range of test frequencies will aid in estimating the properties of the phase in question.

  13. Two-phase viscoelastic jetting

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, J-D; Sakai, S.; Sethian, J.A.

    2008-12-10

    A coupled finite difference algorithm on rectangular grids is developed for viscoelastic ink ejection simulations. The ink is modeled by the Oldroyd-B viscoelastic fluid model. The coupled algorithm seamlessly incorporates several things: (1) a coupled level set-projection method for incompressible immiscible two-phase fluid flows; (2) a higher-order Godunov type algorithm for the convection terms in the momentum and level set equations; (3) a simple first-order upwind algorithm for the convection term in the viscoelastic stress equations; (4) central difference approximations for viscosity, surface tension, and upper-convected derivative terms; and (5) an equivalent circuit model to calculate the inflow pressure (or flow rate) from dynamic voltage.

  14. Identifying Plant Part Composition of Forest Logging Residue Using Infrared Spectral Data and Linear Discriminant Analysis.

    PubMed

    Acquah, Gifty E; Via, Brian K; Billor, Nedret; Fasina, Oladiran O; Eckhardt, Lori G

    2016-08-27

    As new markets, technologies and economies evolve in the low carbon bioeconomy, forest logging residue, a largely untapped renewable resource will play a vital role. The feedstock can however be variable depending on plant species and plant part component. This heterogeneity can influence the physical, chemical and thermochemical properties of the material, and thus the final yield and quality of products. Although it is challenging to control compositional variability of a batch of feedstock, it is feasible to monitor this heterogeneity and make the necessary changes in process parameters. Such a system will be a first step towards optimization, quality assurance and cost-effectiveness of processes in the emerging biofuel/chemical industry. The objective of this study was therefore to qualitatively classify forest logging residue made up of different plant parts using both near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIRS) together with linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Forest logging residue harvested from several Pinus taeda (loblolly pine) plantations in Alabama, USA, were classified into three plant part components: clean wood, wood and bark and slash (i.e., limbs and foliage). Five-fold cross-validated linear discriminant functions had classification accuracies of over 96% for both NIRS and FTIRS based models. An extra factor/principal component (PC) was however needed to achieve this in FTIRS modeling. Analysis of factor loadings of both NIR and FTIR spectra showed that, the statistically different amount of cellulose in the three plant part components of logging residue contributed to their initial separation. This study demonstrated that NIR or FTIR spectroscopy coupled with PCA and LDA has the potential to be used as a high throughput tool in classifying the plant part makeup of a batch of forest logging residue feedstock. Thus, NIR/FTIR could be employed as a tool to rapidly probe/monitor the variability of forest

  15. Prediction of the Viscoelastic Bulk Modulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jiaxi; Simon, Sindee

    2010-03-01

    The bulk and shear viscoelastic responses for several materials appear to arise from the same molecular mechanisms at short times, i.e., Andrade creep where the KWW beta parameter is approximately 0.3. If this is indeed the case, prediction and placement of the bulk viscoelastic response can be made simply by knowing the limiting elastic and rubbery bulk moduli and the viscoelastic shear response. The proposed methodology, which uses only easily measured functions, is considerably less time- and labor-intensive than direct measurement of the viscoelastic bulk modulus. Here we investigate this hypothesis and compare the calculated viscoelastic bulk responses for several materials to existing data in the literature.

  16. Failure criteria for viscoelastic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knauss, W. G.

    1974-01-01

    Research projects concerned with developing a theory of fracture of materials are discussed. The effects of the geometry of the structure and the loads acting on the structure as they influence the failure process are analyzed. The effects of the viscoelastic deformation characteristics of the bulk elastomer on failure behavior are examined. Additional material parameters which control the fracture process are identified.

  17. Viscoelastic behaviour of pumpkin balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerngross, T.; Xu, Y.; Pellegrino, S.

    2008-11-01

    The lobes of the NASA ULDB pumpkin-shaped super-pressure balloons are made of a thin polymeric film that shows considerable time-dependent behaviour. A nonlinear viscoelastic model based on experimental measurements has been recently established for this film. This paper presents a simulation of the viscoelastic behaviour of ULDB balloons with the finite element software ABAQUS. First, the standard viscoelastic modelling capabilities available in ABAQUS are examined, but are found of limited accuracy even for the case of simple uniaxial creep tests on ULDB films. Then, a nonlinear viscoelastic constitutive model is implemented by means of a user-defined subroutine. This approach is verified by means of biaxial creep experiments on pressurized cylinders and is found to be accurate provided that the film anisotropy is also included in the model. A preliminary set of predictions for a single lobe of a ULDB is presented at the end of the paper. It indicates that time-dependent effects in a balloon structure can lead to significant stress redistribution and large increases in the transverse strains in the lobes.

  18. Nonlinear Viscoelastic Stress Transfer As a Possible Aftershock Triggering Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Shcherbakov, R.

    2014-12-01

    The earthquake dynamics can be modelled by employing the spring-block system [Burridge and Knopoff, 1967]. In this approach the earthquake fault is modelled by an array of blocks coupling the loading plate and the lower plate. The dynamics of the system is governed by the system of equations of motion for each block. It is possible to map this system into a cellular automata model, where the stress acting on each block is increased in each time step, and the failing process (frictional slip) is described by stress transfer rules [Olami et al, 1992]. The OFC model produces a power-law distribution for avalanche statistics but it is not capable of producing robust aftershock sequences which follow Omori's law.We propose a nonlinear viscoelastic stress transfer mechanism in the aftershock triggering. In a basic spring-block model setting, we introduce the nonlinear viscoelastic stress transfer between neighbouring blocks, as well as between blocks and the top loading plate. The shear stress of the viscous component is a power-law function of the velocity gradient with an exponent smaller or greater than 1 for the nonlinear viscoelasticity, or 1 for the linear case. The stress transfer function of this nonlinear viscoelastic model has a power-law time-dependent form. It features an instantaneous stress transmission triggering an instantaneous avalanche, which is the same as the original spring-block model; and a power-law relaxation term, which could trigger further aftershocks. We incorporate this nonlinear viscoelasticity mechanism in a lattice cellular automata model. The model could exhibit both the Gutenberg-Richter scaling for the frequency-magnitude distribution and a power-law time decay of aftershocks, which is in accordance with Omori's law. Our study suggests that the stress transfer function may play an important role in the aftershock triggering. We have found that the time decay curve of aftershocks is affected by the shape of the stress transfer function

  19. Cell poking: quantitative analysis of indentation of thick viscoelastic layers.

    PubMed

    Duszyk, M; Schwab, B; Zahalak, G I; Qian, H; Elson, E L

    1989-04-01

    A recently introduced device, the cell poker, measures the force required to indent the exposed surface of a cell adherent to a rigid substratum. The cell poker has provided phenomenological information about the viscoelastic properties of several different types of cells, about mechanical changes triggered by external stimuli, and about the role of the cytoskeleton in these mechanical functions. Except in special cases, however, it has not been possible to extract quantitative estimates of viscosity and elasticity moduli from cell poker measurements. This paper presents cell poker measurements of well characterized viscoelastic polymeric materials, polydimethylsiloxanes of different degrees of polymerization, in a simple shape, a flat, thick layer, which for our purposes can be treated as a half space. Analysis of the measurements in terms of a linear viscoelasticity theory yields viscosity values for three polymer samples in agreement with those determined by measurements on a macroscopic scale. Theoretical analysis further indicates that the measured limiting static elasticity of the layers may result from the tension generated at the interface between the polymer and water. This work demonstrates the possibility of obtaining quantitative viscoelastic material properties from cell poker measurements and represents the first step in extending these quantitative studies to more complicated structures including cells.

  20. Cell poking: quantitative analysis of indentation of thick viscoelastic layers.

    PubMed Central

    Duszyk, M; Schwab, B; Zahalak, G I; Qian, H; Elson, E L

    1989-01-01

    A recently introduced device, the cell poker, measures the force required to indent the exposed surface of a cell adherent to a rigid substratum. The cell poker has provided phenomenological information about the viscoelastic properties of several different types of cells, about mechanical changes triggered by external stimuli, and about the role of the cytoskeleton in these mechanical functions. Except in special cases, however, it has not been possible to extract quantitative estimates of viscosity and elasticity moduli from cell poker measurements. This paper presents cell poker measurements of well characterized viscoelastic polymeric materials, polydimethylsiloxanes of different degrees of polymerization, in a simple shape, a flat, thick layer, which for our purposes can be treated as a half space. Analysis of the measurements in terms of a linear viscoelasticity theory yields viscosity values for three polymer samples in agreement with those determined by measurements on a macroscopic scale. Theoretical analysis further indicates that the measured limiting static elasticity of the layers may result from the tension generated at the interface between the polymer and water. This work demonstrates the possibility of obtaining quantitative viscoelastic material properties from cell poker measurements and represents the first step in extending these quantitative studies to more complicated structures including cells. PMID:2720066

  1. Post-seismic relaxation theory on laterally heterogeneous viscoelastic model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.F.

    2003-01-01

    Investigation was carried out into the problem of relaxation of a laterally heterogeneous viscoelastic Earth following an impulsive moment release event. The formal solution utilizes a semi-analytic solution for post-seismic deformation on a laterally homogeneous Earth constructed from viscoelastic normal modes, followed by application of mode coupling theory to derive the response on the aspherical Earth. The solution is constructed in the Laplace transform domain using the correspondence principle and is valid for any linear constitutive relationship between stress and strain. The specific implementation described in this paper is a semi-analytic discretization method which assumes isotropic elastic structure and a Maxwell constitutive relation. It accounts for viscoelastic-gravitational coupling under lateral variations in elastic parameters and viscosity. For a given viscoelastic structure and minimum wavelength scale, the computational effort involved with the numerical algorithm is proportional to the volume of the laterally heterogeneous region. Examples are presented of the calculation of post-seismic relaxation with a shallow, laterally heterogeneous volume following synthetic impulsive seismic events, and they illustrate the potentially large effect of regional 3-D heterogeneities on regional deformation patterns.

  2. Dynamic viscoelastic models of human skin using optical elastography

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, Steven P.; Khan, Altaf; Dai, Zoujun; Royston, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    A novel technique for measuring in vivo human skin viscoelastic properties using optical elastography has been developed. The technique uses geometrically focused surface (GFS) waves that allow for wide bandwidth measurements of the wave field. An analytical solution for the case of a radiating annular disk surface source was fit to experimentally measured GFS waves, enabling an estimate of the frequency-dependent surface wavenumber, which can then be related to the dynamic shear modulus. Several viscoelastic models were then fit to the dynamic shear modulus dispersion curve. Viscoelastic models were evaluated based on their overall quality of fit and variability amongst healthy volunteers. An Ecoflex phantom was used to validate the procedure and results by comparison to similar studies using the same type of phantom. For skin results, it was found that the “α” parameters from the fractional models had the least variability, with coefficients of variability of 0.15, and 0.16. The best fitting models were the standard linear solid, and the fractional Voigt, with a mean fit correlation coefficient, R2, of 0.93, 0.89, respectively. This study has demonstrated the efficacy of this new method, and with larger studies the viscoelastic skin models could be used to identify various skin diseases and their response to treatment. PMID:26305137

  3. Viscoelasticity of brain corpus callosum in biaxial tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labus, Kevin M.; Puttlitz, Christian M.

    2016-11-01

    Computational models of the brain rely on accurate constitutive relationships to model the viscoelastic behavior of brain tissue. Current viscoelastic models have been derived from experiments conducted in a single direction at a time and therefore lack information on the effects of multiaxial loading. It is also unclear if the time-dependent behavior of brain tissue is dependent on either strain magnitude or the direction of loading when subjected to tensile stresses. Therefore, biaxial stress relaxation and cyclic experiments were conducted on corpus callosum tissue isolated from fresh ovine brains. Results demonstrated the relaxation behavior to be independent of strain magnitude, and a quasi-linear viscoelastic (QLV) model was able to accurately fit the experimental data. Also, an isotropic reduced relaxation tensor was sufficient to model the stress-relaxation in both the axonal and transverse directions. The QLV model was fitted to the averaged stress relaxation tests at five strain magnitudes while using the measured strain history from the experiments. The resulting model was able to accurately predict the stresses from cyclic tests at two strain magnitudes. In addition to deriving a constitutive model from the averaged experimental data, each specimen was fitted separately and the resulting distributions of the model parameters were reported and used in a probabilistic analysis to determine the probability distribution of model predictions and the sensitivity of the model to the variance of the parameters. These results can be used to improve the viscoelastic constitutive models used in computational studies of the brain.

  4. Viscoelastic properties of vis-breaking polypropylenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobile, Maria Rossella; Moad, Graeme; Habsuda, Jana; Li, Guoxin; Nichols, Lance; Dagley, Ian; Simon, George P.

    2015-12-01

    In this work hydrogen peroxide is used as a green initiator to cause scissioning of polypropylene (PP) with water as the only by-product replacing the organic peroxides that are usually used. The rheological properties of a commercial polypropylene and of the scissioned samples are determined by dynamic rheology and an inversion procedure for converting the linear viscoelastic data into molar mass distribution has been adopted. The results presented show that the molar mass distribution of the PP polymer is narrowed on scissioning. The process is found to produce polymers similar in molecular architecture and behavior to organic peroxide cleaved materials, the results of which are given as a comparison in this work.

  5. Scaling the Non-linear Impact Response of Flat and Curved Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.; Chunchu, Prasad B.; Rose, Cheryl A.; Feraboli, Paolo; Jackson, Wade C.

    2005-01-01

    The application of scaling laws to thin flat and curved composite panels exhibiting nonlinear response when subjected to low-velocity transverse impact is investigated. Previous research has shown that the elastic impact response of structural configurations exhibiting geometrically linear response can be effectively scaled. In the present paper, a preliminary experimental study is presented to assess the applicability of the scaling laws to structural configurations exhibiting geometrically nonlinear deformations. The effect of damage on the scalability of the structural response characteristics, and the effect of scale on damage development are also investigated. Damage is evaluated using conventional methods including C-scan, specimen de-plying and visual inspection of the impacted panels. Coefficient of restitution and normalized contact duration are also used to assess the extent of damage. The results confirm the validity of the scaling parameters for elastic impacts. However, for the panels considered in the study, the extent and manifestation of damage do not scale according to the scaling laws. Furthermore, the results indicate that even though the damage does not scale, the overall panel response characteristics, as indicated by contact force profiles, do scale for some levels of damage.

  6. Identifying Plant Part Composition of Forest Logging Residue Using Infrared Spectral Data and Linear Discriminant Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Acquah, Gifty E.; Via, Brian K.; Billor, Nedret; Fasina, Oladiran O.; Eckhardt, Lori G.

    2016-01-01

    As new markets, technologies and economies evolve in the low carbon bioeconomy, forest logging residue, a largely untapped renewable resource will play a vital role. The feedstock can however be variable depending on plant species and plant part component. This heterogeneity can influence the physical, chemical and thermochemical properties of the material, and thus the final yield and quality of products. Although it is challenging to control compositional variability of a batch of feedstock, it is feasible to monitor this heterogeneity and make the necessary changes in process parameters. Such a system will be a first step towards optimization, quality assurance and cost-effectiveness of processes in the emerging biofuel/chemical industry. The objective of this study was therefore to qualitatively classify forest logging residue made up of different plant parts using both near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIRS) together with linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Forest logging residue harvested from several Pinus taeda (loblolly pine) plantations in Alabama, USA, were classified into three plant part components: clean wood, wood and bark and slash (i.e., limbs and foliage). Five-fold cross-validated linear discriminant functions had classification accuracies of over 96% for both NIRS and FTIRS based models. An extra factor/principal component (PC) was however needed to achieve this in FTIRS modeling. Analysis of factor loadings of both NIR and FTIR spectra showed that, the statistically different amount of cellulose in the three plant part components of logging residue contributed to their initial separation. This study demonstrated that NIR or FTIR spectroscopy coupled with PCA and LDA has the potential to be used as a high throughput tool in classifying the plant part makeup of a batch of forest logging residue feedstock. Thus, NIR/FTIR could be employed as a tool to rapidly probe/monitor the variability of forest

  7. Structure-induced nonlinear viscoelasticity of non-woven fibrous matrices.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Mohd Suhail; Pal, Anupam; Das, Sovan Lal

    2016-12-01

    Fibrous materials are widely utilized as tissue engineering scaffolds for tissue regeneration and other bioengineering applications. The structural as well as mechanical characteristics of the fibrous matrices under static and dynamic mechanical loading conditions influence the response of the cells. In this paper, we study the mechanical response of the non-woven fibrous matrices under oscillatory loading conditions and its dependence on the structural properties of fibrous matrix. We demonstrate that under oscillatory shear and elongation, the fibrous matrices demonstrate nonlinear viscoelasticity at all strain amplitudes. This is contrary to the behavior of other soft polymeric materials for which nonlinearity in the viscoelastic response vanishes for small strains. These observations suggest that despite their prevalence, the measures of linear viscoelasticity (e.g., storage and loss moduli) are inadequate for the general description of the viscoelastic nature of the fibrous materials. It was, however, found that linear viscoelastic nature of fibrous matrices for small amplitudes is restored when a pre-stretch is applied to the fibrous matrix along with oscillatory strains. Further, we also explored the influence of the structural properties of the fibrous matrices (fiber orientation, alignment and curvature) on their viscoelastic nature.

  8. Viscoelastic behavior of dense microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cametti, C.; Codastefano, P.; D'arrigo, G.; Tartaglia, P.; Rouch, J.; Chen, S. H.

    1990-09-01

    We have performed extensive measurements of shear viscosity, ultrasonic absorption, and sound velocity in a ternary system consisting of water-decane-sodium di(2-ethylhexyl)sulfo- succinate(AOT), in the one-phase region where it forms a water-in-oil microemulsion. We observe a rapid increase of the static shear viscosity in the dense microemulsion region. Correspondingly the sound absorption shows unambiguous evidence of a viscoelastic behavior. The absorption data for various volume fractions and temperatures can be reduced to a universal curve by scaling both the absorption and the frequency by the measured static shear viscosity. The sound absorption can be interpreted as coming from the high-frequency tail of the viscoelastic relaxation, describable by a Cole-Cole relaxation formula with unusually small elastic moduli.

  9. Viscoelastic properties of heavy oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas Luces, Maria Alejandra

    Rheological low frequency measurements were carried out to analyze the viscoelastic properties of four heavy oil samples. At room conditions, the heavy oil samples exhibit non-Newtonian or viscoelastic behavior since they have a viscous component and an elastic component. The latter becomes very important for temperatures below 30°C, and for seismic to ultrasonic frequencies. Above this temperature, the viscous component increases significantly in comparison to the elastic component, and for seismic frequencies heavy oils can be considered as Newtonian fluids. A new viscosity model based on the concept of activation energy was derived to predict viscosity in terms of frequency and temperature for temperatures below 60°C. A new frequency-temperature dispersion model was derived to address the variation of the complex shear modulus (G*) with frequency and temperature for the heavy oil samples. This model fits the data well for seismic and sonic frequencies but it overpredicts G* at ultrasonic frequencies.

  10. Relation of ultrasonic energy loss factors and constituent properties in unidirectional composites. [graphite-epxoy composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. H., Jr.; Lee, S. S.; Nayebhashemi, H.

    1979-01-01

    A model is developed relating composite constituents properties with ultrasonic energy loss factors for longitudinal waves propagating in the principal directions of a unidirectional graphite/epoxy fiber composite. All the constituents are assumed to behave as linear viscoelastic materials with energy dissipation properties defined by loss factors. It is found that by introducing a new constituent called the interface material, the composite and constituent properties can be brought into consistency with simple series and parallel models. An expression relating the composite loss factors to the loss factors of the constituents is derived and its coefficients are evaluated.

  11. A Numerical Model of Viscoelastic Flow in Microchannels

    SciTech Connect

    Trebotich, D; Colella, P; Miller, G; Liepmann, D

    2002-11-14

    The authors present a numerical method to model non-Newtonian, viscoelastic flow at the microscale. The equations of motion are the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the Oldroyd-B constitutive equation. This constitutive equation is chosen to model a Boger fluid which is representative of complex biological solutions exhibiting elastic behavior due to macromolecules in the solution (e.g., DNA solution). The numerical approach is a projection method to impose the incompressibility constraint and a Lax-Wendroff method to predict velocities and stresses while recovering both viscous and elastic limits. The method is second-order accurate in space and time, free-stream preserving, has a time step constraint determined by the advective CFL condition, and requires the solution of only well-behaved linear systems amenable to the use of fast iterative methods. They demonstrate the method for viscoelastic incompressible flow in simple microchannels (2D) and microducts (3D).

  12. A master relation defines the nonlinear viscoelasticity of single fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Pablo; Pullarkat, Pramod A; Ott, Albrecht

    2006-05-15

    Cell mechanical functions such as locomotion, contraction, and division are controlled by the cytoskeleton, a dynamic biopolymer network whose mechanical properties remain poorly understood. We perform single-cell uniaxial stretching experiments on 3T3 fibroblasts. By superimposing small amplitude oscillations on a mechanically prestressed cell, we find a transition from linear viscoelastic behavior to power law stress stiffening. Data from different cells over several stress decades can be uniquely scaled to obtain a master relation between the viscoelastic moduli and the average force. Remarkably, this relation holds independently of deformation history, adhesion biochemistry, and intensity of active contraction. In particular, it is irrelevant whether force is actively generated by the cell or externally imposed by stretching. We propose that the master relation reflects the mechanical behavior of the force-bearing actin cytoskeleton, in agreement with stress stiffening known from semiflexible filament networks.

  13. Adaptive multifunctional composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ya; Inman, Daniel J.

    2013-05-01

    The adaptive multifunctional composite structure studied here is to address two issues remaining in lightweight structural composites required by many engineering applications. The first is to add additional functionality to multifunctional composites and the second is to provide adaptive damping in structures that cover a wide range of frequencies and temperatures. Because of its potential for practical payoffs, passive structural damping can find wide application through the use of high-damping viscoelastic polymers or elastomers. However, all passive damping using these damping materials suffer from failing at certain temperatures and in certain frequency ranges. The extreme environments often seen by engineering systems provide high temperature, which is exactly where damping levels in structures reduce causing unacceptable vibrations. In addition, as loading frequencies reduce damping levels also fall off, and many loads experienced by large structures are low frequency. The proposed research addresses increasing the range of effectiveness of damping by addressing the temperature and frequency dependence of material damping by using a multifunctional composite system containing an active element. Previous research has yielded a finite element model of linear viscoelastic material and structural behavior that captures characteristic frequency-dependent behavior, continuing research has addressed the accommodation of temperature dependence, and the examination of the new concept of `electronic damping' or `e-damping'. The resulting modeling approach is validated through experimental validation.

  14. Causal analysis of the viscoelastic Lamb problem.

    PubMed

    Moura, André

    2010-03-01

    A mathematical development is given for the generation of viscoelastic waves by an impulsive line source acting on the interface of a viscoelastic half space, where the viscoelasticity is characterized by two relaxation processes. The considered idealized viscoelastic medium is isotropic and characterized by two Lame constants appropriate for low frequencies, by their increments associated with the shift from low to high frequencies, and by separate relation times associated with each of the Lame constants. A causal solution is developed using integral transforms and an extension of Cagniard's method.

  15. Plasmid DNA linearization in the antibacterial action of a new fluorescent Ag nanoparticle-paracetamol dimer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Amaresh Kumar; Sk, Md Palashuddin; Ghosh, Siddhartha Sankar; Chattopadhyay, Arun

    2011-10-01

    Herein, we report the generation of a composite comprised of p-hydroxyacetanilide dimer and Ag nanoparticles (NPs) by reaction of AgNO3 and p-hydroxyacetanilide. The formation of the composite was established by UV-vis, FTIR and NMR spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction along with substantiation by mass spectrometry. Interestingly, the composite exhibited an emission spectrum with a peak at 435 nm when excited by light of wavelength 320 nm. The composite showed superior antimicrobial activity with respect to its individual components against a wide range of Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria at relatively low concentrations of Ag NPs and at which there was no apparent cytotoxicity against mammalian cells. Our results suggest that the composite strongly interacted with the bacterial cell walls leading to cell bursting. Interestingly, enhancement in the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in bacteria was observed in the presence of the composite. It is proposed that the ROS generation led to oxidation of the dimer to N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI). The generated NAPQI acted as a DNA gyrase inhibitor causing cell death following linearization of DNA.Herein, we report the generation of a composite comprised of p-hydroxyacetanilide dimer and Ag nanoparticles (NPs) by reaction of AgNO3 and p-hydroxyacetanilide. The formation of the composite was established by UV-vis, FTIR and NMR spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction along with substantiation by mass spectrometry. Interestingly, the composite exhibited an emission spectrum with a peak at 435 nm when excited by light of wavelength 320 nm. The composite showed superior antimicrobial activity with respect to its individual components against a wide range of Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria at relatively low concentrations of Ag NPs and at which there was no apparent cytotoxicity against mammalian cells. Our results suggest that the

  16. Variational finite-difference methods in linear and nonlinear problems of the deformation of metallic and composite shells (review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimyuk, V. A.; Storozhuk, E. A.; Chernyshenko, I. S.

    2012-11-01

    Variational finite-difference methods of solving linear and nonlinear problems for thin and nonthin shells (plates) made of homogeneous isotropic (metallic) and orthotropic (composite) materials are analyzed and their classification principles and structure are discussed. Scalar and vector variational finite-difference methods that implement the Kirchhoff-Love hypotheses analytically or algorithmically using Lagrange multipliers are outlined. The Timoshenko hypotheses are implemented in a traditional way, i.e., analytically. The stress-strain state of metallic and composite shells of complex geometry is analyzed numerically. The numerical results are presented in the form of graphs and tables and used to assess the efficiency of using the variational finite-difference methods to solve linear and nonlinear problems of the statics of shells (plates)

  17. Hyaluronan derivatives: Alkyl chain length boosts viscoelastic behavior to depolymerization.

    PubMed

    Pavan, Mauro; Galesso, Devis; Menon, Giampaolo; Renier, Davide; Guarise, Cristian

    2013-09-12

    Five amide derivatives of Hyaluronic Acid (HA) were synthesized with C8, C12, C15, C16 and C18 linear alkyl-amines. These polymers (Hyadd) were tested against thermal, oxidative and hyaluronidase degradation by means of rheological experiments and SEC analysis and compared to non-modified HA. First of all, no free hexadecylamine was detected in the treated samples, meaning that under these stressing conditions only cleavage of glycosidic bonds occurs. Then, viscoelastic properties were assessed during thermal degradation and their variation as a function of time was expressed by means of a decay constant k(G'): while no significant difference in the decrease rate was observed between Hyadd-C8 and Hyadd-C12, a marked stabilization of viscoelastic properties during thermal treatment was detected for Hyadd-C15, Hyadd-C16 and Hyadd-C18. On the other hand, no difference was observed between the MW decrease rate (kMW decay constant) of HA and Hyadd-C12 to-C18; the depolymerization takes place on the backbone of the polymers independently whether they are derivatized or not, but longer alkyl chains lead to higher viscoelasticity in the depolymerized products. Finally, both oxidative and enzymatic degradation were carried out analyzing the changes in elastic modulus and in dynamic viscosity: once again, the amide side chain came out with similar behavior to chemical cross-linked HA (HBC) and with improved performances respect to linear HA in terms of preservation of viscoelasticity after chain depolymerization.

  18. A comparison of viscoelastic damping models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, Joseph C.; Belvin, W. Keith; Inman, Daniel J.

    1993-01-01

    Modern finite element methods (FEM's) enable the precise modeling of mass and stiffness properties in what were in the past overwhelmingly large and complex structures. These models allow the accurate determination of natural frequencies and mode shapes. However, adequate methods for modeling highly damped and high frequency dependent structures did not exist until recently. The most commonly used method, Modal Strain Energy, does not correctly predict complex mode shapes since it is based on the assumption that the mode shapes of a structure are real. Recently, many techniques have been developed which allow the modeling of frequency dependent damping properties of materials in a finite element compatible form. Two of these methods, the Golla-Hughes-McTavish method and the Lesieutre-Mingori method, model the frequency dependent effects by adding coordinates to the existing system thus maintaining the linearity of the model. The third model, proposed by Bagley and Torvik, is based on the Fractional Calculus method and requires fewer empirical parameters to model the frequency dependence at the expense of linearity of the governing equations. This work examines the Modal Strain Energy, Golla-Hughes-McTavish and Bagley and Torvik models and compares them to determine the plausibility of using them for modeling viscoelastic damping in large structures.

  19. A stable numerical solution method in-plane loading of nonlinear viscoelastic laminated orthotropic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gramoll, K. C.; Dillard, D. A.; Brinson, H. F.

    1989-01-01

    In response to the tremendous growth in the development of advanced materials, such as fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP) composite materials, a new numerical method is developed to analyze and predict the time-dependent properties of these materials. Basic concepts in viscoelasticity, laminated composites, and previous viscoelastic numerical methods are presented. A stable numerical method, called the nonlinear differential equation method (NDEM), is developed to calculate the in-plane stresses and strains over any time period for a general laminate constructed from nonlinear viscoelastic orthotropic plies. The method is implemented in an in-plane stress analysis computer program, called VCAP, to demonstrate its usefulness and to verify its accuracy. A number of actual experimental test results performed on Kevlar/epoxy composite laminates are compared to predictions calculated from the numerical method.

  20. Viscoelasticity of hyaluronic acid-gelatin hydrogels for vocal fold tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Kazemirad, Siavash; Heris, Hossein K; Mongeau, Luc

    2016-02-01

    Crosslinked injectable hyaluronic acid (HA)-gelatin (Ge) hydrogels have remarkable viscoelastic and biological properties for vocal fold tissue engineering. Patient-specific tuning of the viscoelastic properties of this injectable biomaterial could improve tissue regeneration. The frequency-dependent viscoelasticity of crosslinked HA-Ge hydrogels was measured as a function of the concentration of HA, Ge, and crosslinker. Synthetic extracellular matrix hydrogels were fabricated using thiol-modified HA and Ge, and crosslinked by poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate. A recently developed characterization method based on Rayleigh wave propagation was used to quantify the frequency-dependent viscoelastic properties of these hydrogels, including shear storage and loss moduli, over a broad frequency range; that is, from 40 to 4000 Hz. The viscoelastic properties of the hydrogels increased with frequency. The storage and loss moduli values and the rate of increase with frequency varied with the concentrations of the constituents. The range of the viscoelastic properties of the hydrogels was within that of human vocal fold tissue obtained from in vivo and ex vivo measurements. Frequency-dependent parametric relations were obtained using a linear least-squares regression. The results are useful to better fine-tune the storage and loss moduli of HA-Ge hydrogels by varying the concentrations of the constituents for use in patient-specific treatments.

  1. Viscoelasticity of hyaluronic acid-gelatin hydrogels for vocal fold tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Kazemirad, Siavash; Heris, Hossein K.; Mongeau, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Cross-linked injectable hyaluronic acid-gelatin hydrogels have remarkable viscoelastic and biological properties for vocal fold tissue engineering. Patient-specific tuning of the viscoelastic properties of this injectable biomaterial could improve tissue regeneration. The frequency-dependent viscoelasticity of cross-linked hyaluronic acid-gelatin hydrogels was measured as a function of the concentration of hyaluronic acid, gelatin, and cross-linker. Synthetic extracellular matrix hydrogels were fabricated using thiol-modified hyaluronic acid and gelatin, and cross-linked by Poly(ethylene glycol)diacrylate. A recently developed characterization method based on Rayleigh wave propagation was used to quantify the frequency-dependent viscoelastic properties of these hydrogels, including shear storage and loss moduli, over a broad frequency range; i.e., from 40 to 4000 Hz. The viscoelastic properties of the hydrogels increased with frequency. The storage and loss moduli values and the rate of increase with frequency varied with the concentrations of the constituents. The range of the viscoelastic properties of the hydrogels was within that of human vocal fold tissue obtained from in vivo and ex vivo measurements. Frequency-dependent parametric relations were obtained using a linear least-squares regression. The results are useful to better fine-tune the storage and loss moduli of hyaluronic acid-gelatin hydrogels by varying the concentrations of the constituents for use in patient-specific treatments. PMID:25728914

  2. A review on the systematic formulation of 3-D multiparameter full waveform inversion in viscoelastic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Pengliang; Brossier, Romain; Métivier, Ludovic; Virieux, Jean

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we study 3-D multiparameter full waveform inversion (FWI) in viscoelastic media based on the generalized Maxwell/Zener body including arbitrary number of attenuation mechanisms. We present a frequency-domain energy analysis to establish the stability condition of a full anisotropic viscoelastic system, according to zero-valued boundary condition and the elastic-viscoelastic correspondence principle: the real-valued stiffness matrix becomes a complex-valued one in Fourier domain when seismic attenuation is taken into account. We develop a least-squares optimization approach to linearly relate the quality factor with the anelastic coefficients by estimating a set of constants which are independent of the spatial coordinates, which supplies an explicit incorporation of the parameter Q in the general viscoelastic wave equation. By introducing the Lagrangian multipliers into the matrix expression of the wave equation with implicit time integration, we build a systematic formulation of multiparameter FWI for full anisotropic viscoelastic wave equation, while the equivalent form of the state and adjoint equation with explicit time integration is available to be resolved efficiently. In particular, this formulation lays the foundation for the inversion of the parameter Q in the time domain with full anisotropic viscoelastic properties. In the 3-D isotropic viscoelastic settings, the anelastic coefficients and the quality factors using bulk and shear moduli parametrization can be related to the counterparts using P and S velocity. Gradients with respect to any other parameter of interest can be found by chain rule. Pioneering numerical validations as well as the real applications of this most generic framework will be carried out to disclose the potential of viscoelastic FWI when adequate high-performance computing resources and the field data are available.

  3. Multiscale characterization and representation of composite materials during processing.

    PubMed

    Zobeiry, Navid; Forghani, Alireza; Li, Chao; Gordnian, Kamyar; Thorpe, Ryan; Vaziri, Reza; Fernlund, Goran; Poursartip, Anoush

    2016-07-13

    Given the importance of residual stresses and dimensional changes in composites manufacturing, process simulation has been the focus of many studies in recent years. Consequently, various constitutive models and simulation approaches have been developed and implemented for composites process simulation. In this paper, various constitutive models, ranging from elastic to nonlinear viscoelastic; and simulation approaches ranging from separated flow/solid phases to multiscale integrated phases are presented and their applicability for process simulation is discussed. Attention has been paid to practical aspects of the problem where the complexity of the model coupled with the complexity and size scaling of the structure increases the characterization and simulation costs. Two specific approaches and their application are presented in detail: the pseudo-viscoelastic cure hardening instantaneously linear elastic (CHILE) and linear viscoelastic (VE). It is shown that CHILE can predict the residual stress formation in simple cure cycles such as the one-hold cycle for HEXCEL AS4/8552 where the material does not devitrify during processing. It is also shown that using this simple approach, the cure cycle can be modified to lower the residual stress level and therefore increase the mechanical performance of the composite laminate. For a more complex cure cycle where the material is devitrified during a post-cure, it is shown that a more complex model such as VE is required. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials'.

  4. Characterization of metal matrix composites by linear ultrasonics and finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuesheng; Sharples, Steve D; Clark, Matt; Wright, David

    2013-02-01

    Titanium metal matrix composites (TiMMCs) offer advantages over traditional materials for aerospace applications due to the increased mechanical strength of the materials. But the non-destructive inspection of these materials, especially with ultrasound, is in an infancy stage. If the manufacturing process of TiMMC is not correctly controlled, then disbonds and voids between the fibers can result. The effective microstructure of the composite makes difficulty to interpret results from traditional ultrasound techniques because of the scattering caused by fibers; the scattering prevents the ultrasound from penetrating far into the composite region and produces a background signal masking any reflections from voids. In this paper, relatively low frequency ultrasound is used to probe the composite region, and the state of the composite (porosity) is inferred from the velocity of the ultrasound traversing the composite. The relationship between the velocity and porosity is complex in this regime, so finite element (FE) analysis is used to model the composite regions and relate the velocity to the porosity. The FE simulated results are validated by ultrasound velocity measurements.

  5. Measuring Viscoelastic Deformation with an Optical Mouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, T. W.

    2004-01-01

    The feasibility of using an optical mouse to track the viscoelastic deformation of low-density polyethylene films that have a fixed attached load is presented. It is seen that using an optical mouse and with rudimentary experiment paraphernalia and arrangement, it is possible to get good measurements of viscoelastic deformation.

  6. Modular-based multiscale modeling on viscoelasticity of polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Liu, Zeliang; Jia, Zheng; Liu, Wing Kam; Aldousari, Saad M.; Hedia, Hassan S.; Asiri, Saeed A.

    2017-02-01

    Polymer nanocomposites have been envisioned as advanced materials for improving the mechanical performance of neat polymers used in aerospace, petrochemical, environment and energy industries. With the filler size approaching the nanoscale, composite materials tend to demonstrate remarkable thermomechanical properties, even with addition of a small amount of fillers. These observations confront the classical composite theories and are usually attributed to the high surface-area-to-volume-ratio of the fillers, which can introduce strong nanoscale interfacial effect and relevant long-range perturbation on polymer chain dynamics. Despite decades of research aimed at understanding interfacial effect and improving the mechanical performance of composite materials, it is not currently possible to accurately predict the mechanical properties of polymer nanocomposites directly from their molecular constituents. To overcome this challenge, different theoretical, experimental and computational schemes will be used to uncover the key physical mechanisms at the relevant spatial and temporal scales for predicting and tuning constitutive behaviors in silico, thereby establishing a bottom-up virtual design principle to achieve unprecedented mechanical performance of nanocomposites. A modular-based multiscale modeling approach for viscoelasticity of polymer nanocomposites has been proposed and discussed in this study, including four modules: (A) neat polymer toolbox; (B) interphase toolbox; (C) microstructural toolbox and (D) homogenization toolbox. Integrating these modules together, macroscopic viscoelasticity of polymer nanocomposites could be directly predicted from their molecular constituents. This will maximize the computational ability to design novel polymer composites with advanced performance. More importantly, elucidating the viscoelasticity of polymer nanocomposites through fundamental studies is a critical step to generate an integrated computational material

  7. Modular-based multiscale modeling on viscoelasticity of polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Liu, Zeliang; Jia, Zheng; Liu, Wing Kam; Aldousari, Saad M.; Hedia, Hassan S.; Asiri, Saeed A.

    2016-10-01

    Polymer nanocomposites have been envisioned as advanced materials for improving the mechanical performance of neat polymers used in aerospace, petrochemical, environment and energy industries. With the filler size approaching the nanoscale, composite materials tend to demonstrate remarkable thermomechanical properties, even with addition of a small amount of fillers. These observations confront the classical composite theories and are usually attributed to the high surface-area-to-volume-ratio of the fillers, which can introduce strong nanoscale interfacial effect and relevant long-range perturbation on polymer chain dynamics. Despite decades of research aimed at understanding interfacial effect and improving the mechanical performance of composite materials, it is not currently possible to accurately predict the mechanical properties of polymer nanocomposites directly from their molecular constituents. To overcome this challenge, different theoretical, experimental and computational schemes will be used to uncover the key physical mechanisms at the relevant spatial and temporal scales for predicting and tuning constitutive behaviors in silico, thereby establishing a bottom-up virtual design principle to achieve unprecedented mechanical performance of nanocomposites. A modular-based multiscale modeling approach for viscoelasticity of polymer nanocomposites has been proposed and discussed in this study, including four modules: (A) neat polymer toolbox; (B) interphase toolbox; (C) microstructural toolbox and (D) homogenization toolbox. Integrating these modules together, macroscopic viscoelasticity of polymer nanocomposites could be directly predicted from their molecular constituents. This will maximize the computational ability to design novel polymer composites with advanced performance. More importantly, elucidating the viscoelasticity of polymer nanocomposites through fundamental studies is a critical step to generate an integrated computational material

  8. Coefficient of restitution in fractional viscoelastic compliant impacts using fractional Chebyshev collocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabiri, Arman; Butcher, Eric A.; Nazari, Morad

    2017-02-01

    Compliant impacts can be modeled using linear viscoelastic constitutive models. While such impact models for realistic viscoelastic materials using integer order derivatives of force and displacement usually require a large number of parameters, compliant impact models obtained using fractional calculus, however, can be advantageous since such models use fewer parameters and successfully capture the hereditary property. In this paper, we introduce the fractional Chebyshev collocation (FCC) method as an approximation tool for numerical simulation of several linear fractional viscoelastic compliant impact models in which the overall coefficient of restitution for the impact is studied as a function of the fractional model parameters for the first time. Other relevant impact characteristics such as hysteresis curves, impact force gradient, penetration and separation depths are also studied.

  9. The nonlinear viscoelasticity of hyaluronic acid and its role in joint lubrication.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenhuan; Christopher, Gordon F

    2015-04-07

    Hyaluronic acid solutions have been widely studied due to their relevance to the rheological behavior of synovial fluid and joint lubrication. Ambulatory joint motion is typically large oscillatory deflections; therefore, large amplitude oscillatory shear strain experiments are used to examine the relevant non-linear viscoelastic properties of these solutions. Using the sequence of physical processes method to analyze data provides time dependent viscoelastic moduli, which exhibit a clear physiologically relevant behavior to hyaluronic acids non-linear viscoelasticity. In particular, it is seen that during peak strain/acceleration, the time dependent elastic modulus peaks and the loss modulus is at a minimum. The hyaluronic acid can provide an immediate elastic response to sudden forces, acting like a shock absorber during sudden changes in direction of motion or maximum deflection. However, during peak rate, the elastic modulus is at a minimum and the loss modulus is at a maximum, which provides greater efficacy to hydrodynamic shear lubrication.

  10. Numerical modeling of bubble dynamics in viscoelastic media with relaxation.

    PubMed

    Warnez, M T; Johnsen, E

    2015-06-01

    Cavitation occurs in a variety of non-Newtonian fluids and viscoelastic materials. The large-amplitude volumetric oscillations of cavitation bubbles give rise to high temperatures and pressures at collapse, as well as induce large and rapid deformation of the surroundings. In this work, we develop a comprehensive numerical framework for spherical bubble dynamics in isotropic media obeying a wide range of viscoelastic constitutive relationships. Our numerical approach solves the compressible Keller-Miksis equation with full thermal effects (inside and outside the bubble) when coupled to a highly generalized constitutive relationship (which allows Newtonian, Kelvin-Voigt, Zener, linear Maxwell, upper-convected Maxwell, Jeffreys, Oldroyd-B, Giesekus, and Phan-Thien-Tanner models). For the latter two models, partial differential equations (PDEs) must be solved in the surrounding medium; for the remaining models, we show that the PDEs can be reduced to ordinary differential equations. To solve the general constitutive PDEs, we present a Chebyshev spectral collocation method, which is robust even for violent collapse. Combining this numerical approach with theoretical analysis, we simulate bubble dynamics in various viscoelastic media to determine the impact of relaxation time, a constitutive parameter, on the associated physics. Relaxation time is found to increase bubble growth and permit rebounds driven purely by residual stresses in the surroundings. Different regimes of oscillations occur depending on the relaxation time.

  11. A Nonlinear Viscoelastic Model for Ceramics at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, Lynn M.; Panoskaltsis, Vassilis P.; Gasparini, Dario A.; Choi, Sung R.

