Science.gov

Sample records for linearized gravity waves

  1. Gravity Waves

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    article title:  Gravity Waves Ripple over Marine Stratocumulus Clouds ... Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), a fingerprint-like gravity wave feature occurs over a deck of marine stratocumulus clouds. Similar ... that occur when a pebble is thrown into a still pond, such "gravity waves" sometimes appear when the relatively stable and stratified air ...

  2. Linear mechanism of surface gravity wave generation in horizontally sheared flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kalashnik, M. V.

    2008-01-15

    An analysis is presented of a linear mechanism of surface gravity wave generation in a horizontally sheared flow in a fluid layer with free boundary. A free-surface flow of this type is found to be algebraically unstable. The development of instability leads to the formation of surface gravity waves whose amplitude grows with time according to a power law. Flow stability is analyzed by using a nonmodal approach in which the behavior of a spatial Fourier harmonic of a disturbance is considered in a semi-Lagrangian frame of reference moving with the flow. Shear-flow disturbances are divided into two classes (wave and vortex disturbances) depending on the value of potential vorticity. It is shown that vortex disturbances decay with time while the energy of wave disturbances increases indefinitely. Transformation of vortex disturbances into wave ones under strong shear is described.

  3. Gravity waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritts, David

    1987-01-01

    Gravity waves contributed to the establishment of the thermal structure, small scale (80 to 100 km) fluctuations in velocity (50 to 80 m/sec) and density (20 to 30%, 0 to peak). Dominant gravity wave spectrum in the middle atmosphere: x-scale, less than 100 km; z-scale, greater than 10 km; t-scale, less than 2 hr. Theorists are beginning to understand middle atmosphere motions. There are two classes: Planetary waves and equatorial motions, gravity waves and tidal motions. The former give rise to variability at large scales, which may alter apparent mean structure. Effects include density and velocity fluctuations, induced mean motions, and stratospheric warmings which lead to the breakup of the polar vortex and cooling of the mesosphere. On this scale are also equatorial quasi-biennial and semi-annual oscillations. Gravity wave and tidal motions produce large rms fluctuations in density and velocity. The magnitude of the density fluctuations compared to the mean density is of the order of the vertical wavelength, which grows with height. Relative density fluctuations are less than, or of the order of 30% below the mesopause. Such motions may cause significant and variable convection, and wind shear. There is a strong seasonal variation in gravity wave amplitude. Additional observations are needed to address and quantify mean and fluctuation statistics of both density and mean velocity, variability of the mean and fluctuations, and to identify dominant gravity wave scales and sources as well as causes of variability, both temporal and geographic.

  4. Linear stability analysis and the speed of gravitational waves in dynamical Chern-Simons modified gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Garfinkle, David; Pretorius, Frans; Yunes, Nicolas

    2010-08-15

    We perform a linear stability analysis of dynamical Chern-Simons modified gravity in the geometric optics approximation and find that it is linearly stable on the backgrounds considered. Our analysis also reveals that gravitational waves in the modified theory travel at the speed of light in Minkowski spacetime. However, on a Schwarzschild background the characteristic speed of propagation along a given direction splits into two modes, one subluminal and one superluminal. The width of the splitting depends on the azimuthal components of the propagation vector, is linearly proportional to the mass of the black hole, and decreases with the third inverse power of the distance from the black hole. Radial propagation is unaffected, implying that as probed by gravitational waves the location of the event horizon of the spacetime is unaltered. The analysis further reveals that when a high frequency, pure gravitational wave is scattered from a black hole, a scalar wave of comparable amplitude is excited, and vice versa.

  5. Gravity Waves and Linear Inflation From Axion Monodromy

    SciTech Connect

    McAllister, Liam; Silverstein, Eva; Westphal, Alexander; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-08-26

    Wrapped branes in string compactifications introduce a monodromy that extends the field range of individual closed-string axions to beyond the Planck scale. Furthermore, approximate shift symmetries of the system naturally control corrections to the axion potential. This suggests a general mechanism for chaotic inflation driven by monodromy-extended closed-string axions. We systematically analyze this possibility and show that the mechanism is compatible with moduli stabilization and can be realized in many types of compactifications, including warped Calabi-Yau manifolds and more general Ricci-curved spaces. In this broad class of models, the potential is linear in the canonical inflaton field, predicting a tensor to scalar ratio r {approx} 0.07 accessible to upcoming cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations.

  6. Gravity waves and linear inflation from axion monodromy

    SciTech Connect

    McAllister, Liam; Silverstein, Eva; Westphal, Alexander

    2010-08-15

    Wrapped branes in string compactifications introduce a monodromy that extends the field range of individual closed-string axions to beyond the Planck scale. Furthermore, approximate shift symmetries of the system naturally control corrections to the axion potential. This suggests a general mechanism for chaotic inflation driven by monodromy-extended closed-string axions. We systematically analyze this possibility and show that the mechanism is compatible with moduli stabilization and can be realized in many types of compactifications, including warped Calabi-Yau manifolds and more general Ricci-curved spaces. In this broad class of models, the potential is linear in the canonical inflaton field, predicting a tensor to scalar ratio r{approx_equal}0.07 accessible to upcoming cosmic microwave background observations.

  7. 2D instabilities of surface gravity waves on a linear shear current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francius, Marc; Kharif, Christian

    2016-04-01

    instabilities due to resonant four-wave interactions, as well as to study the influence of vorticity and nonlinearity on the characteristics of linear instabilities due to resonant five-wave and six-wave interactions. Depending on the dimensionless depth, superharmonic instabilities due to five-wave interactions can become dominant with increasing positive vorticiy. Acknowledgments: This work was supported by the Direction Générale de l'Armement and funded by the ANR project n°. ANR-13-ASTR-0007. References [1] A. Constantin, Two-dimensionality of gravity water flows of constant non-zero vorticity beneath a surface wave train, Eur. J. Mech. B/Fluids, 2011, 30, 12-16. [2] R. S. Johnson, On the modulation of water waves on shear flows, Proc. Royal Soc. Lond. A., 1976, 347, 537-546. [3] M. Oikawa, K. Chow, D. J. Benney, The propagation of nonlinear wave packets in a shear flow with a free surface, Stud. Appl. Math., 1987, 76, 69-92. [4] A. I Baumstein, Modulation of gravity waves with shear in water, Stud. Appl. Math., 1998, 100, 365-90. [5] R. Thomas, C. Kharif, M. Manna, A nonlinear Schrödinger equation for water waves on finite depth with constant vorticity, Phys. Fluids, 2012, 24, 127102. [6] M. M Rienecker, J. D Fenton, A Fourier approximation method for steady water waves , J. Fluid Mech., 1981, 104, 119-137 [7] M. Francius, C. Kharif, Three-dimensional instabilities of periodic gravity waves in shallow water, J. Fluid Mech., 2006, 561, 417-437

  8. Gravity Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzandt, T. E.

    1985-01-01

    Atmospheric parameters fluctuate on all scales. In the mesoscale these fluctuations are occasionally sinusoidal so that they can be interpreted as gravity waves. Usually, however, the fluctuations are noise like, so that their cause is not immediately evident. Results of mesoscale observations in the 20 to 120 m altitude range that are suitable for incorporation into a model atmosphere are very limited. In the stratosphere and lower mesosphere observations are sparse and very little data has been summarized into appropriate form. There is much more data in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere, but again very little of it has been summarized. The available mesoscale spectra of horizontal wind u versus vertical wave number m in the 20 to 120 km altitude range are shown together with a spectrum from the lower atmosphere for comparison. Further information about these spectra is given. In spite of the large range of altitudes and latitudes, the spectra from the lower atmosphere (NASA, 1971 and DEWAN, 1984) are remarkably similar in both shape and amplitude. The mean slopes of -2.38 for the NASA spectrum and -2.7 for the Dewan spectra are supported by the mean slope of -2.75 found by ROSENBERG et al. (1974). The mesospheric spectrum is too short to establish a shape. Its amplitude is about an order of magnitude larger than the NASA spectrum in the same wave number range. The NASA and Dewan spectra suggest that the mesoscale spectra in the lower atmosphere are insensitive to meteorological conditions.

  9. Gravity wave transmission diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomikawa, Yoshihiro

    2016-07-01

    A possibility of gravity wave propagation from a source region to the airglow layer around the mesopause has been discussed based on the gravity wave blocking diagram taking into account the critical level filtering alone. This paper proposes a new gravity wave transmission diagram in which both the critical level filtering and turning level reflection of gravity waves are considered. It shows a significantly different distribution of gravity wave transmissivity from the blocking diagram.

  10. On the linear approximation of gravity wave saturation in the mesosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, W. C.; Schoeberl, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    Lindzen's model of gravity wave breaking is shown to be inconsistent with the process of convective adjustment and associated turbulent outbreak. The K-theory turbulent diffusion model used by Lindzen implies a spatially uniform turbulent field which is not in agreement with the fact that gravity wave saturation and the associated convection produce turbulence only in restricted zones. The Lindzen model may be corrected to some extent by taking the turbulent Prandtl number for a diffusion acting on the wave itself to be very large. The eddy diffusion coefficients computed by Lindzen then become a factor of 2 larger and eddy transports of heat and constituents by wave fields vanish to first order.

  11. The interaction between Gravity Waves and Solar Tides: results from 4D Ray Tracing coupled to a Linear Tidal Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribstein, Bruno; Achatz, Ulrich; fabian, Senf

    2015-04-01

    Internal gravity waves contribute to an important part in the variability of the Stratosphere - Mesosphere - lower - Thermosphere. Numerous General Circulation Model do not present (for exemple) a Quasi-biennale Oscillation. Moreover, Internal gravity waves parameterizations often neglect time and horizontal dependence of the background flow ('column approximation'). Interactions between internal gravity waves and large scale flow, specially Solar tide waves, are studied here. Thermally driven global scaled waves, Solar tides describe the large-scale modulation (at sub-daily period) of all middle atmosphere fields. Gravity waves propagate in a time and spatially varying background flow, composed by a climatological mean, stationary planetary waves and diurnal Solar tides. Global three-dimensional propagation of internal gravity waves is performed by a new W. K. B. gravity wave model (ray tracer scheme), where waves propagate in position-wavenumber phase-space in order to prevent the crossing of rays. Propagation of Solar tides is modeled by linearising a General Circulation Model over a climatological mean and a stationnary planetary waves reference. Gravity wave deposition of momentum and buoyancy are calculated. Characterizing the daily evolution, Rayleigh-friction and temperature-relaxation coefficients are calculated. They approximately describe the internal gravity wave forcing on the diurnal Solar tides propagation and are so used for it. The extracted diurnal Solar tides are then used for a new computation of the gravity wave fluxes. This is iterated a few times to obtain a converged result on gravity wave deposition and on tidal field. Internal gravity waves are shown to influence both Solar tides amplitude and phase. Seasonal cycle of migrating and non-migrating tidal components is studied, as it is the seasonal cycle of gravity wave deposition. Gravity wave deposition and tidal fields are also obtained under the 'column approximation'. They show a clear

  12. Gravity wave initiated convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The vertical velocity of convection initiated by gravity waves was investigated. In one particular case, the convective motion-initiated and supported by the gravity wave-induced activity (excluding contributions made by other mechanisms) reached its maximum value about one hour before the production of the funnel clouds. In another case, both rawinsonde and geosynchronous satellite imagery were used to study the life cycles of severe convective storms. Cloud modelling with input sounding data and rapid-scan imagery from GOES were used to investigate storm cloud formation, development and dissipation in terms of growth and collapse of cloud tops, as well as, the life cycles of the penetration of overshooting turrets above the tropopause. The results based on these two approaches are presented and discussed.

  13. Mirages with atmospheric gravity waves.

    PubMed

    Lehn, W H; Silvester, W K; Fraser, D M

    1994-07-20

    The temperature inversions that produce superior mirages are capable of supporting gravity (buoyancy) waves of very low frequency and long wavelength. This paper describes the optics of single mode gravity waves that propagate in a four-layer atmosphere. Images calculated by ray tracing show that (1) relatively short waves add a fine structure to the basic static mirage, and (2) long waves produce cyclic images, similar to those observed in the field, that display significant variation from a base image.

  14. Acoustic-gravity waves, theory and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadri, Usama; Farrell, William E.; Munk, Walter

    2015-04-01

    Acoustic-gravity waves (AGW) propagate in the ocean under the influence of both the compressibility of sea water and the restoring force of gravity. The gravity dependence vanishes if the wave vector is normal to the ocean surface, but becomes increasingly important as the wave vector acquires a horizontal tilt. They are excited by many sources, including non-linear surface wave interactions, disturbances of the ocean bottom (submarine earthquakes and landslides) and underwater explosions. In this introductory lecture on acoustic-gravity waves, we describe their properties, and their relation to organ pipe modes, to microseisms, and to deep ocean signatures by short surface waves. We discuss the generation of AGW by underwater earthquakes; knowledge of their behaviour with water depth can be applied for the early detection of tsunamis. We also discuss their generation by the non-linear interaction of surface gravity waves, which explains the major role they play in transforming energy from the ocean surface to the crust, as part of the microseisms phenomenon. Finally, they contribute to horizontal water transport at depth, which might affect benthic life.

  15. Squids, brains and gravity waves

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, J.

    1986-03-01

    Superconducting quantum interference devices are so sensitive to magnetic flux that they can map the tiny magnetic fields emanating from the human brain and detect the submicroscopic motions of gravity-wave detectors.

  16. Surface gravity-wave lensing.

    PubMed

    Elandt, Ryan B; Shakeri, Mostafa; Alam, Mohammad-Reza

    2014-02-01

    Here we show that a nonlinear resonance between oceanic surface waves caused by small seabed features (the so-called Bragg resonance) can be utilized to create the equivalent of lenses and curved mirrors for surface gravity waves. Such gravity wave lenses, which are merely small changes to the seafloor topography and therefore are surface noninvasive, can focus or defocus the energy of incident waves toward or away from any desired focal point. We further show that for a broadband incident wave spectrum (i.e., a wave group composed of a multitude of different-frequency waves), a polychromatic topography (occupying no more than the area required for a monochromatic lens) can achieve a broadband lensing effect. Gravity wave lenses can be utilized to create localized high-energy wave zones (e.g., for wave energy harvesting or creating artificial surf zones) as well as to disperse waves in order to create protected areas (e.g., harbors or areas near important offshore facilities). In reverse, lensing of oceanic waves may be caused by natural seabed features and may explain the frequent appearance of very high amplitude waves in certain bodies of water. PMID:25353576

  17. Surface gravity-wave lensing.

    PubMed

    Elandt, Ryan B; Shakeri, Mostafa; Alam, Mohammad-Reza

    2014-02-01

    Here we show that a nonlinear resonance between oceanic surface waves caused by small seabed features (the so-called Bragg resonance) can be utilized to create the equivalent of lenses and curved mirrors for surface gravity waves. Such gravity wave lenses, which are merely small changes to the seafloor topography and therefore are surface noninvasive, can focus or defocus the energy of incident waves toward or away from any desired focal point. We further show that for a broadband incident wave spectrum (i.e., a wave group composed of a multitude of different-frequency waves), a polychromatic topography (occupying no more than the area required for a monochromatic lens) can achieve a broadband lensing effect. Gravity wave lenses can be utilized to create localized high-energy wave zones (e.g., for wave energy harvesting or creating artificial surf zones) as well as to disperse waves in order to create protected areas (e.g., harbors or areas near important offshore facilities). In reverse, lensing of oceanic waves may be caused by natural seabed features and may explain the frequent appearance of very high amplitude waves in certain bodies of water.

  18. Gravity wave diagnosis using empirical normal modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charron, Martin

    We adapt the theory of Empirical Normal Modes (ENMs) to diagnose gravity waves generated by a relatively high resolution numerical model solving the primitive equations. The ENM approach is based on the Principal Component Analysis (which consists of finding the most efficient basis explaining the variance of a time series), except that it takes advantage of wave-activity conservation laws. In the present work, the small- amplitude version of the pseudoenergy is used to extract from data quasi-monochromatic three-dimensional empirical modes that describe atmospheric wave activity. The spatial distributions of these quasi-monochromatic modes are identical to the normal modes of the linearized primitive equations when the underlying dynamics can be described with a stochastic linear and forced model, thus establishing a bridge between statistics and dynamics. We use this diagnostic method to study inertia-gravity wave generation, propagation, transience, and breaking over the Rockies, the North Pacific, and Central America in the troposphere-stratosphere-mesosphere GFDL SKYHI general circulation model at a resolution of 1° of latitude by 1.2° of longitude. Besides the action of mountains in exciting orographic waves, inertia-gravity wave activity has been found to be generated at the jet stream level as a possible consequence of a sustained nonlinear and ageostrophic flow. In the Tropical region of the model, the ``obstacle effect'' has been found to be the major source of inertia-gravity waves. A significant proportion of these inertia-gravity waves was able to reach the model mesosphere without much dissipation and absorption.

  19. Local effects of gravity wave propagation and saturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritts, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    In recent years, gravity waves were recognized to play a major role in the dynamics of the middle atmosphere. Perhaps the major effect of such motions are the reversal of the vertical shear of the mean zonal wind and the occurrence of a large turbulent diffusivity in the mesosphere due to gravity wave saturation. Yet, despite the importance of these gravity wave effects, the processes and the consequences of gravity wave propagation and saturation are only beginning to be understood in detail. The linear saturation theory predicts drag and turbulent diffusion due to saturating wave motion. This theory, however, fails to address a number of issues that are certain to be important for gravity wave propagation and saturation in the middle atmosphere. These issues, including wave transience, wave superposition, local convective adjustment, and nonlinearity, are discussed.

  20. A study of the non-linear response of the upper atmosphere to episodic and stochastic acoustic-gravity wave forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C. Y. T.; Deng, Y.; Sheng, C.; Drob, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    Waves of various spatial and temporal scales, including acoustic waves, gravity waves, tides, and planetary waves, modify the dynamics of the terrestrial atmosphere at all altitudes. Perturbations caused by the natural and mankind activities on the ground, such as volcano eruptions, earthquakes, explosions, propagate upward and impact the upper atmosphere. Among these waves, propagation of the atmospheric acoustic waves is particularly sensitive to the fine structure of the background atmosphere. However, the fine-structured gravity waves (smaller than 1° x 1°) are currently poorly measured especially at the altitudes above 100 km and are computationally too expensive for most models to incorporate properly. The Global Ionosphere Thermosphere Model (GITM) allows for non-hydrostatic solutions and has a flexible resolution. Thus, it is ideal for the study of vertical propagating waves. In this study, the ionospheric and thermospheric response to acoustic-gravity waves is first presented with an artificial source of various frequencies, followed by a case study of the 2014 Tohoku tsunami. Additionally a time-varying spectral gravity wavefield propagated from the ground is implemented into GITM to capture the statistical background structures that is crucial to the upper atmospheric models. Our results show the importance of consideration of background small-scale structures to interpretation of the observed ionospheric and thermospheric perturbations, such as traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) and traveling atmospheric disturbances (TADs).

  1. Shear waves in inhomogeneous, compressible fluids in a gravity field.

    PubMed

    Godin, Oleg A

    2014-03-01

    While elastic solids support compressional and shear waves, waves in ideal compressible fluids are usually thought of as compressional waves. Here, a class of acoustic-gravity waves is studied in which the dilatation is identically zero, and the pressure and density remain constant in each fluid particle. These shear waves are described by an exact analytic solution of linearized hydrodynamics equations in inhomogeneous, quiescent, inviscid, compressible fluids with piecewise continuous parameters in a uniform gravity field. It is demonstrated that the shear acoustic-gravity waves also can be supported by moving fluids as well as quiescent, viscous fluids with and without thermal conductivity. Excitation of a shear-wave normal mode by a point source and the normal mode distortion in realistic environmental models are considered. The shear acoustic-gravity waves are likely to play a significant role in coupling wave processes in the ocean and atmosphere.

  2. Shear waves in inhomogeneous, compressible fluids in a gravity field.

    PubMed

    Godin, Oleg A

    2014-03-01

    While elastic solids support compressional and shear waves, waves in ideal compressible fluids are usually thought of as compressional waves. Here, a class of acoustic-gravity waves is studied in which the dilatation is identically zero, and the pressure and density remain constant in each fluid particle. These shear waves are described by an exact analytic solution of linearized hydrodynamics equations in inhomogeneous, quiescent, inviscid, compressible fluids with piecewise continuous parameters in a uniform gravity field. It is demonstrated that the shear acoustic-gravity waves also can be supported by moving fluids as well as quiescent, viscous fluids with and without thermal conductivity. Excitation of a shear-wave normal mode by a point source and the normal mode distortion in realistic environmental models are considered. The shear acoustic-gravity waves are likely to play a significant role in coupling wave processes in the ocean and atmosphere. PMID:24606251

  3. The interaction between gravity waves and solar tides: results from 4-D ray tracing fully coupled to a linear tidal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribstein, B.; Achatz, U.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction between solar tides (STs) and gravity waves (GWs) is studied via a fully coupled system of a three-dimensional ray-tracer model and a linear tidal model.The tidal model describes the propagation of STs on a monthly mean climatology, allowing STs to interact with stationary planetary waves. The tidal model has been obtained by linearization of the primitive equations about the climatology. STs are being forced by aclimatological diurnal heating and by the (instantaneous) GWs flux convergences of momentum and buoyancy. The GW forcing is calculated (at each time step) by the ray tracer model.The ray tracer model describes GW dynamics on a spatially and time dependent background formed by a monthly mean climatology and STs, the last being calculated (at each time step) by the linear tidal model. It does not suffer from typical simplifications of conventional GW parameterizations, where horizontal GW propagation is neglected, as are the effects of horizontal background gradients on GW dynamics. The ray tracer model uses a variant of Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) theory where a spectral description in position-wavenumber space is helping to avoid numerical instabilities otherwise likely to occur in caustic like situations.Notwithstanding the simplicity of the employed GW source many aspects of observed tidal dynamics are reproduced. Under the conventional ``single-column'' approximation, GW impacts are shown to be significantly overestimated. Those overestimated GWflux convergences lead to significant changes in ST amplitudes and phases, pointing at a sensitive issue of GW parameterizations in general. Non-diurnal STs, whose existence is in this model set-up exclusively due to the GW forcing, are studied and shown to be more important near the poles, giving a partial explanation of STs amplitudes in these latitudes.

  4. AdS waves as exact solutions to quadratic gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Guellue, Ibrahim; Sisman, Tahsin Cagri; Tekin, Bayram; Guerses, Metin

    2011-04-15

    We give an exact solution of the quadratic gravity in D dimensions. The solution is a plane-fronted wave metric with a cosmological constant. This metric solves not only the full quadratic gravity field equations but also the linearized ones which include the linearized equations of the recently found critical gravity. A subset of the solutions change the asymptotic structure of the anti-de Sitter space due to their logarithmic behavior.

  5. Nonstationary Gravity Wave Forcing of the Stratospheric Zonal Mean Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, M. J.; Rosenlof, K. H.

    1996-01-01

    The role of gravity wave forcing in the zonal mean circulation of the stratosphere is discussed. Starting from some very simple assumptions about the momentum flux spectrum of nonstationary (non-zero phase speed) waves at forcing levels in the troposphere, a linear model is used to calculate wave propagation through climatological zonal mean winds at solstice seasons. As the wave amplitudes exceed their stable limits, a saturation criterion is imposed to account for nonlinear wave breakdown effects, and the resulting vertical gradient in the wave momentum flux is then used to estimate the mean flow forcing per unit mass. Evidence from global, assimilated data sets are used to constrain these forcing estimates. The results suggest the gravity-wave-driven force is accelerative (has the same sign as the mean wind) throughout most of the stratosphere above 20 km. The sense of the gravity wave forcing in the stratosphere is thus opposite to that in the mesosphere, where gravity wave drag is widely believed to play a principal role in decelerating the mesospheric jets. The forcing estimates are further compared to existing gravity wave parameterizations for the same climatological zonal mean conditions. Substantial disagreement is evident in the stratosphere, and we discuss the reasons for the disagreement. The results suggest limits on typical gravity wave amplitudes near source levels in the troposphere at solstice seasons. The gravity wave forcing in the stratosphere appears to have a substantial effect on lower stratospheric temperatures during southern hemisphere summer and thus may be relevant to climate.

  6. Resonant triad interactions of acoustc-gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadri, Usama; Akylas, T. R.

    2015-11-01

    Surface-acoustic wave disturbances in water of constant depth over a rigid bottom, due to the combined action of gravity and compressibility, are studied. In the linear theory, apart from free-surface (gravity) waves, there is also a countable infinity of acoustic (compression) modes. As the sound speed in water, typically, far exceeds the maximum gravity wave phase speed, these two types of modes feature vastly different spatial and/or temporal scales, and their linear coupling is weak. It is possible, however, to realize significant energy exchange between gravity and acoustic waves via nonlinear interactions. This scenario is analyzed for resonant wave triads that comprise two counter-propagating gravity waves and a long-crested acoustic mode. Owing to this disparity in length scales, the interaction time scale as well as the form of the amplitude evolution equations differ from those of a standard resonant triad. In the case of a perfectly tuned triad of uniform monochromatic wave trains, nearly all the energy initially in the gravity waves can be transferred to the acoustic wave. This mechanism, however, is less efficient when the interacting waves are modulated wavepackets.

  7. Asymptotic Linear Stability of Solitary Water Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pego, Robert L.; Sun, Shu-Ming

    2016-06-01

    We prove an asymptotic stability result for the water wave equations linearized around small solitary waves. The equations we consider govern irrotational flow of a fluid with constant density bounded below by a rigid horizontal bottom and above by a free surface under the influence of gravity neglecting surface tension. For sufficiently small amplitude waves, with waveform well-approximated by the well-known sech-squared shape of the KdV soliton, solutions of the linearized equations decay at an exponential rate in an energy norm with exponential weight translated with the wave profile. This holds for all solutions with no component in (that is, symplectically orthogonal to) the two-dimensional neutral-mode space arising from infinitesimal translational and wave-speed variation of solitary waves. We also obtain spectral stability in an unweighted energy norm.

  8. Impact of gravity waves on long-range infrasound propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millet, Christophe; Lott, François; De La Camara, Alvaro

    2016-04-01

    In this work we study infrasound propagation in acoustic waveguides that support a finite number of propagating modes. We analyze the effects of gravity waves on these acoustic waveguides. Testing sound propagation in such perturbed fields can potentially be used to improve the gravity wave models. A linear solution modeling the interaction between an incoming acoustic wave and a randomly perturbed atmosphere is developed, using the forward-scattering approximation. The wave mode structure is determined by the effective sound speed profile which is strongly affected by gravity wave breaking. The random perturbations are described by a stochastic field predicted by a multiwave stochastic parameterization of gravity waves, which is operational in the LMDz climate model. The justification for this approach is two fold. On the one hand, the use of a few monochromatic waves mimics the observations of rather narrow-banded gravity wave packets in the lower stratosphere. On the other hand, the stochastic sampling of the gravity wave field and the random choice of wave properties deals with the inherent unpredictability of mesoscale dynamics from large scale conditions provided by the meteorological reanalysis. The transmitted acoustic signals contain a stable front and a small-amplitude incoherent coda. A general expression for the stable front is derived in terms of saddle-point contributions. The saddle-points are obtained from a WKB approximation of the vertical eigenvalue problem. This approach extract the dominant effects in the acoustic - gravity wave interaction. We present results that show how statistics of the transmitted signal are related to a few saddle-points and how the GW field can trigger large deviations in the acoustic signals. While some of the characteristics of the stable front can be directly related to that of a few individual gravity waves, it is shown that the amount of the launched gravity waves included in climate models can be estimated using

  9. Interaction of modulated gravity water waves of finite depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannoulis, Ioannis

    2016-10-01

    We consider the capillary-gravity water wave problem of finite depth with a flat bottom of one or two horizontal dimensions. We derive the modulation equations of leading and next-to-leading order in the hyperbolic scaling for three weakly amplitude-modulated plane wave solutions of the linearized problem in the absence of quadratic and cubic resonances. We justify the derived system of macroscopic equations in the case of gravity waves using the stability of the finite depth water wave problem on the time scale O (1 / ɛ).

  10. Gravity wave reflection: Case study based on rocket data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wüst, Sabine; Bittner, Michael

    2008-03-01

    Since gravity waves significantly influence the atmosphere by transporting energy and momentum, it is important to study their wave spectrum and their energy dissipation rates. Besides that, knowledge about gravity wave sources and the propagation of the generated waves is essential. Originating in the lower atmosphere, gravity waves can move upwards; when the background wind field is equal to their phase speed a so-called critical layer is reached. Their breakdown and deposition of energy and momentum is possible. Another mechanism which can take place at critical layers is gravity wave reflection. In this paper, gravity waves which were observed by foil chaff measurements during the DYANA (DYnamics Adapted Network for the Atmosphere) campaign in 1990 in Biscarrosse (44°N, 1°W)--as reported by Wüst and Bittner [2006. Non-linear wave-wave interaction: case studies based on rocket data and first application to satellite data. Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 68, 959-976]--are investigated to look for gravity wave reflection processes. Following nonlinear theory, energy dissipation rates according to Weinstock [1980. Energy dissipation rates of turbulence in the stable free atmosphere. Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences 38, 880-883] are calculated from foil chaff cloud and falling sphere data and compared with the critical layer heights. Enhanced energy dissipation rates are found at those altitudes where the waves' phase speed matches the zonal background wind speeds. Indication of gravity wave trapping is found between two altitudes of around 95 and 86 km.

  11. Transversally periodic solitary gravity-capillary waves.

    PubMed

    Milewski, Paul A; Wang, Zhan

    2014-01-01

    When both gravity and surface tension effects are present, surface solitary water waves are known to exist in both two- and three-dimensional infinitely deep fluids. We describe here solutions bridging these two cases: travelling waves which are localized in the propagation direction and periodic in the transverse direction. These transversally periodic gravity-capillary solitary waves are found to be of either elevation or depression type, tend to plane waves below a critical transverse period and tend to solitary lumps as the transverse period tends to infinity. The waves are found numerically in a Hamiltonian system for water waves simplified by a cubic truncation of the Dirichlet-to-Neumann operator. This approximation has been proved to be very accurate for both two- and three-dimensional computations of fully localized gravity-capillary solitary waves. The stability properties of these waves are then investigated via the time evolution of perturbed wave profiles. PMID:24399922

  12. Transversally periodic solitary gravity-capillary waves.

    PubMed

    Milewski, Paul A; Wang, Zhan

    2014-01-01

    When both gravity and surface tension effects are present, surface solitary water waves are known to exist in both two- and three-dimensional infinitely deep fluids. We describe here solutions bridging these two cases: travelling waves which are localized in the propagation direction and periodic in the transverse direction. These transversally periodic gravity-capillary solitary waves are found to be of either elevation or depression type, tend to plane waves below a critical transverse period and tend to solitary lumps as the transverse period tends to infinity. The waves are found numerically in a Hamiltonian system for water waves simplified by a cubic truncation of the Dirichlet-to-Neumann operator. This approximation has been proved to be very accurate for both two- and three-dimensional computations of fully localized gravity-capillary solitary waves. The stability properties of these waves are then investigated via the time evolution of perturbed wave profiles.

  13. Gravity wave turbulence revealed by horizontal vibrations of the container.

    PubMed

    Issenmann, B; Falcon, E

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally study the role of forcing on gravity-capillary wave turbulence. Previous laboratory experiments using spatially localized forcing (vibrating blades) have shown that the frequency power-law exponent of the gravity wave spectrum depends on the forcing parameters. By horizontally vibrating the whole container, we observe a spectrum exponent that does not depend on the forcing parameters for both gravity and capillary regimes. This spatially extended forcing leads to a gravity spectrum exponent in better agreement with the theory than by using a spatially localized forcing. The role of the vessel shape has been also studied. Finally, the wave spectrum is found to scale linearly with the injected power for both regimes whatever the forcing type used.

  14. Direct numerical simulations of gravity-capillary wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deike, Luc; Fuster, Daniel; Berhanu, Michael; Falcon, Eric

    2012-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation of the full two phase Navier-Stokes equations, including surface tension are performed, using the code Gerris (Popinet, 2009), in order to investigate gravity-capillary wave turbulence. Wave turbulence concerns the study of the statistical and dynamical properties of a set of nonlinear interacting waves (Zakharov, 1992). Waves at the air-water interface, initially at rest, are excited at low wave-numbers and a stationary wave turbulence state is obtained after a time long enough (typically 30 periods of the wave forcing period). The space-time wave height power spectrum is calculated for both capillary and gravity waves regimes. The observed dispersion relation is in agreement with the theoretical one for linear gravity-capillary wave. The wave height power spectrum in the wave-number-space or in the frequency-space exhibit a power law and will be discussed with respects of weak turbulence theory (Zakharov, 2012). Finally the scaling of the spectrum with the injected power will be compared with theoretical and experimental works.

  15. Plants respond to gravity with gravity related waves.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Orvin E

    2007-07-01

    Gravity related waves in plants control plant shapes by their velocity, vertical to horizontal velocity ratios, and the stepwise change in velocity from horizontal to vertical. Velocities are measured directly while velocity ratios can be derived from internodal spacings or measurements of velocities. Plant wave frequencies are the same in every direction. The wave proofs are overwhelming with plant communication and ac field interaction as added proof.

  16. The Effect of Gravity Waves on Jupiter's Middle Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yelle, R. V.; Young, L. A.; Young, R. E.

    1998-09-01

    The temperature profile of Jupiter's middle atmosphere exhibits numerous fluctuations that are likely the manifestation of gravity waves. The amplitude of the temperature perturbations are large enough for non-linear effects on the wave propagation, the interaction among waves, and the interaction between waves and the background atmosphere to be important. As a consequence wave propagation and dissipation affects the energy balance, momentum balance, and diffusion of trace species in the middle atmosphere. We adapt theories for wave-wave interaction developed for the terrestrial atmosphere to Jupiter's atmosphere and extend them to include dissipation by molecular viscosity and thermal conduction. Although definitive conclusions are limited by our knowledge of the wave spectrum on Jupiter, we find that wave-wave interactions in the presence of these molecular effects can explain the observed levels of turbulent mixing and dynamical heating in the middle atmosphere.

  17. Triad resonance between gravity and vorticity waves in vertical shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drivas, Theodore D.; Wunsch, Scott

    2016-07-01

    Weakly nonlinear theory is used to explore the effect of vertical shear on surface gravity waves in three dimensions. An idealized piecewise-linear shear profile motivated by wind-driven profiles and ambient currents in the ocean is used. It is shown that shear may mediate weakly nonlinear resonant triad interactions between gravity and vorticity waves. The triad results in energy exchange between gravity waves of comparable wavelengths propagating in different directions. For realistic ocean shears, shear-mediated energy exchange may occur on timescales of minutes for shorter wavelengths, but slows as the wavelength increases. Hence this triad mechanism may contribute to the larger angular spreading (relative to wind direction) for shorter wind-waves observed in the oceans.

  18. Effect of nonlinear instability on gravity-wave momentum transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunkerton, Timothy J.

    1987-01-01

    This paper investigates the nonlinear instability of internal gravity waves and the effects of their nonlinear interaction on momentum flux, using simple theoretical and numerical models. From the result of an analysis of parametric instability of a two-dimensional internal gravity wave as discussed by Yeh and Liu (1981) and Klostermeyer (1982), a group trajectory length scale for a gravity wave packet was determined, expressed in terms of the dominant vertical wavelenght and the degree of convective saturation. It is shown that this analysis justifies the Eikonal saturation method for relatively transient packets, that are well below the saturation amplitude, propagating in a slowly varying mean flow. Conversely, linear theory fails for persistent disturbances and trasient wave packets near convective saturation.

  19. PROPAGATION OF GRAVITY WAVES IN A CONVECTIVE LAYER

    SciTech Connect

    Onofri, M.; Vecchio, A.; Veltri, P.; De Masi, G.

    2012-02-10

    We perform numerical simulations of gravity mode propagation in a convective layer to investigate the observed association between small spatial scales and low frequencies in the photospheric velocity fields. According to the linear theory, when the fluid layer is convectively unstable, gravity modes are evanescent waves. However, in simple two-dimensional numerical settings, we find that when the equilibrium structure is modified by coherent large-scale convective motions, the waves injected at the bottom of the layer are no longer evanescent. In this situation, gravity waves can be detected at the surface of the layer. In our simplified model the injected wave's frequency remains unchanged, but its amplitude has a spatial modulation determined by the convective structure. This result may explain some analyses done with the proper orthogonal decomposition method of the solar surface velocity field even though solar convection is far more complex than the convection model considered here.

  20. Mesosphere Dynamics with Gravity Wave Forcing. 2; Planetary Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Mengel, J. G.; Chan, K. L.; Porter, H. S.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We present results from a non-linear, 3D, time dependent numerical spectral model (NSM) which extends from the ground up into the thermosphere and incorporates Hines' Doppler Spread Parameterization for small-scale gravity waves (GW). Our focal point is the mesosphere where wave interactions are playing a dominant role. We discuss planetary waves in the present paper and diurnal and semi-diurnal tides in the companion paper. Without external time dependent energy or momentum sources, planetary waves (PWs) are generated in the model for zonal wavenumbers 1 to 4, which have amplitudes in the mesosphere above 50 km as large as 30 m/s and periods between 2 and 50 days. The waves are generated primarily during solstice conditions, which indicates that the baroclinic instability (associated with the GW driven reversal in the latitudinal temperature gradient) is playing an important role. Results from a numerical experiment show that GWs are also involved directly in generating the PWs. For the zonal wavenumber m = 1, the predominant wave periods in summer are around 4 days and in winter between 6 and 10 days. For m = 2, the periods are in summer and close to 2.5 and 3.5 days respectively For m = 3, 4 the predominant wave periods are in both seasons close to two days. The latter waves have the characteristics of Rossby gravity waves with meridional winds at equatorial latitudes. A common feature of the PWs (m = 1 to 4) generated in summer and winter is that their vertical wavelengths throughout the mesosphere are large which indicates that the waves are not propagating freely but are generated throughout the region. Another common feature is that the PWs propagate preferentially westward in summer and eastward in winter, being launched from the westward and eastward zonal winds that prevail respectively in summer and winter altitudes below 80 km. During spring and fall, for m = 1 and 2 eastward propagating long period PWs are generated that are launched from the smaller

  1. Gravitational waves in fourth order gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozziello, S.; Stabile, A.

    2015-08-01

    In the post-Minkowskian limit approximation, we study gravitational wave solutions for general fourth-order theories of gravity. Specifically, we consider a Lagrangian with a generic function of curvature invariants . It is well known that when dealing with General Relativity such an approach provides massless spin-two waves as propagating degree of freedom of the gravitational field while this theory implies other additional propagating modes in the gravity spectra. We show that, in general, fourth order gravity, besides the standard massless graviton is characterized by two further massive modes with a finite-distance interaction. We find out the most general gravitational wave solutions in terms of Green functions in vacuum and in presence of matter sources. If an electromagnetic source is chosen, only the modes induced by are present, otherwise, for any gravity model, we have the complete analogy with tensor modes of General Relativity. Polarizations and helicity states are classified in the hypothesis of plane wave.

  2. Gravity waves from cosmic bubble collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Salem, Michael P.; Saraswat, Prashant; Shaghoulian, Edgar E-mail: ps88@stanford.edu

    2013-02-01

    Our local Hubble volume might be contained within a bubble that nucleated in a false vacuum with only two large spatial dimensions. We study bubble collisions in this scenario and find that they generate gravity waves, which are made possible in this context by the reduced symmetry of the global geometry. These gravity waves would produce B-mode polarization in the cosmic microwave background, which could in principle dominate over the inflationary background.

  3. Waves in Radial Gravity Using Magnetic Fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohlsen, Daniel R.; Hart, John E.; Weidman, Patrick D.

    1996-01-01

    We are beginning laboratory experiments using magnetically active ferrofluids to study surface waves in novel geometries. Terrestrial gravity is eliminated from the dynamics, and the magnetic body force felt by ferrofluid in the presence of a magnetic field gradient is used to create a geopotential field which is a section of or an entire sphere or cylinder. New optical, electromagnetic and ultrasonic diagnostic techniques are under development to initially study capillary-gravity wave propagation and interaction in such geometries.

  4. Triadic Resonance of Tidally Excited Internal Gravity Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecoanet, D.; Quataert, E.

    2013-12-01

    Tides can excite internal gravity waves in many different ways including, e.g., inducing flow over topography, linear resonance, and nonlinear coupling. These waves can then be unstable to triadic resonance instabilities, which can influence the rate of dissipation of the tidal energy. In this work, we simulate the full nonlinear interaction of many internal gravity waves in a 3D, triply periodic, Boussinesq box. To model the wave excitation due to the tide, we linearly force a specific mode. Diffusivity and the quantization of modes in the box determine which modes couple to the forced mode. For low forcing rates and high diffusivity, only a few modes interact, and we are able to predict the equilibrium amplitudes of the modes and dissipation rates. However, for higher forcing rates or low diffusivity, many modes interact with one another and the system becomes turbulent.

  5. A Simple Theory of Capillary-Gravity Wave Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazman, Roman E.

    1993-01-01

    Employing a recently proposed 'multi-wave interaction' theory [JFM, 243, 623-625], spectra of capillary-gravity waves are derived. This case is characterized by a rather high degree of nonlinearity and a complicated dispersion law. The resultant absence of scale invariance makes this and some other problems of wave turbulence (e.g., nonlinear Rossby waves) intractable by small-perturbation techniques, even in the weak turbulence limit. The analytical solution obtained in the present work is shown to be in good agreement with experimental data. Its low- and high-frequency limits yield power-laws characterizing spectra of purely gravity and capillary waves, respectively. In the limits of weak and strong linearity, these reduce of the Zakharov-Filonenko and Phillips spectra, respectively.

  6. Supersaturation of vertically propagating internal gravity waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindzen, Richard S.

    1988-01-01

    The usual assumption that vertically propagating internal gravity waves will cease growing with height once their amplitudes are such as to permit convective instability anywhere within the wave is reexamined. Two factors lead to amplitude limitation: (1) wave clipping associated with convective mixing, and (2) energetic constraints associated with the rate at which the wave can supply energy to the convection. It is found that these two factors limit supersaturation to about 50 percent for waves with short horizontal wavelengths and high relative phase speeds. Usually the degree of supersaturation will be much less. These factors also lead to a gradual, rather than sudden, cessation of wave growth with height.

  7. Observations of gravity waves at atmospheric fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abusamah, Azizan B. Hj

    1990-09-01

    An observational study of pressure perturbations associated with the passage of atmospheric fronts over the British Isles using a triangular array of sensitive microbarographs reveals the preponderance of gravity wave activities in the vicinity of the surface cold front (SCF). Examination of the time series of these pressure perturbations in the frequency domain shows an enhancement for frequencies less than the local buoyancy frequency N after the passage of the SCF. The spectral analysis also shows two predominant frequency peaks usually located near N and N/2 s(exp -1). Isolating these frequencies shows that there is a systematic amplitude modulation with an amplification near the SCF and at a region 2-3 hours before and after the SCF passage. The cross-correlation analysis reveals that the gravity waves in the post SCF region propagate towards the SCF. As these waves approach the SCF, the across front component of the phase speed decreases and the direction of propagation of the wave rotates in an anticlockwise manner. It is found that a consistent description of the gravity waves can only be made if first the waves are assumed to be ducted, i.e. there is a reflecting layer aloft, and second that as these waves propagate through the frontal environment, due to the inhomogeneity, they are refracted. A number of conceptual models are then developed to account for the observed wave behavior in a frontal region. In this investigation it is shown that the stable layer associated with the frontal zone can form a good upper reflector for non-hydrostatic gravity waves. It is also argued that the slope of this layer plays an important role in the refraction of the observed gravity waves. A model of wave propagation in a wedge is then used to account for this slope.

  8. Role of the basin boundary conditions in gravity wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berhanu, Michael; Deike, Luc; Miquel, Benjamin; Gutierrez, Pablo; Jamin, Timothee; Semin, Benoit; Falcon, Eric; Bonnefoy, Felicien

    2015-11-01

    Gravity wave turbulence is studied in a large wave basin where irregular waves are generated unidirectionally. The role of the basin boundary conditions (absorbing or reflecting) are investigated. To that purpose, an absorbing sloping beach opposite to the wavemaker can be replaced by a reflecting vertical wall. The wave field properties depend strongly on these boundary conditions. Unidirectional waves propagate before to be damped by the beach whereas a more multidirectional wave field is observed with the wall. In both cases, the wave spectrum scales as a frequency-power law with an exponent that increases continuously with the forcing amplitude up to a value close to -4. We have also studied freely decaying gravity wave turbulence in the closed basin. No self-similar decay of the spectrum is observed, whereas its Fourier modes decay first as a time power law due to nonlinear mechanisms, and then exponentially due to linear viscous damping. We estimate the linear, nonlinear and dissipative time scales to test the time scale separation. Using the mean energy flux from the initial decay of wave energy, the Kolmogorov-Zakharov constant of the weak turbulence theory is evaluated experimentally for the first time.

  9. Brane-induced-gravity shock waves.

    PubMed

    Kaloper, Nemanja

    2005-05-13

    We construct exact gravitational field solutions for a relativistic particle localized on a tensional brane in brane-induced gravity. They are a generalization of gravitational shock waves in 4D de Sitter space. We provide the metrics for both the normal branch and the self-inflating branch Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati brane worlds, and compare them to the 4D Einstein gravity solution and to the case when gravity resides only in the 5D bulk, without any brane-localized curvature terms. At short distances the wave profile looks the same as in four dimensions. The corrections appear only far from the source, where they differ from the long distance corrections in 4D de Sitter space. We also discover a new nonperturbative channel for energy emission into the bulk from the self-inflating [corrected] branch, when gravity is modified at the de Sitter radius.

  10. Conformal linear gravity in de Sitter space

    SciTech Connect

    Takook, M. V.; Tanhayi, M. R.; Fatemi, S.

    2010-03-15

    It has been shown that the theory of linear conformal quantum gravity must include a tensor field of rank-3 and mixed symmetry [Binegar et al., Phys. Rev. D 27, 2249 (1983)]. In this paper, we obtain the corresponding field equation in de Sitter space. Then, in order to relate this field with the symmetric tensor field of rank-2, K{sub {alpha}}{sub {beta}} related to graviton, we will define homomorphisms between them. Our main result is that if one insists K{sub {alpha}}{sub {beta}} to be a unitary irreducible representation of de Sitter and conformal groups, it must satisfy a field equation of order of 6, which is obtained.

  11. Primordial gravity waves and weak lensing.

    PubMed

    Dodelson, Scott; Rozo, Eduardo; Stebbins, Albert

    2003-07-11

    Inflation produces a primordial spectrum of gravity waves in addition to the density perturbations which seed structure formation. We compute the signature of these gravity waves in the large scale shear field. The shear can be divided into a gradient mode (G or E) and a curl mode (C or B). The latter is produced only by gravity waves, so the observations of a nonzero curl mode could be seen as evidence for inflation. We find that the expected signal from inflation is small, peaking on the largest scales at l(l+1)C(l)/2pi<10(-11) at l=2 and falling rapidly thereafter. Even for an all-sky deep survey, this signal would be below noise at all multipoles. PMID:12906468

  12. Primordial gravity waves and weak lensing.

    PubMed

    Dodelson, Scott; Rozo, Eduardo; Stebbins, Albert

    2003-07-11

    Inflation produces a primordial spectrum of gravity waves in addition to the density perturbations which seed structure formation. We compute the signature of these gravity waves in the large scale shear field. The shear can be divided into a gradient mode (G or E) and a curl mode (C or B). The latter is produced only by gravity waves, so the observations of a nonzero curl mode could be seen as evidence for inflation. We find that the expected signal from inflation is small, peaking on the largest scales at l(l+1)C(l)/2pi<10(-11) at l=2 and falling rapidly thereafter. Even for an all-sky deep survey, this signal would be below noise at all multipoles.

  13. Altimeter Observations of Baroclinic Oceanic Inertia-Gravity Wave Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazman, R. E.; Cheng, B.

    1996-01-01

    For a wide range of nonlinear wave processes - from capillary to planetary waves - theory predicts the existence of Kolmogorov-type spectral cascades of energy and other conserved quantities occuring via nonlinear resonant wave-wave interactions. So far, observations of wave turbulence (WT) have been limited to small-scale processes such as surface gravity and capillary-gravity waves.

  14. Coupling Between Mesospheric and Lower-Thermospheric Ducted Gravity Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snively, J. B.; Walterscheid, R. L.; Hickey, M. P.

    2011-12-01

    The structure of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) region is at times able to support ducted gravity wave propagation in a dual duct system: a lower-thermospheric thermal duct (LTD) that is always present, and an upper-mesospheric thermal duct that forms from an upper-mesospheric inversion layer (MIL). The combined effects of temperature and wind structure (sometimes to the extent of causing "Doppler" ducting, where wind is the Doppler shift becomes the dominant trapping mechanism) may lead to strongly-resonant ducted wave modes that can be easily forced to large amplitude. These modes may be initially excited by mechanisms such as gravity wave breaking or nonlinear interaction at duct altitudes [e.g., Snively and Pasko, JGR, 113, A06303, 2008], or via upward propagating linear waves which tunnel through the lower duct boundaries. In the latter case, excitation to large amplitudes is favored if the wave frequency and wavenumber closely match a duct resonance mode. Even waves that are not fully resonant may tunnel effectively between ducts, leading to dissipation as the waves ascend vertically [e.g., Snively and Taylor, AGU FM, SA54A-04, 2008]. Here we investigate cases where resonant duct modes are shared between the LTD and MIL [e.g., Walterscheid and Hickey, JGR, 114, D19109, 2009], allowing strong waves in the MIL to effectively excite even stronger waves in the LTD. Using steady-state linear and nonlinear time-dependent models in combination, we examine the coupling between MIL and LTD modes, and the generation and evolution of the large amplitude ducted wave modes. The linear model is first used to identify resonance modes, and the nonlinear model is then used to investigate the evolution of waves, from moderate-amplitude quasi-linear waves to large-amplitude nonlinear waves approaching the onset of breaking. We find that waves forced in one duct can profoundly affect the other, especially under resonant conditions where large amplitudes may be

  15. Investigation of resonances in gravity-capillary wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubourg, Quentin; Mordant, Nicolas

    2016-06-01

    We report experimental results on nonlinear wave coupling in surface wave turbulence on water at scales close to the crossover between surface gravity waves and capillary waves. We study three-wave correlations either in the frequency domain or in the wave-vector domain. We observe that in a weakly nonlinear regime, the dominant nonlinear interactions correspond to waves that are collinear or close to collinear. Although the resonant coupling of pure gravity waves is supposed to involve four waves, at the capillary crossover we observe a nonlocal coupling between a gravity wave and two capillary waves. Furthermore, nonlinear spectral spreading permits three-gravity wave coupling. These observations raise the question of the relevance of these processes in the oceanographic context and in particular the range of frequencies of gravity waves that may be impacted.

  16. Observations of Gravity Waves at Atmospheric Fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu Samah, Azizan B. Hj.

    1990-01-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. An observational study of pressure perturbations associated with the passage of atmospheric fronts over the British Isles using a triangular array of sensitive microbarographs reveals the preponderance of gravity wave activities in the vicinity of the surface cold front (SCF). Examination of the time series of these pressure perturbations in the frequency domain shows an enhancement for frequencies less than the local buoyancy frequency N after the passage of the SCF. The spectral analysis also shows two predominant frequency peaks usually located near N and N/2 s ^{-1}. Isolating these frequencies shows that there is a systematic amplitude modulation with an amplification near the SCF and at a region 2-3 hours before and after the SCF passage. The cross-correlation analysis reveals that the gravity waves in the post SCF region propagate towards the SCF. As these waves approach the SCF, the across front component of the phase speed decreases and the direction of propagation of the wave rotates in an anticlockwise manner. It is found that a consistent description of the gravity waves can only be made if first the waves are assumed to be ducted, i.e. there is a reflecting layer aloft, and second that as these waves propagate through the frontal environment, due to the inhomogeneity, they are refracted. A number of conceptual models are then developed to account for the observed wave behaviour in a frontal region. In this investigation it is shown that the stable layer associated with the frontal zone can form a good upper reflector for non-hydrostatic gravity waves. It is also argued that the slope of this layer plays an important role in the refraction of the observed gravity waves. A model of wave propagation in a wedge is then used to account for this slope. This model however predicts a clockwise rotation of the direction of propagation as the wave propagates toward the SCF. This rotation is the opposite

  17. Linear superposition solutions to nonlinear wave equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu

    2012-11-01

    The solutions to a linear wave equation can satisfy the principle of superposition, i.e., the linear superposition of two or more known solutions is still a solution of the linear wave equation. We show in this article that many nonlinear wave equations possess exact traveling wave solutions involving hyperbolic, triangle, and exponential functions, and the suitable linear combinations of these known solutions can also constitute linear superposition solutions to some nonlinear wave equations with special structural characteristics. The linear superposition solutions to the generalized KdV equation K(2,2,1), the Oliver water wave equation, and the k(n, n) equation are given. The structure characteristic of the nonlinear wave equations having linear superposition solutions is analyzed, and the reason why the solutions with the forms of hyperbolic, triangle, and exponential functions can form the linear superposition solutions is also discussed.

  18. Excitation of gravity waves in common envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soker, Noam

    1992-01-01

    We study the excitation of gravity waves by a low-mass companion orbiting inside the envelope of a giant star, concentrating on brown dwarfs inside the envelope of asymptotic giant branch stars. Efficient g-wave excitations occur only after the brown dwarf has spiraled-in to the radiative zone, well inside the envelope, of the asymptotic giant branch star. The brown dwarf excites g-waves when its orbital radius is about 3-10 solar radii. At this stage of the evolution the envelope mass is below 0.1 solar mass. The g-waves propagate inward from the secondary orbit, carrying angular momentum and energy. We find that the angular momentum transport leads to an efficient spin-up of the inner envelopes. The differential rotation between the envelope and core and nonlinear wave effects, can cause a mixing of heavy elements from the core to the envelope.

  19. Inertio Gravity Waves in the Upper Mesosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Mengel, J. G.; Talaat, E. L.; Porter, H. S.; Chan, K. L.

    2003-01-01

    In the polar region of the upper mesosphere, horizontal wind oscillations have been observed with periods around 10 hours (Hernandez et al., 1992). Such waves are generated in our Numerical Spectral Model (NSM) and appear to be inertio gravity waves (IGW). Like the planetary waves (PW) in the model, the IGWs are generated by instabilities that arise in the mean zonal circulation. In addition to stationary waves for m = 0, eastward and westward propagating waves for m = 1 to 4 appear above 70 km that grow in magnitude up to about 110 km, having periods between 9 and 11 hours. The m = 1 westward propagating IGWs have the largest amplitudes, which can reach at the poles 30 m/s. Like PWs, the IGWs are intermittent but reveal systematic seasonal variations, with the largest amplitudes occurring generally in winter and spring. The IGWs propagate upward with a vertical wavelength of about 20 km.

  20. Surface wave acoustics of granular packing under gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, Eric; Andreotti, Bruno; Bonneau, Lenaic

    2009-06-18

    Due to the non-linearity of Hertzian contacts, the speed of sound in granular matter increases with pressure. For a packing under gravity and in the presence of a free surface, bulk acoustic waves cannot propagate due to the inherent refraction toward the surface (the mirage effect). Thus, only modes corresponding to surface waves (Raleigh-Hertz modes) are able to propagate the acoustic signal. First, based on a non-linear elasticity model, we describe the main features associated to these surface waves. We show that under gravity, a granular packing is from the acoustic propagation point of view an index gradient waveguide that selects modes of two distinct families i.e. the sagittal and transverse waves localized in the vicinity of the free surface. A striking feature of these surface waves is the multi-modal propagation: for both transverse and sagittal waves, we show the existence of a infinite but discrete series of propagating modes. In each case, we determine the mode shape and and the corresponding dispersion relation. In the case of a finite size system, a geometric waveguide is superimposed to the index gradient wave guide. In this later case, the dispersion relations are modified by the appearance of a cut-off frequency that scales with depth. The second part is devoted to an experimental study of surface waves propagating in a granular packing confined in a long channel. This set-up allows to tune a monomodal emission by taking advantage of the geometric waveguide features combined with properly designed emitters. For both sagittal and transverses waves, we were able to isolate a single mode (the fundamental one) and to plot the dispersion relation. This measurements agree well with the Hertzian scaling law as predicted by meanfield models. Furthermore, it allows us to determine quantitatively relations on the elastic moduli. However, we observe that our data yield a shear modulus abnormally weak when compared to several meanfield predictions.

  1. Rossby-gravity waves in tropical total ozone data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, J. L.; Ziemke, J. R.

    1993-01-01

    Evidence for Rossby-gravity waves in tropical data fields produced by the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) was recently reported. Similar features are observable in fields of total column ozone from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) satellite instrument. The observed features are episodic, have zonal (east-west) wavelengths of 6,000-10,000 km, and oscillate with periods of 5-10 days. In accord with simple linear theory, the modes exhibit westward phase progression and eastward group velocity. The significance of finding Rossby-gravity waves in total ozone fields is that (1) the report of similar features in ECMWF tropical fields is corroborated with an independent data set and (2) the TOMS data set is demonstrated to possess surprising versatility and sensitivity to relatively smaller scale tropical phenomena.

  2. On the interaction between infrasonic waves and internal gravity waves perturbations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalande, Jean-Marie; Waxler, Roger; Lonzaga, Joel; Velea, Doru; Assink, Jelle

    2014-05-01

    Infrasonic waves propagate at long range through atmospheric ducts resulting from the stratification of atmospheric properties. These ducts are characterized by their spatio-temporal variability. Hence, infrasonic waves integrate information upon the atmosphere along their propagation paths. In order to study infrasonic wave propagation, we resort to atmospheric specification combining Numerical Weather Prediction and climatological models. However, due to the lack of observations these models fail to describe small scale variability such as perturbations associated to the presence of internal gravity waves. These waves play an important role in the atmospheric dynamic by transferring momentum to the mean flow at critical levels and at wave-breaking altitudes. In this study we intend to describe the interaction of infrasonic waves with internal gravity waves in order to understand the long-tail behavior observed in infrasound broadband signals. We developed a model for the propagation of internal waves used to generate realistic perturbations of the background atmospheric states. By using a linear full-wave model of infrasound propagation, our goal is to ultimately relate infrasound characterics to internal waves properties.

  3. Gravitational waves in ghost free bimetric gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Mohseni, Morteza

    2012-11-01

    We obtain a set of exact gravitational wave solutions for the ghost free bimetric theory of gravity. With a flat reference metric, the theory admits the vacuum Brinkmann plane wave solution for suitable choices of the coefficients of different terms in the interaction potential. An exact gravitational wave solution corresponding to a massive scalar mode is also admitted for arbitrary choice of the coefficients with the reference metric being proportional to the spacetime metric. The proportionality factor and the speed of the wave are calculated in terms of the parameters of the theory. We also show that a F(R) extension of the theory admits similar solutions but in general is plagued with ghost instabilities.

  4. Slow EIT waves as gravity modes

    SciTech Connect

    Vranjes, J.

    2011-06-15

    The EIT waves [named after the extreme-ultraviolet imaging telescope (EIT) onboard the solar and heliospheric observatory (SOHO)] are in the literature usually described as fast magneto-acoustic (FMA) modes. However, observations show that a large percentage of these events propagate with very slow speeds that may be as low as 20 km/s. This is far below the FMA wave speed which cannot be below the sound speed, the latter being typically larger than 10{sup 2} km/s in the corona. In the present study, it is shown that, to account for such low propagation speed, a different wave model should be used, based on the theory of gravity waves, both internal (IG) and surface (SG) ones. The gravity modes are physically completely different from the FMA mode, as they are essentially dispersive and in addition the IG wave is a transverse mode. Both the IG and the SG mode separately can provide proper propagation velocities in the whole low speed range.

  5. Seeding and layering of equatorial spread F by gravity waves

    SciTech Connect

    Hysell, D.L.; Kelley, M.C.; Swartz, W.E. ); Woodman, R.F. )

    1990-10-01

    Studies dating back more than 15 years have presented evidence that atmospheric gravity waves play a role in initiating nighttime equatorial F region instabilities. This paper analyzes a spectabular spread F event that for the first time demonstrates a layering which, the authors argue, is controlled by a gravity wave effect. The 50-km vertical wavelength of a gravity wave which they have found is related theoretically to a plasma layering irregularity that originated at low altitudes and then was convected, intact, to higher altitudes. Gravity waves also seem to have determined bottomside intermediate scale undulations, although this fact is not as clear in the data. The neutral wind dynamo effect yields wave number conditions on the gravity wave's ability to modulate the Rayleigh-Taylor instaiblity process. Finally, after evaluating the gravity wave dispersion relation and spatial resonance conditions, we estimate the properties of the seeding wave.

