Science.gov

Sample records for linear viscoelastic properties

  1. Accurate prediction of the linear viscoelastic properties of highly entangled mono and bidisperse polymer melts.

    PubMed

    Stephanou, Pavlos S; Mavrantzas, Vlasis G

    2014-06-07

    We present a hierarchical computational methodology which permits the accurate prediction of the linear viscoelastic properties of entangled polymer melts directly from the chemical structure, chemical composition, and molecular architecture of the constituent chains. The method entails three steps: execution of long molecular dynamics simulations with moderately entangled polymer melts, self-consistent mapping of the accumulated trajectories onto a tube model and parameterization or fine-tuning of the model on the basis of detailed simulation data, and use of the modified tube model to predict the linear viscoelastic properties of significantly higher molecular weight (MW) melts of the same polymer. Predictions are reported for the zero-shear-rate viscosity η0 and the spectra of storage G'(ω) and loss G″(ω) moduli for several mono and bidisperse cis- and trans-1,4 polybutadiene melts as well as for their MW dependence, and are found to be in remarkable agreement with experimentally measured rheological data.

  2. Linear viscoelastic properties of transient networks formed by associating polymers with multiple stickers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indei, Tsutomu; Takimoto, Jun-ichi

    2010-11-01

    We have developed a single-chain theory that describes dynamics of associating polymer chains carrying multiple associative groups (or stickers) in the transient network formed by themselves and studied linear viscoelastic properties of this network. It is shown that if the average number N¯ of stickers associated with the network junction per chain is large, the terminal relaxation time τA that is proportional to τXN¯2 appears. The time τX is the interval during which an associated sticker goes back to its equilibrium position by one or more dissociation steps. In this lower frequency regime ω <1/τX, the moduli are well described in terms of the Rouse model with the longest relaxation time τA. The large value of N¯ is realized for chains carrying many stickers whose rate of association with the network junction is much larger than the dissociation rate. This associative Rouse behavior stems from the association/dissociation processes of stickers and is different from the ordinary Rouse behavior in the higher frequency regime, which is originated from the thermal segmental motion between stickers. If N¯ is not large, the dynamic shear moduli are well described in terms of the Maxwell model characterized by a single relaxation time τX in the moderate and lower frequency regimes. Thus, the transition occurs in the viscoelastic relaxation behavior from the Maxwell-type to the Rouse-type in ω <1/τX as N¯ increases. All these results are obtained under the affine deformation assumption for junction points. We also studied the effect of the junction fluctuations from the affine motion on the plateau modulus by introducing the virtual spring for bound stickers. It is shown that the plateau modulus is not affected by the junction fluctuations.

  3. A Thermodynamic Theory Of Solid Viscoelasticity. Part 1: Linear Viscoelasticity.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.; Leonov, Arkady I.

    2002-01-01

    The present series of three consecutive papers develops a general theory for linear and finite solid viscoelasticity. Because the most important object for nonlinear studies are rubber-like materials, the general approach is specified in a form convenient for solving problems important for many industries that involve rubber-like materials. General linear and nonlinear theories for non-isothermal deformations of viscoelastic solids are developed based on the quasi-linear approach of non-equilibrium thermodynamics. In this, the first paper of the series, we analyze non-isothermal linear viscoelasticity, which is applicable in a range of small strains not only to all synthetic polymers and bio-polymers but also to some non-polymeric materials. Although the linear case seems to be well developed, there still are some reasons to implement a thermodynamic derivation of constitutive equations for solid-like, non-isothermal, linear viscoelasticity. The most important is the thermodynamic modeling of thermo-rheological complexity , i.e. different temperature dependences of relaxation parameters in various parts of relaxation spectrum. A special structure of interaction matrices is established for different physical mechanisms contributed to the normal relaxation modes. This structure seems to be in accord with observations, and creates a simple mathematical framework for both continuum and molecular theories of the thermo-rheological complex relaxation phenomena. Finally, a unified approach is briefly discussed that, in principle, allows combining both the long time (discrete) and short time (continuous) descriptions of relaxation behaviors for polymers in the rubbery and glassy regions.

  4. Viscoelastic properties of the false vocal fold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Roger W.

    2004-05-01

    The biomechanical properties of vocal fold tissues have been the focus of many previous studies, as vocal fold viscoelasticity critically dictates the acoustics and biomechanics of phonation. However, not much is known about the viscoelastic response of the ventricular fold or false vocal fold. It has been shown both clinically and in computer simulations that the false vocal fold may contribute significantly to the aerodynamics and sound generation processes of human voice production, with or without flow-induced oscillation of the false fold. To better understand the potential role of the false fold in phonation, this paper reports some preliminary measurements on the linear and nonlinear viscoelastic behavior of false vocal fold tissues. Linear viscoelastic shear properties of human false fold tissue samples were measured by a high-frequency controlled-strain rheometer as a function of frequency, and passive uniaxial tensile stress-strain response of the tissue samples was measured by a muscle lever system as a function of strain and loading rate. Elastic moduli (Young's modulus and shear modulus) of the false fold tissues were calculated from the measured data. [Work supported by NIH.

  5. Viscoelastic properties of cellular polypropylene ferroelectrets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaal, Mate; Bovtun, Viktor; Stark, Wolfgang; Erhard, Anton; Yakymenko, Yuriy; Kreutzbruck, Marc

    2016-03-01

    Viscoelastic properties of cellular polypropylene ferroelectrets (PP FEs) were studied at low frequencies (0.3-33 Hz) by dynamic mechanical analysis and at high frequencies (250 kHz) by laser Doppler vibrometry. Relaxation behavior of the in-plane Young's modulus ( Y11 ' ˜ 1500 MPa at room temperature) was observed and attributed to the viscoelastic response of polypropylene matrix. The out-of-plane Young's modulus is very small ( Y33 ' ≈ 0.1 MPa) at low frequencies, frequency- and stress-dependent, evidencing nonlinear viscoelastic response of PP FEs. The high-frequency mechanical response of PP FEs is shown to be linear viscoelastic with Y33 ' ≈ 0.8 MPa. It is described by thickness vibration mode and modeled as a damped harmonic oscillator with one degree of freedom. Frequency dependence of Y33 * in the large dynamic strain regime is described by the broad Cole-Cole relaxation with a mean frequency in kHz range attributed to the dynamics of the air flow between partially closed air-filled voids in PP FEs. Switching-off the relaxation contribution causes dynamic crossover from the nonlinear viscoelastic regime at low frequencies to the linear viscoelastic regime at high frequencies. In the small strain regime, contribution of the air flow seems to be insignificant and the power-law response, attributed to the mechanics of polypropylene cell walls and closed air voids, dominates in a broad frequency range. Mechanical relaxation caused by the air flow mechanism takes place in the sound and ultrasound frequency range (10 Hz-1 MHz) and, therefore, should be taken into account in ultrasonic applications of the PP FEs deal with strong exciting or receiving signals.

  6. Modeling of linear viscoelastic space structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McTavish, D. J.; Hughes, P. C.

    1993-01-01

    The GHM Method provides viscoelastic finite elements derived from the commonly used elastic finite elements. Moreover, these GHM elements are used directly and conveniently in second-order structural models just like their elastic counterparts. The forms of the GHM element matrices preserve the definiteness properties usually associated with finite element matrices (the mass matrix is positive definite, the stiffness matrix is nonnegative definite, and the damping matrix is positive semidefinite). In the Laplace domain, material properties are modeled phenomenologically as a sum of second-order rational functions dubbed 'minioscillator' terms. Developed originally as a tool for the analysis of damping in large flexible space structures, the GHM method is applicable to any structure which incorporates viscoelastic materials.

  7. Influence of composition fluctuations on the linear viscoelastic properties of symmetric diblock copolymers near the order-disorder transition

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, Robert J.; Gillard, Timothy M.; Lodge, Timothy P.; Bates, Frank S.

    2015-08-28

    Rheological evidence of composition fluctuations in disordered diblock copolymers near the order disorder transition (ODT) has been documented in the literature over the past three decades, characterized by a failure of time–temperature superposition (tTS) to reduce linear dynamic mechanical spectroscopy (DMS) data in the terminal viscoelastic regime to a temperature-independent form. However, for some materials, most notably poly(styrene-b-isoprene) (PS–PI), no signature of these rheological features has been found. We present small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) results on symmetric poly(cyclohexylethylene-b-ethylene) (PCHE–PE) diblock copolymers that confirm the presence of fluctuations in the disordered state and DMS measurements that also show no sign of the features ascribed to composition fluctuations. Assessment of DMS results published on five different diblock copolymer systems leads us to conclude that the effects of composition fluctuations can be masked by highly asymmetric block dynamics, thereby resolving a long-standing disagreement in the literature and reinforcing the importance of mechanical contrast in understanding the dynamics of ordered and disordered block polymers.

  8. Viscoelastic properties of heavy oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas Luces, Maria Alejandra

    Rheological low frequency measurements were carried out to analyze the viscoelastic properties of four heavy oil samples. At room conditions, the heavy oil samples exhibit non-Newtonian or viscoelastic behavior since they have a viscous component and an elastic component. The latter becomes very important for temperatures below 30°C, and for seismic to ultrasonic frequencies. Above this temperature, the viscous component increases significantly in comparison to the elastic component, and for seismic frequencies heavy oils can be considered as Newtonian fluids. A new viscosity model based on the concept of activation energy was derived to predict viscosity in terms of frequency and temperature for temperatures below 60°C. A new frequency-temperature dispersion model was derived to address the variation of the complex shear modulus (G*) with frequency and temperature for the heavy oil samples. This model fits the data well for seismic and sonic frequencies but it overpredicts G* at ultrasonic frequencies.

  9. Viscoelastic properties of a synthetic meniscus implant.

    PubMed

    Shemesh, Maoz; Asher, Roy; Zylberberg, Eyal; Guilak, Farshid; Linder-Ganz, Eran; Elsner, Jonathan J

    2014-01-01

    There are significant potential advantages for restoration of meniscal function using a bio-stable synthetic implant that combines long-term durability with a dependable biomechanical performance resembling that of the natural meniscus. A novel meniscus implant made of a compliant polycarbonate-urethane matrix reinforced with high modulus ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene fibers was designed as a composite structure that mimics the structural elements of the natural medial meniscus. The overall success of such an implant is linked on its capability to replicate the stress distribution in the knee over the long-term. As this function of the device is directly dependent on its mechanical properties, changes to the material due to exposure to the joint environment and repeated loading could have non-trivial influences on the viscoelastic properties of the implant. Thus, the goal of this study was to measure and characterize the strain-rate response, as well as the viscoelastic properties of the implant as measured by creep, stress relaxation, and hysteresis after simulated use, by subjecting the implant to realistic joint loads up to 2 million cycles in a joint-like setting. The meniscus implant behaved as a non-linear viscoelastic material. The implant underwent minimal plastic deformation after 2 million fatigue loading cycles. Under low compressive loads, the implant was fairly flexible, and able to deform relatively easily (E=120-200 kPa). However as the compressive load applied on the implant was increased, the implant became stiffer (E=3.8-5.2 MPa), to resist deformation. The meniscus implant appears well-matched to the viscoelastic properties of the natural meniscus, and importantly, these properties were found to remain stable and minimally affected by potentially degradative and loading conditions associated with long-term use.

  10. Viscoelastic properties of oat ß-glucan-rich aqueous dispersions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    C-trim is a healthy food product containing the dietary of soluble fiber ß-glucan. The suspension of C-trim in water is a hydrocolloid biopolymer. The linear and non-linear rheological properties for suspensions of C-trim biopolymers were investigated. The linear viscoelastic behaviors for C-trim...

  11. Viscoelastic properties of Ionomer Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Monojoy; Kumar, Sanat

    2007-03-01

    Viscoelastic prperties of a model telechelic ionomer, i.e., a melt of non-polar polymers with a charge at each chain end along with neutralizing counterions, have been examined using molecular dynamics simulation. Equlibrium calculation of the loss modulus G^''(φ) and storage modulus G^'(φ) shows plateau at lower temperatures when the systems are not relaxed. In this situation the specific heat (Cv) peak corresponds to the self-assembly of the system, at lower temperatures the specific heat begins to plateau. Similarities of the dynamic features found for telechelic melts with those observed in glass-forming liquids and entangled polymers have been shown. Furthremore, using an athermal 'probe', the properties of these materials is being distinctly classified as 'strong' glass or physical gels.

  12. A log-linearized arterial viscoelastic model for evaluation of the carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Harutoyo; Horiuchi, Tetsuya; Kutluk, Abdugheni; Kurita, Yuichi; Ukawa, Teiji; Nakamura, Ryuji; Saeki, Noboru; Higashi, Yukihito; Kawamoto, Masashi; Yoshizumi, Masao; Tsuji, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a method for qualitatively estimating the mechanical properties of arterial walls on a beat-to-beat basis through noninvasive measurement of continuous arterial pressure and arterial diameter using an ultrasonic device. First, in order to describe the nonlinear relationships linking arterial pressure waveforms and arterial diameter waveforms as well as the viscoelastic characteristics of arteries, we developed a second-order nonlinear model (called the log-linearized arterial viscoelastic model) to allow estimation of arterial wall viscoelasticity. Next, to verify the validity of the proposed method, the viscoelastic indices of the carotid artery were estimated. The results showed that the proposed model can be used to accurately approximate the mechanical properties of arterial walls. It was therefore deemed suitable for qualitative evaluation of arterial viscoelastic properties based on noninvasive measurement of arterial pressure and arterial diameter.

  13. Viscoelastic properties of levan polysaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noll, Kenneth; Rende, Deniz; Ozisik, Rahmi; Toksoy-Oner, Ebru

    2014-03-01

    Levan is a naturally occurring polysaccharide that is composed of β-D-fructofuranose units with β(2-6) linkages between fructose rings. It is synthesized by the action of a secreted levansucrase (EC 2.4.1.10) that converts sucrose into the levan externally (exopolysaccharide). Levan is a homopolysaccharide that is non-toxic, water soluble,, and has anti-tumor activity and low immunological response. Therefore, levan presents great potential to be used as a novel functional biopolymer in foods, feeds, cosmetics, pharmaceutical and chemical industries. Despite these favorable properties, levan has a moderately low mechanical properties and poor film forming capability. In the current study, the agglomeration behavior of levan in water and in saline solutions was investigated at 298 and 310 K by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The viscoelastic properties of neat and oxidized levan films were studied via nanoindentation experiments in the quasi-static and dynamic modes The material is partially based upon work supported by NSF under Grant Nos. 1200270 and 1003574, and TUBITAK 111M232.

  14. Geometrically-linear and nonlinear analysis of linear viscoelastic composites using the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerand, Daniel C.

    Over the past several decades, the use of composite materials has grown considerably. Typically, fiber-reinforced polymer-matrix composites are modeled as being linear elastic. However, it is well-known that polymers are viscoelastic in nature. Furthermore, the analysis of complex structures requires a numerical approach such as the finite element method. In the present work, a triangular flat shell element for linear elastic composites is extended to model linear viscoelastic composites. Although polymers are usually modeled as being incompressible, here they are modeled as compressible. Furthermore, the macroscopic constitutive properties for fiber-reinforced composites are assumed to be known and are not determined using the matrix and fiber properties along with the fiber volume fraction. Hygrothermo-rheologically simple materials are considered for which a change in the hygrothermal environment results in a horizontal shifting of the relaxation moduli curves on a log time scale, in addition to the usual hygrothermal loads. Both the temperature and moisture are taken to be prescribed. Hence, the heat energy generated by the viscoelastic deformations is not considered. When the deformations and rotations are small under an applied load history, the usual engineering stress and strain measures can be used and the time history of a viscoelastic deformation process is determined using the original geometry of the structure. If, however, sufficiently large loads are applied, the deflections and rotations will be large leading to changes in the structural stiffness characteristics and possibly the internal loads carried throughout the structure. Hence, in such a case, nonlinear effects must be taken into account and the appropriate stress and strain measures must be used. Although a geometrically-nonlinear finite element code could always be used to compute geometrically-linear deformation processes, it is inefficient to use such a code for small deformations, due to

  15. Semi-analytical computation of displacement in linear viscoelastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinu, S.; Gradinaru, D.

    2015-11-01

    Prediction of mechanical contact performance based on elastic models is not accurate in case of viscoelastic materials; however, a closed-form description of the viscoelastic contact has yet to be found. This paper aims to advance a semi-analytical method for computation of displacement induced in viscoelastic materials by arbitrary surface tractions, as a prerequisite to a semi-analytical solution for the viscoelastic contact problem. The newly advanced model is expected to provide greater generality, allowing for arbitrary contact geometry and / or arbitrary loading history. While time-independent equations in the purely elastic model can be treated numerically by imposing a spatial discretization only, a viscoelastic constitutive law requires supplementary temporal discretization capable of simulating the memory effect specific to viscoelastic materials. By deriving new influence coefficients, computation of displacement induced in a viscoelastic material by a known but otherwise arbitrary history of surface tractions can be achieved via superposition authorized by the Boltzmann superposition theory applicable in the frame of linear viscoelasticity.

  16. Viscoelastic properties of vis-breaking polypropylenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobile, Maria Rossella; Moad, Graeme; Habsuda, Jana; Li, Guoxin; Nichols, Lance; Dagley, Ian; Simon, George P.

    2015-12-01

    In this work hydrogen peroxide is used as a green initiator to cause scissioning of polypropylene (PP) with water as the only by-product replacing the organic peroxides that are usually used. The rheological properties of a commercial polypropylene and of the scissioned samples are determined by dynamic rheology and an inversion procedure for converting the linear viscoelastic data into molar mass distribution has been adopted. The results presented show that the molar mass distribution of the PP polymer is narrowed on scissioning. The process is found to produce polymers similar in molecular architecture and behavior to organic peroxide cleaved materials, the results of which are given as a comparison in this work.

  17. Viscoelastic properties of polymer composites during processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Daniel James

    Residual stresses that are induced during processing of polymer matrix composites lead to warpage of structural parts and can produce microcracks and other forms of damage. Process models that track the development of residual stresses in composites during processing have received growing attention in recent years. An accurate and easy to implement simulation will help lower the manufacturing cost by enabling engineers to predict and prevent the warpage in parts due to residual stress. The critical feature of a process model is the development of an accurate material model to predict mechanical properties throughout the entire manufacturing cycle. Material models are very complex since the matrix changes from a fluid to a viscoelastic solid at the end of cure. In this work several aspects of the curing, viscoelastic, and cure shrinkage behavior of an aerospace grade epoxy resin were characterized and modeled for the purpose of composites process modeling. Measurement of matrix viscoelastic properties during cure was accomplished through two experimental approaches, each suited to a particular range of cure states. To investigate the material behavior during later stages of cure after gelation, small beam specimens were tested in three-point bending. During early stages of curing, samples were examined by shearing the material between parallel plates in a rheometer. Specimens for each configuration were manufactured at several cure states and tested at a range of temperatures. These data were used to develop a material model to predict the relaxation modulus of the matrix at any time during cure. Additionally, moire interferometry was successfully applied to the measurement of the viscoelastic Poisson's ratio of the matrix through its entire glassy-to-rubbery transition. The matrix viscoelastic material models were then used to predict composite viscoelastic properties and correlated with experimental results. In addition, the viscoelastic shrinkage behavior of the

  18. A geometrically nonlinear shell element for hygrothermorheologically simple linear viscoelastic composites

    SciTech Connect

    HAMMERAND,DANIEL C.; KAPANIA,RAKESH K.

    2000-05-01

    A triangular flat shell element for large deformation analysis of linear viscoelastic laminated composites is presented. Hygrothermorheologically simple materials are considered for which a change in the hygrothermal environment results in a horizontal shifting of the relaxation moduli curves on a log time scale, in addition to the usual hygrothermal loads. Recurrence relations are developed and implemented for the evaluation of the viscoelastic memory loads. The nonlinear deformation process is computed using an incremental/iterative approach with the Newton-Raphson Method used to find the incremental displacements in each step. The presented numerical examples consider the large deformation and stability of linear viscoelastic structures under deformation-independent mechanical loads, deformation-dependent pressure loads, and thermal loads. Unlike elastic structures that have a single critical load value associated with a given snapping of buckling instability phenomenon, viscoelastic structures will usually exhibit a particular instability for a range of applied loads over a range of critical times. Both creep buckling and snap-through examples are presented here. In some cases, viscoelastic results are also obtained using the quasielastic method in which load-history effects are ignored, and time-varying viscoelastic properties are simply used in a series of elastic problems. The presented numerical examples demonstrate the capability and accuracy of the formulation.

  19. Anisotropy of bituminous mixture in the linear viscoelastic domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Benedetto, Hervé; Sauzéat, Cédric; Clec'h, Pauline

    2016-08-01

    Some anisotropic properties in the linear viscoelastic domain of bituminous mixtures compacted with a French LPC wheel compactor are highlighted in this paper. Bituminous mixture is generally considered as isotropic even if the compaction process on road or in laboratory induces anisotropic properties. Tension-compression complex modulus tests have been performed on parallelepipedic specimens in two directions: (i) direction of compactor wheel movement (direction I, which is horizontal) and (ii) direction of compaction (direction II, which is vertical). These tests consist in measuring sinusoidal axial and lateral strains as well as sinusoidal axial stress, when sinusoidal axial loading is applied on the specimen. Different loading frequencies and temperatures are applied. Two complex moduli, EI ^{*} and E_{II}^{*}, and four complex Poisson's ratios, ν_{{II-I}}^{*}, ν_{{III-I}}^{*}, ν_{{I-II}}^{*} and ν_{{III-II}}^{*}, were obtained. The vertical direction appears softer than the other ones for the highest frequencies. There are very few differences between the two directions I and II for parameters concerning viscous effects (phase angles φ(EI) and φ(E_{II}), and shift factors). The four Poisson's ratios reveal anisotropic properties but rheological tensor can be considered as symmetric when considering very similar values obtained for the two measured parameters (I-II and II-I)

  20. Viscoelastic properties of laryngeal posturing muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alipour, Fariborz; Hunter, Eric; Titze, Ingo

    2003-10-01

    Viscoelastic properties of canine laryngeal muscles were measured in a series of in vitro experiments. Laryngeal posturing that controls vocal fold length and adduction/abduction is an essential component of the voice production. The dynamics of posturing depends on the viscoelastic and physiological properties of the laryngeal muscles. The time-dependent and nonlinear behaviors of these tissues are also crucial in the voice production and pitch control theories. The lack of information on some of these muscles such as posterior cricoarytenoid muscle (PCA), lateral cricoarytenoid muscle (LCA), and intraarytenoid muscle (IA) was the major incentive for this study. Samples of PCA and LCA muscles were made from canine larynges and mounted on a dual-servo system (Ergometer) as described in our previous works. Two sets of experiments were conducted on each muscle, a 1-Hz stretch and release experiment that provides stress-strain data and a stress relaxation test. Data from these muscles were fitted to viscoelastic models and Young's modulus and viscoelastic constants are obtained for each muscle. Preliminary data indicates that elastics properties of these muscles are similar to those of thyroarytenoid and cricothyroid muscles. The relaxation response of these muscles also shows some similarity to other laryngeal muscles in terms of time constants.

  1. Measurement of viscoelastic properties at small length scales for heterogeneous and nonlinear materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fang

    In this dissertation, advances in linear and non-linear viscoelastic analysis and experimentation have been employed to investigate the properties of materials using nanoindentation. In the first study, a general linear-viscoelastic model was developed to measure the properties of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) using a flat punch indenter. Subsequently, linear viscoelastic nanoindentation was used to measure the young's relaxation modulus of a locally-heterogeneous thermally-aged bismaleimide resin using a Berkovich indenter. Nanoindentation measurements were conducted on both surface and cross section of aged bismaleimide resin specimens with different aging time at 200°C and 300°C respectively to extract the oxidation effect of sample under high temperatures. Finally, nanoindentation measurements were made on human tympanic membrane specimens with using a spherical nanoindenter tip in direct contact with the collagen fiber layer. Linear viscoelastic analysis was conducted to extract the Young's relaxation modulus distributions. The study also focused on the development of non-linear viscoelastic analysis of indentation experiments. Despite the fact that the nanoindentation technique is well established for the characterization of elasto-plastic materials, nanoindentation on viscoelastic materials is not fully understood especially in nonlinear viscoelastic region. In the dissertation, a nonlinear viscoelastic model was developed and implemented in Abaqus/Implicit Code to analyze the nonlinear visceoelastic behavior of polyvinyl acetate (PVA) under nanoindentation.

  2. A simple-shear rheometer for linear viscoelastic characterization of vocal fold tissues at phonatory frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Roger W.; Rodriguez, Maritza L.

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies reporting the linear viscoelastic shear properties of the human vocal fold cover or mucosa have been based on torsional rheometry, with measurements limited to low audio frequencies, up to around 80 Hz. This paper describes the design and validation of a custom-built, controlled-strain, linear, simple-shear rheometer system capable of direct empirical measurements of viscoelastic shear properties at phonatory frequencies. A tissue specimen was subjected to simple shear between two parallel, rigid acrylic plates, with a linear motor creating a translational sinusoidal displacement of the specimen via the upper plate, and the lower plate transmitting the harmonic shear force resulting from the viscoelastic response of the specimen. The displacement of the specimen was measured by a linear variable differential transformer whereas the shear force was detected by a piezoelectric transducer. The frequency response characteristics of these system components were assessed by vibration experiments with accelerometers. Measurements of the viscoelastic shear moduli (G′ and G″) of a standard ANSI S2.21 polyurethane material and those of human vocal fold cover specimens were made, along with estimation of the system signal and noise levels. Preliminary results showed that the rheometer can provide valid and reliable rheometric data of vocal fold lamina propria specimens at frequencies of up to around 250 Hz, well into the phonatory range. PMID:18681608

  3. Viscoelastic Properties of Vitreous Gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirouz Kavehpour, H.; Sharif-Kashani, Pooria

    2010-11-01

    We studied the rheological properties of porcine vitreous humor using a stressed-control shear rheometer. All experiments were performed in a closed environment at body temperature to mimic in-vivo conditions. We modeled the creep deformation using a two-element retardation spectrum model. By associating each element of the model to an individual biopolymeric system in the vitreous gel, a separate response to the applied stress was obtained from each component. The short time scale was associated with the collagen structure, while the longer time scale was related to the microfibrilis and hyaluronan network. We were able to distinguish the role of each main component from the overall rheological properties. Knowledge of this correlation enables us to relate the physical properties of vitreous to its pathology, as well as optimize surgical procedures such as vitrectomy.

  4. Linear orthotropic viscoelasticity model for fiber reinforced thermoplastic material based on Prony series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Vitor Takashi; de Carvalho Pereira, José Carlos

    2016-09-01

    Material properties description and understanding are essential aspects when computational solid mechanics is applied to product development. In order to promote injected fiber reinforced thermoplastic materials for structural applications, it is very relevant to develop material characterization procedures, considering mechanical properties variation in terms of fiber orientation and loading time. Therefore, a methodology considering sample manufacturing, mechanical tests and data treatment is described in this study. The mathematical representation of the material properties was solved by a linear viscoelastic constitutive model described by Prony series, which was properly adapted to orthotropic materials. Due to the large number of proposed constitutive model coefficients, a parameter identification method was employed to define mathematical functions. This procedure promoted good correlation among experimental tests, and analytical and numerical creep models. Such results encourage the use of numerical simulations for the development of structural components with the proposed linear viscoelastic orthotropic constitutive model. A case study was presented to illustrate an industrial application of proposed methodology.

  5. Elastic and viscoelastic properties of a type I collagen fiber.

    PubMed

    Sopakayang, Ratchada; De Vita, Raffaella; Kwansa, Albert; Freeman, Joseph W

    2012-01-21

    A new mathematical model is presented to describe the elastic and viscoelastic properties of a single collagen fiber. The model is formulated by accounting for the mechanical contribution of the collagen fiber's main constituents: the microfibrils, the interfibrillar matrix and crosslinks. The collagen fiber is modeled as a linear elastic spring, which represents the mechanical contribution of the microfibrils, and an arrangement in parallel of elastic springs and viscous dashpots, which represent the mechanical contributions of the crosslinks and interfibrillar matrix, respectively. The linear elastic spring and the arrangement in parallel of elastic springs and viscous dashpots are then connected in series. The crosslinks are assumed to gradually break under strain and, consequently, the interfibrillar is assumed to change its viscous properties. Incremental stress relaxation tests are conducted on dry collagen fibers reconstituted from rat tail tendons to determine their elastic and viscoelastic properties. The elastic and total stress-strain curves and the stress relaxation at different levels of strain collected by performing these tests are then used to estimate the parameters of the model and evaluate its predictive capabilities.

  6. VISCOELASTIC PROPERTIES OF A BIOLOGICAL HYDROGEL PRODUCED FROM SOYBEAN OIL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrogels formed from biopolymers or natural sources have special advantages because of their biodegradable and biocompatible properties. The viscoelastic properties of a newly developed biological hydrogel made from modified vegetable oil, epoxidized soybean oil (ESO) were investigated. The mater...

  7. Measurement of the linear viscoelastic behavior of antimisting kerosene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferry, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements of dynamic viscoelastic properties in very small oscillating shear deformations was made on solutions of a jet fuel, Jet A, containing an antimisting polymeric additive, FM-9. A few measurements were also made on solutions of FM-9 in a mixed solvent of mineral oil, Tetralin, and 0-terphenyl. Two samples of FM-9 had approximate number-average molecular weights of 12,000,000 and 8,100,000 as deduced from analysis of the measurements. The ranges of variables were 2.42 to 4.03 g/1 in concentration (0.3 to 0.5% by weight), 1 to 35 in temperature, 1.3 to 9.4 cp in solvent viscosity, and 103 to 6100 Hz in frequency. Measurements in the Jet A solvent were made both with and without a modifying carrier. The results were compared with the Zimm theory and the viscoelastic behavior was found to resemble rather closely that of ordinary non-polar polymers in theta solvents. The relation of the results to the antithixotropic behavior of such solutions a high shear rates is discussed in terms of intramolecular and intermolecular interactions.

  8. [Viscoelastic properties of relaxed papillary muscle at physiological hypertrophy].

    PubMed

    Smoliuk, L T; Lisin, R V; Kuznetsov, D A; Protsenko, Iu L

    2012-01-01

    Viscoelastic properties of relaxed rat papillary muscles at physiological hypertrophy (intensive swimming for 5 weeks) have been obtained. It has been ascertained that viscoelastic properties of hypertrophied muscles are not significantly distinguished from those of control papillary muscles. A three-dimensional model of myocardial fascicle has been verified in compliance with experimental data of biomechanical tests of hypertrophied muscles. Elastic and viscous parameters of structural elements of the model negligibly differ from the parameters of the model of a control muscle. It is shown that physiological hypertrophy has a slight influence on viscoelastic properties of papillary muscles.

  9. Viscoelastic effective properties of two types of heterogeneous materials.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornet, Jan; Dabrowski, Marcin; Schmid, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    In the past, a lot of efforts have been put to describe two end cases of rock behaviors: elasticity and viscosity. In recent years, more focus has been brought on the intermediate viscoelastic cases which describe better the rheology of rocks such as shales. Shales are typically heterogeneous and the question arises as to how to derive their effective properties so that they can be approximated as homogeneous media. This question has already been dealt with at the elastic and viscous limit but still remains for some cases in between. Using MILAMIN, a fast finite element solver for large problems, we numerically investigate different approaches to derive the effective properties of several viscoelastic media. Two types of geometries are considered: layered and inclusion based media. We focus on two dimensional plane strain problems considering two phase composites deformed under pure shear. We start by investigating the case of transversely isotropic layered media made of two Maxwell materials. Using the Backus averaging method we discuss the degree of relevance of this averaging by considering some parameters as: layer periodicity, layer thickness and layer interface roughness. Other averaging methods are also discussed which provide a broader perspective on the performances of Backus averaging. In a second part we move on to inclusion based models. The advantage of these models compared to the previous one is that they provide a better approximation to real microstructures in rocks. The setup we consider in this part is the following: some viscous circular inclusions are embedded in an elastic matrix. Both the inclusions and the matrix are homogeneous but the inclusions are purely isotropic while the matrix can also be anisotropic. In order to derive the effective viscoelastic properties of the medium we use two approaches: the self-consistent averaging and the differential effective medium theory. The idea behind self-consistency is to assume that the inclusions

  10. Generalization of the ordinary state-based peridynamic model for isotropic linear viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delorme, Rolland; Tabiai, Ilyass; Laberge Lebel, Louis; Lévesque, Martin

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a generalization of the original ordinary state-based peridynamic model for isotropic linear viscoelasticity. The viscoelastic material response is represented using the thermodynamically acceptable Prony series approach. It can feature as many Prony terms as required and accounts for viscoelastic spherical and deviatoric components. The model was derived from an equivalence between peridynamic viscoelastic parameters and those appearing in classical continuum mechanics, by equating the free energy densities expressed in both frameworks. The model was simplified to a uni-dimensional expression and implemented to simulate a creep-recovery test. This implementation was finally validated by comparing peridynamic predictions to those predicted from classical continuum mechanics. An exact correspondence between peridynamics and the classical continuum approach was shown when the peridynamic horizon becomes small, meaning peridynamics tends toward classical continuum mechanics. This work provides a clear and direct means to researchers dealing with viscoelastic phenomena to tackle their problem within the peridynamic framework.

  11. Dynamic tensile properties of bovine periodontal ligament: A nonlinear viscoelastic model.

    PubMed

    Oskui, Iman Z; Hashemi, Ata

    2016-03-21

    As a support to the tooth, the mechanical response of the periodontal ligament (PDL) is complex. Like other connective tissues, the PDL exhibits non-linear and time-dependent behavior. The viscoelasticity of the PDL plays a significant role in low and high loading rates. Little information, however, is available on the short-term viscoelastic behavior of the PDL. Also, due to the highly non-linear stress-strain response, it was hypothesized that the dynamic viscoelastic properties of the PDL would be greatly dependent on the preload. Therefore, the present study was designed to explore the dynamic tensile properties of the bovine PDL as a function of loading frequency and preload. The in vitro dynamic tensile tests were performed over a wide range of frequencies (0.01-100Hz) with dynamic force amplitude of 1N and different preloads of 3, 5 and 10N. The generalized Maxwell model was utilized to describe the non-linear viscoelastic behavior of the PDL. The low loss factor of the bovine PDL, measured between 0.04 and 0.08, indicates low energy dissipation due to the high content of collagen fibers. Moreover, the influence of viscous components in the linear region of the stress-strain curve (10N preload) was lower than those of the toe region (3N preload). The data reported in this study could be used in developing accurate computational models of the PDL.

  12. Characterization of damping properties of nonlinear viscoelastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganeriwala, Surendra N.

    1995-05-01

    The dynamic behavior of most polymeric materials become non-linear at a moderately large strain amplitude excitation. In order to optimize their uses for noise and vibration attenuation, it is necessary to characterize their damping properties as a function of strain amplitude. This work reports the strain amplitude dependent non-linear dynamic behavior of two elastomer compounds, NBR and Neoprene, studied at various frequencies and strain amplitudes using the Fourier transform mechanical analysis (FTMA) technique, developed by us. The basic theory and experimental results are presented for a one-dimensional isothermal simple shear deformation. The Green-Rivlin constitutive equation was used to model the observed behavior. The results indicate that a complete characterization of non-linear dynamic properties is rather complex. The energy dissipation is governed, however, by a simple mechanism. It is shown that the energy dissipation is governed only by the first harmonic loss modulus term of the Green-Rivlin representation, but the energy storage is related to many material functions. An expression for the energy dissipation of a non-linear viscoelastic material is derived. It is also shown that irrespective of the material constitutive law the energy dissipation can occur only at the frequency of excitation but it can be stored in a complex manner. The results are rather generalized to show that the amplitude dependence can be modeled by a power law function. It is also shown that an examination of the stress Fourier spectra can give a quantitative indication of material non-linearity and suggest a direction for developing an adequate model of these complex materials.

  13. Viscoelastic properties of healthy human artery measured in saline solution by AFM based indentation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Lundkvist, A.; Lilleodden, E.; Sickhaus, W.; Kinney, J.; Pruitt, L.; Balooch, M.

    1998-02-09

    Using an Atomic Force Microscope with an attachment for indentation, we have measured local, in vitro mechanical properties of healthy femoral artery tissue held in saline solution. The elastic modulus (34. 3 kPa) and viscoelastic response ({tau}sub{epsilon} {equals} 16.9 s and {tau}sub{sigma} {equals} 29.3 s) of the unstretched,intimal vessel wall have been determined using Sneddon theory and a three element model(standard linear solid) for viscoelastic materials. The procedures necessary to employ the indenting attachment to detect elastic moduli in the kPa range in liquid are described.

  14. Micromechanics of transformation fields in ageing linear viscoelastic composites: effects of phase dissolution or precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honorio, Tulio

    2017-02-01

    Transformation fields, in an affine formulation characterizing mechanical behavior, describe a variety of physical phenomena regardless their origin. Different composites, notably geomaterials, present a viscoelastic behavior, which is, in some cases of industrial interest, ageing, i.e. it evolves independently with respect to time and loading time. Here, a general formulation of the micromechanics of prestressed or prestrained composites in Ageing Linear Viscoelasticity (ALV) is presented. Emphasis is put on the estimation of effective transformation fields in ALV. The result generalizes Ageing Linear Thermo- and Poro-Viscoelasticity and it can be used in approaches coping with a phase transformation. Additionally, the results are extended to the case of locally transforming materials due to non-coupled dissolution and/or precipitation of a given (elastic or viscoelastic) phase. The estimations of locally transforming composites can be made with respect to different morphologies. As an application, estimations of the coefficient of thermal expansion of a hydrating alite paste are presented.

  15. Viscoelastic properties of high solids softwood kraft black liquors

    SciTech Connect

    Zaman, A.A.; Fricke, A.L. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1995-01-01

    The linear viscoelastic functions of several softwood slash pine kraft black liquors from a two level, four variable factorially designed pulping experiment were determined for solids concentrations from 65% to 81% and temperatures from 40 to 85 C. At high solids and lower temperatures, black liquors behave like un-cross-linked polymers.The exact level of dynamic viscosity and storage modulus at any given condition is dependent upon the solids composition which will vary from liquor to liquor. The linear viscoelastic functions were described using Cross and Carreau-Yasuda models. Superposition principles developed for polymer melts and concentrated polymer solutions were applied to obtain reduced correlations for dynamic viscosity and storage modulus. The data for dynamic viscosity were shifted over the whole range of temperature, solids concentrations, and frequency, and a single curve for dynamic viscosity behavior of every liquor was obtained. The data for storage modulus did not superimpose into a single curve for the effects of solids concentration. The reduced correlations were used to estimate the viscoelasticity of the liquors near normal firing conditions and found that black liquors will not have any problem in droplet formation for concentrations up to 81% solids and temperatures above 120 C. The viscometric and linear viscoelastic functions of black liquors were compared (Cox-Merz rule), and it was shown that at sufficiently low shear rates and frequencies both shear viscosity and the magnitude of the complex viscosity approach zero shear rate viscosity.

  16. An axisymmetric boundary integral model for incompressible linear viscoelasticity: application to the micropipette aspiration contact problem.

    PubMed

    Haider, M A; Guilak, F

    2000-06-01

    The micropipette aspiration test has been used extensively in recent years as a means of quantifying cellular mechanics and molecular interactions at the microscopic scale. However, previous studies have generally modeled the cell as an infinite half-space in order to develop an analytical solution for a viscoelastic solid cell. In this study, an axisymmetric boundary integral formulation of the governing equations of incompressible linear viscoelasticity is presented and used to simulate the micropipette aspiration contact problem. The cell is idealized as a homogeneous and isotropic continuum with constitutive equation given by three-parameter (E, tau 1, tau 2) standard linear viscoelasticity. The formulation is used to develop a computational model via a "correspondence principle" in which the solution is written as the sum of a homogeneous (elastic) part and a nonhomogeneous part, which depends only on past values of the solution. Via a time-marching scheme, the solution of the viscoelastic problem is obtained by employing an elastic boundary element method with modified boundary conditions. The accuracy and convergence of the time-marching scheme are verified using an analytical solution. An incremental reformulation of the scheme is presented to facilitate the simulation of micropipette aspiration, a nonlinear contact problem. In contrast to the halfspace model (Sato et al., 1990), this computational model accounts for nonlinearities in the cell response that result from a consideration of geometric factors including the finite cell dimension (radius R), curvature of the cell boundary, evolution of the cell-micropipette contact region, and curvature of the edges of the micropipette (inner radius a, edge curvature radius epsilon). Using 60 quadratic boundary elements, a micropipette aspiration creep test with ramp time t* = 0.1 s and ramp pressure p*/E = 0.8 is simulated for the cases a/R = 0.3, 0.4, 0.5 using mean parameter values for primary chondrocytes

  17. Identification of the Hereditary Kernels of Isotropic Linear Viscoelastic Materials in Combined Stress State. 2. Proportional deviators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golub, V. P.; Maslov, B. P.; Fernati, P. V.

    2016-11-01

    The relationships between the hereditary and creep kernels are established. The hereditary kernels define the scalar properties of isotropic linear viscoelastic materials in a combined stress state. The creep kernels are obtained in uniaxial-tension and pure-torsion tests. The constitutive equations are chosen so as to meet the hypothesis of proportional deviators. The problems of analyzing the creep deformation and stress relaxation of thin-walled tubular specimens under combined tension and torsion are solved and tested experimentally

  18. Linear and Nonlinear Viscoelastic Modeling of Aorta and Carotid Pressure-Area Dynamics under in vivo and ex vivo Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Valdez-Jasso, Daniela; Bia, Daniel; Zócalo, Yanina; Armentano, Ricardo L.; Haider, Mansoor A.; Olufsen, Mette S.

    2013-01-01

    A better understanding of the biomechanical properties of the arterial wall provides important insight into arterial vascular biology under normal (healthy) and pathological conditions. This insight has potential to improve tracking of disease progression and to aid in vascular graft design and implementation. In this study, we use linear and nonlinear viscoelastic models to predict biomechanical properties of the thoracic descending aorta and the carotid artery under ex vivo and in vivo conditions in ovine and human arteries. Models analyzed include a four-parameter (linear) Kelvin viscoelastic model and two five-parameter nonlinear viscoelastic models (an arctangent and a sigmoid model) that relate changes in arterial blood pressure to the vessel cross-sectional area (via estimation of vessel strain). These models were developed using the framework of Quasilinear Viscoelasticity (QLV) theory and were validated using measurements from the thoracic descending aorta and the carotid artery obtained from human and ovine arteries. In vivo measurements were obtained from ten ovine aortas and ten human carotid arteries. Ex vivo measurements (from both locations) were made in eleven male Merino sheep. Biomechanical properties were obtained through constrained estimation of model parameters. To further investigate the parameter estimates we computed standard errors and confidence intervals and we used analysis of variance to compare results within and between groups. Overall, our results indicate that optimal model selection depends on the arterial type. Results showed that for the thoracic descending aorta (under both experimental conditions) the best predictions were obtained with the nonlinear sigmoid model, while under healthy physiological pressure loading the carotid arteries nonlinear stiffening with increasing pressure is negligible, and consequently, the linear (Kelvin) viscoelastic model better describes the pressure-area dynamics in this vessel. Results

  19. Fractional characteristic times and dissipated energy in fractional linear viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colinas-Armijo, Natalia; Di Paola, Mario; Pinnola, Francesco P.

    2016-08-01

    In fractional viscoelasticity the stress-strain relation is a differential equation with non-integer operators (derivative or integral). Such constitutive law is able to describe the mechanical behavior of several materials, but when fractional operators appear, the elastic and the viscous contribution are inseparable and the characteristic times (relaxation and retardation time) cannot be defined. This paper aims to provide an approach to separate the elastic and the viscous phase in the fractional stress-strain relation with the aid of an equivalent classical model (Kelvin-Voigt or Maxwell). For such equivalent model the parameters are selected by an optimization procedure. Once the parameters of the equivalent model are defined, characteristic times of fractional viscoelasticity are readily defined as ratio between viscosity and stiffness. In the numerical applications, three kinds of different excitations are considered, that is, harmonic, periodic, and pseudo-stochastic. It is shown that, for any periodic excitation, the equivalent models have some important features: (i) the dissipated energy per cycle at steady-state coincides with the Staverman-Schwarzl formulation of the fractional model, (ii) the elastic and the viscous coefficients of the equivalent model are strictly related to the storage and the loss modulus, respectively.

  20. Viscoelastic and optical properties of four different PDMS polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deguchi, Shinji; Hotta, Junya; Yokoyama, Sho; Matsui, Tsubasa S.

    2015-09-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is the most commonly used silicone elastomer with a wide range of applications including microfluidics and microcontact printing. Various types of PDMS are currently available, and their bulk material properties have been extensively investigated. However, because the properties are rarely compared in a single study, it is often unclear whether the large disparity of the reported data is attributable to the difference in methodology or to their intrinsic characteristics. Here we report on viscoelastic properties and optical properties of four different PDMS polymers, i.e. Sylgard-184, CY52-276, SIM-360, and KE-1606. Our results show that all the PDMSs are highly elastic rather than viscoelastic at the standard base/curing agent ratios, and their quantified elastic modulus, refractive index, and optical cleanness are similar but distinct in magnitude.

  1. The analytical representation of viscoelastic material properties using optimization techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, S. A.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents a technique to model viscoelastic material properties with a function of the form of the Prony series. Generally, the method employed to determine the function constants requires assuming values for the exponential constants of the function and then resolving the remaining constants through linear least-squares techniques. The technique presented here allows all the constants to be analytically determined through optimization techniques. This technique is employed in a computer program named PRONY and makes use of commercially available optimization tool developed by VMA Engineering, Inc. The PRONY program was utilized to compare the technique against previously determined models for solid rocket motor TP-H1148 propellant and V747-75 Viton fluoroelastomer. In both cases, the optimization technique generated functions that modeled the test data with at least an order of magnitude better correlation. This technique has demonstrated the capability to use small or large data sets and to use data sets that have uniformly or nonuniformly spaced data pairs. The reduction of experimental data to accurate mathematical models is a vital part of most scientific and engineering research. This technique of regression through optimization can be applied to other mathematical models that are difficult to fit to experimental data through traditional regression techniques.

  2. Nonlinear simulation and linear stability analysis of viscous fingering instability of viscoelastic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokri, H.; Kayhani, M. H.; Norouzi, M.

    2017-03-01

    In this study, the viscous fingering instability of miscible displacement involving a viscoelastic fluid is investigated using both linear stability analysis and computational fluid dynamics for the first time. The Oldroyd-B model is used as the constitutive equation of a viscoelastic fluid. Here, it is assumed that one of the displacing fluids or the displaced one is viscoelastic. In linear stability analysis, the quasi-steady state approximation and six order shooting method are used to predict the growth rate of the disturbance in the flow. It is shown that the flow is more stabilized when the elasticity (Weissenberg number) of the displaced or displacing viscoelastic fluid is increased. In the nonlinear simulation, using the spectral method based on Hartley transforms and the fourth-order Adams-Bashforth technique, the effect of the viscoelastic fluid on this instability has been studied. Evaluation of concentration contours, mixing length, sweep efficiency, and transversely average concentration show that the elasticity has a significant effect on the fingering instability and the flow becomes more stable by increasing the Weissenberg number.

  3. Measuring Cell Viscoelastic Properties Using a Microfluidic Extensional Flow Device.

    PubMed

    Guillou, Lionel; Dahl, Joanna B; Lin, Jung-Ming G; Barakat, AbduI I; Husson, Julien; Muller, Susan J; Kumar, Sanjay

    2016-11-01

    The quantification of cellular mechanical properties is of tremendous interest in biology and medicine. Recent microfluidic technologies that infer cellular mechanical properties based on analysis of cellular deformations during microchannel traversal have dramatically improved throughput over traditional single-cell rheological tools, yet the extraction of material parameters from these measurements remains quite complex due to challenges such as confinement by channel walls and the domination of complex inertial forces. Here, we describe a simple microfluidic platform that uses hydrodynamic forces at low Reynolds number and low confinement to elongate single cells near the stagnation point of a planar extensional flow. In tandem, we present, to our knowledge, a novel analytical framework that enables determination of cellular viscoelastic properties (stiffness and fluidity) from these measurements. We validated our system and analysis by measuring the stiffness of cross-linked dextran microparticles, which yielded reasonable agreement with previously reported values and our micropipette aspiration measurements. We then measured viscoelastic properties of 3T3 fibroblasts and glioblastoma tumor initiating cells. Our system captures the expected changes in elastic modulus induced in 3T3 fibroblasts and tumor initiating cells in response to agents that soften (cytochalasin D) or stiffen (paraformaldehyde) the cytoskeleton. The simplicity of the device coupled with our analytical model allows straightforward measurement of the viscoelastic properties of cells and soft, spherical objects.

  4. Chemical control of the viscoelastic properties of vinylogous urethane vitrimers

    PubMed Central

    Denissen, Wim; Droesbeke, Martijn; Nicolaÿ, Renaud; Leibler, Ludwik; Winne, Johan M.; Du Prez, Filip E.

    2017-01-01

    Vinylogous urethane based vitrimers are polymer networks that have the intrinsic property to undergo network rearrangements, stress relaxation and viscoelastic flow, mediated by rapid addition/elimination reactions of free chain end amines. Here we show that the covalent exchange kinetics significantly can be influenced by combination with various simple additives. As anticipated, the exchange reactions on network level can be further accelerated using either Brønsted or Lewis acid additives. Remarkably, however, a strong inhibitory effect is observed when a base is added to the polymer matrix. These effects have been mechanistically rationalized, guided by low-molecular weight kinetic model experiments. Thus, vitrimer elastomer materials can be rationally designed to display a wide range of viscoelastic properties. PMID:28317893

  5. Chemical control of the viscoelastic properties of vinylogous urethane vitrimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denissen, Wim; Droesbeke, Martijn; Nicolaÿ, Renaud; Leibler, Ludwik; Winne, Johan M.; Du Prez, Filip E.

    2017-03-01

    Vinylogous urethane based vitrimers are polymer networks that have the intrinsic property to undergo network rearrangements, stress relaxation and viscoelastic flow, mediated by rapid addition/elimination reactions of free chain end amines. Here we show that the covalent exchange kinetics significantly can be influenced by combination with various simple additives. As anticipated, the exchange reactions on network level can be further accelerated using either Brønsted or Lewis acid additives. Remarkably, however, a strong inhibitory effect is observed when a base is added to the polymer matrix. These effects have been mechanistically rationalized, guided by low-molecular weight kinetic model experiments. Thus, vitrimer elastomer materials can be rationally designed to display a wide range of viscoelastic properties.

  6. Inverting Glacial Isostatic Adjustment beyond linear viscoelasticity using Burgers rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, L.; Greff-Lefftz, M.; Fleitout, L.; Metivier, L.; Rouby, H.

    2014-12-01

    In Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) inverse modeling, the usual assumption for the mantle rheology is the Maxwell model, which exhibits constant viscosity over time. However, mineral physics experiments and post-seismic observations show evidence of a transient component in the deformation of the shallow mantle, with a short-term viscosity lower than the long-term one. In these studies, the resulting rheology is modeled by a Burgers material: such rheology is indeed expected as the mantle is a mixture of materials with different viscosities. We propose to apply this rheology for the whole viscoelastic mantle, and, using a Bayesian MCMC inverse formalism for GIA during the last glacial cycle, study its impact on estimations of viscosity values, elastic thickness of the lithosphere, and ice distribution. To perform this inversion, we use a global dataset of sea level records, the geological constraints of ice-sheet margins, and present-day GPS data as well as satellite gravimetry. Our ambition is to present not only the best fitting model, but also the range of possible solutions (within the explored space of parameters) with their respective probability of explaining the data. Our first results indicate that compared to the Maxwell models, the Burgers models involve a larger lower mantle viscosity and thicker ice over Fennoscandia and Canada.

  7. Non-linear dynamics of viscoelastic liquid trilayers subjected to an electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karapetsas, George; Bontozoglou, Vasilis

    2014-11-01

    The scope of this work is to investigate the non-linear dynamics of the electro-hydrodynamic instability of a trilayer of immiscible liquids. We consider the case of a polymer film which is separated from the top electrode by two viscous fluids. We develop a computational model and carry out 2D numerical simulations fully accounting for the flow and electric field in all phases. For the numerical solution of the governing equations we employ the mixed finite element method combined with a quasi-elliptic mesh generation scheme which is capable of following the large deformations of the liquid-liquid interface. We model the viscoelastic behavior using the Phan-Thien and Tanner (PTT) constitutive equation taking fully into account the non-linear elastic effects as well as a varying shear and extensional viscosity. We perform a thorough parametric study and investigate the influence of the electric properties of fluids, applied voltage and various rheological parameters. The authors acknowledge the support by the General Secretariat of Research and Technology of Greece under the action ``Supporting Postdoctoral Researchers'' (Grant Number PE8/906), co-funded by the European Social Fund and National Resources.

  8. High-frequency viscoelastic shear properties of vocal fold tissues: implications for vocal fold tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Teller, Sean S; Farran, Alexandra J E; Xiao, Longxi; Jiao, Tong; Duncan, Randall L; Clifton, Rodney J; Jia, Xinqiao

    2012-10-01

    The biomechanical function of the vocal folds (VFs) depends on their viscoelastic properties. Many conditions can lead to VF scarring that compromises voice function and quality. To identify candidate replacement materials, the structure, composition, and mechanical properties of native tissues need to be understood at phonation frequencies. Previously, the authors developed the torsional wave experiment (TWE), a stress-wave-based experiment to determine the linear viscoelastic shear properties of small, soft samples. Here, the viscoelastic properties of porcine and human VFs were measured over a frequency range of 10-200 Hz. The TWE utilizes resonance phenomena to determine viscoelastic properties; therefore, the specimen test frequency is determined by the sample size and material properties. Viscoelastic moduli are reported at resonance frequencies. Structure and composition of the tissues were determined by histology and immunochemistry. Porcine data from the TWE are separated into two groups: a young group, consisting of fetal and newborn pigs, and an adult group, consisting of 6-9-month olds and 2+-year olds. Adult tissues had an average storage modulus of 2309±1394 Pa and a loss tangent of 0.38±0.10 at frequencies of 36-200 Hz. The VFs of young pigs were significantly more compliant, with a storage modulus of 394±142 Pa and a loss tangent of 0.40±0.14 between 14 and 30 Hz. No gender dependence was observed. Histological staining showed that adult porcine tissues had a more organized, layered structure than the fetal tissues, with a thicker epithelium and a more structured lamina propria. Elastin fibers in fetal VF tissues were immature compared to those in adult tissues. Together, these structural changes in the tissues most likely contributed to the change in viscoelastic properties. Adult human VF tissues, recovered postmortem from adult patients with a history of smoking or disease, had an average storage modulus of 756±439 Pa and a loss tangent of 0

  9. Dynamic analysis of linear viscoelastic cylindrical and conical helicoidal rods using the mixed FEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eratlı, Nihal; Argeso, Hakan; Çalım, Faruk F.; Temel, Beytullah; Omurtag, Mehmet H.

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the influence of the rotary inertia on dynamic behavior of linear viscoelastic cylindrical and conical helixes by means of the Laplace transform-mixed finite element formulation and solution. The element matrix is based on the Timoshenko beam theory. The influence of rotary inertias is considered in the dynamic analysis, which is original in the literature. Rectangular, sine and step type of impulsive loads are applied on helices having rectangular cross-sections with various aspect ratios. The Kelvin and standard models are used for defining the linear viscoelastic material behavior; and by means of the correspondence principle (the elastic-viscoelastic analogy), the material parameters are replaced with their complex counterparts in the Laplace domain. The analysis is carried out in the Laplace domain and the results are transformed back to time space numerically by modified Durbin's algorithm. First, the solution algorithm is verified using the existing open sources in the literature and afterwards some benchmark examples such as conical viscoelastic rods are handled.

  10. Tensile Properties and Viscoelastic Model of a Polyimide Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shengde; Mori, Syuhei; Sakane, Masao; Nagasawa, Tadashi; Kobayashi, Kaoru

    This paper presents tensile properties of a polyimide thin film used in electronic devices. Tensile tests were performed to determine Young's modulus, proportional limit, yield stress, ultimate tensile strength and elongation of the polyimide film. Effects of strain rate and temperature on the tensile properties were discussed. There was a little effect of strain rate on Young's modulus but proportional limit, yield stress and ultimate tensile strength increased with increasing strain rate. Only elongation decreased with strain rate. Young's modulus, proportional limit, yield stress and ultimate tensile strength decreased with increasing temperature, but elongation increased. Applicability of a viscoelastic model for describing the stress-strain curves of the polyimide film was discussed.

  11. Characterization of Viscoelastic Properties of Polymeric Materials Through Nanoindentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, G. M.; Bandorawalla, T.; Herring, H. M.; Gates, T. S.

    2003-01-01

    Nanoindentation is used to determine the dynamic viscoelastic properties of six polymer materials. It is shown that varying the harmonic frequency of the nanoindentation does not have any significant effect on the measured storage and loss moduli of the polymers. Agreement is found between these results and data from DMA testing of the same materials. Varying the harmonic amplitude of the nanoindentation does not have a significant effect on the measured properties of the high performance resins, however, the storage modulus of the polyethylene decreases as the harmonic amplitude increases. Measured storage and loss moduli are also shown to depend on the density of the polyethylene.

  12. Imaging the Viscoelastic Properties of Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatemi, Mostafa; Greenleaf, James F.

    Elasticity and viscosity of soft tissues are often related to pathology. These parameters, along with other mechanical parameters, determine the dynamic response of tissue to a force. Tissue mechanical response, therefore, may be used for diagnosis. Measuring and imaging of the mechanical properties of tissues is the aim of a class of techniques generally called elasticity imaging or elastography. The general approach is to measure tissue motion caused by a force or displacement and use it to reconstruct the elastic parameters of the tissue. The excitation stress can be either static or dynamic (vibration). Dynamic excitation is of particular interest because it provides more comprehensive information about tissue properties in a spectrum of frequencies. In one approach an external stress field must pass through the superficial portion of the object before reaching the region of interest within the interior. An alternative strategy is to apply a localized stress directly in the region of interest. One way to accomplish this task is to use the radiation force of ultrasound. This approach offers several benefits, including: (a) safety - acoustic energy is a noninvasive means of exerting force; (b) adaptability - existing ultrasound technology and devices can be readily modified for this purpose; (c) remoteness - radiation force can be generated remotely inside tissue without disturbing its superficial layers; (d) localization - the radiation stress field can be highly localized, thus allowing for precise positioning of the excitation point; and (e) a wide frequency spectrum. Several methods have been developed for tissue probing using the dynamic radiation force of ultrasound, including: (a) transient methods which are based on impulsive radiation force; (b) shear-wave methods which are based on generation of shear-waves; and (c) vibro-acoustography, recently developed by the authors, where a localized oscillating radiation force is applied to the tissue and the

  13. Modeling Viscoelastic Properties of Triblock Copolymers: A DPD Simulation Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    et al .17,18 studied the micellar organization and rheology of the triblock gels and found that equilibrium...Rousseau, B. Polymer 2007, 48, 3584–3592. 51 Masubuchi, Y.; Ianniruberto, G.; Greco, F.; Marrucci, G. J Non-Cryst Solids 2006, 352, 5001–5007. ARTICLE MODELING VISCOELASTIC PROPERTIES, SLIOZBERG ET AL . 25 ...SLIOZBERG ET AL . 15 as: r(x) ¼ Ax (G0(x)sin(xt)þ G00(x)cos(xt)), where Ax is the amplitude. The storage modulus, G0(x), characterizes the

  14. Constitutive models for linear compressible viscoelastic flows of simple liquids at nanometer length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Debadi; Sader, John E.

    2015-05-01

    Simple bulk liquids such as water are commonly assumed to be Newtonian. While this assumption holds widely, the fluid-structure interaction of mechanical devices at nanometer scales can probe the intrinsic molecular relaxation processes in a surrounding liquid. This was recently demonstrated through measurement of the high frequency (20 GHz) linear mechanical vibrations of bipyramidal nanoparticles in simple liquids [Pelton et al., "Viscoelastic flows in simple liquids generated by vibrating nanostructures," Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 244502 (2013)]. In this article, we review and critically assess the available constitutive equations for compressible viscoelastic flows in their linear limits—such models are required for analysis of the above-mentioned measurements. We show that previous models, with the exception of a very recent proposal, do not reproduce the required response at high frequency. We explain the physical origin of this recent model and show that it recovers all required features of a linear viscoelastic flow. This constitutive equation thus provides a rigorous foundation for the analysis of vibrating nanostructures in simple liquids. The utility of this model is demonstrated by solving the fluid-structure interaction of two common problems: (1) a sphere executing radial oscillations in liquid, which depends strongly on the liquid compressibility and (2) the extensional mode vibration of bipyramidal nanoparticles in liquid, where the effects of liquid compressibility are negligible. This highlights the importance of shear and compressional relaxation processes, as a function of flow geometry, and the impact of the shear and bulk viscosities on nanometer scale flows.

  15. Investigation of multilayer printed circuit board (PCB) film warpage using viscoelastic properties measured by a vibration test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Sung-Jun; Park, Buhm; Kim, Do-Hyoung; Kwak, Dong-Ok; Song, In-Sang; Park, Junhong; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2015-03-01

    Woven glass fabric/BT (bismaleimide triazine) composite laminate (BT core), copper (Cu), and photoimageable solder resist (PSR) are the most widely used materials for semiconductors in electronic devices. Among these materials, BT core and PSR contain polymeric materials that exhibit viscoelastic behavior. For this reason, these materials are considered to have time- and temperature-dependent moduli during warpage analysis. However, the thin geometry of multilayer printed circuit board (PCB) film makes it difficult to identify viscoelastic characteristics. In this work, a vibration test method was proposed for measuring the viscoelastic properties of a multilayer PCB film at different temperatures. The beam-shaped specimens, composed of a BT core, Cu laminated on a BT core, and PSR and Cu laminated on a BT core, were used in the vibration test. The frequency-dependent variation of the complex bending stiffness was determined using a transfer function method. The storage modulus (E‧) of the BT core, Cu, and PSR as a function of temperature and frequency were obtained, and their temperature-dependent variation was identified. The obtained properties were fitted using a viscoelastic model for the BT core and the PSR, and a linear elastic model for the Cu. Warpage of a line pattern specimen due to temperature variation was measured using a shadow Moiré analysis and compared to predictions using a finite element model. The results provide information on the mechanism of warpage, especially warpage due to temperature-dependent variation in viscoelastic properties.

  16. Elastic and viscoelastic mechanical properties of brain tissues on the implanting trajectory of sub-thalamic nucleus stimulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Deng, Jianxin; Zhou, Jun; Li, Xueen

    2016-11-01

    Corresponding to pre-puncture and post-puncture insertion, elastic and viscoelastic mechanical properties of brain tissues on the implanting trajectory of sub-thalamic nucleus stimulation are investigated, respectively. Elastic mechanical properties in pre-puncture are investigated through pre-puncture needle insertion experiments using whole porcine brains. A linear polynomial and a second order polynomial are fitted to the average insertion force in pre-puncture. The Young's modulus in pre-puncture is calculated from the slope of the two fittings. Viscoelastic mechanical properties of brain tissues in post-puncture insertion are investigated through indentation stress relaxation tests for six interested regions along a planned trajectory. A linear viscoelastic model with a Prony series approximation is fitted to the average load trace of each region using Boltzmann hereditary integral. Shear relaxation moduli of each region are calculated using the parameters of the Prony series approximation. The results show that, in pre-puncture insertion, needle force almost increases linearly with needle displacement. Both fitting lines can perfectly fit the average insertion force. The Young's moduli calculated from the slope of the two fittings are worthy of trust to model linearly or nonlinearly instantaneous elastic responses of brain tissues, respectively. In post-puncture insertion, both region and time significantly affect the viscoelastic behaviors. Six tested regions can be classified into three categories in stiffness. Shear relaxation moduli decay dramatically in short time scales but equilibrium is never truly achieved. The regional and temporal viscoelastic mechanical properties in post-puncture insertion are valuable for guiding probe insertion into each region on the implanting trajectory.

  17. Probing viscoelastic surfaces with bimodal tapping-mode atomic force microscopy: Underlying physics and observables for a standard linear solid model.

    PubMed

    Solares, Santiago D

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents computational simulations of single-mode and bimodal atomic force microscopy (AFM) with particular focus on the viscoelastic interactions occurring during tip-sample impact. The surface is modeled by using a standard linear solid model, which is the simplest system that can reproduce creep compliance and stress relaxation, which are fundamental behaviors exhibited by viscoelastic surfaces. The relaxation of the surface in combination with the complexities of bimodal tip-sample impacts gives rise to unique dynamic behaviors that have important consequences with regards to the acquisition of quantitative relationships between the sample properties and the AFM observables. The physics of the tip-sample interactions and its effect on the observables are illustrated and discussed, and a brief research outlook on viscoelasticity measurement with intermittent-contact AFM is provided.

  18. Continuous Shear Wave Elastography: a New Method to Measure in-vivo Viscoelastic Properties of Tendons

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Daniel H.; Suydam, Stephen M.; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare; Buchanan, Thomas S.; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2015-01-01

    Viscoelastic mechanical properties are frequently altered after tendon injuries and during recovery. Therefore, non-invasive measurements of shear viscoelastic properties may help evaluate tendon recovery and compare the effectiveness of different therapies. The objectives of this study are to present an elastography method to measure localized viscoelastic properties of tendon and to present initial results in healthy and injured human Achilles and semitendinosus tendons. The technique used an external actuator to generate the shear waves in the tendon at different frequencies and plane wave imaging to measure shear wave displacements. For each of the excitation frequencies, maps of direction specific wave speeds were calculated using Local Frequency Estimation. Maps of viscoelastic properties were obtained using a pixel wise curve-fit of wave speed and frequency. The method was validated by comparing measurements of wave speed in agarose gels to those obtained using magnetic resonance elastography. Measurements in human healthy Achilles tendons revealed a pronounced increase in wave speed as function of frequency that highlights the importance of tendon viscoelasticity. Additionally, the viscoelastic properties of the Achilles tendon were larger than those reported for other tissues. Measurements in a tendinopathic Achilles tendon showed that it is feasible to quantify local viscoeasltic properties. Similarly, measurement in the semitendinosus tendon showed a substantial differences in viscoelastic properties between the healthy and contralateral tendons. Consequently, this technique has the potential of evaluating localized changes in tendon viscoelastic properties due to injury and during recovery in a clinical setting. PMID:25796414

  19. Linear oscillation of gas bubbles in a viscoelastic material under ultrasound irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hamaguchi, Fumiya; Ando, Keita

    2015-11-15

    Acoustically forced oscillation of spherical gas bubbles in a viscoelastic material is studied through comparisons between experiments and linear theory. An experimental setup has been designed to visualize bubble dynamics in gelatin gels using a high-speed camera. A spherical gas bubble is created by focusing an infrared laser pulse into (gas-supersaturated) gelatin gels. The bubble radius (up to 150 μm) under mechanical equilibrium is controlled by gradual mass transfer of gases across the bubble interface. The linearized bubble dynamics are studied from the observation of spherical bubble oscillation driven by low-intensity, planar ultrasound driven at 28 kHz. It follows from the experiment for an isolated bubble that the frequency response in its volumetric oscillation was shifted to the high frequency side and its peak was suppressed as the gelatin concentration increases. The measurement is fitted to the linearized Rayleigh–Plesset equation coupled with the Voigt constitutive equation that models the behavior of linear viscoelastic solids; the fitting yields good agreement by tuning unknown values of the viscosity and rigidity, indicating that more complex phenomena including shear thinning, stress relaxation, and retardation do not play an important role for the small-amplitude oscillations. Moreover, the cases for bubble-bubble and bubble-wall systems are studied. The observed interaction effect on the linearized dynamics can be explained as well by a set of the Rayleigh–Plesset equations coupled through acoustic radiation among these systems. This suggests that this experimental setup can be applied to validate the model of bubble dynamics with more complex configuration such as a cloud of bubbles in viscoelastic materials.

  20. Linear oscillation of gas bubbles in a viscoelastic material under ultrasound irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, Fumiya; Ando, Keita

    2015-11-01

    Acoustically forced oscillation of spherical gas bubbles in a viscoelastic material is studied through comparisons between experiments and linear theory. An experimental setup has been designed to visualize bubble dynamics in gelatin gels using a high-speed camera. A spherical gas bubble is created by focusing an infrared laser pulse into (gas-supersaturated) gelatin gels. The bubble radius (up to 150 μm) under mechanical equilibrium is controlled by gradual mass transfer of gases across the bubble interface. The linearized bubble dynamics are studied from the observation of spherical bubble oscillation driven by low-intensity, planar ultrasound driven at 28 kHz. It follows from the experiment for an isolated bubble that the frequency response in its volumetric oscillation was shifted to the high frequency side and its peak was suppressed as the gelatin concentration increases. The measurement is fitted to the linearized Rayleigh-Plesset equation coupled with the Voigt constitutive equation that models the behavior of linear viscoelastic solids; the fitting yields good agreement by tuning unknown values of the viscosity and rigidity, indicating that more complex phenomena including shear thinning, stress relaxation, and retardation do not play an important role for the small-amplitude oscillations. Moreover, the cases for bubble-bubble and bubble-wall systems are studied. The observed interaction effect on the linearized dynamics can be explained as well by a set of the Rayleigh-Plesset equations coupled through acoustic radiation among these systems. This suggests that this experimental setup can be applied to validate the model of bubble dynamics with more complex configuration such as a cloud of bubbles in viscoelastic materials.