    2002-01-01

    High-temperature creep behavior of ceramics is characterized by nonlinear time-dependent responses, asymmetric behavior in tension and compression, and nucleation and coalescence of voids leading to creep rupture. Moreover, creep rupture experiments show considerable scatter or randomness in fatigue lives of nominally equal specimens. To capture the nonlinear, asymmetric time-dependent behavior, the standard linear viscoelastic solid model is modified. Nonlinearity and asymmetry are introduced in the volumetric components by using a nonlinear function similar to a hyperbolic sine function but modified to model asymmetry. The nonlinear viscoelastic model is implemented in an ABAQUS user material subroutine. To model the random formation and coalescence of voids, each element is assigned a failure strain sampled from a lognormal distribution. An element is deleted when its volumetric strain exceeds its failure strain. Element deletion has been implemented within ABAQUS. Temporal increases in strains produce a sequential loss of elements (a model for void nucleation and growth), which in turn leads to failure. Nonlinear viscoelastic model parameters are determined from uniaxial tensile and compressive creep experiments on silicon nitride. The model is then used to predict the deformation of four-point bending and ball-on-ring specimens. Simulation is used to predict statistical moments of creep rupture lives. Numerical simulation results compare well with results of experiments of four-point bending specimens. The analytical model is intended to be used to predict the creep rupture lives of ceramic parts in arbitrary stress conditions.

  12. Nonlinear viscoelasticity and generalized failure criterion for biopolymer gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divoux, Thibaut; Keshavarz, Bavand; Manneville, Sébastien; McKinley, Gareth

    2016-11-01

    Biopolymer gels display a multiscale microstructure that is responsible for their solid-like properties. Upon external deformation, these soft viscoelastic solids exhibit a generic nonlinear mechanical response characterized by pronounced stress- or strain-stiffening prior to irreversible damage and failure, most often through macroscopic fractures. Here we show on a model acid-induced protein gel that the nonlinear viscoelastic properties of the gel can be described in terms of a 'damping function' which predicts the gel mechanical response quantitatively up to the onset of macroscopic failure. Using a nonlinear integral constitutive equation built upon the experimentally-measured damping function in conjunction with power-law linear viscoelastic response, we derive the form of the stress growth in the gel following the start up of steady shear. We also couple the shear stress response with Bailey's durability criteria for brittle solids in order to predict the critical values of the stress σc and strain γc for failure of the gel, and how they scale with the applied shear rate. This provides a generalized failure criterion for biopolymer gels in a range of different deformation histories. This work was funded by the MIT-France seed fund and by the CNRS PICS-USA scheme (#36939). BK acknowledges financial support from Axalta Coating Systems.

  13. Stability Analysis of a Spinning and Precessing Viscoelastic Rotor Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, S.; Nandi, A.; Neogy, S.

    2013-10-01

    The present work deals with stability analysis of a spinning and precessing gyroscopic systems, where the spin axis and precession axis intersect at right angle. The nutation speed is zero, the spin and precession speeds are considered to be uniform and the precession axis is located at one end of the shaft. The properties of the shaft material correspond to a four element type linear viscoelastic model. The shaft disk system is assumed to be axially and torsionally stiff. For analysis, a simple rotor has been considered with the rigid disk placed on a massless viscoelastic shaft at specified locations from one end of the shaft. The governing parametric equations for such a rotor are derived in the simultaneously spinning and precessing frame. A stability analysis is performed considering both two- and four-degree of freedom models. The stability borderlines are computed considering spin and precession speeds as parameters. It is shown that though viscoelastic material may appear attractive for its large material damping, for gyroscopic systems it may lead to unstable vibrations.

  14. Numerical modeling of bubble dynamics in viscoelastic media with relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Warnez, M. T.; Johnsen, E.

    2015-01-01

    Cavitation occurs in a variety of non-Newtonian fluids and viscoelastic materials. The large-amplitude volumetric oscillations of cavitation bubbles give rise to high temperatures and pressures at collapse, as well as induce large and rapid deformation of the surroundings. In this work, we develop a comprehensive numerical framework for spherical bubble dynamics in isotropic media obeying a wide range of viscoelastic constitutive relationships. Our numerical approach solves the compressible Keller–Miksis equation with full thermal effects (inside and outside the bubble) when coupled to a highly generalized constitutive relationship (which allows Newtonian, Kelvin–Voigt, Zener, linear Maxwell, upper-convected Maxwell, Jeffreys, Oldroyd-B, Giesekus, and Phan-Thien-Tanner models). For the latter two models, partial differential equations (PDEs) must be solved in the surrounding medium; for the remaining models, we show that the PDEs can be reduced to ordinary differential equations. To solve the general constitutive PDEs, we present a Chebyshev spectral collocation method, which is robust even for violent collapse. Combining this numerical approach with theoretical analysis, we simulate bubble dynamics in various viscoelastic media to determine the impact of relaxation time, a constitutive parameter, on the associated physics. Relaxation time is found to increase bubble growth and permit rebounds driven purely by residual stresses in the surroundings. Different regimes of oscillations occur depending on the relaxation time. PMID:26130967

  15. Numerical modeling of bubble dynamics in viscoelastic media with relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnez, M. T.; Johnsen, E.

    2015-06-01

    Cavitation occurs in a variety of non-Newtonian fluids and viscoelastic materials. The large-amplitude volumetric oscillations of cavitation bubbles give rise to high temperatures and pressures at collapse, as well as induce large and rapid deformation of the surroundings. In this work, we develop a comprehensive numerical framework for spherical bubble dynamics in isotropic media obeying a wide range of viscoelastic constitutive relationships. Our numerical approach solves the compressible Keller-Miksis equation with full thermal effects (inside and outside the bubble) when coupled to a highly generalized constitutive relationship (which allows Newtonian, Kelvin-Voigt, Zener, linear Maxwell, upper-convected Maxwell, Jeffreys, Oldroyd-B, Giesekus, and Phan-Thien-Tanner models). For the latter two models, partial differential equations (PDEs) must be solved in the surrounding medium; for the remaining models, we show that the PDEs can be reduced to ordinary differential equations. To solve the general constitutive PDEs, we present a Chebyshev spectral collocation method, which is robust even for violent collapse. Combining this numerical approach with theoretical analysis, we simulate bubble dynamics in various viscoelastic media to determine the impact of relaxation time, a constitutive parameter, on the associated physics. Relaxation time is found to increase bubble growth and permit rebounds driven purely by residual stresses in the surroundings. Different regimes of oscillations occur depending on the relaxation time.

  16. Physical and mechanical properties of composites based on a linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE) and natural fiber waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestore, O.; Kajaks, J.; Vancovicha, I.; Reihmane, S.

    2013-01-01

    The influence of the content and fiber length of textile waste (cotton, flax, and hemp) on the deformation and strength properties (in tension and bending) of a linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE) was investigated. It was found that the tensile strength increased for all composites containing hemp fibers of up to 30 wt.%. The elongation at break rapidly decreased when the filler content was raised to 10 wt.%, but thereafter changed insignificantly. The flexural strength and modulus increased considerably with filler content in the composites. On the contrary, their deformability, as expected, decreased. The influence of hemp fibers on the physicalmechanical properties of the LLDPE was somewhat more pronounced. The optimum content of fibers in the composites (30 wt.%) was significantly smaller than that usually obtained (40-50 wt.% natural fibers) for other polyolefin composites, for example, with low-density polyethylene and polypropylene matrices. The highest values of strength parameters, both in tension and bending, were reached for systems with a fiber length of up to 1 mm. The melt flow index decreased considerably with increasing fiber content in the LLDPE matrix (from 4.4 dg/min for LLDPE to 0.05-0.14 dg/min for systems containing 30 wt.% fibers). Nevertheless, processing of the composites was possible by traditional methods, for example, extrusion.

  17. Composite propellant technology research: Mechanical property characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bower, Mark V.

    1991-01-01

    Proof for the existence of a single Poisson's ratio function in isotropic linear viscoelastic materials is presented. An in-depth discussion is given of three dimensional viscoelastic material properties and their relationships to linear isotropic and orthotropic viscoelastic materials. A discussion of the alternate invariant definition as used by Abaqus and how it relates to the form used by Dr. S. Peng is presented.

  18. The linear relationship between the proportion of fresh grass in the cow diet, milk fatty acid composition, and butter properties.

    PubMed

    Couvreur, S; Hurtaud, C; Lopez, C; Delaby, L; Peyraud, J L

    2006-06-01

    Fresh grass in the cow diet improves the rheological and nutritional properties of butter. However, the relationship between the proportion of fresh grass in the diet and these properties is still unknown. The objective of the study was to determine the relationship between the proportion of fresh grass in the diet and the properties of milk and butter. Four groups of 2 cows were fed 4 isoenergetic diets characterized by increasing amounts of fresh grass (0, 30, 60, and 100% dry matter of forage) according to a Youden square design. Energy levels were similar among all diets. Thus, no effect of mobilization was observed and the results were only due to the proportion of fresh grass in the diet. Milk yield linearly increased with the proportion of fresh grass in the diet (+0.21 kg/d per 10% of grass). Fat yield remained unchanged. Thus, by effect of dilution, increasing the proportion of fresh grass in the diet induced a linear decrease in fat content. Milk fat globule size decreased by 0.29 mum when the proportion of grass reached 30% in the diet. Increasing the proportion of fresh grass in the diet induced a linear increase in unsaturated fatty acids percentages at the expense of saturated fatty acids. Relationships were +0.38, +0.12, +0.05 and -0.69 points/10% of fresh grass in the diet for C18:1 trans-11, C18:2 cis-9,trans-11, C18:3n-3, and C16:0, respectively. These modifications in fatty acid composition, and in particular in the spreadability index, C16:0/C18:1, were responsible for linear decreases in final melting temperature and solid fat content in butter fat, perceived in sensory analysis by a linear decrease in firmness in mouth. The nutritional value of butter was also linearly improved by the proportion of fresh grass in the diet by halving the atherogenicity index.

  19. The effects of physical aging at elevated temperatures on the viscoelastic creep on IM7/K3B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.; Feldman, Mark

    1994-01-01

    Physical aging at elevated temperature of the advanced composite IM7/K3B was investigated through the use of creep compliance tests. Testing consisted of short term isothermal, creep/recovery with the creep segments performed at constant load. The matrix dominated transverse tensile and in-plane shear behavior were measured at temperatures ranging from 200 to 230 C. Through the use of time based shifting procedures, the aging shift factors, shift rates and momentary master curve parameters were found at each temperature. These material parameters were used as input to a predictive methodology, which was based upon effective time theory and linear viscoelasticity combined with classical lamination theory. Long term creep compliance test data was compared to predictions to verify the method. The model was then used to predict the long term creep behavior for several general laminates.

  20. Fractional order models of viscoelasticity as an alternative in the analysis of red blood cell (RBC) membrane mechanics.

    PubMed

    Craiem, Damian; Magin, Richard L

    2010-01-20

    New lumped-element models of red blood cell mechanics can be constructed using fractional order generalizations of springs and dashpots. Such 'spring-pots' exhibit a fractional order viscoelastic behavior that captures a wide spectrum of experimental results through power-law expressions in both the time and frequency domains. The system dynamics is fully described by linear fractional order differential equations derived from first order stress-strain relationships using the tools of fractional calculus. Changes in the composition or structure of the membrane are conveniently expressed in the fractional order of the model system. This approach provides a concise way to describe and quantify the biomechanical behavior of membranes, cells and tissues.

  1. Fractional order models of viscoelasticity as an alternative in the analysis of red blood cell (RBC) membrane mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Craiem, Damian; Magin, Richard L

    2011-01-01

    New lumped-element models of red blood cell mechanics can be constructed using fractional order generalizations of springs and dashpots. Such ‘spring-pots’ exhibit a fractional order viscoelastic behavior that captures a wide spectrum of experimental results through power-law expressions in both the time and frequency domains. The system dynamics is fully described by linear fractional order differential equations derived from first order stress–strain relationships using the tools of fractional calculus. Changes in the composition or structure of the membrane are conveniently expressed in the fractional order of the model system. This approach provides a concise way to describe and quantify the biomechanical behavior of membranes, cells and tissues. PMID:20090192

  2. Harnessing Computational Biology for Exact Linear B-Cell Epitope Prediction: A Novel Amino Acid Composition-Based Feature Descriptor.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, Vijayakumar; Gautham, Namasivayam

    2015-10-01

    Proteins embody epitopes that serve as their antigenic determinants. Epitopes occupy a central place in integrative biology, not to mention as targets for novel vaccine, pharmaceutical, and systems diagnostics development. The presence of T-cell and B-cell epitopes has been extensively studied due to their potential in synthetic vaccine design. However, reliable prediction of linear B-cell epitope remains a formidable challenge. Earlier studies have reported discrepancy in amino acid composition between the epitopes and non-epitopes. Hence, this study proposed and developed a novel amino acid composition-based feature descriptor, Dipeptide Deviation from Expected Mean (DDE), to distinguish the linear B-cell epitopes from non-epitopes effectively. In this study, for the first time, only exact linear B-cell epitopes and non-epitopes have been utilized for developing the prediction method, unlike the use of epitope-containing regions in earlier reports. To evaluate the performance of the DDE feature vector, models have been developed with two widely used machine-learning techniques Support Vector Machine and AdaBoost-Random Forest. Five-fold cross-validation performance of the proposed method with error-free dataset and dataset from other studies achieved an overall accuracy between nearly 61% and 73%, with balance between sensitivity and specificity metrics. Performance of the DDE feature vector was better (with accuracy difference of about 2% to 12%), in comparison to other amino acid-derived features on different datasets. This study reflects the efficiency of the DDE feature vector in enhancing the linear B-cell epitope prediction performance, compared to other feature representations. The proposed method is made as a stand-alone tool available freely for researchers, particularly for those interested in vaccine design and novel molecular target development for systems therapeutics and diagnostics: https://github.com/brsaran/LBEEP.

  3. Adhesive joint and composites modeling in SIERRA.

    SciTech Connect

    Ohashi, Yuki; Brown, Arthur A.; Hammerand, Daniel Carl; Adolf, Douglas Brian; Chambers, Robert S.; Foulk, James W., III

    2005-11-01

    Polymers and fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites play an important role in many Defense Program applications. Recently an advanced nonlinear viscoelastic model for polymers has been developed and incorporated into ADAGIO, Sandia's SIERRA-based quasi-static analysis code. Standard linear elastic shell and continuum models for fiber-reinforced polymer-matrix composites have also been added to ADAGIO. This report details the use of these models for advanced adhesive joint and composites simulations carried out as part of an Advanced Simulation and Computing Advanced Deployment (ASC AD) project. More specifically, the thermo-mechanical response of an adhesive joint when loaded during repeated thermal cycling is simulated, the response of some composite rings under internal pressurization is calculated, and the performance of a composite container subjected to internal pressurization, thermal loading, and distributed mechanical loading is determined. Finally, general comparisons between the continuum and shell element approaches for modeling composites using ADAGIO are given.

  4. Modeling the nonlinear viscoelastic behavior of polyurea using a distortion modified free volume approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevellard, G.; Ravi-Chandar, K.; Liechti, K. M.

    2012-05-01

    The pressure-dependent behavior of polyurea was examined under monotonic loading in the confined compression configuration. Additional data from Arcan shear and uniaxial compression was used to respectively complete parameter selection for the linear and nonlinear behavior and then validate it. The bulk and shear relaxation behavior were both pressure dependent. Under ramp loadings, the shear and tensile responses were quite nonlinearly viscoelastic.

  5. Dynamic tensile properties of bovine periodontal ligament: A nonlinear viscoelastic model.

    PubMed

    Oskui, Iman Z; Hashemi, Ata

    2016-03-21

    As a support to the tooth, the mechanical response of the periodontal ligament (PDL) is complex. Like other connective tissues, the PDL exhibits non-linear and time-dependent behavior. The viscoelasticity of the PDL plays a significant role in low and high loading rates. Little information, however, is available on the short-term viscoelastic behavior of the PDL. Also, due to the highly non-linear stress-strain response, it was hypothesized that the dynamic viscoelastic properties of the PDL would be greatly dependent on the preload. Therefore, the present study was designed to explore the dynamic tensile properties of the bovine PDL as a function of loading frequency and preload. The in vitro dynamic tensile tests were performed over a wide range of frequencies (0.01-100Hz) with dynamic force amplitude of 1N and different preloads of 3, 5 and 10N. The generalized Maxwell model was utilized to describe the non-linear viscoelastic behavior of the PDL. The low loss factor of the bovine PDL, measured between 0.04 and 0.08, indicates low energy dissipation due to the high content of collagen fibers. Moreover, the influence of viscous components in the linear region of the stress-strain curve (10N preload) was lower than those of the toe region (3N preload). The data reported in this study could be used in developing accurate computational models of the PDL.

  6. Nonlinear viscoelastic characterization of thin polyethylene film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbeck, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    In order to understand the state of stress and strain in a typical balloon fabricated from thin polyethylene film, experiment data in the literature reviewed. It was determined that the film behaves as a nonlinear viscoelasticity material and should be characterized accordingly. A simple uniaxial, nonlinear viscoelastic model was developed for predicting stress given a certain strain history. The simple model showed good qualitative agreement with results of constant rate, uniaxial accurately predicting stresses for cyclic strain histories typical of balloon flights. A program was outlined which will result in the development of a more complex nonlinear viscoelastic model.

  7. Cake Filtration in Viscoelastic Polymer Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surý, Alexander; Machač, Ivan

    2009-07-01

    In this contribution, the filtration equations for a cake filtration in viscoelastic fluids are presented. They are based on a capillary hybrid model for the flow of a power law fluid. In order to express the elastic pressure drop excess in the flow of viscoelastic filtrate through the filter cake and filter screen, modified Deborah number correction functions are included into these equations. Their validity was examined experimentally. Filtration experiments with suspensions of hardened polystyrene particles (Krasten) in viscoelastic aqueous solutions of polyacryl amides (0.4% and 0.6%wt. Kerafloc) were carried out at a constant pressure on a cylindrical filtration unit using filter screens of different resistance.

  8. Non-linear numerical analysis of the Iosipescu specimen for composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Henjen; Morton, John; Farley, Gary L.

    1994-01-01

    A nonlinear elastic finite element analysis is presented of the Iosipescu shear specimen tested in the modified Wyoming fixture for unidirectional graphite/epoxy composites. It is shown that the nonlinear effects due to specimen-to-fixture contact interactions and specimen geometry on the overall shear response are negligible. It is proposed that the tangential shear modulus should be used to characterize the shear resistance of composite materials with highly nonlinear shear response. The correction factors, which are needed to compensate for the nonuniformity of the shear stress or strain distribution in the specimen test section for shear modulus measurement, have to be defined carefully. Strain contours in the nonlinear response ranges are presented and the initiation of failure in the notch regions is investigated.

  9. Viscoelastic properties of Ionomer Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Monojoy; Kumar, Sanat

    2007-03-01

    Viscoelastic prperties of a model telechelic ionomer, i.e., a melt of non-polar polymers with a charge at each chain end along with neutralizing counterions, have been examined using molecular dynamics simulation. Equlibrium calculation of the loss modulus G^''(φ) and storage modulus G^'(φ) shows plateau at lower temperatures when the systems are not relaxed. In this situation the specific heat (Cv) peak corresponds to the self-assembly of the system, at lower temperatures the specific heat begins to plateau. Similarities of the dynamic features found for telechelic melts with those observed in glass-forming liquids and entangled polymers have been shown. Furthremore, using an athermal 'probe', the properties of these materials is being distinctly classified as 'strong' glass or physical gels.

  10. Viscoelastic response of a model endothelial glycocalyx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nijenhuis, Nadja; Mizuno, Daisuke; Spaan, Jos A. E.; Schmidt, Christoph F.

    2009-06-01

    Many cells cover themselves with a multifunctional polymer coat, the pericellular matrix (PCM), to mediate mechanical interactions with the environment. A particular PCM, the endothelial glycocalyx (EG), is formed by vascular endothelial cells at their luminal side, forming a mechanical interface between the flowing blood and the endothelial cell layer. The glycosaminoglycan (GAG) hyaluronan (HA) is involved in the main functions of the EG, mechanotransduction of fluid shear stress and molecular sieving. HA, due to its length, is the only GAG in the EG or any other PCM able to form an entangled network. The mechanical functions of the EG are, however, impaired when any one of its components is removed. We here used microrheology to measure the effect of the EG constituents heparan sulfate, chondroitin sulfate, whole blood plasma and albumin on the high-bandwidth mechanical properties of a HA solution. Furthermore, we probed the effect of the hyaldherin aggrecan, a constituent of the PCM of chondrocytes, and very similar to versican (present in the PCM of various cells, and possibly in the EG). We show that components directly interacting with HA (chondroitin sulfate and aggrecan) can increase the viscoelastic shear modulus of the polymer composite.

  11. Modeling Electrically Active Viscoelastic Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sitikantha; Brownell, William E.; Spector, Alexander A.

    2012-01-01

    The membrane protein prestin is native to the cochlear outer hair cell that is crucial to the ear's amplification and frequency selectivity throughout the whole acoustic frequency range. The outer hair cell exhibits interrelated dimensional changes, force generation, and electric charge transfer. Cells transfected with prestin acquire unique active properties similar to those in the native cell that have also been useful in understanding the process. Here we propose a model describing the major electromechanical features of such active membranes. The model derived from thermodynamic principles is in the form of integral relationships between the history of voltage and membrane resultants as independent variables and the charge density and strains as dependent variables. The proposed model is applied to the analysis of an active force produced by the outer hair cell in response to a harmonic electric field. Our analysis reveals the mechanism of the outer hair cell active (isometric) force having an almost constant amplitude and phase up to 80 kHz. We found that the frequency-invariance of the force is a result of interplay between the electrical filtering associated with prestin and power law viscoelasticity of the surrounding membrane. Paradoxically, the membrane viscoelasticity boosts the force balancing the electrical filtering effect. We also consider various modes of electromechanical coupling in membrane with prestin associated with mechanical perturbations in the cell. We consider pressure or strains applied step-wise or at a constant rate and compute the time course of the resulting electric charge. The results obtained here are important for the analysis of electromechanical properties of membranes, cells, and biological materials as well as for a better understanding of the mechanism of hearing and the role of the protein prestin in this mechanism. PMID:22701528

  12. Quantitative nondestructive characterization of visco-elastic materials at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Aizawa, Tatsuhiko; Kihara, Junji; Ohno, Jun

    1995-11-01

    New anvil apparatus was developed to realize high pressure atmosphere suitable to investigation of viscoelastic behaviors of such soft materials as polymers, lubricants, proteins and so forth. In addition, ultrasonic spectroscopy system was also newly constructed to make quantitative nondestructive evaluation of elasticity and viscosity of soft materials at high pressure. In order to demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of the developed system and methodology for quantitative nondestructive visco-elastic characterization, various silicone oils are employed, and measured spectra are compared to the theoretical results calculated by the three linear element model.

  13. Transient responses of an axially accelerating viscoelastic string constituted by a fractional differentiation law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Li-Qun; Zhao, Wei-Jia; Zu, Jean W.

    2004-12-01

    This paper deals with the transverse vibration of an initially stressed moving viscoelastic string obeying a fractional differentiation constitutive law. The governing equation is derived from Newtonian second law of motion, and reduced to a set of non-linear differential-integral equations based on Galerkin's truncation. A numerical approach is proposed to solve numerically the differential-integral equation through developing an approximate expression of the fractional derivatives involved. Some numerical examples are presented to highlight the effects of viscoelastic parameters and frequencies of parametric excitations on the transient responses of the axially moving string.

  14. Viscoelastic properties of healthy human artery measured in saline solution by AFM based indentation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Lundkvist, A.; Lilleodden, E.; Sickhaus, W.; Kinney, J.; Pruitt, L.; Balooch, M.

    1998-02-09

    Using an Atomic Force Microscope with an attachment for indentation, we have measured local, in vitro mechanical properties of healthy femoral artery tissue held in saline solution. The elastic modulus (34. 3 kPa) and viscoelastic response ({tau}sub{epsilon} {equals} 16.9 s and {tau}sub{sigma} {equals} 29.3 s) of the unstretched,intimal vessel wall have been determined using Sneddon theory and a three element model(standard linear solid) for viscoelastic materials. The procedures necessary to employ the indenting attachment to detect elastic moduli in the kPa range in liquid are described.

  15. Crustal deformation, the earthquake cycle, and models of viscoelastic flow in the asthenosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.; Kramer, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    The crustal deformation patterns associated with the earthquake cycle can depend strongly on the rheological properties of subcrustal material. Substantial deviations from the simple patterns for a uniformly elastic earth are expected when viscoelastic flow of subcrustal material is considered. The detailed description of the deformation pattern and in particular the surface displacements, displacement rates, strains, and strain rates depend on the structure and geometry of the material near the seismogenic zone. The origin of some of these differences are resolved by analyzing several different linear viscoelastic models with a common finite element computational technique. The models involve strike-slip faulting and include a thin channel asthenosphere model, a model with a varying thickness lithosphere, and a model with a viscoelastic inclusion below the brittle slip plane. The calculations reveal that the surface deformation pattern is most sensitive to the rheology of the material that lies below the slip plane in a volume whose extent is a few times the fault depth. If this material is viscoelastic, the surface deformation pattern resembles that of an elastic layer lying over a viscoelastic half-space. When the thickness or breath of the viscoelastic material is less than a few times the fault depth, then the surface deformation pattern is altered and geodetic measurements are potentially useful for studying the details of subsurface geometry and structure. Distinguishing among the various models is best accomplished by making geodetic measurements not only near the fault but out to distances equal to several times the fault depth. This is where the model differences are greatest; these differences will be most readily detected shortly after an earthquake when viscoelastic effects are most pronounced.

  16. Crustal deformation, the earthquake cycle, and models of viscoelastic flow in the asthenosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.; Kramer, M. J.

    1984-01-01

    The crustal deformation patterns associated with the earthquake cycle can depend strongly on the rheological properties of subcrustal material. Substantial deviations from the simple patterns for a uniformly elastic earth are expected when viscoelastic flow of subcrustal material is considered. The detailed description of the deformation pattern and in particular the surface displacements, displacement rates, strains, and strain rates depend on the structure and geometry of the material near the seismogenic zone. The origin of some of these differences are resolved by analyzing several different linear viscoelastic models with a common finite element computational technique. The models involve strike-slip faulting and include a thin channel asthenosphere model, a model with a varying thickness lithosphere, and a model with a viscoelastic inclusion below the brittle slip plane. The calculations reveal that the surface deformation pattern is most sensitive to the rheology of the material that lies below the slip plane in a volume whose extent is a few times the fault depth. If this material is viscoelastic, the surface deformation pattern resembles that of an elastic layer lying over a viscoelastic half-space. When the thickness or breath of the viscoelastic material is less than a few times the fault depth, then the surface deformation pattern is altered and geodetic measurements are potentially useful for studying the details of subsurface geometry and structure. Distinguishing among the various models is best accomplished by making geodetic measurements not only near the fault but out to distances equal to several times the fault depth. This is where the model differences are greatest; these differences will be most readily detected shortly after an earthquake when viscoelastic effects are most pronounced.

  17. Single Microbubble Measurements of Lipid Monolayer Viscoelastic Properties for Small-Amplitude Oscillations.

    PubMed

    Lum, Jordan S; Dove, Jacob D; Murray, Todd W; Borden, Mark A

    2016-09-20

    Lipid monolayer rheology plays an important role in a variety of interfacial phenomena, the physics of biological membranes, and the dynamic response of acoustic bubbles and drops. We show here measurements of lipid monolayer elasticity and viscosity for very small strains at megahertz frequency. Individual plasmonic microbubbles of 2-6 μm radius were photothermally activated with a short laser pulse, and the subsequent nanometer-scale radial oscillations during ring-down were monitored by optical scatter. This method provided average dynamic response measurements of single microbubbles. Each microbubble was modeled as an underdamped linear oscillator to determine the damping ratio and eigenfrequency, and thus the lipid monolayer viscosity and elasticity. Our nonisothermal measurement technique revealed viscoelastic trends for different lipid shell compositions. We observed a significant increase in surface elasticity with the lipid acyl chain length for 16 to 20 carbons, and this effect was explained by an intermolecular forces model that accounts for the lipid composition, packing, and hydration. The surface viscosity was found to be equivalent for these lipid shells. We also observed an anomalous decrease in elasticity and an increase in viscosity when increasing the acyl chain length from 20 to 22 carbons. These results illustrate the use of a novel nondestructive optical technique to investigate lipid monolayer rheology in new regimes of frequency and strain, possibly elucidating the phase behavior, as well as how the dynamic response of a microbubble can be tuned by the lipid intermolecular forces.

  18. Dynamic response of visco-elastic plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadıoǧlu, Fethi; Tekin, Gülçin

    2016-12-01

    In this study, a comprehensive analysis about the dynamic response characteristics of visco-elastic plates is given. To construct the functional in the Laplace-Carson domain for the analysis of visco-elastic plates based on the Kirchhoff hypothesis, functional analysis method is employed. By using this new energy functional in the Laplace-Carson domain, moment values that are important for engineers can be obtained directly with excellent accuracy and element equations can be written explicitly. Three-element model is considered for modelling the visco-elastic material behavior. The solutions obtained in the Laplace-Carson domain by utilizing mixed finite element formulation are transformed to the time domain using the Durbin's inverse Laplace transform technique. The proposed mixed finite element formulation is shown to be simple to implement and gives satisfactory results for dynamic response of visco-elastic plates.

  19. Dynamics and Stability of Rolling Viscoelastic Tires

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, Trevor

    2013-04-30

    Current steady state rolling tire calculations often do not include treads because treads destroy the rotational symmetry of the tire. We describe two methodologies to compute time periodic solutions of a two-dimensional viscoelastic tire with treads: solving a minimization problem and solving a system of equations. We also expand on work by Oden and Lin on free spinning rolling elastic tires in which they disovered a hierachy of N-peak steady state standing wave solutions. In addition to discovering a two-dimensional hierarchy of standing wave solutions that includes their N-peak hiearchy, we consider the eects of viscoelasticity on the standing wave solutions. Finally, a commonplace model of viscoelasticity used in our numerical experiments led to non-physical elastic energy growth for large tire speeds. We show that a viscoelastic model of Govindjee and Reese remedies the problem.

  20. Europa's surface composition from near-infrared observations: A comparison of results from linear mixture modeling and radiative transfer modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirley, James H.; Jamieson, Corey S.; Dalton, J. Bradley

    2016-08-01

    Quantitative estimates of the abundance of surface materials and of water ice particle grain sizes at five widely separated locations on the surface of Europa have been obtained by two independent methods in order to search for possible discrepancies that may be attributed to differences in the methods employed. Results of radiative transfer (RT) compositional modeling (also known as intimate mixture modeling) from two prior studies are here employed without modification. Areal (or "checkerboard") mixture modeling, also known as linear mixture (LM) modeling, was performed to allow direct comparisons. The failure to model scattering processes (whose effects may be strongly nonlinear) in the LM approach is recognized as a potential source of errors. RT modeling accounts for nonlinear spectral responses due to scattering but is subject to other uncertainties. By comparing abundance estimates for H2SO4 · nH2O and water ice, obtained through both methods as applied to identical spectra, we may gain some insight into the importance of "volume scattering" effects for investigations of Europa's surface composition. We find that both methods return similar abundances for each location analyzed; linear correlation coefficients of ≥ 0.98 are found between the derived H2SO4 · nH2O and water ice abundances returned by both methods. We thus find no evidence of a significant influence of volume scattering on the compositional solutions obtained by LM modeling for these locations. Some differences in the results obtained for water ice grain sizes are attributed to the limited selection of candidate materials allowed in the RT investigations.

  1. Linear electric field mass analysis: a technique for three-dimensional high mass resolution space plasma composition measurements.

    PubMed Central

    McComas, D J; Nordholt, J E; Bame, S J; Barraclough, B L; Gosling, J T

    1990-01-01

    A revolutionary type of three-dimensional space plasma composition analyzer has been developed that combines very high-resolution mass composition measurements on a fraction of the incident ions simultaneously with lower mass resolution but high sensitivity measurements of the remaining population in a single compact and robust sensor design. Whereas the lower mass resolution measurements are achieved using conventional energy/charge (E/q) and linear time-of-flight analysis, the high mass resolution measurements are made by timing reflected E/q analyzed ions in a linear electric field (LEF). In a LEF the restoring (reflecting) force that an ion experiences in the direction parallel to the field is proportional to the depth it travels into the LEF region, and its equation of motion in that direction is that of a simple harmonic oscillator. Consequently, an ion's travel time is independent of its initial angle and energy and is simply proportional to the square root of the ion's mass/charge (m/q). The measured m/q resolution, (m/q)/Delta(m/q), for a small LEF-based prototype that we have developed and tested is approximately 20. In addition, our laboratory measurements with the prototype instrument show that characteristic time-of-flight spectra allow the resolution of atomic and molecular species with nearly identical m/q values. The measured response of the prototype is in excellent agreement with computer simulations of the device. Advanced design work using this computer simulation indicates that three-dimensional plasma composition analyzers with m/q resolutions of at least 50 are readily achievable. PMID:11607095

  2. Constitutive Equations: Plastic and Viscoelastic Properties. (Latest citations from the Aerospace Database)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning analytical techniques using constitutive equations, applied to materials under stress. The properties explored with these techniques include viscoelasticity, thermoelasticity, and plasticity. While many of the references are general as to material type, most refer to specific metals or composites, or to specific shapes, such as flat plate or spherical vessels.

  3. Mixed FE analysis of viscoelastic cylindrical helixes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arıbaş, Ü. N.; Omurtag, M. H.

    2012-09-01

    In this study, analysis of viscoelastic cylindrical helixes with circular and square cross section is investigated by using the mixed FEM based on Timoshenko beam theory. The Kelvin model is used for the viscoelastic behavior. The analysis is performed in the Laplace domain and the results are transformed back to time domain numerically by Modified Durbin algorithm. The outcome is quite satisfactory besides the necessary engineering precision.

  4. Numerical solution of an elastic and viscoelastic gravitational models by the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjona Almodóvar, A.; Chacón Rebollo, T.; Gómez Marmol, M.

    2014-12-01

    Volcanic areas present a lower effective viscosity than usually in the Earth's crust. Both the elastic-gravitational and the viscoelastic-gravitational models allow the computation of gravity, deformation, and gravitational potential changes in order to investigate crustal deformations of Earth (see for instance Battaglia & Segall, 2004; Fernández et al. 1999, 2001; Rundle 1980 and 1983). These models can be represented by a coupled system of linear parabolic (for the elastic deformations), hyperbolic (for the viscoelastic deformations) and elliptic partial differential equations (for gravitational potential changes) (see for instance Arjona et al. 2008 and 2010). The existence and uniqueness of weak solutions for both the elastic-gravitational and viscoelastic-gravitational problem was demonstrated in Arjona et al. (2008 and 2014). The stabilization to solutions of the associated stationary system was proved in Arjona and Díaz (2007). Here we consider the internal source as response to the effect of a pressurized magma reservoir into a multilayered, elastic-gravitational and viscoelastic-gravitational earth model. We introduce the numerical analysis of a simplified steady elastic-gravitational model, solved by means of the finite element method. We also present some numerical tests in realistic situations that confirm the predictions of theoretical order of convergence. Finally, we describe the methodology for both the elastic-gravitational and the viscoelastic-gravitational models using 2D and 3D test examples performed with FreeFEM++.

  5. Droplet impact on soft viscoelastic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Chen, Longquan; Bonaccurso, Elmar; Deng, Peigang; Zhang, Haibo

    2016-12-01

    In this work, we experimentally investigate the impact of water droplets onto soft viscoelastic surfaces with a wide range of impact velocities. Several impact phenomena, which depend on the dynamic interaction between the droplets and viscoelastic surfaces, have been identified and analyzed. At low We, complete rebound is observed when the impact velocity is between a lower and an upper threshold, beyond which droplets are deposited on the surface after impact. At intermediate We, entrapment of an air bubble inside the impinging droplets is found on soft surfaces, while a bubble entrapment on the surface is observed on rigid surfaces. At high We, partial rebound is only identified on the most rigid surface at We≳92. Rebounding droplets behave similarly to elastic drops rebounding on superhydrophobic surfaces and the impact process is independent of surface viscoelasticity. Further, surface viscoelasticity does not influence drop spreading after impact-as the surfaces behave like rigid surfaces-but it does affect drop recoiling. Also, the postimpact drop oscillation on soft viscoelastic surfaces is influenced by dynamic wettability of these surfaces. Comparing sessile drop oscillation with a damped harmonic oscillator allows us to conclude that surface viscoelasticity affects the damping coefficient and liquid surface tension sets the spring constant of the system.

  6. Droplet impact on soft viscoelastic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Longquan; Bonaccurso, Elmar; Deng, Peigang; Zhang, Haibo

    2016-12-01

    In this work, we experimentally investigate the impact of water droplets onto soft viscoelastic surfaces with a wide range of impact velocities. Several impact phenomena, which depend on the dynamic interaction between the droplets and viscoelastic surfaces, have been identified and analyzed. At low We , complete rebound is observed when the impact velocity is between a lower and an upper threshold, beyond which droplets are deposited on the surface after impact. At intermediate We , entrapment of an air bubble inside the impinging droplets is found on soft surfaces, while a bubble entrapment on the surface is observed on rigid surfaces. At high We , partial rebound is only identified on the most rigid surface at We ≳92 . Rebounding droplets behave similarly to elastic drops rebounding on superhydrophobic surfaces and the impact process is independent of surface viscoelasticity. Further, surface viscoelasticity does not influence drop spreading after impact—as the surfaces behave like rigid surfaces—but it does affect drop recoiling. Also, the postimpact drop oscillation on soft viscoelastic surfaces is influenced by dynamic wettability of these surfaces. Comparing sessile drop oscillation with a damped harmonic oscillator allows us to conclude that surface viscoelasticity affects the damping coefficient and liquid surface tension sets the spring constant of the system.

  7. Nonlinear viscoelastic characterization of bovine trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Manda, Krishnagoud; Wallace, Robert J; Xie, Shuqiao; Levrero-Florencio, Francesc; Pankaj, Pankaj

    2017-02-01

    The time-independent elastic properties of trabecular bone have been extensively investigated, and several stiffness-density relations have been proposed. Although it is recognized that trabecular bone exhibits time-dependent mechanical behaviour, a property of viscoelastic materials, the characterization of this behaviour has received limited attention. The objective of the present study was to investigate the time-dependent behaviour of bovine trabecular bone through a series of compressive creep-recovery experiments and to identify its nonlinear constitutive viscoelastic material parameters. Uniaxial compressive creep and recovery experiments at multiple loads were performed on cylindrical bovine trabecular bone samples ([Formula: see text]). Creep response was found to be significant and always comprised of recoverable and irrecoverable strains, even at low stress/strain levels. This response was also found to vary nonlinearly with applied stress. A systematic methodology was developed to separate recoverable (nonlinear viscoelastic) and irrecoverable (permanent) strains from the total experimental strain response. We found that Schapery's nonlinear viscoelastic constitutive model describes the viscoelastic response of the trabecular bone, and parameters associated with this model were estimated from the multiple load creep-recovery (MLCR) experiments. Nonlinear viscoelastic recovery compliance was found to have a decreasing and then increasing trend with increasing stress level, indicating possible stiffening and softening behaviour of trabecular bone due to creep. The obtained parameters from MLCR tests, expressed as second-order polynomial functions of stress, showed a similar trend for all the samples, and also demonstrate stiffening-softening behaviour with increasing stress.

  8. Ligament Mediated Fragmentation of Viscoelastic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshavarz, Bavand; Houze, Eric C.; Moore, John R.; Koerner, Michael R.; McKinley, Gareth H.

    2016-10-01

    The breakup and atomization of complex fluids can be markedly different than the analogous processes in a simple Newtonian fluid. Atomization of paint, combustion of fuels containing antimisting agents, as well as physiological processes such as sneezing are common examples in which the atomized liquid contains synthetic or biological macromolecules that result in viscoelastic fluid characteristics. Here, we investigate the ligament-mediated fragmentation dynamics of viscoelastic fluids in three different canonical flows. The size distributions measured in each viscoelastic fragmentation process show a systematic broadening from the Newtonian solvent. In each case, the droplet sizes are well described by Gamma distributions which correspond to a fragmentation-coalescence scenario. We use a prototypical axial step strain experiment together with high-speed video imaging to show that this broadening results from the pronounced change in the corrugated shape of viscoelastic ligaments as they separate from the liquid core. These corrugations saturate in amplitude and the measured distributions for viscoelastic liquids in each process are given by a universal probability density function, corresponding to a Gamma distribution with nmin=4 . The breadth of this size distribution for viscoelastic filaments is shown to be constrained by a geometrical limit which can not be exceeded in ligament-mediated fragmentation phenomena.

  9. Pseudospectral modeling and dispersion analysis of Rayleigh waves in viscoelastic media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, K.; Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Chen, C.

    2011-01-01

    Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) is one of the most widely used techniques in environmental and engineering geophysics to determine shear-wave velocities and dynamic properties, which is based on the elastic layered system theory. Wave propagation in the Earth, however, has been recognized as viscoelastic and the propagation of Rayleigh waves presents substantial differences in viscoelastic media as compared with elastic media. Therefore, it is necessary to carry out numerical simulation and dispersion analysis of Rayleigh waves in viscoelastic media to better understand Rayleigh-wave behaviors in the real world. We apply a pseudospectral method to the calculation of the spatial derivatives using a Chebyshev difference operator in the vertical direction and a Fourier difference operator in the horizontal direction based on the velocity-stress elastodynamic equations and relations of linear viscoelastic solids. This approach stretches the spatial discrete grid to have a minimum grid size near the free surface so that high accuracy and resolution are achieved at the free surface, which allows an effective incorporation of the free surface boundary conditions since the Chebyshev method is nonperiodic. We first use an elastic homogeneous half-space model to demonstrate the accuracy of the pseudospectral method comparing with the analytical solution, and verify the correctness of the numerical modeling results for a viscoelastic half-space comparing the phase velocities of Rayleigh wave between the theoretical values and the dispersive image generated by high-resolution linear Radon transform. We then simulate three types of two-layer models to analyze dispersive-energy characteristics for near-surface applications. Results demonstrate that the phase velocity of Rayleigh waves in viscoelastic media is relatively higher than in elastic media and the fundamental mode increases by 10-16% when the frequency is above 10. Hz due to the velocity dispersion of P

  10. Visco-elastic effects on wave dispersion in three-phase acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krushynska, A. O.; Kouznetsova, V. G.; Geers, M. G. D.

    2016-11-01

    This paper studies the wave attenuation performance of dissipative solid acoustic metamaterials (AMMs) with local resonators possessing subwavelength band gaps. The metamaterial is composed of dense rubber-coated inclusions of a circular shape embedded periodically in a matrix medium. Visco-elastic material losses present in a matrix and/or resonator coating are introduced by either the Kelvin-Voigt or generalized Maxwell models. Numerical solutions are obtained in the frequency domain by means of k(ω)-approach combined with the finite element method. Spatially attenuating waves are described by real frequencies ω and complex-valued wave vectors k. Complete 3D band structure diagrams including complex-valued pass bands are evaluated for the undamped linear elastic and several visco-elastic AMM cases. The changes in the band diagrams due to the visco-elasticity are discussed in detail; the comparison between the two visco-elastic models representing artificial (Kelvin-Voigt model) and experimentally characterized (generalized Maxwell model) damping is performed. The interpretation of the results is facilitated by using attenuation and transmission spectra. Two mechanisms of the energy absorption, i.e. due to the resonance of the inclusions and dissipative effects in the materials, are discussed separately. It is found that the visco-elastic damping of the matrix material decreases the attenuation performance of AMMs within band gaps; however, if the matrix material is slightly damped, it can be modeled as linear elastic without the loss of accuracy given the resonator coating is dissipative. This study also demonstrates that visco-elastic losses properly introduced in the resonator coating improve the attenuation bandwidth of AMMs although the attenuation on the resonance peaks is reduced.