  6. Nonlinear gravity-capillary water waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lei

    1997-11-01

    Two-dimensional gravity-capillary water waves are analyzed using a fully-nonlinear Cauchy-integral method with spectral accuracy. Standing waves are generated in experiments by vertical oscillation and measured by a non-intrusive optical system along with a wave probe. Nonlinear resonance of standing waves with non-wetting contact line effects are discussed in detail. Amplitude- dependent wave frequency and damping in a glass rectangular tank suggest a new contact-line model. A new type of sideband resonance due to modulated forcing is discovered and explained by weakly-nonlinear analysis. This analytical solution is verified by our numerical simulations and physical experiments. New standing waveforms with dimpled or sharp crests are observed in experiments and computations. These new waveforms have strong symmetry breaking in time as a result of nonlinear harmonic interaction. With increasing wave steepness, steep standing waves experience period- tripling with three distinct forms: sharp crest, dimpled or flat crest, and round crest. Significant breaking occurs in the sharp-crest mode and the dimpled-crest mode. Using a complex-demodulation technique, I find that these breaking waves are related to the same 1:2 internal resonance (harmonic interaction) that causes the new steep waveforms. Novel approaches are used to estimate the (breaking and non-breaking) wave dissipation in steep and breaking standing waves. The breaking events (spray, air entrainment, and plunging) approximately double the wave dissipation. Weak capillarity significantly affects the limiting wave height and the form of standing waves, as demonstrated by both computations and small-scale Faraday-wave experiments. Capillary ripple generation on traveling waves is shown to be significant even at moderate wave steepness. The ubiquitous horizontal asymmetry of traveling waves is shown to be critical to capillary ripple generation. Two new asymmetric modes are identified and are shown to have an

  7. Testing relativistic theories of gravity with spacecraft-Doppler gravity-wave detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hellings, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    The response of a spacecraft Doppler-tracking system to the passage of a weak plane gravity wave of the most general polarization is calculated. Results show that the simultaneous tracking of several spacecraft could provide an unambiguous determination of the gravity-wave polarization, a much needed result in the continuing experimental testing of relativistic theories of gravity.

  8. Gravity Wave Seeding of Equatorial Plasma Bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Sardul; Johnson, F. S.; Power, R. A.

    1997-01-01

    Some examples from the Atmosphere Explorer E data showing plasma bubble development from wavy ion density structures in the bottomside F layer are described. The wavy structures mostly had east-west wavelengths of 150-800 km, in one example it was about 3000 km. The ionization troughs in the wavy structures later broke up into either a multiple-bubble patch or a single bubble, depending upon whether, in the precursor wavy structure, shorter wavelengths were superimposed on the larger scale wavelengths. In the multiple bubble patches, intrabubble spacings vaned from 55 km to 140 km. In a fully developed equatorial spread F case, east-west wavelengths from 690 km down to about 0.5 km were present simultaneously. The spacings between bubble patches or between bubbles in a patch appear to be determined by the wavelengths present in the precursor wave structure. In some cases, deeper bubbles developed on the western edge of a bubble patch, suggesting an east-west asymmetry. Simultaneous horizontal neutral wind measurements showed wavelike perturbations that were closely associated with perturbations in the plasma horizontal drift velocity. We argue that the wave structures observed here that served as the initial seed ion density perturbations were caused by gravity waves, strengthening the view that gravity waves seed equatorial spread F irregularities.

  9. Acoustic-Gravity Waves from Bolide Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revelle, Douglas O.

    2008-06-01

    We have developed a new approach to modeling the acoustic-gravity wave (AGW) radiation from bolide sources. This first effort involves entry modeling of bolide sources that have available satellite data through procedures developed in ReVelle (Earth Moon Planets 95, 441-476, 2004a; in: A. Milani, G. Valsecchi, D. Vokrouhlicky (eds) NEO Fireball Diversity: Energetics-based Entry Modeling and Analysis Techniques, Near-earth Objects: Our Celestial Neighbors (IAU S236), 2007b). Results from the entry modeling are directly coupled to AGW production through line source blast wave theory for the initial wave amplitude and period at x=10 (at 10 blast wave radii and perpendicular to the trajectory). The second effort involves the prediction of the formation and or dominance of the propagation of the atmospheric Lamb, edge-wave composite mode in a viscous fluid (Pierce, J. Acoust. Soc. Amer. 35, 1798-1807, 1963) as a function of the source energy, horizontal range and source altitude using the Lamb wave frequency that was deduced directly during the entry modeling and that is used as a surrogate for the source energy. We have also determined that Lamb wave production by bolides at close range decreases dramatically as either the source energy decreases or the source altitude increases. Finally using procedures in Gill ( Atmospheric-Ocean Dynamics, 1982) and in Tolstoy ( Wave Propagation, 1973), we have analyzed two simple dispersion relationships and have calculated the expected dispersion for the Lamb edge-wave mode and for the excited, propagating internal acoustic waves. Finally, we have used the above formalism to fully evaluate these techniques for four large bolides, namely: the Tunguska bolide of June 30, 1908; the Revelstoke bolide of March 31, 1965; the Crete bolide of June 6, 2002 and the Antarctic bolide of September 3, 2004. Due to page limitations, we will only present results in detail for the Revelstoke bolide.

  10. Density response of the mesospheric sodium layer to gravity wave perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, J. D.; Gardner, C. S.; Sechrist, C. F., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Lidar observations of the mesospheric sodium layer often reveal wavelike features moving through the layer. It is often assumed that these features are a layer density response to gravity waves. Chiu and Ching (1978) described the approximate form of the linear response of atmospheric layers to gravity waves. In this paper, their results are used to predict the response of the sodium layer to gravity waves. These simulations are compared with experimental observations and a good correlation is found between the two. Because of the thickness of the sodium layer and the density gradients found in it, a linear model of the layer response is not always adequate to describe gravity wave-sodium layer interactions. Inclusion of nonlinearities in the layer response is briefly discussed. Experimental data is seen to contain features consistent with the predicted nonlinearities.

  11. Matter wave explorer of gravity (MWXG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertmer, W.; Schubert, C.; Wendrich, T.; Gilowski, M.; Zaiser, M.; Zoest, T. V.; Rasel, E.; Bordé, Ch. J.; Clairon, A.; Landragin; Laurent, P.; Lemonde, P.; Santarelli, G.; Schleich, W.; Cataliotti, F. S.; Inguscio, M.; Poli, N.; Sorrentino, F.; Modugno, C.; Tino, G. M.; Gill, P.; Klein, H.; Margolis, H.; Reynaud, S.; Salomon, C.; Lambrecht, A.; Peik, E.; Jentsch, C.; Johann, U.; Rathke, A.; Bouyer, P.; Cacciapuoti, L.; de Natale, P.; Christophe, B.; Foulon, B.; Touboul, P.; Maleki, L.; Yu, N.; Turyshev, S. G.; Anderson, J. D.; Schmidt-Kaler, F.; Walser, R.; Vigué, J.; Büchner, M.; Angonin, M.-C.; Delva, P.; Tourrenc, P.; Bingham, R.; Kent, B.; Wicht, A.; Wang, L. J.; Bongs, K.; Dittus, Hj.; Lämmerzahl, C.; Theil, S.; Sengstock, K.; Peters, A.; Müller, T.; Arndt, M.; Iess, L.; Bondu, F.; Brillet, A.; Samain, E.; Chiofalo, M. L.; Levi, F.; Calonico, D.

    2009-03-01

    In response to ESA’s Call for proposals of 5 March 2007 of the COSMIC VISION 2015-2025 plan of the ESA science programme, we propose a M-class satellite mission to test of the Equivalence Principle in the quantum domain by investigating the extended free fall of matter waves instead of macroscopic bodies as in the case of GAUGE, MICROSCOPE or STEP. The satellite, called Matter Wave E xplorer of Gravity, will carry an experiment to test gravity, namely the measurement of the equal rate of free fall with various isotopes of distinct atomic species with precision cold atom interferometry in the vicinity of the earth. This will allow for a first quantum test the Equivalence Principle with spin polarised particles and with pure fermionic and bosonic atomic ensembles. Due to the space conditions, the free fall of Rubidium and Potassium isotopes will be compared with a maximum accelerational sensitivity of 5·10 - 16 m/s2 corresponding to an accuracy of the test of the Equivalence Principle of 1 part in 1016. Besides the primary scientific goal, the quantum test of the Equivalence Principle, the mission can be extended to provide additional information about the gravitational field of the earth or for testing theories of fundamental processes of decoherence which are investigated by various theory groups in the context of quantum gravity phenomenology. In this proposal we present in detail the mission objectives and the technical aspects of the proposed mission.

  12. Propagation of gravity waves across the tropopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bense, Vera; Spichtinger, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The tropopause region is characterised by strong gradients in various atmospheric quantities that exhibit different properties in the troposphere compared to the stratosphere. The temperature lapse rate typically changes from negative to near-zero values resulting in a strong increase in stability. Accordingly, the buoyancy frequency often undergoes a jump at the tropopause. Analysis of radiosounding data also shows the existence of a strong inversion layer (tropopause inversion layer, TIL) characterised by a strong maximum in buoyancy frequency just above the tropopause, see e.g. Birner et al. (2002). Additionally, the magnitude of the vertical wind shear of the horizontal wind maximizes at the tropopause and the region also exhibits characteristical gradients of trace gases. Vertically propagating gravity waves can be excited in the troposphere by several mechanisms, e.g. by flow over topography (e.g. Durran, 1990), by jets and fronts (for a recent review: Plougonven and Zhang, 1990) or by convection (e.g. Clark et al., 1986). When these waves enter the tropopause region, their properties can be changed drastically by the changing stratification and strong wind shear. Within this work, the EULAG (Eulerian/semi-Lagrangian fluid solver, see e.g. Smolarkiewicz and Margolin, 1997) model is used to investigate the impact of the tropopause on vertically propagating gravity waves excited by flows over topography. The choice of topography (sine-shaped mountains, bell-shaped mountain) along with horizontal wind speed and tropospheric value of buoyancy frequency determine the spectrum of waves (horizontal and vertical wavelengths) that is excited in the tropsphere. In order to analyse how these spectra change for several topographies when a tropopause is present, we investigate different idealized cases in a two-dimensional domain. By varying the vertical profiles of buoyancy frequency (step-wise vs. continuos change, including TIL) and wind shear, the tropopause

  13. Waves in Radial Gravity Using Magnetic Fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohlsen, D. R.; Hart, J. E.; Weidman, P. D.

    1999-01-01

    Terrestrial laboratory experiments studying various fluid dynamical processes are constrained, by being in an Earth laboratory, to have a gravitational body force which is uniform and unidirectional. Therefore fluid free-surfaces are horizontal and flat. Such free surfaces must have a vertical solid boundary to keep the fluid from spreading horizontally along a gravitational potential surface. In atmospheric, oceanic, or stellar fluid flows that have a horizontal scale of about one-tenth the body radius or larger, sphericity is important in the dynamics. Further, fluids in spherical geometry can cover an entire domain without any sidewall effects, i.e. have truly periodic boundary conditions. We describe spherical body-force laboratory experiments using ferrofluid. Ferrofluids are dilute suspensions of magnetic dipoles, for example magnetite particles of order 10 nm diameter, suspended in a carrier fluid. Ferrofluids are subject to an additional body force in the presence of an applied magnetic field gradient. We use this body force to conduct laboratory experiments in spherical geometry. The present study is a laboratory technique improvement. The apparatus is cylindrically axisymmetric. A cylindrical ceramic magnet is embedded in a smooth, solid, spherical PVC ball. The geopotential field and its gradient, the body force, were made nearly spherical by careful choice of magnet height-to-diameter ratio and magnet size relative to the PVC ball size. Terrestrial gravity is eliminated from the dynamics by immersing the "planet" and its ferrofluid "ocean" in an immiscible silicone oil/freon mixture of the same density. Thus the earth gravity is removed from the dynamics of the ferrofluid/oil interface and the only dynamically active force there is the radial magnetic gravity. The entire apparatus can rotate, and waves are forced on the ferrofluid surface by exterior magnets. The biggest improvement in technique is in the wave visualization. Fluorescing dye is added to

  14. The orbiting double pendulum - An analogue to interacting gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dysthe, K.; Henyey, F. S.; Longuet-Higgins, M. S.; Schult, R. L.

    1988-08-01

    The apparent gravity felt by a particle on the surface of water when a progressive train of gravity waves of finite amplitude passes is shown to be analogous to the apparent gravity on the bob of a rapidly rotating pendulum under weak gravity. A train of short gravity waves riding on longer waves will thus have some properties in common with those of a smaller, rapidly rotating pendulum attached to the first pendulum. The variation of the energy and action of the smaller pendulum are examined analytically and by numerical integration.

  15. Evidence for a saturated spectrum of atmospheric gravity waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Steven A.; Fritts, David C.; Vanzandt, Thomas E.

    1987-01-01

    The slope and power spectral density of atmospheric velocity fluctuations versus vertical wavenumber at large wavenumbers are observed to be nearly independent of altitude. It is suggested that such a universality is due to saturation of short vertical-scale fluctuations. A brief review of linear gravity wave saturation theory indicates a physical basis for such spectra. It is demonstrated that observed saturation spectra are not solely due to individually saturated waves but most likely result from amplitude limiting instabilities arising from wave superposition. It is also shown that, while the spectrum is saturated at large wavenumbers, the total kinetic energy per unit mass and the characteristic vertical wavelength increase with altitude. Both of these predictions are consistent with observations.

  16. Gravity waves and gravity wave "breaking" as contributors to aviation turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharman, R.; Lane, T. P.; Trier, S. B.; Fovell, R. G.

    2012-12-01

    Turbulence is a well-known hazard to aviation that is responsible for numerous injuries each year, with occasional fatalities, and results in millions of dollars of operational costs to airlines each year. It has been widely accepted that aviation-scale turbulence that occurs in clear air (CAT) at upper levels (upper troposphere and lower stratosphere) has its origins in Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities induced by enhanced shears and reduced Richardson numbers associated with the jet stream and upper level fronts. However, it is becoming increasingly apparent that gravity waves and gravity wave "breaking" also play a major role in instigating turbulence that affects aviation. Gravity waves and inertia-gravity waves may be produced by a variety of sources, but one major source that impacts aviation seems to be those produced by convection. Several examples of high-resolution numerical simulations that are based on actual encounters with turbulence by commercial aircraft will be presented to demonstrate these situations. Implications for aviation-scale turbulence forecasting will also be discussed.

  17. Characteristic of gravity waves resolved in ECMWF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preusse, Peter; Eckermann, Stephen; Ern, Manfred; Riese, Martin

    Gravity waves (GWs) influence the circulation of the atmosphere on global scale. Because of insufficient measurements and the difficulty to involve all relevant scales in a single model run, they are one of the chief uncertainties in climate and weather prediction. More information, in particular on global scale, is required. Can we employ global models such as the ECMWF high-resolution GCM to infer quantities of resolved GWs? Does this give us insight for the characteristics and relative importance of real GW sources? And can we use such data safely for, e.g., planning measurement campaigns on GWs? Also trajectory studies of cloud formation (cirrus in the UTLS, PSCs) and related dehydration and denitrification rely heavily on realistic temperature structures due to GWs. We here apply techniques developed for an ESA study proving the scientifc break-through which could be reached by a novel infrared limb imager. The 3D temperature structure of mesoscale GWs is exploited to determine amplitudes and 3D wave vectors of GWs at different levels (25km, 35km and 45km altitude) in the stratosphere. Similar to real observations, GW momentum flux is largest in the winter polar vortex and exhibits a second maximum in the summer subtropics. Based on the 3D wavevectors backward ray-tracing is employed to characterize specific sources. For instance, we find for the northern winter strong GW momentum flux (GWMF) associated with mountain waves from Norway and Greenland as well as waves emitted in the lower troposphere from a storm approaching Norway. Waves from these sources spread up to several thousand km in the stratosphere. Together these three events form a burst in the total hemispheric GWMF of a factor of 3. Strong mountain wave events are also found e.g. at Tierra del Fuego and the Antarctic Peninsula, regions which are in the focus of observational and modeling studies for a decade. Gravity waves in the tropical region are associated with deep convection in the upper

  18. Rossby wave instability with self-gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovelace, R. V. E.; Hohlfeld, R. G.

    2013-02-01

    The Rossby wave instability (RWI) in non-self-gravitating discs can be triggered by a bump at a radius r0 in the disc surface mass density (which is proportional to the inverse potential vorticity). It gives rise to a growing non-axisymmetric perturbation [∝exp (imφ), m = 1, 2 …] in the vicinity of r0 consisting of anticyclonic vortices which may facilitate planetesimal growth in protoplanetary discs. Here, we analyse a continuum of thin disc models ranging from self-gravitating to non-self-gravitating. The key quantities determining the stability/instability are (1) the parameters of the bump (or depression) in the disc surface density, (2) the Toomre Q parameter of the disc (a non-self-gravitating disc has Q ≫ 1) and (3) the dimensionless azimuthal wavenumber of the perturbation overline{k}_φ =mQh/r_0, where h is the half-thickness of the disc. For discs stable to axisymmetric perturbations (Q > 1), the self-gravity has a significant role for overline{k}_φ < π /2 or m < (π/2)(r0/h)Q- 1; instability may occur for a depression or groove in the surface density if Q ≲ 2. For overline{k}_φ > π /2 the self-gravity is not important, and instability may occur at a bump in the surface density. Thus, for all mode numbers m ≥ 1, the self-gravity is unimportant for Q > (π/2)(r0/h). We suggest that the self-gravity be included in simulations for cases where Q < (r0/h).

  19. Ionospheric acoustic and gravity waves associated with midlatitude thunderstorms

    SciTech Connect

    Lay, Erin H.; Shao, Xuan -Min; Kendrick, Alexander K.; Carrano, Charles S.

    2015-07-30

    Acoustic waves with periods of 2–4 min and gravity waves with periods of 6–16 min have been detected at ionospheric heights (25–350 km) using GPS total electron content measurements. The area disturbed by these waves and the wave amplitudes have been associated with underlying thunderstorm activity. A statistical study comparing Next Generation Weather Radar thunderstorm measurements with ionospheric acoustic and gravity waves in the midlatitude U.S. Great Plains region was performed for the time period of May–July 2005. An increase of ionospheric acoustic wave disturbed area and amplitude is primarily associated with large thunderstorms (mesoscale convective systems). Ionospheric gravity wave disturbed area and amplitude scale with thunderstorm activity, with even small storms (i.e., individual storm cells) producing an increase of gravity waves.

  20. Gravity Waves Ripple over Marine Stratocumulus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    In this natural-color image from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), a fingerprint-like gravity wave feature occurs over a deck of marine stratocumulus clouds. Similar to the ripples that occur when a pebble is thrown into a still pond, such 'gravity waves' sometimes appear when the relatively stable and stratified air masses associated with stratocumulus cloud layers are disturbed by a vertical trigger from the underlying terrain, or by a thunderstorm updraft or some other vertical wind shear. The stratocumulus cellular clouds that underlie the wave feature are associated with sinking air that is strongly cooled at the level of the cloud-tops -- such clouds are common over mid-latitude oceans when the air is unperturbed by cyclonic or frontal activity. This image is centered over the Indian Ocean (at about 38.9o South, 80.6o East), and was acquired on October 29, 2003.

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer observes the daylit Earth continuously and every 9 days views the entire globe between 82o north and 82o south latitude. These data products were generated from a portion of the imagery acquired during Terra orbit 20545. The image covers an area of 245 kilometers x 378 kilometers, and uses data from blocks 121 to 122 within World Reference System-2 path 134.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  1. Direct heating rates associated with gravity wave saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Erich

    2004-04-01

    Analysis of filtering out subscale motions is applied for internal gravity waves. This leads to a new perspective of the planetary-scale sensible heat budget of the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere. In line with previous results of Becker and Schmitz, the present paper recapitulates that the dissipation of gravity wave kinetic energy and the local adiabatic conversion of mean enthalpy into gravity wave kinetic energy cannot be neglected, and that the net effect of both cools the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere. In addition, the importance of the wave entropy flux-an effect which is ignored in customary gravity wave parameterizations for global circulation models-is stressed. We show that, when evaluated on the basis of Lindzen's saturation assumption, the wave entropy flux convergence behaves like a vertical diffusion of the mean stratification, where the wave-induced diffusion coefficient is involved with a Prandtl number of 2. This result imposes an upper bound of 2 for the effective Prandtl number which scales the combined entropy flux owing to turbulence and gravity waves. The direct heating rates generated by gravity wave saturation are assessed quantitatively, using an idealized general circulation model completed by a Lindzen-type gravity wave parameterization.

  2. Satellite observations of the QBO wave driving by Kelvin waves and gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ern, Manfred; Preusse, Peter; Kalisch, Silvio; Riese, Martin

    2014-05-01

    The quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) of the zonal wind in the tropical stratosphere is an important process in atmospheric dynamics influencing a wide range of altitudes and latitudes. Effects of the QBO are found also in the mesosphere and in the extra-tropics. The QBO even has influence on the surface weather and climate, for example during winter in the northern hemisphere at midlatitudes. Still, climate models have large difficulties in reproducing a realistic QBO. One reason for this deficiency are uncertainties in the wave driving by planetary waves and, in particular, gravity waves that are usually too small-scale to be resolved in global models. Different global equatorial wave modes (e.g., Kelvin waves) have been identified by longitude-time 2D spectral analysis in Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) satellite temperature data, as well as ECMWF temperatures. We find good agreement between SABER satellite observations and ECMWF wave variances in both QBO-related temporal variations and their magnitude. Slow phase speed waves are strongly modulated by the QBO, higher phase speed waves are almost unaffected by the QBO, and ultra-fast equatorial waves can even reach the MLT region. Momentum fluxes and zonal wind drag due to Kelvin waves are derived, and the relative contribution of Kelvin waves to the QBO wind reversal from westward to eastward wind is estimated to be about 30% of the total wave driving. This is in good agreement with the general assumption that gravity waves (GWs) are probably more important for the QBO driving than global-scale waves. This is further supported by SABER and High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) satellite observations of gravity wave drag in the equatorial region. These observations are compared with the drag still missing in the ECMWF ERA Interim (ERAI) tropical momentum budget after considering zonal wind tendency, Coriolis force, advection terms and drag of resolved global

  3. New Gravity Wave Treatments for GISS Climate Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geller, Marvin A.; Zhou, Tiehan; Ruedy, Reto; Aleinov, Igor; Nazarenko, Larissa; Tausnev, Nikolai L.; Sun, Shan; Kelley, Maxwell; Cheng, Ye

    2011-01-01

    Previous versions of GISS climate models have either used formulations of Rayleigh drag to represent unresolved gravity wave interactions with the model-resolved flow or have included a rather complicated treatment of unresolved gravity waves that, while being climate interactive, involved the specification of a relatively large number of parameters that were not well constrained by observations and also was computationally very expensive. Here, the authors introduce a relatively simple and computationally efficient specification of unresolved orographic and nonorographic gravity waves and their interaction with the resolved flow. Comparisons of the GISS model winds and temperatures with no gravity wave parameterization; with only orographic gravity wave parameterization; and with both orographic and nonorographic gravity wave parameterizations are shown to illustrate how the zonal mean winds and temperatures converge toward observations. The authors also show that the specifications of orographic and nonorographic gravity waves must be different in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. Then results are presented where the nonorographic gravity wave sources are specified to represent sources from convection in the intertropical convergence zone and spontaneous emission from jet imbalances. Finally, a strategy to include these effects in a climate-dependent manner is suggested.

  4. New Gravity Wave Treatments for GISS Climate Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geller, Marvin A.; Zhou, Tiehan; Ruedy, Reto; Aleinov, Igor; Nazarenko, Larissa; Tausnev, Nikolai L.; Sun, Shan; Kelley, Maxwell; Cheng, Ye

    2010-01-01

    Previous versions of GISS climate models have either used formulations of Rayleigh drag to represent unresolved gravity wave interactions with the model resolved flow or have included a rather complicated treatment of unresolved gravity waves that, while being climate interactive, involved the specification of a relatively large number of parameters that were not well constrained by observations and also was computationally very expensive. Here, we introduce a relatively simple and computationally efficient specification of unresolved orographic and non-orographic gravity waves and their interaction with the resolved flow. We show comparisons of the GISS model winds and temperatures with no gravity wave parametrization; with only orographic gravity wave parameterization; and with both orographic and non-orographic gravity wave parameterizations to illustrate how the zonal mean winds and temperatures converge toward observations. We also show that the specifications of orographic and nonorographic gravity waves must be different in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. We then show results where the non-orographic gravity wave sources are specified to represent sources from convection in the Intertropical Convergence Zone and spontaneous emission from jet imbalances. Finally, we suggest a strategy to include these effects in a climate dependent manner.

  5. Gravity wave vertical energy flux at 95 km

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, P. G.; Jacka, F.

    1985-01-01

    A three-field photometer (3FP) located at Mt. Torrens near Adelaide, is capable of monitoring different airglow emissions from three spaced fields in the sky. A wheel containing up to six different narrow bandpass interference filters can be rotated, allowing each of the filters to be sequentially placed into each of the three fields. The airglow emission of interest is the 557.7 nm line which has an intensity maximum at 95 km. Each circular field of view is located at the apexes of an equilateral triangle centered on zenith with diameters of 5 km and field separations of 13 km when projected to the 95-km level. The sampling period was 30 seconds and typical data lengths were between 7 and 8 hours. The analysis and results from the interaction of gravity waves on the 557.7 nm emission layer are derived using an atmospheric model similar to that proposed by Hines (1960) where the atmosphere is assumed isothermal and perturbations caused by gravity waves are small and adiabatic, therefore, resulting in linearized equations of motion. In the absence of waves, the atmosphere is also considered stationary. Thirteen nights of quality data from January 1983 to October 1984, covering all seasons, are used in this analysis.

  6. Ionospheric acoustic and gravity waves associated with midlatitude thunderstorms

    DOE PAGES

    Lay, Erin H.; Shao, Xuan -Min; Kendrick, Alexander K.; Carrano, Charles S.

    2015-07-30

    Acoustic waves with periods of 2–4 min and gravity waves with periods of 6–16 min have been detected at ionospheric heights (25–350 km) using GPS total electron content measurements. The area disturbed by these waves and the wave amplitudes have been associated with underlying thunderstorm activity. A statistical study comparing Next Generation Weather Radar thunderstorm measurements with ionospheric acoustic and gravity waves in the midlatitude U.S. Great Plains region was performed for the time period of May–July 2005. An increase of ionospheric acoustic wave disturbed area and amplitude is primarily associated with large thunderstorms (mesoscale convective systems). Ionospheric gravity wavemore » disturbed area and amplitude scale with thunderstorm activity, with even small storms (i.e., individual storm cells) producing an increase of gravity waves.« less

  7. Deterministic forward scatter from surface gravity waves.

    PubMed

    Deane, Grant B; Preisig, James C; Tindle, Chris T; Lavery, Andone; Stokes, M Dale

    2012-12-01

    Deterministic structures in sound reflected by gravity waves, such as focused arrivals and Doppler shifts, have implications for underwater acoustics and sonar, and the performance of underwater acoustic communications systems. A stationary phase analysis of the Helmholtz-Kirchhoff scattering integral yields the trajectory of focused arrivals and their relationship to the curvature of the surface wave field. Deterministic effects along paths up to 70 water depths long are observed in shallow water measurements of surface-scattered sound at the Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory. The arrival time and amplitude of surface-scattered pulses are reconciled with model calculations using measurements of surface waves made with an upward-looking sonar mounted mid-way along the propagation path. The root mean square difference between the modeled and observed pulse arrival amplitude and delay, respectively, normalized by the maximum range of amplitudes and delays, is found to be 0.2 or less for the observation periods analyzed. Cross-correlation coefficients for modeled and observed pulse arrival delays varied from 0.83 to 0.16 depending on surface conditions. Cross-correlation coefficients for normalized pulse energy for the same conditions were small and varied from 0.16 to 0.06. In contrast, the modeled and observed pulse arrival delay and amplitude statistics were in good agreement.

  8. Numerical simulation of an elve modulated by a gravity wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, R. A.; Yue, Jia; Lyons, Walter A.

    2015-07-01

    Recent video observations have shown that elves—the visible manifestation of the lightning electromagnetic pulse (EMP) interacting with the lower ionosphere—can be modulated by neutral density fluctuations at lower ionosphere altitudes due to gravity waves. The elve emissions thus illuminate the gravity wave structure. Here we use a finite difference time domain (FDTD) model of the lightning EMP to simulate elve emissions in the presence of neutral density fluctuations representative of gravity waves. We show that observable elve striations can be generated by gravity waves with a neutral density perturbation of as low as 5% at elve altitudes near 85 km. Higher perturbations lead to more pronounced striations. The depth of the optical signature perturbation is found to be similar in magnitude to the neutral density perturbation at elve altitudes, although the relationship depends on viewing geometry, gravity wave geometry, and the elve-causative lightning peak current moment.

  9. Gravity waves from tachyonic preheating after hybrid inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Dufaux, Jean-Francois; Kofman, Lev; Navros, Olga E-mail: gfelder@email.smith.edu E-mail: navros@email.unc.edu

    2009-03-15

    We study the stochastic background of gravitational waves produced from preheating in hybrid inflation models. We investigate different dynamical regimes of preheating in these models and we compute the resulting gravity wave spectra using analytical estimates and numerical simulations. We discuss the dependence of the gravity wave frequencies and amplitudes on the various potential parameters. We find that large regions of the parameter space leads to gravity waves that may be observable in upcoming interferometric experiments, including Advanced LIGO, but this generally requires very small coupling constants.

  10. The Role of Gravity Waves in Modulating Atmospheric Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Mengel, J. G; Chan, K. L.; Porter, H. S.

    1999-01-01

    We discuss results for the diurnal and semidiurnal tides obtained from our 3-D, time dependent numerical spectral model (NMS), extending from the ground up into the thermosphere, which incorporates Hines' Doppler spread parameterization of small scale gravity waves (GW). In the DSP, GW momentum (and energy) are conserved as the waves modulate the background flow and are filtered by the flow.As a consequence, the GW interaction tightly couples the dynamic components of the middle atmosphere with strong non-linear interactions between mean zonal circulation, tides and planetary waves to produce complicated patterns of variability much like those observed. The major conclusions are: (1) Since GW momentum is deposited in the altitude regime of increasing winds, the amplitude of the diurnal tide is amplified and its vertical wavelength is reduced at altitudes between 80 and 120 km. Wave filtering by the mean zonal circulation (with peak velocities during solstice) causes the GW flux to peak during equinox, and this produces a large semi-annual variation in the tide that has been observed on UARS. (2) Without the diurnal tide, the semidiurnal tide would also be modulated in this way. But the diurnal tide filters out the GW preferentially during equinox, so that the semidiurnal tide, at higher altitudes, tends to peak during solstice. (3) Under the influence of GW, the tides are modulated also significantly by planetary waves, with periods between 2 and 30 days, which are generated preferentially during solstice in part due to baroclinic instability.

  11. Experimental observation of negative effective gravity in water waves.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xinhua; Yang, Jiong; Zi, Jian; Chan, C T; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2013-01-01

    The gravity of Earth is responsible for the formation of water waves and usually difficult to change. Although negative effective gravity was recently predicted theoretically in water waves, it has not yet been observed in experiments and remains a mathematical curiosity which is difficult to understand. Here we experimentally demonstrate that close to the resonant frequency of purposely-designed resonating units, negative effective gravity can occur for water waves passing through an array of resonators composing of bottom-mounted split tubes, resulting in the prohibition of water wave propagation. It is found that when negative gravity occurs, the averaged displacement of water surface in a unit cell of the array has a phase difference of π to that along the boundary of the unit cell, consistent with theoretical predictions. Our results provide a mechanism to block water waves and may find applications in wave energy conversion and coastal protection.

  12. Experimental Observation of Negative Effective Gravity in Water Waves

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xinhua; Yang, Jiong; Zi, Jian; Chan, C. T.; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2013-01-01

    The gravity of Earth is responsible for the formation of water waves and usually difficult to change. Although negative effective gravity was recently predicted theoretically in water waves, it has not yet been observed in experiments and remains a mathematical curiosity which is difficult to understand. Here we experimentally demonstrate that close to the resonant frequency of purposely-designed resonating units, negative effective gravity can occur for water waves passing through an array of resonators composing of bottom-mounted split tubes, resulting in the prohibition of water wave propagation. It is found that when negative gravity occurs, the averaged displacement of water surface in a unit cell of the array has a phase difference of π to that along the boundary of the unit cell, consistent with theoretical predictions. Our results provide a mechanism to block water waves and may find applications in wave energy conversion and coastal protection. PMID:23715132

  13. GRAVITY WAVES ON HOT EXTRASOLAR PLANETS. I. PROPAGATION AND INTERACTION WITH THE BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, Chris; Cho, J. Y-K. E-mail: J.Cho@qmul.ac.u

    2010-05-01

    We study the effects of gravity waves, or g-modes, on hot extrasolar planets. These planets are expected to possess stably stratified atmospheres, which support gravity waves. In this paper, we review the derivation of the equation that governs the linear dynamics of gravity waves and describe its application to a hot extrasolar planet, using HD 209458 b as a generic example. We find that gravity waves can exhibit a wide range of behaviors, even for a single atmospheric profile. The waves can significantly accelerate or decelerate the background mean flow, depending on the difference between the wave phase and mean flow speeds. In addition, the waves can provide significant heating ({approx}10{sup 2} to {approx}10{sup 3} K per planetary rotation), especially to the region of the atmosphere above about 10 scale heights from the excitation region. Furthermore, by propagating horizontally, gravity waves provide a mechanism for transporting momentum and heat from the dayside of a tidally locked planet to its nightside. We discuss work that needs to be undertaken to incorporate these effects in current atmosphere models of extrasolar planets.

  14. Internal gravity waves in the equatorial Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Skyllingstad, E.D.; Denbo, D.W. )

    1992-09-01

    Mixing in the ocean surface layer is an important process in the transport of heat, momentum, and CO[sub 2] into the deep ocean, For example, the flux of heat into the cold, upwelling water in equatorial regions provides one of the major heat sources driving the ocean circulation. Direct measurements of the ocean mixed layer have provided good estimates of the bulk layer properties. However, estimates of the small-scale effects of intenial waves and related turbulence have remained ambiguous because of the difficulty in observing these processes. Until more detailed measurements become available, numerical models can provide a convenient and cost-effective way to analyze the details of the surface mixed layer. Modeling the surface layer of the equatorial Pacific Ocean is challenging because of the strong vertical current shear and density stratification common to the region. The primary zonal current is the eastward flowing Equatorial Undercurrent (EUC) centered at roughly 120 m depth, with a speed of about 1.5 ms[sup [minus]1] as shown in Figure 1. The EUC is forced by a zonal pressure gradient resulting from the westward directed surface wind stress. Above the EUC, the wind stress directly forces thee South Equatorial Current (SEC), which flows westward with a speed of about 0.5 ms[sup [minus]1]. The shear zone generated by these currents is marginally stable and exhibits a diurnal cycle of turbulence dependent on convection forced by surface cooling. In addition, surface convection forces internal gravity waves, which can transport momentum away from the surface current to deeper waters. In this report, we discuss recent modeling results for the equatorial Pacific showing the generation of convection, turbulence, and internal waves.

  15. Internal gravity waves in the equatorial Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Skyllingstad, E.D.; Denbo, D.W.

    1992-09-01

    Mixing in the ocean surface layer is an important process in the transport of heat, momentum, and CO{sub 2} into the deep ocean, For example, the flux of heat into the cold, upwelling water in equatorial regions provides one of the major heat sources driving the ocean circulation. Direct measurements of the ocean mixed layer have provided good estimates of the bulk layer properties. However, estimates of the small-scale effects of intenial waves and related turbulence have remained ambiguous because of the difficulty in observing these processes. Until more detailed measurements become available, numerical models can provide a convenient and cost-effective way to analyze the details of the surface mixed layer. Modeling the surface layer of the equatorial Pacific Ocean is challenging because of the strong vertical current shear and density stratification common to the region. The primary zonal current is the eastward flowing Equatorial Undercurrent (EUC) centered at roughly 120 m depth, with a speed of about 1.5 ms{sup {minus}1} as shown in Figure 1. The EUC is forced by a zonal pressure gradient resulting from the westward directed surface wind stress. Above the EUC, the wind stress directly forces thee South Equatorial Current (SEC), which flows westward with a speed of about 0.5 ms{sup {minus}1}. The shear zone generated by these currents is marginally stable and exhibits a diurnal cycle of turbulence dependent on convection forced by surface cooling. In addition, surface convection forces internal gravity waves, which can transport momentum away from the surface current to deeper waters. In this report, we discuss recent modeling results for the equatorial Pacific showing the generation of convection, turbulence, and internal waves.

  16. Stratospheric gravity wave observations of AIRS and HIRDLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Catrin I.; Hoffmann, Lars; Ern, Manfred; Trinh, Thai

    2016-04-01

    The Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) aboard NASA's Aqua satellite provides stratospheric temperature observations for a variety of scientific analyses. However, the horizontal resolution of the operational temperature retrievals is generally not sufficient for studies of gravity waves. The AIRS high-resolution retrieval discussed here provides stratospheric temperature profiles for each individual satellite footprint and therefore has nine times better horizontal sampling than the operational data. The retrieval configuration is optimized so that the results provide a trade-off between spatial resolution and retrieval noise that is considered optimal for gravity wave analysis. To validate the AIRS data we performed an intercomparison with stratospheric temperature measurements of the High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS). Selected case studies of gravity wave events are analyzed. AIRS and HIRDLS utilize rather different measurement geometries (nadir and limb) and have different sensitivities to gravity wave horizontal and vertical wavelengths, as indicated by their observational filters. Nevertheless, the wave structures found in the stratosphere in AIRS and HIRDLS data are often in remarkably good agreement. The three-dimensional temperature fields from AIRS allow us to derive the horizontal orientation of the phase fronts, which is a limiting factor for gravity wave analyses based on limb measurements today. In addition, a statistical comparison focuses on temperature variances due to stratospheric gravity wave activity at 20-60 km altitude. The analysis covers monthly zonal averages and time series for the HIRDLS measurement time period (January 2005-March 2008). We found good agreement in the seasonal and latitudinal patterns of gravity wave activity. Time series of gravity wave variances show a strong annual cycle at high latitudes with maxima during wintertime and minima during summertime. Largest variability is found at 60°S during austral

  17. Plane wave holonomies in quantum gravity. II. A sine wave solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neville, Donald E.

    2015-08-01

    This paper constructs an approximate sinusoidal wave packet solution to the equations of canonical gravity. The theory uses holonomy-flux variables with support on a lattice (LHF =lattice-holonomy flux ). There is an SU(2) holonomy on each edge of the LHF simplex, and the goal is to study the behavior of these holonomies under the influence of a passing gravitational wave. The equations are solved in a small sine approximation: holonomies are expanded in powers of sines and terms beyond sin2 are dropped; also, fields vary slowly from vertex to vertex. The wave is unidirectional and linearly polarized. The Hilbert space is spanned by a set of coherent states tailored to the symmetry of the plane wave case. Fixing the spatial diffeomorphisms is equivalent to fixing the spatial interval between vertices of the loop quantum gravity lattice. This spacing can be chosen such that the eigenvalues of the triad operators are large, as required in the small sine limit, even though the holonomies are not large. Appendices compute the energy of the wave, estimate the lifetime of the coherent state packet, discuss circular polarization and coarse-graining, and determine the behavior of the spinors used in the U(N) SHO realization of LQG.

  18. Application of linear inverse theory to borehole gravity data

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhard, N.R.

    1991-09-01

    Traditional borehole gravity interpretations are based upon an earth model which assumes horizontal, laterally infinite, uniformly thick, and constant density layers. I apply discrete stabilized linear inverse theory to determine the density distribution directly from borehole gravity observations that have been corrected for drift, tide, and terrain. The stabilization is the result of including a priori data about the free-air gradient and the density structure in the inversion process. The discrete generalized linear inverse approach enables one to solve for a density distribution using all of the borehole gravity data. Moreover, the data need not be free-air corrected. An important feature of the approach is that density estimates are not required to be density averages between adjacent borehole gravity observations as in the traditional method. This approach further permits the explicit incorporation of independent density information from gamma-gamma logging tools or laboratory core measurements. Finally, explicit linear constraints upon the density and/or free-air gradient can also be handled. The non-uniqueness of the density structure determined by the inversion process is represented in a resolution matrix. 12 refs., 11 figs.

  19. Nonlocal resonances in weak turbulence of gravity-capillary waves.

    PubMed

    Aubourg, Quentin; Mordant, Nicolas

    2015-04-10

    We report a laboratory investigation of weak turbulence of water surface waves in the gravity-capillary crossover. By using time-space-resolved profilometry and a bicoherence analysis, we observe that the nonlinear processes involve three-wave resonant interactions. By studying the solutions of the resonance conditions, we show that the nonlinear interaction is dominantly one dimensional and involves collinear wave vectors. Furthermore, taking into account the spectral widening due to weak nonlinearity explains why nonlocal interactions are possible between a gravity wave and high-frequency capillary ones. We observe also that nonlinear three-wave coupling is possible among gravity waves, and we raise the question of the relevance of this mechanism for oceanic waves. PMID:25910127

  20. A Simple Theory of Capillary-Gravity Wave Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazman, Roman E.

    1995-01-01

    Employing a recently proposed 'multi-wave interaction' theory, inertial spectra of capillary gravity waves are derived. This case is characterized by a rather high degree of nonlinearity and a complicated dispersion law. The absence of scale invariance makes this and some other problems of wave turbulence (e.g., nonlinear inertia gravity waves) intractable by small-perturbation techniques, even in the weak-turbulence limit. The analytical solution obtained in the present work for an arbitrary degree of nonlinearity is shown to be in reasonable agreement with experimental data. The theory explains the dependence of the wave spectrum on wind input and describes the accelerated roll-off of the spectral density function in the narrow sub-range separating scale-invariant regimes of purely gravity and capillary waves, while the appropriate (long- and short-wave) limits yield power laws corresponding to the Zakharov-Filonenko and Phillips spectra.

  1. Nonlocal resonances in weak turbulence of gravity-capillary waves.

    PubMed

    Aubourg, Quentin; Mordant, Nicolas

    2015-04-10

    We report a laboratory investigation of weak turbulence of water surface waves in the gravity-capillary crossover. By using time-space-resolved profilometry and a bicoherence analysis, we observe that the nonlinear processes involve three-wave resonant interactions. By studying the solutions of the resonance conditions, we show that the nonlinear interaction is dominantly one dimensional and involves collinear wave vectors. Furthermore, taking into account the spectral widening due to weak nonlinearity explains why nonlocal interactions are possible between a gravity wave and high-frequency capillary ones. We observe also that nonlinear three-wave coupling is possible among gravity waves, and we raise the question of the relevance of this mechanism for oceanic waves.

  2. Colliding plane waves in F(R)=RN gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahamtan, T.; Halilsoy, M.; Habib Mazharimousavi, S.

    2016-10-01

    We identify a region of a specific F( R)= R N gravity solution without external sources which is isometric to the spacetime of colliding plane waves (CPW). The analogy renders construction and collision of plane waves in F( R)= R N gravity possible. The geometry of the interaction region is equivalent to the Reissner-Nordström (RN) one, however there is no Einstein-Maxwell (EM) source --this is made possible by using the model of RN gravity and the parameter N>1 creates the source. For N=1, we naturally recover the plane waves (and their collision) in Einstein's theory.

  3. Gravity waves and instabilities in the lower and middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klostermeyer, Juergen

    1989-01-01

    Some basic aspects of mesoscale and small-scale gravity waves and instability mechanisms are discussed. Internal gravity waves with wavelengths between ten and less than one kilometer and periods between several hours and several minutes appear to play a central role in atmospheric wavenumber and frequency spectra. Therefore, the author discusses the propagation of gravity waves in simplified atmospheric models. Their interaction with the wind as well as their mutual interaction and stability mechanisms based on these processes are discussed. Mesosphere stratosphere troposphere radar observations showing the relevant hydrodynamic processes are stressed.

  4. Non local resonances in weak turbulence of gravity-capillary water waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordant, Nicolas; Aubourg, Quentin

    2015-11-01

    We investigate experimentally the statistical properties of wave turbulence of surface waves on water. In the limit of weak non linearity an energy cascade in scale is predicted by the Weak Turbulence Theory. Energy transfers are predicted to occur among resonant waves. We use a Fourier Transform Profilometry technique that provides a 2D measurement of the water surface deformation that is resolved in time and scale. The principle is to project a pattern on the surface of water which diffuses light thanks to the addition of a Titanium oxyde powder. The pattern can then be inverted to provide the elevation of the water surface. Our wave tank is 70 cm long and we investigate waves that lie is the vicinity of the capillary-gravity crossover with frequencies between 1Hz and 100 Hz. We compute 3-wave correlations so that to study the non linear coupling and the energy transfers among resonant waves. We observe a 3-wave non linear coupling which is dominantly unidirectional and non local in scale: a low frequency gravity wave can be coupled to 2 high frequency capillary waves. We will also discuss the importance of approximate resonances in the wave coupling.

  5. Turbulence-particle interactions under surface gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paskyabi, Mostafa Bakhoday

    2016-11-01

    The dispersion and transport of single inertial particles through an oscillatory turbulent aquatic environment are examined numerically by a Lagrangian particle tracking model using a series of idealised test cases. The turbulent mixing is incorporated into the Lagrangian model by the means of a stochastic scheme in which the inhomogeneous turbulent quantities are governed by a one-dimensional k- ɛ turbulence closure scheme. This vertical mixing model is further modified to include the effects of surface gravity waves including Coriolis-Stokes forcing, wave breaking, and Langmuir circulations. To simplify the complex interactions between the deterministic and the stochastic phases of flow, we assume a time-invariant turbulent flow field and exclude the hydrodynamic biases due to the effects of ambient mean current. The numerical results show that the inertial particles acquire perturbed oscillations traced out as time-varying sinking/rising orbits in the vicinity of the sea surface under linear and cnoidal waves and acquire a non-looping single arc superimposed with the high-frequency fluctuations beneath the nonlinear solitary waves. Furthermore, we briefly summarise some recipes through the course of this paper on the implementation of the stochastic particle tracking models to realistically describe the drift and suspension of inertial particles throughout the water column.

  6. A Parabolic Equation Approach to Modeling Acousto-Gravity Waves for Local Helioseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Bene, Kevin; Lingevitch, Joseph; Doschek, George

    2016-08-01

    A wide-angle parabolic-wave-equation algorithm is developed and validated for local-helioseismic wave propagation. The parabolic equation is derived from a factorization of the linearized acousto-gravity wave equation. We apply the parabolic-wave equation to modeling acoustic propagation in a plane-parallel waveguide with physical properties derived from helioseismic data. The wavenumber power spectrum and wave-packet arrival-time structure for receivers in the photosphere with separation up to 30° is computed, and good agreement is demonstrated with measured values and a reference spectral model.

  7. Gravity effects of polyhedral bodies with linearly varying density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Urso, M. G.

    2014-12-01

    We extend a recent approach for computing the gravity effects of polyhedral bodies with uniform density by the case of bodies with linearly varying density and by consistently taking into account the relevant singularities. We show in particular that the potential and the gravity vector can be given an expression in which singularities are ruled out, thus avoiding the introduction of small positive numbers advocated by some authors in order to circumvent undefined operations. We also prove that the entries of the second derivative exhibit a singularity if and only if the observation point is aligned with an edge of a face of the polyhedron. The formulas presented in the paper have been numerically checked with alternative ones derived on the basis of different approaches, already established in the literature, and intensively tested by computing the gravity effects induced by real asteroids with arbitrarily assigned density variations.

  8. Mesospheric gravity waves and ionospheric plasma bubbles observed during the COPEX campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulino, I.; Takahashi, H.; Medeiros, A. F.; Wrasse, C. M.; Buriti, R. A.; Sobral, J. H. A.; Gobbi, D.

    2011-07-01

    During the Conjugate Point Experiment (COPEX) campaign performed at Boa Vista (2.80∘N;60.70∘W, dip angle21.7∘N) from October to December 2002, 15 medium-scale gravity waves in the OHNIR airglow images were observed. Using a Keogram image analysis, we estimate their parameters. Most of the waves propagate to Northwest, indicating that their main sources are Southeast of Boa Vista. Quasi-simultaneous plasma bubble activities in the OI 630 nm images were observed in seven cases. The distances between the bubble depletions have a linear relationship with the wavelengths of the gravity waves observed in the mesosphere, which suggests a direct contribution of the mesospheric medium-scale gravity waves in seeding the equatorial plasma bubbles.

  9. Massive gravitational waves in Chern-Simons modified gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Myung, Yun Soo; Moon, Taeyoon E-mail: tymoon@inje.ac.kr

    2014-10-01

    We consider the nondynamical Chern-Simons (nCS) modified gravity, which is regarded as a parity-odd theory of massive gravity in four dimensions. We first find polarization modes of gravitational waves for θ=x/μ in nCS modified gravity by using the Newman-Penrose formalism where the null complex tetrad is necessary to specify gravitational waves. We show that in the Newman–Penrose formalism, the number of polarization modes is one in addition to an unspecified Ψ{sub 4}, implying three degrees of freedom for θ=x/μ. This compares with two for a canonical embedding of θ=t/μ. Also, if one introduces the Ricci tensor formalism to describe a massive graviton arising from the nCS modified gravity, one finds one massive mode after making second-order wave equations, which is compared to five found from the parity-even Einstein–Weyl gravity.

  10. Role of Gravity Waves in Determining Cirrus Cloud Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OCStarr, David; Singleton, Tamara; Lin, Ruei-Fong

    2008-01-01

    Cirrus clouds are important in the Earth's radiation budget. They typically exhibit variable physical properties within a given cloud system and from system to system. Ambient vertical motion is a key factor in determining the cloud properties in most cases. The obvious exception is convectively generated cirrus (anvils), but even in this case, the subsequent cloud evolution is strongly influenced by the ambient vertical motion field. It is well know that gravity waves are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and occur over a wide range of scales and amplitudes. Moreover, researchers have found that inclusion of statistical account of gravity wave effects can markedly improve the realism of simulations of persisting large-scale cirrus cloud features. Here, we use a 1 -dimensional (z) cirrus cloud model, to systematically examine the effects of gravity waves on cirrus cloud properties. The model includes a detailed representation of cloud microphysical processes (bin microphysics and aerosols) and is run at relatively fine vertical resolution so as to adequately resolve nucleation events, and over an extended time span so as to incorporate the passage of multiple gravity waves. The prescribed gravity waves "propagate" at 15 m s (sup -1), with wavelengths from 5 to 100 km, amplitudes range up to 1 m s (sup -1)'. Despite the fact that the net gravity wave vertical motion forcing is zero, it will be shown that the bulk cloud properties, e.g., vertically-integrated ice water path, can differ quite significantly from simulations without gravity waves and that the effects do depend on the wave characteristics. We conclude that account of gravity wave effects is important if large-scale models are to generate realistic cirrus cloud property climatology (statistics).

  11. Gravity wave detection by GPS radio occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Torsten; Arras, Christina; De la Torre, Alejandro; Alexander, Peter; Llamedo, Pablo

    2016-07-01

    Gravity waves (GWs) play an important role for the general atmospheric circulation due to the related transport of energy and momentum between different regions of the atmosphere. The momentum mostly generated in the troposphere is transported to upper atmospheric levels where GWs break or dissipate and transfer their momentum to the background wind (GW drag). The deposit of GW momentum can occur in the complete altitude range from the upper troposphere-stratosphere, the mesosphere, and even in the thermosphere. A global observation of GW parameters (e.g. potential energy and vertical flux of absolute horizontal momentum) is only possible with satellite data. The radio occultation (RO) technique uses GPS signals received aboard low Earth orbiting satellites for atmospheric limb sounding. Atmospheric temperature profiles in the troposphere/stratosphere and ionospheric electron densities are derived with high vertical resolution. The GPS RO technique is sensitive to GWs with small ratios of vertical to horizontal wavelengths. In this presentation we give an overview about the derivation of GW parameters from RO temperature profiles, review some results of GW detection with RO data, and discuss the limitations of the RO technique. The focus of the presented results is (1) global GW activity in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere for different seasons, (2) influence of the topography on GW activity from the troposphere to the ionosphere in the Andean region of South America, and (3) the variation of ionospheric sporadic E layers.

  12. Observations of gravity wave scales, fluxes, and saturation during MAP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, I. M.

    1989-01-01

    During the MAP/MAC period, considerable improvements in instrumentation and experimental technique have occurred, and many hitherto unavailable parameters relating to gravity waves have become available. Studies of individual wave events and simultaneous observations made with a variety of techniques have provided insight into wave saturation mechanisms. In addition, long data sets of upper middle atmosphere winds were collected at a number of widely spaced sites, allowing climatological investigations of gravity wave amplitudes, wave number spectra, polarization, mean flow acceleration, and other saturation effects to be undertaken. Observations of gravity wave scales, momentum fluxes, saturation and saturation effects obtained during MAP/MAC, made on both a statistical and case study basis are reviewed.

  13. 3D Solitons of Capillary-Gravity and Flexural-Gravity Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Reza

    2013-11-01

    In the context of nonlinear water wave theory an intriguing question has always been if fully-localized 3D wave structures, counterparts of 2D solitons, can exist. These structures are important because, if exist, they can transport mass, momentum and energy over long distances. For pure gravity waves this possibility is already ruled out, but- as we will discuss- few limiting cases of capillary-gravity and flexural-gravity wave equations admit such solutions in the form of dromions and lumps. Here we show that weakly nonlinear flexural-gravity wave packets, such as those propagating on the surface of ice-covered waters, admit three-dimensional fully localized solutions in the form of dromions. This study is motivated by observations of (relatively) large amplitude localized waves deep inside the ice-pack in polar waters. For capillary-gravity wave classical theory obtains dromions for shallow-water and strong surface tension (Bond number, Bo, greater than 1/3). Here we show that capillary-gravity dromions exist beyond this limit for a broad range of finite water depths as well as for sub-critical Bond numbers, i.e. for Bo < 1/3.

  14. pp waves of conformal gravity with self-interacting source

    SciTech Connect

    Ayon-Beato, Eloy . E-mail: ayon@cecs.cl; Hassaine, Mokhtar . E-mail: hassaine@cecs.cl

    2005-05-01

    Recently, Deser, Jackiw and Pi have shown that three-dimensional conformal gravity with a source given by a conformally coupled scalar field admits pp wave solutions. In this paper, we consider this model with a self-interacting potential preserving the conformal structure. A pp wave geometry is also supported by this system and, we show that this model is equivalent to topologically massive gravity with a cosmological constant whose value is given in terms of the potential strength.

  15. Transport equations for linear surface waves with random underlying flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bal, Guillaume; Chou, Tom

    1999-11-01

    We define the Wigner distribution and use it to develop equations for linear surface capillary-gravity wave propagation in the transport regime. The energy density a(r, k) contained in waves propagating with wavevector k at field point r is given by dota(r,k) + nabla_k[U_⊥(r,z=0) \\cdotk + Ω(k)]\\cdotnabla_ra [13pt] \\: hspace1in - (nabla_r\\cdotU_⊥)a - nabla_r(k\\cdotU_⊥)\\cdotnabla_ka = Σ(δU^2) where U_⊥(r, z=0) is a slowly varying surface current, and Ω(k) = √(k^3+k)tanh kh is the free capillary-gravity dispersion relation. Note that nabla_r\\cdotU_⊥(r,z=0) neq 0, and that the surface currents exchange energy density with the propagating waves. When an additional weak random current √\\varepsilon δU(r/\\varepsilon) varying on the scale of k-1 is included, we find an additional scattering term Σ(δU^2) as a function of correlations in δU. Our results can be applied to the study of surface wave energy transport over a turbulent ocean.

  16. Gravity wave observations using an all-sky imager network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrasse, Cristiano Max; Almeida, Lazaro M.; Abalde Guede, Jose Ricardo; Fagundes, Paulo Roberto; Nicoli Candido, Claudia Maria; Alves Bolzan, Maurício José; Guarnieri, Fernando; Messias Almeida, Lazaro

    Gravity waves in the mesosphere were observed by airglow all-sky imager network of the UNI- VAP at São José dos Campos (23o S, 45o W), Braśpolis (22o S, 45o W) and Palmas (10o S, 48o W), a e o Brazil. Gravity wave characteristics like morphology, horizontal wavelength, period, phase speed and propagation direction will be analysed and discussed. The results will be compared with other observation sites in Brazil. Wave directionality will also be discussed in terms of wave sources and wind filtering.

  17. Gravity waves and turbulence in the middle atmosphere program (GRATMAP): An overview of gravity wave studies during MAP/MAC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritts, D. C.

    1989-01-01

    Considerable progress was made in understanding gravity waves and their effects in the middle atmosphere during the MAP and MAC periods. During this time, gravity waves were recognized to play a central role in controlling the large scale circulation and the thermal and constituent structure of this region through wave transports of energy and momentum, a significant induced meridional circulation, and through the action of wave induced turbulence. Both theoretical and observational studies also have contributed to the understanding of the gravity wave spectrum, its temporal and spatial variability, and the processes responsible for wave saturation. As a result, the propagation, interactions, and detailed effects of such motions in the middle atmosphere are beginning to be understood. An overview is provided.

  18. Tsunami and acoustic-gravity waves in water of constant depth

    SciTech Connect

    Hendin, Gali; Stiassnie, Michael

    2013-08-15

    A study of wave radiation by a rather general bottom displacement, in a compressible ocean of otherwise constant depth, is carried out within the framework of a three-dimensional linear theory. Simple analytic expressions for the flow field, at large distance from the disturbance, are derived. Realistic numerical examples indicate that the Acoustic-Gravity waves, which significantly precede the Tsunami, are expected to leave a measurable signature on bottom-pressure records that should be considered for early detection of Tsunami.

  19. Integrated gravity and gravity gradient 3D inversion using the non-linear conjugate gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Pengbo; Huang, Danian; Yuan, Yuan; Geng, Meixia; Liu, Jie

    2016-03-01

    Gravity data, which are critical in mineral, oil, and gas exploration, are obtained from the vertical component of the gravity field, while gravity gradient data are measured from changes in the gravity field in three directions. However, few studies have sought to improve exploration techniques by integrating gravity and gravity gradient data using inversion methods. In this study, we developed a new method to integrate gravity and gravity gradient data in a 3D density inversion using the non-linear conjugate gradient (NLCG) method and the minimum gradient support (MGS) functional to regularize the 3D inverse problem and to obtain a clear and accurate image of the anomalous body. The NLCG algorithm, which is suitable for solving large-scale nonlinear optimization problems and requires no memory storage, was compared to the Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (BFGS) quasi-Newton algorithm and the results indicated that the convergence rate of NLCG is slower, but that the storage requirement and computation time is lower. To counteract the decay in kernel function, we introduced a depth weighting function for anomalous bodies at the same depth, with information about anomalous body depth obtained from well log and seismic exploration data. For anomalous bodies at different depths, we introduced a spatial gradient weighting function to incorporate additional information obtained in the inversion. We concluded that the spatial gradient weighting function enhanced the spatial resolution of the recovered model. Furthermore, our results showed that including multiple components for inversion increased the resolution of the recovered model. We validated our model by applying our inversion method to survey data from Vinton salt dome, Louisiana, USA. The results showed good agreement with known geologic information; thus confirming the accuracy of this approach.

  20. Breaking Gravity Waves Over Large-Scale Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, J. D.; Shapiro, M. A.

    2002-12-01

    The importance of mountain waves is underscored by the numerous studies that document the impact on the atmospheric momentum balance, turbulence generation, and the creation of severe downslope winds. As stably stratified air is forced to rise over topography, large amplitude internal gravity waves may be generated that propagate vertically, amplify and breakdown in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Many of the numerical studies reported on in the literature have used two- and three-dimensional models with simple, idealized initial states to examine gravity wave breaking. In spite of the extensive previous work, many questions remain regarding gravity wave breaking in the real atmosphere. Outstanding issues that are potentially important include: turbulent mixing and wave overturning processes, mountain wave drag, downstream effects, and the mesoscale predictability of wave breaking. The current limit in our knowledge of gravity wave breaking can be partially attributed to lack of observations. During the Fronts and Atlantic Storm-Track Experiment (FASTEX), a large amplitude gravity wave was observed in the lee of Greenland on 29 January 1997. Observations taken collected during FASTEX presented a unique opportunity to study topographically forced gravity wave breaking and to assess the ability of high-resolution numerical models to predict the structure and evolution of such phenomena. Measurements from the NOAA G-4 research aircraft and high-resolution numerical simulations are used to study the evolution and dynamics of the large-amplitude gravity wave event that took place during the FASTEX. Vertical cross section analysis of dropwindsonde data, with 50-km horizontal spacing, indicates the presence of a large amplitude breaking gravity wave that extends from above the 150-hPa level to 500 hPa. Flight-level data indicate a horizontal shear of over 10-3 s-1 across the breaking wave with 25 K potential temperature perturbations. This breaking wave may

  1. DUSTYWAVE: Linear waves in gas and dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laibe, Guillaume; Price, Daniel J.