  1. Explicit causal relations between material damping ratio and phase velocity from exact solutions of the dispersion equations of linear viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meza-Fajardo, Kristel C.; Lai, Carlo G.

    2007-12-01

    The theory of linear viscoelasticity is the simplest constitutive model that can be adopted to accurately predict the small-strain mechanical response of materials exhibiting the ability to both store and dissipate strain energy. An important result implied by this theory is the relationship existing between material attenuation and the velocity of propagation of a mechanical disturbance. The functional dependence of these important parameters is represented by the Kramers-Kronig (KK) equations, also known as dispersion equations, which are nothing but a statement of the necessary and sufficient conditions to satisfy physical causality. This paper illustrates the derivation of exact solutions of the KK equations to provide explicit relations between frequency-dependent phase velocity and material damping ratio (or equivalently, quality factor). The assumptions that form the basis of the derivation are not beyond those established by the standard theory of viscoelasticity for a viscoelastic solid. The explicit expression for phase velocity as a function of damping ratio was derived by means of the theory of linear singular integral equations, and in particular by the solution of the associated Homogeneous Riemann Boundary Value Problem. It is shown that the same solution may be obtained also by using the implications of physical causality on the Fourier Transform. On the other hand, the explicit solution for damping ratio as a function of phase velocity was found through the components of the complex wavenumber. The exact solutions make it possible to obtain frequency-dependent material damping ratio solely from phase velocity measurements, and conversely. Hence, these relations provide an innovative and inexpensive tool to determine the small-strain dynamic properties of geomaterials. It is shown that the obtained rigorous solutions are in good agreement with well-known solutions based on simplifying assumptions that have been developed in the fields of seismology

  2. Viscoelastic Timoshenko beam theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, Harry H.

    2009-03-01

    The concept of elastic Timoshenko shear coefficients is used as a guide for linear viscoelastic Euler-Bernoulli beams subjected to simultaneous bending and twisting. It is shown that the corresponding Timoshenko viscoelastic functions now depend not only on material properties and geometry as they do in elasticity, but also additionally on stresses and their time histories. Possible viscoelastic definitions are formulated and evaluated. In general, the viscoelastic relations are sufficiently complicated so that the elastic-viscoelastic correspondence principle (analogy) cannot be applied. This is particularly true for, but not limited to, elastic shear coefficients which are Poisson ratio dependent. Expressions for equivalent viscoelastic Timoshenko shear functions must, therefore, be derived de novo on a case by case basis, taking in to account specific relaxation moduli, stresses, temperatures and their time histories. Thus the elastic simplicity and generality is lost and hence rendering the use of viscoelastic Timoshenko shear functions as highly impractical. Consequently, it is necessary to directly solve the coupled viscoelastic beam governing relations for bending and twisting deflections by using appropriate solution protocols as discussed herein.

  3. Attenuation and Shock Waves in Linear Hereditary Viscoelastic Media; Strick-Mainardi, Jeffreys-Lomnitz-Strick and Andrade Creep Compliances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanyga, Andrzej

    2014-09-01

    Dispersion, attenuation and wavefronts in a class of linear viscoelastic media proposed by Strick and Mainardi (Geophys J R Astr Soc 69:415-429, 1982) and a related class of models due to Lomnitz, Jeffreys and Strick are studied by a new method due to the author. Unlike the previously studied explicit models of relaxation modulus or creep compliance, these two classes support propagation of discontinuities. Due to an extension made by Strick, either of these two classes of models comprise both viscoelastic solids and fluids. We also discuss the Andrade viscoelastic media. The Andrade media do not support discontinuity waves and exhibit the pedestal effect.

  4. Correlated random walk: a fractal approach to erythrocyte viscoelastic properties.

    PubMed

    Korol, A; Rasia, R J

    1999-01-01

    A numerical method is proposed to evaluate the fractal correlation coefficient on viscoelastic properties of mammalian erythrocyte membranes from the diffractometric data obtained with the erythrodeformeter [16]. The numerical method is formulated on the basis of the fractal approximation for ordinary Brownian motion (OBM) and fractionary Brownian motion (FBM) [10]. Photometric readings performed on the elliptical diffraction pattern, generated by the shear elongated cells and photometrically recorded curves of creep and recovery of cells, are used in the calculations of self-affine Brownian correlation coefficient, averaged over several millions of cells. The time dependence of the correlation coefficient from different hematological disorders and also from healthy donors was calculated, and significative differences were found between both results. Diffractometric data belonging to healthy donors behaves as white noise, while data series from different disease were found to be chaotic.

  5. Viscoelastic Properties of the Aortic Valve Interstitial Cell

    PubMed Central

    Merryman, W. David; Bieniek, Paul D.; Guilak, Farshid; Sacks, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    There has been growing interest in the mechanobiological function of the aortic valve interstitial cell (AVIC), due to its role in valve tissue homeostasis and remodeling. In a recent study we determined the relation between diastolic loading of the AV leaflet and the resulting AVIC deformation, which was found to be substantial. However, due to the rapid loading time of the AV leaflets during closure (~0.05 s), time-dependent effects may play a role in AVIC deformation during physiological function. In the present study, we explored AVIC viscoelastic behavior using the micropipette aspiration technique. We then modeled the resulting time-length data over the 100 sec test period using a standard linear solid (SLS) model which included Boltzmann superposition. To quantify the degree of creep and stress relaxation during physiological timescales, simulations of micropipette aspiration were preformed with a valve loading time of 0.05 s and a full valve closure time of 0.3 s. The 0.05 s loading simulations suggest that, during valve closure, AVICs act elastically. During diastole, simulations revealed creep (4.65%) and stress relaxation (4.39%) over the 0.3 s physiological timescale. Simulations also indicated that if Boltzmann superposition was not used in parameter estimation, as in much of the micropipette literature, creep and stress relaxation predicted values were nearly doubled (7.92% and 7.35%, respectively). We conclude that while AVIC viscoelastic effects are negligible during valve closure, they likely contribute to the deformation time-history of AVIC deformation during diastole. PMID:19275434

  6. Determining the parameters of the fractional exponential heredity kernels of linear viscoelastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golub, V. P.; Fernati, P. V.; Lyashenko, Ya. G.

    2008-09-01

    The parameters of the fractional exponential creep and relaxation kernels of linear viscoelastic materials are determined. Methods that approximate the kernel by using the Mittag-Leffler function, the Laplace-Carson transform, and direct approximation of the creep function by the original equation are analyzed. The parameters of fractional exponential kernels are determined for aramid fibers, parapolyamide fibers, glass-reinforced plastic, and polymer concrete. It is shown that the kernel parameters calculated through the direct approximation of the creep function provide the best agreement between theory and experiment. The methods are experimentally validated for constant-stress and variable-stress loading in the modes of additional loading and complete unloading

  7. Viscoelastic shear properties of porcine temporomandibular joint disc

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yongren; Kuo, Jonathan; Wright, Gregory J.; Cisewski, Sarah E.; Wei, Feng; Kern, Michael J.; Yao, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the intrinsic viscoelastic shear properties in porcine TMJ discs. Materials and Methods Twelve fresh porcine TMJ discs from young adult pigs (6-8 months) were used. Cylindrical samples (5 mm diameter) with uniform thickness (~1.2 mm) were prepared from five regions of the TMJ disc. Torsional shear tests were performed under 10% compressive strain. Dynamic shear was applied in two methods: (1) a frequency sweep test over the frequency range of 0.01-10 rad/s with a constant shear strain amplitude of 0.025 rad, and (2) a strain sweep test over the range of 0.005-0.05 rad at a constant frequency of 10 rad/s. Transient stress-relaxation tests were also performed to determine the equilibrium shear properties. Results As the frequency increased in the frequency sweep test, the dynamic shear complex modulus increased, with values ranging from 7 to 17 kPa. The phase angle, ranging from 11 to 15 degrees, displayed no pattern of regional variation as the frequency increased. The dynamic shear modulus decreased as the shear strain increased. The equilibrium shear modulus had values ranging from 2 to 4.5 kPa. The posterior region had significantly higher values for dynamic shear modulus than those in the anterior region while no significant regional difference was found for equilibrium shear modulus. Conclusion Our results suggest that the intrinsic region-dependent viscoelastic shear characteristics of TMJ disc may play a crucial role in determining the local strain of the TMJ disc under mechanical loading. PMID:25865544

  8. Mapping Viscoelastic and Plastic Properties of Polymers and Polymer-Nanotube Composites using Instrumented Indentation.

    PubMed

    Gayle, Andrew J; Cook, Robert F

    An instrumented indentation method is developed for generating maps of time-dependent viscoelastic and time-independent plastic properties of polymeric materials. The method is based on a pyramidal indentation model consisting of two quadratic viscoelastic Kelvin-like elements and a quadratic plastic element in series. Closed-form solutions for indentation displacement under constant load and constant loading-rate are developed and used to determine and validate material properties. Model parameters are determined by point measurements on common monolithic polymers. Mapping is demonstrated on an epoxy-ceramic interface and on two composite materials consisting of epoxy matrices containing multi-wall carbon nanotubes. A fast viscoelastic deformation process in the epoxy was unaffected by the inclusion of the nanotubes, whereas a slow viscoelastic process was significantly impeded, as was the plastic deformation. Mapping revealed considerable spatial heterogeneity in the slow viscoelastic and plastic responses in the composites, particularly in the material with a greater fraction of nanotubes.

  9. Active microrheology reveals molecular-level variations in the viscoelastic properties of Chaetopterus mucus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigand, William; Messmore, Ashley; Anderson, Rae

    The sea annelid, Chaetopterus Variopedatus, secretes a bioluminescent mucus that also exhibits complex viscoelastic properties. The constituents of the mucus are relatively unknown but it does play an important role in the development of the worms' parchment-like housing tubes. In order to determine how and why this mucus can exhibit material properties ranging from fluidity to rigidity we perform microrheology experiments. We determine the microscale viscoelastic properties by using optical tweezers to produce small oscillations in the mucus which allow us to determine both the linear storage and loss moduli (G',G'') along with the viscosity of the fluid. By varying the size of the microspheres (2-10 µm) and oscillation amplitude (.5-10 µm) we are able to determine the dominant intrinsic length scales of the molecular mesh comprising the mucus. By varying the oscillation frequency (1-15Hz) we determine the crossover frequency at which G' surpasses G'', to quantify the longest relaxation time of the mesh network. Initial results show a strong dependence on bead size which indicate that the dominant entanglement lengthscale of the mucus mesh is ~5 um. Microspheres of this size exhibit a wide variety of stress responses in different regions of the mucus demonstrating the substantial microscale heterogeneity of the mucus. We carry out measurements on a population of worms of varying size and age to determine mucus variability between worms.

  10. A comparative study on the viscoelastic properties of human and animal lenses.

    PubMed

    Sharma, P K; Busscher, H J; Terwee, T; Koopmans, S A; van Kooten, T G

    2011-11-01

    A new method of compression between two parallel plates is used to measure the viscoelastic properties of whole and decapsulated human lenses and compare them with other animal species. Compressive load relaxation was performed by deforming the lens by 10% and measuring the force relaxation response for 100 s to obtain thickness, stiffness and relaxation of the induced loading force and Maxwell parameters for human, monkey, porcine and leporine whole and decapsulated lenses. Thickness and percentage loading force relaxation increased linearly with lens age, whereas stiffness and induced loading force increased exponentially. Human and monkey lenses aged at different rates. Loading force relaxation in a generalized Maxwell model was described by three time constants ranging from 1 to 1000 s. Compressive load relaxation is a very versatile method to study the viscoelastic properties of whole and decapsulated lenses and potentially also artificial accommodating lenses. The data presented in the study will help researchers choose the most suitable animal lenses based on the desired properties and age to be mimicked from the human lenses.

  11. Small strain vibration of a continuous, linearized viscoelastic rod of expanded polymer cushion material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batt, Gregory S.; Gibert, James M.; Daqaq, Mohammed

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, the free and forced vibration response of a linearized, distributed-parameter model of a viscoelastic rod with an applied tip-mass is investigated. A nonlinear model is developed from constitutive relations and is linearized about a static equilibrium position for analysis. A classical Maxwell-Weichert model, represented via a Prony series, is used to model the viscoelastic system. The exact solution to both the free and forced vibration problem is derived and used to study the behavior of an idealized packaging system containing Nova Chemicals' Arcel® foam. It is observed that, although three Prony series terms are deemed sufficient to fit the static test data, convergence of the dynamic response and study of the storage and loss modulii necessitate the use of additional Prony series terms. It is also shown that the model is able to predict the modal frequencies and the primary resonance response at low acceleration excitation, both with reasonable accuracy given the non-homogeneity and density variation observed in the specimens. Higher acceleration inputs result in softening nonlinear responses highlighting the need for a nonlinear elastic model that extends beyond the scope of this work. Solution analysis and experimental data indicate little material vibration energy dissipation close to the first modal frequency of the mass/rod system.

  12. Non-linear analysis and the design of Pumpkin Balloons: stress, stability and viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rand, J. L.; Wakefield, D. S.

    Tensys have a long-established background in the shape generation and load analysis of architectural stressed membrane structures Founded upon their inTENS finite element analysis suite these activities have broadened to encompass lighter than air structures such as aerostats hybrid air-vehicles and stratospheric balloons Winzen Engineering couple many years of practical balloon design and fabrication experience with both academic and practical knowledge of the characterisation of the non-linear viscoelastic response of the polymeric films typically used for high-altitude scientific balloons Both companies have provided consulting services to the NASA Ultra Long Duration Balloon ULDB Program Early implementations of pumpkin balloons have shown problems of geometric instability characterised by improper deployment and these difficulties have been reproduced numerically using inTENS The solution lies in both the shapes of the membrane lobes and also the need to generate a biaxial stress field in order to mobilise in-plane shear stiffness Balloons undergo significant temperature and pressure variations in flight The different thermal characteristics between tendons and film can lead to significant meridional stress Fabrication tolerances can lead to significant local hoop stress concentrations particularly adjacent to the base and apex end fittings The non-linear viscoelastic response of the envelope film acts positively to help dissipate stress concentrations However creep over time may produce lobe geometry variations that may

  13. Acoustic characterization of monodisperse lipid-coated microbubbles: relationship between size and shell viscoelastic properties.

    PubMed

    Parrales, Miguel A; Fernandez, Juan M; Perez-Saborid, Miguel; Kopechek, Jonathan A; Porter, Tyrone M

    2014-09-01

    The acoustic attenuation spectrum of lipid-coated microbubble suspensions was measured in order to characterize the linear acoustic behavior of ultrasound contrast agents. For that purpose, microbubbles samples were generated with a very narrow size distribution by using microfluidics techniques. A performance as good as optical characterization techniques of single microbubbles was achieved using this method. Compared to polydispersions (i.e., contrast agents used clinically), monodisperse contrast agents have a narrower attenuation spectrum, which presents a maximum peak at a frequency value corresponding to the average single bubble resonance frequency. The low polydispersity index of the samples made the estimation of the lipid viscoelastic properties more accurate since, as previously reported, the shell linear parameters may change with the equilibrium bubble radius. The results showed the great advantage of dealing with monodisperse populations rather than polydisperse populations for the acoustic characterization of ultrasound contrast agents.

  14. Viscoelastic properties of the contracting detrusor. I. Theoretical basis.

    PubMed

    Venegas, J G

    1991-08-01

    This paper presents the theoretical basis for estimating the detrusor's viscoelastic properties using the small-amplitude oscillatory perturbations technique. Three possible configurations of the simplest second-order lumped-parameter model of the bladder were analyzed to derive equations of the parameters incremental resistance (R) and incremental elastance (K) in terms of the experimentally measurable magnitude and phase of hydrodynamic stiffness. In model I, single viscous, elastic, and inertial elements were assumed to to be connected in series. In model III the elastic and viscous elements were connected in series, but the inertial element was connected in parallel. With the assumption of a spherical geometry of the bladder, equations were also derived to obtain the bladder wall mechanical properties, spring incremental constant (S), and muscle incremental viscosity (b) as functions of bladder volume and the hydrodynamic properties R and K. Integration of the incremental equation describing the viscous component yields an expression that fits well the force-velocity experimental data from bladder strips reported by others. This finding suggests that muscle viscosity measured with the small-amplitude oscillations and analyzed with the proper theoretical model may be related to the force-velocity characteristics of the muscle. The equations delivered here form the basis for analyzing the experimental data described in the companion paper.

  15. Interrogating the viscoelastic properties of tissue using viscoelastic response (VISR) ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selzo, Mallory Renee

    Affecting approximately 1 in 3,500 newborn males, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most common lethal genetic disorders in humans. Boys with DMD suffer progressive loss of muscle strength and function, leading to wheelchair dependence, cardiac and respiratory compromise, and death during young adulthood. There are currently no treatments that can halt or reverse the disease progression, and translating prospective treatments into clinical trials has been delayed by inadequate outcome measures. Current outcome measures, such as functional and muscle strength assessments, lack sensitivity to individual muscles, require subjective effort of the child, and are impacted by normal childhood growth and development. The goal of this research is to develop Viscoelastic Response (VisR) ultrasound which can be used to delineate compositional changes in muscle associated with DMD. In VisR, acoustic radiation force (ARF) is used to produce small, localized displacements within the muscle. Using conventional ultrasound to track the motion, the displacement response of the tissue can be evaluated against a mechanical model. In order to develop signal processing techniques and assess mechanical models, finite element method simulations are used to model the response of a viscoelastic material to ARF excitations. Results are then presented demonstrating VisR differentiation of viscoelastic changes with progressive dystrophic degeneration in a dog model of DMD. Finally, clinical feasibility of VisR imaging is demonstrated in two boys with DMD.

  16. Viscoelastic properties of vascular endothelial cells exposed to uniaxial stretch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterday, Kathryn; Chew, Thomas; Loury, Phillip; Haga, Jason; Del Alamo, Juan C.; Chien, Shu

    2011-11-01

    Vascular endothelial cells (VECs) line the interior of blood vessels and regulate a variety of functions in the cardiovascular system. It is widely accepted that VECs will remodel themselves in response to mechanical stimuli, but few studies have analyzed the mechanical properties of these cells under stretch. We hypothesize that uniaxial stretch will cause an anisotropic realignment of actin filaments, and a change in the viscoelastic properties of the cell. To test this hypothesis, VECs were grown on a thin, transparent membrane mounted on a microscope. The membrane was stretched, consequently stretching the cells. Time-lapse sequences of the cells were taken every hour with a time resolution of 10 Hz. The random trajectories of intracellular endogenous particles were tracked using in-house algorithms. These trajectories were analyzed using a novel particle tracking microrheology formulation that takes into account the anisotropy of the cytoplasm of VECs. Supported by NSF CBET-1055697 CAREER Award (JCA) and NIH grants BRP HL064382 (SC), 1R01 HL080518 (SC).

  17. Viscoelastic properties of an aesthetic translucent orthodontic wire.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, A Jon; Liebler, Stephenie A H; Burstone, Charles J

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the time-dependent viscoelastic properties of an aesthetic orthodontic archwire. The wire is based on a recently developed translucent polyphenylene thermoplastic, whose rigid molecular structure provides high strength. While the wire has good instantaneous mechanical properties, over time all polymers may relax so it is important to understand the potential impact of the relaxation on orthodontic force systems. Four samples of 0.020 inch round and six samples of 0.021 × 0.025 inch rectangular wire were loaded in tension to a range of initial stresses, and relaxation of the stress was monitored for 7 days. Sixty-three additional samples were maintained in edgewise bracket pairs with vertical displacement for up to 6 weeks. The deformation of these wires was measured immediately after removal from the brackets and for 2 days as the samples recovered. Tensile stress decayed about 10-30 per cent over 24-48 hours depending on the initial stress. The relaxation behaviour was proportional to the initial tensile strain and therefore these data were combined into a single curve using regression. Deformation of the samples placed in the bracket pairs increased with increasing vertical displacement and time, evaluated with analysis of variance, but 19-100 per cent of the deformation was recoverable. The force systems from polyphenylene wires could vary with time and activation, but this behaviour is predictable.

  18. Time-resolved photoacoustic measurement for evaluation of viscoelastic properties of biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yue; Chen, Conggui; Liu, Hongwei; Yang, Sihua; Xing, Da

    2016-11-01

    In this letter, we proposed a method for viscoelastic characterization of biological tissues based on time-resolved photoacoustic measurement. The theoretical and experimental study was performed on the influence of viscoelasticity effects on photoacoustic generation. Taking the time delay between the photoacoustic signal and the exciting laser, the viscoelasticity distribution of biological tissues can be mapped. To validate our method, gelatin phantoms with different densities were measured. We also applied this method in discrimination between fat and liver to confirm the usefulness of the viscoelastic evaluation. Furthermore, pilot experiments were performed on atherosclerosis artery from an apolipoprotein E-knockout mouse to show the viscoelastic characterization of atherosclerotic plaque. Our results demonstrate that this technique has the potential for visualizing the biomechanical properties and lesions of biological tissues.

  19. Radiation force imaging of viscoelastic properties with reduced artifacts.

    PubMed

    Viola, Francesco; Walker, William F

    2003-06-01

    It is well-known that changes in the mechanical properties of tissues are correlated with the presence of disease. In the eye, for example, the vitreous body undergoes dramatic changes in mechanical properties during age-related degradation. These changes may play a significant role in the formation of retinal detachment or other vitreoretinal diseases. We previously presented a noninvasive method called kinetic acoustic vitreoretial examination (KAVE), which may be used to detect these mechanical changes. KAVE uses acoustic radiation force as a means to produce small, localized displacements within the tissues. Returning echoes are processed using ultrasonic motion tracking so that the response of the tissue to the induced force can be evaluated. By repeating this process at a number of locations, images depicting viscoelastic properties of tissues can be formed. Through the combination of appropriate mechanical modeling and signal processing, we are able to generate images of parameters such as relative mass, relative elasticity, and relative viscosity. These parameters are called relative because they depend on the force applied, which is typically unknown. In this paper, we present new force-free images depicting the time constant tau, the damping ratio xi, and the natural frequency omega of the phantom material. These images are significant in that they lack the artifacts common in the relative property images. Experiments were conducted on a set of three acrylamide-based phantoms with varying gel concentrations. We present images depicting B-mode echogenicity, maximum radiation force-induced displacement, relative material parameters, and force-free characteristics of the series of phantoms. The presented force-free images depict mechanical properties without artifacts from local force variation due to acoustic reflection, refraction, and attenuation. Force-free images should prove particularly useful for in vivo imaging through inhomogeneous tissues.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations of the structural, mechanical and visco-elastic properties of polymer nanocomposites filled with grafted nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jianxiang; Liu, Jun; Li, Haidong; Gao, Yangyang; Li, Xiaolin; Wu, Youping; Zhang, Liqun

    2015-03-21

    Through coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, we have studied the effects of grafting density (Σ) and grafted chain length (Lg) on the structural, mechanical and visco-elastic properties of end-grafted nanoparticles (NPs) filled polymer nanocomposites (PNCs). It is found that increasing the grafting density and grafted chain length both enhance the brush/matrix interface thickness and improve the dispersion of NPs, but there seems to exist an optimum grafting density, above which the end-grafted NPs tend to aggregate. The uniaxial stress-strain behavior of PNCs is also examined, showing that the tensile stress is more enhanced by increasing Lg compared to increasing Σ. The tensile modulus as a function of the strain is fitted following our previous work (Soft Matter, 2014, 10, 5099), exhibiting a gradually reduced non-linearity with the increase of Σ and Lg. Meanwhile, by imposing a sinusoidal external shear strain, for the first time we probe the effects of Σ and Lg on the visco-elastic properties such as the storage modulus G', loss modulus G'' and loss factor tan δ of end-grafted NPs filled PNCs. It is shown that the non-linear relation of G' and G'' as a function of shear strain amplitude decreases with the increase of Σ and Lg, which is consistent with experimental observations. We infer that the increased mechanical and reduced non-linear visco-elastic properties are correlated with the enhanced brush/matrix interface and therefore better dispersion of NPs and stronger physical cross-linking. This work may provide some rational means to tune the mechanical and visco-elastic properties of end-grafted NPs filled polymer nanocomposites.

  1. Physical aging effects on the compressive linear viscoelastic creep of IM7/K3B composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veazie, David R.; Gates, Thomas S.

    1995-01-01

    An experimental study was undertaken to establish the viscoelastic behavior of 1M7/K3B composite in compression at elevated temperature. Creep compliance, strain recovery and the effects of physical aging on the time dependent response was measured for uniaxial loading at several isothermal conditions below the glass transition temperature (T(g)). The IM7/K3B composite is a graphite reinforced thermoplastic polyimide with a T(g) of approximately 240 C. In a composite, the two matrix dominated compliance terms associated with time dependent behavior occur in the transverse and shear directions. Linear viscoelasticity was used to characterize the creep/recovery behavior and superposition techniques were used to establish the physical aging related material constants. Creep strain was converted to compliance and measured as a function of test time and aging time. Results included creep compliance master curves, physical aging shift factors and shift rates. The description of the unique experimental techniques required for compressive testing is also given.

  2. Comparative study of viscoelastic properties using virgin yogurt

    SciTech Connect

    Dimonte, G.; Nelson, D.; Weaver, S.; Schneider, M.; Flower-Maudlin, E.; Gore, R.; Baumgardner, J.R.; Sahota, M.S.

    1998-07-01

    We describe six different tests used to obtain a consistent set of viscoelastic properties for yogurt. Prior to yield, the shear modulus {mu} and viscosity {eta} are measured nondestructively using the speed and damping of elastic waves. Although new to foodstuffs, this technique has been applied to diverse materials from metals to the earth{close_quote}s crust. The resultant shear modulus agrees with {mu}{approximately}E/3 for incompressible materials, where the Young{close_quote}s modulus E is obtained from a stress{endash}strain curve in compression. The tensile yield stress {tau}{sub o} is measured in compression and tension, with good agreement. The conventional vane and cone/plate rheometers measured a shear stress yield {tau}{sub os}{approximately}{tau}{sub o}/{radical} (3) , as expected theoretically, but the inferred {open_quotes}apparent{close_quotes} viscosity from the cone/plate rheometer is much larger than the wave measurement due to the finite yield ({tau}{sub os}{ne}0). Finally, we inverted an open container of yogurt for 10{sup 6} s{gt}{eta}/{mu} and observed no motion. This demonstrates unequivocally that yogurt possesses a finite yield stress rather than a large viscosity. We present a constitutive model with a pre-yield viscosity to describe the damping of the elastic waves and use a simulation code to describe yielding in complex geometry. {copyright} {ital 1998 Society of Rheology.}

  3. Viscoelastic Properties and Dynamics of Porcine Gastric Mucin

    SciTech Connect

    Celli,J.; Gregor, B.; Turner, B.; Afdhal, N.; Bansil, R.; Erramilli, S.

    2005-01-01

    Gastric mucin is a glycoprotein known to undergo a pH-dependent sol-gel transition that is crucial to the protective function of the gastric mucus layer in mammalian stomachs. We present microscope-based dynamic light scattering data on porcine gastric mucin at pH 6 (solution) and pH 2 (gel) with and without the presence of tracer particles. The data provide a measurement of the microscale viscosity and the shear elastic modulus as well as an estimate of the mesh size of the gel formed at pH 2. We observe that the microscale viscosity in the gel is about 100-fold lower than its macroscopic viscosity, suggesting that large pores open up in the gel reducing frictional effects. The data presented here help to characterize physiologically relevant viscoelastic properties of an important biological macromolecule and may also serve to shed light on diffusive motion of small particles in the complex heterogeneous environment of a polymer gel network.

  4. Measurement of nonlinear viscoelastic properties of fluids using Dynamic Acoustoelastic Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trarieux, C.; Callé, S.; Poulin, A.; Tranchant, J.-F.; Moreschi, H.; Defontaine, M.

    2012-12-01

    A nonlinear ultrasound-based method called Dynamic Acoustoelastic Testing (DAET) is used to assess nonlinear viscoelastic properties of fluids. This method is based on the interaction between two elastic waves: a low-frequency (LF) sinusoidal wave (4 kHz) to successively compress and expand the liquid as a bulk stress, and ultrasound (US) pulses (1 MHz) to simultaneously probe the sample at different states of the quasi-hydrostatic pressure. The DAET method provides estimations of the elastic nonlinearities issued from the Time Of Flight Modulations (TOFM) of the US pulses. The TOFM is plotted as a function of the LF acoustic pressure, allowing an estimation of the nonlinear elastic parameter B/A. In this study, we first present the results obtained in Newtonian fluids such as water and silicone oils. Simple viscoelastic gels (Carbomers and Xanthan gums) have also been tested exhibiting the same behavior: TOFM linearly related to LF pressure amplitude corresponding to classical quadratic nonlinearity. Finally, preliminary DAET measurements have been performed in biphasic systems composed of hard glass beads in a gel-based matrix and in gelatin during a gelation process.

  5. Viscoelastic properties of graphene-based epoxy resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobile, Maria Rossella; Fierro, Annalisa; Rosolia, Salvatore; Raimondo, Marialuigia; Lafdi, Khalid; Guadagno, Liberata

    2015-12-01

    In this paper the viscoelastic properties of an epoxy resin filled with graphene-based nanoparticles have been investigated in the liquid state, before curing, by means of a rotational rheometer equipped with a parallel plate geometry. Exfoliated graphite was prepared using traditional acid intercalation followed by a sudden treatment at high temperature (900°C). The percentage of exfoliated graphite was found to be 56%. The epoxy matrix was prepared by mixing a tetrafunctional precursor with a reactive diluent which produces a significant decrease in the viscosity of the epoxy precursor so that the dispersion step of nanofillers in the matrix can easily occur. The hardener agent, the 4,4-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS), was added at a stoichiometric concentration with respect to all the epoxy rings. The inclusion of the partially exfoliated graphite (pEG) in the formulated epoxy mixture significantly modifies the rheological behaviour of the mixture itself. The epoxy mixture, indeed, shows a Newtonian behaviour while, at 3 wt % pEG content, the complex viscosity of the nanocomposite clearly shows a shear thinning behaviour with η* values much higher at the lower frequencies. The increase in complex viscosity with the increasing of the partially exfoliated graphite content was mostly caused by a dramatic increase in the storage modulus. All the graphene-based epoxy mixtures were cured by a two-stage curing cycles: a first isothermal stage was carried out at the lower temperature of 125°C for 1 hour while the second isothermal stage was performed at the higher temperature of 200°C for 3 hours. The mechanical properties of the cured nanocomposites show high values in the storage modulus and glass transition temperature.

  6. A multiscale model for predicting the viscoelastic properties of asphalt concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Cucalon, Lorena; Rahmani, Eisa; Little, Dallas N.; Allen, David H.

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that the accurate prediction of long term performance of asphalt concrete pavement requires modeling to account for viscoelasticity within the mastic. However, accounting for viscoelasticity can be costly when the material properties are measured at the scale of asphalt concrete. This is due to the fact that the material testing protocols must be performed recursively for each mixture considered for use in the final design.

  7. Intraluminal mapping of tissue viscoelastic properties using laser speckle rheology catheter (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Hosoda, Masaki; Tshikudi, Diane M.; Nadkarni, Seemantini K.

    2016-03-01

    A number of disease conditions including coronary atherosclerosis, peripheral artery disease and gastro-intestinal malignancies are associated with alterations in tissue mechanical properties. Laser speckle rheology (LSR) has been demonstrated to provide important information on tissue mechanical properties by analyzing the time scale of temporal speckle intensity fluctuations, which serves as an index of tissue viscoelasticity. In order to measure the mechanical properties of luminal organs in vivo, LSR must be conducted via a miniature endoscope or catheter. Here we demonstrate the capability of an omni-directional LSR catheter to quantify tissue mechanical properties over the entire luminal circumference without the need for rotational motion. Retracting the catheter using a motor-drive assembly enables the reconstruction of cylindrical maps of tissue mechanical properties. The performance of the LSR catheter is tested using a luminal phantom with mechanical moduli that vary in both circumferential and longitudinal directions. 2D cylindrical maps of phantom viscoelastic properties are reconstructed over four quadrants of the coronary circumference simultaneously during catheter pullback. The reconstructed cylindrical maps of the decorrelation time constants easily distinguish the different gel components of the phantom with different viscoelastic moduli. The average values of decorrelation times calculated for each gel component of the phantom show a strong correspondence with the viscoelastic moduli measured via standard mechanical rheometry. These results highlight the capability for cylindrical mapping of tissue viscoelastic properties using LSR in luminal organs using a miniature catheter, thus opening the opportunity for improved diagnosis of several disease conditions.

  8. Interface transferring mechanism and error modification of FRP-OFBG strain sensor based on standard linear viscoelastic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jilong; Zhou, Zhi; Ou, Jinping

    2006-03-01

    This paper presents the interface transferring mechanism and error modification of the Fiber Reinforced Polymer-Optical Fiber Bragg Grating (FRP-OFBG) sensing tendons, which including GFRP (Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer) and CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer), using standard linear viscoelastic model. The optical fiber is made up of glass, quartz or plastic, et al, which creep strain is very small at room temperature. So the tensile creep compliance of optical fiber is independent of time at room temperature. On the other hand, the FRP (GFRP or CFRP) is composed of a kind of polymeric matrix (epoxy resins or the others) with glass, carbon or aramid fibers, which shear creep strain is dependent of time at room temperature. Hence, the standard linear viscoelastic model is employed to describe the shear creep compliance of FRP along the fiber direction. The expression of interface strain transferring mechanism of FRP-OFBG sensors is derived based on the linear viscoelastic theory and the analytic solution of the error rate is given by the inverse Laplace transform. The effects of FRP viscoelasticity on the error rate of FRP-OFBG sensing tendons are included in the above expression. And the transient and steady-state error modified coefficient of FRP-OFBG sensors are obtained using initial value and final value theorems. Finally, a calculated example is given to explain the correct of theoretical prediction.

  9. Modeling of Viscoelastic Properties of Porous Rocks Saturated with Viscous Fluid at Seismic Frequencies at the Core Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, D. R.; Wang, Z.; Wang, F.; Wang, R.

    2015-12-01

    Currently the moduli and velocities of rocks at seismic frequencies are usually measured by the strain-stress method in lab. However, such measurements require well-designed equipment and skilled technicians, which greatly hinders the experimental investigation on the elastic and visco-elastic properties of rocks at seismic frequencies. We attempt to model the dynamic moduli of porous rocks saturated with viscous fluid at seismic frequencies on core scale using the strain-stress method, aiming to provide a complement to real core measurements in lab. First, we build 2D geometrical models containing the pore structure information of porous rocks based on the digital images (such as thin section, SEM, CT, etc.) of real rocks. Then we assume the rock frames are linearly elastic, and use the standard Maxwell spring-dash pot model to describe the visco-elastic properties of pore fluids. Boundary conditions are set according to the strain-stress method; and the displacement field is calculated using the finite element method (FEM). We numerically test the effects of fluid viscosity, frequency, and pore structure on the visco-elastic properties based on the calculation results. In our modeling, the viscosity of the pore fluid ranges from 103mPas to 109mPas; and the frequency varies from 5Hz to 500Hz. The preliminary results indicate that the saturated rock behaves stiffer and shows larger phase lag between stress and strain when the viscosity of the pore fluid and (or) the frequency increase.

  10. Assessing the viscoelastic properties of thrombus using a solid-sphere-based instantaneous force approach.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Chung; Shih, Cho-Chiang; Liu, Ting-Yu; Lee, Po-Yang

    2011-10-01

    The viscoelastic properties of thrombus play a significant role when the clot closes a leak in a vessel of the blood circulation. The common method used to measure the viscoelastic properties of a clot employs a rheometer but this might be unsuitable due to the clot fiber network being broken up by excessive deformation. This study assessed the feasibility of using a novel acoustic method to assess the viscoelastic properties of blood clots. This method is based on monitoring the motion of a solid sphere in a blood clot induced by an applied instantaneous force. Experiments were performed in which a solid sphere was displaced by a 1 MHz single-element focused transducer, with a 20 MHz single-element focused transducer used to track this displacement. The spatiotemporal behavior of the sphere displacement was used to determine the viscoelastic properties of the clot. The experimental system was calibrated by measuring the viscoelastic modulus of gelatin using different types of solid spheres embedded in the phantoms and, then, the shear modulus and viscosity of porcine blood clots with hematocrits of 0% (plasma), 20% and 40% were assessed. The viscoelastic modulus of each clot sample was also measured directly by a rheometer for comparison. The results showed that the shear modulus increased from 173 ± 52 (mean ± SD) Pa for 40%-hematocrit blood clots to 619.5 ± 80.5 Pa for plasma blood clots, while the viscosity decreased from 0.32 ± 0.07 Pa∙s to 0.16 ± 0.06 Pa∙s, respectively, which indicated that the concentration of red blood cells and the amount of fibrinogen are the main determinants of the clot viscoelastic properties.

  11. A self-consistent estimate for linear viscoelastic polycrystals with internal variables inferred from the collocation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Q. H.; Brenner, R.; Castelnau, O.; Moulinec, H.; Suquet, P.

    2012-03-01

    The correspondence principle is customarily used with the Laplace-Carson transform technique to tackle the homogenization of linear viscoelastic heterogeneous media. The main drawback of this method lies in the fact that the whole stress and strain histories have to be considered to compute the mechanical response of the material during a given macroscopic loading. Following a remark of Mandel (1966 Mécanique des Milieux Continus(Paris, France: Gauthier-Villars)), Ricaud and Masson (2009 Int. J. Solids Struct. 46 1599-1606) have shown the equivalence between the collocation method used to invert Laplace-Carson transforms and an internal variables formulation. In this paper, this new method is developed for the case of polycrystalline materials with general anisotropic properties for local and macroscopic behavior. Applications are provided for the case of constitutive relations accounting for glide of dislocations on particular slip systems. It is shown that the method yields accurate results that perfectly match the standard collocation method and reference full-field results obtained with a FFT numerical scheme. The formulation is then extended to the case of time- and strain-dependent viscous properties, leading to the incremental collocation method (ICM) that can be solved efficiently by a step-by-step procedure. Specifically, the introduction of isotropic and kinematic hardening at the slip system scale is considered.

  12. The Viscoelastic Properties of Nematic Monodomains Containing Liquid Crystal Polymers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Dongfeng

    The work presented here investigates the viscoelastic properties of nematic materials containing liquid crystal polymers (LCP). We focus on how the elastic constants and the viscosity coefficients of the mixture systems are influenced by polymer architectures. In dynamic light scattering studies of the relaxation of the director orientation fluctuations for the splay, twist, and bend deformation modes, decrease of the relaxation rates was observed when LCPs were dissolved into low molar mass nematics (LMMN). For the side-chain LCPs, the slowing down in the bend mode is comparable to or larger than those of the splay and twist modes. For main-chain LCPs, the relative changes in the relaxation rates for the twist and splay modes are about one order of magnitude larger than that for the bend mode. The results of light scattering under an electric field show that the decrease in the twist relaxation rate is due to a large increase in the twist viscosity and a minor decrease in the twist elastic constant. These changes were found to increase with decrease of the spacer length, with increase of molecular weight, and with decrease of the backbone flexibility. In Freedericksz transition measurements, the splay and bend elastic constants and the dielectric anisotropies of the nematic mixtures were determined and the values are 5~15% lower than those of the pure solvent. From the analysis of the results of Freedericksz transition and light scattering experiments, a complete set of the elastic constants and viscosity coefficients corresponding to the three director deformation modes were obtained for the LCP mixtures. The changes in the viscosity coefficients due to addition of LCPs were analysed to estimate the anisotropic shapes of the polymer backbone via a hydrodynamic model. The results suggest that an oblate backbone configuration is maintained by the side-chain LCPs and a prolate chain configuration appears for the main-chain LCPs. The rheological behavior of a side

  13. Determinants of ovine compact bone viscoelastic properties: effects of architecture, mineralization, and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Les, C M; Spence, C A; Vance, J L; Christopherson, G T; Patel, B; Turner, A S; Divine, G W; Fyhrie, D P

    2004-09-01

    Significant decreases in ovine compact bone viscoelastic properties (specifically, stress-rate sensitivity, and damping efficiency) are associated with three years of ovariectomy and are particularly evident at higher frequencies [Proc. Orthop. Res. Soc. 27 (2002) 89]. It is unclear what materials or architectural features of bone are responsible for either the viscoelastic properties themselves, or for the changes in those properties that were observed with estrogen depletion. In this study, we examined the relationship between these viscoelastic mechanical properties and features involving bone architecture (BV/TV), materials parameters (ash density, %mineralization), and histologic evidence of remodeling (%remodeled, cement line interface). The extent of mineralization was inversely proportional to the material's efficiency in damping stress oscillations. The damping characteristics of bone material from ovariectomized animals were significantly more sensitive to variation in mineralization than was bone from control animals. At low frequencies (6 Hz or less), increased histologic evidence of remodeling was positively correlated with increased damping efficiency. However, the dramatic decreases in stress-rate sensitivity that accompanied 3-year ovariectomy were seen throughout the bone structure and occurred even in areas with little or no secondary Haversian remodeling as well as in areas of complete remodeling. Taken together, these data suggest that, while the mineral component may modify the viscoelastic behavior of bone, the basic mechanism underlying bone viscoelastic behavior, and of the changes in that behavior with estrogen depletion, reside in a non-mineral component of the bone that can be significantly altered in the absence of secondary remodeling.

  14. Laser Speckle Rheology for evaluating the viscoelastic properties of hydrogel scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajjarian, Zeinab; Nia, Hadi Tavakoli; Ahn, Shawn; Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Jain, Rakesh K.; Nadkarni, Seemantini K.

    2016-12-01

    Natural and synthetic hydrogel scaffolds exhibit distinct viscoelastic properties at various length scales and deformation rates. Laser Speckle Rheology (LSR) offers a novel, non-contact optical approach for evaluating the frequency-dependent viscoelastic properties of hydrogels. In LSR, a coherent laser beam illuminates the specimen and a high-speed camera acquires the time-varying speckle images. Cross-correlation analysis of frames returns the speckle intensity autocorrelation function, g2(t), from which the frequency-dependent viscoelastic modulus, G*(ω), is deduced. Here, we establish the capability of LSR for evaluating the viscoelastic properties of hydrogels over a large range of moduli, using conventional mechanical rheometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based indentation as reference-standards. Results demonstrate a strong correlation between |G*(ω)| values measured by LSR and mechanical rheometry (r = 0.95, p < 10‑9), and z-test analysis reports that moduli values measured by the two methods are identical (p > 0.08) over a large range (47 Pa – 36 kPa). In addition, |G*(ω)| values measured by LSR correlate well with indentation moduli, E, reported by AFM (r = 0.92, p < 10‑7). Further, spatially-resolved moduli measurements in micro-patterned substrates demonstrate that LSR combines the strengths of conventional rheology and micro-indentation in assessing hydrogel viscoelastic properties at multiple frequencies and small length-scales.

  15. Lamb Wave Dispersion Ultrasound Vibrometry (LDUV) Method for Quantifying Mechanical Properties of Viscoelastic Solids

    PubMed Central

    Nenadic, Ivan Z.; Urban, Matthew W.; Mitchell, Scott A.; Greenleaf, James F.

    2011-01-01

    Diastolic dysfunction is the inability of the left ventricle to supply sufficient stroke volumes under normal physiological conditions and is often accompanied by stiffening of the left-ventricular myocardium. A noninvasive technique capable of quantifying viscoelasticity of the myocardium would be beneficial in clinical settings. Our group has been investigating the use of Shearwave Dispersion Ultrasound Vibrometry (SDUV), a noninvasive ultrasound based method for quantifying viscoelasticity of soft tissues. The primary motive of this study is the design and testing of viscoelastic materials suitable for validation of the Lamb wave Dispersion Ultrasound Vibrometry (LDUV), an SDUV-based technique for measuring viscoelasticity of tissues with plate-like geometry. We report the results of quantifying viscoelasticity of urethane rubber and gelatin samples using LDUV and an embedded sphere method. The LDUV method was used to excite antisymmetric Lamb waves and measure the dispersion in urethane rubber and gelatin plates. An antisymmetric Lamb wave model was fitted to the wave speed dispersion data to estimate elasticity and viscosity of the materials. A finite element model of a viscoelastic plate submerged in water was used to study the appropriateness of the Lamb wave dispersion equations. An embedded sphere method was used as an independent measurement of the viscoelasticity of the urethane rubber and gelatin. The FEM dispersion data were in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions. Viscoelasticity of the urethane rubber and gelatin obtained using the LDUV and embedded sphere methods agreed within one standard deviation. LDUV studies on excised porcine myocardium sample were performed to investigate the feasibility of the approach in preparation for open-chest in vivo studies. The results suggest that the LDUV technique can be used to quantify mechanical properties of soft tissues with a plate-like geometry. PMID:21403186

  16. Viscoelastic and dynamic nonlinear properties of airway smooth muscle tissue: roles of mechanical force and the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Ito, Satoru; Majumdar, Arnab; Kume, Hiroaki; Shimokata, Kaoru; Naruse, Keiji; Lutchen, Kenneth R; Stamenovic, Dimitrije; Suki, Béla

    2006-06-01

    The viscoelastic and dynamic nonlinear properties of guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle tissues were investigated by measuring the storage (G') and loss (G") moduli using pseudorandom small-amplitude length oscillations between 0.12 and 3.5 Hz superimposed on static strains of either 10 or 20% of initial length. The G" and G' spectra were interpreted using a linear viscoelastic model incorporating damping (G) and stiffness (H), respectively. Both G and H were elevated following an increase in strain from 10 to 20%. There was no change in harmonic distortion (K(d)), an index of dynamic nonlinearity, between 10 and 20% strains. Application of methacholine at 10% strain significantly increased G and H while it decreased K(d). Cytochalasin D, isoproterenol, and HA-1077, a Rho-kinase inhibitor, significantly decreased both G and H but increased K(d). Following cytochalasin D, G, H, and K(d) were all elevated when mean strain increased from 10 to 20%. There were no changes in hysteresivity, G/H, under any condition. We conclude that not all aspects of the viscoelastic properties of tracheal smooth muscle strips are similar to those previously observed in cultured cells. We attribute these differences to the contribution of the extracellular matrix. Additionally, using a network model, we show that the dynamic nonlinear behavior, which has not been observed in cell culture, is associated with the state of the contractile stress and may derive from active polymerization within the cytoskeleton.

  17. Structural and viscoelastic properties of actin networks formed by espin or pathologically relevant espin mutants.

    PubMed

    Lieleg, Oliver; Schmoller, Kurt M; Purdy Drew, Kirstin R; Claessens, Mireille M A E; Semmrich, Christine; Zheng, Lili; Bartles, James R; Bausch, Andreas R

    2009-11-09

    The structural organization of the cytoskeleton determines its viscoelastic response which is crucial for the correct functionality of living cells. Both the mechanical response and microstructure of the cytoskeleton are regulated on a microscopic level by the local activation of different actin binding and/or bundling proteins (ABPs). Misregulations in the expression of these ABPs or mutations in their sequence can entail severe cellular dysfunctions and diseases. Here, we study the structural and viscoelastic properties of reconstituted actin networks cross-linked by the ABP espin and compare the obtained network properties to those of other bundled actin networks. Moreover, we quantify the impact of pathologically relevant espin mutations on the viscoelastic properties of these cytoskeletal networks.

  18. Time-Dependent Morphologies and Viscoelastic Properties of Block Copolymers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-15

    been shown proportional to the relative amounts of those phases (17). Diamant and coworkers (14-16) showed that the viscoelastic behavior between the...traditionally been associated with the re- lative amounts of styrene and butadiene in their respective domains (35). Recently, Diamant and coworkers (14-i6...understood at present. However, Diamant and coworkers (14-16) showed that a maximum in G"(T) between the two main transitions could be attributed to a "bulge

  19. Effect of Solar Radiation on Viscoelastic Properties of Bovine Leather: Temperature and Frequency Scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalyanya, Kallen Mulilo; Rop, Ronald K.; Onyuka, Arthur S.

    2017-04-01

    This work presents both analytical and experimental results of the effect of unfiltered natural solar radiation on the thermal and dynamic mechanical properties of Boran bovine leather at both pickling and tanning stages of preparation. Samples cut from both pickled and tanned pieces of leather of appropriate dimensions were exposed to unfiltered natural solar radiation for time intervals ranging from 0 h (non-irradiated) to 24 h. The temperature of the dynamic mechanical analyzer was equilibrated at 30°C and increased to 240°C at a heating rate of 5°C \\cdot Min^{-1}, while its oscillation frequency varied from 0.1 Hz to 100 Hz. With the help of thermal analysis (TA) control software which analyzes and generates parameter means/averages at temperature/frequency range, the graphs were created by Microsoft Excel 2013 from the means. The viscoelastic properties showed linear frequency dependence within 0.1 Hz to 30 Hz followed by negligible frequency dependence above 30 Hz. Storage modulus (E') and shear stress (σ ) increased with frequency, while loss modulus (E''), complex viscosity (η ^{*}) and dynamic shear viscosity (η) decreased linearly with frequency. The effect of solar radiation was evident as the properties increased initially from 0 h to 6 h of irradiation followed by a steady decline to a minimum at 18 h before a drastic increase to a maximum at 24 h. Hence, tanning industry can consider the time duration of 24 h for sun-drying of leather to enhance the mechanical properties and hence the quality of the leather. At frequencies higher than 30 Hz, the dynamic mechanical properties are independent of the frequency. The frequency of 30 Hz was observed to be a critical value in the behavior in the mechanical properties of bovine hide.

  20. On the use of a loudspeaker for measuring the viscoelastic properties of sound absorbing materials.

    PubMed

    Doutres, Olivier; Dauchez, Nicolas; Génevaux, Jean-Michel; Lemarquand, Guy

    2008-12-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility to use an electrodynamic loudspeaker to determine viscoelastic properties of sound-absorbing materials in the audible frequency range. The loudspeaker compresses the porous sample in a cavity, and a measurement of its electrical impedance allows one to determine the mechanical impedance of the sample: no additional sensors are required. Viscoelastic properties of the material are then estimated by inverting a 1D Biot model. The method is applied to two sound-absorbing materials (glass wool and polymer foam). Results are in good agreement with the classical compression quasistatic method.

  1. The prediction of long term viscoelastic properties of fiber reinforced plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinson, H. F.; Dillard, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    A method for the experimental and analytical accelerated characterization of long term viscoelastic properties is presented. The time-temperature-stress superposition principle (TTSSP) is shown to serve as the basis for determining long term compliance data from short term creep test results. Nonlinear viscoelastic theories are discussed to provide the framework for the mathematically modeling of such a process. A time dependent Tsai-Hill-Zhurkov failure theory is used to determine long term failure properties from short term data. Compliance and failure data are incorporated in an incremental lamination theory to make long term laminate predictions. Comparisons are made between theory and experiment.

  2. Impact of gas injection on the apparent viscosity and viscoelastic property of waste activated sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Bobade, Veena; Baudez, Jean Christophe; Evans, Geoffery; Eshtiaghi, Nicky

    2017-05-01

    Gas injection is known to play a major role on the particle size of the sludge, the oxygen transfer rate, as well as the mixing efficiency of membrane bioreactors and aeration basins in the waste water treatment plants. The rheological characteristics of sludge are closely related to the particle size of the sludge floc. However, particle size of sludge floc depends partly on the shear induced in the sludge and partly on physico-chemical nature of the sludge. The objective of this work is to determine the impact of gas injection on both the apparent viscosity and viscoelastic property of sludge. The apparent viscosity of sludge was investigated by two methods: in-situ and after sparging. Viscosity curves obtained by in-situ measurement showed that the apparent viscosity decreases significantly from 4000 Pa s to 10 Pa s at low shear rate range (below 10 s(-1)) with an increase in gas flow rate (0.5LPM to 3LPM); however the after sparging flow curve analysis showed that the reduction in apparent viscosity throughout the shear rate range is negligible to be displayed. Torque and displacement data at low shear rate range revealed that the obtained lower apparent viscosity in the in-situ method is not the material characteristics, but the slippage effect due to a preferred location of the bubbles close to the bob, causing an inconsistent decrease of torque and increase of displacement at low shear rate range. In linear viscoelastic regime, the elastic and viscous modulus of sludge was reduced by 33% & 25%, respectively, due to gas injection because of induced shear. The amount of induced shear measured through two different tests (creep and time sweep) were the same. The impact of this induced shear on sludge structure was also verified by microscopic images.

  3. The viscoelastic properties of microvilli are dependent upon the cell-surface molecule.

    PubMed

    Python, Johanne L; Wilson, Kristal O; Snook, Jeremy H; Guo, Bin; Guilford, William H

    2010-07-02

    We studied at nanometer resolution the viscoelastic properties of microvilli and tethers pulled from myelogenous cells via P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1 (PSGL-1) and found that in contrast to pure membrane tethers, the viscoelastic properties of microvillus deformations are dependent upon the cell-surface molecule through which load is applied. A laser trap and polymer bead coated with anti-PSGL-1 (KPL-1) were used to apply step loads to microvilli. The lengthening of the microvillus in response to the induced step loads was fitted with a viscoelastic model. The quasi-steady state force on the microvillus at any given length was approximately fourfold lower in cells treated with cytochalasin D or when pulled with concanavalin A-coated rather than KPL-1-coated beads. These data suggest that associations between PSGL-1 and the underlying actin cytoskeleton significantly affect the early stages of leukocyte deformation under flow.

  4. Mapping Viscoelastic and Plastic Properties of Polymers and Polymer-Nanotube Composites using Instrumented Indentation

    PubMed Central

    Gayle, Andrew J.; Cook, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    An instrumented indentation method is developed for generating maps of time-dependent viscoelastic and time-independent plastic properties of polymeric materials. The method is based on a pyramidal indentation model consisting of two quadratic viscoelastic Kelvin-like elements and a quadratic plastic element in series. Closed-form solutions for indentation displacement under constant load and constant loading-rate are developed and used to determine and validate material properties. Model parameters are determined by point measurements on common monolithic polymers. Mapping is demonstrated on an epoxy-ceramic interface and on two composite materials consisting of epoxy matrices containing multi-wall carbon nanotubes. A fast viscoelastic deformation process in the epoxy was unaffected by the inclusion of the nanotubes, whereas a slow viscoelastic process was significantly impeded, as was the plastic deformation. Mapping revealed considerable spatial heterogeneity in the slow viscoelastic and plastic responses in the composites, particularly in the material with a greater fraction of nanotubes. PMID:27563168

  5. Non-linear visco-elastic analysis and the design of super-pressure balloons : stress, strain and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakefield, David

    approach to stress and stability analysis inherent in inTENS, and focuses in particular on: Implementation of an alternative application of the Incremental Schapery Rand (ISR) representation of the non-linear visco-elastic response of the polyethylene balloon film. This is based upon the relaxation modulus, rather than the creep compliance, and as such fits more efficiently into the Dynamic Relaxation analysis procedure used within inTENS. Comparisons of results between the two approaches are given. Verification of the material model by comparison with material tests. Verification of the application to pumpkin balloon structures by comparison with scale model tests. Application of inTENS with ISR to time-stepping analyses of a balloon flight including diurnal variations of temperature and pressure. This includes the demonstration of a method for checking the likely hood of overall instability developing at any particular time in the flight as both balloon geometry and film properties change due to visco-elastic effects.

  6. Estimation of the viscoelastic properties of vessel walls using a computational model and Doppler ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balocco, Simone; Basset, Olivier; Courbebaisse, Guy; Boni, Enrico; Frangi, Alejandro F.; Tortoli, Piero; Cachard, Christian

    2010-06-01

    Human arteries affected by atherosclerosis are characterized by altered wall viscoelastic properties. The possibility of noninvasively assessing arterial viscoelasticity in vivo would significantly contribute to the early diagnosis and prevention of this disease. This paper presents a noniterative technique to estimate the viscoelastic parameters of a vascular wall Zener model. The approach requires the simultaneous measurement of flow variations and wall displacements, which can be provided by suitable ultrasound Doppler instruments. Viscoelastic parameters are estimated by fitting the theoretical constitutive equations to the experimental measurements using an ARMA parameter approach. The accuracy and sensitivity of the proposed method are tested using reference data generated by numerical simulations of arterial pulsation in which the physiological conditions and the viscoelastic parameters of the model can be suitably varied. The estimated values quantitatively agree with the reference values, showing that the only parameter affected by changing the physiological conditions is viscosity, whose relative error was about 27% even when a poor signal-to-noise ratio is simulated. Finally, the feasibility of the method is illustrated through three measurements made at different flow regimes on a cylindrical vessel phantom, yielding a parameter mean estimation error of 25%.

  7. Estimation of the viscoelastic properties of vessel walls using a computational model and Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Balocco, Simone; Basset, Olivier; Courbebaisse, Guy; Boni, Enrico; Frangi, Alejandro F; Tortoli, Piero; Cachard, Christian

    2010-06-21

    Human arteries affected by atherosclerosis are characterized by altered wall viscoelastic properties. The possibility of noninvasively assessing arterial viscoelasticity in vivo would significantly contribute to the early diagnosis and prevention of this disease. This paper presents a noniterative technique to estimate the viscoelastic parameters of a vascular wall Zener model. The approach requires the simultaneous measurement of flow variations and wall displacements, which can be provided by suitable ultrasound Doppler instruments. Viscoelastic parameters are estimated by fitting the theoretical constitutive equations to the experimental measurements using an ARMA parameter approach. The accuracy and sensitivity of the proposed method are tested using reference data generated by numerical simulations of arterial pulsation in which the physiological conditions and the viscoelastic parameters of the model can be suitably varied. The estimated values quantitatively agree with the reference values, showing that the only parameter affected by changing the physiological conditions is viscosity, whose relative error was about 27% even when a poor signal-to-noise ratio is simulated. Finally, the feasibility of the method is illustrated through three measurements made at different flow regimes on a cylindrical vessel phantom, yielding a parameter mean estimation error of 25%.

  8. Effects of swelling on the viscoelastic properties of polyester films made from glycerol and glutaric acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Viscoelastic properties have been determined for poly(glycerol-co-glutaric acid) films synthesized from Lewis acid-catalyzed polyesterifications. The polymers were prepared by synthesizing polymer gels that were subsequently cured at 125 degrees C to form polymer films. The polymers were evaluated ...

  9. A Rapid Small-Scale Method to Evaluate Dough Viscoelastic Properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dough viscoelastic properties are of special interest to bakers and wheat breeders. Dough extensibility (DE) and resistance to extension (RE) influence each step of the baking process as well as product end-use quality, and thus are important quality factors to consider in wheat breeding programs. T...

  10. Rheology of the vitreous gel: effects of macromolecule organization on the viscoelastic properties.

    PubMed

    Sharif-Kashani, Pooria; Hubschman, Jean-Pierre; Sassoon, Daniel; Kavehpour, H Pirouz

    2011-02-03

    The macromolecular organization of vitreous gel is responsible for its viscoelastic properties. Knowledge of this correlation enables us to relate the physical properties of vitreous to its pathology, as well as optimize surgical procedures such as vitrectomy. Herein, we studied the rheological properties (e.g. dynamic deformation, shear stress-strain flow, and creep compliance) of porcine vitreous humor using a stressed-control shear rheometer. All experiments were performed in a closed environment with the temperature set to that of the human body (i.e. 37°C) to mimic in-vivo conditions. We modeled the creep deformation using the two-element retardation spectrum model. By associating each element of the model to an individual biopolymeric system in the vitreous gel, a distinct response to the applied stress was observed from each component. We hypothesized that the first viscoelastic response with the short time scale (~1 s) is associated with the collagen structure, while the second viscoelastic response with longer time scale (~100 s) is related to the microfibrilis and hyaluronan network. Consequently, we were able to differentiate the role of each main component from the overall viscoelastic properties.

  11. Dynamic Viscoelasticity and Surface Properties of Porcine Left Anterior Descending Coronary Arteries.

    PubMed

    Burton, Hanna E; Freij, Jenny M; Espino, Daniel M

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was, for the first time, to measure and compare quantitatively the viscoelastic properties and surface roughness of coronary arteries. Porcine left anterior descending coronary arteries were dissected ex vivo. Viscoelastic properties were measured longitudinally using dynamic mechanical analysis, for a range of frequencies from 0.5 to 10 Hz. Surface roughness was calculated following three-dimensional reconstructed of surface images obtained using an optical microscope. Storage modulus ranged from 14.47 to 25.82 MPa, and was found to be frequency-dependent, decreasing as the frequency increased. Storage was greater than the loss modulus, with the latter found to be frequency-independent with a mean value of 2.10 ± 0.33 MPa. The circumferential surface roughness was significantly greater (p < 0.05) than the longitudinal surface roughness, ranging from 0.73 to 2.83 and 0.35 to 0.92 µm, respectively. However, if surface roughness values were corrected for shrinkage during processing, circumferential and longitudinal surface roughness were not significantly different (1.04 ± 0.47, 0.89 ± 0.27 µm, respectively; p > 0.05). No correlation was found between the viscoelastic properties and surface roughness. It is feasible to quantitatively measure the viscoelastic properties of coronary arteries and the roughness of their endothelial surface.

  12. Constitutive Equations: Plastic and Viscoelastic Properties. (Latest citations from the Aerospace Database)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning analytical techniques using constitutive equations, applied to materials under stress. The properties explored with these techniques include viscoelasticity, thermoelasticity, and plasticity. While many of the references are general as to material type, most refer to specific metals or composites, or to specific shapes, such as flat plate or spherical vessels.

  13. Influence of jet-cooking Prowashonupana barley flour on phenolic composition, antioxidant activities, and viscoelastic properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The influence of jet-cooking Prowashonupana barley flour on total phenolic contents, antioxidant activities, water holding capacities, and viscoelastic properties was studied. Barley flour was jet-cooked without or with pH adjustment at 7, 9, or 11. Generally, the free phenolic content and antioxi...

  14. Importance of Viscoelastic Property Measurement of a New Hydrogel for Health Care

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Niladri; Saha, Nabanita; Kitano, Takeshi; Saha, Petr

    2009-07-01

    A simple technology based new hydrogel "PVP-CMC-BA" has been prepared by the scientists of Tomas Bata University in Zlin, Czech Republic. Its swelling property (in presence of water, human blood and different pH), antimicrobial property (in presence of skin infection causing agents like: Staphylococcus aureus; bacteria and Candida albicans; fungi) and viscoelastic properties such as storage modulus (G'), loss modulus (G") and complex viscosity (η*) were investigated at room temperature (25-28° C) which demonstrate that PVP-CMC-BA hydrogel is maintaining requisite properties for health care application, specially as a wound dressing material. The elasticity and antimicrobial property of PVP-CMC-BA is directly correlated with percentage of boric acid, an antiseptic agent. The consequential values of viscoelastic properties of the hydrogel (before drying) enable us to understand its specific flexible condition to apply on the surface of human body.

  15. Indentation testing and optimized property identification for viscoelastic materials using the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resapu, Rajeswara Reddy

    The most common approaches to determining mechanical material properties of materials are tension and compression tests. However, tension and compression testing cannot be implemented under certain loading conditions (immovable object, not enough space to hold object for testing, etc). Similarly, tensile and compression testing cannot be performed on certain types of materials (delicate, bulk, non-machinable, those that cannot be separated from a larger structure, etc). For such cases, other material testing methods need to be implemented. Indentation testing is one such method; this approach is often non-destructive and can be used to characterize regions that are not compatible with other testing methods. However, indentation testing typically leads to force-displacement data as opposed to the direct stress-strain data normally used for the mechanical characterization of materials; this data needs to be analyzed using a suitable approach to determine the associated material properties. As such, methods to establish material properties from force-displacement indentation data need to be identified. In this work, a finite element approach using parameter optimization is developed to determine the mechanical properties from the experimental indentation data. Polymers and tissues tend to have time-dependent mechanical behavior; this means that their mechanical response under load changes with time. This dissertation seeks to characterize the properties of these materials using indentation testing under the assumption that they are linear viscoelastic. An example of a material of interest is the polymer poly vinyl chloride (PVC) that is used as the insulation of some aircraft wiring. Changes in the mechanical properties of this material over years of service can indicate degradation and a potential hazard to continued use. To investigate the validity of using indentation testing to monitor polymer insulation degradation, PVC film and PVC-insulated aircraft wiring are

  16. Microscale characterization of the viscoelastic properties of hydrogel biomaterials using dual-mode ultrasound elastography.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xiaowei; Stegemann, Jan P; Deng, Cheri X

    2016-05-01

    Characterization of the microscale mechanical properties of biomaterials is a key challenge in the field of mechanobiology. Dual-mode ultrasound elastography (DUE) uses high frequency focused ultrasound to induce compression in a sample, combined with interleaved ultrasound imaging to measure the resulting deformation. This technique can be used to non-invasively perform creep testing on hydrogel biomaterials to characterize their viscoelastic properties. DUE was applied to a range of hydrogel constructs consisting of either hydroxyapatite (HA)-doped agarose, HA-collagen, HA-fibrin, or preosteoblast-seeded collagen constructs. DUE provided spatial and temporal mapping of local and bulk displacements and strains at high resolution. Hydrogel materials exhibited characteristic creep behavior, and the maximum strain and residual strain were both material- and concentration-dependent. Burger's viscoelastic model was used to extract characteristic parameters describing material behavior. Increased protein concentration resulted in greater stiffness and viscosity, but did not affect the viscoelastic time constant of acellular constructs. Collagen constructs exhibited significantly higher modulus and viscosity than fibrin constructs. Cell-seeded collagen constructs became stiffer with altered mechanical behavior as they developed over time. Importantly, DUE also provides insight into the spatial variation of viscoelastic properties at sub-millimeter resolution, allowing interrogation of the interior of constructs. DUE presents a novel technique for non-invasively characterizing hydrogel materials at the microscale, and therefore may have unique utility in the study of mechanobiology and the characterization of hydrogel biomaterials.

  17. Measurement of viscoelastic properties of in vivo swine myocardium using Lamb Wave Dispersion Ultrasound Vibrometry (LDUV)

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Matthew W.; Pislaru, Cristina; Nenadic, Ivan Z.; Kinnick, Randall R.; Greenleaf, James F.

    2012-01-01

    Viscoelastic properties of the myocardium are important for normal cardiac function and may be altered by disease. Thus, quantification of these properties may aid with evaluation of the health of the heart. Lamb Wave Dispersion Ultrasound Vibrometry (LDUV) is a shear wave-based method that uses wave velocity dispersion to measure the underlying viscoelastic material properties of soft tissue with plate-like geometries. We tested this method in eight pigs in an open-chest preparation. A mechanical actuator was used to create harmonic, propagating mechanical waves in the myocardial wall. The motion was tracked using a high frame rate acquisition sequence, typically 2500 Hz. The velocities of wave propagation were measured over the 50–400 Hz frequency range in 50 Hz increments. Data were acquired over several cardiac cycles. Dispersion curves were fit with a viscoelastic, anti-symmetric Lamb wave model to obtain estimates of the shear elasticity, μ1, and viscosity, μ2 as defined by the Kelvin-Voigt rheological model. The sensitivity of the Lamb wave model was also studied using simulated data. We demonstrated that wave velocity measurements and Lamb wave theory allow one to estimate the variation of viscoelastic moduli of the myocardial walls in vivo throughout the course of the cardiac cycle. PMID:23060325

  18. Influence of the viscoelastic properties of the respiratory system on the energetically optimum breathing frequency.

    PubMed

    Bates, J H; Milic-Emili, J

    1993-01-01

    We hypothesized that the viscoelastic properties of the respiratory system should have significant implications for the energetically optimal frequency of breathing, in view of the fact that these properties cause marked dependencies of overall system resistance and elastance on frequency. To test our hypothesis we simulated two models of canine and human respiratory system mechanics during sinusoidal breathing and calculated the inspiratory work (WI) and pressure-time integral (PTI) per minute under both resting and exercise conditions. The two models were a two-compartment viscoelastic model and a single-compartment model. Requiring minute alveolar ventilation to be fixed, we found that both models predicted almost identical optimum breathing frequencies. The calculated PTI was very insensitive to increases in breathing frequency above the optimal frequencies, while WI was found to increase slowly with frequency above its optimum. In contrast, both WI and PTI increased sharply as frequency decreased below their respective optima. A sensitivity analysis showed that the model predictions were very insensitive to the elastance and resistance values chosen to characterize tissue viscoelasticity. We conclude that the WI criterion for choosing the frequency of breathing is compatible with observations in nature, whereas the optimal frequency predictions of the PTI are rather too high. Both criteria allow for a fairly wide margin of choice in frequency above the optimum values without incurring excessive additional energy expenditure. Furthermore, contrary to our expectations, the viscoelastic properties of the respiratory system tissues do not pose a noticeable problem to the respiratory controller in terms of energy expenditure.