  11. Elastic and viscoelastic properties of a type I collagen fiber.

    PubMed

    Sopakayang, Ratchada; De Vita, Raffaella; Kwansa, Albert; Freeman, Joseph W

    2012-01-21

    A new mathematical model is presented to describe the elastic and viscoelastic properties of a single collagen fiber. The model is formulated by accounting for the mechanical contribution of the collagen fiber's main constituents: the microfibrils, the interfibrillar matrix and crosslinks. The collagen fiber is modeled as a linear elastic spring, which represents the mechanical contribution of the microfibrils, and an arrangement in parallel of elastic springs and viscous dashpots, which represent the mechanical contributions of the crosslinks and interfibrillar matrix, respectively. The linear elastic spring and the arrangement in parallel of elastic springs and viscous dashpots are then connected in series. The crosslinks are assumed to gradually break under strain and, consequently, the interfibrillar is assumed to change its viscous properties. Incremental stress relaxation tests are conducted on dry collagen fibers reconstituted from rat tail tendons to determine their elastic and viscoelastic properties. The elastic and total stress-strain curves and the stress relaxation at different levels of strain collected by performing these tests are then used to estimate the parameters of the model and evaluate its predictive capabilities.

  12. Atomistic Mechanisms for Viscoelastic Damping in Inorganic Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranganathan, Raghavan

    Viscoelasticity, a ubiquitous material property, can be tuned to engineer a wide range of fascinating applications such as mechanical dampers, artificial tissues, functional foams and optoelectronics, among others. Traditionally, soft matter such as polymers and polymer composites have been used extensively for viscoelastic damping applications, owing to the inherent viscous nature of interactions between polymer chains. Although this leads to good damping characteristics, the stiffness in these materials is low, which in turn leads to limitations. In this context, hard inorganic materials and composites are promising candidates for enhanced damping, owing to their large stiffness and, in some cases large loss modulus. Viscoelasticity in these materials has been relatively unexplored and atomistic mechanisms responsible for damping are not apparent. Therefore, the overarching goal of this work is to understand mechanisms for viscoelastic damping in various classes of inorganic composites and alloys at an atomistic level from molecular dynamics simulations. We show that oscillatory shear deformation serves as a powerful probe to explain mechanisms for exceptional damping in hitherto unexplored systems. The first class of inorganic materials consists of crystalline phases of a stiff inclusion in a soft matrix. The two crystals within the composite, namely the soft and a stiff phase, individually show a highly elastic behavior and a very small loss modulus. On the other hand, a composite with the two phases is seen to exhibit damping that is about 20 times larger than predicted theoretical bounds. The primary reason for the damping is due to large anharmonicity in phonon-phonon coupling, resulting from the composite microstructure. A concomitant effect is the distribution of shear strain, which is observed to be highly inhomogeneous and mostly concentrated in the soft phase. Interestingly, the shear frequency at which the damping is greatest is observed to scale with

  13. A kinematically driven anisotropic viscoelastic constitutive model applied to tires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Arthur R.; Tanner, John A.; Mason, Angela J.

    1995-08-01

    Aircraft tires are composite structures manufactured with viscoelastic materials such as carbon black filled rubber and nylon cords. When loaded they experience large deflections and moderately large strains. Detailed structural models of tires require the use of either nonlinear shell or nonlinear three dimensional solid finite elements. Computational predictions of the dynamic response of tires must consider the composite viscoelastic material behavior in a realistic fashion. We describe a modification to a nonlinear anisotropic shell finite element so it can be used to model viscoelastic stresses during general deformations. The model is developed by introducing internal variables of the type used to model elastic strain energy. The internal variables are strains, curvatures, and transverse shear angles which are in a one-to-one correspondence with the generalized coordinates used to model the elastic strain energy for nonlinear response. A difference-relaxation equation is used to relate changes in the observable strain field to changes in the internal strain field. The internal stress state is introduced into the equilibrium equations by converting it to nodal loads associated with the element's displacement degrees of freedom. In this form the tangent matrix in the Newton-Raphson solution algorithm is not modified from its form for the nonlinear statics problem. Only the gradient vector is modified and the modification is not computationally costly. The existing finite element model for the Space Shuttle nose gear tire is used to provide examples of the algorithm. In the first example, the tire's rim is displaced at a constant rate up to a fixed value. In the second example, the tire's rim is enforced to follow a saw tooth load and unload curve to generate hysteresis loops.

  14. A kinematically driven anisotropic viscoelastic constitutive model applied to tires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Arthur R.; Tanner, John A.; Mason, Angela J.

    1995-01-01

    Aircraft tires are composite structures manufactured with viscoelastic materials such as carbon black filled rubber and nylon cords. When loaded they experience large deflections and moderately large strains. Detailed structural models of tires require the use of either nonlinear shell or nonlinear three dimensional solid finite elements. Computational predictions of the dynamic response of tires must consider the composite viscoelastic material behavior in a realistic fashion. We describe a modification to a nonlinear anisotropic shell finite element so it can be used to model viscoelastic stresses during general deformations. The model is developed by introducing internal variables of the type used to model elastic strain energy. The internal variables are strains, curvatures, and transverse shear angles which are in a one-to-one correspondence with the generalized coordinates used to model the elastic strain energy for nonlinear response. A difference-relaxation equation is used to relate changes in the observable strain field to changes in the internal strain field. The internal stress state is introduced into the equilibrium equations by converting it to nodal loads associated with the element's displacement degrees of freedom. In this form the tangent matrix in the Newton-Raphson solution algorithm is not modified from its form for the nonlinear statics problem. Only the gradient vector is modified and the modification is not computationally costly. The existing finite element model for the Space Shuttle nose gear tire is used to provide examples of the algorithm. In the first example, the tire's rim is displaced at a constant rate up to a fixed value. In the second example, the tire's rim is enforced to follow a saw tooth load and unload curve to generate hysteresis loops.

  15. Finite element method for viscoelastic medium with damage and the application to structural analysis of solid rocket motor grain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Bin; Shen, ZhiBin; Duan, JingBo; Tang, GuoJin

    2014-05-01

    This paper studies the damage-viscoelastic behavior of composite solid propellants of solid rocket motors (SRM). Based on viscoelastic theories and strain equivalent hypothesis in damage mechanics, a three-dimensional (3-D) nonlinear viscoelastic constitutive model incorporating with damage is developed. The resulting viscoelastic constitutive equations are numerically discretized by integration algorithm, and a stress-updating method is presented by solving nonlinear equations according to the Newton-Raphson method. A material subroutine of stress-updating is made up and embedded into commercial code of Abaqus. The material subroutine is validated through typical examples. Our results indicate that the finite element results are in good agreement with the analytical ones and have high accuracy, and the suggested method and designed subroutine are efficient and can be further applied to damage-coupling structural analysis of practical SRM grain.

  16. Accelerated viscoelastic characterization of T300-5208 graphite-epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, M. E.; Brinson, H. F.

    1985-01-01

    A viscoelastic response scheme for the accelerated characterization of polymer-based composite laminates in applied to T300/5208 graphite/epoxy. The response of uni-directional specimens is modeled. The transient component of the viscoelastic creep compliance is assumed to follow a power law approximation. A recursive relationship is developed, based upon the Schapery single-integral equation, which allows approximation of a continuous time-varying uniaxial load using discrete steps in stress. The viscoelastic response of T300/5208 to transverse normal and shear stresses is determined unsing 90 deg and 10 deg off-axis tensile specimens. In each case the seven viscoelastic material parameters required in the analysis are determined experimentally using short-term creep and creep recovery tests. It is shown that an accurate measure of the power law exponent is crucial for accurate long-term prediction. A short term test cycle selection procedure is proposed, which should provide useful guidelines for the evaluation of other viscoelastic materials.

  17. Viscoelastic properties of levan polysaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noll, Kenneth; Rende, Deniz; Ozisik, Rahmi; Toksoy-Oner, Ebru

    2014-03-01

    Levan is a naturally occurring polysaccharide that is composed of β-D-fructofuranose units with β(2-6) linkages between fructose rings. It is synthesized by the action of a secreted levansucrase (EC 2.4.1.10) that converts sucrose into the levan externally (exopolysaccharide). Levan is a homopolysaccharide that is non-toxic, water soluble,, and has anti-tumor activity and low immunological response. Therefore, levan presents great potential to be used as a novel functional biopolymer in foods, feeds, cosmetics, pharmaceutical and chemical industries. Despite these favorable properties, levan has a moderately low mechanical properties and poor film forming capability. In the current study, the agglomeration behavior of levan in water and in saline solutions was investigated at 298 and 310 K by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The viscoelastic properties of neat and oxidized levan films were studied via nanoindentation experiments in the quasi-static and dynamic modes The material is partially based upon work supported by NSF under Grant Nos. 1200270 and 1003574, and TUBITAK 111M232.

  18. Nonlinear Dynamics in Viscoelastic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majmudar, Trushant; Varagnat, Matthieu; McKinley, Gareth

    2008-11-01

    Instabilities in free surface continuous jets of non-Newtonian fluids, although relevant for many industrial processes, remain poorly understood in terms of fundamental fluid dynamics. Inviscid, and viscous Newtonian jets have been studied in considerable detail, both theoretically and experimentally. Instability in viscous jets leads to regular periodic coiling of the jet, which exhibits a non-trivial frequency dependence with the height of the fall. Here we present a systematic study of the effect of viscoelasticity on the dynamics of continuous jets of worm-like micellar surfactant solutions of varying viscosities and elasticities. We observe complex nonlinear spatio-temporal dynamics of the jet, and uncover a transition from periodic to quasi-periodic to a multi-frequency, broad-spectrum dynamics. Beyond this regime, the jet dynamics smoothly crosses over to exhibit the ``leaping shampoo'' or the Kaye effect. We examine different dynamical regimes in terms of scaling variables, which depend on the geometry (dimensionless height), kinematics (dimensionless flow rate), and the fluid properties (elasto-gravity number) and present a regime map of the dynamics of the jet in terms of these dimensionless variables.

  19. Nonlinear Dynamics in Viscoelastic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majmudar, Trushant; Varagnat, Matthieu; McKinley, Gareth

    2009-03-01

    Instabilities in free surface continuous jets of non-Newtonian fluids, although relevant for many industrial processes, remain poorly understood in terms of fundamental fluid dynamics. Inviscid, and viscous Newtonian jets have been studied in considerable detail, both theoretically and experimentally. Instability in viscous jets leads to regular periodic coiling of the jet, which exhibits a non-trivial frequency dependence with the height of the fall. Here we present a systematic study of the effect of viscoelasticity on the dynamics of continuous jets of worm-like micellar surfactant solutions of varying viscosities and elasticities. We observe complex nonlinear spatio-temporal dynamics of the jet, and uncover a transition from periodic to quasi-periodic to a multi-frequency, broad-spectrum dynamics. Beyond this regime, the jet dynamics smoothly crosses over to exhibit the ``leaping shampoo'' or the Kaye effect. We examine different dynamical regimes in terms of scaling variables, which depend on the geometry (dimensionless height), kinematics (dimensionless flow rate), and the fluid properties (elasto-gravity number) and present a regime map of the dynamics of the jet in terms of these dimensionless variables.

  20. Viscoelasticity of model interphase chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valet, Manon; Rosa, Angelo

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the viscoelastic response of model interphase chromosomes by tracking the three-dimensional motion of hundreds of dispersed Brownian particles of sizes ranging from the thickness of the chromatin fiber up to slightly above the mesh size of the chromatin solution. In agreement with previous computational studies on polymer solutions and melts, we found that the large-time behaviour of the diffusion coefficient and the experienced viscosity of moving particles as functions of particle size deviate from the traditional Stokes-Einstein relation and agree with a recent scaling theory of diffusion of non-sticky particles in polymer solutions. Interestingly, we found that at short times large particles are temporarily "caged" by chromatin spatial constraints, which thus form effective domains whose sizes match remarkably well with recent experimental results for micro-tracers inside interphase nuclei. Finally, by employing a known mathematical relation between the time mean-square displacement of tracked particles and the complex shear modulus of the surrounding solution, we calculated the elastic and viscous moduli of interphase chromosomes.

  1. Passive vibration control in rotor dynamics: Optimization of composed support using viscoelastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Eduardo Afonso; Pereira, Jucélio Tomás; Alberto Bavastri, Carlos

    2015-09-01

    One of the major reasons for inserting damping into bearings is that rotating machines are often requested in critical functioning conditions having sometimes to function under dynamic instability or close to critical speeds. Hydrodynamic and magnetic bearings have usually been used for this purpose, but they present limitations regarding costs and operation, rendering the use of viscoelastic supports a feasible solution for vibration control in rotating machines. Most papers in the area use simple analytic or single degree of freedom models for the rotor as well as classic mechanical models of linear viscoelasticity for the support - like Maxwell, Kelvin-Voigt, Zenner, four-element, GHM models and even frequency independent models - but they lack the accuracy of fractional models in a large range of frequency and temperature regarding the same number of coefficients. Even in those works, the need to consider the addition of degrees of freedom to the support is evident. However, so far no paper has been published focusing on a methodology to determine the optimal constructive form for any viscoelastic support in which the rotor is discretized by finite elements associated to an accurate model for characterizing the viscoelastic material. In general, the support is meant to be a simple isolation system, and the fact the stiffness matrix is complex and frequency-temperature dependent - due to its viscoelastic properties - forces the traditional methods to require an extremely long computing time, thus rendering them too time consuming in an optimization environment. The present work presents a robust methodology based mainly on generalized equivalent parameters (GEP) - for an optimal design of viscoelastic supports for rotating machinery - aiming at minimizing the unbalance frequency response of the system using a hybrid optimization technique (genetic algorithms and Nelder-Mead method). The rotor is modeled based on the finite element method using Timoshenko's thick

  2. Linear relationship between increasing amounts of extruded linseed in dairy cow diet and milk fatty acid composition and butter properties.

    PubMed

    Hurtaud, C; Faucon, F; Couvreur, S; Peyraud, J-L

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this experiment was to compare the effects of increasing amounts of extruded linseed in dairy cow diet on milk fat yield, milk fatty acid (FA) composition, milk fat globule size, and butter properties. Thirty-six Prim'Holstein cows at 104 d in milk were sorted into 3 groups by milk production and milk fat globule size. Three diets were assigned: a total mixed ration (control) consisting of corn silage (70%) and concentrate (30%), or a supplemented ration based on the control ration but where part of the concentrate energy was replaced on a dry matter basis by 2.1% (LIN1) or 4.3% (LIN2) extruded linseed. The increased amounts of extruded linseed linearly decreased milk fat content and milk fat globule size and linearly increased the percentage of milk unsaturated FA, specifically alpha-linolenic acid and trans FA. Extruded linseed had no significant effect on butter color or on the sensory properties of butters, with only butter texture in the mouth improved. The LIN2 treatment induced a net improvement of milk nutritional properties but also created problems with transforming the cream into butter. The butters obtained were highly spreadable and melt-in-the-mouth, with no pronounced deficiency in taste. The LIN1 treatment appeared to offer a good tradeoff of improved milk FA profile and little effect on butter-making while still offering butters with improved functional properties.

  3. Optically operated linear electrooptical effect in δ-Bi1-xNdxB3O6/polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrunik, M.; Ebothé, J.; Majchrowski, A.; Michel, J.; Jaroszewicz, L. R.; Kityk, I. V.

    2016-04-01

    A novel type of laser operated polymer composites based on orthorhombic δ-Bi1-xNdxB3O6 powders (where x=0.025÷0.100) was prepared. The powders were synthesized by means of polymeric precursor method through the citrate way. They were analyzed using XRD, and HRTEM methods, then embedded into polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) photopolymer. During solidification the additional DC-electric field alignment was carried out. The composite films with thickness up to 0.4 mm were studied using the Senarmont method at wavelength of CW He-Ne laser 633 nm with simultaneous application of the DC-electric field at 50 kHz frequency possessing rectangular symmetrical form. As a source of photoinducing beam we used polarized 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser radiation and its power density was varied using a Glan prism polarizer. The linear electrooptical (EO) effect measurements were carried out during and after Nd:YAG laser treatment at different temperatures. The laser stimulated EO effect was explored versus the Nd3+ content and temperature. It was shown that the Nd3+ ion content plays the crucial role in the observed EO effect efficiency. The contribution of the piezo-electrical and piezo-optical phenomena as well as phonons in the observed effects is discussed.

  4. A viscoelastic higher-order beam finite element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Arthur R.; Tressler, Alexander

    1996-01-01

    A viscoelastic internal variable constitutive theory is applied to a higher-order elastic beam theory and finite element formulation. The behavior of the viscous material in the beam is approximately modeled as a Maxwell solid. The finite element formulation requires additional sets of nodal variables for each relaxation time constant needed by the Maxwell solid. Recent developments in modeling viscoelastic material behavior with strain variables that are conjugate to the elastic strain measures are combined with advances in modeling through-the-thickness stresses and strains in thick beams. The result is a viscous thick-beam finite element that possesses superior characteristics for transient analysis since its nodal viscous forces are not linearly dependent an the nodal velocities, which is the case when damping matrices are used. Instead, the nodal viscous forces are directly dependent on the material's relaxation spectrum and the history of the nodal variables through a differential form of the constitutive law for a Maxwell solid. The thick beam quasistatic analysis is explored herein as a first step towards developing more complex viscoelastic models for thick plates and shells, and for dynamic analyses. The internal variable constitutive theory is derived directly from the Boltzmann superposition theorem. The mechanical strains and the conjugate internal strains are shown to be related through a system of first-order, ordinary differential equations. The total time-dependent stress is the superposition of its elastic and viscous components. Equations of motion for the solid are derived from the virtual work principle using the total time-dependent stress. Numerical examples for the problems of relaxation, creep, and cyclic creep are carried out for a beam made from an orthotropic Maxwell solid.

  5. Viscoelasticity of subcortical gray matter structures.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Curtis L; Schwarb, Hillary; D J McGarry, Matthew; Anderson, Aaron T; Huesmann, Graham R; Sutton, Bradley P; Cohen, Neal J

    2016-12-01

    Viscoelastic mechanical properties of the brain assessed with magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) are sensitive measures of microstructural tissue health in neurodegenerative conditions. Recent efforts have targeted measurements localized to specific neuroanatomical regions differentially affected in disease. In this work, we present a method for measuring the viscoelasticity in subcortical gray matter (SGM) structures, including the amygdala, hippocampus, caudate, putamen, pallidum, and thalamus. The method is based on incorporating high spatial resolution MRE imaging (1.6 mm isotropic voxels) with a mechanical inversion scheme designed to improve local measures in pre-defined regions (soft prior regularization [SPR]). We find that in 21 healthy, young volunteers SGM structures differ from each other in viscoelasticity, quantified as the shear stiffness and damping ratio, but also differ from the global viscoelasticity of the cerebrum. Through repeated examinations on a single volunteer, we estimate the uncertainty to be between 3 and 7% for each SGM measure. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the use of specific methodological considerations-higher spatial resolution and SPR-both decrease uncertainty and increase sensitivity of the SGM measures. The proposed method allows for reliable MRE measures of SGM viscoelasticity for future studies of neurodegenerative conditions. Hum Brain Mapp 37:4221-4233, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Size-dependent geometrically nonlinear free vibration analysis of fractional viscoelastic nanobeams based on the nonlocal elasticity theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, R.; Faraji Oskouie, M.; Gholami, R.

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades, mathematical modeling and engineering applications of fractional-order calculus have been extensively utilized to provide efficient simulation tools in the field of solid mechanics. In this paper, a nonlinear fractional nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli beam model is established using the concept of fractional derivative and nonlocal elasticity theory to investigate the size-dependent geometrically nonlinear free vibration of fractional viscoelastic nanobeams. The non-classical fractional integro-differential Euler-Bernoulli beam model contains the nonlocal parameter, viscoelasticity coefficient and order of the fractional derivative to interpret the size effect, viscoelastic material and fractional behavior in the nanoscale fractional viscoelastic structures, respectively. In the solution procedure, the Galerkin method is employed to reduce the fractional integro-partial differential governing equation to a fractional ordinary differential equation in the time domain. Afterwards, the predictor-corrector method is used to solve the nonlinear fractional time-dependent equation. Finally, the influences of nonlocal parameter, order of fractional derivative and viscoelasticity coefficient on the nonlinear time response of fractional viscoelastic nanobeams are discussed in detail. Moreover, comparisons are made between the time responses of linear and nonlinear models.

  7. Effect of 3-D viscoelastic structure on post-seismic relaxation from the 2004 M = 9.2 Sumatra earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.; Banerjee, P.; Grijalva, K.; Nagarajan, B.; Burgmann, R.

    2008-01-01

    The 2004 M=9.2 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake profoundly altered the state of stress in a large volume surrounding the ???1400 km long rupture. Induced mantle flow fields and coupled surface deformation are sensitive to the 3-D rheology structure. To predict the post-seismic motions from this earthquake, relaxation of a 3-D spherical viscoelastic earth model is simulated using the theory of coupled normal modes. The quasi-static deformation basis set and solution on the 3-D model is constructed using: a spherically stratified viscoelastic earth model with a linear stress-strain relation; an aspherical perturbation in viscoelastic structure; a 'static'mode basis set consisting of Earth's spheroidal and toroidal free oscillations; a "viscoelastic" mode basis set; and interaction kernels that describe the coupling among viscoelastic and static modes. Application to the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake illustrates the profound modification of the post-seismic flow field at depth by a slab structure and similarly large effects on the near-field post-seismic deformation field at Earth's surface. Comparison with post-seismic GPS observations illustrates the extent to which viscoelastic relaxation contributes to the regional post-seismic deformation. ?? Journal compilation ?? 2008 RAS.

  8. Parametric imaging of viscoelasticity using optical coherence elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijesinghe, Philip; McLaughlin, Robert A.; Sampson, David D.; Kennedy, Brendan F.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate imaging of soft tissue viscoelasticity using optical coherence elastography. Viscoelastic creep deformation is induced in tissue using step-like compressive loading and the resulting time-varying deformation is measured using phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography. From a series of co-located B-scans, we estimate the local strain rate as a function of time, and parameterize it using a four-parameter Kelvin-Voigt model of viscoelastic creep. The estimated viscoelastic strain and time constant are used to visualize viscoelastic creep in 2D, dual-parameter viscoelastograms. We demonstrate our technique on six silicone tissue-simulating phantoms spanning a range of viscoelastic parameters. As an example in soft tissue, we report viscoelastic contrast between muscle and connective tissue in fresh, ex vivo rat gastrocnemius muscle and mouse abdominal transection. Imaging viscoelastic creep deformation has the potential to provide complementary contrast to existing imaging modalities, and may provide greater insight into disease pathology.

  9. A computational study of two-phase viscoelastic systems in a capillary tube with a sudden contraction/expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izbassarov, Daulet; Muradoglu, Metin

    2016-01-01

    Two-phase viscoelastic systems are computationally studied in a pressure-driven flow with a sudden contraction and expansion using a finite-difference/front-tracking method. The effects of viscoelasticity in drop and bulk fluids are investigated including high Weissenberg and Reynolds number cases up to Wi = 100 and Re = 100. The Finitely Extensible Non-linear Elastic-Chilcott and Rallison (FENE-CR) model is used to account for the fluid viscoelasticity. Extensive computations are performed to examine drop dynamics for a wide range of parameters. It is found that viscoelasticity interacts with drop interface in a non-monotonic and complicated way, and the two-phase viscoelastic systems exhibit very rich dynamics especially in the expansion region. At high Re, the drop undergoes large deformation in the contraction region followed by strong shape oscillations in the downstream of the expansion. For a highly viscous drop, a re-entrant cavity develops in the contraction region at the trailing edge which, in certain cases, grows and eventually causes encapsulation of ambient fluid. The re-entrant cavity formation is initiated at the entrance of the contraction and is highly influenced by the viscoelasticity. Compared to the corresponding straight channel case, the effects of viscoelasticity are reversed in the constricted channel: Viscoelasticity in drop/continuous phase hinders/enhances formation of the re-entrant cavity and entrainment of ambient fluid into main drop. Encapsulation of ambient fluid into main droplet may be another route to produce a compound droplet in microfluidic applications.

  10. Dynamics of slender viscoelastic free jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forest, M. Gregory; Wang, Q.

    1994-08-01

    Previous studies of slender viscoelastic and Newtonian free surface jets have focused mainly on steady state predictions, guided primarily by industrial textile applications. Dynamical analyses and simulations of fiber flows, even the linearized stability analysis of nontrivial steady states, have lagged behind considerable experimental and textile processing observations and advances. The foundational work of Chang and Lodge and Petrie has been extended by the axisymmetric modeling and simulation of Beris and Liu, for Maxwell fluids, and Markovich and Renardy for Johnson-Segalman fluids. The model is a single, nonlinear parabolic equation in which elastic retardation provides dominant smoothing effects. The Maxwell slender jet model that is considered here consists of a quasilinear system of four first-order partial differential equations in one space dimension (along the jet axis). The authors focus on hyperbolic behavior in the slender free surface flow dominated by surface tension, inertia, viscosity, elastic relaxation, and gravity. Analyses and numerical computations of the governing system of quasilinear partial differential equations are presented. Results presented consist of the following: (1) a classification of all locally well-posed boundary conditions; (2) boundary conditions relevant for a take-up fiber spinning simulation, computations of the draw ratio (where we define draw ratio as the ratio of take-up speed to initial speed of the filament) as a function of model parameters; (3) classes of exact and numerical steady solutions together with linearized stability analyses, including temporal stability (to superimposed spatial perturbations) and spatial stability (to time-dependent boundary fluctuations); (4) an upwind numerical algorithm for the full initial-boundary value problem of this 4 x 4 quasilinear hyperbolic system; and (5) dynamical nonlinear simulations in the neighborhood of the steady states to ascertain spatial and temporal stability

  11. Influence of Reversibly Associating Side Group Bond Strength on Viscoelastic Properties of Polymer Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Christopher; Stewart, Kathleen; Anthamatten, Mitchell

    2013-03-01

    Reversible hydrogen-bonding between side-groups of linear polymers can sharply influence a material's dynamic mechanical behavior, giving rise to valuable shape memory and self-healing properties. Here, we investigate how bond-strength affects the bulk rheological behavior of functional poly(n-butyl acrylate) (PBA) melts. A series of random copolymers containing three different reversibly bonding groups (aminopyridine, carboxylic acid, and ureidopyrimidinone) were synthesized to systematically vary the side-group hydrogen bond strength (~26, 40, 70 kJ/mol). The materials' volumetric hydrogen-bond energy densities can be tuned by adjusting the side-group composition. By comparing the viscoelastic behavior of materials containing an equivalent bond energy density, with different bonding groups, the efficacy and cooperativity of reversible binding can be directly examined. Melt rheology results are interpreted using a state-of-ease model that assumes continuous mechanical equilibrium between applied stress and resistive stresses of entropic origin arising from a network of reversible bonds. The authors acknowledge support from funding provided by the National Science Foundation under Grant DMR-0906627

  12. Collective motion of microswimmers in viscoelastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gaojin; Ardekani, Arezoo

    2015-11-01

    The dynamics of suspension of self-propelled microorganisms show fascinating hydrodynamic phenomena, such as, large scale swarming motion, locally correlated motion, enhanced particle diffusion, and enhanced fluid mixing. Even though many studies have been conducted in a Newtonian fluid, the collective motion of microorganisms in non-Newtonian fluids is less understood. The non-Newtonian fluid rheological properties, such as viscoelasticity and shear-dependent viscosity in saliva, mucus and biofilm, significantly affect the swimming properties and hydrodynamic interaction of microorganisms. In this work, we use direct numerical simulation to investigate the collective motion of rod-like swimmers in viscoelastic fluids. Two swimming types, pusher and puller, are investigated. The background viscoelastic fluid is modeled using an Oldroyd-B constitutive equation. This work is supported by NSF CBET-1445955 and Indiana CTSI TR001108.

  13. Viscoelastic love-type surface waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borcherdt, Roger D.

    2008-01-01

    The general theoretical solution for Love-Type surface waves in viscoelastic media provides theoreticalexpressions for the physical characteristics of the waves in elastic as well as anelastic media with arbitraryamounts of intrinsic damping. The general solution yields dispersion and absorption-coefficient curves for the waves as a function of frequency and theamount of intrinsic damping for any chosen viscoelastic model.Numerical results valid for a variety of viscoelastic models provide quantitative estimates of the physicalcharacteristics of the waves pertinent to models of Earth materials ranging from small amounts of damping in the Earth’s crust to moderate and large amounts of damping in soft soils and water-saturated sediments. Numerical results, presented herein, are valid for a wide range of solids and applications.

  14. The influence of the rotary inertia on the dynamic behavior of viscoelastic non-cylindrical helicoidal bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermiş, Merve; Eratlı, Nihal; Omurtag, Mehmet H.

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the influence of the rotary inertia on the dynamic behavior of linear viscoelastic non-cylindrical helicoidal bars due to variation of the active turns. Dynamic analysis is performed in the Laplace space by using the mixed finite element method. The standard model is used for defining the viscoelastic material behavior and by using the correspondence principle, the material constants are replaced with their complex counterparts in the Laplace space. The solution under the rectangular impulsive type loading is carried out in the Laplace space and then the results are transformed back to time domain numerically by the Modified Durbin's transformation algorithm. Some original numerical results for the dynamic behavior of linear viscoelastic non-cylindrical helices with rectangular cross-section are presented.

  15. Stability of Couette flow past a viscoelastic solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Andrew; Gao, Tong

    2016-11-01

    Soft materials such as polymer gels have been widely used in engineering applications such as microfluidics, micro-optics, and active surfaces. It is important to obtain fundamental understandings of the dynamics of various soft materials when interacting with fluid. Here we investigate the material behavior of a viscoelastic solid film immersed in a simple Newtonian Couette flow. An Eulerian formulation of the Zener model is used to model the solid phase with the surface tension effect. A linear stability analysis is first performed to predict the material instabilities induced by the shear flow field, and provide an analytical basis to the numerical results. The nonlinear fluid/elastic structure interactions are further explored by using the direct numerical simulations. Phase tracking is accomplished through the use of a generalized Cahn-Hilliard model for the surface tension between the gel-like material and the ambient fluid. The coupled Cahn-Hilliard/Navier-Stokes/Zener equations are then solved on a staggered grid through a finite difference method. The results are compared with previous studies for both the hyperelastic and viscoelastic materials.

  16. Axisymmetric instabilities in electrospinning of highly conducting, viscoelastic polymer solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Colman P.; Joo, Yong Lak

    2009-10-01

    In this paper the axisymmetric instabilities observed during the electrospinning of highly electrically conducting, viscoelastic poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)/water solutions are investigated. In our theoretical study, a linear stability analysis is coupled with a model for the stable electrospun jet. The combined model is used to calculate the expected bead growth rate and wave number for given electrospinning conditions. In the experimental section of the study, PEO/water solutions are electrospun and the formation of axisymmetric beads is captured using high-speed photography. Experimental values for the bead growth rate and wave number are extracted and compared with the model predictions. An energy analysis is then carried out on the stability results to investigate the mechanism of instability via the coupling between base flow and perturbation. The analysis reveals that the unstable axisymmetric mode for electrically driven, highly conducting jets is not a capillary mode, but is mainly driven by electrical forces due to the interaction of charges on the jet. We note that this axisymmetric, conducting mode often exhibits a growth rate too small to be observed during electrospinning. However, both our experiments and stability analysis demonstrate that the axisymmetric instability with a high growth rate can be seen in practice when the electrical force is effectively coupled with viscoelastic forces.

  17. Viscoelasticity imaging using ultrasound: parameters and error analysis.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, M; Liu, J; Insana, M F

    2007-05-07

    Techniques are being developed to image viscoelastic features of soft tissues from time-varying strain. A compress-hold-release stress stimulus commonly used in creep-recovery measurements is applied to samples to form images of elastic strain and strain retardance times. While the intended application is diagnostic breast imaging, results in gelatin hydrogels are presented to demonstrate the techniques. The spatiotemporal behaviour of gelatin is described by linear viscoelastic theory formulated for polymeric solids. Measured creep responses of polymers are frequently modelled as sums of exponentials whose time constants describe the delay or retardation of the full strain response. We found the spectrum of retardation times tau to be continuous and bimodal, where the amplitude at each tau represents the relative number of molecular bonds with a given strength and conformation. Such spectra indicate that the molecular weight of the polymer fibres between bonding points is large. Imaging parameters are found by summarizing these complex spectral distributions at each location in the medium with a second-order Voigt rheological model. This simplification reduces the dimensionality of the data for selecting imaging parameters while preserving essential information on how the creeping deformation describes fluid flow and collagen matrix restructuring in the medium. The focus of this paper is on imaging parameter estimation from ultrasonic echo data, and how jitter from hand-held force applicators used for clinical applications propagate through the imaging chain to generate image noise.

  18. Viscoelasticity imaging using ultrasound: parameters and error analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sridhar, M; Liu, J

    2009-01-01

    Techniques are being developed to image viscoelastic features of soft tissues from time-varying strain. A compress-hold-release stress stimulus commonly used in creep-recovery measurements is applied to samples to form images of elastic strain and strain retardance times. While the intended application is diagnostic breast imaging, results in gelatin hydrogels are presented to demonstrate the techniques. The spatiotemporal behaviour of gelatin is described by linear viscoelastic theory formulated for polymeric solids. Measured creep responses of polymers are frequently modelled as sums of exponentials whose time constants describe the delay or retardation of the full strain response. We found the spectrum of retardation times τ to be continuous and bimodal, where the amplitude at each τ represents the relative number of molecular bonds with a given strength and conformation. Such spectra indicate that the molecular weight of the polymer fibres between bonding points is large. Imaging parameters are found by summarizing these complex spectral distributions at each location in the medium with a second-order Voigt rheological model. This simplification reduces the dimensionality of the data for selecting imaging parameters while preserving essential information on how the creeping deformation describes fluid flow and collagen matrix restructuring in the medium. The focus of this paper is on imaging parameter estimation from ultrasonic echo data, and how jitter from hand-held force applicators used for clinical applications propagate through the imaging chain to generate image noise. PMID:17440244

  19. A Thermodynamic Theory of Solid Viscoelasticity. Part 3: Nonlinear Glassy Viscoelasticity, Stability Constraints, Specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan; Leonov, Arkady I.

    2002-01-01

    This paper, the last in the series, continues developing the nonlinear constitutive relations for non-isothermal, compressible, solid viscoelasticity. We initially discuss a single integral approach, more suitable for the glassy state of rubber-like materials, with basic functionals involved in the thermodynamic description for this type of viscoelasticity. Then we switch our attention to analyzing stability constraints, imposed on the general formulation of the nonlinear theory of solid viscoelasticity. Finally, we discuss specific (known from the literature or new) expressions for material functions that are involved in the constitutive formulations of both the rubber-like and glassy-like, complementary parts of the theory.

  20. Comparison of non-linear models to describe the lactation curves for milk yield and composition in buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Ghavi Hossein-Zadeh, N

    2016-02-01

    In order to describe the lactation curves of milk yield (MY) and composition in buffaloes, seven non-linear mathematical equations (Wood, Dhanoa, Sikka, Nelder, Brody, Dijkstra and Rook) were used. Data were 116,117 test-day records for MY, fat (FP) and protein (PP) percentages of milk from the first three lactations of buffaloes which were collected from 893 herds in the period from 1992 to 2012 by the Animal Breeding Center of Iran. Each model was fitted to monthly production records of dairy buffaloes using the NLIN and MODEL procedures in SAS and the parameters were estimated. The models were tested for goodness of fit using adjusted coefficient of determination (Radj(2)), root means square error (RMSE), Durbin-Watson statistic and Akaike's information criterion (AIC). The Dijkstra model provided the best fit of MY and PP of milk for the first three parities of buffaloes due to the lower values of RMSE and AIC than other models. For the first-parity buffaloes, Sikka and Brody models provided the best fit of FP, but for the second- and third-parity buffaloes, Sikka model and Brody equation provided the best fit of lactation curve for FP, respectively. The results of this study showed that the Wood and Dhanoa equations were able to estimate the time to the peak MY more accurately than the other equations. In addition, Nelder and Dijkstra equations were able to estimate the peak time at second and third parities more accurately than other equations, respectively. Brody function provided more accurate predictions of peak MY over the first three parities of buffaloes. There was generally a positive relationship between 305-day MY and persistency measures and also between peak yield and 305-day MY, calculated by different models, within each lactation in the current study. Overall, evaluation of the different equations used in the current study indicated the potential of the non-linear models for fitting monthly productive records of buffaloes.

  1. Linear and nonlinear optical properties of nanostructured Zn(1-x)SrxO-PVA composite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamgadge, Y. S.; Sunatkari, A. L.; Talwatkar, S. S.; Pahurkar, V. G.; Muley, G. G.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the effect of strontium doping on the linear and third order nonlinear optical properties of ZnO-polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nano-composite thin films. Strontium doped ZnO nanoparticles capped with L-arginine were synthesized by low cost soft chemical route. These nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy for its crystal structure and surface morphology studies. Linear optical responses of these samples were studied by using ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Presence of excitonic peaks for doped and undoped ZnO was revealed by UV-vis data and shift of excitonic peaks towards lower energy with increase in dopant concentration was observed. Rotational and vibrational signatures of capping agent and ZnO were confirmed by FT-IR spectroscopy. Third order nonlinearity (nonlinear refraction and absorption) of Zn(1-x)SrxO-PVA thin films, deposited on the good optical quality glass substrate, were studied by z-scan technique using He-Ne laser (wavelength 632.8 nm) in continuous wavelength regime which shows negative nonlinearity with self-defocusing effect. The large value of n2 (10-4 cm2/W) is obtained for 5 wt% strontium doped ZnO-PVA thin film and is attributed to the thermal effect. Enhanced nonlinear absorption due to reverse saturable absorption and weak free carrier absorption is observed for all undoped and doped ZnO-PVA thin films and is prominent for 5 wt% doping of strontium. Third order nonlinear susceptibility χeff(3) is calculated for all samples.

  2. Viscoelastic Creep of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    viscoelastic creep tests were performed on a Nano Indenter XP (MTS Nano Instruments, Oak Ridge, TN) with a spherical indenter of tip radius of 150µm. The...viscoelastic behaviour due to their ability to dissipate mechanical energy [36]. It is expected that the nano -scale helical springs will inherit the same...Oliver W C and Fabes B D 1995 The relationship between indentation and uniaxial creep in amorphous selenium J. Mater. Res. 10 2024–32 [16] Lu Y C, Tandon G

  3. Quantification of viscoelastic effects of polyacrylamide solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Heemskerk, J.; Holtslag, R.J.; Janssen-van Rosmalen, R.; Teeuw, D.

    1984-04-01

    Beyond a critical rate of flow in cores the viscoelasticity of polyacrylamide solutions is reflected by shear thickening behaviour. Practical information is provided on the critical flow rate and magnitude of shear thickening and their dependency on core permeability, temperature, molecular weight and concentration of commercial polymers. To describe the onset of shear thickening, critical Deborah numbers were calculated using fluid relaxation times obtained by oscillation rheometry. Using three core-flow parameters, viz. the critical flow rate and two powerlaw exponents, the viscoelastic effects are quantified.

  4. Small scale dynamics of isotropic viscoelastic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, M. Quan; Delache, Alexandre; Simoëns, Serge; Bos, Wouter J. T.; El Hajem, Mamoud

    2016-12-01

    The comparison of the results of direct numerical simulations of isotropic turbulence of Newtonian and viscoelastic fluid provides evidence that viscoelasticity modifies qualitatively the behavior of the smallest scales: we observe a power law in the far dissipation range of the fluid kinetic energy spectrum and we show that it is a robust feature, roughly independent of the large scale dynamics. A detailed analysis of the energy transfer shows that at these scales energy is injected into the fluid flow through polymer relaxation. It is further shown that a part of the total energy is transferred among scales through an interaction of the velocity field with the polymer field.

  5. Hamiltonian and Lagrangian theory of viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanyga, A.; Seredyńska, M.

    2008-03-01

    The viscoelastic relaxation modulus is a positive-definite function of time. This property alone allows the definition of a conserved energy which is a positive-definite quadratic functional of the stress and strain fields. Using the conserved energy concept a Hamiltonian and a Lagrangian functional are constructed for dynamic viscoelasticity. The Hamiltonian represents an elastic medium interacting with a continuum of oscillators. By allowing for multiphase displacement and introducing memory effects in the kinetic terms of the equations of motion a Hamiltonian is constructed for the visco-poroelasticity.

  6. Wind turbine blade with viscoelastic damping

    DOEpatents

    Sievers, Ryan A.; Mullings, Justin L.

    2017-01-10

    A wind turbine blade (60) damped by viscoelastic material (54, 54A-F) sandwiched between stiffer load-bearing sublayers (52A, 52B, 56A, 56B) in portions of the blade effective to damp oscillations (38) of the blade. The viscoelastic material may be located in one or more of: a forward portion (54A) of the shell, an aft portion (54D) of the shell, pressure and suction side end caps (54B) of an internal spar, internal webbing walls (54C, 54E), and a trailing edge core (54F).

  7. Structural transformations, composition anomalies and a dramatic collapse of linear polymer chains in dilute ethanol-water mixtures.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Saikat; Ghosh, Rikhia; Bagchi, Biman

    2012-03-29

    Water-ethanol mixtures exhibit many interesting anomalies, such as negative excess partial molar volume of ethanol, excess sound absorption coefficient at low concentrations, and positive deviation from Raoult's law for vapor pressure, to mention a few. These anomalies have been attributed to different, often contradictory origins, but a quantitative understanding is still lacking. We show by computer simulation and theoretical analyses that these anomalies arise from the sudden emergence of a bicontinuous phase that occurs at a relatively low ethanol concentration of x(eth) ≈ 0.06-0.10 (that amounts to a volume fraction of 0.17-0.26, which is a significant range!). The bicontinuous phase is formed by aggregation of ethanol molecules, resulting in a weak phase transition whose nature is elucidated. We find that the microheterogeneous structure of the mixture gives rise to a pronounced nonmonotonic composition dependence of local compressibility and nonmonotonic dependence in the peak value of the radial distribution function of ethyl groups. A multidimensional free energy surface of pair association is shown to provide a molecular explanation of the known negative excess partial volume of ethanol in terms of parallel orientation and hence better packing of the ethyl groups in the mixture due to hydrophobic interactions. The energy distribution of the ethanol molecules indicates additional energy decay channels that explain the excess sound attenuation coefficient in aqueous alcohol mixtures. We studied the dependence of the solvation of a linear polymer chain on the composition of the water-ethanol solvent. We find that there is a sudden collapse of the polymer at x(eth) ≈ 0.05-a phenomenon which we attribute to the formation of the microheterogeneous structures in the binary mixture at low ethanol concentrations. Together with recent single molecule pulling experiments, these results provide new insight into the behavior of polymer chain and foreign solutes

  8. Surface plasmon-polariton propagation in piecewise linear chains of composite nanospheres: the role of optical gain and chain layout.