    2016-02-01

    Written in Fortran, DUSTYWAVE computes the exact solution for linear waves in a two-fluid mixture of gas and dust. The solutions are general with respect to both the dust-to-gas ratio and the amplitude of the drag coefficient.

  2. Intercomparison of stratospheric gravity wave observations with AIRS and IASI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Lars; Alexander, M. Joan; Clerbaux, Cathy; Grimsdell, Alison W.; Meyer, Catrin I.; Rößler, Thomas; Tournier, Bernard

    2015-04-01

    Gravity waves are an important driver for the atmospheric circulation and have substantial impact on weather and climate. Satellite instruments offer excellent opportunities to study gravity waves on a global scale. This study focuses on observations from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) onboard the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Aqua satellite and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) onboard the European MetOp satellites. The main aim of this study is an intercomparison of stratospheric gravity wave observations of both instruments. In particular, we analyzed AIRS and IASI 4.3 μm brightness temperature measurements, which directly relate to stratospheric temperature. Three case studies showed that AIRS and IASI provide a clear and consistent picture of the temporal development of individual gravity wave events. Statistical comparisons based on a five-year period of measurements (2008 - 2012) showed similar spatial and temporal patterns of gravity wave activity. However, the statistical comparisons also revealed systematic differences of variances between AIRS and IASI that we attribute to the different spatial measurement characteristics of both instruments. We also found differences between day- and nighttime data that are partly due to the local time variations of the gravity wave sources. While AIRS has been used successfully in many previous gravity wave studies, IASI data are applied here for the first time for that purpose. Our study shows that gravity wave observations from different hyperspectral infrared sounders such as AIRS and IASI can be directly related to each other, if instrument-specific characteristics such as different noise levels and spatial resolution and sampling are carefully considered. The ability to combine observations from different satellites provides an opportunity to create a long-term record, which is an exciting prospect for future climatological studies of stratospheric gravity wave

  3. Mesospheric wave number spectra from Poker Flat MST radar measurements compared with gravity-wave model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. A.; Fritts, D. C.; Vanzandt, T. E.

    1986-01-01

    The results of a comparison of mesospheric wind fluctuation spectra computed from radial wind velocity estimates made by the Poker Flat mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radar are compared with a gravity-wave model developed by VanZandt (1982, 1985). The principal conclusion of this comparison is that gravity waves can account for 80% of the mesospheric power spectral density.

  4. Middle Atmosphere Dynamics with Gravity Wave Interactions in the Numerical Spectral Model: Tides and Planetary Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, Hans G.; Mengel, J. G.; Chan, K. L.; Huang, F. T.

    2010-01-01

    As Lindzen (1981) had shown, small-scale gravity waves (GW) produce the observed reversals of the zonal-mean circulation and temperature variations in the upper mesosphere. The waves also play a major role in modulating and amplifying the diurnal tides (DT) (e.g., Waltersheid, 1981; Fritts and Vincent, 1987; Fritts, 1995a). We summarize here the modeling studies with the mechanistic numerical spectral model (NSM) with Doppler spread parameterization for GW (Hines, 1997a, b), which describes in the middle atmosphere: (a) migrating and non-migrating DT, (b) planetary waves (PW), and (c) global-scale inertio gravity waves. Numerical experiments are discussed that illuminate the influence of GW filtering and nonlinear interactions between DT, PW, and zonal mean variations. Keywords: Theoretical modeling, Middle atmosphere dynamics, Gravity wave interactions, Migrating and non-migrating tides, Planetary waves, Global-scale inertio gravity waves.

  5. Angular momentum transport via internal gravity waves in evolving stars

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, Jim; Lecoanet, Daniel; Cantiello, Matteo; Brown, Ben

    2014-11-20

    Recent asteroseismic advances have allowed for direct measurements of the internal rotation rates of many subgiant and red giant stars. Unlike the nearly rigidly rotating Sun, these evolved stars contain radiative cores that spin faster than their overlying convective envelopes, but slower than they would in the absence of internal angular momentum transport. We investigate the role of internal gravity waves in angular momentum transport in evolving low-mass stars. In agreement with previous results, we find that convectively excited gravity waves can prevent the development of strong differential rotation in the radiative cores of Sun-like stars. As stars evolve into subgiants, however, low-frequency gravity waves become strongly attenuated and cannot propagate below the hydrogen-burning shell, allowing the spin of the core to decouple from the convective envelope. This decoupling occurs at the base of the subgiant branch when stars have surface temperatures of T ≈ 5500 K. However, gravity waves can still spin down the upper radiative region, implying that the observed differential rotation is likely confined to the deep core near the hydrogen-burning shell. The torque on the upper radiative region may also prevent the core from accreting high angular momentum material and slow the rate of core spin-up. The observed spin-down of cores on the red giant branch cannot be totally attributed to gravity waves, but the waves may enhance shear within the radiative region and thus increase the efficacy of viscous/magnetic torques.

  6. Linear excitation of the trapped waves by an incident wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postacioglu, Nazmi; Sinan Özeren, M.

    2016-04-01

    The excitation of the trapped waves by coastal events such as landslides has been extensively studied. The events in the open sea have in general larger magnitude. However the incident waves produced by these events in the open sea can only excite the the trapped waves through no linearity if the isobaths are straight lines that are in parallel with the coastline. We will show that the imperfections of the coastline can couple the incident and trapped waves using only linear processes. The Coriolis force is neglected in this work . Accordingly the trapped waves are consequence of uneven bathimetry. In the bathimetry we consider, the sea is divided into zones of constant depth and the boundaries between the zones are a family of hyperbolas. The boundary conditions between the zones will lead to an integral equation for the source distribution on the boundaries. The solution will contain both radiating and trapped waves. The trapped waves pose a serious threat for the coastal communities as they can travel long distances along the coastline without losing their energy through geometrical spreading.

  7. Observation of star-shaped surface gravity waves.

    PubMed

    Rajchenbach, Jean; Clamond, Didier; Leroux, Alphonse

    2013-03-01

    We report a new type of standing gravity wave of large amplitude, having alternatively the shape of a star and of a polygon. This wave is observed by means of a laboratory experiment by vertically vibrating a tank. The symmetry of the star (i.e., the number of branches) is independent of the container form and size, and can be changed according to the amplitude and frequency of the vibration. We show that a nonlinear resonant coupling between three gravity waves can be envisaged to trigger the observed symmetry breaking, although more complex interactions certainly take place in the final periodic state.

  8. A numerical model for gravity wave dissipation in the thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, M. P.; Cole, K. D.

    1988-01-01

    Two simplified models have been developed for the internal gravity wave dissipation due to viscosity, thermal conduction, and ion-drag in a multilayered, isothermal thermosphere. Both models use the WKB approximation, ray theory, and the time-averaged equations of gravity wave energy conservation. One model uses all the equations appropriate to a dissipative atmosphere, while the other uses the dispersion equation and polarization relations applicable to a nondissipative atmosphere, neglecting the viscous and thermal conduction contributions to the energy flux. Results from these models are compared to each other and to the results obtained by Klostermeyer (1973), using a full-wave model.

  9. Quantum modifications to gravity waves in de Sitter spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiang, Jen-Tsung; Lee, Da-Shin; Ford, L. H.; Yu, Hoi-Lai

    2011-04-15

    We treat a model in which tensor perturbations of de Sitter spacetime, represented as a spatially flat model, are modified by the effects of the vacuum fluctuations of a massless conformally invariant field, such as the electromagnetic field. We use the semiclassical theory of gravity with the expectation value of the conformal field stress tensor as a source. We first study the stability of de Sitter spacetime by searching for growing, spatially homogeneous modes, and conclude that it is stable within the limits of validity of the semiclassical theory. We next examine the modification of linearized plane gravity waves by the effects of the quantum stress tensor. We find a correction term which is of the same form as the original wave, but displaced in phase by {pi}/2, and with an amplitude which depends upon an initial time. The magnitude of this effect is proportional to the change in scale factor after this time. We discuss alternative interpretations of this time, but pay particular attention to the view that this is the beginning of inflation. So long as the energy scale of inflation and the proper frequency of the mode at the beginning of inflation are well below the Planck scale, the fractional correction is small. However, modes which are trans-Planckian at the onset of inflation can undergo a significant correction. The increase in amplitude can potentially have observable consequences through a modification of the power spectrum of tensor perturbations in inflationary cosmology. This enhancement of the power spectrum depends upon the initial time, and is greater for shorter wavelengths.

  10. In Situ Observations of PSCs Generated by Gravity Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfister, Leonhard; Bui, Paul; Mahoney, M. J.; Gandrud, Bruce; Hipskind, K. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    During SOLVE, the bulk of the in-situ observations of PSCs are of large scale extended structures associated with synoptic scale cooling. The nature of these structures is also determined by layers of high relative NOy that have been stretched into thin layers by advective processes. Some of the in situ observations, however, are clearly correlated with gravity wave signatures. The first goal of this work is to examine these cases and evaluate gravity wave parameters. In particular, we are interested in the intrinsic periods of the waves and their temperature amplitude, which are key ingredients in the nucleation process. Secondly, we will examine some rudimentary properties of the particle size distributions and composition, comparing these with in situ observations of the more extended PSC features. Finally, we will attempt to ascertain the mechanism which generates the gravity waves.

  11. Mapping High Latitude Gravity Wave Amplitudes over Antarctica during Summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badenhausen, P.; Millan, R. M.; Gerrard, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Appropriate inclusion of gravity wave amplitudes into general circulation models is required to get accurate atmospheric circulation characteristics. However, high latitude gravity wave amplitudes are particularly difficult to obtain due to the challenging experimental and logistical constraints in these regions. In this study, we present gravity wave climatology of high latitudes during austral summer conditions over the Antarctic continent. These data were obtained using high-resolution GPS measurements aboard long duration high altitude balloon flights that were flown as part of the NASA Balloon Array for Radiation-belt Relativistic Electron Losses (BARREL) mission in December 2013-February 2014 and December 2012-February 2013. The results show increased gravity wave activity along the coast of the Antarctic continent, particularly over the Peninsula and Halley Bay, whereas at higher latitudes, particularly over regions near the South Pole, gravity wave amplitudes decrease substantially. Through use of horizontal winds data, we obtained measurements of the vertical transport of horizontal momentum fluxes, which were unusually high for the summer high latitude lower stratosphere. Such unique measurements as these are immediately applicable to understanding of upwelling in the summer middle atmosphere as well as to the formation of overlaying mesospheric clouds formation.

  12. Characterizing the propagation of gravity waves in 3D nonlinear simulations of solar-like stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvan, L.; Strugarek, A.; Brun, A. S.; Mathis, S.; Garcia, R. A.

    2015-09-01

    Context. The revolution of helio- and asteroseismology provides access to the detailed properties of stellar interiors by studying the star's oscillation modes. Among them, gravity (g) modes are formed by constructive interferences between progressive internal gravity waves (IGWs), propagating in stellar radiative zones. Our new 3D nonlinear simulations of the interior of a solar-like star allows us to study the excitation, propagation, and dissipation of these waves. Aims: The aim of this article is to clarify our understanding of the behavior of IGWs in a 3D radiative zone and to provide a clear overview of their properties. Methods: We use a method of frequency filtering that reveals the path of individual gravity waves of different frequencies in the radiative zone. Results: We are able to identify the region of propagation of different waves in 2D and 3D, to compare them to the linear raytracing theory and to distinguish between propagative and standing waves (g-modes). We also show that the energy carried by waves is distributed in different planes in the sphere, depending on their azimuthal wave number. Conclusions: We are able to isolate individual IGWs from a complex spectrum and to study their propagation in space and time. In particular, we highlight in this paper the necessity of studying the propagation of waves in 3D spherical geometry, since the distribution of their energy is not equipartitioned in the sphere.

  13. Infrasound monitoring, acoustic-gravity waves and global atmospheric dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc, E.; Le Pichon, A.; Ceranna, L.; Farges, T.

    2008-12-01

    For the verification of the Comprehensive nuclear Test Ban Treaty, the International Monitoring System has been developed. As part of this system, the infrasound network provides an unique opportunity to monitor continuously pressure waves in the atmosphere. Such infrasonic waves propagate in the channel formed by the temperature and wind gradients of the atmosphere. Long term observations provide information about the evolution of the propagation conditions and then of atmospheric parameters. The monitoring of continuous sources, as ocean swell, gives the characteristics of the stratospheric wave channel submitted to stratospheric warming effects. Large scale gravity waves, which are also observed by the network, produce a forcing of the stratosphere at low and middle latitudes and long-lived changes in the stratospheric circulation towards high latitudes, leading to fluctuations in the strength of the polar vortex. These fluctuations move down to the lower stratosphere with possible effects on the tropospheric temperature. Gravity wave monitoring in Antarctica reveals a gravity wave system probably related to the wind effect over mountains. At mid latitudes an additional main sources of disturbances is the thunderstorm activity. The infrasound monitoring system allows a better knowledge of the atmospheric wave systems and of the dynamics of the atmosphere. In return this better knowledge of the wave systems allow a better identification of the possible explosion signals in the background of the atmospheric waves and then to improve the discrimination methods

  14. Finite amplitude gravity waves: Harmonics, advective steepening, breaking and saturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstock, J.

    1985-01-01

    A simple theory is presented which determines details of the breaking and saturation of a gravity wave as it propagates upward in the atmosphere. Breaking and saturation are here due to nonlinear advection analogous to the breaching of a surface wave and to the breaking of a planetary wave. Much simplification is obtained by the assumption that in a wave packet consisting of a primary wave and its harmonics, the primary wave remains dominant. This assumption, referred to a quasi-monochromatic approximation, is suggested by observations. Determined by this approximate theory are: a detailed picture of the waveform as it steepens and breaks; harmonics of the wave; the turbulence generation; and an underlying relationship between superadiabatic lapse rate and saturation by wave-wave interactions.

  15. Dissipation of acoustic-gravity waves: an asymptotic approach.

    PubMed

    Godin, Oleg A

    2014-12-01

    Acoustic-gravity waves in the middle and upper atmosphere and long-range propagation of infrasound are strongly affected by air viscosity and thermal conductivity. To characterize the wave dissipation, it is typical to consider idealized environments, which admit plane-wave solutions. Here, an asymptotic approach is developed that relies instead on the assumption that spatial variations of environmental parameters are gradual. It is found that realistic assumptions about the atmosphere lead to rather different predictions for wave damping than do the plane-wave solutions. A modification to the Sutherland-Bass model of infrasound absorption is proposed. PMID:25480091

  16. Dissipation of acoustic-gravity waves: an asymptotic approach.

    PubMed

    Godin, Oleg A

    2014-12-01

    Acoustic-gravity waves in the middle and upper atmosphere and long-range propagation of infrasound are strongly affected by air viscosity and thermal conductivity. To characterize the wave dissipation, it is typical to consider idealized environments, which admit plane-wave solutions. Here, an asymptotic approach is developed that relies instead on the assumption that spatial variations of environmental parameters are gradual. It is found that realistic assumptions about the atmosphere lead to rather different predictions for wave damping than do the plane-wave solutions. A modification to the Sutherland-Bass model of infrasound absorption is proposed.

  17. Scattering of gravity waves in subcritical flows over an obstacle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Scott; Michel, Florent; Parentani, Renaud

    2016-06-01

    We numerically study the scattering coefficients of linear water waves on stationary flows above a localized obstacle. We compare the scattering on trans- and subcritical flows, and then focus on the latter which have been used in recent analog gravity experiments. The main difference concerns the magnitude of the mode amplification: whereas transcritical flows display a large amplification (which is generally in good agreement with the Hawking prediction), this effect is heavily suppressed in subcritical flows. This is due to the transmission across the obstacle for frequencies less than some critical value. As a result, subcritical flows display high- and low-frequency behaviors separated by a narrow band around the critical frequency. In the low-frequency regime, transmission of long wavelengths is accompanied by nonadiabatic scattering into short wavelengths, whose spectrum is approximately linear in frequency. By contrast, in the high-frequency regime, no simple description seems to exist. In particular, for obstacles similar to those recently used, we observe that the upstream slope still affects the scattering on the downstream side because of some residual transmission.

  18. Direct measurement of dispersion relation for directional random surface gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnus Arnesen Taklo, Tore; Trulsen, Karsten; Krogstad, Harald; Nieto Borge, José Carlos

    2014-05-01

    Linear wave theory is widely used to model for instance response of ocean structures and ships to water surface gravity waves and assumes that the water surface can be modeled as a linear superposition of regular waves satisfying the linear dispersion relation. The linear dispersion relation is often taken for granted for the interpretation of wave measurements. The interpretation of nautical radar images currently depends on the linear dispersion relation as a prerequisite, Nieto Borge et al. (J. Atmos. Ocean Tech., 2004, vol. 21, pp. 1291-1300). Krogstad & Trulsen (Ocean Dynamics, 2010, vol. 60, pp. 973-991) carried out numerical simulations in one horizontal dimension with the nonlinear Schrödinger equation NLS and the modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation MNLS. From wavenumber-frequency spectra obtained from the simulated unidirectional surfaces they found that nonlinear evolution of unidirectional wave fields may cause deviation from the linear dispersion relation. Extending the work by Krogstad & Trulsen (2010) we carried out experiments with unidirectional waves with fixed wave steepness and various bandwidths in a narrow wave tank. These experiments verified the results obtained from the simulations with the (M)NLS models and showed that the directly measured dispersion relation deviated from the linear dispersion relation for sufficiently narrow bandwidths. For broad bandwidths, however, the linear dispersion relation was satisfied, suggesting validity of linear wave theory. By further analysis of the experimental data we suggest that the occurence of the deviation depends on steepness and spectral bandwidth. Recently we have extended the work by Krogstad & Trulsen (2010) to two horizontal dimensions using the MNLS equation and simulated directional random surface gravity waves with bandwidths ranging from narrow to relatively broad. The wavenumber-frequency spectra obtained from these simulated directional surfaces also show deviation from the linear

  19. First tsunami gravity wave detection in ionospheric radio occultation data

    DOE PAGES

    Coïsson, Pierdavide; Lognonné, Philippe; Walwer, Damian; Rolland, Lucie M.

    2015-05-09

    After the 11 March 2011 earthquake and tsunami off the coast of Tohoku, the ionospheric signature of the displacements induced in the overlying atmosphere has been observed by ground stations in various regions of the Pacific Ocean. We analyze here the data of radio occultation satellites, detecting the tsunami-driven gravity wave for the first time using a fully space-based ionospheric observation system. One satellite of the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC) recorded an occultation in the region above the tsunami 2.5 h after the earthquake. The ionosphere was sounded from top to bottom, thus providing themore » vertical structure of the gravity wave excited by the tsunami propagation, observed as oscillations of the ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC). The observed vertical wavelength was about 50 km, with maximum amplitude exceeding 1 total electron content unit when the occultation reached 200 km height. We compared the observations with synthetic data obtained by summation of the tsunami-coupled gravity normal modes of the Earth/Ocean/atmosphere system, which models the associated motion of the ionosphere plasma. These results provide experimental constraints on the attenuation of the gravity wave with altitude due to atmosphere viscosity, improving the understanding of the propagation of tsunami-driven gravity waves in the upper atmosphere. They demonstrate that the amplitude of the tsunami can be estimated to within 20% by the recorded ionospheric data.« less

  20. First tsunami gravity wave detection in ionospheric radio occultation data

    SciTech Connect

    Coïsson, Pierdavide; Lognonné, Philippe; Walwer, Damian; Rolland, Lucie M.

    2015-05-09

    After the 11 March 2011 earthquake and tsunami off the coast of Tohoku, the ionospheric signature of the displacements induced in the overlying atmosphere has been observed by ground stations in various regions of the Pacific Ocean. We analyze here the data of radio occultation satellites, detecting the tsunami-driven gravity wave for the first time using a fully space-based ionospheric observation system. One satellite of the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC) recorded an occultation in the region above the tsunami 2.5 h after the earthquake. The ionosphere was sounded from top to bottom, thus providing the vertical structure of the gravity wave excited by the tsunami propagation, observed as oscillations of the ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC). The observed vertical wavelength was about 50 km, with maximum amplitude exceeding 1 total electron content unit when the occultation reached 200 km height. We compared the observations with synthetic data obtained by summation of the tsunami-coupled gravity normal modes of the Earth/Ocean/atmosphere system, which models the associated motion of the ionosphere plasma. These results provide experimental constraints on the attenuation of the gravity wave with altitude due to atmosphere viscosity, improving the understanding of the propagation of tsunami-driven gravity waves in the upper atmosphere. They demonstrate that the amplitude of the tsunami can be estimated to within 20% by the recorded ionospheric data.

  1. Nonlinear gravity-wave interactions in stratified turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remmel, Mark; Sukhatme, Jai; Smith, Leslie M.

    2014-04-01

    To investigate the dynamics of gravity waves in stratified Boussinesq flows, a model is derived that consists of all three-gravity-wave-mode interactions (the GGG model), excluding interactions involving the vortical mode. The GGG model is a natural extension of weak turbulence theory that accounts for exact three-gravity-wave resonances. The model is examined numerically by means of random, large-scale, high-frequency forcing. An immediate observation is a robust growth of the so-called vertically sheared horizontal flow (VSHF). In addition, there is a forward transfer of energy and equilibration of the nonzero-frequency (sometimes called "fast") gravity-wave modes. These results show that gravity-wave-mode interactions by themselves are capable of systematic interscale energy transfer in a stratified fluid. Comparing numerical simulations of the GGG model and the full Boussinesq system, for the range of Froude numbers ( Fr) considered (0.05 ≤ Fr ≤ 1), in both systems the VSHF is hardest to resolve. When adequately resolved, VSHF growth is more vigorous in the GGG model. Furthermore, a VSHF is observed to form in milder stratification scenarios in the GGG model than the full Boussinesq system. Finally, fully three-dimensional nonzero-frequency gravity-wave modes equilibrate in both systems and their scaling with vertical wavenumber follows similar power-laws. The slopes of the power-laws obtained depend on Fr and approach -2 (from above) at Fr = 0.05, which is the strongest stratification that can be properly resolved with our computational resources.

  2. Properties of QBO and SAO Generated by Gravity Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Mengel, J. G.; Reddy, C. A.; Chan, K. L.; Porter, H. S.

    1999-01-01

    We present an extension for the 2D (zonal mean) version of our Numerical Spectral Mode (NSM) that incorporates Hines' Doppler spread parameterization (DSP) for small scale gravity waves (GW). This model is applied to describe the seasonal variations and the semi-annual and quasi-biennial oscillations (SAO and QBO). Our earlier model reproduced the salient features of the mean zonal circulation in the middle atmosphere, including the QBO extension into the upper mesosphere inferred from UARS measurements. In the present model we incorporate also tropospheric heating to reproduce the upwelling at equatorial latitudes associated with the Brewer-Dobson circulation that affects significantly the dynamics of the stratosphere as Dunkerton had pointed out. Upward vertical winds increase the period of the QBO observed from the ground. To compensate for that, one needs to increase the eddy diffusivity and the GW momentum flux, bringing the latter closer to values recommended in the DSP. The QBO period in the model is 30 months (mo), which is conducive to synchronize this oscillation with the seasonal cycle of solar forcing. Multi-year interannual oscillations are generated through wave filtering by the solar driven annual oscillation in the zonal circulation. Quadratic non-linearities generate interseasonal variations to produce a complicated pattern of variability associated with the QBO. The computed temperature amplitudes for the SAO and QBO are in substantial agreement with observations at equatorial and extratropical latitudes. At high latitudes, however, the observed QBO amplitudes are significantly larger, which may be a signature of propagating planetary waves not included in the present model. The assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium not being imposed, we find that the effects from the vertical Coriolis force associated with the equatorial oscillations are large for the vertical winds and significant for the temperature variations even outside the tropics but are

  3. Simultaneous rocket and MST radar observation of an internal gravity wave breaking in the mesosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. A.; Fritts, D. C.; Balsley, B. B.; Philbrick, C. R.

    1986-01-01

    In June, 1983, the Structure and Atmospheric Turbulence Environment (STATE) rocket and Poker Flat Mesophere-Stratosphere-Troposphere radar campaign was conducted to measure the interaction between turbulence, electron density and electron density gradient that has produced unusually strong MST radar echoes from the summer mesosphere over Poker Flat, Alaska. Analysis or radar wind measurements and a concurrent wind and temperature profile obtained from a rocket probe carrying a three-axis accelerometer are given. The two data sets provide a fairly complete (and in some cases, redundant) picture of the breaking (or more correctly, the saturation) of a large-amplitude, low-frequency, long-wavelength internal gravity wave. The data show that small-scale turbulence and small-scale wave intensity is greatest at those altitudes where the large-scale wave-induced temperature lapse rate is most negative or most nearly unstable, but the wind shear due to the large-scale wave is a minimum. A brief review of linear gravity-wave theory is presented as an aid to the identification of the gravity-wave signature in the radar and rocket data. Analysis of the time and height cross sections of wind speed and turbulence intensity observed by the Poker Flat MST radar follows. Then, the vertical profile of temperature and winds measured by a rocket probe examined. Finally, the use of the independent data sets provided by the rocket and the radar are discussed and implications for theories of wave saturation are presented.

  4. A mesoscale gravity wave event observed during CCOPE. III - Wave environment and probable source mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Steven E.; Dorian, Paul B.

    1988-01-01

    The multiscale environment of gravity wave events and the probable mechanisms of their origin are examined on the basis of observations taken during the Cooperative Convective Precipitation Experiment in extreme eastern Montana, during the period from 1200 UTC July 11, 1981, to 0500 UTC July 12. During this time, two distinct gravity wave episodes were diagnosed. The results of the analysis of the evolving structures in the subsynoptic-scale and mesoscale environments indicate that the observed mesoscale gravity waves were generated by geostrophic adjustment processes, with additional energy supplied through interaction with the critical level; their coherence was maintained through a ducting mechanism.

  5. Gravitational Waves in Effective Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calmet, Xavier; Kuntz, Iberê; Mohapatra, Sonali

    2016-08-01

    In this short paper we investigate quantum gravitational effects on Einstein's equations using Effective Field Theory techniques. We consider the leading order quantum gravitational correction to the wave equation. Besides the usual massless mode, we find a pair of modes with complex masses. These massive particles have a width and could thus lead to a damping of gravitational waves if excited in violent astrophysical processes producing gravitational waves such as e.g. black hole mergers. We discuss the consequences for gravitational wave events such as GW 150914 recently observed by the Advanced LIGO collaboration.

  6. Generating gravity waves with matter and electromagnetic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Barrabes, C.; Hogan, P A.

    2008-05-15

    If a homogeneous plane lightlike shell collides head on with a homogeneous plane electromagnetic shock wave having a step-function profile then no backscattered gravitational waves are produced. We demonstrate, by explicit calculation, that if the matter is accompanied by a homogeneous plane electromagnetic shock wave with a step-function profile then backscattered gravitational waves appear after the collision.

  7. Gravity wave climatology at midlatitude from Rayleigh lidar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R.; Chanin, M. L.; Hauchecorne, A.

    1989-01-01

    Atmospheric sounding of the middle atmosphere by Rayleigh scattering has been performed in France for several years, from two stations with different orographic situations: one in the Alps, the Observatoire de Haute Provence, one on the Atlantic coast at Biscarosse. The vertical profiles of density and temperature are obtained with a temporal and spatial resolution of, respectively, 15 mn and 300 m between 30 and 80 km. A statistical study of the atmospheric fluctuations due to gravity waves was performed and the main results are presented: climatology of the gravity wave activity, distribution of energy versus vertical wave number and altitude, and comparison of the observations at the two sites. Conclusions are presented on the saturation of the wave field, the filtering by the mean wind, the transfer of energy and momentum into the atmosphere.

  8. Global Budget of Gravity Wave Momentum and Energy Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric gravity waves are known to play a key role in the middle and upper atmosphere. These waves carry momentum and energy fluxes as they propagate, and can deposit momentum and energy when waves dissipate due to either instability or background diffusion. The global budgets of gravity wave momentum fluxes have previously been estimated by using ground-based observations, and more recently deduced from satellite observations. There have been less reports on the global energy flux budget. In this study, we analyze the momentum and energy fluxes calculated from mesoscale-resolving Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM), including their global distribution, altitude dependence, and seasonal variation. The momentum fluxes and their spatial and seasonal variation are found to be in general agreement with satellite observations. With this verification of the momentum flux, the energy flux budget, in particular the altitude dependence of the total energy flux, is examined.

  9. Numerical simulation of the resonantly excited capillary-gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanazaki, Hideshi; Hirata, Motonori; Okino, Shinya

    2015-11-01

    Capillary gravity waves excited by an obstacle are investigated by a direct numerical simulation. In the flow without capillary effects, it is well known that large-amplitude upstream advancing solitary waves are generated periodically under the resonant condition, i.e., when the phase velocity of the long surface waves and the mean flow velocity agrees. With capillary effects, solutions of the Euler equations show the generation of very short waves further upstream of the solitary waves and also in the depression region downstream of the obstacle. The overall characteristics of these waves agree with the solutions of the forced fifth-order KdV equation, while the weakly nonlinear theory generally overestimates the wavelength of the short waves.

  10. Localizing the energy and momentum of linear gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, Luke M.; Lasenby, Anthony; Hobson, Michael

    2010-11-15

    A framework is developed which quantifies the local exchange of energy and momentum between matter and the linearized gravitational field. We derive the unique gravitational energy-momentum tensor consistent with this description, and find that this tensor only exists in the harmonic gauge. Consequently, nearly all the gauge freedom of our framework is naturally and unavoidably removed. The gravitational energy-momentum tensor is then shown to have two exceptional properties: (a) it is gauge-invariant for gravitational plane-waves, (b) for arbitrary transverse-traceless fields, the energy-density is never negative, and the energy-flux is never spacelike. We analyze in detail the local gauge-invariant energy-momentum transferred between the gravitational field and an infinitesimal point-source, and show that these invariants depend only on the transverse-traceless components of the field. As a result, we are led to a natural gauge-fixing program which at last renders the energy-momentum of the linear gravitational field completely unambiguous, and additionally ensures that gravitational energy is never negative nor flows faster than light. Finally, we calculate the energy-momentum content of gravitational plane-waves, the linearized Schwarzschild spacetime (extending to arbitrary static linear spacetimes) and the gravitational radiation outside two compact sources: a vibrating rod, and an equal-mass binary.

  11. Slosh wave excitation in gravity Probe-B spacecraft experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Lee, C. C.; Leslie, F. W.

    1990-01-01

    The dynamical behavior of fluids, in particular the effect of surface tension on partially-filled fluids in a rotating dewar under microgravity environment have been investigated. Results show that there is a group of wave trains, both in longitudinal and transverse modes, with various frequencies and wavelengths of slosh waves generated by the restoring force field of gravity jitters and centrifugal forces in this study.

  12. Tropospheric gravity waves observed by three closely spaced ST radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, D. A.; Balsley, B. B.; Ecklund, W. L.; Crochet, M.; Riddle, A. C.; Garello, R.

    1984-01-01

    Clear-air radar experiments were carried out on the southern coast of France during the (ALPEX) Alpine experiment program vertically directed stratosphere-troposphere-radars were set up with spacings of about 5 to 6 km. The temporal and spectral characteristics of the vertical velocity fluctuations were examined. The horizontal and vertical properties of gravity waves in the lower atmosphere were analyzed. The techniques used and the first results from this wave study are described.

  13. pp-waves with torsion and metric-affine gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasic, Vedad; Vassiliev, Dmitri

    2005-10-01

    A classical pp-wave is a four-dimensional Lorentzian spacetime which admits a nonvanishing parallel spinor field; here the connection is assumed to be Levi-Civita. We generalize this definition to metric compatible spacetimes with torsion and describe basic properties of such spacetimes. We use our generalized pp-waves for constructing new explicit vacuum solutions of quadratic metric-affine gravity.

  14. Longitudinal Variations of Low-Latitude Gravity Waves and Their Impacts on the Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cullens, C. Y.; England, S.; Immel, T. J.

    2014-12-01

    The lower atmospheric forcing has important roles in the ionospheric variability. However, influences of lower atmospheric gravity waves on the ionospheric variability are still not clear due to the simplified gravity wave parameterizations and the limited knowledge of gravity wave distributions. In this study, we aim to study the longitudinal variations of gravity waves and their impacts of longitudinal variations of low-latitude gravity waves on the ionospheric variability. Our SABER results show that longitudinal variations of gravity waves at the lower boundary of TIME-GCM are the largest in June-August and January-February. We have implemented these low-latitude gravity wave variations from SABER instrument into TIME-GCM model. TIME-GCM simulation results of ionospheric responses to longitudinal variations of gravity waves and physical mechanisms will be discussed.

  15. Advances in understanding the gravity wave spectrum during MAP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzandt, T. E.

    1989-01-01

    Prior to MAP, virtually nothing was known about gravity wave spectra in the atmosphere. The development of observational techniques has played a major role in these studies. Radar and lidar have been particularly important since they can measure atmospheric parameters continuously over large height ranges. Some advances made are: (1) The observed fluctuations and power spectra in the free atmosphere are mostly if not entirely due to a superposition of gravity waves, which can be modeled by the Garrett Munk (GM) model; (2) There is no evidence that 2-D turbulence makes a significant contribution to the observed fluctuations. In any case, the agreement between observations and the GM model shows that the 2DT contribution must be relatively small; (3) Spectra versus vertical wave number are saturated at large wave number, with theory and observations indicating that t approximately equals 3; and (4) Vertical velocity fluctuations and spectra measured near rough terrain are strongly contaminated by mountain waves. But over very flat terrain the spectra are dominated by gravity waves at periods shorter than about 6 hours and apparently by synoptic scale velocities at periods longer than 6 hours. Thus it may be possible to study synoptic scale vertical velocities using radars located in very flat terrain.

  16. Educing the emission mechanism of internal gravity waves in the differentially heat rotating annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolland, Joran; Hien, Steffen; Achatz, Ulrich; Borchert, Sebastian; Fruman, Mark

    2016-04-01

    geostrophic balance. For the first stage of this investigation, we separated the flow between a balance and an imbalanced part at first order in Rossby number: the balanced pressure field was computed through an inversion of the potential vorticity equation [3]. The balanced horizontal velocity field and buoyancy were then computed using the geostrophic and hydrostatic balance conditions. We first checked that this decomposition gave on the one hand a large scaled balanced flow, comprising mostly of the baroclinic wave, and on the other hand a small scale flow comprising mostly of the gravity wave signal. We then proceeded with the central stage of the validation: we simulated the tangent linear dynamics of the imbalanced part of the flow [4]. The equations are linearised about the balanced part, and any imbalances forces the modeled imbalanced part. The output of this simulation compares very well with the actual imbalanced part, thus confirming that the observed gravity waves are indeed generated through spontaneous imbalance. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of emission by this mechanism in a flow which is not idealised: a flow which can be obtained as a result of a numerical simulation of primitive equations or actually observed in a laboratory experiment. References [1] R. Plougonven, F. Zhang, Internal gravity waves from atmospheric jets and fronts, Rev. Geophys. 52, 33-76 (2014). [2] S. Borchert, U. Achatz, M.D. Fruman, Spontaneous Gravity wave emission in the differentially heated annulus, J. Fluid Mech. 758, 287-311 (2014). [3] F. Zhang, S.E . Koch, C. A. Davis, M. L. Kaplan, A Survey of unbalanced flow diagnostics and their application, Adv. Atmo. Sci. 17, 165-183 (2000). [4] S. Wang, F. Zhang, Source of gravity waves within a vortex dipole jet revealed by a linear model, J. Atmo. Sci. 67, 1438-1455 (2010).

  17. Shock waves and Birkhoff's theorem in Lovelock gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Gravanis, E.

    2010-11-15

    Spherically symmetric shock waves are shown to exist in Lovelock gravity. They amount to a change of branch of the spherically symmetric solutions across a null hypersurface. The implications of their existence for the status of Birkhoff's theorem in the theory is discussed.

  18. A mesoscale gravity wave event observed during CCOPE. I - Multiscale statistical analysis of wave characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Steven E.; Golus, Robert E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a statistical analysis of the characteristics of the wavelike activity that occurred over the north-central United States on July 11-12, 1981, using data from the Cooperative Convective Precipitation Experiment in Montana. In particular, two distinct wave episodes of about 8-h duration within a longer (33 h) period of wave activity were studied in detail. It is demonstrated that the observed phenomena display features consistent with those of mesoscale gravity waves. The principles of statistical methods used to detect and track mesoscale gravity waves are discussed together with their limitations.

  19. Mesospheric Non-Migrating Tides Generated With Planetary Waves: II Influence of Gravity Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Mengel, J. G.; Talaat, E. L.; Porter, H. S.; Chan, K. L.

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrated that, in our model, non-linear interactions between planetary waves (PW) and migrating tides could generate in the upper mesosphere non-migrating tides with amplitudes comparable to those observed. The Numerical Spectral Model (NSM) we employ incorporates Hines Doppler Spread Parameterization for small-scale gravity waves (GW), which affect in numerous ways the dynamics of the mesosphere. The latitudinal (seasonal) reversals in the temperature and zonal circulation, which are largely caused by GWs (Lindzen, 198l), filter the PWs and contribute to the instabilities that generate the PWs. The PWs in turn are amplified by the momentum deposition of upward propagating GWs, as are the migrating tides. The GWs thus affect significantly the migrating tides and PWs, the building blocks of non-migrating tides. In the present paper, we demonstrate that GW filtering also contributes to the non-linear coupling between PWs and tides. Two computer experiments are presented to make this point. In one, we simply turn off the GW source to show the effect. In the second case, we demonstrate the effect by selectively suppressing the momentum source for the m = 0 non-migrating tides.

  20. Generating electromagnetic waves from gravity waves in cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, P. A.; O'Farrell, S.

    2009-05-15

    Examples of test electromagnetic waves on a Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) background are constructed from explicit perturbations of the FLRW space-times describing gravitational waves propagating in the isotropic universes. A possible physical mechanism for the production of the test electromagnetic waves is shown to be the coupling of the gravitational waves with a test magnetic field, confirming the observation of Marklund, Dunsby and Brodin [Phys. Rev. D 62, 101501(R) (2000)].

  1. Surface Gravity Waves: Resonance in a Fish Tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinick, Scott J.; Lynch, John J.

    2010-05-01

    In this work, an inexpensive 10-gallon glass aquarium was used to study wave motion in water. The waves travel at speeds comparable to a person walking (˜1 m/s). The scale of the motion allows for distances to be measured with a meterstick and for times to be measured with a stopwatch. For a wide range of water depths, standing waves were excited by hand using strips of Styrofoam. Several resonant modes were studied starting with the fundamental. Experimental values of wave speed were obtained from measurements of wavelength and period of oscillation. Theoretical values of wave speed were calculated using the surface gravity wave dispersion relation. The agreement between experiment and theory was usually better than 0.5%. The aquarium was a winner in the Apparatus Competition (Low Cost Category) during the AAPT 2006 Summer Meeting at Syracuse University.

  2. Experimental study of spatiotemporally localized surface gravity water waves.

    PubMed

    Chabchoub, A; Akhmediev, N; Hoffmann, N P

    2012-07-01

    We present experimental results on the study of spatiotemporally localized surface wave events on deep water that can be modeled using the Peregrine breather solution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. These are often considered as prototypes of oceanic rogue waves that can focus wave energy into a single wave packet. For small steepness values of the carrier gravity waves the Peregrine breathers are relatively wide, thus providing an excellent agreement between the theory and experimental results. For larger steepnesses the focusing leads to temporally and spatially shorter events. Nevertheless, agreement between measurements and the Peregrine breather theory remains reasonably good, with discrepancies of modulation gradients and spatiotemporal symmetries being tolerable. Lifetimes and travel distances of the spatiotemporally localized wave events determined from the experiment are in good agreement with the theory.

  3. Nonlinear reflection of internal gravity wave onto a slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, Keshav; Sommeria, Joel; Staquet, Chantal; Leclair, Matthieu; Grisouard, Nicolas; Gostiaux, Louis

    2016-04-01

    reflected wave. We study the momentum and energy budget of the process in order to understand the mechanism of generation of mean flow, its interaction with the wave and account for the loss of wave energy upon reflection. REFERENCES N. Grisouard, M. Leclair, L. Gostiaux and C. Staquet 2013. Large scale energy transfer from an internal gravity wave reflecting on a simple slope IUTAM Symposium Procedia 8 119-128 M. Leclair, K. Raja and C. Staquet 2016. Nonlinear reflection of a two-dimensional finite-width internal gravity wave onto a slope Journal of Fluid Mechanics. in preparation

  4. Investigating seasonal gravity wave activity in the summer polar mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Taylor, M. J.; Randall, C. E.; Lumpe, J. D.; Siskind, D. E.; Bailey, S. M.; Russell, J. M.

    2015-05-01

    The NASA Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) satellite is the first spaceborne mission dedicated to studying high-altitude (~83 km) Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMCs). Since its launch in 2007, the Cloud Imaging and Particle Size (CIPS) instrument onboard AIM has obtained large-field, high resolution (25 km2/pixel) images of the PMCs, enabling a unique investigation of mesospheric gravity wave activity in the summer polar mesosphere where previous measurements have been sparse. In this study, we have analyzed 12 consecutive seasons of AIM/CIPS PMC albedo data to determine the statistical properties of medium and large horizontal scale (>100 km) gravity waves present in the PMC data. Over 60,000 wave events with horizontal scale-sizes ranging up to >2000 km have been identified and measured, revealing a wealth of wave events particularly in the ~300-800 km range where our analysis sensitivity is largest. These data are ideal for investigating the intra-seasonal, inter-annual and hemispheric variability of these waves as observed over the whole summer polar cap regions. Throughout this 6 year study, the wave activity in the southern hemisphere was found to be consistently 10-15% higher than in the northern hemisphere and both the northern and southern hemisphere wave activity was determined to decrease systematically (by ~15%) during the course of each summer season. This decrease agrees well with previous seasonal stratospheric studies of variations in the wave energy, suggesting a direct influence of the lower atmospheric sources on polar mesospheric dynamics. Very similar and consistent results were also found from season to season in both hemispheres providing new information for gravity wave modeling and dynamical studies of the high-latitude summer-time mesosphere.

  5. Propagation and Breaking at High Altitudes of Gravity Waves Excited by Tropospheric Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prusa, Joseph M.; Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K.; Garcia, Rolando R.

    1996-01-01

    An anelastic approximation is used with a time-variable coordinate transformation to formulate a two-dimensional numerical model that describes the evolution of gravity waves. The model is solved using a semi-Lagrangian method with monotone (nonoscillatory) interpolation of all advected fields. The time-variable transformation is used to generate disturbances at the lower boundary that approximate the effect of a traveling line of thunderstorms (a squall line) or of flow over a broad topographic obstacle. The vertical propagation and breaking of the gravity wave field (under conditions typical of summer solstice) is illustrated for each of these cases. It is shown that the wave field at high altitudes is dominated by a single horizontal wavelength; which is not always related simply to the horizontal dimension of the source. The morphology of wave breaking depends on the horizontal wavelength; for sufficiently short waves, breaking involves roughly one half of the wavelength. In common with other studies, it is found that the breaking waves undergo "self-acceleration," such that the zonal-mean intrinsic frequency remains approximately constant in spite of large changes in the background wind. It is also shown that many of the features obtained in the calculations can be understood in terms of linear wave theory. In particular, linear theory provides insights into the wavelength of the waves that break at high altitudes, the onset and evolution of breaking. the horizontal extent of the breaking region and its position relative to the forcing, and the minimum and maximum altitudes where breaking occurs. Wave breaking ceases at the altitude where the background dissipation rate (which in our model is a proxy for molecular diffusion) becomes greater than the rate of dissipation due to wave breaking, This altitude, in effect, the model turbopause, is shown to depend on a relatively small number of parameters that characterize the waves and the background state.

  6. Comparison of Gravity Wave Temperature Variances from Ray-Based Spectral Parameterization of Convective Gravity Wave Drag with AIRS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Hyun-Joo; Chun, Hye-Yeong; Gong, Jie; Wu, Dong L.

    2012-01-01

    The realism of ray-based spectral parameterization of convective gravity wave drag, which considers the updated moving speed of the convective source and multiple wave propagation directions, is tested against the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) onboard the Aqua satellite. Offline parameterization calculations are performed using the global reanalysis data for January and July 2005, and gravity wave temperature variances (GWTVs) are calculated at z = 2.5 hPa (unfiltered GWTV). AIRS-filtered GWTV, which is directly compared with AIRS, is calculated by applying the AIRS visibility function to the unfiltered GWTV. A comparison between the parameterization calculations and AIRS observations shows that the spatial distribution of the AIRS-filtered GWTV agrees well with that of the AIRS GWTV. However, the magnitude of the AIRS-filtered GWTV is smaller than that of the AIRS GWTV. When an additional cloud top gravity wave momentum flux spectrum with longer horizontal wavelength components that were obtained from the mesoscale simulations is included in the parameterization, both the magnitude and spatial distribution of the AIRS-filtered GWTVs from the parameterization are in good agreement with those of the AIRS GWTVs. The AIRS GWTV can be reproduced reasonably well by the parameterization not only with multiple wave propagation directions but also with two wave propagation directions of 45 degrees (northeast-southwest) and 135 degrees (northwest-southeast), which are optimally chosen for computational efficiency.

  7. On Highest Profile of Faraday Gravity Waves Calculated in Lagrangian Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekerzh-Zenkovich, S.; Sekerzh-Zenkovich, S.

    2001-12-01

    The calculation of the highest achievable profile of a nonlinear steady progressive deep water gravity wave is basically a solved classical problem (G. B. Whitham, Linear and Nonlinear Waves, John Wiley & Sons, New York, 1974). The wave of greatest height has a sharp profile with a crest angle equal to 120 degrees. On the other hand, the corresponding problem for standing waves apparently has not been treated thoroughly (J. W. Rottman, J. Fluid Mech. 1982, 124:293-306, and M. Perlin, and W. W. Schultz, Annu. Rev. Fluid Mech. 2000, 32:1-24) and to day there exist different predictions on the shape and amplitude of the highest standing gravity wave. In the present study, the results of analytical modeling of highest two-dimensional Faraday gravity waves excited on the free surface of a fluid contained in a rectangular vertically oscillating container are presented. The corresponding problem for free waves was reported by I. Shingareva & S. Sekerzh-Zenkovich (Int. Conf. Fluxes and Structures in Fluids, Moscow, 2001). The equations of motion and boundary conditions are written in terms of Lagrangian variables. Approximate solutions are derived with a formal asymptotic procedure of two time-scales (similar to the Krylov-Bogolyubov averaging method). Approximations from second to eight order have been obtained for the nonlinear wave frequency and wave profile. The main result is, that the steepness of the highest profiles obtained with the fourth and fifth approximations are in better agreement with those obtained in Schultz's et al. experiment (J. Fluid Mech. 1998, 369:253-72), while the shape of the profiles is like the shape of the highest profiles of nonregular waves observed in Jiang's et al. experiments (J. Fluid Mech. 1998, 369:273-99) and differs from those predicted previously in the theoretical papers. The present work has been funded by CONACYT Mexico, Project 35226-E.

  8. The vortical structure of capillary-gravity waves: An experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Juan Jay

    1997-11-01

    An experimental investigation of near-surface flow beneath progressive capillary-gravity waves is presented. For capillary-gravity waves of lengths 50 mm to 100 mm with moderate steepnesses, significant capillary ripples are present. This phenomenon complicates the flow field, and highly non-linear mechanisms are present. Measuring precise experimental wave profiles is the first objective of the present thesis. A non-intrusive waveform detection technique is developed successfully. Due to the relatively small slopes of free-surface water waves, this method optically exaggerates the vertical scale of the wave profile to accurately measure the surface of the capillary ripples. Comparisons between experimental results and existing theories show good agreement for low steepness waves; however, the existing models do not satisfactorily explain the unsteady/modulated capillary ripple phenomena that appear on steeper capillary-gravity waves. Various aspects of these phenomena are presented and discussed. The second major achievement is the investigation of the velocity/vorticity field beneath capillary-gravity waves. A new technique, Sub-pattern particle image velocimetry, is developed to investigate the vortical characteristics of the extremely thin free-surface boundary layer. This modified particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique overcomes the difficulties in choosing optimal experimental parameters for conventional PIV methods, and successfully measures the fine-scale vortical structure of the capillary-gravity waves with parasitic capillary ripples present. The experimental data are compared to a direct numerical simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations, and they show reasonable agreement. This new Sub-pattern PIV technique is general and flexible and can be applied to other flow investigations that include fluid-fluid interfaces and thin shear (boundary) layers. For higher frequency capillary-gravity waves (8 Hz to 16 Hz), viscous drift phenomena are investigated

  9. Dust gravitational drift wave in complex plasma under gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Salahshoor, M. Niknam, A. R.

    2014-12-15

    The dispersion relation of electrostatic waves in a complex plasma under gravity is presented. It is assumed that the waves propagate parallel to the external fields. The effects of weak electric field, neutral drag force, and ion drag force are also taken into account. The dispersion relation is numerically examined in an appropriate parameter space in which the gravity plays the dominant role in the dynamics of microparticles. The numerical results show that, in the low pressure complex plasma under gravity, a low frequency drift wave can be developed in the long wavelength limit. The stability state of this wave is switched at a certain critical wavenumber in such a way that the damped mode is transformed into a growing one. Furthermore, the influence of the external fields on the dispersion properties is analyzed. It is shown that the wave instability is essentially due to the electrostatic streaming of plasma particles. It is also found that by increasing the electric field strength, the stability switching occurs at smaller wavenumbers.

  10. Electromagnetic inertio-gravity waves in the Earth's ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaladze, T. D.; Tsamalashvili, L. V.; Kahlon, L. Z.

    2011-05-01

    Propagation of electromagnetic inertio-gravity (IG) waves in the partially ionized ionospheric E- and F-layers is considered in the shallow water approximation. Accounting of the field-aligned current is the main novelty of the investigation. Existence of two new eigen-frequencies for fast and slow electromagnetic waves is revealed in the ionospheric E-layer. It is shown that in F-layer slowly damping new type of inertial-fast magnetosonic waves can propagate. Slowly damping low-frequency oscillations connected with the field-aligned conductivity are found. Broad spectrum of oscillations is investigated.

  11. Soundproof simulations of stratospheric gravity waves on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolarkiewicz, P.; Szmelter, J.

    2012-04-01

    An edge-based unstructured-mesh semi-implicit model is presented that integrates nonhydrostatic soundproof equations, inclusive of anelastic and pseudo-incompressible systems of partial differential equations. The model numerics employ nonoscillatory forward-in-time MPDATA methods [Smolarkiewicz, 2006, Int. J. Numer. Meth. Fl., 50, 1123-1144] using finite-volume spatial discretization and unstructured meshes with arbitrarily shaped cells. Implicit treatment of gravity waves benefits both accuracy and stability of the model. The unstructured-mesh solutions are compared to equivalent structured-grid results for intricate, multiscale internal-wave phenomenon of a non-Boussinesq amplification and breaking of deep stratospheric gravity waves. The departures of the anelastic and pseudo-incompressible results are quantified in reference to a recent asymptotic theory [Achatz et al., 2010, J. Fluid Mech., 663, 120-147].

  12. Gravity waves generated by sounds from big bang phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalaydzhyan, Tigran; Shuryak, Edward

    2015-04-01

    Inhomogeneities associated with the cosmological QCD and electroweak phase transitions produce hydrodynamical perturbations, longitudinal sounds and rotations. It has been demonstrated by Hindmarsh et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 041301 (2014)] that the sounds produce gravity waves well after the phase transition is over. We further argue that, under certain conditions, an inverse acoustic cascade may occur and move sound perturbations from the (UV) momentum scale at which the sound is originally produced to much smaller (IR) momenta. The weak turbulence regime of this cascade is studied via the Boltzmann equation, possessing stationary power and time-dependent self-similar solutions. We suggest certain indices for the strong turbulence regime as well, into which the cascade eventually proceeds. Finally, we point out that two on-shell sound waves can produce one on-shell gravity wave, and we evaluate the rate of the process using a standard sound loop diagram.

  13. The Binary Pulsar: Gravity Waves Exist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Will, Clifford

    1987-01-01

    Reviews the history of pulsars generally and the 1974 discovery of the binary pulsar by Joe Taylor and Russell Hulse specifically. Details the data collection and analysis used by Taylor and Hulse. Uses this discussion as support for Albert Einstein's theory of gravitational waves. (CW)

  14. Upper atmospheric gravity wave details revealed in nightglow satellite imagery.

    PubMed

    Miller, Steven D; Straka, William C; Yue, Jia; Smith, Steven M; Alexander, M Joan; Hoffmann, Lars; Setvák, Martin; Partain, Philip T

    2015-12-01

    Gravity waves (disturbances to the density structure of the atmosphere whose restoring forces are gravity and buoyancy) comprise the principal form of energy exchange between the lower and upper atmosphere. Wave breaking drives the mean upper atmospheric circulation, determining boundary conditions to stratospheric processes, which in turn influence tropospheric weather and climate patterns on various spatial and temporal scales. Despite their recognized importance, very little is known about upper-level gravity wave characteristics. The knowledge gap is mainly due to lack of global, high-resolution observations from currently available satellite observing systems. Consequently, representations of wave-related processes in global models are crude, highly parameterized, and poorly constrained, limiting the description of various processes influenced by them. Here we highlight, through a series of examples, the unanticipated ability of the Day/Night Band (DNB) on the NOAA/NASA Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership environmental satellite to resolve gravity structures near the mesopause via nightglow emissions at unprecedented subkilometric detail. On moonless nights, the Day/Night Band observations provide all-weather viewing of waves as they modulate the nightglow layer located near the mesopause (∼ 90 km above mean sea level). These waves are launched by a variety of physical mechanisms, ranging from orography to convection, intensifying fronts, and even seismic and volcanic events. Cross-referencing the Day/Night Band imagery with conventional thermal infrared imagery also available helps to discern nightglow structures and in some cases to attribute their sources. The capability stands to advance our basic understanding of a critical yet poorly constrained driver of the atmospheric circulation. PMID:26630004

  15. Upper atmospheric gravity wave details revealed in nightglow satellite imagery.

    PubMed

    Miller, Steven D; Straka, William C; Yue, Jia; Smith, Steven M; Alexander, M Joan; Hoffmann, Lars; Setvák, Martin; Partain, Philip T

    2015-12-01

    Gravity waves (disturbances to the density structure of the atmosphere whose restoring forces are gravity and buoyancy) comprise the principal form of energy exchange between the lower and upper atmosphere. Wave breaking drives the mean upper atmospheric circulation, determining boundary conditions to stratospheric processes, which in turn influence tropospheric weather and climate patterns on various spatial and temporal scales. Despite their recognized importance, very little is known about upper-level gravity wave characteristics. The knowledge gap is mainly due to lack of global, high-resolution observations from currently available satellite observing systems. Consequently, representations of wave-related processes in global models are crude, highly parameterized, and poorly constrained, limiting the description of various processes influenced by them. Here we highlight, through a series of examples, the unanticipated ability of the Day/Night Band (DNB) on the NOAA/NASA Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership environmental satellite to resolve gravity structures near the mesopause via nightglow emissions at unprecedented subkilometric detail. On moonless nights, the Day/Night Band observations provide all-weather viewing of waves as they modulate the nightglow layer located near the mesopause (∼ 90 km above mean sea level). These waves are launched by a variety of physical mechanisms, ranging from orography to convection, intensifying fronts, and even seismic and volcanic events. Cross-referencing the Day/Night Band imagery with conventional thermal infrared imagery also available helps to discern nightglow structures and in some cases to attribute their sources. The capability stands to advance our basic understanding of a critical yet poorly constrained driver of the atmospheric circulation.

  16. Upper atmospheric gravity wave details revealed in nightglow satellite imagery

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Steven D.; Straka, William C.; Yue, Jia; Smith, Steven M.; Alexander, M. Joan; Hoffmann, Lars; Setvák, Martin; Partain, Philip T.

    2015-01-01

    Gravity waves (disturbances to the density structure of the atmosphere whose restoring forces are gravity and buoyancy) comprise the principal form of energy exchange between the lower and upper atmosphere. Wave breaking drives the mean upper atmospheric circulation, determining boundary conditions to stratospheric processes, which in turn influence tropospheric weather and climate patterns on various spatial and temporal scales. Despite their recognized importance, very little is known about upper-level gravity wave characteristics. The knowledge gap is mainly due to lack of global, high-resolution observations from currently available satellite observing systems. Consequently, representations of wave-related processes in global models are crude, highly parameterized, and poorly constrained, limiting the description of various processes influenced by them. Here we highlight, through a series of examples, the unanticipated ability of the Day/Night Band (DNB) on the NOAA/NASA Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership environmental satellite to resolve gravity structures near the mesopause via nightglow emissions at unprecedented subkilometric detail. On moonless nights, the Day/Night Band observations provide all-weather viewing of waves as they modulate the nightglow layer located near the mesopause (∼90 km above mean sea level). These waves are launched by a variety of physical mechanisms, ranging from orography to convection, intensifying fronts, and even seismic and volcanic events. Cross-referencing the Day/Night Band imagery with conventional thermal infrared imagery also available helps to discern nightglow structures and in some cases to attribute their sources. The capability stands to advance our basic understanding of a critical yet poorly constrained driver of the atmospheric circulation. PMID:26630004

  17. Linking Atmospheric Gravity Wave Research to the Undergraduate Curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay, J.; Nielsen, K.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric gravity waves are often generated in the lower atmosphere and can, under favorable atmospheric conditions, propagate into the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. As a consequence of this vertical propagation, the waves carry momentum fluxes and energy from the lower atmosphere into the near-space environment, providing a strong coupling across atmospheric layers. While these waves have been observed and studied in details for decades, there are still many questions to be addressed regarding the tropospheric source location and nature of individually observed waves in the mesosphere. In an effort to increase undergraduate student research experiences, we are linking atmospheric gravity wave research and undergraduate curriculum to improve both academic and scholarly experiences by our students. In this particular case, we present a research project addressing the identification of tropospheric source locations of mesospheric waves observed by airglow imagers. The project involves observations, theory, and modeling techniques with a strong emphasis on how each part plays a role in the curriculum. Specifically, a simple ray tracing model is propagating observed waves downwards through the atmosphere until the point of origin is reached. In the process, we apply basic calculus, numerical methods, and simple fluid dynamics related to course taught at the undergraduate level.

  18. Linear and Nonlinear Electrostatic Waves in Unmagnetized Dusty Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mamun, A. A.; Shukla, P. K.

    2010-12-14

    A rigorous and systematic theoretical study has been made of linear and nonlinear electrostatic waves propagating in unmagnetized dusty plasmas. The basic features of linear and nonlinear electrostatic waves (particularly, dust-ion-acoustic and dust-acoustic waves) for different space and laboratory dusty plasma conditions are described. The experimental observations of such linear and nonlinear features of dust-ion-acoustic and dust-acoustic waves are briefly discussed.

  19. Investigating Seasonal Gravity Wave Activity in the Summer Polar Mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Taylor, M. J.; Randall, C. E.; Lumpe, J. D., Jr.; Siskind, D. E.; Bailey, S. M.; Russell, J. M., III

    2014-12-01

    The NASA Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) satellite is the first satellite mission dedicated to studying polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs). In particular, the Cloud Imaging and Particle Size (CIPS) instrument onboard AIM obtains large-field PMC images enabling a unique investigation of the mesospheric gravity waves, as the satellite traverses over the summer polar regions. The high quality of CIPS data has provided an exceptional capability to investigate the gravity wave signatures in the summer polar mesosphere where previous measurements have been sparse. We have utilized 12 consecutive seasons of AIM/CIPS PMC albedo data to derive the statistical properties of a broad spectrum of gravity waves present in the PMC data. Over 60,000 waves with horizontal scale sizes ranging from ~50 to >2000 km were identified and measured, revealing a well-developed, consistent distribution for their horizontal wavelengths with a peak in occurrence frequency centered around 400 km. The same result was found from season to season and in both hemispheres. Throughout this study, the wave activity in the southern hemisphere was found to be 10-15% higher than in the northern hemisphere and both northern and southern wave activity was found to decrease systematically (average ~15%) during the course of each summer season. We present new results of the intra-seasonal, inter-annual and hemispheric variability of these waves observed over the whole summer polar cap regions. The systematic decrease in wave activity is consistent with background wind filtering in the northern hemisphere but is not apparently associated with the critical level filtering in the southern hemisphere.