  19. Viscoelastic properties of cell walls of single living plant cells determined by dynamic nanoindentation.

    PubMed

    Hayot, Céline M; Forouzesh, Elham; Goel, Ashwani; Avramova, Zoya; Turner, Joseph A

    2012-04-01

    Plant development results from controlled cell divisions, structural modifications, and reorganizations of the cell wall. Thereby, regulation of cell wall behaviour takes place at multiple length scales involving compositional and architectural aspects in addition to various developmental and/or environmental factors. The physical properties of the primary wall are largely determined by the nature of the complex polymer network, which exhibits time-dependent behaviour representative of viscoelastic materials. Here, a dynamic nanoindentation technique is used to measure the time-dependent response and the viscoelastic behaviour of the cell wall in single living cells at a micron or sub-micron scale. With this approach, significant changes in storage (stiffness) and loss (loss of energy) moduli are captured among the tested cells. The results reveal hitherto unknown differences in the viscoelastic parameters of the walls of same-age similarly positioned cells of the Arabidopsis ecotypes (Col 0 and Ws 2). The technique is also shown to be sensitive enough to detect changes in cell wall properties in cells deficient in the activity of the chromatin modifier ATX1. Extensive computational modelling of the experimental measurements (i.e. modelling the cell as a viscoelastic pressure vessel) is used to analyse the influence of the wall thickness, as well as the turgor pressure, at the positions of our measurements. By combining the nanoDMA technique with finite element simulations quantifiable measurements of the viscoelastic properties of plant cell walls are achieved. Such techniques are expected to find broader applications in quantifying the influence of genetic, biological, and environmental factors on the nanoscale mechanical properties of the cell wall.

  20. Laser Speckle Rheology for evaluating the viscoelastic properties of hydrogel scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Hajjarian, Zeinab; Nia, Hadi Tavakoli; Ahn, Shawn; Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Jain, Rakesh K.; Nadkarni, Seemantini K.

    2016-01-01

    Natural and synthetic hydrogel scaffolds exhibit distinct viscoelastic properties at various length scales and deformation rates. Laser Speckle Rheology (LSR) offers a novel, non-contact optical approach for evaluating the frequency-dependent viscoelastic properties of hydrogels. In LSR, a coherent laser beam illuminates the specimen and a high-speed camera acquires the time-varying speckle images. Cross-correlation analysis of frames returns the speckle intensity autocorrelation function, g2(t), from which the frequency-dependent viscoelastic modulus, G*(ω), is deduced. Here, we establish the capability of LSR for evaluating the viscoelastic properties of hydrogels over a large range of moduli, using conventional mechanical rheometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based indentation as reference-standards. Results demonstrate a strong correlation between |G*(ω)| values measured by LSR and mechanical rheometry (r = 0.95, p < 10−9), and z-test analysis reports that moduli values measured by the two methods are identical (p > 0.08) over a large range (47 Pa – 36 kPa). In addition, |G*(ω)| values measured by LSR correlate well with indentation moduli, E, reported by AFM (r = 0.92, p < 10−7). Further, spatially-resolved moduli measurements in micro-patterned substrates demonstrate that LSR combines the strengths of conventional rheology and micro-indentation in assessing hydrogel viscoelastic properties at multiple frequencies and small length-scales. PMID:27905494

  1. Viscoelastic properties of cell walls of single living plant cells determined by dynamic nanoindentation

    PubMed Central

    Hayot, Céline M.; Forouzesh, Elham; Goel, Ashwani; Avramova, Zoya; Turner, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    Plant development results from controlled cell divisions, structural modifications, and reorganizations of the cell wall. Thereby, regulation of cell wall behaviour takes place at multiple length scales involving compositional and architectural aspects in addition to various developmental and/or environmental factors. The physical properties of the primary wall are largely determined by the nature of the complex polymer network, which exhibits time-dependent behaviour representative of viscoelastic materials. Here, a dynamic nanoindentation technique is used to measure the time-dependent response and the viscoelastic behaviour of the cell wall in single living cells at a micron or sub-micron scale. With this approach, significant changes in storage (stiffness) and loss (loss of energy) moduli are captured among the tested cells. The results reveal hitherto unknown differences in the viscoelastic parameters of the walls of same-age similarly positioned cells of the Arabidopsis ecotypes (Col 0 and Ws 2). The technique is also shown to be sensitive enough to detect changes in cell wall properties in cells deficient in the activity of the chromatin modifier ATX1. Extensive computational modelling of the experimental measurements (i.e. modelling the cell as a viscoelastic pressure vessel) is used to analyse the influence of the wall thickness, as well as the turgor pressure, at the positions of our measurements. By combining the nanoDMA technique with finite element simulations quantifiable measurements of the viscoelastic properties of plant cell walls are achieved. Such techniques are expected to find broader applications in quantifying the influence of genetic, biological, and environmental factors on the nanoscale mechanical properties of the cell wall. PMID:22291130

  2. Influence of Reversibly Associating Side Group Bond Strength on Viscoelastic Properties of Polymer Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Christopher; Stewart, Kathleen; Anthamatten, Mitchell

    2013-03-01

    Reversible hydrogen-bonding between side-groups of linear polymers can sharply influence a material's dynamic mechanical behavior, giving rise to valuable shape memory and self-healing properties. Here, we investigate how bond-strength affects the bulk rheological behavior of functional poly(n-butyl acrylate) (PBA) melts. A series of random copolymers containing three different reversibly bonding groups (aminopyridine, carboxylic acid, and ureidopyrimidinone) were synthesized to systematically vary the side-group hydrogen bond strength (~26, 40, 70 kJ/mol). The materials' volumetric hydrogen-bond energy densities can be tuned by adjusting the side-group composition. By comparing the viscoelastic behavior of materials containing an equivalent bond energy density, with different bonding groups, the efficacy and cooperativity of reversible binding can be directly examined. Melt rheology results are interpreted using a state-of-ease model that assumes continuous mechanical equilibrium between applied stress and resistive stresses of entropic origin arising from a network of reversible bonds. The authors acknowledge support from funding provided by the National Science Foundation under Grant DMR-0906627

  3. Viscoelastic shear properties of human vocal fold mucosa: theoretical characterization based on constitutive modeling.

    PubMed

    Chan, R W; Titze, I R

    2000-01-01

    The viscoelastic shear properties of human vocal fold mucosa (cover) were previously measured as a function of frequency [Chan and Titze, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 106, 2008-2021 (1999)], but data were obtained only in a frequency range of 0.01-15 Hz, an order of magnitude below typical frequencies of vocal fold oscillation (on the order of 100 Hz). This study represents an attempt to extrapolate the data to higher frequencies based on two viscoelastic theories, (1) a quasilinear viscoelastic theory widely used for the constitutive modeling of the viscoelastic properties of biological tissues [Fung, Biomechanics (Springer-Verlag, New York, 1993), pp. 277-292], and (2) a molecular (statistical network) theory commonly used for the rheological modeling of polymeric materials [Zhu et al., J. Biomech. 24, 1007-1018 (1991)]. Analytical expressions of elastic and viscous shear moduli, dynamic viscosity, and damping ratio based on the two theories with specific model parameters were applied to curve-fit the empirical data. Results showed that the theoretical predictions matched the empirical data reasonably well, allowing for parametric descriptions of the data and their extrapolations to frequencies of phonation.

  4. Influences of viscoelastic properties of one-part epoxy adhesives on automotive dispensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dakin, Suzanne Irene Mcaleer

    The rheological properties of automotive adhesives were investigated to help understand how these properties may influence the performance of streaming dispensing processes used in automotive manufacturing. The rheological investigation included examining the base epoxies of the adhesives and two filler components: fumed silica and a spherical glass filler. Although the base epoxies are similar in chemical composition and viscosity, one exhibited non-linear elastic properties while the other did not. The enhancement of non-linear elastic properties due to the presence of fillers only occurred in the epoxy, which exhibited normal forces without fillers. Time temperature superposition was successfully applied to create master rheological curves for shear and viscoelastic properties. The shear rate range of the master viscosity curves extended to shear rates similar to shear rates of streaming dispensing. The non-linear elastic response differences of the materials played an important role in how well the materials dispensed with streaming. Dispensing studies of the adhesives using unwetted nozzles with a Graco Ultra-Flo 10 dispensing, indicated that deviations from centerline (DFC) increased as Re and De numbers increased. The adhesive, which exhibited an elastic response, looped and deviated out of view of the camera under unwetted nozzle conditions making quantifying distance from center impossible. Therefore, the adhesives and the epoxies were dispensed using a wetted nozzle. In-flight dispensed streams were photographed and DFC were recorded at distances of 2-cm and 4-cm from nozzle tip. Even under wetted nozzle conditions, the adhesive, which exhibited an elastic response during shear testing, streamed worse than the adhesive that had no detectable normal force response. Under wetted nozzle conditions, the effect of De (increase in DFC as De increases) is masked by the large stabilizing effect of Re. Therefore, the data was analyzed with respect to Re and N1/tau

  5. Piezoelectric generation of extensional waves in a viscoelastic bar by use of a linear power amplifier: Theoretical basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansson, A.; Lundberg, B.

    2007-09-01

    A system consisting of a linear power amplifier driving a piezoelectric actuator pair attached to a long viscoelastic bar is analysed. Coupled piezoelectric theory is used, and allowance is made for the dynamics of the amplifier and of the actuators. Formulae are derived for the relation between the input voltage to the amplifier and the normal force associated with extensional waves generated in the bar and for the load impedance constituted by the actuator-bar assembly. It is established that the mechanical work performed on the external parts of the bar at the actuator/bar interfaces is at most equal to the electrical energy supplied by the amplifier. The results are applied to a three-parameter viscoelastic bar and to an elastic bar, and the effects of the cut-off frequency, without load, and the output impedance of the amplifier are examined. For the elastic bar, sharp response minima occur at frequencies that are integral multiples of the inverse transit time through the actuator region. For the viscoelastic bar, the corresponding minima are less sharp and deep. The input voltage to the amplifier required to produce a desired output wave at the actuator/bar interfaces can be determined provided that the spectrum of this wave is not too broad.

  6. Visco-Elastic Properties of Sodium Hyaluronate Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulicke, Werner-Michael; Meyer, Fabian; Bingöl, Ali Ö.; Lohmann, Derek

    2008-07-01

    Sodium Hyaluronate (NaHA) is a member of the glycosaminoglycans and is present in the human organism as part of the synovial fluid and the vitreous body. HA is mainly commercialized as sodium or potassium salt. It can be extracted from cockscombs or can be produced by bacterial fermentation ensuring a low protein content. Because of its natural origin and toxicological harmlessness, NaHA is used to a great extent for pharmaceutical and cosmetic products. In medical applications, NaHA is already being used as a component of flushing and stabilizing fluids in the treatment of eye cataract and as a surrogate for natural synovial fluid. Another growing domain in the commercial utilization of NaHA is the field of skin care products like dermal fillers or moisturizers. In this spectrum, NaHA is used in dilute over semidilute up to concentrated (0viscoelastic behavior. We therefore present in this contribution the results of a comprehensive investigation of the viscous and elastic material functions of different NaHA samples. This includes, besides shear flow and oscillatory experiments, the performance of rheo-optical measurements in order to determine the elastic component in the range of low shear rates and low concentrations.

  7. Lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals: From viscoelastic properties to living liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shuang

    Lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal (LCLC) represents a broad range of molecules, from organic dyes and drugs to DNA, that self-assemble into linear aggregates in water through face-to-face stacking. These linear aggregates of high aspect ratio are capable of orientational order, forming, for example nematic phase. Since the microscopic properties (such as length) of the chromonic aggregates are results of subtle balance between energy and entropy, the macroscopic viscoelastic properties of the nematic media are sensitive to change of external factors. In the first part of this thesis, by using dynamic light scattering and magnetic Frederiks transition techniques, we study the Frank elastic moduli and viscosity coefficients of LCLC disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) and sunset yellow (SSY) as functions of concentration c , temperature T and ionic contents. The elastic moduli of splay (K1) and bend (K3) are in the order of 10pN, about 10 times larger than the twist modulus (K2). The splay modulus K1 and the ratio K1/K3 both increase substantially as T decreases or c increases, which we attribute to the elongation of linear aggregates at lower T or higher c . The bend viscosity is comparable to that of thermotropic liquid crystals, while the splay and twist viscosities are several orders of magnitude larger, changing exponentially with T . Additional ionic additives into the system influence the viscoelastic properties of these systems in a dramatic and versatile way. For example, monovalent salt NaCl decreases bend modulus K3 and increases twist viscosity, while an elevated pH decreases all the parameters. We attribute these features to the ion-induced changes in length and flexibility of building units of LCLC, the chromonic aggregates, a property not found in conventional thermotropic and lyotropic liquid crystals form by covalently bound units of fixed length. The second part of the thesis studies a new active bio-mechanical hybrid system called living liquid crystal

  8. Effects of Immediate vs. Delayed Massage-like Loading on Skeletal Muscle Viscoelastic Properties Following Eccentric Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Scott K.; Haas, Caroline; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Xiaoli; Zhao, Yi; Best, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Background This study compared immediate versus delayed massage-like compressive loading on skeletal muscle viscoelastic properties following eccentric exercise. Methods Eighteen rabbits were surgically instrumented with peroneal nerve cuffs for stimulation of the tibialis anterior muscle. Rabbits were randomly assigned to a massage loading protocol applied immediately post exercise (n=6), commencing 48 hours post exercise (n=6), or exercised no-massage control (n=6). Viscoelastic properties were evaluated in vivo by performing a stress-relaxation test pre- and post-exercise and daily pre- and post-massage for four consecutive days of massage loading. A quasi-linear viscoelastic approach modeled the instantaneous elastic response (AG0), fast ( g1p) and slow ( g2p) relaxation coefficients, and the corresponding relaxation time constants τ1 and τ2. Findings Exercise increased AG0 in all groups (P<0.05). After adjusting for the three multiple comparisons, recovery of AG0 was not significant in the immediate (P=0.021) or delayed (P=0.048) groups compared to the control group following four days of massage. However, within-day (pre- to post-massage) analysis revealed a decrease in AG0 in both massage groups. Following exercise, g1p increased and g2p and τ1 decreased for all groups (P<0.05). Exercise had no effect on τ2 (P>0.05). After four days of massage, there was no significant recovery of the relaxation parameters for either massage loading group compared to the control group. Interpretation Our findings suggest that massage loading following eccentric exercise has a greater effect on reducing muscle stiffness, estimated by AG0, within-day rather than affecting recovery over multiple days. Massage loading also has little effect on the relaxation response. PMID:24861827

  9. Monitoring of peripheral vascular condition using a log-linearized arterial viscoelastic index during endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Hiroki; Horiuchi, Tetsuya; Hirano, Harutoyo; Kurita, Yuichi; Ukawa, Teiji; Nakamura, Ryuji; Saeki, Noboru; Yoshizumi, Masao; Kawamoto, Masashi; Tsuji, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel technique to support the monitoring of peripheral vascular conditions using biological signals such as electrocardiograms, arterial pressure values and pulse oximetry plethysmographic waveforms. In this approach, a second-order log-linearized model (referred to here as a log-linearized peripheral arterial viscoelastic model) is used to describe the non-linear viscoelastic relationship between blood pressure waveforms and photo-plethysmographic waveforms. The proposed index enables estimation of peripheral arterial wall stiffness changes induced by sympathetic nerve activity. The validity of the method is discussed here based on the results of peripheral vascular condition monitoring conducted during endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS). The results of ETS monitoring showed significant changes in stiffness variations between the periods before and during the procedures observed (p < 0.01) as well as during and after them (p < 0.01), so that it was confirmed that sympathetic nerve activity is drastically decreased in the area around the monitoring site after the thoracic sympathetic nerve trunk on the monitoring side is successfully blocked. In addition, no change was observed in the values of the proposed index during the ETS procedure on the side opposite that of the monitoring site. The experimental results obtained clearly show the proposed method can be used to assess changes in sympathetic nerve activity during ETS.

  10. Comparison of viscoelastic properties of suture versus porcine mitral valve chordae tendineae.

    PubMed

    Cochran, R P; Kunzelman, K S

    1991-12-01

    Recent reports have advocated the use of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) suture for replacement or reinforcement of ruptured or elongated mitral valve chordae tendineae. The mechanical properties of PTFE (Gore-Tex) and other sutures were determined and compared to those of porcine mitral valve chordae. The results were analyzed to assess how closely chordal mechanical function may be simulated by synthetic suture materials. Chordae tendineae and suture samples were tested in uniaxial tension using an INSTRON Model 1000 at strain rates of 5 and 10 mm/min. The stress (g/mm2) was plotted versus strain, and the elastic modulus determined as the slope of the curve. Chordae tendineae exhibited a nonlinear viscoelastic stress/strain behavior. The elastic modulus of both suture types tested was significantly higher than that of the chordae. However, the PTFE suture did exhibit some viscoelastic characteristics (hysteresis and creep) that begin to approach the chordal behavior. Chordal viscoelastic behavior results from the inherent composite structure (collagen, elastin, endothelium, water, and ground substance). As yet, no synthetic materials are able to imitate this behavior with the appropriate tensile strength and fatigue resistant characteristics. At present, PTFE appears to be the best synthetic alternative for chordal replacement, due to its limited viscoelastic capabilities. Nevertheless, the need to more nearly approximate the mechanical behavior of mitral valve chordae tendineae with synthetic material warrants further investigation.

  11. Numerical predictions of viscoelastic properties and dynamic moduli of innovative pothole patching materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, K. Y.; Yuan, W.; Ju, J. W.; Yang, J. M.; Kao, W.; Carlson, L.

    2013-04-01

    As asphalt pavements age and deteriorate, recurring pothole repair failures and propagating alligator cracks in the asphalt pavements have become a serious issue to our daily life and resulted in high repairing costs for pavement and vehicles. To solve this urgent issue, pothole repair materials with superior durability and long service life are needed. In the present work, revolutionary pothole patching materials with high toughness, high fatigue resistance that are reinforced with nano-molecular resins have been developed to enhance their resistance to traffic loads and service life of repaired potholes. In particular, DCPD resin (dicyclopentadiene, C10H12) with a Rhuthinium-based catalyst is employed to develop controlled properties that are compatible with aggregates and asphalt binders. In this paper, a multi-level numerical micromechanics-based model is developed to predict the viscoelastic properties and dynamic moduli of these innovative nano-molecular resin reinforced pothole patching materials. Irregular coarse aggregates in the finite element analysis are modeled as randomly-dispersed multi-layers coated particles. The effective properties of asphalt mastic, which consists of fine aggregates, tar, cured DCPD and air voids are theoretically estimated by the homogenization technique of micromechanics in conjunction with the elastic-viscoelastic correspondence principle. Numerical predictions of homogenized viscoelastic properties and dynamic moduli are demonstrated.

  12. Comparison of the viscoelastic properties of cells from different kidney cancer phenotypes measured with atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebelo, L. M.; de Sousa, J. S.; Mendes Filho, J.; Radmacher, M.

    2013-02-01

    The viscoelastic properties of human kidney cell lines from different tumor types (carcinoma (A-498) and adenocarcinoma (ACHN)) are compared to a non-tumorigenic cell line (RC-124). Our methodology is based on the mapping of viscoelastic properties (elasticity modulus E and apparent viscosity η) over the surface of tens of individual cells with atomic force microscopy (AFM). The viscoelastic properties are averaged over datasets as large as 15000 data points per cell line. We also propose a model to estimate the apparent viscosity of soft materials using the hysteresis observed in conventional AFM deflection-displacement curves, without any modification to the standard AFM apparatus. The comparison of the three cell lines show that the non-tumorigenic cells are less deformable and more viscous than cancerous cells, and that cancer cell lines have distinctive viscoelastic properties. In particular, we obtained that ERC-124 > EA-498 > EACHN and ηRC-124 > ηA-498 > ηACHN.

  13. Non linear viscoelasticity applied for the study of durability of polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardon, A.; Brinson, H. F.; Hiel, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    A methodology is described for the durability analysis of polymer matrix composites, based on nonlinear viscoelasticity theory. The durability analysis is performed on the basis of a certain number of tests carried out on limited and, if possible, short time scale by the use of accelerating factors. The method was applied to thermomatrix composites under uniaxial and biaxial loadings, showing satisfactory agreement between the life-time predictions and the published data on real-time behavior.

  14. The viscoelastic properties of chromatin and the nucleoplasm revealed by scale-dependent protein mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdel, Fabian; Baum, Michael; Rippe, Karsten

    2015-02-01

    The eukaryotic cell nucleus harbours the DNA genome that is organized in a dynamic chromatin network and embedded in a viscous crowded fluid. This environment directly affects enzymatic reactions and target search processes that access the DNA sequence information. However, its physical properties as a reaction medium are poorly understood. Here, we exploit mobility measurements of differently sized inert green fluorescent tracer proteins to characterize the viscoelastic properties of the nuclear interior of a living human cell. We find that it resembles a viscous fluid on small and large scales but appears viscoelastic on intermediate scales that change with protein size. Our results are consistent with simulations of diffusion through polymers and suggest that chromatin forms a random obstacle network rather than a self-similar structure with fixed fractal dimensions. By calculating how long molecules remember their previous position in dependence on their size, we evaluate how the nuclear environment affects search processes of chromatin targets.

  15. Constitutive Equations: Plastic and Viscoelastic Properties. (Latest Citations from the Aerospace Database)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning analytical techniques using constitutive equations, applied to materials under stress. The properties explored with these techniques include viscoelasticity, thermoelasticity, and plasticity. While many of the references are general as to material type, most refer to specific metals or composites, or to specific shapes, such as flat plate or spherical vessels. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  16. Viscoelastic and Transport Properties of Sulfonated PS-PIB-PS Block Copolymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-05-01

    000 1200 Time (min) Figure 13. IR intensity vs. time for ethanol through three sulfonated P5-PIB- PS membranes. Figure 14 shows a comparison of four ...sulfonated PS -PIB- PS membrane. Table 1 shows a comparison of the equilibrium sorbtion values for the four alcohols in the sulfonated PS -PIB- PS . Table 1...Army Research Laboratory Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5069 ARL-TR-2482 May2001 Viscoelastic and Transport Properties of Sulfonated PS -PIB- PS

  17. Viscoelastic properties of the ferret brain measured in vivo at multiple frequencies by magnetic resonance elastography

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Y.; Clayton, E.H.; Chang, Y.; Okamoto, R.J.; Bayly, P.V.

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of the dynamic mechanical behavior of brain tissue is essential for understanding and simulating the mechanisms of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Changes in mechanical properties may also reflect changes in the brain due to aging or disease. In this study, we used magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) to measure the viscoelastic properties of ferret brain tissue in vivo. Three-dimensional (3D) displacement fields were acquired during wave propagation in the brain induced by harmonic excitation of the skull at 400 Hz, 600 Hz and 800 Hz. Shear waves with wavelengths on the order of millimeters were clearly visible in the displacement field, in strain fields, and in the curl of displacement field (which contains no contributions from longitudinal waves). Viscoelastic parameters (storage and loss moduli) governing dynamic shear deformation were estimated in gray and white matter for these excitation frequencies. To characterize the reproducibility of measurements, two ferrets were studied on three different dates each. Estimated viscoelastic properties of white matter in the ferret brain were generally similar to those of gray matter and consistent between animals and scan dates. In both tissue types G′ increased from approximately 3 kPa at 400 Hz to 7 kPa at 800 Hz and G″ increased from approximately 1 kPa at 400 Hz to 2 kPa at 800 Hz. These measurements of shear wave propagation in the ferret brain can be used to both parameterize and validate finite element models of brain biomechanics. PMID:23352648

  18. The viscoelastic properties of the vitreous humor measured using an optically trapped local probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, Fiona; Tan, Lay Ean; Tassieri, Manlio; McAlinden, Niall; Wilson, Clive G.; Girkin, John M.; Wright, Amanda J.

    2011-10-01

    We present results demonstrating for the first time that an optically trapped bead can be used as a local probe to measure the variation in the viscoelastic properties of the vitreous humor of a rabbit eye. The Brownian motion of the optically trapped bead was monitored on a fast CCD camera on the millisecond timescale. Analysis of the bead trajectory provides local information about the viscoelastic properties of the medium surrounding the particle. Previous, bulk, methods for measuring the viscoelastic properties of the vitreous destroy the sample and allow only a single averaged measurement to be taken per eye. Whereas, with our approach, we were able to observe local behaviour typical of non-Newtonian and gel-like materials, along with the homogenous and in-homogeneous nature of different regions of the dissected vitreous humor. The motivation behind these measurements is to gain a better understanding of the structure of the vitreous humor in order to design effective drug delivery techniques. In particular, we are interested in methods for delivering drug to the retina of the eye in order to treat sight threatening diseases such as age related macular degeneration.

  19. Local Viscoelastic Properties of Live Cells Investigated Using Dynamic and Quasi-Static Atomic Force Microscopy Methods

    PubMed Central

    Cartagena, Alexander; Raman, Arvind

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of viscoelasticity of cells in physiological environments with high spatio-temporal resolution is a key goal in cell mechanobiology. Traditionally only the elastic properties have been measured from quasi-static force-distance curves using the atomic force microscope (AFM). Recently, dynamic AFM-based methods have been proposed to map the local in vitro viscoelastic properties of living cells with nanoscale resolution. However, the differences in viscoelastic properties estimated from such dynamic and traditional quasi-static techniques are poorly understood. In this work we quantitatively reconstruct the local force and dissipation gradients (viscoelasticity) on live fibroblast cells in buffer solutions using Lorentz force excited cantilevers and present a careful comparison between mechanical properties (local stiffness and damping) extracted using dynamic and quasi-static force spectroscopy methods. The results highlight the dependence of measured viscoelastic properties on both the frequency at which the chosen technique operates as well as the interactions with subcellular components beyond certain indentation depth, both of which are responsible for differences between the viscoelasticity property maps acquired using the dynamic AFM method against the quasi-static measurements. PMID:24606928

  20. Deformation and relaxation of an incompressible viscoelastic body with surface viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liping; Yu, Miao; Lin, Hao; Foty, Ramsey

    2017-01-01

    Measuring mechanical properties of cells or cell aggregates has proven to be an involved process due to their geometrical and structural complexity. Past measurements are based on material models that completely neglect the elasticity of either the surface membrane or the interior bulk. In this work, we consider general material models to account for both surface and bulk viscoelasticity. The boundary value problems are formulated for deformations and relaxations of a closed viscoelastic surface coupled with viscoelastic media inside and outside of the surface. The linearized surface elasticity models are derived for the constant surface tension model and the Helfrich-Canham bending model for coupling with the bulk viscoelasticity. For quasi-spherical surfaces, explicit solutions are obtained for the deformation, stress-strain and relaxation behaviors under a variety of loading conditions. These solutions can be applied to extract the intrinsic surface and bulk viscoelastic properties of biological cells or cell aggregates in the indentation, electro-deformation and relaxation experiments.

  1. Relationship between powder surface characteristics and viscoelastic properties of powder-filled semisolids.

    PubMed

    Radebaugh, G W; Simonelli, A P

    1985-01-01

    The viscoelastic properties of dispersions of powdered zinc oxide in anhydrous lanolin and colloidal sulfur in anhydrous lanolin were characterized by dynamic mechanical testing. The elastic shear modulus, G', viscous shear modulus, G", and loss tangent (damping), tan delta, were determined as a function of shear frequency, v, temperature, T, and volume fraction of powder, phi 2. A priori, it might be expected that zinc oxide and colloidal sulfur would elicit different viscoelastic properties due to their contrasting surface characteristics; zinc oxide has a hydrophilic surface and colloidal sulfur has a hydrophobic surface. Even though constitutive mathematical models, derived to predict the mechanical behavior of solid-filled polymeric materials, were not designed to account for differences in surface characteristics of the filler, the findings of these experiments show that these models are useful in explaining the differences in viscoelastic behavior of powder-filled semisolids due to surface characteristics of the filler. One model of particular value was the Kerner equation. With it, mechanisms were postulated for zinc oxide-zinc oxide interactions, sulfur-sulfur interactions, zinc oxide-anhydrous lanolin interactions, and sulfur-anhydrous lanolin interactions, within dispersions as a function of nu, T, and phi 2. In addition, damping was used to further identify the influence of temperature. Data obtained from three temperatures, where anhydrous lanolin exists in three different structural states, shows that the influence of the powder on damping is not only determined by the surface characteristics of the powder but also the structural state of anhydrous lanolin.

  2. Soft viscoelastic properties of nuclear actin age oocytes due to gravitational creep.

    PubMed

    Feric, Marina; Broedersz, Chase P; Brangwynne, Clifford P

    2015-11-18

    The actin cytoskeleton helps maintain structural organization within living cells. In large X. laevis oocytes, gravity becomes a dominant force and is countered by a nuclear actin network that prevents liquid-like nuclear bodies from immediate sedimentation and coalescence. However, nuclear actin's mechanical properties, and how they facilitate the stabilization of nuclear bodies, remain unknown. Using active microrheology, we find that nuclear actin forms a weak viscoelastic network, with a modulus of roughly 0.1 Pa. Embedded probe particles subjected to a constant force exhibit continuous displacement, due to viscoelastic creep. Gravitational forces also cause creep displacement of nuclear bodies, resulting in their asymmetric nuclear distribution. Thus, nuclear actin does not indefinitely support the emulsion of nuclear bodies, but only kinetically stabilizes them by slowing down gravitational creep to ~2 months. This is similar to the viability time of large oocytes, suggesting gravitational creep ages oocytes, with fatal consequences on long timescales.

  3. Comparison of dynamic viscoelastic and physicochemical properties of pressurised and pasteurised longan juices with xanthan addition.

    PubMed

    Chaikham, Pittaya; Apichartsrangkoon, Arunee

    2012-10-15

    Physical and biochemical properties of pressurised and pasteurised longan juices with various xanthan additions, such as viscoelastic behaviour, colour L (lightness), -a(*) (greenness), b(*) (yellowness), ΔE (total different colours) and BI (Browning Index) parameters, polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity, ascorbic acid, gallic acid, ellagic acid, total phenols and antioxidant capacity (DPPH assay) were studied. Viscoelastic determination indicated that longan juice with 0.15% xanthan addition was optimal for a fruit drink. Colour parameters showed pressurised longan juice at 500 MPa was brighter and more transparent than fresh and other processed juices. PPO was completely inactivated in pasteurised juices, whereas in pressurised juices at 300 and 500 MPa, the activities were more than 100% and 95-99%, respectively. Bioactive components including ascorbic acid were significantly reduced according to treatment severities, whereas gallic and ellagic acids were relatively stable in all processed juices. Total phenols and DPPH radical-scavenging activity decreased significantly on pasteurisation, but were stable on pressurisation.

  4. Calculation by iterative method of linear viscoelastic plate under biaxial tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svetashkov, A. A.; Miciński, J.; Manabaev, K. K.; Vakurov, A. A.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we used the iterative solution algorithm, proposed in the work of Pavlov and Svetashkova. This algorithm results in a complete separation of spatial and temporal variables, if we set up the boundary loads and (or) volumetric forces in the same kind. In this paper, we have examined the stress-strain state of a viscoelastic plate, and the results of the calculation displacements, stresses are given. In addition, we made a comparison of the calculation indices rate of convergence for the iterative process with their theoretical values.

  5. Single-Specimen Technique to Establish the J-Resistance of Linear Viscoelastic Solids with Constant Poisson's Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez-Lemini, Danton; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A method is developed to establish the J-resistance function for an isotropic linear viscoelastic solid of constant Poisson's ratio using the single-specimen technique with constant-rate test data. The method is based on the fact that, for a test specimen of fixed crack size under constant rate, the initiation J-integral may be established from the crack size itself, the actual external load and load-point displacement at growth initiation, and the relaxation modulus of the viscoelastic solid, without knowledge of the complete test record. Since crack size alone, of the required data, would be unknown at each point of the load-vs-load-point displacement curve of a single-specimen test, an expression is derived to estimate it. With it, the physical J-integral at each point of the test record may be established. Because of its basis on single-specimen testing, not only does the method not require the use of multiple specimens with differing initial crack sizes, but avoids the need for tracking crack growth as well.

  6. Viscoelastic Properties of Fluorinated Ethylene-Propylene (FEP) Random Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtin, Megan; Wright, Benjamin; Ozisik, Rahmi

    Florinated ethylene-propylene (FEP) random copolymers contain tetrafluoroethylene (TFE) and hexafluoropropylene (HFP) repeat units. FEP is an excellent alternative to poly(tetrafluoroethylene), PTFE, which cannot be melt processed due to its high molecular weight and extensive crystallinity. On the other hand, FEP is a melt processible polymer and offers similar if not the same properties as PTFE. Many studies have been performed on FEP over the years, however, the properties of these polymers strongly depend on the HFP concentration and molecular weight (distribution). Just like PTFE, FEP cannot be dissolved in many solvents, therefore, obtaining molecular weight distribution of these polymers is not possible with commonly used methods. In the current study, we perform rheological analysis of various FEPs and obtain their molecular weight distributions by employing the Tuminello method. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CMMI-1538730.

  7. Viscoelastic Properties and Morphology of Mumio-based Medicated Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandraa, Oyunchimeg; Jelínková, Lenka; Roy, Niladri; Sáha, Tomáš; Kitano, Takeshi; Saha, Nabanita

    2011-07-01

    Novel medicated hydrogels were prepared (by moist heat treatment) with PVA, agar, mumio, mare's milk (MM), seabuckthorn oil (SB oil) and salicylic acid (SA) for wound dressing/healing application. Scanning electron micrographs (SEM) show highly porous structure of these hydrogels. The swelling behaviour of the hydrogels in physiological solution displays remarkable liquid absorption property. The knowledge obtained from rheological investigations of these-systems may be highly useful for the characterization of the newly developed topical formulations. In the present study, an oscillation frequency sweep test was used for the evaluation of storage modulus (G'), loss modulus (G″), and complex viscosity (η*) of five different formulations, over an angular frequency range from 0.1 to 100 rad.s-1. The influence of healing agents and swelling effect on the rheological properties of mumio-based medicated hydrogels was investigated to judge its application on uneven surface of body.

  8. A new method to improve the clinical evaluation of cystic fibrosis patients by mucus viscoelastic properties.

    PubMed

    Tomaiuolo, Giovanna; Rusciano, Giulia; Caserta, Sergio; Carciati, Antonio; Carnovale, Vincenzo; Abete, Pasquale; Sasso, Antonio; Guido, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF) patients airways mucus shows an increased viscoelasticity due to the concentration of high molecular weight components. Such mucus thickening eventually leads to bacterial overgrowth and prevents mucus clearance. The altered rheological behavior of mucus results in chronic lung infection and inflammation, which causes most of the cases of morbidity and mortality, although the cystic fibrosis complications affect other organs as well. Here, we present a quantitative study on the correlation between cystic fibrosis mucus viscoelasticity and patients clinical status. In particular, a new diagnostic parameter based on the correlation between CF sputum viscoelastic properties and the severity of the disease, expressed in terms of FEV1 and bacterial colonization, was developed. By using principal component analysis, we show that the types of colonization and FEV1 classes are significantly correlated to the elastic modulus, and that the latter can be used for CF severity classification with a high predictive efficiency (88%). The data presented here show that the elastic modulus of airways mucus, given the high predictive efficiency, could be used as a new clinical parameter in the prognostic evaluation of cystic fibrosis.

  9. Viscoelastic Properties Measurement of Human Lymphocytes by Atomic Force Microscopy Based on Magnetic Beads Cell Isolation.

    PubMed

    Li, Mi; Liu, Lianqing; Xiao, Xiubin; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao

    2016-03-28

    Cell mechanics has been proved to be an effective biomarker for indicating cellular states. The advent of atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides an exciting instrument for measuring the mechanical properties of single cells. However, current AFM single-cell mechanical measurements are commonly performed on cell lines cultured in vitro which are quite different from the primary cells in the human body. Investigating the mechanical properties of primary cells from clinical environments can help us to better understand cell behaviors. Here, by combining AFM with magnetic beads cell isolation, the viscoelastic properties of human primary B lymphocytes were quantitatively measured. B lymphocytes were isolated from the peripheral blood of healthy volunteers by density gradient centrifugation and CD19 magnetic beads cell isolation. The activity and specificity of the isolated cells were confirmed by fluorescence microscopy. AFM imaging revealed the surface topography and geometric parameters of B lymphocytes. The instantaneous modulus and relaxation time of living B lymphocytes were measured by AFM indenting technique, showing that the instantaneous modulus of human normal B lymphocytes was 2~3 kPa and the relaxation times were 0.03~0.06 s and 0.35~0.55 s. The differences in cellular visocoelastic properties between primary B lymphocytes and cell lines cultured in vitro were analyzed. The study proves the capability of AFM in quantifying the viscoelastic properties of individual specific primary cells from the blood sample of clinical patients, which will improve our understanding of the behaviors of cells in the human body.

  10. Viscoelastic properties of actin networks influence material transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stam, Samantha; Weirich, Kimberly; Gardel, Margaret

    2015-03-01

    Directed flows of cytoplasmic material are important in a variety of biological processes including assembly of a mitotic spindle, retraction of the cell rear during migration, and asymmetric cell division. Networks of cytoskeletal polymers and molecular motors are known to be involved in these events, but how the network mechanical properties are tuned to perform such functions is not understood. Here, we construct networks of either semiflexible actin filaments or rigid bundles with varying connectivity. We find that solutions of rigid rods, where unimpeded sliding of filaments may enhance transport in comparison to unmoving tracks, are the fastest at transporting network components. Entangled solutions of semiflexible actin filaments also transport material, but the entanglements provide resistance. Increasing the elasticity of the actin networks with crosslinking proteins slows network deformation further. However, the length scale of correlated transport in these networks is increased. Our results reveal how the rigidity and connectivity of biopolymers allows material transport to occur over time and length scales required for physiological processes. This work was supported by the U. Chicago MRSEC

  11. Morphological, physicochemical, and viscoelastic properties of sonicated corn starch.

    PubMed

    Mohammad Amini, Asad; Razavi, Seyed Mohammad Ali; Mortazavi, Seyed Ali

    2015-05-20

    In the present work, different parameters of ultrasound treatment were studied for physical modification of corn starch. The results revealed that the influence of sonication strongly depends on temperature (25-65 °C) and exposure time (5-15 min), while concentration (10-20% w/w) and ultrasound amplitude (50 and 100%) have little influence on functional and rheological properties. SEM micrographs demonstrated the damage induced by ultrasound on starch granules' surface. The solubility, swelling power, and gel clarity were increased. Ultrasonication decreased the gelatinisation enthalpy and temperature range while the X-ray pattern and crystallinity remained almost unchanged, except for samples treated at onset temperature as measured by DSC. The pseudoplasticity and consistency coefficient decreased; also, apparent viscosity diminished prominently. The pasting behaviour of samples was altered without any clear change in gel strength characterised by loss factor. The results of the present work provide further insight into the mode of action of ultrasound on modifying corn starch granules.

  12. Viscoelastic properties of kenaf reinforced unsaturated polyester composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman, Ekhlas A.; Mutasher, Saad A.

    2014-03-01

    In order to quantify the effect of temperature on the mechanical and dynamic properties of kenaf fiber unsaturated polyester composites, formulations containing 10 wt.% to 40 wt.% kenaf fiber were produced and tested at two representative temperatures of 30°C and 50°C. Dynamic mechanical analysis was performed, to obtain the strain and creep compliance for kenaf composites at various styrene concentrations. It is possible to obtain creep curves at different temperature levels which can be shifted along the time axis to generate a single curve known as a master curve. This technique is known as the time-temperature superposition principle. Shift factors conformed to a William-Landel-Ferry (WLF) equation. However, more long term creep data was needed in order to further validate the applicability of time-temperature superposition principle (TTSP) to this material. The primary creep strain model was fitted to 60 min creep data. The resulting equation was then extrapolated to 5.5 days; the creep strain model of power-law was successfully used to predict the long-term creep behavior of natural fiber/thermoset composites.

  13. In vivo brain viscoelastic properties measured by magnetic resonance elastography.

    PubMed

    Green, Michael A; Bilston, Lynne E; Sinkus, Ralph

    2008-08-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is a non-invasive imaging technique used to visualise and quantify mechanical properties of tissue, providing information beyond what can be currently achieved with standard MR sequences and could, for instance, provide new insight into pathological processes in the brain. This study uses the MRE technique at 3 T to extract the complex shear modulus for in vivo brain tissue utilizing a full three-dimensional approach to reconstruction, removing contributions of the dilatational wave by application of the curl operator. A calibrated phantom is used to benchmark the MRE measurements, and in vivo results are presented for healthy volunteers. The results provide data for in vivo brain storage modulus (G'), finding grey matter (3.1 kPa) to be significantly stiffer than white matter (2.7 kPa). The first in vivo loss modulus (G'') measurements show no significant difference between grey matter (2.5 kPa) and white matter (2.5 kPa).

  14. Prediction of fish body's passive visco-elastic properties and related muscle mechanical performance in vivo during steady swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Yu, YongLiang; Tong, BingGang

    2014-01-01

    For attaining the optimized locomotory performance of swimming fishes, both the passive visco-elastic properties of the fish body and the mechanical behavior of the active muscles should coordinate with the fish body's undulatory motion pattern. However, it is difficult to directly measure the visco-elastic constitutive relation and the muscular mechanical performance in vivo. In the present paper, a new approach based on the continuous beam model for steady swimming fish is proposed to predict the fish body's visco-elastic properties and the related muscle mechanical behavior in vivo. Given the lateral travelling-wave-like movement as the input condition, the required muscle force and the energy consumption are functions of the fish body's visco-elastic parameters, i.e. the Young's modulus E and the viscosity coefficient µ in the Kelvin model. After investigating the variations of the propagating speed of the required muscle force with the fish body's visco-elastic parameters, we analyze the impacts of the visco-elastic properties on the energy efficiencies, including the energy utilization ratios of each element of the kinematic chain in fish swimming and the overall efficiency. Under the constraints of reasonable wave speed of muscle activation and the physiological feasibility, the optimal design of the passive visco-elastic properties can be predicted aiming at maximizing the overall efficiency. The analysis is based on the small-amplitude steady swimming of the carangiform swimmer, with typical Reynolds number varying from 2.5×104 to 2.5×105, and the present results show that the non-dimensional Young's modulus is 112±34, and the non-dimensional viscosity coefficient is 13 approximately. In the present estimated ranges, the overall efficiency of the swimming fish is insensitive to the viscosity, and its magnitude is about 0.11±0.02, in the predicted range given by previous study.

  15. Identification of the Hereditary Kernels of Isotropic Linear Viscoelastic Materials in Combined Stress state. 1. Superposition of Shear and Bulk creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golub, V. P.; Maslov, B. P.; Fernati, P. V.

    2016-03-01

    Relations between the shear and bulk creep kernels of an isotropic linear viscoelastic material in combined stress state and the longitudinal and shear creep kernels constructed from data of creep tests under uniaxial tension and pure torsion are formulated. The constitutive equations of viscoelasticity for the combined stress state are chosen in the form of a superposition of the equation for shear strains and the equation for bulk strains. The hereditary kernels are described by Rabotnov's fractional-exponential functions. The creep strains of thin-walled pipes under a combination of tension and torsion or tension and internal pressure are calculated

  16. Corneal Viscoelastic Properties from Finite-Element Analysis of In Vivo Air-Puff Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Kling, Sabine; Bekesi, Nandor; Dorronsoro, Carlos; Pascual, Daniel; Marcos, Susana

    2014-01-01

    Biomechanical properties are an excellent health marker of biological tissues, however they are challenging to be measured in-vivo. Non-invasive approaches to assess tissue biomechanics have been suggested, but there is a clear need for more accurate techniques for diagnosis, surgical guidance and treatment evaluation. Recently air-puff systems have been developed to study the dynamic tissue response, nevertheless the experimental geometrical observations lack from an analysis that addresses specifically the inherent dynamic properties. In this study a viscoelastic finite element model was built that predicts the experimental corneal deformation response to an air-puff for different conditions. A sensitivity analysis reveals significant contributions to corneal deformation of intraocular pressure and corneal thickness, besides corneal biomechanical properties. The results show the capability of dynamic imaging to reveal inherent biomechanical properties in vivo. Estimates of corneal biomechanical parameters will contribute to the basic understanding of corneal structure, shape and integrity and increase the predictability of corneal surgery. PMID:25121496

  17. Viscoelastic properties and efficient acoustic damping in confined polymer nano-layers at GHz frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hettich, Mike; Jacob, Karl; Ristow, Oliver; Schubert, Martin; Bruchhausen, Axel; Gusev, Vitalyi; Dekorsy, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the viscoelastic properties of confined molecular nano-layers by time resolved optical pump-probe measurements. Access to the elastic properties is provided by the damping time of acoustic eigenmodes of thin metal films deposited on the molecular nano-layers which show a strong dependence on the molecular layer thickness and on the acoustic eigen-mode frequencies. An analytical model including the viscoelastic properties of the molecular layer allows us to obtain the longitudinal sound velocity as well as the acoustic absorption coefficient of the layer. Our experiments and theoretical analysis indicate for the first time that the molecular nano-layers are much more viscous than elastic in the investigated frequency range from 50 to 120 GHz and thus show pronounced acoustic absorption. The longitudinal acoustic wavenumber has nearly equal real and imaginary parts, both increasing proportional to the square root of the frequency. Thus, both acoustic velocity and acoustic absorption are proportional to the square root of frequency and the propagation of compressional/dilatational acoustic waves in the investigated nano-layers is of the diffusional type, similar to the propagation of shear waves in viscous liquids and thermal waves in solids.

  18. Viscoelastic properties and efficient acoustic damping in confined polymer nano-layers at GHz frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Hettich, Mike; Jacob, Karl; Ristow, Oliver; Schubert, Martin; Bruchhausen, Axel; Gusev, Vitalyi; Dekorsy, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the viscoelastic properties of confined molecular nano-layers by time resolved optical pump-probe measurements. Access to the elastic properties is provided by the damping time of acoustic eigenmodes of thin metal films deposited on the molecular nano-layers which show a strong dependence on the molecular layer thickness and on the acoustic eigen-mode frequencies. An analytical model including the viscoelastic properties of the molecular layer allows us to obtain the longitudinal sound velocity as well as the acoustic absorption coefficient of the layer. Our experiments and theoretical analysis indicate for the first time that the molecular nano-layers are much more viscous than elastic in the investigated frequency range from 50 to 120 GHz and thus show pronounced acoustic absorption. The longitudinal acoustic wavenumber has nearly equal real and imaginary parts, both increasing proportional to the square root of the frequency. Thus, both acoustic velocity and acoustic absorption are proportional to the square root of frequency and the propagation of compressional/dilatational acoustic waves in the investigated nano-layers is of the diffusional type, similar to the propagation of shear waves in viscous liquids and thermal waves in solids. PMID:27633351

  19. Inverting Glacial Isostatic Adjustment beyond linear viscoelasticity using the Burgers rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, Lambert; Greff-Lefftz, Marianne; Fleitout, Luce; Métivier, Laurent; Rouby, Hélène

    2015-04-01

    In Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) inverse modeling, the usual assumption for the mantle rheology is the Maxwell model, which exhibits constant viscosity over time. However, mineral physics experiments and post-seismic observations show evidence of a transient component in the deformation of the shallow mantle, with a short-term viscosity lower than the long-term one. In these studies, the resulting rheology is modeled by a Burgers material: such rheology is indeed expected as the mantle is a mixture of materials with different viscosities. We propose to apply this rheology for the whole viscoelastic mantle, and, using a Bayesian MCMC inverse formalism for GIA during the last glacial cycle, study its impact on estimations of viscosity values, elastic thickness of the lithosphere, and ice distribution. To perform this inversion, we use a global dataset of sea level records, the geological constraints of ice-sheet margins, and present-day GPS data as well as satellite gravimetry. Our ambition is to present not only the best fitting model, but also the range of possible solutions (within the explored space of parameters) with their respective probability of explaining the data. Our results show that the Burgers model is able to fit the dataset as well as the Maxwell model, but would imply a larger lower mantle viscosity, thicker ice sheets over Fennoscandia and Canada, and thinner ice sheets over Antarctica and Greenland.

  20. A Study on the Influence of Process Parameters on the Viscoelastic Properties of ABS Components Manufactured by FDM Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dakshinamurthy, Devika; Gupta, Srinivasa

    2016-06-01

    Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM) is a fast growing Rapid Prototyping (RP) technology due to its ability to build parts having complex geometrical shape in reasonable time period. The quality of built parts depends on many process variables. In this study, the influence of three FDM process parameters namely, slice height, raster angle and raster width on viscoelastic properties of Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) RP-specimen is studied. Statistically designed experiments have been conducted for finding the optimum process parameter setting for enhancing the storage modulus. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis has been used to understand the viscoelastic properties at various parameter settings. At the optimal parameter setting the storage modulus and loss modulus of the ABS-RP specimen was 1008 and 259.9 MPa respectively. The relative percentage contribution of slice height and raster width on the viscoelastic properties of the FDM-RP components was found to be 55 and 31 % respectively.

  1. OREGANO_VE: a new parallelised 3D solver for the general (non-)linear Maxwell visco-elastic problem: validation and application to the calculation of surface deformation in the earthquake cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, Tadashi; Houseman, Gregory; Hamling, Ian; Postek, Elek

    2010-05-01

    We have developed a new parallelized 3-D numerical code, OREGANO_VE, for the solution of the general visco-elastic problem in a rectangular block domain. The mechanical equilibrium equation is solved using the finite element method for a (non-)linear Maxwell visco-elastic rheology. Time-dependent displacement and/or traction boundary conditions can be applied. Matrix assembly is based on a tetrahedral element defined by 4 vertex nodes and 6 nodes located at the midpoints of the edges, and within which displacement is described by a quadratic interpolation function. For evaluating viscoelastic relaxation, an explicit time-stepping algorithm (Zienkiewicz and Cormeau, Int. J. Num. Meth. Eng., 8, 821-845, 1974) is employed. We test the accurate implementation of the OREGANO_VE by comparing numerical and analytic (or semi-analytic half-space) solutions to different problems in a range of applications: (1) equilibration of stress in a constant density layer after gravity is switched on at t = 0 tests the implementation of spatially variable viscosity and non-Newtonian viscosity; (2) displacement of the welded interface between two blocks of differing viscosity tests the implementation of viscosity discontinuities, (3) displacement of the upper surface of a layer under applied normal load tests the implementation of time-dependent surface tractions (4) visco-elastic response to dyke intrusion (compared with the solution in a half-space) tests the implementation of all aspects. In each case, the accuracy of the code is validated subject to use of a sufficiently small time step, providing assurance that the OREGANO_VE code can be applied to a range of visco-elastic relaxation processes in three dimensions, including post-seismic deformation and post-glacial uplift. The OREGANO_VE code includes a capability for representation of prescribed fault slip on an internal fault. The surface displacement associated with large earthquakes can be detected by some geodetic observations

  2. Assessment of the viscoelastic and oscillation properties of a nano-engineered multimodality contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Kothapalli, Satya V V N; Oddo, Letizia; Paradossi, Gaio; Brodin, Lars-Åke; Grishenkov, Dmitry

    2014-10-01

    Combinations of microbubbles (MBs) and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are used to fabricate dual contrast agents for ultrasound and MRI. This study examines the viscoelastic and oscillation characteristics of two MB types that are manufactured with SPIONs and either anchored chemically on the surface (MBs-chem) or physically embedded (MBs-phys) into a polymer shell. A linearized Church model was employed to simultaneously fit attenuation coefficients and phase velocity spectra that were acquired experimentally. The model predicted lower viscoelastic modulus values, undamped resonance frequencies and total damping ratios for MBs-chem. MBs-chem had a resonance frequency of approximately 13 MHz and a damping ratio of approximately 0.9; thus, MBs-chem can potentially be used as a conventional ultrasound contrast agent with the combined functionality of MRI detection. In contrast, MBs-phys had a resonance frequency and damping of 28 MHz and 1.2, respectively, and requires further modification of clinically available contrast pulse sequences to be visualized.

  3. Numerical evaluation of implantable hearing devices using a finite element model of human ear considering viscoelastic properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Tian, Jiabin; Ta, Na; Huang, Xinsheng; Rao, Zhushi

    2016-08-01

    Finite element method was employed in this study to analyze the change in performance of implantable hearing devices due to the consideration of soft tissues' viscoelasticity. An integrated finite element model of human ear including the external ear, middle ear and inner ear was first developed via reverse engineering and analyzed by acoustic-structure-fluid coupling. Viscoelastic properties of soft tissues in the middle ear were taken into consideration in this model. The model-derived dynamic responses including middle ear and cochlea functions showed a better agreement with experimental data at high frequencies above 3000 Hz than the Rayleigh-type damping. On this basis, a coupled finite element model consisting of the human ear and a piezoelectric actuator attached to the long process of incus was further constructed. Based on the electromechanical coupling analysis, equivalent sound pressure and power consumption of the actuator corresponding to viscoelasticity and Rayleigh damping were calculated using this model. The analytical results showed that the implant performance of the actuator evaluated using a finite element model considering viscoelastic properties gives a lower output above about 3 kHz than does Rayleigh damping model. Finite element model considering viscoelastic properties was more accurate to numerically evaluate implantable hearing devices.

  4. Characterizing the viscoelastic properties of thin hydrogel-based constructs for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Ahearne, Mark; Yang, Ying; El Haj, Alicia J; Then, Kong Y; Liu, Kuo-Kang

    2005-12-22

    We present a novel indentation method for characterizing the viscoelastic properties of alginate and agarose hydrogel based constructs, which are often used as a model system of soft biological tissues. A sensitive long working distance microscope was used for measuring the time-dependent deformation of the thin circular hydrogel membranes under a constant load. The deformation of the constructs was measured laterally. The elastic modulus as a function of time can be determined by a large deformation theory based on Mooney-Rivlin elasticity. A viscoelastic theory, Zener model, was applied to correlate the time-dependent deformation of the constructs with various gel concentrations, and the creep parameters can therefore be quantitatively estimated. The value of Young's modulus was shown to increase in proportion with gel concentration. This finding is consistent with other publications. Our results also showed the great capability of using the technique to measure gels with incorporated corneal stromal cells. This study demonstrates a novel and convenient technique to measure mechanical properties of hydrogel in a non-destructive, online and real-time fashion. Thus this novel technique can become a valuable tool for soft tissue engineering.

  5. Dynamic crack propagation in a viscoelastic strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popelar, C. H.; Atkinson, C.

    1980-04-01

    THE DYNAMIC PROPAGATION of a semi-infinite crack in a finite linear viscoelastic strip subjected to Mode I loading is investigated. Through the use of integral transforms the problem is reduced to solving a Wiener-Hopf equation. The asymptotic properties of the transforms are exploited to establish the stress intensity factor. Plane-stress and plane-strain stress intensity factors as a function of crack speed for both fully-clamped and shear-free lateral boundaries are presented for the standard linear viscoelastic solid. Comparisons are made with previously obtained asymptotic stress intensity factors and with stress intensity factors for the equivalent elastic strips.

  6. Modeling and Testing of the Viscoelastic Properties of a Graphite Nanoplatelet/Epoxy Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, Gregory M.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2005-01-01

    In order to facilitate the interpretation of experimental data, a micromechanical modeling procedure is developed to predict the viscoelastic properties of a graphite nanoplatelet/epoxy composite as a function of volume fraction and nanoplatelet diameter. The predicted storage and loss moduli for the composite are compared to measured values from the same material using three test methods; Dynamical Mechanical Analysis, nanoindentation, and quasi-static tensile tests. In most cases, the model and experiments indicate that for increasing volume fractions of nanoplatelets, both the storage and loss moduli increase. Also, the results indicate that for nanoplatelet sizes above 15 microns, nanoindentation is capable of measuring properties of individual constituents of a composite system. Comparison of the predicted values to the measured data helps illustrate the relative similarities and differences between the bulk and local measurement techniques.

  7. Interrelationship between the zeta potential and viscoelastic properties in coacervates complexes.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Andrews, Hugo; Enríquez-Ramírez, Karina Esmeralda; García-Márquez, Eristeo; Ramírez-Santiago, Cesar; Lobato-Calleros, Consuelo; Vernon-Carter, Jaime

    2013-06-05

    The formation of the complex coacervate (CC) phases between gum Arabic (GA) and low molecular weight chitosan (Ch) and the interrelationship between the zeta-potential and viscoelastic properties of the coacervate phase were investigated. The maximum charge difference of biopolymers stock dispersion was displayed in a range of pH between 4.0 and 5.5. Titration experiment between the oppositely charged biopolymers showed that the isoelectric point was found at a biopolymers mass ratio (R[GA:Ch]) of R[5.5:1]. Turbidity, size and ζ-potential of the soluble complexes (SC) showed an interrelation with the complex coacervate yield (CCY). Higher CCY values (82.2-88.1%) were obtained in the range from R[3:1] to R[5.5:1]. Change the R[GA:Ch] in dispersion, make possible to produce CC's phases exhibiting cationic (R[1:1] and R[3:1]), neutral (R[5.5:1]) or anionic (R[9:1] and R[7:1]) charged. All CC's exhibited liquid-viscoelastic behavior at lower frequencies and a crossover between G″ and G' at higher frequencies.

  8. Application of dynamic mechanical testing to characterize the viscoelastic properties of powder-filled semisolids.

    PubMed

    Radebaugh, G W; Simonelli, A P

    1984-05-01

    A nondestructive technique, dynamic mechanical testing, was used to characterize the viscoelastic properties of dispersions of powdered starch in anhydrous lanolin. The elastic shear modulus (G'), viscous shear modulus (G"), and loss tangent (damping; tan delta) were determined as a function of shear frequency, temperature, and the volume fraction of starch. The results of these studies show that constitutive mathematical models, derived to predict the mechanical behavior of solid-filled polymeric materials, can be applied to solid-filled semisolid pharmaceuticals. In particular, the Kerner equation was useful in describing the influence of starch on the G' of the dispersions. Even though the Kerner equation was unable to predict viscoelastic behavior at all shear frequencies, temperatures, and starch volume fractions, it proved beneficial in postulating mechanisms for starch-starch and starch-anhydrous lanolin interactions within the dispersions. In addition, damping was able to differentiate the influence of temperature. Data obtained from three temperature ranges, where anhydrous lanolin exists in three different structural states, shows that the influence of starch on damping is dictated by the structural state of anhydrous lanolin.

  9. Characterization of the elastic and viscoelastic properties of dentin by a nanoindentation creep test.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Shu-Fen; Lin, Shih-Yun; Wei, Pal-Jen; Han, Chang-Fu; Lin, Jen-Fin; Chang, Hsien-Chang

    2015-07-16

    Dentin is the main supporting structure of teeth, but its mechanical properties may be adversely affected by pathological demineralization. The purposes of this study were to develop a quantitative approach to characterize the viscoelastic properties of dentin after de- and re-mineralization, and to examine the elastic properties using a nanoindentation creep test. Dentin specimens were prepared to receive both micro- and nano-indentation tests at wet and dry states. These tests were repeatedly performed after demineralization (1% citric acid for 3 days) and remineralization (artificial saliva immersion for 28 days). The nanoindentation test was executed in a creep mode, and the resulting displacement-time responses were disintegrated into primary (transient) and secondary (viscous) creep. The structural changes and mineral densities of dentin were also examined under SEM and microCT, respectively. The results showed that demineralization removed superficial minerals of dentin to the depth of 400 μm, and affected its micro- and nano-hardness, especially in the hydrate state. Remineralization only repaired the minerals at the surface layer, and partially recovered the nanohardness. Both the primary the secondary creep increased in the demineralized dentin, while the hydration further enhanced creep deformation of untreated and remineralized dentin. Remineralization reduced the primary creep of dentin, but did not effectively increase the viscosity. In conclusion, water plasticization increases the transient and viscous creep strains of demineralized dentin and reduces load sustainability. The nanoindentation creep test is capable of analyzing the elastic and viscoelastic properties of dentin, and reveals crucial information about creep responses.

  10. Viscoelastic properties of bovine orbital connective tissue and fat: constitutive models.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Lawrence; Gupta, Vijay; Lee, Choongyeop; Kavehpore, Pirouz; Demer, Joseph L

    2011-12-01

    Reported mechanical properties of orbital connective tissue and fat have been too sparse to model strain-stress relationships underlying biomechanical interactions in strabismus. We performed rheological tests to develop a multi-mode upper convected Maxwell (UCM) model of these tissues under shear loading. From 20 fresh bovine orbits, 30 samples of connective tissue were taken from rectus pulley regions and 30 samples of fatty tissues from the posterior orbit. Additional samples were defatted to determine connective tissue weight proportion, which was verified histologically. Mechanical testing in shear employed a triborheometer to perform: strain sweeps at 0.5-2.0 Hz; shear stress relaxation with 1% strain; viscometry at 0.01-0.5 s(-1) strain rate; and shear oscillation at 1% strain. Average connective tissue weight proportion was 98% for predominantly connective tissue and 76% for fatty tissue. Connective tissue specimens reached a long-term relaxation modulus of 668 Pa after 1,500 s, while corresponding values for fatty tissue specimens were 290 Pa and 1,100 s. Shear stress magnitude for connective tissue exceeded that of fatty tissue by five-fold. Based on these data, we developed a multi-mode UCM model with variable viscosities and time constants, and a damped hyperelastic response that accurately described measured properties of both connective and fatty tissues. Model parameters differed significantly between the two tissues. Viscoelastic properties of predominantly connective orbital tissues under shear loading differ markedly from properties of orbital fat, but both are accurately reflected using UCM models. These viscoelastic models will facilitate realistic global modeling of EOM behavior in binocular alignment and strabismus.

  11. Viscoelastic properties of bovine orbital connective tissue and fat: constitutive models

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Lawrence; Gupta, Vijay; Lee, Choongyeop; Kavehpore, Pirouz

    2012-01-01

    Reported mechanical properties of orbital connective tissue and fat have been too sparse to model strain–stress relationships underlying biomechanical interactions in strabismus. We performed rheological tests to develop a multi-mode upper convected Maxwell (UCM) model of these tissues under shear loading. From 20 fresh bovine orbits, 30 samples of connective tissue were taken from rectus pulley regions and 30 samples of fatty tissues from the posterior orbit. Additional samples were defatted to determine connective tissue weight proportion, which was verified histologically. Mechanical testing in shear employed a triborheometer to perform: strain sweeps at 0.5–2.0 Hz; shear stress relaxation with 1% strain; viscometry at 0.01–0.5 s−1 strain rate; and shear oscillation at 1% strain. Average connective tissue weight proportion was 98% for predominantly connective tissue and 76% for fatty tissue. Connective tissue specimens reached a long-term relaxation modulus of 668 Pa after 1,500 s, while corresponding values for fatty tissue specimens were 290 Pa and 1,100 s. Shear stress magnitude for connective tissue exceeded that of fatty tissue by five-fold. Based on these data, we developed a multimode UCM model with variable viscosities and time constants, and a damped hyperelastic response that accurately described measured properties of both connective and fatty tissues. Model parameters differed significantly between the two tissues. Viscoelastic properties of predominantly connective orbital tissues under shear loading differ markedly from properties of orbital fat, but both are accurately reflected using UCM models. These viscoelastic models will facilitate realistic global modeling of EOM behavior in binocular alignment and strabismus. PMID:21207094

  12. The viscoelastic properties of processed cheeses depend on their thermal history and fat polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Gliguem, Hela; Lopez, Christelle; Michon, Camille; Lesieur, Pierre; Ollivon, Michel

    2011-04-13

    Both the composition and the thermal kinetics that are applied to processed cheeses can affect their texture. This study investigated the effect of the storage conditions and thermal history on the viscoelastic properties of processed cheese and the physical properties of the fat phase. The microstructure of processed cheese has been characterized. Using a combination of physical techniques such as rheometry, differential scanning calorimetry, and X-ray diffraction, the partial crystallization of fat and the polymorphism of triacylglycerols (TG; main constituents of milk fat) were related to changes in the elastic modulus and tan δ as a function of temperature. In the small emulsion droplets (<1 μm) dispersed in processed cheeses, the solid fat phase was studied at a molecular level and showed differences as a function of the thermal history. Storage of processed cheese at 4 °C and its equilibration at 25 °C lead to partial crystallization of the fat phase, with the formation of a β' 2 L (40.9 Å) structure; on cooling at 2 °C min(-1), the formation of an α 3 L (65.8 Å) structure was characterized. The cooling of processed cheese from 60 to -10 °C leads to the formation of a single type of crystal: α 3 L (72 Å). Structural reorganizations of the solid fat phase characterized on heating allowed the interpretation of the elastic modulus evolution of processed cheese. This study evidenced polymorphism of TG in a complex food product such as processed cheese and allowed a better understanding of the viscoelastic properties as a function of the thermal history.

  13. Effect of sexual maturation on thermal stability, viscoelastic properties, and texture of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, fillets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nutrient and energy demand of sexual maturation in many fish cultivars causes structural change to key contractile proteins and thereby, affects fillet firmness. Thermal denaturation and viscoelastic properties of white muscle from diploid (2N; fertile) and triploid (3N; sterile) female rainbow...

  14. Studies of the viscoelastic properties of water confined between surfaces of specified chemical nature.

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, Jack E.; Grest, Gary Stephen; Moore, Nathan W.; Feibelman, Peter J.

    2010-09-01

    This report summarizes the work completed under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project 10-0973 of the same title. Understanding the molecular origin of the no-slip boundary condition remains vitally important for understanding molecular transport in biological, environmental and energy-related processes, with broad technological implications. Moreover, the viscoelastic properties of fluids in nanoconfinement or near surfaces are not well-understood. We have critically reviewed progress in this area, evaluated key experimental and theoretical methods, and made unique and important discoveries addressing these and related scientific questions. Thematically, the discoveries include insight into the orientation of water molecules on metal surfaces, the premelting of ice, the nucleation of water and alcohol vapors between surface asperities and the lubricity of these molecules when confined inside nanopores, the influence of water nucleation on adhesion to salts and silicates, and the growth and superplasticity of NaCl nanowires.

  15. Effects of multiwall carbon nanotubes on viscoelastic properties of magnetorheological elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Siti Aishah Abdul; Amri Mazlan, Saiful; Intan Nik Ismail, Nik; Ubaidillah, U.; Choi, Seung-Bok; Khairi, Muntaz Hana Ahmad; Azhani Yunus, Nurul

    2016-07-01

    The effect of different types of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on the morphological, magnetic and viscoelastic properties of magnetorheological elastomers (MREs) are studied in this work. A series of natural rubber MRE are prepared by adding MWCNTs as a new additive in MRE. Effects of functionalized MWCNT namely carboxylated MWCNT (COOH-MWCNT) and hydroxylated MWCNT (OH-MWCNT) on the rheological properties of MREs are investigated and the pristine MWCNTs is referred as a control. Epoxidised palm oil (EPO) is used as a medium to disperse carbonyl iron particle (CIP) and sonicate the MWCNTs. Morphological and magnetic properties of MREs are characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), respectively. Rheological properties under different magnetic field are evaluated by using parallel plate rheometer. From the results obtained, FESEM images indicate that COOH-MWCNT and CIP have better compatibility which leads to the formation of interconnected network in the matrix. In addition, by adding functionalized COOH-MWCNT, it is shown that the saturation magnetization is 5% higher than the pristine MWCNTs. It is also found that with the addition of COOH-MWCNT, the magnetic properties are improved parallel with enhancement of MR effect particularly at low strain amplitude. It is finally shown that the use of EPO also can contribute to the enhancement of MR performance.

  16. From Brittle to Pliant Viscoelastic Materials with Solid State Linear Polyphosphonium - Carboxylate Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Godeau, Guilhem; Navailles, Laurence; Nallet, Frédéric; Lin, Xinrong; McIntosh, Thomas J.; Grinstaff, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    A polystyrenylphosphonium polymer was synthesized and complexed with various carboxylic acid derivatives to form new solid-state polyelectrolyte-surfactant assemblies. The properties of these ionic materials were highly dependent on the nature of the anion and included a brittle material, a rubbery ball that bounces, or a sticky fiber. The values for the equilibrium modulus, storage modulus, and loss modulus were dependent on the composition of the carboxylic acid and the number of electrostatic interactions. Small-angle X-ray scattering studies on the supramolecular assemblies confirmed a bilayer structure for two of the assemblies. PMID:24511156

  17. Morphology, absorptivity and viscoelastic properties of mineralized PVP-CMC hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Nabanita; Shah, Rushita; Vyroubal, Radek; Kitano, Takeshi; Saha, Petr

    2013-04-01

    A simple liquid diffusion mineralization technique was applied for the incorporation of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in PVP-CMC hydrogel. The hydrogel was prepared 6.5 mm thick to achieve around 1 mm thick sample after mineralization of hydrogel matrix with calcite. The calcite crystals were round shaped and organized as building blocks inside the porous three dimensional cross linked structure of the PVP-CMC hydrogel. The present study was designed to evaluate the properties of mineralized (calcite) hydrogel with respect to freshly prepared hydrogel and those swelled in water (H2O) after drying. The viscoelastic properties of swelled and mineralized samples were reported though the dry PVP-CMC hydrogel were swelled and mineralized with calcite until 150 min. It is observed that there is not much difference in elastic property of fresh and 60 min mineralized hydrogels but the values of elastic property are decreased in the case of swelled hydrogels. It is interesting that in case of swelled samples the values of complex viscosity (η*) are increased with the increase of swelling time after 90 min but in case of calcite hydrogel the values (η*) are gradually decreased with the increase of time.