    PubMed

    Udagedara, Indika B; Rukhlenko, Ivan D; Premaratne, Malin

    2011-10-10

    The energy transport properties of plasmonic waveguides can be analyzed by solving the dispersion relation for surface plasmon-polaritons (SPPs). We use this approach to derive an approximate analytical expression for SPP propagation length when the waveguide is composed of linearly arranged metallic nanoparticles, while assuming that metal losses are small or partially compensated by gain. Applied to metal-dielectric (composite) nanospheres, the obtained expression allows us to optimize the performance of the waveguide and arrive at a number of practical design rules. Specifically, we show that SPP attenuation can be minimized at a certain interparticle distance for transverse modes, but gradually grows for both longitudinal and transverse modes with the increase of particle separation. We also show that the two basic methods of supplying gain to the system, i.e., embedding the particles into a gain medium or having a metal-gain composition for the particles, do not perform equally well and the former method is more efficient, but the way the two methods affect depends on the polarization of SPPs. To investigate the role of the nanoparticles' arrangement in determining SPP characteristics, we follow a purely numerical approach and consider a two-segment bent waveguide as an example. Analyzing the waveguide's transmission shows that it behaves in an oscillatory manner with respect to the angle between the two segments and is therefore higher for certain angles than for the others. This suggests that, in the design of waveguides with bends, careful attention needs to be paid in order to avoid bend angles that yield low transmission and to choose angles that give maximum transmission.

  9. Smart viscoelastic and self-healing characteristics of graphene nano-gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhar, Purbarun; Katiyar, Ajay; Maganti, Lakshmi Sirisha

    2016-12-01

    Readily synthesizable nano-graphene and poly ethylene glycol based stable gels have been synthesized employing an easy refluxing method, and exhaustive rheological and viscoelastic characterizations have been performed to understand the nature of such complex gel systems. The gels exhibit shear thinning response with pronounced yield stress values which is indicative of a microstructure, where the graphene nanoflakes intercalate (possible due to the refluxing) with the polymer chains and form a pseudo spring damper network. Experimentations on the thixotropic behavior of the gels indicate that the presence of the G nanoflakes leads to immensely augmented structural stability capable of withstanding severe impact shears. Further information about the localized interactions of the G nanoflakes with the polymer chains is revealed from the amplitude and frequency sweep analyses in both linear and non-linear viscoelastic regimes. Massively enhanced cross over amplitude values are recorded and several smart effects such as enhanced elastic behavior at increasing forcing frequencies are registered. Structural resonance induced disruption of the elastic behavior is observed for the gels for a given range of frequency and the proposition of resonance has been justified mathematically. It is observed that, post this resonance bandwidth, the gels are able to self-heal and regain their original elastic behavior back without any external intervention. More detailed information on the viscoelastic nature of the gels has been obtained from creep and recovery compliance tests and justifications for the spring damper microstructure has been obtained. Smart features such as enhanced stress relaxation behavior with increasing strain have been observed and the same explained, based on the proposed microstructure. The viscoelastic response of the gels has been mathematically modeled and it has been revealed that such complex gels can be accommodated as modified Burger's viscoelastic

  10. A Modified Error in Constitutive Equation Approach for Frequency-Domain Viscoelasticity Imaging Using Interior Data

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Manuel I.; Aquino, Wilkins; Bonnet, Marc

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology for the inverse identification of linearly viscoelastic material parameters in the context of steady-state dynamics using interior data. The inverse problem of viscoelasticity imaging is solved by minimizing a modified error in constitutive equation (MECE) functional, subject to the conservation of linear momentum. The treatment is applicable to configurations where boundary conditions may be partially or completely underspecified. The MECE functional measures the discrepancy in the constitutive equations that connect kinematically admissible strains and dynamically admissible stresses, and also incorporates the measurement data in a quadratic penalty term. Regularization of the problem is achieved through a penalty parameter in combination with the discrepancy principle due to Morozov. Numerical results demonstrate the robust performance of the method in situations where the available measurement data is incomplete and corrupted by noise of varying levels. PMID:26388656

  11. Analytical and numerical study of the electro-osmotic annular flow of viscoelastic fluids.

    PubMed

    Ferrás, L L; Afonso, A M; Alves, M A; Nóbrega, J M; Pinho, F T

    2014-04-15

    In this work we present semi-analytical solutions for the electro-osmotic annular flow of viscoelastic fluids modeled by the Linear and Exponential PTT models. The viscoelastic fluid flows in the axial direction between two concentric cylinders under the combined influences of electrokinetic and pressure forcings. The analysis invokes the Debye-Hückel approximation and includes the limit case of pure electro-osmotic flow. The solution is valid for both no slip and slip velocity at the walls and the chosen slip boundary condition is the linear Navier slip velocity model. The combined effects of fluid rheology, electro-osmotic and pressure gradient forcings on the fluid velocity distribution are also discussed.

  12. Synergistic Effects of Physical Aging and Damage on Long-Term Behavior of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinson, L. Cate

    1999-01-01

    The research consisted of two major parts, first modeling and simulation of the combined effects of aging and damage on polymer composites and secondly an experimental phase examining composite response at elevated temperatures, again activating both aging and damage. For the simulation, a damage model for polymeric composite laminates operating at elevated temperatures was developed. Viscoelastic behavior of the material is accounted for via the correspondence principle and a variational approach is adopted to compute the temporal stresses within the laminate. Also, the effect of physical aging on ply level stress and on overall laminate behavior is included. An important feature of the model is that damage evolution predictions for viscoelastic laminates can be made. This allows us to track the mechanical response of the laminate up to large load levels though within the confines of linear viscoelastic constitutive behavior. An experimental investigation of microcracking and physical aging effects in polymer matrix composites was also pursued. The goal of the study was to assess the impact of aging on damage accumulation, in ten-ns of microcracking, and the impact of damage on aging and viscoelastic behavior. The testing was performed both at room and elevated temperatures on [+/- 45/903](sub s) and [02/903](sub s) laminates, both containing a set of 90 deg plies centrally located to facilitate investigation of microcracking. Edge replication and X-ray-radiography were utilized to quantify damage. Sequenced creep tests were performed to characterize viscoelastic and aging parameters. Results indicate that while the aging times studied have limited ]Influence on damage evolution, elevated temperature and viscoelastic effects have a profound effect on the damage mode seen. Some results are counterintuitive, including the lower strain to failure for elevated temperature tests and the catastrophic failure mode observed for the [+/- 45/9O3](sub s), specimens. The

  13. Kinematically consistent models of viscoelastic stress evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVries, Phoebe M. R.; Meade, Brendan J.

    2016-05-01

    Following large earthquakes, coseismic stresses at the base of the seismogenic zone may induce rapid viscoelastic deformation in the lower crust and upper mantle. As stresses diffuse away from the primary slip surface in these lower layers, the magnitudes of stress at distant locations (>1 fault length away) may slowly increase. This stress relaxation process has been used to explain delayed earthquake triggering sequences like the 1992 Mw = 7.3 Landers and 1999 Mw = 7.1 Hector Mine earthquakes in California. However, a conceptual difficulty associated with these models is that the magnitudes of stresses asymptote to constant values over long time scales. This effect introduces persistent perturbations to the total stress field over many earthquake cycles. Here we present a kinematically consistent viscoelastic stress transfer model where the total perturbation to the stress field at the end of the earthquake cycle is zero everywhere. With kinematically consistent models, hypotheses about the potential likelihood of viscoelastically triggered earthquakes may be based on the timing of stress maxima, rather than on any arbitrary or empirically constrained stress thresholds. Based on these models, we infer that earthquakes triggered by viscoelastic earthquake cycle effects may be most likely to occur during the first 50% of the earthquake cycle regardless of the assumed long-term and transient viscosities.

  14. Passive droplet sorting using viscoelastic flow focusing.

    PubMed

    Hatch, Andrew C; Patel, Apurva; Beer, N Reginald; Lee, Abraham P

    2013-04-07

    We present a study of passive hydrodynamic droplet sorting in microfluidic channels based on intrinsic viscoelastic fluid properties. Sorting is achieved by tuning the droplets' intrinsic viscous and viscoelastic properties relative to the continuous oil phase to achieve a positive or negative lateral migration toward high or low shear gradients in the channel. In the presence of weakly viscoelastic fluid behavior, droplets with a viscosity ratio, κ, between 0.5-10 were found to migrate toward a high shear gradient near the channel walls. For all other κ-values, or Newtonian fluids, droplets would migrate toward a low shear gradient at the channel centerline. It was also found that for strongly viscoelastic fluids with low interfacial tension, droplets would migrate toward the edge even with κ-values lower than 0.5. The resulting bi-directional lateral droplet migration between different droplets allows size-independent sorting. Still, their sorting efficiencies are dependent on droplet size, intrinsic fluid elasticity, viscosity, droplet deformability, and overall fluid shear rates. Based on these findings, we demonstrate >200 Hz passive droplet sorting frequencies and achieve >100 fold enrichment factors without the need to actively sense and/or control active mechanisms. Using a low viscosity oil phase of 6.25 cPs, we demonstrate sorting discrimination of 1 cPs and 5 cPs aqueous droplets with κ-values of 0.2 and 0.8 respectively.

  15. Viscoelastic properties of laryngeal posturing muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alipour, Fariborz; Hunter, Eric; Titze, Ingo

    2003-10-01

    Viscoelastic properties of canine laryngeal muscles were measured in a series of in vitro experiments. Laryngeal posturing that controls vocal fold length and adduction/abduction is an essential component of the voice production. The dynamics of posturing depends on the viscoelastic and physiological properties of the laryngeal muscles. The time-dependent and nonlinear behaviors of these tissues are also crucial in the voice production and pitch control theories. The lack of information on some of these muscles such as posterior cricoarytenoid muscle (PCA), lateral cricoarytenoid muscle (LCA), and intraarytenoid muscle (IA) was the major incentive for this study. Samples of PCA and LCA muscles were made from canine larynges and mounted on a dual-servo system (Ergometer) as described in our previous works. Two sets of experiments were conducted on each muscle, a 1-Hz stretch and release experiment that provides stress-strain data and a stress relaxation test. Data from these muscles were fitted to viscoelastic models and Young's modulus and viscoelastic constants are obtained for each muscle. Preliminary data indicates that elastics properties of these muscles are similar to those of thyroarytenoid and cricothyroid muscles. The relaxation response of these muscles also shows some similarity to other laryngeal muscles in terms of time constants.

  16. The role of viscoelasticity in subducting plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrington, R. J.; Moresi, L.-N.; Capitanio, F. A.

    2014-11-01

    of tectonic plates into Earth's mantle occurs when one plate bends beneath another at convergent plate boundaries. The characteristic time of deformation at these convergent boundaries approximates the Maxwell relaxation time for olivine at lithospheric temperatures and pressures, it is therefore by definition a viscoelastic process. While this is widely acknowledged, the large-scale features of subduction can, and have been, successfully reproduced assuming the plate deforms by a viscous mechanism alone. However, the energy rates and stress profile within convergent margins are influenced by viscoelastic deformation. In this study, viscoelastic stresses have been systematically introduced into numerical models of free subduction, using both the viscosity and shear modulus to control the Maxwell relaxation time. The introduction of an elastic deformation mechanism into subduction models produces deviations in both the stress profile and energy rates within the subduction hinge when compared to viscous only models. These variations result in an apparent viscosity that is variable throughout the length of the plate, decreasing upon approach and increasing upon leaving the hinge. At realistic Earth parameters, we show that viscoelastic stresses have a minor effect on morphology yet are less dissipative at depth and result in an energy transfer between the energy stored during bending and the energy released during unbending. We conclude that elasticity is important during both bending and unbending within the slab hinge with the resulting stress loading and energy profile indicating that slabs maintain larger deformation rates at smaller stresses during bending and retain their strength during unbending at depth.

  17. Noise transmission by viscoelastic sandwich panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaicaitis, R.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical study on low frequency noise transmission into rectangular enclosures by viscoelastic sandwich panels is presented. Soft compressible cores with dilatational modes and hard incompressible cores with dilatational modes neglected are considered as limiting cases of core stiffness. It is reported that these panels can effect significant noise reduction.

  18. A BEM formulation applied in the mechanical material modelling of viscoelastic cracked structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Hugo Luiz; Leonel, Edson Denner

    2016-12-01

    The present study aims at performing a mechanical analysis of 2D viscoelastic cracked structural materials using the Boundary Element Method (BEM). The mesh dimensionality reduction provided by the BEM and its accuracy in representing high gradient fields make this numerical method robust to solve fracture mechanics problems. Viscoelastic models address phenomena that provide changes on the mechanical material properties along time. Well-established viscoelastic models such as Maxwell, Kelvin-Voigt and Boltzmann are used in this study. The numerical viscoelastic scheme, which is based on algebraic BEM equations, utilizes the Euler method for time derivative evaluation. Therefore, the unknown variables at the structural boundary and its variations along time are determined through an ordinary linear system of equations. Moreover, time-dependent boundary conditions may be considered, which represent loading phases. The dual BEM formulation is adopted for modelling the mechanical structural behaviour of cracks bodies. Three examples are considered to illustrate the robustness of the adopted formulation. The results achieved by the BEM are in good agreement with reported data and numerical stability is observed.

  19. A BEM formulation applied in the mechanical material modelling of viscoelastic cracked structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Hugo Luiz; Leonel, Edson Denner

    2017-03-01

    The present study aims at performing a mechanical analysis of 2D viscoelastic cracked structural materials using the Boundary Element Method (BEM). The mesh dimensionality reduction provided by the BEM and its accuracy in representing high gradient fields make this numerical method robust to solve fracture mechanics problems. Viscoelastic models address phenomena that provide changes on the mechanical material properties along time. Well-established viscoelastic models such as Maxwell, Kelvin-Voigt and Boltzmann are used in this study. The numerical viscoelastic scheme, which is based on algebraic BEM equations, utilizes the Euler method for time derivative evaluation. Therefore, the unknown variables at the structural boundary and its variations along time are determined through an ordinary linear system of equations. Moreover, time-dependent boundary conditions may be considered, which represent loading phases. The dual BEM formulation is adopted for modelling the mechanical structural behaviour of cracks bodies. Three examples are considered to illustrate the robustness of the adopted formulation. The results achieved by the BEM are in good agreement with reported data and numerical stability is observed.

  20. Evidence against proteoglycan mediated collagen fibril load transmission and dynamic viscoelasticity in tendon.

    PubMed

    Fessel, Gion; Snedeker, Jess G

    2009-10-01

    The glycosaminoglycan (GAG) dermatan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate side-chains of small leucine-rich proteoglycans have been increasingly posited to act as molecular cross links between adjacent collagen fibrils and to directly contribute to tendon elasticity. GAGs have also been implicated in tendon viscoelasticity, supposedly affecting frictional loss during elongation or fluid flow through the extra cellular matrix. The current study sought to systematically test these theories of tendon structure-function by investigating the mechanical repercussions of enzymatic depletion of GAG complexes by chondroitinase ABC in a reproducible tendon structure-function model (rat tail tendon fascicles). The extent of GAG removal (at least 93%) was verified by relevant spectrophotometric assays and transmission electron microscopy. Dynamic viscoelastic tensile tests on GAG depleted rat tail tendon fascicle were not mechanically different from controls in storage modulus (elastic behavior) over a wide range of strain-rates (0.05, 0.5, and 5% change in length per second) in either the linear or nonlinear regions of the material curve. Loss modulus (viscoelastic behavior) was only affected in the nonlinear region at the highest strain-rate, and even this effect was marginal (19% increased loss modulus, p=0.035). Thus glycosaminoglycan chains of small leucine-rich proteoglycans do not appear to mediate dynamic elastic behavior nor do they appear to regulate the dynamic viscoelastic properties in rat tail tendon fascicles.

  1. Development of film- and- fabric composite materials durability assessing methodology under time-dependent influences of temperature and solar radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayumov, R. A.; Muhamedova, I. Z.; Suleymanov, A. M.; Tazyukov, B. F.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we present the design of stress-strain state calculation and film-and- fabric composite materials durability under stresses and solar radiation. We have constructed a two-dimensional finite-state-element computer model of the deforming process of the low- level cell of film-and-fabric-based composite material for the evaluation of its durability which takes into account non-linear viscoelasticity, temperature variations, ageing of the material, the process of upbuilding of microdamage and photodegradation. Qualitative research of operational factors influence (UV, temperature) on film-and-fabric composite materials durability was conducted.

  2. Thermomechanical coupling in fatigue fracture of viscoelastic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hufferd, W. L.; Laheru, K. L.

    1975-01-01

    Subcritical crack growth in a linear viscoelastic material subjected to cyclic loading is investigated starting with the thermodynamic power balance. Physically, it is supposed that the subcritical slow crack growth is due to local weakening of the material in the neighborhood of the crack tip. Under fatigue loading it is assumed that all energy dissipation goes into heat and that this heat build-up is the dominant irreversible process governing crack growth. The cycle averaged temperature distribution around the crack tip is obtained from local application of the first law of thermodynamics (i.e., conservation of energy). The analysis leads to the solution of a nonlinear integro-differential equation for crack length as a function of time which is coupled with the local energy equation. A regular perturbation technique is used to obtain an analytical solution which compares very well with experimental results.

  3. On exponential stability of gravity driven viscoelastic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Fei; Wu, Guochun; Zhong, Xin

    2016-05-01

    We investigate stability of an equilibrium state to a nonhomogeneous incompressible viscoelastic fluid driven by gravity in a bounded domain Ω ⊂R3 of class C3. First, we establish a critical number κC, which depends on the equilibrium density and the gravitational constant, and is a threshold of the elasticity coefficient κ for instability and stability of the linearized perturbation problem around the equilibrium state. Then we prove that the equilibrium state is exponential stability provided that κ >κC and the initial disturbance quantities around the equilibrium state satisfy some relations. In particular, if the equilibrium density ρ bar is a Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) type and ρbar‧ is a constant, our result strictly shows that the sufficiently large elasticity coefficient can prevent the RT instability from occurrence.

  4. Specific shear-dependent viscoelastic third-grade fluid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carapau, Fernando; Correia, Paulo; Grilo, Luis M.

    2016-12-01

    A specific modified constitutive equation for a third-grade fluid is proposed so that the model be suitable for applications where shear-thinning or shear-thickening may occur. For that, we use the Cosserat theory approach reducing the exact three-dimensional equations to a system depending only on time and on a single spatial variable. This one-dimensional system is obtained by integrating the linear momentum equation over the cross-section of the tube, taking a velocity field approximation provided by the Cosserat theory. From this reduced system, we obtain the unsteady equations for the wall shear stress and mean pressure gradient depending on the volume flow rate, Womersley number, viscoelastic coefficient and flow index over a finite section of the tube geometry with constant circular cross-section.

  5. Viscoelastic tides: models for use in Celestial Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragazzo, C.; Ruiz, L. S.

    2016-11-01

    This paper contains equations for the motion of linear viscoelastic bodies interacting under gravity. The equations are fully three dimensional and allow for the integration of the spin, the orbit, and the deformation of each body. The goal is to present good models for the tidal forces that take into account the possibly different rheology of each body. The equations are obtained within a finite dimension Lagrangian framework with dissipation function. The main contribution is a procedure to associate to each spring-dashpot model, which defines the rheology of a body, a potential and a dissipation function for the body deformation variables. The theory is applied to the Earth (solid part plus oceans) and a comparison between model and observation of the following quantities is made: norm of the Love numbers, rate of tidal energy dissipation, Chandler period, and Earth-Moon distance increase.

  6. Viscoelastic hydrodynamic interactions and anomalous CM diffusion in polymer melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Hendrik

    We have recently discovered that anomalous center-of-mass (CM) diffusion occurring on intermediate time scales in polymer melts can be explained by the interplay of viscoelastic and hydrodynamic interactions (VHI). The theory has been solved for unentangled melts in 3D and 2D and excellent agreement between theory and simulation is found, also for alkanes with a force field optimized from neutron scattering. The physical mechanism considers that hydrodynamic interactions are not screened: they are time dependent because of increasing viscosity before the terminal relaxation time. The VHI are generally active in melts of any topology. They are most important at early times well before the terminal relaxation time and thus affect the nanosecond time range typically observable in dynamic neutron scattering experiments. We illustrate the effects with recent molecular dynamics simulations of linear, ring and star polymers. Work performed with A.N. Semenov and J. Farago.

  7. Dynamic analyses of viscoelastic dielectric elastomers incorporating viscous damping effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junshi; Zhao, Jianwen; Chen, Hualing; Li, Dichen

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, based on the standard linear solid rheological model, a dynamics model of viscoelastic dielectric elastomers (DEs) is developed with incorporation of viscous damping effect. Numerical calculations are employed to predict the damping effect on the dynamic performance of DEs. With increase of damping force, the DEs show weak nonlinearity and vibration strength. Phase diagrams and Poincaré maps are utilized to detect the dynamic stability of DEs, and the results indicate that a transition from aperiodic vibration to quasi-periodic vibration occurs with enlargement of damping force. The resonance properties of DEs including damping effect are subsequently analyzed, demonstrating a reduction of resonant frequency and resonance peak with increase of damping force.

  8. Drop dynamics on a stretched viscoelastic filament: An experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peixinho, Jorge; Renoult, Marie-Charlotte; Crumeyrolle, Olivier; Mutabazi, Innocent

    2016-11-01

    Capillary pressure can destabilize a thin liquid filament during breakup into a succession of drops. Besides, the addition of a linear, high molecular weight, flexible and soluble polymer is enough to modify the morphology of this instability. In the time period preceding the breakup, the development of beads-on-a-string structures where drops are connected by thin threads is monitored. The drops dynamics involve drop formation, drop migration and drop coalescence. Experiments using a high-speed camera on stretched bridges of viscoelastic polymeric solutions were conducted for a range of viscosities and polymer concentrations. The rheological properties of the solutions are also quantified through conventional shear rheology and normal stress difference. The overall goal of this experimental investigation is to gain more insight into the formation and time evolution of the drops. The project BIOENGINE is co-financed by the European Union with the European regional development fund and by the Normandie Regional Council.

  9. Observational evidences of viscoelastic behaviour at low strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daminelli, Rosastella; Marcellini, Alberto; Tento, Alberto

    2014-05-01

    Theoretical formulations of inhomogeneous waves in low-loss media have been suggested by a number of researchers due to the important role played by anelasticity in changing the characteristics of seismic waves. The Homogeneous Isotropic Linear Viscoelastic Model (HILV) introduced by Borcherdt (2009) is particularly promising because of its mathematical simplicity and the handiness to test the model in real seismograms. We showed that the seismograms of the explosion of a 2nd World War bomb found in Milan recorded by a seismic station at 2 km epicentral distance, exhibit a clear elliptical prograde P wave particle motion (Marcellini and Tento, 2011) as predicted by HILV. We observed a similar P wave prograde elliptical motion analysing a ML 4.8 earthquake occurred on July 17, 2011 in the Po Valley at a 48 km epicentral distance from a seismic station located at Palazzo Te, Mantova (Daminelli et al., 2013). In both cases the stations were situated on the deep quaternary sediments of the Po Valley. Based on measured Vp and Vs and the amplitude of the recorded motion, the strain at the station sites was estimated to be 10-6, 10-7. In this paper we extend the analysis of the previously mentioned seismograms to check the feasibility of HILV application to other types of waves that are particularly relevant in fields such as the engineering seismology. We focus on the S waves (as it is well known HILV predicts the split of S in S type I and S type II) of the seismograms of the earthquake recorded in Mantova and on the Rayleigh waves of the explosion recorded in Milan. The results show that observational evidences of HILV are not as clear as for P waves, probably because of noise or superposition of converted waves. However, once established the validity of HILV by P waves (that is very simple), the whole seismograms can be interpreted following HILV, confirming the relevancy of anelasticity also at low strain. Borcherdt, R.D. (2009) 'Viscoelastic Waves in Layered Media

  10. Modeling of the viscoelastic behavior of a polyimide matrix at elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crochon, Thibaut

    Use of Polymer Matrix Composite Materials (PMCMs) in aircraft engines requires materials able to withstand extreme service conditions, such as elevated temperatures, high mechanical loadings and an oxidative environment. In such an environment, the polymer matrix is likely to exhibit a viscoelastic behavior dependent on the mechanical loading and temperature. In addition, the combined effects of elevated temperature and the environment near the engines are likely to increase physical as well as chemical aging. These various parameters need to be taken into consideration for the designer to be able to predict the material behavior over the service life of the components. The main objective of this thesis was to study the viscoelastic behavior of a high temperature polyimide matrix and develop a constitutive theory able to predict the material behavior for every of service condition. Then, the model had to have to be implemented into commercially available finite-element software such as ABAQUS or ANSYS. Firstly, chemical aging of the material at service temperature was studied. To that end, a thermogravimetric analysis of the matrix was conducted on powder samples in air atmosphere. Two kinds of tests were performed: i) kinetic tests in which powder samples were heated at a constant rate until complete sublimation; ii) isothermal tests in which the samples were maintained at a constant temperature for 24 hours. The first tests were used to develop a degradation model, leading to an excellent fit of the experimental data. Then, the model was used to predict the isothermal data but which much less success, particularly for the lowest temperatures. At those temperatures, the chemical degradation was preceded by an oxidation phase which the model was not designed to predict. Other isothermal degradation tests were also performed on tensile tests samples instead of powders. Those tests were conducted at service temperature for a much longer period of time. The samples

  11. Experimental and Computational Investigation of Viscoelasticity of Native and Engineered Ligament and Tendon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, J.; Narayanan, H.; Garikipati, K.; Grosh, K.; Arruda, E. M.

    The important mechanisms by which soft collagenous tissues such as ligament and tendon respond to mechanical deformation include non-linear elasticity, viscoelasticity and poroelasticity. These contributions to the mechanical response are modulated by the content and morphology of structural proteins such as type I collagen and elastin, other molecules such as glycosaminoglycans, and fluid. Our ligament and tendon constructs, engineered from either primary cells or bone marrow stromal cells and their autogenous matricies, exhibit histological and mechanical characteristics of native tissues of different levels of maturity. In order to establish whether the constructs have optimal mechanical function for implantation and utility for regenerative medicine, constitutive relationships for the constructs and native tissues at different developmental levels must be established. A micromechanical model incorporating viscoelastic collagen and non-linear elastic elastin is used to describe the non-linear viscoelastic response of our homogeneous engineered constructs in vitro. This model is incorporated within a finite element framework to examine the heterogeneity of the mechanical responses of native ligament and tendon.

  12. Comparison of viscoelastic properties of suture versus porcine mitral valve chordae tendineae.

    PubMed

    Cochran, R P; Kunzelman, K S

    1991-12-01

    Recent reports have advocated the use of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) suture for replacement or reinforcement of ruptured or elongated mitral valve chordae tendineae. The mechanical properties of PTFE (Gore-Tex) and other sutures were determined and compared to those of porcine mitral valve chordae. The results were analyzed to assess how closely chordal mechanical function may be simulated by synthetic suture materials. Chordae tendineae and suture samples were tested in uniaxial tension using an INSTRON Model 1000 at strain rates of 5 and 10 mm/min. The stress (g/mm2) was plotted versus strain, and the elastic modulus determined as the slope of the curve. Chordae tendineae exhibited a nonlinear viscoelastic stress/strain behavior. The elastic modulus of both suture types tested was significantly higher than that of the chordae. However, the PTFE suture did exhibit some viscoelastic characteristics (hysteresis and creep) that begin to approach the chordal behavior. Chordal viscoelastic behavior results from the inherent composite structure (collagen, elastin, endothelium, water, and ground substance). As yet, no synthetic materials are able to imitate this behavior with the appropriate tensile strength and fatigue resistant characteristics. At present, PTFE appears to be the best synthetic alternative for chordal replacement, due to its limited viscoelastic capabilities. Nevertheless, the need to more nearly approximate the mechanical behavior of mitral valve chordae tendineae with synthetic material warrants further investigation.

  13. Thermoviscoelastic finite element modeling of laser-generated ultrasound in viscoelastic plates

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Hongxiang; Zhang Shuyi

    2010-12-15

    Laser-generated ultrasound in a thin composite plate with thermoviscoelastic property has been studied quantitatively. According to thermoviscoelastic theory, considering the viscoelastic and thermophysical properties of materials, a numerical model for the laser-generated Lamb waves is established in the frequency domain by using a finite element method. It is confirmed that the temperature and displacement fields calculated in the frequency domain coincide well with those obtained in the time domain. In the numerical simulations of thermoviscoelastically generated Lamb waves, the effects of viscoelastic and elastic stiffness moduli, and the thickness of the materials have been taken into account in details. The characteristics of the Lamb waves in the numerical results agree well with the features of the disperse curves. The results show that the finite element method in this paper provides a useful technique to characterize mechanical properties of composite materials.

  14. A new numerical framework to simulate viscoelastic free-surface flows with the finite-volume method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comminal, R.; Spangenberg, J.; Hattel, J. H.

    2015-04-01

    A new method for the simulation of 2D viscoelastic flow is presented. Numerical stability is obtained by the logarithmic-conformation change of variable, and a fully-implicit pure-streamfunction flow formulation, without use of any artificial diffusion. As opposed to other simulation results, our calculations predict a hydrodynamic instability in the 4:1 contraction geometry at a Weissenberg number of order 4. This new result is in qualitative agreement with the prediction of a non-linear subcritical elastic instability in Poiseuille flow. Our viscoelastic flow solver is coupled with a volume-of-fluid solver in order to predict free- surfaces in extrusion.

  15. Mathematical Models in Dynamics of Incompressible Viscoelastic Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, S. V.; Pukhnachev, V. V.; Pukhnacheva, T. P.

    2010-11-01

    A consistent model of incompressible viscoelastic Maxwell media is formulated. It corresponds to the choice of Jaumann rotational derivative in the constitutive relation. The governing system of equations has both real and complex characteristics. For this system, the solvability of initial-boundary value problem in the class of analytic functions is established, and for its linearized variant the solvability is shown in the class of functions of finite smoothness. It is shown that the smallness of non-diagonal terms of stress tensor entails absence of short-wave instability. A wide class of exact solutions to the motion of incompressible viscoelastic Maxwell medium is found. These solutions are partially invariant with respect to some sub-group of extended Galilei group which is admitted by equations of motion and their generalizations. The deformation of an viscoelastic strip with free boundaries is described, which moves either inertially or under the action of stretching or compressing longitudinal stresses, as well as shear stresses, applied to the free surface. The problem of filling of a spherical cavity by incompressible Maxwell medium under the action of constant pressure at infinity is considered. This is the generalization of the classic problem for viscous incompressible liquid. In both cases the cavity always shrinks to a point in a finite or infinite time. If the surface tension differs from zero, the collapse takes place in a finite time. Depending on the three dimensionless parameters (Reynolds number, capillary number and dimensionless relaxation time) both oscillatory and monotonic regimes of motion are possible. When the cavity radius is small, no oscillations can exist. A problem of filling of an spherical cavity with incompressible viscoelastic Kelvin-Voigt medium under the action of constant pressure at infinity is also considered. Unlike the case of Maxwell medium, here both the cavity collapse and stabilization of its radius to a positive

  16. Constitutive Equations: Plastic and Viscoelastic Properties. (Latest Citations from the Aerospace Database)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning analytical techniques using constitutive equations, applied to materials under stress. The properties explored with these techniques include viscoelasticity, thermoelasticity, and plasticity. While many of the references are general as to material type, most refer to specific metals or composites, or to specific shapes, such as flat plate or spherical vessels. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  17. The Effect of Modification Methods on the Performance Characteristics of Composites Based on a Linear Low-Density Polyethylene and Natural Hemp Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajaks, J.; Zelca, Z.; Kukle, S.

    2015-11-01

    Influence of the content of hemp fibers (harvested in 2012) and their modification methods (treatment with boiling water, sodium hydroxide, and acetic anhydride) and addition of an interfacial modifier, maleated polyethylene (MAPE), on the performance characteristics (tensile strength, modulus, elongation at break, microhardness, and water resistance) of composites based on a linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE) was investigated. The results obtained are compared with data found earlier for the same type of hemp fibers, but harvested in 2011. It is shown that optimum content of untreated hemp fibers in the LLDPE matrix is 30 wt.% and optimum length of the fibers is less than 1 mm. An increase in the content of hemp fibers (to 30 wt.%) raised the tensile strength and modulus of the composites, but reduced their elasticity and deformation ability. Simultaneously, the microhardness of the composite materials grew. Pretreating the fibers with sodium hydroxide improved the mechanical properties of the composites only slightly, but treating with acetic anhydride allowed us to elevate the content of the fibers up to 40 and 50 wt.%. The best results were achieved by addition of 50 wt.% MAPE, when the tensile modulus increased by about 47% and the tensile strength by 27% as compared with those of composites with fibers pretreated by other methods. To estimate the processing possibilities of the composites, the melt flow index (MFI) was determined. It is established that the pretreatment of the fibers significantly affects the numerical values of MFI. For example, upon treatment with acetic anhydride, a sufficiently high fluidity of the composites was retained even at a 50 wt.% content of fibers. The lowest fluidity was observed for composites with alkali-pretreated hemp fibers. The surface microhardness decreased upon their chemical pretreatment. The highest microhardness showed composites with 30 wt.% untreated fibers. The chemical pretreatment considerably raised the

  18. Composite passive damping struts for large precision structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolgin, Benjamin P. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    In the field of viscoelastic dampers, a new strut design comprises a viscoelastic material sandwiched between multiple layers, some of which layers bear and dampen load force. In one embodiment, the layers are composite plies of opposing orientation. In another embodiment, the strut utilizes a viscoelastic layer sandwiched between V-shaped composite plies. In a third embodiment, a viscoelastic layer is sandwiched between sine-shaped plies. Strut strength is equal to or greater than conventional aluminum struts due to the unique high interlaminar shear ply design.

  19. Phenomenological viscoelasticity of a heterogeneous pharmaceutical semisolid.

    PubMed

    Radebaugh, G W; Simonelli, A P

    1983-04-01

    This study presents the results of an investigation of the viscoelastic properties of anhydrous lanolin USP, as determined by dynamic mechanical testing. The elastic shear modulus (G'), viscous shear modulus (G"), and loss tangent (tan delta) were determined as a function of shear frequency, nu, (0.01--10.0 Hz) and temperature, T, (0--30 degrees). These viscoelastic parameters were found to be temperature and shear frequency dependent. Up to 100-fold changes in shear moduli and tan delta values were observed with appropriate changes in T and nu. Many of the observed properties are also characteristic of high molecular weight polymers and can be attributed to a high degree of molecular structure. It was found that dynamic mechanical testing was a sensitive tool for measuring structural changes, and was especially useful in detecting a major structural transition well below the accepted melting temperature of anhydrous lanolin.

  20. Model Reduction of Viscoelastic Finite Element Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, C. H.; Inman, D. J.; Lam, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper examines a method of adding viscoelastic properties to finite element models by using additional co-ordinates to account for the frequency dependence usually associated with such damping materials. Several such methods exist and all suffer from an increase in order of the final finite model which is undesirable in many applications. Here we propose to combine one of these methods, the GHM (Golla-Hughes-McTavish) method, with model reduction techniques to remove the objection of increased model order. The result of combining several methods is an ability to add the effects of visoelastic components to finite element or other analytical models without increasing the order of the system. The procedure is illustrated by a numerical example. The method proposed here results in a viscoelastic finite element of a structure without increasing the order of the original model.

  1. Streak instability in viscoelastic Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biancofiore, Luca; Brandt, Luca; Zaki, Tamer

    2015-11-01

    The secondary instability of streaks and transition to turbulence in viscoelastic Couette flow are studied using direct numerical simulations (DNS). Viscoelasticity is modeled using the FENE-P constitutive equations, and both the polymer concentration and Weissenberg number are varied in order to assess their effect on transition at moderate Reynolds number, Re = 400 .The base streaks are obtained from nonlinear simulations of the Couette flow response to a streamwise vortex, and can be classified as quasi-Newtonian streaks according to the terminology introduced by Page & Zaki (2014). At every streak amplitude of interest, harmonic forcing is introduced to trigger the secondary instability and breakdown to turbulence. The critical amplitude of this forcing decreases at higher Weissenberg number and also with increasing polymer concentration. The results demonstrate the destabilizing effect of elasticity at moderate Reynolds numbers.

  2. Viscoelasticity of Xenon near the Critical Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    1999-01-01

    Using a novel, overdamped, oscillator flown aboard the Space Shuttle, we measured the viscosity of xenon near the liquid-vapor critical point in the frequency range 2 Hz less than or equal to f less than or equal to 12 Hz. The measured viscosity divergence is characterized by the exponent z(sub eta) = 0.0690 +/- 0.0006, in agreement with the value z(sub eta) = 0.067 +/- 0.002 calculated from a two-loop perturbation expansion. Viscoelastic behavior was evident when t = (T - T(sub c))/T(sub c) less than 10(exp -5) and dominant when t less than 10(exp -6), further from T(sub c) than predicted. Viscoelastic behavior scales as Af(tau) where tau is the fluctuation decay time. The measured value of A is 2.0 +/- 0.3 times the result of a one-loop calculation. (Uncertainties stated are one standard uncertainty.)

  3. Inversion of GPS data for afterslip in viscoelastic Earth media for the 2011 Mw=9.0 Tohoku earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Kreemer, Corne; Hammond, William; Blewitt, Geoffrey

    2014-05-01

    Afterslip and viscoelastic relaxation are two important mechanisms that can explain observed postseismic deformation. For large megathrust events, such as the 2011 Mw=9.0 Tohoku earthquake, it is likely that these two processes happen simultaneously. While coseismic stress change triggers large amounts of flow in the viscous layers below the rupture, afterslip on the fault continues to stress the Earth and causes more viscoelastic relaxation. In other words, afterslip and viscoelastic relaxation are fully coupled. Conventional inversion considers afterslip separately from viscoelastic relaxation. Researchers either assume all the postseismic offsets are caused by afterslip (ignoring viscoelastic relaxation) or they only consider viscoelastic relaxation caused by coseismic change. The viscous flow induced by afterslip is usually ignored. For smaller earthquakes, these strategies may be reasonable, but for huge megathrust events like Tohoku, this can cause a misinterpretation of the data as a consequence of neglecting the coupling effects between afterslip and viscoelastic relaxation. In this work, we develop a strategy to invert GPS data for afterslip within a viscous Earth media considering the concurrence of afterslip and viscoelastic relaxation. The position time series predicted by an Earth model containing viscous layers of linear Maxwell rheology are proportional to the magnitude of the source. If we treat the source as input and Earth's deformation as output, this structure forms a linear time invariant system. In such systems, we can use outputs to linearly invert for inputs, i.e., use observed time series to invert for slip history on the fault embedded in a viscously flowing media. We implement this inversion scheme using three years of GPS position time series data from GEONET of Japan following the Tohoku earthquake. We use a grid search to estimate the elastic depth of the Earth and the viscosity of the lower crust and upper mantle. Based on the

  4. Viscoelastic properties of cell walls of single living plant cells determined by dynamic nanoindentation.

    PubMed

    Hayot, Céline M; Forouzesh, Elham; Goel, Ashwani; Avramova, Zoya; Turner, Joseph A

    2012-04-01

    Plant development results from controlled cell divisions, structural modifications, and reorganizations of the cell wall. Thereby, regulation of cell wall behaviour takes place at multiple length scales involving compositional and architectural aspects in addition to various developmental and/or environmental factors. The physical properties of the primary wall are largely determined by the nature of the complex polymer network, which exhibits time-dependent behaviour representative of viscoelastic materials. Here, a dynamic nanoindentation technique is used to measure the time-dependent response and the viscoelastic behaviour of the cell wall in single living cells at a micron or sub-micron scale. With this approach, significant changes in storage (stiffness) and loss (loss of energy) moduli are captured among the tested cells. The results reveal hitherto unknown differences in the viscoelastic parameters of the walls of same-age similarly positioned cells of the Arabidopsis ecotypes (Col 0 and Ws 2). The technique is also shown to be sensitive enough to detect changes in cell wall properties in cells deficient in the activity of the chromatin modifier ATX1. Extensive computational modelling of the experimental measurements (i.e. modelling the cell as a viscoelastic pressure vessel) is used to analyse the influence of the wall thickness, as well as the turgor pressure, at the positions of our measurements. By combining the nanoDMA technique with finite element simulations quantifiable measurements of the viscoelastic properties of plant cell walls are achieved. Such techniques are expected to find broader applications in quantifying the influence of genetic, biological, and environmental factors on the nanoscale mechanical properties of the cell wall.

  5. Viscoelastic properties of cell walls of single living plant cells determined by dynamic nanoindentation

    PubMed Central

    Hayot, Céline M.; Forouzesh, Elham; Goel, Ashwani; Avramova, Zoya; Turner, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    Plant development results from controlled cell divisions, structural modifications, and reorganizations of the cell wall. Thereby, regulation of cell wall behaviour takes place at multiple length scales involving compositional and architectural aspects in addition to various developmental and/or environmental factors. The physical properties of the primary wall are largely determined by the nature of the complex polymer network, which exhibits time-dependent behaviour representative of viscoelastic materials. Here, a dynamic nanoindentation technique is used to measure the time-dependent response and the viscoelastic behaviour of the cell wall in single living cells at a micron or sub-micron scale. With this approach, significant changes in storage (stiffness) and loss (loss of energy) moduli are captured among the tested cells. The results reveal hitherto unknown differences in the viscoelastic parameters of the walls of same-age similarly positioned cells of the Arabidopsis ecotypes (Col 0 and Ws 2). The technique is also shown to be sensitive enough to detect changes in cell wall properties in cells deficient in the activity of the chromatin modifier ATX1. Extensive computational modelling of the experimental measurements (i.e. modelling the cell as a viscoelastic pressure vessel) is used to analyse the influence of the wall thickness, as well as the turgor pressure, at the positions of our measurements. By combining the nanoDMA technique with finite element simulations quantifiable measurements of the viscoelastic properties of plant cell walls are achieved. Such techniques are expected to find broader applications in quantifying the influence of genetic, biological, and environmental factors on the nanoscale mechanical properties of the cell wall. PMID:22291130

  6. Nonlinear viscoelastic characterization of structural adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochefort, M. A.; Brinson, H. F.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements of the nonliner viscoelastic behavior of two adhesives, FM-73 and FM-300, are presented and discussed. Analytical methods to quantify the measurements are given and fitted into a framework of an accelerated testing and analysis procedure. The single integral model used is shown to function well and is analogous to a time-temperature stress-superposition procedure (TTSSP). Advantages and disadvantages of the creep power law method used in this study are given.

  7. Structural Identifiability of Viscoelastic Mechanical Systems

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We solve the local and global structural identifiability problems for viscoelastic mechanical models represented by networks of springs and dashpots. We propose a very simple characterization of both local and global structural identifiability based on identifiability tables, with the purpose of providing a guideline for constructing arbitrarily complex, identifiable spring-dashpot networks. We illustrate how to use our results in a number of examples and point to some applications in cardiovascular modeling. PMID:24523860

  8. VISCOELASTIC MODELS OF TIDALLY HEATED EXOMOONS

    SciTech Connect

    Dobos, Vera; Turner, Edwin L.