  20. A coupling modulation model of capillary waves from gravity waves: Theoretical analysis and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pengzhen; Wang, Xiaoqing; Liu, Li; Chong, Jinsong

    2016-06-01

    According to Bragg theory, capillary waves are the predominant scatterers of high-frequency band (such as Ka-band) microwave radiation from the surface of the ocean. Therefore, understanding the modulation mechanism of capillary waves is an important foundation for interpreting high-frequency microwave remote sensing images of the surface of the sea. In our experiments, we discovered that modulations of capillary waves are significantly larger than the values predicted by the classical theory. Further, analysis shows that the difference in restoring force results in an inflection point while the phase velocity changes from gravity waves region to capillary waves region, and this results in the capillary waves being able to resonate with gravity waves when the phase velocity of the gravity waves is equal to the group velocity of the capillary waves. Consequently, we propose a coupling modulation model in which the current modulates the capillary wave indirectly by modulating the resonant gravity waves, and the modulation of the former is approximated by that of the latter. This model very effectively explains the results discovered in our experiments. Further, based on Bragg scattering theory and this coupling modulation model, we simulate the modulation of normalized radar cross section (NRCS) of typical internal waves and show that the high-frequency bands are superior to the low-frequency bands because of their greater modulation of NRCS and better radiometric resolution. This result provides new support for choice of radar band for observation of wave-current modulation oceanic phenomena such as internal waves, fronts, and shears.

  1. Testing gravity with gravitational wave source counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabrese, Erminia; Battaglia, Nicholas; Spergel, David N.

    2016-08-01

    We show that the gravitational wave source counts distribution can test how gravitational radiation propagates on cosmological scales. This test does not require obtaining redshifts for the sources. If the signal-to-noise ratio (ρ) from a gravitational wave source is proportional to the strain then it falls as {R}-1, thus we expect the source counts to follow {{d}}{N}/{{d}}ρ \\propto {ρ }-4. However, if gravitational waves decay as they propagate or propagate into other dimensions, then there can be deviations from this generic prediction. We consider the possibility that the strain falls as {R}-γ , where γ =1 recovers the expected predictions in a Euclidean uniformly-filled Universe, and forecast the sensitivity of future observations to deviations from standard General Relativity. We first consider the case of few objects, seven sources, with a signal-to-noise from 8 to 24, and impose a lower limit on γ, finding γ \\gt 0.33 at 95% confidence level. The distribution of our simulated sample is very consistent with the distribution of the trigger events reported by Advanced LIGO. Future measurements will improve these constraints: with 100 events, we estimate that γ can be measured with an uncertainty of 15%. We generalize the formalism to account for a range of chirp masses and the possibility that the signal falls as {exp}(-R/{R}0)/{R}γ .

  2. Detecting gravity waves from binary black holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahlquist, Hugo D.

    1989-01-01

    One of the most attractive possible sources of strong gravitational waves would be a binary system comprising massive black holes (BH). The gravitational radiation from a binary is an elliptically polarized, periodic wave which could be observed continuously - or at intervals whenever a detector was available. This continuity of the signal is certainly appealing compared to waiting for individual pulses from infrequent random events. It also has the advantage over pulses that continued observation can increase the signal-to-noise ratio almost indefinitely. Furthermore, this system is dynamically simple; the theory of the generation of the radiation is unambiguous; all characteristics of the signal can be precisely related to the dynamical parameters of the source. The current situation is that while there is no observational evidence as yet for the existence of massive binary BH, their formation is theoretically plausible, and within certain coupled constraints of mass and location, their existence cannot be observationally excluded. Detecting gravitational waves from these objects might be the first observational proof of their existence.

  3. Observed features of acoustic gravity waves in the heterosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorenko, A. K.; Kryuchkov, E. I.

    2014-01-01

    According to measurements on the Dynamic Explorer 2 satellite, features of the propagation of acoustic gravity waves (AGWs) in the multicomponent upper atmosphere have been investigated. In the altitude range 250-400 km in wave concentration variations of some atmospheric gases, amplitude and phase differences have been observed. Using the approach proposed in this paper, in different gases, AGW variations have been divided into components associated with elastic compression, adiabatic expansion, and the vertical background distribution. The amplitude and phase differences observed in different gases are explained on the basis of analyzing these components. It is shown how to use this effect in order to determine the wave propagation, the vertical displacement of the volume element, the wave frequency, and the spatial distribution of the wave energy density.

  4. Spectra of Baroclinic Inertia-Gravity Wave Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazman, Roman E.

    1996-01-01

    Baroclinic inertia-gravity (IG) waves form a persistent background of thermocline depth and sea surface height oscillations. They also contribute to the kinetic energy of horizontal motions in the subsurface layer. Measured by the ratio of water particle velocity to wave phase speed, the wave nonlinearity may be rather high. Given a continuous supply of energy from external sources, nonlinear wave-wave interactions among IG waves would result in inertial cascades of energy, momentum, and wave action. Based on a recently developed theory of wave turbulence in scale-dependent systems, these cascades are investigated and IG wave spectra are derived for an arbitrary degree of wave nonlinearity. Comparisons with satellite-altimetry-based spectra of surface height variations and with energy spectra of horizontal velocity fluctuations show good agreement. The well-known spectral peak at the inertial frequency is thus explained as a result of the inverse cascade. Finally, we discuss a possibility of inferring the internal Rossby radius of deformation and other dynamical properties of the upper thermocline from the spectra of SSH (sea surface height) variations based on altimeter measurements.

  5. Gravity Waves in the Atmospheres of Mars and Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellmann, Silvia; Paetzold, Martin; Häusler, Bernd; Bird, Michael K.; Tyler, G. Leonard; Hinson, David P.; Imamura, Takeshi

    2016-10-01

    Gravity waves are ubiquitous in all stably stratified planetary atmospheres and play a major role in the redistribution of energy and momentum. Gravity waves can be excited by many different mechanisms, e.g. by airflow over orographic obstacles or by convection in an adjacent layer.Gravity waves on Mars were observed in the lower atmosphere [1,2] but are also expected to play a major role in the cooling of the thermosphere [3] and the polar warming [4]. They might be excited by convection in the daytime boundary layer or by strong winter jets in combination with the pronounced topographic diversity on Mars.On Venus, gravity waves play an important role in the mesosphere above the cloud layer [5] and probably below. Convection in the cloud layer is one of the most important source mechanisms but certain correlations with topography were observed by different experiments [6,7,8].Temperature height profiles from the radio science experiments on Mars Express (MaRS) [9] and Venus Express (VeRa) [10] have the exceptionally high vertical resolution necessary to study small-scale vertical gravity waves, their global distribution, and possible source mechanisms.Atmospheric instabilities, which are clearly identified in the data, can be investigated to gain further insight into possible atmospheric processes contributing to the excitation of gravity waves.[1] Creasey, J. E., et al.,(2006), Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L01803, doi:10.1029/2005GL024037.[2]Tellmann, S., et al.(2013), J. Geophys. Res. Planets, 118, 306–320, doi:10.1002/jgre.20058.[3]Medvedev, A. S., et al.(2015), J. Geophys. Res. Planets, 120, 913–927. doi:10.1002/2015JE004802.[4] Barnes, J. R. (1990), J. Geophys. Res., 95, B2, 1401–1421.[5] Tellmann, S., et al. (2012), Icarus, 221, 471 – 480.[6] Blamont, J.E. et al., (1986) 231, 1422–1425.[7] Bertaux J.-L., et al. (2016), J. Geophys. Res., Planets, in press.[8] Piccialli, A., et al. (2014), Icarus, 227, 94 – 111.[9] Pätzold, M., et al. (2016), Planet

  6. Transition from geostrophic turbulence to inertia-gravity waves in the atmospheric energy spectrum.

    PubMed

    Callies, Jörn; Ferrari, Raffaele; Bühler, Oliver

    2014-12-01

    Midlatitude fluctuations of the atmospheric winds on scales of thousands of kilometers, the most energetic of such fluctuations, are strongly constrained by the Earth's rotation and the atmosphere's stratification. As a result of these constraints, the flow is quasi-2D and energy is trapped at large scales—nonlinear turbulent interactions transfer energy to larger scales, but not to smaller scales. Aircraft observations of wind and temperature near the tropopause indicate that fluctuations at horizontal scales smaller than about 500 km are more energetic than expected from these quasi-2D dynamics. We present an analysis of the observations that indicates that these smaller-scale motions are due to approximately linear inertia-gravity waves, contrary to recent claims that these scales are strongly turbulent. Specifically, the aircraft velocity and temperature measurements are separated into two components: one due to the quasi-2D dynamics and one due to linear inertia-gravity waves. Quasi-2D dynamics dominate at scales larger than 500 km; inertia-gravity waves dominate at scales smaller than 500 km.

  7. Transition from geostrophic turbulence to inertia-gravity waves in the atmospheric energy spectrum.

    PubMed

    Callies, Jörn; Ferrari, Raffaele; Bühler, Oliver

    2014-12-01

    Midlatitude fluctuations of the atmospheric winds on scales of thousands of kilometers, the most energetic of such fluctuations, are strongly constrained by the Earth's rotation and the atmosphere's stratification. As a result of these constraints, the flow is quasi-2D and energy is trapped at large scales—nonlinear turbulent interactions transfer energy to larger scales, but not to smaller scales. Aircraft observations of wind and temperature near the tropopause indicate that fluctuations at horizontal scales smaller than about 500 km are more energetic than expected from these quasi-2D dynamics. We present an analysis of the observations that indicates that these smaller-scale motions are due to approximately linear inertia-gravity waves, contrary to recent claims that these scales are strongly turbulent. Specifically, the aircraft velocity and temperature measurements are separated into two components: one due to the quasi-2D dynamics and one due to linear inertia-gravity waves. Quasi-2D dynamics dominate at scales larger than 500 km; inertia-gravity waves dominate at scales smaller than 500 km. PMID:25404349

  8. Transition from geostrophic turbulence to inertia–gravity waves in the atmospheric energy spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Callies, Jörn; Ferrari, Raffaele; Bühler, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Midlatitude fluctuations of the atmospheric winds on scales of thousands of kilometers, the most energetic of such fluctuations, are strongly constrained by the Earth’s rotation and the atmosphere’s stratification. As a result of these constraints, the flow is quasi-2D and energy is trapped at large scales—nonlinear turbulent interactions transfer energy to larger scales, but not to smaller scales. Aircraft observations of wind and temperature near the tropopause indicate that fluctuations at horizontal scales smaller than about 500 km are more energetic than expected from these quasi-2D dynamics. We present an analysis of the observations that indicates that these smaller-scale motions are due to approximately linear inertia–gravity waves, contrary to recent claims that these scales are strongly turbulent. Specifically, the aircraft velocity and temperature measurements are separated into two components: one due to the quasi-2D dynamics and one due to linear inertia–gravity waves. Quasi-2D dynamics dominate at scales larger than 500 km; inertia–gravity waves dominate at scales smaller than 500 km. PMID:25404349

  9. Invited review article: Interferometric gravity wave detectors.

    PubMed

    Cella, G; Giazotto, A

    2011-10-01

    A direct detection of gravitational waves is still lacking today. A network of several earthbound interferometric detectors is currently operating with a continuously improving sensitivity. The window of interest for observation has a lower cut off in the frequency domain below some tens of hertz, determined by the effect of seismic motion. For larger frequencies, the sensitivity is limited by thermal effects below few hundreds of hertz and by the quantum nature of light above that value. Each of these sources of noise pose a big technological challenge to experimentalists, and there are big expectations for the next generation of detectors. A reduction of thermal effects by at least one order of magnitude will be obtained with new and carefully designed materials. At that point the quantum nature of light will become an issue, and the use of quantum non-demolition techniques will become mandatory. In this review, we discuss interferometric detection of gravitational waves from an instrumental point of view. We try to address conceptually important issues with an audience of non-experts in mind. A particular emphasis is given to the description of the current limitations and to the perspectives of beating them. PMID:22047273

  10. Invited review article: Interferometric gravity wave detectors.

    PubMed

    Cella, G; Giazotto, A

    2011-10-01

    A direct detection of gravitational waves is still lacking today. A network of several earthbound interferometric detectors is currently operating with a continuously improving sensitivity. The window of interest for observation has a lower cut off in the frequency domain below some tens of hertz, determined by the effect of seismic motion. For larger frequencies, the sensitivity is limited by thermal effects below few hundreds of hertz and by the quantum nature of light above that value. Each of these sources of noise pose a big technological challenge to experimentalists, and there are big expectations for the next generation of detectors. A reduction of thermal effects by at least one order of magnitude will be obtained with new and carefully designed materials. At that point the quantum nature of light will become an issue, and the use of quantum non-demolition techniques will become mandatory. In this review, we discuss interferometric detection of gravitational waves from an instrumental point of view. We try to address conceptually important issues with an audience of non-experts in mind. A particular emphasis is given to the description of the current limitations and to the perspectives of beating them.

  11. Interactions between small and medium scale gravity waves in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heale, Christopher; Snively, Jonathan

    2016-07-01

    Gravity waves play a prominent role in the momentum and energy budget of the Earth's upper atmosphere [e.g. Fritts and Alexander ,Rev. Geophys., 41, 1003, 2003]. Small scale waves with large vertical wavelengths are able to propagate into the thermosphere where they will dissipate and deposit their energy and momentum [e.g. Vadas and Fritts, J. Geoph. Res.,110, D15103, 2005; Yiǧit et al., J. Geophys. Res.-Atmospheres, 114, D07101, 14, 2009; Liu et al., Ann. Geophys., 31, 2013; Heale et al., J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics, 119, 2014]. However, small scale waves are also prone to refraction, reflection, filtering, and instabilities by the temperature and wind structure of the atmosphere. One of the primary sources of variability on scales relevant to these small-scale waves is other, larger scale waves. The use of multiple instruments and Airglow keograms has begun to uncover the richness of the spectrum in the atmosphere, but interaction and relatively poorly understood [e.g. Fritts et al., J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., 119, 2014; Bossert et al., J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., 120, 2015; Lu et al., J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., 120, 2015; Yuan et al., J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., 121, 2016]. We use a 2D nonlinear, compressible numerical model to investigate the character of interactions between small-scale and medium-scale gravity waves at varied amplitudes as they approach nonlinearity. We investigate the relative importance of linear and nonlinear interaction processes and their effects on the propagation of multiple wave packets, and the possibility of energy exchanges and the threshold of onset for instability or breaking within the waves. Furthermore, we assess the validity of linear interpretations of observational data where coherent large-amplitude waves are detected at multiple, separated scales.

  12. Evolution of cosmological gravitational waves in f(R) gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ananda, K. N.; Carloni, S.; Dunsby, P. K. S.

    2008-01-15

    We give a rigorous and mathematically clear presentation of the covariant and gauge-invariant theory of gravitational waves in a perturbed Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker universe for fourth order gravity, where the matter is described by a perfect fluid with a barotropic equation of state. As an example of a consistent analysis of tensor perturbations in fourth order gravity, we apply the formalism to a simple background solution of R{sup n} gravity. We obtain the exact solutions of the perturbation equations for scales much bigger than and smaller than the Hubble radius. It is shown that the evolution of tensor modes is highly sensitive to the choice of n and an interesting new feature arises. During the radiation dominated era, their exists a growing tensor perturbation for nearly all choices of n. This occurs even when the background model is undergoing accelerated expansion as opposed to the case of general relativity. Consequently, cosmological gravitational wave modes can in principle provide a strong constraint on the theory of gravity independent of other cosmological data sets.

  13. Primordial gravity wave fossils and their use in testing inflation.

    PubMed

    Masui, Kiyoshi Wesley; Pen, Ue-Li

    2010-10-15

    A new effect is described by which primordial gravity waves leave a permanent signature in the large scale structure of the Universe. The effect occurs at second order in perturbation theory and is sensitive to the order in which perturbations on different scales are generated. We derive general forecasts for the detectability of the effect with future experiments and consider observations of the prereionization gas through the 21 cm line. It is found that the Square Kilometer Array will not be competitive with current cosmic microwave background constraints on primordial gravity waves from inflation. However, a more futuristic experiment could, through this effect, provide the highest ultimate sensitivity to tensor modes and possibly even measure the tensor spectral index. It is thus a potentially quantitative probe of the inflationary paradigm.

  14. Gravity wave momentum flux in the lower stratosphere over convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, M. Joan; Pfister, Leonhard

    1995-01-01

    This work describes a method for estimating vertical fluxes of horizontal momentum carried by short horizontal scale gravity waves (lambda(sub x) = 10-100 km) using aircraft measured winds in the lower stratosphere. We utilize in situ wind vector and pressure altitude measurements provided by the Meteorological Measurement System (MMS) on board the ER-2 aircraft to compute the momentum flux vectors at the flight level above deep convection during the tropical experiment of the Stratosphere Troposphere Exchange Project (STEP-Tropical). Data from Flight 9 are presented here for illustration. The vertical flux of horizontal momentum these observations points in opposite directions on either side of the location of a strong convective updraft in the cloud shield. This property of internal gravity waves propagating from a central source compares favorably with previously described model results.

  15. Gravity-wave induced CO2 clouds on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiǧit, Erdal; Medvedev, Alexander S.; Hartogh, Paul

    2016-07-01

    We present the first general circulation model simulations that quantify and reproduce patches of extremely cold air required for CO2 condensation and cloud formation in the Martian mesosphere. They are created by subgrid-scale gravity waves (GWs) accounted for in the model with the whole atmosphere GW parameterization of Yiǧit et al. (2008)}. Distributions of GW-induced temperature fluctuations and occurrences of supersaturation conditions are in a good agreement with observations of high-altitude CO2 ice clouds. Our study confirms the key role of GWs in facilitating CO2 cloud formation, discusses their tidal modulation, and predicts clouds at altitudes higher than have been observed to date. Reference: Yiǧit, E., A. D. Aylward, and A. S. Medvedev (2008), Parameterization of the effects of vertically propagating gravity waves for thermosphere general circulation models: Sensitivity study, J. Geophys. Res., 113, D19106, doi:10.1029/2008JD010135.

  16. Primordial gravity wave fossils and their use in testing inflation.

    PubMed

    Masui, Kiyoshi Wesley; Pen, Ue-Li

    2010-10-15

    A new effect is described by which primordial gravity waves leave a permanent signature in the large scale structure of the Universe. The effect occurs at second order in perturbation theory and is sensitive to the order in which perturbations on different scales are generated. We derive general forecasts for the detectability of the effect with future experiments and consider observations of the prereionization gas through the 21 cm line. It is found that the Square Kilometer Array will not be competitive with current cosmic microwave background constraints on primordial gravity waves from inflation. However, a more futuristic experiment could, through this effect, provide the highest ultimate sensitivity to tensor modes and possibly even measure the tensor spectral index. It is thus a potentially quantitative probe of the inflationary paradigm. PMID:21230961

  17. Acoustic-gravity waves in atmospheric and oceanic waveguides.

    PubMed

    Godin, Oleg A

    2012-08-01

    A theory of guided propagation of sound in layered, moving fluids is extended to include acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) in waveguides with piecewise continuous parameters. The orthogonality of AGW normal modes is established in moving and motionless media. A perturbation theory is developed to quantify the relative significance of the gravity and fluid compressibility as well as sensitivity of the normal modes to variations in sound speed, flow velocity, and density profiles and in boundary conditions. Phase and group speeds of the normal modes are found to have certain universal properties which are valid for waveguides with arbitrary stratification. The Lamb wave is shown to be the only AGW normal mode that can propagate without dispersion in a layered medium.

  18. Electromagnetic internal gravity waves in the Earth's ionospheric E-layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaladze, T. D.; Tsamalashvili, L. V.; Kaladze, D. T.

    2011-12-01

    In the Earth's ionospheric E-layer existence of the new waves connecting with the electromagnetic nature of internal gravity waves is shown. They represent the mixture of the ordinary internal gravity waves and the new type of dispersive Alfven waves.

  19. Interseasonal Variations in the Middle Atmosphere Forced by Gravity Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Mengel, J. G.; Drob, D. P.; Porter, H. S.; Chan, K. L.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In our Numerical Spectral Model (NSM), which incorporates Hines' Doppler Spread Parameterization, gravity waves (GW) propagating in the east/west direction can generate the essential features of the observed equatorial oscillations in the zonal circulation and in particular the QBO (quasi-biennial oscillation) extending from the stratosphere into the upper mesosphere. We report here that the NSM also produces inter-seasonal variations in the zonally symmetric (m = 0) meridional circulation. A distinct but variable meridional wind oscillation (MWO) is generated, which appears to be the counterpart to the QBO. With a vertical grid-point resolution of about 0.5 km, the NSM produces the MWO through momentum deposition of GWs propagating in the north/south direction. The resulting momentum source represents a third (generally odd) order non-linear function of the meridional winds, and this enables the oscillation, as in the case of the QBO for the zonal winds. Since the meridional winds are relatively small compared to the zonal winds, however, the vertical wavelength that maintains the MWO is much smaller, i.e., only about 10 km instead of 40 km for the QBO. Consistent with the associated increase of the viscous stress, the period of the MWO is then short compared with that of the QBO, i.e., only about two to four months. Depending on the strength of the GW forcing, the computed amplitudes of the MWO are typically 4 m/s in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere, and the associated temperature amplitudes are between about 2 and 3 K. These amplitudes may be observable with the instruments on the TIMED spacecraft. Extended computer simulations with the NSM in 2D (two-dimensional) and 3D (three-dimensional) reveal that the MWO is modulated by and in turn influences the QBO.

  20. Interseasonal Variations in the Middle Atmosphere Forced by Gravity Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Mengel, J. G.; Drob, D. P.; Porter, H. S.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In our Numerical Spectral Model (NSM), which incorporates Hines' Doppler Spread Parameterization, gravity waves (GW) propagating in the east/west direction can generate the essential features of the observed equatorial oscillations of the zonal circulation and in particular the QBO (quasi-biennial oscillation) extending from the stratosphere into the upper mesosphere. We report here that the NSM also produces inter-seasonal variations in the zonally symmetric meridional circulation. A distinct meridional oscillation (MO) is generated, which appears to be the counterpart to the QBO. With a vertical grid-point resolution of about 0.5 km, the NSM produces the MO through momentum deposition of GW's propagating in the north/south direction. This process is inherently non-linear, of third (odd) order, which enables the oscillation. Since the meridional winds are relatively small compared to the zonal winds, the vertical wavelength required to maintain the MO is also smaller, i.e., only about 10 km instead of the 30 km for the QBO. The corresponding viscous stress is then larger, and the period of the MO is thus short compared with that of the QBO, i.e., only about 3 to 4 months. Depending on the strength of the GW forcing, the computed amplitudes of the meridional wind oscillation are typically 5 m/s in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere, and the associated temperature amplitudes are between about 2 and 3 K. These amplitudes may be observable with the instruments on the TIMED spacecraft. Extended computer simulations with the NSM in 2D and 3D reveal that the MO at low latitudes is modulated by the QBO and in turn can influence it to produce a hemispherically asymmetric component. The annual circulation from the summer to the winter hemisphere is likely to play an important role.

  1. Modeling the Diurnal Tides in the MLT Region with the Doppler Spread Parameterization of Gravity Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Mengel, J. G.; Chan, K. L.; Trob, D.; Porter, H. C.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Special Session: SA03 The mesosphere/lower thermosphere region: Structure, dynamics, composition, and emission. Ground based and satellite observations in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) reveal large seasonal variations in the horizontal wind fields of the diurnal and semidiurnal tides. To provide an understanding of the observations, we discuss results obtained with our Numerical Spectral Model (NMS) that incorporates the gravity wave Doppler Spread Parameterization (DSP) of Hines. Our model reproduces many of the salient features observed, and we discuss numerical experiments that delineate the important processes involved. Gravity wave momentum deposition and the seasonal variations in the tidal excitation contribute primarily to produce the large equinoctial amplitude maxima in the diurnal tide. Gravity wave induced variations in eddy viscosity, not accounted for in the model, have been shown by Akmaev to be important too. For the semidiurnal tide, with amplitude maximum observed during winter solstice, these processes also contribute, but filtering by the mean zonal circulation is more important. A deficiency of our model is that it cannot reproduce the observed seasonal variations in the phase of the semidiurnal tide, and numerical experiments are being carried out to diagnose the cause and to alleviate this problem. The dynamical components of the upper mesosphere are tightly coupled through non-linear processes and wave filtering, and this may constrain the model and require it to reproduce in detail the observed phenomenology.

  2. Inverting for a deterministic surface gravity wave using the sensitivity-kernel approach.

    PubMed

    Roux, Philippe; Nicolas, Barbara

    2014-04-01

    The dynamic imaging of a deterministic gravity wave propagating at an air-water interface requires continuous sampling of every point at this interface. This sampling can be done acoustically using waves that propagate in the water column but have specular reflection points that fully scan the air-water interface. This study aims to perform this complex task experimentally, with identical ultrasonic source and receiver arrays that face each other in a 1-m-long, 5-cm-deep fluid waveguide, and with frequencies in the MHz range. The waveguide transfer matrix is recorded 100 times per second between the source-receiver arrays, while a gravity wave is generated at the air-water interface. Through the beamforming process, a large set of acoustic multi-reverberated beams are isolated and identified that interact with the air-water interface. The travel-time and amplitude modulations of each eigenbeam are measured when the surface gravity wave travels through the source-receiver plane. Linear inversion of the travel-time and amplitude perturbations is performed from a few thousand eigenbeams using diffraction-based sensitivity kernels. Inversion results using travel-times, amplitudes, or these two observables together, lead to accurate spatial-temporal patterns of the surface deformation. The advantages and limitations of the method are discussed. PMID:25234978

  3. Inverting for a deterministic surface gravity wave using the sensitivity-kernel approach.

    PubMed

    Roux, Philippe; Nicolas, Barbara

    2014-04-01

    The dynamic imaging of a deterministic gravity wave propagating at an air-water interface requires continuous sampling of every point at this interface. This sampling can be done acoustically using waves that propagate in the water column but have specular reflection points that fully scan the air-water interface. This study aims to perform this complex task experimentally, with identical ultrasonic source and receiver arrays that face each other in a 1-m-long, 5-cm-deep fluid waveguide, and with frequencies in the MHz range. The waveguide transfer matrix is recorded 100 times per second between the source-receiver arrays, while a gravity wave is generated at the air-water interface. Through the beamforming process, a large set of acoustic multi-reverberated beams are isolated and identified that interact with the air-water interface. The travel-time and amplitude modulations of each eigenbeam are measured when the surface gravity wave travels through the source-receiver plane. Linear inversion of the travel-time and amplitude perturbations is performed from a few thousand eigenbeams using diffraction-based sensitivity kernels. Inversion results using travel-times, amplitudes, or these two observables together, lead to accurate spatial-temporal patterns of the surface deformation. The advantages and limitations of the method are discussed.

  4. Selection rules for the nonlinear interaction of internal gravity waves.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chung-Hsiang; Marcus, Philip S

    2009-03-27

    Two intersecting beams of internal gravity waves will generically create two wave packets by nonlinear interaction. The frequency of one packet will be the sum and that of the other packet will be the difference of the frequencies of the intersecting beams. In principle, each packet should form an "X" pattern, or "St. Andrew's cross" consisting of four beams outgoing from the point of intersection. Here we derive selection rules and show that most of the expected nonlinear beams are forbidden. These rules can also be applied to the reflection of a beam from a boundary.

  5. Characteristics of acoustic gravity waves obtained from Dynasonde data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrea, Cǎtǎlin; Zabotin, Nikolay; Bullett, Terrence; Fuller-Rowell, Tim; Fang, Tzu-Wei; Codrescu, Mihail

    2016-04-01

    Traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) are ubiquitous in the thermosphere-ionosphere and are often assumed to be caused by acoustic gravity waves (AGWs). This study performs an analysis of the TID and AGW activity above Wallops Island, VA, during October 2013. The variations in electron density and ionospheric tilts obtained with the Dynasonde technique are used as primary indicators of wave activity. The temporal and spectral characteristics of the data are discussed in detail, using also results of the Whole Atmosphere Model (WAM) and the Global Ionosphere Plasmasphere Model (GIP). The full set of propagation parameters (frequency, and the vertical, zonal and meridional wave vector components) of the TIDs is determined over the 160-220 km height range. A test of the self-consistency of these results within the confines of the theoretical AGW dispersion relation is devised. This is applied to a sample data set of 24 October 2013. A remarkable agreement has been achieved for wave periods between 52 and 21 min, for which we can rigorously claim the TIDs are caused by underlying acoustic gravity waves. The Wallops Island Dynasonde can operate for extended periods at a 2 min cadence, allowing determination of the statistical distributions of propagation parameters. A dominant population of TIDs is identified in the frequency band below 1 mHz, and for it, the distributions of the horizontal wavelengths, vertical wavelengths, and horizontal phase speeds are obtained.

  6. Long-Term Global Morphology of Gravity Wave Activity Using UARS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckermann, Stephen D.; Bacmeister, Julio T.; Wu, Dong L.

    1998-01-01

    This is the first quarter's report on research to extract global gravity-wave data from satellite data and to model those observations synoptically. Preliminary analysis of global maps of extracted middle atmospheric temperature variance from the CRISTA instrument is presented, which appear to contain gravity-wave information. Corresponding simulations of global gravity-wave and mountain-wave activity during this mission period are described using global ray-tracing and mountain-wave models, and interesting similarities among simulated data and CRISTA data are noted. Climatological simulations of mesospheric gravity-wave activity using the HWM-03 wind-temperature climatology are also reported, for comparison with UARS MLS data. Preparatory work on modeling of gravity wave observations from space-based platforms and subsequent interpretation of the MLS gravity-wave product are also described. Preliminary interpretation and relation to the research objectives are provided, and further action for the next quarter's research is recommended.

  7. Impact of mountain gravity waves on infrasound propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damiens, Florentin; Lott, François; Millet, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Linear theory of acoustic propagation is used to analyze how mountain waves can change the characteristics of infrasound signals. The mountain wave model is based on the integration of the linear inviscid Taylor-Goldstein equation forced by a nonlinear surface boundary condition. For the acoustic propagation we solve the wave equation using the normal mode method together with the effective sound speed approximation. For large-amplitude mountain waves we use direct numerical simulations to compute the interactions between the mountain waves and the infrasound component. It is shown that the mountain waves perturb the low level waveguide, which leads to significant acoustic dispersion. The mountain waves also impact the arrival time and spread of the signals substantially and can produce a strong absorption of the wave signal. To interpret our results we follow each acoustic mode separately and show which mode is impacted and how. We also show that the phase shift between the acoustic modes over the horizontal length of the mountain wave field may yield to destructive interferences in the lee side of the mountain, resulting in a new form of infrasound absorption. The statistical relevance of those results is tested using a stochastic version of the mountain wave model and large enough sample sizes.

  8. Spatiotemporal measurement of surfactant distribution on gravity-capillary waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Stephen; Shearer, Michael; Daniels, Karen

    2015-11-01

    Materials adsorbed to the surface of a fluid - for instance, crude oil, biogenic slicks, or industrial/medical surfactants - will move in response to surface waves. Due to the difficulty of non-invasive measurement of the spatial distribution of a molecular monolayer, little is known about the dynamics that couple the surface waves and the evolving density field. We report measurements of the spatiotemporal dynamics of the density field of an insoluble surfactant driven by gravity-capillary waves in a shallow cylindrical container. Standing Faraday waves and traveling waves generated by the meniscus are superimposed to create a non-trivial surfactant density field. We measure both the height field of the surface using moire-imaging and the density field of the surfactant via the fluorescence of NBD-tagged phosphatidylcholine. Through phase-averaging stroboscopically-acquired images of the density field, we determine that the surfactant accumulates on the leading edge of the traveling meniscus waves and in the troughs of the standing Faraday waves. We fit the spatiotemporal variations in the two fields and report measurements of the wavenumbers as well as a temporal phase shift between the two fields. These measurements suggest that longitudinal waves contribute to the dynamics. Funded by NSF grant DMS-0968258.

  9. Directional asymmetry of the nonlinear wave phenomena in a three-dimensional granular phononic crystal under gravity.

    PubMed

    Merkel, A; Tournat, V; Gusev, V

    2014-08-01

    We report the experimental observation of the gravity-induced asymmetry for the nonlinear transformation of acoustic waves in a noncohesive granular phononic crystal. Because of the gravity, the contact precompression increases with depth inducing space variations of not only the linear and nonlinear elastic moduli but also of the acoustic wave dissipation. We show experimentally and explain theoretically that, in contrast to symmetric propagation of linear waves, the amplitude of the nonlinearly self-demodulated wave depends on whether the propagation of the waves is in the direction of the gravity or in the opposite direction. Among the observed nonlinear processes, we report frequency mixing of the two transverse-rotational modes belonging to the optical band of vibrations and propagating with negative phase velocities, which results in the excitation of a longitudinal wave belonging to the acoustic band of vibrations and propagating with positive phase velocity. We show that the measurements of the gravity-induced asymmetry in the nonlinear acoustic phenomena can be used to compare the in-depth distributions of the contact nonlinearity and of acoustic absorption.

  10. Directional asymmetry of the nonlinear wave phenomena in a three-dimensional granular phononic crystal under gravity.

    PubMed

    Merkel, A; Tournat, V; Gusev, V

    2014-08-01

    We report the experimental observation of the gravity-induced asymmetry for the nonlinear transformation of acoustic waves in a noncohesive granular phononic crystal. Because of the gravity, the contact precompression increases with depth inducing space variations of not only the linear and nonlinear elastic moduli but also of the acoustic wave dissipation. We show experimentally and explain theoretically that, in contrast to symmetric propagation of linear waves, the amplitude of the nonlinearly self-demodulated wave depends on whether the propagation of the waves is in the direction of the gravity or in the opposite direction. Among the observed nonlinear processes, we report frequency mixing of the two transverse-rotational modes belonging to the optical band of vibrations and propagating with negative phase velocities, which results in the excitation of a longitudinal wave belonging to the acoustic band of vibrations and propagating with positive phase velocity. We show that the measurements of the gravity-induced asymmetry in the nonlinear acoustic phenomena can be used to compare the in-depth distributions of the contact nonlinearity and of acoustic absorption. PMID:25215842

  11. Nonlinear airglow signatures of ducted gravity waves in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snively, J. B.; Hickey, M. P.; Taylor, M. J.

    2010-12-01

    Signatures of short-period gravity waves are detected frequently in airglow data, revealing typical horizontal wavelengths of ˜15-35 km and periods of ˜4-8 minutes [e.g., Simkhada et al., Ann. Geophys., 27, 3213, 2009]. Many of such waves are ducted within the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) region [e.g., Walterscheid and Hickey, 114, D19109, 2009], and typical airglow intensity perturbations suggest amplitudes on the order of a few to tens of Kelvin within the airglow layers. At these amplitudes, trapped small-scale waves may be intermittently subject to nonlinear dissipation, potentially contributing to the local small-scale dynamics and variability of the lower thermosphere. For exceptionally strong small-scale waves, nonlinear behavior may become detectable in airglow data, including examples of wave breakdown [e.g., Yamada et al., GRL, 28(11), 2153, 2001], or apparent bore formation [e.g., Smith et al., JGR, 108(A2), 1083, 2003]. For moderately strong gravity waves with principally-linear propagation characteristics, however, airglow signatures may also exhibit nonlinearity in the form of harmonics, due to strong perturbations of reacting minor species at steep gradients of density [Huang et al., JGR, 108(A5), 1173, 2003; Snively et al., JGR, In Press, 2010]. Two scenarios are investigated numerically, using a nonlinear photochemical-dynamical model to simulate ducted gravity wave perturbations to the hydroxyl airglow layer. First, signatures of ducted waves are considered that exhibit nonlinearity associated with the wave perturbations to minor species participating in the emission processes. In this case, the nonlinear signatures are not indicative of changes in the wave packet spectrum. Second, we consider signatures of ducted waves at sufficient amplitudes to exhibit nonlinear propagation as they approach dissipation. In this second case, observable nonlinearity in the airglow signatures arise simultaneously from the overall wave perturbation and

  12. Vertical evolution of gravity wave spectra and the parameterization of associated wave drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, A. S.; Klaassen, G. P.

    1995-12-01

    Extensions of Weinstock's theory of nonlinear gravity waves and a parameterization of the related momentum deposition are developed. Our approach, which combines aspects of Hines' Doppler spreading theory with Weinstock's theory of nonlinear wave diffusion, treats the low-frequency part of the gravity wave spectrum as an additional background flow for higher-frequency waves. This technique allows one to calculate frequency shifting and wave amplitude damping produced by the interaction with this additional background wind. For a nearly monochromatic spectrum the parameterization formulae for wave drag coincide with those of Lindzen. It is shown that two processes should be distinguished: wave breaking due to instabilities and saturation due to nonlinear diffusionlike processes. The criteria for wave breaking and wave saturation in terms of wave spectra are derived. For a saturated spectrum the power spectral density's (PSD) dependence S(m) = AN2/m3 is obtained, where m is the vertical wavenumber and N is the Brunt-Väisäla frequency. Unlike Weinstock's original formulation, our coefficient of proportionality A is a slowly varying function of m and mean wind. For vertical wavelengths ranging from 10 km to 100 m and for typical wind shears, A varies from one half to one ninth. Calculations of spectral evolution with height as well as related profiles of wave drag are shown. These results reproduce vertical wavenumber spectral tail slopes which vary near the -3 value reported by observations. An explanation of these variations is given.

  13. ANALYTICAL SOLUTION FOR WAVES IN PLANETS WITH ATMOSPHERIC SUPERROTATION. I. ACOUSTIC AND INERTIA-GRAVITY WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Peralta, J.; López-Valverde, M. A.; Imamura, T.; Read, P. L.; Luz, D.; Piccialli, A.

    2014-07-01

    This paper is the first of a two-part study devoted to developing tools for a systematic classification of the wide variety of atmospheric waves expected on slowly rotating planets with atmospheric superrotation. Starting with the primitive equations for a cyclostrophic regime, we have deduced the analytical solution for the possible waves, simultaneously including the effect of the metric terms for the centrifugal force and the meridional shear of the background wind. In those cases when the conditions for the method of the multiple scales in height are met, these wave solutions are also valid when vertical shear of the background wind is present. A total of six types of waves have been found and their properties were characterized in terms of the corresponding dispersion relations and wave structures. In this first part, only waves that are direct solutions of the generic dispersion relation are studied—acoustic and inertia-gravity waves. Concerning inertia-gravity waves, we found that in the cases of short horizontal wavelengths, null background wind, or propagation in the equatorial region, only pure gravity waves are possible, while for the limit of large horizontal wavelengths and/or null static stability, the waves are inertial. The correspondence between classical atmospheric approximations and wave filtering has been examined too, and we carried out a classification of the mesoscale waves found in the clouds of Venus at different vertical levels of its atmosphere. Finally, the classification of waves in exoplanets is discussed and we provide a list of possible candidates with cyclostrophic regimes.

  14. Stratospheric Gravity Wave Scales And Fluxes During Deepwave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    The Gulfstream V research aircraft flights for the Deepwave project in June and July 2014 included 97 legs over the Southern Alps of New Zealand and 150 legs over the Tasman Sea and Southern Ocean, mostly in the low stratosphere at 12.1 km altitude. Improved instrument calibration, redundant sensors, longer flight legs, energy flux estimation and wavelet and filter analysis revealed new gravity wave properties. Over the sea, flight level wave amplitudes mostly fall below our detection threshold. Over terrain, disturbances show characteristic mountain wave attributes of positive vertical energy flux (EFz), negative momentum flux and upwind horizontal energy flux. In some cases, the fluxes change rapidly within an eight hour flight, even though environmental conditions are unchanged, suggesting high sensitivity or auto-oscillation. The extreme EFz=22W/m2.Most intriguing is the variety of disturbance scales found over New Zealand. In many cases, the dominant wavelength of the flux carrying mountain waves is long; between 60 and 150km. In the strong cases however, with EFz>4W/m2, the wave "downshifts" to an intermediate wavelength between 20 to 60 km. Two other disturbance scales are seen. In all cases, the vertical wind variance at flight level is dominated by short "fluxless" waves with wavelengths in the 8 to 15km range. These waves propagate upwind but they carry no vertical momentum or energy fluxes. These fluxless waves may be secondary ducted waves riding on the tropopause inversion. In four cases, mountain waves stagnate the wind and turbulent wave breaking is found with a dominant wavelength of 500m.

  15. Gravity Waves Generated by Convection: A New Idealized Model Tool and Direct Validation with Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, M. Joan; Stephan, Claudia

    2015-04-01

    In climate models, gravity waves remain too poorly resolved to be directly modelled. Instead, simplified parameterizations are used to include gravity wave effects on model winds. A few climate models link some of the parameterized waves to convective sources, providing a mechanism for feedback between changes in convection and gravity wave-driven changes in circulation in the tropics and above high-latitude storms. These convective wave parameterizations are based on limited case studies with cloud-resolving models, but they are poorly constrained by observational validation, and tuning parameters have large uncertainties. Our new work distills results from complex, full-physics cloud-resolving model studies to essential variables for gravity wave generation. We use the Weather Research Forecast (WRF) model to study relationships between precipitation, latent heating/cooling and other cloud properties to the spectrum of gravity wave momentum flux above midlatitude storm systems. Results show the gravity wave spectrum is surprisingly insensitive to the representation of microphysics in WRF. This is good news for use of these models for gravity wave parameterization development since microphysical properties are a key uncertainty. We further use the full-physics cloud-resolving model as a tool to directly link observed precipitation variability to gravity wave generation. We show that waves in an idealized model forced with radar-observed precipitation can quantitatively reproduce instantaneous satellite-observed features of the gravity wave field above storms, which is a powerful validation of our understanding of waves generated by convection. The idealized model directly links observations of surface precipitation to observed waves in the stratosphere, and the simplicity of the model permits deep/large-area domains for studies of wave-mean flow interactions. This unique validated model tool permits quantitative studies of gravity wave driving of regional

  16. A plant's response to gravity as a wave phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Wagner, O E

    1999-07-01

    to lower waves when traveling along the gravitational field as compared to traveling perpendicular to the gravitational field. Both effects may complete the picture. Gravity has a very large influence on frequencies appearing to reduce frequencies to lower values by as much as a factor of one third (or even a smaller fraction) in live plant material. This results in cell lengths and internodal spacings being up to three (or even more) times longer parallel to the gravitational field compared to perpendicular to the gravitational field. Cell lengths and internodal spacings take on immediate values between vertical and horizontal. If the gravitational field is missing or nearly so as with microgravity, the cell is missing the gravity references that determine its shape, for example. It appears that plant parts grow at discrete angles to the gravitational field. All these features constitute overwhelming proof that plants are wave operated with the characteristics of the waves involved very much influenced by the gravitational field.

  17. Do waves carrying orbital angular momentum possess azimuthal linear momentum?

    PubMed

    Speirits, Fiona C; Barnett, Stephen M

    2013-09-01

    All beams are a superposition of plane waves, which carry linear momentum in the direction of propagation with no net azimuthal component. However, plane waves incident on a hologram can produce a vortex beam carrying orbital angular momentum that seems to require an azimuthal linear momentum, which presents a paradox. We resolve this by showing that the azimuthal momentum is not a true linear momentum but the azimuthal momentum density is a true component of the linear momentum density.

  18. Horizontal structure and propagation characteristics of mesospheric gravity waves observed by Antarctic Gravity Wave Imaging/Instrument Network (ANGWIN), using a 3-D spectral analysis technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Takashi S.; Nakamura, Takuji; Murphy, Damian; Tsutsumi, Masaki; Moffat-Griffin, Tracy; Zhao, Yucheng; Pautet, Pierre-Dominique; Ejiri, Mitsumu K.; Taylor, Michael

    2016-07-01

    ANGWIN (Antarctic Gravity Wave Imaging/Instrument Network) is an international airglow imager/instrument network in the Antarctic, which commenced observations in 2011. It seeks to reveal characteristics of mesospheric gravity waves, and to study sources, propagation, breaking of the gravity waves over the Antarctic and the effects on general circulation and upper atmosphere. In this study, we compared distributions of horizontal phase velocity of the gravity waves at around 90 km altitude observed in the mesospheric airglow imaging over different locations using our new statistical analysis method of 3-D Fourier transform, developed by Matsuda et al. (2014). Results from the airglow imagers at four stations at Syowa (69S, 40E), Halley (76S, 27W), Davis (69S, 78E) and McMurdo (78S, 156E) out of the ANGWIN imagers have been compared, for the observation period between April 6 and May 21 in 2013. In addition to the horizontal distribution of propagation and phase speed, gravity wave energies have been quantitatively compared, indicating a smaller GW activity in higher latitude stations. We further investigated frequency dependence of gravity wave propagation direction, as well as nightly variation of the gravity wave direction and correlation with the background wind variations. We found that variation of propagation direction is partly due to the effect of background wind in the middle atmosphere, but variation of wave sources could play important role as well. Secondary wave generation is also needed to explain the observed results.

  19. Longitudinal and transverse modes of slosh wave excitation in rotating dewar associated with gravity jitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Lee, C. C.; Leslie, F. W.

    1991-01-01

    Characteristics of slosh waves based on the dynamical behavior of oscillations at the liquid-vapor interface have been investigated. Twelve case studies of slosh wave excitation due to various frequencies of gravity jitters under different rotating speeds of the propellant tank and different levels of background gravity environment have been simulated. The study shows that slosh waves excited inside the spacecraft propellant tank are characterized by the lowest frequency of the waves initiated, frequencies of the gravity jitters imposed on the propellant system, the levels of background gravity environment, and dewar rotating speeds. Conditions for suppression and amplification of the slosh waves are discussed.

  20. Experimental study of three-wave interactions among capillary-gravity surface waves.

    PubMed

    Haudin, Florence; Cazaubiel, Annette; Deike, Luc; Jamin, Timothée; Falcon, Eric; Berhanu, Michael

    2016-04-01

    In propagating wave systems, three- or four-wave resonant interactions constitute a classical nonlinear mechanism exchanging energy between the different scales. Here we investigate three-wave interactions for gravity-capillary surface waves in a closed laboratory tank. We generate two crossing wave trains and we study their interaction. Using two optical methods, a local one (laser doppler vibrometry) and a spatiotemporal one (diffusive light photography), a third wave of smaller amplitude is detected, verifying the three-wave resonance conditions in frequency and in wave number. Furthermore, by focusing on the stationary regime and by taking into account viscous dissipation, we directly estimate the growth rate of the resonant mode. The latter is then compared to the predictions of the weakly nonlinear triadic resonance interaction theory. The obtained results confirm qualitatively and extend previous experimental results obtained only for collinear wave trains. Finally, we discuss the relevance of three-wave interaction mechanisms in recent experiments studying gravity-capillary turbulence. PMID:27176393

  1. Experimental study of three-wave interactions among capillary-gravity surface waves.

    PubMed

    Haudin, Florence; Cazaubiel, Annette; Deike, Luc; Jamin, Timothée; Falcon, Eric; Berhanu, Michael

    2016-04-01

    In propagating wave systems, three- or four-wave resonant interactions constitute a classical nonlinear mechanism exchanging energy between the different scales. Here we investigate three-wave interactions for gravity-capillary surface waves in a closed laboratory tank. We generate two crossing wave trains and we study their interaction. Using two optical methods, a local one (laser doppler vibrometry) and a spatiotemporal one (diffusive light photography), a third wave of smaller amplitude is detected, verifying the three-wave resonance conditions in frequency and in wave number. Furthermore, by focusing on the stationary regime and by taking into account viscous dissipation, we directly estimate the growth rate of the resonant mode. The latter is then compared to the predictions of the weakly nonlinear triadic resonance interaction theory. The obtained results confirm qualitatively and extend previous experimental results obtained only for collinear wave trains. Finally, we discuss the relevance of three-wave interaction mechanisms in recent experiments studying gravity-capillary turbulence.

  2. Convective generation and vertical propagation of fast gravity waves on Mars: One- and two-dimensional modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamura, Takeshi; Watanabe, Ayuka; Maejima, Yasumitsu

    2016-03-01

    Generation of gravity waves by convection was studied using a nonlinear two-dimensional model. A boundary-layer convection forced by a horizontally-uniform heating and a plume forced by a localized heating representing a local dust storm were tested. The results suggest that vigorous convection occurs due to the low density of the martian atmosphere and that short-period waves having frequencies near the buoyancy frequency can be preferentially generated. The propagation of those gravity waves to thermospheric heights was studied using a linearized one-dimensional model. Because of the fast vertical propagation the waves attain large amplitudes in the lower thermosphere, being consistent with Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Odyssey's accelerometer measurements and MAVEN's neutral and ion measurements. The heating and cooling caused by the waves are expected to be significant in the energy budget of the thermosphere, and the vertical mixing induced by those gravity waves should influence the homopause height. Since the thermospheric densities of light, minor species increase with the lowering of the homopause, a lower homopause may have enhanced the escape of such species to space for early Mars, where slower, weaker gravity waves should dominate.

  3. INTERNAL GRAVITY WAVES IN MASSIVE STARS: ANGULAR MOMENTUM TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, T. M.; Lin, D. N. C.; McElwaine, J. N.; Lau, H. H. B. E-mail: lin@ucolick.org E-mail: hblau@astro.uni-bonn.de

    2013-07-20

    We present numerical simulations of internal gravity waves (IGW) in a star with a convective core and extended radiative envelope. We report on amplitudes, spectra, dissipation, and consequent angular momentum transport by such waves. We find that these waves are generated efficiently and transport angular momentum on short timescales over large distances. We show that, as in Earth's atmosphere, IGW drive equatorial flows which change magnitude and direction on short timescales. These results have profound consequences for the observational inferences of massive stars, as well as their long term angular momentum evolution. We suggest IGW angular momentum transport may explain many observational mysteries, such as: the misalignment of hot Jupiters around hot stars, the Be class of stars, Ni enrichment anomalies in massive stars, and the non-synchronous orbits of interacting binaries.

  4. Plane-wave analysis of solar acoustic-gravity waves: A (slightly) new approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogart, Richard S.; Sa, L. A. D.; Duvall, Thomas L., Jr.; Haber, Deborah A.; Toomre, Juri; Hill, Frank

    1995-01-01

    The plane-wave decomposition of the acoustic-gravity wave effects observed in the photosphere provides a computationally efficient technique that probes the structure of the upper convective zone and boundary. In this region, the flat sun approximation is considered as being reasonably accurate. A technique to be used for the systematic plane-wave analysis of Michelson Doppler imager data, as part of the solar oscillations investigation, is described. Estimates of sensitivity are presented, and the effects of using different planar mappings are discussed. The technique is compared with previous approaches to the three dimensional plane-wave problem.

  5. Chaotic particle motion under linear surface waves.

    PubMed

    Bohr, Tomas; Hansen, Jonas Lundbek

    1996-12-01

    We investigate the motion of infinitesimal particles in the flow field inside the fluid under a traveling surface wave. It is shown that, even for two-dimensional waves, a superposition of two or more traveling harmonic waves is enough to generate chaotic particle motion, i.e., Lagrangian chaos. (c) 1996 American Institute of Physics.

  6. Sound propagation through internal gravity wave fields in a laboratory tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Likun; Swinney, Harry L.; Lin, Ying-Tsing

    2014-11-01

    We conduct laboratory experiments and numerical simulations for sound propagation through an internal gravity wave field. The goal is to improve the understanding of the effect of internal gravity waves on acoustic propagation in the oceans. The laboratory tank is filled with a fluid whose density decreases linearly from the bottom to the top of the tank; the resultant buoyancy frequency is 0.15 Hz. A 1 MHz sound wave is generated and received by 12.5 mm diameter transducers, which are positioned 0.2 m apart on a horizontal acoustic axis that is perpendicular to the internal wave beam. The fluid velocity field, measured by Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), agrees well with results from simulations made using a Navier-Stokes spectral code. The sound intensity at the receiver is computed numerically for different measured and simulated frozen density fields. Fluctuations in the sound speed and intensity are determined as a function of the location of the receiver and the frequency and phase of the internal waves. Supported by ONR MURI Grant N000141110701 (WHOI). Also, L.Z. is supported by the 2013-14 ASA F. V. Hunt Postdoctoral Research Fellowship.

  7. Linear coupling of acoustic and cyclotron waves in plasma flows

    SciTech Connect

    Rogava, Andria; Gogoberidze, Grigol

    2005-05-15

    It is found that in magnetized electrostatic plasma flows the velocity shear couples ion-acoustic waves with ion-cyclotron waves and leads, under favorable conditions, to their efficient reciprocal transformations. It is shown that in a two-dimensional setup this coupling has a remarkable feature: it is governed by equations that are mathematically equal to the ones describing coupling of sound waves with internal gravity waves [Rogava and Mahajan, Phys. Rev. E 55, 1185 (1997)] in neutral fluids. For flows with low shearing rates a fully analytic, quantitative description of the coupling efficiency, based on a noteworthy quantum-mechanical analogy, is given and transformation coefficients are calculated.

  8. Dynamics and Predictability of Deep Propagating Atmospheric Gravity Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, J.; Fritts, D. C.; Smith, R.; Eckermann, S. D.

    2012-12-01

    An overview will be provided of the first field campaign that attempts to follow deeply propagating gravity waves (GWs) from their tropospheric sources to their mesospheric breakdown. The DEEP propagating gravity WAVE experiment over New Zealand (DEEPWAVE-NZ) is a comprehensive, airborne and ground-based measurement and modeling program focused on providing a new understanding of GW dynamics and impacts from the troposphere through the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT). This program will employ the new NSF/NCAR GV (NGV) research aircraft from a base in New Zealand in a 6-week field measurement campaign in June-July 2014. The NGV will be equipped with new lidar and airglow instruments for the DEEPWAVE measurement program, providing temperatures and vertical winds spanning altitudes from immediately above the NGV flight altitude (~13 km) to ~100 km. The region near New Zealand is chosen since all the relevant GW sources occur strongly here, and upper-level winds in austral winter permit GWs to propagate to very high altitudes. Given large-amplitude GWs that propagate routinely into the MLT, the New Zealand region offers an ideal natural laboratory for studying these important GW dynamics and effects impacting weather and climate over a much deeper atmospheric layer than previous campaigns have attempted (0-100 km altitude). The logistics of making measurements in the vicinity of New Zealand are potentially easier than from the Andes and Drake Passage region. A suite of GW-focused modeling and predictability tools will be used to guide NGV flight planning to GW events of greatest scientific significance. These models will also drive scientific interpretation of the GW measurements, together providing answers to the key science questions posed by DEEPWAVE about GW dynamics, morphology, predictability and impacts from 0-100 km. Preliminary results will be presented from high-resolution and adjoint models applied over areas featuring deep wave propagation. The high

  9. Turbulent dynamics of breaking internal gravity waves on slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, Robert; Fringer, Oliver

    2014-11-01

    The turbulent dynamics of breaking internal gravity waves on slopes are investigated using a high-resolution numerical model. A Navier-Stokes code is employed in an idealized, three-dimensional domain where an internal solitary wave of depression impinges upon a sloping bottom. A bottom-following curvilinear grid is used to capture the bathymetry accurately, and the vertical grid spacing Δz+ = O(1) near the bottom in the breaking region to resolve the near-wall flow. In order to understand the transition to turbulence as a result of wave breaking, flow variability is analyzed in the cross-stream dimension. In particular, streamwise vorticity, or secondary streamwise rolls that lead to the turbulent breakdown of the wave, is found to develop in regions of unstable stratification. Dissipation and irreversible mixing of the density field are analyzed as a function of time, and related to breaking dynamics; irreversible mixing is quantified in terms of the change in background potential energy inside the domain. The mixing efficiency is also calculated for various wave and slope conditions. These results have application to the nearshore coastal ocean, where breaking internal waves affect the distributions of ecologically important scalars such as temperature, oxygen, and nutrients.

  10. Planetary and Gravity Waves in the Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Rocket and ground based studies of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere show that waves play an important role in the dynamics of their region. The waves manifest themselves in wind, temperature, density, pressure, ionization and airglow fluctuations in the 80-120 km height range. Rockets have enabled the density and temperature structure to be measured with excellent height resolution, while long term studies of wind motions using MST, partial reflection and meteor radars and, more recently, lidar investigations of temperature and density, have enabled the temporal behaviour of the waves to be better understood. A composite of power spectra is shown of wind motions measured near the mesopause at widely separated locations and illustrates how wave energy is distributed as a function of frequency. The spectra show three distinct parts; (1) a long period section corresponding to periods longer than 24 h; (2) a section between 12 and 24 h priod where the spectra are dominated by narrow; peaks associated with the semidiurnal and diurnal tides and (3) a section at periods less than 12 h where the spectral density decreases montonically (except for the 8 h tidal peak). The long period section is associated with transient planetary scale waves while the short period motions are caused by gravity waves.

  11. Characteristics of gravity waves generated in a baroclinic instability simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.-H.; Chun, H.-Y.; Park, S.-H.; Song, I.-S.; Choi, H.-J.

    2015-11-01

    An idealized baroclinic instability case is simulated using a ~ 10 km resolution global model to investigate the characteristics of gravity waves (GWs) generated in the baroclinic life cycle. Three groups of GWs (W1-W3) appear around the high-latitude surface trough at the mature stage of the baroclinic wave. They have horizontal and vertical wavelengths of 40-400 and 2.9-9.8 km, respectively, in the upper troposphere. The two-dimensional phase-velocity spectrum of the waves is arc-shaped with a peak at 17 m s-1 eastward, which is difficult for the waves to propagate upward through the tropospheric westerly jet. At the breaking stage of the baroclinic wave, a midlatitude surface low is isolated from the higher-latitude trough, and two groups of quasi-stationary GWs (W4 and W5) appear near the surface low. These waves have horizontal and vertical wavelengths of 60-400 and 4.9-14 km, respectively, and are able to propagate vertically for long distances. The generation mechanism of the simulated GWs is discussed.

  12. Monitoring gravity waves detected by I33MG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randrianarinosy, Fanomezana; Andrianaivoarisora, Jean Bernardo; Tahina Rakotoariza, Andriniaina; Rambolamanana, Gérard; Harifidy Ramanantsoa, Andry

    2013-04-01

    Since September 2001, I33MG has recorded and stored data in the National Data Centre which belongs to the Laboratory of Seismology and Infrasound at the Institute and Observatory of Geophysics in Antananarivo (IOGA). The recorded data allowed us to monitor different sources of infrasound such as microbaroms, lightning, volcanoes, cyclones, mountain associated waves, explosions, etc which can be distinguished as acoustic waves. Besides, in the framework of the ARISE project, atmospheric waves having frequency below the acoustic cut-off frequency, known as gravity waves, are considered. Buoyancy oscillations are observed that fill the atmosphere and ocean and propagate long distances horizontally and vertically, have length scales from meters to thousands of kilometers, time scales from seconds to weeks, and release energy into turbulence by wave breaking. WinPMCC based on the Progressive Multi-Channel Correlation (PMCC) is used to detect and to get the wave parameters. Azimuth variation versus time is observed but events are mostly found from 200° to 360°, 0° to 100° and a few from 100° to 200°.

  13. Wave drag due to generation of capillary-gravity surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burghelea, Teodor; Steinberg, Victor

    2002-11-01

    The onset of the wave resistance via the generation of capillary-gravity waves by a small object moving with a velocity V is investigated experimentally. Due to the existence of a minimum phase velocity Vc for surface waves, the problem is similar to the generation of rotons in superfluid helium near their minimum. In both cases, waves or rotons are produced at V>Vc due to Cherenkov radiation. We find that the transition to the wave drag state is continuous: in the vicinity of the bifurcation the wave resistance force is proportional to (V-Vc) for various fluids. This observation contradicts the theory of Raphaël and de Gennes. We also find that the reduced wave drag force for different fluids and different ball size may be scaled in such a way that all the data collapse on a single curve. The capillary-gravity wave pattern and the shape of the wave-generating region are investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Good agreement between the theory and the experimental data is found in this case.

  14. Magneto-gravity waves caused by auroral electrojets instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkhatov, Nikolay; Barkhatova, Oksana; Grigor'ev, Gennadiy

    2010-05-01

    Auroral electrojets аs probable sources of wave disturbances in ionosphere, including travelling ionospheric disturbances (TID), are frequently considered. According to current opinion, disturbances from auroral region to middle and low latitudes by acoustic-gravity waves (AGW) of different spatial scales are carried. However there are difficulties to explanation of the large spatial scales AGW propagation with high speeds (exceeding 1300 m/s) connected to insufficiently high ionospheric temperature. This complexity is connected with theoretical consideration of AGW propagation in neutral gas. At the same time ionosphere ionized component as a small component of an atmosphere is taken into account. In the equations of AGW propagation it is accepted that the gravity plays a leading role and the magnetic field plays a second role and in first approximation it is not taken into account. The ionosphere is stratified medium on density and ionization degree therefore in wave propagation can be involved not only neutral, but also ionized component. The account of magnetic field and a gravity combined influence in the equations of magnetic hydrodynamics (MHD) is carried out. It shows that in ionosphere can propagate magneto-gravity waves (MGW) which velocity is higher then AGW but is lower than MHD wave velocities. A transfer from AGW to MGW is possible if magnetic pressure is higher than hydrostatic pressure, frozen magnetic field in plasma exist and frequency of investigated waves is much less than collision frequency of neutrals with ions. These frameworks in an ionosphere since heights about 250 km are carried out. In work the ground of MGW existence is produced on the basis of ionosphere oblique sounding data on traces Inskip - Rostov-on-Don, Cyprus - Rostov-on-Don, Irkutsk - Rostov-on-Don and Noril'sk - Rostov-on-Don and the data of index AE which characterizes disturbances on auroral region. For search of connection between index AE and maximum observed frequencies

  15. Gravity waves in the middle atmosphere: Recent progress and needed studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritts, D. C.