  18. Chemical and antimicrobial treatments change the viscoelastic properties of bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Jones, Warren L; Sutton, Michael P; McKittrick, Ladean; Stewart, Philip S

    2011-02-01

    Changes in the viscoelastic material properties of bacterial biofilms resulting from chemical and antimicrobial treatments were measured by rheometry. Colony biofilms of Staphylococcus epidermidis or a mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa were subjected to a classical creep test performed using a parallel plate rheometer. Data were fit to the 4-parameter Burger model to quantify the material properties. Biofilms were exposed to the chloride salts of several common mono-, di-, and tri- valent cations, and to urea, industrial biocides, and antibiotics. Many of these treatments resulted in statistically significant alterations in the material properties of the biofilm. Multivalent cations stiffened the P. aeruginosa biofilm, while ciprofloxacin and glutaraldehyde weakened it. Urea, rifampin, and a quaternary ammonium biocide weakened the S. epidermidis biofilm. In general, there was no correspondence between the responses of the two different types of biofilms to a particular treatment. These results underscore the distinction between the killing power of an antimicrobial agent and its ability to alter biofilm mechanical properties and thereby influence biofilm removal. Understanding biofilm rheology and how it is affected by chemical treatment could lead to improvements in biofilm control.

  19. Viscoelastic properties of human mesenchymally-derived stem cells and primary osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Darling, Eric M.; Topel, Matthew; Zauscher, Stefan; Vail, Thomas P.; Guilak, Farshid

    2010-01-01

    The mechanical properties of single cells play important roles in regulating cell-matrix interactions, potentially influencing the process of mechanotransduction. Recent studies also suggest that cellular mechanical properties may provide novel biological markers, or “biomarkers,” of cell phenotype, reflecting specific changes that occur with disease, differentiation, or cellular transformation. Of particular interest in recent years has been the identification of such biomarkers that can be used to determine specific phenotypic characteristics of stem cells that separate them from primary, differentiated cells. The goal of this study was to determine the elastic and viscoelastic properties of three primary cell types of mesenchymal lineage (chondrocytes, osteoblasts, and adipocytes) and to test the hypothesis that primary differentiated cells exhibit distinct mechanical properties compared to adult stem cells (adipose-derived or bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells). In an adherent, spread configuration, chondrocytes, osteoblasts, and adipocytes all exhibited significantly different mechanical properties, with osteoblasts being stiffer than chondrocytes and both being stiffer than adipocytes. Adipose-derived and mesenchymal stem cells exhibited similar properties to each other, but were mechanically distinct from primary cells, particularly when comparing a ratio of elastic to relaxed moduli. These findings will help more accurately model the cellular mechanical environment in mesenchymal tissues, which could assist in describing injury thresholds and disease progression or even determining the influence of mechanical loading for tissue engineering efforts. Furthermore, the identification of mechanical properties distinct to stem cells could result in more successful sorting procedures to enrich multipotent progenitor cell populations. PMID:17825308

  20. Viscoelastic Properties of Collagen-Adhesive Composites under Water Saturated and Dry Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Viraj; Misra, Anil; Parthasarathy, Ranganathan; Ye, Qiang; Spencer, Paulette

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the time and rate dependent mechanical properties of collagen-adhesive composites, creep and monotonic experiments are performed under dry and wet conditions. The composites are prepared by infiltration of dentin adhesive into a demineralized bovine dentin. Experimental results show that for small stress level under dry conditions, both the composite and neat adhesive have similar behavior. On the other hand, in wet conditions, the composites are significantly soft and weak compared to the neat adhesives. The behavior in the wet condition is found to be affected by the hydrophilicity of both the adhesive and collagen. Since the adhesive-collagen composites area part of the complex construct that forms the adhesive-dentin interface, their presence will affect the overall performance of the restoration. We find that Kelvin-Voigt model with at least 4-elements is required to fit the creep compliance data, indicating that the adhesive-collagen composites are complex polymers with several characteristics time-scales whose mechanical behavior will be significantly affected by loading rates and frequencies. Such mechanical properties have not been investigated widely for these types of materials. The derived model provides an additional advantage that it can be exploited to extract other viscoelastic properties which are, generally, time consuming to obtain experimentally. The calibrated model is utilized to obtain stress relaxation function, frequency-dependent storage and loss modulus, and rate dependent elastic modulus. PMID:24753362

  1. Single Microbubble Measurements of Lipid Monolayer Viscoelastic Properties for Small-Amplitude Oscillations.

    PubMed

    Lum, Jordan S; Dove, Jacob D; Murray, Todd W; Borden, Mark A

    2016-09-20

    Lipid monolayer rheology plays an important role in a variety of interfacial phenomena, the physics of biological membranes, and the dynamic response of acoustic bubbles and drops. We show here measurements of lipid monolayer elasticity and viscosity for very small strains at megahertz frequency. Individual plasmonic microbubbles of 2-6 μm radius were photothermally activated with a short laser pulse, and the subsequent nanometer-scale radial oscillations during ring-down were monitored by optical scatter. This method provided average dynamic response measurements of single microbubbles. Each microbubble was modeled as an underdamped linear oscillator to determine the damping ratio and eigenfrequency, and thus the lipid monolayer viscosity and elasticity. Our nonisothermal measurement technique revealed viscoelastic trends for different lipid shell compositions. We observed a significant increase in surface elasticity with the lipid acyl chain length for 16 to 20 carbons, and this effect was explained by an intermolecular forces model that accounts for the lipid composition, packing, and hydration. The surface viscosity was found to be equivalent for these lipid shells. We also observed an anomalous decrease in elasticity and an increase in viscosity when increasing the acyl chain length from 20 to 22 carbons. These results illustrate the use of a novel nondestructive optical technique to investigate lipid monolayer rheology in new regimes of frequency and strain, possibly elucidating the phase behavior, as well as how the dynamic response of a microbubble can be tuned by the lipid intermolecular forces.

  2. A micromechanical approach to elastic and viscoelastic properties of fiber reinforced concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Pasa Dutra, V.F.; Maghous, S. Campos Filho, A.; Pacheco, A.R.

    2010-03-15

    Some aspects of the constitutive behavior of fiber reinforced concrete (FRC) are investigated within a micromechanical framework. Special emphasis is put on the prediction of creep of such materials. The linear elastic behavior is first examined by implementation of a Mori-Tanaka homogenization scheme. The micromechanical predictions for the overall stiffness prove to be very close to finite element solutions obtained from the numerical analysis of a representative elementary volume of FRC modeled as a randomly heterogeneous medium. The validation of the micromechanical concepts based on comparison with a set of experiments, shows remarkable predictive capabilities of the micromechanical representation. The second part of the paper is devoted to non-ageing viscoelasticity of FRC. Adopting a Zener model for the behavior of the concrete matrix and making use of the correspondence principle, the homogenized relaxation moduli are derived analytically. The validity of the model is established by mean of comparison with available experiment measurements of creep strain of steel fiber reinforced concrete under compressive load. Finally, the model predictions are compared to those derived from analytical models formulated within a one-dimensional setting.

  3. Elastic modulus and viscoelastic properties of full thickness skin characterised at micro scales.

    PubMed

    Crichton, Michael L; Chen, Xianfeng; Huang, Han; Kendall, Mark A F

    2013-03-01

    The recent emergence of micro-devices for vaccine delivery into upper layers of the skin holds potential for increased immune responses using physical means to target abundant immune cell populations. A challenge in doing this has been a limited understanding of the skin elastic properties at the micro scale (i.e. on the order of a cell diameter; ~10 μm). Here, we quantify skin's elastic properties at a micro-scale by fabricating customised probes of scales from sub- to super-cellular (0.5 μm-20 μm radius). We then probe full thickness skin; first with force-relaxation experiments and subsequently by elastic indentations. We find that skin's viscoelastic response is scale-independent: consistently a ~40% decrease in normalised force over the first second, followed by further 10% reduction over 10 s. Using Prony series and Hertzian contact analyses, we determined the strain-rate independent elastic moduli of the skin. A high scale dependency was found: the smallest probe encountered the highest elastic modulus (~30 MPa), whereas the 20 μm radius probe was lowest (below 1 MPa). We propose that this may be a result of the load distribution in skin facilitated by the hard corneocytes in the outermost skin layers, and softer living cell layers below.

  4. An acoustic wave biosensor for probing the viscoelastic properties of living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fang; Wang, James H.-C.; Wang, Qing-Ming

    2006-05-01

    The thickness shear mode (TSM) resonator attached with living cells has been shown to be an effective functional biosensing device to monitor the process of cell adhesion to a surface. In this study, we first monitored the dynamic process of cell attachment and spreading as a function of cell seeding densities. Based on the steady state of cell adhesion to the substrate, a multilayer sensor structure model including a quartz substrate, a cell-substrate interfacial layer and a cell layer was constructed. The thickness of cell-substrate interfacial layer and the viscoelastic properties of human skin fibroblasts (HSF) were then determined by fitting experimental results with the theoretical model. It has been obtained that the thickness of the cell-substrate interfacial layer is 60-80 nm, and the elastic module and viscosity of cell layers are about 13 KPa and 3-4 mPa's respectively. These results are in a good agreement with those measured by other techniques, such as magnetic bead microrheometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Surface Plasmon Resonance Microscopy (SPRM). In addition, knowing that the actin cytoskeleton is important for the mechanical properties of living cells, we investigated the motional resistance change caused by the disruption of actin cytoskeleton induced by fungal toxin Cytochalasin D in the human skin fibroblasts. The results indeed indicate the direct correlation between resistance changes and the disruption of actin cytoskeleton, which are again consistent with the results observed by fluorescence images.

  5. Preparation and characterization of herbal creams for improvement of skin viscoelastic properties.

    PubMed

    Ahshawat, M S; Saraf, S; Saraf, S

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to formulate and evaluate herbal cosmetic creams for their improvement of skin viscoelastic and hydration properties. The cosmetic cream formulations were designed by using ethanolic extracts of Glycyrriza glabra, Curcuma longa (roots), seeds of Psorolea corlifolia, Cassia tora, Areca catechu, Punica granatum, fruits of Embelica officinale, leaves of Centella asiatica, dried bark of Cinnamon zeylanicum and fresh gel of Aloe vera in varied concentrations (0.12-0.9%w/w) and characterized using physicochemical and physiological measurements. The ethanolic extracts of herbs were incorporated in a cream base that is prepared by a phase inversion emulsification technique. The cream base was prepared by utilizing oil of Prunus amagdalus, Sesamum indicum, honey, cetyl alcohol, stearic acid, polysorbate monoleate, sorbitan monostearate, propylene glycol and glycerin. Physicochemical assessments and microbiological testing were completed for all formulations according to the methods of the Indian Standard Bureau. The studies were carried out for 6 weeks on normal subjects (6 males and 12 females, between 22 and 50 years) on the back of their volar forearm for evaluation of viscoelastic properties in terms of extensibility via a suction measurement, firmness using laboratory fabricated instruments such as ball bouncing and skin hydration using electric (resistance) measurement methods. The physicochemical parameters of formulations CAA1-CAA6, i.e. pH, acid value, saponification value, viscosity, spreadability, layer thickness microbial count and skin sensitivity were found to be in the range of 5.01 +/- 0.4-6.07 +/- 0.6, 3.3-5.1 +/- 0.2, 20-32, 5900-6755 cps, 60-99%, 25-50 mum, 31-46 colony-forming units (CFU) and a 0-1 erythema score. The formulations, CAA4 and CAA5, showed an increase in percentage extensibility (32.27 +/- 1.7% and 29.89 +/- 1.64%, respectively), firmness (28.86 +/- 0.86% and 29.89 +/- 2.8%, respectively) and improved skin

  6. RLC model of visco-elastic properties of the chest wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliverti, Andrea; Ferrigno, Giancarlo

    1996-04-01

    The quantification of the visco-elastic properties (resistance (R), inertia (L) and compliance (C)) of the different chest wall compartments (pulmonary rib cage,diaphragmatic rib cage and abdomen) is important to study the status of the passive components of the respiratory system, particularly in selected pathologies. Applying the viscoelastic-electrical analogy to the chest wall, we used an identification method in order to estimate the R, L and C parameters of the different parts of the chest, basing on different models; the input and output measured data were constituted by the volume variations of the different chest wall compartments and by the nasal pressure during controlled intermittent positive pressure ventilation by nasal mask, while the parameters of the system (R, L and C of the different compartments) were to be estimated. Volumes were measured with a new method, recently validated, based on an opto-electronic motion analyzer, able to compute with high accuracy and null invasivity the absolute values and the time variations of the volumes of each of the three compartments. The estimation of the R, L and C parameters has been based on a least-squared criterion, and the minimization has been based on a robustified iterative Gauss-Newton algorithm. The validation of the estimation procedure (fitting) has ben performed computing the percentage root mean square value of the error between the output real data and the output estimated data. The method has been applied to 2 healthy subjects. Also preliminary results have been obtained from 20 subjects affected by neuromuscular diseases (Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) and Spinal Muscle Atrophy (SMA)). The results show that: (a) the best-fitting electrical models of the respiratory system are made up by one or three parallel RLC branches supplied by a voltage generator (so considering inertial properties, particularly in the abdominal compartment, and not considering patient/machine connection); (b) there

  7. Microstructure and textural and viscoelastic properties of model processed cheese with different dry matter and fat in dry matter content.

    PubMed

    Černíková, Michaela; Nebesářová, Jana; Salek, Richardos Nikolaos; Řiháčková, Lada; Buňka, František

    2017-04-05

    The aim of this work was to examine the effect of a different dry matter (DM) contents (35 and 45% wt/wt) and fat in DM contents (40 and 50% wt/wt) on the textural and viscoelastic properties and microstructure of model processed cheeses made from real ingredients regularly used in the dairy industry. A constant DM content and constant fat in DM content were kept throughout the whole study. Apart from the basic chemical parameters, textural and viscoelastic properties of the model samples were measured and scanning electron microscopy was carried out. With increasing DM content, the rigidity of the products increased and the size of the fat globules in the model samples of the processed cheeses decreased. With increasing fat in DM content, the rigidity of the processed cheeses decreased and the size of the fat globules increased.

  8. Comparison of viscoelastic property characterization of plastisol phantoms with magnetic resonance elastography and high-frequency rheometry.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, P M; Koon, K Tse Ve; Brusseau, E; Nicolle, S; Palieme, J-F; Lambert, S A; Grenier, D

    2016-08-01

    This study aims at evaluating Magnetic Resonance Elastography (MRE) as a reliable technique for the characterization of viscoelastic properties of soft tissues. Three phantoms with different concentrations of plastisol and softener were prepared in order to mechanically mimic a broad panel of healthy and pathological soft tissues. Once placed in a MRI device, each sample was excited by a homemade external driver, inducing shear waves within the medium. The storage (G') and loss (G") moduli of each phantom were then reconstructed from MRE acquisitions over a frequency range from 300 to 1,000 Hz, by applying a 2D Helmholtz inversion algorithm. At the same time, mechanical tests were performed on four samples of each phantom with a High-Frequency piezo-Rheometer (HFR) over an overlapping frequency range (from 160 to 630 Hz) with the same test conditions (temperature, ageing). The comparison between both techniques shows a good agreement in the measurement of the storage and loss moduli, underlying the capability of MRE to noninvasively assess the complex shear modulus G* of a medium and its interest for investigating the viscoelastic properties of living tissues. Moreover, the phantoms with varying concentrations of plastisol used in this study show interesting rheological properties, which make them good candidates to simulate the broad variety of viscoelastic behaviors of healthy and pathological soft tissues.

  9. Monitoring the Changes of Material Properties at Bone-Implant Interface during the Healing Process In Vivo: A Viscoelastic Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsiang-Ho; Lai, Wei-Yi; Chee, Tze-Jian

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to monitor the changes of viscoelastic properties at bone-implant interface via resonance frequency analysis (RFA) and the Periotest device during the healing process in an experimental rabbit model. Twenty-four dental implants were inserted into the femoral condyles of rabbits. The animals were sacrificed immediately after implant installation or on day 14, 28, or 56 after surgery. Viscoelastic properties at bone-implant interface were evaluated by measuring the implant stability quotient (ISQ) using RFA and by measuring the Periotest values (PTVs) using the Periotest device. The bone/implant specimens were evaluated histopathologically and histomorphometrically to determine the degree of osseointegration (BIC%). The BIC% values at different time points were then compared with the corresponding ISQ values and PTVs. The mean ISQ value increased gradually and reached 81 ± 1.7 on day 56, whereas the mean PTV decreased over time, finally reaching −0.7 ± 0.5 on day 56. Significant correlations were found between ISQ and BIC% (r = 0.701, p < 0.001), PTV and BIC% (r = −0.637, p < 0.05), and ISQ and PTV (r = −0.68, p < 0.05). These results show that there is a positive correlation between implant stability parameters and peri-implant-bone healing, indicating that the RFA and Periotest are useful for measuring changes of viscoelastic properties at bone-implant interface and are reliable for indirectly predicting the degree of osseointegration. PMID:28373978

  10. Dynamics of viscoelastic properties of rat cardiac sarcomeres during the diastolic interval: involvement of Ca2+.

    PubMed Central

    Stuyvers, B D; Miura, M; ter Keurs, H E

    1997-01-01

    1. Cardiac sarcomere stiffness was investigated during diastole in eighteen trabeculae dissected from the right ventricle of rat heart. The trabeculae were stimulated at 0.5 Hz, in a modified Krebs-Henseleit solution (pH, 7.4; 25 degrees C). Sarcomere length (SL) was measured using high resolution (+/-2 nm) laser diffraction techniques. Force (F) was measured with a silicon strain gauge. 2. SL increased exponentially (amplitude, 25 +/- 9 nm; n = 15) throughout diastole. This increase occurred even at slack SL, showing that this phenomenon was due to an internal expansion. The majority of the muscles showed discrete spontaneous fluctuations of SL (amplitude < 20 nm) starting approximately 1 s after the end of the twitch. 3. The intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) was measured from the fluorescence of microinjected fura-2 salt in seven trabeculae under the same experimental conditions. [Ca2+]i continuously declined (from 240 to 90 nM) during diastole following a monoexponential time course (time constant, 210-325 ms). 4. The stiffness of the sarcomere was evaluated at 10, 30, 50, 70 and 90% of diastole using bursts (30 ms) of 500 Hz sinusoidal perturbations of muscle length (amplitude of SL oscillations < 30 nm). At 1 nM external Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]o), the average stiffness modulus (Mod) increased from 9.3 +/- 0.6 to 12 +/- 0.6 nN mm-2 micron-1 (n = 18; P < 0.05), while the average phase shift (phi) between F and SL signals decreased from 84 +/- 3 to 73 +/- 4 deg (n = 18; P < 0.05) between 10 and 90% during diastole. The increase in Mod and the decrease in phi reversed when spontaneous activity occurred. When [Ca2+]o was raised to 2 mM, the stiffness time course reversed approximately 450 ms earlier, simultaneously with the occurrence of spontaneous activity. 5. Our results show that diastole is only an apparent steady state and suggest that the structural system responsible for the viscoelastic properties of the sarcomere is regulated by [Ca2+]i

  11. Cell adaptation to a physiologically relevant ECM mimic with different viscoelastic properties

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Kaustabh; Pan, Zhi; Guan, E; Ge, Shouren; Liu, Yajie; Nakamura, Toshio; Ren, Xiang-Dong; Rafailovich, Miriam; Clark, Richard A.F.

    2009-01-01

    To successfully induce tissue repair or regeneration in vivo, bioengineered constructs must possess both optimal bioactivity and mechanical strength. This is because cell interaction with the extracellular matrix (ECM) produces two different but concurrent signaling mechanisms: ligation-induced signaling, which depends on ECM biological stimuli, and traction-induced signaling, which depends on ECM mechanical stimuli. In this report, we provide a fundamental understanding of how alterations in mechanical stimuli alone, produced by varying the viscoelastic properties of our bioengineered construct, modulate phenotypic behavior at the whole-cell level. Using a physiologically-relevant ECM mimic composed of hyaluronan and fibronectin, we found that adult human dermal fibroblasts modify their mechanical response in order to match substrate stiffness. More specifically, the cells on stiffer substrates had higher modulus and a more stretched and organized actin cytoskeleton (and vice versa), which translated into larger traction forces exerted on the substrate. This modulation of cellular mechanics had contrasting effects on migration and proliferation, where cells migrated faster on softer substrates while proliferating preferentially on the stiffer ones. These findings implicate substrate rigidity as a critical design parameter in the development of bioengineered constructs aimed at eliciting maximal cell and tissue function. PMID:17049594

  12. Nano confinement effects on dynamic and viscoelastic properties of Selenium Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Heedong; McKenna, Gregory

    2015-03-01

    In current study, we use a novel nano bubble inflation technique to study nano confinement effects on the dynamic and viscoelastic properties of physical vapor deposited Selenium films. Film thicknesses ranged from 60 to 260 nm. Creep experiments were performed for the temperatures ranging from Tg,macroscopic-14 °C to Tg,\\ macroscopic + 19 °C. Time temperature superposition and time thickness superposition were applied to create reduced creep curves, and those were compared with macroscopic data [J. Non-Cryst. Solids. 2002, 307, 790-801]. The results showed that the time temperature superposition was applicable in the glassy relaxation regime to the steady-state plateau regime. However in the long time response of the creep compliance, time thickness superposition failed due to the thickness dependence on the steady-state plateau. It was observed that the steady state compliance increased with film thickness. The thickness dependence on the plateau stiffening followed a power law of DPlateau ~ h2.46, which is greater than observed in organic polymers where the exponents observed range from 0.83 to 2.0 [Macromolecules. 2012, 45 (5), 2453-2459]. National Science Foundation Grant No. CHE 1112416 and John R. Bradford Endowment at Texas Tech

  13. Comparison of viscoelastic properties of walls and functional characteristics of valves in lymphatic and venous vessels.

    PubMed

    Ohhashi, T

    1987-12-01

    The principal function of the lymphatic and venous system is to maintain a favorable environment for cells of the body. As a consequence mainly of hydrostatic forces, shifts of fluid usually occur between the vascular system and the extracellular space. To compensate for these shifts the veins are capable of active and passive changes in capacity that serve to modulate the filling pressure of the heart by adjusting the central blood volume. In addition to the venous function, the lymphatic function also contributes to compensate for the fluid shifts by drainage from the interstitial space. Namely, the general function of the lymphatic system is to return fluid and protein which escapes from the blood capillaries to the lymph circulation. To elucidate the mode of venous and lymph transport, therefore, it is of essential importance to obtain basic knowledge of the mechanical characteristics of the walls of the vessels and the functional characteristics of the lymphatic and venous valves dividing two adjacent compartments. In this communication, in order to answer the question, "Are Lymphatics Different From Blood Vessels?", I would like to review a comparison of viscoelastic properties of walls and functional characteristics of valves in lymph and venous vessels by use of our original data obtained with isolated canine veins and thoracic ducts and with isolated bovine mesenteric lymphatics (1-9).

  14. Gelation kinetics and viscoelastic properties of pluronic and α-cyclodextrin-based pseudopolyrotaxane hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Pradal, Clementine; Jack, Kevin S; Grøndahl, Lisbeth; Cooper-White, Justin J

    2013-10-14

    The results of a systematic investigation into the gelation behavior of α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) and Pluronic (poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) block copolymers) pseudopolyrotaxane (PPR) hydrogels are reported here in terms of the effects of temperature, α-CD concentration, and Pluronic type (Pluronic F68 and Pluronic F127). It was found that α-CD significantly modifies the gelation behavior of Pluronic solutions and that the PPR hydrogels are highly sensitive to changes in the α-CD concentration. In some cases, the addition of α-CD was found to be detrimental to the gelation process, leading to slower gelation kinetics and weaker gels than with Pluronic alone. However, in other cases, the hydrogels formed in the presence of the α-CDs reached higher moduli and showed faster gelation kinetics than with Pluronic alone and in some instances α-CD allowed the formation of hydrogels from Pluronic solutions that would normally not undergo gelation. Depending on composition and ratio of α-CD/Pluronic, these highly viscoelastic hydrogels displayed elastic shear modulus values ranging from 2 kPa to 7 MPa, gelation times ranging from a few seconds to a few hours and self-healing behaviors post failure. Using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), we probed the resident structure of these systems, and from these insights we have proposed a new molecular mechanism that accounts for the macroscopic properties observed.

  15. Viscoelastic characteristics and phytochemical properties of purple-rice drinks following ultrahigh pressure and pasteurization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worametrachanon, Srivilai; Apichartsrangkoon, Arunee

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated how pressure (500, 600 MPa/20 min) altered the viscoelastic characteristics and phytochemical properties of germinated and non-germinated purple-rice drinks in comparison with pasteurization. Accordingly, color parameters, storage and loss moduli, anthocyanin content, γ-oryzanol, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), total phenolic compounds and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylthydrazyl (DPPH) capacity of the processed drinks were determined. The finding showed that germinated and pressurized rice drink had lower Browning Index than the non-germinated and pasteurized rice drink. The plots of storage and loss moduli for processed rice drinks indicated that time of pressurization had greater impact on gel structural modification than the level of pressure used. The phytochemicals, including total phenolics, and DPPH capacity in pressurized rice drinks retained higher quantity than those in pasteurized drink, despite less treatment effects on anthocyanin. On the contrary, both γ-oryzanol and GABA were found in high amounts in germinated rice drink with little variation among processing effects.

  16. Viscoelastic properties of an exopolysaccharide: Aeromonas gum, produced by Aeromonas nichidenii 5797.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaojuan; Chen, Pan; Zhang, Lina

    2007-01-01

    The viscoelastic properties of Aeromonas (A) gum in water were investigated by using the Rheometric Scientific ARES controlled strain rheometer. An intrinsic viscosity of 8336 ml/g was obtained according to the Fuoss-Straus equation. The effect of salt concentration on intrinsic viscosity revealed that the A gum exists as semiflexible chain. Typical shear-thinning (pseudoplastic) behavior was observed at concentrations higher than 0.52%. The zero shear viscosity (eta(0)) increased with increasing polysaccharide concentration (c) showing a gradient of approximately 1.0, 2.9 and 4.8 in different concentration domains. The critical concentrations c* and c**, at which the transitions from a dilute solution of independently moving chains to semidilute and then concentrated domains occurred, were determined roughly to be 1.2% and 3.5%. The results from dynamic experiments revealed that the A gum solution shows characteristics of polymer solutions without any evidence of gel-like character. All the results from steady and dynamic tests suggest that the A gum is a non-gelling polysaccharide. The temperature dependence of apparent viscosity was described by Arrhenius equation and the flow activation energy was estimated to be 45.2 kJ/mol, which is independent on polymer concentration.

  17. Effect of Age and Exercise on the Viscoelastic Properties of Rat Tail Tendon

    PubMed Central

    LaCroix, Andrew S.; Duenwald-Kuehl, Sarah E.; Brickson, Stacey; Akins, Tiffany L.; Diffee, Gary; Aiken, Judd; Vanderby, Ray; Lakes, Roderic S.

    2013-01-01

    Tendon mechanical properties are thought to degrade during aging but improve with exercise. A remaining question is whether exercise in aged animals provides sufficient regenerative, systemic stimulus to restore younger mechanical behaviors. Herein we address that question with tail tendons from aged and exercised rats, which would be subject to systemic effects but not direct loading from the exercise regimen. Twenty-four month old rats underwent one of three treadmill exercise training protocols for 12 months: sedentary (walking at 0° incline for 5 min/day), moderate (running at 0° incline for 30 min/day), or high (running at 4° incline for 30 min/day). A group of 9 month old rats were used to provide an adult control, while a group of 3 month old rats provided a young control. Tendons were harvested at sacrifice and mechanically tested. Results show significant age-dependent differences in modulus, ultimate stress, relaxation rate, and percent relaxation. Relaxation rate was strain-dependent, consistent with nonlinear superposition or Schapery models but not with quasilinear viscoelasticity (QLV). Trends in exercise data suggest that with exercise, tendons assume the elastic character of younger rats (lower elastic modulus and ultimate stress). PMID:23549897

  18. Fractal behavior and optical properties on erythrocytes viscoelasticity subjected to mechanical stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korol, Ana M.; Valverde, Juana R.; Rasia, Rodolfo J.

    2000-11-01

    In this study techniques of fractal analysis as well as a home made device are proposed to characterize viscoelastic properties on mammalian erythrocyte membranes. A numerical method formulated on the basis of the fractal approximation for ordinary (OBM) and fractionary Brownian motion (FBM), is proposed to evaluate sensitive dependence on initial conditions. We hypothesize that this photometric temporal series, could be modeled as a system of bounded correlated random walk. Hence, three phase spaces n-dimensional (n=2 to 8) are generated, and used to distinguish chaotic from white noise behavior. The time series was obtained by ektacytometry over several millions of shear elongated cells. These experimental determinations were carried out in a home made device called erythrodeformeter, that has been built for rheological measurements on red blood cells subjected to definite fluid shear stress. A laser beam traverses the layer of shear deformed erythrocytes producing an elliptical pattern and diffracted intensity corresponding to each principal diameter of the diffraction pattern falls onto a photomultiplier tube (PMT), after passing through a thin straight slot in a mask placed exactly on the corresponding axis of the elliptical pattern. These photometric reading performed while erythrocytes became deformed and relaxed are used to calculate three different parameters over the time dependent process, and very different results were obtained.

  19. Interactions of glycosphingolipids and lipopolysaccharides with silica and polyamide surfaces: adsorption and viscoelastic properties.

    PubMed

    Gutman, Jenia; Kaufman, Yair; Kawahara, Kazuyoshi; Walker, Sharon L; Freger, Viatcheslav; Herzberg, Moshe

    2014-06-09

    Bacterial outer membrane components play a critical role in bacteria-surface interactions (adhesion and repulsion). Sphingomonas species (spp.) differ from other Gram-negative bacteria in that they lack lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) in their outer membrane. Instead, Sphingomonas spp. outer membrane consists of glycosphingolipids (GSLs). To delineate the properties of the outer membrane of Sphingomonas spp. and to explain the adhesion of these cells to surfaces, we employed a single-component-based approach of comparing GSL vesicles to LPS vesicles. This is the first study to report the formation of vesicles containing 100% GSL. Significant physicochemical differences between GSL and LPS vesicles are reported. Composition-dependent vesicle adherence to different surfaces using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) technology was observed, where higher GSL content resulted in higher mass accumulation on the sensor. Additionally, the presence of 10% GSL and above was found to promote the relative rigidity of the vesicle obtaining viscoelastic ratio of 30-70% higher than that of pure LPS vesicles.

  20. Experimental methods for the characterization of the frequency-dependent viscoelastic properties of soft materials

    PubMed Central

    Kazemirad, Siavash; K. Heris, Hossein; Mongeau, Luc

    2013-01-01

    A characterization method based on Rayleigh wave propagation was developed for the quantification of the frequency-dependent viscoelastic properties of soft materials at high frequencies; i.e., up to 4 kHz. Planar harmonic surface waves were produced on the surface of silicone rubber samples. The phase and amplitude of the propagating waves were measured at different locations along the propagation direction, which allowed the calculation of the complex Rayleigh wavenumbers at each excitation frequency using a transfer function method. An inverse wave propagation problem was then solved to obtain the complex shear/elastic moduli from the measured wavenumbers. In a separate, related investigation, dynamic indentation tests using atomic force microscopy (AFM) were performed at frequencies up to 300 Hz. No systematic verification study is available for the AFM-based method, which can be used when the dimensions of the test samples are too small for other existing testing methods. The results obtained from the Rayleigh wave propagation and AFM-based indentation methods were compared with those from a well-established method, which involves the generation of standing longitudinal compression waves in rod-shaped test specimens. The results were cross validated and qualitatively confirmed theoretical expectations presented in the literature for the frequency-dependence of polymers. PMID:23654420

  1. Viscoelastic properties of normal and cancerous human breast cells are affected differently by contact to adjacent cells.

    PubMed

    Schierbaum, Nicolas; Rheinlaender, Johannes; Schäffer, Tilman E

    2017-04-07

    Malignant transformation drastically alters the mechanical properties of the cell and its response to the surrounding cellular environment. We studied the influence of the physical contact between adjacent cells in an epithelial monolayer on the viscoelastic behavior of normal MCF10A, non-invasive cancerous MCF7, and invasive cancerous MDA-MB-231 human breast cells. Using an atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging technique termed force clamp force mapping (FCFM) to record images of the viscoelastic material properties of sparse and confluent cells, we found that normal MCF10A cells are stiffer and have a lower fluidity when at confluent than at sparse density. Contrarily, cancerous MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells do not stiffen and do not decrease their fluidity when progressing from sparse to confluent density. The behavior of normal MCF10A cells appears to be governed by the formation of stable cell-cell contacts, because their disruption with a calcium-chelator (EGTA) causes the stiffness and fluidity values to return to those at sparse density. In contrast, EGTA-treatment of MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells does not change their viscoelastic properties. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that the change of the viscoelastic behavior in MCF10A cells when going from sparse to confluent density is accompanied by a remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton into thick stress fiber bundles, while in MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells the actin cytoskeleton is only composed of thin and short fibers, regardless of cell density. While the observed behavior of normal MCF10A cells might be crucial for providing mechanical stability and thus in turn integrity of the epithelial monolayer, the dysregulation of this behavior in cancerous MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells is possibly a central aspect of cancer progression in the epithelium.

  2. Temperature Dependence of the Viscoelastic Properties of a Confined Liquid Polymer Measured by Using an Oscillating Optical Fiber Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Shintaro; Fukuzawa, Kenji; Hamamoto, Yuya; Zhang, Hedong

    2010-08-01

    We measured the temperature dependence of the viscoelastic properties of a liquid polymer confined and sheared within a nanometer-sized gap. In the viscoelastic measurements, we used the fiber wobbling method, a highly sensitive method that we have developed for measuring shear forces. As a liquid sample, we used the fluoropolyether lubricant Fomblin Zdol4000. Our experimental results showed that the temperature dependence of the viscosity was well expressed by the well-known Andrade equation, even in the confined state. The activation enthalpy was calculated by assuming that Eyring's theory of viscosity holds for gaps of a width ranging from 100 nm down to a few nanometers. We observed a significant decrease in the activation enthalpy for gaps smaller than 10 nm. Elasticity, which only appeared for confinement in gaps smaller than 10 nm, roughly decreased with increasing temperature.

  3. Impact of Texture Heterogeneity on Elastic and Viscoelastic Properties of Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ravi

    This thesis discusses the impacts of fabric heterogeneity, fluids and fluid saturations, effective pressures, and frequency of investigation on the elastic and viscoelastic properties of calcite-rich limestone and chalk formations. Carbonate reservoirs have been analyzed either with empirical relations and analogs from siliciclastic reservoirs or using simplistic models. However, under the varying parameters mentioned above, their seismic response can be very different. The primary reason is because these rocks of biochemical origins readily undergo textural changes and support heterogeneous distribution of fluid flow and elastic properties. Thus, many current rock physics models are unable to predict the time-lapse elastic response in these reservoirs. I have measured elastic properties of calcite rich rocks in the seismic frequency range of 2 to 2000 Hz and at the ultrasonic frequency of 800 kHz. The samples selected for this study represent the typical heterogeneities found in carbonate formations. These measurements covering a large frequency range provide an understanding of the dispersion and attenuation mechanisms during seismic wave propagation in the subsurface. I find that a heterogeneous formation shows significant velocity dispersion and attenuations when saturated with brine, and even more on saturation with CO2. I also show that the shear modulus of carbonate rocks changes significantly (from 8% for brine saturation to 70% for CO2 saturation) upon fluid saturation with polar fluids. I evaluated rock physics models, such as Gassmann's and with uniform and patchy fluid substitution, and Hashin-Shtrikman to predict saturated elastic properties in carbonates. Fluid sensitivity is directly related to the initial stiffness of the rock instead of porosity, as normally assumed. The Gassmann model can predict elastic properties for uniform saturations - mostly in homogenous rocks. Heterogeneous rocks, however, are better modeled using a patchy fluid saturation

  4. The role of isocyanates in determining the viscoelastic properties of polyurethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AqilahHamuzan, Hawa; Badri, Khairiah Haji

    2016-11-01

    Polyurethane (PU) has a unique structure that is dependent on the structure of the starting material used. This research focused on investigating the role of isocyanate groups (NCO) in the determination of the viscoelastic properties of the polymer. Monoester polyol was reacted with three different diisocyanates separately by prepolymerization method. The diisocyanates used were 2,4-diphenyl methane diisocyanate (MDI), toluene 2,4-diisocyanate (TDI) and isophoronediisocyanate (IPDI). Acetone was used as a solvent. IPDI, MDI and TDI were reacted with monoester polyol at ratios of 10:9, 10:10, 10:12 and 10:14 (polyol:diisocyanate). Then, the PU foams produced by the curing process were analyzed by Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The FTIR spectra showed the presence of the amide peak (-NH) and the absence of hydroxyl peak (-OH) indicated that the reaction between polyol and diisocyanate has occurred. However, the soxhlet extraction showed that only MDI-based PUs contain crosslinking bond. These cross-linking bond at the ratio of 10:10, 10:12 and 10:14 were 41.3 %,61.1 % and 74.1 % respectively. Thermal properties of the PU foams were determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetry (TGA) techniques. MDI-based PUs and TDI-based PUs show two values of Tg while IPDI-based PUs only show one Tg value. The tensile strains of PU foams decreased with increasing ratio of isocyanate. Meanwhile, PU foams with ratio of polyol to isocyanate at 10:12 showed the highest tensile stress and modulus compared to at 10:10 and 10:14.

  5. Viscoelastic properties of rabbit osteoarthritic menisci: A correlation with matrix alterations.

    PubMed

    Levillain, A; Magoariec, H; Boulocher, C; Decambron, A; Viateau, V; Hoc, T

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of early osteoarthritis (OA) on the viscoelastic properties of rabbit menisci and to correlate the mechanical alterations with the microstructural changes. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Transection (ACLT) was performed in six male New-Zealand White rabbits on the right knee joint. Six healthy rabbits served as controls. Menisci were removed six weeks after ACLT and were graded macroscopically. Indentation-relaxation tests were performed in the anterior and posterior regions of the medial menisci. The collagen fibre organization and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content were assessed by biphotonic confocal microscopy and histology, respectively. OA menisci displayed severe macroscopic lesions compared with healthy menisci (p=0.009). Moreover, the instantaneous and equilibrium moduli, which were 2.9±1.0MPa and 0.60±0.18MPa in the anterior region of healthy menisci, respectively, decreased significantly (p=0.03 and p=0.004, respectively) in OA menisci by 55% and 57%, respectively, indicating a global decrease in meniscal stiffness in this region. The equilibrium modulus alone decreased significantly (p=0.04) in the posterior region, going from 0.60±0.18MPa to 0.26±012MPa. This induced a loss of tissue elasticity. These mechanical changes were associated in the posterior region with a structural disruption of the superficial layers, from which the tie fibres emanate, and with a decrease in the GAG content in the anterior region. Consequently, the circumferential collagen fibres of the deep zone were dissociated and the collagen bundles were less compact. Our results demonstrate the strong meniscal modifications induced by ACLT at an early stage of OA and highlight the relationship between structural and chemical matrix alterations and mechanical properties.

  6. Effects of resistance and stretching training programmes on the viscoelastic properties of human tendon structures in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, Keitaro; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Fukunaga, Tetsuo

    2002-01-01

    The present study examined whether resistance and stretching training programmes altered the viscoelastic properties of human tendon structures in vivo. Eight subjects completed 8 weeks (4 days per week) of resistance training which consisted of unilateral plantar flexion at 70 % of one repetition maximum with 10 repetitions per set (5 sets per day). They performed resistance training (RT) on one side and resistance training and static stretching training (RST; 10 min per day, 7 days per week) on the other side. Before and after training, the elongation of the tendon structures in the medial gastrocnemius muscle was directly measured using ultrasonography, while the subjects performed ramp isometric plantar flexion up to the voluntary maximum, followed by a ramp relaxation. The relationship between estimated muscle force (Fm) and tendon elongation (L) was fitted to a linear regression, the slope of which was defined as stiffness. The hysteresis was calculated as the ratio of the area within the Fm-L loop to the area beneath the load portion of the curve. The stiffness increased significantly by 18.8 ± 10.4 % for RT and 15.3 ± 9.3 % for RST. There was no significant difference in the relative increase of stiffness between RT and RST. The hysteresis, on the other hand, decreased 17 ± 20 % for RST, but was unchanged for RT. These results suggested that the resistance training increased the stiffness of tendon structures as well as muscle strength and size, and the stretching training affected the viscosity of tendon structures but not the elasticity. PMID:11773330

  7. Nanoscale effects in the characterization of viscoelastic materials with atomic force microscopy: coupling of a quasi-three-dimensional standard linear solid model with in-plane surface interactions

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary Significant progress has been accomplished in the development of experimental contact-mode and dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods designed to measure surface material properties. However, current methods are based on one-dimensional (1D) descriptions of the tip–sample interaction forces, thus neglecting the intricacies involved in the material behavior of complex samples (such as soft viscoelastic materials) as well as the differences in material response between the surface and the bulk. In order to begin to address this gap, a computational study is presented where the sample is simulated using an enhanced version of a recently introduced model that treats the surface as a collection of standard-linear-solid viscoelastic elements. The enhanced model introduces in-plane surface elastic forces that can be approximately related to a two-dimensional (2D) Young’s modulus. Relevant cases are discussed for single- and multifrequency intermittent-contact AFM imaging, with focus on the calculated surface indentation profiles and tip–sample interaction force curves, as well as their implications with regards to experimental interpretation. A variety of phenomena are examined in detail, which highlight the need for further development of more physically accurate sample models that are specifically designed for AFM simulation. A multifrequency AFM simulation tool based on the above sample model is provided as supporting information. PMID:27335746

  8. Nanoscale effects in the characterization of viscoelastic materials with atomic force microscopy: Coupling of a quasi-three-dimensional standard linear solid model with in-plane surface interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Solares, Santiago D.

    2016-04-15

    Significant progress has been accomplished in the development of experimental contact-mode and dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods designed to measure surface material properties. However, current methods are based on one-dimensional (1D) descriptions of the tip-sample interaction forces, thus neglecting the intricacies involved in the material behavior of complex samples (such as soft viscoelastic materials) as well as the differences in material response between the surface and the bulk. In order to begin to address this gap, a computational study is presented where the sample is simulated using an enhanced version of a recently introduced model that treats the surface as a collection of standard-linear-solid viscoelastic elements. The enhanced model introduces in-plane surface elastic forces that can be approximately related to a two-dimensional (2D) Young's modulus. Relevant cases are discussed for single-and multifrequency intermittent-contact AFM imaging, with focus on the calculated surface indentation profiles and tip-sample interaction force curves, as well as their implications with regards to experimental interpretation. A variety of phenomena are examined in detail, which highlight the need for further development of more physically accurate sample models that are specifically designed for AFM simulation. As a result, a multifrequency AFM simulation tool based on the above sample model is provided as supporting information.

  9. Nanoscale effects in the characterization of viscoelastic materials with atomic force microscopy: Coupling of a quasi-three-dimensional standard linear solid model with in-plane surface interactions

    DOE PAGES

    Solares, Santiago D.

    2016-04-15

    Significant progress has been accomplished in the development of experimental contact-mode and dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods designed to measure surface material properties. However, current methods are based on one-dimensional (1D) descriptions of the tip-sample interaction forces, thus neglecting the intricacies involved in the material behavior of complex samples (such as soft viscoelastic materials) as well as the differences in material response between the surface and the bulk. In order to begin to address this gap, a computational study is presented where the sample is simulated using an enhanced version of a recently introduced model that treats the surfacemore » as a collection of standard-linear-solid viscoelastic elements. The enhanced model introduces in-plane surface elastic forces that can be approximately related to a two-dimensional (2D) Young's modulus. Relevant cases are discussed for single-and multifrequency intermittent-contact AFM imaging, with focus on the calculated surface indentation profiles and tip-sample interaction force curves, as well as their implications with regards to experimental interpretation. A variety of phenomena are examined in detail, which highlight the need for further development of more physically accurate sample models that are specifically designed for AFM simulation. As a result, a multifrequency AFM simulation tool based on the above sample model is provided as supporting information.« less

  10. Nanoscale effects in the characterization of viscoelastic materials with atomic force microscopy: coupling of a quasi-three-dimensional standard linear solid model with in-plane surface interactions.

    PubMed

    Solares, Santiago D

    2016-01-01

    Significant progress has been accomplished in the development of experimental contact-mode and dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods designed to measure surface material properties. However, current methods are based on one-dimensional (1D) descriptions of the tip-sample interaction forces, thus neglecting the intricacies involved in the material behavior of complex samples (such as soft viscoelastic materials) as well as the differences in material response between the surface and the bulk. In order to begin to address this gap, a computational study is presented where the sample is simulated using an enhanced version of a recently introduced model that treats the surface as a collection of standard-linear-solid viscoelastic elements. The enhanced model introduces in-plane surface elastic forces that can be approximately related to a two-dimensional (2D) Young's modulus. Relevant cases are discussed for single- and multifrequency intermittent-contact AFM imaging, with focus on the calculated surface indentation profiles and tip-sample interaction force curves, as well as their implications with regards to experimental interpretation. A variety of phenomena are examined in detail, which highlight the need for further development of more physically accurate sample models that are specifically designed for AFM simulation. A multifrequency AFM simulation tool based on the above sample model is provided as supporting information.

  11. Viscoelastic properties of pressure overload hypertrophied myocardium: effect of serine protease treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroud, Jason D.; Baicu, Catalin F.; Barnes, Mary A.; Spinale, Francis G.; Zile, Michael R.

    2002-01-01

    To determine whether and to what extent one component of the extracellular matrix, fibrillar collagen, contributes causally to abnormalities in viscoelasticity, collagen was acutely degraded by activation of endogenous matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) with the serine protease plasmin. Papillary muscles were isolated from normal cats and cats with right ventricular pressure overload hypertrophy (POH) induced by pulmonary artery banding. Plasmin treatment caused MMP activation, collagen degradation, decreased the elastic stiffness constant, and decreased the viscosity constant in both normal and POH muscles. Thus, whereas many mechanisms may contribute to the abnormalities in myocardial viscoelasticity in the POH myocardium, changes in fibrillar collagen appear to play a predominant role.

  12. Assessing viscoelastic properties of chitosan scaffolds and validation with cyclical tests.

    PubMed

    Ratakonda, Swapnika; Sridhar, Upasana M; Rhinehart, R Russell; Madihally, Sundararajan V

    2012-04-01

    We evaluated and modeled the viscoelastic characteristics of chitosan and chitosan-gelatin scaffolds prepared using a freeze-drying technique. Chitosan and chitosan-gelatin solutions (0.5 and 2 wt.%) were frozen at -80°C and freeze-dried. Using the scaffolds, uniaxial tensile properties were evaluated under physiological conditions (hydrated in phosphate buffered saline at 37°C) at a cross-head speed of 0.17 mms(-1) (10 mm min(-1)). From the break strain, the limit of strain per ramp was calculated to be 5% and the samples were stretched at a strain rate of 2.5%s(-1). The ramp-and-hold type of stress-relaxation test was performed for five successive stages. Chitosan and chitosan-gelatin showed nearly 90% relaxation of stress after each stage. The relaxation behavior was independent of the concentration of chitosan and gelatin. Also, changes in the microstructure of the tested samples were evaluated using an inverted microscope. The micrographs acquired after relaxation experiments showed orientation of pores, suggesting the retention of the stretched state even after many hours of relaxation. Based on these observations, two models (i) containing a hyper-elastic spring (containing two parameters) and (ii) retaining pseudo-components (containing three parameters) were developed in Visual Basic Applications accessed through MS Excel. The models were used to fit the experimental stress-relaxation data and the parameters obtained from modeling were used to predict their respective cyclic behaviors, which were compared with cyclical experimental results. These results showed that the model could be used to predict the cyclical behavior under the tested strain rates. The model predictions were also tested using cyclic properties at a lower strain rate of 0.0867%s(-1) (5%min(-1)) for 0.5 wt.% scaffolds but the model could not predict cyclical behavior at a very slow rate. In summary, the pseudo-component modeling approach can be used to model the sequential strain

  13. Asphalt Pavement Aging and Temperature Dependent Properties Using Functionally Graded Viscoelastic Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dave, Eshan V.

    2009-01-01

    Asphalt concrete pavements are inherently graded viscoelastic structures. Oxidative aging of asphalt binder and temperature cycling due to climatic conditions being the major cause of non-homogeneity. Current pavement analysis and simulation procedures dwell on the use of layered approach to account for these non-homogeneities. The conventional…

  14. Passive Viscoelastic Properties of Costameres in EDL Skeletal Muscle in Normal and Dystrophin Null Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Pelagio, Karla P.; Bloch, Robert J.; Ortega, Alicia; Gonzalez-Serratos, Hugo

    2008-08-01

    Costameres at the sarcolemmal skeletal myofibers transmit the lateral force generated by myofibrils from them to the extracellular matrix. We used an elastimeter method by which sucking pressure is applied through a micropipette to the surface membrane of single mice myofibers of the Extensor digitorum longus to measure the viscoelasticity of the sarcolemma-costamere complex as a function of sarcomere length (SL). Constant suction pressure applied to the sarcolemma generated a sarcolemmal-costamere-myofibril bleb of variable height depending on the sucking pressure and SL. It took some time for the bleb to reach a stable height after applying the pressure. This time delay indicates that the sarcolemma-costamere-myofibril system acts as a viscoelastic system. We undertook the present experiments to measure the height stabilization time of the bleb at different sarcomere lengths from which we estimated the viscoelastic parameters of the system. The time course of the bleb formation was biphasic and reached a plateau between 3.5 to 1.3 and 4.9 to 3.5 min for normal and dystrophic mice respectively depending on SL of 3.0 to 5.6 μm. Based on a Maxwell-Voigt system we found the viscoelastic parameters such as viscosity, friction coefficient and the costameres (k) and sarcolemma (k1) elasticity constants.

  15. Viscoelastic properties of a bio-hydrogel produced from soybean oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrogels are a class of viscoelastic materials that have many biomedical utilization potentials, such as drug delivery, wound care product, breast implant materials, and tissue engineering, etc. Hydrogels produced from biopolymers and/or natural sources have particular advantages in vivo applicati...

  16. Finite element analysis and experimental study on dynamic properties of a composite beam with viscoelastic damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ya; Inman, Daniel J.

    2013-11-01

    This paper investigates the frequency dependent viscoelastic dynamics of a multifunctional composite structure from finite element analysis and experimental validation. The frequency-dependent behavior of the stiffness and damping of a viscoelastic material directly affects the system's modal frequencies and damping, and results in complex vibration modes and differences in the relative phase of vibration. A second order three parameter Golla-Hughes-McTavish (GHM) method and a second order three fields Anelastic Displacement Fields (ADF) approach are used to implement the viscoelastic material model, enabling the straightforward development of time domain and frequency domain finite elements, and describing the frequency dependent viscoelastic behavior. Considering the parameter identification a strategy to estimate the fractional order of the time derivative and the relaxation time is outlined. Agreement between the curve fits using both the GHM and ADF and experiment is within 0.001 percent error. Continuing efforts are addressing the material modulus comparison of the GHM and the ADF model. There may be a theoretical difference between viscoelastic degrees of freedom at nodes and elements, but their numerical results are very close to each other in the specific frequency range of interest. With identified model parameters, numerical simulation is carried out to predict the damping behavior in its first two vibration modes. The experimental testing on the layered composite beam validates the numerical predication. Experimental results also show that elastic modulus measured from dynamic response yields more accurate results than static measurement, such as tensile testing, especially for elastomers. The viscoelatic layer is augmented with the inclusion of a shear angle associated with transverse shear in addition to Euler-Bernoulli hypotheses. >The other four layers are assumed to be elastic; Euler-Bernoulli bending assumption applies; Transverse and rotatory

  17. Contribution of material properties of cellular components on the viscoelastic, stress-relaxation response of a cell during AFM indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unnikrishnan, Ginu U.; Unnikrishnan, Vinu U.; Reddy, J. N.

    2016-05-01

    The close relationship between the mechanical properties of biological cells, namely, elasticity, viscosity, and the state of its disease condition has been widely investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM). In this study, computational simulation of the AFM indentation is carried out using a finite element (FE) model of an adherent cell. A parametric evaluation of the material properties of the cellular components on the viscoelastic, stress-relaxation response during AFM indentation is performed. In addition, the loading rate, the size of the nucleus, and the geometry of the cell are varied. From the present study, it is found that when comparing the material properties derived from experimental force-deflection curves, the influence of loading rates should be accommodated. It also provides a framework that can quantify the variation of the mechanical property with various stages of malignancy of the cancer cell, a potential procedure for cancer diagnosis.

  18. Relation between EPS adherence, viscoelastic properties, and MBR operation: Biofouling study with QCM-D.

    PubMed

    Sweity, Amer; Ying, Wang; Ali-Shtayeh, Mohammed S; Yang, Fei; Bick, Amos; Oron, Gideon; Herzberg, Moshe

    2011-12-01

    Membrane fouling is one of the main constraints of the wide use of membrane bioreactor (MBR) technology. The biomass in MBR systems includes extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), metabolic products of active microbial secretion that adversely affect the membrane performance. Solids retention time (SRT) in the MBR is one of the most important parameters affecting membrane fouling in MBR systems, where fouling is minimized at optimal SRT. Among the operating parameters in MBR systems, SRT is known to strongly influence the ratio of proteins to polysaccharides in the EPS matrix. In this study, we have direct evidence for changes in EPS adherence and viscoelastic properties due to changes in the sludge removal rate that strongly correlate with the membrane fouling rate and EPS composition. EPS were extracted from a UF membrane in a hybrid growth MBR operated at sludge removal rates of 59, 35.4, 17.7, and 5.9 L day(-1) (corresponding SRT of 3, 5, 10, and 30 days, respectively). The EPS adherence and adsorption kinetics were carried out in a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) technology in several adsorption measurements to a gold sensor coated with Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF). EPS adsorption to the sensor surface is characterized by a decrease of the oscillation frequency and an increase in the dissipation energy of the sensor during parallel flow of aqueous media, supplemented with EPS, above the sensor surface. The results from these experiments were further modeled using the Voigt based model, in which the thickness, shear modulus, and shear viscosity values of the adsorbed EPS layers on the PVDF crystal were calculated. The observations in the QCM-D suggested that the elevated fouling of the UF membrane is due to higher adherence of the EPS as well as reduction in viscosity and elasticity of the EPS adsorbed layer and elevation of the EPS fluidity. These results corroborate with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) image

  19. Powder densification. 1. Particle-particle basis for incorporation of viscoelastic material properties.

    PubMed

    Lum, S K; Duncan-Hewitt, W C

    1999-02-01

    The present investigation was undertaken to examine the basic unit of densification: the particle-particle indentation. The true interparticle contact area that is established during densification ultimately determines the quality of the tablet compact. By examining the interfacial contact between mutually indenting viscoelastic particles, the process of contact evolution may be represented in mathematical form through extension of the classical Hertzian elastic contact description to encompass material viscoelastic terms. In this way, the time-dependent response of materials to applied loads may be addressed explicitly. The effects of rates of applied loading and maximum load levels were also considered. This analysis was based on viscoelastic stress data collected using an instrumented Instron analyzer during the densification of PMMA/coMMA, a pharmaceutical polymeric coating material. A crossed cylinder matrix compaction geometry was used to simulate the geometry of two mutually indenting spherical particles. Numerical and graphical solutions delineating the relationship between contact area evolution and the prescribed loading force are presented. This particle-particle description of the contacting interface serves as a unit basis for describing the entire powder bed. The powder bed may ultimately be modeled as a collection of these particles in contact.

  20. Reconstructing 3-D maps of the local viscoelastic properties using a finite-amplitude modulated radiation force.

    PubMed

    Giannoula, Alexia; Cobbold, Richard; Bezerianos, Anastasios

    2014-02-01

    A modulated acoustic radiation force, produced by two confocal tone-burst ultrasound beams of slightly different frequencies (i.e. 2.0 MHz ± Δf/2, where Δf is the difference frequency), can be used to remotely generate modulated low-frequency (Δf ≤ 500 Hz) shear waves in attenuating media. By appropriately selecting the duration of the two beams, the energy of the generated shear waves can be concentrated around the difference frequency (i.e., Δf ± Δf/2). In this manner, neither their amplitude nor their phase information is distorted by frequency-dependent effects, thereby, enabling a more accurate reconstruction of the viscoelastic properties. Assuming a Voigt viscoelastic model, this paper describes the use of a finite-element-method model to simulate three-dimensional (3-D) shear-wave propagation in viscoelastic media containing a spherical inclusion. Nonlinear propagation is assumed for the two ultrasound beams, so that higher harmonics are developed in the force and shear spectrum. Finally, an inverse reconstruction algorithm is used to extract 3-D maps of the local shear modulus and viscosity from the simulated shear-displacement fields based on the fundamental and second-harmonic component. The quality of the reconstructed maps is evaluated using the contrast between the inclusion and the background and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). It is shown that the shear modulus can be accurately reconstructed based on the fundamental component, such that the observed contrast deviates from the true contrast by a root-mean-square-error (RMSE) of only 0.38 and the CNR is greater than 30 dB. If the second-harmonic component is used, the RMSE becomes 1.54 and the corresponding CNR decreases by approximately 10-15 dB. The reconstructed shear viscosity maps based on the second harmonic are shown to be of higher quality than those based on the fundamental. The effects of noise are also investigated and a fusion operation between the two spectral components is

  1. The viscoelastic properties of the protein-rich materials from the fermented hard wheat, soft wheat and barley flours

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The linear and non-linear rheological properties of the suspensions for the hard red spring wheat (HRS) flour, soft wheat (Pastry) flour, barley flour, as well as the remain residues of HRS flour, Pastry flour, and barley flour after fermentation were investigated. The linear and non-linear rheologi...

  2. Insoluble elastin reduces collagen scaffold stiffness, improves viscoelastic properties, and induces a contractile phenotype in smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Alan J; O'Brien, Fergal J

    2015-12-01

    Biomaterials with the capacity to innately guide cell behaviour while also displaying suitable mechanical properties remain a challenge in tissue engineering. Our approach to this has been to utilise insoluble elastin in combination with collagen as the basis of a biomimetic scaffold for cardiovascular tissue engineering. Elastin was found to markedly alter the mechanical and biological response of these collagen-based scaffolds. Specifically, during extensive mechanical assessment elastin was found to reduce the specific tensile and compressive moduli of the scaffolds in a concentration dependant manner while having minimal effect on scaffold microarchitecture with both scaffold porosity and pore size still within the ideal ranges for tissue engineering applications. However, the viscoelastic properties were significantly improved with elastin addition with a 3.5-fold decrease in induced creep strain, a 6-fold increase in cyclical strain recovery, and with a four-parameter viscoelastic model confirming the ability of elastin to confer resistance to long term deformation/creep. Furthermore, elastin was found to result in the modulation of SMC phenotype towards a contractile state which was determined via reduced proliferation and significantly enhanced expression of early (α-SMA), mid (calponin), and late stage (SM-MHC) contractile proteins. This allows the ability to utilise extracellular matrix proteins alone to modulate SMC phenotype without any exogenous factors added. Taken together, the ability of elastin to alter the mechanical and biological response of collagen scaffolds has led to the development of a biomimetic biomaterial highly suitable for cardiovascular tissue engineering.

  3. Viscoelastic Properties of Polymers: A Comparison of Micro and Macro Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champhekar, Mangesh

    annealing time. The decreasing hardness and modulus of the samples with increasing contact depth or indentation depth (for rubbers) was attributed to interplay between the instrumental/analysis errors and material properties. Dynamic nanoindentation studies were also carried out on the three amorphous glassy materials (a-PS, HIPS, ABS), the four rubbers (SBR, NR, neoprene, PDMS) and the PLLA samples. The storage modulus (E') and loss modulus (E'') values obtained by dynamic nanoindentation were compared with those obtained from conventional DMA testing and a good level of agreement was observed, with the values obtained from nanoindentation ca. 2-3 times higher than those obtained from conventional DMA testing depending upon the material under consideration. The reason for this observation is currently unknown, as there is no physical basis available in the literature to compare the values on different length scales since the methods of analysis used to extract the values of E' and E'' and the mode of deformation used is different for both the methods. However, the level of agreement between the two methods shows that dynamic nanoindentation is a powerful tool to capture the viscoelastic properties of polymers on smaller length scales.

  4. The relationship between mechanical properties and ballistic penetration depth in a viscoelastic gel.

    PubMed

    Mrozek, Randy A; Leighliter, Brad; Gold, Christopher S; Beringer, Ian R; Yu, Jian H; VanLandingham, Mark R; Moy, Paul; Foster, Mark H; Lenhart, Joseph L

    2015-04-01

    The fundamental material response of a viscoelastic material when impacted by a ballistic projectile has important implication for the defense, law enforcement, and medical communities particularly for the evaluation of protective systems. In this paper, we systematically vary the modulus and toughness of a synthetic polymer gel to determine their respective influence on the velocity-dependent penetration of a spherical projectile. The polymer gels were characterized using tensile, compression, and rheological testing taking special care to address the unique challenges associated with obtaining high fidelity mechanical data on highly conformal materials. The depth of penetration data was accurately described using the elastic Froude number for viscoelastic gels ranging in Young's modulus from ~60 to 630 kPa. The minimum velocity of penetration was determined to scale with the gel toughness divided by the gel modulus, a qualitative estimate for the zone of deformation size scale upon impact. We anticipate that this work will provide insight into the critical material factors that control ballistic penetration behavior in soft materials and aid in the design and development of new ballistic testing media.

  5. Influence of the combined effect of magnetic field and rotation on the onset of a non-Newtonian viscoelastic nanofluid layer: Linear and nonlinear analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurana, Meenakshi; Rana, Puneet; Srivastava, Sangeet

    2016-12-01

    In the present paper, we present both linear and nonlinear analyses to investigate thermal instability on a rotating non-Newtonian viscoelastic nanofluid layer under the influence of a magnetic field. In the linear stability analysis, the stationary and oscillatory modes of convection are obtained for various controlling parameters using the normal mode technique. Both Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are calculated after employing the minimal truncated Fourier series to steady and unsteady state. The main findings conclude that rotation and strain retardation parameter increase the value of the critical Rayleigh number in the neutral stability curve which delays the onset of convection in the nanofluid layer while the stress relaxation parameter enhances the convection. The magnetic field stabilizes the system for low values of the Taylor number (rotation) but an inverse trend is observed for high Taylor number. Both Nusselt and Sherwood numbers initially oscillate with time until the steady state prevails and they decrease with both Chandrasekhar and Taylor numbers. The magnitude of the streamlines and the contours of both isotherms and iso-nanohalines concentrate near the boundaries for large values of Ra, indicating an increase in convection.

  6. Textural and cooking properties and viscoelastic changes on heating and cooling of Balkan cheeses.

    PubMed

    Guinee, T P; Pudja, P; Miočinović, J; Wiley, J; Mullins, C M

    2015-11-01

    The growth in food service and prepared consumer foods has led to increasing demand for cheese with customized textural and cooking characteristics. The current study evaluated Kačkavalj, Kačkavalj Krstaš, and Trappist cheeses procured from manufacturing plants in Serbia for texture profile characteristics, flow and extensibility of the heated cheese, and changes in viscoelasticity characteristics during heating and cooling. Measured viscoelastic parameters included elastic modulus, G', loss modulus, G″, and loss tangent, LT (G″/G'). The melting temperature and congealing temperature were defined as the temperature at which LT=1 during heating from 25 to 90°C and on cooling from 90 to 25°C. The maximum LT during heating was as an index of the maximum fluidity of the molten cheese. Significant variation was noted for the extent of flow and extensibility of the heated cheeses, with no trend of cheese type. As a group, the Kačkavalj cheeses had relatively high levels of salt-in-moisture and pH 4.6-soluble N and low protein-to-fat ratio and levels of αs1-CN (f24-199). They fractured during compression to 75%; had relatively low values of cohesiveness, chewiness, and springiness; melted at ~70 to 90°C; reached maximum LT at 90°C; and congealed at 58 to 63°C. Conversely, the Kačkavalj Krstaš and Trappist cheeses had low levels of primary proteolysis and salt-in-moisture content and a high protein-to-fat ratio. They did not fracture during compression, had high values for cohesiveness and chewiness, melted at lower temperatures (56-62°C), attained maximum fluidity at a lower temperature (72-78°C), and congealed at 54 to 69°C. There was a hysteretic dependence of G' and LT on temperature for all cheeses, with the LT during cooling being higher than that during heating, and G' during cooling being lower or higher than the equivalent values during heating depending on the cheese type. Monitoring the dynamic changes in viscoelasticity during heating and

  7. Influence of different purification and drying methods on rheological properties and viscoelastic behaviour of durian seed gum.

    PubMed

    Amid, Bahareh Tabatabaee; Mirhosseini, Hamed

    2012-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of different purification and drying methods on the viscoelastic behaviour and rheological properties of durian seed gum. The results indicated that the purified gum A (using isopropanol and ethanol) and D (using hydrochloric acid and ethanol) showed the highest and lowest viscosity, respectively. Four drying techniques included oven drying (105 °C), freeze drying, spray drying and vacuum oven drying. In the present work, all purified gums exhibited more elastic (gel-like) behaviour than the viscous (liquid-like) behaviour (G″

  8. Optical tweezers study of viscoelastic properties in the outer hair cell plasma membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdock, David R.; Ermilov, Sergey A.; Qian, Feng; Brownell, William E.; Anvari, Bahman

    2004-06-01

    An optical tweezers system was used to study the mechanical characteristics of the outer hair cell (OHC) lateral wall by forming plasma membrane tethers. A 2nd order generalized Kelvin model was applied to describe the viscoelastic behavior of OHC membrane tethers. The measured parameters included equilibrium tethering force, (Feq), force relaxation times (τ), stiffness values (κ), and coefficients of friction (μ). An analysis of force relaxation in membrane tethers indicated that the force decay is a biphasic process containing both an elastic and a viscous phase. In general, we observed an overall negative trend in the measured parameters upon application of the cationic amphipath chlorpromazine (CPZ). CPZ was found to cause up to a 40 pN reduction in Feq in OHCs. A statistically significant reduction in relaxation times and coefficients of friction was also observed, suggesting an increase in rate of force decay and a decrease in plasma membrane viscosity.

  9. Temperature-frequency equivalence of the viscoelastic properties of anhydrous lanolin USP.

    PubMed

    Radebaugh, G W; Simonelli, A P

    1983-04-01

    Methods of data analysis novel to pharmaceutical semisolids have been applied to the dynamic mechanical data obtained for anhydrous lanolin USP. It was found that the viscoelastic parameters determined over a wide range of temperatures and shear frequencies could be superposed. Elastic moduli (G') and viscous moduli (G") obtained at low temperatures (T) and frequencies (nu), were equivalent to moduli obtained at high T and nu. Empirical shifts of modulus versus shear frequency data obtained at different temperatures were used to produce G' and G" versus nu master curves (complete log modulus versus log frequency behavior at a constant temperature). A method of reduced variables, in conjunction with an Arrhenius-type relation, proved useful in calculating the energy of activation for the structural processes involved in a major mechanical transition.

  10. Mapping viscoelastic properties of healthy and pathological red blood cells at the nanoscale level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciasca, G.; Papi, M.; di Claudio, S.; Chiarpotto, M.; Palmieri, V.; Maulucci, G.; Nocca, G.; Rossi, C.; de Spirito, M.

    2015-10-01

    In order to pass through the microcirculation, red blood cells (RBCs) need to undergo extensive deformations and to recover the original shape. This extreme deformability is altered by various pathological conditions. On the other hand, an altered RBC deformability can have major effects on blood flow and can lead to pathological implications. The study of the viscoelastic response of red blood cells to mechanical stimuli is crucial to fully understand deformability changes under pathological conditions. However, the typical erythrocyte biconcave shape hints to a complex and intrinsically heterogeneous mechanical response that must be investigated by using probes at the nanoscale level. In this work, the local viscoelastic behaviour of healthy and pathological red blood cells was probed by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Our results clearly show that the RBC stiffness is not spatially homogeneous, suggesting a strong correlation with the erythrocyte biconcave shape. Moreover, our nanoscale mapping highlights the key role played by viscous forces, demonstrating that RBCs do not behave as pure elastic bodies. The fundamental role played by viscous forces is further strengthened by the comparison between healthy and pathological (diabetes mellitus) RBCs. It is well known that pathological RBCs are usually stiffer than the healthy ones. Our measures unveil a more complex scenario according to which the difference between normal and pathological red blood cells does not merely lie in their stiffness but also in a different dynamical response to external stimuli that is governed by viscous forces.In order to pass through the microcirculation, red blood cells (RBCs) need to undergo extensive deformations and to recover the original shape. This extreme deformability is altered by various pathological conditions. On the other hand, an altered RBC deformability can have major effects on blood flow and can lead to pathological implications. The study of the viscoelastic

  11. Composite propellant technology research: Mechanical property characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bower, Mark V.

    1991-01-01

    Proof for the existence of a single Poisson's ratio function in isotropic linear viscoelastic materials is presented. An in-depth discussion is given of three dimensional viscoelastic material properties and their relationships to linear isotropic and orthotropic viscoelastic materials. A discussion of the alternate invariant definition as used by Abaqus and how it relates to the form used by Dr. S. Peng is presented.

  12. Viscoelastic Properties, Ionic Conductivity, and Materials Design Considerations for Poly(styrene-b-ethylene oxide-b-styrene)-Based Ion Gel Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Sipei; Lee, Keun Hyung; Sun, Jingru; Frisbie, C. Daniel; Lodge, Timothy P.