    2015-05-01

    Tidal heating of exomoons may play a key role in their habitability, since the elevated temperature can melt the ice on the body even without significant solar radiation. The possibility of life has been intensely studied on solar system moons such as Europa or Enceladus where the surface ice layer covers a tidally heated water ocean. Tidal forces may be even stronger in extrasolar systems, depending on the properties of the moon and its orbit. To study the tidally heated surface temperature of exomoons, we used a viscoelastic model for the first time. This model is more realistic than the widely used, so-called fixed Q models because it takes into account the temperature dependence of the tidal heat flux and the melting of the inner material. Using this model, we introduced the circumplanetary Tidal Temperate Zone (TTZ), which strongly depends on the orbital period of the moon and less on its radius. We compared the results with the fixed Q model and investigated the statistical volume of the TTZ using both models. We have found that the viscoelastic model predicts 2.8 times more exomoons in the TTZ with orbital periods between 0.1 and 3.5 days than the fixed Q model for plausible distributions of physical and orbital parameters. The viscoelastic model provides more promising results in terms of habitability because the inner melting of the body moderates the surface temperature, acting like a thermostat.

  9. Helical swimming in viscoelastic and porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin

    2012-02-01

    Many bacteria swim by rotating helical flagella. These cells often live in polymer suspensions, which are viscoelastic. Recently there have been several theoretical and experimental studies showing that viscoelasticity can either enhance or suppress propulsion, depending on the details of the microswimmer. To help clarify this situation, we study experimentally the motility of the flagellum using a scaled-up model system - a motorized helical coil that rotates along its axial direction. A free-swimming speed is obtained when the net force on the helix is zero. When the helix is immersed in a viscoelastic (Boger) fluid, we find an increase in the force-free swimming speed as compared with the Newtonian case. The enhancement is maximized at a Deborah number of approximately one, and the magnitude depends not only on the elasticity of the fluid but also on the geometry of the helix. In the second part of my talk, I will discuss how spatial confinements, such as a porous medium, affect the flagellated swimming. For clarity, the porous media are modeled as cylindrical cavities with solid walls. A modified boundary element method allows us to investigate a situation that the helical flagella are very close to the wall, with high spatial resolution and relatively low computational cost. To our surprise, at fixed power consumption, a highly coiled flagellum swims faster in narrower confinements, while an elongated flagellum swims faster in a cavity with a wider opening. We try understanding these effects with simple physical pictures.

  10. Aero-servo-viscoelasticity theory: Lifting surfaces, plates, velocity transients, flutter, and instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrett, Craig G.

    Modern flight vehicles are fabricated from composite materials resulting in flexible structures that behave differently from the more traditional elastic metal structures. Composite materials offer a number of advantages compared to metals, such as improved strength to mass ratio, and intentional material property anisotropy. Flexible aircraft structures date from the Wright brothers' first aircraft with fabric covered wooden frames. The flexibility of the structure was used to warp the lifting surface for flight control, a concept that has reappeared as aircraft morphing. These early structures occasionally exhibited undesirable characteristics during flight such as interactions between the empennage and the aft fuselage, or control problems with the elevators. The research to discover the cause and correction of these undesirable characteristics formed the first foray into the field of aeroelasticity. Aeroelasticity is the intersection and interaction between aerodynamics, elasticity, and inertia or dynamics. Aeroelasticity is well suited for metal aircraft, but requires expansion to improve its applicability to composite vehicles. The first is a change from elasticity to viscoelasticity to more accurately capture the solid mechanics of the composite material. The second change is to include control systems. While the inclusion of control systems in aeroelasticity lead to aero-servo-elasticity, more control possibilities exist for a viscoelastic composite material. As an example, during the lay-up of carbon-epoxy plies, piezoelectric control patches are inserted between different plies to give a variety of control options. The expanded field is called aero-servo-viscoelasticity. The phenomena of interest in aero-servo-viscoelasticity are best classified according to the type of structure considered, either a lifting surface or a panel, and the type of dynamic stability present. For both types of structures, the governing equations are integral

  11. Elastic and viscoelastic mechanical properties of brain tissues on the implanting trajectory of sub-thalamic nucleus stimulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Deng, Jianxin; Zhou, Jun; Li, Xueen

    2016-11-01

    Corresponding to pre-puncture and post-puncture insertion, elastic and viscoelastic mechanical properties of brain tissues on the implanting trajectory of sub-thalamic nucleus stimulation are investigated, respectively. Elastic mechanical properties in pre-puncture are investigated through pre-puncture needle insertion experiments using whole porcine brains. A linear polynomial and a second order polynomial are fitted to the average insertion force in pre-puncture. The Young's modulus in pre-puncture is calculated from the slope of the two fittings. Viscoelastic mechanical properties of brain tissues in post-puncture insertion are investigated through indentation stress relaxation tests for six interested regions along a planned trajectory. A linear viscoelastic model with a Prony series approximation is fitted to the average load trace of each region using Boltzmann hereditary integral. Shear relaxation moduli of each region are calculated using the parameters of the Prony series approximation. The results show that, in pre-puncture insertion, needle force almost increases linearly with needle displacement. Both fitting lines can perfectly fit the average insertion force. The Young's moduli calculated from the slope of the two fittings are worthy of trust to model linearly or nonlinearly instantaneous elastic responses of brain tissues, respectively. In post-puncture insertion, both region and time significantly affect the viscoelastic behaviors. Six tested regions can be classified into three categories in stiffness. Shear relaxation moduli decay dramatically in short time scales but equilibrium is never truly achieved. The regional and temporal viscoelastic mechanical properties in post-puncture insertion are valuable for guiding probe insertion into each region on the implanting trajectory.

  12. Viscoelasticity of crosslinked fracturing fluids and proppant transport

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, A.R. )

    1988-11-01

    In hydraulic fracturing treatments, the success of the treatment strongly depends on the proper placement of proppant particles in the fracture. ''Proper placement'' means the packing of the fracture to achieve maximum conductivity of gas/oil through the fracture into the wellbore. The placement of the proppants along the fracture is based on design equations where sand transport velocity is related to the rheological parameters of the fracturing fluid and characteristics of the proppant particle, such as size and density. The present work describes the theoretical transport equations that take into account the elasticity of the fluid in predicting proppant settling rate in the fracture. It presents the rheological data of commonly used fracturing fluids (titanate and borate crosslinked), including viscous and elastic parameter measurements made with a Rheometrics Pressure Rheometer (RPR) and Rheometrics Mechanical Spectrometer (RMS-800). These data show some important differences between borate crosslinked gels and titanate crosslinked gels. The paper also presents experimental data of proppant settling rates in various fracturing fluids and how these can be correlated with rheological parameters obtained in this work. The difference in rheology between borate and titanate gels was correlated with the difference in settling rates of proppants in these two gels. The theoretical and experimental work presented here led to the conclusion that the model for proppant placement in a hydraulic fracture should include: (1) proppant characteristics, (2) viscous rheological parameters (KAPPA and n), (3) elastic parameters (complex dynamic viscosity) from linear viscoelastic constitutive equation, and (4) normal stress difference from nonlinear viscoelastic constitutive equation. The influence of crosslinked-polymer-gel network structure on proppant transport is also discussed.

  13. Viscoelastic Properties of the Aortic Valve Interstitial Cell

    PubMed Central

    Merryman, W. David; Bieniek, Paul D.; Guilak, Farshid; Sacks, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    There has been growing interest in the mechanobiological function of the aortic valve interstitial cell (AVIC), due to its role in valve tissue homeostasis and remodeling. In a recent study we determined the relation between diastolic loading of the AV leaflet and the resulting AVIC deformation, which was found to be substantial. However, due to the rapid loading time of the AV leaflets during closure (~0.05 s), time-dependent effects may play a role in AVIC deformation during physiological function. In the present study, we explored AVIC viscoelastic behavior using the micropipette aspiration technique. We then modeled the resulting time-length data over the 100 sec test period using a standard linear solid (SLS) model which included Boltzmann superposition. To quantify the degree of creep and stress relaxation during physiological timescales, simulations of micropipette aspiration were preformed with a valve loading time of 0.05 s and a full valve closure time of 0.3 s. The 0.05 s loading simulations suggest that, during valve closure, AVICs act elastically. During diastole, simulations revealed creep (4.65%) and stress relaxation (4.39%) over the 0.3 s physiological timescale. Simulations also indicated that if Boltzmann superposition was not used in parameter estimation, as in much of the micropipette literature, creep and stress relaxation predicted values were nearly doubled (7.92% and 7.35%, respectively). We conclude that while AVIC viscoelastic effects are negligible during valve closure, they likely contribute to the deformation time-history of AVIC deformation during diastole. PMID:19275434

  14. Characterization of damping properties of nonlinear viscoelastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganeriwala, Surendra N.

    1995-05-01

    The dynamic behavior of most polymeric materials become non-linear at a moderately large strain amplitude excitation. In order to optimize their uses for noise and vibration attenuation, it is necessary to characterize their damping properties as a function of strain amplitude. This work reports the strain amplitude dependent non-linear dynamic behavior of two elastomer compounds, NBR and Neoprene, studied at various frequencies and strain amplitudes using the Fourier transform mechanical analysis (FTMA) technique, developed by us. The basic theory and experimental results are presented for a one-dimensional isothermal simple shear deformation. The Green-Rivlin constitutive equation was used to model the observed behavior. The results indicate that a complete characterization of non-linear dynamic properties is rather complex. The energy dissipation is governed, however, by a simple mechanism. It is shown that the energy dissipation is governed only by the first harmonic loss modulus term of the Green-Rivlin representation, but the energy storage is related to many material functions. An expression for the energy dissipation of a non-linear viscoelastic material is derived. It is also shown that irrespective of the material constitutive law the energy dissipation can occur only at the frequency of excitation but it can be stored in a complex manner. The results are rather generalized to show that the amplitude dependence can be modeled by a power law function. It is also shown that an examination of the stress Fourier spectra can give a quantitative indication of material non-linearity and suggest a direction for developing an adequate model of these complex materials.

  15. Principal resonance in transverse nonlinear parametric vibration of an axially accelerating viscoelastic string

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liqun, Chen; Zu, Jean W.; Jun, Wu

    2004-06-01

    To investigate the principal resonance in transverse nonlinear parametric vibration of an axially accelerating viscoelastic string, the method of multiple scales is applied directly to the nonlinear partial differential equation that governs the transverse vibration of the string. To derive the governing equation, Newton's second law, Lagrangean strain, and Kelvin's model are respectively used to account the dynamical relation, geometric nonlinearity and the viscoelasticity of the string material. Based on the solvability condition of eliminating the secular terms, closed form solutions are obtained for the amplitude and the existence conditions of nontrivial steady-state response of the principal parametric resonance. The Lyapunov linearized stability theory is employed to analyze the stability of the trivial and nontrivial solutions in the principal parametric resonance. Some numerical examples are presented to show the effects of the mean transport speed, the amplitude and the frequency of speed variation.

  16. Inertial collapse and oscillations of a bubble in a compressible viscoelastic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnsen, Eric; Hua, Chengyun

    2011-11-01

    The inertial collapse and subsequent oscillations of a bubble in a compressible viscoelastic medium are studied theoretically and numerically in the context of therapeutic ultrasound. The focus of the present work is on the response of a bubble subjected to a step increase in pressure, i.e., Rayleigh collapse. Linear constitutive relations that include stress relaxation, elasticity, viscosity and strain rate relaxation are considered. A perturbation analysis is followed to estimate the damping, frequency and relaxation of the oscillations. The results are compared to numerical solutions of the Keller equation, showing good agreement over a wide range of parameters. The nonlinear coupling between viscosity, compressibility, elasticity and relaxation leads to unexpected bubble behavior, e.g., sustained oscillations when damping is expected. Direct simulations of the full three-dimensional equations of motion will be discussed, including viscous and viscoelastic effects, non-spherical behavior and nonlinear constitutive models.

  17. Sloshing waves in a heated viscoelastic fluid layer in an excited rectangular tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirwah, Magdy A.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the motion of a heated viscoelastic fluid layer in a rectangular tank that is subjected to a horizontal periodic oscillation. The mathematical model of the current problem is communicated with the linearized Navier-Stokes equation of the viscoelastic fluid and heat equation together with the boundary conditions that are solved by means of Laplace transform. Time domain solutions are consequently computed by using Durbin's numerical inverse Laplace transform scheme. Various numerical results are provided and thereby illustrated graphically to show the effects of the physical parameters on the free-surface elevation time histories and heat distribution. The numerical applications revealed that increasing the Reynolds number as well as the relaxation time parameter leads to a wider range of variation of the free-surface elevation, especially for the short time history.

  18. Viscoelastic material inversion using Sierra-SD and ROL

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Timothy; Aquino, Wilkins; Ridzal, Denis; Kouri, Drew Philip; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; Urbina, Angel

    2014-11-01

    In this report we derive frequency-domain methods for inverse characterization of the constitutive parameters of viscoelastic materials. The inverse problem is cast in a PDE-constrained optimization framework with efficient computation of gradients and Hessian vector products through matrix free operations. The abstract optimization operators for first and second derivatives are derived from first principles. Various methods from the Rapid Optimization Library (ROL) are tested on the viscoelastic inversion problem. The methods described herein are applied to compute the viscoelastic bulk and shear moduli of a foam block model, which was recently used in experimental testing for viscoelastic property characterization.

  19. Modelling the viscoelasticity of ceramic tiles by finite element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovic, Ana; Fragassa, Cristiano

    2016-05-01

    This research details a numerical method aiming at investigating the viscoelastic behaviour of a specific family of ceramic material, the Grès Porcelain, during an uncommon transformation, known as pyroplasticity, which occurs when a ceramic tile bends under a combination of thermal stress and own weight. In general, the theory of viscoelasticity can be considered extremely large and precise, but its application on real cases is particularly delicate. A time-depending problem, as viscoelasticity naturally is, has to be merged with a temperature-depending situation. This paper investigates how the viscoelastic response of bending ceramic materials can be modelled by commercial Finite Elements codes.

  20. Mechanical characterization and modeling of non-linear deformation and fracture of a fiber reinforced metal matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansson, S.

    1991-01-01

    The nonlinear anisotropic mechanical behavior of an aluminum alloy metal matrix composite reinforced with continuous alumina fibers was determined experimentally. The mechanical behavior of the composite were modeled by assuming that the composite has a periodical microstructure. The resulting unit cell problem was solved with the finite element method. Excellent agreement was found between theoretically predicted and measured stress-strain responses for various tensile and shear loadings. The stress-strain responses for transverse and inplane shear were found to be identical and this will provide a simplification of the constitutive equations for the composite. The composite has a very low ductility in transverse tension and a limited ductility in transverse shear that was correlated to high hydrostatic stresses that develop in the matrix. The shape of the initial yield surface was calculated and good agreement was found between the calculated shape and the experimentally determined shape.

  1. Viscoelastic Lithosphere Response and Stress Memory of Tectonic Force History (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusznir, N. J.

    2009-12-01

    While great attention is often paid to the details of creep deformation mechanisms, brittle failure and their compositional controls when predicting the response of lithosphere to tectonic forces, the lithosphere’s elastic properties are usually neglected; a viscous rheology alone is often used to predict the resulting distribution of stress with depth or to determine lithosphere strength. While this may simplify geodynamic modelling of lithosphere response to tectonic processes, the omission of the elastic properties can often give misleading or false predictions. The addition of the elastic properties of lithosphere material in the form of a visco-elastic rheology results is a fundamentally different lithosphere response. This difference can be illustrated by examining the application of horizontal tectonic force to a section of lithosphere incorporating the brittle-visco-elastic response of each infinitesimal lithosphere layer with temperature and stress dependent viscous rheology. The transient response of a visco-elastic lithosphere to a constant applied tectonic force and the resulting distribution of stress with depth are substantially different from that predicted by a viscous lithosphere model, with the same lithosphere composition and temperature structure, subjected to a constant lateral strain rate. For visco-elastic lithosphere subject to an applied horizontal tectonic force, viscous creep in the lower crust and mantle leads to stress decay in these regions and to stress amplification in the upper lithosphere through stress redistribution. Cooling of lithosphere with a visco-elastic rheology results in thermal stresses which, as a consequence of stress dissipation by creep and brittle failure, results in a complex and sometimes counter-intuitive distribution of stress with depth. This can be most clearly illustrated for the cooling of oceanic lithosphere, however similar or more complex behaviour can be expected to occur for continental lithosphere

  2. Role of viscoelasticity in mantle convection models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patocka, Vojtech; Cadek, Ondrej; Tackley, Paul

    2015-04-01

    A present limitation of global thermo-chemical convection models is that they assume a purely viscous or visco-plastic flow law for solid rock, i.e. elasticity is ignored. This may not be a good assumption in the cold, outer boundary layer known as the lithosphere, where elastic deformation may be important. Elasticity in the lithosphere plays at least two roles: It changes surface topography, which changes the relationship between topography and gravity, and it alters the stress distribution in the lithosphere, which may affect dynamical behaviour such as the formation of plate boundaries and other tectonics features. A method for adding elasticity to a viscous flow solver to make a visco-elastic flow solver, which involves adding advected elastic stress to the momentum equation and introducing an "effective" viscosity has been proposed (e.g. Moresi, 2002). The proposed method is designed primarily for a regional-scale numerical model which employs tracers for advection and co-rotation of the stress field. In this study we test a grid-based version of the method in context of thermal convection in the Boussinesq approximation. A simple finite difference/volume model with staggered grid is used, with the aim to later use the same method to implement viscoelasticity into StagYY (Tackley, 2008). The main obstacle is that Maxwell viscoelastic rheology produces instantaneous deformation if instantaneous change of the driving forces occurs. It is not possible to model such deformation in a velocity formulated convection model, as velocity undergoes a singularity for an instantaneous deformation. For a given Rayleigh number there exists a certain critical value of the Deborah number above which it is necessary to use a thermal time step different from the one used in viscoelastic constitutive equation to avoid this numerical instability from happening. Critical Deborah numbers for various Rayleigh numbers are computed. We then propose a method to decouple the thermal and

  3. Cell motility and local viscoelasticity of fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Park, S; Koch, D; Cardenas, R; Käs, J; Shih, C K

    2005-12-01

    Viscoelastic changes of the lamellipodial actin cytoskeleton are a fundamental element of cell motility. Thus, the correlation between the local viscoelastic properties of the lamellipodium (including the transitional region to the cell body) and the speed of lamellipodial extension is studied for normal and malignantly transformed fibroblasts. Using our atomic force microscopy-based microrheology technique, we found different mechanical properties between the lamellipodia of malignantly transformed fibroblasts (H-ras transformed and SV-T2 fibroblasts) and normal fibroblasts (BALB 3T3 fibroblasts). The average elastic constants, K, in the leading edge of SV-T2 fibroblasts (0.48 +/- 0.51 kPa) and of H-ras transformed fibroblasts (0.42 +/- 0.35 kPa) are significantly lower than that of BALB 3T3 fibroblasts (1.01 +/- 0.40 kPa). The analysis of time-lapse phase contrast images shows that the decrease in the elastic constant, K, for malignantly transformed fibroblasts is correlated with the enhanced motility of the lamellipodium. The measured mean speeds are 6.1 +/- 4.5 microm/h for BALB 3T3 fibroblasts, 13.1 +/- 5.2 microm/h for SV-T2 fibroblasts, and 26.2 +/- 11.5 microm/h for H-ras fibroblasts. Furthermore, the elastic constant, K, increases toward the cell body in many instances which coincide with an increase in actin filament density toward the cell body. The correlation between the enhanced motility and the decrease in viscoelastic moduli supports the Elastic Brownian Ratchet model for driving lamellipodia extension.

  4. Viscoelastic behavior of polymers undergoing crosslinking reactions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moacanin, J.; Aklonis, J. J.

    1971-01-01

    Previously a method was developed for predicting the viscoelastic response of polymers undergoing scission reactions. These results are now extended to include crosslinking reactions. As for scission, at any given time the character of the network chains is determined by the instantaneous crosslink density. For scission all chains were assumed to carry the same stress; for crosslinking, however, the stress is distributed between the 'new' and 'old' chains. Equations for calculating the creep response of a system which experiences a step increase in crosslink density are derived.

  5. Viscoelastic Analysis of Thermally Stiffening Polymer Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, Andrew; Rende, Deniz; Senses, Erkan; Akcora, Pinar; Ozisik, Rahmi

    Poly(ethylene oxide), PEO, filled with silica nanoparticles coated with poly(methyl methacrylate), PMMA, was shown to present thermally stiffening behavior above the glass transition temperature of both PEO and PMMA. In the current study, the viscoelastic beahvior of this nanocomposite system is investigated via nanoindenation experiments to complement on going rheological studies. Results were compared to neat polymers, PEO and PMMA, to understand the effect of coated nanoparticles. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CMMI-1538730.

  6. How to approximate viscoelastic dynamic topographies of stagnant lid planetary bodies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumoulin, Caroline; Čadek, Ondřej; Choblet, Gaël

    2013-04-01

    Planetary mantles are viscoelastic media. However, since numerical models of thermal convection in a viscoelastic spherical shell are still very challenging, most of the studies concerning dynamic topography of planetary surfaces generated by mantle convection use one of the following simplified rheological set-up: i) IVF (instantaneous viscous flow), ii) viscous body with a free surface, or iii) hybrid methods combining viscous deformation and elastic filtering of the topography. Justifications for the use of such approximations instead of a fully viscoelastic rheology have been made on the basis of simple tests with step-like viscosity structures, with small to moderate viscosity contrasts. However, because the rheology of planetary materials is thermally activated, the radial stratification of viscosity is more likely to be a continuous function of depth, and global viscosity contrasts might be very large. In our study, we systematically compare viscoelastic dynamic topography induced by an internal load to topographies generated by the three different simplified approaches listed above using a realistic viscosity profile for a stagnant lid associated to the lithosphere of a one plate planete. To this purpose, we compute response functions of surface topography and geoid using three different semi-spectral models that all include self-gravitation: a) a linear Maxwell body with a pseudo free upper surface, b) a viscous body with a pseudo free upper surface, and c) a viscous body with a free-slip condition at the surface. Results obtained with this last model (IVF) can then be filtered using the elastic thin shell approximation: the effective elastic thickness then corresponds to the elastic thickness that is needed to fit the viscoelastic topography with an elastic filtering of the IVF topography. We show that the effective elastic thickness varies strongly with the degree of the load, with the depth of the load, and with the duration of the loading. These

  7. Eight-band k ṡp calculations of the composition contrast effect on the linear polarization properties of columnar quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrzejewski, Janusz; Sek, Grzegorz; O'Reilly, Eoin; Fiore, Andrea; Misiewicz, Jan

    2010-04-01

    We present eight-band k ṡp calculations of the electronic and polarization properties of columnar InzGa1-zAs quantum dots (CQD) with high aspect ratio embedded in an InxGa1-xAs/GaAs quantum well. Our model accounts for the linear strain effects, linear piezoelectricity, and spin-orbit interaction. We calculate the relative intensities of transverse-magnetic (TM) and transverse-electric (TE) linear polarized light emitted from the edge of the semiconductor wafer as a function of the two main factors affecting the heavy hole—light hole valence band mixing and hence, the polarization dependent selection rules for the optical transitions, namely, (i) the composition contrast z /x between the dot material and the surrounding well and (ii) the dot aspect ratio. The numerical results show that the former is the main driving parameter for tuning the polarization properties. This is explained by analyzing the biaxial strain in the CQD, based on which it is possible to predict the TM to TE intensity ratio. The conclusions are supported by analytical considerations of the strain in the dots. Finally, we present the compositional and geometrical conditions to achieve polarization independent emission from InGaAs/GaAs CQDs.

  8. Influences of viscoelastic properties of one-part epoxy adhesives on automotive dispensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dakin, Suzanne Irene Mcaleer

    The rheological properties of automotive adhesives were investigated to help understand how these properties may influence the performance of streaming dispensing processes used in automotive manufacturing. The rheological investigation included examining the base epoxies of the adhesives and two filler components: fumed silica and a spherical glass filler. Although the base epoxies are similar in chemical composition and viscosity, one exhibited non-linear elastic properties while the other did not. The enhancement of non-linear elastic properties due to the presence of fillers only occurred in the epoxy, which exhibited normal forces without fillers. Time temperature superposition was successfully applied to create master rheological curves for shear and viscoelastic properties. The shear rate range of the master viscosity curves extended to shear rates similar to shear rates of streaming dispensing. The non-linear elastic response differences of the materials played an important role in how well the materials dispensed with streaming. Dispensing studies of the adhesives using unwetted nozzles with a Graco Ultra-Flo 10 dispensing, indicated that deviations from centerline (DFC) increased as Re and De numbers increased. The adhesive, which exhibited an elastic response, looped and deviated out of view of the camera under unwetted nozzle conditions making quantifying distance from center impossible. Therefore, the adhesives and the epoxies were dispensed using a wetted nozzle. In-flight dispensed streams were photographed and DFC were recorded at distances of 2-cm and 4-cm from nozzle tip. Even under wetted nozzle conditions, the adhesive, which exhibited an elastic response during shear testing, streamed worse than the adhesive that had no detectable normal force response. Under wetted nozzle conditions, the effect of De (increase in DFC as De increases) is masked by the large stabilizing effect of Re. Therefore, the data was analyzed with respect to Re and N1/tau

  9. Compression creep rupture of an E-glass/vinyl ester composite subjected to combined mechanical and fire loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Steven Earl

    Polymer matrix composites are seeing increasing use in structural systems (e.g. ships, bridges) and require a quantitative basis for describing their performance under combined mechanical load and fire. Although much work has been performed to characterize the flammability, fire resistance and toxicity of these composite systems, an understanding of the structural response of sandwich type structures and laminate panels under combined mechanical and thermal loads (simulating fire conditions) is still largely unavailable. Therefore a research effort to develop a model to describe the structural response of these glass/vinyl esters systems under fire loading conditions is relevant to the continuing and future application of polymer matrix composites aboard naval ships. The main goal of the effort presented here is to develop analytical models and finite element analysis methods and tools to predict limit states such as local compression failures due to micro-buckling, residual strength and times to failure for composite laminates at temperatures in the vicinity of the glass transition where failure is controlled by viscoelastic effects. Given the importance of compression loading to a structure subject to fire exposure, the goals of this work are succinctly stated as the: (a) Characterization of the non-linear viscoelastic and viscoplastic response of the E-glass/vinyl ester composite above Tg. (b) Description of the laminate compression mechanics as a function of stress and temperature including viscoelasticity. (c) Viscoelastic stress analysis of a laminated panel ([0/+45/90/-45/0] S) using classical lamination theory (CLT). Three manuscripts constitute this dissertation which is representative of the three steps listed above. First, a detailed characterization of the nonlinear thermoviscoelastic response of Vetrotex 324/Derakane 510A--40 through Tg was conducted using the Time--Temperature--Stress--Superposition Principle (TTSSP) and Zapas--Crissman model. Second

  10. Viscoelastic damper overview for seismic and wind applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Edmond J.; Lai, Ming-Lai; Soong, T. T.; Kelly, James M.

    1996-05-01

    Viscoelastic dampers to reduce building structural vibration were first utilized in the Twin World Trade Center Towers in New York in 1969 for wind induced vibrations. In the 1980s, the Columbia SeaFirst and Two Union Square Buildings in Seattle utilized dampers for wind. In 1994 the Chien-Tan railroad station roof in Taipei, Taiwan utilized viscoelastic dampers to reduce wind induced vibrations. Recent seismic studies at several universities have demonstrated the benefits of viscoelastic dampers for steel and concrete structures. A 13 story steel moment frame building in Santa Clara County was retrofitted with viscoelastic dampers in 1994 to reduce seismic vibrations. A non-ductile concrete building in San Diego will be retrofitted with viscoelastic dampers in 1996. The results of university testing and building application installations are reviewed in this paper.

  11. Rheology of human blood plasma: viscoelastic versus Newtonian behavior.

    PubMed

    Brust, M; Schaefer, C; Doerr, R; Pan, L; Garcia, M; Arratia, P E; Wagner, C

    2013-02-15

    We investigate the rheological characteristics of human blood plasma in shear and elongational flows. While we can confirm a Newtonian behavior in shear flow within experimental resolution, we find a viscoelastic behavior of blood plasma in the pure extensional flow of a capillary breakup rheometer. The influence of the viscoelasticity of blood plasma on capillary blood flow is tested in a microfluidic device with a contraction-expansion geometry. Differential pressure measurements revealed that the plasma has a pronounced flow resistance compared to that of pure water. Supplementary measurements indicate that the viscoelasticity of the plasma might even lead to viscoelastic instabilities under certain conditions. Our findings show that the viscoelastic properties of plasma should not be ignored in future studies on blood flow.

  12. An equivalent viscoelastic model for rock mass with parallel joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianchun; Ma, Guowei; Zhao, Jian

    2010-03-01

    An equivalent viscoelastic medium model is proposed for rock mass with parallel joints. A concept of "virtual wave source (VWS)" is proposed to take into account the wave reflections between the joints. The equivalent model can be effectively applied to analyze longitudinal wave propagation through discontinuous media with parallel joints. Parameters in the equivalent viscoelastic model are derived analytically based on longitudinal wave propagation across a single rock joint. The proposed model is then verified by applying identical incident waves to the discontinuous and equivalent viscoelastic media at one end to compare the output waves at the other end. When the wavelength of the incident wave is sufficiently long compared to the joint spacing, the effect of the VWS on wave propagation in rock mass is prominent. The results from the equivalent viscoelastic medium model are very similar to those determined from the displacement discontinuity method. Frequency dependence and joint spacing effect on the equivalent viscoelastic model and the VWS method are discussed.

  13. Is viscoelastic coagulation monitoring with ROTEM or TEG validated?

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Cristina; Asmis, Lars M.; Spahn, Donat R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recent years have seen increasing worldwide interest in the use of viscoelastic coagulation monitoring tests, performed using devices such as ROTEM and TEG. The use of such tests to guide haemostatic therapy may help reduce transfusion of allogeneic blood products in bleeding patients and is supported in European guidelines for managing trauma and severe perioperative bleeding. In addition, viscoelastic tests form the basis of numerous published treatment algorithms. However, some publications have stated that viscoelastic tests are not validated. A specific definition of the term validation is lacking and regulatory requirements of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMA) have been fulfilled by ROTEM and TEG assays. Viscoelastic tests have been used in pivotal clinical trials, and they are approved for use in most of the world’s countries. Provided that locally approved indications are adhered to, the regulatory framework for clinicians to use viscoelastic tests in routine clinical practice is in place. PMID:27354213

  14. Modelling of the collision of two viscoelastic spherical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossikhin, Yury A.; Shitikova, Marina V.; Manh, Duong Tuan

    2016-11-01

    In the present paper, the collision of two viscoelastic spherical shells is investigated using the wave theory of impact. The model developed here suggests that after the moment of impact quasi-longitudinal and quasi-transverse shock waves are generated, which then propagate along the spherical shells. The solution behind the wave fronts is constructed with the help of the theory of discontinuities. Since the local bearing of the materials of the colliding viscoelastic shells is taken into account, the solution in the contact domain is found via the modified Hertz contact theory involving the operator representation of viscoelastic analogs of Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio. The collision of two elastic spherical shells is considered first, and then using Volterra correspondence principle, according to which the elastic constants in the governing equations should be replaced by the corresponding viscoelastic operators, the solution obtained for elastic shells is extended over the case of viscoelastic shells.

  15. Room temperature rechargeable magnesium batteries with sulfur-containing composite cathodes prepared from elemental sulfur and bis(alkenyl) compound having a cyclic or linear ether unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itaoka, Kanae; Kim, In-Tae; Yamabuki, Kazuhiro; Yoshimoto, Nobuko; Tsutsumi, Hiromori

    2015-11-01

    Room temperature rechargeable magnesium (Mg) batteries are constructed from Mg as a negative material, sulfur (S)-containing composite prepared from elemental sulfur and the bis(alkenyl) compound having a crown ether unit (BUMB18C6) or linear ether unit (UOEE) as a positive material and the simple electrolyte (0.7 mol dm-3 Mg[N(SO2CF3)2]2-triglyme (G3) solution). The reaction between molten S and the bis(alkenyl) compound (BUMB18C6 or UOEE) provides the sulfur-containing composite, S-BUMB18C6 or S-UOEE. Both of the sulfur-containing composites are electrochemically active in the Mg salt-based electrolyte, acetonitrile- or G3- Mg[N(SO2CF3)2]2 electrolyte. The first discharge capacity of the test cells with the sulfur-containing composite is 460 Ah kg-1 (per the weight of sulfur in the composite) with the S-BUMB18C6 electrode and 495 Ah kg-1 with the S-UOEE electrode. According to the continuous charge-discharge cycle tests (at 10th cycle), the discharge capacity of the test cell with the S-BUMB18C6 electrode (68.1 Ah kg-1) is higher than that with the S-UOEE electrode (0.18 Ah kg-1). The crown ether units in the S-BUMB18C6 composite may create ion-conducting paths in the cathode, prevent rise in the internal resistance of the cathode, and provide better cycle performance of the test cells with the S-BUMB18C6 composite electrode than that with the S-UOEE electrode.

  16. Optical coherence elastography assessment of corneal viscoelasticity with a modified Rayleigh-Lamb wave model.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhaolong; Li, Jiasong; Singh, Manmohan; Wu, Chen; Liu, Chih-Hao; Raghunathan, Raksha; Aglyamov, Salavat R; Vantipalli, Srilatha; Twa, Michael D; Larin, Kirill V

    2017-02-01

    The biomechanical properties of the cornea play a critical role in forming vision. Diseases such as keratoconus can structurally degenerate the cornea causing a pathological loss in visual acuity. UV-A/riboflavin corneal collagen crosslinking (CXL) is a clinically available treatment to stiffen the cornea and restore its healthy shape and function. However, current CXL techniques do not account for pre-existing biomechanical properties of the cornea nor the effects of the CXL treatment itself. In addition to the inherent corneal structure, the intraocular pressure (IOP) can also dramatically affect the measured biomechanical properties of the cornea. In this work, we present the details and development of a modified Rayleigh-Lamb frequency equation model for quantifying corneal biomechanical properties. After comparison with finite element modeling, the model was utilized to quantify the viscoelasticity of in situ porcine corneas in the whole eye-globe configuration before and after CXL based on noncontact optical coherence elastography measurements. Moreover, the viscoelasticity of the untreated and CXL-treated eyes was quantified at various IOPs. The results showed that the stiffness of the cornea increased after CXL and that corneal stiffness is close to linear as a function of IOP. These results show that the modified Rayleigh-Lamb wave model can provide an accurate assessment of corneal viscoelasticity, which could be used for customized CXL therapies.

  17. Force-free swimming of a model helical flagellum in viscoelastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Powers, Thomas; Breuer, Kenneth

    2011-11-01

    Many bacteria swim by rotating helical flagella. These cells often live in polymer suspensions, which are viscoelastic. Recently there have been several theoretical and experimental studies showing that viscoelasticity can either enhance or suppress propulsion, depending on the details of the microswimmer. To help clarify this situation, we study experimentally the motility of the flagellum using a scaled-up model system - a motorized helical coil that rotates along its axial direction. The rotating helix is tethered on a linear stage that advances at prescribed speeds along the axial direction. A free-swimming speed is obtained when the net force on the helix is zero. In the Newtonian case, the free-swimming speed of the helix matches the predictions from the slender body theory and the boundary element method, with increasing order of agreement as the numerical strategy improves. When the helix is immersed in a viscoelastic (Boger) fluid, we find an increase in the force-free swimming speed. The enhancement is maximized at a Deborah number of approximately one, and the magnitude depends not only on the elasticity of the fluid but also on the geometry of the helix.

  18. Effect of rotation on the onset of thermal convection in a viscoelastic fluid layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swamy, Mahantesh S.; Sidram, W.

    2013-02-01

    A rotating viscoelastic fluid layer heated from below is studied analytically using both linear and nonlinear stability analyses. The Oldroyd-B fluid model is employed to describe the rheological behaviour of the fluid. The Coriolis term is included in the momentum equation and the Oberbeck-Boussinesq approximation is invoked. The onset criterion for both stationary and oscillatory convection is derived as a function of Taylor number, Prandtl number and viscoelastic parameters. There is competition between the processes of rotation, viscous relaxation and thermal diffusion that causes the convection to set in through oscillatory rather than stationary modes. The rotation inhibits the onset of convection in both stationary and oscillatory modes. The stress relaxation parameter destabilizes the system towards the oscillatory mode, while the strain retardation parameter enhances the stability and this stabilization is reinforced by the rotation effect. The nonlinear theory is based on a truncated representation of the Fourier series method. The effect of rotation, viscoelastic parameters and also the Prandtl number on the transient heat transfer is presented graphically.

  19. Correlating Viscoelasticity with Metabolism in Single Cells using Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caporizzo, Matthew; Roco, Charles; Coll-Ferrer, Carme; Eckmann, David; Composto, Russell

    2015-03-01

    Variable indentation-rate rheometric analysis by Laplace transform (VIRRAL), is developed to evaluate Dex-Gel drug carriers as biocompatible delivery agents. VIRRAL provides a general platform for the rapid characterization of the health of single cells by viscoelasticity to promote the self-consistent comparison between cells paramount to the development of early diagnosis and treatment of disease. By modelling the frequency dependence of elastic modulus, VIRRAL provides three metrics of cytoplasmic viscoelasticity: low frequency stiffness, high frequency stiffness, and a relaxation time. THP-1 cells are found to exhibit a frequency dependent elastic modulus consistent with the standard linear solid model of viscoelasticity. VIRRAL indicates that dextran-lysozyme drug carriers are biocompatible and deliver concentrated toxic material (rhodamine or silver nanoparticles) to the cytoplasm of THP-1 cells. The signature of cytotoxicity by rhodamine or silver exposure is a frequency independent 2-fold increase in elastic modulus and cytoplasmic viscosity while the cytoskeletal relaxation time remains unchanged independent of cytoplasmic stiffness. This is consistent with the known toxic mechanism of silver nanoparticles, where mitochondrial injury leads to ATP depletion and metabolic stress causes a decrease of mobility within cytoplasm. NSF DMR08-32802, NIH T32-HL007954, and ONR N000141410538.

  20. A numerical solution to the cattaneo-mindlin problem for viscoelastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinu, S.; Cerlinca, D.

    2016-08-01

    The problem of the frictional mechanical contact with slip and stick, also referred to as the Cattaneo-Mindlin problem, is an important topic in engineering, with applications in the modeling of particle-flow simulations or in the study of contact between rough surfaces. In the frame of Linear Theory of Elasticity, accurate description of the slip-stick contact can only be achieved numerically, due to mutual interaction between normal and shear contact tractions. Additional difficulties arise when considering a viscoelastic constitutive law, as the mechanical response of the contacting materials depends explicitly on time. To overcome this obstacle, an existing algorithm for the purely elastic slip-stick contact is coupled with a semi-analytical method for viscoelastic displacement computation. The main advantage of this approach is that the contact model can be divided in subunits having the same structure as that of the purely elastic frictionless contact model, for which a well-established solution is readily available. In each time step, the contact solver assesses the contact area, the pressure distribution, the stick area and the shear tractions that satisfy the contact compatibility conditions and the static force equilibrium in both normal and tangential directions. A temporal discretization of the simulation windows assures that the memory effect, specific to both viscoelasticity and friction as a path-dependent processes, is properly replicated.

  1. Arterial viscoelasticity: a fractional derivative model.

    PubMed

    Craiem, Damien O; Armentano, Ricardo L

    2006-01-01

    Arteries are viscoelastic materials. Viscoelastic laws are fully characterized by measuring a complex modulus. Arterial mechanics can be described using stress-strain dynamic measurements applied to the particular cylindrical geometry. Most materials show an energy loss per cycle that increases steadily with frequency. By contrast, the frequency modulus response in arteries presents a frequency independence describing a plateau above a corner frequency near 4Hz. Traditional methods to fit this response include several spring and dashpot elements to model integer order differential equations in time domain. Recently, fractional derivative models proved to be efficient to describe rheological tissues, reducing the number of parameters and showing a natural power-law response. In this work a fractional derivative model with 4-parameter was selected to describe the arterial wall mechanics in-vivo. Strain and stress were measured simultaneously in an anaesthetized sheep. A fractional model was applied. The order resulted alpha=0.12, confirming the manifest elastic response of the aorta. The fractional derivative model proved to naturally mimic the elastic modulus spectrum with only 4 parameters and a reasonable small computational effort.

  2. Mechanical vibration of viscoelastic liquid droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, James; Harrold, Victoria

    2014-03-01

    The resonant vibrations of viscoelastic sessile droplets supported on different substrates were monitored using a simple laser light scattering technique. In these experiments, laser light was reflected from the surfaces of droplets of high Mw poly acrylamide-co-acrylic acid (PAA) dissolved in water. The scattered light was allowed to fall on the surface of a photodiode detector and a mechanical impulse was applied to the drops using a vibration motor mounted beneath the substrates. The mechanical impulse caused the droplets to vibrate and the scattered light moved across the surface of the photodiode. The resulting time dependent photodiode signal was then Fourier transformed to obtain the mechanical vibrational spectra of the droplets. The frequencies and widths of the resonant peaks were extracted for droplets containing different concentrations of PAA and with a range of sizes. This was repeated for PAA loaded water drops on surfaces which displayed different values of the three phase contact angle. The results were compared to a simple model of droplet vibration which considers the formation of standing wave states on the surface of a viscoelastic droplet. We gratefully acknowledge the support of the Leverhulme trust under grant number RPG-2012-702.

  3. Coiling and Folding of Viscoelastic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majmudar, Trushant; Varagnat, Matthieu; McKinley, Gareth

    2007-11-01

    The study of fluid jets impacting on a flat surface has industrial applications in many areas, including processing of foods and consumer goods, bottle filling, and polymer melt processing. Previous studies have focused primarily on purely viscous, Newtonian fluids, which exhibit a number of different dynamical regimes including dripping, steady jetting, folding, and steady coiling. Here we add another dimension to the problem by focusing on mobile (low viscosity) viscoelastic fluids, with the study of two wormlike-micellar fluids, a cetylpyridinum-salicylic acid salt (CPyCl/NaSal) solution, and an industrially relevant shampoo base. We investigate the effects of viscosity and elasticity on the dynamics of axi-symmetric jets. The viscoelasticity of the fluids is systematically controlled by varying the concentration of salt counterions. Experimental methods include shear and extensional rheology measurements to characterize the fluids, and high-speed digital video imaging. In addition to the regimes observed in purely viscous systems, we also find a novel regime in which the elastic jet buckles and folds on itself, and alternates between coiling and folding behavior. We suggest phase diagrams and scaling laws for the coiling and folding frequencies through a systematic exploration of the experimental parameter space (height of fall, imposed flow rate, elasticity of the solution).

  4. Viscoelasticity and shear thinning of nanoconfined water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapoor, Karan; Amandeep, Patil, Shivprasad

    2014-01-01

    Understanding flow properties and phase behavior of water confined to nanometer-sized pores and slits is central to a wide range of problems in science, such as percolation in geology, lubrication of future nano-machines, self-assembly and interactions of biomolecules, and transport through porous media in filtration processes. Experiments with different techniques in the past have reported that viscosity of nanoconfined water increases, decreases, or remains close to bulk water. Here we show that water confined to less than 20-nm-thick films exhibits both viscoelasticity and shear thinning. Typically viscoelasticity and shear thinning appear due to shearing of complex non-Newtonian mixtures possessing a slowly relaxing microstructure. The shear response of nanoconfined water in a range of shear frequencies (5 to 25 KHz) reveals that relaxation time diverges with reducing film thickness. It suggests that slow relaxation under confinement possibly arises due to existence of a critical point with respect to slit width. This criticality is similar to the capillary condensation in porous media.