    1986-01-01

    The recent recognition of the important role played by gravity waves in the large-scale circulation and thermal structure of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere has stimulated considerable research on their properties and their middle atmosphere effects. For example, these studies have begun to provide important information on gravity wave scales, propagation, filtering, and the processes responsible for saturation and turbulent diffusion. There remain, however, many areas in which our current understanding of middle atmosphere gravity waves is deficient. The purpose here is to review the progress that has been made to date and to suggest areas in which additional studies are most needed. Gravity wave scales, gravity wave saturation mechanisms, turbulence production and turbulent diffusion, and distribution of gravity wave energies and momentum fluxes with height and time are discussed.

  16. Doppler sodar and radar wind-profiler observations of gravity-wave activity associated with a gravity current

    SciTech Connect

    Ralph, F.M.; Venkateswaran, S.V. ); Mazaudier, C. ); Crochet, M. )

    1993-02-01

    Observations from two Doppler sodars and a radar wind profiler have been used in conjunction with data from a rawinsonde station and a mesoscale surface observation network to conduct a case study of a gravity current entering into an environment containing a nocturnal inversion and an elevated neutral layer. On the basis of synoptic and mesoscale analyses, it is concluded that the gravity current might have originated either as a scale-contracted cold front or as a gust front resulting from thunderstorm outflows observed very near the leading edge of a cold front. Despite this ambiguity, the detailed vertical structure of the gravity current itself is well resolved from the data. Moreover, the vertical velocity measurements provided by the sodars and the radar wind profiler at high time resolution have given unique information about the height structure of gravity waves excited by the gravity current. Although only wave periods, and not phase speeds or wavelengths, are directly measured, it is possible to make reasonable inferences about wave excitation mechanisms and about the influence and control of ambient stratification on wave-field characteristics. Both Kelvin-Helmholtz waves generated in the regions of high wind shear found in association with the gravity current and lee-type waves forced by the gravity current acting as an obstacle to opposing prefrontal flow are identified. It is also found that the propagation speed of the gravity current and the relative depths of the prefrontal inversion and the postfrontal cold air were not favorable for the formation of either internal bores or solitary waves at the time of day at which the gravity current was being observed. 42 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Surface gravity waves at equilibrium with a steady wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazman, Roman E.

    1994-01-01

    Observations of wave fields' spatial evolution and of gravity wave spectra S(sub omega) are analyzed on the basis of the data reported by several research groups as well as on a 2-year data set of wind and wave measurements by stationary National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration buoys near the Hawaiian Islands. We seek to clarify the role of the wave energy advection (with the wave group velocity) in the overall energy balance. This advective transfer appears to be no less important than the local (breaking wave induced) dissipation as a factor of wind-wave equilibrium. The advection is found to manifest itself in the shape of wave spectra by reducing the rate at which the spectra density of the wave energy, S(sub omega approximately omega (exp -p), falls off as the frequency increases away from the spectra peak. This and other conclusions are derived by comparing the field observations with theoretical predictions of the weak turbulence theory for a spatially inhomogeneous, statistically stationary, wave field. The observations also indicate that the typical wave age xi = C(sub 0)/U in the open ocean is much greater than the limiting value 1.2 attributed to the 'fully developed sea.' Although the observed spectra can be approximated by a power law with a single 'effective' exponent, this apparent exponent, p, is found to depend on the wave age. At high xi and at frequencies below the generation range, -p tends to -3 rather than the value of -11/3 predicted by the Zakharov-Zaslavskii theory. This deviation is interpreted as pointing to a nonconservative nature of the inverse cascade, the latter including a leakage of energy to low-wavenumber modes. Dependence of the overall effective exponent on xi is shown to be responsible for variation in the coefficients b, B, c, C appearing in empirical fetch laws, such as xi = C bar-x (exp c) and e = B bar-x (exp B), where bar-x and e are the dimensionless fetch and wave energy, respectively.

  18. Long-Term Global Morphology of Gravity Wave Activity Using UARS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckermann, Stephen D.; Bacmeister, Julio T.; Wu, Dong L.

    1998-01-01

    Progress in research into the global morphology of gravity wave activity using UARS data is described for the period March-June, 1998. Highlights this quarter include further progress in the analysis and interpretation of CRISTA temperature variances; model-generated climatologies of mesospheric gravity wave activity using the HWM-93 wind and temperature model; and modeling of gravity wave detection from space-based platforms. Preliminary interpretations and recommended avenues for further analysis are also described.

  19. Observations of Gravity Waves with the UARS Microwave Limb Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, D. L.; Waters, J. W.

    1996-01-01

    From Introduction: Observations (of gravity waves-GW) from radar, lidar, balloon and rocket yield good temporal and vertical resolutions usually at one geographical location while aircraft observations provide good horizontal resolution but for a short period of time. It is difficult in general for space-borne sensors to obtain the same resolutions, but observations of GWs at somewhat larger scales are feasible, for example using saturated radiances from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS)[Wu and Waters, 1996].

  20. Mesoscale Gravity Wave Variances from AMSU-A Radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Dong L.

    2004-01-01

    A variance analysis technique is developed here to extract gravity wave (GW) induced temperature fluctuations from NOAA AMSU-A (Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A) radiance measurements. By carefully removing the instrument/measurement noise, the algorithm can produce reliable GW variances with the minimum detectable value as small as 0.1 K2. Preliminary analyses with AMSU-A data show GW variance maps in the stratosphere have very similar distributions to those found with the UARS MLS (Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite Microwave Limb Sounder). However, the AMSU-A offers better horizontal and temporal resolution for observing regional GW variability, such as activity over sub-Antarctic islands.

  1. Internal Gravity Waves: Generation and Breaking Mechanisms by Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    la Forgia, Giovanni; Adduce, Claudia; Falcini, Federico

    2016-04-01

    Internal gravity waves (IGWs), occurring within estuaries and the coastal oceans, are manifest as large amplitude undulations of the pycnocline. IGWs propagating horizontally in a two layer stratified fluid are studied. The breaking of an IGW of depression shoaling upon a uniformly sloping boundary is investigated experimentally. Breaking dynamics beneath the shoaling waves causes both mixing and wave-induced near-bottom vortices suspending and redistributing the bed material. Laboratory experiments are conducted in a Perspex tank through the standard lock-release method, following the technique described in Sutherland et al. (2013). Each experiment is analysed and the instantaneous pycnocline position is measured, in order to obtain both geometric and kinematic features of the IGW: amplitude, wavelength and celerity. IGWs main features depend on the geometrical parameters that define the initial experimental setting: the density difference between the layers, the total depth, the layers depth ratio, the aspect ratio, and the displacement between the pycnoclines. Relations between IGWs geometric and kinematic features and the initial setting parameters are analysed. The approach of the IGWs toward a uniform slope is investigated in the present experiments. Depending on wave and slope characteristics, different breaking and mixing processes are observed. Sediments are sprinkled on the slope to visualize boundary layer separation in order to analyze the suspension e redistribution mechanisms due to the wave breaking.

  2. Characteristic of gravity waves resolved in ECMWF anaylses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preusse, Peter; Ern, Manfred; Riese, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Gravity waves (GWs) influence the circulation of the atmosphere on global scale. Can we employ global models such as the ECMWF high-resolution GCM to infer quantities of resolved GWs? Does this give us insight for the characteristics and relative importance of real GW sources? And can we use such data savely for, e.g., campaign planing? We here apply techniques developed for an ESA study proving the scientifc break-through which could be reached by a novel infrared limb imager. The 3D wave structure of mesoscale GWs is exploited to determine amplitudes and 3D wave vectors of GWs at different levels (25km, 35km and 45km altitude) in the stratosphere. Similar to real observations, GW momentum flux is largest in the winter polar vortex and exhibits a second maximum in the summer subtropics. Based on the 3D wavevectors backward ray-tracing is employed to characterize specific sources. For instance, we find for the northern winter strong GWMF associated with mountain waves from Norway and Greenland as well as waves emitted in the lower troposphere from a storm approaching Norway. Waves from these sources spread up to several thousand km in the stratosphere. Together these three events form a burst in the total hemispheric GWMF of a factor of 3. Strong mountain wave events are also found e.g. at Tierre del Fuego and the Antarctic Peninsula, regions which are in the focus of observational and modeling studies for a decade. Gravity waves in the tropical region are likely generated above deep convection in the upper troposphere. They have significantly larger horizontal wavelengths but shorter vertical wavelengths than indicated by observations. They also exhibit lower phase speeds than waves simulated by mesoscale modeling of deep convection events. This difference is not due to the model resolution. Rather, GWs in ECMWF are excited aloft of the convection in the altitudes of largest wind-shear and least dynamical stability. GWs which are excited by resonant forcing

  3. Stabilization of linear higher derivative gravity with constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Tai-jun; Lim, Eugene A. E-mail: eugene.a.lim@gmail.com

    2014-05-01

    We show that the instabilities of higher derivative gravity models with quadratic curvature invariant αR{sup 2}+βR{sub μν}R{sup μν} can be removed by judicious addition of constraints at the quadratic level of metric fluctuations around Minkowski/de Sitter background. With a suitable parameter choice, we find that the instabilities of helicity-0, 1, 2 modes can be removed while reducing the dimensionality of the original phase space. To retain the renormalization properties of higher derivative gravity, Lorentz symmetry in the constrained theory is explicitly broken.

  4. Effect of surface gravity waves on atmospheric circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Janssen, P.A.E.M. |

    1994-12-31

    During the last decade there has been considerable interest in the problem of the interaction of wind and waves with emphasis on the sea state dependence of the momentum transfer across the air-sea interface. Simulations with the WAM model show that, depending on the sea state, the drag coefficient may vary by a factor of two. Therefore, one may wonder whether two-way interaction has impact on e.g. the evolution of a depression and the atmospheric circulation. In order to study systematic effects on the atmospheric circulation, climate runs have to be performed. Performing Monte Carlo Forecasting with the coupled WAM-ECMWF model for the winter season 1990, it is concluded that surface gravity waves have a significant impact on the atmospheric circulation.

  5. Gravity waves in the thermosphere during a sudden stratospheric warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yigit, E.; Medvedev, A. S.

    2012-12-01

    For the first time, the propagation and dissipation of internal gravity waves (GWs) of lower atmospheric origin to the thermosphere above the turbopause (~105 km) during a sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) are examined. The study is performed with a general circulation model (GCM) coupling the lower atmosphere with the thermosphere and the implemented spectral nonlinear extended GW parameterization of Yigit et al. (2008). The Yigit et al. (2008) extended GW parameterization calculates the propagation and dissipation of small-scale GWs in the whole atmosphere system by physically taking into account ion drag, molecular viscosity and thermal conduction, eddy viscosity, nonlinear diffusion, and radiative damping in form of Newtonian cooling. Model simulations reveal a strong modulation by SSWs of GW activity, momentum deposition rates, and the circulation feedbacks at heights up to F region altitudes (~270 km). Wave-induced root mean square wind fluctuations increase several times during the warming in the thermosphere above the turbopause. This occurs mainly due to a reduction of filtering eastward traveling GWs by the weaker stratospheric jet. These waves propagate higher under the favorable conditions, grow in amplitude, and produce stronger forcing on the mean flow, compared to pre-warming period, when they are dissipated in the thermosphere. The evolution of stratospheric and mesospheric winds during an SSW life-cycle creates a robust and distinctive response in GW activity and mean fields deeply in the thermosphere. Yigit, E., A.~D. Aylward, and A.~S. Medvedev (2008), Parameterization of the effects of vertically propagating gravity waves for thermosphere general circulation models: Sensitivity study, J. Geophys. Res., 113, D19106, doi:10.1029/2008JD010135.

  6. Generalized analytical model for benthic water flux forced by surface gravity waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, J.N.; Mehta, A.J.; Dean, R.G.

    2009-01-01

    A generalized analytical model for benthic water flux forced by linear surface gravity waves over a series of layered hydrogeologic units is developed by adapting a previous solution for a hydrogeologic unit with an infinite thickness (Case I) to a unit with a finite thickness (Case II) and to a dual-unit system (Case III). The model compares favorably with laboratory observations. The amplitude of wave-forced benthic water flux is shown to be directly proportional to the amplitude of the wave, the permeability of the hydrogeologic unit, and the wave number and inversely proportional to the kinematic viscosity of water. A dimensionless amplitude parameter is introduced and shown to reach a maximum where the product of water depth and the wave number is 1.2. Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) is a benthic water discharge flux to a marine water body. The Case I model estimates an 11.5-cm/d SGD forced by a wave with a 1 s period and 5-cm amplitude in water that is 0.5-m deep. As this wave propagates into a region with a 0.3-m-thick hydrogeologic unit, with a no-flow bottom boundary, the Case II model estimates a 9.7-cm/d wave-forced SGD. As this wave propagates into a region with a 0.2-m-thick hydrogeologic unit over an infinitely thick, more permeable unit, the Case III quasi-confined model estimates a 15.7-cm/d wave-forced SGD. The quasi-confined model has benthic constituent flux implications in coral reef, karst, and clastic regions. Waves may undermine tracer and seepage meter estimates of SGD at some locations. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. A ray tracing model of gravity wave propagation and breakdown in the middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, M. R.

    1985-01-01

    Lindzen (1981, 1984) has considered the effects of monochromatic, steady gravity waves propagating into the upper atmosphere. These waves reach such large amplitudes in the mesosphere that they become convectively unstable. The wave is effectively dissipated by the convection, and the pseudomomentum carried by the wave is transferred to the basic flow. The net effect is to accelerate the background flow to the phase speed of the breaking gravity wave. Schoeberl et al. (1983) have discussed modifications to Lindzen's parameterization. The present paper has the objective to develop a type of parameterization scheme for wave breaking that, in principle, can handle lateral wave propagation. Ray tracing is used to follow the gravity wave packets through varying wind conditions. The theory considered uses both the propagation properties of the wave packet and the concept of the conservation of wave action density to determine the local amplitude and position of the wave packet.

  8. Grazing Occultation reveals Gravity Wave Breaking in Pluto's High Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Susan D.; McCarthy, D. W.; Kulesa, C. A.; Hubbard, W. B.; Person, M. J.; Elliot, J. L.; Gulbis, A. A.

    2007-10-01

    Occultation observations of the star P445.3 (2UCAC 25823784; McDonald & Elliot 2000, AJ 120, 1599) by (134340) Pluto on 2007 March 18.453 UT were simultaneously collected in visible and H-band wavelengths from the 6.5-m MMT (Mt. Hopkins) in Arizona. The event was grazing and slow (6.77 km/s), lasting 4 minutes. These conditions facilitated the detection of large-scale, nearly limb-aligned features in Pluto's atmosphere over a pressure range of 0.1-0.7 μbar (0.01-0.07 Pa; radius range of 1500-1350 km). The data are high signal-to-noise and show these features to be fully resolved and achromatic. The scintillation increases with depth in Pluto's atmosphere and indicates a high-frequency cutoff operating on a broad-band spectrum of gravity waves generated deeper in Pluto's atmosphere. The data are in excellent agreement with atmospheric gravity wave theory (Fritts 1984, RGSP 22, 275). Observations reported here were obtained at the MMT Observatory, a joint facility of The University of Arizona and the Smithsonian Institution. The integration and alignment of both cameras was funded by the Astronomy Camp science education program. We also acknowledge support from NASA's Planetary Astronomy Program via grants NNG04GE48G and NNG04GF25G.

  9. Probability distributions of surface gravity waves during spectral changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socquet-Juglard, Hervé; Dysthe, Kristian; Trulsen, Karsten; Krogstad, Harald E.; Liu, Jingdong

    2005-10-01

    Simulations have been performed with a fairly narrow band numerical gravity wave model (higher-order nls type) and a computational domain of dimensions 128× 128 typical wavelengths. The simulations are initiated with ˜6×10^{4} fourier modes corresponding to truncated jonswap spectra and different angular distributions giving both short- and long-crested waves. A development of the spectra on the so-called benjamin feir timescale is seen, similar to the one reported by dysthe et al. (J. Fluid Mech. vol. 478, 2003, p.1). The probability distributions of surface elevation and crest height are found to fit theoretical distributions found by tayfun (J. Geophys. Res. Vol. 85, 1980, p. 1548) very well for elevations up to four standard deviations (for realistic angular spectral distributions). moreover, in this range of the distributions, the influence of the spectral evolution seems insignificant. for the extreme parts of the distributions a significant correlation with the spectral change can be seen for very long-crested waves. For this case we find that the density of large waves increases during spectral change, in agreement with a recent experimental study by onorato et al. (J. Fluid Mech. 2004 submitted).

  10. Gravity Waves Near 300 km Over the Polar Caps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, F. S.; Hanson, W. B.; Hodges, R. R.; Coley, W. R.; Carignan, G. R.; Spencer, N. W.

    1995-01-01

    Distinctive wave forms in the distributions of vertical velocity and temperature of both neutral particles and ions are frequently observed from Dynamics Explorer 2 at altitudes above 250 km over the polar caps. These are interpreted as being due to internal gravity waves propagating in the neutral atmosphere. The disturbances characterized by vertical velocity perturbations of the order of 100 m/s and horizontal wave lengths along the satellite path of about 500 km. They often extend across the entire polar cap. The associated temperature perturbations indicate that the horizontal phase progression is from the nightside to the dayside. Vertical displacements are inferred to be of the order of 10 km and the periods to be of the order of 10(exp 3) s. The waves must propagate in the neutral atmosphere, but they usually are most clearly recognizable in the observations of ion vertical velocity and ion temperature. By combining the neutral pressure calculated from the observed neutral concentration and temperature with the vertical component of the neutral velocity, an upward energy flux of the order of 0.04 erg/sq cm-s at 250 km has been calculated, which is about equal to the maximum total solar ultraviolet heat input above that altitude. Upward energy fluxes calculated from observations on orbital passes at altitudes from 250 to 560 km indicate relatively little attenuation with altitude.

  11. Liquid hydrogen suction dip and slosh wave excitation during draining under normal and reduced gravity environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Shyu, K. L.

    1992-01-01

    The paper discusses the dynamical behavior of vapor ingestion, liquid residual at the incipience of suction dip, slosh wave excitation under normal and reduced gravity and different flow rates during liquid hydrogen draining. Liquid residuals at the incipience of suction dip increase as the values of gravity decrease. Also liquid residuals increase with the draining flow rates. Lower ratio of Bond number and Weber number are unable to excite slosh waves. Lower flow rates and higher gravity excites waves with lower frequencies and higher wave amplitude slosh waves.

  12. Multi-wave interaction theory for wind-generated surface gravity waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazman, Roman E.

    1992-01-01

    Consistently employing the assumption of localness of wave-wave interactions in the wavenumber space, the Kolmogorov treatment of the energy cascade is applied to the case of wind-generated surface gravity waves. The effective number v of resonantly interacting wave harmonics is not limited to four but is found as a solution of a coupled system of equations expressing: (i) the dependence of the spectrum shape on the degree of the wave nonlinearity, and (ii) the continuity of the wave action flux through the spectrum given a continuous positive input from wind. The latter is specified in a Miles-type fashion, and a simple scaling relationship based on the concept of the turnover time is derived in place of the kinetic equation. The mathematical problem is reduced to an ordinary differential equation of first order. The exponent in the 'power law' for the spectral density of the wave potential energy and the effective number of resonantly interacting wave harmonics are found as functions of the wave frequency and of external factors of wind-wave interaction. The solution is close to the Zakharov-Filonenko spectrum at low frequencies and low wind input while approaching the Phillips spectrum at high frequencies and sufficiently high wind.

  13. Driving of the SAO by gravity waves as observed from satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ern, M.; Preusse, P.; Riese, M.

    2015-04-01

    It is known that atmospheric dynamics in the tropical stratosphere have an influence on higher altitudes and latitudes as well as on surface weather and climate. In the tropics, the dynamics are governed by an interplay of the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) and semiannual oscillation (SAO) of the zonal wind. The QBO is dominant in the lower and middle stratosphere, and the SAO in the upper stratosphere/lower mesosphere. For both QBO and SAO the driving by atmospheric waves plays an important role. In particular, the role of gravity waves is still not well understood. In our study we use observations of the High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) satellite instrument to derive gravity wave momentum fluxes and gravity wave drag in order to investigate the interaction of gravity waves with the SAO. These observations are compared with the ERA-Interim reanalysis. Usually, QBO westward winds are much stronger than QBO eastward winds. Therefore, mainly gravity waves with westward-directed phase speeds are filtered out through critical-level filtering already below the stratopause region. Accordingly, HIRDLS observations show that gravity waves contribute to the SAO momentum budget mainly during eastward wind shear, and not much during westward wind shear. These findings confirm theoretical expectations and are qualitatively in good agreement with ERA-Interim and other modeling studies. In ERA-Interim most of the westward SAO driving is due to planetary waves, likely of extratropical origin. Still, we find in both observations and ERA-Interim that sometimes westward-propagating gravity waves may contribute to the westward driving of the SAO. Four characteristic cases of atmospheric background conditions are identified. The forcings of the SAO in these cases are discussed in detail, supported by gravity wave spectra observed by HIRDLS. In particular, we find that the gravity wave forcing of the SAO cannot be explained by critical-level filtering alone; gravity

  14. Multi-instrument investigation of troposphere-ionosphere coupling through gravity waves and the role of gravity waves in the formation of equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakandan, Mani; Patra, Amit; Sripathi, Samireddipelle; Thokuluwa, Ramkumar; Paulino, Igo; Taori, Alok; Kandula, Niranjan

    2016-07-01

    Equatorial plasma bubble (EPB) occurs in the equatorial ionosphere in pre-mid night (most of the time) as well as post-midnight (rarely) hours. The generation of EPBs by Rayleigh-Taylor Instability (RTI) due to seeding of gravity wave perturbation (polarization electric field) have well been explained theoretically by several authors but experimental evidence supporting this hypothesis is very limited. Using co-located observations from Gadanki (13.5oN, 79.2o E) using an all sky airglow imager and Gadanki Ionospheric Radar Interferometer (GIRI) and Ionosonde observations from Tirunelveli (8.7o N, 77.8o E), we investigate the role of gravity waves in the generation EPB during geomagnetic quiet conditions. To avoid any changes occurring in the background ionosphere owing to the large scale features (e.g., seasonal variation), we use four consecutive nights (03-06, February, 2014). Out of these four nights on two nights we have noted very strong plasma depletions in the OI 630 nm airglow emission and radar plumes. We analyse data to identify cases where, 1) EPBs occurred with large amplitudes of mesospheric gravity waves, 2) Occurrence of EPBs without large amplitudes of mesospheric gravity waves, and 3) identifiable mesospheric gravity waves without occurrence of EPBs. In order to calculate the mesospheric gravity wave parameter we used mesospheric OH airglow emission imager data, to identify their propagation to the E-region, we used E-region observations made using the MST radar which resembled the gravity wave signatures. Together with these, by using ray tracing techniques, we have identified the source region of the noted gravity wave events also. These results are discussed in detail in the present study.

  15. Wave Driven Non-linear Flow Oscillator for the 22-Year Solar Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, Hans G.; Wolff, Charles L.; Hartle, Richard E.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    In the Earth's atmosphere, a zonal flow oscillation is observed with periods between 20 and 32 months, the Quasi Biennial Oscillation. This oscillation does not require external time dependent forcing but is maintained by non-linear wave momentum deposition. It is proposed that such a mechanism also drives long-period oscillations in planetary and stellar interiors. We apply this mechanism to generate a flow oscillation for the 22-year solar cycle. The oscillation would occur just below the convective envelope where waves can propagate. Using scale analysis, we present results from a simplified model that incorporates Hines' gravity wave parameterization. Wave amplitudes less than 10 m/s can produce reversing zonal flows of 25 m/s that should be sufficient to generate a corresponding oscillation in the poloidal magnetic field. Low buoyancy frequency and the associated increase in turbulence help to produce the desired oscillation period of the flow.

  16. Effect of gravity wave temperature variations on homogeneous ice nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinh, Tra; Podglajen, Aurélien; Hertzog, Albert; Legras, Bernard; Plougonven, Riwal

    2015-04-01

    Observations of cirrus clouds in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) have shown various ice number concentrations (INC) (e.g., Jensen et al. 2013), which has lead to a puzzle regarding their formation. In particular, the frequently observed low numbers of ice crystals seemed hard to reconcile with homogeneous nucleation knowing the ubuquity of gravity waves with vertical velocity of the order of 0.1 m/s. Using artificial time series, Spichtinger and Krämer (2013) have illustrated that the variation of vertical velocity during a nucleation event could terminate it and limit the INC. However, their study was limited to constructed temperature time series. Here, we carry out numerical simulations of homogeneous ice nucleation forced by temperature time series data collected by isopycnic balloon flights near the tropical tropopause. The balloons collected data at high frequency (30 s), so gravity wave signals are well resolved in the temperature time series. With the observed temperature time series, the numerical simulations with homogeneous freezing show a full range of ice number concentrations (INC) as previously observed in the tropical upper troposphere. The simulations confirm that the dynamical time scale of temperature variations (as seen from observations) can be shorter than the nucleation time scale. They show the existence of two regimes for homogeneous ice nucleation : one limited by the depletion of water vapor by the nucleated ice crystals (those we name vapor events) and one limited by the reincrease of temperature after its initial decrease (temperature events). Low INC may thus be obtained for temperature events when the gravity wave perturbations produce a non-persistent cooling rate (even with large magnitude) such that the absolute change in temperature remains small during nucleation. This result for temperature events is explained analytically by a dependence of the INC on the absolute drop in temperature (and not on the cooling rate). This

  17. Modeling the QBO and SAO Driven by Gravity Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Mengel, J. G.; Chan, K. L.; Porter, H. S.

    1999-01-01

    Hines' Doppler spread parameterization (DSP) for small scale gravity waves (GW) is applied in a global scale numerical spectral model (NSM) to describe the semi-annual and quasi-biennial oscillations (SAO and QBO) as well as the long term interannual variations that are driven by wave mean flow interactions. This model has been successful in simulating the salient features observed near the equator at altitudes above 20 km, including the QBO extension into the upper mesosphere inferred from UARS measurements. The model has now been extended to describe also the mean zonal and meridional circulations of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere that affect the equatorial QBO and its global scale extension. This is accomplished in part through tuning of the GW parameterization, and preliminary results lead to the following conclusions: (1) To reproduce the upwelling at equatorial latitudes associated with the Brewer/Dobson circulation that in part is modulated in the model by the vertical component of the Coriolis force, the eddy diffusivity in the lower stratosphere had to be enhanced and the related GW spectrum modified to bring it in closer agreement with the form recommended for the DSP. (2) To compensate for the required increase in the diffusivity, the observed QBO requires a larger GW source that is closer to the middle of the range recommended for the DSP. (3) Through global scale momentum redistribution, the above developments are conducive to extending the QBO and SAO oscillations to higher latitudes. Multi-year interannual oscillations are generated through wave filtering by the solar driven annual oscillation in the zonal circulation. (4) In a 3D version of the model, wave momentum is absorbed and dissipated by tides and planetary waves. Thus, a somewhat larger GW source is required to generate realistic amplitudes for the QBO and SAO.

  18. Smoothed-particle-hydrodynamics modeling of dissipation mechanisms in gravity waves.

    PubMed

    Colagrossi, Andrea; Souto-Iglesias, Antonio; Antuono, Matteo; Marrone, Salvatore

    2013-02-01

    The smoothed-particle-hydrodynamics (SPH) method has been used to study the evolution of free-surface Newtonian viscous flows specifically focusing on dissipation mechanisms in gravity waves. The numerical results have been compared with an analytical solution of the linearized Navier-Stokes equations for Reynolds numbers in the range 50-5000. We found that a correct choice of the number of neighboring particles is of fundamental importance in order to obtain convergence towards the analytical solution. This number has to increase with higher Reynolds numbers in order to prevent the onset of spurious vorticity inside the bulk of the fluid, leading to an unphysical overdamping of the wave amplitude. This generation of spurious vorticity strongly depends on the specific kernel function used in the SPH model.

  19. Analysis of non linear partially standing waves from 3D velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drevard, D.; Rey, V.; Svendsen, Ib; Fraunie, P.

    2003-04-01

    Surface gravity waves in the ocean exhibit an energy spectrum distributed in both frequency and direction of propagation. Wave data collection is of great importance in coastal zones for engineering and scientific studies. In particular, partially standing waves measurements near coastal structures and steep or barred beaches may be a requirement, for instance for morphodynamic studies. The aim of the present study is the analysis of partially standing surface waves icluding non-linear effects. According to 1st order Stokes theory, synchronous measurements of horizontal and vertical velocity components allow calculation of rate of standing waves (Drevard et al, 2003). In the present study, it is demonstrated that for deep water conditions, partially standing 2nd order Stokes waves induced velocity field is still represented by the 1st order solution for the velocity potential contrary to the surface elevation which exhibits harmonic components. For intermediate water depth, harmonic components appear not only in the surface elevation but also in the velocity fields, but their weight remains much smaller, because of the vertical decreasing wave induced motion. For irregular waves, the influence of the spectrum width on the non-linear effects in the analysis is discussed. Keywords: Wave measurements ; reflection ; non-linear effects Acknowledgements: This work was initiated during the stay of Prof. Ib Svendsen, as invited Professor, at LSEET in autumn 2002. This study is carried out in the framework of the Scientific French National Programmes PNEC ART7 and PATOM. Their financial supports are acknowledged References: Drevard, D., Meuret, A., Rey, V. Piazzola, J. And Dolle, A.. (2002). "Partially reflected waves measurements using Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV)", Submitted to ISOPE 03, Honolulu, Hawaii, May 2003.

  20. Evidence of a saturated gravity-wave spectrum throughout the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritts, D. C.; Smith, S. A.

    1986-01-01

    The view adapted here is that the dominant mesoscale motions are due to internal gravity waves and show that previous and new vertical wave number spectra of horizontal winds are consistent with the notion of a saturation limit on wave amplitudes. It is also proposed that, at any height, only those vertical wave numbers m less than m sub asterisk are at saturation amplitudes, where m sub asterisk is the vertical wave number of the dominant energy-containing scale. Wave numbers m less than m sub asterisk are unsaturated, but experience growth with height due to the decrease of atmospheric density. The result is a saturated spectrum of gravity waves with both m sub asterisk decreasing and wave energy increasing with height. This saturation theory is consistent with a variety of atmospheric spectral observations and provides a basis for the notion of a universal spectrum of atmospheric gravity waves.

  1. Testing Modified Gravity with Gravitational-Wave Observations from Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sopuerta, Carlos F.; Yunes, Nicolas

    The inspiral of stellar compact objects into massive black holes sitting at galactic centers, usually known as extreme-mass-ratio inspirals (EMRIs), is one of the most important sources of gravitational radiation for the future Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), an ESA-NASA mission. It is expected that LISA will determine the physical parameters of these sources with a high precision. These precise measurements open the possibility of making robust tests of the existence of black holes, of their geometry, and even of the gravitational interaction. In relation to this, intermediate-mass-ratio inspirals (IMRIs) are also of interest to advance ground-based gravitational-wave observatories. In this talk, we discuss how modifications to the gravitational interaction can affect the signals emitted by EMRIs and the detectability of these modifications by LISA. To that end, we present results from an study of a particular modification of General Relativity (GR): Chern-Simons modified gravity, a theory that emerges in different quantum gravitational approaches and where spinning black holes have a geometry different from the Kerr geometry predicted by GR. References: C. F. Sopuerta and N. Yunes "Extreme and Intermediate-Mass Ratio Inspirals in Dynamical Chern-Simons Modified Gravity" Physical Review D80, 064006 (2009). e-Print: arXiv:0904.4501 [gr-qc

  2. Gravity wave-induced variability of the middle thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Jeffrey M.; Bruinsma, Sean L.; Doornbos, Eelco; Zhang, Xiaoli

    2016-07-01

    Contemporary theory, modeling, and first-principles simulations indicate that dissipation of gravity waves (GW) plays an important role in modifying the mean circulation, thermal structure, and composition of the thermosphere. GW can propagate into the thermosphere from various sources in the lower atmosphere, deposit energy, and momentum into the thermosphere, and thereby modify its mean circulation, thermal structure and composition. However, measurements that verify or constrain predictions of GW propagation well into the thermosphere, especially on a global basis, are extremely limited. In this paper total mass densities and cross-track winds between 230 and 280 km derived from accelerometer measurements on the Gravity Field and Ocean Circulation Earth Explorer (GOCE) satellite between November 2009 and October 2013 are used to reveal the global morphology of horizontal structures between 128 km and 640 km, which are assumed to mainly reflect the presence of GW. The zonal-mean RMS variability at these scales is quantified in terms of seasonal-latitudinal dependences and dawn-dusk differences, which are interpreted in terms of current theoretical and modeling results. Little evidence is found for any longitude variability that can be attributed to specific source regions, except at high latitudes where polar/auroral sources and magnetic control dominate and near the Andes and the Antarctic Peninsula during local winter.

  3. Gravity Wave Forcing of the Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere: Mountain and Convective Waves Ascending Vertically (MaCWAVE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritts, David C.

    2004-01-01

    The specific objectives of this research effort included the following: 1) Quantification of gravity wave propagation throughout the lower and middle atmosphere in order to define the roles of topographic and convective sources and filtering by mean and low-frequency winds in defining the wave field and wave fluxes at greater altitudes; 2) The influences of wave instability processes in constraining wave amplitudes and fluxes and generating turbulence and transport; 3) Gravity wave forcing of the mean circulation and thermal structure in the presence of variable motion fields and wave-wave interactions, since the mean forcing may be a small residual when wave interactions, anisotropy, and momentum and heat fluxes are large; 4) The statistical forcing and variability imposed on the thermosphere at greater altitudes by the strong wave forcing and interactions occurring in the MLTI.

  4. Properties of thermospheric gravity waves on earth, Venus and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Harris, I.; Pesnell, W. D.

    1992-01-01

    A spectral model with spherical harmonics and Fourier components that can simulate atmospheric perturbations in the global geometry of a multiconstituent atmosphere is presented. The boundaries are the planetary surface where the transport velocities vanish and the exobase where molecular heat conduction and viscosity dominate. The time consuming integration of the conservation equations is reduced to computing the transfer function (TF) which describes the dynamic properties of the medium divorced from the complexities in the temporal and horizontal variations of the excitation source. Given the TF, the atmospheric response to a chosen source distribution is then obtained in short order. Theoretical studies are presented to illuminate some properties of gravity waves on earth, Venus and Mars.

  5. Gravity waves and momentum fluxes in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere using 430 MHz dual-beam measurements at Arecibo: 1. Measurements, methods, and gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janches, Diego; Fritts, David C.; Riggin, Dennis M.; Sulzer, Michael P.; Gonzalez, Sixto

    2006-09-01

    We report here and in a companion paper by Fritts et al. (2006a) on a new use of the UHF radar at the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico. We have employed the 430 MHz radar for incoherent scatter measurements of radial wind spectra at altitudes from ˜71 to 95 km using the Gregorian and line-feed antennas to define beam angles inclined 15° to the east and west of zenith. We find that the two beams define radial velocities with sufficient accuracy to characterize both the gravity waves and the momentum fluxes due to these waves over the majority of the observed altitude range during daylight hours. The characteristics of the gravity waves inferred from these measurements include (1) vertical scales ranging from ˜2 to 20 km, (2) downward phase progression of the dominant gravity waves up to ˜5 ms-1, and (3) vertical wave number spectra having slopes near a value (-3) expected for saturated gravity waves. Gravity wave frequency spectra and momentum fluxes are addressed in the companion paper.

  6. Gravity wave motions and momentum fluxes in the middle atmosphere at Adelaide, Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, R. A.; Fritts, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    A study was made of gravity wave momentum fluxes in the middle atmosphere using data collected during June 1984 at Adelaide, Australia (35 deg S). The primary objectives were to identify that portion of the gravity wave spectrum that contributes most of the momentum transport and flux divergence and to examine the temporal variability of wave energies and momentum fluxes. The data were obtained with an HF (2 MHz) radar operated in a Doppler configuration with two coplanar off-vertical beams. This technique provides a direct measure of the vertical flux of horizontal momentum due to an arbitrary spectrum of gravity wave and other motions in the plane of the radar beams.

  7. Applications of acoustic-gravity waves numerical modelling to tsunami signals observed by gravimetry satellites in very low orbit.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissaud, Quentin; Garcia, Raphael; Martin, Roland; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Sladen, Anthony

    2016-04-01

    Acoustic and gravity waves propagating in planetary atmospheres have been studied intensively as markers of specific phenomena (tectonic events, explosions) or as contributors to atmosphere dynamics. To get a better understanding of the physics behind these dynamic processes, both acoustic and gravity waves propagation should be modeled in an attenuating and windy 3D atmosphere from the ground all the way to the upper thermosphere. Thus, in order to provide an efficient numerical tool at the regional or global scale we introduce a high-order finite- difference time domain (FDTD) approach that relies on the linearized compressible Navier-Stokes equations with non constant physical parameters (density, viscosities and speed of sound) and background velocities (wind). We present applications of these simulations to the propagation of gravity waves generated by tsunamis for realistic cases for which atmospheric models are extracted from empirical models including 3D variations of atmospheric parameters, and tsunami forcing at the ocean surface is extracted from finite-fault dislocation simulations. We describe the specific difficulties induced by the size of the simulation, the boundary conditions and the spherical geometry and compare the simulation outputs to data gathered by gravimetric satellites crossing gravity waves generated by tsunamis.

  8. The southern stratospheric gravity wave hot spot: individual waves and their momentum fluxes measured by COSMIC GPS-RO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindley, N. P.; Wright, C. J.; Smith, N. D.; Mitchell, N. J.

    2015-07-01

    Nearly all general circulation models significantly fail to reproduce the observed behaviour of the southern wintertime polar vortex. It has been suggested that these biases result from an underestimation of gravity wave drag on the atmosphere at latitudes near 60° S, especially around the "hot spot" of intense gravity wave fluxes above the mountainous Southern Andes and Antarctic peninsula. Here, we use Global Positioning System radio occultation (GPS-RO) data from the COSMIC satellite constellation to determine the properties of gravity waves in the hot spot and beyond. We show considerable southward propagation to latitudes near 60° S of waves apparently generated over the southern Andes. We propose that this propagation may account for much of the wave drag missing from the models. Furthermore, there is a long leeward region of increased gravity wave energy that sweeps eastwards from the mountains over the Southern Ocean. Despite its striking nature, the source of this region has historically proved difficult to determine. Our observations suggest that this region includes both waves generated locally and orographic waves advected downwind from the hot spot. We describe and use a new wavelet-based analysis technique for the quantitative identification of individual waves from COSMIC temperature profiles. This analysis reveals different geographical regimes of wave amplitude and short-timescale variability in the wave field over the Southern Ocean. Finally, we use the increased numbers of closely spaced pairs of profiles from the deployment phase of the COSMIC constellation in 2006 to make estimates of gravity wave horizontal wavelengths. We show that, given sufficient observations, GPS-RO can produce physically reasonable estimates of stratospheric gravity wave momentum flux in the hot spot that are consistent with measurements made by other techniques. We discuss our results in the context of previous satellite and modelling studies and explain how they

  9. Joint Geophysical Imaging of the Utah Area Using Seismic Body Waves, Surface Waves and Gravity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Maceira, M.; Toksoz, M. N.; Burlacu, R.; Yang, Y.

    2009-12-01

    We present a joint geophysical imaging method that makes use of seismic body wave arrival times, surface wave dispersion measurements, and gravity data to determine three-dimensional (3D) Vp and Vs models. An empirical relationship mapping densities to Vp and Vs for earth materials is used to link them together. The joint inversion method takes advantage of strengths of individual data sets and is able to better constrain the velocity models from shallower to greater depths. Combining three different data sets to jointly invert for the velocity structure is equivalent to a multiple-objective optimization problem. Because it is unlikely that the different “objectives” (data types) would be optimized by the same parameter choices, some trade-off between the objectives is needed. The optimum weighting scheme for different data types is based on relative uncertainties of individual observations and their sensitivities to model parameters. We will apply this joint inversion method to determine 3D Vp and Vs models of the Utah area. The seismic body wave arrival times are assembled from waveform data recorded by the University of Utah Seismograph Stations (UUSS) regional network for the past 7 years. The surface wave dispersion measurements are obtained from the ambient noise tomography study by the University of Colorado group using EarthScope/USArray stations. The gravity data for the Utah area is extracted from the North American Gravity Database managed by the University of Texas at El Paso. The preliminary study using the seismic body wave arrival times indicates strong low velocity anomalies in middle crust beneath some known geothermal sites in Utah. The joint inversion is expected to produce a reasonably well-constrained velocity structure of the Utah area, which is helpful for characterizing and exploring existing and potential geothermal reservoirs.

  10. Ionospsheric observation of enhanced convection-initiated gravity waves during tornadic storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    Atmospheric gravity waves associated with tornadoes, with locally severe storms occuring with tornadoes, and with hurricanes were studied through the coupling between the ionosphere and the troposphere. Reverse group ray tracing computations of gravity waves observed by an ionospheric Doppler sounder array were analyzed. The results of ray tracing computations and comparisons between the computed location of the wave sources and with conventional meteorological data indicate that the computed sources of the waves were near the touchdown of the tornadoes, near the eye of the hurricanes, and directly on the squall line of the severe thunderstorms. The signals excited occurred one hour in advance of the tornadoes and three hours in advance of the hurricanes. Satellite photographs show convective overshooting turrets occurring at the same locations and times the gravity waves were being excited. It is suggested that gravity wave observations, conventional meteorological data, and satellite photographs be combined to develop a remote sensing technique for detecting severe storms.

  11. Theoretical and lidar studies of the density response of the mesospheric sodium layer to gravity wave perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, J. D.; Gardner, C. S.

    1981-01-01

    The density response of atmospheric layers to gravity waves is developed in two forms, an exact solution and a perturbation series solution. The degree of nonlinearity in the layer density response is described by the series solution whereas the exact solution gives insight into the nature of the responses. Density perturbation in an atmospheric layer are shown to be substantially greater than the atmospheric density perturbation associated with the propagation of a gravity wave. Because of the density gradients present in atmospheric layers, interesting effects were observed such as a phase reversal in the linear layer response which occurs near the layer peak. Once the layer response is understood, the sodium layer can be used as a tracer of atmospheric wave motions. A two dimensional digital signal processing technique was developed. Both spatial and temporal filtering are utilized to enhance the resolution by decreasing shot noise by more han 10 dB. Many of the features associated with a layer density response to gravity waves were observed in high resolution density profiles of the mesospheric sodium layer. These include nonlinearities as well as the phase reversal in the linear layer response.

  12. Wave Driven Non-Linear Flow Oscillator for the 22-Year Solar Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Wolff, C. L.; Hartle, R. E.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We propose that waves generate an oscillation in the Sun to account for the 22-year magnetic cycle. The mechanism we envision is analogous to that driving the Quasi Biennial Oscillation (QBO) observed in the terrestrial atmosphere, which is well understood in principal. Planetary waves and gravity waves deposit momentum in the background atmosphere and accelerate the flow under viscous dissipation. Analysis shows that such a momentum source represents a non-linearity of third or generally odd order, which generates also the fundamental frequency/period so that an oscillation is maintained without external time dependent forcing. For the Sun, we propose that the wave driven oscillation would occur just below the convection region, where the buoyancy frequency or convective stability becomes small to favor wave breaking and wave mean flow interaction. Using scale analysis to extrapolate from terrestrial to solar conditions, we present results from a simplified analytical model, applied to the equator, that incorporates Hines'Doppler Spread Parameterization for gravity waves (GW). Based on a parametric study, we conclude: (1) Depending on the adopted horizontal wavelengths of GW's, wave amplitudes < 10 m/s can be made to produce oscillating zonal winds of about 25 m/s that should be large enough to generate a corresponding oscillation in the main poloidal magnetic field; (2) The oscillation period can be made to be 22 years provided the buoyancy frequency (stability) is sufficiently small, which would place the oscillating wind field near the base of the convection region; (3) In this region, the turbulence associated with wave processes would be enhanced by low stability, and this also helps to produce the desired oscillation period and generate the dynamo currents that would produce the reversing magnetic field. We suggest that the above mechanism may also drive other long-period metronomes in planetary and stellar interiors.

  13. Could linear hysteresis contribute to shear wave losses in tissues?

    PubMed

    Parker, Kevin J

    2015-04-01

    For nearly 100 y in the study of cyclical motion in materials, a particular phenomenon called "linear hysteresis" or "ideal hysteretic damping" has been widely observed. More recently in the field of shear wave elastography, the basic mechanisms underlying shear wave losses in soft tissues are in question. Could linear hysteresis play a role? An underlying theoretical question must be answered: Is there a real and causal physical model that is capable of producing linear hysteresis over a band of shear wave frequencies used in diagnostic imaging schemes? One model that can approximately produce classic linear hysteresis behavior, by examining a generalized Maxwell model with a specific power law relaxation spectrum, is described here. This provides a theoretical plausibility for the phenomenon as a candidate for models of tissue behavior.

  14. Dispersion Relation of Linear Waves in Quantum Magnetoplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jun

    2016-07-01

    The quantum magnetohydrodynamic (QMHD) model is applied in investigating the propagation of linear waves in quantum magnetoplasmas. Using the QMHD model, the dispersion equation for quantum magnetoplasmas and the dispersion relations of linear waves are deduced. Results show that quantum effects affect the propagation of electron plasma waves and extraordinary waves (X waves). When we select the plasma parameters of the laser-based plasma compression (LBPC) schemes for calculation, the quantum correction cannot be neglected. Meanwhile, the corrections produced by the Fermi degeneracy pressure and Bohm potential are compared under different plasma parameter conditions. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11447125) and the Research Training Program for Undergraduates of Shanxi University of China (Nos. 2014012167, 2015013182)

  15. OHP02 gravity wave campaign in relation to optical turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernin, J.; Trinquet, H.; Jumper, G.; Murphy, E.; Ratkowski, A.

    2007-09-01

    Herein we present a campaign dedicated to the detection and the characterization of Gravity Waves (GW) in the Earth's atmosphere in relation to the generation of Optical Turbulence (OT). The observations took place in France from 17 to 24 July 2002 at the Haute Provence Observatory (OHP) and simultaneously at the Sirene Observatory, some 20 km apart. From both sites, several balloons were launched that measured the classical PTU-Wind profiles and additionally the structure constant of the temperature field C_T^2 vertical profiles. A Generalized Scidar (GS) technique was implemented at the 1.93 m-diameter OHP telescope, providing C_N^2(h) profiles every minute. From our observations, a significant amount of GW activity was observed at both sites, but without clear evidence of correlation between the two sites. It seems from our observations that a wide spectrum of GW is present at a given altitude and that this could result in a lack of correlation between observat! ions made from two sites 20 km apart. Most GW are non-stationary with long horizontal wavelengths (λ ˜ 100-200 km), kilometric vertical wavelengths (λ ~ 0.5-2 km) and long intrinsic period (T ~ 2-15 h). They belong in the category of "hydrostatic rotating or non-rotating waves". Layers of optical turbulence detected by balloons and the Scidar technique correlate well with regions of GW activity.

  16. Mass Distribution in Plumes: constraints from gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacks, S. I.; Baines, P. G.

    2012-12-01

    The Soufriere Hills volcano on Montserrat Island in the Caribbean has been active for more than 15 years. A small network, consisting of 4 sites, 5 - 10 km distant from the Soufriere Hills Volcano, was installed early in 2003. Each site has borehole strainmeters as well as micro-barographs and gave clear data from all volcanic events. A number of vulcanian explosions followed the major dome collapse on 13th July, 2003 and have continued until at least January 2008.. The plumes from these fragmentation events gave rise to an ~800 second period atmospheric pressure signal of 20 - 50 pascal amplitude propagating at about 30 m/sec. The onset is rarefaction. The data are consistent with a gravity wave confined to the troposphere. Note that plumes penetrating the stratosphere have a very different air pressure character. Initial modeling indicated that the coda of these waves was sensitive to the mass distribution in the plume. Since only the data beyond about 1000 seconds are found to yield information about mass distribution, we can use a simple impulsive source. The data, and particularly the coda, are best satisfied if most of the effective mass is at mid-plume, with reduced amounts near the surface and high in the troposphere. This suggests that the heavier ash particles fall as the plume rises. Since particle size impacts the event's hazard, this type of observation may have predictive capability.

  17. The QBO, gravity waves forced by tropical convection, and ENSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geller, Marvin A.; Zhou, Tiehan; Yuan, Wei

    2016-08-01

    By means of theory, a simplified cartoon illustrating wave forcing of the stratospheric quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO), and general circulation modeling of the QBO, it is argued that the period of the QBO is mainly controlled by the magnitude of the gravity wave (GW) vertical fluxes of horizontal momentum (GWMF) forcing the QBO, while the QBO amplitude is mainly determined by the phase speeds of the GWs that make up this momentum flux. It is furthermore argued that it is the zonally averaged GWMF that principally determines the QBO period irrespective of the longitudinal distribution of this GW momentum flux. These concepts are used to develop a hypothesis for the cause of a previously reported El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) modulation of QBO periods and amplitudes. Some observational evidence is reported for the ENSO modulation of QBO amplitudes to have been different before the 1980s than after about 1990. A hypothesis is also given to explain this in terms of the different ENSO modulation of tropical deep convection that took place before the 1980s from that which occurred after about 1990. The observational evidence, while consistent with our hypotheses, does not prove that our hypotheses are correct given the small number of El Niños and La Niñas that occurred in the early and later periods. Further research is needed to support or refute our hypotheses.

  18. Gravity Wave Emission by Spontaneous Imbalance of Baroclinic Waves in the Continuously Stratified Rotating Annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borchert, Sebastian; Achatz, Ulrich; Rieper, Felix; Fruman, Mark

    2013-04-01

    We use a numerical model of the classic differentially heated rotating annulus experiment to study the spontaneous emission of gravity waves (GWs) from jet stream imbalances, which is a major source of these waves in the atmosphere for which no satisfactory parameterization exists. Atmospheric observations are the main tool for the testing and verification of theoretical concepts but have their limitations. Given their specific potential for yielding reproducible data and for studying process dependence on external system parameters, laboratory experiments are an invaluable complementary tool. Experiments with a rotating annulus exhibiting a jet modulated by large-scale waves due to baroclinic instability have already been used to study GWs: Williams et al (2008) observed spontaneously emitted interfacial GWs in a two-layer flow, and Jacoby et al (2011) detected GWs emitted from boundary-layer instabilities in a differentially heated rotating annulus. Employing a finite-volume code for the numerical simulation of a continuously stratified liquid in a differentially heated rotating annulus, we here investigate the GWs in a wide and shallow annulus with relatively large temperature difference between inner and outer cylinder walls. In this atmosphere-like regime where the Brunt-Vaisala frequency is larger than the inertial frequency, various analyses suggest a distinct gravity wave activity. To identify regions of GW emission we decompose the flow into the geostrophic and ageostrophic part through the inversion of the quasi-geostrophic potential vorticity (e.g. Verkley, 2009). The analysis of the geostrophic sources of the ageostrophic flow indicates that, in addition to boundary layer instabilities, spontaneous imbalance in the jet region acts as an important source mechanism. Jacoby, T. N. L., Read, P. L., Williams, P. D. and Young, R. M. B., 2011: Generation of inertia-gravity waves in the rotating thermal annulus by a localised boundary layer instability. Geophys

  19. Using a new algorithm to track mixed-Rossby gravity waves (MRG) waves in reanalysis data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Au-Yeung, A. Y. M.; Tam, C. Y.

    2015-12-01

    A new algorithm has been developed to track westward travelling mixed-Rossby gravity waves (MRG) waves in the western Pacific based on the theoretical meridional wind structure stated in the shallow water equation (SWE) solutions. Applied to space-time filtered (period=3 to 8 days and wavenumber =-20 to 0), asymmetric meridional wind data at the 850hPa level from the NCEP CFS reanalysis, the algorithm finds locations with Gaussian-shaped meridional wind structure stated in SWE solutions through space and time. Two groups of MRG waves were found: one with higher wavenumber (11) and another one with lower-wavenumber (6). Moreover, the MRG waves show very different dispersive properties and occurrence behavior in the western and eastern equatorial Pacific. While both groups appear in the western Pacific, mainly 6 waves were found in the eastern Pacific. The fact that both 6 and 11 waves appear in the western Pacific agrees with past discussions on the co-existence of MRG waves and tropical-disturbance type (TD-type) waves. Also, the high wavenumber wave activities mainly appear west of the dateline, meaning that some triggering process may have taken place there. Northwestward wave train movement was found west of 140E in the low-level wind composites. On the other hand, negative correlation between meridional wind and temperature (negative) found in the vertical composites indicates downward vertical wave activity flux prior to the occurrences of MRG waves. Finally, in the western Pacific, kinetic energy energetics suggests that energy source of transient eddies is from the confluent background flow and also the zonal wind shear terms in the western Pacific. Overall, our method provides a way to identify the MRG waves instantaneously; in contrast, most of the methods employed in the past (e.g., spectral analysis or lag correlation/regression) are based on aggregates of data and they can only examine wave properties averaged over a certain period of time. Since MRG

  20. Long-term Global Morphology of Gravity Wave Activity Using UARS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckermann, Stephen D.; Jackman, C. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    An extensive body of research this quarter is documented. Further methodical analysis of temperature residuals in Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) Version 8 level 3AT data show signatures during December 1992 at middle and high northern latitudes that, when compared to Naval Research Laboratory/Mountain Wave Forecast Model (NRL)/(MWFM) mountain wave hindcasts, reveal evidence of long mountain waves in these data over Eurasia, Greenland, Scandinavia and North America. The explicit detection of gravity waves in limb-scanned Cryogenic Infrared Spectrometers and Telescopes for the Atmosphere (CRISTA) temperatures is modeled at length, to derive visibility functions. These insights are used to convert CRISTA gravity wave temperature residuals into data that more closely resemble gravity wave fluctuations detected in data from other satellite instruments, such as Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) and Global Positioning System/Meteorology (GPS)/(MET). Finally, newly issued mesospheric temperatures from inversion of CRISTA 15gin emissions are analyzed using a new method that uses separate Kalman fits to the ascending and descending node data. This allows us to study global gravity wave amplitudes at two local times, 12 hours apart. In the equatorial mesosphere, where a large diurnal tidal temperature signal exists, we see modulations of gravity wave activity that are consistent with gravity wave-tidal interactions produced by tidal temperature variability.

  1. Linearized traveling wave amplifier with hard limiter characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmahl, H. G. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A dynamic velocity taper is provided for a traveling wave tube with increased linearity to avoid intermodulation of signals being amplified. In a traveling wave tube, the slow wave structure is a helix including a sever. A dynamic velocity taper is provided by gradually reducing the spacing between the repeating elements of the slow wave structure which are the windings of the helix. The reduction which takes place coincides with the ouput point of helix. The spacing between the repeating elements of the slow wave structure is ideally at an exponential rate because the curve increases the point of maximum efficiency and power, at an exponential rate. A coupled cavity traveling wave tube having cavities is shown. The space between apertured discs is gradually reduced from 0.1% to 5% at an exponential rate. Output power (or efficiency) versus input power for a commercial tube is shown.

  2. Satellite radio occultation investigations of internal gravity waves in the planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillovich, Ivan; Gubenko, Vladimir; Pavelyev, Alexander

    Internal gravity waves (IGWs) modulate the structure and circulation of the Earth’s atmosphere, producing quasi-periodic variations in the wind velocity, temperature and density. Similar effects are anticipated for the Venus and Mars since IGWs are a characteristic of stably stratified atmosphere. In this context, an original method for the determination of IGW parameters from a vertical temperature profile measurement in a planetary atmosphere has been developed [Gubenko et al., 2008, 2011, 2012]. This method does not require any additional information not contained in the profile and may be used for the analysis of profiles measured by various techniques. The criterion for the IGW identification has been formulated and argued. In the case when this criterion is satisfied, the analyzed temperature fluctuations can be considered as wave-induced. The method is based on the analysis of relative amplitudes of the wave field and on the linear IGW saturation theory in which these amplitudes are restricted by dynamical (shear) instability processes in the atmosphere. When the amplitude of an internal wave reaches the shear instability threshold, energy is assumed to be dissipated in such a way that the IGW amplitude is maintained at the instability threshold level as the wave propagates upwards. We have extended the developed technique [Gubenko et al., 2008] in order to reconstruct the complete set of wave characteristics including such important parameters as the wave kinetic and potential energy per unit mass and IGW fluxes of the energy and horizontal momentum [Gubenko et al., 2011]. We propose also an alternative method to estimate the relative amplitudes and to extract IGW parameters from an analysis of perturbations of the Brunt-Vaislala frequency squared [Gubenko et al., 2011]. An application of the developed method to the radio occultation (RO) temperature data has given the possibility to identify the IGWs in the Earth's, Martian and Venusian atmospheres and

  3. Capillary-gravity waves on a liquid film of arbitrary depth: analysis of the wave resistance.

    PubMed

    Wędołowski, Karol; Napiórkowski, Marek

    2013-10-01

    We discuss the wave resistance in the case of an externally perturbed viscous liquid film of arbitrary thickness. Emphasis is placed on the dependence of the wave resistance on the film thickness H, the length scale b characterizing the external perturbation, and its velocity V. In particular, the effectiveness of the mechanisms of capillary-gravity waves and the viscous dissipation localized in the vicinity of the perturbation are compared and discussed as functions of H and V. We show that, in general, the wave resistance is a nonmonotonous function of H with a maximum whose amplitude and position depend on b and V. In the case of small H the wave resistance depends on a parameter S proportional V/H(3). We find three different regimes of this parameter in which the wave resistance behaves like S(r) with the exponent r equal to 1, 1/3, and -1. These results are also obtained independently within the thin liquid film approximation. This allows us to assess the range of validity of the thin liquid film approximation in various cases, in particular its dependence on the perturbation length scale b. PMID:24229283

  4. Capillary-gravity waves on a liquid film of arbitrary depth: analysis of the wave resistance.

    PubMed

    Wędołowski, Karol; Napiórkowski, Marek

    2013-10-01

    We discuss the wave resistance in the case of an externally perturbed viscous liquid film of arbitrary thickness. Emphasis is placed on the dependence of the wave resistance on the film thickness H, the length scale b characterizing the external perturbation, and its velocity V. In particular, the effectiveness of the mechanisms of capillary-gravity waves and the viscous dissipation localized in the vicinity of the perturbation are compared and discussed as functions of H and V. We show that, in general, the wave resistance is a nonmonotonous function of H with a maximum whose amplitude and position depend on b and V. In the case of small H the wave resistance depends on a parameter S proportional V/H(3). We find three different regimes of this parameter in which the wave resistance behaves like S(r) with the exponent r equal to 1, 1/3, and -1. These results are also obtained independently within the thin liquid film approximation. This allows us to assess the range of validity of the thin liquid film approximation in various cases, in particular its dependence on the perturbation length scale b.

  5. Gravity waves as a probe of the Hubble expansion rate during an electroweak scale phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Daniel J. H.; Zhou Peng

    2010-07-15

    Just as big bang nucleosynthesis allows us to probe the expansion rate when the temperature of the Universe was around 1 MeV, the measurement of gravity waves from electroweak scale first order phase transitions may allow us to probe the expansion rate when the temperature of the Universe was at the electroweak scale. We compute the simple transformation rule for the gravity wave spectrum under the scaling transformation of the Hubble expansion rate. We then apply this directly to the scenario of quintessence kination domination and show how gravity wave spectra would shift relative to Laser Interferometer Space Antenna and Big Bang Observer projected sensitivities.

  6. Effects of anisotropy on the frequency spectrum of gravity waves observed by MST radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, C. H.

    1986-01-01

    In the investigation of gravity waves using mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere radar data, model gravity-wave spectra have been used. In these model spectra, one usually assumes azimuthal symmetry. The effect of spectral anisotropy on the observed spectrum is studied here. It is shown that for a general Garrett-Munk-type spectrum, the anisotropy does not affect the frequency spectrum observed by the vertically beamed radar. For the oblique beam, however, the observed frequency spectrum is changed. A general gravity wave spectrum including azimuthal anisotropy is considered.

  7. Comparison of Global Distributions of Zonal-Mean Gravity Wave Variance Inferred from Different Satellite Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preusse, Peter; Eckermann, Stephen D.; Offermann, Dirk; Jackman, Charles H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Gravity wave temperature fluctuations acquired by the CRISTA instrument are compared to previous estimates of zonal-mean gravity wave temperature variance inferred from the LIMS, MLS and GPS/MET satellite instruments during northern winter. Careful attention is paid to the range of vertical wavelengths resolved by each instrument. Good agreement between CRISTA data and previously published results from LIMS, MLS and GPS/MET are found. Key latitudinal features in these variances are consistent with previous findings from ground-based measurements and some simple models. We conclude that all four satellite instruments provide reliable global data on zonal-mean gravity wave temperature fluctuations throughout the middle atmosphere.