    2013-03-07

    The viscoelastic properties and ionic conductivity of ion gels based on the self-assembly of a poly(styrene-b-ethylene oxide-b-styrene) (SOS) triblock copolymer (M{sub n,S} = 3 kDa, M{sub n,O} = 35 kDa) in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide ([EMI][TFSA]) were investigated over the composition range of 10-50 wt % SOS and the temperature range of 25-160 C. The poly(styrene) (PS) end-blocks associate into micelles, whereas the poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) midblocks are well-solvated by this ionic liquid. The ion gel with 10 wt % SOS melts at 54 C, with the longest relaxation time exhibiting a similar temperature dependence to that of the viscosity of bulk PS. However, the actual values of the gel relaxation time are more than 4 orders of magnitude larger than the relaxation time of bulk PS. This is attributed to the thermodynamic penalty of pulling PS end-blocks through the PEO/[EMI][TFSA] matrix. Ion gels with 20-50 wt % SOS do not melt and show two plateaus in the storage modulus over the temperature and frequency ranges measured. The one at higher frequencies is that of an entangled network of PEO strands with PS cross-links; the modulus displays a quadratic dependence on polymer weight fraction and agrees with the prediction of linear viscoelastic theory assuming half of the PEO chains are elastically effective. The frequency that separates the two plateaus, {omega}{sub c}, reflects the time scale of PS end-block pull-out. The other plateau at lower frequencies is that of a congested micelle solution with PS cores and PEO coronas, which has a power law dependence on domain spacing similar to diblock melts. The ionic conductivity of the ion gels is compared to PEO homopolymer solutions at similar polymer concentrations; the conductivity is reduced by a factor of 2.1 or less, decreases with increasing PS volume fraction, and follows predictions based on a simple obstruction model. Our collective results allow the formulation

  13. Viscoelasticity of hyaluronic acid-gelatin hydrogels for vocal fold tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Kazemirad, Siavash; Heris, Hossein K; Mongeau, Luc

    2016-02-01

    Crosslinked injectable hyaluronic acid (HA)-gelatin (Ge) hydrogels have remarkable viscoelastic and biological properties for vocal fold tissue engineering. Patient-specific tuning of the viscoelastic properties of this injectable biomaterial could improve tissue regeneration. The frequency-dependent viscoelasticity of crosslinked HA-Ge hydrogels was measured as a function of the concentration of HA, Ge, and crosslinker. Synthetic extracellular matrix hydrogels were fabricated using thiol-modified HA and Ge, and crosslinked by poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate. A recently developed characterization method based on Rayleigh wave propagation was used to quantify the frequency-dependent viscoelastic properties of these hydrogels, including shear storage and loss moduli, over a broad frequency range; that is, from 40 to 4000 Hz. The viscoelastic properties of the hydrogels increased with frequency. The storage and loss moduli values and the rate of increase with frequency varied with the concentrations of the constituents. The range of the viscoelastic properties of the hydrogels was within that of human vocal fold tissue obtained from in vivo and ex vivo measurements. Frequency-dependent parametric relations were obtained using a linear least-squares regression. The results are useful to better fine-tune the storage and loss moduli of HA-Ge hydrogels by varying the concentrations of the constituents for use in patient-specific treatments.

  14. Viscoelasticity of hyaluronic acid-gelatin hydrogels for vocal fold tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Kazemirad, Siavash; Heris, Hossein K.; Mongeau, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Cross-linked injectable hyaluronic acid-gelatin hydrogels have remarkable viscoelastic and biological properties for vocal fold tissue engineering. Patient-specific tuning of the viscoelastic properties of this injectable biomaterial could improve tissue regeneration. The frequency-dependent viscoelasticity of cross-linked hyaluronic acid-gelatin hydrogels was measured as a function of the concentration of hyaluronic acid, gelatin, and cross-linker. Synthetic extracellular matrix hydrogels were fabricated using thiol-modified hyaluronic acid and gelatin, and cross-linked by Poly(ethylene glycol)diacrylate. A recently developed characterization method based on Rayleigh wave propagation was used to quantify the frequency-dependent viscoelastic properties of these hydrogels, including shear storage and loss moduli, over a broad frequency range; i.e., from 40 to 4000 Hz. The viscoelastic properties of the hydrogels increased with frequency. The storage and loss moduli values and the rate of increase with frequency varied with the concentrations of the constituents. The range of the viscoelastic properties of the hydrogels was within that of human vocal fold tissue obtained from in vivo and ex vivo measurements. Frequency-dependent parametric relations were obtained using a linear least-squares regression. The results are useful to better fine-tune the storage and loss moduli of hyaluronic acid-gelatin hydrogels by varying the concentrations of the constituents for use in patient-specific treatments. PMID:25728914

  15. Wave dispersion of carbon nanotubes conveying fluid supported on linear viscoelastic two-parameter foundation including thermal and small-scale effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sina, Nima; Moosavi, Hassan; Aghaei, Hosein; Afrand, Masoud; Wongwises, Somchai

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, for the first time, a nonlocal Timoshenko beam model is employed for studying the wave dispersion of a fluid-conveying single-walled carbon nanotube on Viscoelastic Pasternak foundation under high and low temperature change. In addition, the phase and group velocity for the nanotube are discussed, respectively. The influences of Winkler and Pasternak modulus, homogenous temperature change, steady flow velocity and damping factor of viscoelastic foundation on wave dispersion of carbon nanotubes are investigated. It was observed that the characteristic of the wave for carbon nanotubes conveying fluid is the normal dispersion. Moreover, implying viscoelastic foundation leads to increasing the wave frequencies.

  16. Structure-induced nonlinear viscoelasticity of non-woven fibrous matrices.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Mohd Suhail; Pal, Anupam; Das, Sovan Lal

    2016-12-01

    Fibrous materials are widely utilized as tissue engineering scaffolds for tissue regeneration and other bioengineering applications. The structural as well as mechanical characteristics of the fibrous matrices under static and dynamic mechanical loading conditions influence the response of the cells. In this paper, we study the mechanical response of the non-woven fibrous matrices under oscillatory loading conditions and its dependence on the structural properties of fibrous matrix. We demonstrate that under oscillatory shear and elongation, the fibrous matrices demonstrate nonlinear viscoelasticity at all strain amplitudes. This is contrary to the behavior of other soft polymeric materials for which nonlinearity in the viscoelastic response vanishes for small strains. These observations suggest that despite their prevalence, the measures of linear viscoelasticity (e.g., storage and loss moduli) are inadequate for the general description of the viscoelastic nature of the fibrous materials. It was, however, found that linear viscoelastic nature of fibrous matrices for small amplitudes is restored when a pre-stretch is applied to the fibrous matrix along with oscillatory strains. Further, we also explored the influence of the structural properties of the fibrous matrices (fiber orientation, alignment and curvature) on their viscoelastic nature.

  17. Derivation and Analysis of Viscoelastic Properties in Human Liver: Impact of Frequency on Fibrosis and Steatosis Staging

    PubMed Central

    Nightingale, Kathryn R.; Rouze, Ned C.; Rosenzweig, Stephen J.; Wang, Michael H.; Abdelmalek, Manal F.; Guy, Cynthia D.; Palmeri, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Commercially-available shear wave imaging systems measure group shear wave speed (SWS) and often report stiffness parameters applying purely elastic material models. Soft tissues, however, are viscoelastic, and higher-order material models are necessary to characterize the dispersion associated with broadband shearwaves. In this paper, we describe a robust, model-based algorithm and use a linear dispersion model to perform shearwave dispersion analysis in traditionally “difficult-to-image” subjects. In a cohort of 135 Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease patients, we compare the performance of group SWS with dispersion analysis-derived phase velocity c(200 Hz) and dispersion slope dc/df parameters to stage hepatic fibrosis and steatosis. AUROC analysis demonstrates correlation between all parameters (group SWS, c(200 Hz), and, to a lesser extent dc/df) and fibrosis stage, while no correlation was observed between steatosis stage and any of the material parameters. Interestingly, optimal AUROC threshold SWS values separating advanced liver fibrosis (≥F3) from mild-to-moderate fibrosis (≤F2) were shown to be frequency dependent, and to increase from 1.8 to 3.3 m/s over the 0–400 Hz shearwave frequency range. PMID:25585400

  18. Characterization of physical and viscoelastic properties of polymer films for coating applications under different temperature of drying and storage.

    PubMed

    Perfetti, G; Jansen, K M B; Wildeboer, W J; van Hee, P; Meesters, G M H

    2010-01-15

    The increasing tendency to enhance consumer products with added functionality is leading to ever more complex products. Nowadays more and more particulate products are coated to give the product specific functionalities. An appropriate approach is needed to be able to satisfy customer's requirements. In this work, three reference well-known coating agents, namely two grades of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) and one polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) were selected and investigated. Aqueous solutions of such polymers were obtained and viscosity and shear stress were measured function of shear rate, temperature and polymer concentration. The viscosities of the solutions appear to be mainly shear rate independent, they clearly show Newtonian behaviour. Drying and storage conditions influence on morphology and structure of the cast films were evaluated using scanning electron microscope (SEM). Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) experiments were carried out on HPMC and PVA cast films to assess the viscoelastic properties over wide temperature-frequency range. The time-temperature superposition principle was used to determine the shift factor, aT, and to compose a master curve. Magnitudes and profiles of storage modulus, E', loss modulus, E'', and tan delta master curves are discussed with relation to drying and storage conditions. No impact of drying temperature on the polymer properties was observed whereas the effect of storage temperature resulted to be relevant in terms of shifts in glass transition temperature and, only partially, changes in the magnitudes of E' and E''.

  19. Viscoelastic properties combined with relevant boundary conditions can produce the arctangent shape of the geodetic displacement field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traore, N.; Le Pourhiet, L.; Frelat, J.; Rolandone, F.; Meyer, B.

    2012-04-01

    The screw dislocation model (Weertman & Weertman, 1966) gives the horizontal displacement u as a function of the vertical distance d to the dislocation, the horizontal distance x and the slip s on each side of the dislocation. u = - (s/π) arctan(x/d) Savage and Burford (1973) interpreted this model in terms of horizontal displacement across a strike slip fault which is locked down to depth d, s being the plate velocity. Because of its simplicity and because the arctangent shape well represents the displacement that can be measured around most of the major strike slip faults, this model is commonly used to match geodetic data. We present numerical simulations that have been made with the software CASTEM, a finite element code for structural and mechanical modeling. The models are rectangular boxes that have elastic or viscoelastic properties, and three different kinds of conditions are applied on the boundaries of the domain that may have an impact on the localization of the displacement near the fault plane. The first boundary condition imposes the displacement under the plate, this case has been chosen because of its similarity to the Weertman's screw dislocation model. The second boundary condition imposes the displacement in the front, it corresponds to an extrusion. For the third boundary condition, the displacement is imposed laterally and simulates the general plate motion that drags the domain on both sides. We found that the displacement at the free surface does not fit an arctangent in all cases. If a perfectly elastic, homogeneous domain is used, only the first two types of boundary conditions lead to a displacement field resembling the geodetic data. This is awkward since the third kind of boundary conditions seems to be geologically the more relevant one. We then introduced local rheological modifications to reduce locally the equivalent elastic plate thickness in the vicinity of the fault. This is achieved by introducing a viscoelastic relaxation in

  20. The effect of water absorption on the viscoelastic properties of poly(styrene-block-isobutylene-block-styrene) for use in biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fittipaldi, Mauro; Rodriguez, Luis A.; Grace, Landon R.

    2015-05-01

    The decrease in glass transition temperature and change in creep compliance due to water diffusion in a biocompatible thermoplastic elastomer was studied and quantified. Knowledge of the mechanical and viscoelastic performance of the styrene-isobutylene-styrene block (SIBS) copolymer is important to determine the feasibility of certain in-vivo applications. Furthermore, the deterioration in these types of properties due to the plasticizing effect of water must be well understood for long term usage. Samples were formed with an injection molding press and fully dried prior to immersion in distilled water at 37°C. Water diffusion kinetics were studied for four different SIBS copolymers of varying molecular weight and styrene content by measuring weight changes as a function of time. These gravimetric diffusion studies showed an inverse relationship between diffusivity and styrene content and molecular weight for the first thousand hours of immersion. Measurements of storage modulus, loss modulus, tangent delta, strain recovery and creep compliance were performed using a dynamic mechanical analyzer for the high molecular weight, high styrene content SIBS version at different absorbed water contents. A measurable and nearly linear decrease of the glass transition temperature and creep recovery with respect to water content was observed for the samples tested even at relatively low water content: an increase in water content of 0.27% correlated to a decrease of 4°C in glass transition temperature while a 0.16% weight increase corresponded to a 12.5% decrease in creep recovery. These quantified material properties restrict the use of SIBS in certain implantable operations that undergo cyclic strains, and in sterilization techniques that require high temperatures. As such, they are important to understand in order to determine the viability of in vivo usage of this biocompatible polymer.

  1. A new highly viscoelastic hyaluronic acid gel: rheological properties, biocompatibility and clinical investigation in esthetic and restorative surgery.

    PubMed

    Iannitti, Tommaso; Bingöl, Ali Ö; Rottigni, Valentina; Palmieri, Beniamino

    2013-11-18

    Nowadays there is an increased demand for safe and effective volume enhancing fillers to achieve soft tissue augmentation in order to overcome tissue defects and aging-associated skin changes. In the present study we characterized the rheological and biological properties of Variofill(®), a new highly viscoelastic hyaluronic acid gel, by investigating the local effects following subcutaneous implantation in the rat to detect the host-tissue reactions and biodegradation over 18 months. We also investigated, for the first time, the application of Variofill(®) in esthetic and restorative surgery in two medical case reports. In the first case report we successfully performed Variofill(®) treatment to improve facial scars in a patient previously involved in a car crash. In the second case report we carried out a novel procedure involving a high-dose (1000 ml) injection of Variofill(®) into the dermis and subcutis of the abdominal quadrants in order to allow a classic reconstructive procedure of the abdominal wall in a patient presenting a wide incisional hernia.

  2. The nonlinear elastic and viscoelastic passive properties of left ventricular papillary muscle of a guinea pig heart.

    PubMed

    Hassan, M A; Hamdi, M; Noma, A

    2012-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of the heart muscle tissues is the central problem in finite element simulation of the heart contraction, excitation propagation and development of an artificial heart. Nonlinear elastic and viscoelastic passive material properties of the left ventricular papillary muscle of a guinea pig heart were determined based on in-vitro precise uniaxial and relaxation tests. The nonlinear elastic behavior was modeled by a hypoelastic model and different hyperelastic strain energy functions such as Ogden and Mooney-Rivlin. Nonlinear least square fitting and constrained optimization were conducted under MATLAB and MSC.MARC in order to obtain the model material parameters. The experimental tensile data was used to get the nonlinear elastic mechanical behavior of the heart muscle. However, stress relaxation data was used to determine the relaxation behavior as well as viscosity of the tissues. Viscohyperelastic behavior was constructed by a multiplicative decomposition of a standard Ogden strain energy function, W, for instantaneous deformation and a relaxation function, R(t), in a Prony series form. The study reveals that hypoelastic and hyperelastic (Ogden) models fit the tissue mechanical behaviors well and can be safely used for heart mechanics simulation. Since the characteristic relaxation time (900 s) of heart muscle tissues is very large compared with the actual time of heart beating cycle (800 ms), the effect of viscosity can be reasonably ignored. The amount and type of experimental data has a strong effect on the Ogden parameters. The in vitro passive mechanical properties are good initial values to start running the biosimulation codes for heart mechanics. However, an optimization algorithm is developed, based on clinical intact heart measurements, to estimate and re-correct the material parameters in order to get the in vivo mechanical properties, needed for very accurate bio-simulation and for the development of new materials for the

  3. Linear and nonlinear optical properties of a rotaxane molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, Ilena; Czaplicki, Robert; Humeau, Adeline; Luc, Jerome; Sahraoui, Bouchta; Boudebs, Georges; Kajzar, François; Leigh, David A.; Berna-Canovas, Jose

    2006-09-01

    In this paper the recent results of our studies of linear and nonlinear optical properties of a selected rotaxane are presented and discussed. The studied rotaxane can be processed into good optical quality thin films by vacuum evaporation. The linear optical properties of rotaxane solutions were studied by the UV-VIS spectroscopy and the nonlinear optical properties by the picosecond degenerate four wave mixing and Z-scan methods. The results show important rotational contribution to the nonlinear index of refraction.

  4. The advantage of linear viscoelastic material behavior in passive damper design-with application in broad-banded resonance dampers for industrial high-precision motion stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbaan, Cornelis A. M.; Peters, Gerrit W. M.; Steinbuch, Maarten

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the advantage of applying viscoelastic materials instead of purely viscous materials as damping medium in mechanical dampers. Although the loss modulus decreases as function of frequency in case of viscoelastic behavior, which can be interpreted as a decrease of damping, the viscoelastic behavior still leads to an increased modal damping for mechanical structures. This advantage holds for inertial-mass-type dampers that are tuned for broad-banded resonance damping. It turns out that an increase of the storage modulus as function of frequency contributes to the effectiveness of mechanical dampers with respect to energy dissipation at different mechanical resonance frequencies. It is shown that this phenomenon is medium specific and is independent of the amount of damper mass.

  5. Viscoelastic nematodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turzi, Stefano S.

    2016-12-01

    Nematic liquid crystals exhibit both crystallike and fluidlike features. In particular, the propagation of an acoustic wave shows an interesting occurrence of some of the solidlike features at the hydrodynamic level, namely, the frequency-dependent anisotropy of sound velocity and acoustic attenuation. The non-Newtonian behavior of nematics also emerges from the frequency-dependent viscosity coefficients. To account for these phenomena, we put forward a viscoelastic model of nematic liquid crystals, and we extend our previous theory to fully include the combined effects of compressibility, anisotropic elasticity, and dynamic relaxation, at any shear rate. The low-frequency limit agrees with the compressible Ericksen-Leslie theory, while at intermediate frequencies the model correctly captures the relaxation mechanisms underlying finite shear and bulk elastic moduli. We show that there are only four relaxation times allowed by the uniaxial symmetry.

  6. Cell poking: quantitative analysis of indentation of thick viscoelastic layers.

    PubMed

    Duszyk, M; Schwab, B; Zahalak, G I; Qian, H; Elson, E L

    1989-04-01

    A recently introduced device, the cell poker, measures the force required to indent the exposed surface of a cell adherent to a rigid substratum. The cell poker has provided phenomenological information about the viscoelastic properties of several different types of cells, about mechanical changes triggered by external stimuli, and about the role of the cytoskeleton in these mechanical functions. Except in special cases, however, it has not been possible to extract quantitative estimates of viscosity and elasticity moduli from cell poker measurements. This paper presents cell poker measurements of well characterized viscoelastic polymeric materials, polydimethylsiloxanes of different degrees of polymerization, in a simple shape, a flat, thick layer, which for our purposes can be treated as a half space. Analysis of the measurements in terms of a linear viscoelasticity theory yields viscosity values for three polymer samples in agreement with those determined by measurements on a macroscopic scale. Theoretical analysis further indicates that the measured limiting static elasticity of the layers may result from the tension generated at the interface between the polymer and water. This work demonstrates the possibility of obtaining quantitative viscoelastic material properties from cell poker measurements and represents the first step in extending these quantitative studies to more complicated structures including cells.

  7. Cell poking: quantitative analysis of indentation of thick viscoelastic layers.

    PubMed Central

    Duszyk, M; Schwab, B; Zahalak, G I; Qian, H; Elson, E L

    1989-01-01

    A recently introduced device, the cell poker, measures the force required to indent the exposed surface of a cell adherent to a rigid substratum. The cell poker has provided phenomenological information about the viscoelastic properties of several different types of cells, about mechanical changes triggered by external stimuli, and about the role of the cytoskeleton in these mechanical functions. Except in special cases, however, it has not been possible to extract quantitative estimates of viscosity and elasticity moduli from cell poker measurements. This paper presents cell poker measurements of well characterized viscoelastic polymeric materials, polydimethylsiloxanes of different degrees of polymerization, in a simple shape, a flat, thick layer, which for our purposes can be treated as a half space. Analysis of the measurements in terms of a linear viscoelasticity theory yields viscosity values for three polymer samples in agreement with those determined by measurements on a macroscopic scale. Theoretical analysis further indicates that the measured limiting static elasticity of the layers may result from the tension generated at the interface between the polymer and water. This work demonstrates the possibility of obtaining quantitative viscoelastic material properties from cell poker measurements and represents the first step in extending these quantitative studies to more complicated structures including cells. PMID:2720066

  8. Viscoelastic Properties of Rubber Composites Reinforced by Wheat Gluten and Starch Co-filler

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to different abilities of wheat gluten (WG) and wheat starch (WS) to increase the modulus of rubber composites, the composite properties can be adjusted by varying the ratio of WG to WS as a co-filler. This study shows that the co-filler composites became more temperature dependent as the WG co...

  9. Effect of Hydrolyzed Wheat Gluten and Starch Ratio on the Viscoelastic Properties of Rubber Composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The hydrolyzed wheat gluten (WG) and wheat starch (WS) showed substantial reinforcement effects in rubber composites. Due to different abilities of WG and WS to increase the modulus of rubber composites, the composite properties can be adjusted by varying the ratio of WG and WS as a co-filler. The...

  10. Viscoelastic properties of kenaf bast fiber in relation to stem age

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural fibers traditionally used for cordage are proving valuable for advanced industrial applications due in part to beneficial physical and chemical properties, but also because they are a renewable and biodegradable resource. Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L., Malvaceae) produces high yields of lig...

  11. Viscoelastic Properties of Rubber Composites Reinforced by Wheat Gluten and Wheat Starch Co-filler

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to different abilities of wheat gluten (WG) and wheat starch (WS) to increase the modulus of rubber composites, the composite properties can be adjusted by varying the ratio of WG to WS as a co-filler. This study shows that the co-filler composites became more temperature dependent as the WG co...

  12. A new soy-based hydrogels: development, viscoelastic properties, and application for controlled drug release

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrogels have been widely studied due to their potential application in drug delivery systems as they are capable of forming aggregates in aqueous solutions. Hydrogels formed from biopolymers or natural sources have special advantages because of their biodegradable and biocompatible properties. I...

  13. Mechanically Viscoelastic Properties of Cellulose Nanocrystals Skeleton Reinforced Hierarchical Composite Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Han, ChunRui

    2016-09-28

    With inspiration from the concept of natural dynamic materials, binary-component composite hydrogels with excellent mechanical properties and recovery capability were prepared from the cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) skeleton reinforced covalently cross-linked polyacrylamide (PAAm) networks. The hierarchical skeleton obtained by freeze-drying of CNC aqueous suspension was directly impregnated into acrylamide (AAm) monomer solution, and in situ polymerization occurred in the presence of hydrophilic cross-linker PEGDA575. Under stress, hydrogen bonds at the interface between CNC and PAAm as well as inside the CNC skeleton acted as sacrificial bonds to dissipate energy, while the covalently cross-linked PAAm chains bind the network together by providing adhesion to CNC and thereby suppress the catastrophic craze propagation. The above synergistic effects of the CNC skeleton and the elastic PAAm network enabled the composite hydrogels to withstand up to 181 kPa of tensile stress, 1.01 MPa of compressive strength, and 1392% elongation at break with the fracture energy as high as 2.82 kJ/m(2). Moreover, the hydrogels recovered more than 70% elasticity after eight loading-unloading cycles, revealing excellent fatigue resistance. The depth-sensing instrumentation by indentation test corroborated that the CNC skeleton contributed simultaneous improvements in hardness and elasticity by as much as 500% in comparison with the properties of the pristine PAAm hydrogels. This elegant strategy by using the CNC skeleton as a reinforcing template offers a new perspective for the fabrication of robust hydrogels with exceptional mechanical properties that may be important for biomedical applications where high strength is required, such as scaffolds for tissue engineering.

  14. Ultrasonic characterization of changes in viscoelastic properties of epoxy during cure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winfree, W. P.; Parker, F. R.

    1985-01-01

    A technique for using the longitudinal velocity (LV) of an ultrasonic wave to monitor the extent of cross linking (CL) during the cure of thermosetting resins is described. The method was developed by monitoring the rate of change in LV during the cure of a bisphenol-A epoxy resin with an amine adduct. The experiment included variations in the temperature and stoichiometry in order to express the rate of change in terms of the reaction kinetics. The pulse-echo method was used with a single transducer operating at 20 MHz. Numerical models were defined to account for the acoustic response of a single layer, the attenuation and the reflection coefficient. A linear relationship was observed between the inverse of the temperature and the log of the rate of change in the velocity, supporting the theory that the velocity could be used to monitor the extent of the cross-linking reaction. An activation energy of 11.9 kcal/mole was calculated for the mixture being investigated.

  15. Shear-Thinning Supramolecular Hydrogels with Secondary Autonomous Covalent Crosslinking to Modulate Viscoelastic Properties In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Rodell, Christopher B.; MacArthur, John W.; Dorsey, Shauna M.; Wade, Ryan J.; Wang, Leo L.; Woo, Y. Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Clinical percutaneous delivery of synthetically engineered hydrogels remains limited due to challenges posed by crosslinking kinetics – too fast leads to delivery failure, too slow limits material retention. To overcome this challenge, we exploit supramolecular assembly to localize hydrogels at the injection site and introduce subsequent covalent crosslinking to control final material properties. Supramolecular gels were designed through the separate pendant modifications of hyaluronic acid (HA) by the guest-host pair cyclodextrin and adamantane, enabling shear-thinning injection and high target site retention (>98%). Secondary covalent crosslinking occurred via addition of thiols and Michael-acceptors (i.e., methacrylates, acrylates, vinyl sulfones) on HA and increased hydrogel moduli (E=25.0±4.5kPa) and stability (>3.5 fold in vivo at 28 days). Application of the dual-crosslinking hydrogel to a myocardial infarct model showed improved outcomes relative to untreated and supramolecular hydrogel alone controls, demonstrating its potential in a range of applications where the precise delivery of hydrogels with tunable properties is desired. PMID:26526097

  16. Viscoelastic and Mechanical Properties of Thermoset PMR-type Polyimide-Clay Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdalla, Mohamed O.; Dean, Derrick; Campbell, Sandi

    2002-01-01

    High temperature thermoset polyimide-clay nanocomposites were prepared by blending 2.5 and 5 wt% of an unmodified Na(+-) montmorillonite (PGV) and two organically modified FGV (PGVCl0COOH, PGVC12) with a methanol solution of PMR-15 precursor. The methanol facilitated the dispersal of the unmodified clay. Dynamic mechanical analysis results showed a significant increase in the thermomechanical properties (E' and E") of 2.5 wt% clay loaded nanocomposites in comparison with the neat polyimide. Higher glass transition temperatures were observed for 2.5 wt% nanocomposites compared to the neat polyimide. Flexural properties measurements for the 2.5 wt% nanocomposites showed a significant improvement in the modulus and strength, with no loss in elongation. This trend was not observed for the 5 wt% nanocomposites. An improvement in the CTE was observed for the PGV/PMR-15 nanocomposites, while a decrease was observed for the organically modified samples. This was attributed to potential variations in the interface caused by modifier degradation.

  17. Linear and nonlinear magnetic properties of ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szalai, I.; Nagy, S.; Dietrich, S.

    2015-10-01

    Within a high-magnetic-field approximation, employing Ruelle's algebraic perturbation theory, a field-dependent free-energy expression is proposed which allows one to determine the magnetic properties of ferrofluids modeled as dipolar hard-sphere systems. We compare the ensuing magnetization curves, following from this free energy, with those obtained by Ivanov and Kuznetsova [Phys. Rev. E 64, 041405 (2001), 10.1103/PhysRevE.64.041405] as well as with new corresponding Monte Carlo simulation data. Based on the power-series expansion of the magnetization, a closed expression for the magnetization is also proposed, which is a high-density extension of the corresponding equation of Ivanov and Kuznetsova. From both magnetization equations the zero-field susceptibility expression due to Tani et al. [Mol. Phys. 48, 863 (1983), 10.1080/00268978300100621] can be obtained, which is in good agreement with our MC simulation results. From the closed expression for the magnetization the second-order nonlinear magnetic susceptibility is also derived, which shows fair agreement with the corresponding MC simulation data.

  18. Coefficient of restitution in fractional viscoelastic compliant impacts using fractional Chebyshev collocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabiri, Arman; Butcher, Eric A.; Nazari, Morad

    2017-02-01

    Compliant impacts can be modeled using linear viscoelastic constitutive models. While such impact models for realistic viscoelastic materials using integer order derivatives of force and displacement usually require a large number of parameters, compliant impact models obtained using fractional calculus, however, can be advantageous since such models use fewer parameters and successfully capture the hereditary property. In this paper, we introduce the fractional Chebyshev collocation (FCC) method as an approximation tool for numerical simulation of several linear fractional viscoelastic compliant impact models in which the overall coefficient of restitution for the impact is studied as a function of the fractional model parameters for the first time. Other relevant impact characteristics such as hysteresis curves, impact force gradient, penetration and separation depths are also studied.

  19. The nonlinear viscoelasticity of hyaluronic acid and its role in joint lubrication.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenhuan; Christopher, Gordon F

    2015-04-07

    Hyaluronic acid solutions have been widely studied due to their relevance to the rheological behavior of synovial fluid and joint lubrication. Ambulatory joint motion is typically large oscillatory deflections; therefore, large amplitude oscillatory shear strain experiments are used to examine the relevant non-linear viscoelastic properties of these solutions. Using the sequence of physical processes method to analyze data provides time dependent viscoelastic moduli, which exhibit a clear physiologically relevant behavior to hyaluronic acids non-linear viscoelasticity. In particular, it is seen that during peak strain/acceleration, the time dependent elastic modulus peaks and the loss modulus is at a minimum. The hyaluronic acid can provide an immediate elastic response to sudden forces, acting like a shock absorber during sudden changes in direction of motion or maximum deflection. However, during peak rate, the elastic modulus is at a minimum and the loss modulus is at a maximum, which provides greater efficacy to hydrodynamic shear lubrication.

  20. An Analytical Model of Nanometer Scale Viscoelastic Properties of Polymer Surfaces Measured Using an Atomic Force Microscope

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    Review of Scien- tific Instruments, 67(9):3281– 3293 , September 1996. [76] Radmacher, M., R.W. Tillmann, and H.E. Gaub. “Imaging viscoelasticity by...Baker (AFIT/ENC) REPORT U ABSTRACT U c. THIS PAGE U 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code ) (937) 255-3636, ext. 4517

  1. Low Modulus Silicone Elastomer Networks with Desirable Viscoelastic Properties for Cell Mobility Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Julie N. L.; Genzer, Jan

    2013-03-01

    Biocompatible silicone elastomer networks provide a versatile platform for studying the effect of compliance on cell movement. In conventional network formation schemes, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) is cross-linked via reactive end groups, and the modulus of the material is controlled by the ratio of polymer to cross-linker. However, low modulus networks fabricated in this manner are imperfect and insufficiently cross-linked with high soluble fractions and reduced elasticity, especially as the network modulus approaches that of soft tissues (on the order of 10 kPa). In order to overcome these limitations, we synthesized PDMS chains in which vinylmethylsiloxane units were incorporated every ~15-20 kDa along the polymer backbone. We then cross-linked the polymer through the vinyl groups using hydrosilylation chemistry. The resultant networks exhibited lower soluble fractions and lower viscous dissipation/greater elasticity as compared to equivalent-modulus networks fabricated by the conventional end-group cross-linking scheme. We attribute the mechanical properties of our networks to the presence of network-bound free chain ends that effectively plasticize the network to lower the modulus without compromising network elasticity.

  2. Viscoelastic properties of electrorheological suspensions of core-shell (carbon/polyaniline) particles in silicone oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlacik, M.; Almajdalawi, S.; Mrlik, M.; Pavlinek, V.; Saha, P.; Stejskal, J.

    2013-02-01

    Carbon/polyaniline particles with core-shell structure were synthesized as a novel dispersed phase for electrorheological (ER) suspensions in this study. Core of these composite particles was obtained by carbonization of polyaniline base in an inert atmosphere of nitrogen at 650°C and then coated with polyaniline shell. The morphology and composition of prepared particles were examined with scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, respectively. The analysis revealed the conversion of polyaniline to carbon via ring-opening happened during the carbonization process and successful coating of carbonized particles with shell layer. The products retained the original granular structure after carbonization as well as after the coatings. The dielectric spectra analysis suggests high particle polarizability of carbonized material. Thus, the measurements performed under oscillatory shear flow showed a remarkably high ER intensity at relatively low electric field strengths. Coating of carbonized particles by polyaniline base changes compatibility of particle surface with silicone oil medium and, consequently, flow properties of suspensions in the absence of electric field, but does not influence the shear rate dependence of the complex viscosity in the electric field.

  3. Impact of Simulated Microgravity on Cytoskeleton and Viscoelastic Properties of Endothelial Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janmaleki, M.; Pachenari, M.; Seyedpour, S. M.; Shahghadami, R.; Sanati-Nezhad, A.

    2016-09-01

    This study focused on the effects of simulated microgravity (s-μg) on mechanical properties, major cytoskeleton biopolymers, and morphology of endothelial cells (ECs). The structural and functional integrity of ECs are vital to regulate vascular homeostasis and prevent atherosclerosis. Furthermore, these highly gravity sensitive cells play a key role in pathogenesis of many diseases. In this research, impacts of s-μg on mechanical behavior of human umbilical vein endothelial cells were investigated by utilizing a three-dimensional random positioning machine (3D-RPM). Results revealed a considerable drop in cell stiffness and viscosity after 24 hrs of being subjected to weightlessness. Cortical rigidity experienced relatively immediate and significant decline comparing to the stiffness of whole cell body. The cells became rounded in morphology while western blot analysis showed reduction of the main cytoskeletal components. Moreover, fluorescence staining confirmed disorganization of both actin filaments and microtubules (MTs). The results were compared statistically among test and control groups and it was concluded that s-μg led to a significant alteration in mechanical behavior of ECs due to remodeling of cell cytoskeleton.

  4. Impact of Simulated Microgravity on Cytoskeleton and Viscoelastic Properties of Endothelial Cell

    PubMed Central

    Janmaleki, M.; Pachenari, M.; Seyedpour, S. M.; Shahghadami, R.; Sanati-Nezhad, A.

    2016-01-01

    This study focused on the effects of simulated microgravity (s-μg) on mechanical properties, major cytoskeleton biopolymers, and morphology of endothelial cells (ECs). The structural and functional integrity of ECs are vital to regulate vascular homeostasis and prevent atherosclerosis. Furthermore, these highly gravity sensitive cells play a key role in pathogenesis of many diseases. In this research, impacts of s-μg on mechanical behavior of human umbilical vein endothelial cells were investigated by utilizing a three-dimensional random positioning machine (3D-RPM). Results revealed a considerable drop in cell stiffness and viscosity after 24 hrs of being subjected to weightlessness. Cortical rigidity experienced relatively immediate and significant decline comparing to the stiffness of whole cell body. The cells became rounded in morphology while western blot analysis showed reduction of the main cytoskeletal components. Moreover, fluorescence staining confirmed disorganization of both actin filaments and microtubules (MTs). The results were compared statistically among test and control groups and it was concluded that s-μg led to a significant alteration in mechanical behavior of ECs due to remodeling of cell cytoskeleton. PMID:27581365

  5. Dynamic viscoelastic models of human skin using optical elastography

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, Steven P.; Khan, Altaf; Dai, Zoujun; Royston, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    A novel technique for measuring in vivo human skin viscoelastic properties using optical elastography has been developed. The technique uses geometrically focused surface (GFS) waves that allow for wide bandwidth measurements of the wave field. An analytical solution for the case of a radiating annular disk surface source was fit to experimentally measured GFS waves, enabling an estimate of the frequency-dependent surface wavenumber, which can then be related to the dynamic shear modulus. Several viscoelastic models were then fit to the dynamic shear modulus dispersion curve. Viscoelastic models were evaluated based on their overall quality of fit and variability amongst healthy volunteers. An Ecoflex phantom was used to validate the procedure and results by comparison to similar studies using the same type of phantom. For skin results, it was found that the “α” parameters from the fractional models had the least variability, with coefficients of variability of 0.15, and 0.16. The best fitting models were the standard linear solid, and the fractional Voigt, with a mean fit correlation coefficient, R2, of 0.93, 0.89, respectively. This study has demonstrated the efficacy of this new method, and with larger studies the viscoelastic skin models could be used to identify various skin diseases and their response to treatment. PMID:26305137

  6. A review on the systematic formulation of 3-D multiparameter full waveform inversion in viscoelastic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Pengliang; Brossier, Romain; Métivier, Ludovic; Virieux, Jean

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we study 3-D multiparameter full waveform inversion (FWI) in viscoelastic media based on the generalized Maxwell/Zener body including arbitrary number of attenuation mechanisms. We present a frequency-domain energy analysis to establish the stability condition of a full anisotropic viscoelastic system, according to zero-valued boundary condition and the elastic-viscoelastic correspondence principle: the real-valued stiffness matrix becomes a complex-valued one in Fourier domain when seismic attenuation is taken into account. We develop a least-squares optimization approach to linearly relate the quality factor with the anelastic coefficients by estimating a set of constants which are independent of the spatial coordinates, which supplies an explicit incorporation of the parameter Q in the general viscoelastic wave equation. By introducing the Lagrangian multipliers into the matrix expression of the wave equation with implicit time integration, we build a systematic formulation of multiparameter FWI for full anisotropic viscoelastic wave equation, while the equivalent form of the state and adjoint equation with explicit time integration is available to be resolved efficiently. In particular, this formulation lays the foundation for the inversion of the parameter Q in the time domain with full anisotropic viscoelastic properties. In the 3-D isotropic viscoelastic settings, the anelastic coefficients and the quality factors using bulk and shear moduli parametrization can be related to the counterparts using P and S velocity. Gradients with respect to any other parameter of interest can be found by chain rule. Pioneering numerical validations as well as the real applications of this most generic framework will be carried out to disclose the potential of viscoelastic FWI when adequate high-performance computing resources and the field data are available.

  7. Relativistic viscoelastic fluid mechanics.

    PubMed

    Fukuma, Masafumi; Sakatani, Yuho

    2011-08-01

    A detailed study is carried out for the relativistic theory of viscoelasticity which was recently constructed on the basis of Onsager's linear nonequilibrium thermodynamics. After rederiving the theory using a local argument with the entropy current, we show that this theory universally reduces to the standard relativistic Navier-Stokes fluid mechanics in the long time limit. Since effects of elasticity are taken into account, the dynamics at short time scales is modified from that given by the Navier-Stokes equations, so that acausal problems intrinsic to relativistic Navier-Stokes fluids are significantly remedied. We in particular show that the wave equations for the propagation of disturbance around a hydrostatic equilibrium in Minkowski space-time become symmetric hyperbolic for some range of parameters, so that the model is free of acausality problems. This observation suggests that the relativistic viscoelastic model with such parameters can be regarded as a causal completion of relativistic Navier-Stokes fluid mechanics. By adjusting parameters to various values, this theory can treat a wide variety of materials including elastic materials, Maxwell materials, Kelvin-Voigt materials, and (a nonlinearly generalized version of) simplified Israel-Stewart fluids, and thus we expect the theory to be the most universal description of single-component relativistic continuum materials. We also show that the presence of strains and the corresponding change in temperature are naturally unified through the Tolman law in a generally covariant description of continuum mechanics.

  8. Predicting nonlinear properties of metamaterials from the linear response.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Kevin; Suchowski, Haim; Rho, Junsuk; Salandrino, Alessandro; Kante, Boubacar; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2015-04-01

    The discovery of optical second harmonic generation in 1961 started modern nonlinear optics. Soon after, R. C. Miller found empirically that the nonlinear susceptibility could be predicted from the linear susceptibilities. This important relation, known as Miller's Rule, allows a rapid determination of nonlinear susceptibilities from linear properties. In recent years, metamaterials, artificial materials that exhibit intriguing linear optical properties not found in natural materials, have shown novel nonlinear properties such as phase-mismatch-free nonlinear generation, new quasi-phase matching capabilities and large nonlinear susceptibilities. However, the understanding of nonlinear metamaterials is still in its infancy, with no general conclusion on the relationship between linear and nonlinear properties. The key question is then whether one can determine the nonlinear behaviour of these artificial materials from their exotic linear behaviour. Here, we show that the nonlinear oscillator model does not apply in general to nonlinear metamaterials. We show, instead, that it is possible to predict the relative nonlinear susceptibility of large classes of metamaterials using a more comprehensive nonlinear scattering theory, which allows efficient design of metamaterials with strong nonlinearity for important applications such as coherent Raman sensing, entangled photon generation and frequency conversion.

  9. Human Arm-Like Robot Control Based on Human Multi-Joint Arm Viscoelastic Properties and A Modified Forward Gaze Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Aihui; Deng, Mingcong

    In this paper, a human arm-like robot control scheme is proposed based on time-varying viscoelastic properties which consist of multi-joint stiffness and multi-joint viscosity during human arm movements and a modified forward gaze model. In general, in human multi-joint arm movements, the multi-joint torque is assumed to be a function of multi-joint stiffness matrix, multi-joint viscosity matrix, and motor command descending from central nervous system (CNS). In order to make the present human arm-like robot move like a human multi-joint arm, a feedback controller and a modified forward gaze model are presented in the human arm-like robot control system. That is, the feedback controller is designed to obtain desired motion mechanism based on real measured data from viscoelastic properties of human multi-joint arm, and the forward gaze model in which steering gains are modified using a cost function is used to compensate the term related to the effect of CNS. The effectiveness of the proposed method is confirmed by the simulation results based on experimental data.

  10. A master relation defines the nonlinear viscoelasticity of single fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Pablo; Pullarkat, Pramod A; Ott, Albrecht

    2006-05-15

    Cell mechanical functions such as locomotion, contraction, and division are controlled by the cytoskeleton, a dynamic biopolymer network whose mechanical properties remain poorly understood. We perform single-cell uniaxial stretching experiments on 3T3 fibroblasts. By superimposing small amplitude oscillations on a mechanically prestressed cell, we find a transition from linear viscoelastic behavior to power law stress stiffening. Data from different cells over several stress decades can be uniquely scaled to obtain a master relation between the viscoelastic moduli and the average force. Remarkably, this relation holds independently of deformation history, adhesion biochemistry, and intensity of active contraction. In particular, it is irrelevant whether force is actively generated by the cell or externally imposed by stretching. We propose that the master relation reflects the mechanical behavior of the force-bearing actin cytoskeleton, in agreement with stress stiffening known from semiflexible filament networks.

  11. Linear optical properties of solids within the full-potential linearized augmented planewave method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosch-Draxl, Claudia; Sofo, Jorge O.

    2006-07-01

    We present a scheme for the calculation of linear optical properties by the all-electron full-potential linearized augmented planewave (LAPW) method. A summary of the theoretical background for the derivation of the dielectric tensor within the random-phase approximation is provided. The momentum matrix elements are evaluated in detail for the LAPW basis, and the interband as well as the intra-band contributions to the dielectric tensor are given. As an example the formalism is applied to Aluminum. The program is available as a module within the WIEN2k code.

  12. Hyaluronan derivatives: Alkyl chain length boosts viscoelastic behavior to depolymerization.

    PubMed

    Pavan, Mauro; Galesso, Devis; Menon, Giampaolo; Renier, Davide; Guarise, Cristian

    2013-09-12

    Five amide derivatives of Hyaluronic Acid (HA) were synthesized with C8, C12, C15, C16 and C18 linear alkyl-amines. These polymers (Hyadd) were tested against thermal, oxidative and hyaluronidase degradation by means of rheological experiments and SEC analysis and compared to non-modified HA. First of all, no free hexadecylamine was detected in the treated samples, meaning that under these stressing conditions only cleavage of glycosidic bonds occurs. Then, viscoelastic properties were assessed during thermal degradation and their variation as a function of time was expressed by means of a decay constant k(G'): while no significant difference in the decrease rate was observed between Hyadd-C8 and Hyadd-C12, a marked stabilization of viscoelastic properties during thermal treatment was detected for Hyadd-C15, Hyadd-C16 and Hyadd-C18. On the other hand, no difference was observed between the MW decrease rate (kMW decay constant) of HA and Hyadd-C12 to-C18; the depolymerization takes place on the backbone of the polymers independently whether they are derivatized or not, but longer alkyl chains lead to higher viscoelasticity in the depolymerized products. Finally, both oxidative and enzymatic degradation were carried out analyzing the changes in elastic modulus and in dynamic viscosity: once again, the amide side chain came out with similar behavior to chemical cross-linked HA (HBC) and with improved performances respect to linear HA in terms of preservation of viscoelasticity after chain depolymerization.

  13. Effect of enzymatic hydrolysis of starch on pasting, rheological and viscoelastic properties of milk-barnyard millet (Echinochloa frumentacea) blends meant for spray drying.

    PubMed

    Kumar, P Arun; Pushpadass, Heartwin A; Franklin, Magdaline Eljeeva Emerald; Simha, H V Vikram; Nath, B Surendra

    2016-10-01

    The influence of enzymatic hydrolysis of starch on the pasting properties of barnyard millet was studied using a rheometer. The effects of blending hydrolyzed barnyard millet wort with milk at different ratios (0:1, 1:1, 1:1.5 and 1:2) on flow and viscoelastic behavior were investigated. From the pasting curves, it was evident that enzymatically-hydrolyzed starch did not exhibit typical pasting characteristics expected of normal starch. The Herschel-Bulkley model fitted well to the flow behaviour data, with coefficient of determination (R(2)) ranging from 0.942 to 0.988. All milk-wort blends demonstrated varying degree of shear thinning with flow behavior index (n) ranging from 0.252 to 0.647. Stress-strain data revealed that 1:1 blend of milk to wort had the highest storage modulus (7.09-20.06Pa) and an elastically-dominant behavior (phase angle <45°) over the tested frequency range. The crossover point of G' and G" shifted to higher frequencies with increasing wort content. From the flow and viscoelastic behavior, it was concluded that the 1:1 blend of milk to wort would have least phase separation and better flowability during spray drying.

  14. Resonance electromagnetoacoustic method of measuring viscoelastic properties of amorphous ferromagnetic ribbons subjected to low-temperature annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Len'kov, S. V.; Fedorova, N. V.

    2014-08-01

    Stationary and damped vibrations of the s 0 Lamb mode in a viscoelastic amorphous ferromagnetic ribbon excited upon the electromagnetoacoustic (EMA) transformation have been considered. A resonance method is suggested that employs double EMA transformation for measuring elasticity moduli E and internal friction in amorphous ferromagnetic ribbons. The effect of low-temperature isochronous annealing on the field dependences of Young's modulus and internal friction of the Fe80Si10B10 and Fe73.7Cu1.0Nb3.2Si12.7B9.4 alloys has been studied.

  15. Calibrating Nonlinear Soil Material Properties for Seismic Analysis Using Soil Material Properties Intended for Linear Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Spears, Robert Edward; Coleman, Justin Leigh

    2015-08-01

    Seismic analysis of nuclear structures is routinely performed using guidance provided in “Seismic Analysis of Safety-Related Nuclear Structures and Commentary (ASCE 4, 1998).” This document, which is currently under revision, provides detailed guidance on linear seismic soil-structure-interaction (SSI) analysis of nuclear structures. To accommodate the linear analysis, soil material properties are typically developed as shear modulus and damping ratio versus cyclic shear strain amplitude. A new Appendix in ASCE 4-2014 (draft) is being added to provide guidance for nonlinear time domain SSI analysis. To accommodate the nonlinear analysis, a more appropriate form of the soil material properties includes shear stress and energy absorbed per cycle versus shear strain. Ideally, nonlinear soil model material properties would be established with soil testing appropriate for the nonlinear constitutive model being used. However, much of the soil testing done for SSI analysis is performed for use with linear analysis techniques. Consequently, a method is described in this paper that uses soil test data intended for linear analysis to develop nonlinear soil material properties. To produce nonlinear material properties that are equivalent to the linear material properties, the linear and nonlinear model hysteresis loops are considered. For equivalent material properties, the shear stress at peak shear strain and energy absorbed per cycle should match when comparing the linear and nonlinear model hysteresis loops. Consequently, nonlinear material properties are selected based on these criteria.

  16. Theory of reciprocating contact for viscoelastic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putignano, Carmine; Carbone, Giuseppe; Dini, Daniele

    2016-04-01

    A theory of reciprocating contacts for linear viscoelastic materials is presented. Results are discussed for the case of a rigid sphere sinusoidally driven in sliding contact with a viscoelastic half-space. Depending on the size of the contact, the frequency and amplitude of the reciprocating motion, and on the relaxation time of the viscoelastic body, we establish that the contact behavior may range from the steady-state viscoelastic solution, in which traction forces always oppose the direction of the sliding rigid punch, to a more elaborate trend, which is due to the strong interaction between different regions of the path covered during the reciprocating motion. Practical implications span a number of applications, ranging from seismic engineering to biotechnology.

  17. Geometric and asymptotic properties associated with linear switched systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitour, Y.; Gaye, M.; Mason, P.

    2015-12-01

    Consider a continuous-time linear switched system on Rn associated with a compact convex set of matrices. When it is irreducible and its largest Lyapunov exponent is zero there always exists a Barabanov norm associated with the system. This paper deals with two types of issues: (a) properties of Barabanov norms such as uniqueness up to homogeneity and strict convexity; (b) asymptotic behavior of the extremal solutions of the linear switched system. Regarding Issue (a), we provide partial answers and propose four related open problems. As for Issue (b), we establish, when n = 3, a Poincaré-Bendixson theorem under a regularity assumption on the set of matrices. We then revisit a noteworthy result of N.E. Barabanov describing the asymptotic behavior of linear switched system on R3 associated with a pair of Hurwitz matrices { A , A + bcT }. After pointing out a gap in Barabanov's proof we partially recover his result by alternative arguments.

  18. Nonlinear viscoelasticity and generalized failure criterion for biopolymer gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divoux, Thibaut; Keshavarz, Bavand; Manneville, Sébastien; McKinley, Gareth

    2016-11-01

    Biopolymer gels display a multiscale microstructure that is responsible for their solid-like properties. Upon external deformation, these soft viscoelastic solids exhibit a generic nonlinear mechanical response characterized by pronounced stress- or strain-stiffening prior to irreversible damage and failure, most often through macroscopic fractures. Here we show on a model acid-induced protein gel that the nonlinear viscoelastic properties of the gel can be described in terms of a 'damping function' which predicts the gel mechanical response quantitatively up to the onset of macroscopic failure. Using a nonlinear integral constitutive equation built upon the experimentally-measured damping function in conjunction with power-law linear viscoelastic response, we derive the form of the stress growth in the gel following the start up of steady shear. We also couple the shear stress response with Bailey's durability criteria for brittle solids in order to predict the critical values of the stress σc and strain γc for failure of the gel, and how they scale with the applied shear rate. This provides a generalized failure criterion for biopolymer gels in a range of different deformation histories. This work was funded by the MIT-France seed fund and by the CNRS PICS-USA scheme (#36939). BK acknowledges financial support from Axalta Coating Systems.

  19. Non-linear optical titanyl arsenates: Crystal growth and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordborg, Jenni Eva Louise

    Crystals are appreciated not only for their appearance, but also for their unique physical properties which are utilized by the photonic industry in appliances that we come across every day. An important part of enabling the technical use of optical devices is the manufacture of crystals. This dissertation deals with a specific group of materials called the potassium titanyl phosphate (KIP) family, known for their non-linear optical and ferroelectric properties. The isomorphs vary in their linear optical and dielectric properties, which can be tuned to optimize device performance by forming solid solutions of the different materials. Titanyl arsenates have a wide range of near-infrared transmission which makes them useful for tunable infrared lasers. The isomorphs examined in the present work were primarily RbTiOASO4 (RTA) and CsTiOAsO4 (CTA) together with the mixtures RbxCs 1-xTiOAsO4 (RCTA). Large-scale crystals were grown by top seeding solution growth utilizing a three-zone furnace with excellent temperature control. Sufficiently slow cooling and constant upward lifting produced crystals with large volumes useable for technical applications. Optical quality RTA crystals up to 10 x 12 x 20 mm were grown. The greater difficulty in obtaining good crystals of CTA led to the use of mixed RCTA materials. The mixing of rubidium and cesium in RCTA is more favorable to crystal growth than the single components in pure RTA and CTA. Mixed crystals are rubidium-enriched and contain only 20-30% of the cesium concentration in the flux. The cesium atoms show a preference for the larger cation site. The network structure is very little affected by the cation substitution; consequently, the non-linear optical properties of the Rb-rich isomorphic mixtures of RTA and CTA can be expected to remain intact. Crystallographic methods utilizing conventional X-ray tubes, synchrotron radiation and neutron diffraction have been employed to investigate the properties of the atomic

  20. Linear and nonlinear optical properties of chalcogenide microstructured optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trolès, Johann; Brilland, Laurent; Caillaud, Celine; Renversez, Gilles; Mechin, David; Adam, Jean-Luc

    2015-03-01

    Chalcogenide glasses are known for their large transparency in the mid-infrared and their high linear refractive index (>2). They present also a high non-linear coefficient (n2), 100 to 1000 times larger than for silica, depending on the composition. we have developed a casting method to prepare the microstructured chalcogenide preform. This method allows optical losses as low as 0.4 dB/m at 1.55 µm and less than 0.05 dB/m in the mid IR. Various chalcogenide MOFs operating in the IR range has been fabricated in order to associate the high non-linear properties of these glasses and the original MOF properties. For example, small core fibers have been drawn to enhance the non linearities for telecom applications such as signal regeneration and generation of supercontinuum sources. On another hand, in the 3-12 µm window, single mode fibers and exposed core fibers have been realized for Gaussian beams propagation and sensors applications respectively.

  1. A Thermodynamic Theory of Solid Viscoelasticity. Part II:; Nonlinear Thermo-viscoelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.; Leonov, Arkady I.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper, second in the series of three papers, develops a general, nonlinear, non-isothermal, compressible theory for finite rubber viscoelasticity and specifies it in a form convenient for solving problems important to the rubber, tire, automobile, and air-space industries, among others. Based on the quasi-linear approach of non-equilibrium thermodynamics, a general nonlinear theory of differential type has been developed for arbitrary non-isothermal deformations of viscoelastic solids. In this theory, the constitutive equations were presented as the sum of a rubber elastic (equilibrium) and a liquid type viscoelastic (non-equilibrium) terms. These equations have then been simplified using several modeling and simplicity arguments.

  2. Crustal deformation, the earthquake cycle, and models of viscoelastic flow in the asthenosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.; Kramer, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    The crustal deformation patterns associated with the earthquake cycle can depend strongly on the rheological properties of subcrustal material. Substantial deviations from the simple patterns for a uniformly elastic earth are expected when viscoelastic flow of subcrustal material is considered. The detailed description of the deformation pattern and in particular the surface displacements, displacement rates, strains, and strain rates depend on the structure and geometry of the material near the seismogenic zone. The origin of some of these differences are resolved by analyzing several different linear viscoelastic models with a common finite element computational technique. The models involve strike-slip faulting and include a thin channel asthenosphere model, a model with a varying thickness lithosphere, and a model with a viscoelastic inclusion below the brittle slip plane. The calculations reveal that the surface deformation pattern is most sensitive to the rheology of the material that lies below the slip plane in a volume whose extent is a few times the fault depth. If this material is viscoelastic, the surface deformation pattern resembles that of an elastic layer lying over a viscoelastic half-space. When the thickness or breath of the viscoelastic material is less than a few times the fault depth, then the surface deformation pattern is altered and geodetic measurements are potentially useful for studying the details of subsurface geometry and structure. Distinguishing among the various models is best accomplished by making geodetic measurements not only near the fault but out to distances equal to several times the fault depth. This is where the model differences are greatest; these differences will be most readily detected shortly after an earthquake when viscoelastic effects are most pronounced.

  3. Crustal deformation, the earthquake cycle, and models of viscoelastic flow in the asthenosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.; Kramer, M. J.

    1984-01-01

    The crustal deformation patterns associated with the earthquake cycle can depend strongly on the rheological properties of subcrustal material. Substantial deviations from the simple patterns for a uniformly elastic earth are expected when viscoelastic flow of subcrustal material is considered. The detailed description of the deformation pattern and in particular the surface displacements, displacement rates, strains, and strain rates depend on the structure and geometry of the material near the seismogenic zone. The origin of some of these differences are resolved by analyzing several different linear viscoelastic models with a common finite element computational technique. The models involve strike-slip faulting and include a thin channel asthenosphere model, a model with a varying thickness lithosphere, and a model with a viscoelastic inclusion below the brittle slip plane. The calculations reveal that the surface deformation pattern is most sensitive to the rheology of the material that lies below the slip plane in a volume whose extent is a few times the fault depth. If this material is viscoelastic, the surface deformation pattern resembles that of an elastic layer lying over a viscoelastic half-space. When the thickness or breath of the viscoelastic material is less than a few times the fault depth, then the surface deformation pattern is altered and geodetic measurements are potentially useful for studying the details of subsurface geometry and structure. Distinguishing among the various models is best accomplished by making geodetic measurements not only near the fault but out to distances equal to several times the fault depth. This is where the model differences are greatest; these differences will be most readily detected shortly after an earthquake when viscoelastic effects are most pronounced.

  4. Method for evaluating material viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yusaku; Yamaguchi, Takao

    2004-01-01

    A method for evaluating the viscoelasticity of materials under oscillation load is proposed. In the method, a material under test is connected to a mass, which generates an oscillating inertial force after the mass is manually struck using a hammer. A pneumatic linear bearing is used to realize linear motion with sufficiently small friction acting on the mass that is the moving part of the bearing. The inertial force acting on the mass is determined highly accurately by means of measuring the velocity of the mass using an optical interferometer.

  5. Response properties of pigeon otolith afferents to linear acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Si, X.; Angelaki, D. E.; Dickman, J. D.

    1997-01-01

    In the present study, the sensitivity to sinusoidal linear accelerations in the plane of the utricular macula was tested in afferents. The head orientation relative to the translation axis was varied in order to determine the head position that elicited the maximal and minimal responses for each afferent. The response gain and phase values obtained to 0.5-Hz and 2-Hz linear acceleration stimuli were then plotted as a function of head orientation and a modified cosine function was fit to the data. From the best-fit cosine function, the predicted head orientations that would produce the maximal and minimal response gains were estimated. The estimated maximum response gains to linear acceleration in the utricular plane for the afferents varied between 75 and 1420 spikes s-1 g-1. The mean maximal gains for all afferents to 0.5-Hz and 2-Hz sinusoidal linear acceleration stimuli were 282 and 367 spikes s-1 g-1, respectively. The minimal response gains were essentially zero for most units. The response phases always led linear acceleration and remained constant for each afferent, regardless of head orientation. These response characteristics indicate that otolith afferents are cosine tuned and behave as one-dimensional linear accelerometers. The directions of maximal sensitivity to linear acceleration for the afferents varied throughout the plane of the utricle; however, most vectors were directed out of the opposite ear near the interaural axis. The response dynamics of the afferents were tested using stimulus frequencies ranging between 0.25 Hz and 10 Hz (0.1 g peak acceleration). Across stimulus frequencies, most afferents had increasing gains and constant phase values. These dynamic properties for individual afferents were fit with a simple transfer function that included three parameters: a mechanical time constant, a gain constant, and a fractional order distributed adaptation operator.

  6. Influence of Structure and Composition on Dynamic Viscoelastic Property of Cartilaginous Tissue: Criteria for Classification between Hyaline Cartilage and Fibrocartilage Based on Mechanical Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyata, Shogo; Tateishi, Tetsuya; Furukawa, Katsuko; Ushida, Takashi

    Recently, many types of methodologies have been developed to regenerate articular cartilage. It is important to assess whether the reconstructed cartilaginous tissue has the appropriate mechanical functions to qualify as hyaline (articular) cartilage. In some cases, the reconstructed tissue may become fibrocartilage and not hyaline cartilage. In this study, we determined the dynamic viscoelastic properties of these two types of cartilage by using compression and shear tests, respectively. Hyaline cartilage specimens were harvested from the articular surface of bovine knee joints and fibrocartilage specimens were harvested from the meniscus tissue of the same. The results of this study revealed that the compressive energy dissipation of hyaline cartilage showed a strong dependence on testing frequency at low frequencies, while that of fibrocartilage did not. Therefore, the compressive energy dissipation that is indicated by the loss tangent could become the criterion for the in vitro assessment of the mechanical function of regenerated cartilage.

  7. Linear and Branched PEIs (Polyethylenimines) and Their Property Space

    PubMed Central

    Lungu, Claudiu N.; Diudea, Mircea V.; Putz, Mihai V.; Grudziński, Ireneusz P.

    2016-01-01

    A chemical property space defines the adaptability of a molecule to changing conditions and its interaction with other molecular systems determining a pharmacological response. Within a congeneric molecular series (compounds with the same derivatization algorithm and thus the same brute formula) the chemical properties vary in a monotonic manner, i.e., congeneric compounds share the same chemical property space. The chemical property space is a key component in molecular design, where some building blocks are functionalized, i.e., derivatized, and eventually self-assembled in more complex systems, such as enzyme-ligand systems, of which (physico-chemical) properties/bioactivity may be predicted by QSPR/QSAR (quantitative structure-property/activity relationship) studies. The system structure is determined by the binding type (temporal/permanent; electrostatic/covalent) and is reflected in its local electronic (and/or magnetic) properties. Such nano-systems play the role of molecular devices, important in nano-medicine. In the present article, the behavior of polyethylenimine (PEI) macromolecules (linear LPEI and branched BPEI, respectively) with respect to the glucose oxidase enzyme GOx is described in terms of their (interacting) energy, geometry and topology, in an attempt to find the best shape and size of PEIs to be useful for a chosen (nanochemistry) purpose. PMID:27089324

  8. Linear and Branched PEIs (Polyethylenimines) and Their Property Space.

    PubMed

    Lungu, Claudiu N; Diudea, Mircea V; Putz, Mihai V; Grudziński, Ireneusz P

    2016-04-13

    A chemical property space defines the adaptability of a molecule to changing conditions and its interaction with other molecular systems determining a pharmacological response. Within a congeneric molecular series (compounds with the same derivatization algorithm and thus the same brute formula) the chemical properties vary in a monotonic manner, i.e., congeneric compounds share the same chemical property space. The chemical property space is a key component in molecular design, where some building blocks are functionalized, i.e., derivatized, and eventually self-assembled in more complex systems, such as enzyme-ligand systems, of which (physico-chemical) properties/bioactivity may be predicted by QSPR/QSAR (quantitative structure-property/activity relationship) studies. The system structure is determined by the binding type (temporal/permanent; electrostatic/covalent) and is reflected in its local electronic (and/or magnetic) properties. Such nano-systems play the role of molecular devices, important in nano-medicine. In the present article, the behavior of polyethylenimine (PEI) macromolecules (linear LPEI and branched BPEI, respectively) with respect to the glucose oxidase enzyme GOx is described in terms of their (interacting) energy, geometry and topology, in an attempt to find the best shape and size of PEIs to be useful for a chosen (nanochemistry) purpose.

  9. Viscoelastic properties of soft gels: a comparison of magnetic resonance elastography and dynamic shear testing in the shear wave regime

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, RJ; Clayton, EH; Bayly, PV

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is used to quantify the viscoelastic shear modulus, G*, of human and animal tissues. Previously, values of G* determined by MRE have been compared to values from mechanical tests performed at lower frequencies. In this study, a novel dynamic shear test (DST) was used to measure G* of a tissue-mimicking material at higher frequencies for direct comparison to MRE. A closed form solution, including inertial effects, was used to extract G* values from DST data obtained between 20 and 200 Hz. MRE was performed using cylindrical “phantoms” of the same material in an overlapping frequency range of 100 to 400 Hz. Axial vibrations of a central rod caused radially propagating shear waves in the phantom. Displacement fields were fit to a viscoelastic form of Navier’s equation using a total least squares approach to obtain local estimates of G*. DST estimates of the storage G′ (Re[G*]) and loss modulus, G″ (Im [G*]) for the tissue-mimicking material increased with frequency from 0.86 to 0.97 kPa (20 – 200 Hz, n = 16), while MRE estimates of G′ increased from 1.06 to 1.15 kPa (100–400 Hz, n=6). The loss factor (Im[G*]/Re[G*]) also increased with frequency for both test methods: 0.06 to 0.14 (20 – 200 Hz, DST) and 0.1 to 0.23 (100 – 400 Hz, MRE). Close agreement between MRE and DST results at overlapping frequencies indicates that G* can be locally estimated with MRE over a wide frequency range. Low signal-to-noise ratio, long shear wavelengths and boundary effects were found to increase residual fitting error, reinforcing the use of an error metric to assess confidence in local parameter estimates obtained by MRE. PMID:21908903

  10. Pseudospectral modeling and dispersion analysis of Rayleigh waves in viscoelastic media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, K.; Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Chen, C.

    2011-01-01

    Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) is one of the most widely used techniques in environmental and engineering geophysics to determine shear-wave velocities and dynamic properties, which is based on the elastic layered system theory. Wave propagation in the Earth, however, has been recognized as viscoelastic and the propagation of Rayleigh waves presents substantial differences in viscoelastic media as compared with elastic media. Therefore, it is necessary to carry out numerical simulation and dispersion analysis of Rayleigh waves in viscoelastic media to better understand Rayleigh-wave behaviors in the real world. We apply a pseudospectral method to the calculation of the spatial derivatives using a Chebyshev difference operator in the vertical direction and a Fourier difference operator in the horizontal direction based on the velocity-stress elastodynamic equations and relations of linear viscoelastic solids. This approach stretches the spatial discrete grid to have a minimum grid size near the free surface so that high accuracy and resolution are achieved at the free surface, which allows an effective incorporation of the free surface boundary conditions since the Chebyshev method is nonperiodic. We first use an elastic homogeneous half-space model to demonstrate the accuracy of the pseudospectral method comparing with the analytical solution, and verify the correctness of the numerical modeling results for a viscoelastic half-space comparing the phase velocities of Rayleigh wave between the theoretical values and the dispersive image generated by high-resolution linear Radon transform. We then simulate three types of two-layer models to analyze dispersive-energy characteristics for near-surface applications. Results demonstrate that the phase velocity of Rayleigh waves in viscoelastic media is relatively higher than in elastic media and the fundamental mode increases by 10-16% when the frequency is above 10. Hz due to the velocity dispersion of P

  11. Nonlinear viscoelastic characterization of bovine trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Manda, Krishnagoud; Wallace, Robert J; Xie, Shuqiao; Levrero-Florencio, Francesc; Pankaj, Pankaj

    2017-02-01

    The time-independent elastic properties of trabecular bone have been extensively investigated, and several stiffness-density relations have been proposed. Although it is recognized that trabecular bone exhibits time-dependent mechanical behaviour, a property of viscoelastic materials, the characterization of this behaviour has received limited attention. The objective of the present study was to investigate the time-dependent behaviour of bovine trabecular bone through a series of compressive creep-recovery experiments and to identify its nonlinear constitutive viscoelastic material parameters. Uniaxial compressive creep and recovery experiments at multiple loads were performed on cylindrical bovine trabecular bone samples ([Formula: see text]). Creep response was found to be significant and always comprised of recoverable and irrecoverable strains, even at low stress/strain levels. This response was also found to vary nonlinearly with applied stress. A systematic methodology was developed to separate recoverable (nonlinear viscoelastic) and irrecoverable (permanent) strains from the total experimental strain response. We found that Schapery's nonlinear viscoelastic constitutive model describes the viscoelastic response of the trabecular bone, and parameters associated with this model were estimated from the multiple load creep-recovery (MLCR) experiments. Nonlinear viscoelastic recovery compliance was found to have a decreasing and then increasing trend with increasing stress level, indicating possible stiffening and softening behaviour of trabecular bone due to creep. The obtained parameters from MLCR tests, expressed as second-order polynomial functions of stress, showed a similar trend for all the samples, and also demonstrate stiffening-softening behaviour with increasing stress.

  12. Stability Analysis of a Spinning and Precessing Viscoelastic Rotor Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, S.; Nandi, A.; Neogy, S.

    2013-10-01

    The present work deals with stability analysis of a spinning and precessing gyroscopic systems, where the spin axis and precession axis intersect at right angle. The nutation speed is zero, the spin and precession speeds are considered to be uniform and the precession axis is located at one end of the shaft. The properties of the shaft material correspond to a four element type linear viscoelastic model. The shaft disk system is assumed to be axially and torsionally stiff. For analysis, a simple rotor has been considered with the rigid disk placed on a massless viscoelastic shaft at specified locations from one end of the shaft. The governing parametric equations for such a rotor are derived in the simultaneously spinning and precessing frame. A stability analysis is performed considering both two- and four-degree of freedom models. The stability borderlines are computed considering spin and precession speeds as parameters. It is shown that though viscoelastic material may appear attractive for its large material damping, for gyroscopic systems it may lead to unstable vibrations.

  13. Fluorescent viscoelastic enhancement.

    PubMed

    Smith, K D; Burt, W L

    1992-11-01

    By inserting an Erreger 485 exciter filter into the operating microscope, translucent yellow Healon (sodium hyaluronate) transforms into a brilliant opaque green viscoelastic. We have developed this technique and termed it "fluorescent viscoelastic enhancement." Using the technique, we demonstrated that the time required to remove Healon from the anterior chamber after intraocular lens insertion varies. Healon is usually aspirated quickly, in less than 17 seconds. Otherwise it traps behind the intraocular lens and requires more time for irrigation/aspiration (I/A) and manipulation of the I/A tip. Fluorescent viscoelastic enhancement minimized I/A time, reducing excess turbulence and manipulation in the anterior chamber, and thus may reduce corneal endothelial cell loss. This study also demonstrated that fluorescent viscoelastic enhancement prevented postoperative intraocular pressure rise, compared to the conventional removal of clear Healon. Fluorescent viscoelastic enhancement assures the surgeon that a large amount of Healon is not left behind.