  5. Viscoelastic struts for vibration mitigation of FORTE

    SciTech Connect

    Maly, J.R.; Butler, T.A.

    1996-05-01

    FORTE is a small satellite being developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque (SNLA). It will be placed into orbit via a Pegasus launch in 1996. Testing a full-scale engineering model of the structure using the proto-qualification, system-level vibration spectrum indicated that acceleration levels caused by structural resonances exceed component levels to which certain sensitive components had previously been qualified. Viscoelastic struts were designed to reduce response levels associated with these resonances by increasing the level of damping in key structural modes of the spacecraft. Four identical shear-lap struts were fabricated ad installed between the two primary equipment decks. The struts were designed using a system finite element model (FEM) of the spacecraft, a component FEM of the strut, and measured viscoelastic properties. Direct complex stiffness testing was performed to characterize the frequency-dependent behavior of the struts, and these measured properties (shear modulus and loss factor) were used to represent the struts in the spacecraft model. System-level tests were repeated with the struts installed and the response power spectral densities at critical component locations were reduced by as much as 10 dB in the frequency range of interest.

  6. Droplet breakup dynamics of weakly viscoelastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Kristin; Walker, Travis

    2016-11-01

    The addition of macromolecules to solvent, even in dilute quantities, can alter a fluid's response in an extensional flow. For low-viscosity fluids, the presence of elasticity may not be apparent when measured using a standard rotational rheometer, yet it may still alter the response of a fluid when undergoing an extensional deformation, especially at small length scales where elastic effects are enhanced. Applications such as microfluidics necessitate investigating the dynamics of fluids with elastic properties that are not pronounced at large length scales. In the present work, a microfluidic cross-slot configuration is used to study the effects of elasticity on droplet breakup. Droplet breakup and the subsequent iterated-stretching - where beads form along a filament connecting two primary droplets - were observed for a variety of material and flow conditions. We present a relationship on the modes of bead formation and how and when these modes will form based on key parameters such as the properties of the outer continuous-phase fluid. The results are vital not only for simulating the droplet breakup of weakly viscoelastic fluids but also for understanding how the droplet breakup event can be used for characterizing the extensional properties of weakly-viscoelastic fluids.

  7. Compressive viscoelasticity of freshly excised mouse skin is dependent on specimen thickness, strain level and rate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuxiang; Marshall, Kara L; Baba, Yoshichika; Lumpkin, Ellen A; Gerling, Gregory J

    2015-01-01

    Although the skin's mechanical properties are well characterized in tension, little work has been done in compression. Here, the viscoelastic properties of a population of mouse skin specimens (139 samples from 36 mice, aged 5 to 34 weeks) were characterized upon varying specimen thickness, as well as strain level and rate. Over the population, we observed the skin's viscoelasticity to be quite variable, yet found systematic correlation of residual stress ratio with skin thickness and strain, and of relaxation time constants with strain rates. In particular, as specimen thickness ranged from 211 to 671 μm, we observed significant variation in both quasi-linear viscoelasticity (QLV) parameters, the relaxation time constant (τ1 = 0.19 ± 0.10 s) and steady-state residual stress ratio (G∞ = 0.28 ± 0.13). Moreover, when τ1 was decoupled and fixed, we observed that G∞ positively correlated with skin thickness. Second, as steady-state stretch was increased (λ∞ from 0.22 to 0.81), we observed significant variation in both QLV parameters (τ1 = 0.26 ± 0.14 s, G∞ = 0.47 ± 0.17), and when τ1 was fixed, G∞ positively correlated with stretch level. Third, as strain rate was increased from 0.06 to 22.88 s-1, the median time constant τ1 varied from 1.90 to 0.31 s, and thereby negatively correlated with strain rate. These findings indicate that the natural range of specimen thickness, as well as experimental controls of compression level and rate, significantly influence measurements of skin viscoelasticity.

  8. Compressive Viscoelasticity of Freshly Excised Mouse Skin Is Dependent on Specimen Thickness, Strain Level and Rate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuxiang; Marshall, Kara L.; Baba, Yoshichika; Lumpkin, Ellen A.; Gerling, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Although the skin’s mechanical properties are well characterized in tension, little work has been done in compression. Here, the viscoelastic properties of a population of mouse skin specimens (139 samples from 36 mice, aged 5 to 34 weeks) were characterized upon varying specimen thickness, as well as strain level and rate. Over the population, we observed the skin’s viscoelasticity to be quite variable, yet found systematic correlation of residual stress ratio with skin thickness and strain, and of relaxation time constants with strain rates. In particular, as specimen thickness ranged from 211 to 671 μm, we observed significant variation in both quasi-linear viscoelasticity (QLV) parameters, the relaxation time constant (τ1 = 0.19 ± 0.10 s) and steady-state residual stress ratio (G∞ = 0.28 ± 0.13). Moreover, when τ1 was decoupled and fixed, we observed that G∞ positively correlated with skin thickness. Second, as steady-state stretch was increased (λ∞ from 0.22 to 0.81), we observed significant variation in both QLV parameters (τ1 = 0.26 ± 0.14 s, G∞ = 0.47 ± 0.17), and when τ1 was fixed, G∞ positively correlated with stretch level. Third, as strain rate was increased from 0.06 to 22.88 s−1, the median time constant τ1 varied from 1.90 to 0.31 s, and thereby negatively correlated with strain rate. These findings indicate that the natural range of specimen thickness, as well as experimental controls of compression level and rate, significantly influence measurements of skin viscoelasticity. PMID:25803703

  9. Instability suppression in viscoelastic film flows down an inclined plane lined with a deformable solid layer.

    PubMed

    Jain, Aashish; Shankar, V

    2007-10-01

    The linear stability of viscoelastic (Oldroyd-B) film flow down an inclined plane lined with a deformable (neo-Hookean) solid layer is analyzed using low-wave-number asymptotic analysis and the Chebyshev-Tau spectral numerical method. The free surface of film flows of viscoelastic liquids, unlike that of their Newtonian counterparts, becomes unstable in flow down a rigid inclined surface even in the absence of fluid inertia, due to the elastic nature of the liquids. For film flow past a deformable solid, our low-wave-number asymptotic analysis reveals that the solid deformability has a stabilizing effect on the free-surface instability, and, remarkably, this prediction is insensitive to rheology of the liquid film, be it viscoelastic or Newtonian. Using the spectral numerical method, we demonstrate that the free-surface instability can be completely suppressed at all wave numbers when the solid becomes sufficiently deformable. For the case of pure polymeric liquids without any solvent, when the solid layer is made further deformable, both the free surface and the liquid-solid interface are destabilized at finite wave numbers. We also demonstrate a type of mode exchange phenomenon between the modes corresponding to the two interfaces. Importantly, our numerical results show that there is a sufficient range of shear modulus of the solid where both the modes are stable at all wave numbers. For polymer solutions described by the Oldroyd-B model, while the free-surface instability is suppressed by the deformable solid, a host of new unstable modes appear at finite Reynolds number and wave number because of the coupling between liquid flow and free shear waves in the solid. Our study thus demonstrates that the elastohydrodynamic coupling between liquid flow and solid deformation can be exploited either to suppress the free-surface instability (present otherwise in rigid inclines) in viscoelastic film flows, or to induce new instabilities that are absent in flow adjacent

  10. Viscoelastic changes in the blood and vascular wall in a pulsating circular flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beraia, Merab; Todua, Fridon; Khomeriki, Irina

    2010-01-01

    Altered flow conditions, such as separation and recirculationg zones, low and oscillatory shear stress, play an important role in the development of arterial disease. Endothelial denudation by the blood flow is the first step in atherosclerosis. The description of blood flow in vivo is complicated due to the viscoelasticity of vessel walls. However, conventional researches of the effect of the blood vessel viscoelasticity on the blood pressure wave propagation using non-linear one-dimensional models do not take into account the viscoelasticity, despite it being importance in the analysis of pulse wave propagation in arteries. The purpose of this paper is to study the impact of the arterial pulse wave on the viscoelastic blood flow and initial factors of atherosclerosis. In 12 healthy men (25-39 years of age) peak velocity, mean velocity, mean flow and net flow in the aorta have been investigated by MR angiography. Initial velocity was registered after 43msec of the ECG-R wave, and it differed from zero at all sites of the aorta, although net flow was equal to zero. Womersley's number from the ascending to the thoracic aorta decreased from 12.5 ± 1.5 to 7.3 ± 1.2; flow modified from inertio-elastic to viscous. Pulse pressure wave move on artery walls fifteen or more times more rapidly than the blood flow. In the aortic arch in protodiastole blood flow separated into the opposite directed streams resulting in wave superposition with the high net flow. At the isthmus area separated waves interferences and reflects to anterograde direction. Pulse oscillation increases strain rate to the contiguous vessel wall flow layers. At the sites with the flow wave negative interference vessel pulse oscillation attenuates and at the boundary reflection flow wave can shift the vessel wall.

  11. Composition, structure, origin, and evolution of off-axis linear volcanic structures of the Brazil Basin, South Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skolotnev, S. G.; Peive, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    The paper considers the conditions and mechanisms of the formation of linear volcanic structures in the Brazil Basin, South Atlantic. Among these objects, those related to the ascent of deep mantle plumes predominate. It is shown that the ascent of melts from plume sources leads to the formation of (a) hot spot tracks in the form of linear volcanic ridges and (b) active hot lines in the form of submarine mountain chains with trends differing from those of hot spot tracks and with a more variable character of the age distribution of volcanic rocks. Fault tectonics affects the character of plume activity. In addition, plume material from a hot spot area is dragged by a moving plate as a flow or a sublithospheric lens, which leads to the long-term existence of particular independent segments of linear structures and sometimes to late volcanism reactivation within their limits. Decompression melting of the asthenospheric mantle in zones where thin lithosphere undergoes tension causes the formation of passive hot lines. The main mantle source for the considered volcanic rocks was a mixture of DMM and HIMU mantle components, with the latter abruptly dominating. In marginal oceanic regions, the EM1 component is also present (the EM2 component is found more rarely) within fragments of tectonically delaminated continental mantle that was trapped by the oceanic mantle during the breakup of Gondwana.

  12. Stability analysis of the interface between two weak viscoelastic liquids under periodic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Gonzalez, Sergio; Fernandez-Feria, Ramon

    2017-01-01

    We consider the motion and the linear hydrodynamic instabilities of two immiscible viscoelastic liquids above a horizontal solid surface induced by the periodic oscillations of the horizontal plate along its plane. A planar interface, parallel to the oscillating plate, separates the lower layer from the other viscoelastic fluid that extends vertically to infinity. The two-dimensional motion of these fluids is studied together with the conditions under which the flow becomes unstable, deforming the planar interface and promoting the mixing of both liquids. The study extends the previous work by Isakova et al. ["A model for the linear stability of the interface between aqueous humor and vitreous substitutes after vitreoretinal surgery," Phys. Fluids 26, 124101 (2014)] by considering non-Newtonian fluids, particularly liquids with weak viscoelasticity (neglecting normal stress differences), which may model more accurately the physical behavior of the aqueous humor and, especially, the vitreous humour substitute in the vitreous chamber of the eye after vitrectomy. A novel approach to the quasi-steady stability analysis of unsteady flows of Maxwell liquids is developed in the present paper. We focus on the effect of the small Deborah numbers on the motion and on the hydrodynamic instability of the two fluids as the other non-dimensional parameters are varied within the range of interest for the biofluiddynamics of the eye. The special case in which the lower layer modelling the aqueous humor is a Newtonian liquid and the upper vitreous substitute is a Maxwell liquid is considered with detail. We find that, even for a very small Deborah number of the vitreous substitute, the dynamics and the hydrodynamic stability of the two fluids can be qualitatively very different to the Newtonian case, especially as the viscosity ratio is varied, showing that weak viscoelasticity may change dramatically the dynamics of the eye. An exhaustive characterization of the influence of the

  13. In situ multi-level analysis of viscoelastic deformation mechanisms in tendon collagen.

    PubMed

    Gupta, H S; Seto, J; Krauss, S; Boesecke, P; Screen, H R C

    2010-02-01

    Tendon is a hydrated multi-level fibre composite, in which time-dependent behaviour is well established. Studies indicate significant stress relaxation, considered important for optimising tissue stiffness. However, whilst this behaviour is well documented, the mechanisms associated with the response are largely unknown. This study investigates the sub-structural mechanisms occurring during stress relaxation at both the macro (fibre) and nano (fibril) levels of the tendon hierarchy. Stress relaxation followed a two-stage exponential behaviour, during which structural changes were visible at the fibre and fibril levels. Fibril relaxation and fibre sliding showed a double exponential response, while fibre sliding was clearly the largest contributor to relaxation. The amount of stress relaxation and sub-structural reorganisation increased with increasing load increments, but fibre sliding was consistently the largest contributor to stress relaxation. A simple model of tendon viscoelasticity at the fibril and fibre levels has been developed, capturing this behaviour by serially coupling a Voigt element (collagen fibril), with two Maxwell elements (non-collagenous matrix between fibrils and fibres). This multi-level analysis provides a first step towards understanding how sub-structural interactions contribute to viscoelastic behaviour. It indicates that nano- and micro-scale shearing are significant dissipative mechanisms, and the kinetics of relaxation follows a two-stage exponential decay, well fitted by serially coupled viscoelastic elements.

  14. Large-scale fabrication of linear low density polyethylene/layered double hydroxides composite films with enhanced heat retention, thermal, mechanical, optical and water vapor barrier properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jiazhuo; Zhang, Kun; Zhao, Qinghua; Wang, Qingguo; Xu, Jing

    2016-11-01

    Novel LDH intercalated with organic aliphatic long-chain anion was large-scale synthesized innovatively by high-energy ball milling in one pot. The linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE)/layered double hydroxides (LDH) composite films with enhanced heat retention, thermal, mechanical, optical and water vapor barrier properties were fabricated by melt blending and blowing process. FT IR, XRD, SEM results show that LDH particles were dispersed uniformly in the LLDPE composite films. Particularly, LLDPE composite film with 1% LDH exhibited the optimal performance among all the composite films with a 60.36% enhancement in the water vapor barrier property and a 45.73 °C increase in the temperature of maximum mass loss rate compared with pure LLDPE film. Furthermore, the improved infrared absorbance (1180-914 cm-1) of LLDPE/LDH films revealed the significant enhancement of heat retention. Therefore, this study prompts the application of LLDPE/LDH films as agricultural films with superior heat retention.

  15. Viscoelasticity and texture of spreadable cheeses with different fat contents at refrigeration and room temperatures.

    PubMed

    Bayarri, S; Carbonell, I; Costell, E

    2012-12-01

    The effect of the 2 common consumption temperatures, refrigeration temperature (10°C) and room temperature (22°C), on the viscoelasticity, mechanical properties, and perceived texture of commercial cream cheeses was studied. Two samples with different fat contents, regular and low fat, from each of 4 selected commercial brands were analyzed. The selection criteria were based on identification of brands with different percentages of fat content reduction between the regular- and low-fat samples (35, 50, 84, and 98.5%). The fat content of regular-fat samples ranged from 19.8 to 26.0% (wt/wt), and that of low-fat samples ranged from 0.3 to 13.0% (wt/wt). Viscoelasticity was measured in a controlled-stress rheometer using parallel-plate geometry, and the mechanical characteristics of samples were measured using the spreadability test. Differences in the intensity of thickness, creaminess, and roughness between the regular- and low-fat samples of each commercial brand were evaluated at each of the selected temperatures by using the paired comparisons test. At 10°C, all samples showed higher viscoelastic modulus values, firmness, and stickiness, and lower spreadability than when they were measured at 22°C. Differences in viscoelasticity and mechanical properties between each pair of samples of the same brand were greater at 10°C than at 22°C because of the influence not only of fat content but also of fat state. Ingestion temperature did not modify the sensory differences detected between each pair of samples in terms of creaminess and roughness, but it did modify the differences detected in thickness. The joint consideration of sample composition, fat state, and product behavior during oral processing could explain the differences detected in thickness perceived because of measurement temperatures.

  16. Dynamic characteristics of temperature-dependent viscoelastic FG nanobeams subjected to 2D-magnetic field under periodic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirafzal, A.; Fereidoon, A.

    2017-04-01

    In this study, natural frequency and dynamic stability of functionally graded (FG) viscoelastic nanobeams based on the Euler-Bernoulli theory on the visco-Pasternak foundation are predicted. The material characteristics of FG nanobeam are temperature-dependent, and vary according to power-law model along thickness. The FG viscoelastic nanobeam is located on a two-dimensional magnetic field which considers the effects of transverse and longitudinal magnetic field. The uniform, linear, and sinusoidal temperature fields are applied on the FG viscoelastic nanobeam. The governing equations are derived through Hamilton's principle and Eringen's nonlocal theory. The equations are solved by a Navier-type method and the Bolotin method for simply supported conditions. The effect of three different temperature fields on natural frequency and dynamic stability region of the nanobeam is analyzed. The importance of various parameters such as nonlocal parameter, gradient indexes, magnitude of magnetic field, angle of magnetic field, temperature changes, and aspect ratio on both natural frequency and dynamic stability region of the FG viscoelastic nanobeam is investigated.

  17. Effects of Matrix Viscoelasticity on Rheology of Dilute and Semi-Dilute Suspensions of Non Brownian Rigid Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grizzuti, Nino; Pasquino, Rossana

    2008-07-01

    The rheology of non-Brownian, inertialess rigid spheres suspended in viscoelastic fluids was investigated in the dilute and semi-dilute regimes (volume fractions up to 10%), where interparticle interactions become increasingly relevant. PMMA spherical particles were suspended in viscoelastic Polydimethylsiloxanes (PDMS). A Newtonian fluid (Polyisobutilene, PIB) was also used as a reference system. As expected, both the viscosity and the viscoelastic moduli increased with increasing solid volume fraction. The rheological parameters showed a simple scaling behaviour when their normalized values (with respect to the pure fluid) were considered. Viscosity and moduli were found to be independent upon shear rate and frequency, respectively. Following Batchelor's approach for non-dilute Newtonian suspensions, a second order polynomial dependency for the rheological properties was assumed. While the Newtonian reference fluid was found to obey well Batchelor's theoretical predictions, the viscoelastic suspensions showed more pronounced deviations from the linear dilute behavior, resulting in a second order polynomial coefficient substantially larger than that predicted by Batchelor for Newtonian systems. It was also found that the same concentration dependence was followed by both elastic and loss modulus.

  18. The analytical representation of viscoelastic material properties using optimization techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, S. A.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents a technique to model viscoelastic material properties with a function of the form of the Prony series. Generally, the method employed to determine the function constants requires assuming values for the exponential constants of the function and then resolving the remaining constants through linear least-squares techniques. The technique presented here allows all the constants to be analytically determined through optimization techniques. This technique is employed in a computer program named PRONY and makes use of commercially available optimization tool developed by VMA Engineering, Inc. The PRONY program was utilized to compare the technique against previously determined models for solid rocket motor TP-H1148 propellant and V747-75 Viton fluoroelastomer. In both cases, the optimization technique generated functions that modeled the test data with at least an order of magnitude better correlation. This technique has demonstrated the capability to use small or large data sets and to use data sets that have uniformly or nonuniformly spaced data pairs. The reduction of experimental data to accurate mathematical models is a vital part of most scientific and engineering research. This technique of regression through optimization can be applied to other mathematical models that are difficult to fit to experimental data through traditional regression techniques.

  19. Viscoelastic Behavior and Adhesion of Ionic Alginate Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, Rebecca; Shull, Kenneth

    2004-03-01

    Transient networks, polymer gels in which the physical crosslinks can be broken and recovered, have been of recent interest to the scientific community, especially due to their potential as soft, dissipative materials for biomedical applications. Alginates, naturally derived linear copolymers of mannuronic and guluronic acid residues, can form hydrogels in the presence of divalent ions. Alginate gels have been studied extensively and are useful model systems to elucidate the mechanisms behind the mechanical behavior of reversibly associating polymers. In this study, alginate hydrogels were formed by the addition of Ca ions to an aqueous solution of sodium alginate. The rheological and mechanical behavior of the hydrogels was studied using an axisymmetric probe tack apparatus with stress relaxation and cyclic movement capabilities. These hydrogels behave elastically at small strains and become viscoelastic at large strains, supporting transient network theories. During cyclic loading tests, it was found that the alginate hydrogels exhibit time-dependent adhesion. The effects of humidity, aging and ion exchange on the gel properties were also investigated.

  20. Leukocyte deformability: finite element modeling of large viscoelastic deformation.

    PubMed

    Dong, C; Skalak, R

    1992-09-21

    An axisymmetric deformation of a viscoelastic sphere bounded by a prestressed elastic thin shell in response to external pressure is studied by a finite element method. The research is motivated by the need for understanding the passive behavior of human leukocytes (white blood cells) and interpreting extensive experimental data in terms of the mechanical properties. The cell at rest is modeled as a sphere consisting of a cortical prestressed shell with incompressible Maxwell fluid interior. A large-strain deformation theory is developed based on the proposed model. General non-linear, large strain constitutive relations for the cortical shell are derived by neglecting the bending stiffness. A representation of the constitutive equations in the form of an integral of strain history for the incompressible Maxwell interior is used in the formulation of numerical scheme. A finite element program is developed, in which a sliding boundary condition is imposed on all contact surfaces. The mathematical model developed is applied to evaluate experimental data of pipette tests and observations of blood flow.

  1. Oil drainage in model porous media by viscoelastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaumont, Julien; Bodiguel, Hugues; Colin, Annie

    2012-11-01

    Crude oil recovery efficiency has been shown to depend directly on the capillary number (Ca). If the capillary phenomenon is well described for Newtonian fluids, the consequences of non linear rheology and viscoelasticity require more experimental work at the pore scale. In this work we take advantage of microfluidic to revisit this field. We carried out oil drainage experiments through a micromodel made up with photoresist resin. The wetting phase trapped is a model oil. The invading phases used are aqueous solutions of high molecular weight hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (HPAM) and surfactant. Qualitatively, we observed a transition between a capillary fingering at low flow rates and a stable front at high flow rates for the drainage experiments with HPAM and surfactant solutions as it happened for drainage with Newtonian fluids. From movies of the filling of the device, we determine the local velocity of all menisci in the porous media. Thus, we quantify the capillary fingering. Surprisingly, local velocities are not significantly different from those measured using water, whereas the HPAM solutions are much more viscous. With betaine solutions, we observed an emulsification of the oil clusters trapped during the invasion leading to a very high oil recovery after percolation.

  2. Initial Fracture of a Viscoelastic Isotropic Plate with Two Collinear Cracks of Equal Length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminsky, A. A.; Selivanov, M. F.; Chernoivan, Yu. A.

    2014-05-01

    The stress-strain state of an unbounded linear viscoelastic isotropic body weakened by collinear cracks of equal length and subjected to a time-independent load normal to the cracks is studied. The expression for the crack opening displacement in the nonlinear range that is derived based on the Leonov-Panasyuk-Dugdale model is used to deduce the equations of subcritical crack growth. A numerical algorithm for solving them is presented. The solutions of the equations describing subcritical crack growth are analyzed in determining the duration of the initial crack growth period. The numerical results are presented as graphs and tables

  3. Viscoelastic-coupling model for the earthquake cycle driven from below

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    In a linear system the earthquake cycle can be represented as the sum of a solution which reproduces the earthquake cycle itself (viscoelastic-coupling model) and a solution that provides the driving force. We consider two cases, one in which the earthquake cycle is driven by stresses transmitted along the schizosphere and a second in which the cycle is driven from below by stresses transmitted along the upper mantle (i.e., the schizosphere and upper mantle, respectively, act as stress guides in the lithosphere). In both cases the driving stress is attributed to steady motion of the stress guide, and the upper crust is assumed to be elastic. The surface deformation that accumulates during the interseismic interval depends solely upon the earthquake-cycle solution (viscoelastic-coupling model) not upon the driving source solution. Thus geodetic observations of interseismic deformation are insensitive to the source of the driving forces in a linear system. In particular, the suggestion of Bourne et al. [1998] that the deformation that accumulates across a transform fault system in the interseismic interval is a replica of the deformation that accumulates in the upper mantle during the same interval does not appear to be correct for linear systems.

  4. Acquisition of the linearization process in text composition in third to ninth graders: effects of textual superstructure and macrostructural organization.

    PubMed

    Favart, Monik; Coirier, Pierre

    2006-07-01

    Two complementary experiments analyzed the acquisition of text content linearization in writing, in French-speaking participants from third to ninth grades. In both experiments, a scrambled text paradigm was used: eleven ideas presented in random order had to be rearranged coherently so as to compose a text. Linearization was analyzed on the basis of the conceptual ordering of ideas and writing fluency. The first experiment focused on the effect of superstructural facilitation (in decreasing order: 1--instructional, 2--narrative, 3--argumentative), while the second experiment studied the effect of prewriting conditions: 1-scrambled presentation, 2--macrostructural facilitation, 3--ideas given in optimal order (control condition). As expected, scores in conceptual ordering and writing fluency improved through the grade levels. Students were most successful with respect to conceptual ordering in the instructional superstructure, followed by the narrative and finally the argumentative superstructures. The prewriting assignment also had the expected effect (control better than macrostructural presentation which, in turn, was better than the random order) but only with the argumentative superstructure. Contrary to conceptual ordering, writing fluency was not affected by the type of superstructure, although we did record an effect of the prewriting condition. The results are discussed in light of Bereiter and Scardamalia's knowledge transforming strategy (1987) taking into account cognitive development and French language curriculum.

  5. Thermal convection of viscoelastic shear-thinning fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albaalbaki, Bashar; Khayat, Roger E.; Ahmed, Zahir U.

    2016-12-01

    The Rayleigh-Bénard convection for non-Newtonian fluids possessing both viscoelastic and shear-thinning behaviours is examined. The Phan-Thien-Tanner (PTT) constitutive equation is implemented to model the non-Newtonian character of the fluid. It is found that while the shear-thinning and viscoelastic effects could annihilate one another for the steady roll flow, presence of both behaviours restricts the roll stability limit significantly compared to the cases when the fluid is either inelastic shear-thinning or purely viscoelastic with constant viscosity.

  6. Viscoelastic Flows in Simple Liquids Generated by Vibrating Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sader, John; Pelton, Matthew; Chakraborty, Debadi; Malachosky, Edward; Guyot-Sionnest, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    Newtonian fluid mechanics, in which the shear stress is proportional to the strain rate, is synonymous with the flow of simple liquids like water. We report the measurement and theoretical verification of non-Newtonian, viscoelastic flow phenomena produced by the high-frequency (>20 GHz) vibration of gold nanoparticles immersed in water-glycerol mixtures. The observed viscoelasticity is not due to molecular confinement, but is a bulk continuum effect arising from the short time scale of vibration. This represents the first direct mechanical measurement of the intrinsic viscoelastic properties of simple bulk liquids, and opens a new paradigm for understanding extremely high frequency fluid mechanics, nanoscale sensing technologies, and biophysical processes.

  7. [Viscoelastic properties of relaxed papillary muscle at physiological hypertrophy].

    PubMed

    Smoliuk, L T; Lisin, R V; Kuznetsov, D A; Protsenko, Iu L

    2012-01-01

    Viscoelastic properties of relaxed rat papillary muscles at physiological hypertrophy (intensive swimming for 5 weeks) have been obtained. It has been ascertained that viscoelastic properties of hypertrophied muscles are not significantly distinguished from those of control papillary muscles. A three-dimensional model of myocardial fascicle has been verified in compliance with experimental data of biomechanical tests of hypertrophied muscles. Elastic and viscous parameters of structural elements of the model negligibly differ from the parameters of the model of a control muscle. It is shown that physiological hypertrophy has a slight influence on viscoelastic properties of papillary muscles.

  8. Non-destructive visualization of linear explosive-induced Pyroshock using phase arrayed laser-induced shock in a space launcher composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    kyeong Jang, Jae; Ryul Lee, Jung

    2015-07-01

    Separation mechanism of Space launch vehicles are used in various separation systems and pyrotechnic devices. The operation of these pyrotechnic devices generates Pyroshock that can cause failures in electronic components. The prediction of high frequency structural response, especially the shock response spectrum (SRS), is important. This paper presents a non-destructive visualization and simulation of linear explosive-induced Pyroshock using phase arrayed Laser-induced shock. The proposed method includes a laser shock test based on laser beam and filtering zone conditioning to predict the SRS of Pyroshock. A ballistic test based on linear explosive and non-contact Laser Doppler Vibrometers and a nondestructive Laser shock measurement using laser excitation and several PZT sensors, are performed using a carbon composite sandwich panel. The similarity of the SRS of the conditioned laser shock to that of the real explosive Pyroshock is evaluated with the Mean Acceleration Difference. The average of MADs over the two training points was 33.64%. And, MAD at verification point was improved to 31.99%. After that, experimentally found optimal conditions are applied to any arbitrary points in laser scanning area. Finally, it is shown that linear explosive-induced real Pyroshock wave propagation can be visualized with high similarity based on the proposed laser technology.

  9. Viscoelastic studies on Tetrahymena macronuclear DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, J B; Fleck, E W; Hellier, L E; Uhlenhopp, E

    1978-01-01

    We have used viscoelastometry in an attempt to understand the physical organization of genetic material in Tetrahymena nuclei. The micronucleus or germ line nucleus is diploid. It divides mitotically during vegetative growth, and five pairs of chromosomes are seen in meiosis. The macronucleus, or somatic nucleus, is approximately 45-ploid, divides amitotically, and has no visible chromosomes at any stage. Viscoelastic analysis of Tetrahymena macronuclei reveals DNA Molecules of 2-3 X 10(10) daltons accounting for much, if not all, of the macronuclear DNA. Since the average chromosome in the micronucleus contains 2.4-2.7 X 10(10) daltons of DNA, we deduce that the macronucleus of Tetrahymena contains chromosome-sized DNA molecules. PMID:105362

  10. Collective dynamics of sperm in viscoelastic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Chih-Kuan; Fiore, Alyssa G.; Ardon, Florencia; Suarez, Susan S.; Wu, Mingming

    2015-03-01

    Collective dynamics of artificial swimmers has gathered a lot of attention from physicists, in part because of its close relations to emergent behaviors in condensed matter, such as phase transitions. However, the emergence of order tends to be less drastic in the systems composed of real living cells, sometimes due to the natural variability in individual organisms. Here, using bull sperm as a model system, we demonstrate that the local orientation order of sperm spontaneously emerges in viscoelastic fluids, migrating collectively in clusters in high cell concentrations, or pairs in low cell concentrations. This collectiveness is similar to a liquid-gas phase transition, as both phases coexist simultaneously in our system. Unlike bacterial swarming, this collectiveness does not require the cells to be in a different phenotype than the regular swimming one, providing further simplicity to the physicists. We will discuss the underlying interaction mechanism, and the potential influence in biology. Supported by NIH Grant 1R01HD070038.

  11. Collective dynamics of sperm in viscoelastic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Chih-Kuan; Harvey, Benedict B.; Fiore, Alyssa G.; Ardon, Florencia; Suarez, Susan S.; Wu, Mingming

    Collective dynamics in biology is an interesting subject for physicists, in part because of its close relations to emergent behaviors in condensed matter, such as phase separation and criticality. However, the emergence of order is often less drastic in systems composed of the living cells, sometimes due to the natural variability among individual organisms. Here, using bull sperm as a model system, we demonstrate that the cells migrate collectively in viscoelastic fluids, exhibiting behavior similar to ``flocking''. This collectiveness is greatly reduced in similarly viscous Newtonian fluids, suggesting that the cell-cell interaction is primarily a result of the elastic property or the memory effect of the fluids, instead of pure hydrodynamic interactions. Unlike bacterial swarming, this collectiveness does not require a change in phenotype of the cells; therefore, it is a better model system for physicists. Supported by NIH grant 1R01HD070038.

  12. Water evaporation on highly viscoelastic polymer surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pu, Gang; Severtson, Steven J

    2012-07-03

    Results are reported for a study on the evaporation of water droplets from a highly viscoelastic acrylic polymer surface. These are contrasted with those collected for the same measurements carried out on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). For PDMS, the evaporation process involves the expected multistep process including constant drop area, constant contact angle, and finally a combination of these steps until the liquid is gone. In contrast, water evaporation from the acrylic polymer shows a constant drop area mode throughout. Furthermore, during the evaporation process, the drop area actually expands on the acrylic polymer. The single mode evaporation process is consistent with formation of wetting structures, which cannot be propagated by the capillary forces. Expansion of the drop area is attributed to the influence of the drop capillary pressure. Furthermore, the rate of drop area expansion is shown to be dependent on the thickness of the polymer film.

  13. Pumping by flapping in a viscoelastic fluid.

    PubMed

    Pak, On Shun; Normand, Thibaud; Lauga, Eric

    2010-03-01

    In a world without inertia, Purcell's scallop theorem states that in a Newtonian fluid a time-reversible motion cannot produce any net force or net flow. Here we consider the extent to which the nonlinear rheological behavior of viscoelastic fluids can be exploited to break the constraints of the scallop theorem in the context of fluid pumping. By building on previous work focusing on force generation, we consider a simple, biologically inspired geometrical example of a flapper in a polymeric (Oldroyd-B) fluid, and calculate asymptotically the time-average net fluid flow produced by the reciprocal flapping motion. The net flow occurs at fourth order in the flapping amplitude, and suggests the possibility of transporting polymeric fluids using reciprocal motion in simple geometries even in the absence of inertia. The induced flow field and pumping performance are characterized and optimized analytically. Our results may be useful in the design of micropumps handling complex fluids.

  14. Standing shear waves in anisotropic viscoelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krit, T.; Golubkova, I.; Andreev, V.

    2015-10-01

    We studied standing shear waves in anisotropic resonator represented by a rectangular parallelepiped (layer) fixed without slipping between two wooden plates of finite mass. The viscoelastic layer with edges of 70 mm × 40 mm × 15 mm was made of a rubber-like polymer plastisol with rubber bands inside. The bands were placed vertical between the top and the bottom plate. Mechanical properties of the plastisol itself were carefully measured previously. It was found that plastisol shows a cubic nonlinear behavior, i.e. the stress-strain curve could be represented as: σ = μɛ + βμɛ3, where ɛ stands for shear strain and σ is an applied shear stress. The value of shear modulus μ depends on frequency and was found to be several kilopascals which is common for such soft solids. Nonlinear parameter β is frequency dependent too and varies in range from tenths to unity at 1-100 Hz frequency range, decreasing with frequency growth. Stretching the rubber bands inside the layer leads to change of elastic properties in resonator. Such effect could be noticed due to frequency response of the resonator. The numerical model of the resonator was based on finite elements method (FEM) and performed in MatLab. The resonator was cut in hundreds of right triangular prisms. Each prism was provided with viscoelastic properties of the layer except for the top prisms provided with the wooden plate properties and the prisms at the site of the rubber bands provided with the rubber properties. The boundary conditions on each prism satisfied the requirements that resonator is inseparable and all its boundaries but bottom are free. The bottom boundary was set to move horizontally with constant acceleration amplitude. It was shown numerically that the resonator shows anisotropic behavior expressed in different frequency response to oscillations applied to a bottom boundary in different directions.

  15. Nutation damping in viscoelastic tumbling rotators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frouard, Julien; Efroimsky, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Presently, 138 asteroids show signs of being in non-principal spin states (Warner et al. 2009, updated September 2015). Such spin is often called `tumble' or `wobble'. The instantaneous rotation axis of a wobbling body performs nutation about the direction of the (conserved) angular-momentum vector. Incited by collisions and YORP, wobble is mitigated by internal dissipation due to the nutation-caused alternating stresses inside the asteroid.The knowledge of the timescale related to the damping of the nutation angle is complementary to the knowledge of the timescales associated with collisions and YORP. Previous evaluations of the nutation relaxation rate were based on an inherently inconsistent approach that may be called "Q-model". First, the elastic energy in a periodically deforming rotator was calculated in assumption of the deformation being elastic. Therefrom, the energy dissipation rate was determined by introducing an ad hoc quality factor Q. This ignored the fact that friction (and the ensuing existence of Q) is due to deviation from elasticity.We use the viscoelastic Maxwell model which naturally implies dissipation (as any other viscoelastic model would). In this approach, we compute the power and damping time for an oblate ellipsoid and a prism. Now, the viscosity assumes the role of the product μQ in the empirical Q-model, with μ being the rigidity. Contrarily to the Q-model, our model naturally gives a null dissipation for a shape tending to a sphere. We also explore when the constant part of the stress can be ignored in the derivation of the damping time. The neglect of prestressing turns out to be legitimate for the mean viscosity exceeding a certain threshold value.

  16. Piezoactuation of sandwich plates with viscoelastic cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang; Wereley, Norman M.

    1999-06-01

    Experimental and analytical validations of a Galerkin analysis of sandwich plates is presented in this paper. The 3-layered sandwich plate specimen consists of isotropic face-plates with surface bonded piezo-electric patch actuators, and a viscoelastic core. The experimental validation is conducted by testing sandwiched plates that are 67.31 cm (26.5') long, 52.07 cm (20.5') wide and nominally 0.16 cm (1/16') thick. The analysis includes the membrane and transverse energies in the face plates, and shear energies in the core. The shear modulus of the dissipative core is assumed to be complex and variant with frequency and temperature. The Golla-Hughes-McTavish (GHM) method is used to account for the frequency dependent properties of the viscoelastic core. Experiments have been conducted on sandwich plates with aluminum face-plates under clamped boundary conditions to validate the model for isotropic face-plates. Symmetric and asymmetric sandwiches have been tested. The maximum error in damped natural frequency predictions obtained via the assumed modes solutions is less than 11%. Analytical studies on the influence of the number of assumed modes in the Galerkin approximation, and the temperature variation, have been conducted. Error in the first plate bending mode is 112% when only a single in-plane mode is used; error reduces to 3.95% as the number of in-plane modes is increased to 25 in each of the in-plane directions. The study on the temperature influence shows that every plate mode has a corresponding temperature, wherein the loss factor is maximized.

  17. Time and Temperature Dependence of Viscoelastic Stress Relaxation in Gold and Gold Alloy Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mongkolsuttirat, Kittisun

    modulus relaxation of Au films also proves that the films exhibit linear viscoelastic behavior. From this, a linear viscoelastic model is shown to fit very well to experimental steady state stress relaxation data and can predict time dependent stress for complex loading histories including the ability to predict stress-time behavior at other strain rates during loading. Two specific factors that are expected to influence the viscoelastic behavior-degree of alloying and grain size are investigated to explore the influence of V concentration in solid solution and grain size of pure Au. It is found that the normalized modulus of Au films is dependent on both concentration (C) and grain size (D) with proportionalities of C1/3 and D 2, respectively. A quantitative model of the rate-equation for dislocation glide plasticity based on Frost and Ashby is proposed and fitted well with steady state anelastic stress relaxation experimental data. The activation volume and the density of mobile dislocations is determined using repeated stress relaxation tests in order to further understand the viscoelastic relaxation mechanism. A rapid decrease of mobile dislocation density is found at the beginning of relaxation, which correlates well with a large reduction of viscoelastic modulus at the early stage of relaxation. The extracted activation volume and dislocation mobility can be ascribed to mobile dislocation loops with double kinks generated at grain boundaries, consistent with the dislocation mechanism proposed for the low activation energy measured in this study.

  18. Simplifications in the Behavior of Viscoelastic Composites With Growing Damage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    Eengineering interest. The emphasis of this paper is on simplifications which appear to be applicable at least to particle and fiber reinforced polymers when the...parameters. From equation (5), 3 Qj= aW T/aq j (10) showing that the body exhibits hyperelastic behavior during the time any 3 particular set of

  19. VISCOELASTIC PROPERTIES OF A BIOLOGICAL HYDROGEL PRODUCED FROM SOYBEAN OIL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrogels formed from biopolymers or natural sources have special advantages because of their biodegradable and biocompatible properties. The viscoelastic properties of a newly developed biological hydrogel made from modified vegetable oil, epoxidized soybean oil (ESO) were investigated. The mater...

  20. Multiplex particle focusing via hydrodynamic force in viscoelastic fluids.

    PubMed

    Lee, Doo Jin; Brenner, Howard; Youn, Jae Ryoun; Song, Young Seok

    2013-11-19

    We introduce a multiplex particle focusing phenomenon that arises from the hydrodynamic interaction between the viscoelastic force and the Dean drag force in a microfluidic device. In a confined microchannel, the first normal stress difference of viscoelastic fluids results in a lateral migration of suspended particles. Such a viscoelastic force was harnessed to focus different sized particles in the middle of a microchannel, and spiral channel geometry was also considered in order to take advantage of the counteracting force, Dean drag force that induces particle migration in the outward direction. For theoretical understanding, we performed a numerical analysis of viscoelastic fluids in the spiral microfluidic channel. From these results, a concept of the 'Dean-coupled Elasto-inertial Focusing band (DEF)' was proposed. This study provides in-depth physical insight into the multiplex focusing of particles that can open a new venue for microfluidic particle dynamics for a concrete high throughput platform at microscale.

  1. Peristaltic pumping of solid particles immersed in a viscoelastic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrispell, John; Fauci, Lisa

    2010-11-01

    Peristaltic pumping of fluid is a fundamental method of transport in many biological processes. In some instances, particles of appreciable size are transported along with the fluid, such as ovum transport in the oviduct or kidney stones in the ureter. In some of these biological settings, the fluid may be viscoelastic. In such a case, a nonlinear constitutive equation to describe the evolution of the viscoelastic contribution to the stress tensor must be included in the governing equations. Here we use an immersed boundary framework to study peristaltic transport of a macroscopic solid particle in a viscoelastic fluid governed by a Navier-Stokes/Oldroyd-B model. Numerical simulations of peristaltic pumping as a function of Weissenberg number are presented. We examine the spatial and temporal evolution of the polymer stress field, and also find that the viscoelasticity of the fluid does hamper the overall transport of the particle in the direction of the wave.

  2. A K-BKZ Formulation for Soft-Tissue Viscoelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.; Diethelm, Kai

    2005-01-01

    A viscoelastic model of the K-BKZ (Kaye 1962; Bernstein et al. 1963) type is developed for isotropic biological tissues, and applied to the fat pad of the human heel. To facilitate this pursuit, a class of elastic solids is introduced through a novel strain-energy function whose elements possess strong ellipticity, and therefore lead to stable material models. The standard fractional-order viscoelastic (FOV) solid is used to arrive at the overall elastic/viscoelastic structure of the model, while the elastic potential via the K-BKZ hypothesis is used to arrive at the tensorial structure of the model. Candidate sets of functions are proposed for the elastic and viscoelastic material functions present in the model, including a regularized fractional derivative that was determined to be the best. The Akaike information criterion (AIC) is advocated for performing multi-model inference, enabling an objective selection of the best material function from within a candidate set.