  8. An Object Oriented, Finite Element Framework for Linear Wave Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Koning, Joseph M.

    2004-03-01

    This dissertation documents an object oriented framework which can be used to solve any linear wave equation. The linear wave equations are expressed in the differential forms language. This differential forms expression allows a strict discrete interpretation of the system. The framework is implemented using the Galerkin Finite Element Method to define the discrete differential forms and operators. Finite element basis functions including standard scalar Nodal and vector Nedelec basis functions are used to implement the discrete differential forms resulting in a mixed finite element system. Discretizations of scalar and vector wave equations in the time and frequency domains will be demonstrated in both differential forms and vector calculi. This framework conserves energy, maintains physical continuity, is valid on unstructured grids, conditionally stable and second order accurate. Examples including linear electrodynamics, acoustics, elasticity and magnetohydrodynamics are demonstrated.

  9. Linear coupling of planetary scale waves in ionospheric zonal shear winds: Generation of fast magnetic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanishvili, R.; Chagelishvili, G.; Uchava, E.; Kharshiladze, O.

    2016-04-01

    Our goal is to gain new insight into the physics of wave dynamics in ionospheric zonal shear flows. We study the shear flow non-normality induced linear coupling of planetary scale (slow) modified Rossby waves and westward propagating fast magnetized (Khantadze) waves using an approach different from the existing one to the linear wave dynamics. The performed analysis allows us to separate from each other different physical processes, grasp their interplay, and, by this way, construct the basic physics of the linear coupling of the slow and fast waves in an ionospheric zonal flow with linear shear of mean velocity, U0=(S y ,0 ) . It should be noted from the beginning that we consider incompressible flow and the classified "slow" and "fast" waves are not connected with the similarly labeled magnetosonic waves in compressible heliosphere. We show that: the modified Rossby waves generate fast magnetized waves due to the coupling for a quite wide range of ionospheric and shear flow parameters; the linear transient processes are highly anisotropic in wavenumber plane; the generation of the magnetized waves/oscillations is most efficient/optimal for S ≃0.1 (S is the shear rate normalized to the combination of the angular velocity and latitude, Ω0 cos θ0 ); the streamwise wave number of the optimally generated magnetized wave harmonics decreases (the length scale increases) with increasing the Hall parameter, α. At the end, we discuss nonlinear consequences of the described anisotropic linear dynamics—they should lead to an anisotropy of nonlinear cascade processes (in wavenumber plane). In turn, an interplay of the analyzed quite strong transient growth of the fast magnetic waves with anisotropic nonlinear processes should ensure self-sustenance of (stochastic or regular) magnetic perturbations.

  10. HIRDLS observations of global gravity wave absolute momentum fluxes: A wavelet based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Sherine Rachel; Kishore Kumar, Karanam

    2016-02-01

    Using wavelet technique for detection of height varying vertical and horizontal wavelengths of gravity waves, the absolute values of gravity wave momentum fluxes are estimated from High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) temperature measurements. Two years of temperature measurements (2005 December-2007 November) from HIRDLS onboard EOS-Aura satellite over the globe are used for this purpose. The least square fitting method is employed to extract the 0-6 zonal wavenumber planetary wave amplitudes, which are removed from the instantaneous temperature profiles to extract gravity wave fields. The vertical and horizontal wavelengths of the prominent waves are computed using wavelet and cross correlation techniques respectively. The absolute momentum fluxes are then estimated using prominent gravity wave perturbations and their vertical and horizontal wavelengths. The momentum fluxes obtained from HIRDLS are compared with the fluxes obtained from ground based Rayleigh LIDAR observations over a low latitude station, Gadanki (13.5°N, 79.2°E) and are found to be in good agreement. After validation, the absolute gravity wave momentum fluxes over the entire globe are estimated. It is found that the winter hemisphere has the maximum momentum flux magnitudes over the high latitudes with a secondary maximum over the summer hemispheric low-latitudes. The significance of the present study lies in introducing the wavelet technique for estimating the height varying vertical and horizontal wavelengths of gravity waves and validating space based momentum flux estimations using ground based lidar observations.

  11. Note on the velocity and related fields of steady irrotational two-dimensional surface gravity waves.

    PubMed

    Clamond, Didier

    2012-04-13

    The velocity and other fields of steady two-dimensional surface gravity waves in irrotational motion are investigated numerically. Only symmetric waves with one crest per wavelength are considered, i.e. Stokes waves of finite amplitude, but not the highest waves, nor subharmonic and superharmonic bifurcations of Stokes waves. The numerical results are analysed, and several conjectures are made about the velocity and acceleration fields.

  12. Sodium Lidar-observed Strong Inertia-gravity Wave Activities in the Mesopause Region over Fort Collins, Colorado (41 deg N, 105 deg W)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Tao; She, C. -Y.; Liu, Han-Li; Leblanc, Thierry; McDermid, I. Stuart

    2007-01-01

    In December 2004, the Colorado State University sodium lidar system at Fort Collins, Colorado (41 deg N, 105 deg W), conducted an approximately 80-hour continuous campaign for the simultaneous observations of mesopause region sodium density, temperature, and zonal and meridional winds. This data set reveals the significant inertia-gravity wave activities with a period of approximately 18 hours, which are strong in both wind components since UT day 338 (second day of the campaign), and weak in temperature and sodium density. The considerable variability of wave activities was observed with both wind amplitudes growing up to approximately 40 m/s at 95-100 km in day 339 and then decreasing dramatically in day 340. We also found that the sodium density wave perturbation is correlated in phase with temperature perturbation below 90 km, and approximately 180 deg out of phase above. Applying the linear wave theory, we estimated the wave horizontal propagation direction, horizontal wavelength, and apparent horizontal phase speed to be approximately 25 deg south of west, approximately 1800 +/- 150 km, and approximately 28 +/- 2 m/s, respectively of wave intrinsic period, intrinsic phase speed, and vertical wavelength were also estimated. While the onset of enhanced inertia-gravity wave amplitude in the night of 338 was observed to be in coincidence with short-period gravity wave breaking via convective instability, the decrease of inertia-gravity wave amplitude after noon of day 339 was also observed to coincide with the development of atmospheric dynamical instability layers with downward phase progression clearly correlated with the 18-hour inertia-gravity wave, suggesting likely breaking of this inertia-gravity wave via dynamical (shear) instability.

  13. A ray tracing model of gravity wave propagation and breakdown in the middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, M. R.

    1985-01-01

    Gravity wave ray tracing and wave packet theory is used to parameterize wave breaking in the mesosphere. Rays are tracked by solving the group velocity equations, and the interaction with the basic state is determined by considering the evolution of the packet wave action density. The ray tracing approach has a number of advantages over the steady state parameterization as the effects of gravity wave focussing and refraction, local dissipation, and wave response to rapid changes in the mean flow are more realistically considered; however, if steady state conditions prevail, the method gives identical results. The ray tracing algorithm is tested using both interactive and noninteractive models of the basic state. In the interactive model, gravity wave interaction with the polar night jet on a beta-plane is considered. The algorithm produces realistic polar night jet closure for weak topographic forcing of gravity waves. Planetary scale waves forced by local transfer of wave action into the basic flow in turn transfer their wave action into the zonal mean flow. Highly refracted rays are also found not to contribute greatly to the climatology of the mesosphere, as their wave action is severely reduced by dissipation during their lateral travel.

  14. On the covariant gauge {alpha} of the linearized gravity in de Sitter spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Cheong, Lee Yen

    2012-09-26

    In previous work, we studied the linearized gravity with covariant gauge {beta}= 2/3 and {alpha}= 5/3. It was found that the sum of the source and initial contributions reproduces the correct field configuration over the whole de Sitter spacetime. In this paper, we extend this work to generalizing the linearized gravitational field in an arbitrary value of the gauge parameter {alpha} but the gauge parameter {beta} remains the same.

  15. Gravity Wave Emission by Spontaneous Imbalance of Baroclinic Waves in the Continuously Stratified Rotating Annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borchert, S.; Achatz, U.; Rieper, F.; Fruman, M. D.

    2012-04-01

    We use a numerical model of the classic differentially heated rotating annulus experiment to study the spontaneous emission of gravity waves (GWs) from jet stream imbalances, which is a major source of these waves in the atmosphere for which no satisfactory parameterization exists. Atmospheric observations are the main tool for the testing and verification of theoretical concepts but have their limitations. Given their specific potential for yielding reproducible data and for studying process dependence on external system parameters, laboratory experiments are an invaluable complementary tool. Experiments with a rotating annulus exhibiting a jet modulated by large-scale waves due to baroclinic instability have already been used to study GWs: Williams et al (2008) observed spontaneously emitted interfacial GWs in a two-layer flow, and Jacoby et al (2011) detected GWs emitted from boundary-layer instabilities in a differentially heated rotating annulus. Employing a new finite-volume code for the numerical simulation of a continuously stratified liquid in a differentially heated rotating annulus, we here investigate whether such an experiment might be useful for studies of spontaneous imbalance. A major problem was the identification of experimental parameters yielding an atmosphere-like regime where the Brunt-Vaisala frequency is larger than the inertial frequency, so that energy transport by the lowest-frequency waves is predominantly horizontal while high-frequency GWs transport energy vertically. We show that this is indeed the case for a wide and shallow annulus with relatively large temperature difference between the inner and outer cylinder walls. We also show that this set-up yields a conspicuous signal in the horizontal divergence field close to the meandering jet. Various analyses support the notion that this signal is predominantly due to GWs superposed on a geostrophic flow. Jacoby, T. N. L., Read, P. L., Williams, P. D. and Young, R. M. B., 2011

  16. Gravity waves, Tides and Planetary wave characteristics revealed by network of MLT radars over Indian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkat Ratnam, Madineni; Karanam, Kishore Kumar; Sunkara, Eswaraiah; Vijaya Bhaskara Rao, S.; Subrahmanyam, K. V.; Ramanjaneyulu, L.

    2016-07-01

    Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere (MLT) mean winds, gravity waves, tidal and planetary wave characteristics are investigated using two years (2013-2015) of advanced meteor radar installed at Tirupathi (13.63oN, 79.4oE), India. The observations reveal the presence of high frequency gravity waves (30-120 minutes), atmospheric tides (diurnal, semi-diurnal and terr-diurnal) along with long period oscillations in both zonal and meridional winds. Background mean zonal winds show clear semi-annual oscillation in the mesosphere, whereas meridional winds are characterized by annual oscillation as expected. Diurnal tide amplitudes are significantly larger (60-80 m/s) than semi-diurnal (10-20 m/s) and terr-diurnal (5-8 m/s) tides and larger in meridional than zonal winds. The measured meridional components are in good agreement with Global Scale Wave Model (GSWM-09) predictions than zonal up to ~90 km in all the seasons, except fall equinox. Diurnal tidal phase matches well than the amplitudes between observations and model predictions. However, no similarity is being found in the semi-diurnal tides between observations and model. The measurements are further compared with nearby Thumba meteor radar (8.5oN, 77oE) observations. Some differences do exist between the measurements from Tirupati and Thumba meteor radar and model outputs at greater heights and the possible reasons are discussed. SVU meteor radar observations clearly showed the dominance of well-known ultra-fast kelvin waves (3.5 days), 5-8 day, 16 day, 27 day, and 30-40 day oscillations. Due to higher meteor count extending up to 110 km, we could investigate the variability of these PWs and oscillations covering wider range (70-110 km) for the first time. Significant change above 100 km is noticed in all the above mentioned PW activity and oscillations. We also used ERA-Interim reanalysis data sets available at 0.125x0.125 degree grids for investigating the characteristics of these PW right from surface to 1 h

  17. Gravity Wave Variances and Propagation Derived from AIRS Radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, Jie; Wu, Dong L.; Eckermann, S. D.

    2012-01-01

    As the first gravity wave (GW) climatology study using nadir-viewing infrared sounders, 50 Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) radiance channels are selected to estimate GW variances at pressure levels between 2-100 hPa. The GW variance for each scan in the cross-track direction is derived from radiance perturbations in the scan, independently of adjacent scans along the orbit. Since the scanning swaths are perpendicular to the satellite orbits, which are inclined meridionally at most latitudes, the zonal component of GW propagation can be inferred by differencing the variances derived between the westmost and the eastmost viewing angles. Consistent with previous GW studies using various satellite instruments, monthly mean AIRS variance shows large enhancements over meridionally oriented mountain ranges as well as some islands at winter hemisphere high latitudes. Enhanced wave activities are also found above tropical deep convective regions. GWs prefer to propagate westward above mountain ranges, and eastward above deep convection. AIRS 90 field-of-views (FOVs), ranging from +48 deg. to -48 deg. off nadir, can detect large-amplitude GWs with a phase velocity propagating preferentially at steep angles (e.g., those from orographic and convective sources). The annual cycle dominates the GW variances and the preferred propagation directions for all latitudes. Indication of a weak two-year variation in the tropics is found, which is presumably related to the Quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO). AIRS geometry makes its out-tracks capable of detecting GWs with vertical wavelengths substantially shorter than the thickness of instrument weighting functions. The novel discovery of AIRS capability of observing shallow inertia GWs will expand the potential of satellite GW remote sensing and provide further constraints on the GW drag parameterization schemes in the general circulation models (GCMs).

  18. Gravity wave variations during elevated stratopause events using SABER observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Chihoko; England, Scott L.; Immel, Thomas J.; Chang, Loren C.

    2013-06-01

    stratopauses formed at ~80-90 km altitude during the recovery phase of stratospheric sudden warmings in February 2006 and 2009. These likely occurred in response to changes in the downward circulation due to gravity waves (GWs) and/or planetary waves in the mesosphere and the lower thermosphere (MLT). However, the physical mechanisms are not fully understood, due in part to the lack of global GW observations in the MLT. This study presents global-scale GW observations in the MLT during elevated stratopause events using Thermosphere, Ionosphere, Mesosphere Energetics Dynamics (TIMED)-Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) temperature observation, which provide a better insight into the formation of an elevated stratopause. During the downward movement of elevated stratopause events in 2006 and 2009, GWs were suppressed below ~60 km and enhanced above ~60 km at high latitudes compared to non-elevated stratopause years (2005 and 2007). Global SABER GW observations indicate that the regions of GW enhancement propagate from low-mid latitudes to high latitudes in association with the equatorward shift of the polar night jet during elevated stratopause events. Ray-tracing simulations show enhancements of the poleward propagation of GWs during elevated stratopause events as well as continuous propagation of non-orographic GWs within high latitudes. Therefore, our results suggest that meridional propagation of GWs from lower to higher latitudes, which is typically not included in global-scale models, plays an important role in determining GW variations and thus the downward movement of an elevated stratopause, in addition to non-orographic GWs originating at high latitudes.

  19. Gravity Waves and Mesospheric Clouds in the Summer Middle Atmosphere: A Comparison of Lidar Measurements and Ray Modeling of Gravity Waves Over Sondrestrom, Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerrard, Andrew J.; Kane, Timothy J.; Eckermann, Stephen D.; Thayer, Jeffrey P.

    2004-01-01

    We conducted gravity wave ray-tracing experiments within an atmospheric region centered near the ARCLITE lidar system at Sondrestrom, Greenland (67N, 310 deg E), in efforts to understand lidar observations of both upper stratospheric gravity wave activity and mesospheric clouds during August 1996 and the summer of 2001. The ray model was used to trace gravity waves through realistic three-dimensional daily-varying background atmospheres in the region, based on forecasts and analyses in the troposphere and stratosphere and climatologies higher up. Reverse ray tracing based on upper stratospheric lidar observations at Sondrestrom was also used to try to objectively identify wave source regions in the troposphere. A source spectrum specified by reverse ray tracing experiments in early August 1996 (when atmospheric flow patterns produced enhanced transmission of waves into the upper stratosphere) yielded model results throughout the remainder of August 1996 that agreed best with the lidar observations. The model also simulated increased vertical group propagation of waves between 40 km and 80 km due to intensifying mean easterlies, which allowed many of the gravity waves observed at 40 km over Sondrestrom to propagate quasi-vertically from 40-80 km and then interact with any mesospheric clouds at 80 km near Sondrestrom, supporting earlier experimentally-inferred correlations between upper stratospheric gravity wave activity and mesospheric cloud backscatter from Sondrestrom lidar observations. A pilot experiment of real-time runs with the model in 2001 using weather forecast data as a low-level background produced less agreement with lidar observations. We believe this is due to limitations in our specified tropospheric source spectrum, the use of climatological winds and temperatures in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere, and missing lidar data from important time periods.

  20. Detection of traveling ionospheric disturbances induced by atmospheric gravity waves using the global positioning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bassiri, Sassan; Hajj, George A.

    1993-01-01

    Natural and man-made events like earthquakes and nuclear explosions launch atmospheric gravity waves (AGW) into the atmosphere. Since the particle density decreases exponentially with height, the gravity waves increase exponentially in amplitude as they propagate toward the upper atmosphere and ionosphere. As atmospheric gravity waves approach the ionospheric heights, the neutral particles carried by gravity waves collide with electrons and ions, setting these particles in motion. This motion of charged particles manifests itself by wave-like fluctuations and disturbances that are known as traveling ionospheric disturbances (TID). The perturbation in the total electron content due to TID's is derived analytically from first principles. Using the tilted dipole magnetic field approximation and a Chapman layer distribution for the electron density, the variations of the total electron content versus the line-of-sight direction are numerically analyzed. The temporal variation associated with the total electron content measurements due to AGW's can be used as a means of detecting characteristics of the gravity waves. As an example, detection of tsunami generated earthquakes from their associated atmospheric gravity waves using the Global Positioning System is simulated.

  1. Seasonal and interannual variability of gravity waves from airglow imaging at Adelaide and Alice Springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelinas, L. J.; Hecht, J. H.; Reid, I. M.; Vincent, R. A.; Walterscheid, R. L.; Woithe, J. M.

    2009-12-01

    The mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MALT) is a region largely controlled by tides and gravity waves. In this paper, we explore the seasonal and interannual variability of the MALT and its relationship to gravity wave fluxes using long-term airglow measurements at two Australian sites. The data presented here are the result of more than seven years of airglow imager observations at Adelaide 34°55’S, 138°36’ E) and Alice Springs (23°42’ S, 133°53’ E). The imagers measure rotational temperature and intensity of two atmospheric emissions, OH Meinel (6, 2) and O2 atmospheric (0, 1). Here we present analysis of the seasonal and interannual variation of gravity waves at both Australian sites. Automated analysis is used to determine individual gravity wave wavelength and orientation in each airglow image. Gravity wave statistics are then compiled and correlated with tropospheric disturbances, as characterized by Australian rainfall statistics and low pressure systems. By these methods, both seasonal variations in gravity wave occurrence and directionality and storm-related wave events can be identified.

  2. Tropical Gravity Wave Momentum Fluxes and Latent Heating Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geller, Marvin A.; Zhou, Tiehan; Love, Peter T.

    2015-01-01

    Recent satellite determinations of global distributions of absolute gravity wave (GW) momentum fluxes in the lower stratosphere show maxima over the summer subtropical continents and little evidence of GW momentum fluxes associated with the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ). This seems to be at odds with parameterizations forGWmomentum fluxes, where the source is a function of latent heating rates, which are largest in the region of the ITCZ in terms of monthly averages. The authors have examined global distributions of atmospheric latent heating, cloud-top-pressure altitudes, and lower-stratosphere absolute GW momentum fluxes and have found that monthly averages of the lower-stratosphere GW momentum fluxes more closely resemble the monthly mean cloud-top altitudes rather than the monthly mean rates of latent heating. These regions of highest cloud-top altitudes occur when rates of latent heating are largest on the time scale of cloud growth. This, plus previously published studies, suggests that convective sources for stratospheric GW momentum fluxes, being a function of the rate of latent heating, will require either a climate model to correctly model this rate of latent heating or some ad hoc adjustments to account for shortcomings in a climate model's land-sea differences in convective latent heating.

  3. Structured elves: Modulation by convectively generated gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Jia; Lyons, Walter A.

    2015-02-01

    We report on a markedly striated elve (Emissions of Light and Very Low Frequency Perturbations due to Electromagnetic Pulse Source) (a "tiger elve") observed using an intensified high-speed Phantom camera system at the Yucca Ridge Field Station near Fort Collins, Colorado, on the night of 12 June 2013. This elve was induced by a 204 kA positive cloud-to-ground lightning flash within a mesoscale convective system in western South Dakota. A halo and a sprite followed the elve. The banded structure in the elve was aligned with convectively generated gravity waves (CGGWs) independently observed by a collocated color near-infrared camera. Assuming the height of the OH layer and elve both to be 85 km, photogrammetry allowed projection of the elve and the CGGWs onto the same geographic map. The tiger elve stripes approximately overlay on the troughs (dark bands) of CGGWs. This is consistent with model predictions that the ionization rate in the D region ionosphere is inversely proportional to the air density, which is modulated by the CGGWs.

  4. Stratospheric gravity wave momentum fluxes from radio occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Torsten; Wickert, Jens; De la Torre, Alejandro; Alexander, Peter; Llamedo, Pablo; Ramezani Ziarani, Maryam

    2016-07-01

    Triples of GPS radio occultation (RO) temperature data are used to derive horizontal and vertical gravity wave (GW) parameters in the stratosphere between 20 km and 40 km from which the vertical flux of horizontal momentum is determined. Compared to previous studies using RO data better limiting values for the sampling distance (Δd<250 km) and the time interval (Δt<15 minutes) are used. For several latitude bands the mean momentum fluxes (MF) derived in this study are considerable larger than MF from other satellite missions based on horizontal wavelengths calculated between two adjacent temperature profiles along the satellite track. Error sources for the estimation of MF from RO data and the geometrical setup for the applied method is investigated. Another crucial issue discussed in the presentation is the influence of different background separation methods to the final MF. For GW analysis a measured temperature profile is divided into a fluctuation and a background and it is assumed that the fluctuation is caused by GWs only. For the background separation, i.e. the detrending of large-scale processes from the measured temperature profile, several methods exist. In this study we compare different detrending approaches including a new attempt by detrending RO data with ERA-Interim data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. We demonstrate that the horizontal detrending based on RO data and ERA-Interim gives more consistent results compared with a vertical detrending.

  5. Stratospheric gravity wave momentum flux from radio occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, T.; Alexander, P.; Torre, A.

    2016-05-01

    Triples of GPS radio occultation (RO) temperature data are used to derive horizontal and vertical gravity wave (GW) parameters in the stratosphere between 20 km and 40 km from which the vertical flux of horizontal momentum is determined. Compared to previous studies using RO data, better limiting values for the sampling distance (Δd≤250 km) and the time interval (Δt≤15 min) are used. For several latitude bands the mean momentum fluxes (MFs) derived in this study are considerably larger than MF from other satellite missions based on horizontal wavelengths calculated between two adjacent temperature profiles along the satellite track. Error sources for the estimation of MF from RO data and the geometrical setup for the applied method are investigated. Another crucial issue discussed in this paper is the influence of different background separation methods to the final MF. For GW analysis a measured temperature profile is divided into a fluctuation and a background and it is assumed that the fluctuation is caused by GWs only. For the background separation, i.e., the detrending of large-scale processes from the measured temperature profile, several methods exist. In this study we compare different detrending approaches and for the first time an attempt is made to detrend RO data with ERA-Interim data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. We demonstrate that the horizontal detrending based on RO data and ERA-Interim gives more consistent results compared with a vertical detrending.

  6. Ionospheric gravity wave measurements with the USU dynasonde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkey, Frank T.; Deng, Jun Yuan

    1992-01-01

    A method for the measurement of ionospheric Gravity Wave (GW) using the USU Dynasonde is outlined. This method consists of a series of individual procedures, which includes functions for data acquisition, adaptive scaling, polarization discrimination, interpolation and extrapolation, digital filtering, windowing, spectrum analysis, GW detection, and graphics display. Concepts of system theory are applied to treat the ionosphere as a system. An adaptive ionogram scaling method was developed for automatically extracting ionogram echo traces from noisy raw sounding data. The method uses the well known Least Mean Square (LMS) algorithm to form a stochastic optimal estimate of the echo trace which is then used to control a moving window. The window tracks the echo trace, simultaneously eliminating the noise and interference. Experimental results show that the proposed method functions as designed. Case studies which extract GW from ionosonde measurements were carried out using the techniques described. Geophysically significant events were detected and the resultant processed results are illustrated graphically. This method was also developed for real time implementation in mind.

  7. Formation of ionospheric sporadic E by atmospheric gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didebulidze, Goderdzi; Dalakishvili, Giorgi; Matiashvili, Giorgi

    2016-07-01

    The atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs) significantly influence the behavior of the thermosphere ions/electrons. It is shown, that in the lower thermosphere when the background wind present, the AGWs evolving in this wind affect the heavy metallic ions vertical motions and can lead to their convergence into horizontal thin layers and consequently form ionosphere sporadic E (Es). For certain values of the velocity of horizontal back-ground wind, occurring in this region, the declined propagation of the AGWs in the mid-latitude lower thermosphere can cause formation multilayered sporadic E. The distances between such Es layers i.e. distance between locations of maximal ions/electrons densities occur is about one AGWs vertical wavelength. The observed phenomena like of sporadic E multilayered structures and Es layers downward motions are demonstrated by using 3-D numerical simulations describing Es formation by AGWs. The formation of quasi-periodic echoes like structures by AGWs evolving in the horizontal inhomogeneous wind and possibility of its ions/electrons density oscillations by smaller periods (smaller than Bunt-Väisälä period), which also is observed phenomena, is shown. Acknowledgements: This work has been supported by Shota Rustaveli National Science Foundation grant No 31/81.

  8. A Simulated Spectrum of Convectively Generated Gravity Waves: Propagation from the Tropopause to the Mesopause and Effects on the Middle Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, M. Joan

    1996-01-01

    This work evaluates the interaction of a simulated spectrum of convectively generated gravity waves with realistic middle atmosphere mean winds. The wave spectrum is derived from the nonlinear convection model described by Alexander et al. [1995] that simulated a two-dimensional midlatitude squall line. This spectrum becomes input to a linear ray tracing model for evaluation of wave propagation as a function of height through climatological background wind and buoyancy frequency profiles. The energy defined by the spectrum as a function of wavenumber and frequency is distributed spatially and temporally into wave packets for the purpose of estimating wave amplitudes at the lower boundary of the ray tracing model. A wavelet analysis provides an estimate of these wave packet widths in space and time. Without this redistribution of energies into wave packets the Fourier analysis alone inaccurately assumes the energy is evenly distributed throughout the storm model domain. The growth with height of wave amplitudes is derived from wave action flux conservation coupled to a convective instability saturation condition. Mean flow accelerations and wave energy dissipation profiles are derived from this analysis and compared to parameterized estimates of gravity wave forcing, providing a measure of the importance of the storm source to global gravity wave forcing. The results suggest that a single large convective storm system like the simulated squall line could provide a significant fraction of the zonal mean gravity wave forcing at some levels, particularly in the mesosphere. The vertical distributions of mean flow acceleration and energy dissipation do not much resemble the parameterized profiles in form because of the peculiarities of the spectral properties of the waves from the storm source. The ray tracing model developed herein provides a tool for examining the role of convectively generated waves in middle atmosphere physics.

  9. A Simulated Spectrum of Convectively Generated Gravity Waves: Propagation from the Tropopause to the Mesopause and Effects on the Middle Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Joan

    1996-01-01

    This work evaluates the interaction of a simulated spectrum of convectively generated gravity waves with realistic middle atmosphere mean winds. The wave spectrum is derived from the nonlinear convection model described by Alexander et al. that simulated a two-dimensional midlatitude squall line. This spectrum becomes input to a linear ray tracing model for evaluation of wave propagation as a function of height through climatological background wind and buoyancy frequency profiles. The energy defined by the spectrum as a function of wavenumber and frequency is distributed spatially and temporally into wave packets for the purpose of estimating wave amplitudes at the lower boundary of the ray tracing model. A wavelet analysis provides an estimate of these wave packet widths in space and time. Without this redistribution of energies into wave packets the Fourier analysis alone inaccurately assumes the energy is evenly distributed throughout the storm model domain. The growth with height of wave amplitudes is derived from wave action flux conservation coupled to a convective instability saturation condition. Mean flow accelerations and wave energy dissipation profiles are derived from this analysis and compared to parameterized estimates of gravity wave forcing, providing a measure of the importance of the storm source to global gravity wave forcing. The results suggest that a single large convective storm system like the simulated squall line could provide a significant fraction of the zonal mean gravity wave forcing at some levels, particularly in the mesosphere. The vertical distributions of mean flow acceleration and energy dissipation do not much resemble the parameterized profiles in form because of the peculiarities of the spectral properties of the waves from the storm source. The ray tracing model developed herein provides a tool for examining the role of convectively generated waves in middle atmosphere physics.

  10. Gravity wave vertical coupling on Earth and Mars: similarities and peculiarities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Alexander S.; Kuroda, Takeshi; Yiǧit, Erdal

    2016-07-01

    Gravity waves play a major role in the dynamical coupling between the lower and upper atmosphere both on Earth and Mars. A significant progress with understanding gravity wave phenomena in the Martian atmosphere has been achieved over the last decade. We present some of these findings focusing on comparison with the terrestrial atmosphere. Gravity waves are stronger on Mars, thanks to more violent meteorology and rougher topography. They transport energy and momentum upon propagation to the mesosphere and thermosphere, and affect the circulation there. Gravity waves facilitate a formation of mesospheric CO2 ice clouds, and cause a strong thermospheric response to dust storms in the troposphere. This talk promotes a view of coupling processes not only as an Earth phenomenon, but as a universal mechanism in planetary atmospheres.

  11. Global Propagation of Gravity Waves Generated with the Whole Atmosphere Transfer Function Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Talaat, E. R.; Wolven, B. C.

    2012-12-01

    Gravity waves are ubiquitous phenomena in the Earth's atmosphere, accounting for a significant fraction of its observed variability. These waves, with periods ranging from minutes to hours, are thought to be a major means for exchange of momentum and energy between atmospheric regions. The Transfer Function Model (TFM) describes acoustic gravity waves (AGW) that propagate across the globe in a dissipative static background atmosphere extending from the ground to 700 km. The model is limited to waves with periods << 12 hr where the Coriolis force is not important. Formulated in terms of zonal vector spherical harmonics and oscillation frequencies, the linearized equations of energy, mass, and momentum conservation are solved to generate the transfer function (TF) for a chosen height distribution of the excitation source. The model accounts for momentum exchange between atmospheric species (He, O, N2, O2, Ar), which affects significantly the wave amplitudes and phases of thermospheric temperature, densities, and wind fields. Covering a broad range of frequencies and spherical harmonic wave numbers (wavelengths), without limitations, the assembled TF captures the physics that controls the propagation of AGW, and the computational effort is considerable. For a chosen horizontal geometry and impulsive time dependence of the source, however, the global wave response is then obtained in short order. The model is computationally efficient and well suited to serve as an experimental and educational tool for simulating propagating wave patterns on the globe. The model is also semi-analytical and therefore well suited to explore the different wave modes that can be generated under varying dynamical conditions. The TFM has been applied to simulate the AGW, which are generated in the auroral region of the thermosphere by joule heating and momentum coupling due to solar wind induced electric fields [e.g., Mayr et al., Space Science Reviews, 1990]. The auroral source generates

  12. Four years of gravity waves monitoring in Antarctica : Impact for global atmospheric studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc, E.; Le Pichon, A.; Ceranna, L.

    2007-12-01

    The development of the Infrasound International Monitoring System, used for the verification of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, offers a powerful way to measure, permanently and at a global scale, the atmospheric waves at different latitudes. Infrasound stations using several microbarometers are very sensitive acoustic antennas, measuring the main characteristics of infrasound waves including velocity and direction of the wave front. Associated with new data processing methods, a global analysis of the atmospheric disturbances is now possible in a large frequency range. The networks if mostly sensitive to infrasound in the range 0.01 to 10 Hz, but most of gravity waves, which are characterized by very large amplitudes, are also detected by the network. The Antarctic stations are especially interesting for the study of gravity waves, because they are controlled by the polar vortex, and because they are rarely disturbed by the low latitude mountain gravity waves activity which is less important than in the Northern hemisphere. The monitoring of the gravity wave activity in the Antarctica station I27DE from 2003 up to 2007 reveals two active gravity wave systems. The first one, characterized by an azimuth from East, is produced in the troposphere by the wind blowing over mountains. The second system, characterized by an azimuth from West, is correlated with the wind and the temperature gradients in the lower stratosphere and is related with the polar stratospheric vortex. During magnetic storms infrasound waves are generally observed with a North azimuth at frequencies from 0.5 Hz to few Hz, however, gravity waves are generally not observed. A strong wave system has been observed coming from North only once in January 2005 several days after a major magnetic storm. The origin of this wave system in terms of magnetic storm or other processes related with the global dynamics of the stratosphere is discussed.

  13. Non-linear Langmuir waves in a warm quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Dubinov, Alexander E. Kitaev, Ilya N.

    2014-10-15

    A non-linear differential equation describing the Langmuir waves in a warm quantum electron-ion plasma has been derived. Its numerical solutions of the equation show that ordinary electronic oscillations, similar to the classical oscillations, occur along with small-scale quantum Langmuir oscillations induced by the Bohm quantum force.

  14. A Comparison Between Gravity Wave Momentum Fluxes in Observations and Climate Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geller, Marvin A.; Alexadner, M. Joan; Love, Peter T.; Bacmeister, Julio; Ern, Manfred; Hertzog, Albert; Manzini, Elisa; Preusse, Peter; Sato, Kaoru; Scaife, Adam A.; Zhou, Tiehan

    2013-01-01

    For the first time, a formal comparison is made between gravity wave momentum fluxes in models and those derived from observations. Although gravity waves occur over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales, the focus of this paper is on scales that are being parameterized in present climate models, sub-1000-km scales. Only observational methods that permit derivation of gravity wave momentum fluxes over large geographical areas are discussed, and these are from satellite temperature measurements, constant-density long-duration balloons, and high-vertical-resolution radiosonde data. The models discussed include two high-resolution models in which gravity waves are explicitly modeled, Kanto and the Community Atmosphere Model, version 5 (CAM5), and three climate models containing gravity wave parameterizations,MAECHAM5, Hadley Centre Global Environmental Model 3 (HadGEM3), and the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) model. Measurements generally show similar flux magnitudes as in models, except that the fluxes derived from satellite measurements fall off more rapidly with height. This is likely due to limitations on the observable range of wavelengths, although other factors may contribute. When one accounts for this more rapid fall off, the geographical distribution of the fluxes from observations and models compare reasonably well, except for certain features that depend on the specification of the nonorographic gravity wave source functions in the climate models. For instance, both the observed fluxes and those in the high-resolution models are very small at summer high latitudes, but this is not the case for some of the climate models. This comparison between gravity wave fluxes from climate models, high-resolution models, and fluxes derived from observations indicates that such efforts offer a promising path toward improving specifications of gravity wave sources in climate models.

  15. Spherically symmetric analysis on open FLRW solution in non-linear massive gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, Chien-I; Izumi, Keisuke; Chen, Pisin E-mail: izumi@phys.ntu.edu.tw

    2012-12-01

    We study non-linear massive gravity in the spherically symmetric context. Our main motivation is to investigate the effect of helicity-0 mode which remains elusive after analysis of cosmological perturbation around an open Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) universe. The non-linear form of the effective energy-momentum tensor stemming from the mass term is derived for the spherically symmetric case. Only in the special case where the area of the two sphere is not deviated away from the FLRW universe, the effective energy momentum tensor becomes completely the same as that of cosmological constant. This opens a window for discriminating the non-linear massive gravity from general relativity (GR). Indeed, by further solving these spherically symmetric gravitational equations of motion in vacuum to the linear order, we obtain a solution which has an arbitrary time-dependent parameter. In GR, this parameter is a constant and corresponds to the mass of a star. Our result means that Birkhoff's theorem no longer holds in the non-linear massive gravity and suggests that energy can probably be emitted superluminously (with infinite speed) on the self-accelerating background by the helicity-0 mode, which could be a potential plague of this theory.

  16. Surface Waves in Fibre-Reinforced Anisotropic Solid Elastic Media under the Influence of Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethi, M.; Gupta, K. C.; Gupta; Manisha, D.

    2013-03-01

    The aim of the present paper is to investigate surface waves in an anisotropic, elastic solid medium under the influence of gravity. First, a theory of generalised surface waves was developed and then it was employed to investigate particular cases of waves, viz., Stoneley and Rayleigh, Love type. The wave velocity equations were obtained for different cases and they are in well agreement with the corresponding classical result, when the effect of gravity, viscosity as well as parameters for fibre-reinforcement of the material medium are ignored.

  17. Mathematical Methods in Wave Propagation: Part 2--Non-Linear Wave Front Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffrey, Alan

    1971-01-01

    The paper presents applications and methods of analysis for non-linear hyperbolic partial differential equations. The paper is concluded by an account of wave front analysis as applied to the piston problem of gas dynamics. (JG)

  18. Characteristics of gravity waves generated in the jet-front system in a baroclinic instability simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Ha; Chun, Hye-Yeong; Park, Sang-Hun; Song, In-Sun; Choi, Hyun-Joo

    2016-04-01

    An idealized baroclinic instability case is simulated using a ˜ 10 km resolution global model to investigate the characteristics of gravity waves generated in the baroclinic life cycle. Three groups of gravity waves appear around the high-latitude surface trough at the mature stage of the baroclinic wave. They have horizontal and vertical wavelengths of 40-400 and 2.9-9.8 km, respectively, in the upper troposphere. The two-dimensional phase-velocity spectrum of the waves is arc shaped with a peak at 17 m s-1 eastward. These waves have difficulty in propagating upward through the tropospheric westerly jet. At the breaking stage of the baroclinic wave, a midlatitude surface low is isolated from the higher-latitude trough, and two groups of quasi-stationary gravity waves appear near the surface low. These waves have horizontal and vertical wavelengths of 60-400 and 4.9-14 km, respectively, and are able to propagate vertically for long distances. The simulated gravity waves seem to be generated by surface fronts, given that the structures and speeds of wave phases are coherent with those of the fronts.

  19. An investigation of the modulation of capillary and short gravity waves in the open ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. D.; Shemdin, O. H.

    1980-01-01

    A preliminary investigation of the modulation of capillary and gravity waves by long ocean waves is described. A pressure transducer is used to obtain water surface displacements, and a high-response laser-optical system is used to detect short-wave slopes. Analytical techniques are developed to account for the orbital motion of long waves. The local mean squared wave slope is found to be maximum leeward of the long-wave crests. For the long waves studied here and for short waves from 1 cm to 1 m, the longer a short-wave component is, the more leeward its maximum tends to occur. Also, the shortest waves tend to modulate least. The modulation of short waves is found to be strong enough to be an important component of the synthetic aperture radar image formation mechanism for long ocean waves.

  20. Direct Numerical Simulations of Small-Scale Gravity Wave Instability Dynamics in Variable Stratification and Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mixa, T.; Fritts, D. C.; Laughman, B.; Wang, L.; Kantha, L. H.

    2015-12-01

    Multiple observations provide compelling evidence that gravity wave dissipation events often occur in multi-scale environments having highly-structured wind and stability profiles extending from the stable boundary layer into the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. Such events tend to be highly localized and thus yield local energy and momentum deposition and efficient secondary gravity wave generation expected to have strong influences at higher altitudes [e.g., Fritts et al., 2013; Baumgarten and Fritts, 2014]. Lidars, radars, and airglow imagers typically cannot achieve the spatial resolution needed to fully quantify these small-scale instability dynamics. Hence, we employ high-resolution modeling to explore these dynamics in representative environments. Specifically, we describe numerical studies of gravity wave packets impinging on a sheet of high stratification and shear and the resulting instabilities and impacts on the gravity wave amplitude and momentum flux for various flow and gravity wave parameters. References: Baumgarten, Gerd, and David C. Fritts (2014). Quantifying Kelvin-Helmholtz instability dynamics observed in noctilucent clouds: 1. Methods and observations. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, 119.15, 9324-9337. Fritts, D. C., Wang, L., & Werne, J. A. (2013). Gravity wave-fine structure interactions. Part I: Influences of fine structure form and orientation on flow evolution and instability. Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 70(12), 3710-3734.

  1. Gravity Wave Driven Instabilities at Large Richardson Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walterscheid, R. L.; Hecht, J. H.; Gelinas, L. J.

    2011-12-01

    The formalism that addresses rigorously the instability of waves on a basic state modulated by a primary wave is Floquet theory. However, the commonly used criteria for shear and convective instabilities were developed for steady horizontally uniform background flows. The prototypical shear instability is the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. The flow is stable if the local Richardson number Ri =N2/{\\vert{∂ /∂ z}\\vert}2 > 1/4 everywhere, where N is the Brunt-Väisälä frequency and u is the horizontal wind. The prototypical convective instability is the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Ignoring wind effects and dissipation, the flow is unstable if N2 < 0 (i.e., Ri <0) somewhere. These instability structures drift with the wind. In Floquet theory the linear system of equations is transformed so that the basic wave is stationary and the vertical coordinate points along the wavenumber vector of the basic wave. A Floquet system supports instabilities when conventional Richardson number criteria indicate that the system is stable. Indeed, finite amplitude waves are unstable no matter how large the Richardson number might be. An essential instability mechanism in Floquet systems is a resonant interaction between a forced primary oscillation and a free oscillation of the time-averaged system. These are parametric instabilities. They can have a significant influence on shaping the spectrum by transferring energy from one scale to another. Hecht et al. [2005] in a study of small scale instability structures during the Maui MALT campaign noted that there were occurrences of ripple (instability) structure when the conventional criteria indicated stable conditions. We have followed up this work with a detailed survey of the occurrence of ripple structure over Maui during periods that were stable and unstable according to conventional criteria. Values of Ri were calculated from meteor radar and lidar data. We have found frequent occurrence of ripple structure when Ri > 1/4 and

  2. Linear models of acoustic waves in sunspot umbrae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurman, J. B.; Leibacher, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    The two-dimensional, linear hydrodynamics of quiet solar and umbral model atmospheres in a plane-parallel, adiabatic approximation are investigated. The 5.5-8.5 mHz oscillations observed in umbral chromospheres and transition regions are interpreted as acoustic waves propagating parallel, or nearly parallel, to the temperature gradient. These waves are not totally internally reflected by the steep temperature gradient and, thus, are not trapped. Partial reflections, however, are effective in modulating the transmission as a function of frequency. The resonant transmission mechanism of Zugzda, Locans, and Staude (1983) is found to produce a spectrum of resonances in the transmission of acoustic waves in any atmosphere with a temperature minimum. Since the observed umbral oscillations display power in only a narrow range of frequencies, characteristics of the umbral models, wave propagation, and observations that would tend to suppress the higher frequency resonances are examined.

  3. Southern Argentina Agile Meteor Radar: Initial assessment of gravity wave momentum fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritts, D. C.; Janches, D.; Hocking, W. K.

    2010-10-01

    The Southern Argentina Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER) was installed on Tierra del Fuego (53.8°S) in May 2008 and has been operational since that time. This paper describes tests of the SAAMER ability to measure gravity wave momentum fluxes and applications of this capability during different seasons. Test results for specified mean, tidal, and gravity wavefields, including tidal amplitudes and gravity wave momentum fluxes varying strongly with altitude and/or time, suggest that the distribution of meteors throughout the diurnal cycle and averaged over a month allows characterization of both monthly mean profiles and diurnal variations of the gravity wave momentum fluxes. Applications of the same methods for real data suggest confidence in the monthly mean profiles and the composite day diurnal variations of gravity wave momentum fluxes at altitudes where meteor counts are sufficient to yield good statistical fits to the data. Monthly mean zonal winds and gravity wave momentum fluxes exhibit anticorrelations consistent with those seen at other midlatitude and high-latitude radars during austral spring and summer, when no strong local gravity wave sources are apparent. When stratospheric variances are significantly enhanced over the Drake Passage “hot spot” during austral winter, however, MLT winds and momentum fluxes over SAAMER exhibit very different correlations that suggest that MLT dynamics are strongly influenced by strong local gravity wave sources within this “hot spot.” SAAMER measurements of mean zonal and meridional winds at these times and their differences from measurements at a conjugate site provide further support for the unusual momentum flux measurements.

  4. Possibility of measuring gravity-wave momentum flux by single beam observation of MST radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, C. H.

    1986-01-01

    Vincent and Reid (1983) proposed a technique to measure gravity-wave momentum fluxes in the atmosphere by mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radars using two or more radar beams. Since the vertical momentum fluxes are assumed to be due to gravity waves, it appears possible to make use of the dispersion and polarization relations for gravity waves in extracting useful information from the radar data. In particular, for an oblique radar beam, information about both the vertical and the horizontal velocities associated with the waves are contained in the measured Doppler data. Therefore, it should be possible to extract both V sub Z and V sub h from a single beam observational configuration. A procedure is proposed to perform such an analysis. The basic assumptions are: the measured velocity fluctuations are due to gravity waves and a separable model gravity-wave spectrum of the Garrett-Munk type that is statistically homogeneous in the horizontal plane. Analytical expressions can be derived that relate the observed velocity fluctuations to the wave momentum flux at each range gate. In practice, the uncertainties related to the model parameters and measurement accuracy will affect the results. A MST radar configuration is considered.

  5. Global Gravity Wave Variances from Aura MLS: Characteristics and Interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Dong L.; Eckermann, Stephen D.

    2008-01-01

    The gravity wave (GW)-resolving capabilities of 118-GHz saturated thermal radiances acquired throughout the stratosphere by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Aura satellite are investigated and initial results presented. Because the saturated (optically thick) radiances resolve GW perturbations from a given altitude at different horizontal locations, variances are evaluated at 12 pressure altitudes between 21 and 51 km using the 40 saturated radiances found at the bottom of each limb scan. Forward modeling simulations show that these variances are controlled mostly by GWs with vertical wavelengths z 5 km and horizontal along-track wavelengths of y 100-200 km. The tilted cigar-shaped three-dimensional weighting functions yield highly selective responses to GWs of high intrinsic frequency that propagate toward the instrument. The latter property is used to infer the net meridional component of GW propagation by differencing the variances acquired from ascending (A) and descending (D) orbits. Because of improved vertical resolution and sensitivity, Aura MLS GW variances are 5?8 times larger than those from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) MLS. Like UARS MLS variances, monthly-mean Aura MLS variances in January and July 2005 are enhanced when local background wind speeds are large, due largely to GW visibility effects. Zonal asymmetries in variance maps reveal enhanced GW activity at high latitudes due to forcing by flow over major mountain ranges and at tropical and subtropical latitudes due to enhanced deep convective generation as inferred from contemporaneous MLS cloud-ice data. At 21-28-km altitude (heights not measured by the UARS MLS), GW variance in the tropics is systematically enhanced and shows clear variations with the phase of the quasi-biennial oscillation, in general agreement with GW temperature variances derived from radiosonde, rocketsonde, and limb-scan vertical profiles.

  6. Statistical dynamics of internal gravity waves-turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederiksen, J. S.; Bell, R. C.

    Numerical simulations of internal gravity waves-turbulence are carried out for the inviscid, viscous and forced-dissipative two-dimensional primitive equations using the spectral method. Some of the results are compared with the predictions of the eddy damped quasi-normal Markovian (EDQNM) closure for internal waves of Carnevale and Frederiksen, generalized for periodic boundary conditions and possible random forcing and dissipation. The EDQNM reduces to the Boltzman equation of resonant interaction theory in the continuum space limit and as the forcing and dissipation vanish. However, the limit is singular in the sense that as well as conserving total energy, E, and total cross-correlation between the vorticity and buoyancy fields, C, an additional conservation law, viz. z-momentum, Pz, occurs in the limit. This means that the resonant interaction equilibrium (RIE) solution of the Boltzmann equation differs from the statistical mechanical equilibrium (SME) solution of the EDQNM closure. The statistical stability of the SME and RIE spectra for the primitive equations is tested by integrating the inviscid equations using initial realizations of these spectra with random phases. It is found that E and C are accurately conserved while Pz undergoes large amplitude variations. The approach to equilibrium of initial disequilibrium spectra is monitored by examining the evolution of the entropy. The increase and asymptotic approach to a constant value corresponding to complete chaos is consistent with the behaviour predicted by the EDQNM closure. For the viscous decay and forced-dissipative experiments, the behaviour of the entropy is also consistent with that predicted by the EDQNM closure. There is approximate equipartition of potential and total kinetic energies throughout the integrations from initial conditions having equal potential and total kinetic energies and as well equal vertical and horizontal energies, but as expected, the ratio of horizontal to vertical

  7. On the unsteady gravity-capillary wave pattern found behind a slow moving localized pressure distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masnadi, N.; Duncan, J. H.

    2013-11-01

    The non-linear response of a water surface to a slow-moving pressure distribution is studied experimentally using a vertically oriented carriage-mounted air-jet tube that is set to translate over the water surface in a long tank. The free surface deformation pattern is measured with a full-field refraction-based method that utilizes a vertically oriented digital movie camera (under the tank) and a random dot pattern (above the water surface). At towing speeds just below the minimum phase speed of gravity-capillary waves (cmin ~ 23 cm/s), an unsteady V-shaped pattern is formed behind the pressure source. Localized depressions are generated near the source and propagate in pairs along the two arms of the V-shaped pattern. These depressions are eventually shed from the tips of the pattern at a frequency of about 1 Hz. It is found that the shape and phase speeds of the first depressions shed in each run are quantitatively similar to the freely-propagating gravity-capillary lumps from potential flow calculations. In the experiments, the amplitudes of the depressions decrease by approximately 60 percent while travelling 12 wavelengths. The depressions shed later in each run behave in a less consistent manner, probably due to their interaction with neighboring depressions.

  8. Wavemaker theories for acoustic-gravity waves over a finite depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Miao; Kadri, Usama

    2016-04-01

    Acoustic-gravity waves (hereafter AGWs) in ocean have received much interest recently, mainly with respect to early detection of tsunamis as they travel at near the speed of sound in water which makes them ideal candidates for early detection of tsunamis. While the generation mechanisms of AGWs have been studied from the perspective of vertical oscillations of seafloor (Yamamoto, 1982; Stiassnie, 2010) and triad wave-wave interaction (Longuet-Higgins 1950; Kadri and Stiassnie 2013; Kadri and Akylas 2016), in the current study we are interested in their generation by wave-structure interaction with possible application to the energy sector. Here, we develop two wavemaker theories to analyze different wave modes generated by impermeable (the classic Havelock's theory) and porous (porous wavemaker theory) plates in weakly compressible fluids. Slight modification has been made to the porous theory so that, unlike the previous theory (Chwang, 1983), the new solution depends on the geometry of the plate. The expressions for three different types of plates (piston, flap, delta-function) are introduced. Analytical solutions are also derived for the potential amplitude of the gravity, evanescent, and acoustic-gravity waves, as well as the surface elevation, velocity distribution, and pressure for AGWs. Both theories reduce to previous results for incompressible flow when the compressibility is negligible. We also show numerical examples for AGW generated in a wave flume as well as in deep ocean. Our current study sets the theoretical background towards remote sensing by AGWs, for optimized deep ocean wave-power harnessing, among others. References Chwang, A.T. 1983 A porous-wavemaker theory. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 132, 395- 406. Kadri, U., Stiassnie, M. 2013 Generation of an acoustic-gravity wave by two gravity waves, and their subsequent mutual interaction. J. Fluid Mech. 735, R6. Kadri U., Akylas T.R. 2016 On resonant triad interactions of acoustic-gravity waves. J

  9. Fast non-linear gravity inversion in spherical coordinates with application to the South American Moho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uieda, Leonardo; Barbosa, Valéria C. F.

    2016-10-01

    Estimating the relief of the Moho from gravity data is a computationally intensive non-linear inverse problem. What is more, the modeling must take the Earths curvature into account when the study area is of regional scale or greater. We present a regularized non-linear gravity inversion method that has a low computational footprint and employs a spherical Earth approximation. To achieve this, we combine the highly efficient Bott's method with smoothness regularization and a discretization of the anomalous Moho into tesseroids (spherical prisms). The computational efficiency of our method is attained by harnessing the fact that all matrices involved are sparse. The inversion results are controlled by three hyper-parameters: the regularization parameter, the anomalous Moho density-contrast, and the reference Moho depth. We estimate the regularization parameter using the method of hold-out cross-validation. Additionally, we estimate the density-contrast and the reference depth using knowledge of the Moho depth at certain points. We apply the proposed method to estimate the Moho depth for the South American continent using satellite gravity data and seismological data. The final Moho model is in accordance with previous gravity-derived models and seismological data. The misfit to the gravity and seismological data is worse in the Andes and best in oceanic areas, central Brazil and Patagonia, and along the Atlantic coast. Similarly to previous results, the model suggests a thinner crust of 30-35 km under the Andean foreland basins. Discrepancies with the seismological data are greatest in the Guyana Shield, the central Solimões and Amazonas Basins, the Paraná Basins, and the Borborema province. These differences suggest the existence of crustal or mantle density anomalies that were unaccounted for during gravity data processing.

  10. Linear and Nonlinear MHD Wave Processes in Plasmas. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Tataronis, J. A.

    2004-06-01

    This program treats theoretically low frequency linear and nonlinear wave processes in magnetized plasmas. A primary objective has been to evaluate the effectiveness of MHD waves to heat plasma and drive current in toroidal configurations. The research covers the following topics: (1) the existence and properties of the MHD continua in plasma equilibria without spatial symmetry; (2) low frequency nonresonant current drive and nonlinear Alfven wave effects; and (3) nonlinear electron acceleration by rf and random plasma waves. Results have contributed to the fundamental knowledge base of MHD activity in symmetric and asymmetric toroidal plasmas. Among the accomplishments of this research effort, the following are highlighted: Identification of the MHD continuum mode singularities in toroidal geometry. Derivation of a third order ordinary differential equation that governs nonlinear current drive in the singular layers of the Alfvkn continuum modes in axisymmetric toroidal geometry. Bounded solutions of this ODE implies a net average current parallel to the toroidal equilibrium magnetic field. Discovery of a new unstable continuum of the linearized MHD equation in axially periodic circular plasma cylinders with shear and incompressibility. This continuum, which we named “accumulation continuum” and which is related to ballooning modes, arises as discrete unstable eigenfrequency accumulate on the imaginary frequency axis in the limit of large mode numbers. Development of techniques to control nonlinear electron acceleration through the action of multiple coherent and random plasmas waves. Two important elements of this program aye student participation and student training in plasma theory.

  11. Gravity waves from non-minimal quadratic inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Pallis, Constantinos; Shafi, Qaisar

    2015-03-12

    We discuss non-minimal quadratic inflation in supersymmetric (SUSY) and non-SUSY models which entails a linear coupling of the inflaton to gravity. Imposing a lower bound on the parameter c{sub R}, involved in the coupling between the inflaton and the Ricci scalar curvature, inflation can be attained even for subplanckian values of the inflaton while the corresponding effective theory respects the perturbative unitarity up to the Planck scale. Working in the non-SUSY context we also consider radiative corrections to the inflationary potential due to a possible coupling of the inflaton to bosons or fermions. We find ranges of the parameters, depending mildly on the renormalization scale, with adjustable values of the spectral index n{sub s}, tensor-to-scalar ratio r≃(2−4)⋅10{sup −3}, and an inflaton mass close to 3⋅10{sup 13} GeV. In the SUSY framework we employ two gauge singlet chiral superfields, a logarithmic Kähler potential including all the allowed terms up to fourth order in powers of the various fields, and determine uniquely the superpotential by applying a continuous R and a global U(1) symmetry. When the Kähler manifold exhibits a no-scale-type symmetry, the model predicts n{sub s}≃0.963 and r≃0.004. Beyond no-scale SUGRA, n{sub s} and r depend crucially on the coefficient involved in the fourth order term, which mixes the inflaton with the accompanying non-inflaton field in the Kähler potential, and the prefactor encountered in it. Increasing slightly the latter above (−3), an efficient enhancement of the resulting r can be achieved putting it in the observable range. The inflaton mass in the last case is confined in the range (5−9)⋅10{sup 13} GeV.

  12. On Sub-linear Convergence for Linearly Degenerate Waves in Capturing Schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, J W; Aslam, T; Rider, W J

    2008-03-17

    A common attribute of capturing schemes used to find approximate solutions to the Euler equations is a sub-linear rate of convergence with respect to mesh resolution. Purely nonlinear jumps, such as shock waves produce a first-order convergence rate, but linearly degenerate discontinuous waves, where present, produce sub-linear convergence rates which eventually dominate the global rate of convergence. The classical explanation for this phenomenon investigates the behavior of the exact solution to the numerical method in combination with the finite error terms, often referred to as the modified equation. For a first-order method, the modified equation produces the hyperbolic evolution equation with second-order diffusive terms. In the frame of reference of the traveling wave, the solution of a discontinuous wave consists of a diffusive layer that grows with a rate of t{sup 1/2}, yielding a convergence rate of 1/2. Self-similar heuristics for higher order discretizations produce a growth rate for the layer thickness of {Delta}t{sup 1/(p+1)} which yields an estimate for the convergence rate as p/(p+1) where p is the order of the discretization. In this paper we show that this estimated convergence rate can be derived with greater rigor for both dissipative and dispersive forms of the discrete error. In particular, the form of the analytical solution for linear modified equations can be solved exactly. These estimates and forms for the error are confirmed in a variety of demonstrations ranging from simple linear waves to multidimensional solutions of the Euler equations.

  13. Observations of gravity waves from satellite and implications for the wave driving of the SAO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ern, Manfred; Preusse, Peter; Riese, Martin

    2015-04-01

    The dynamics at low latitudes in the stratosphere and lower mesosphere is governed by an interplay of the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) and the semiannual oscillation (SAO) of the zonal wind. It is known that tropical dynamics has significant influence on the atmosphere over a large range of altitudes and latitudes. For example, QBO and SAO effects are seen in the MLT region, and there is a significant influence of the QBO on surface weather and climate in the Northern Hemisphere during winter. Still, global models have large difficulties in simulating a realistic QBO and SAO. One main uncertainty is the wave driving of these oscillations, in particular the driving by gravity waves (GWs). We derive GW temperature variances, GW momentum fluxes and potential GW drag from over three years of High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) satellite data in the stratopause region. These observations are compared with the SAO driving due to planetary waves, as well as the zonal wind tendencies, both determined from the ECMWF ERA-Interim (ERAI) reanalysis. HIRDLS satellite observations and ERAI support the general assumption that, due to selective filtering of the GW spectrum by the QBO in the stratosphere, GWs mainly contribute to the SAO momentum budget during SAO eastward wind shear. However, during SAO westward wind shear the GW contribution is usually smaller, and the wave driving is dominated by planetary waves, probably of extratropical origin. Still, we find indications in both satellite observations and ERAI that sometimes GW drag is important also during SAO westward wind shear.

  14. Non-linear massive gravity as a gravitational σ-model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arraut, Ivan; Chelabi, Kaddour

    2016-08-01

    We show the direct analogy between the ghost-free non-linear formulation of massive gravity and the standard σ-models well understood in the literature. This issue explains why there are two non-trivial family of solutions for the spherically symmetric case inside the non-linear massive gravity formulations with two free parameters α and β. In general, the case β < α2 has a single physical vacuum state. On the other hand, the case β=α2 contains a natural vacuum degeneracy. This is in perfect analogy with the σ-model for scalar fields where depending on the values taken by the parameters of the theory the vacuum can be single or degenerate.

  15. Analysis of Small-Scale Atmospheric Gravity Waves Using UARS MLS Radiance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Dong L.

    1999-01-01

    Gravity waves play an important role in determining atmospheric circulation and small-scale mixing. Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) 63-GHz radiances can be used to calculate small-scale wave variances at 30-80 km altitudes. The major results from this new data set are summarized in the following: (1) MLS radiance fluctuations are contributed mostly by gravity waves of small (about 100 km) horizontal and large (>10 km) vertical scales. (2) MLS observations show that variance enhancements are strongly correlated with the stratospheric polar vortices, tropospheric deep convection zones, and surface topography. (3) As expected for gravity wave propagation, the normalized wave variances grow exponentially with height in the stratosphere but saturate in the mesosphere. (4) The long-term variations of the wave variance are dominated by an annual cycle in the stratosphere and a semiannual cycle in the mesosphere. (5) Separate analyses of the ascending and descending measurements show that the variances are sensitive to wave propagation directions. The subtropical variances, which are associated with deep convection, are likely caused by the gravity waves that propagate upward and eastward in the westward background wind. Additional information contained in the original.