  14. The influence of time dependent flight and maneuver velocities and elastic or viscoelastic flexibilities on aerodynamic and stability derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochrane, Alexander P.; Merrett, Craig G.; Hilton, Harry H.

    2014-12-01

    The advent of new structural concepts employing composites in primary load carrying aerospace structures in UAVs, MAVs, Boeing 787s, Airbus A380s, etc., necessitates the inclusion of flexibility as well as viscoelasticity in static structural and aero-viscoelastic analyses. Differences and similarities between aeroelasticity and aero-viscoelasticity have been investigated in [2]. An investigation is undertaken as to the dependence and sensitivity of aerodynamic and stability derivatives to elastic and viscoelastic structural flexibility and as to time dependent flight and maneuver velocities. Longitudinal, lateral and directional stabilities are investigated. It has been a well established fact that elastic lifting surfaces are subject to loss of control effectiveness and control reversal at certain flight speeds, which depend on aerodynamic, structural and material properties [5]. Such elastic analyses are extended to linear viscoelastic materials under quasi-static, dynamic, and sudden and gradual loading conditions. In elastic wings one of the critical static parameters is the velocity at which control reversal takes place (VREVE). Since elastic formulations constitute viscoelastic initial conditions, viscoelastic reversal may occur at speeds VREV<≧VREVE, but furthermore does so in time at 0 < tREV ≤ ∞. The influence of the twin effects of viscoelastic and elastic materials and of variable flight velocities on longitudinal, lateral, directional and spin stabilities are also investigated. It has been a well established fact that elastic lifting surfaces are subject to loss of control effectiveness and control reversal at certain flight speeds, which depend on aerodynamic, structural and material properties [5]. Such elastic analyses are here extended to linear viscoelastic materials under quasi-static, dynamic, and sudden and gradual loading conditions. In elastic wings the critical parameter is the velocity at which control reversal takes place (VREVE

  15. The influence of time dependent flight and maneuver velocities and elastic or viscoelastic flexibilities on aerodynamic and stability derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrane, Alexander P.; Merrett, Craig G.; Hilton, Harry H.

    2014-12-10

    The advent of new structural concepts employing composites in primary load carrying aerospace structures in UAVs, MAVs, Boeing 787s, Airbus A380s, etc., necessitates the inclusion of flexibility as well as viscoelasticity in static structural and aero-viscoelastic analyses. Differences and similarities between aeroelasticity and aero-viscoelasticity have been investigated in [2]. An investigation is undertaken as to the dependence and sensitivity of aerodynamic and stability derivatives to elastic and viscoelastic structural flexibility and as to time dependent flight and maneuver velocities. Longitudinal, lateral and directional stabilities are investigated. It has been a well established fact that elastic lifting surfaces are subject to loss of control effectiveness and control reversal at certain flight speeds, which depend on aerodynamic, structural and material properties [5]. Such elastic analyses are extended to linear viscoelastic materials under quasi-static, dynamic, and sudden and gradual loading conditions. In elastic wings one of the critical static parameters is the velocity at which control reversal takes place (V{sub REV}{sup E}). Since elastic formulations constitute viscoelastic initial conditions, viscoelastic reversal may occur at speeds V{sub REV<}{sup ≧}V{sub REV}{sup E}, but furthermore does so in time at 0 < t{sub REV} ≤ ∞. The influence of the twin effects of viscoelastic and elastic materials and of variable flight velocities on longitudinal, lateral, directional and spin stabilities are also investigated. It has been a well established fact that elastic lifting surfaces are subject to loss of control effectiveness and control reversal at certain flight speeds, which depend on aerodynamic, structural and material properties [5]. Such elastic analyses are here extended to linear viscoelastic materials under quasi-static, dynamic, and sudden and gradual loading conditions. In elastic wings the critical parameter is the velocity at

  16. Influence of Chemical Extraction on Rheological Behavior, Viscoelastic Properties and Functional Characteristics of Natural Heteropolysaccharide/Protein Polymer from Durio zibethinus Seed

    PubMed Central

    Amid, Bahareh Tabatabaee; Mirhosseini, Hamed

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the demand for a natural plant-based polymer with potential functions from plant sources has increased considerably. The main objective of the current study was to study the effect of chemical extraction conditions on the rheological and functional properties of the heteropolysaccharide/protein biopolymer from durian (Durio zibethinus) seed. The efficiency of different extraction conditions was determined by assessing the extraction yield, protein content, solubility, rheological properties and viscoelastic behavior of the natural polymer from durian seed. The present study revealed that the soaking process had a more significant (p < 0.05) effect than the decolorizing process on the rheological and functional properties of the natural polymer. The considerable changes in the rheological and functional properties of the natural polymer could be due to the significant (p < 0.05) effect of the chemical extraction variables on the protein fraction present in the molecular structure of the natural polymer from durian seed. The natural polymer from durian seed had a more elastic (or gel like) behavior compared to the viscous (liquid like) behavior at low frequency. The present study revealed that the natural heteropolysaccharide/protein polymer from durian seed had a relatively low solubility ranging from 9.1% to 36.0%. This might be due to the presence of impurities, insoluble matter and large particles present in the chemical structure of the natural polymer from durian seed. PMID:23203099

  17. The Role of Molecular Weight and Temperature on the Elastic and Viscoelastic Properties of a Glassy Thermoplastic Polyimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholson, Lee M.; Whitley, Karen S.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2001-01-01

    Mechanical testing of the elastic and viscoelastic response of an advanced thermoplastic polyimide (LaRC-SI) with known variations in molecular weight was performed over a range of temperatures below the glass transition temperature. The notched tensile strength was shown to be a strong function of both molecular weight and temperature, whereas stiffness was only a strong function of temperature. A critical molecular weight was observed to occur at a weight average molecular weight of M, approx. 22,000 g/mol below which, the notched tensile strength decreases rapidly. This critical molecular weight transition is temperature-independent. Low, molecular weight materials tended to fail in a brittle manner, whereas high molecular weight materials exhibited ductile failure. Furthermore, low molecular weight materials have increased creep compliance and creep compliance rate, and are more sensitive to temperature than the high molecular weight materials. At long timescales (less than 1100 hours) physical aging serves to significantly decrease the creep compliance and creep rate of all the materials tested. Low molecular weight materials are less influenced by the effects of physical aging.

  18. Viscoelastic material inversion using Sierra-SD and ROL

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Timothy; Aquino, Wilkins; Ridzal, Denis; Kouri, Drew Philip; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; Urbina, Angel

    2014-11-01

    In this report we derive frequency-domain methods for inverse characterization of the constitutive parameters of viscoelastic materials. The inverse problem is cast in a PDE-constrained optimization framework with efficient computation of gradients and Hessian vector products through matrix free operations. The abstract optimization operators for first and second derivatives are derived from first principles. Various methods from the Rapid Optimization Library (ROL) are tested on the viscoelastic inversion problem. The methods described herein are applied to compute the viscoelastic bulk and shear moduli of a foam block model, which was recently used in experimental testing for viscoelastic property characterization.

  19. Passive vibration control in rotor dynamics: Optimization of composed support using viscoelastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Eduardo Afonso; Pereira, Jucélio Tomás; Alberto Bavastri, Carlos

    2015-09-01

    One of the major reasons for inserting damping into bearings is that rotating machines are often requested in critical functioning conditions having sometimes to function under dynamic instability or close to critical speeds. Hydrodynamic and magnetic bearings have usually been used for this purpose, but they present limitations regarding costs and operation, rendering the use of viscoelastic supports a feasible solution for vibration control in rotating machines. Most papers in the area use simple analytic or single degree of freedom models for the rotor as well as classic mechanical models of linear viscoelasticity for the support - like Maxwell, Kelvin-Voigt, Zenner, four-element, GHM models and even frequency independent models - but they lack the accuracy of fractional models in a large range of frequency and temperature regarding the same number of coefficients. Even in those works, the need to consider the addition of degrees of freedom to the support is evident. However, so far no paper has been published focusing on a methodology to determine the optimal constructive form for any viscoelastic support in which the rotor is discretized by finite elements associated to an accurate model for characterizing the viscoelastic material. In general, the support is meant to be a simple isolation system, and the fact the stiffness matrix is complex and frequency-temperature dependent - due to its viscoelastic properties - forces the traditional methods to require an extremely long computing time, thus rendering them too time consuming in an optimization environment. The present work presents a robust methodology based mainly on generalized equivalent parameters (GEP) - for an optimal design of viscoelastic supports for rotating machinery - aiming at minimizing the unbalance frequency response of the system using a hybrid optimization technique (genetic algorithms and Nelder-Mead method). The rotor is modeled based on the finite element method using Timoshenko's thick

  20. A comparison of viscoelastic damping models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, Joseph C.; Belvin, W. Keith; Inman, Daniel J.

    1993-01-01

    Modern finite element methods (FEM's) enable the precise modeling of mass and stiffness properties in what were in the past overwhelmingly large and complex structures. These models allow the accurate determination of natural frequencies and mode shapes. However, adequate methods for modeling highly damped and high frequency dependent structures did not exist until recently. The most commonly used method, Modal Strain Energy, does not correctly predict complex mode shapes since it is based on the assumption that the mode shapes of a structure are real. Recently, many techniques have been developed which allow the modeling of frequency dependent damping properties of materials in a finite element compatible form. Two of these methods, the Golla-Hughes-McTavish method and the Lesieutre-Mingori method, model the frequency dependent effects by adding coordinates to the existing system thus maintaining the linearity of the model. The third model, proposed by Bagley and Torvik, is based on the Fractional Calculus method and requires fewer empirical parameters to model the frequency dependence at the expense of linearity of the governing equations. This work examines the Modal Strain Energy, Golla-Hughes-McTavish and Bagley and Torvik models and compares them to determine the plausibility of using them for modeling viscoelastic damping in large structures.

  1. Viscoelastic cationic polymers containing the urethane linkage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A. (Inventor)

    1972-01-01

    A method for the synthesis and manufacturing of elastomeric compositions and articles containing quaternary nitrogen centers and condensation residues along the polymeric backbone of the centers is presented. Linear and cross-linked straight chain and block polymers having a wide damping temperature range were synthesized. Formulae for the viscoelastic cationic polymers are presented.

  2. Linear and non-linear properties of feature selectivity in V4 neurons

    PubMed Central

    Touryan, Jon; Mazer, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Extrastriate area V4 is a critical component of visual form processing in both humans and non-human primates. Previous studies have shown that the tuning properties of V4 neurons demonstrate an intermediate level of complexity that lies between the narrow band orientation and spatial frequency tuning of neurons in primary visual cortex and the highly complex object selectivity seen in inferotemporal neurons. However, the nature of feature selectivity within this cortical area is not well understood, especially in the context of natural stimuli. Specifically, little is known about how the tuning properties of V4 neurons, measured in isolation, translate to feature selectivity within natural scenes. In this study, we assessed the degree to which preferences for natural image components can readily be inferred from classical orientation and spatial frequency tuning functions. Using a psychophysically-inspired method we isolated and identified the specific visual “driving features” occurring in natural scene photographs that reliably elicited spiking activity from single V4 neurons. We then compared the measured driving features to those predicted based on the spectral receptive field (SRF), estimated from responses to narrowband sinusoidal grating stimuli. This approach provided a quantitative framework for assessing the degree to which linear feature selectivity was preserved during natural vision. First, we found evidence of both spectrally and spatially tuned suppression within the receptive field, neither of which were present in the linear SRF. Second, we found driving features that were stable during translation of the image across the receptive field (due to small fixational eye movements). The degree of translation invariance fell along a continuum, with some cells showing nearly complete invariance across the receptive field and others exhibiting little to no position invariance. This form of limited translation invariance could indicate that a subset of

  3. RF properties of periodic accelerating structures for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.

    1989-07-01

    With the advent of the SLAC electron-positron linear collider (SLC) in the 100 GeV center-of-mass energy range, research and development work on even higher energy machines of this type has started in several laboratories in the United States, Europe, the Soviet Union and Japan. These linear colliders appear to provide the only promising approach to studying e/sup /plus//e/sup /minus// physics at center-of-mass energies approaching 1 TeV. This thesis concerns itself with the study of radio frequency properties of periodic accelerating structures for linear colliders and their interaction with bunched beams. The topics that have been investigated are: experimental measurements of the energy loss of single bunches to longitudinal modes in two types of structures, using an equivalent signal on a coaxial wire to simulate the beam; a method of canceling the energy spread created within a single bunch by longitudinal wakefields, through appropriate shaping of the longitudinal charge distribution of the bunch; derivation of the complete transient beam-loading equation for a train of bunches passing through a constant-gradient accelerator section, with application to the calculation and minimization of multi-bunch energy spread; detailed study of field emission and radio frequency breakdown in disk-loaded structures at S-, C- and X-band frequencies under extremely high-gradient conditions, with special attention to thermal effects, radiation, sparking, emission of gases, surface damage through explosive emission and its possible control through RF-gas processing. 53 refs., 49 figs., 9 tabs.

  4. Statistical modelling of the rheological and mucoadhesive properties of aqueous poly(methylvinylether-co-maleic acid) networks: Redefining biomedical applications and the relationship between viscoelasticity and mucoadhesion.

    PubMed

    Jones, David S; Laverty, Thomas P; Morris, Caoimhe; Andrews, Gavin P

    2016-08-01

    Poly(methylvinylether-co-maleic acid) (PMVE/MA) is commonly used as a component of pharmaceutical platforms, principally to enhance interactions with biological substrates (mucoadhesion). However, the limited knowledge on the rheological properties of this polymer and their relationships with mucoadhesion has negated the biomedical use of this polymer as a mono-component platform. This study presents a comprehensive study of the rheological properties of aqueous PMVE/MA platforms and defines their relationships with mucoadhesion using multiple regression analysis. Using dilute solution viscometry the intrinsic viscosities of un-neutralised PMVE/MA and PMVE/MA neutralised using NaOH or TEA were 22.32±0.89dLg(-1), 274.80±1.94dLg(-1) and 416.49±2.21dLg(-1) illustrating greater polymer chain expansion following neutralisation using Triethylamine (TEA). PMVE/MA platforms exhibited shear-thinning properties. Increasing polymer concentration increased the consistencies, zero shear rate (ZSR) viscosities (determined from flow rheometry), storage and loss moduli, dynamic viscosities (defined using oscillatory analysis) and mucoadhesive properties, yet decreased the loss tangents of the neutralised polymer platforms. TEA neutralised systems possessed significantly and substantially greater consistencies, ZSR and dynamic viscosities, storage and loss moduli, mucoadhesion and lower loss tangents than their NaOH counterparts. Multiple regression analysis enabled identification of the dominant role of polymer viscoelasticity on mucoadhesion (r>0.98). The mucoadhesive properties of PMVE/MA platforms were considerable and were greater than those of other platforms that have successfully been shown to enhance in vivo retention when applied to the oral cavity, indicating a positive role for PMVE/MA mono-component platforms for pharmaceutical and biomedical applications.

  5. Linear and nonlinear magneto-optical properties of monolayer phosphorene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Chuong V.; Ngoc Hieu, Nguyen; Duque, C. A.; Quoc Khoa, Doan; Van Hieu, Nguyen; Van Tung, Luong; Vinh Phuc, Huynh

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically study the magneto-optical properties of monolayer phosphorene under a perpendicular magnetic field. We evaluate linear, third-order nonlinear, and total absorption coefficients and relative refractive index changes as functions of the photon energy and the magnetic field, and show that they are strongly influenced by the magnetic field. The magneto-optical absorption coefficients and relative refractive index changes appear in two different regimes: the microwave to THz and the visible frequency. The amplitude of intra-band transition peaks is larger than that of the inter-band transitions. The resonant peaks are blue-shifted with the magnetic field. Our results demonstrate the potential of monolayer phosphorene as a new two-dimensional material for applications in nano-electronic and optical devices as a promising alternative to graphene.

  6. Electrical analogous in viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ala, Guido; Di Paola, Mario; Francomano, Elisa; Li, Yan; Pinnola, Francesco P.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, electrical analogous models of fractional hereditary materials are introduced. Based on recent works by the authors, mechanical models of materials viscoelasticity behavior are firstly approached by using fractional mathematical operators. Viscoelastic models have elastic and viscous components which are obtained by combining springs and dashpots. Various arrangements of these elements can be used, and all of these viscoelastic models can be equivalently modeled as electrical circuits, where the spring and dashpot are analogous to the capacitance and resistance, respectively. The proposed models are validated by using modal analysis. Moreover, a comparison with numerical experiments based on finite difference time domain method shows that, for long time simulations, the correct time behavior can be obtained only with modal analysis. The use of electrical analogous in viscoelasticity can better reveal the real behavior of fractional hereditary materials.

  7. String-merging of meso- viscoelastic droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yuanze; Xu, Jianmao

    2007-03-01

    Great challenge exists in the multi-scale rheological modeling of immiscible polyblends with non-linear morphology changes, including viscoelastic drop break-up and collapse. A new type mechanism of merging and coalescence, called string-merging of meso- viscoelastic droplets was described and analyzed. By iterative stretching and relaxation in a four-roll mill rheometer, one droplet containing high molar mass PIB (polyisobutene), was separated into two droplets connected by a string in a dumbbell shape suspending in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) medium. In quiescent state, the string pulled the two spheres merging closer and collapsed into one spherical drop finally. The process exhibits interesting features, different from capillary breakup mechanism. By adding the viscoelasticity of the systems to the force balance of Laplace force and viscous drag, the phenomenon may be well analyzed. The necessity to involve the microscopic consideration of the highly oriented entangled state are discussed.

  8. Approximations of thermoelastic and viscoelastic control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, J. A.; Liu, Z. Y.; Miller, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    Well-posed models and computational algorithms are developed and analyzed for control of a class of partial differential equations that describe the motions of thermo-viscoelastic structures. An abstract (state space) framework and a general well-posedness result are presented that can be applied to a large class of thermo-elastic and thermo-viscoelastic models. This state space framework is used in the development of a computational scheme to be used in the solution of a linear quadratic regulator (LQR) control problem. A detailed convergence proof is provided for the viscoelastic model and several numerical results are presented to illustrate the theory and to analyze problems for which the theory is incomplete.

  9. Numerical solution methods for viscoelastic orthotropic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gramoll, K. C.; Dillard, D. A.; Brinson, H. F.

    1988-01-01

    Numerical solution methods for viscoelastic orthotropic materials, specifically fiber reinforced composite materials, are examined. The methods include classical lamination theory using time increments, direction solution of the Volterra Integral, Zienkiewicz's linear Prony series method, and a new method called Nonlinear Differential Equation Method (NDEM) which uses a nonlinear Prony series. The criteria used for comparison of the various methods include the stability of the solution technique, time step size stability, computer solution time length, and computer memory storage. The Volterra Integral allowed the implementation of higher order solution techniques but had difficulties solving singular and weakly singular compliance function. The Zienkiewicz solution technique, which requires the viscoelastic response to be modeled by a Prony series, works well for linear viscoelastic isotropic materials and small time steps. The new method, NDEM, uses a modified Prony series which allows nonlinear stress effects to be included and can be used with orthotropic nonlinear viscoelastic materials. The NDEM technique is shown to be accurate and stable for both linear and nonlinear conditions with minimal computer time.

  10. Simplified Bulk Experiments and Hygrothermal Nonlinear Viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Soo Jae; Liechti, Kenneth M.; Roy, Samit

    2004-12-01

    Bulk and shear linear viscoelastic functions were simultaneously determined using confined compression experiments on an epoxy primer, one component of a concrete/fiber-reinforced polymer composite bond line. The results were validated with data from separately conducted bulk creep compliance experiments. The transition region of the bulk modulus was as wide as those of the tensile and shear relaxation moduli. Thermal and hygral expansions were measured and used to calibrate a hybrid nonlinear viscoelastic constitutive model which represented the hygrothermal nonlinear viscoelastic response of the material. This model was a combination of Schapery’s (Further Development of a Thermodynamic Constitutive Theory: Stress Formulation, AA {&} ES Report (69 2), 1969a, Purdue University, West Lafayette; Schapery, R.A., ‘On the characterization of nolinear viscoelastic materials’, Polym. Eng. Sci. 9 1969b, 295 310.) and Popelar’s (K., ‘Multiaxial nonlinear viscoelastic characterization and modeling of a structural adhesive’, J. Eng. Mater. Technol. Trans. ASME 119, 1997, 205 210.) shear modified free volume model, which was calibrated ramp using torsion and tension experiments at various temperature and humidity levels. Using free volume concepts to accomplish time shifting as a function of strain, temperature and humidity levels did not create the extent of the softening behavior that was observed in the experiments, particularly at high humidity levels. The vertical shifting concepts of Schapery were required to capture the extraordinarily strong hygral effect.

  11. Collective motion of microswimmers in viscoelastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gaojin; Ardekani, Arezoo

    2015-11-01

    The dynamics of suspension of self-propelled microorganisms show fascinating hydrodynamic phenomena, such as, large scale swarming motion, locally correlated motion, enhanced particle diffusion, and enhanced fluid mixing. Even though many studies have been conducted in a Newtonian fluid, the collective motion of microorganisms in non-Newtonian fluids is less understood. The non-Newtonian fluid rheological properties, such as viscoelasticity and shear-dependent viscosity in saliva, mucus and biofilm, significantly affect the swimming properties and hydrodynamic interaction of microorganisms. In this work, we use direct numerical simulation to investigate the collective motion of rod-like swimmers in viscoelastic fluids. Two swimming types, pusher and puller, are investigated. The background viscoelastic fluid is modeled using an Oldroyd-B constitutive equation. This work is supported by NSF CBET-1445955 and Indiana CTSI TR001108.

  12. Surface force spectroscopic point load measurements and viscoelastic modelling of the micromechanical properties of air flow sensitive hairs of a spider (Cupiennius salei).

    PubMed

    McConney, Michael E; Schaber, Clemens F; Julian, Michael D; Eberhardt, William C; Humphrey, Joseph A C; Barth, Friedrich G; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2009-08-06

    The micromechanical properties of spider air flow hair sensilla (trichobothria) were characterized with nanometre resolution using surface force spectroscopy (SFS) under conditions of different constant deflection angular velocities theta (rad s(-1)) for hairs 900-950 microm long prior to shortening for measurement purposes. In the range of angular velocities examined (4 x 10(-4) - 2.6 x 10(-1) rad s(-1)), the torque T (Nm) resisting hair motion and its time rate of change (Nm s(-1)) were found to vary with deflection velocity according to power functions. In this range of angular velocities, the motion of the hair is most accurately captured by a three-parameter solid model, which numerically describes the properties of the hair suspension. A fit of the three-parameter model (3p) to the experimental data yielded the two torsional restoring parameters, S(3p)=2.91 x 10(-11) Nm rad(-1) and =2.77 x 10(-11) Nm rad(-1) and the damping parameter R(3p)=1.46 x 10(-12) Nm s rad(-1). For angular velocities larger than 0.05 rad s(-1), which are common under natural conditions, a more accurate angular momentum equation was found to be given by a two-parameter Kelvin solid model. For this case, the multiple regression fit yielded S(2p)=4.89 x 10(-11) Nm rad(-1) and R(2p)=2.83 x 10(-14) Nm s rad(-1) for the model parameters. While the two-parameter model has been used extensively in earlier work primarily at high hair angular velocities, to correctly capture the motion of the hair at both low and high angular velocities it is necessary to employ the three-parameter model. It is suggested that the viscoelastic mechanical properties of the hair suspension work to promote the phasic response behaviour of the sensilla.

  13. A BEM formulation applied in the mechanical material modelling of viscoelastic cracked structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Hugo Luiz; Leonel, Edson Denner

    2016-12-01

    The present study aims at performing a mechanical analysis of 2D viscoelastic cracked structural materials using the Boundary Element Method (BEM). The mesh dimensionality reduction provided by the BEM and its accuracy in representing high gradient fields make this numerical method robust to solve fracture mechanics problems. Viscoelastic models address phenomena that provide changes on the mechanical material properties along time. Well-established viscoelastic models such as Maxwell, Kelvin-Voigt and Boltzmann are used in this study. The numerical viscoelastic scheme, which is based on algebraic BEM equations, utilizes the Euler method for time derivative evaluation. Therefore, the unknown variables at the structural boundary and its variations along time are determined through an ordinary linear system of equations. Moreover, time-dependent boundary conditions may be considered, which represent loading phases. The dual BEM formulation is adopted for modelling the mechanical structural behaviour of cracks bodies. Three examples are considered to illustrate the robustness of the adopted formulation. The results achieved by the BEM are in good agreement with reported data and numerical stability is observed.

  14. A BEM formulation applied in the mechanical material modelling of viscoelastic cracked structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Hugo Luiz; Leonel, Edson Denner

    2017-03-01

    The present study aims at performing a mechanical analysis of 2D viscoelastic cracked structural materials using the Boundary Element Method (BEM). The mesh dimensionality reduction provided by the BEM and its accuracy in representing high gradient fields make this numerical method robust to solve fracture mechanics problems. Viscoelastic models address phenomena that provide changes on the mechanical material properties along time. Well-established viscoelastic models such as Maxwell, Kelvin-Voigt and Boltzmann are used in this study. The numerical viscoelastic scheme, which is based on algebraic BEM equations, utilizes the Euler method for time derivative evaluation. Therefore, the unknown variables at the structural boundary and its variations along time are determined through an ordinary linear system of equations. Moreover, time-dependent boundary conditions may be considered, which represent loading phases. The dual BEM formulation is adopted for modelling the mechanical structural behaviour of cracks bodies. Three examples are considered to illustrate the robustness of the adopted formulation. The results achieved by the BEM are in good agreement with reported data and numerical stability is observed.

  15. Evidence against proteoglycan mediated collagen fibril load transmission and dynamic viscoelasticity in tendon.

    PubMed

    Fessel, Gion; Snedeker, Jess G

    2009-10-01

    The glycosaminoglycan (GAG) dermatan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate side-chains of small leucine-rich proteoglycans have been increasingly posited to act as molecular cross links between adjacent collagen fibrils and to directly contribute to tendon elasticity. GAGs have also been implicated in tendon viscoelasticity, supposedly affecting frictional loss during elongation or fluid flow through the extra cellular matrix. The current study sought to systematically test these theories of tendon structure-function by investigating the mechanical repercussions of enzymatic depletion of GAG complexes by chondroitinase ABC in a reproducible tendon structure-function model (rat tail tendon fascicles). The extent of GAG removal (at least 93%) was verified by relevant spectrophotometric assays and transmission electron microscopy. Dynamic viscoelastic tensile tests on GAG depleted rat tail tendon fascicle were not mechanically different from controls in storage modulus (elastic behavior) over a wide range of strain-rates (0.05, 0.5, and 5% change in length per second) in either the linear or nonlinear regions of the material curve. Loss modulus (viscoelastic behavior) was only affected in the nonlinear region at the highest strain-rate, and even this effect was marginal (19% increased loss modulus, p=0.035). Thus glycosaminoglycan chains of small leucine-rich proteoglycans do not appear to mediate dynamic elastic behavior nor do they appear to regulate the dynamic viscoelastic properties in rat tail tendon fascicles.

  16. THE RHEOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF WHEAT PROTEIN ISOLATE PROLITE TM 200 SUSPENSIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Linear and non-linear rheological properties of wheat protein isolate PROLITE TM 200 suspensions were investigated as a function of concentration and pH. Linear dynamic viscoelastic properties for PROLITE TM 200 were strongly dependent on concentration and pH. The higher the concentration, the str...

  17. Viscoelasticity of subcortical gray matter structures.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Curtis L; Schwarb, Hillary; D J McGarry, Matthew; Anderson, Aaron T; Huesmann, Graham R; Sutton, Bradley P; Cohen, Neal J

    2016-12-01

    Viscoelastic mechanical properties of the brain assessed with magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) are sensitive measures of microstructural tissue health in neurodegenerative conditions. Recent efforts have targeted measurements localized to specific neuroanatomical regions differentially affected in disease. In this work, we present a method for measuring the viscoelasticity in subcortical gray matter (SGM) structures, including the amygdala, hippocampus, caudate, putamen, pallidum, and thalamus. The method is based on incorporating high spatial resolution MRE imaging (1.6 mm isotropic voxels) with a mechanical inversion scheme designed to improve local measures in pre-defined regions (soft prior regularization [SPR]). We find that in 21 healthy, young volunteers SGM structures differ from each other in viscoelasticity, quantified as the shear stiffness and damping ratio, but also differ from the global viscoelasticity of the cerebrum. Through repeated examinations on a single volunteer, we estimate the uncertainty to be between 3 and 7% for each SGM measure. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the use of specific methodological considerations-higher spatial resolution and SPR-both decrease uncertainty and increase sensitivity of the SGM measures. The proposed method allows for reliable MRE measures of SGM viscoelasticity for future studies of neurodegenerative conditions. Hum Brain Mapp 37:4221-4233, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. 3D Viscoelastic traction force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Toyjanova, Jennet; Hannen, Erin; Bar-Kochba, Eyal; Darling, Eric M; Henann, David L; Franck, Christian

    2014-10-28

    Native cell-material interactions occur on materials differing in their structural composition, chemistry, and physical compliance. While the last two decades have shown the importance of traction forces during cell-material interactions, they have been almost exclusively presented on purely elastic in vitro materials. Yet, most bodily tissue materials exhibit some level of viscoelasticity, which could play an important role in how cells sense and transduce tractions. To expand the realm of cell traction measurements and to encompass all materials from elastic to viscoelastic, this paper presents a general, and comprehensive approach for quantifying 3D cell tractions in viscoelastic materials. This methodology includes the experimental characterization of the time-dependent material properties for any viscoelastic material with the subsequent mathematical implementation of the determined material model into a 3D traction force microscopy (3D TFM) framework. Utilizing this new 3D viscoelastic TFM (3D VTFM) approach, we quantify the influence of viscosity on the overall material traction calculations and quantify the error associated with omitting time-dependent material effects, as is the case for all other TFM formulations. We anticipate that the 3D VTFM technique will open up new avenues of cell-material investigations on even more physiologically relevant time-dependent materials including collagen and fibrin gels.

  19. Hamiltonian and Lagrangian theory of viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanyga, A.; Seredyńska, M.

    2008-03-01

    The viscoelastic relaxation modulus is a positive-definite function of time. This property alone allows the definition of a conserved energy which is a positive-definite quadratic functional of the stress and strain fields. Using the conserved energy concept a Hamiltonian and a Lagrangian functional are constructed for dynamic viscoelasticity. The Hamiltonian represents an elastic medium interacting with a continuum of oscillators. By allowing for multiphase displacement and introducing memory effects in the kinetic terms of the equations of motion a Hamiltonian is constructed for the visco-poroelasticity.

  20. Microsurgery-aided in-situ force probing reveals extensibility and viscoelastic properties of individual stress fibers

    PubMed Central

    Labouesse, Céline; Gabella, Chiara; Meister, Jean-Jacques; Vianay, Benoît; Verkhovsky, Alexander B.

    2016-01-01

    Actin-myosin filament bundles (stress fibers) are critical for tension generation and cell shape, but their mechanical properties are difficult to access. Here we propose a novel approach to probe individual peripheral stress fibers in living cells through a microsurgically generated opening in the cytoplasm. By applying large deformations with a soft cantilever we were able to fully characterize the mechanical response of the fibers and evaluate their tension, extensibility, elastic and viscous properties. PMID:27025817

  1. Model for bubble pulsation in liquid between parallel viscoelastic layers

    PubMed Central

    Hay, Todd A.; Ilinskii, Yurii A.; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A.; Hamilton, Mark F.

    2012-01-01

    A model is presented for a pulsating spherical bubble positioned at a fixed location in a viscous, compressible liquid between parallel viscoelastic layers of finite thickness. The Green’s function for particle displacement is found and utilized to derive an expression for the radiation load imposed on the bubble by the layers. Although the radiation load is derived for linear harmonic motion it may be incorporated into an equation for the nonlinear radial dynamics of the bubble. This expression is valid if the strain magnitudes in the viscoelastic layer remain small. Dependence of bubble pulsation on the viscoelastic and geometric parameters of the layers is demonstrated through numerical simulations. PMID:22779461

  2. Optical coherence elastography assessment of corneal viscoelasticity with a modified Rayleigh-Lamb wave model.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhaolong; Li, Jiasong; Singh, Manmohan; Wu, Chen; Liu, Chih-Hao; Raghunathan, Raksha; Aglyamov, Salavat R; Vantipalli, Srilatha; Twa, Michael D; Larin, Kirill V

    2017-02-01

    The biomechanical properties of the cornea play a critical role in forming vision. Diseases such as keratoconus can structurally degenerate the cornea causing a pathological loss in visual acuity. UV-A/riboflavin corneal collagen crosslinking (CXL) is a clinically available treatment to stiffen the cornea and restore its healthy shape and function. However, current CXL techniques do not account for pre-existing biomechanical properties of the cornea nor the effects of the CXL treatment itself. In addition to the inherent corneal structure, the intraocular pressure (IOP) can also dramatically affect the measured biomechanical properties of the cornea. In this work, we present the details and development of a modified Rayleigh-Lamb frequency equation model for quantifying corneal biomechanical properties. After comparison with finite element modeling, the model was utilized to quantify the viscoelasticity of in situ porcine corneas in the whole eye-globe configuration before and after CXL based on noncontact optical coherence elastography measurements. Moreover, the viscoelasticity of the untreated and CXL-treated eyes was quantified at various IOPs. The results showed that the stiffness of the cornea increased after CXL and that corneal stiffness is close to linear as a function of IOP. These results show that the modified Rayleigh-Lamb wave model can provide an accurate assessment of corneal viscoelasticity, which could be used for customized CXL therapies.

  3. Rheology of human blood plasma: viscoelastic versus Newtonian behavior.

    PubMed

    Brust, M; Schaefer, C; Doerr, R; Pan, L; Garcia, M; Arratia, P E; Wagner, C

    2013-02-15

    We investigate the rheological characteristics of human blood plasma in shear and elongational flows. While we can confirm a Newtonian behavior in shear flow within experimental resolution, we find a viscoelastic behavior of blood plasma in the pure extensional flow of a capillary breakup rheometer. The influence of the viscoelasticity of blood plasma on capillary blood flow is tested in a microfluidic device with a contraction-expansion geometry. Differential pressure measurements revealed that the plasma has a pronounced flow resistance compared to that of pure water. Supplementary measurements indicate that the viscoelasticity of the plasma might even lead to viscoelastic instabilities under certain conditions. Our findings show that the viscoelastic properties of plasma should not be ignored in future studies on blood flow.

  4. Time Domain Viscoelastic Full Waveform Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabien-Ouellet, Gabriel; Gloaguen, Erwan; Giroux, Bernard

    2017-03-01

    Viscous attenuation can have a strong impact on seismic wave propagation, but it is rarely taken into account in full waveform inversion (FWI). When viscoelasticity is considered in time domain FWI, the displacement formulation of the wave equation is usually used instead of the popular velocity-stress formulation. However, inversion schemes rely on the adjoint equations, which are quite different for the velocity-stress formulation than for the displacement formulation. In this paper, we apply the adjoint state method to the isotropic viscoelastic wave equation in the velocity-stress formulation based on the generalized standard linear solid rheology. By applying linear transformations to the wave equation before deriving the adjoint state equations, we obtain two symmetric sets of partial differential equations for the forward and adjoint variables. The resulting sets of equations only differ by a sign change and can be solved by the same numerical implementation. We also investigate the crosstalk between parameter classes (velocity and attenuation) of the viscoelastic equation. More specifically, we show that the attenuation levels can be used to recover the quality factors of P- and S- waves, but that they are very sensitive to velocity errors. Finally, we present a synthetic example of viscoelastic FWI in the context of monitoring CO2 geological sequestration. We show that FWI based on our formulation can indeed recover P- and S- wave velocities and their attenuation levels when attenuation is high enough. Both changes in velocity and attenuation levels recovered with FWI can be used to track the CO2 plume during and after injection. Further studies are required to evaluate the performance of viscoelastic FWI on real data.

  5. Surface force spectroscopic point load measurements and viscoelastic modelling of the micromechanical properties of air flow sensitive hairs of a spider (Cupiennius salei)

    PubMed Central

    McConney, Michael E.; Schaber, Clemens F.; Julian, Michael D.; Eberhardt, William C.; Humphrey, Joseph A.C.; Barth, Friedrich G.; Tsukruk, Vladimir V.

    2009-01-01

    The micromechanical properties of spider air flow hair sensilla (trichobothria) were characterized with nanometre resolution using surface force spectroscopy (SFS) under conditions of different constant deflection angular velocities (rad s−1) for hairs 900–950 μm long prior to shortening for measurement purposes. In the range of angular velocities examined (4×10−4−2.6×10−1 rad s−1), the torque T (Nm) resisting hair motion and its time rate of change (Nm s−1) were found to vary with deflection velocity according to power functions. In this range of angular velocities, the motion of the hair is most accurately captured by a three-parameter solid model, which numerically describes the properties of the hair suspension. A fit of the three-parameter model (3p) to the experimental data yielded the two torsional restoring parameters, S 3p=2.91×10−11 Nm rad−1 and =2.77×10−11 Nm rad−1 and the damping parameter R 3p=1.46×10−12 Nm s rad−1. For angular velocities larger than 0.05 rad s−1, which are common under natural conditions, a more accurate angular momentum equation was found to be given by a two-parameter Kelvin solid model. For this case, the multiple regression fit yielded S 2p=4.89×10−11 Nm rad−1 and R 2p=2.83×10−14 Nm s rad−1 for the model parameters. While the two-parameter model has been used extensively in earlier work primarily at high hair angular velocities, to correctly capture the motion of the hair at both low and high angular velocities it is necessary to employ the three-parameter model. It is suggested that the viscoelastic mechanical properties of the hair suspension work to promote the phasic response behaviour of the sensilla. PMID:19091682

  6. Passive droplet sorting using viscoelastic flow focusing.

    PubMed

    Hatch, Andrew C; Patel, Apurva; Beer, N Reginald; Lee, Abraham P

    2013-04-07

    We present a study of passive hydrodynamic droplet sorting in microfluidic channels based on intrinsic viscoelastic fluid properties. Sorting is achieved by tuning the droplets' intrinsic viscous and viscoelastic properties relative to the continuous oil phase to achieve a positive or negative lateral migration toward high or low shear gradients in the channel. In the presence of weakly viscoelastic fluid behavior, droplets with a viscosity ratio, κ, between 0.5-10 were found to migrate toward a high shear gradient near the channel walls. For all other κ-values, or Newtonian fluids, droplets would migrate toward a low shear gradient at the channel centerline. It was also found that for strongly viscoelastic fluids with low interfacial tension, droplets would migrate toward the edge even with κ-values lower than 0.5. The resulting bi-directional lateral droplet migration between different droplets allows size-independent sorting. Still, their sorting efficiencies are dependent on droplet size, intrinsic fluid elasticity, viscosity, droplet deformability, and overall fluid shear rates. Based on these findings, we demonstrate >200 Hz passive droplet sorting frequencies and achieve >100 fold enrichment factors without the need to actively sense and/or control active mechanisms. Using a low viscosity oil phase of 6.25 cPs, we demonstrate sorting discrimination of 1 cPs and 5 cPs aqueous droplets with κ-values of 0.2 and 0.8 respectively.

  7. Exposing the nonlinear viscoelastic behavior of asphalt-aggregate mixes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levenberg, Eyal; Uzan, Jacob

    2012-05-01

    In this study asphalt-aggregate mixes are treated as both viscoelastic and viscoplastic. Following a damage mechanics approach, a nonlinear viscoelastic constitutive formulation is generated from a linear formulation by replacing `applied stresses' with `effective viscoelastic stresses'. A non-dimensional scalar entity called `relative viscoelastic stiffness' is introduced; it is defined as the ratio of applied to effective viscoelastic stress and encapsulates different types of nonlinearities. The paper proposes a computational scheme for exposing these nonlinearities by uncovering, through direct analysis of any test data, changes experienced by the `relative viscoelastic stiffness'. In general terms, the method is based on simultaneous application of creep and relaxation formulations while preserving the interrelationship between the corresponding time functions. The proposed scheme is demonstrated by analyzing a uniaxial tension test and a uniaxial compression test (separately). Results are presented and discussed, unveiling and contrasting the character of viscoelastic nonlinearities in both cases. A conceptual viewpoint is offered to explain the observations, illustrating the requirements from any candidate constitutive theory.

  8. Poly(L-lactic acid)/poly(glycolic acid) microfibrillar polymer-polymer composites: Preparation and viscoelastic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimble, L. D.; Fakirov, S.; Bhattacharyya, D.

    2015-05-01

    Microfibrillar composites (MFCs) from petrochemical-derived polymers have been investigated for several years and the technique can result in significant improvements in mechanical properties when compared with the neat matrix material of the respective composite. The current work applies the technique to biodegradable, biocompatible polymers for potential applications in bioabsorbable medical devices. MFCs were prepared from melt blended poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) and poly(glycolic acid) (PGA) via cold drawing then compression molding of extruded yarn. These MFCs were shown to have higher Young's moduli than that of neat PLLA but for load-bearing applications the creep characteristics are of interest. The MFC sheets resulting from compression molding were subjected to tensile relaxation tests at 37°C in the fiber orientation direction. Specimens were also tested via dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). Neat PLLA specimens were subjected to the same tests for comparison. Results indicate that at 37°C PLLA/PGA MFCs exhibit lower creep resistance than that of neat PLLA due to the more rapid relaxation of stress observed. DMTA results elucidate the loss modulus changes in PLLA/PGA MFCs which occur as the material approaches the glass transition temperature of PGA (˜45°C).

  9. Control of size and viscoelastic properties of nanofibrillated cellulose from palm tree by varying the TEMPO-mediated oxidation time.

    PubMed

    Benhamou, Karima; Dufresne, Alain; Magnin, Albert; Mortha, Gérard; Kaddami, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of the present study was to control and optimize the preparation of nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) from the date palm tree by monitoring the oxidation time (degree of oxidation) of the pristine cellulose and the number of cycles through the homogenizer. The oxidation was monitored by TEMPO (1-oxo-2,2,6,6-tétraméthylpipyridine 1-oxyle) mediated oxidation. Evidence of the successful isolation of NFC was given by FE-SEM observation revealing fibrils with a width in the range 20-30nm, depending of the oxidation time. The evolution of the transparency of the aqueous NFC suspension and carboxylic content according to the degree of oxidation and number of cycles were also analyzed by UV-vis transmittance, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), conductimetry, and X-ray diffraction analysis. A significant NFC length reduction occurred during the TEMPO-mediated oxidation. The rheological properties of NFC suspensions were characterized as function of the oxidation time. Dynamic rheology showed that the aqueous suspension behavior changed from liquid to gel depending on the concentration. The highest concentration studied was 1wt% and the modulus reached 1MPa which was higher than for non-oxidized NFC. An explanation of the gel structure evolution with the oxidation time applied to the NFC (NFC length) was proposed. The gel structure evolves from an entanglement-governed gel structure to an immobilized water molecule-governed one.

  10. Poly(vinyl alcohol)-borate hydro/cosolvent gels: viscoelastic properties, solubilizing power, and application to art conservation.

    PubMed

    Carretti, Emiliano; Grassi, Scilla; Cossalter, Manuela; Natali, Irene; Caminati, Gabriella; Weiss, Richard G; Baglioni, Piero; Dei, Luigi

    2009-08-04

    We report the development of a new type of hydrogel in which a cosolvent has been added to the water component. The gel networks are based on the well-known poly(vinyl alcohol)-borate systems (PVA-borate). However, it is shown that the rheological and solubilizing properties of the hydrogels can be modified drastically by the addition of a cosolvent. The studies have focused on 1-propanol as the added liquid, although it is shown that others (propylene carbonate, 1-pentanol, cyclohexanone, and 2-butanol) are amenable to making modified hydrogels as well. In addition to the rheological measurements, the gels have been investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (free water index) and determination of their solubilizing power. Finally, the gels have been applied to clean and oxidized varnish (patina) from the surface of a XVI-XVII century oil-on-wood painting by Ludovico Cardi detto il Cigoli. The mode of cleaning by and removal of the PVA-borate water/1-propanol gel from the painted surface demonstrate several advantages over other gels used in art conservation.

  11. On the linear properties of the nonlinear radiative transfer problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikichyan, H. V.

    2016-11-01

    In this report, we further expose the assertions made in nonlinear problem of reflection/transmission of radiation from a scattering/absorbing one-dimensional anisotropic medium of finite geometrical thickness, when both of its boundaries are illuminated by intense monochromatic radiative beams. The new conceptual element of well-defined, so-called, linear images is noteworthy. They admit a probabilistic interpretation. In the framework of nonlinear problem of reflection/transmission of radiation, we derive solution which is similar to linear case. That is, the solution is reduced to the linear combination of linear images. By virtue of the physical meaning, these functions describe the reflectivity and transmittance of the medium for a single photon or their beam of unit intensity, incident on one of the boundaries of the layer. Thereby the medium in real regime is still under the bilateral illumination by external exciting radiation of arbitrary intensity. To determine the linear images, we exploit three well known methods of (i) adding of layers, (ii) its limiting form, described by differential equations of invariant imbedding, and (iii) a transition to the, so-called, functional equations of the "Ambartsumyan's complete invariance".

  12. Investigation of Thermal and Viscoelastic Properties of Polymers Relevant to Hot Melt Extrusion, IV: Affinisol™ HPMC HME Polymers.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Simerdeep Singh; Solanki, Nayan; Serajuddin, Abu T M

    2016-02-01

    Most cellulosic polymers cannot be used as carriers for preparing solid dispersion of drugs by hot melt extrusion (HME) due to their high melt viscosity and thermal degradation at high processing temperatures. Three HME-grade hydroxypropyl methylcelluloses, namely Affinisol™ HPMC HME 15 cP, Affinisol™ HPMC HME 100 cP, and Affinisol™ HPMC HME 4 M, have recently been introduced by The Dow Chemical Co. to enable the preparation of solid dispersion at lower and more acceptable processing temperatures. In the present investigation, physicochemical properties of the new polymers relevant to HME were determined and compared with that of Kollidon(®) VA 64. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), modulated differential scanning calorimetry (mDSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), moisture sorption, rheology, and torque analysis by melt extrusion were applied. PXRD and mDSC showed that the Affinisol™ polymers were amorphous in nature. According to TGA, the onset of degradation for all polymers was >220°C. The Affinisol™ polymers exhibited less hygroscopicity than Kollidon(®) VA 64 and another HPMC polymer, Methocel™ K100LV. The complex viscosity profiles of the Affinisol™ polymers as a function of temperature were similar. The viscosity of the Affinisol™ polymers was highly sensitive to the shear rate applied, and unlike Kollidon(®) VA 64, the viscosity decreased drastically when the angular frequency was increased. Because of the very high shear rate encountered during melt extrusion, Affinisol™ polymers showed capability of being extruded at larger windows of processing temperatures as compared to that of Kollidon(®) VA 64.

  13. Frequency Response of Synthetic Vocal Fold Models with Linear and Nonlinear Material Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Stephanie M.; Thomson, Scott L.; Dromey, Christopher; Smith, Simeon

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to create synthetic vocal fold models with nonlinear stress-strain properties and to investigate the effect of linear versus nonlinear material properties on fundamental frequency (F[subscript 0]) during anterior-posterior stretching. Method: Three materially linear and 3 materially nonlinear models were…

  14. Viscoelastic Flows in Simple Liquids Generated by Vibrating Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sader, John; Pelton, Matthew; Chakraborty, Debadi; Malachosky, Edward; Guyot-Sionnest, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    Newtonian fluid mechanics, in which the shear stress is proportional to the strain rate, is synonymous with the flow of simple liquids like water. We report the measurement and theoretical verification of non-Newtonian, viscoelastic flow phenomena produced by the high-frequency (>20 GHz) vibration of gold nanoparticles immersed in water-glycerol mixtures. The observed viscoelasticity is not due to molecular confinement, but is a bulk continuum effect arising from the short time scale of vibration. This represents the first direct mechanical measurement of the intrinsic viscoelastic properties of simple bulk liquids, and opens a new paradigm for understanding extremely high frequency fluid mechanics, nanoscale sensing technologies, and biophysical processes.

  15. Nonlinear Viscoelastic Mechanics of Cross-linked Rubbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.; Leonov, Arkady I.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The paper develops a general theory for finite rubber viscoelasticity, and specifies it in the form, convenient for solving problems important for rubber, tire and space industries. Based on the quasi-linear approach of non-equilibrium thermodynamics, a general nonlinear theory has been developed for arbitrary nonisothermal deformations of viscoelastic solids. In this theory, the constitutive equations are presented as the sum of known equilibrium (rubber elastic) and non-equilibrium (liquid polymer viscoelastic) terms. These equations are then simplified using several modeling arguments. Stability constraints for the proposed constitutive equations are also discussed. It is shown that only strong ellipticity criteria are applicable for assessing stability of the equations governing viscoelastic solids.

  16. Dynamic analyses of viscoelastic dielectric elastomers incorporating viscous damping effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junshi; Zhao, Jianwen; Chen, Hualing; Li, Dichen

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, based on the standard linear solid rheological model, a dynamics model of viscoelastic dielectric elastomers (DEs) is developed with incorporation of viscous damping effect. Numerical calculations are employed to predict the damping effect on the dynamic performance of DEs. With increase of damping force, the DEs show weak nonlinearity and vibration strength. Phase diagrams and Poincaré maps are utilized to detect the dynamic stability of DEs, and the results indicate that a transition from aperiodic vibration to quasi-periodic vibration occurs with enlargement of damping force. The resonance properties of DEs including damping effect are subsequently analyzed, demonstrating a reduction of resonant frequency and resonance peak with increase of damping force.

  17. Drop dynamics on a stretched viscoelastic filament: An experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peixinho, Jorge; Renoult, Marie-Charlotte; Crumeyrolle, Olivier; Mutabazi, Innocent

    2016-11-01

    Capillary pressure can destabilize a thin liquid filament during breakup into a succession of drops. Besides, the addition of a linear, high molecular weight, flexible and soluble polymer is enough to modify the morphology of this instability. In the time period preceding the breakup, the development of beads-on-a-string structures where drops are connected by thin threads is monitored. The drops dynamics involve drop formation, drop migration and drop coalescence. Experiments using a high-speed camera on stretched bridges of viscoelastic polymeric solutions were conducted for a range of viscosities and polymer concentrations. The rheological properties of the solutions are also quantified through conventional shear rheology and normal stress difference. The overall goal of this experimental investigation is to gain more insight into the formation and time evolution of the drops. The project BIOENGINE is co-financed by the European Union with the European regional development fund and by the Normandie Regional Council.

  18. Measuring viscoelasticity of soft samples using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, S; Berger, E J

    2009-09-01

    Relaxation indentation experiments using atomic force microscopy (AFM) are used to obtain viscoelastic material properties of soft samples. The quasilinear viscoelastic (QLV) model formulated by Fung (1972, "Stress Strain History Relations of Soft Tissues in Simple Elongation," in Biomechanics, Its Foundation and Objectives, Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, pp. 181-207) for uniaxial compression data was modified for the indentation test data in this study. Hertz contact mechanics was used for the instantaneous deformation, and a reduced relaxation function based on continuous spectrum is used for the time-dependent part in the model. The modified QLV indentation model presents a novel method to obtain viscoelastic properties from indentation data independent of relaxation times of the test. The major objective of the present study is to develop the QLV indentation model and implement the model on AFM indentation data for 1% agarose gel and a viscoelastic polymer using spherical indenter.

  19. Linearization properties, first integrals, nonlocal transformation for heat transfer equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orhan, Özlem; Özer, Teoman

    2016-08-01

    We examine first integrals and linearization methods of the second-order ordinary differential equation which is called fin equation in this study. Fin is heat exchange surfaces which are used widely in industry. We analyze symmetry classification with respect to different choices of thermal conductivity and heat transfer coefficient functions of fin equation. Finally, we apply nonlocal transformation to fin equation and examine the results for different functions.

  20. Viscoelastic behavior of stock indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gündüz, Güngör; Gündüz, Yalin

    2010-12-01

    The scattering diagram of a stock index results in a complex network structure, which can be used to analyze the viscoelastic properties of the index. The change along x- or y-direction of the diagram corresponds to purely elastic (or spring like) movement whereas the diagonal change at an angle of 45° corresponds to purely viscous (or dashpot like) movement. The viscous component pushes the price from its current value to any other value, while the elastic component acts like a restoring force. Four indices, namely, DJI, S&P-500, NASDAQ-100, and NASDAQ-composite were studied for the period of 2001-2009. NASDAQ-composite displayed very high elasticity while NASDAQ-100 displayed the highest fluidity in the time period considered. The fluidity of DJI and S&P-500 came out to be close to each other, and they are almost the same in the second half of the period.

  1. Rheological regional properties of brain tissue studied under cyclic creep/ recovery shear stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudjema, F.; Lounis, M.; Khelidj, B.; Bessai, N.

    2015-04-01

    The rheological properties of brain tissue were studied by repeated creep-recovery shear tests under static conditions for different regions. Corpus callosum CC, Thalamus Th and Corona radiata CR. Non-linear viscoelastic model was also proposed to characterize the transient/steady states of shear creep results. From the creep-recovery data it was obvious that the brain tissues show high regional anisotropy. However. the both samples exhibit fluid viscoelastic properties in the first shear stress cycle of 100 Pa, while this behaviour evolutes to solid viscoelastic with cyclic effect.

  2. Viscoelasticity of a homeotropic nematic slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswald, Patrick

    2015-12-01

    The viscoelastic behavior of a homeotropic nematic slab is studied when it is subjected to a (dilation-compression) sinusoidal deformation of small amplitude (linear regime). I show that the nematic phase behaves as an isotropic liquid of viscosity ηc (ν3) at low (high) frequency, where ηc is the third Miesowicz viscosity and ν3 a smaller viscosity first introduced by Martin, Parodi, and Pershan. The crossover frequency f⊙ between these two asymptotic regimes scales as h2/D , where h is the sample thickness and D =K3/γ1 is the orientational diffusivity (with K3 the bend constant and γ1 the rotational viscosity). Between these two limits the sample behaves as a viscoelastic fluid whose elastic and loss moduli G' and G'' are calculated. These predictions are tested experimentally with a piezoelectric rheometer.

  3. Enhanced diffusion for oscillatory viscoelastic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manopoulos, C.; Tsangaris, S.

    2014-08-01

    This paper examines the enhanced axial solute dispersion of a linear viscoelastic fluid, subjected to a longitudinal pressure gradient sinusoidal oscillation, in a duct between parallel walls. The viscoelastic fluid follows the material law of the Jeffrey fluid. An extension of Watson’s theory, developed in 1983, is used to solve the problem analytically. The diffusivity enhancement results are shown in dimensionless form and are presented as functions of the dimensionless group β = h(2ω/ν)1/2 as defined by Watson, the dimensionless retardation time, and the Schmidt, elasticity, and Euler dimensionless numbers. This paper compares the dispersion enhancement of the Jeffrey fluid, in relation to the Newtonian one, for several intervals of the dimensionless parameters. The results indicate very high dispersion enhancement in several cases, especially for high realistic Schmidt number values, and peaks appear at certain dimensionless parameter β values.

  4. Viscoelastic study of an adhesively bonded joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, P. F.

    1983-01-01

    The plane strain problem of two dissimilar orthotropic plates bonded with an isotropic, linearly viscoelastic adhesive is considered. Both the shear and the normal stresses in the adhesive are calculated for various geometries and loading conditions. Transverse shear deformations of the adherends are taken into account, and their effect on the solution is shown in the results. All three inplane strains of the adhesive are included. Attention is given to the effect of temperature, both in the adhesive joint problem and to the heat generation in a viscoelastic material under cyclic loading. This separate study is included because heat generation and or spatially varying temperature are at present too difficult to account for in the analytical solution of the bonded joint, but whose effect can not be ignored in design.

  5. A Viscoelastic Constitutive Law For FRP Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascione, Luigi; Berardi, Valentino Paolo; D'Aponte, Anna

    2011-09-01

    The present study deals with the long-term behavior of fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) materials in civil engineering. More specifically, the authors propose a mechanical model capable of predicting the viscoelastic behavior of FRP laminates in the field of linear viscoelasticity, starting from that of the matrix material and fiber. The model is closely connected with the low FRP stress levels in civil engineering applications. The model is based on a micromechanical approach which assumes that there is a perfect adhesion between the matrix and fiber. The long-term behavior of the phases is described through a four-parameter rheological law. A validation of the model has also been developed by matching the predicted behavior with an experimental one available in the literature.

  6. Noncontact Viscoelastic Measurement of Polymer Thin Films in a Liquid Medium Using Long-Needle Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Guan, Dongshi; Barraud, Chloé; Charlaix, Elisabeth; Tong, Penger

    2017-02-14

    We report the noncontact measurement of the viscoelastic property of polymer thin films in a liquid medium using frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy with a newly developed long-needle probe. The probe contains a long vertical glass fiber with one end adhered to a cantilever beam and the other end with a sharp tip placed near the liquid-film interface. The nanoscale flow generated by the resonant oscillation of the needle tip provides a precise hydrodynamic force acting on the soft surface of the thin film. By accurately measuring the mechanical response of the thin film, we obtain the elastic and loss moduli of the thin film using the linear response theory of elastohydrodynamics. The experiment verifies the theory and demonstrates its applications. The technique can be used to accurately measure the viscoelastic property of soft surfaces, such as those made of polymers, nanobubbles, live cells, and tissues.

  7. Modeling Electrically Active Viscoelastic Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sitikantha; Brownell, William E.; Spector, Alexander A.

    2012-01-01

    The membrane protein prestin is native to the cochlear outer hair cell that is crucial to the ear's amplification and frequency selectivity throughout the whole acoustic frequency range. The outer hair cell exhibits interrelated dimensional changes, force generation, and electric charge transfer. Cells transfected with prestin acquire unique active properties similar to those in the native cell that have also been useful in understanding the process. Here we propose a model describing the major electromechanical features of such active membranes. The model derived from thermodynamic principles is in the form of integral relationships between the history of voltage and membrane resultants as independent variables and the charge density and strains as dependent variables. The proposed model is applied to the analysis of an active force produced by the outer hair cell in response to a harmonic electric field. Our analysis reveals the mechanism of the outer hair cell active (isometric) force having an almost constant amplitude and phase up to 80 kHz. We found that the frequency-invariance of the force is a result of interplay between the electrical filtering associated with prestin and power law viscoelasticity of the surrounding membrane. Paradoxically, the membrane viscoelasticity boosts the force balancing the electrical filtering effect. We also consider various modes of electromechanical coupling in membrane with prestin associated with mechanical perturbations in the cell. We consider pressure or strains applied step-wise or at a constant rate and compute the time course of the resulting electric charge. The results obtained here are important for the analysis of electromechanical properties of membranes, cells, and biological materials as well as for a better understanding of the mechanism of hearing and the role of the protein prestin in this mechanism. PMID:22701528

  8. Phenomenological viscoelasticity of a heterogeneous pharmaceutical semisolid.

    PubMed

    Radebaugh, G W; Simonelli, A P

    1983-04-01

    This study presents the results of an investigation of the viscoelastic properties of anhydrous lanolin USP, as determined by dynamic mechanical testing. The elastic shear modulus (G'), viscous shear modulus (G"), and loss tangent (tan delta) were determined as a function of shear frequency, nu, (0.01--10.0 Hz) and temperature, T, (0--30 degrees). These viscoelastic parameters were found to be temperature and shear frequency dependent. Up to 100-fold changes in shear moduli and tan delta values were observed with appropriate changes in T and nu. Many of the observed properties are also characteristic of high molecular weight polymers and can be attributed to a high degree of molecular structure. It was found that dynamic mechanical testing was a sensitive tool for measuring structural changes, and was especially useful in detecting a major structural transition well below the accepted melting temperature of anhydrous lanolin.

  9. Organic-inorganic hybrid glass: non-linear optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez Cruz, R.; Mendez-Perez, A.; Romero Galván, G.; Mendoza-Panduro, M.; Trejo-Duran, M.; Alvarado-Mendez, E.; Estudillo-Ayala, J. M.; Rojas-Laguna, R.; Martínez-Richa, A.; Castano, V. M.

    2008-04-01

    In this paper we report the preliminary results about the optical characterization of a new kind of organic-inorganic hybrid glass named 4-((5-dichloromethylsily1)-penty)oxy-cyanobenzene (DCN) synthesized by sol-gel process. We obtain the sign and magnitude of the sample by the Z-scan technique using a low power He-Ne laser at 632 nm in CW operation. The experimental data show that the DNC glass has a negative Kerr optical non-linearity and is estimated a nonlinear coefficient as Δn˜10-6.

  10. Effects of Matrix Viscoelasticity on Rheology of Dilute and Semi-Dilute Suspensions of Non Brownian Rigid Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grizzuti, Nino; Pasquino, Rossana

    2008-07-01

    The rheology of non-Brownian, inertialess rigid spheres suspended in viscoelastic fluids was investigated in the dilute and semi-dilute regimes (volume fractions up to 10%), where interparticle interactions become increasingly relevant. PMMA spherical particles were suspended in viscoelastic Polydimethylsiloxanes (PDMS). A Newtonian fluid (Polyisobutilene, PIB) was also used as a reference system. As expected, both the viscosity and the viscoelastic moduli increased with increasing solid volume fraction. The rheological parameters showed a simple scaling behaviour when their normalized values (with respect to the pure fluid) were considered. Viscosity and moduli were found to be independent upon shear rate and frequency, respectively. Following Batchelor's approach for non-dilute Newtonian suspensions, a second order polynomial dependency for the rheological properties was assumed. While the Newtonian reference fluid was found to obey well Batchelor's theoretical predictions, the viscoelastic suspensions showed more pronounced deviations from the linear dilute behavior, resulting in a second order polynomial coefficient substantially larger than that predicted by Batchelor for Newtonian systems. It was also found that the same concentration dependence was followed by both elastic and loss modulus.

  11. Asymptotic stability properties of linear Volterra integrodifferential equations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. K.

    1971-01-01

    The Liapunov stability properties of solution to a certain system of Volterra integrodifferential equations is studied. Various types of Liapunov stability are defined; the definitions are natural extensions of the corresponding notions for ordinary differential equations. Necessary and sufficient conditions, in general, for uniform stability and uniform asymptotic stability are obtained in the form of a theorem. Connections between the stability of the system studied and the stability properties of a related Volterra integrodifferential equation with infinite memory are examined. Sufficient conditions in order that the trivial solution to the system studied be stable, uniformly stable, asymptotically stable, or uniformly asymptotically stable are derived.

  12. Electronic contributions to linear and nonlinear electric properties in fullerene-based molecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skwara, B.; Loboda, O.; Avramopoulos, A.; Luis, J.-M.; Reis, H.; Papadopoulos, M. G.

    2012-12-01

    Recent studies of the linear and nonlinear electric properties of various fullerene-based subsystems are reviewed. The electric properties of derivatives of C60 fullerene with carbazole, benzothiazole, benzothiazole-triphenyloamine and free-base porphyrin substituents at different levels of theory are summarized. In addition, the electronic and vibrational electric properties of endohedral Sc2@C72 system are reported.

  13. Compressive viscoelasticity of freshly excised mouse skin is dependent on specimen thickness, strain level and rate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuxiang; Marshall, Kara L; Baba, Yoshichika; Lumpkin, Ellen A; Gerling, Gregory J

    2015-01-01

    Although the skin's mechanical properties are well characterized in tension, little work has been done in compression. Here, the viscoelastic properties of a population of mouse skin specimens (139 samples from 36 mice, aged 5 to 34 weeks) were characterized upon varying specimen thickness, as well as strain level and rate. Over the population, we observed the skin's viscoelasticity to be quite variable, yet found systematic correlation of residual stress ratio with skin thickness and strain, and of relaxation time constants with strain rates. In particular, as specimen thickness ranged from 211 to 671 μm, we observed significant variation in both quasi-linear viscoelasticity (QLV) parameters, the relaxation time constant (τ1 = 0.19 ± 0.10 s) and steady-state residual stress ratio (G∞ = 0.28 ± 0.13). Moreover, when τ1 was decoupled and fixed, we observed that G∞ positively correlated with skin thickness. Second, as steady-state stretch was increased (λ∞ from 0.22 to 0.81), we observed significant variation in both QLV parameters (τ1 = 0.26 ± 0.14 s, G∞ = 0.47 ± 0.17), and when τ1 was fixed, G∞ positively correlated with stretch level. Third, as strain rate was increased from 0.06 to 22.88 s-1, the median time constant τ1 varied from 1.90 to 0.31 s, and thereby negatively correlated with strain rate. These findings indicate that the natural range of specimen thickness, as well as experimental controls of compression level and rate, significantly influence measurements of skin viscoelasticity.

  14. Compressive Viscoelasticity of Freshly Excised Mouse Skin Is Dependent on Specimen Thickness, Strain Level and Rate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuxiang; Marshall, Kara L.; Baba, Yoshichika; Lumpkin, Ellen A.; Gerling, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Although the skin’s mechanical properties are well characterized in tension, little work has been done in compression. Here, the viscoelastic properties of a population of mouse skin specimens (139 samples from 36 mice, aged 5 to 34 weeks) were characterized upon varying specimen thickness, as well as strain level and rate. Over the population, we observed the skin’s viscoelasticity to be quite variable, yet found systematic correlation of residual stress ratio with skin thickness and strain, and of relaxation time constants with strain rates. In particular, as specimen thickness ranged from 211 to 671 μm, we observed significant variation in both quasi-linear viscoelasticity (QLV) parameters, the relaxation time constant (τ1 = 0.19 ± 0.10 s) and steady-state residual stress ratio (G∞ = 0.28 ± 0.13). Moreover, when τ1 was decoupled and fixed, we observed that G∞ positively correlated with skin thickness. Second, as steady-state stretch was increased (λ∞ from 0.22 to 0.81), we observed significant variation in both QLV parameters (τ1 = 0.26 ± 0.14 s, G∞ = 0.47 ± 0.17), and when τ1 was fixed, G∞ positively correlated with stretch level. Third, as strain rate was increased from 0.06 to 22.88 s−1, the median time constant τ1 varied from 1.90 to 0.31 s, and thereby negatively correlated with strain rate. These findings indicate that the natural range of specimen thickness, as well as experimental controls of compression level and rate, significantly influence measurements of skin viscoelasticity. PMID:25803703

  15. Ferromagnetic viscoelastic liquid crystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlesier, Cristina; Shibaev, Petr; McDonald, Scott

    2012-02-01

    Novel ferromagnetic liquid crystalline materials were designed by mixing ferromagnetic nanoparticles with glass forming oligomers and low molar mass liquid crystals. The matrix in which nanoparticles are embedded is highly viscous that reduces aggregation of nanoparticles and stabilizes the whole composition. Mechanical and optical properties of the composite material are studied in the broad range of nanoparticle concentrations. The mechanical properties of the viscoelastic composite material resemble those of chemically crosslinked elastomers (elasticity and reversibility of deformations). The optical properties of ferromagnetic cholesteric materials are discussed in detail. It is shown that application of magnetic field leads to the shift of the selective reflection band of the cholesteric material and dramatically change its color. Theoretical model is suggested to account for the observed effects; physical properties of the novel materials and liquid crystalline elastomers are compared and discussed. [1] P.V. Shibaev, C. Schlesier, R. Uhrlass, S. Woodward, E. Hanelt, Liquid Crystals, 37, 1601 (2010) [2] P.V. Shibaev, R. Uhrlass, S. Woodward, C. Schlesier, Md R. Ali, E. Hanelt, Liquid Crystals, 37, 587 (2010)

  16. Syntheses, structures and properties of linear and branched oligogermanes.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Charles S

    2009-03-14

    This Perspective surveys recent developments in the synthesis and characterization of discrete oligogermanes. The use of the hydrogermolysis reaction, combined with a protection/deprotection strategy for a Ge-H moiety, has resulted in the synthesis of a variety of oligogermanes where the number of catenated atoms and the identity of the organic substituents can be readily controlled. Relationships between the composition of these oligomers and their optical and electronic properties have also been established.

  17. Photoinduced nanocomposites—creation, modification, linear and nonlinear optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bityurin, N.; Alexandrov, A.; Afanasiev, A.; Agareva, N.; Pikulin, A.; Sapogova, N.; Soustov, L.; Salomatina, E.; Gorshkova, E.; Tsverova, N.; Smirnova, L.

    2013-07-01

    UV irradiation of materials consisting of a polymer matrix that possesses precursors of noble metals followed by annealing results in creation of metal nanoparticles within the irradiated domains. Such photoinduced nanocomposites are promising for photonics applications due to the strong alteration of their optical properties compared to initial nonirradiated materials. We report our results on the synthesis and investigation of two kinds of these materials: (a) Photoinduced Au nanocomposites based on PMMA matrices, including bulk materials prepared by means of the polymerization technique;

  18. Investigation of transient cavitating flow in viscoelastic pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keramat, A.; Tijsseling, A. S.; Ahmadi, A.