  3. Measuring viscoelasticity of soft samples using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, S; Berger, E J

    2009-09-01

    Relaxation indentation experiments using atomic force microscopy (AFM) are used to obtain viscoelastic material properties of soft samples. The quasilinear viscoelastic (QLV) model formulated by Fung (1972, "Stress Strain History Relations of Soft Tissues in Simple Elongation," in Biomechanics, Its Foundation and Objectives, Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, pp. 181-207) for uniaxial compression data was modified for the indentation test data in this study. Hertz contact mechanics was used for the instantaneous deformation, and a reduced relaxation function based on continuous spectrum is used for the time-dependent part in the model. The modified QLV indentation model presents a novel method to obtain viscoelastic properties from indentation data independent of relaxation times of the test. The major objective of the present study is to develop the QLV indentation model and implement the model on AFM indentation data for 1% agarose gel and a viscoelastic polymer using spherical indenter.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations of the structural, mechanical and visco-elastic properties of polymer nanocomposites filled with grafted nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jianxiang; Liu, Jun; Li, Haidong; Gao, Yangyang; Li, Xiaolin; Wu, Youping; Zhang, Liqun

    2015-03-21

    Through coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, we have studied the effects of grafting density (Σ) and grafted chain length (Lg) on the structural, mechanical and visco-elastic properties of end-grafted nanoparticles (NPs) filled polymer nanocomposites (PNCs). It is found that increasing the grafting density and grafted chain length both enhance the brush/matrix interface thickness and improve the dispersion of NPs, but there seems to exist an optimum grafting density, above which the end-grafted NPs tend to aggregate. The uniaxial stress-strain behavior of PNCs is also examined, showing that the tensile stress is more enhanced by increasing Lg compared to increasing Σ. The tensile modulus as a function of the strain is fitted following our previous work (Soft Matter, 2014, 10, 5099), exhibiting a gradually reduced non-linearity with the increase of Σ and Lg. Meanwhile, by imposing a sinusoidal external shear strain, for the first time we probe the effects of Σ and Lg on the visco-elastic properties such as the storage modulus G', loss modulus G'' and loss factor tan δ of end-grafted NPs filled PNCs. It is shown that the non-linear relation of G' and G'' as a function of shear strain amplitude decreases with the increase of Σ and Lg, which is consistent with experimental observations. We infer that the increased mechanical and reduced non-linear visco-elastic properties are correlated with the enhanced brush/matrix interface and therefore better dispersion of NPs and stronger physical cross-linking. This work may provide some rational means to tune the mechanical and visco-elastic properties of end-grafted NPs filled polymer nanocomposites.

  5. Modelling water hammer in viscoelastic pipelines: short brief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanowicz, K.; Firkowski, M.; Zarzycki, Z.

    2016-10-01

    The model of water hammer in viscoelastic pipelines is analyzed. An appropriate mathematical model of water hammer in polymer pipelines is presented. An additional term has been added to continuity equation to describe the retarded deformation of the pipe wall. The mechanical behavior of viscoelastic material is described by generalized Kelvin-Voigt model. The comparison of numerical simulation and experimental data from well known papers is presented. Short discussion about obtained results are given.

  6. Investigation of transient cavitating flow in viscoelastic pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keramat, A.; Tijsseling, A. S.; Ahmadi, A.

    2010-08-01

    A study on water hammer in viscoelastic pipes when the fluid pressure drops to liquid vapour pressure is performed. Two important concepts including column separation and the effects of retarded strains in the pipe wall on the fluid response have been investigated separately in recent works, but there is some curiosity as to how the results for pressure and discharge are when column separation occurs in a viscoelastic pipe. For pipes made of plastic such as polyethylene (PE) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC), viscoelasticity is a crucial mechanical property which changes the hydraulic and structural transient responses. Based on previous developments in the analysis of water hammer, a model which is capable of analysing column separation in viscoelastic pipes is presented and used for solving the selected case studies. For the column-separation modelling the Discrete Vapour Cavity Model (DVCM) is utilised and the viscoelasticity property of the pipe wall is modelled by Kelvin-Voigt elements. The effects of viscoelasticity play an important role in the column separation phenomenon because it changes the water hammer fundamental frequency and so affects the time of opening or collapse of the cavities. Verification of the implemented computer code is performed for the effects of viscoelasticity and column separation - separately and simultaneously - using experimental results from the literature. In the provided examples the focus is placed on the simultaneous effect of viscoelasticity and column separation on the hydraulic transient response. The final conclusions drawn are that if rectangular grids are utilised the DVCM gives acceptable predictions of the phenomenon and that the pipe wall material's retarded behaviour strongly dampens the pressure spikes caused by column separation.

  7. Quasi-Static Viscoelasticity Loading Measurements of an Aircraft Tire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Angela J.; Tanner, John A.; Johnson, Arthur R.

    1997-01-01

    Stair-step loading, cyclic loading, and long-term relaxation tests were performed on an aircraft tire to observe the quasi-static viscoelastic response of the tire. The data indicate that the tire continues to respond viscoelastically even after it has been softened by deformation. Load relaxation data from the stair-step test at the 15,000-lb loading was fit to a monotonically decreasing Prony series.

  8. Identification of the dynamic characteristics of a viscoelastic, nonlinear adhesive joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naraghi, T.; Nobari, A. S.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the nonlinear mechanical characteristics of an adhesive (Sikaflex-252) are identified over frequency range, using eigenvalues of nonlinear system and inverse eigen-sensitivity method and experimental data. Sikaflex-252 is selected as an adhesive which is mainly used as a joining medium (joint) in structural applications. In order to simulate the viscoelastic behaviour of the adhesive, the frequency dependent Young's modulus and damping coefficient are assumed in identification process leading to the updating process being repeated for different ranges of frequencies to identify stiffness and damping properties of the adhesive. Using the optimum equivalent linear frequency response function (OELF) concept, in order to realize the nonlinear nature of the adhesive, modal tests are performed under two different random excitation levels which illustrate the stiffness softening characteristic of adhesive which can have serious implications regarding dynamic stability of structures. Furthermore, based on the identified characteristics, the paper examines the possibility of tuning of the Standard Linear Solid model (SLS), in representing the adhesive viscoelastic behaviour. Results of this attempt proved that the S.L.S. model with tuned parameters significantly improves the fidelity of finite element (FE) model to experimental results.

  9. Influence of energetics on the stability of viscoelastic Taylor-Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Mubaiyedh, U. A.; Sureshkumar, R.; Khomami, B.

    1999-11-01

    Previously reported isothermal linear stability analyses of viscoelastic Taylor-Couette flow have predicted transitions to nonaxisymmetric and time-dependent secondary flows for elasticity numbers E≡De/Re>0.01. In contrast, recent experiments by Baumert and Muller using constant viscosity Boger fluids have shown that the primary flow transition leads to axisymmetric and stationary Taylor-type toroidal vortices. Moreover, experimentally observed onset Deborah number is an order of magnitude lower than that predicted by isothermal linear stability analyses. In this work, we explore the influence of energetics on the stability characteristics of the viscoelastic Taylor-Couette flow. Our analysis is based on a thermodynamically consistent reformulation of the Oldroyd-B constitutive model that takes into account the influence of thermal history on polymeric stress, and an energy equation that takes into account viscous dissipation effects. Our calculations reveal that for experimentally realizable values of Peclet and Brinkman numbers, the most dangerous eigenvalue is real, corresponding to a stationary and axisymmetric mode of instability. Moreover, the critical Deborah number associated with this eigenvalue is an order of magnitude lower than those associated with the nonisothermal extensions of the most dangerous eigenvalues of the isothermal flow. Eigenfunction analysis shows stratification of perturbation hoop stress across the gap width drives a radial secondary flow. The convection of base state temperature gradients by this radial velocity perturbation leads to this new mode of instability. The influence of geometric and kinematic parameters on this instability is also investigated.

  10. In vivo measurement of spinal column viscoelasticity--an animal model.

    PubMed

    Hult, E; Ekström, L; Kaigle, A; Holm, S; Hansson, T

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this study was to measure the in vivo viscoelastic response of spinal motion segments loaded in compression using a porcine model. Nine pigs were used in the study. The animals were anaesthetized and, using surgical techniques, four intrapedicular screws were inserted into the vertebrae of the L2-L3 motion segment. A miniaturized servohydraulic exciter capable of compressing the motion segment was mounted on to the screws. In six animals, a loading scheme consisting of 50 N and 100 N of compression, each applied for 10 min, was used. Each loading period was followed by 10 min restitution with zero load. The loading scheme was repeated four times. Three animals were examined for stiffening effects by consecutively repeating eight times 50 N loading for 5 min followed by 5 min restitution with zero load. This loading scheme was repeated using a 100 N load level. The creep-recovery behavior of the motion segment was recorded continuously. Using non-linear regression techniques, the experimental data were used for evaluating the parameters of a three-parameter standard linear solid model. Correlation coefficients of the order of 0.85 or higher were obtained for the three independent parameters of the model. A survey of the data shows that the viscous deformation rate was a function of the load level. Also, repeated loading at 100 N seemed to induce long-lasting changes in the viscoelastic properties of the porcine lumbar motion segment.

  11. Nonlinear viscoelastic characterization of polymer materials using a dynamic-mechanical methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strganac, Thomas W.; Payne, Debbie Flowers; Biskup, Bruce A.; Letton, Alan

    1995-01-01

    Polymer materials retrieved from LDEF exhibit nonlinear constitutive behavior; thus the authors present a method to characterize nonlinear viscoelastic behavior using measurements from dynamic (oscillatory) mechanical tests. Frequency-derived measurements are transformed into time-domain properties providing the capability to predict long term material performance without a lengthy experimentation program. Results are presented for thin-film high-performance polymer materials used in the fabrication of high-altitude scientific balloons. Predictions based upon a linear test and analysis approach are shown to deteriorate for moderate to high stress levels expected for extended applications. Tests verify that nonlinear viscoelastic response is induced by large stresses. Hence, an approach is developed in which the stress-dependent behavior is examined in a manner analogous to modeling temperature-dependent behavior with time-temperature correspondence and superposition principles. The development leads to time-stress correspondence and superposition of measurements obtained through dynamic mechanical tests. Predictions of material behavior using measurements based upon linear and nonlinear approaches are compared with experimental results obtained from traditional creep tests. Excellent agreement is shown for the nonlinear model.

  12. Oscillation of satellite droplets in an Oldroyd-B viscoelastic liquid jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fang; Yin, Xie-Yuan; Yin, Xie-Zhen

    2017-01-01

    A one-dimensional numerical simulation is carried out to study the oscillation characteristics of satellite droplets in the beads-on-a-string structure of an Oldroyd-B viscoelastic liquid jet. The oscillation of satellite droplets is compared with the linear oscillation of a single viscoelastic droplet. It is found that, contrary to the predictions of linear theory, the period of oscillation of satellite droplets decreases with time, despite the increase in droplet volume. The mechanism may lie in the existence of the filament, which exerts an extra resistance on droplets. On the other hand, the oscillation of droplets does not influence very much the thinning of the filament. The influence of the axial wave number, viscosity, and elasticity on the oscillation of satellite droplets is examined. Increasing the wave number may result in the decrease in the period and the increase in the decay rate of oscillation, while increasing viscosity may lead to the increase in both the period and the decay rate of oscillation. Elasticity is shown to suppress the oscillation at large wave numbers, but its influence is limited at small wave numbers.

  13. The physics of aerobreakup. III. Viscoelastic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theofanous, T. G.; Mitkin, V. V.; Ng, C. L.

    2013-03-01

    We extend the work of Theofanous and Li [Phys. Fluids 20, 052103 (2008), 10.1063/1.2907989] on aerobreakup physics of water-like, low viscosity liquid drops, and of Theofanous et al. [Phys. Fluids 24, 022104 (2012), 10.1063/1.3680867] for Newtonian liquids of any viscosity, to polymer-thickened liquids over wide ranges of viscoelasticity. The scope includes the full range of aerodynamics from near incompressible to supersonic flows and visualizations are recorded with μs/μm resolutions. The key physics of Rayleigh-Taylor piercing (RTP, first criticality) and of Shear-Induced Entrainment (SIE, second criticality) are verified and quantified on the same scaling approach as in our previous work, but with modifications due to the shear-thinning and elastic nature of these liquids. The same holds for the onset of surface waves by Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, which is a key attribute of the second criticality. However, in the present case, even at conditions well-past the first criticality, there is no breakup (particulation) to be found; instead the apparently unstable (extensively stretched into sheets) drops rebound elastically to reconstitute an integral mass. Such a resistance to breakup is found also past the second criticality, now with extensive filament formation that maintain a significant degree of cohesiveness, until the gas-dynamic pressure is high enough to cause filament ruptures. Thereby we define the onset of a third criticality peculiar to viscoelastic liquids—SIER, for SIE with ruptures. Past this criticality the extent of particulation increases and the characteristic dimension of fragments generated decreases in a more or less continuous fashion with increasing dynamic pressure. We outline a rheology-based scaling approach for these elasticity-modulated phenomena and suggest a path to similitude (with polymer and solvent variations) in terms of a critical rupture stress that can be measured independently. The advanced stages of breakup and

  14. An investigation on the motion and deformation of viscoelastic drops descending in another viscoelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davoodi, M.; Norouzi, M.

    2016-10-01

    In the present study, an investigation of the motion and shape deformation of drops is carried out in creeping flow to highlight the effect of viscoelastic properties on the problem. A perturbation method is employed to derive an analytical solution for the general case that both interior and exterior fluids are viscoelastic, both fluids obeying the Giesekus model. An experiment is also performed for the limiting case of an immiscible drop of a 0.03% (w/w) polyacrylamide in an 80:20 glycerol/water solution falling through a viscous Newtonian silicon oil (410 cP polydimethylsiloxane oil) in order to check the accuracy of the analytical solution. It is shown that the addition of elastic properties to the interior fluid may cause a decrease in the terminal velocity of the droplet while an increase in the elastic properties of the exterior fluid results in the opposite behavior and increases the terminal velocity. The well-known spherical shape of creeping drops for Newtonian fluids is modified by elasticity into either prolate or oblate shapes. Using the analytical solution, it is shown that normal stresses play a key role on the final steady-state shape of the drops. To keep the drops spherical in viscoelastic phases, it is shown that the effect of normal stresses on the interior and exterior media can cancel out under certain conditions. The results presented here may be of interest to industries dealing with petroleum and medicine processing, paint and power-plant related fields where knowledge of the shape and terminal velocity of descending droplets is of great importance.

  15. Two-dimensional frequency-domain visco-elastic full waveform inversion: Parallel algorithms, optimization and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brossier, R.

    2011-04-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) is an appealing seismic data-fitting procedure for the derivation of high-resolution quantitative models of the subsurface at various scales. Full modelling and inversion of visco-elastic waves from multiple seismic sources allow for the recovering of different physical parameters, although they remain computationally challenging tasks. An efficient massively parallel, frequency-domain FWI algorithm is implemented here on large-scale distributed-memory platforms for imaging two-dimensional visco-elastic media. The resolution of the elastodynamic equations, as the forward problem of the inversion, is performed in the frequency domain on unstructured triangular meshes, using a low-order finite element discontinuous Galerkin method. The linear system resulting from discretization of the forward problem is solved with a parallel direct solver. The inverse problem, which is presented as a non-linear local optimization problem, is solved in parallel with a quasi-Newton method, and this allows for reliable estimation of multiple classes of visco-elastic parameters. Two levels of parallelism are implemented in the algorithm, based on message passing interfaces and multi-threading, for optimal use of computational time and the core-memory resources available on modern distributed-memory multi-core computational platforms. The algorithm allows for imaging of realistic targets at various scales, ranging from near-surface geotechnic applications to crustal-scale exploration.

  16. Visualization and simulation of a linear explosive-induced pyroshock wave using Q-switched laser and phased array transducers in a space launcher composite structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Ryul; Jang, Jae-Kyeong; Choi, Mijin; Kong, Cheol-Won

    2015-04-01

    During space flights, pyrotechnic devices are used for various purposes such as separation of boosters, satellites, fairings, and stages. In particular, the prediction of high shock structural response induced by linear explosives is important for safe operation of pyrotechnic devices. In general, repetitive explosive testing using distributed accelerometers is widely used, but multiple test structures are usually necessary because they are easily damaged and not reusable. This paper pertains to a nondestructive technology to replace the damage-causing, time-consuming, expensive, dangerous, and low-repeatability explosive test with a laser-induced shock test. The method proposed in this paper predicts nondestructively the linear explosive-induced pyroshock wave, visualizes its propagation, and allows the simulation of some detonation conditions. A ballistic test based on a linear explosive and noncontact laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) as well as a nondestructive pyroshock test using laser-induced shock and PZT array sensors is performed in a 12.68-mm thick composite sandwich panel. The optimal laser-induced shock experimental conditions to predict real pyroshock response spectra (SRSs) are investigated by controlling the optical characteristics of the laser beam and adjusting the frequency bands in signal acquisition. The similarity of the SRS of the conditioned laser-induced shock to that of the real explosive pyroshock is evaluated with the mean acceleration difference. Next, the experimentally-determined optimal conditions are applied to arbitrary points in the laser-induced shock scanning area. Finally, it is shown that the proposed method will allow nondestructive and quantitative pyroshock testing, pyroshock wave propagation visualization showing the direction and magnitude of principal wave propagation, and detonation speed simulation depending on explosive type and detonation initiation point and direction.

  17. Noncontact Viscoelastic Measurement of Polymer Thin Films in a Liquid Medium Using Long-Needle Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Guan, Dongshi; Barraud, Chloé; Charlaix, Elisabeth; Tong, Penger

    2017-02-14

    We report the noncontact measurement of the viscoelastic property of polymer thin films in a liquid medium using frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy with a newly developed long-needle probe. The probe contains a long vertical glass fiber with one end adhered to a cantilever beam and the other end with a sharp tip placed near the liquid-film interface. The nanoscale flow generated by the resonant oscillation of the needle tip provides a precise hydrodynamic force acting on the soft surface of the thin film. By accurately measuring the mechanical response of the thin film, we obtain the elastic and loss moduli of the thin film using the linear response theory of elastohydrodynamics. The experiment verifies the theory and demonstrates its applications. The technique can be used to accurately measure the viscoelastic property of soft surfaces, such as those made of polymers, nanobubbles, live cells, and tissues.

  18. Sliding viscoelastic drops on slippery surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Clarke, A.; Rothstein, J. P.; Poole, R. J.

    2016-06-01

    We study the sliding of drops of constant-viscosity dilute elastic liquids (Boger fluids) on various surfaces caused by sudden surface inclination. For smooth or roughened hydrophilic surfaces, such as glass or acrylic, there is essentially no difference between these elastic liquids and a Newtonian comparator fluid (with identical shear viscosity, surface tension, and static contact angle). In contrast for embossed polytetrafluoroethylene superhydrophobic surfaces, profound differences are observed: the elastic drops slide at a significantly reduced rate and complex branch-like patterns are left on the surface by the drop's wake including, on various scales, beads-on-a-string like phenomena. Microscopy images indicate that the strong viscoelastic effect is caused by stretching filaments of fluid from isolated islands, residing at pinning sites on the surface pillars, of the order ˜30 μm in size. On this scale, the local strain rates are sufficient to extend the polymer chains, locally increasing the extensional viscosity of the solution, retarding the drop and leaving behind striking branch-like structures on much larger scales.

  19. Dynamics of Contracting Asymmetric Viscoelastic Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, Christopher; Thete, Sumeet; Appathurai, Santosh; Bhat, Pradeep; Basaran, Osman; Harris, Michael

    2013-11-01

    In ink-jet printing and atomization, slender filaments are routinely formed. Such filaments either contract to form a single drop or breakup into multiple drops, e.g. by end pinching. Beginning with papers by Schulkes (1996) and Notz & Basaran (2004), past studies have focused exclusively on the contraction dynamics of Newtonian filaments. Also in these studies, initial filament shapes are taken to be long cylinders terminated by two identical spherical caps (symmetric filaments). In emerging applications, e.g. ink-jet printing of complex fluids, the filaments are viscoelastic (VE) fluids. Moreover, older experiments by Notz et al. (2001) and more recent ones by Castrejón-Pita et al. (2012) show that initial filament shapes resemble long, tapered cylinders terminated by hemispherical caps of unequal radii (asymmetric filaments). Therefore, we analyze the contraction dynamics of both asymmetric and symmetric filaments of VE fluids using the Giesekus model. Rather than solving the full set of equations governing the problem, we take advantage of filament slenderness and solve a much simpler set of 1D equations (Eggers, 1997). We then use a finite element method with Streamline Upwind/Petrov Galerkin (SUPG) formulation (Brooks & Hughes, 1982) to solve the reduced equations.

  20. Immersed boundary methods for viscoelastic particulate flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Sreenath; Shaqfeh, Eric; Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2015-11-01

    Viscoelastic particulate suspensions play key roles in many energy applications. Our goal is to develop a simulation-based tool for engineering such suspensions. This study is concerned with fully resolved simulations, wherein all flow scales associated with the particle motion are resolved. The present effort is based on Immersed Boundary methods, in which the domain grids do not conform to particle geometry. In this approach, the conservation of momentum equations, which include both Newtonian and non-Newtonian stresses, are solved over the entire domain including the region occupied by the particles. The particles are defined on a separate Lagrangian mesh that is free to move over an underlying Eulerian grid. The development of an immersed boundary forcing technique for moving bodies within an unstructured-mesh, massively parallel, non-Newtonian flow solver is thus developed and described. The presentation will focus on the numerical algorithm and measures taken to enable efficient parallelization and transfer of information between the underlying fluid grid and the particle mesh. Several validation test cases will be presented including sedimentation under orthogonal shear - a key flow in drilling muds and fracking fluids.

  1. Dynamics of magnetic nanoparticles in viscoelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remmer, Hilke; Roeben, Eric; Schmidt, Annette M.; Schilling, Meinhard; Ludwig, Frank

    2017-04-01

    We compare different models for the description of the complex susceptibility of magnetic nanoparticles in an aqueous gelatin solution representing a model system for a Voigt-Kelvin scheme. The analysis of susceptibility spectra with the numerical model by Raikher et al. [7] is compared with the analysis applying a phenomenological, modified Debye model. The fit of the models to the measured data allows one to extract the viscoelastic parameter dynamic viscosity η and shear modulus G. The experimental data were recorded on single-core thermally blocked CoFe2O4 nanoparticles in an aqueous solution with 2.5 wt% gelatin. Whereas the dynamic viscosities obtained by fitting the model - extended by distributions of hydrodynamic diameters and viscosities - agree very well, the derived values for the shear modulus show the same temporal behavior during the gelation process, but vary approximately by a factor of two. To verify the values for viscosity and shear modulus obtained from nanorheology, macrorheological measurements are in progress.

  2. Dynamic homogenization of viscoelastic phononic metasolids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichard, Hélène; Torrent, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    The effects of dissipation in metamaterials is a sensitive issue and, although experiments show that they are more than relevant, their theoretical study and modeling has received less attention. In this work, we study the effects of viscosity on the dissipation of elastic metamaterials. It is found that these metasolids present effective constitutive parameters that are in general complex, in contrast with common elastic materials where the mass density is a real valued scalar quantity and dissipation enters only through the stiffness tensor. It is also found that, while in the low frequency limit the dissipation is higher as the viscoelastic coefficient is also higher, near a resonance of the metamaterial this condition does not hold, since the imaginary part of the constitutive parameters is higher as the viscosity is smaller. Finally, the effects of viscosity are studied on the non-local properties of the effective parameters, and it is found that this property is attenuated with dissipation although still has to be considered.

  3. Comparison of continuation or cessation of growth hormone (GH) therapy on body composition and metabolic status in adolescents with severe GH deficiency at completion of linear growth.

    PubMed

    Carroll, P V; Drake, W M; Maher, K T; Metcalfe, K; Shaw, N J; Dunger, D B; Cheetham, T D; Camacho-Hübner, C; Savage, M O; Monson, J P

    2004-08-01

    Although GH replacement improves the features of GH deficiency (GHD) in adults, it has yet to be established whether cessation of GH at completion of childhood growth results in adverse consequences for the adolescent with GHD. Effects of continuation or cessation of GH on body composition, insulin sensitivity, and lipid levels were studied in 24 adolescents (13 males, 11 females, aged 17.0 +/- 0.3, yr, mean +/- se, puberty stage 4 or 5) in whom height velocity was less than 2 cm/yr. Provocative testing confirmed severe GHD [peak GH < 9 mU/liter (3 microg/liter)] in all cases and was followed by a lead-in period of 3 months during which the pediatric dose of GH continued unchanged. Baseline investigations were then performed using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (body composition), lipid measurements, and assessment of insulin sensitivity by both homeostasis model assessment and a short insulin tolerance test. Twelve patients remained on GH (0.35 U/kg.wk), and 12 patients ceased GH treatment. The groups were followed up in parallel with repeat observations made after 6 and 12 months. No endocrine differences were evident between the groups at baseline. GH cessation resulted in a reduction of serum IGF-I Z score [-1.62 +/- 0.29, baseline vs. -2.52 +/- 0.12, 6 months (P < 0.05) vs. -2.52 +/- 0.10, 12 months (P < 0.01)] but values remained unchanged in those continuing GH replacement. Lean body mass increased by 2.5 +/- 0.5 kg ( approximately 6%) over 12 months in those receiving GH but was unchanged after GH discontinuation. Cessation of GH resulted in increased insulin sensitivity [short insulin tolerance test, 153 +/- 22 micromol/liter.min, baseline vs. 187 +/- 20, 6 months (P < 0.05) vs. 204 +/- 14, 12 months (P = 0.05)], but no significant change was seen during 12 months of GH continuation. Lipid levels remained unaltered in both groups. Continuation of GH at completion of linear growth resulted in ongoing accrual of lean body mass (LBM), whereas skeletal

  4. Dynamics of the nonlinear viscoelastic slider-block model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Shcherbakov, R.

    2015-12-01

    The full understanding and modeling of earthquake physics remains a challenging task. Presently, there are several approaches to model the earthquake dynamics. They include the full elasto-dynamic simulation of rupture propagation and initiation. The stochastic approach employs the forward and inverse analysis of various point process models. Another approach assumes that the fault can be modeled by an array of blocks which interact with the loading plate and between each other. These approaches were successful in reproducing some aspects of observed seismicity. In this work, we analyze the slider-block model where we introduce a nonlinear visco-elastic interaction between blocks and the tectonic loading plate, which mimics the rheology of the fault system. This approach preserves the full inertial effects in the system that are generally neglected in cellular automaton version of this model. The slider-block model consists of N elements which are governed by non-linear differential equations. The fault zone is modelled by an array of N interacting elements, driven by tectonic loading force. The frictional force is also applied between the elements and the substrate. Earthquakes in this system are realized as slipping events with different sizes. The model is characterized by a set of tuning parameters with clear physical significance: the elasticity, the viscosity, the shear rate exponent which controls the nonlinearity. The properties of the model, including the motion pattern, the interevent time statistics, the frequency-size distributions are examined. By tuning the parameter sets, one can easily explore the phase space of the model, and determine the factors that control various aspects of the system behaviour, providing more insight into real earthquakes.

  5. Acoustic characterization of monodisperse lipid-coated microbubbles: relationship between size and shell viscoelastic properties.

    PubMed

    Parrales, Miguel A; Fernandez, Juan M; Perez-Saborid, Miguel; Kopechek, Jonathan A; Porter, Tyrone M

    2014-09-01

    The acoustic attenuation spectrum of lipid-coated microbubble suspensions was measured in order to characterize the linear acoustic behavior of ultrasound contrast agents. For that purpose, microbubbles samples were generated with a very narrow size distribution by using microfluidics techniques. A performance as good as optical characterization techniques of single microbubbles was achieved using this method. Compared to polydispersions (i.e., contrast agents used clinically), monodisperse contrast agents have a narrower attenuation spectrum, which presents a maximum peak at a frequency value corresponding to the average single bubble resonance frequency. The low polydispersity index of the samples made the estimation of the lipid viscoelastic properties more accurate since, as previously reported, the shell linear parameters may change with the equilibrium bubble radius. The results showed the great advantage of dealing with monodisperse populations rather than polydisperse populations for the acoustic characterization of ultrasound contrast agents.

  6. Foundations of the mathematical theory of composite and prestressed beam structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lazic, V.B.

    1996-10-01

    It is supposed: concrete is an aging linear viscoelastic material, prestressing steel has the relaxation property, steel parts and reinforcing steel are linear elastic materials; in the uncracked composite cross section these different materials are arranged arbitrarily, the beam is of variable cross section and the assumptions of the engineering beam-bending theory are accepted. The theory refers to any concrete creep function. Linear integral operators, adapted to the aging creep, are used so that the symbolical mathematical procedure is carried out. Because of that it could be anticipated that the results denote the type and the number of mathematical operations, only. However, using the properties of these operators, it was possible to establish that kind of operator relations which reduce the stress and displacement expressions to the simple forms suitable for the calculation.

  7. Residual stress characterization for laminated composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shao-Chun

    With increasing applications of advanced laminated composites, process-induced residual stress has drawn more and more attention in recent years. Efforts have been devoted to understanding residual stress both quantitatively and qualitatively. In the current study, a novel technique called the Cure Referencing Method was developed which has the capability for measuring the residual stress on the symmetric laminated composite plates. It can also differentiate residual stress into two components: one is due to the mismatch of the coefficient of thermal expansion, the other is caused by the matrix chemical curing shrinkage. The chemical curing shrinkage of the polymer matrix was investigated in further detail. A technique was developed to measure the post-gel chemical curing shrinkage which is the portion of curing shrinkage that really induces the residual stress in the polymer matrix composites. Time-dependent material property is another issue associated with polymer matrix composite materials. The data of several short-term tensile creep tests run at different temperature were used to construct a linear viscoelastic: model for describing the behavior of the composites over a long period of time. It was found that physical aging of the polymer matrix needs to be taken into account in order to have a more accurate representation of the long-term behavior. A fair agreement was obtained between the result of the long-term creep test and the master curve constructed from several momentary creep tests.

  8. A numerical method for reorientation of rotating tidally deformed viscoelastic bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, H.; Wal, W.; Vermeersen, L. L. A.

    2017-01-01

    Existing approaches for simulating the true polar wander (TPW) of a viscoelastic body can be divided into three categories: (i) a linear dynamic approach which uses the linearized Liouville equation (e.g., Wu and Peltier (1984) and Mitrovica et al. (2005)); (ii) a nonlinear dynamic approach which is based on the quasi-fluid approximation (e.g., Sabadini and Peltier (1981), Ricard et al. (1993), and Cambiotti et al. (2011)); and (iii) a long-term limit approach which only considers the fluid limit of a reorientation (e.g., Matsuyama and Nimmo (2007)). Several limitations of these approaches have not been studied: the range for which the linear approach is accurate, the validity of the quasi-fluid approximation, and the dynamic solution for TPW of a tidally deformed rotating body. We establish a numerical procedure which is able to determine the large-angle reorientation of a viscoelastic celestial body that can be both centrifugally and tidally deformed. We show that the linear approach leads to significant errors for loadings near the poles or the equator. Second, we show that slow relaxation modes can have a significant effect on large-angle TPW of Earth or other planets. Finally, we show that reorientation of a tidally deformed body driven by a positive mass anomaly near the poles has a preference for rotating around the tidal axis instead of toward it. At a tidally deformed body which does not have a remnant bulge, positive mass anomalies are more likely to be found near the equator and the plane perpendicular to the tidal axis, while negative mass anomalies tend to be near the great circle that contains the tidal and rotational axes.

  9. Influence of viscoelasticity on the nano-micromechanical behavior of latex films and pigmented coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, Manish

    2001-09-01

    Nano to microscale deformation behavior of different carboxylated styrene-butadiene co-polymer Latexes were investigated using a commercial nanoindentation device. The latexes differed primarily in their glass transition temperature (T g). The bulk dynamic rheological properties, as determined from a rheometer, dictate the axismmetric deformation behavior of the latexes. Results from dynamic tests performed on latexes were analyzed using the theories in contact and fracture mechanics. Two theories of linear viscoelastic fracture mechanics (LVEFM) were employed to model the adhesion hysteresis (loading-unloading cycle) curves to obtain meaningful cohesive zone (fracture process zone) parameters and a stress intensity functional (K I(t)) for an entire cycle. The stress intensity functional, extracted from the deformation behavior, is independent of the loading history and was shown to depend only on the crack propagation velocity, (da/dt), for the entire cycle. The quantitative values of stress intensities were then discussed in the light of polymer molecular phenomenon's such as viscous chain desorption. Nanoindetation was developed as a tool for systematically investigating both the bulk as well as the cohesive zone properties of viscoelastic polymers. Effect of plastic deformation on the deformation behavior of high pigment volume concentration (PVC) coatings was also analyzed. Polystyrene plastic pigment, CaCO3 and Clay pigments were used to form the coatings layers. High PVC coatings are viscoelastic due to the latex present but also contain air, the third phase, which could explain the plastic deformation if a certain critical yield stress is exceeded. At PVC's greater than 70%, the coatings showed significant plastic (permanent) deformation, which has to be accounted for in modeling the hysteresis curves. The residual plastic deformation was confirmed by imaging the indent over a period of time. Modeling the curves resulted in a compressive yield stress (sigma

  10. Dynamics of a microorganism in a sheared viscoelastic liquid.

    PubMed

    De Corato, Marco; D'Avino, Gaetano

    2016-12-21

    In this paper, we investigate the dynamics of a model spherical microorganism, called squirmer, suspended in a viscoelastic fluid undergoing unconfined shear flow. The effect of the interplay of shear flow, fluid viscoelasticity, and self-propulsion on the orientational dynamics is addressed. In the limit of weak viscoelasticity, quantified by the Deborah number, an analytical expression for the squirmer angular velocity is derived by means of the generalized reciprocity theorem. Direct finite element simulations are carried out to study the squirmer dynamics at larger Deborah numbers. Our results show that the orientational dynamics of active microorganisms in a sheared viscoelastic fluid greatly differs from that observed in Newtonian suspensions. Fluid viscoelasticity leads to a drift of the particle orientation vector towards the vorticity axis or the flow-gradient plane depending on the Deborah number, the relative weight between the self-propulsion velocity and the flow characteristic velocity, and the type of swimming. Generally, pullers and pushers show an opposite equilibrium orientation. The results reported in the present paper could be helpful in designing devices where separation of microorganisms, based on their self-propulsion mechanism, is obtained.

  11. Characterizing gelatin hydrogel viscoelasticity with diffusing colloidal probe microscopy.

    PubMed

    Shabaniverki, Soheila; Juárez, Jaime J

    2017-07-01

    In this study, we investigate viscoelasticity in gelatin hydrogels using diffusing colloidal probe microscopy (DCPM) to directly measure the elastic potential energy interaction between colloidal probes and the underlying viscoelastic media. Gelatin samples are prepared in four different concentrations between 0.3wt% and 0.6wt% to examine changes in viscoelasticity with concentration. A force balance describing the interaction between the colloidal probes and the hydrogel as a spring-damper system lead to a simple model for mean square displacement. A histogram of locations sampled by the colloidal probes is directly related to the elastic potential energy and the effective spring constant of the gelatin hydrogels. The effective spring constant is a fixed parameter used in the mean square displacement model to find effective viscosity. These parameters are comparable to viscoelastic parameters obtain by a microrheology analysis of two-dimensional mean square displacements. These results can serve as a guide for assessing hydrogel systems where viscoelastic properties are an important factor in biomaterial design.

  12. Helmholtz-Smoluchowski velocity for viscoelastic electroosmotic flows.

    PubMed

    Park, H M; Lee, W M

    2008-01-15

    Many biofluids such as blood and DNA solutions are viscoelastic and exhibit extraordinary flow behaviors, not existing in Newtonian fluids. Adopting appropriate constitutive equations these exotic flow behaviors can be modeled and predicted reasonably using various numerical methods. However, the governing equations for viscoelastic flows are not easily solvable, especially for electroosmotic flows where the streamwise velocity varies rapidly from zero at the wall to a nearly uniform velocity at the outside of the very thin electric double layer. In the present investigation, we have devised a simple method to find the volumetric flow rate of viscoelastic electroosmotic flows through microchannels. It is based on the concept of the Helmholtz-Smoluchowski velocity which is widely adopted in the electroosmotic flows of Newtonian fluids. It is shown that the Helmholtz-Smoluchowski velocity for viscoelastic fluids can be found by solving a simple cubic algebraic equation. The volumetric flow rate obtained using this Helmholtz-Smoluchowski velocity is found to be almost the same as that obtained by solving the governing partial differential equations for various viscoelastic fluids.

  13. The ultratough peeling of elastic tapes from viscoelastic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afferrante, L.; Carbone, G.

    2016-11-01

    The peeling of an elastic thin tape from a flat smooth viscoelastic substrate is investigated. Based on a Green function approach and on the translational invariance, a closed form analytical solution is proposed, which takes into account the viscoelastic dissipation in the substrate material. We find that peeling is prevented from taking place, only when the external force is smaller than the one predicted by Kendall's formula for elastic tapes on rigid substrates. However, we also find that, regardless of the value of the applied force, steady state detachment may occur when the elastic tape is sufficiently stiff. In this case, the constant peeling velocity can be modulated by properly defining the geometrical parameters and the material properties of tape and viscoelastic foundation. On the other hand, for relatively high peeling angles or compliant tapes a threshold value of the peeling force is found, above which the steady-state equilibrium is no longer possible and unstable detachment occurs. The present study contributes to shed light on the behavior of pressure sensitive adhesives in contact with viscoelastic substrates like the human skin. At the same time, it can be considered a first step towards a better understanding of the effect of viscoelastic dissipation on the fracture behavior of solids.

  14. Experimental Study on the Mechanical, Creep, and Viscoelastic Behavior of TiO2/Glass/Epoxy Hybrid Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi, H. R.; Salehi, M.

    2016-11-01

    The mechanical and viscoelastic properties of hybrid glass/epoxy nanocomposites whose matrix was doped with 0.25, 0.5, and 1 vol.% of TiO2 nanoparticles were investigated in tension and bending. The nanoparticles were found to increase the strength of the composites by 20-30% and their stiffness by 10-20%. In addition, their creep resistance also grew. A SEM analysis of microstructure of the composites revealed that these improvements were caused by an increased adhesion between fibers and the matrix and enhanced properties of the matrix itself.

  15. Aerobreakup of Newtonian and Viscoelastic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theofanous, T. G.

    2011-01-01

    In this review, we consider and unify all aspects of the dynamics of Newtonian and viscoelastic liquid drops in high-speed gas flows, including shock waves. The path to understanding is opened by novel, laser-induced fluorescence visualizations at spatial resolutions of up to 200 pixels for millimeter and exposure times as low as 5 ns. The central role of the competition between Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities is assessed in the frame of rich aerodynamics, from low subsonic to supersonic, and the multitude of characteristic length scales and timescales at play with varying liquid properties. Acceleration and liquid redistribution (drop deformation) early in the evolution set the stage for this competition, and we insist on an interpretation of the drag coefficient that is physically meaningful. Two principal breakup regimes (patterns of bodily loss of coherence) are identified depending on whether the gas finds its way through the liquid mass, causing gross disintegration, or goes around to induce, through shear, a surface-layer peeling-and-ejection action. Corresponding criticalities are quantified in terms of key physics, consistent with experiments. This covers in a unified fashion all liquids, independent of viscosity and elasticity, and the potential role of direct numerical simulations in supporting further advances is forecast. The resulting particle-size distributions (in a final equilibrium cloud) depend crucially on the pattern of breakup, although in this respect the role of elasticity obtains a special significance in terms of the underlying entangled-polymer-chain dynamics. From a more general perspective, we explain the canonical significance of this fundamental problem and summarize the wide range of its practical relevance, including the recently renewed interest in predicting shock-induced fluidization (or high-speed, atmospheric dissemination) of large masses of liquid agents (so-called weapons of mass destruction).

  16. The viscoelastic flow behavior of pitches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleurot, Olivier

    1998-11-01

    For the first time, a commercial impregnating coal-tar pitch was air-blown (or heat-treated) for various periods of time to produce series of treated pitches. Each pitch was chemically and rheologically characterized. During air-blowing, the formation of large, aromatic, cross- linked molecules increased the elasticity of the pitch and prevented mesophase formation. During heat-treatment, large, planar, aromatic molecules formed and aggregated in mesophase spheres. These two-phase materials exhibited yield stress behavior. Also, their elasticity was similar to that of air-blown pitches. The flow/microstructure relationship in mesophase pitches was investigated. It was found that the steady and transient shear behaviors of mesophase pitches were qualitatively similar to that of LCPs. Also, the size of the structure decreased with increasing shear rate. Upon cessation of flow, the structure slowly coarsened. New techniques were proposed to estimate (1) relaxation time for structure recovery, and (2) the average elastic constant of mesophase pitches. Using Marrucci's model (originally designed for LCPs) it was possible for the first time to predict mesophase pitches' structure shrinkage during pure shear. Finally, the flow-induced structural development that occurs during extrusion of mesophase pitch through capillaries was observed and accurately predicted by coupling computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to Marrucci's model. Using a viscoelastic stress tensor to characterize the pitch flow behavior, the model was able to accurately predict the magnitude of the vortex experimentally observed at the spinnerette capillary counterbore as well as the extend of die swell at the exit of the capillary.

  17. Mixed-mode fatigue fracture of adhesive joints in harsh environments and nonlinear viscoelastic modeling of the adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzoumanidis, Alexis Gerasimos

    A four point bend, mixed-mode, reinforced, cracked lap shear specimen experimentally simulated adhesive joints between load bearing composite parts in automotive components. The experiments accounted for fatigue, solvent and temperature effects on a swirled glass fiber composite adherend/urethane adhesive system. Crack length measurements based on compliance facilitated determination of da/dN curves. A digital image processing technique was also utilized to monitor crack growth from in situ images of the side of the specimen. Linear elastic fracture mechanics and finite elements were used to determine energy release rate and mode-mix as a function of crack length for this specimen. Experiments were conducted in air and in a salt water bath at 10, 26 and 90°C. Joints tested in the solvent were fully saturated. In air, both increasing and decreasing temperature relative to 26°C accelerated crack growth rates. In salt water, crack growth rates increased with increasing temperature. Threshold energy release rate is shown to be the most appropriate design criteria for joints of this system. In addition, path of the crack is discussed and fracture surfaces are examined on three length scales. Three linear viscoelastic properties were measured for the neat urethane adhesive. Dynamic tensile compliance (D*) was found using a novel extensometer and results were considerably more accurate and precise than standard DMTA testing. Dynamic shear compliance (J*) was determined using an Arcan specimen. Dynamic Poisson's ratio (nu*) was extracted from strain gage data analyzed to include gage reinforcement. Experiments spanned three frequency decades and isothermal data was shifted by time-temperature superposition to create master curves spanning thirty decades. Master curves were fit to time domain Prony series. Shear compliance inferred from D* and nu* compared well with measured J*, forming a basis for finding the complete time dependent material property matrix for this

  18. Synthesis of linear low-density polyethylene-g-poly (acrylic acid)-co-starch/organo-montmorillonite hydrogel composite as an adsorbent for removal of Pb(ΙΙ) from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Irani, Maryam; Ismail, Hanafi; Ahmad, Zulkifli; Fan, Maohong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to remove Pb(II) from the aqueous solution using a type of hydrogel composite. A hydrogel composite consisting of waste linear low density polyethylene, acrylic acid, starch, and organo-montmorillonite was prepared through emulsion polymerization method. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Solid carbon nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (CNMR)), silicon(-29) nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (Si NMR)), and X-ray diffraction spectroscope ((XRD) were applied to characterize the hydrogel composite. The hydrogel composite was then employed as an adsorbent for the removal of Pb(II) from the aqueous solution. The Pb(II)-loaded hydrogel composite was characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR)), scanning electron microscopy (SEM)), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy ((XPS)). From XPS results, it was found that the carboxyl and hydroxyl groups of the hydrogel composite participated in the removal of Pb(II). Kinetic studies indicated that the adsorption of Pb(II) followed the pseudo-second-order equation. It was also found that the Langmuir model described the adsorption isotherm better than the Freundlich isotherm. The maximum removal capacity of the hydrogel composite for Pb(II) ions was 430mg/g. Thus, the waste linear low-density polyethylene-g-poly (acrylic acid)-co-starch/organo-montmorillonite hydrogel composite could be a promising Pb(II) adsorbent.