  16. On the detection and attribution of gravity waves generated by the 20 March 2015 solar eclipse.

    PubMed

    Marlton, G J; Williams, P D; Nicoll, K A

    2016-09-28

    Internal gravity waves are generated as adjustment radiation whenever a sudden change in forcing causes the atmosphere to depart from its large-scale balanced state. Such a forcing anomaly occurs during a solar eclipse, when the Moon's shadow cools part of the Earth's surface. The resulting atmospheric gravity waves are associated with pressure and temperature perturbations, which in principle are detectable both at the surface and aloft. In this study, surface pressure and temperature data from two UK sites at Reading and Lerwick are examined for eclipse-driven gravity wave perturbations during the 20 March 2015 solar eclipse over northwest Europe. Radiosonde wind data from the same two sites are also analysed using a moving parcel analysis method, to determine the periodicities of the waves aloft. On this occasion, the perturbations both at the surface and aloft are found not to be confidently attributable to eclipse-driven gravity waves. We conclude that the complex synoptic weather conditions over the UK at the time of this particular eclipse helped to mask any eclipse-driven gravity waves.This article is part of the themed issue 'Atmospheric effects of solar eclipses stimulated by the 2015 UK eclipse'. PMID:27550763

  17. On the detection and attribution of gravity waves generated by the 20 March 2015 solar eclipse

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Internal gravity waves are generated as adjustment radiation whenever a sudden change in forcing causes the atmosphere to depart from its large-scale balanced state. Such a forcing anomaly occurs during a solar eclipse, when the Moon’s shadow cools part of the Earth’s surface. The resulting atmospheric gravity waves are associated with pressure and temperature perturbations, which in principle are detectable both at the surface and aloft. In this study, surface pressure and temperature data from two UK sites at Reading and Lerwick are examined for eclipse-driven gravity wave perturbations during the 20 March 2015 solar eclipse over northwest Europe. Radiosonde wind data from the same two sites are also analysed using a moving parcel analysis method, to determine the periodicities of the waves aloft. On this occasion, the perturbations both at the surface and aloft are found not to be confidently attributable to eclipse-driven gravity waves. We conclude that the complex synoptic weather conditions over the UK at the time of this particular eclipse helped to mask any eclipse-driven gravity waves. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Atmospheric effects of solar eclipses stimulated by the 2015 UK eclipse’. PMID:27550763

  18. On the detection and attribution of gravity waves generated by the 20 March 2015 solar eclipse.

    PubMed

    Marlton, G J; Williams, P D; Nicoll, K A

    2016-09-28

    Internal gravity waves are generated as adjustment radiation whenever a sudden change in forcing causes the atmosphere to depart from its large-scale balanced state. Such a forcing anomaly occurs during a solar eclipse, when the Moon's shadow cools part of the Earth's surface. The resulting atmospheric gravity waves are associated with pressure and temperature perturbations, which in principle are detectable both at the surface and aloft. In this study, surface pressure and temperature data from two UK sites at Reading and Lerwick are examined for eclipse-driven gravity wave perturbations during the 20 March 2015 solar eclipse over northwest Europe. Radiosonde wind data from the same two sites are also analysed using a moving parcel analysis method, to determine the periodicities of the waves aloft. On this occasion, the perturbations both at the surface and aloft are found not to be confidently attributable to eclipse-driven gravity waves. We conclude that the complex synoptic weather conditions over the UK at the time of this particular eclipse helped to mask any eclipse-driven gravity waves.This article is part of the themed issue 'Atmospheric effects of solar eclipses stimulated by the 2015 UK eclipse'.

  19. The ANGWIN Antarctic Research Program: First Results on Coordinated Trans-Antarctic Gravity Wave Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M. J.; Pautet, P. D.; Zhao, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Ejiri, M. K.; Murphy, D. J.; Moffat-Griffin, T.; Kavanagh, A. J.; Takahashi, H.; Wrasse, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    ANGWIN (ANrctic Gravity Wave Instrument Network) is a new "scientist driven" research program designed to develop and utilize a network of Antarctic atmospheric gravity wave observatories, operated by different nations working together in a spirit of close scientific collaboration. Our research plan has brought together colleagues from several international institutions, all with a common goal to better understand the large "continental-scale" characteristics and impacts of gravity waves on the Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere (MLT) environment over Antarctica. ANGWIN combines complementary measurements obtained using new and existing aeronomy instrumentation with new modeling capabilities. To date, our activities have focused on developing coordinated airglow image data of gravity waves in the MLT region at the following sites: McMurdo (US), Syowa (Japan), Davis (Australia), Halley (UK), Rothera (UK), and Comandante Ferraz (Brazil). These are all well-established international research stations that are uniformly distributed around the continental perimeter, and together with ongoing measurements at South Pole Station they provide unprecedented coverage of the Antarctic gravity wave field and its variability during the extended polar winter season. This presentation introduces the ANGWIN program and research goals, and presents first results on trans-Antarctic wave propagation using coordinated measurements during the winter season 2011. We also discuss future plans for the development of this exciting program for Antarctic research.

  20. Mesoscale Gravity Waves Generated by Tropical Convection: An Examination of the Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfister, Leonhard; Bui, P.; Chan, K. Roland (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Convection represents the predominant source of gravity wave energy from the tropical troposphere. These gravity waves are of clear importance to stratospheric dynamics through their momentum flux, and the distribution of that momentum flux in phase speed. This momentum flux drives large scale mean circulations, such as the quasi-biennial oscillation, which are important in the transport of trace constituents and pollutants from stratospheric aircraft. Unlike topographically generated waves, whose momentum flux is strongly peaked at one phase speed (stationary), the momentum flux distribution of highly transient convective sources is broadly distributed in phase speed. The nature of that distribution as well as the overall magnitude of the momentum flux associated with convectively generated gravity waves is important. This is because in the tropical stratosphere gravity waves break, deposit their momentum, and exert a drag at the level where their phase speed is comparable to the mean flow. In the tropics, the stratospheric mean flow varies strongly with altitude, season, and interannually. In fact, gravity waves play a critical role in driving these variations. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  1. Quantification of the gravity wave forcing of the migrating diurnal tide in a gravity wave-resolving general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Shingo; Miyahara, Saburo

    2009-04-01

    The interaction of gravity waves (GWs) and the migrating diurnal tide are studied in a GW-resolving general circulation model (GCM) by calculating the tidal components of zonal wind accelerations and equivalent Rayleigh friction due to tidal induced GW dissipation. Two 15-day periods for perpetual equinoctial and solstice simulations are analyzed, which are performed with the Japanese Atmospheric General circulation model for Upper Atmosphere Research (JAGUAR) high-resolution GCM. The model can directly simulate GWs with horizontal wavelengths greater than about 190 km, and, thus reproduce the general features of the mean winds and temperatures from the surface to the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT). The amplitudes of the migrating diurnal tide are successfully simulated during both seasons, and the tidal winds affect the altitudes of GW dissipation in the low-latitude MLT. The tidal component of GW forcing has maximal values of about 15 m s-1 d-1 near the maximal vertical shears of the tidal winds and generally works to shorten the vertical wavelength of the migrating diurnal tide. The phase relationship between the tidal winds and the tidal induced GW forcing is not exactly 90° out of phase, causing amplification/suppression of the tide. The GW forcing amplifies the migrating diurnal tide during the equinox, while during the solstice, it suppresses the tidal winds in the upper mesosphere of both hemispheres. This difference in behavior can be attributed to a seasonal variation of the mean zonal winds, because combination of the mean and tidal winds affects the altitudes of GW dissipation.

  2. Linear waves in two-layer fluids over periodic bottoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jie; Maas, Leo

    2015-11-01

    A new, exact Floquet theory is presented for linear waves in two-layer fluids over a periodic bottom of arbitrary shape and amplitude. A method of conformal transformation is adapted. The solutions are given, in essentially analytical form, for the dispersion relation between wave frequency and generalized wavenumber (Floquet exponent), and for the waveforms of free wave modes. The dispersion relation is the analogue of the classical Lamb's equation for a two-layer fluid over a flat bottom. For internal modes the interfacial wave shows rapid modulation at the scale of its own wavelength that is comparable to bottom wavelength, whereas for surface modes it becomes a long wave carrier for modulating short waves of bottom wavelength. The approximation using a rigid-lid is given. Sample calculations are shown, including the frequencies that are Bragg resonant. Supports to JY by US National Science Foundation (Grant CBET-0845957) and a visitor's grant of the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) during the period of this work, are gratefully acknowledged.

  3. The Transfer Function Model (TFM) as a Tool for Simulating Gravity Wave Phenomena in the Mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, H.; Mayr, H.; Moore, J.; Wilson, S.; Armaly, A.

    2008-12-01

    The Transfer Function Model (TFM) is semi-analytical and linear, and it is designed to describe the acoustic gravity waves (GW) propagating over the globe and from the ground to 600 km under the influence of vertical temperature variations. Wave interactions with the flow are not accounted for. With an expansion in terms of frequency-dependent spherical harmonics, the time consuming vertical integration of the conservation equations is reduced to computing the transfer function (TF). (The applied lower and upper boundary conditions assure that spurious wave reflections will not occur.) The TF describes the dynamical properties of the medium divorced from the complexities of the temporal and horizontal variations of the excitation source. Given the TF, the atmospheric response to a chosen source is then obtained in short order to simulate the GW propagating through the atmosphere over the globe. In the past, this model has been applied to study auroral processes, which produce distinct wave phenomena such as: (1) standing lamb modes that propagate horizontally in the viscous medium of the thermosphere, (2) waves generated in the auroral oval that experience geometric amplification propagating to the pole where constructive interference generates secondary waves that propagate equatorward, (3) ducted modes propagating through the middle atmosphere that leak back into the thermosphere, and (4) GWs reflected from the Earth's surface that reach the thermosphere in a narrow propagation cone. Well-defined spectral features characterize these wave modes in the TF to provide analytical understanding. We propose the TFM as a tool for simulating GW in the mesosphere and in particular the features observed in Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMC). With present-day computers, it takes less than one hour to compute the TF, so that there is virtually no practical limitation on the source configurations that can be applied and tested in the lower atmosphere. And there is no limitation on

  4. Surface wave and linear operating mode of a plasma antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Bogachev, N. N. Bogdankevich, I. L.; Gusein-zade, N. G.; Rukhadze, A. A.

    2015-10-15

    The relation between the propagation conditions of a surface electromagnetic wave along a finiteradius plasma cylinder and the linear operating mode of a plasma antenna is investigated. The solution to the dispersion relation for a surface wave propagating along a finite-radius plasma cylinder is analyzed for weakly and strongly collisional plasmas. Computer simulations of an asymmetrical plasma dipole antenna are performed using the KARAT code, wherein the dielectric properties of plasma are described in terms of the Drude model. The plasma parameters corresponding to the linear operating mode of a plasma antenna are determined. It is demonstrated that the characteristics of the plasma antenna in this mode are close to those of an analogous metal antenna.

  5. The southern stratospheric gravity-wave hot spot: individual waves and their momentum fluxes measured by COSMIC GPS-RO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindley, N. P.; Wright, C. J.; Smith, N. D.; Mitchell, N. J.

    2015-02-01

    During austral winter the mountains of the southern Andes and Antarctic Peninsula are a known hot spot of intense gravity wave momentum flux. There also exists a long leeward region of increased gravity wave energy that sweeps eastwards from the mountains out over the Southern Ocean, the source of which has historically proved difficult to determine. In this study we use Global Positioning System (GPS) Radio Occultation (RO) data from the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC) satellite constellation to investigate the distribution, variability and sources of waves in the hot spot region and over the Southern Ocean. We present evidence that suggests a southward focusing of waves into the stratospheric jet from sources to the north. We also describe a wavelet analysis technique for the quantitative identification of individual waves from COSMIC temperature profiles. This analysis reveals different geographical regimes of wave amplitude and short-timescale variability in the wave field over the Southern Ocean. Finally, we take advantage of the large numbers of closely spaced pairs of profiles from the deployment phase of the COSMIC constellation in 2006 to make estimates of gravity wave horizontal wavelengths. We show that, given sufficient numbers of these pairs, GPS-RO can then produce physically reasonable estimates of stratospheric gravity wave momentum flux in the hot spot region that are consistent with other studies. The results are discussed in the context of previous satellite and modelling studies to build up a better picture of the nature and origins of waves in the southern winter stratosphere.

  6. Auroral origin of medium scale gravity waves in neutral composition and temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, S.; Spencer, N. W.; Krankowsky, D.; Laemmerzahl, P.

    1979-01-01

    The kinetic temperature and neutral composition data obtained from the Aeros B neutral atmosphere temperature experiment and the neutral and ion mass spectrometer show spatial structures characteristic of medium scale gravity waves with a wavelength in the range of several hundred kilometers. These waves are associated with auroral activity, and their spatial structure reflects the time history of the auroral electrojet. The medium scale gravity waves tend to propagate to mid-latitudes on the nightside. On the dayside their range is limited to high latitudes. Gravity waves are carriers of auroral energy to middle and low latitudes where they may cause irreversible changes in temperature via viscous dissipation. Since auroral activity occurs frequently, it is suggested that this energy reaches the mid-latitude region of the thermosphere much more frequently than is indicated by planetary magnetic indices.

  7. Spectral measurements of turbulence and gravity waves, part 4.2A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gage, K. S.

    1984-01-01

    Recently, it has become widely recognized that gravity waves play an important role in determining the large-scale circulation of the middle atmosphere. This realization has come about, in large measure, from the realization that Rayleigh friction plays an important role in the dynamics of the middle atmosphere. Since Rayleigh friction is intimately related to the saturation of vertically propagating gravity waves, an understanding of the saturation process has become a focal point for theoretical studies. With the advent of MST radar studies of the middle atmosphere, it has become possible to determine the spectrum of horizontal atmospheric velocity fluctuations over the range of scales which comprise the gravity-wave spectrum. It has been suggested that these spectra are comprised of buoyancy waves. The controversial interpretation of these spectra is discussed.

  8. Linear transformation method to control flexural waves in thin plates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongquan; Ma, Zhaoyang; Su, Xianyue

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the linear transformation method (LTM) to control flexural waves propagating in thin plates is presented. Unlike earlier studies, only a small number of homogeneous materials with no requirement of in-plane forces or pre-stress are needed, which tremendously simplifies the implementation of devices for flexural waves. An invisibility cloak with homogeneous materials is studied to confirm the validity of the present approach, and to show its imperfection due to impedance mismatch at interfaces. Required materials can be further simplified as layered isotropic materials using the effective medium theory. Finally, the LTM can be extended to the case of flexural waves propagating in anisotropic thin plates. The present method opens a promising avenue toward the realization of advanced structured shields and other devices. PMID:27586744

  9. The runup of long waves around piecewise linear bathymetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanoglu, Utku

    The evolution of waves on beaches is the quintissential problem of coastal engineering. Most practical problems involve directional waveforms with complex spectral distributions. In the last ten years consensus has emerged that certain terminal effects such as coastal flooding and inundation are mainly affected by the infragravity waves, i.e. the long wave part of the incident spectrum. These waves can be described by the shallow-water wave equations, which are also the standard model for tsunamis or tidal waves. Interest in these equations has rekindled because comparisons with both large-scale laboratory data and field data have demonstrated a remarkable and surprising capability to model complex evolution phenomena, and in particular the maximum runup. The maximum runup is arguably the single most important parameter in the design of coastal structures such as seawalls and dikes and for evaluating the inundation potential of tsunamis. A general method for solving developing exact solutions of the shallow-water wave equations is developed for determining the amplification factor of incident long waves as a function of the incident wave characteristics and the topographic variation. This method is then applied to the different ocean topographies composed of linearly varying depth segments and of constant depth segments, also known as composite beaches. Asysmptotic expressions are derived for the runup of solitary waves, and a series of large-scale laboratory experiments was conducted and is described. The analytical results are found in good agreement with the laboratory data for the time histories of free surface elevations and the maximum runup heights. An important result is that the maximum runup on the continental slope and shelf case is governed by the onshore slope, i.e., the slope which includes the initial shoreline, at least for the long waves of tsunami scales. In the last part of the study the evolution of solitary waves around circular islands is

  10. A mesoscale gravity wave event observed during CCOPE. II - Interactions between mesoscale convective systems and the antecedent waves. [Cooperative Convection Precipitation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Steven E.; Golus, Robert E.; Dorian, Paul B.

    1988-01-01

    The interactions between preexisting gravity waves and convective systems were investigated using data obtained by the Cooperative Convection Precipitation Experiment observational network in Montana on July 11-12, 1981. The results indicate that strong convection substantially affects gravity waves locally by augmenting the wave amplitude, reducing its wavelength, distorting the wave shape, altering the wave phase velocity, and greatly weakening the in-phase covariance between the perturbation wind and pressure fields. These convective effects upon gravity waves are explained in terms of hydrostatic and nonhydrostatic pressure forces and gust front processes associated with thunderstorms.

  11. Investigation of the role of gravity waves in the generation of equatorial bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Francis S.; Coley, William R.

    1995-01-01

    The following areas of interest in this progress report are: (1) the continuation of software development in the examination of F-region gravity-wave power using in-situ data from the Atmosphere Explorer (AE-E); (2) the inquiry into the use of the San Marco data for the study of the initiation and growth of bubbles, particularly when the satellite passes through the early evening hours at relatively high altitudes, and the development of bubbles using not only the San Marco data but includes the use of airglow observations made in Hawaii; and (3) the promising development in the observation of distinct well formed waves at about 400 km altitude in the equatorial region. These waves look very much like waves seen over the polar cap that are attributed to internal gravity waves in the neutral atmosphere driving ionization up and down the magnetic field lines. These equatorial waves show no modulation of the total ion concentration.

  12. Observation of gravity waves during the extreme tornado outbreak of 3 April 1974

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Phan, T.; Smith, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    A continuous wave-spectrum high-frequency radiowave Doppler sounder array was used to observe upper-atmospheric disturbances during an extreme tornado outbreak. The observations indicated that gravity waves with two harmonic wave periods were detected at the F-region ionospheric height. Using a group ray path computational technique, the observed gravity waves were traced in order to locate potential sources. The signals were apparently excited 1-3 hours before tornado touchdown. Reverse ray tracing indicated that the wave source was located at the aurora zone with a Kp index of 6 at the time of wave excitation. The summation of the 24-hour Kp index for the day was 36. The results agree with existing theories (Testud, 1970; Titheridge, 1971; Kato, 1976) for the excitation of large-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances associated with geomagnetic activity in the aurora zone.

  13. Three-dimensional numerical simulation of nonlinear acoustic-gravity wave propagation from the troposphere to the thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, Nikolai M.; Kshevetskii, Sergey P.

    2014-12-01

    Three-dimensional nonlinear breaking acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) propagating from the Earth's surface to the upper atmosphere are simulated numerically. Horizontally moving periodical structures of vertical velocity on the Earth's surface are used as AGW sources in the model. The 3D algorithm for hydrodynamic equation solution uses finite-difference analogues of basic conservation laws. This approach allows us to select physically correct generalized wave solutions of hydrodynamic equations. The numerical simulation covers altitudes from the ground up to 500 km. Vertical profiles of the mean temperature, density, molecular viscosity, and thermal conductivity are specified from standard models of the atmosphere. Atmospheric waves in a few minutes can propagate to high altitudes above 100 km after activation of the surface wave forcing. Surfaces of constant phases are quasi-vertical first, and then become inclined to the horizon below about 100 km after some transition time interval. Vertical wavelengths decrease with time and tend to theoretically predicted values after times longer than several periods of the wave forcing. Decrease in vertical wavelengths and increase in AGW amplitudes can lead to wave instabilities, accelerations of the mean flow and wave-induced jet streams at altitudes above 100 km. AGWs may transport amplitude modulation of atmospheric wave sources in horizontal directions up to very high levels. Low wave amplitudes in the beginning of transition processes after activation of atmospheric wave sources could be additional reasons for slower amplitude grows with height compared to the nondissipative exponential growth predicted for stationary linear AGWs. Production of wave-induced mean jets and their superposition with nonlinear unstable dissipative AGWs can produce strong narrow peaks of horizontal speed in the upper atmosphere. This may increase the role of transient nonstationary waves in effective energy transport and variations of

  14. Statistical characteristics of gravity waves observed by an all-sky airglow imager at Maui, HI and Cerro Pachon, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Bing; Liu, Alan Z.

    2016-07-01

    Many long-term observations, such as airglow imaging, have shown that gravity waves exist in the mesopause region most of the time. These waves deposit momentum and energy into the background atmosphere when dissipating, and thus exert strong influence to the atmosphere. In this study, we focus on (1) the climatology of gravity waves characteristics, (2) the intermittency of gravity wave momentum flux and (3) the duration/lifespan of gravity wave events. These properties have important implications for gravity wave parameterizations. This study is based on multi-year all sky OH airglow observations obtained at Maui, HI (20.7° N, 156.3° W) and the Andes Lidar Observatory in Chile (30.3° S, 70.7° W). The statistical distribution of intrinsic wave parameters and the momentum flux are analyzed. The probability density functions of gravity wave momentum flux and duration can be described by simple functions and are related to the gravity wave intermittency. The probability distributions of the two sites have some similarity but with noticeable differences, indicating different effects of the background flow and wave source on the gravity wave intermittency in the mesopause region.

  15. Interpretation of ground-based radiometric observations in terms of a gravity wave model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canavero, F. G.; Einaudi, F.; Westwater, E. R.; Falls, M. J.; Schroeder, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    An analysis is presented of 2-hour and 4-hour segments of data taken at Denver, Colorado, on February 3, 1984, by a ground-based radiometer designed and operated by the Wave Propagation Laboratory of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The zenith-viewing instrument has two moisture-sensing and four temperature-sensing channels. It is demonstrated that a peak at a period of 10 min, present in the spectra of the measured brightness temperature and of the derived geopotential heights, thicknesses, and vertically integrated water vapor content, is due to an internal gravity wave generated by wind shear in the jet aloft. This analysis shows that the radiometer has the sensitivity to detect such disturbances and that the mathematical inversion technique used to retrieve the geopotential field and other integrated quantities retains the derived information as well. Finally, a linear expression is derived which relates the brightness temperature to the atmospheric temperature, density, humidity, and cloud liquid perturbation fields.

  16. Linear and nonlinear effects in detonation wave structure formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, S. P.; Kudryavtsev, A. N.

    2016-06-01

    The role of linear and nonlinear effects in the process of formation of detonation wave structure is investigated using linear stability analysis and direct numerical simulation. A simple model with a one-step irreversible chemical reaction is considered. For linear stability computations, both the local iterative shooting procedure and the global Chebyshev pseudospectral method are employed. Numerical simulations of 1D pulsating instability are performed using a shock fitting approach based on a 5th order upwind-biased compact-difference discretization and a shock acceleration equation deduced from the Rankine-Hugoniot conditions. A shock capturing WENO scheme of the 5th order is used to simulate propagation of detonation wave in a plane channel. It is shown that the linear analysis predicts correctly the mode dominating on early stages of flow evolution and the size of detonation cells which emerge during these stages. Later, however, when a developed self-reproducing cellular structure forms, the cell size is approximately doubled due to nonlinear effects.

  17. Compound gravity receptor polarization vectors evidenced by linear vestibular evoked potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, S. M.; Jones, T. A.; Bell, P. L.; Taylor, M. J.

    2001-01-01

    The utricle and saccule are gravity receptor organs of the vestibular system. These receptors rely on a high-density otoconial membrane to detect linear acceleration and the position of the cranium relative to Earth's gravitational vector. The linear vestibular evoked potential (VsEP) has been shown to be an effective non-invasive functional test specifically for otoconial gravity receptors (Jones et al., 1999). Moreover, there is some evidence that the VsEP can be used to independently test utricular and saccular function (Taylor et al., 1997; Jones et al., 1998). Here we characterize compound macular polarization vectors for the utricle and saccule in hatchling chickens. Pulsed linear acceleration stimuli were presented in two axes, the dorsoventral (DV, +/- Z axis) to isolate the saccule, and the interaural (IA, +/- Y axis) to isolate the utricle. Traditional signal averaging was used to resolve responses recorded from the surface of the skull. Latency and amplitude of eighth nerve components of the linear VsEP were measured. Gravity receptor responses exhibited clear preferences for one stimulus direction in each axis. With respect to each utricular macula, lateral translation in the IA axis produced maximum ipsilateral response amplitudes with substantially greater amplitude intensity (AI) slopes than medially directed movement. Downward caudal motions in the DV axis produced substantially larger response amplitudes and AI slopes. The results show that the macula lagena does not contribute to the VsEP compound polarization vectors of the sacculus and utricle. The findings suggest further that preferred compound vectors for the utricle depend on the pars externa (i.e. lateral hair cell field) whereas for the saccule they depend on pars interna (i.e. superior hair cell fields). These data provide evidence that maculae saccule and utricle can be selectively evaluated using the linear VsEP.

  18. Compound gravity receptor polarization vectors evidenced by linear vestibular evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Jones, S M; Jones, T A; Bell, P L; Taylor, M J

    2001-04-01

    The utricle and saccule are gravity receptor organs of the vestibular system. These receptors rely on a high-density otoconial membrane to detect linear acceleration and the position of the cranium relative to Earth's gravitational vector. The linear vestibular evoked potential (VsEP) has been shown to be an effective non-invasive functional test specifically for otoconial gravity receptors (Jones et al., 1999). Moreover, there is some evidence that the VsEP can be used to independently test utricular and saccular function (Taylor et al., 1997; Jones et al., 1998). Here we characterize compound macular polarization vectors for the utricle and saccule in hatchling chickens. Pulsed linear acceleration stimuli were presented in two axes, the dorsoventral (DV, +/- Z axis) to isolate the saccule, and the interaural (IA, +/- Y axis) to isolate the utricle. Traditional signal averaging was used to resolve responses recorded from the surface of the skull. Latency and amplitude of eighth nerve components of the linear VsEP were measured. Gravity receptor responses exhibited clear preferences for one stimulus direction in each axis. With respect to each utricular macula, lateral translation in the IA axis produced maximum ipsilateral response amplitudes with substantially greater amplitude intensity (AI) slopes than medially directed movement. Downward caudal motions in the DV axis produced substantially larger response amplitudes and AI slopes. The results show that the macula lagena does not contribute to the VsEP compound polarization vectors of the sacculus and utricle. The findings suggest further that preferred compound vectors for the utricle depend on the pars externa (i.e. lateral hair cell field) whereas for the saccule they depend on pars interna (i.e. superior hair cell fields). These data provide evidence that maculae saccule and utricle can be selectively evaluated using the linear VsEP. PMID:11423215

  19. Compound gravity receptor polarization vectors evidenced by linear vestibular evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Jones, S M; Jones, T A; Bell, P L; Taylor, M J

    2001-04-01

    The utricle and saccule are gravity receptor organs of the vestibular system. These receptors rely on a high-density otoconial membrane to detect linear acceleration and the position of the cranium relative to Earth's gravitational vector. The linear vestibular evoked potential (VsEP) has been shown to be an effective non-invasive functional test specifically for otoconial gravity receptors (Jones et al., 1999). Moreover, there is some evidence that the VsEP can be used to independently test utricular and saccular function (Taylor et al., 1997; Jones et al., 1998). Here we characterize compound macular polarization vectors for the utricle and saccule in hatchling chickens. Pulsed linear acceleration stimuli were presented in two axes, the dorsoventral (DV, +/- Z axis) to isolate the saccule, and the interaural (IA, +/- Y axis) to isolate the utricle. Traditional signal averaging was used to resolve responses recorded from the surface of the skull. Latency and amplitude of eighth nerve components of the linear VsEP were measured. Gravity receptor responses exhibited clear preferences for one stimulus direction in each axis. With respect to each utricular macula, lateral translation in the IA axis produced maximum ipsilateral response amplitudes with substantially greater amplitude intensity (AI) slopes than medially directed movement. Downward caudal motions in the DV axis produced substantially larger response amplitudes and AI slopes. The results show that the macula lagena does not contribute to the VsEP compound polarization vectors of the sacculus and utricle. The findings suggest further that preferred compound vectors for the utricle depend on the pars externa (i.e. lateral hair cell field) whereas for the saccule they depend on pars interna (i.e. superior hair cell fields). These data provide evidence that maculae saccule and utricle can be selectively evaluated using the linear VsEP.

  20. Global climatology of the wind vector rotation - implications for the orographic gravity waves propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisoft, Petr; Sacha, Petr; Kuchar, Ales

    2015-04-01

    The gravity waves spectrum is shaped not only by different sources but it also reflects tropospheric background conditions contributing to filtering of various gravity waves. This could be most easily illustrated for the propagation of the orographic gravity waves that are critically filtered when the wind speed is zero. This condition is ensured in case of the directional shear exceeding 180°. Above regions where it is fulfilled, one can rule out the possibility of orographic GW modes contributing to the observed GW activity and vice versa regions of small wind rotation in the lower levels are often precursors of enhanced GW activity higher. In this study, we have performed a global analysis of the background conditions with a focus on the rotation of the ground level winds. We have analyzed MERRA and JRA-55 time series. The results provided climatology of atmospheric regions with the conditions favorable for the upward propagation of the orographic gravity waves from the troposphere into the stratosphere. The regions are detected mainly over areas where tropospheric and stratospheric jets coincide. The study is supplemented by a global analysis of the fields of potential energy of disturbances as a proxy for gravity waves activity using COSMIC GPS RO data.

  1. Gravity waves observation of wind field in stratosphere based on a Rayleigh Doppler lidar.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ruocan; Dou, Xiankang; Sun, Dongsong; Xue, Xianghui; Zheng, Jun; Han, Yuli; Chen, Tingdi; Wang, Guocheng; Zhou, Yingjie

    2016-03-21

    Simultaneous wind and temperature measurements in stratosphere with high time-spatial resolution for gravity waves study are scarce. In this paper we perform wind field gravity waves cases in the stratosphere observed by a mobile Rayleigh Doppler lidar. This lidar system with both wind and temperature measurements were implemented for atmosphere gravity waves research in the altitude region 15-60 km. Observations were carried out for two periods of time: 3 months started from November 4, 2014 in Xinzhou, China (38.425°N,112.729°E) and 2 months started from October 7, 2015 in Jiuquan, China (39.741°N, 98.495°E) . The mesoscale fluctuations of the horizontal wind velocity and the two dimensional spectra analysis of these fluctuations show the presence of dominant oscillatory modes with wavelength of 4-14 km and period of around 10 hours in several cases. The simultaneous temperature observations make it possible to identify gravity wave cases from the relationships between different variables: temperature and horizontal wind. The observed cases demonstrate the Rayleigh Doppler Lidar's capacity to study gravity waves. PMID:27136878

  2. A regional study of atmospheric gravity waves using the USArray Transportable Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedlin, M. A. H.; Stephan, C. C.; de Groot-Hedlin, C. D.; Alexander, M. J.; Hoffmann, L.

    2015-12-01

    The USArray Transportable Array (TA) is a network of approximately 400 seismo-acoustic stations deployed on a 70 km Cartesian grid covering an area of 2,000,000 km2 in the continental United States. The network moves eastward through station redeployments and is now located on the Atlantic coast. This dense network has provided unprecedented opportunities for research in seismology, infrasound and atmospheric science. We have developed a novel technique to investigate gravity wave occurrence and propagation across the network and have applied it to atmospheric pressure data recorded from Jan 1, 2010 through 2014. We divided the stations in this time range into 3,600 non-overlapping triangular arrays (triads). Each triad is most sensitive to propagating gravity waves in the 1-6 hour period range. We report two lines of research with this new dataset. First, we study individual large events in which atmospheric gravity waves are observed to cross the TA. We also study the long-term occurrence statistics of gravity waves and compare them to satellite observations of convective clouds and gravity waves in the stratosphere. We discuss plans for future work when the network is redeployed in Alaska.

  3. Convectively Forced Gravity Waves and their Sensitivity to Heating Profile and Atmospheric Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, Oliver; Parker, Douglas; Griffiths, Stephen; Vosper, Simon; Stirling, Alison

    2016-04-01

    It has been known for some time that convective heating is communicated to its environment by gravity waves. Despite this, the radiation of gravity waves in macro-scale models, which are typically forced at the grid-scale by meso-scale parameterization schemes, is not well understood. We present here theoretical work directed toward improving our fundamental understanding of convectively forced gravity wave effects at the meso-scale, in order to begin to address this problem. Starting with the hydrostatic, non-rotating, 2D, Boussinesq equations in a slab geometry, we find a radiating, analytical solution to prescribed sensible heat forcing for both the vertical velocity and potential temperature response. Both Steady and pulsed heating with adjustable horizontal structure is considered. From these solutions we construct a simple model capable of interrogating the spatial and temporal sensitivity to chosen heating functions of the remote forced response in particular. By varying the assumed buoyancy frequency, the influence of the model stratosphere on the upward radiation of gravity waves, and in turn, on the tropospheric response can be understood. Further, we find that the macro-scale response to convection is highly dependent on the radiation characteristics of gravity waves, which are in turn dependent upon the temporal and spatial structure of the source, and upper boundary condition of the domain.

  4. Gravity waves observation of wind field in stratosphere based on a Rayleigh Doppler lidar.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ruocan; Dou, Xiankang; Sun, Dongsong; Xue, Xianghui; Zheng, Jun; Han, Yuli; Chen, Tingdi; Wang, Guocheng; Zhou, Yingjie

    2016-03-21

    Simultaneous wind and temperature measurements in stratosphere with high time-spatial resolution for gravity waves study are scarce. In this paper we perform wind field gravity waves cases in the stratosphere observed by a mobile Rayleigh Doppler lidar. This lidar system with both wind and temperature measurements were implemented for atmosphere gravity waves research in the altitude region 15-60 km. Observations were carried out for two periods of time: 3 months started from November 4, 2014 in Xinzhou, China (38.425°N,112.729°E) and 2 months started from October 7, 2015 in Jiuquan, China (39.741°N, 98.495°E) . The mesoscale fluctuations of the horizontal wind velocity and the two dimensional spectra analysis of these fluctuations show the presence of dominant oscillatory modes with wavelength of 4-14 km and period of around 10 hours in several cases. The simultaneous temperature observations make it possible to identify gravity wave cases from the relationships between different variables: temperature and horizontal wind. The observed cases demonstrate the Rayleigh Doppler Lidar's capacity to study gravity waves.

  5. Characteristics of Mesospheric Gravity Waves Observed in the Central Region of Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrasse, Cristiano Max; Messias Almeida, Lazaro; Abalde Guede, Jose Ricardo; Valentin Bageston, José; Pillat, Valdir G.; Lima, Washington L. C.

    Gravity waves observations were carried out at Palmas (10.16o S, 48.26o W) Brazil, between September 2007 and December 2008, using an all-sky airglow imager to measure the OH emis-sion. The gravity waves were divided in two groups following they morphology as band and ripples type waves. The main characteristics of the band type waves are: horizontal wavelength between 10-35 km; observed period raging from 5 to 25 minutes; observed phase speed between 5-60 m/s. Preferential propagation directions of the bands are northward and southward, show-ing a clear anisotropy. For the ripples the main wave parameters are: horizontal wavelength ranging between 5 and 15 km; observed period mainly distributed between 5 and 15 minutes and horizontal phase velocity from 5 to 30 m/s. The ripples showed the same anisotropy as in the preferential propagation direction as the band type waves. The gravity wave characteristics observed at Palmas were compared with other observations carried out in Brazil, showing simi-lar features. In order to explain the seasonal variation of the wave propagation direction, maps of Outgoing Longwave Radiation (ORL) were used to locate regions with intense deep con-vection (OLR < 220 W.m-2 ) in the lower atmosphere. During summer and autumn the wave sources regions are well correlated with deep convection areas located at west and northwest of Palmas.

  6. The response of oxygen(1S) and hydroxyl emission brightness to gravity wave perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhiling

    2001-11-01

    The middle atmosphere exhibits a wide range of dynamical and photochemical phenomena. It is also a region where gravity waves play a dominant role in atmospheric dynamics, such as energy and momentum transfer, temperature and wind fluctuation, and constituent structure. A complete understanding of gravity waves is therefore essential due to their effects and influences on the phenomena in the atmosphere. The Airborne Lidar and Observations of Hawaiian Airglow (ALOHA) Campaign was conducted in 1993 to explore the nature of gravity wave activities and the roles they play. Among many observations, one of the most exciting wave events, known as ``wall event'', was observed on October 10, 1993, when a wave structure with a sharp front covering significant parts of the sky was observed to move with a phase velocity of 76 m/s at a period of 4-5 min; and meanwhile, MF radar measurements indicated that the average winds in the direction of the wave motion were at about 17m/s at OH heights, and less than 10m/s above. Remarkably, simultaneous observations of the Green line O(1S) and OH emission brightness showed an approximate and persistent 180° phase difference. In this thesis, we propose the presence of a fully guided gravity wave is responsible for the observed 180° phase reversal between O( 1S) and OH emission. Since one can show that a fully horizontally guided gravity wave mode can occur [Munasinghe et al, 1998] at the height levels of O(1S) and OH peaks, with its wave parameters very close to those observed on October 10, 1993 during the ALOHA Campaign, we compute this gravity wave mode in presence of the observed background winds. We then compute the integrated airglow response of O(1S) and OH to this fully guided gravity wave mode. Our results showed a 191° phase difference between the O(1S) and OH emission brightness, which is consistent with the observed phase reversal. We also investigated the reasons for this behavior. Finally we conclude that the presence of

  7. An effective absorbing boundary condition for linear long-wave and linear dispersive-wave tsunami simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Takuto; Tsushima, Hiroaki; Furumura, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    We numerically simulated the propagation of tsunami waves with finite difference methods by using perfectly matched layer (PML) boundary conditions to effectively eliminate artificial reflections from model boundaries. The PML method damps the tsunami height and velocity of seawater only in directions perpendicular to the boundary. Although the additional terms required to implement the PML conditions make the use of the PML technique difficult for linear dispersive tsunami waves, we have proposed an empirical extension of the PML method for modeling dispersive tsunami waves. Even for heterogeneous, realistic bathymetries, numerical tests demonstrated that the PML boundary condition dramatically decreased artificial reflections from model boundaries compared to the use of traditional boundary conditions. The use of PML boundary conditions for numerical modeling of tsunamis is especially useful because it facilitates use of the later phases of tsunamis that would otherwise be compromised by artifacts caused by reflections from model boundaries.

  8. Fifth-Order Approximations for Steep Gravity-Capillary Faraday Waves in Lagrangian Coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekerzh-Zenkovich, Sergey; Shingareva, Inna; Lizárraga-Celaya, Carlos

    2001-11-01

    Nonlinear gravity-capillary waves in water have been described usually in Eulearian coordinates (see M. Perlin & W. W. Schultz, Ann. Rev. Fluid Mech., Vol. 32, pp. 1-24, 2000). Less frequently, Lagrangian coordinates have been used by A. Miche (1944), Ya.I. Sekerzh-Zenkovich (1959), G.N. Mercer & A.J. Roberts (1992) and others for modeling free gravity waves. In the present study, Lagrangian coordinates are used for analytical description of 2D steep gravity and gravity-capillary Faraday waves of small forcing in a rectangular container. A formal asymptotic procedure of two-time scales (similar to Krylov-Bogolyubov averaging method) is developed to obtain (i) a power series expansions in wave amplitude for Lagrangian coordinates and (ii) the equations govering the wave amplitude and the slow phase as functions of the slow time-scale. With these equations, the fifth-order approximations have been derived for periodic waves excited in the subharmonic resonance conditions. The calculated wave parameters are found to be in good agreement with the known experimental data for standing waves of wave steepness up to 0.288. For the conditions of Schultz's et al. experiment (JFM, Vol.369, pp. 253-272, 1998) with a profile of the greatest wave steepness 0.425, the corresponding steepness is found to be 0.392. The highest predicted profile with these approximations has an unusual form: it is smooth and has infinite slope in two points in a small region of the wave crest.

  9. The Role of Gravity Waves in the Formation and Organization of Clouds during TWPICE

    SciTech Connect

    Reeder, Michael J.; Lane, Todd P.; Hankinson, Mai Chi Nguyen

    2013-09-27

    All convective clouds emit gravity waves. While it is certain that convectively-generated waves play important parts in determining the climate, their precise roles remain uncertain and their effects are not (generally) represented in climate models. The work described here focuses mostly on observations and modeling of convectively-generated gravity waves, using the intensive observations from the DoE-sponsored Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE), which took place in Darwin, from 17 January to 13 February 2006. Among other things, the research has implications the part played by convectively-generated gravity waves in the formation of cirrus, in the initiation and organization of further convection, and in the subgrid-scale momentum transport and associated large-scale stresses imposed on the troposphere and stratosphere. The analysis shows two groups of inertia-gravity waves are detected: group L in the middle stratosphere during the suppressed monsoon period, and group S in the lower stratosphere during the monsoon break period. Waves belonging to group L propagate to the south-east with a mean intrinsic period of 35 h, and have vertical and horizontal wavelengths of about 5-6 km and 3000-6000 km, respectively. Ray tracing calculations indicate that these waves originate from a deep convective region near Indonesia. Waves belonging to group S propagate to the south-south-east with an intrinsic period, vertical wavelength and horizontal wavelength of about 45 h, 2 km and 2000-4000 km, respectively. These waves are shown to be associated with shallow convection in the oceanic area within about 1000 km of Darwin. The intrinsic periods of high-frequency waves are estimated to be between 20-40 minutes. The high-frequency wave activity in the stratosphere, defined by mass-weighted variance of the vertical motion of the sonde, has a maximum following the afternoon local convection indicating that these waves are generated by local convection

  10. Gravitational-wave observations as a tool for testing relativistic gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eardley, D. M.; Lee, D. L.; Lightman, A. P.

    1973-01-01

    Gravitational radiation in the far field was examined using a formalism that encompassed all metric theories of gravity. There are six possible modes of polarization, which can be completely resolved by feasible experiments. A theoretical framework is set forth for classification of waves and theories, based on the Lorentz transformation properties of the six modes. Also shown in detail is how the six modes may be experimentally identified and to what extent such information limits the correct theory of gravity.

  11. Modeling the Dynamics of the Middle Atmosphere and Lower Thermosphere Under the Influence of Gravity Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Mengel, J. G.; Chan, K. L.; Porter, H. S.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Our Numerical Spectral Model (NSM), which extends from the ground up into the thermosphere, is non-linear, time-dependent and has been employed for 2D and 3D applications. The standard version of the NSM incorporates Hines' Doppler Spread Parameterization for small scale gravity waves (GW), but planetary waves generated in the troposphere have also been incorporated. The NSM has been applied to describe: (1) the anomalous seasonal variations of the zonal circulation and temperature in the upper mesosphere, (2) the equatorial oscillations (quasi-biennial and semi-annual oscillations (QBO and SAO)) extending from the stratosphere into the upper mesosphere, (3) the diurnal and semi-diurnal tides, and (4) the planetary waves that are excited in the mesosphere. With the emphasis to provide understanding, we present here results from numerical experiments with the NSM that shed light on the GW processes that are of central importance in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. These are our conclusions: (1) The large semiannual variations in the diurnal tide (DT), with peak amplitudes observed around equinox, are produced primarily by GW interactions that involve, in part, planetary waves. The DT, like planetary waves, tends to be amplified by GW momentum deposition, which reduces also the vertical wavelength, but variations in eddy viscosity associated with GW interactions are also important. (2) The semidiurnal tide (SDT) and its phase in particular, is strongly influenced by the mean zonal circulation. The SDT, individually, is also amplified by GW. But the DT filters out GW such that the GW interaction effectively reduces the amplitude of the SDT, producing a strong nonlinear interaction between the DT and SDT. (3) Without external time dependent energy or momentum sources, planetary waves (PW) are generated in the model for zonal wavenumbers 1 to 4, which have amplitudes in the mesosphere above 50 km as large as 40 m/s and periods between 50 and 2 days. The waves are

  12. Long-Term Global Morphology of Gravity Wave Activity Using UARS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckermann, Stephen D.; Jackman, Charles H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This report provides a broad outline of the total body of research conducted during the past three years. We report on detailed model studies of the precise way in which infrared limb scanning satellites explicitly detect gravity waves, and use these insights to resolve earlier discrepant zonal mean estimates of gravity wave variances from satellite limb scanners. Detailed analysis of CRISTA temperature fluctuations are outlined, which provide new global information on long-wavelength stratospheric gravity waves generated by mountains, tropical convection and the mid-latitude jet stream- vortex system, as well as interactions higher in the mesosphere with the diurnal tide. The detailed insights gained from analyzing CRISTA data are applied to provide a multi- year analysis of stratospheric mountain waves over the Andes evident in MLS limb-track data. We also demonstrate for the first time that stratospheric temperature data from the CLAES instrument on UARS resolved gravity waves, and we highlight mountain wave information in a subset of these data. Final conclusions and recommendations are set forth, and the present findings are directly related to the original goals of the research contract. A full list of publications that resulted from this research is provided.

  13. Long-Term Global Morphology of Gravity Wave Activity Using UARS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckermann, Stephen D.

    2000-01-01

    This report provides a broad outline of the total body of research conducted during the past three years. We report on detailed model studies of the precise way in which infrared limb scanning satellites explicitly detect gravity waves, and use these insights to resolve earlier discrepant zonal mean estimates of gravity wave variances from satellite limb scanners. Detailed analysis of CRISTA temperature fluctuations are outlined, which provide new global information on long-wavelength stratospheric gravity waves generated by mountains, tropical convection and the mid-latitude jet stream-vortex system, as well as interactions higher in the mesosphere with the diurnal tide. The detailed insights gained from analyzing CRISTA data are applied to provide a multiyear analysis of stratospheric mountain waves over the Andes evident in MLS limb-track data. We also demonstrate for the first time that stratospheric temperature data from the CLAES instrument on UARS resolved gravity waves, and we highlight mountain wave information in a subset of these data. Final conclusions and recommendations are set forth, and the present findings are directly related to the original goals of the research contract. A full list of publications that resulted from this research is provided.

  14. Seasonal Variability and Dynamics of Mesospheric Gravity Waves Over the Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criddle, Neal; Taylor, Michael; Pautet, Dominique; Zhao, Yucheng

    2011-10-01

    The ALO is a new facility developed for atmospheric research, located at the foot of the Andes in Cerro Pachon, Chile (30.2 S, 70.7 W). As part of a collaborative program, Utah State has a mesospheric temperature mapper (MTM) on site, which is used to study short period gravity wave dynamics and temperature variations in the mesosphere-lower thermosphere region. The MTM began taking measurements of the OH(6,2) and O2(0,1) spectral bands in August 2009 and a complete profile of seasonal variation in gravity wave characteristics has been created for August 2009 through August 2010 using the OH(6,2) Band. The primary goal of this program is to Quantify seasonal variability of gravity wave structures. Compare and contrast seasonal directionality with results from the Maui-MALT site. Quantify mountain wave observations, their frequency, characteristics and seasonal variability. Seasonal variability for gravity wave structures at this site is shown. Mountain waves have been exclusively observed to appear in the winter months. Future work includes verifying yearly repeatability, which is seen at other sites, and continued investigation of unique events occurring over the Andes mountain range.

  15. Negative effective gravity in water waves by periodic resonator arrays.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xinhua; Chan, C T; Ho, Kai-Ming; Zi, Jian

    2011-04-29

    Based on analytic derivations and numerical simulations, we show that near a low resonant frequency water waves cannot propagate through a periodic array of resonators (bottom-mounted split tubes) as if water has a negative effective gravitational acceleration g(e) and positive effective depth h(e). This gives rise to a low-frequency resonant band gap in which water waves can be strongly reflected by the resonator array. For a damping resonator array, the resonant gap can also dramatically modify the absorption efficiency of water waves. The results provide a mechanism to block water waves and should find applications in ocean wave energy extraction.

  16. Antarctic MLT Gravity Wave Momentum Flux Observed by the Davis MST Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, P. T.; Murphy, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The MST radar at Davis Station, Antarctica, 68.6 S 78.0 E, was used to make dual coplanar beam measurements of short period (12-60 minutes) gravity wave momentum flux in the mesopause region during the southern hemisphere summer of 2014-2015. Mean zonal and meridional momentum flux estimates are eastward and southward respectively, throughout the region and season, with a bias towards both larger mean flux and number of eastward and southward propagating waves. Lognormal distributions of the absolute momentum flux attributable to individual wave events are broadly consistent with satellite and other middle atmosphere gravity wave observation and modelling techniques, with greater than 40% of the total flux being contributed by the largest 10% of wave events. Estimates of flux divergence are made during periods where sufficient density of observations exist. Ray tracing methods are employed to identify potential source regions and mechanisms to aid the development of meteorologically interactive parameterization schemes for the region.

  17. Linear and non-linear numerical simulations of poloidal Alfven waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, A.

    2013-05-01

    Among the many of numerical simulations of MHD turbulence, few studies had been made of Alfven waves interacting with realistic boundaries. Thus, we have developed a novel hybrid spectral/finite element code, which is capable of simulate properly realistic boundaries properties. Our model is based on a Fourier decompositions of all variables in the azimuthal direction and on a finite element projection in the meridian plan. In order to simulate realistic boundary conditions for the magnetic field we solve the induction equation enforcing continuity of the magnetic field H at the interface with the external insulating medium through a Interior Penalty Galerkin method (IPG) [1]. I will present the results of our investigation of Alfven waves propagating in a cylinder filled of liquid metal submitted to an axial magnetic field. Poloidal Alfven waves are excited magnetically by imposing an azimuthal current pulse at the bottom of the cylinder. In the linear axisymmetric model we find a good agreement with previous experiments in liquid metals by Lundquist and by Lenhert and more recently by Alboussiere et al [2]. This axisymmetric study is extended to the non linear regime, where the amplitudes of the perturbations are comparable to the external applied magnetic field,in this conditions a complex response is found due to waves waves interactions. [1] J. L. Guermond, J.L Leorat, F. Luddens, C. Nore, A. Ribeiro. Effects of discontinuous magnetic permeability on magnetodynamic problems, Journal of Computational Physics Volume 230, Issue 16, 10 July 2011, Pages 6299 -- 6319. [2] T. Alboussiere, P. Cardin, F. Debray, H. C. Nataf, F. Plunian, A. Ribeiro, D. Schmitt, Experimental evidence of Alfven wave propagation in a Gallium alloy, Physics of fluids, 2011, vol. 23, nb 9.

  18. Estimations of model parameters for gravity wave spectra observed by MST radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheffler, A. O.; Liu, C. H.; Franke, S. J.

    1989-01-01

    The general theory of MST radar observations of gravity wave spectra is developed. This effort extends the previous results to include anisotropy and Doppler effects for the spectra, as well as the consequences for the multibeam configuration. The relationships between the observed one- or two-dimensional spectra for the line-of-sight velocity in the gravity wave spectra are derived. Expressions for cross spectra, as well as covariances between velocities observed on different beams, are computed. Using these results, studies are carried out to show how model parameters for gravity wave spectra can be estimated from the observed quantities. Model parameters include the variance, power law indices, anisotropy parameters, Doppler parameters, mean scale sizes, etc. Cases with different numbers of beams are investigated.

  19. The Influence of Surface Gravity Waves on Marine Current Turbine Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lust, E.; Luznik, L.; Flack, K. A.; Walker, J.; Van Benthem, M.

    2013-12-01

    Surface gravity waves can significantly impact operating conditions for a marine current turbine, imparting unsteady velocities several orders of magnitude larger than the ambient turbulence. The influence of surface waves on the performance characteristics of a two-bladed horizontal axis marine current turbine was investigated experimentally in a large towing tank facility at the United States Naval Academy. The turbine model had a 0.8 m diameter (D) rotor with a NACA 63-618 cross section, which is Reynolds number independent with respect to lift coefficient in the operating range of Rec ≈ 4 x 105. The torque, thrust and rotational speed were measured at a range of tip speed ratios (TSR) from 5 < TSR < 11. Tests were performed at two rotor depths (1.3D and 2.25D) with and without waves. The average turbine performance characteristics were largely unchanged by depth or the presence of waves. However, tests with waves indicate large variations in thrust, rotational speed, and torque occurred with the passage of the wave. These results demonstrate the impact of surface gravity waves on power production and structural loading and suggest that turbines should be positioned vertically within the water column at a depth which maximizes power output while minimizing material fatigue. Keywords-- marine current turbine, tidal turbine, towing-tank experiments, surface gravity waves, fatigue loading, phase averaging

  20. Shallow water surface gravity wave imaging, spectra and their use in shallow water dredging operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostater, Charles R.; Yang, Bingyu

    2014-10-01

    Imaging of shallow waters using high resolution video imagery is described. Common to mono, stereo and trinocular imaging approaches from ground and airborne platforms is the need to validate the surface water wave field measurements, particularly the amplitude and specular reflectance of water surface small gravity waves. A technique for calibration and validation of water surface gravity wave field energy spectra is described. Results demonstrate the value of video imagery where water level staff gauges with approximately with 0.5 cm wave height accuracy are easily sensed using high definition videography. Essentially, a staff gauge placed in shallow water constructed from PVC materials with custom colored line coding are imaged at 30 H or high frame rates, followed by frame by frame analyses in order to detect the water level measured at 0.5 cm height intervals. The image based time series allow the development of shallow water gravity wave energy spectra using standard FFT analysis procedures. Spectral models based upon peak frequency, for example, are then used in a two dimensional water surface wave simulation model that generates radiative transfer based hyperspectral images of the water surface wave field. The simulated and observed water surface wave patch fields are compared by extracting vertical or horizontal transects within observed and simulated imagery. The approach allows one to developed spectral energy model probability distributions at low cost. The novel noncontact video sensing and image analysis methodology used to calibrate and validate shallow water gravity wave models yield a means for ultimately calculating bottom boundary velocities under measured or simulated wave fields. These boundary layer velocities can cause migration and horizontal particle fluxes (g cm-2 s-1), resuspension, settling, and increased turbidity during dredging operations, but not necessarily due to waterway dredging operations and activities.

  1. A Study of Mesoscale Gravity Waves over the North Atlantic with Satellite Observations and a Mesoscale Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Dong L.; Zhang, Fuqing

    2004-01-01

    Satellite microwave data are used to study gravity wave properties and variabilities over the northeastern United States and the North Atlantic in the December-January periods. The gravity waves in this region, found in many winters, can reach the stratopause with growing amplitude. The Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) observations show that the wave occurrences are correlated well with the intensity and location of the tropospheric baroclinic jet front systems. To further investigate the cause(s) and properties of the North Atlantic gravity waves, we focus on a series of wave events during 19-21 January 2003 and compare AMSU-A observations to simulations from a mesoscale model (MM5). The simulated gravity waves compare qualitatively well with the satellite observations in terms of wave structures, timing, and overall morphology. Excitation mechanisms of these large-amplitude waves in the troposphere are complex and subject to further investigations.

  2. Stratospheric gravity waves at Southern Hemisphere orographic hotspots: 2003-2014 AIRS/Aqua observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Lars; Grimsdell, Alison W.; Alexander, M. Joan

    2016-07-01

    Stratospheric gravity waves from small-scale orographic sources are currently not well-represented in general circulation models. This may be a reason why many simulations have difficulty reproducing the dynamical behavior of the Southern Hemisphere polar vortex in a realistic manner. Here we discuss a 12-year record (2003-2014) of stratospheric gravity wave activity at Southern Hemisphere orographic hotspots as observed by the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) aboard the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Aqua satellite. We introduce a simple and effective approach, referred to as the "two-box method", to detect gravity wave activity from infrared nadir sounder measurements and to discriminate between gravity waves from orographic and other sources. From austral mid-fall to mid-spring (April-October) the contributions of orographic sources to the observed gravity wave occurrence frequencies were found to be largest for the Andes (90 %), followed by the Antarctic Peninsula (76 %), Kerguelen Islands (73 %), Tasmania (70 %), New Zealand (67 %), Heard Island (60 %), and other hotspots (24-54 %). Mountain wave activity was found to be closely correlated with peak terrain altitudes, and with zonal winds in the lower troposphere and mid-stratosphere. We propose a simple model to predict the occurrence of mountain wave events in the AIRS observations using zonal wind thresholds at 3 and 750 hPa. The model has significant predictive skill for hotspots where gravity wave activity is primarily due to orographic sources. It typically reproduces seasonal variations of the mountain wave occurrence frequencies at the Antarctic Peninsula and Kerguelen Islands from near zero to over 60 % with mean absolute errors of 4-5 percentage points. The prediction model can be used to disentangle upper level wind effects on observed occurrence frequencies from low-level source and other influences. The data and methods presented here can help to identify interesting

  3. Modeling Wave Driven Non-linear Flow Oscillations: The Terrestrial QBO and a Solar Analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, Hans G.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Quasi Biennial Oscillation (QBO) of the zonal circulation observed in the terrestrial atmosphere at low latitudes is driven by wave mean flow interaction as was demonstrated first by Lindzen and Holton (1968), shown in a laboratory experiment by Plumb and McEwan (1978), and modeled by others (e.g., Plumb, Dunkerton). Although influenced by the seasonal cycle of solar forcing, the QBO, in principle, represents a nonlinear flow oscillation that can be maintained by a steady source of upward propagating waves. The wave driven non-linearity is of third or odd order in the flow velocity, which regenerates the fundamental harmonic itself to keep the oscillation going - the fluid dynamical analog of the displacement mechanism in the mechanical clock. Applying Hines' Doppler Spread Parameterization (DSP) for gravity waves (GW), we discuss with a global-scale spectral model numerical experiments that elucidate some properties of the QBO and its possible effects on the climatology of the atmosphere. Depending on the period of the QBO, wave filtering can cause interaction with the seasonal variations to produce pronounced oscillations with beat periods around 10 years. Since the seasonal cycle and its variability influence the period of the QBO, it may also be a potent conduit of solar activity variations to lower altitudes. Analogous to the terrestrial QBO, we propose that a flow oscillation may account for the 22-year periodicity of the solar magnetic cycle, potentially answering Dicke (1978) who asked, "Is there a chronometer hidden deep inside the Sun?" The oscillation would occur below the convection region, where gravity waves can propagate. Employing a simplified, analytic model, Hines' DSP is applied to estimate the flow oscillation. Depending on the adopted horizontal wavelengths of GW's, wave amplitudes less than 10 m/s can be made to produce oscillating zonal flows of about 20 m/s that should be large enough to generate a significant oscillation in the magnetic

  4. Surface gravity waves and their acoustic signatures, 1-30 Hz, on the mid-Pacific sea floor.

    PubMed

    Farrell, W E; Munk, Walter

    2013-10-01

    In 1999, Duennebier et al. deployed a hydrophone and geophone below the conjugate depth in the abyssal Pacific, midway between Hawaii and California. Real time data were transmitted for 3 yr over an abandoned ATT cable. These data have been analyzed in the frequency band 1 to 30 Hz. Between 1 and 6 Hz, the bottom data are interpreted as acoustic radiation from surface gravity waves, an extension to higher frequencies of a non-linear mechanism proposed by Longuet-Higgins in 1950 to explain microseisms. The inferred surface wave spectrum for wave lengths between 6 m and 17 cm is saturated (wind-independent) and roughly consistent with the traditional Phillips κ(-4) wave number spectrum. Shorter ocean waves have a strong wind dependence and a less steep wave number dependence. Similar features are found in the bottom record between 6 and 30 Hz. But this leads to an enigma: The derived surface spectrum inferred from the Longuet-Higgins mechanism with conventional assumptions for the dispersion relation is associated with mean square slopes that greatly exceed those derived from glitter. Regardless of the generation mechanism, the measured bottom intensities between 10 and 30 Hz are well below minimum noise standards reported in the literature.

  5. Inter-hemispheric Comparison of Mesospheric Short-period Gravity Wave Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, K.; Taylor, M. J.; Collins, R. L.; Irving, B. K.; Negale, M.; Siskind, D. E.; Eckermann, S. D.; Hoppel, K.; Harvey, V.; Russell, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Mesospheric short-period (≤1-hr) gravity waves are of great importance for dynamics in the mesosphere-lower thermosphere (MLT) region, and are typically measured by instruments capable of high temporal and/or spatial resolutions such as lidars and airglow imagers. These waves have been studied extensively at low- and mid-latitudes where known wave sources are well established. The results show strong dependence on the background wind and temperature fields, which can act as a barrier prohibiting vertical propagation of the waves, as well as providing a ducted environment in which the waves can travel large horizontal distances. In fact, results show that up to 75% of these waves may exhibit ducted wave motion. Recent airglow imaging measurements over Antarctica have revealed a large number of short-period gravity waves in absence of the prominent wave sources present at lower latitudes. In contrast to results at lower latitudes, very few waves (˜5%) observed over Halley (76°S) exhibited Doppler ducted motion. In this work, we utilize airglow imagery, SABER temperature measurements, together with the Navy's high-altitude numerical weather prediction system, NOGAPS-ALPHA, to investigate propagation conditions (particularly, the role of thermal ducting) over Rothera (68°S). Data acquired from a newly installed airglow imager operating at Poker Flat, Alaska (65°N) and the co-located lidar provide an opportunity to perform an inter-hemispheric comparison of propagation conditions over two polar sites at similar latitudes.

  6. Rayleigh lidar observations of gravity wave activity in the upper stratosphere at Urbana, Ill.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, C. S.; Miller, M. S.; Liu, C. H.