    2010-08-01

    A study on water hammer in viscoelastic pipes when the fluid pressure drops to liquid vapour pressure is performed. Two important concepts including column separation and the effects of retarded strains in the pipe wall on the fluid response have been investigated separately in recent works, but there is some curiosity as to how the results for pressure and discharge are when column separation occurs in a viscoelastic pipe. For pipes made of plastic such as polyethylene (PE) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC), viscoelasticity is a crucial mechanical property which changes the hydraulic and structural transient responses. Based on previous developments in the analysis of water hammer, a model which is capable of analysing column separation in viscoelastic pipes is presented and used for solving the selected case studies. For the column-separation modelling the Discrete Vapour Cavity Model (DVCM) is utilised and the viscoelasticity property of the pipe wall is modelled by Kelvin-Voigt elements. The effects of viscoelasticity play an important role in the column separation phenomenon because it changes the water hammer fundamental frequency and so affects the time of opening or collapse of the cavities. Verification of the implemented computer code is performed for the effects of viscoelasticity and column separation - separately and simultaneously - using experimental results from the literature. In the provided examples the focus is placed on the simultaneous effect of viscoelasticity and column separation on the hydraulic transient response. The final conclusions drawn are that if rectangular grids are utilised the DVCM gives acceptable predictions of the phenomenon and that the pipe wall material's retarded behaviour strongly dampens the pressure spikes caused by column separation.

  19. Acousto-Optic and Linear Electro-Optic Properties of Organic Polymeric Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-04-27

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5000 NRL Memorandum Report 6454 od I3 Acousto - Optic and Linear Electro-Optic Properties of Organic...PROGRAM P1RC;EC7 ASK Arlington, VA 22217-5000 ELEMENT NO NO1 I1I TITLE (Include Security Classification) Acousto - Optic and Linear Electro-Optic...briefly discussing the important molecular properties for enhanced acousto ~ optic and electro-Ooptic ef fects and then relating these to "current

  20. Bounding solutions of geometrically nonlinear viscoelastic problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stubstad, J. M.; Simitses, G. J.

    1986-01-01

    Integral transform techniques, such as the Laplace transform, provide simple and direct methods for solving viscoelastic problems formulated within a context of linear material response and using linear measures for deformation. Application of the transform operator reduces the governing linear integro-differential equations to a set of algebraic relations between the transforms of the unknown functions, the viscoelastic operators, and the initial and boundary conditions. Inversion either directly or through the use of the appropriate convolution theorem, provides the time domain response once the unknown functions have been expressed in terms of sums, products or ratios of known transforms. When exact inversion is not possible approximate techniques may provide accurate results. The overall problem becomes substantially more complex when nonlinear effects must be included. Situations where a linear material constitutive law can still be productively employed but where the magnitude of the resulting time dependent deformations warrants the use of a nonlinear kinematic analysis are considered. The governing equations will be nonlinear integro-differential equations for this class of problems. Thus traditional as well as approximate techniques, such as cited above, cannot be employed since the transform of a nonlinear function is not explicitly expressible.

  1. Wideband MR elastography for viscoelasticity model identification

    PubMed Central

    Yasar, Temel K.; Royston, Thomas J.; Magin, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    The growing clinical use of MR Elastography (MRE) requires the development of new quantitative standards for measuring tissue stiffness. Here, we examine a soft tissue mimicking phantom material (Ecoflex) over a wide frequency range (200 Hz to 7.75 kHz). The recorded data are fit to a cohort of viscoelastic models of varying complexity (integer and fractional order). This was accomplished using multiple sample sizes by employing geometric focusing of the shear wave front to compensate for the changes in wavelength and attenuation over this broad range of frequencies. The simple axisymmetric geometry and shear wave front of this experiment allows us to calculate the frequency-dependent complex-valued shear modulus of the material. The data were fit to several common models of linear viscoelasticity, including those with fractional derivative operators, and we identified the best possible matches over both a limited frequency band (often used in clinical studies) and over the entire frequency span considered. In addition to demonstrating the superior capability of the fractional order viscoelastic models, this study highlights the advantages of measuring the complex-valued shear modulus over as wide a range of frequencies as possible. PMID:23001852

  2. Model Reduction of Viscoelastic Finite Element Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, C. H.; Inman, D. J.; Lam, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper examines a method of adding viscoelastic properties to finite element models by using additional co-ordinates to account for the frequency dependence usually associated with such damping materials. Several such methods exist and all suffer from an increase in order of the final finite model which is undesirable in many applications. Here we propose to combine one of these methods, the GHM (Golla-Hughes-McTavish) method, with model reduction techniques to remove the objection of increased model order. The result of combining several methods is an ability to add the effects of visoelastic components to finite element or other analytical models without increasing the order of the system. The procedure is illustrated by a numerical example. The method proposed here results in a viscoelastic finite element of a structure without increasing the order of the original model.

  3. Linear and Nonlinear Ultrasonic Properties of Granular Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Bonner, B.; Berge, P.A.; Aracne-Ruddle, C.M.; Bertete-Auguirre, H.; Wildenschild, D.; Trombino, C.N.; Hardy, E.

    2000-04-20

    The ultrasonic pulse transmission method (100-500 kHz) was adapted to measure compressional (P) and shear (S) wave velocities for synthetic soils fabricated from quartz-clay and quartz-peat mixtures. Velocities were determined as samples were loaded by small (up to 0.1 MPa) uniaxial stress to determine how stress at grain contacts affects ave amplitudes, velocities, and frequency content. Samples were fabricated from quartz sand mixed with either a swelling clay or peat (natural cellulose). P velocities in these dry synthetic soil samples were low, ranging from about 230 to 430 m/s for pure sand, about 91 to 420 m/s for sand-peat mixtures, and about 230 to 470 m/s for dry sand-clay mixtures. S velocities were about half of the P velocity in most cases, about 130 to 250 m/s for pure sand, about 75-220 m/s for sand-peat mixtures, and about 88-220 m/s for dry sand-clay mixtures. These experiments demonstrate that P and S velocities are sensitive to the amount and type of admixed second phase at low concentrations. They found that dramatic increases in all velocities occur with small uniaxial loads, indicating strong nonlinearity of the acoustic properties. Composition and grain packing contribute to the mechanical response at grain contacts and the nonlinear response at low stresses.

  4. Model Checking Linear-Time Properties of Probabilistic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baier, Christel; Größer, Marcus; Ciesinski, Frank

    This chapter is about the verification of Markov decision processes (MDPs) which incorporate one of the fundamental models for reasoning about probabilistic and nondeterministic phenomena in reactive systems. MDPs have their roots in the field of operations research and are nowadays used in a wide variety of areas including verification, robotics, planning, controlling, reinforcement learning, economics and semantics of randomized systems. Furthermore, MDPs served as the basis for the introduction of probabilistic automata which are related to weighted automata. We describe the use of MDPs as an operational model for randomized systems, e.g., systems that employ randomized algorithms, multi-agent systems or systems with unreliable components or surroundings. In this context we outline the theory of verifying ω-regular properties of such operational models. As an integral part of this theory we use ω-automata, i.e., finite-state automata over finite alphabets that accept languages of infinite words. Additionally, basic concepts of important reduction techniques are sketched, namely partial order reduction of MDPs and quotient system reduction of the numerical problem that arises in the verification of MDPs. Furthermore we present several undecidability and decidability results for the controller synthesis problem for partially observable MDPs.

  5. Metal colloids and quantum dots: linear and nonlinear optical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Don O.

    1997-05-12

    Nanophase materials have found a wide application in a variety of technological areas which include ultrafast optical switching high density information storage and retrieval, electronics, and catalysts, to mention a few. Nanocrystal science has also drawn considerable interest from the fundamental perspective engaging physicists, chemists, and material scientists into this area of rapidly expanding and challenging research. Basic questions concerning how matter evolves from atomic like behavior to molecular and onto bulk lie at the center nanocrystal research. In addition, because of the high surface to volume ratio of the nanocrystals, the interaction potential between a nanocrystal and its surrounding environment becomes an important issue in determining its properties. While significant progress has been made in nanocrystal research, there are many problems concerned with their fabrication. In particular, the difficulty of incorporating nanocrystals into a matrix that is appropriate for ultimate device development has hindered some aspects of nanocrystal research. Ion implantation is a method that is now established as a technique for fabricating metal and semiconductor nanocrystals. It is highly versatile in that one may select nearly any host material for incorporating the nanocrystals of interest. The flexibility of being able to select the host matrix is also interesting from the point of view that it opens the opportunity to investigate matrix-nanocrystal interactions. We summarize in the following sections results on metal and semiconductor nanocrystals formed by ion implantation into dielectric hosts.

  6. Dynamic finite element simulations of composite stiffened panels with a transverse-isotropic viscoelastic energy dissipation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Thomas; Doreille, Mathias; Merazzi, Silvio; Vescovini, Riccardo; Bisagni, Chiara

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a methodology for predicting the damped response and energy dissipation of laminated composite structures, subjected to dynamic loads. Starting from simple coupon tests to characterize the material, the numerical simulation of damping properties is made possible by a novel linear viscoelastic model that has been developed and implemented in the finite element code B2000++. A nonlinear optimization procedure is adopted to fit experimental data and define the exponential Maxwell parameter model. To illustrate the potentialities of the method, the post-buckling analysis of a relatively complex aeronautical panel is presented, accounting not only for geometric nonlinearities, but also for viscoelastic effects. The results illustrate the effects due to material dissipation, their relation to the effects of inertia, and the influence of geometric imperfections on the response of the panel.

  7. Aerobic fitness, hippocampal viscoelasticity, and relational memory performance.

    PubMed

    Schwarb, Hillary; Johnson, Curtis L; Daugherty, Ana M; Hillman, Charles H; Kramer, Arthur F; Cohen, Neal J; Barbey, Aron K

    2017-03-30

    The positive relationship between hippocampal structure, aerobic fitness, and memory performance is often observed among children and older adults; but evidence of this relationship among young adults, for whom the hippocampus is neither developing nor atrophying, is less consistent. Studies have typically relied on hippocampal volumetry (a gross proxy of tissue composition) to assess individual differences in hippocampal structure. While volume is not specific to microstructural tissue characteristics, microstructural differences in hippocampal integrity may exist even among healthy young adults when volumetric differences are not diagnostic of tissue health or cognitive function. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is an emerging noninvasive imaging technique for measuring viscoelastic tissue properties and provides quantitative measures of tissue integrity. We have previously demonstrated that individual differences in hippocampal viscoelasticity are related to performance on a relational memory task; however, little is known about health correlates to this novel measure. In the current study, we investigated the relationship between hippocampal viscoelasticity and cardiovascular health, and their mutual effect on relational memory in a group of healthy young adults (N=51). We replicated our previous finding that hippocampal viscoelasticity correlates with relational memory performance. We extend this work by demonstrating that better aerobic fitness, as measured by VO2max, was associated with hippocampal viscoelasticity that mediated the benefits of fitness on memory function. Hippocampal volume, however, did not account for individual differences in memory. Therefore, these data suggest that hippocampal viscoelasticity may provide a more sensitive measure to microstructural tissue organization and its consequences to cognition among healthy young adults.

  8. Viscoelasticity of Concentrated Proteoglycan Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meechai, Nispa; Jamieson, Alex; Blackwell, John; Carrino, David

    2001-03-01

    Proteoglycan Aggregate (PGA) is the principal macromolecular component of the energy-absorbing matrix of cartilage and tendon. Its brush-like supramolecular structure consists of highly-ionic subunits, non-covalently bound to a hyaluronate chain. We report viscoelastic behavior of concentrated solutions of PGA, purified by column fractionation to remove free subunits. At physiological ionic strength, these preparations exhibit a sol-to-gel transition when the concentration is increased above molecular overlap. The strain dependence of concentrated solutions shows a pronounced non-linearity above a critical strain, at which the storage modulus decreases suddenly, and the loss modulus exhibits a maximum. This response is similar to that observed for close-packed dispersions of soft spheres, when the applied strain is sufficient to move a sphere past its neighbors. At low and high ionic strength, the elasticity of solutions near the overlap concentration decreases. The former is interpreted as due to a decrease in intramolecular and intermolecular electrostatic repulsions, because of strong trapping of counterions within the PGA brush, the latter to salt-induced brush collapse.

  9. Investigating Filler Reinforcement and Nonlinear Viscoelastic Behavior in Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhiyong; Wang, Shi-Qing; von Meerwall, Ernst

    2004-03-01

    Solid fillers have been known to enhance the linear viscoelastic responses of polymer melts and elastomers. Nonlinear viscoelastic behavior of such systems is closely related to the reinforcement of the linear viscoelascity. Understanding such phenomena as the Payne effect (where the storage modulus is measured to decrease in oscillatory shear with the amplitude of the oscillation and with time for a fixed amplitude) requires a better understanding of the filler reinforcement mechanism. Recent publications, from two different groups (a) (b) prompted our present study. Using monodisperse 1,4-polybutadiene melts as the matrix and nano-silicon oxide particles of 15 nm diameter as the fillers, we carried out a variety of viscoelastic and NMR-spin-echo diffusion measurements to elucidate the important role of the filler-filler networking in controlling the observed linear and nonlinear behavior at temperatures over 100 degrees above the glass transition temperature of PBD. (a)S.S. Sternstein and A. Zhu, Macromolecules 35, 7262 (2002); Composites Sci. and Techn. 63, 1113 (2003). This work claims that the reinforcement arises primarily from the entrapped chain entanglement due to chain adsorption on filler surfaces instead of the filler-filler networking. (b) H. Montes, F. Lequeux and J. Berriot, Macromolecules, 36, 8107 (2003). This work advocates that a glassy layer formed around each filler is responsible for the enhanced linear viscoelascity and for the observed nonlinear viscoelastic behavior such as the Payne effect.

  10. Blow-up of a hyperbolic equation of viscoelasticity with supercritical nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yanqiu; Rammaha, Mohammad A.; Sakuntasathien, Sawanya

    2017-02-01

    We investigate a hyperbolic PDE, modeling wave propagation in viscoelastic media, under the influence of a linear memory term of Boltzmann type, and a nonlinear damping modeling friction, as well as an energy-amplifying supercritical nonlinear source:

  11. VISCOELASTIC MODELS OF TIDALLY HEATED EXOMOONS

    SciTech Connect

    Dobos, Vera; Turner, Edwin L.

    2015-05-01

    Tidal heating of exomoons may play a key role in their habitability, since the elevated temperature can melt the ice on the body even without significant solar radiation. The possibility of life has been intensely studied on solar system moons such as Europa or Enceladus where the surface ice layer covers a tidally heated water ocean. Tidal forces may be even stronger in extrasolar systems, depending on the properties of the moon and its orbit. To study the tidally heated surface temperature of exomoons, we used a viscoelastic model for the first time. This model is more realistic than the widely used, so-called fixed Q models because it takes into account the temperature dependence of the tidal heat flux and the melting of the inner material. Using this model, we introduced the circumplanetary Tidal Temperate Zone (TTZ), which strongly depends on the orbital period of the moon and less on its radius. We compared the results with the fixed Q model and investigated the statistical volume of the TTZ using both models. We have found that the viscoelastic model predicts 2.8 times more exomoons in the TTZ with orbital periods between 0.1 and 3.5 days than the fixed Q model for plausible distributions of physical and orbital parameters. The viscoelastic model provides more promising results in terms of habitability because the inner melting of the body moderates the surface temperature, acting like a thermostat.

  12. Modeling viscoelastic flow in a multiflux static mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köpplmayr, T.; Miethlinger, J.

    2014-05-01

    We present a numerical and experimental study of the polymer flow in a multiflux static mixer. Various geometrical configurations are compared in terms of layer homogeneity. To evaluate the layer-forming process in different geometries, we applied a general and precise approach based on trajectory calculations for a large set of material points, followed by a statistical analysis. A simulation of viscous flow using the Carreau-Yasuda constitutive equation produced results which deviated from our experimental findings. Therefore, we used the Giesekus constitutive equation, taking into account viscoelastic effects, such as extrudate swell and secondary motions inside the mixer. Parallel plate rheometry was employed to collect dynamic mechanical data in the linear viscoelastic flow regime. Weissenberg numbers were calculated, and the maximum relaxation time in the obtained spectrum was limited to avoid divergence issues. The results of our study provide deeper insights into the layerforming process of viscoelastic melts in a multiflux static mixer.

  13. Nonlinear Dynamics in Viscoelastic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majmudar, Trushant; Varagnat, Matthieu; McKinley, Gareth

    2008-11-01

    Instabilities in free surface continuous jets of non-Newtonian fluids, although relevant for many industrial processes, remain poorly understood in terms of fundamental fluid dynamics. Inviscid, and viscous Newtonian jets have been studied in considerable detail, both theoretically and experimentally. Instability in viscous jets leads to regular periodic coiling of the jet, which exhibits a non-trivial frequency dependence with the height of the fall. Here we present a systematic study of the effect of viscoelasticity on the dynamics of continuous jets of worm-like micellar surfactant solutions of varying viscosities and elasticities. We observe complex nonlinear spatio-temporal dynamics of the jet, and uncover a transition from periodic to quasi-periodic to a multi-frequency, broad-spectrum dynamics. Beyond this regime, the jet dynamics smoothly crosses over to exhibit the ``leaping shampoo'' or the Kaye effect. We examine different dynamical regimes in terms of scaling variables, which depend on the geometry (dimensionless height), kinematics (dimensionless flow rate), and the fluid properties (elasto-gravity number) and present a regime map of the dynamics of the jet in terms of these dimensionless variables.

  14. Nonlinear Dynamics in Viscoelastic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majmudar, Trushant; Varagnat, Matthieu; McKinley, Gareth

    2009-03-01

    Instabilities in free surface continuous jets of non-Newtonian fluids, although relevant for many industrial processes, remain poorly understood in terms of fundamental fluid dynamics. Inviscid, and viscous Newtonian jets have been studied in considerable detail, both theoretically and experimentally. Instability in viscous jets leads to regular periodic coiling of the jet, which exhibits a non-trivial frequency dependence with the height of the fall. Here we present a systematic study of the effect of viscoelasticity on the dynamics of continuous jets of worm-like micellar surfactant solutions of varying viscosities and elasticities. We observe complex nonlinear spatio-temporal dynamics of the jet, and uncover a transition from periodic to quasi-periodic to a multi-frequency, broad-spectrum dynamics. Beyond this regime, the jet dynamics smoothly crosses over to exhibit the ``leaping shampoo'' or the Kaye effect. We examine different dynamical regimes in terms of scaling variables, which depend on the geometry (dimensionless height), kinematics (dimensionless flow rate), and the fluid properties (elasto-gravity number) and present a regime map of the dynamics of the jet in terms of these dimensionless variables.

  15. Chain length dependence of the thermodynamic properties of linear and cyclic alkanes and polymers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dinghai; Simon, Sindee L; McKenna, Gregory B

    2005-02-22

    The specific heat capacity was measured with step-scan differential scanning calorimetry for linear alkanes from pentane (C(5)H(12)) to nonadecane (C(19)H(40)), for several cyclic alkanes, for linear and cyclic polyethylenes, and for a linear and a cyclic polystyrene. For the linear alkanes, the specific heat capacity in the equilibrium liquid state decreases as chain length increases; above a carbon number N of 10 (decane) the specific heat asymptotes to a constant value. For the cyclic alkanes, the heat capacity in the equilibrium liquid state is lower than that of the corresponding linear chains and increases with increasing chain length. At high enough molecular weights, the heat capacities of cyclic and linear molecules are expected to be equal, and this is found to be the case for the polyethylenes and polystyrenes studied. In addition, the thermal properties of the solid-liquid and the solid-solid transitions are examined for the linear and cyclic alkanes; solid-solid transitions are observed only in the odd-numbered alkanes. The thermal expansion coefficients and the specific volumes of the linear and cyclic alkanes are also calculated from literature data and compared with the trends in the specific heats.

  16. Multi-Push (MP) Acoustic Radiation Force (ARF) Ultrasound for Assessing Tissue Viscoelasticity, In Vivo*

    PubMed Central

    Scola, Mallory R.; Baggesen, Leslie M.; Gallippi, Caterina M.

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force (ARF) ultrasound is a method of elastographic imaging in which micron-scale tissue displacements, induced and tracked by ultrasound, reflect clinically relevant tissue mechanical properties. Our laboratory has recently shown that tissue viscoelasticity is assessed using the novel Multi-Push (MP) ARF method. MP ARF applies the Voigt model for viscoelastic materials and compares the displacements achieved by successive ARF excitations to qualitatively or quantitatively represent the relaxation time for constant stress, which is a direct descriptor of the viscoelastic response of the tissue. We have demonstrated MP ARF in custom viscoelastic tissue mimicking materials and implemented the method in vivo in canine muscle and human renal allografts, with strong spatial correlation between MP ARF findings and histochemical features and previously reported mechanical changes with renal disease. These data support that noninvasive MP ARF is capable of clinically relevant assessment of tissue viscoelastic properties. PMID:23366389

  17. Theory of heterogeneous viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirmacher, Walter; Ruocco, Giancarlo; Mazzone, Valerio

    2016-03-01

    We review a new theory of viscoelasticity of a glass-forming viscous liquid near and below the glass transition. In our model, we assume that each point in the material has a specific viscosity, which varies randomly in space according to a fluctuating activation free energy. We include a Maxwellian elastic term, and assume that the corresponding shear modulus fluctuates as well with the same distribution as that of the activation barriers. The model is solved in coherent potential approximation, for which a derivation is given. The theory predicts an Arrhenius-type temperature dependence of the viscosity in the vanishing frequency limit, independent of the distribution of the activation barriers. The theory implies that this activation energy is generally different from that of a diffusing particle with the same barrier height distribution. If the distribution of activation barriers is assumed to have the Gaussian form, the finite-frequency version of the theory describes well the typical low-temperature alpha relaxation peak of glasses. Beta relaxation can be included by adding another Gaussian with centre at much lower energies than that is responsible for the alpha relaxation. At high frequencies, our theory reduces to the description of an elastic medium with spatially fluctuating elastic moduli (heterogeneous elasticity theory), which explains the occurrence of the boson peak-related vibrational anomalies of glasses.

  18. Linear and nonlinear optical properties of anisotropic quantum dots in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Wenfang

    2013-05-01

    We have investigated the linear and nonlinear optical properties of a two-dimensional anisotropic quantum dot in a magnetic field. Based on the computed energies and wave functions, the linear, third-order nonlinear and total optical absorption coefficients as well as the refractive index changes have been examined. The results are presented as a function of the incident photon energy for the different cases of anisotropy, dot size and external magnetic field. The results show that the linear and nonlinear optical properties of anisotropic quantum dots are strongly affected by the degree of anisotropy, the dot size, the external magnetic field and the polarized direction of the incident electromagnetic wave. The result also shows that the size effect of anisotropy quantum dots on the optical absorptions is different from that of isotropic quantum dots.

  19. Structural reliability and robustness properties of optimal linear-quadratic multivariable regulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, P.-K.; Stein, G.; Athans, M.

    1979-01-01

    Strong sufficient conditions are derived for the robustness of optimal linear-quadratic (LQ) regulators to large parameter perturbations. In particular, it is shown that under certain conditions LQ designs remain stable in the presence of actuator channel failures. The general results can be specialized to provide insight into the gain margin, gain reduction, and phase margin properties of optimal LQ regulators.

  20. The Linear Stability Properties of Medium- to High- n TAEs in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelenkov, N N; Budny, R V; Kessel, C E; Kramer, G J; McCune, D; Manickam, J; Nazikian, R

    2008-02-14

    This document provides a detailed report on the successful completion of the DOE OFES Theory Milestone for FY2007: Improve the simulation resolution of linear stability properties of Toroidal Alfvén Eigenmodes (TAE) driven by energetic particles and neutral beams in ITER by increasing the numbers of toroidal modes used to 15.

  1. Postseismic viscoelastic surface deformation and stress. Part 1: Theoretical considerations, displacement and strain calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.

    1979-01-01

    A model of viscoelastic deformations associated with earthquakes is presented. A strike-slip fault is represented by a rectangular dislocation in a viscoelastic layer (lithosphere) lying over a viscoelastic half-space (asthenosphere). Deformations occur on three time scales. The initial response is governed by the instantaneous elastic properties of the earth. A slower response is associated with viscoelastic relaxation of the lithosphere and a yet slower response is due to viscoelastic relaxation of the asthenosphere. The major conceptual contribution is the inclusion of lithospheric viscoelastic properties into a dislocation model of earthquake related deformations and stresses. Numerical calculations using typical fault parameters reveal that the postseismic displacements and strains are small compared to the coseismic ones near the fault, but become significant further away. Moreover, the directional sense of the deformations attributable to the elastic response, the lithospheric viscoelastic softening, and the asthenospheric viscoelastic flow may differ and depend on location and model details. The results and theoretical arguments suggest that the stress changes accompanying lithospheric relaxation may also be in a different sense than and be larger than the strain changes.

  2. Identification of the dynamic characteristics of a viscoelastic, nonlinear adhesive joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naraghi, T.; Nobari, A. S.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the nonlinear mechanical characteristics of an adhesive (Sikaflex-252) are identified over frequency range, using eigenvalues of nonlinear system and inverse eigen-sensitivity method and experimental data. Sikaflex-252 is selected as an adhesive which is mainly used as a joining medium (joint) in structural applications. In order to simulate the viscoelastic behaviour of the adhesive, the frequency dependent Young's modulus and damping coefficient are assumed in identification process leading to the updating process being repeated for different ranges of frequencies to identify stiffness and damping properties of the adhesive. Using the optimum equivalent linear frequency response function (OELF) concept, in order to realize the nonlinear nature of the adhesive, modal tests are performed under two different random excitation levels which illustrate the stiffness softening characteristic of adhesive which can have serious implications regarding dynamic stability of structures. Furthermore, based on the identified characteristics, the paper examines the possibility of tuning of the Standard Linear Solid model (SLS), in representing the adhesive viscoelastic behaviour. Results of this attempt proved that the S.L.S. model with tuned parameters significantly improves the fidelity of finite element (FE) model to experimental results.

  3. Frequency-dependent scaling from mesoscale to macroscale in viscoelastic random composites

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the scaling from a statistical volume element (SVE; i.e. mesoscale level) to representative volume element (RVE; i.e. macroscale level) of spatially random linear viscoelastic materials, focusing on the quasi-static properties in the frequency domain. Requiring the material statistics to be spatially homogeneous and ergodic, the mesoscale bounds on the RVE response are developed from the Hill–Mandel homogenization condition adapted to viscoelastic materials. The bounds are obtained from two stochastic initial-boundary value problems set up, respectively, under uniform kinematic and traction boundary conditions. The frequency and scale dependencies of mesoscale bounds are obtained through computational mechanics for composites with planar random chessboard microstructures. In general, the frequency-dependent scaling to RVE can be described through a complex-valued scaling function, which generalizes the concept originally developed for linear elastic random composites. This scaling function is shown to apply for all different phase combinations on random chessboards and, essentially, is only a function of the microstructure and mesoscale. PMID:27274689

  4. In vivo measurement of spinal column viscoelasticity--an animal model.

    PubMed

    Hult, E; Ekström, L; Kaigle, A; Holm, S; Hansson, T

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this study was to measure the in vivo viscoelastic response of spinal motion segments loaded in compression using a porcine model. Nine pigs were used in the study. The animals were anaesthetized and, using surgical techniques, four intrapedicular screws were inserted into the vertebrae of the L2-L3 motion segment. A miniaturized servohydraulic exciter capable of compressing the motion segment was mounted on to the screws. In six animals, a loading scheme consisting of 50 N and 100 N of compression, each applied for 10 min, was used. Each loading period was followed by 10 min restitution with zero load. The loading scheme was repeated four times. Three animals were examined for stiffening effects by consecutively repeating eight times 50 N loading for 5 min followed by 5 min restitution with zero load. This loading scheme was repeated using a 100 N load level. The creep-recovery behavior of the motion segment was recorded continuously. Using non-linear regression techniques, the experimental data were used for evaluating the parameters of a three-parameter standard linear solid model. Correlation coefficients of the order of 0.85 or higher were obtained for the three independent parameters of the model. A survey of the data shows that the viscous deformation rate was a function of the load level. Also, repeated loading at 100 N seemed to induce long-lasting changes in the viscoelastic properties of the porcine lumbar motion segment.

  5. Nonlinear viscoelastic characterization of polymer materials using a dynamic-mechanical methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strganac, Thomas W.; Payne, Debbie Flowers; Biskup, Bruce A.; Letton, Alan

    1995-01-01

    Polymer materials retrieved from LDEF exhibit nonlinear constitutive behavior; thus the authors present a method to characterize nonlinear viscoelastic behavior using measurements from dynamic (oscillatory) mechanical tests. Frequency-derived measurements are transformed into time-domain properties providing the capability to predict long term material performance without a lengthy experimentation program. Results are presented for thin-film high-performance polymer materials used in the fabrication of high-altitude scientific balloons. Predictions based upon a linear test and analysis approach are shown to deteriorate for moderate to high stress levels expected for extended applications. Tests verify that nonlinear viscoelastic response is induced by large stresses. Hence, an approach is developed in which the stress-dependent behavior is examined in a manner analogous to modeling temperature-dependent behavior with time-temperature correspondence and superposition principles. The development leads to time-stress correspondence and superposition of measurements obtained through dynamic mechanical tests. Predictions of material behavior using measurements based upon linear and nonlinear approaches are compared with experimental results obtained from traditional creep tests. Excellent agreement is shown for the nonlinear model.

  6. Frequency-dependent scaling from mesoscale to macroscale in viscoelastic random composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates the scaling from a statistical volume element (SVE; i.e. mesoscale level) to representative volume element (RVE; i.e. macroscale level) of spatially random linear viscoelastic materials, focusing on the quasi-static properties in the frequency domain. Requiring the material statistics to be spatially homogeneous and ergodic, the mesoscale bounds on the RVE response are developed from the Hill-Mandel homogenization condition adapted to viscoelastic materials. The bounds are obtained from two stochastic initial-boundary value problems set up, respectively, under uniform kinematic and traction boundary conditions. The frequency and scale dependencies of mesoscale bounds are obtained through computational mechanics for composites with planar random chessboard microstructures. In general, the frequency-dependent scaling to RVE can be described through a complex-valued scaling function, which generalizes the concept originally developed for linear elastic random composites. This scaling function is shown to apply for all different phase combinations on random chessboards and, essentially, is only a function of the microstructure and mesoscale.

  7. Quasi-static and dynamic response of viscoelastic helical rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temel, Beytullah; Fırat Çalim, Faruk; Tütüncü, Naki

    2004-04-01

    In this study, the dynamic behaviour of cylindrical helical rods made of linear viscoelastic materials are investigated in the Laplace domain. The governing equations for naturally twisted and curved spatial rods obtained using the Timoshenko beam theory are rewritten for cylindrical helical rods. The curvature of the rod axis, effect of rotary inertia, and shear and axial deformations are considered in the formulation. The material of the rod is assumed to be homogeneous, isotropic and linear viscoelastic. In the viscoelastic material case, according to the correspondence principle, the material constants are replaced with their complex counterparts in the Laplace domain. Ordinary differential equations in scalar form obtained in the Laplace domain are solved numerically using the complementary functions method to calculate the dynamic stiffness matrix of the problem. In the solutions, the Kelvin model is employed. The solutions obtained are transformed to the real space using the Durbin's numerical inverse Laplace transform method. Numerical results for quasi-static and dynamic response of viscoelastic models are presented in the form of graphics.

  8. Droplet breakup dynamics of weakly viscoelastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Kristin; Walker, Travis

    2016-11-01

    The addition of macromolecules to solvent, even in dilute quantities, can alter a fluid's response in an extensional flow. For low-viscosity fluids, the presence of elasticity may not be apparent when measured using a standard rotational rheometer, yet it may still alter the response of a fluid when undergoing an extensional deformation, especially at small length scales where elastic effects are enhanced. Applications such as microfluidics necessitate investigating the dynamics of fluids with elastic properties that are not pronounced at large length scales. In the present work, a microfluidic cross-slot configuration is used to study the effects of elasticity on droplet breakup. Droplet breakup and the subsequent iterated-stretching - where beads form along a filament connecting two primary droplets - were observed for a variety of material and flow conditions. We present a relationship on the modes of bead formation and how and when these modes will form based on key parameters such as the properties of the outer continuous-phase fluid. The results are vital not only for simulating the droplet breakup of weakly viscoelastic fluids but also for understanding how the droplet breakup event can be used for characterizing the extensional properties of weakly-viscoelastic fluids.

  9. Characterizing gelatin hydrogel viscoelasticity with diffusing colloidal probe microscopy.

    PubMed

    Shabaniverki, Soheila; Juárez, Jaime J

    2017-07-01

    In this study, we investigate viscoelasticity in gelatin hydrogels using diffusing colloidal probe microscopy (DCPM) to directly measure the elastic potential energy interaction between colloidal probes and the underlying viscoelastic media. Gelatin samples are prepared in four different concentrations between 0.3wt% and 0.6wt% to examine changes in viscoelasticity with concentration. A force balance describing the interaction between the colloidal probes and the hydrogel as a spring-damper system lead to a simple model for mean square displacement. A histogram of locations sampled by the colloidal probes is directly related to the elastic potential energy and the effective spring constant of the gelatin hydrogels. The effective spring constant is a fixed parameter used in the mean square displacement model to find effective viscosity. These parameters are comparable to viscoelastic parameters obtain by a microrheology analysis of two-dimensional mean square displacements. These results can serve as a guide for assessing hydrogel systems where viscoelastic properties are an important factor in biomaterial design.

  10. The ultratough peeling of elastic tapes from viscoelastic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afferrante, L.; Carbone, G.

    2016-11-01

    The peeling of an elastic thin tape from a flat smooth viscoelastic substrate is investigated. Based on a Green function approach and on the translational invariance, a closed form analytical solution is proposed, which takes into account the viscoelastic dissipation in the substrate material. We find that peeling is prevented from taking place, only when the external force is smaller than the one predicted by Kendall's formula for elastic tapes on rigid substrates. However, we also find that, regardless of the value of the applied force, steady state detachment may occur when the elastic tape is sufficiently stiff. In this case, the constant peeling velocity can be modulated by properly defining the geometrical parameters and the material properties of tape and viscoelastic foundation. On the other hand, for relatively high peeling angles or compliant tapes a threshold value of the peeling force is found, above which the steady-state equilibrium is no longer possible and unstable detachment occurs. The present study contributes to shed light on the behavior of pressure sensitive adhesives in contact with viscoelastic substrates like the human skin. At the same time, it can be considered a first step towards a better understanding of the effect of viscoelastic dissipation on the fracture behavior of solids.

  11. Cell motility and local viscoelasticity of fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Park, S; Koch, D; Cardenas, R; Käs, J; Shih, C K

    2005-12-01

    Viscoelastic changes of the lamellipodial actin cytoskeleton are a fundamental element of cell motility. Thus, the correlation between the local viscoelastic properties of the lamellipodium (including the transitional region to the cell body) and the speed of lamellipodial extension is studied for normal and malignantly transformed fibroblasts. Using our atomic force microscopy-based microrheology technique, we found different mechanical properties between the lamellipodia of malignantly transformed fibroblasts (H-ras transformed and SV-T2 fibroblasts) and normal fibroblasts (BALB 3T3 fibroblasts). The average elastic constants, K, in the leading edge of SV-T2 fibroblasts (0.48 +/- 0.51 kPa) and of H-ras transformed fibroblasts (0.42 +/- 0.35 kPa) are significantly lower than that of BALB 3T3 fibroblasts (1.01 +/- 0.40 kPa). The analysis of time-lapse phase contrast images shows that the decrease in the elastic constant, K, for malignantly transformed fibroblasts is correlated with the enhanced motility of the lamellipodium. The measured mean speeds are 6.1 +/- 4.5 microm/h for BALB 3T3 fibroblasts, 13.1 +/- 5.2 microm/h for SV-T2 fibroblasts, and 26.2 +/- 11.5 microm/h for H-ras fibroblasts. Furthermore, the elastic constant, K, increases toward the cell body in many instances which coincide with an increase in actin filament density toward the cell body. The correlation between the enhanced motility and the decrease in viscoelastic moduli supports the Elastic Brownian Ratchet model for driving lamellipodia extension.

  12. Fractional modeling of Pasternak-type viscoelastic foundation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Wei; Chen, Wen; Xu, Wenxiang

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a fractional Pasternak-type foundation model to characterize the time-dependent properties of the viscoelastic foundation. With varying fractional orders, the proposed model can govern the traditional Winkler model, Pasternak model, and viscoelastic model. We take the four-edge simply supported rectangular thin plate as an example to analyze the viscoelastic foundation reaction, and obtain the solution of the new governing equation. Theoretical results show that the fractional order has a dramatic influence on the deflection and bending moment. It can be further concluded that the softer foundation will become more time-dependent. Subsequently, the difference between fractional Pasternak-type and Winkler foundation model is presented in this work. The existence of constrained boundary is found to definitely affect deflection and bending moment. Such phenomenon, known as the wall effect, is deeply discussed.

  13. Viscoelastic flows in simple liquids generated by vibrating nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Pelton, Matthew; Chakraborty, Debadi; Malachosky, Edward; Guyot-Sionnest, Philippe; Sader, John E

    2013-12-13

    Newtonian fluid mechanics, in which the shear stress is proportional to the strain rate, is synonymous with the flow of simple liquids such as water. We report the measurement and theoretical verification of non-Newtonian, viscoelastic flow phenomena produced by the high-frequency (20 GHz) vibration of gold nanoparticles immersed in water-glycerol mixtures. The observed viscoelasticity is not due to molecular confinement, but is a bulk continuum effect arising from the short time scale of vibration. This represents the first direct mechanical measurement of the intrinsic viscoelastic properties of simple bulk liquids, and opens a new paradigm for understanding extremely high frequency fluid mechanics, nanoscale sensing technologies, and biophysical processes.

  14. Viscoelastic Flows in Simple Liquids Generated by Vibrating Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelton, Matthew; Chakraborty, Debadi; Malachosky, Edward; Guyot-Sionnest, Philippe; Sader, John E.

    2013-12-01

    Newtonian fluid mechanics, in which the shear stress is proportional to the strain rate, is synonymous with the flow of simple liquids such as water. We report the measurement and theoretical verification of non-Newtonian, viscoelastic flow phenomena produced by the high-frequency (20 GHz) vibration of gold nanoparticles immersed in water-glycerol mixtures. The observed viscoelasticity is not due to molecular confinement, but is a bulk continuum effect arising from the short time scale of vibration. This represents the first direct mechanical measurement of the intrinsic viscoelastic properties of simple bulk liquids, and opens a new paradigm for understanding extremely high frequency fluid mechanics, nanoscale sensing technologies, and biophysical processes.

  15. Influence of viscoelasticity on the nano-micromechanical behavior of latex films and pigmented coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, Manish

    2001-09-01

    Nano to microscale deformation behavior of different carboxylated styrene-butadiene co-polymer Latexes were investigated using a commercial nanoindentation device. The latexes differed primarily in their glass transition temperature (T g). The bulk dynamic rheological properties, as determined from a rheometer, dictate the axismmetric deformation behavior of the latexes. Results from dynamic tests performed on latexes were analyzed using the theories in contact and fracture mechanics. Two theories of linear viscoelastic fracture mechanics (LVEFM) were employed to model the adhesion hysteresis (loading-unloading cycle) curves to obtain meaningful cohesive zone (fracture process zone) parameters and a stress intensity functional (K I(t)) for an entire cycle. The stress intensity functional, extracted from the deformation behavior, is independent of the loading history and was shown to depend only on the crack propagation velocity, (da/dt), for the entire cycle. The quantitative values of stress intensities were then discussed in the light of polymer molecular phenomenon's such as viscous chain desorption. Nanoindetation was developed as a tool for systematically investigating both the bulk as well as the cohesive zone properties of viscoelastic polymers. Effect of plastic deformation on the deformation behavior of high pigment volume concentration (PVC) coatings was also analyzed. Polystyrene plastic pigment, CaCO3 and Clay pigments were used to form the coatings layers. High PVC coatings are viscoelastic due to the latex present but also contain air, the third phase, which could explain the plastic deformation if a certain critical yield stress is exceeded. At PVC's greater than 70%, the coatings showed significant plastic (permanent) deformation, which has to be accounted for in modeling the hysteresis curves. The residual plastic deformation was confirmed by imaging the indent over a period of time. Modeling the curves resulted in a compressive yield stress (sigma

  16. Cutting edge science: Laser surgery illuminates viscoelasticity of merotelic kinetochores

    PubMed Central

    Cabello, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence in eukaryotic cells suggests that mechanical forces are essential for building a robust mitotic apparatus and correcting inappropriate chromosome attachments. In this issue, Cojoc et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol., http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201506011) use laser microsurgery in vivo to measure and study the viscoelastic properties of kinetochores. PMID:27002164

  17. Microfluidic Printheads for Multimaterial 3D Printing of Viscoelastic Inks.

    PubMed

    Hardin, James O; Ober, Thomas J; Valentine, Alexander D; Lewis, Jennifer A

    2015-06-03

    Multimaterial 3D printing using microfluidic printheads specifically designed for seamless switching between two visco-elastic materials "on-the-fly" during fabrication is demonstrated. This approach opens new avenues for the digital assembly of functional matter with controlled compositional and property gradients at the microscale.

  18. Viscoelastic/damage modeling of filament-wound spherical pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackett, Robert M.; Dozier, Jan D.

    1987-01-01

    A model of the viscoelastic/damage response of a filament-wound spherical vessel used for long-term pressure containment is developed. The matrix material of the composite system is assumed to be linearly viscoelastic. Internal accumulated damage based upon a quadratic relationship between transverse modulus and maximum circumferential strain is postulated. The resulting nonlinear problem is solved by an iterative routine. The elastic-viscoelastic correspondence is employed to produce, in the Laplace domain, the associated elastic solution for the maximum circumferential strain which is inverted by the method of collocation to yield the time-dependent solution. Results obtained with the model are compared to experimental observations.

  19. Two-phase viscoelastic jetting

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, J-D; Sakai, S.; Sethian, J.A.

    2008-12-10

    A coupled finite difference algorithm on rectangular grids is developed for viscoelastic ink ejection simulations. The ink is modeled by the Oldroyd-B viscoelastic fluid model. The coupled algorithm seamlessly incorporates several things: (1) a coupled level set-projection method for incompressible immiscible two-phase fluid flows; (2) a higher-order Godunov type algorithm for the convection terms in the momentum and level set equations; (3) a simple first-order upwind algorithm for the convection term in the viscoelastic stress equations; (4) central difference approximations for viscosity, surface tension, and upper-convected derivative terms; and (5) an equivalent circuit model to calculate the inflow pressure (or flow rate) from dynamic voltage.

  20. Application of linear response theory to magnetotransport properties of dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J. R.; Redmer, R.; Reinholz, H.

    2010-03-15

    Linear response theory, as developed within the Zubarev formalism, is a quantum statistical approach for describing systems out of but close to equilibrium, which has been successfully applied to a wide variety of plasmas in an external electric field and/or containing a temperature gradient. We present here an extension of linear response theory to include the effects of an external magnetic field. General expressions for the complete set of relevant transport properties are given. In particular, the Hall effect and the influence of a magnetic field on the dc electrical conductivity are discussed. Low-density limits including electron-electron scattering are presented as well as results for arbitrary degeneracy.

  1. On linear structure and phase rotation invariant properties of block M-PSK modulation codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasami, Tadao; Takata, Toyoo; Fujiwara, Toru; Lin, Shu

    1991-01-01

    Two important structural properties of block M(=2')-ary PSK modulation codes, linear structure and phase symmetry, are investigated. An M-ary modulation code is first represented as a code with symbols from the integer group S(MPSK) = (0,1,2,...M-1) under modulo-M addition. Then the linear structure of block MPSK modulation codes over S(M-PSK) with respect to modulo-M vector addition is defined, and conditions are derived under which a block MPSK modulation code is linear. Once the linear structure is developed, the phase symmetry of block M-PSK modulation codes is studied. In particular, a necessary and sufficient condition for a block MPSK modulation code that is linear as a binary code to be invariant under 2 h 180 deg/M phase rotation (for h = 1 to l) is derived. Finally, a list of short 8PSK and 16PSK modulation codes is given, together with their linear structure and the smallest phase rotation for which a code is invariant.

  2. Linear and nonlinear optical properties of hybrid metallic–dielectric plasmonic nanoantennas

    PubMed Central

    Hentschel, Mario; Metzger, Bernd; Knabe, Bastian

    2016-01-01

    Summary We study the linear and nonlinear optical properties of hybrid metallic–dielectric plasmonic gap nanoantennas. Using a two-step-aligned electron beam lithography process, we demonstrate the ability to selectively and reproducibly fill the gap region of nanoantennas with dielectric nanoparticles made of lithium niobate (LiNbO3) with high efficiency. The linear optical properties of the antennas are modified due to the large refractive index of the material. This leads to a change in the coupling strength as well as an increase of the effective refractive index of the surrounding. The combination of these two effects causes a red- or blue-shift of the plasmonic modes, respectively. We find that the nonlinear optical properties of the combined system are only modified in the range of one order of magnitude. The observed changes in our experiments in the nonlinear emission can be traced to the changed dielectric environment and thus the modified linear optical properties. The intrinsic nonlinearity of the dielectric used is in fact small when compared to the nonlinearity of the metallic part of the hybrid antennas. Thus, the nonlinear signals generated by the antenna itself are dominant in our experiments. We demonstrate that the well-known nonlinear response of bulk dielectric materials cannot always straightforwardly be used to boost the nonlinear response of nanoscale antenna systems. Our results significantly deepen the understanding of these interesting hybrid systems and offer important guidelines for the design of nanoscale, nonlinear light sources. PMID:26925359

  3. Linear and nonlinear optical properties of hybrid metallic-dielectric plasmonic nanoantennas.

    PubMed

    Hentschel, Mario; Metzger, Bernd; Knabe, Bastian; Buse, Karsten; Giessen, Harald

    2016-01-01

    We study the linear and nonlinear optical properties of hybrid metallic-dielectric plasmonic gap nanoantennas. Using a two-step-aligned electron beam lithography process, we demonstrate the ability to selectively and reproducibly fill the gap region of nanoantennas with dielectric nanoparticles made of lithium niobate (LiNbO3) with high efficiency. The linear optical properties of the antennas are modified due to the large refractive index of the material. This leads to a change in the coupling strength as well as an increase of the effective refractive index of the surrounding. The combination of these two effects causes a red- or blue-shift of the plasmonic modes, respectively. We find that the nonlinear optical properties of the combined system are only modified in the range of one order of magnitude. The observed changes in our experiments in the nonlinear emission can be traced to the changed dielectric environment and thus the modified linear optical properties. The intrinsic nonlinearity of the dielectric used is in fact small when compared to the nonlinearity of the metallic part of the hybrid antennas. Thus, the nonlinear signals generated by the antenna itself are dominant in our experiments. We demonstrate that the well-known nonlinear response of bulk dielectric materials cannot always straightforwardly be used to boost the nonlinear response of nanoscale antenna systems. Our results significantly deepen the understanding of these interesting hybrid systems and offer important guidelines for the design of nanoscale, nonlinear light sources.

  4. Viscoelastic struts for vibration mitigation of FORTE

    SciTech Connect

    Maly, J.R.; Butler, T.A.

    1996-05-01

    FORTE is a small satellite being developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque (SNLA). It will be placed into orbit via a Pegasus launch in 1996. Testing a full-scale engineering model of the structure using the proto-qualification, system-level vibration spectrum indicated that acceleration levels caused by structural resonances exceed component levels to which certain sensitive components had previously been qualified. Viscoelastic struts were designed to reduce response levels associated with these resonances by increasing the level of damping in key structural modes of the spacecraft. Four identical shear-lap struts were fabricated ad installed between the two primary equipment decks. The struts were designed using a system finite element model (FEM) of the spacecraft, a component FEM of the strut, and measured viscoelastic properties. Direct complex stiffness testing was performed to characterize the frequency-dependent behavior of the struts, and these measured properties (shear modulus and loss factor) were used to represent the struts in the spacecraft model. System-level tests were repeated with the struts installed and the response power spectral densities at critical component locations were reduced by as much as 10 dB in the frequency range of interest.

  5. Viscoelasticity of biofilms and their recalcitrance to mechanical and chemical challenges

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Brandon W.; He, Yan; Ren, Yijin; Zerdoum, Aidan; Libera, Matthew R.; Sharma, Prashant K.; van Winkelhoff, Arie-Jan; Neut, Danielle; Stoodley, Paul; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.

    2015-01-01

    We summarize different studies describing mechanisms through which bacteria in a biofilm mode of growth resist mechanical and chemical challenges. Acknowledging previous microscopic work describing voids and channels in biofilms that govern a biofilms response to such challenges, we advocate a more quantitative approach that builds on the relation between structure and composition of materials with their viscoelastic properties. Biofilms possess features of both viscoelastic solids and liquids, like skin or blood, and stress relaxation of biofilms has been found to be a corollary of their structure and composition, including the EPS matrix and bacterial interactions. Review of the literature on viscoelastic properties of biofilms in ancient and modern environments as well as of infectious biofilms reveals that the viscoelastic properties of a biofilm relate with antimicrobial penetration in a biofilm. In addition, also the removal of biofilm from surfaces appears governed by the viscoelasticity of a biofilm. Herewith, it is established that the viscoelasticity of biofilms, as a corollary of structure and composition, performs a role in their protection against mechanical and chemical challenges. Pathways are discussed to make biofilms more susceptible to antimicrobials by intervening with their viscoelasticity, as a quantifiable expression of their structure and composition. PMID:25725015

  6. Linear Contrail Coverage and Cloud Property Retrievals from 2012 MODIS Imagery over the Northern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duda, D. P.; Minnis, P.; Chee, T.; Khlopenkov, K. V.; Bedka, S. T.

    2015-12-01

    Observation of linear contrail cirrus coverage and retrieval of their optical properties are valuable data for validating atmospheric climate models that represent contrail formation explicitly. These data can reduce our uncertainty of the regional effects of contrail-generated cirrus on global radiative forcing, and thus improve our estimation of the impact of aviation on climate change. We continue our work to create a multi-year climatology of the physical properties of linear contrails from multi-spectral satellite observations. We use an automated contrail detection algorithm (CDA) to determine the coverage of linear persistent contrails over the Northern Hemisphere during 2012. The contrail detection algorithm is a modified form of the Mannstein et al. (1999) method, and uses several channels from thermal infrared MODIS data to reduce the occurrence of false positive detections. Global aircraft emissions waypoint data provided by FAA allow comparison of detected contrails with commercial aircraft flight tracks. A pixel-level product based on the advected flight tracks defined by the waypoint data and U-V wind component profiles from the NASA GMAO MERRA reanalyses has been developed to assign a confidence of contrail detection for the contrail mask. To account for possible contrail cirrus missed by the CDA, a post-processing method based on the assumption that pixels adjacent to detected linear contrails will have radiative signatures similar to those of the detected contrails is applied to the Northern Hemisphere data. Results from MODIS measurements during 2012 will be presented, representing a near-global climatology of contrail coverage. Linear contrail coverage will be compared with coverage estimates determined previously from 2006 MODIS data and with maps of potential persistent contrail formation derived from MERRA reanalysis data for both 2006 and 2012. In addition, contrail physical properties such as optical depth and particle size derived from the

  7. Prediction of the Viscoelastic Bulk Modulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jiaxi; Simon, Sindee

    2010-03-01

    The bulk and shear viscoelastic responses for several materials appear to arise from the same molecular mechanisms at short times, i.e., Andrade creep where the KWW beta parameter is approximately 0.3. If this is indeed the case, prediction and placement of the bulk viscoelastic response can be made simply by knowing the limiting elastic and rubbery bulk moduli and the viscoelastic shear response. The proposed methodology, which uses only easily measured functions, is considerably less time- and labor-intensive than direct measurement of the viscoelastic bulk modulus. Here we investigate this hypothesis and compare the calculated viscoelastic bulk responses for several materials to existing data in the literature.

  8. Spin Trapping and Cytoprotective Properties of Fluorinated Amphiphilic Carrier Conjugates of Cyclic versus Linear Nitrones

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Grégory; Prosak, Robert A.; Han, Yongbin; Ortial, Stéphanie; Rockenbauer, Antal; Pucci, Bernard; Villamena, Frederick A.

    2009-01-01

    Nitrone spin traps have been employed as pharmacological agent against neurodegenerative diseases and ischemia-reperfusion induced injury. The structure-activity relationship was explored for the two types of nitrones, i.e., cyclic (DMPO) and linear (PBN), which are conjugated to a fluorinated amphiphilic carrier (FAC) for their cytoprotective properties against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), 3-morpholinosynonimine hydrochloride (SIN-1) and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) induced cell death on bovine aortic endothelial cells. The compound FAMPO was synthesized and characterized, and its physical-chemical and spin trapping properties were explored. Cytotoxicity and cytoprotective properties of various nitrones either conjugated and non-conjugated to FAC (i.e., AMPO, FAMPO, PBN and FAPBN) were assessed using 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium (MTT) reduction assay. Results show that of all the nitrones tested, FAPBN is the most protective against H2O2, but FAMPO and to a lesser extent its unconjugated form, AMPO, are more protective against SIN-1 induced cytotoxicity. However, none of the nitrones used protect the cells from HNE-induced cell death. The difference in the cytoprotective properties observed between the cyclic and linear nitrones may arise from the differences in their intrinsic antioxidant properties and localization in the cell. PMID:19678661

  9. Properties of Linear Integral Equations Related to the Six-Vertex Model with Disorder Parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boos, Hermann; Göhmann, Frank

    2011-10-01

    One of the key steps in recent work on the correlation functions of the XXZ chain was to regularize the underlying six-vertex model by a disorder parameter α. For the regularized model it was shown that all static correlation functions are polynomials in only two functions. It was further shown that these two functions can be written as contour integrals involving the solutions of a certain type of linear and non-linear integral equations. The linear integral equations depend parametrically on α and generalize linear integral equations known from the study of the bulk thermodynamic properties of the model. In this note we consider the generalized dressed charge and a generalized magnetization density. We express the generalized dressed charge as a linear combination of two quotients of Q-functions, the solutions of Baxter's t-Q-equation. With this result we give a new proof of a lemma on the asymptotics of the generalized magnetization density as a function of the spectral parameter.

  10. Molecular weight effects on interfacial properties of linear and ring polymer melts: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meddah, Chahrazed; Milchev, Andrey; Sabeur, Sid Ahmed; Skvortsov, Alexander M.

    2016-11-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we study and compare the pressure, P, and the surface tension, γ , of linear chains and of ring polymers at the hard walls confining both melts into a slit. We examine the dependence of P and γ on the length (i.e., molecular weight) N of the macromolecules. For linear chains, we find that both pressure and surface tension are inversely proportional to the chain length, P (N ) -P (N →∞ ) ∝N-1,γ (N ) -γ (N →∞ ) ∝N-1 , irrespective of whether the confining planes attract or repel the monomers. In contrast, for melts comprised of cyclic (ring) polymers, neither the pressure nor the surface tension is found to depend on molecular weight N for both kinds of wall-monomer interactions. While other structural properties as, e.g., the probability distributions of trains and loops at impenetrable walls appear quantitatively indistinguishable, we observe an amazing dissimilarity in the probability to find a chain end or a tagged monomer of a ring at a given distance from the wall in both kinds of polymeric melts. In particular, we demonstrate that the conformational equivalence of linear chains in a confined melt to a single chain under conditions of critical adsorption to a planar surface, established two decades ago, does also hold for ring polymers in a melt of linear chains. This analogy does not hold, however, for linear and ring chains in a confined melt of ring chains.

  11. Lattice model of linear telechelic polymer melts. II. Influence of chain stiffness on basic thermodynamic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Wen-Sheng; Freed, Karl F.

    2015-07-14

    The lattice cluster theory (LCT) for semiflexible linear telechelic melts, developed in Paper I, is applied to examine the influence of chain stiffness on the average degree of self-assembly and the basic thermodynamic properties of linear telechelic polymer melts. Our calculations imply that chain stiffness promotes self-assembly of linear telechelic polymer melts that assemble on cooling when either polymer volume fraction ϕ or temperature T is high, but opposes self-assembly when both ϕ and T are sufficiently low. This allows us to identify a boundary line in the ϕ-T plane that separates two regions of qualitatively different influence of chain stiffness on self-assembly. The enthalpy and entropy of self-assembly are usually treated as adjustable parameters in classical Flory-Huggins type theories for the equilibrium self-assembly of polymers, but they are demonstrated here to strongly depend on chain stiffness. Moreover, illustrative calculations for the dependence of the entropy density of linear telechelic polymer melts on chain stiffness demonstrate the importance of including semiflexibility within the LCT when exploring the nature of glass formation in models of linear telechelic polymer melts.

  12. Failure criteria for viscoelastic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knauss, W. G.

    1974-01-01

    Research projects concerned with developing a theory of fracture of materials are discussed. The effects of the geometry of the structure and the loads acting on the structure as they influence the failure process are analyzed. The effects of the viscoelastic deformation characteristics of the bulk elastomer on failure behavior are examined. Additional material parameters which control the fracture process are identified.

  13. Viscoelastic behaviour of pumpkin balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerngross, T.; Xu, Y.; Pellegrino, S.

    2008-11-01

    The lobes of the NASA ULDB pumpkin-shaped super-pressure balloons are made of a thin polymeric film that shows considerable time-dependent behaviour. A nonlinear viscoelastic model based on experimental measurements has been recently established for this film. This paper presents a simulation of the viscoelastic behaviour of ULDB balloons with the finite element software ABAQUS. First, the standard viscoelastic modelling capabilities available in ABAQUS are examined, but are found of limited accuracy even for the case of simple uniaxial creep tests on ULDB films. Then, a nonlinear viscoelastic constitutive model is implemented by means of a user-defined subroutine. This approach is verified by means of biaxial creep experiments on pressurized cylinders and is found to be accurate provided that the film anisotropy is also included in the model. A preliminary set of predictions for a single lobe of a ULDB is presented at the end of the paper. It indicates that time-dependent effects in a balloon structure can lead to significant stress redistribution and large increases in the transverse strains in the lobes.

  14. Standing shear waves in anisotropic viscoelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krit, T.; Golubkova, I.; Andreev, V.

    2015-10-01

    We studied standing shear waves in anisotropic resonator represented by a rectangular parallelepiped (layer) fixed without slipping between two wooden plates of finite mass. The viscoelastic layer with edges of 70 mm × 40 mm × 15 mm was made of a rubber-like polymer plastisol with rubber bands inside. The bands were placed vertical between the top and the bottom plate. Mechanical properties of the plastisol itself were carefully measured previously. It was found that plastisol shows a cubic nonlinear behavior, i.e. the stress-strain curve could be represented as: σ = μɛ + βμɛ3, where ɛ stands for shear strain and σ is an applied shear stress. The value of shear modulus μ depends on frequency and was found to be several kilopascals which is common for such soft solids. Nonlinear parameter β is frequency dependent too and varies in range from tenths to unity at 1-100 Hz frequency range, decreasing with frequency growth. Stretching the rubber bands inside the layer leads to change of elastic properties in resonator. Such effect could be noticed due to frequency response of the resonator. The numerical model of the resonator was based on finite elements method (FEM) and performed in MatLab. The resonator was cut in hundreds of right triangular prisms. Each prism was provided with viscoelastic properties of the layer except for the top prisms provided with the wooden plate properties and the prisms at the site of the rubber bands provided with the rubber properties. The boundary conditions on each prism satisfied the requirements that resonator is inseparable and all its boundaries but bottom are free. The bottom boundary was set to move horizontally with constant acceleration amplitude. It was shown numerically that the resonator shows anisotropic behavior expressed in different frequency response to oscillations applied to a bottom boundary in different directions.

  15. Nonlinear Viscoelastic Stress Transfer As a Possible Aftershock Triggering Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Shcherbakov, R.

    2014-12-01

    The earthquake dynamics can be modelled by employing the spring-block system [Burridge and Knopoff, 1967]. In this approach the earthquake fault is modelled by an array of blocks coupling the loading plate and the lower plate. The dynamics of the system is governed by the system of equations of motion for each block. It is possible to map this system into a cellular automata model, where the stress acting on each block is increased in each time step, and the failing process (frictional slip) is described by stress transfer rules [Olami et al, 1992]. The OFC model produces a power-law distribution for avalanche statistics but it is not capable of producing robust aftershock sequences which follow Omori's law.We propose a nonlinear viscoelastic stress transfer mechanism in the aftershock triggering. In a basic spring-block model setting, we introduce the nonlinear viscoelastic stress transfer between neighbouring blocks, as well as between blocks and the top loading plate. The shear stress of the viscous component is a power-law function of the velocity gradient with an exponent smaller or greater than 1 for the nonlinear viscoelasticity, or 1 for the linear case. The stress transfer function of this nonlinear viscoelastic model has a power-law time-dependent form. It features an instantaneous stress transmission triggering an instantaneous avalanche, which is the same as the original spring-block model; and a power-law relaxation term, which could trigger further aftershocks. We incorporate this nonlinear viscoelasticity mechanism in a lattice cellular automata model. The model could exhibit both the Gutenberg-Richter scaling for the frequency-magnitude distribution and a power-law time decay of aftershocks, which is in accordance with Omori's law. Our study suggests that the stress transfer function may play an important role in the aftershock triggering. We have found that the time decay curve of aftershocks is affected by the shape of the stress transfer function

  16. Post-seismic relaxation theory on laterally heterogeneous viscoelastic model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.F.

    2003-01-01

    Investigation was carried out into the problem of relaxation of a laterally heterogeneous viscoelastic Earth following an impulsive moment release event. The formal solution utilizes a semi-analytic solution for post-seismic deformation on a laterally homogeneous Earth constructed from viscoelastic normal modes, followed by application of mode coupling theory to derive the response on the aspherical Earth. The solution is constructed in the Laplace transform domain using the correspondence principle and is valid for any linear constitutive relationship between stress and strain. The specific implementation described in this paper is a semi-analytic discretization method which assumes isotropic elastic structure and a Maxwell constitutive relation. It accounts for viscoelastic-gravitational coupling under lateral variations in elastic parameters and viscosity. For a given viscoelastic structure and minimum wavelength scale, the computational effort involved with the numerical algorithm is proportional to the volume of the laterally heterogeneous region. Examples are presented of the calculation of post-seismic relaxation with a shallow, laterally heterogeneous volume following synthetic impulsive seismic events, and they illustrate the potentially large effect of regional 3-D heterogeneities on regional deformation patterns.

  17. Viscoelasticity of brain corpus callosum in biaxial tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labus, Kevin M.; Puttlitz, Christian M.

    2016-11-01

    Computational models of the brain rely on accurate constitutive relationships to model the viscoelastic behavior of brain tissue. Current viscoelastic models have been derived from experiments conducted in a single direction at a time and therefore lack information on the effects of multiaxial loading. It is also unclear if the time-dependent behavior of brain tissue is dependent on either strain magnitude or the direction of loading when subjected to tensile stresses. Therefore, biaxial stress relaxation and cyclic experiments were conducted on corpus callosum tissue isolated from fresh ovine brains. Results demonstrated the relaxation behavior to be independent of strain magnitude, and a quasi-linear viscoelastic (QLV) model was able to accurately fit the experimental data. Also, an isotropic reduced relaxation tensor was sufficient to model the stress-relaxation in both the axonal and transverse directions. The QLV model was fitted to the averaged stress relaxation tests at five strain magnitudes while using the measured strain history from the experiments. The resulting model was able to accurately predict the stresses from cyclic tests at two strain magnitudes. In addition to deriving a constitutive model from the averaged experimental data, each specimen was fitted separately and the resulting distributions of the model parameters were reported and used in a probabilistic analysis to determine the probability distribution of model predictions and the sensitivity of the model to the variance of the parameters. These results can be used to improve the viscoelastic constitutive models used in computational studies of the brain.

  18. Viscoelastic Behavior and Adhesion of Ionic Alginate Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, Rebecca; Shull, Kenneth

    2004-03-01

    Transient networks, polymer gels in which the physical crosslinks can be broken and recovered, have been of recent interest to the scientific community, especially due to their potential as soft, dissipative materials for biomedical applications. Alginates, naturally derived linear copolymers of mannuronic and guluronic acid residues, can form hydrogels in the presence of divalent ions. Alginate gels have been studied extensively and are useful model systems to elucidate the mechanisms behind the mechanical behavior of reversibly associating polymers. In this study, alginate hydrogels were formed by the addition of Ca ions to an aqueous solution of sodium alginate. The rheological and mechanical behavior of the hydrogels was studied using an axisymmetric probe tack apparatus with stress relaxation and cyclic movement capabilities. These hydrogels behave elastically at small strains and become viscoelastic at large strains, supporting transient network theories. During cyclic loading tests, it was found that the alginate hydrogels exhibit time-dependent adhesion. The effects of humidity, aging and ion exchange on the gel properties were also investigated.

  19. Leukocyte deformability: finite element modeling of large viscoelastic deformation.

    PubMed

    Dong, C; Skalak, R

    1992-09-21

    An axisymmetric deformation of a viscoelastic sphere bounded by a prestressed elastic thin shell in response to external pressure is studied by a finite element method. The research is motivated by the need for understanding the passive behavior of human leukocytes (white blood cells) and interpreting extensive experimental data in terms of the mechanical properties. The cell at rest is modeled as a sphere consisting of a cortical prestressed shell with incompressible Maxwell fluid interior. A large-strain deformation theory is developed based on the proposed model. General non-linear, large strain constitutive relations for the cortical shell are derived by neglecting the bending stiffness. A representation of the constitutive equations in the form of an integral of strain history for the incompressible Maxwell interior is used in the formulation of numerical scheme. A finite element program is developed, in which a sliding boundary condition is imposed on all contact surfaces. The mathematical model developed is applied to evaluate experimental data of pipette tests and observations of blood flow.

  20. Thermorheologically complex behavior of multi-phase viscoelastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinson, L. C.; Knauss, W. G.

    T HE DYNAMIC correspondence principle of viscoelasticity is used to study the nature of time-temperature behavior of multi-phase composites by means of finite element computation. The composite considered contains viscoelastic inclusions embedded in a viscoelastic matrix. Each phase of the composite is considered to be thermorheologically simple, but the resulting mechanical properties of the composite are thermorheologically complex. The deviation of the composite moduli from thermorheologically simple behavior of the matrix material is shown to occur at frequencies and temperatures where the glass-to-rubber transition of the included phases are reached. Properties of a styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) block copolymer are investigated based on the individual phase properties of polystyrene and polybutadiene. To achieve congruence of the results with experimental data, it is necessary to consider a transition phase of properties "intermediate" to those of polystyrene and polybutadiene. Using accurate physical information on the individual phase properties and on the interphase region, it is possible to predict properties of multiphase composites. Although detailed a priori knowledge of such an interphase is usually lacking, it is shown that the computational procedure presented here together with an extended range of test frequencies will aid in estimating the properties of the phase in question.

  1. New effective moduli of isotropic viscoelastic composites. Part I. Theoretical justification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svetashkov, A. A.; Vakurov, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    According to the approach based on the commonality of problems of determining effective moduli of composites and viscoelastic solids, which properties are time-inhomogeneous, it is assumed that a viscoelastic solid is a two-component composite. One component displays temporal properties defined by a pair of Castiglianian-type effective moduli, and the other is defined by a pair of Lagrangian-type effective moduli. The Voigt and Reuss averaging is performed for the obtained two-composite solid with the introduction of a time function of volume fraction. In order to determine closer estimates, a method of iterative transformation of time effective moduli is applied to the viscoelastic Voigt-Reuss model. The physical justification of the method is provided. As a result, new time effective moduli of the viscoelastic solid are obtained which give a closer estimate of temporal properties as compared to the known models.

  2. Modeling and experimental verification of frequency-, amplitude-, and magneto-dependent viscoelasticity of magnetorheological elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Fu-Long; Bai, Xian-Xu; Qian, Li-Jun

    2016-10-01

    Magnetorheological elastomers (MREs), a smart composite, exhibit dual characteristics of both MR materials and particle reinforced composites, i.e., the viscoelasticity of MREs depends on external magnetic field as well as strain amplitude and excitation frequency. In this article, the principle of a frequency-, amplitude-, and magneto-dependent linear dynamic viscoelastic model for isotropic MREs is proposed and investigated. The viscoelasticity of MREs is divided into frequency- and amplitude-dependent mechanical viscoelasticity and frequency-, amplitude-, and magneto-dependent magnetic viscoelasticity. Based on the microstructures of ferrous particles and matrix, the relationships between mechanical shear modulus corresponding to the mechanical viscoelasticity and strain amplitude and excitation frequency are obtained. The relationships between magnetic shear modulus corresponding to the magnetic viscoelasticity with strain amplitude, excitation frequency, and further external magnetic field are derived using the magneto-elastic theory. The influence of magnetic saturation on the MR effect is also considered. The dynamic characteristics of a fabricated isotropic MRE sample under different strain amplitudes, excitation frequencies and external magnetic fields are tested. The parameters of the proposed model are identified with the experimental data and the theoretical expressions of shear storage modulus and shear loss modulus of the MRE sample are obtained. In the light of the theoretical expressions, the loss factors of the MRE sample under different loading conditions are analyzed and compared with the test results to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed model.