  19. Nonlocal vibration and biaxial buckling of double-viscoelastic-FGM-nanoplate system with viscoelastic Pasternak medium in between

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J. C.; Zhang, Y. Q.; Fan, L. F.

    2017-04-01

    The general equation for transverse vibration of double-viscoelastic-FGM-nanoplate system with viscoelastic Pasternak medium in between and each nanoplate subjected to in-plane edge loads is formulated on the basis of the Eringen's nonlocal elastic theory and the Kelvin model. The factors of the structural damping, medium damping, small size effect, loading ratio, and Winkler modulus and shear modulus of the medium are incorporated in the formulation. Based on the Navier's method, the analytical solutions for vibrational frequency and buckling load of the system with simply supported boundary conditions are obtained. The influences of these factors on vibrational frequency and buckling load of the system are discussed. It is demonstrated that the vibrational frequency of the system for the out-of-phase vibration is dependent upon the structural damping, small size effect and viscoelastic Pasternak medium, whereas the vibrational frequency for the in-phase vibration is independent of the viscoelastic Pasternak medium. While the buckling load of the system for the in-phase buckling case has nothing to do with the viscoelastic Pasternak medium, the buckling load for the out-of-phase case is related to the small size effect, loading ratio and Pasternak medium.

  20. Fractional modeling of Pasternak-type viscoelastic foundation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Wei; Chen, Wen; Xu, Wenxiang

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a fractional Pasternak-type foundation model to characterize the time-dependent properties of the viscoelastic foundation. With varying fractional orders, the proposed model can govern the traditional Winkler model, Pasternak model, and viscoelastic model. We take the four-edge simply supported rectangular thin plate as an example to analyze the viscoelastic foundation reaction, and obtain the solution of the new governing equation. Theoretical results show that the fractional order has a dramatic influence on the deflection and bending moment. It can be further concluded that the softer foundation will become more time-dependent. Subsequently, the difference between fractional Pasternak-type and Winkler foundation model is presented in this work. The existence of constrained boundary is found to definitely affect deflection and bending moment. Such phenomenon, known as the wall effect, is deeply discussed.

  1. Design of a rotary passive viscoelastic joint for wearable robots.

    PubMed

    Carpino, Giorgio; Accoto, Dino; Di Palo, Michelangelo; Tagliamonte, Nevio Luigi; Sergi, Fabrizio; Guglielmelli, Eugenio

    2011-01-01

    In the design of wearable robots that strictly interact with the human body and, in general, in any robotics application that involves the human component, the possibility of having modular joints able to produce a viscoelastic behaviour is very useful to achieve an efficient and safe human-robot interaction and to give rise to emergent dynamical behaviors. In this paper we propose the design of a compact, passive, rotary viscoelastic joint for assistive wearable robotics applications. The system integrates two functionally distinct sub-modules: one to render a desired torsional stiffness profile and the other to provide a desired torsional damping. Concepts and design choices regarding the overall architecture and the single components are presented and discussed. A viscoelastic model of the system has been developed and the design of the joint is presented.

  2. Viscoelastic flows in simple liquids generated by vibrating nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Pelton, Matthew; Chakraborty, Debadi; Malachosky, Edward; Guyot-Sionnest, Philippe; Sader, John E

    2013-12-13

    Newtonian fluid mechanics, in which the shear stress is proportional to the strain rate, is synonymous with the flow of simple liquids such as water. We report the measurement and theoretical verification of non-Newtonian, viscoelastic flow phenomena produced by the high-frequency (20 GHz) vibration of gold nanoparticles immersed in water-glycerol mixtures. The observed viscoelasticity is not due to molecular confinement, but is a bulk continuum effect arising from the short time scale of vibration. This represents the first direct mechanical measurement of the intrinsic viscoelastic properties of simple bulk liquids, and opens a new paradigm for understanding extremely high frequency fluid mechanics, nanoscale sensing technologies, and biophysical processes.

  3. GPU accelerated numerical simulations of viscoelastic phase separation model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Keda; Su, Jiaye; Guo, Hongxia

    2012-07-05

    We introduce a complete implementation of viscoelastic model for numerical simulations of the phase separation kinetics in dynamic asymmetry systems such as polymer blends and polymer solutions on a graphics processing unit (GPU) by CUDA language and discuss algorithms and optimizations in details. From studies of a polymer solution, we show that the GPU-based implementation can predict correctly the accepted results and provide about 190 times speedup over a single central processing unit (CPU). Further accuracy analysis demonstrates that both the single and the double precision calculations on the GPU are sufficient to produce high-quality results in numerical simulations of viscoelastic model. Therefore, the GPU-based viscoelastic model is very promising for studying many phase separation processes of experimental and theoretical interests that often take place on the large length and time scales and are not easily addressed by a conventional implementation running on a single CPU.

  4. Viscoelastic Flows in Simple Liquids Generated by Vibrating Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelton, Matthew; Chakraborty, Debadi; Malachosky, Edward; Guyot-Sionnest, Philippe; Sader, John E.

    2013-12-01

    Newtonian fluid mechanics, in which the shear stress is proportional to the strain rate, is synonymous with the flow of simple liquids such as water. We report the measurement and theoretical verification of non-Newtonian, viscoelastic flow phenomena produced by the high-frequency (20 GHz) vibration of gold nanoparticles immersed in water-glycerol mixtures. The observed viscoelasticity is not due to molecular confinement, but is a bulk continuum effect arising from the short time scale of vibration. This represents the first direct mechanical measurement of the intrinsic viscoelastic properties of simple bulk liquids, and opens a new paradigm for understanding extremely high frequency fluid mechanics, nanoscale sensing technologies, and biophysical processes.

  5. Active-passive calibration of optical tweezers in viscoelastic media.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Mario; Richardson, Andrew C; Reihani, S Nader S; Oddershede, Lene B; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine

    2010-01-01

    In order to use optical tweezers as a force measuring tool inside a viscoelastic medium such as the cytoplasm of a living cell, it is crucial to perform an exact force calibration within the complex medium. This is a nontrivial task, as many of the physical characteristics of the medium and probe, e.g., viscosity, elasticity, shape, and density, are often unknown. Here, we suggest how to calibrate single beam optical tweezers in a complex viscoelastic environment. At the same time, we determine viscoelastic characteristics such as friction retardation spectrum and elastic moduli of the medium. We apply and test a method suggested [M. Fischer and K. Berg-Sørensen, J. Opt. A, Pure Appl. Opt. 9, S239 (2007)], a method which combines passive and active measurements. The method is demonstrated in a simple viscous medium, water, and in a solution of entangled F-actin without cross-linkers.

  6. Effect of viscoelastic relaxation on moisture transport in foods. Part I: solution of general transport equation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pawan P; Maier, Dirk E; Cushman, John H; Haghighi, Kamyar; Corvalan, Carlos

    2004-07-01

    Within the framework of continuum mechanics, Singh et al. developed an integro-differential equation, which applies to both Darcian (Fickian) and non-Darcian (non-Fickian) modes of fluid transport in swelling biological systems. A dimensionless form of the equation was obtained and transformed from moving Eulerian to the stationary Lagrangian coordinates. Here a solution scheme for the transport equation is developed to predict moisture transport and viscoelastic stresses in spheroidal biopolymeric materials. The equation was solved numerically and results used for predicting drying and sorption curves, moisture profiles, and viscoelastic stresses in soybeans. The Lagrangian solution was obtained by assembling together several schemes: the finite element method was used to discretize the equation in space; non-linearity was addressed using the Newton-Raphson method; the Volterra term was handled via a time integration scheme of Patlashenko et al. and the Galerkin rule was used to solve the time-differential term. The solution obtained in Lagrangian coordinates was transformed back to the Eulerian coordinates. In part II of this sequence we present the numerical results.

  7. Measurement of nonlinear viscoelastic properties of fluids using Dynamic Acoustoelastic Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trarieux, C.; Callé, S.; Poulin, A.; Tranchant, J.-F.; Moreschi, H.; Defontaine, M.

    2012-12-01

    A nonlinear ultrasound-based method called Dynamic Acoustoelastic Testing (DAET) is used to assess nonlinear viscoelastic properties of fluids. This method is based on the interaction between two elastic waves: a low-frequency (LF) sinusoidal wave (4 kHz) to successively compress and expand the liquid as a bulk stress, and ultrasound (US) pulses (1 MHz) to simultaneously probe the sample at different states of the quasi-hydrostatic pressure. The DAET method provides estimations of the elastic nonlinearities issued from the Time Of Flight Modulations (TOFM) of the US pulses. The TOFM is plotted as a function of the LF acoustic pressure, allowing an estimation of the nonlinear elastic parameter B/A. In this study, we first present the results obtained in Newtonian fluids such as water and silicone oils. Simple viscoelastic gels (Carbomers and Xanthan gums) have also been tested exhibiting the same behavior: TOFM linearly related to LF pressure amplitude corresponding to classical quadratic nonlinearity. Finally, preliminary DAET measurements have been performed in biphasic systems composed of hard glass beads in a gel-based matrix and in gelatin during a gelation process.

  8. Effect of viscoelastic postseismic relaxation on estimates of interseismic crustal strain accumulation at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, William C.; Kreemer, Corné; Blewitt, Geoffrey; Plag, Hans-Peter

    2010-03-01

    We estimate the long-term crustal strain rate at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada from GPS velocities taking into account viscoelastic relaxation following recent earthquakes to remove bias associated with transient deformation. The YM data reveal postseismic relaxation in time series non-linearity and geographic variation of the transient signal. From the data we estimate best-fitting lower crust and upper mantle viscosities of 1019.5 Pa s and 1018.5 Pa s, respectively. Once the relaxation model predictions are subtracted from the data, the long-term shear strain accumulation rate is between 16.3 and 25.1 nanostrains/year (ns/yr) to 99% confidence, a range much larger than the formal uncertainties from GPS measurement. We conclude that 1) a Maxwell viscoelastic model cannot explain all the deformation observed at YM, 2) uncertainty in viscosities dominates uncertainty in YM strain rates, and 3) the effects of large, recent earthquakes must be accounted for in seismic hazard studies using GPS.

  9. Active microrheology reveals molecular-level variations in the viscoelastic properties of Chaetopterus mucus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigand, William; Messmore, Ashley; Anderson, Rae

    The sea annelid, Chaetopterus Variopedatus, secretes a bioluminescent mucus that also exhibits complex viscoelastic properties. The constituents of the mucus are relatively unknown but it does play an important role in the development of the worms' parchment-like housing tubes. In order to determine how and why this mucus can exhibit material properties ranging from fluidity to rigidity we perform microrheology experiments. We determine the microscale viscoelastic properties by using optical tweezers to produce small oscillations in the mucus which allow us to determine both the linear storage and loss moduli (G',G'') along with the viscosity of the fluid. By varying the size of the microspheres (2-10 µm) and oscillation amplitude (.5-10 µm) we are able to determine the dominant intrinsic length scales of the molecular mesh comprising the mucus. By varying the oscillation frequency (1-15Hz) we determine the crossover frequency at which G' surpasses G'', to quantify the longest relaxation time of the mesh network. Initial results show a strong dependence on bead size which indicate that the dominant entanglement lengthscale of the mucus mesh is ~5 um. Microspheres of this size exhibit a wide variety of stress responses in different regions of the mucus demonstrating the substantial microscale heterogeneity of the mucus. We carry out measurements on a population of worms of varying size and age to determine mucus variability between worms.

  10. Assessment of the viscoelastic and oscillation properties of a nano-engineered multimodality contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Kothapalli, Satya V V N; Oddo, Letizia; Paradossi, Gaio; Brodin, Lars-Åke; Grishenkov, Dmitry

    2014-10-01

    Combinations of microbubbles (MBs) and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are used to fabricate dual contrast agents for ultrasound and MRI. This study examines the viscoelastic and oscillation characteristics of two MB types that are manufactured with SPIONs and either anchored chemically on the surface (MBs-chem) or physically embedded (MBs-phys) into a polymer shell. A linearized Church model was employed to simultaneously fit attenuation coefficients and phase velocity spectra that were acquired experimentally. The model predicted lower viscoelastic modulus values, undamped resonance frequencies and total damping ratios for MBs-chem. MBs-chem had a resonance frequency of approximately 13 MHz and a damping ratio of approximately 0.9; thus, MBs-chem can potentially be used as a conventional ultrasound contrast agent with the combined functionality of MRI detection. In contrast, MBs-phys had a resonance frequency and damping of 28 MHz and 1.2, respectively, and requires further modification of clinically available contrast pulse sequences to be visualized.

  11. A comparative study on the viscoelastic properties of human and animal lenses.

    PubMed

    Sharma, P K; Busscher, H J; Terwee, T; Koopmans, S A; van Kooten, T G

    2011-11-01

    A new method of compression between two parallel plates is used to measure the viscoelastic properties of whole and decapsulated human lenses and compare them with other animal species. Compressive load relaxation was performed by deforming the lens by 10% and measuring the force relaxation response for 100 s to obtain thickness, stiffness and relaxation of the induced loading force and Maxwell parameters for human, monkey, porcine and leporine whole and decapsulated lenses. Thickness and percentage loading force relaxation increased linearly with lens age, whereas stiffness and induced loading force increased exponentially. Human and monkey lenses aged at different rates. Loading force relaxation in a generalized Maxwell model was described by three time constants ranging from 1 to 1000 s. Compressive load relaxation is a very versatile method to study the viscoelastic properties of whole and decapsulated lenses and potentially also artificial accommodating lenses. The data presented in the study will help researchers choose the most suitable animal lenses based on the desired properties and age to be mimicked from the human lenses.

  12. Postseismic deformation due to subcrustal viscoelastic relaxation following dip-slip earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.

    1982-01-01

    The deformation of the Earth following a dip-slip earthquake is calculated using a three layer rheological model and finite element techniques. The three layers are an elastic upper lithosphere, a standard linear solid lower lithosphere, and a Maxwell viscoelastic asthenosphere-a model previously analyzed in the strike-clip case (Cohen, 1981, 1982). Attention is focused on the magnitude of the postseismic subsidence and the width of the subsidence zone that can develop due to the viscoelastic response to coseismic reverse slip. Detailed analysis for a fault extending from the surface to 15 km with a 45 deg dip reveals that postseismic subsidence is sensitive to the depth to the asthenosphere but is only weakly dependent on lower lithosphere depth. The greatest subsidence occurs when the elastic lithosphere is about 30 km thick and the asthenosphere lies just below this layer (asthenosphere depth = 2 times the fault depth). The extremum in the subsidence pattern occurs at about 5 km from the surface trace of the fault and lies over the slip plane. In a typical case after a time t = 30 tau (tau = Maxwell time) following the earthquake the subsidence at this point is 60% of the coseismic uplift. Unlike the horizontal deformation following a strike slip earthquake, significant vertical deformation due to asthenosphere flow persists for many times tau and the magnitude of the vertical deformation is not necessarily enhanced by having a partially relaxing lower lithosphere.

  13. Understanding the viscoelastic behavior of collagen matrices through relaxation time distribution spectrum.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Li, Haiyue; Zhang, Yanhang

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to provide understanding of the macroscopic viscoelastic behavior of collagen matrices through studying the relaxation time distribution spectrum obtained from stress relaxation tests. Hydrated collagen gel and dehydrated collagen thin film was exploited as two different hydration levels of collagen matrices. Genipin solution was used to induce crosslinking in collagen matrices. Biaxial stress relaxation tests were performed to characterize the viscoelastic behavior of collagen matrices. The rate of stress relaxation of both hydrated and dehydrated collagen matrices shows a linear initial stress level dependency. Increased crosslinking reduces viscosity in collagen gel, but the effect is negligible for thin film. Relaxation time distribution spectrum was obtained from the stress relaxation data by inverse Laplace transform. For most of the collagen matrices, three peaks at the short (0.3s ~1 s), medium (3s ~90 s), and long relaxation time (> 200 s) were observed in the continuous spectrum, which likely corresponds to relaxation mechanisms involve fiber, inter-fibril, and fibril sliding. Splitting of the middle peak was observed at higher initial stress levels suggesting increased structural heterogeneity at the fibril level with mechanical loading. The intensity of the long-term peaks increases with higher initial stress levels indicating the engagement of collagen fibrils at higher levels of tissue strain.

  14. Dynamics of a Particle in a Viscoelastic Medium with Conformable Derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Won Sang; Hassanabadi, Hassan

    2017-03-01

    In this paper we use the conformable derivative to study the dynamics of a particle in a viscoelastic medium. We discuss two examples. One is the resisted horizontal motion of a particle in a viscoelastic medium and another is the resisted horizontal motion of a particle in a viscoelastic medium with a uniform force F 0.

  15. Collective Motion of Microorganisms in a Viscoelastic Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gaojin; Ardekani, Arezoo M.

    2016-09-01

    We study the collective motion of a suspension of rodlike microswimmers in a two-dimensional film of viscoelastic fluids. We find that the fluid elasticity has a small effect on a suspension of pullers, while it significantly affects the pushers. The attraction and orientational ordering of the pushers are enhanced in viscoelastic fluids. The induced polymer stresses break down the large-scale flow structures and suppress velocity fluctuations. In addition, the energy spectra and induced mixing in the suspension of pushers are greatly modified by fluid elasticity.

  16. On steady motion of viscoelastic fluid of Oldroyd type

    SciTech Connect

    Baranovskii, E. S.

    2014-06-01

    We consider a mathematical model describing the steady motion of a viscoelastic medium of Oldroyd type under the Navier slip condition at the boundary. In the rheological relation, we use the objective regularized Jaumann derivative. We prove the solubility of the corresponding boundary-value problem in the weak setting. We obtain an estimate for the norm of a solution in terms of the data of the problem. We show that the solution set is sequentially weakly closed. Furthermore, we give an analytic solution of the boundary-value problem describing the flow of a viscoelastic fluid in a flat channel under a slip condition at the walls. Bibliography: 13 titles. (paper)

  17. Probing viscoelastic response of soft material surfaces at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Haviland, David B; van Eysden, Cornelius Anthony; Forchheimer, Daniel; Platz, Daniel; Kassa, Hailu G; Leclère, Philippe

    2016-01-14

    We study the interaction between an AFM tip and a soft viscoelastic surface. Using a multifrequency method we measure the amplitude-dependence of the cantilever dynamic force quadratures, which clearly show the effect of finite relaxation time of the viscoelastic surface. A model is introduced which treats the tip and surface as a two-body dynamic problem with a nonlinear interaction depending on their separation. We find good agreement between simulations of this model and experimental data on polymer blend samples for a variety of materials and measurement conditions.

  18. Quasi-static and dynamic analysis of viscoelastic plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aköz, Ahmet Yalçın; Kadıoğlu, Fethi; Tekin, Gülçin

    2015-11-01

    In this study, the quasi-static and dynamic behavior of viscoelastic Kirchhoff plates is studied numerically by using the mixed finite element method in transformed Laplace-Carson space. In the transformed Laplace-Carson space, a new functional has been constructed for viscoelastic Kirchhoff plates through a systematic procedure based on the Gâteaux differential. For numerical inversion, the Maximum Degree of Precision (MDOP), Dubner and Abate's, and Durbin's transform techniques are employed. The developed solution technique is applied to several quasi-static and dynamic example problems.

  19. Determination of the linear coefficient of thermal expansion in polymer films at the nanoscale: influence of the composition of EVA copolymers and the molecular weight of PMMA.

    PubMed

    González-Benito, J; Castillo, E; Cruz-Caldito, J F

    2015-07-28

    Nanothermal-expansion of poly(ethylene-co-vinylacetate), EVA, and poly(methyl methacrylate), PMMA, in the form of films was measured to finally obtain linear coefficients of thermal expansion, CTEs. The simple deflection of a cantilever in an atomic force microscope, AFM, was used to monitor thermal expansions at the nanoscale. The influences of: (a) the structure of EVA in terms of its composition (vinylacetate content) and (b) the size of PMMA chains in terms of the molecular weight were studied. To carry out this, several polymer samples were used, EVA copolymers with different weight percents of the vinylacetate comonomer (12, 18, 25 and 40%) and PMMA polymers with different weight average molecular weights (33.9, 64.8, 75.600 and 360.0 kg mol(-1)). The dependencies of the vinyl acetate weight fraction of EVA and the molecular weight of PMMA on their corresponding CTEs were analyzed to finally explain them using new, intuitive and very simple models based on the rule of mixtures. In the case of EVA copolymers a simple equation considering the weighted contributions of each comonomer was enough to estimate the final CTE above the glass transition temperature. On the other hand, when the molecular weight dependence is considered the free volume concept was used as novelty. The expansion of PMMA, at least at the nanoscale, was well and easily described by the sum of the weighted contributions of the occupied and free volumes, respectively.

  20. Equations of state, transport properties, and compositions of argon plasma: combination of self-consistent fluid variation theory and linear response theory.

    PubMed

    Quan, W L; Chen, Q F; Fu, Z J; Sun, X W; Zheng, J; Gu, Y J

    2015-02-01

    A consistent theoretical model that can be applied in a wide range of densities and temperatures is necessary for understanding the variation of a material's properties during compression and heating. Taking argon as an example, we show that the combination of self-consistent fluid variational theory and linear response theory is a promising route for studying warm dense matter. Following this route, the compositions, equations of state, and transport properties of argon plasma are calculated in a wide range of densities (0.001-20 g/cm(3)) and temperatures (5-100 kK). The obtained equations of state and electrical conductivities are found in good agreement with available experimental data. The plasma phase transition of argon is observed at temperatures below 30 kK and density about 2-6g/cm(3). The minimum density for the metallization of argon is found to be about 5.8 g/cm(3), occurring at 30-40 kK. The effects of many-particle correlations and dynamic screening on the electrical conductivity are also discussed through the effective potentials.

  1. Modeling of Viscoelastic Properties of Porous Rocks Saturated with Viscous Fluid at Seismic Frequencies at the Core Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, D. R.; Wang, Z.; Wang, F.; Wang, R.

    2015-12-01

    Currently the moduli and velocities of rocks at seismic frequencies are usually measured by the strain-stress method in lab. However, such measurements require well-designed equipment and skilled technicians, which greatly hinders the experimental investigation on the elastic and visco-elastic properties of rocks at seismic frequencies. We attempt to model the dynamic moduli of porous rocks saturated with viscous fluid at seismic frequencies on core scale using the strain-stress method, aiming to provide a complement to real core measurements in lab. First, we build 2D geometrical models containing the pore structure information of porous rocks based on the digital images (such as thin section, SEM, CT, etc.) of real rocks. Then we assume the rock frames are linearly elastic, and use the standard Maxwell spring-dash pot model to describe the visco-elastic properties of pore fluids. Boundary conditions are set according to the strain-stress method; and the displacement field is calculated using the finite element method (FEM). We numerically test the effects of fluid viscosity, frequency, and pore structure on the visco-elastic properties based on the calculation results. In our modeling, the viscosity of the pore fluid ranges from 103mPas to 109mPas; and the frequency varies from 5Hz to 500Hz. The preliminary results indicate that the saturated rock behaves stiffer and shows larger phase lag between stress and strain when the viscosity of the pore fluid and (or) the frequency increase.

  2. A simple and efficient quasi 3-dimensional viscoelastic model and software for simulation of tapping-mode atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Solares, Santiago D.

    2015-11-26

    This study introduces a quasi-3-dimensional (Q3D) viscoelastic model and software tool for use in atomic force microscopy (AFM) simulations. The model is based on a 2-dimensional array of standard linear solid (SLS) model elements. The well-known 1-dimensional SLS model is a textbook example in viscoelastic theory but is relatively new in AFM simulation. It is the simplest model that offers a qualitatively correct description of the most fundamental viscoelastic behaviors, namely stress relaxation and creep. However, this simple model does not reflect the correct curvature in the repulsive portion of the force curve, so its application in the quantitative interpretation of AFM experiments is relatively limited. In the proposed Q3D model the use of an array of SLS elements leads to force curves that have the typical upward curvature in the repulsive region, while still offering a very low computational cost. Furthermore, the use of a multidimensional model allows for the study of AFM tips having non-ideal geometries, which can be extremely useful in practice. Examples of typical force curves are provided for single- and multifrequency tappingmode imaging, for both of which the force curves exhibit the expected features. Lastly, a software tool to simulate amplitude and phase spectroscopy curves is provided, which can be easily modified to implement other controls schemes in order to aid in the interpretation of AFM experiments.

  3. A simple and efficient quasi 3-dimensional viscoelastic model and software for simulation of tapping-mode atomic force microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Solares, Santiago D.

    2015-11-26

    This study introduces a quasi-3-dimensional (Q3D) viscoelastic model and software tool for use in atomic force microscopy (AFM) simulations. The model is based on a 2-dimensional array of standard linear solid (SLS) model elements. The well-known 1-dimensional SLS model is a textbook example in viscoelastic theory but is relatively new in AFM simulation. It is the simplest model that offers a qualitatively correct description of the most fundamental viscoelastic behaviors, namely stress relaxation and creep. However, this simple model does not reflect the correct curvature in the repulsive portion of the force curve, so its application in the quantitative interpretationmore » of AFM experiments is relatively limited. In the proposed Q3D model the use of an array of SLS elements leads to force curves that have the typical upward curvature in the repulsive region, while still offering a very low computational cost. Furthermore, the use of a multidimensional model allows for the study of AFM tips having non-ideal geometries, which can be extremely useful in practice. Examples of typical force curves are provided for single- and multifrequency tappingmode imaging, for both of which the force curves exhibit the expected features. Lastly, a software tool to simulate amplitude and phase spectroscopy curves is provided, which can be easily modified to implement other controls schemes in order to aid in the interpretation of AFM experiments.« less

  4. A simple and efficient quasi 3-dimensional viscoelastic model and software for simulation of tapping-mode atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Solares, Santiago D

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a quasi-3-dimensional (Q3D) viscoelastic model and software tool for use in atomic force microscopy (AFM) simulations. The model is based on a 2-dimensional array of standard linear solid (SLS) model elements. The well-known 1-dimensional SLS model is a textbook example in viscoelastic theory but is relatively new in AFM simulation. It is the simplest model that offers a qualitatively correct description of the most fundamental viscoelastic behaviors, namely stress relaxation and creep. However, this simple model does not reflect the correct curvature in the repulsive portion of the force curve, so its application in the quantitative interpretation of AFM experiments is relatively limited. In the proposed Q3D model the use of an array of SLS elements leads to force curves that have the typical upward curvature in the repulsive region, while still offering a very low computational cost. Furthermore, the use of a multidimensional model allows for the study of AFM tips having non-ideal geometries, which can be extremely useful in practice. Examples of typical force curves are provided for single- and multifrequency tapping-mode imaging, for both of which the force curves exhibit the expected features. Finally, a software tool to simulate amplitude and phase spectroscopy curves is provided, which can be easily modified to implement other controls schemes in order to aid in the interpretation of AFM experiments.

  5. Viscoelastic and dynamic nonlinear properties of airway smooth muscle tissue: roles of mechanical force and the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Ito, Satoru; Majumdar, Arnab; Kume, Hiroaki; Shimokata, Kaoru; Naruse, Keiji; Lutchen, Kenneth R; Stamenovic, Dimitrije; Suki, Béla

    2006-06-01

    The viscoelastic and dynamic nonlinear properties of guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle tissues were investigated by measuring the storage (G') and loss (G") moduli using pseudorandom small-amplitude length oscillations between 0.12 and 3.5 Hz superimposed on static strains of either 10 or 20% of initial length. The G" and G' spectra were interpreted using a linear viscoelastic model incorporating damping (G) and stiffness (H), respectively. Both G and H were elevated following an increase in strain from 10 to 20%. There was no change in harmonic distortion (K(d)), an index of dynamic nonlinearity, between 10 and 20% strains. Application of methacholine at 10% strain significantly increased G and H while it decreased K(d). Cytochalasin D, isoproterenol, and HA-1077, a Rho-kinase inhibitor, significantly decreased both G and H but increased K(d). Following cytochalasin D, G, H, and K(d) were all elevated when mean strain increased from 10 to 20%. There were no changes in hysteresivity, G/H, under any condition. We conclude that not all aspects of the viscoelastic properties of tracheal smooth muscle strips are similar to those previously observed in cultured cells. We attribute these differences to the contribution of the extracellular matrix. Additionally, using a network model, we show that the dynamic nonlinear behavior, which has not been observed in cell culture, is associated with the state of the contractile stress and may derive from active polymerization within the cytoskeleton.

  6. Application of colloid probe atomic force microscopy to the adhesion of thin films of viscous and viscoelastic silicone fluids.

    PubMed

    Bowen, James; Cheneler, David; Andrews, James W; Avery, Andrew R; Zhang, Zhibing; Ward, Michael C L; Adams, Michael J

    2011-09-20

    The adhesive characteristics of thin films (0.2-2 μm) of linear poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) liquids with a wide range of molecular weights have been measured using an atomic force microscope with a colloid probe (diameters 5 and 12 μm) for different separation velocities. The data were consistent with a residual film in the contact region having a thickness of ∼6 nm following an extended dwell time before separation of the probe. It was possible to estimate the maximum adhesive force as a function of the capillary number, Ca, by applying existing theoretical models based on capillary interactions and viscous flow except at large values of Ca in the case of viscoelastic fluids, for which it was necessary to develop a nonlinear viscoelastic model. The compliance of the atomic force microscope colloid beam was an important factor in governing the retraction velocity of the probe and therefore the value of the adhesive force, but the inertia of the beam and viscoelastic stress overshoot effects were not significant in the range of separation velocities investigated.

  7. Viscoelastic Response (VisR) Imaging for Assessment of Viscoelasticity in Voigt Materials

    PubMed Central

    Selzo, Mallory R.; Gallippi, Caterina M.

    2014-01-01

    Viscoelastic response (VisR) imaging is presented as a new acoustic radiation force (ARF)-based elastographic imaging method. Exploiting the Voigt model, VisR imaging estimates displacement in only the ARF region of excitation from one or two successive ARF impulses to estimate τσ, the relaxation time for constant stress. Double-push VisR τσ estimates were not statistically significantly different (p < 0.02) from those of shearwave dispersion ultrasound vibrometry (SDUV) or monitored steady-state excitation recovery (MSSER) ultrasound in six homogeneous viscoelastic tissue mimicking phantoms with elastic moduli ranging from 3.92 to 15.34 kPa and coefficients of viscosity ranging from 0.87 to 14.06 Pa·s. In two-dimensional imaging, double-push VisR τσ images discriminated a viscous spherical inclusion in a structured phantom with higher CNR over a larger axial range than single-push VisR or conventional acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) ultrasound. Finally, 2-D in vivo double-push VisR images in normal canine semitendinosus muscle were compared with spatially matched histochemistry to corroborate lower double-push VisR τσ values in highly collagenated connective tissue than in muscle, suggesting double-push VisR’s in vivo relevance to diagnostic imaging, particularly in muscle. The key advantages and disadvantages to VisR, including lack of compensation for inertial terms, are discussed. PMID:24297015

  8. Characterization of microstructure, viscoelasticity, heterogeneity and ergodicity in pectin-laponite-CTAB-calcium nanocomposite hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Nidhi; Rawat, Kamla; Bohidar, H B

    2016-01-20

    In order to customize the viscoelastic properties of pectin gels, it is necessary to work on a composite platform. Herein, the gelation kinetics, and viscoelastic characterization of anionic polysaccharide pectin dispersion prepared in presence of nanoclay laponite are reported using dynamic light scattering and rheology measurements. The ratio Rg/Rh (Rg and Rh are radius of gyration and hydrodynamic radius respectively) determined from light scattering data revealed the presence of random coils of pectin chains inside the gel matrix. When nanoclay laponite was added to the pectin chains solution, two-phase separation was noticed instantaneously. Therefore, the surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide [CTAB] was added to exfoliate the clay platelets in the dispersion, and also in its gel phase. The exfoliating agent cetyltrimethylammonium bromide ([CTAB]≈ cmc/10) helped to enhance the homogeneity and stability of the pectin-clay sols and gels. The storage and loss moduli (G' and G") of the composite gel changed significantly as function of nanoclay laponite content for concentration up to 0.03% (w/v) causing the softening of the gels (gel strength reduced by close to 50%) compared to pectin-calcium gel. However, as the concentration of nanoclay laponite was maintained between 0.01% and 0.03% (w/v), the gel rigidity (G') recovered by 30% (35-45 Pa). The transition from ergodic to non-ergodic state occurred during sol-gel transition owing to the presence of the nanoclay laponite. The gelation time was not too different from the ergodicity breaking time. Thus, the presence of nanoclay laponite in such minute concentration is shown to cause considerable change in the thermo-physical property of the composite gels. This material property modulation will facilitate designing of soft gels having storage modulus continuously varying in the wide range of 10-70 Pa while keeping the gelation temperature mostly unaltered.

  9. Visco-elastic effects in strongly coupled dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bandyopadhyay, P.; Prasad, G.; Sen, A.; Kaw, P. K.

    2008-09-07

    We report on experimental evidence of visco-elastic effects in a strongly coupled dusty plasma through investigations of the propagation characteristics of low frequency dust acoustic waves and by excitations of transverse shear waves in a DC discharge Argon plasma.

  10. Viscoelastic shock wave in ballistic gelatin behind soft body armor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Fan, Yurun; Li, Wei

    2014-06-01

    Ballistic gelatins are widely used as a surrogate of biological tissue in blunt trauma tests. Non-penetration impact tests of handgun bullets on the 10wt% ballistic gelatin block behind soft armor were carried out in which a high-speed camera recorded the crater׳s movement and pressure sensors imbedded in the gelatin block recorded the pressure waves at different locations. The observed shock wave attenuation indicates the necessity of considering the gelatin׳s viscoelasticity. A three-element viscoelastic constitutive model was adopted, in which the relevant parameters were obtained via fitting the damping free oscillations at the beginning of the creep-mode of rheological measurement, and by examining the data of published split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) experiments. The viscoelastic model is determined by a retardation time of 5.5×10(-5)s for high oscillation frequencies and a stress relaxation time of 2.0-4.5×10(-7)s for shock wave attenuation. Using the characteristic-line method and the spherical wave assumption, the propagation of impact pressure wave front and the subsequent unloading profile can be simulated using the experimental velocity boundary condition. The established viscoelastic model considerably improves the prediction of shock wave attenuation in the ballistic gelatin.

  11. Stress memory effect in viscoelastic stagnant lid convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patočka, V.; Cadek, O.; Tackley, P. J.; Cizkova, H.

    2017-03-01

    Present thermo-chemical convection models of planetary evolution often assume a purely viscous or visco-plastic rheology. Ignoring elasticity in the cold, outer boundary layer is, however, questionable since elastic effects may play an important role there and affect surface topography as well as the stress distribution within the stiff cold lithosphere. Here we present a modelling study focused on the combined effects of Maxwell viscoelastic rheology and a free surface in the stagnant lid planetary convection. We implemented viscoelastic rheology in the StagYY code using a tracer-based stress advection scheme that suppresses subgrid oscillations. We apply this code to perform thermal convection models of the cooling planetary mantles and we demonstrate that while the global characteristics of the mantle flow do not change significantly when including viscoelasticity, the stress state of the cold lithosphere may be substantially different. Transient cooling of an initially thin upper thermal boundary layer results in a complex layered stress structure due to the memory effects of viscoelastic rheology. The stress state of the lid may thus contain a record of the planetary thermal evolution.

  12. Cutting edge science: Laser surgery illuminates viscoelasticity of merotelic kinetochores

    PubMed Central

    Cabello, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence in eukaryotic cells suggests that mechanical forces are essential for building a robust mitotic apparatus and correcting inappropriate chromosome attachments. In this issue, Cojoc et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol., http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201506011) use laser microsurgery in vivo to measure and study the viscoelastic properties of kinetochores. PMID:27002164

  13. Strain rate viscoelastic analysis of soft and highly hydrated biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Tirella, A; Mattei, G; Ahluwalia, A

    2014-01-01

    Measuring the viscoelastic behavior of highly hydrated biological materials is challenging because of their intrinsic softness and labile nature. In these materials, it is difficult to avoid prestress and therefore to establish precise initial stress and strain conditions for lumped parameter estimation using creep or stress-relaxation (SR) tests. We describe a method ( or epsilon dot method) for deriving the viscoelastic parameters of soft hydrated biomaterials which avoids prestress and can be used to rapidly test degradable samples. Standard mechanical tests are first performed compressing samples using different strain rates. The dataset obtained is then analyzed to mathematically derive the material's viscoelastic parameters. In this work a stable elastomer, polydimethylsiloxane, and a labile hydrogel, gelatin, were first tested using the, in parallel SR was used to compare lumped parameter estimation. After demonstrating that the elastic parameters are equivalent and that the estimation of short-time constants is more precise using the proposed method, the viscoelastic behavior of porcine liver was investigated using this approach. The results show that the constitutive parameters of hepatic tissue can be quickly quantified without the application of any prestress and before the onset of time-dependent degradation phenomena. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 102A: 3352–3360, 2014 PMID:23946054

  14. A physically-based, quasilinear viscoelasticity model for the dynamic response of polyurea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifton, Rodney J.; Wang, Xinjie; Jiao, Tong

    2016-08-01

    Polyurea, a promising material for damage mitigation in impact scenarios, has been investigated through plane-wave, pressure-shear plate impact (PSPI) experiments to obtain its mechanical response at high pressures and high strain rates. Based on these experimental results, a physically-based, quasi-linear, viscoelasticity model is introduced to capture the observed nonlinear pressure-volume behavior, the strong dependence of shearing resistance on pressure, and the strong relaxation of deviatoric stresses. This model has been implemented in finite element software ABAQUS to simulate the response of polyurea P1000 under the impact conditions of a variety of PSPI experiments. Simulation results agree reasonably well with those of the experiments.

  15. Model and Comparative Study for Flow of Viscoelastic Nanofluids with Cattaneo-Christov Double Diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Tasawar; Aziz, Arsalan; Muhammad, Taseer; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Here two classes of viscoelastic fluids have been analyzed in the presence of Cattaneo-Christov double diffusion expressions of heat and mass transfer. A linearly stretched sheet has been used to create the flow. Thermal and concentration diffusions are characterized firstly by introducing Cattaneo-Christov fluxes. Novel features regarding Brownian motion and thermophoresis are retained. The conversion of nonlinear partial differential system to nonlinear ordinary differential system has been taken into place by using suitable transformations. The resulting nonlinear systems have been solved via convergent approach. Graphs have been sketched in order to investigate how the velocity, temperature and concentration profiles are affected by distinct physical flow parameters. Numerical values of skin friction coefficient and heat and mass transfer rates at the wall are also computed and discussed. Our observations demonstrate that the temperature and concentration fields are decreasing functions of thermal and concentration relaxation parameters. PMID:28046011

  16. Viscoelastic relaxations of high alcohols and alkanes: Effects of heterogeneous structure and translation-orientation coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi

    2017-03-01

    The frequency-dependent shear viscosity of high alcohols and linear alkanes, including 1-butanol, 1-octanol, 1-dodecanol, n-hexane, n-decane, and n-tetradecane, was calculated using molecular dynamics simulation. The relaxation of all the liquids was bimodal. The correlation functions of the collective orientation were also evaluated. The analysis of these functions showed that the slower relaxation mode of alkanes is assigned to the translation-orientation coupling, while that of high alcohols is not. The X-ray structure factors of all the alcohols showed prepeaks, as have been reported in the literature, and the intermediate scattering functions were calculated at the prepeak. Comparing the intermediate scattering function with the frequency-dependent shear viscosity based on the mode-coupling theory, it was demonstrated that the slower viscoelastic relaxation of the alcohols is assigned to the relaxation of the heterogeneous structure described by the prepeak.

  17. A Comparative Study for Flow of Viscoelastic Fluids with Cattaneo-Christov Heat Flux

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Tasawar; Muhammad, Taseer; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Mustafa, Meraj

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the impact of Cattaneo-Christov heat flux in flows of viscoelastic fluids. Flow is generated by a linear stretching sheet. Influence of thermal relaxation time in the considered heat flux is seen. Mathematical formulation is presented for the boundary layer approach. Suitable transformations lead to a nonlinear differential system. Convergent series solutions of velocity and temperature are achieved. Impacts of various influential parameters on the velocity and temperature are sketched and discussed. Numerical computations are also performed for the skin friction coefficient and heat transfer rate. Our findings reveal that the temperature profile has an inverse relationship with the thermal relaxation parameter and the Prandtl number. Further the temperature profile and thermal boundary layer thickness are lower for Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model in comparison to the classical Fourier’s law of heat conduction. PMID:27176779

  18. Hall Effect on Thermal Instability of Viscoelastic Dusty Fluid in Porous Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, M.; Gupta, R. K.

    2013-08-01

    The effect of Hall currents and suspended dusty particles on the hydromagnetic stability of a compressible, electrically conducting Rivlin-Ericksen elastico viscous fluid in a porous medium is considered. Following the linearized stability theory and normal mode analysis the dispersion relation is obtained. For the case of stationary convection, Hall currents and suspended particles are found to have destabilizing effects whereas compressibility and magnetic field have stabilizing effects on the system. The medium permeability, however, has stabilizing and destabilizing effects on thermal instability in contrast to its destabilizing effect in the absence of the magnetic field. The critical Rayleigh numbers and the wave numbers of the associated disturbances for the onset of instability as stationary convection are obtained and the behavior of various parameters on critical thermal Rayleigh numbers are depicted graphically. The magnetic field, Hall currents and viscoelasticity parameter are found to introduce oscillatory modes in the systems, which did not exist in the absence of these parameters

  19. Linear Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-01

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  20. Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, John G.

    The Composites market is arguably the most challenging and profitable market for phenolic resins aside from electronics. The variety of products and processes encountered creates the challenges, and the demand for high performance in critical operations brings value. Phenolic composite materials are rendered into a wide range of components to supply a diverse and fragmented commercial base that includes customers in aerospace (Space Shuttle), aircraft (interiors and brakes), mass transit (interiors), defense (blast protection), marine, mine ducting, off-shore (ducts and grating) and infrastructure (architectural) to name a few. For example, phenolic resin is a critical adhesive in the manufacture of honeycomb sandwich panels. Various solvent and water based resins are described along with resin characteristics and the role of metal ions for enhanced thermal stability of the resin used to coat the honeycomb. Featured new developments include pultrusion of phenolic grating, success in RTM/VARTM fabricated parts, new ballistic developments for military vehicles and high char yield carbon-carbon composites along with many others. Additionally, global regional market resin volumes and sales are presented and compared with other thermosetting resin systems.