  3. The photophysical properties of expanded porphyrins: relationships between aromaticity, molecular geometry and non-linear optical properties.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jong Min; Yoon, Zin Seok; Shin, Jae-Yoon; Kim, Kil Suk; Yoon, Min-Chul; Kim, Dongho

    2009-01-21

    Porphyrins, which consist of four pyrrolic subunits, are a ubiquitous class of naturally occurring compound with versatile photophysical properties. As an extension of the basic structure of the porphyrin macrocycle, there have been a multitude of approaches to synthesize expanded porphyrins with more than four pyrrole rings, leading to the modification of the macrocyclic ring size, planarity, number of pi-electrons and aromaticity. However, the relationship between the photophysical properties and the structures of expanded porphyrins has not been systematically investigated. The main purpose of this article is to describe the structure-property relationships of a variety of expanded porphyrins based on experimental and theoretical results, which include steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic characterizations, non-linear absorption ability and nucleus-independent chemical shift calculations.

  4. Viscoelasticity and shear thinning of nanoconfined water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapoor, Karan; Amandeep, Patil, Shivprasad

    2014-01-01

    Understanding flow properties and phase behavior of water confined to nanometer-sized pores and slits is central to a wide range of problems in science, such as percolation in geology, lubrication of future nano-machines, self-assembly and interactions of biomolecules, and transport through porous media in filtration processes. Experiments with different techniques in the past have reported that viscosity of nanoconfined water increases, decreases, or remains close to bulk water. Here we show that water confined to less than 20-nm-thick films exhibits both viscoelasticity and shear thinning. Typically viscoelasticity and shear thinning appear due to shearing of complex non-Newtonian mixtures possessing a slowly relaxing microstructure. The shear response of nanoconfined water in a range of shear frequencies (5 to 25 KHz) reveals that relaxation time diverges with reducing film thickness. It suggests that slow relaxation under confinement possibly arises due to existence of a critical point with respect to slit width. This criticality is similar to the capillary condensation in porous media.

  5. A generalized hydrodynamic model for acoustic mode stability in viscoelastic plasma fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borah, B.; Haloi, A.; Karmakar, P. K.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper a generalized hydrodynamic (GH) model to investigate acoustic-mode excitation and stability in simplified strongly coupled bi-component plasma is proposed. The goal is centered in seeing the viscoelasticity-influences on the instability properties. The dispersive and nondispersive features are methodologically explored followed by numerical illustrations. It is seen that, unlike usual plasma acoustic mode, here the mode stability is drastically modified due to the considered viscoelastic effects contributed from both the electronic and ionic fluids. For example, it is found that there exists an excitation threshold value on angular wavenumber, K ≈3 in the K-space on the Debye scale, beyond which only dispersive characteristic features prevail. Further, it is demonstrated that the viscoelastic relaxation time plays a stabilizing influential role on the wave dynamics. In contrast, it is just opposite for the effective viscoelastic relaxation effect. Consistency with the usual viscoelasticity-free situations, with and without plasma approximation taken into account, is also established and explained. It is identified and conjectured that the plasma fluid viscoelasticity acts as unavoidable dispersive agency in attributing several new characteristics to acoustic wave excitation and propagation. The analysis is also exploited to derive a quantitative glimpse on the various basic properties and dimensionless numbers of the viscoelastic plasma. Finally, extended implications of our results tentative to different cosmic, space and astrophysical situations, amid the entailed facts and faults, are highlighted together with indicated future directions.

  6. An investigation on the motion and deformation of viscoelastic drops descending in another viscoelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davoodi, M.; Norouzi, M.

    2016-10-01

    In the present study, an investigation of the motion and shape deformation of drops is carried out in creeping flow to highlight the effect of viscoelastic properties on the problem. A perturbation method is employed to derive an analytical solution for the general case that both interior and exterior fluids are viscoelastic, both fluids obeying the Giesekus model. An experiment is also performed for the limiting case of an immiscible drop of a 0.03% (w/w) polyacrylamide in an 80:20 glycerol/water solution falling through a viscous Newtonian silicon oil (410 cP polydimethylsiloxane oil) in order to check the accuracy of the analytical solution. It is shown that the addition of elastic properties to the interior fluid may cause a decrease in the terminal velocity of the droplet while an increase in the elastic properties of the exterior fluid results in the opposite behavior and increases the terminal velocity. The well-known spherical shape of creeping drops for Newtonian fluids is modified by elasticity into either prolate or oblate shapes. Using the analytical solution, it is shown that normal stresses play a key role on the final steady-state shape of the drops. To keep the drops spherical in viscoelastic phases, it is shown that the effect of normal stresses on the interior and exterior media can cancel out under certain conditions. The results presented here may be of interest to industries dealing with petroleum and medicine processing, paint and power-plant related fields where knowledge of the shape and terminal velocity of descending droplets is of great importance.

  7. Stochastic system identification of skin properties: linear and wiener static nonlinear methods.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Hunter, Ian W

    2012-10-01

    Wiener static nonlinear system identification was used to study the linear dynamics and static nonlinearities in the response of skin and underlying tissue under indentation in vivo. A device capable of measuring the dynamic mechanical properties of bulk skin tissue was developed and it incorporates a custom-built Lorentz force actuator that measures the dynamic compliance between the input force (<12 N) and the output displacement (<20 mm). A simple linear stochastic system identification technique produced a variance accounted for (VAF) of 75-81% and Wiener static nonlinear techniques increased the VAF by 5%. Localized linear techniques increased the VAF to 85-95% with longer tests. Indentation experiments were conducted on 16 test subjects to determine device sensitivity and repeatability. Using the device, the coefficient of variation of test metrics was found to be as low as 2% for a single test location. The measured tissue stiffness was 300 N/m near the surface and 4.5 kN/m for high compression. The damping ranged from 5 to 23 N s/m. The bulk skin properties were also shown to vary significantly with gender and body mass index. The device and techniques used in this research can be applied to consumer product analysis, medical diagnosis and tissue research.

  8. The role of flow-independent viscoelasticity in the biphasic tensile and compressive responses of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Huang, C Y; Mow, V C; Ateshian, G A

    2001-10-01

    A long-standing challenge in the biomechanics of connective tissues (e.g., articular cartilage, ligament, tendon) has been the reported disparities between their tensile and compressive properties. In general, the intrinsic tensile properties of the solid matrices of these tissues are dictated by the collagen content and microstructural architecture, and the intrinsic compressive properties are dictated by their proteoglycan content and molecular organization as well as water content. These distinct materials give rise to a pronounced and experimentally well-documented nonlinear tension-compression stress-strain responses, as well as biphasic or intrinsic extracellular matrix viscoelastic responses. While many constitutive models of articular cartilage have captured one or more of these experimental responses, no single constitutive law has successfully described the uniaxial tensile and compressive responses of cartilage within the same framework. The objective of this study was to combine two previously proposed extensions of the biphasic theory of Mow et al. [1980, ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 102, pp. 73-84] to incorporate tension-compression nonlinearity as well as intrinsic viscoelasticity of the solid matrix of cartilage. The biphasic-conewise linear elastic model proposed by Soltz and Ateshian [2000, ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 122, pp. 576-586] and based on the bimodular stress-strain constitutive law introduced by Curnier et al. [1995, J. Elasticity, 37, pp. 1-38], as well as the biphasic poroviscoelastic model of Mak [1986, ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 108, pp. 123-130], which employs the quasi-linear viscoelastic model of Fung [1981, Biomechanics: Mechanical Properties of Living Tissues, Springer-Verlag, New York], were combined in a single model to analyze the response of cartilage to standard testing configurations. Results were compared to experimental data from the literature and it was found that a simultaneous prediction of compression and tension experiments of

  9. A novel viscoelastic-based ferrofluid for continuous sheathless microfluidic separation of nonmagnetic microparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Yan, Sheng; Yuan, Dan; Zhao, Qianbin; Tan, Say Hwa; Nguyen, Nam-Trung; Li, Weihua

    2016-10-05

    Separation of microparticles has found broad applications in biomedicine, industry and clinical diagnosis. In a conventional aqueous ferrofluid, separation of microparticles usually employs a sheath flow or two offset magnets to confine particle streams for downstream particle sorting. This complicates the fluid control, device fabrication, and dilutes the particle sample. In this work, we propose and develop a novel viscoelastic ferrofluid by replacing the Newtonian base medium of the conventional ferrofluid with non-Newtonian poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) aqueous solution. The properties of both viscoelastic 3D focusing and negative magnetophoresis of the viscoelastic ferrofluid were verified and investigated. By employing the both properties in a serial manner, continuous and sheathless separation of nonmagnetic particles based on particle size has been demonstrated. This novel viscoelastic ferrofluid is expected to bring more flexibility and versatility to the design and functionality in microfluidic devices.

  10. Effect of Sb addition on linear and non-linear optical properties of amorphous Ge-Se-Sn thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Navjeet; Sharma, Surbhi; Sarin, Amit; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Optical characterization of amorphous thin films of Ge20Sn10Se70-xSbx (x = 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15) has been carried out. Thin films were deposited onto pre cleaned glass substrates using thermal evaporation technique. Transmission spectra of the films were recorded, for normal incidence, in range 400-2400 nm. Refractive index of the films was calculated using the envelope method by Swanepoel. Dispersion analysis has been carried out using single effective oscillator model. Other optical constants such as absorption coefficients, extinction coefficients have also been evaluated. Tauc plots were used to evaluate the optical band gap. The refractive index has been found to be increasing while the band gap decreases with increasing Sb concentration. The observed optical behavior of the films has been explained using chemical bond approach. Cohesive energy is found to be decreasing in the present work, which reflects that bond strength decreases with the increasing content of Sb. Non-linear optical parameters (i.e. n2 and χ(3)) have been derived from linear optical parameters (i.e. n, k, Eg). Observed changes in linear and non-linear parameters have been reported in this study.

  11. The Component Slope Linear Model for Calculating Intensive Partial Molar Properties: Application to Waste Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Jacob G.

    2013-01-11

    Partial molar properties are the changes occurring when the fraction of one component is varied while the fractions of all other component mole fractions change proportionally. They have many practical and theoretical applications in chemical thermodynamics. Partial molar properties of chemical mixtures are difficult to measure because the component mole fractions must sum to one, so a change in fraction of one component must be offset with a change in one or more other components. Given that more than one component fraction is changing at a time, it is difficult to assign a change in measured response to a change in a single component. In this study, the Component Slope Linear Model (CSLM), a model previously published in the statistics literature, is shown to have coefficients that correspond to the intensive partial molar properties. If a measured property is plotted against the mole fraction of a component while keeping the proportions of all other components constant, the slope at any given point on a graph of this curve is the partial molar property for that constituent. Actually plotting this graph has been used to determine partial molar properties for many years. The CSLM directly includes this slope in a model that predicts properties as a function of the component mole fractions. This model is demonstrated by applying it to the constant pressure heat capacity data from the NaOH-NaAl(OH{sub 4}H{sub 2}O system, a system that simplifies Hanford nuclear waste. The partial molar properties of H{sub 2}O, NaOH, and NaAl(OH){sub 4} are determined. The equivalence of the CSLM and the graphical method is verified by comparing results detennined by the two methods. The CSLM model has been previously used to predict the liquidus temperature of spinel crystals precipitated from Hanford waste glass. Those model coefficients are re-interpreted here as the partial molar spinel liquidus temperature of the glass components.

  12. Viscoelastic behavior of dense microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cametti, C.; Codastefano, P.; D'arrigo, G.; Tartaglia, P.; Rouch, J.; Chen, S. H.

    1990-09-01

    We have performed extensive measurements of shear viscosity, ultrasonic absorption, and sound velocity in a ternary system consisting of water-decane-sodium di(2-ethylhexyl)sulfo- succinate(AOT), in the one-phase region where it forms a water-in-oil microemulsion. We observe a rapid increase of the static shear viscosity in the dense microemulsion region. Correspondingly the sound absorption shows unambiguous evidence of a viscoelastic behavior. The absorption data for various volume fractions and temperatures can be reduced to a universal curve by scaling both the absorption and the frequency by the measured static shear viscosity. The sound absorption can be interpreted as coming from the high-frequency tail of the viscoelastic relaxation, describable by a Cole-Cole relaxation formula with unusually small elastic moduli.

  13. Guaranteed properties of gain scheduled control for linear parameter-varying plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shamma, Jeff S.; Athans, Michael

    1991-01-01

    Gain scheduling has proven to be a successful design methodology in many engineering applications. However, in the absence of a sound theoretical analysis, these designs come with no guarantees on the robustness, performance, or even nominal stability of the overall gain scheduled design. This paper presents such an analysis for one type of gain scheduled system, namely, a linear parameter-varying plant scheduling on its exogenous parameters. Conditions are given which guarantee that the stability, robustness, and performance properties of the fixed operating point designs carry over to the global gain scheduled design. These conditions confirm and formalize popular notions regarding gain scheduled design, such as the scheduling variable should 'vary slowly'.

  14. Linear and nonlinear optical properties of gold nanoparticle-doped photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Bigot, L; El Hamzaoui, H; Le Rouge, A; Bouwmans, G; Chassagneux, F; Capoen, B; Bouazaoui, M

    2011-09-26

    We report on the production of air/silica photonic crystal fiber doped with gold nanoparticles. The stack-and-draw technique was used to combine a gold nanoparticles-doped silica core rod synthesized by the sol-gel route with capillaries drawn from commercially available silica tubes. The presence of nanoparticles in the core region was confirmed at the different steps of the process down to the fiber geometry, even after multiple drawings at ~2000 °C. Optical properties of the fiber were investigated and put in evidence the impact of gold nanoparticles on both linear and nonlinear transmission.

  15. Antenna Linear-Quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) Controllers: Properties, Limits of Performance, and Tuning Procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gawronski, W.

    2004-01-01

    Wind gusts are the main disturbances that depreciate tracking precision of microwave antennas and radiotelescopes. The linear-quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) controllers - as compared with the proportional-and-integral (PI) controllers significantly improve the tracking precision in wind disturbances. However, their properties have not been satisfactorily understood; consequently, their tuning is a trial-and-error process. A control engineer has two tools to tune an LQG controller: the choice of coordinate system of the controller model and the selection of weights of the LQG performance index. This article analyzes properties of an open- and closed-loop antenna. It shows that the proper choice of coordinates of the open-loop model simplifies the shaping of the closed-loop performance. The closed-loop properties are influenced by the LQG weights. The article shows the impact of the weights on the antenna closed-loop bandwidth, disturbance rejection properties, and antenna acceleration. The bandwidth and the disturbance rejection characterize the antenna performance, while the acceleration represents the performance limit set by the antenna hardware (motors). The article presents the controller tuning procedure, based on the coordinate selection and the weight properties. The procedure rationally shapes the closed-loop performance, as an alternative to the trial-and-error approach.

  16. Innovative viscoelastic material selection strategy based on dma and mini-shaker tests for spacecraft applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawak, B. J.; Cabon, B. H.; Aglietti, G. S.

    2017-02-01

    With the increase of payload sensitivity (such as high precision optics for sub-metric imager), micro-vibration disturbances generated by spinning actuators, if not controlled, may affect on-board instruments and may worsen the quality of pictures taken by an Earth observation imager. For the last two decades, viscoelastic materials have been gradually used in isolators designed for space applications. Their attractiveness comes from their ability to act as a second order low pass filter to minimise micro-vibration forces. In this study, an innovative viscoelastic material pre-selection process has been developed to assess the mechanical and thermal properties of viscoelastic isolators during early design stages. In order to characterise the viscoelastic isolators, tests have been performed at viscoelastic material level (material characterisation) and at viscoelastic isolator level (isolator characterisation). A qualitative correlation has been established between the master curves (material characterisation) and the transmissibility curves (isolator characterisation) which leads to a possible prediction of expected isolation performances of a viscoelastic material during early design stages.

  17. Unsteady Boundary-Layer Flow over Jerked Plate Moving in a Free Stream of Viscoelastic Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Mehmood, Ahmer; Ali, Asif; Saleem, Najma

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the unsteady boundary-layer flow of a viscoelastic non-Newtonian fluid over a flat surface. The plate is suddenly jerked to move with uniform velocity in a uniform stream of non-Newtonian fluid. Purely analytic solution to governing nonlinear equation is obtained. The solution is highly accurate and valid for all values of the dimensionless time 0 ≤ τ < ∞. Flow properties of the viscoelastic fluid are discussed through graphs. PMID:24892060

  18. Collective dynamics of sperm in viscoelastic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Chih-Kuan; Harvey, Benedict B.; Fiore, Alyssa G.; Ardon, Florencia; Suarez, Susan S.; Wu, Mingming

    Collective dynamics in biology is an interesting subject for physicists, in part because of its close relations to emergent behaviors in condensed matter, such as phase separation and criticality. However, the emergence of order is often less drastic in systems composed of the living cells, sometimes due to the natural variability among individual organisms. Here, using bull sperm as a model system, we demonstrate that the cells migrate collectively in viscoelastic fluids, exhibiting behavior similar to ``flocking''. This collectiveness is greatly reduced in similarly viscous Newtonian fluids, suggesting that the cell-cell interaction is primarily a result of the elastic property or the memory effect of the fluids, instead of pure hydrodynamic interactions. Unlike bacterial swarming, this collectiveness does not require a change in phenotype of the cells; therefore, it is a better model system for physicists. Supported by NIH grant 1R01HD070038.

  19. Preparation, linear and NLO properties of DNA-CTMA-SBE complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manea, Ana-Maria; Rau, Ileana; Kajzar, Francois; Meghea, Aurelia

    2013-10-01

    Synthesis of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) - was cetyltrimethylammonium (CTMA) - sea buckthorn extract (SBE) at different concentrations is decribed. The complexes were processed into good optical quality thin films by spin coating on different substrates such as: glass, silica and ITO covered glass substrates. SBE contains many bioactive substances that can be used in the treatment of several diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, and acute mountain sickness. The obtained thin films were characterized for their spectroscopic, fluorescent, linear and nonlinear optical properties as function of SBE concentration. The third-order nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of thin films were determined by the optical third-harmonic generation technique at 1 064.2 nm fundamental wavelength.

  20. Estimates for the overall linear properties of pointwise heterogeneous solids with application to elasto-viscoplasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idiart, Martín I.; Lahellec, Noel

    2016-12-01

    New estimates are derived for the overall properties of linear solids with pointwise heterogeneous local properties. The derivation relies on the use of 'comparison solids' which, unlike comparison solids considered previously, are themselves pointwise heterogeneous. The estimates are then exploited within an incremental homogenization scheme to determine the overall response of multiphase elasto-viscoplastic solids under arbitrary loading histories. By way of example, the scheme is applied to incompressible Maxwellian solids with power-law plastic dissipation; particularly simple estimates of the Hashin-Shtrikman type are obtained. Predictions are confronted with full-field simulations for particulate composites under cyclic and rotating loading conditions. Good agreement is found for all cases considered. In particular, elasto-plastic transitions, tension-compression asymmetries (Bauschinger effect) and stress-path distortions induced by material heterogeneity are all well-captured, thus improving significantly on commonly used elastic-plastic decoupled schemes.

  1. Device and method for imaging of non-linear and linear properties of formations surrounding a borehole

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Paul A; Tencate, James A; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Guyer, Robert; Vu, Cung Khac; Skelt, Christopher

    2013-11-05

    In some aspects of the disclosure, a method and an apparatus is disclosed for investigating material surrounding the borehole. The method includes generating a first low frequency acoustic wave within the borehole, wherein the first low frequency acoustic wave induces a linear and a nonlinear response in one or more features in the material that are substantially perpendicular to a radius of the borehole; directing a first sequence of high frequency pulses in a direction perpendicularly with respect to the longitudinal axis of the borehole into the material contemporaneously with the first acoustic wave; and receiving one or more second high frequency pulses at one or more receivers positionable in the borehole produced by an interaction between the first sequence of high frequency pulses and the one or more features undergoing linear and nonlinear elastic distortion due to the first low frequency acoustic wave to investigate the material surrounding the borehole.

  2. Linear and non-linear optical properties of capped CdTe nanocrystals prepared by mechanical alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, G. L.; Yang, Q.; Hömmerich, U.; Seo, J. T.; Temple, D.

    2004-12-01

    CdTe nanocrystals were prepared by mechanical alloying the elemental Cd and Te powders. The formation of CdTe with a single cubic phase after 20 h of ball milling was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The surface of as-milled CdTe nanoparticles was then capped with polarization TOP/TOPO or (Na3PO4)n organic ligand, which resulted in colorful dispersion solution with optical absorption peaks located at 573 nm and 525 nm, respectively. The third-order non-linearity, namely, the non-linear refraction and two-photon absorption (TPA) coefficient, of the capped CdTe dispersion samples were evaluated using Z-scan technique. The fitting of Z-scan experimental data with a special equation demonstrated that the capped CdTe nanocrystals possess large third-order susceptibilities at resonant wavelength. The non-linear figure of merit (γ/β) for 20 h as-milled CdTe nanocrystals after capping with TOP/TOPO was determined to be ∼ -2 × 10-5 m, which is nearly 215 times larger than the value reported for bulk CdTe crystals.

  3. A Numerical Model of Viscoelastic Flow in Microchannels

    SciTech Connect

    Trebotich, D; Colella, P; Miller, G; Liepmann, D

    2002-11-14

    The authors present a numerical method to model non-Newtonian, viscoelastic flow at the microscale. The equations of motion are the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the Oldroyd-B constitutive equation. This constitutive equation is chosen to model a Boger fluid which is representative of complex biological solutions exhibiting elastic behavior due to macromolecules in the solution (e.g., DNA solution). The numerical approach is a projection method to impose the incompressibility constraint and a Lax-Wendroff method to predict velocities and stresses while recovering both viscous and elastic limits. The method is second-order accurate in space and time, free-stream preserving, has a time step constraint determined by the advective CFL condition, and requires the solution of only well-behaved linear systems amenable to the use of fast iterative methods. They demonstrate the method for viscoelastic incompressible flow in simple microchannels (2D) and microducts (3D).

  4. Development of a viscoelastic continuum damage model for cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, R. W.

    2008-12-01

    A previously developed spectrum model for linear viscoelastic behavior of solids is used to describe the rate-dependent damage growth of a time dependent material under cyclic loading. Through the use of the iterative solution of a special Volterra integral equation, the cyclic strain history is described. The spectrum-based model is generalized for any strain rate and any uniaxial load history to formulate the damage function. Damage evolution in the body is described through the use of a rate-type evolution law which uses a pseudo strain to express the viscoelastic constitutive equation with damage. The resulting damage function is used to formulate a residual strength model. The methodology presented is demonstrated by comparing the peak values of the computed cyclic strain history as well as the residual strength model predictions to the experimental data of a polymer matrix composite.

  5. Optical properties of phenanthrene: A DFT study for comparison between linear and nonlinear regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omidi, A. R.; Dadsetani, M.

    2016-05-01

    The present study tries to determine the optical characteristics as well as the electronic structure of phenanthrene as an important nonlinear organic crystal. We have performed our calculations within the frame work of DFT. Also, we have used bootstrap exchange-correlation kernel (within the framework of TDDFT) to estimate the excitonic effects. According to the results of our study, the investigated crystal has a band structure with low dispersions which is a sign of low intermolecular interactions. In addition to the high values of linear and nonlinear susceptibilities, the crystal in question has a wide range of transparency as well as sufficient anisotropy which make it promising crystal for nonlinear optical applications. Our TDDFT calculations show that the influence of excitonic effects on optical properties can be very dramatic, particularly near the band edge. In addition, the crystal in question shows extremely small wavelengths of plasmon peaks. Furthermore, this study also covers the 2ω/ω intra- and inter-band contributions to the dominant nonlinear susceptibilities. Findings indicate that these contributions have opposite signs at higher energies and nullify each other. Our calculations show that χxxz, χxzx and χzxx have largest values of nonlinear response but χxxz is the dominant component at IR-VIS region. Moreover, the current study shows significant similarities between linear and nonlinear spectra, when we draw linear one as a function of both ω and 2ω. Finally, our simulation reproduces the experimental results very well.

  6. Causal analysis of the viscoelastic Lamb problem.

    PubMed

    Moura, André

    2010-03-01

    A mathematical development is given for the generation of viscoelastic waves by an impulsive line source acting on the interface of a viscoelastic half space, where the viscoelasticity is characterized by two relaxation processes. The considered idealized viscoelastic medium is isotropic and characterized by two Lame constants appropriate for low frequencies, by their increments associated with the shift from low to high frequencies, and by separate relation times associated with each of the Lame constants. A causal solution is developed using integral transforms and an extension of Cagniard's method.

  7. Evaluation of correlation property of linear-frequency-modulated signals coded by maximum-length sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Kota; Hirata, Shinnosuke; Hachiya, Hiroyuki

    2016-07-01

    Ultrasonic distance measurement for obstacles has been recently applied in automobiles. The pulse-echo method based on the transmission of an ultrasonic pulse and time-of-flight (TOF) determination of the reflected echo is one of the typical methods of ultrasonic distance measurement. Improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the echo and the avoidance of crosstalk between ultrasonic sensors in the pulse-echo method are required in automotive measurement. The SNR of the reflected echo and the resolution of the TOF are improved by the employment of pulse compression using a maximum-length sequence (M-sequence), which is one of the binary pseudorandom sequences generated from a linear feedback shift register (LFSR). Crosstalk is avoided by using transmitted signals coded by different M-sequences generated from different LFSRs. In the case of lower-order M-sequences, however, the number of measurement channels corresponding to the pattern of the LFSR is not enough. In this paper, pulse compression using linear-frequency-modulated (LFM) signals coded by M-sequences has been proposed. The coding of LFM signals by the same M-sequence can produce different transmitted signals and increase the number of measurement channels. In the proposed method, however, the truncation noise in autocorrelation functions and the interference noise in cross-correlation functions degrade the SNRs of received echoes. Therefore, autocorrelation properties and cross-correlation properties in all patterns of combinations of coded LFM signals are evaluated.

  8. Flow properties of natural rubber composites filled with defatted soy flour

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The linear and nonlinear viscoelastic properties of natural rubber composites reinforced with defatted soy flour were studied. Defatted soy flour is an abundant, renewable commodity, and its rigid nature makes it suitable as a reinforcement phase in rubber composites. At small strain, the elastic ...

  9. Linear and nonlinear optical properties of Sb-doped GeSe2 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen-Ying; Chen, Fen; Lu, Shun-Bin; Wang, Yong-Hui; Shen, Xiang; Dai, Shi-Xun; Nie, Qiu-Hua

    2015-06-01

    Sb-doped GeSe2 chalcogenide thin films are prepared by the magnetron co-sputtering method. The linear optical properties of as-deposited films are derived by analyzing transmission spectra. The refractive index rises and the optical band gap decreases from 2.08 eV to 1.41 eV with increasing the Sb content. X-ray photoelectron spectra further confirm the formation of a covalent Sb-Se bond. The third-order nonlinear optical properties of thin films are investigated under femtosecond laser excitation at 800 nm. The results show that the third-order nonlinear optical properties are enhanced with increasing the concentration of Sb. The nonlinear refraction indices of these thin films are measured to be on the order of 10-18 m2/W with a positive sign and the nonlinear absorption coefficients are obtained to be on the order of 10-10 m/W. These excellent properties indicate that Sb-doped Ge-Se films have a good prospect in the applications of nonlinear optical devices. Project supported by the National Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB722703), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61377061), the Young Leaders of Academic Climbing Project of the Education Department of Zhejiang Province, China (Grant No. pd2013092), the Program for Innovative Research Team of Ningbo City, China (Grant No. 2009B217), and the K. C. Wong Magna Fund in Ningbo University, China.

  10. Spectral, morphological, linear and nonlinear optical properties of nanostructured benzimidazole metal complex thin films.

    PubMed

    Praveen, P A; Ramesh Babu, R; Jothivenkatachalam, K; Ramamurthi, K

    2015-11-05

    Metal organic materials are widely investigated to find their suitability for nonlinear optical applications due to the advantage of combined organic and inorganic properties. In this work benzimidazole based metal organic thin films of dichlorobis (1H-Benzimidazole) Co(II) and dichlorobis (1H-Benzimidazole) Cu(II) were deposited by chemical bath deposition method. The deposited films were annealed at 100, 150 and 200 °C to investigate the effect of annealing on the properties of thin films. Surface homogeneity of the films was increased with the annealing temperature due to the surface diffusion of the films and the same was evidently shown by Raman spectroscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy studies. But annealing the films at 200 °C yielded bulk patches on the surface due to the distortion of molecules. Linear and nonlinear optical properties of the films annealed at 150 °C showed relatively higher transmittance and improved nonlinear optical properties than the other as prepared and annealed samples.

  11. Properties of Linear Contrails Detected in 2012 Northern Hemisphere MODIS Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duda, David P.; Chee, Thad; Khlopenkov, Konstantin; Bedka, Sarah; Spangenberg, Doug; Minnis, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Observation of linear contrail cirrus coverage and retrieval of their optical properties are valuable data for validating atmospheric climate models that represent contrail formation explicitly. These data can reduce our uncertainty of the regional effects of contrail-generated cirrus on global radiative forcing, and thus improve our estimation of the impact of commercial aviation on climate change. We use an automated contrail detection algorithm (CDA) to determine the coverage of linear persistent contrails over the Northern Hemisphere during 2012. The contrail detection algorithm is a modified form of the Mannstein et al. (1999) method, and uses several channels from thermal infrared MODIS data to reduce the occurrence of false positive detections. A set of contrail masks of varying sensitivity is produced to define the potential range of uncertainty in contrail coverage estimated by the CDA. Global aircraft emissions waypoint data provided by FAA allow comparison of detected contrails with commercial aircraft flight tracks. A pixel-level product based on the advected flight tracks defined by the waypoint data and U-V wind component profiles from the NASA GMAO GEOS-4 reanalysis has been developed to assign a confidence of contrail detection for the contrail mask. To account for possible contrail cirrus missed by the CDA, a post-processing method based on the assumption that pixels adjacent to detected linear contrails will have radiative signatures similar to those of the detected contrails is applied to the Northern Hemisphere data. Results from several months of MODIS observations during 2012 will be presented, representing a near-global climatology of contrail coverage. Linear contrail coverage will be compared with coverage estimates determined previously from 2006 MODIS data.

  12. Carbon Nanotubes with Temperature Invariant Viscoelasticity from - 196 ∘C to 1000 ∘C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ming

    2011-03-01

    Viscoelasticity describes the ability of a material to possess both elasticity and viscosity. Viscoelastic materials, such as rubbers, possess a limited operational temperature range, (e.g., for silicone rubber: -55 to 300° C) above which the material breaks down and below which the material undergoes a glass transition and hardens. This is because molecular motion that is the origin of viscoelasticity is a thermally activated process. We created a viscoelastic material composed from a random network of long interconnected carbon nanotubes that exhibited an operational temperature range from -196° Cto1000° C [1]. The viscoelastic properties (storage modulus, loss modulus, and damping ratio) measured by DMA in N2 ambient were nearly constant over an exceptionally wide temperature range (-140° / rmC ~600° C). As exemplified by the vibration isolator demonstration, the CNT material showed viscoelasticity beyond the DMA limitation at -190° C (immersed in liquid nitrogen) and at > (exposed to butane torch). And we implemented impact tests at -196° C ,25° C and 1000° C using a steel ball and analyzed the ball tracks. The ball tracks were identical for all cases as observed by SEM and 3-D mapping that suggested unvarying viscoelastic properties across this 1200° C temperature range. We interpret that the thermal stability stems from energy dissipation through the zipping and unzipping of carbon nanotubes at contacts. Quantitatively, the viscoelastic properties by DMA showed that the CNT material possessed similar stiffness (storage modulus 1MPa), higher dissipation ability (loss modulus (0.3MPa) and damping ratio (0.3) than silicone rubber at room temperature. Further DMA characterization from -140° Cto600° C demonstrated temperature invariant frequency stability (0.1-100Hz), the same level of reversible deformation (critical strain 5%) and fatigue resistance (1,000,000 cycles, 100Hz).

  13. Viscoelastic Behavior of High-Copper Dental Amalgam Alloys,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-24

    Apprv.-. . - 17. DISTRIWUTION STATEMENT (of the abstract entered in Block 20, If dliffern Item Roiport) • . y-",.-,D T IC 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES...MAUG 1 3 1980 A * 19. KEY WORDS (Continue on recerse aide if necea2wry and Identify by block number) ? i Amalgam alloys; high-copper amalgam alloys...viscoelastic properties andstress relaxation. C 2 LJJ 20. ABSTRACT (Con"nue on reverse side , f #ncoary and Identify by block numbe) Stress relaxation of

  14. Non-linear hydraulic properties of woodchips necessary to design denitrification beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghane, Ehsan; Feyereisen, Gary W.; Rosen, Carl J.

    2016-11-01

    Denitrification beds are being used to reduce the transport of water-soluble nitrate via subsurface drainage systems to surface water. Only recently has the non-linearity of water flow through woodchips been ascertained. To successfully design and model denitrification beds with optimum nitrate removal, a better understanding of flow in denitrification beds is needed. The main objectives of this study were to characterize the hydraulic properties of old degraded woodchips and provide a better understanding of the factors affecting flow. To achieve this goal, we conducted constant-head column experiments using old woodchips that were excavated from a four-year old denitrification bed near Willmar, Minnesota, USA. For Izbash's equation, the non-Darcy exponent (n) ranged from 0.76 to 0.87 that indicates post-linear regime, and the permeability coefficient (M10) at 10°C ranged from 0.9 to 2.6 cm s-1. For Forchheimer's equation, the intrinsic permeability of 5.6 × 10-5 cm2 and ω constant of 0.40 (at drainable porosity of 0.41) closely resembled the in-situ properties found in a previous study. Forchheimer's equation was better than that of Izbash's for describing water flow through old woodchips, and the coefficients of the former provided stronger correlations with drainable porosity. The strong correlation between intrinsic permeability and drainable porosity showed that woodchip compaction is an important factor affecting water flow through woodchips. Furthermore, we demonstrated the importance of temperature effects on woodchip hydraulics. In conclusion, the hydraulic properties of old woodchips should be characterized using a non-Darcy equation to help design efficient systems with optimum nitrate removal.

  15. Dynamic mechanical measurement of the viscoelasticity of single adherent cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin, Elise A.; Adeniba, Olaoluwa O.; Ewoldt, Randy H.; Bashir, Rashid

    2016-02-01

    Many recent studies on the viscoelasticity of individual cells link mechanics with cellular function and health. Here, we introduce a measurement of the viscoelastic properties of individual human colon cancer cells (HT-29) using silicon pedestal microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) resonant sensors. We demonstrate that the viscoelastic properties of single adherent cells can be extracted by measuring a difference in vibrational amplitude of our resonant sensor platform. The magnitude of vibration of the pedestal sensor is measured using a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV). A change in amplitude of the sensor, compared with the driving amplitude (amplitude ratio), is influenced by the mechanical properties of the adhered cells. The amplitude ratio of the fixed cells was greater than the live cells, with a p-value <0.0001. By combining the amplitude shift with the resonant frequency shift measure, we determined the elastic modulus and viscosity values of 100 Pa and 0.0031 Pa s, respectively. Our method using the change in amplitude of resonant MEMS devices can enable the determination of a refined solution space and could improve measuring the stiffness of cells.

  16. Viscoelastic properties of waxy and nonwaxy rice flours, their fat and protein-free starch, and the microstructure of their cooked kernels.

    PubMed

    Ibañez, Ana M; Wood, Delilah F; Yokoyama, Wallace H; Park, I M; Tinoco, Mario A; Hudson, Carol A; McKenzie, Kent S; Shoemaker, Charles F

    2007-08-08

    Physicochemistry and structural studies of two types of japonica rice, low amylose Calmochi-101 (CM101) and intermediate amylose M-202 (M202), were conducted to determine similarities and differences between the rices perhaps attributable to amylose content differences. The rheological behavior of the gelation and pasting processes of flours and starches was determined with high accuracy and precision using a controlled stress rheometer. Fat and protein, although minor constituents of milled rice, were shown to have significant effects on the physicochemical and pasting properties of starches and flours. Removal of protein and lipids with aqueous alkaline or detergent solutions caused lower pasting temperatures and higher overall viscosity in both starches, compared with their respective flours. There was less viscosity difference between M202 flour and its starch when isolated by enzymatic hydrolysis of protein. The protease did not reduce internally bound lipids, suggesting that fats help to determine pasting properties of rice flours and their respective starches. Structural integrity differences in individual granules of waxy and nonwaxy rice flours, starches, and whole raw, soaked, and cooked milled grain were revealed by fracture analysis and scanning electron microscopy. Calmochi 101 and M202 did not differ in weight-averaged molar mass (Mw) and root-mean-square radii (Rz) between flours and starches, as determined by high-performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) and multiple-angle laser light scattering (MALLS) (Park, I.; Ibanez, A. M.; Shoemaker, C. F. Starch 2007, 59, 69-77).

  17. Consistent treatment of viscoelastic effects at junctions in one-dimensional blood flow models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Lucas O.; Leugering, Günter; Blanco, Pablo J.

    2016-06-01

    While the numerical discretization of one-dimensional blood flow models for vessels with viscoelastic wall properties is widely established, there is still no clear approach on how to couple one-dimensional segments that compose a network of viscoelastic vessels. In particular for Voigt-type viscoelastic models, assumptions with regard to boundary conditions have to be made, which normally result in neglecting the viscoelastic effect at the edge of vessels. Here we propose a coupling strategy that takes advantage of a hyperbolic reformulation of the original model and the inherent information of the resulting system. We show that applying proper coupling conditions is fundamental for preserving the physical coherence and numerical accuracy of the solution in both academic and physiologically relevant cases.

  18. Structural interfaces in linear elasticity. Part II: Effective properties and neutrality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoldi, K.; Bigoni, D.; Drugan, W. J.

    2007-01-01

    The model of structural interfaces developed in Part I of this paper allows us to analytically attack and solve different problems of stress concentration and composites. In particular, (i) new formulae are given for effective properties of composite materials containing dilute suspensions of (randomly oriented) reinforced elliptical voids or inclusions; (ii) a new definition is proposed for inclusion neutrality (to account for the fact that the matrix is always 'overstressed', and thus non-neutral in a classical sense, at the contacts with the interfacial structure), which is shown to provide interesting stress optimality conditions. More generally, it is shown that the incorporation of an interfacial structure at the contact between two elastic solids exhibits properties that cannot be obtained using the more conventional approach of the zero-thickness, linear interface. For instance: contrary to the zero-thickness interface, both bulk and shear effective moduli can be optimized for a structural interface; effective properties higher that those possible with a perfect interface can be attained with a structural interface; and neutrality holds with a structural interface for a substantially broader range of parameters than for a zero-thickness interface.

  19. Piezoactuation of sandwich plates with viscoelastic cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang; Wereley, Norman M.

    1999-06-01

    Experimental and analytical validations of a Galerkin analysis of sandwich plates is presented in this paper. The 3-layered sandwich plate specimen consists of isotropic face-plates with surface bonded piezo-electric patch actuators, and a viscoelastic core. The experimental validation is conducted by testing sandwiched plates that are 67.31 cm (26.5') long, 52.07 cm (20.5') wide and nominally 0.16 cm (1/16') thick. The analysis includes the membrane and transverse energies in the face plates, and shear energies in the core. The shear modulus of the dissipative core is assumed to be complex and variant with frequency and temperature. The Golla-Hughes-McTavish (GHM) method is used to account for the frequency dependent properties of the viscoelastic core. Experiments have been conducted on sandwich plates with aluminum face-plates under clamped boundary conditions to validate the model for isotropic face-plates. Symmetric and asymmetric sandwiches have been tested. The maximum error in damped natural frequency predictions obtained via the assumed modes solutions is less than 11%. Analytical studies on the influence of the number of assumed modes in the Galerkin approximation, and the temperature variation, have been conducted. Error in the first plate bending mode is 112% when only a single in-plane mode is used; error reduces to 3.95% as the number of in-plane modes is increased to 25 in each of the in-plane directions. The study on the temperature influence shows that every plate mode has a corresponding temperature, wherein the loss factor is maximized.

  20. Transient viscoelasticity study of tobacco mosaic virus/Ba2+ superlattice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we reported a new method to synthesize the rod-like tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) superlattice. To explore its potentials in nanolattice templating and tissue scaffolding, this work focused the viscoelasticity of the superlattice with a novel transient method via atomic force microscopy (AFM). For measuring viscoelasticity, in contrast to previous methods that assessed the oscillating response, the method proposed in this work enabled us to determine the transient response (creep or relaxation) of micro/nanobiomaterials. The mathematical model and numerical process were elaborated to extract the viscoelastic properties from the indentation data. The adhesion between the AFM tip and the sample was included in the indentation model. Through the functional equation method, the elastic solution for the indentation model was extended to the viscoelastic solution so that the time dependent force vs. displacement relation could be attained. To simplify the solving of the differential equation, a standard solid model was modified to obtain the elastic and viscoelastic components of the sample. The viscoelastic responses with different mechanical stimuli and the dynamic properties were also investigated. PMID:24994956

  1. Measuring Viscoelastic Deformation with an Optical Mouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, T. W.

    2004-01-01

    The feasibility of using an optical mouse to track the viscoelastic deformation of low-density polyethylene films that have a fixed attached load is presented. It is seen that using an optical mouse and with rudimentary experiment paraphernalia and arrangement, it is possible to get good measurements of viscoelastic deformation.

  2. Velocity transition in the crack growth dynamics of filled elastomers: Contributions of nonlinear viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishita, Yoshihiro; Tsunoda, Katsuhiko; Urayama, Kenji

    2016-04-01

    The crack growth dynamics of the carbon-black (CB) filled elastomers is studied experimentally and analyzed while focusing on both kinetics and crack tip profiles. The CB amounts are varied to change the mechanical properties of the elastomers. Static crack growth measurements simultaneously reveal the discontinuous-like transition of the crack growth rate v between the "slow mode" (v ≈10-5-10-3 m/s) and "fast mode" (v ≈10-1-102 m/s) in a narrow range of the input tearing energy Γ and the accompanying changes in the crack tip profiles from blunt to sharp shapes. The crack tip profiles are characterized by two specific parameters, i.e., the deviation δ from the parabolic profile and the opening displacement a in the loading direction. The analysis based on the linear and weakly nonlinear elasticity theories of fracture dynamics demonstrates that the Γ dependence of δ and a is simply classified into three groups depending on the mode (slow or fast) and the magnitudes of δ , independent of CB volume fractions. The theories well explain the results in the slow and fast modes with small magnitudes of δ , while they fail to describe the data in the fast mode with large magnitudes of δ , where the contributions of the strong nonlinearity and/or energy dissipation become significant. The correlation between a power-law relationship Γ ˜vα observed in the fast mode and the linear viscoelasticity spectrum is also discussed. The correlation in elastomers with low CB volume fractions is quantitatively explained by the theory of Persson and Brener [Phys. Rev. E 71, 036123 (2005), 10.1103/PhysRevE.71.036123], whereas the deviation from the theory becomes appreciable for elastomers with higher CB volume fractions which exhibit strong nonlinear viscoelasticity.

  3. Improvement of mechanical properties of fiber reinforced mortar using a linear optimization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kočí, V.; Černý, R.

    2017-02-01

    A linear optimization method is applied to improve mechanical properties of fiber reinforced cement mortar. Since this method is preferably used in other scientific disciplines, few preconditions are taken into account in advance, in order to accommodate it to the specifics related to building materials design. Defining physical limitations and accelerating the optimization process, the target values of optimization are reached in 21 days after 3 optimization steps. Within this relatively short time span, the compressive and bending strengths of fiber reinforced cement mortar increase from 36.9 to 52.2 MPa and from 9.1 to 10.1 MPa, respectively, while identical components are used. The improvements are achieved after preparation of only nine different mixtures, which is a very small number confirming the effectivity of this method in the field of building materials design.

  4. Supersensitive linear piezoresistive property in carbon nanotubes/silicone rubber nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Zhi-Min; Jiang, Mei-Juan; Xie, Dan; Yao, Sheng-Hong; Zhang, Li-Qun; Bai, Jinbo

    2008-07-01

    High-elasticity carbon nanotube/methylvinyl silicone rubber (CNT/VMQ) nanocomposite with a markedly sensitive linear piezoresistive behavior is fabricated by dispersing conductive multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with different aspect ratios (AR =50 and 500) into rubber matrix homogeneously. We disclose that the percolation threshold of the nanocomposites with MWCNTs at AR =50 is abnormally lower than that at AR =500; extremely sensitive positive-pressure coefficient effect of the resistance and excellent cyclic compression under low pressure are also observed in the MWCNT/VMQ nanocomposite with AR =50 MWCNTs at relatively low loading. These properties might originate from the special microstructure in the nanocomposites with AR =50 MWCNTs. The high-elasticity nanocomposite is very attracting for online compression stress monitoring in future engineering applications.

  5. In vitro digestion and fermentation properties of linear sugar-beet arabinan and its oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jin Seok; Shin, So Yeon; Choi, Hye Sun; Joo, Wooha; Cho, Seung Kee; Li, Ling; Kang, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Tae-Jip; Han, Nam Soo

    2015-10-20

    This study was conducted to investigate the prebiotic effects of linear arabino-oligosaccharides (LAOS) and debranched (linear) sugar beet arabinan (LAR) for the development of new prebiotics. LAOS were prepared from LAR by enzymatic hydrolysis with endo-arabinanase from Bacillus licheniformis, followed by removal of the arabinose fraction by incubation with resting cells of Leuconostoc mesenteroides. The resulting LAOS contained DP2 (28.7%), DP3 (49.9%), DP4 (20.1%), and DP5 (1.16%). A standardized digestibility test showed that LAOS and LAR were not digestible. Individual cultures of 24 strains of gastrointestinal bacteria showed that LAOS and LAR stimulated growth of Lactobacillus brevis, Bifidobacterium longum, and Bacteroides fragilis. In vitro batch fermentation using human fecal samples showed that LAOS had higher bifidogenic properties than LAR; LAOS increased the population of bifidobacteria which produced short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). LAOS was fermented slowly compared to fructo-oligosaccharides and this may permit SCFA production in the distal colon. This study demonstrates that LAOS prepared from LAR are promising dietary substrates for improvement of human intestinal health.

  6. Influence of pH on viscoelastic properties of heat-induced gels obtained with a β-Lactoglobulin fraction isolated from bovine milk whey hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    Estévez, Natalia; Fuciños, Pablo; Bargiela, Verónica; Picó, Guillermo; Valetti, Nadia Woitovich; Tovar, Clara Asunción; Rúa, M Luisa

    2017-03-15

    A β-Lactoglobulin fraction (r-βLg) was isolated from whey hydrolysates produced with cardosins from Cynara cardunculus. The impact of the hydrolysis process on the r-βLg structure and the rheological properties of heat-induced gels obtained thereafter were studied at different pH values. Differences were observed between r-βLg and commercial β-Lg used as control. Higher values for the fluorescence emission intensity and red shifts of the emission wavelength of r-βLg suggested changes in its tertiary structure and more solvent-exposed tryptophan residues. Circular dichroism spectra also supported these evidences indicating that hydrolysis yielded an intermediate (non-native) β-Lg state. The thermal history of r-βLg through the new adopted conformation improved the microstructure of the gels at acidic pH. So, a new microstructure with better rheological characteristics (higher conformational flexibility and lower rigidity) and greater water holding ability was founded for r-βLg gel. These results were reflected in the microstructural analysis by scanning electron microscopy.

  7. Numerical modeling of bubble dynamics in viscoelastic media with relaxation.

    PubMed

    Warnez, M T; Johnsen, E

    2015-06-01

    Cavitation occurs in a variety of non-Newtonian fluids and viscoelastic materials. The large-amplitude volumetric oscillations of cavitation bubbles give rise to high temperatures and pressures at collapse, as well as induce large and rapid deformation of the surroundings. In this work, we develop a comprehensive numerical framework for spherical bubble dynamics in isotropic media obeying a wide range of viscoelastic constitutive relationships. Our numerical approach solves the compressible Keller-Miksis equation with full thermal effects (inside and outside the bubble) when coupled to a highly generalized constitutive relationship (which allows Newtonian, Kelvin-Voigt, Zener, linear Maxwell, upper-convected Maxwell, Jeffreys, Oldroyd-B, Giesekus, and Phan-Thien-Tanner models). For the latter two models, partial differential equations (PDEs) must be solved in the surrounding medium; for the remaining models, we show that the PDEs can be reduced to ordinary differential equations. To solve the general constitutive PDEs, we present a Chebyshev spectral collocation method, which is robust even for violent collapse. Combining this numerical approach with theoretical analysis, we simulate bubble dynamics in various viscoelastic media to determine the impact of relaxation time, a constitutive parameter, on the associated physics. Relaxation time is found to increase bubble growth and permit rebounds driven purely by residual stresses in the surroundings. Different regimes of oscillations occur depending on the relaxation time.

  8. A Nonlinear Viscoelastic Model for Ceramics at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, Lynn M.; Panoskaltsis, Vassilis P.; Gasparini, Dario A.; Choi, Sung R.

    2002-01-01

    High-temperature creep behavior of ceramics is characterized by nonlinear time-dependent responses, asymmetric behavior in tension and compression, and nucleation and coalescence of voids leading to creep rupture. Moreover, creep rupture experiments show considerable scatter or randomness in fatigue lives of nominally equal specimens. To capture the nonlinear, asymmetric time-dependent behavior, the standard linear viscoelastic solid model is modified. Nonlinearity and asymmetry are introduced in the volumetric components by using a nonlinear function similar to a hyperbolic sine function but modified to model asymmetry. The nonlinear viscoelastic model is implemented in an ABAQUS user material subroutine. To model the random formation and coalescence of voids, each element is assigned a failure strain sampled from a lognormal distribution. An element is deleted when its volumetric strain exceeds its failure strain. Element deletion has been implemented within ABAQUS. Temporal increases in strains produce a sequential loss of elements (a model for void nucleation and growth), which in turn leads to failure. Nonlinear viscoelastic model parameters are determined from uniaxial tensile and compressive creep experiments on silicon nitride. The model is then used to predict the deformation of four-point bending and ball-on-ring specimens. Simulation is used to predict statistical moments of creep rupture lives. Numerical simulation results compare well with results of experiments of four-point bending specimens. The analytical model is intended to be used to predict the creep rupture lives of ceramic parts in arbitrary stress conditions.

  9. Electrostatic streaming instability modes in complex viscoelastic quantum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, P. K.; Goutam, H. P.

    2016-11-01

    A generalized quantum hydrodynamic model is procedurally developed to investigate the electrostatic streaming instability modes in viscoelastic quantum electron-ion-dust plasma. Compositionally, inertialess electrons are anticipated to be degenerate quantum particles owing to their large de Broglie wavelengths. In contrast, inertial ions and dust particulates are treated in the same classical framework of linear viscoelastic fluids (non-Newtonian). It considers a dimensionality-dependent Bohmian quantum correction prefactor, γ = [(D - 2)/3D], in electron quantum dynamics, with D symbolizing the problem dimensionality. Applying a regular Fourier-formulaic plane-wave analysis around the quasi-neutral hydrodynamic equilibrium, two distinct instabilities are explored to exist. They stem in ion-streaming (relative to electrons and dust) and dust-streaming (relative to electrons and ions). Their stability is numerically illustrated in judicious parametric windows in both the hydrodynamic and kinetic regimes. The non-trivial influential roles by the relative streams, viscoelasticities, and correction prefactor are analyzed. It is seen that γ acts as a stabilizer for the ion-stream case only. The findings alongside new entailments, as special cases of realistic interest, corroborate well with the earlier predictions in plasma situations. Applicability of the analysis relevant in cosmic and astronomical environments of compact dwarf stars is concisely indicated.

  10. Numerical modeling of bubble dynamics in viscoelastic media with relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Warnez, M. T.; Johnsen, E.

    2015-01-01

    Cavitation occurs in a variety of non-Newtonian fluids and viscoelastic materials. The large-amplitude volumetric oscillations of cavitation bubbles give rise to high temperatures and pressures at collapse, as well as induce large and rapid deformation of the surroundings. In this work, we develop a comprehensive numerical framework for spherical bubble dynamics in isotropic media obeying a wide range of viscoelastic constitutive relationships. Our numerical approach solves the compressible Keller–Miksis equation with full thermal effects (inside and outside the bubble) when coupled to a highly generalized constitutive relationship (which allows Newtonian, Kelvin–Voigt, Zener, linear Maxwell, upper-convected Maxwell, Jeffreys, Oldroyd-B, Giesekus, and Phan-Thien-Tanner models). For the latter two models, partial differential equations (PDEs) must be solved in the surrounding medium; for the remaining models, we show that the PDEs can be reduced to ordinary differential equations. To solve the general constitutive PDEs, we present a Chebyshev spectral collocation method, which is robust even for violent collapse. Combining this numerical approach with theoretical analysis, we simulate bubble dynamics in various viscoelastic media to determine the impact of relaxation time, a constitutive parameter, on the associated physics. Relaxation time is found to increase bubble growth and permit rebounds driven purely by residual stresses in the surroundings. Different regimes of oscillations occur depending on the relaxation time. PMID:26130967

  11. Numerical modeling of bubble dynamics in viscoelastic media with relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnez, M. T.; Johnsen, E.

    2015-06-01

    Cavitation occurs in a variety of non-Newtonian fluids and viscoelastic materials. The large-amplitude volumetric oscillations of cavitation bubbles give rise to high temperatures and pressures at collapse, as well as induce large and rapid deformation of the surroundings. In this work, we develop a comprehensive numerical framework for spherical bubble dynamics in isotropic media obeying a wide range of viscoelastic constitutive relationships. Our numerical approach solves the compressible Keller-Miksis equation with full thermal effects (inside and outside the bubble) when coupled to a highly generalized constitutive relationship (which allows Newtonian, Kelvin-Voigt, Zener, linear Maxwell, upper-convected Maxwell, Jeffreys, Oldroyd-B, Giesekus, and Phan-Thien-Tanner models). For the latter two models, partial differential equations (PDEs) must be solved in the surrounding medium; for the remaining models, we show that the PDEs can be reduced to ordinary differential equations. To solve the general constitutive PDEs, we present a Chebyshev spectral collocation method, which is robust even for violent collapse. Combining this numerical approach with theoretical analysis, we simulate bubble dynamics in various viscoelastic media to determine the impact of relaxation time, a constitutive parameter, on the associated physics. Relaxation time is found to increase bubble growth and permit rebounds driven purely by residual stresses in the surroundings. Different regimes of oscillations occur depending on the relaxation time.

  12. Encoding of head acceleration in vestibular neurons. I. Spatiotemporal response properties to linear acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, G. A.; Perachio, A. A.; Angelaki, D. E.

    1993-01-01

    1. Extracellular recordings were made in and around the medial vestibular nuclei in decerebrated rats. Neurons were functionally identified according to their semicircular canal input on the basis of their responses to angular head rotations around the yaw, pitch, and roll head axes. Those cells responding to angular acceleration were classified as either horizontal semicircular canal-related (HC) or vertical semicircular canal-related (VC) neurons. The HC neurons were further characterized as either type I or type II, depending on the direction of rotation producing excitation. Cells that lacked a response to angular head acceleration, but exhibited sensitivity to a change in head position, were classified as purely otolith organ-related (OTO) neurons. All vestibular neurons were then tested for their response to sinusoidal linear translation in the horizontal head plane. 2. Convergence of macular and canal inputs onto central vestibular nuclei neurons occurred in 73% of the type I HC, 79% of the type II HC, and 86% of the VC neurons. Out of the 223 neurons identified as receiving macular input, 94 neurons were further studied, and their spatiotemporal response properties to sinusoidal stimulation with pure linear acceleration were quantified. Data were obtained from 33 type I HC, 22 type II HC, 22 VC, and 17 OTO neurons. 3. For each neuron the angle of the translational stimulus vector was varied by 15, 30, or 45 degrees increments in the horizontal head plane. In all tested neurons, a direction of maximum sensitivity was identified. An interesting difference among neurons was their response to translation along the direction perpendicular to that that produced the maximum response ("null" direction). For the majority of neurons tested, it was possible to evoke a nonzero response during stimulation along the null direction always had response phases that varied as a function of stimulus direction. 4. These spatiotemporal response properties were quantified in two

  13. Effect of strain on viscoelastic behavior of fresh, swelled and mineralized PVP-CMC hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Nabanita; Vyroubal, Radek; Shah, Rushita; Kitano, Takeshi; Saha, Petr

    2013-04-01

    Mineralization of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in hydrogel matrix is one of the most interesting topics of research by material scientists for the development of bio-inspired polymeric biomaterial for biomedical applications especially for bone tissue regeneration. As per our knowledge there was no work reported about rheological properties of CaCO3 mineralized hydrogel though some works have done on mineralization of CaCO3 in various gel membranes, and also it was reported about the viscoelastic properties of Agarose, Cellulose, PVA and PVPCMC hydrogels. This paper mainly focuses about the effect of strain on viscoelastic properties of fresh, swelled and mineralized (CaCO3) PVP-CMC hydrogel. All these three types of hydrogel sustain (or keep) strictly the elastic properties when low strain (1%) is applied, but at higher strain (10%) the viscoelastic moduli (G' and G") show significant change, and the nature of these materials turned from elastic to viscous.

  14. Magnetic and viscoelastic response of elastomers with hard magnetic filler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramarenko, E. Yu; Chertovich, A. V.; Stepanov, G. V.; Semisalova, A. S.; Makarova, L. A.; Perov, N. S.; Khokhlov, A. R.

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic elastomers (MEs) based on a silicone matrix and magnetically hard NdFeB particles have been synthesized and their magnetic and viscoelastic properties have been studied depending on the size and concentration of magnetic particles and the magnetizing field. It has been shown that magnetic particles can rotate in soft polymer matrix under applied magnetic field, this fact leading to some features in both magnetic and viscoelastic properties. In the maximum magnetic field used magnetization of MEs with smaller particles is larger while the coercivity is smaller due to higher mobility of the particles within the polymer matrix. Viscoelastic behavior is characterized by long relaxation times due to restructuring of the magnetic filler under the influence of an applied mechanical force and magnetic interactions. The storage and loss moduli of magnetically hard elastomers grow significantly with magnetizing field. The magnetic response of the magnetized samples depends on the mutual orientation of the external magnetic field and the internal sample magnetization. Due to the particle rotation within the polymer matrix, the loss factor increases abruptly when the magnetic field is turned on in the opposite direction to the sample magnetization, further decreasing with time. Moduli versus field dependences have minimum at non-zero field and are characterized by a high asymmetry with respect to the field direction.

  15. The nonlinear viscoelastic response of resin matrix composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiel, C.; Cardon, A. H.; Brinson, H. F.

    1984-01-01

    Possible treatments of the nonlinear viscoelastic behavior of materials are reviewed. A thermodynamic based approach, developed by Schapery, is discussed and used to interpret the nonlinear viscoelastic response of a graphite epoxy laminate, T300/934. Test data to verify the analysis for Fiberite 934 neat resin as well as transverse and shear properties of the unidirectional T300/934 composited are presented. Long time creep characteristics as a function of stress level and temperature are generated. Favorable comparisons between the traditional, graphical, and the current analytical approaches are shown. A free energy based rupture criterion is proposed as a way to estimate the life that remains in a structure at any time.

  16. A characterization of frequency temperature prestress effects in viscoelastic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kergourlay, Gérald; Balmès, Etienne; Legal, Gilbert

    2006-10-01

    Viscoelastic materials can be used to design efficient damping treatments. The design of well-damped structures typically requires significant numerical optimizations which rely on proper material characteristics. The present study was motivated by applications where an initially flat viscoelastic sandwich is press formed. Constitutive laws, that gave good correlation for the flat plate, led to poor correlation in bent configurations. It is well known that the properties significantly depend on frequency, temperature but also on other environmental factors such as static prestress. None of the classical techniques being suited to the determination of static prestress effects, a new test rig allowing dynamic measurement of complex shear modulus of a thin film under significant static loading was thus needed. The design and experimental validation of this rig are presented, and some results on the characterization of frequency-temperature-prestress effects in a sandwich plate and their representation using the superposition hypothesis are discussed.

  17. A NON-LINEAR STRUCTURE-PROPERTY MODEL FOR OCTANOL-WATER PARTITION COEFFICIENT.

    PubMed

    Yerramsetty, Krishna M; Neely, Brian J; Gasem, Khaled A M

    2012-10-25

    Octanol-water partition coefficient (K(ow)) is an important thermodynamic property used to characterize the partitioning of solutes between an aqueous and organic phase and has importance in such areas as pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, chemical production and environmental toxicology. We present a non-linear quantitative structure-property relationship model for determining K(ow) values of new molecules in silico. A total of 823 descriptors were generated for 11,308 molecules whose K(ow) values are reported in the PhysProp dataset by Syracuse Research. Optimum network architecture and its associated inputs were identified using a wrapper-based feature selection algorithm that combines differential evolution and artificial neural networks. A network architecture of 50-33-35-1 resulted in the least root-mean squared error (RMSE) in the training set. Further, to improve on single-network predictions, a neural network ensemble was developed by combining five networks that have the same architecture and inputs but differ in layer weights. The ensemble predicted the K(ow) values with RMSE of 0.28 and 0.38 for the training set and internal validation set, respectively. The ensemble performed reasonably well on an external dataset when compared with other popular K(ow) models in the literature.

  18. Rigid Coumarins: a Complete DFT, TD-DFT and Non Linear Optical Property Study.

    PubMed

    Lanke, Sandip K; Sekar, Nagaiyan

    2015-09-01

    The electronic structures and photophysical properties of rigid coumarin dyes have been studied by using quantum chemical methods. The ground-state geometries of these dyes were optimized using the Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods. The lowest singlet excited state was optimized using Time -Dependent Density Functional Theory [TD-B3LYP/6-31G(d)]. On the basis of ground- and excited-state geometries, the absorption and emission spectra have been calculated using the DFT and TD-DFT method. All the calculations were carried out in gas phase and in acetonitrile medium. The results show that the absorption maxima and fluorescence emission maxima calculated using the Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory is in good agreement with the available experimental results. To understand the Non- Linear Optical properties of coumarin dyes we computed dipole moment (μ), electronic polarizability (α), mean first hyperpolarizability (βo) and second hyperpolarizability (γ) using B3LYP density functional theory method in conjunction with 6-31G(d) basis set.

  19. The AMC Linear Disability Score project in a population requiring residential care: psychometric properties

    PubMed Central

    Holman, Rebecca; Lindeboom, Robert; Vermeulen, Marinus; de Haan, Rob J

    2004-01-01

    Background Currently there is a lot of interest in the flexible framework offered by item banks for measuring patient relevant outcomes, including functional status. However, there are few item banks, which have been developed to quantify functional status, as expressed by the ability to perform activities of daily life. Method This paper examines the psychometric properties of the AMC Linear Disability Score (ALDS) project item bank using an item response theory model and full information factor analysis. Data were collected from 555 respondents on a total of 160 items. Results Following the analysis, 79 items remained in the item bank. The remaining 81 items were excluded because of: difficulties in presentation (1 item); low levels of variation in response pattern (28 items); significant differences in measurement characteristics for males and females or for respondents under or over 85 years old (26 items); or lack of model fit to the data at item level (26 items). Conclusions It is conceivable that the item bank will have different measurement characteristics for other patient or demographic populations. However, these results indicate that the ALDS item bank has sound psychometric properties for respondents in residential care settings and could form a stable base for measuring functional status in a range of situations, including the implementation of computerised adaptive testing of functional status. PMID:15291958

  20. Dynamics of the nonlinear viscoelastic slider-block model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Shcherbakov, R.

    2015-12-01

    The full understanding and modeling of earthquake physics remains a challenging task. Presently, there are several approaches to model the earthquake dynamics. They include the full elasto-dynamic simulation of rupture propagation and initiation. The stochastic approach employs the forward and inverse analysis of various point process models. Another approach assumes that the fault can be modeled by an array of blocks which interact with the loading plate and between each other. These approaches were successful in reproducing some aspects of observed seismicity. In this work, we analyze the slider-block model where we introduce a nonlinear visco-elastic interaction between blocks and the tectonic loading plate, which mimics the rheology of the fault system. This approach preserves the full inertial effects in the system that are generally neglected in cellular automaton version of this model. The slider-block model consists of N elements which are governed by non-linear differential equations. The fault zone is modelled by an array of N interacting elements, driven by tectonic loading force. The frictional force is also applied between the elements and the substrate. Earthquakes in this system are realized as slipping events with different sizes. The model is characterized by a set of tuning parameters with clear physical significance: the elasticity, the viscosity, the shear rate exponent which controls the nonlinearity. The properties of the model, including the motion pattern, the interevent time statistics, the frequency-size distributions are examined. By tuning the parameter sets, one can easily explore the phase space of the model, and determine the factors that control various aspects of the system behaviour, providing more insight into real earthquakes.

  1. On Lamb and Rayleigh Wave Convergence in Viscoelastic Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Nenadic, Ivan Z.; Urban, Matthew W.; Aristizabal, Sara; Mitchell, Scott A.; Humphrey, Tye C.; Greenleaf, James F.

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of the viscoelastic material properties of soft tissue has become an important area of research over the last two decades. Our group has been investigating the feasibility of using Shearwave Dispersion Ultrasound Vibrometry (SDUV) method to excite Lamb waves in organs with plate-like geometry to estimate the viscoelasticity of the medium of interest. The use of Lamb wave Dispersion Ultrasound Vibrometry (LDUV) to quantify mechanical properties of viscoelastic solids has previously been reported. Two organs, the heart wall and the spleen, can be readily modeled using plate-like geometries. The elasticity of these two organs is important because they change in pathological conditions. Diastolic dysfunction is the inability of the left ventricle (LV) of the heart to supply sufficient stroke volumes into the systemic circulation and is accompanied by the loss of compliance and stiffening of the LV myocardium. It has been shown that there is a correlation between high splenic stiffness in patients with chronic liver disease and strong correlation between spleen and liver stiffness. Here, we investigate the use of the SDUV method to quantify viscoelasticity of the LV free-wall myocardium and spleen by exciting Rayleigh waves on the organ’s surface and measuring the wave dispersion (change of wave velocity as a function of frequency) in the frequency range 40–500 Hz. An equation for Rayleigh wave dispersion due to cylindrical excitation was derived by modeling the excised myocardium and spleen with a homogenous Voigt material plate immersed in a nonviscous fluid. Boundary conditions and wave potential functions were solved for the surface wave velocity. Analytical and experimental convergence between the Lamb and Rayleigh waves is reported in a finite element model of a plate in a fluid of similar density, gelatin plate and excised porcine spleen and left-ventricular free-wall myocardium. PMID:21970846

  2. Interaction of viscoelastic tissue compliance with lumbar muscles during passive cyclic flexion-extension.

    PubMed

    Olson, Michael W; Li, Li; Solomonow, Moshe

    2009-02-01

    Human and animal models using electromyography (EMG) based methods have hypothesized that viscoelastic tissue properties becomes compromised by prolonged repetitive cyclic trunk flexion-extension which in turn influences muscular activation including the flexion-relaxation phenomenon. Empirical evidence to support this hypothesis, especially the development of viscoelastic tension-relaxation and its associated muscular response in passive cyclic activity in humans, is incomplete. The objective of this study was to examine the response of lumbar muscles to tension-relaxation development of the viscoelastic tissue during prolonged passive cyclic trunk flexion-extension. Activity of the lumbar muscles remained low and steady during the passive exercise session. Tension supplied by the posterior viscoelastic tissues decreased over time without corresponding changes in muscular activity. Active flexion, following the passive flexion session, elicited significant increase in paraspinal muscles EMG together with increase in the median frequency. It was concluded that reduction of tension in the lumbar viscoelastic tissues of humans occurs during cyclic flexion-extension and is compensated by increased activity of the musculature in order to maintain stability. It was also concluded that the ligamento-muscular reflex is inhibited during passive activities but becomes hyperactive following active cyclic flexion, indicating that moment requirements are the controlling variable. It is conceived that prolonged routine exposure to cyclic flexion minimizes the function of the viscoelastic tissues and places increasing demands on the neuromuscular system which over time may lead to a disorder and possible exposure to injury.

  3. Modeling the nonlinear viscoelastic behavior of polyurea using a distortion modified free volume approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevellard, G.; Ravi-Chandar, K.; Liechti, K. M.

    2012-05-01

    The pressure-dependent behavior of polyurea was examined under monotonic loading in the confined compression configuration. Additional data from Arcan shear and uniaxial compression was used to respectively complete parameter selection for the linear and nonlinear behavior and then validate it. The bulk and shear relaxation behavior were both pressure dependent. Under ramp loadings, the shear and tensile responses were quite nonlinearly viscoelastic.

  4. Dynamic homogenization of viscoelastic phononic metasolids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichard, Hélène; Torrent, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    The effects of dissipation in metamaterials is a sensitive issue and, although experiments show that they are more than relevant, their theoretical study and modeling has received less attention. In this work, we study the effects of viscosity on the dissipation of elastic metamaterials. It is found that these metasolids present effective constitutive parameters that are in general complex, in contrast with common elastic materials where the mass density is a real valued scalar quantity and dissipation enters only through the stiffness tensor. It is also found that, while in the low frequency limit the dissipation is higher as the viscoelastic coefficient is also higher, near a resonance of the metamaterial this condition does not hold, since the imaginary part of the constitutive parameters is higher as the viscosity is smaller. Finally, the effects of viscosity are studied on the non-local properties of the effective parameters, and it is found that this property is attenuated with dissipation although still has to be considered.

  5. Linear and non-linear optical properties of Ag-doped Ge2Sb2Te5 thin films estimated by s