    1988-01-01

    During 13 nights of Rayleigh lidar measurements at Urbana, Ill. in 1984 to 1986, thirty-six quasi-monochromatic gravity waves were observed in the 35 to 50 km altitude region of the stratosphere. The characteristics of the waves are compared with other lidar and radar measurements of gravity waves and the theoretical models of wave saturation and dissipation phenomena. The measured vertical wavelengths ranged from 2 to 11.5 km and the measured vertical phase velocities ranged from 10 to 85 cm/s. The vertical wavelengths and vertical phase velocities were used to infer observed wave periods which ranged from 100 to 1000 min and horizontal wavelengths which ranged from 70 to 2000 km. Dominant wave activity was found at vertical wavelengths between 2 to 4 km and 7 to 10 km. No significant seasonal variations were evident in the observed parameters. Vertical and horizontal wavelengths showed a clear tendency to increase with wave periods, which is consistent with recent sodium lidar studies of quasi-monochromatic waves near the mesopause. An average amplitude growth length of 20.9 km for the rms wind perturbations was estimated from the data. Kinetic energy density associated with the waves decreased with height, suggesting that waves in this altitude region were subject to dissipation or saturation effects.

  7. Constraining the Parameterization of Polar Inertia Gravity Waves in WACCM with Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. K.; Murphy, D. J.; Garcia, R. R.; Kinnison, D. E.

    2014-12-01

    A discrepancy that has been seen in a number of climate models is that simulated temperatures in the Antarctic lower stratosphere during winter and spring are much lower than observed; this is referred to as the "cold pole" problem. Recent simulations with the NCAR Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model have shown that polar stratospheric temperatures are much improved by including a parameterization of gravity waves, which have inertial periods, longer horizontal wavelengths and shorter vertical wavelengths than the mesoscale gravity waves already parameterized in this and most other middle atmosphere models. Improvements include a more realistic seasonal development of the ozone hole and somewhat better timing for the winter to summer transition in the zonal winds and Brewer-Dobson Circulation. Although the availability and quality of observations of gravity waves in the middle atmosphere has been increasing, there are still not sufficient observations to validate the inertial gravity wave morphology and distribution in the model. Here, we use constraints from new analyses of radiosonde observations to provide guidance for the horizontal and vertical wavelengths of the waves, their seasonal variability, and their potential sources such as fronts or flow imbalance. Tighter observational constraints remove an element of arbitrary "tuning" and tie the model simulations of the middle atmosphere more closely to the simulated climate.

  8. Ten year observations of gravity waves from thunderstorms in western Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc, E.; Farges, T.; Le Pichon, A.; Heinrich, P.

    2014-06-01

    A new study of gravity waves produced by thunderstorms was performed using continuous recordings at the IS17 (Ivory Coast) infrasound station of the International Monitoring System developed for the verification of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty. A typical case study is presented for a large thunderstorm on 10-11 April 2006 lasting near 14 h. Comparison with cloud temperature measured by the Meteosat 6 satellite shows that wave activity is large when the cloud temperature is low inside convection cells located over the station. Statistics based on 10 year data show that the wave activity is intense throughout the year with peak periods in May and October and less intense activity in January, in good agreement with the local keraunic level. The seasonal variations of the wave azimuth highlight clear trends from northward direction from February to August to southward direction from August to December. Lightning flashes, observed from space, show a similar motion confirming that thunderstorms are the main sources of the gravity wave activity. The gravity wave azimuth follows the seasonal motion of the tropical rain belt partly related to the Intertropical Convergence Zone of the winds. The contribution of other possible sources, such as wind over relief, is weak because surface winds are weak in this region and only oceans are present south of the station. We conclude that the large observed wave activity is mainly produced by convection associated to thunderstorms.

  9. Gravity wave characteristics retrieved from radiosonde observations during DEEPWAVE-NZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gisinger, Sonja; Dörnbrack, Andreas; Ehard, Benedikt; Kaifler, Bernd; Kaifler, Natalie; Rapp, Markus; Garhammer, Markus; Bramberger, Martina; Portele, Tanja; Siller, Maria

    2015-04-01

    The field phase of DEEPWAVE-NZ (DEEP propagating gravity WAVE experiment over New Zealand) took place in June and July 2014 on the southern island of New Zealand. One goal of DEEPWAVE-NZ was to explore the propagation of gravity waves excited by the flow across the southern island into the middle atmosphere. Airborne measurements with the NSF/NCAR GV and the DLR Falcon research aircraft were complemented with ground-based measurements at various stations on the southern island. At Lauder (45 S 169 E), long-lasting upper stratospheric and mesospheric observations were taken by the DLR Rayleigh lidar and the University of Utah Advanced Mesospheric Temperature Mapper and Airglow Imager. To provide data in the lower atmosphere up to 30 km altitude, radiosonde measurements were conducted in periods of mountain wave activity. The 98 radiosondes launched in Lauder reached a mean height of 31.2 km and a maximum ceiling of 36.6 km. We present a comprehensive wave analysis of the radiosoundings using wavelets. This analysis, inter alia, isolates single wave packages and wave properties like intrinsic frequency, horizontal direction of propagation and vertical propagation direction (upward or downward) by means of Stokes parameters. The results will be presented for different cases of mountain induced gravity waves which occurred during DEEPWAVE-NZ.

  10. Investigating gravity waves and mesospheric temperature variability over the Andes Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M. J.; Pautet, P.; Zhao, Y.; Pugmire, J.; Criddle, N.; Swenson, G. R.; Liu, A. Z.; Hecht, J. H.

    2011-12-01

    The Andes region provides an excellent natural laboratory for investigating gravity wave influences on the Upper Mesospheric and Lower Thermospheric (MLT) dynamics with dominant gravity wave forcing expected from deep convection during the summer months replaced by strong orographic forcing during the wintertime, due to intense prevailing zonal winds blowing over the towering Andes mountain range. The instrument suite that comprised the very successful Maui-MALT program (2000-2005) was relocated to a new Andes Lidar Observatory (ALO) located high in the Andes mountains (2,520 m) at Cerro Pachon, Chile (30.3°S, 70.7°W). As part of this instrument set the Utah State University (USU) Mesospheric Temperature Mapper (MTM) has operated continuously over the past two years (August 2009-to date) measuring the nocturnal near infrared OH(6,2) band and the O2(0,1) Atmospheric band intensity and temperature perturbations to investigate a broad range of mesospheric wave forcings, their seasonal variability and effects on the MLT environment over the Andes. This presentation focuses on the strong variability observed from this site using collaborative investigations of selected wave events, including exceptionally large tidal perturbations (70-100 K), unusual "jumps" in OH/O2 temperature possibly associated with wave breaking, mesospheric bore events, and new evidence for quasi-stationary gravity waves, all illustrating the strong wave activity and its diversity over the Andes.

  11. Convective gravity wave propagation and breaking in the stratosphere: comparison between WRF model simulations and lidar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantino, L.; Heinrich, P.; Mzé, N.; Hauchecorne, A.

    2015-09-01

    In this work we perform numerical simulations of convective gravity waves (GWs), using the WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) model. We first run an idealized, simplified and highly resolved simulation with model top at 80 km. Below 60 km of altitude, a vertical grid spacing smaller than 1 km is supposed to reliably resolve the effects of GW breaking. An eastward linear wind shear interacts with the GW field generated by a single convective thunderstorm. After 70 min of integration time, averaging within a radius of 300 km from the storm centre, results show that wave breaking in the upper stratosphere is largely dominated by saturation effects, driving an average drag force up to -41 m s-1 day-1. In the lower stratosphere, mean wave drag is positive and equal to 4.4 m s-1 day-1. In a second step, realistic WRF simulations are compared with lidar measurements from the NDACC network (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Changes) of gravity wave potential energy (Ep) over OHP (Haute-Provence Observatory, southern France). Using a vertical grid spacing smaller than 1 km below 50 km of altitude, WRF seems to reliably reproduce the effect of GW dynamics and capture qualitative aspects of wave momentum and energy propagation and transfer to background mean flow. Averaging within a radius of 120 km from the storm centre, the resulting drag force for the study case (2 h storm) is negative in the higher (-1 m s-1 day-1) and positive in the lower stratosphere (0.23 m s-1 day-1). Vertical structures of simulated potential energy profiles are found to be in good agreement with those measured by lidar. Ep is mostly conserved with altitude in August while, in October, Ep decreases in the upper stratosphere to grow again in the lower mesosphere. On the other hand, the magnitude of simulated wave energy is clearly underestimated with respect to lidar data by about 3-4 times.

  12. Surface Gravity Waves: Resonance in a Fish Tank

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinick, Scott J.; Lynch, John J.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, an inexpensive 10-gallon glass aquarium was used to study wave motion in water. The waves travel at speeds comparable to a person walking ([approximately]1 m/s). The scale of the motion allows for distances to be measured with a meterstick and for times to be measured with a stopwatch. For a wide range of water depths, standing waves…

  13. Global Responses of Gravity Waves to Planetary Wave Variations during Stratospheric Sudden Warming Observed by SABER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cullens, C. Y.; England, S.; Immel, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    This study describes the global responses of observed gravity waves (GWs) to winter planetary wave (PW) variations during stratospheric sudden warmings (SSWs) using TIMED-SABER temperature measurements. GWs affect the ionosphere and thermosphere, and it is important to understand global variations of GWs from the lower atmosphere to the thermosphere during SSWs in order to advance our understanding of vertical coupling. The responses of GWs to SSWs are shown by calculating correlations between vertical components of Eliassen-Palm (EP) fluxes in the winter polar stratosphere and global GW temperature amplitudes derived from SABER observations. Consistent with previous ground-based and satellite observations, winter EP fluxes show positive correlations with GWs in the winter hemisphere. More interestingly, winter stratospheric EP fluxes are positively correlated with GWs in the tropics and in the summer mesosphere, indicating global variations of GWs in response to PW variations in the winter hemisphere. To study the mechanism of GW response to SSWs, global wind simulations from SD-WACCM are used. Zonal wind anomalies (differences in the wind before and during SSWs) extend from the winter stratosphere to the summer mesosphere. By comparing anomalies in background winds to the observed patterns in the correlations between GWs and winter EP fluxes, we find that regions of positive correlation follow change in background winds and zero-wind lines. The results indicate that responses of SABER GWs in the summer hemisphere to winter PW variations during SSWs are likely caused by changes in GW propagation due to the changes in atmospheric circulation. These observed changes in global GWs during SSWs can affect the ionosphere and thermosphere, and studying global GW variation during SSWs is important for understanding mechanisms of vertical coupling.

  14. Global responses of gravity waves to planetary waves during stratospheric sudden warming observed by SABER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cullens, Chihoko Y.; England, Scott L.; Immel, Thomas J.

    2015-12-01

    This study describes the global responses of observed gravity waves (GWs) to winter planetary wave (PW) variations during stratospheric sudden warmings (SSWs) using TIMED-SABER (Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry) temperature measurements. Previous studies have shown responses of atmospheric temperature and parameterized GW drag to SSWs; however, the responses of global GW observations to SSWs have not been presented before. The responses are shown by calculating correlations between vertical components of Eliassen-Palm (EP) fluxes in the winter polar stratosphere and global GW temperature amplitudes derived from SABER observations. Consistent with previous ground-based and satellite observations, winter EP fluxes show positive correlations with GWs in the winter hemisphere. More interestingly, winter stratospheric EP fluxes are positively correlated with GWs in the tropics and in the summer mesosphere, indicating global variations of GWs in response to PW variations in the winter hemisphere. To study the mechanism of GW response to SSWs, global wind simulations from Specified Dynamics Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model are used. Zonal wind anomalies (differences in the wind before and during SSWs) extend from the winter stratosphere to the summer mesosphere. By comparing anomalies in background winds to the observed patterns in the correlations between GWs and winter EP fluxes, we find that regions of positive correlation follow changes in background winds and zero-wind lines. The results indicate that responses of SABER GWs in the summer hemisphere to winter PW variations during SSWs are likely caused by changes in GW propagation due to the changes in winds and atmospheric circulation.

  15. Gravity wave parameters derived from traveling ionospheric disturbances observations in the auroral zone

    SciTech Connect

    Natorf, L.; Schlegel, K.; Wernik, A.W. Space Research Centre, Warsaw )

    1992-12-01

    Large-scale wavelike fluctuations of ion velocity, as measured by the European incoherent scatter radar along the geomagnetic field line, have been attributed to gravity wave effects. The height-dependent parameters of the causative gravity waves are calculated, taking into account the neutral horizontal wind and the electric field. The results are compared with the solutions of a dissipative dispersion relation. Much better agreement is achieved for the imaginary part of the vertical wave vector than for its real part. The calculated wave damping is greater than that given by theory. The possible reasons for this are discussed. It is suggested that E x B drift of the ions and vertical neutral winds, which are characteristic features of the auroral zone ionosphere, may contribute to the observed discrepancies. 40 refs.

  16. The role of gravity wave induced drag and diffusion in the momentum budget of the mesosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holton, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    A slight modification of the parameterization suggested by Lindzen (1981) for the zonal drag and eddy diffusion effects generated by breaking internal gravity waves in the mesosphere is tested using a severely truncated midlatitude beta-plane channel model. It is found that realistic mean zonal flow profiles with zonal wind reversals above the mesopause can be simulated for both winter and summer radiative heating conditions provided that a gravity-wave spectrum is assumed which includes both stationary waves and waves of relatively large phase speeds. These results contrast greatly with the unrealistic mean wind profiles produced when Rayleigh friction is used to parameterize the effects of small scale motions on the mean flow.

  17. Gravity waves in Titan's lower stratosphere from Huygens probe in situ temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.; Young, Leslie A.; Ferri, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    The Huygens probe recorded atmospheric temperatures during its parachute descent through the atmosphere of Titan. A careful analysis of these data reveals for the first time spectacular but hitherto-unreported small-scale variations in stratospheric temperatures that we interpret as gravity waves, consistent with detection of such waves at higher altitudes by other means. The structures have a vertical wavelength of 3-8 km and a peak-peak amplitude of ˜2 K that is roughly constant over altitudes from ˜140 km, where measurements began, to ˜60 km. This altitude, below which no significant temperature waves are seen, coincides with a local maximum in the zonal wind profile, and is close to where the Brunt-Väisälä frequency is highest. It seems possible that the zonal wind field influences the vertical gravity wave propagation.

  18. Gravity wave and tidal structures between 60 and 140 km inferred from space shuttle reentry data

    SciTech Connect

    Fritts, D.C. ); Dingyi Wang ); Blanchard, R.C. )

    1993-03-15

    This study presents an analysis of density measurements made using high-resolution accelerometers aboard several space shuttles at altitudes from 60 to 140 km during reentry into the earth's atmosphere. The observed density fluctuations are interpreted in terms of gravity waves and tides and provide evidence of the importance of such motions well into the thermosphere. Height profiles of fractional density variance reveal that wave amplitudes increase at a rate consistent with observations at lower levels up to [approximately]90 km. The rate of amplitude growth decreases at greater heights, however, and appears to cease above [approximately]110 km. Wave amplitudes are nevertheless large at these heights and suggest that gravity waves may play an important role in forcing of the lower thermosphere.

  19. Trapping and instability of directional gravity waves in localized water currents.

    PubMed

    Eliasson, B; Haas, F

    2014-06-01

    The influence of localized water currents on the nonlinear dynamics and stability of large amplitude, statistically distributed gravity waves is investigated theoretically and numerically by means of an evolution equation for a Wigner function governing the spectrum of waves. It is shown that water waves propagating in the opposite direction of a localized current channel can be trapped in the channel, which can lead to the amplification of the wave intensity. Under certain conditions the wave intensity can be further localized due to a self-focusing (Benjamin-Feir) instability. The localized amplification of the wave intensity may increase the probability of extreme events in the form of freak waves, which have been observed in connection with ocean currents.

  20. Trapping and instability of directional gravity waves in localized water currents.

    PubMed

    Eliasson, B; Haas, F

    2014-06-01

    The influence of localized water currents on the nonlinear dynamics and stability of large amplitude, statistically distributed gravity waves is investigated theoretically and numerically by means of an evolution equation for a Wigner function governing the spectrum of waves. It is shown that water waves propagating in the opposite direction of a localized current channel can be trapped in the channel, which can lead to the amplification of the wave intensity. Under certain conditions the wave intensity can be further localized due to a self-focusing (Benjamin-Feir) instability. The localized amplification of the wave intensity may increase the probability of extreme events in the form of freak waves, which have been observed in connection with ocean currents. PMID:25019886

  1. A standing wave-type noncontact linear ultrasonic motor.

    PubMed

    Hu, J; Li, G; Chan, H L; Choy, C L

    2001-05-01

    In this study, a novel standing wave-type noncontact linear ultrasonic motor is proposed and analyzed. This linear ultrasonic motor uses a properly controlled ultrasonic standing wave to levitate and drive a slider. A prototype of the motor was constructed by using a wedge-shaped aluminum stator, which was placed horizontally and driven by a multilayer PZT vibrator. The levitation and motion of the slider were observed. Assuming that the driving force was generated by the turbulent acoustic streaming in the boundary air layer next to the bottom surface of the slider, a theoretical model was developed. The calculated characteristics of this motor were found to agree quite well with the experimental results. Based on the experimental and theoretical results, guidelines for increasing the displacement and speed of the slider were obtained. It was found that increasing the stator vibration displacement, or decreasing the gradient of the stator vibration velocity and the weight per unit area of the slider, led to an increase of the slider displacement. It was also found that increasing the amplitude and gradient of the stator vibration velocity, or decreasing the weight per unit area of the slider and the driving frequency, gave rise to an increase of the slider speed. There exists an optimum roughness of the bottom surface of the slider at which the slider speed has a maximum. PMID:11381693

  2. All-sky imaging of transglobal thermospheric gravity waves generated by the March 2011 Tohoku Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Steven M.; Martinis, Carlos R.; Baumgardner, Jeffrey; Mendillo, Michael

    2015-12-01

    We report on imaging measurements of thermospheric gravity wave signatures in 630 nm and 557.7 nm nightglow that suggest an association with the M = 9 Tohoku (Japan) earthquake on 11 March 2011. The propagating waves were recorded in all-sky images at the El Leoncito Observatory, Argentina (31.8°S, 69.3°W), which is located 17,080 km from the earthquake epicenter, almost at the global antipodal point.

  3. Estimating gravity wave parameters from oblique high-frequency backscatter: Modeling and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bristow, W.A.; Greenwald, R.A.

    1995-03-01

    A new technique for estimating electron density perturbation amplitudes of traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs), using HF radar data, is presented. TIDs are observed in HF radar data as enhancements of the ground-scattered power which propagate through the radar`s field of view. These TIDs are the ionospheric manifestation of atmospheric acoustic-gravity waves. TID electron density perturbation amplitudes were estimated by simulating the radar returns, using HF ray tracing through a model ionosphere perturbed by a model gravity wave. The simulation determined the return power in the ground-scattered portion of the signal as a function of range, and this was compared to HF radar data from the Goose Bay HF radar at a time when evidence of gravity waves was present in the data. By varying the amplitude of the electron density perturbation in the model it was possible to estimate the perturbation of the actual wave. It was found that the perturbations that are observed by the Goose Bay HF radar are of the order of 20% to 35%. It was also found that the number of observable power enhancements, and the relative amplitudes of these enhancements, depended on the vertical thickness of the gravity wave`s source region. From the simulations and observations it was estimated that the source region for the case presented here was approximately 20 km thick. In addition, the energy in the wave packet was calculated and compared to an estimate of the available energy in the source region. It was found that the wave energy was about 0.2% of the estimated available source region energy. 20 refs., 12 figs.

  4. Observations of height-dependent pressure-perturbation structure of a strong mesoscale gravity wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, David O'C.; Korb, C. L.; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Weng, Chi Y.

    1992-01-01

    Airborne observations using a downward-looking, dual-frequency, near-infrared, differential absorption lidar system provide the first measurements of the height-dependent pressure-perturbation field associated with a strong mesoscale gravity wave. A pressure-perturbation amplitude of 3.5 mb was measured within the lowest 1.6 km of the atmosphere over a 52-km flight line. Corresponding vertical displacements of 250-500 m were inferred from lidar-observed displacement of aerosol layers. Accounting for probable wave orientation, a horizontal wavelength of about 40 km was estimated. Satellite observations reveal wave structure of a comparable scale in concurrent cirrus cloud fields over an extended area. Smaller-scale waves were also observed. Local meteorological soundings are analyzed to confirm the existence of a suitable wave duct. Potential wave-generation mechanisms are examined and discussed. The large pressure-perturbation wave is attributed to rapid amplification or possible wave breaking of a gravity wave as it propagated offshore and interacted with a very stable marine boundary layer capped by a strong shear layer.

  5. On the physical mechanism of front-back asymmetry of nonlinear gravity-capillary waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosaev, Alexander; Troitskaya, Yulia; Shrira, Victor

    2016-04-01

    In nature wind waves of all scales are asymmetric both with respect to the horizontal and vertical axes. The front-back (or fore-aft asymmetry), i.e. the asymmetry with respect to the vertical axis, manifests itself in steeper front slopes. Although it can be important for remote sensing of sea surface and wave field interaction with wind, especially for the waves of gravity-capillary range, at present the understanding of physical mechanisms causing the gravity-capillary waves asymmetry and its dependence on parameters is very poor; there has been no study dedicated to this problem. Here we address this gap. The decimetre-range water waves in many respects essentially differ from the waves of other ranges: wind forcing is stronger, steep waves develop a characteristic pattern of capillary ripples on their forward slopes. These 'parasitic capillaries', generated by a narrow pressure distribution associated with an underlying longer wave' crest, remain quasi-stationary with regard to the longer wave. The train of capillaries is localised on the front slope and decays towards the trough. We investigate the nature of the asymmetry of such waves by extensive numerical simulations of the Euler equations employing the method of conformal mapping for two-dimensional potential flow and taking into account wave generation by wind and dissipation due to molecular viscosity. We examine the role of various factors contributing to the wave profile asymmetry: wind pumping, viscous stresses, the Reynolds stresses caused by ripples and found the latter to be by far the most important. It is the lop-sided ripple distribution which leads to noticeable fore-aft asymmetry of the mean wave profile. We also found how the asymmetry depends on wavelength, steepness, wind and viscosity, which enables us to parametrize these dependencies for applications in microwave remote sensing and wave generation.

  6. Did Tsunami-Launched Gravity Waves Trigger Ionospheric Turbulence over Arecibo?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M. C.; Pradipta, R.; Burke, W. J.; Labno, A.; Burton, L. M.; Cohen, J. A.; Dorfman, S. E.; Coster, A. J.; Sulzer, M. P.; Kuo, S. P.

    2008-01-01

    We report on measurements of ionospheric plasma dynamics conducted at the Arecibo Observatory between 20:00 and 24:00 local time (LT) on December 25 and 26, 2004 using the 430 MHz incoherent scatter radar (ISR). For interpretive purposes these measurements are supported by data from two nearby ionosondes and Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites. The ISR detected different ionospheric behaviors during the vertical-transmission periods on the consecutive, magnetically quiet nights. On the night of December 25 the ionosphere descended smoothly and spread F signatures faded. For about two hours on the following evening the bottomside ionosphere rose by ˜50 km, inducing plasma irregularities and intense spread F. Alternating cycles of bottom-side plasma rising and falling persisted through the remainder of the experiments. We postulate that this sinusoidal behavior is a response to gravity waves propagating above Puerto Rico. Nearly simultaneous data from two nearby stations show that GPS signals were modified by variations in total electron content (TEC) indicating the presence of traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs). The December 26 experiments were conducted about a day after an MW = 9.2 earthquake launched tsunami waves first across the Indian, then into the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. We suggest that coupling at the tsunami sea-air interface launched gravity waves that propagated for great distances beneath the mesopause. GPS data recorded TEC variation in Asia, Europe, and the Caribbean, suggesting that TIDs were induced on a global scale at the wake of tsunami-launched gravity waves. Energy from imperfectly ducted gravity waves leaked into the ionosphere, partially over Puerto Rico. The wind-velocity field of these gravity waves caused local ionospheric plasma to rise, seeding bottomside irregularities via the generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instability.

  7. Forward modeling of tsunami-driven gravity waves observed in airglow emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coisson, P.; Makela, J. J.; Vadas, S.; Sladen, A.

    2013-12-01

    Tsunamis propagating through the ocean excite gravity waves in the overlying atmosphere that propagate vertically, reaching ionospheric heights. Due to the exponential decay of the atmosphere density, waves with amplitudes as low as 10 cm at ocean level are highly amplified in the upper atmosphere, where they can have an appreciable effect on both the neutral an plasma environment. In the last decade, tsunami-generated gravity waves have been detected in the upper atmosphere for all major tsunami using ground-based GPS networks, satellite altimeters and/or airglow imagers. Airglow oscillations following tsunami propagation have been observed from an observatory on the Haleakala volcano in Hawaii for two recent large events: the Mw 9.0, 11 March 2011, Tohoku-Oki, Japan, earthquake and the Mw 7.8, 28 October 2012, Haida Gwaii, Canada, earthquake. The signature of gravity waves traveling at tsunami speed in the same direction of its propagation has been observed in the images of an all-sky imaging system for the first tsunami and in the images of a narrow-field imaging system for the second one. In order to investigate the physics of the coupling between the ocean, the neutral and charged atmosphere and understand the exact origin of the atmospheric imprint recorded by airglow imagers, we present modeling results of gravity waves excited by a realistic tsunami propagation model coupled to the atmosphere and ionosphere, during these two events. The model has been developed to include the propagation of the gravity waves in the atmosphere, the coupling between neutral and charged particles in the ionosphere and the production of the airglow emission at 630.0 nm. The results of the model are compared to the 630.0 nm emission measured by the imaging systems.

  8. Influence of gravity on the eye movement response elicited by periodic lateral linear acceleration.

    PubMed

    Hashiba, M; Wetzig, J; v Baumgarten, R; Watanabe, S; Baba, S

    1993-12-01

    Periodic linear acceleration elicits eye movements in human beings. This is generally considered to be the result of the otolithic-ocular reflex (OOR). However, otolith organs respond not only to the resultant inertial force caused by head motion, but also to the gravitational force. We investigated the influence of the resultant gravito-inertial vector on the OOR using a linear acceleration sled. Subjects were 10 healthy volunteers. The sled moving back and forth parallel to the lateral head axis stimulated the subjects. We tested each subject in 7 different positions in the pitch plane. Horizontal eye movements with nystagmic patterns were elicited by these stimuli. The results indicate that the responses were larger in the forward tilted positions than in the backward tilted positions. It can be concluded that the horizontal OOR is influenced by the gravity vector. The cause of this phenomenon is still unclear. However, it could be closely related to the nystagmus observed during off vertical axis rotation.

  9. Gravity-wave spectra in the atmosphere observed by MST radar, part 4.2B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheffler, A. O.; Liu, C. H.

    1984-12-01

    A universal spectrum of atmospheric buoyancy waves is proposed based on data from radiosonde, Doppler navigation, not-wire anemometer and Jimsphere balloon. The possible existence of such a universal spectrum clearly will have significant impact on several areas in the study of the middle atmosphere dynamics such as the parameterization of sub-grid scale gravity waves in global circulation models; the transport of trace constituents and heat in the middle atmosphere, etc. Therefore, it is important to examine more global wind data with temporal and spatial resolutions suitable for the investigation of the wave spectra. Mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radar observations offer an excellent opportunity for such studies. It is important to realize that radar measures the line-of-sight velocity which, in general, contains the combination of the vertical and horizontal components of the wave-associated particle velocity. Starting from a general oblique radar observation configuration, applying the dispersion relation for the gravity waves, the spectrum for the observed fluctuations in the line-of-sight gravity-wave spectrum is investigated through a filter function. The consequence of the filter function on data analysis is discussed.

  10. Gravity-wave spectra in the atmosphere observed by MST radar, part 4.2B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheffler, A. O.; Liu, C. H.

    1984-01-01

    A universal spectrum of atmospheric buoyancy waves is proposed based on data from radiosonde, Doppler navigation, not-wire anemometer and Jimsphere balloon. The possible existence of such a universal spectrum clearly will have significant impact on several areas in the study of the middle atmosphere dynamics such as the parameterization of sub-grid scale gravity waves in global circulation models; the transport of trace constituents and heat in the middle atmosphere, etc. Therefore, it is important to examine more global wind data with temporal and spatial resolutions suitable for the investigation of the wave spectra. Mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radar observations offer an excellent opportunity for such studies. It is important to realize that radar measures the line-of-sight velocity which, in general, contains the combination of the vertical and horizontal components of the wave-associated particle velocity. Starting from a general oblique radar observation configuration, applying the dispersion relation for the gravity waves, the spectrum for the observed fluctuations in the line-of-sight gravity-wave spectrum is investigated through a filter function. The consequence of the filter function on data analysis is discussed.

  11. Diffraction of acoustic-gravity waves in the presence of a turning point.

    PubMed

    Godin, Oleg A

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) in an inhomogeneous atmosphere often have caustics, where the ray theory predicts unphysical, divergent values of the wave amplitude and needs to be modified. Unlike acoustic waves and gravity waves in incompressible fluids, AGW fields in the vicinity of a caustic have never been systematically studied. Here, asymptotic expansions of acoustic gravity waves are derived in the presence of a turning point in a horizontally stratified, moving fluid such as the atmosphere. Sound speed and the background flow (wind) velocity are assumed to vary gradually with height, and slowness of these variations determines the large parameter of the problem. It is found that uniform asymptotic expansions of the wave field in the presence of a turning point can be expressed in terms of the Airy function and its derivative. The geometrical, or Berry, phase, which arises in the consistent Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation for AGWs, plays an important role in the caustic asymptotics. In the dominant term of the uniform asymptotic solution, the terms with the Airy function and its derivative are weighted by the cosine and sine of the Berry phase, respectively. The physical meaning and corollaries of the asymptotic solutions are discussed. PMID:27475153

  12. Gravity wave forcing in the middle atmosphere due to reduced ozone heating during a solar eclipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritts, David C.; Luo, Zhangai

    1993-01-01

    We present an analysis of the gravity wave structure and the associated forcing of the middle atmosphere induced by the screening of the ozone layer from solar heating during a solar eclipse. Fourier integral techniques and numerical evaluation of the integral solutions were used to assess the wave field structure and to compute the gravity wave forcing of the atmosphere at greater heights. Our solutions reveal dominant periods of a few hours, characteristic horizontal and vertical scales of about 5000 to 10,000 km and 200 km, respectively, and an integrated momentum flux in the direction of eclipse motion of about 5.6 x 10 exp 8 N at each height above the forcing level. These results suggest that responses to solar eclipses may be difficult to detect above background gravity wave and tidal fluctuations until well into the thermosphere. Conversely, the induced body forces may penetrate to considerable heights because of the large wave scales and will have significant effects at levels where the wave field is dissipated.

  13. A Model Study of Zonal Forcing in the Equatorial Stratosphere by Convectively Induced Gravity Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, M. J.; Holton, James R.

    1997-01-01

    A two-dimensional cloud-resolving model is used to examine the possible role of gravity waves generated by a simulated tropical squall line in forcing the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) of the zonal winds in the equatorial stratosphere. A simulation with constant background stratospheric winds is compared to simulations with background winds characteristic of the westerly and easterly QBO phases, respectively. In all three cases a broad spectrum of both eastward and westward propagating gravity waves is excited. In the constant background wind case the vertical momentum flux is nearly constant with height in the stratosphere, after correction for waves leaving the model domain. In the easterly and westerly shear cases, however, westward and eastward propagating waves, respectively, are strongly damped as they approach their critical levels, owing to the strongly scale-dependent vertical diffusion in the model. The profiles of zonal forcing induced by this wave damping are similar to profiles given by critical level absorption, but displaced slightly downward. The magnitude of the zonal forcing is of order 5 m/s/day. It is estimated that if 2% of the area of the Tropics were occupied by storms of similar magnitude, mesoscale gravity waves could provide nearly 1/4 of the zonal forcing required for the QBO.

  14. Diffraction of acoustic-gravity waves in the presence of a turning point.

    PubMed

    Godin, Oleg A

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) in an inhomogeneous atmosphere often have caustics, where the ray theory predicts unphysical, divergent values of the wave amplitude and needs to be modified. Unlike acoustic waves and gravity waves in incompressible fluids, AGW fields in the vicinity of a caustic have never been systematically studied. Here, asymptotic expansions of acoustic gravity waves are derived in the presence of a turning point in a horizontally stratified, moving fluid such as the atmosphere. Sound speed and the background flow (wind) velocity are assumed to vary gradually with height, and slowness of these variations determines the large parameter of the problem. It is found that uniform asymptotic expansions of the wave field in the presence of a turning point can be expressed in terms of the Airy function and its derivative. The geometrical, or Berry, phase, which arises in the consistent Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation for AGWs, plays an important role in the caustic asymptotics. In the dominant term of the uniform asymptotic solution, the terms with the Airy function and its derivative are weighted by the cosine and sine of the Berry phase, respectively. The physical meaning and corollaries of the asymptotic solutions are discussed.

  15. Fermi and LIGO Hone in on Gravity Wave Source

    NASA Video Gallery

    Fermi's GBM saw a fading X-ray source at nearly the same moment LIGO detected gravitational waves from a black hole merger in 2015. This movie shows how scientists can narrow down the location of t...

  16. Design and development of high linearity millimeter wave traveling-wave tube for satellite communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jun; Huang, Ming-Guang; Li, Xian-Xia; Li, Hai-Qiang; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Jian-Dong; Li, Yue; Zhao, Shi-Lei

    2015-10-01

    The linearity of the traveling-wave tube is a very important characteristic for a modern communication system. To improve the linearity of the traveling-wave tube at no expense of the saturated output power and overall efficiency, a modified pitch profile combined with a small adjustment of operating parameters is proposed. The optimal design of the helix circuit is evaluated theoretically by a large signal analysis, and the experimental test is also carried out to make a comparison of performance between the novel and original designed traveling-wave tubes. The experiments show that the saturated output powers and efficiencies of these two tubes are close to each other, while the linearity of the traveling-wave tube is obviously improved. The total phase shift and AM/PM conversion at saturation of the novel tube, averaged over the operating band, are only 30.6°/dB and 2.5°/dB, respectively, which are 20.1°/dB and 1.6°/dB lower than those of the original tube, respectively. Moreover, the third-order intermodulation of the novel tube is up to 2.2 dBc lower than that of the original tube. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61401430).

  17. Mesopause gravity wave momentum flux variability and its relation to interhemispheric coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Wit, Rosmarie; Janches, Diego; Fritts, Dave; Hibbins, Robert

    2016-04-01

    The Southern Argentina Agile MEteor Radar (SAAMER), located at southern midlatitudes (54°S) and specifically designed to measure mesosphere/lower thermosphere (MLT) gravity wave momentum flux, has been providing near-continuous measurements since May 2008. Taking advantage of more than 7 years of observations, the interannual variability of the gravity wave momentum flux is studied. A quasi-biennial modulation, with periods similar to that of the equatorial stratospheric quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) is observed. This QBO signal is found to be largest during southern hemisphere summer, and in-phase with the stratospheric QBO at 50 hPa. The relation between the stratospheric QBO and the QBO modulation in the MLT gravity wave forcing (derived from the divergence of the momentum flux) was found to be consistent with that expected from the Holton-Tan effect coupled to the interhemispheric coupling mechanism, and provides the first observational support for the existence of the midlatitude gravity wave forcing anomalies as hypothesized in the interhemispheric coupling mechanism.

  18. Estimation of the parameters of gravity waves combining ground based and satellite measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulino, Igo; Vadas, Sharon; Buriti, Ricardo; Wrasse, Cristiano M.; Medeiros, Amauri; Takahashi, Hisao; Essien, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    Four medium-scale gravity waves were studied using images of the NIR OH airglow emission obtained from an all sky imager deployed at São João do Cariri (36.5 ^{o}W; 7.4 ^{o}S) and mesospheric temperature profiles from the TIMED/SABER satellite. The coincident measurements were made on 11 and 14 April 2007, 08 February and 28 August 2008. The horizontal parameters of the gravity waves were estimated using the keogram analysis and the vertical ones were calculated from the coincident temperature profiles collected into the area of 15 ^{o} x 15 ^{o} degrees (longitude X latitude), centered at the observatory. The horizontal wavelength were 190, 138, 171 and 355 km, respectively. The observed periods were 50, 20, 33 and 20 min. The vertical wavelength were 15, 10, 15 and 30 km. Comparisons to the dispersion relation for the gravity waves were done and the results are in agreement to the theory. Thus, the SABER satellite measurements may be used to study the gravity wave activity in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere with good precision.

  19. Radiative observables for linearized gravity on asymptotically flat spacetimes and their boundary induced states

    SciTech Connect

    Benini, Marco Dappiaggi, Claudio; Murro, Simone

    2014-08-01

    We discuss the quantization of linearized gravity on globally hyperbolic, asymptotically flat, vacuum spacetimes, and the construction of distinguished states which are both of Hadamard form and invariant under the action of all bulk isometries. The procedure, we follow, consists of looking for a realization of the observables of the theory as a sub-algebra of an auxiliary, non-dynamical algebra constructed on future null infinity ℱ⁺. The applicability of this scheme is tantamount to proving that a solution of the equations of motion for linearized gravity can be extended smoothly to ℱ⁺. This has been claimed to be possible provided that a suitable gauge fixing condition, first written by Geroch and Xanthopoulos [“Asymptotic simplicity is stable,” J. Math. Phys. 19, 714 (1978)], is imposed. We review its definition critically, showing that there exists a previously unnoticed obstruction in its implementation leading us to introducing the concept of radiative observables. These constitute an algebra for which a Hadamard state induced from null infinity and invariant under the action of all spacetime isometries exists and it is explicitly constructed.

  20. The Accuracy of Gravity Wave Models for a Diffusively Separated Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, M. P.; Walterscheid, R. L.; Schubert, G.

    2010-12-01

    Walterscheid and Hickey (2001) showed that the accuracy of gravity wave models for waves propagating in a diffusively separated atmosphere depends sensitively on how compositional effects are included. Gases in the thermosphere are diffusively separated, so the mean molecular weight (M) varies with altitude. Conventional models of gravity wave propagation in the thermosphere treat the atmosphere as a single gas. These models include the height variation of M while neglecting fluctuations of M due to gravity wave motions. This is equivalent to assuming an instantaneous balance between the perturbing effects of vertical motion and the restoring effects of mutual diffusion. Using a one-gas full-wave model Walterscheid and Hickey (2001) examined the two limiting cases where an instantaneous balance prevails (M’=0) and where M is conserved following a parcel (M’ reflects only vertical advection). It was found that the two limits gave significantly different results. We have recently developed a two-gas model (N2 and O) describing gravity wave motions in the thermosphere and have calculated the total gas fluctuation accounting fully for the variation of M due to both vertical advection and mutual diffusion. This model has allowed us to evaluate the accuracy of one-gas models with fixed M (M’=0) and with conserved M (dM/dt =0) for a wide range of wave parameters. We have explicitly calculated both the perturbing effects of vertical advection and the restoring effects of mutual diffusion and have compared the two competing effects. Our results show that the error in ignoring mutual diffusion can be significant and that in general it is best to assume that M is conserved following parcels rather than to assume that M’ is zero. The conservation of M is easily implemented in one-gas models. The implications for future studies of acoustic-gravity wave motions in the thermosphere are discussed. Walterscheid, R., and M. Hickey (2001), One-gas models with height

  1. Estimating gravity wave parameters from oblique high-frequency backscatter: Modeling and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bristow, W. A.; Greenwald, R. A.

    1995-01-01

    A new technique for estimating electron density perturbation amplitudes of traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs), using HF radar data, is presented. TIDs are observed in HF radar data as enhancements of the ground-scattered power which propagate through the radar's field of view. These TIDs are the ionospheric manifestation of atmospheric acoustic-gravity waves. TID electron density perturbation amplitudes were estimated by simulating the radar returns, using HF ray tracing through a model ionosphere perturbed by a model gravity wave. The simulation determined the return power in the ground-scattered portion of the signal as a function of range, and this was compared to HF radar data from the Goose Bay HF radar at a time when evidence of gravity waves was present in the data. By varying the amplitude of the electron density perturbation in the model it was possible to estimate the perturbation of the actual wave. It was found that the perturbations that are observed by the Goose Bay HF radar are of the order of 20% to 35%. It was also found that the number of observable power enhancements, and the relative amplitudes of these enhancements, depended on the vertical thickness of the gravity wave's source region. From the simulations and observations it was estimated that the source region for the case presented here was approximately 20 km thick. In addition, the energy in the wave packet was calculated and compared to an estimate of the available energy in the source region. It was found that the wave energy was about 0.2% of the estimated available source region energy.

  2. Generation of pseudo-waves in the middle atmosphere by flow accelerations due to breaking gravity waves?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Raymond A.; Larsen, M. F.

    1993-01-01

    Low frequency, large amplitude waves are often observed at mesospheric heights in radar and lidar wind measurements. A series of individual profiles of 1-hr averages of velocity data that were taken in October 1981 using the MST radar at Poker Flat, Alaska are presented. The vertical wavelength of this wave-like event is about 15 km and has a period close to 10 hours. A clear downward phase propagation can be seen, and so these oscillations are usually, and probably correctly, interpreted as being gravity wave flow perturbations. We investigate an alternative explanation that may also be possible; specifically, we investigate the possibility that the perturbed flow is a pseudo-wave structure produced by mean flow acceleration due to gravity waves propagating upward from below and breaking in the mesosphere. The question is whether effects similar to those that produce the much longer period Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) in the equatorial stratosphere can produce mesospheric pseudo-waves (MPW) at much shorter periods.

  3. Mesosphere Dynamics with Gravity Wave Forcing. 1; Diurnal and Semi-Diurnal Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Mengel, J. G.; Chan, K. L.; Porter, H. S.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We present results from a nonlinear, 3D, time dependent numerical spectral model (NSM), which extends from the ground up into the thermosphere and incorporates Hines' Doppler Spread Parameterization for small-scale gravity waves (GW). Our focal point is the mesosphere that is dominated by wave interactions. We discuss diurnal and semi-diurnal tides ill the present paper (Part 1) and planetary waves in the companion paper (Part 2). To provide an understanding of the seasonal variations of tides, in particular with regard to gravity wave processes, numerical experiments are performed that lead to the following conclusions: 1. The large semiannual variations in tile diurnal tide (DT), with peak amplitudes observed around equinox, are produced primarily by GW interactions that involve, in part, planetary waves. 2. The DT, like planetary waves, tends to be amplified by GW momentum deposition, which reduces also the vertical wavelength. 3.Variations in eddy viscosity associated with GW interactions tend to peak in late spring and early fall and call also influence the DT. 4. The semidiurnal semidiurnal tide (SDT), and its phase in particular, is strongly influenced by the mean zonal circulation. 5. The SDT, individually, is amplified by GW's. But the DT filters out GW's such that the wave interaction effectively reduces the amplitude of the SDT, effectively producing a strong nonlinear interaction between the DT and SDT. 6.) Planetary waves generated internally by baroclinic instability and GW interaction produce large amplitude modulations of the DT and SDT.

  4. Ray tracing of gravity waves as a possible warning system for tornadic storms and hurricanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Smith, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    Gravity waves with wave periods of 13 to 15 min and horizontal phase velocities of 90 to 220 m/sec were present in ground-based observations of the upper atmosphere during time periods when tornadoes were occurring and gravity waves with wave periods of 20 to 25 min and horizontal phase velocities of 100 to 200 m/sec were detected when a hurricane was present. Combinations of available neutral atmosphere data and model parameter values were used with a group ray tracing technique in an attempt to locate the sources of these waves. Computed sources of the waves with periods of 13 to 15 min were located within 50 km of the locations where tornadoes touched down from 2 to 4 h later. In the case of the waves with periods of 20 to 25 min it was found that the computed location of the source was roughly where the hurricane would be located 3 h after the waves were excited. The applicability of the present study to a tornado and hurricane warning system is noted.

  5. A further study of gravity wave induced drag and diffusion in the mesosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holton, J. R.; Zhu, X.

    1984-01-01

    Lindzen's (1967) parameterization for the drag and eddy diffusion produced by breaking internal gravity waves in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere is applied to a modified version of the beta-plane channel model of Holton (1982) in which an isotropic source spectrum of waves is specified similar to that given in 1982 by Matsuno (1982). The transmission for each wave component is influenced by Newtonian cooling and by eddy diffusion induced by the breaking of other wave components. In general the waves with smallest Doppler-shifted phase speeds break first and produce sufficient eddy diffusion to significantly raise the breaking heights for the higher speed components. Thus, the wave drag and diffusion is spread through a deep layer and the resulting mean wind profiles for both summer and winter solstice conditions are more realistic than those computed previously by Holton.

  6. On the response of a water surface to a surface pressure source moving at trans-critical gravity-capillary wave speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masnadi, Naeem; Cho, Yeunwoo; Duncan, James H.; Akylas, Triantaphyllos

    2015-11-01

    The non-linear response of a water free surface to a pressure source moving at speeds near the minimum speed of linear gravity-capillary waves (Cmin ~ 23 cm/s) is investigated with experiments and theory. In the experiments, waves are generated by a vertically oriented air-jet that moves at a constant speed over the water surface in a long tank. The 3-D surface shape behind the air-jet is measured using a cinematic refraction-based technique combined with an LIF technique. At towing speeds just below Cmin, an unsteady pattern is formed where localized depressions periodically appear in pairs and move away from the source along the arms of a downstream V-shaped pattern. This behavior is analogous to the periodic shedding of solitary waves upstream of a source moving at the maximum wave speed in shallow water. The gravity-capillary depressions are rapidly damped by viscosity and their speed-amplitude characteristics closely match those from inviscid calculations of gravity-capillary lumps. The shedding frequency of the lumps in the present experiments increases with both increasing towing speed and air-flow rate. Predictions of this behavior using a model equation that incorporates damping and a quadratic nonlinearity are in good agreement with the experiments. The partial support of the National Science Foundation under grant OCE0751853 is gratefully acknowledged.

  7. Near-Inertial Internal Gravity Waves in the Ocean.

    PubMed

    Alford, Matthew H; MacKinnon, Jennifer A; Simmons, Harper L; Nash, Jonathan D

    2016-01-01

    We review the physics of near-inertial waves (NIWs) in the ocean and the observations, theory, and models that have provided our present knowledge. NIWs appear nearly everywhere in the ocean as a spectral peak at and just above the local inertial period f, and the longest vertical wavelengths can propagate at least hundreds of kilometers toward the equator from their source regions; shorter vertical wavelengths do not travel as far and do not contain as much energy, but lead to turbulent mixing owing to their high shear. NIWs are generated by a variety of mechanisms, including the wind, nonlinear interactions with waves of other frequencies, lee waves over bottom topography, and geostrophic adjustment; the partition among these is not known, although the wind is likely the most important. NIWs likely interact strongly with mesoscale and submesoscale motions, in ways that are just beginning to be understood.

  8. Near-Inertial Internal Gravity Waves in the Ocean.

    PubMed

    Alford, Matthew H; MacKinnon, Jennifer A; Simmons, Harper L; Nash, Jonathan D

    2016-01-01

    We review the physics of near-inertial waves (NIWs) in the ocean and the observations, theory, and models that have provided our present knowledge. NIWs appear nearly everywhere in the ocean as a spectral peak at and just above the local inertial period f, and the longest vertical wavelengths can propagate at least hundreds of kilometers toward the equator from their source regions; shorter vertical wavelengths do not travel as far and do not contain as much energy, but lead to turbulent mixing owing to their high shear. NIWs are generated by a variety of mechanisms, including the wind, nonlinear interactions with waves of other frequencies, lee waves over bottom topography, and geostrophic adjustment; the partition among these is not known, although the wind is likely the most important. NIWs likely interact strongly with mesoscale and submesoscale motions, in ways that are just beginning to be understood. PMID:26331898

  9. Near-Inertial Internal Gravity Waves in the Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alford, Matthew H.; MacKinnon, Jennifer A.; Simmons, Harper L.; Nash, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    We review the physics of near-inertial waves (NIWs) in the ocean and the observations, theory, and models that have provided our present knowledge. NIWs appear nearly everywhere in the ocean as a spectral peak at and just above the local inertial period f, and the longest vertical wavelengths can propagate at least hundreds of kilometers toward the equator from their source regions; shorter vertical wavelengths do not travel as far and do not contain as much energy, but lead to turbulent mixing owing to their high shear. NIWs are generated by a variety of mechanisms, including the wind, nonlinear interactions with waves of other frequencies, lee waves over bottom topography, and geostrophic adjustment; the partition among these is not known, although the wind is likely the most important. NIWs likely interact strongly with mesoscale and submesoscale motions, in ways that are just beginning to be understood.

  10. A nonreflecting upper boundary condition for anelastic nonhydrostatic Mesoscale gravity-wave models

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Joon; Kar, Sajal K.; Arakawa, Akio )

    1993-04-01

    A sponge layer is formulated to prevent spurious reflection of vertically propagating quasi-stationary gravity waves at the upper boundary of a two-dimensional numerical anelastic nonhydrostatic model. The sponge layer includes damping of both Newtonian-cooling type and Rayleigh-friction type, whose coefficients are determined in such a way that the reflectivity of wave energy at the bottom of the layer is zero. Unlike the formulations in earlier studies, our formulation includes the effects of vertical discretization, vertical mean density variation, and nonhydrostaticity. This sponge formulation is found effective in suppressing false downward reflection of waves for various types of quasi-stationary forcing.

  11. A nonreflecting upper boundary condition for anelastic nonhydrostatic mesoscale gravity-wave models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Young-Joon; Kar, Sajal K.; Arakawa, Akio

    1993-01-01

    A sponge layer is formulated to prevent spurious reflection of vertically propagating quasi-stationary gravity waves at the upper boundary of a two-dimensional numerical anelastic nonhydrostatic model. The sponge layer includes damping of both Newtonian-cooling type and Rayleigh-friction type, whose coefficients are determined in such a way that the reflectivity of wave energy at the bottom of the layer is zero. Unlike the formulations in earlier studies, our formulation includes the effects of vertical discretization, vertical mean density variation, and nonhydrostaticity. This sponge formulation is found effective in suppressing false downward reflection of waves for various types of quasi-stationary forcing.

  12. The First Ten Months of Investigation of Gravity Waves and Temperature Variability Over the Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugmire, Jonathan; Criddle, Neal; Taylor, Michael; Pautet, Dominique; Zhao, Yucheng

    2010-10-01

    The Andes region is an excellent natural laboratory for investigating gravity wave influences on the Upper Mesospheric and Lower Thermospheric (MLT) dynamics. The instrument suite that comprised the very successful Maui-MALT program was recently re-located to a new Andes Lidar Observatory (ALO) located at Cerro Pachon, Chile to obtain in-depth seasonal measurements of MLT dynamics over the Andes mountains. As part of the instrument set the Utah State University CEDAR Mesospheric Temperature Mapper (MTM) has operated continuously since August 2009 measuring the near infrared OH(6,2) band and the O2(0,1) Atmospheric band intensity and temperature perturbations. This poster focuses on an analysis of nightly OH temperatures and the observed variability, as well as selected gravity wave events illustrating the high wave activity and its diversity.

  13. A model for gravity-wave spectra observed by Doppler sounding systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzandt, T. E.

    1986-01-01

    A model for Mesosphere - Stratosphere - Troposphere (MST) radar spectra is developed following the formalism presented by Pinkel (1981). Expressions for the one-dimensional spectra of radial velocity versus frequency and versus radial wave number are presented. Their dependence on the parameters of the gravity-wave spectrum and on the experimental parameters, radar zenith angle and averaging time are described and the conditions for critical tests of the gravity-wave hypothesis are discussed. The model spectra is compared with spectra observed in the Arctic summer mesosphere by the Poker Flat radar. This model applies to any monostatic Doppler sounding system, including MST radar, Doppler lidar and Doppler sonar in the atmosphere, and Doppler sonar in the ocean.

  14. The response of plasma density to breaking inertial gravity wave in the lower regions of ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Wenbo Mahalov, Alex

    2014-04-15

    We present a three-dimensional numerical study for the E and lower F region ionosphere coupled with the neutral atmosphere dynamics. This model is developed based on a previous ionospheric model that examines the transport patterns of plasma density given a prescribed neutral atmospheric flow. Inclusion of neutral dynamics in the model allows us to examine the charge-neutral interactions over the full evolution cycle of an inertial gravity wave when the background flow spins up from rest, saturates and eventually breaks. Using Lagrangian analyses, we show the mixing patterns of the ionospheric responses and the formation of ionospheric layers. The corresponding plasma density in this flow develops complex wave structures and small-scale patches during the gravity wave breaking event.

  15. Analysis of converted S-waves and gravity anomaly along the Aegir Ridge: implications for crustal lithology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, A. K.; Breivik, A. J.; Mjelde, R.; Hanan, B. B.; Ito, G.; Sayit, K.; Howell, S.; Vogt, P. R.; Pedersen, R.

    2012-12-01

    The Aegir Ridge is an extinct spreading ridge in North-East Atlantic ocean. A thinner than normal crust around the Aegir Ridge appears as a hole in the extensively magmatic surroundings. Its proximity to the Iceland hot-spot makes it particularly important for understanding the changing dynamics of hotspot-ridge interaction. An integrated seismic and dredging experiment was conduced during the summer of 2010 with the primary aim to understand the nature of magmatism along the ridge shortly before cessation of seafloor spreading through variations of sub-seafloor lithological properties. Here, we present results of analysis of converted shear-waves recorded on OBS-sesimic data, and ship-gravity data. The shear-wave study enables us to quantify the variation of Vp/Vs in the sediments, crust and the upper-most mantle. We also inverted the gravity data to determine the sub-seafloor density distribution. The P- to S- converted shear-waves were identified on 20 OBSs along a profile with a total length of 550 km parallel to the ridge-axis. The sedimentary section on top of the crystalline crust is well illuminated in the streamer data. The forward modelling of the OBS data reveals that the Vp/Vs ratio in sediments are as high as 4.8, decreasing rapidly to a value of 3.00, primarily due to compaction of sediments with depth. Identification of sufficient PnS and PSn phases enable us to model the crustal and upper-most mantle Vp/Vs. The upper crystalline crust requires a Vp/Vs value of 1.99 and 1.89 for the southern and the northern profiles respectively, to fit the observations. The lower crust and upper-most part of the mantle have a Vp/Vs of ~1.82 and 1.795 respectively. Slightly lower Vp and moderate increase in Vp/Vs in parts of the crust and upper mantle presumably indicate presence of faulting, fracturing in the crust and moderate degree of serpentinization of the upper mantle. A sub-seafloor density model is derived by non-linear inversion of the gravity anomaly. The

  16. Gravity waves in the thermosphere observed by the AE satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, S. H.; Reber, C. A.; Huang, F. T.

    1983-01-01

    Atmospheric Explorer (AE) satellite data were used to investigate the spectra characteristics of wave-like structure observed in the neutral and ionized components of the thermosphere. Power spectral analysis derived by the maximum entropy method indicate the existence of a broad spectrum of scale sizes for the fluctuations ranging from tens to thousands of kilometers.

  17. Study of atmospheric gravity waves and infrasonic sources using the USArray Transportable Array pressure data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedlin, Michael; de Groot-Hedlin, Catherine; Hoffmann, Lars; Alexander, M. Joan; Stephan, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    The upgrade of the USArray Transportable Array (TA) with microbarometers and infrasound microphones has created an opportunity for a broad range of new studies of atmospheric sources and the large- and small-scale atmospheric structure through which signals from these events propagate. These studies are akin to early studies of seismic events and the Earth's interior structure that were made possible by the first seismic networks. In one early study with the new dataset we use the method of de Groot-Hedlin and Hedlin (2015) to recast the TA as a massive collection of 3-element arrays to detect and locate large infrasonic events. Over 2,000 events have been detected in 2013. The events cluster in highly active regions on land and offshore. Stratospherically ducted signals from some of these events have been recorded more than 2,000 km from the source and clearly show dispersion due to propagation through atmospheric gravity waves. Modeling of these signals has been used to test statistical models of atmospheric gravity waves. The network is also useful for making direct observations of gravity waves. We are currently studying TA and satellite observations of gravity waves from singular events to better understand how the waves near ground level relate to those observed aloft. We are also studying the long-term statistics of these waves from the beginning of 2010 through 2014. Early work using data bandpass filtered from 1-6 hr shows that both the TA and satellite data reveal highly active source regions, such as near the Great Lakes. de Groot-Hedlin and Hedlin, 2015, A method for detecting and locating geophysical events using clusters of arrays, Geophysical Journal International, v203, p960-971, doi: 10.1093/gji/ggv345.

  18. Case studies of nonorographic gravity waves over the Southern Ocean emphasize the role of moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plougonven, Riwal; Hertzog, Albert; Alexander, M. Joan

    2015-02-01

    Two case studies of nonorographic gravity waves are carried out for wave events that occurred over the Southern Ocean in November 2005. Mesoscale simulations were carried out with the Weather and Research Forecast model. The simulated waves were compared to observations from superpressure balloons of the Vorcore campaign and from the High Resolution Dynamic Limb Sounder satellite. Satisfactory agreement is found, giving confidence in the estimations of wave parameters and amplitudes. For the amplitudes, both the model and observations provide a lower bound, for different reasons. Waves are found in the lower stratosphere with horizontal wavelengths of the order of 150-200 km in the horizontal, 5-8 km in the vertical, corresponding to intrinsic frequencies between 5 and 10 f, where f is the Coriolis parameter. Although the tropospheric flow is very different between the two cases, there are features which are common and appear significant for the gravity waves: these include intense localized updrafts associated with convection in the troposphere and a displaced polar vortex inducing strong winds in the stratosphere above the frontal region. Relative to theoretical expectations, the simulations emphasize the role of moisture. Intrinsic frequencies are significantly higher than those expected for waves produced by dry spontaneous generation from jets. To quantify the contribution of moisture, dry simulations were carried out, yielding momentum fluxes over oceanic regions that were 2.5 times weaker. Identification of the generation mechanisms in these complex flows calls for further study, and these should include moisture and a realistic stratospheric jet.

  19. The influence of surface gravity waves on the injection of turbulence in the upper ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhoday Paskyabi, M.; Fer, I.

    2014-06-01

    Observations were made in the near-surface layer, at about 8 m depth in 132 m deep water off the coast of Ålesund in Norway, for a duration of 2.5 months in late 2011. The measurement period covers the passage of two low pressure systems with substantial wind and wave forcing. The time series of the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy, ɛ, and the estimates of surface gravity waves are analysed. Dissipation rates varied by 5 orders of magnitude and reached 10-5-10-4 W kg-1 in conditions when wind speed exceeded 15 m s-1 and the significant wave height was of the order of 10 m. The data set suggests substantial injection of turbulence from breaking surface gravity waves and Langmuir turbulence. To support and interpret the observations, numerical calculations are conducted using a second-order turbulence closure scheme based on the Mellor-Yamada level 2.5 scheme, modified to incorporate the near-surface processes such as Langmuir circulation and wave breaking. The results from a run forced by observed wind and wave fields compare favourably with the observations. Comparisons with other near-surface data sets available from the literature lend confidence on our dissipation measurements and the wave-forced simulations.

  20. Design and Analysis of Tubular Permanent Magnet Linear Wave Generator

    PubMed Central

    Si, Jikai; Feng, Haichao; Su, Peng; Zhang, Lufeng

    2014-01-01

    Due to the lack of mature design program for the tubular permanent magnet linear wave generator (TPMLWG) and poor sinusoidal characteristics of the air gap flux density for the traditional surface-mounted TPMLWG, a design method and a new secondary structure of TPMLWG are proposed. An equivalent mathematical model of TPMLWG is established to adopt the transformation relationship between the linear velocity of permanent magnet rotary generator and the operating speed of TPMLWG, to determine the structure parameters of the TPMLWG. The new secondary structure of the TPMLWG contains surface-mounted permanent magnets and the interior permanent magnets, which form a series-parallel hybrid magnetic circuit, and their reasonable structure parameters are designed to get the optimum pole-arc coefficient. The electromagnetic field and temperature field of TPMLWG are analyzed using finite element method. It can be included that the sinusoidal characteristics of air gap flux density of the new secondary structure TPMLWG are improved, the cogging force as well as mechanical vibration is reduced in the process of operation, and the stable temperature rise of generator meets the design requirements when adopting the new secondary structure of the TPMLWG. PMID:25050388

  1. Design and analysis of tubular permanent magnet linear wave generator.

    PubMed

    Si, Jikai; Feng, Haichao; Su, Peng; Zhang, Lufeng

    2014-01-01

    Due to the lack of mature design program for the tubular permanent magnet linear wave generator (TPMLWG) and poor sinusoidal characteristics of the air gap flux density for the traditional surface-mounted TPMLWG, a design method and a new secondary structure of TPMLWG are proposed. An equivalent mathematical model of TPMLWG is established to adopt the transformation relationship between the linear velocity of permanent magnet rotary generator and the operating speed of TPMLWG, to determine the structure parameters of the TPMLWG. The new secondary structure of the TPMLWG contains surface-mounted permanent magnets and the interior permanent magnets, which form a series-parallel hybrid magnetic circuit, and their reasonable structure parameters are designed to get the optimum pole-arc coefficient. The electromagnetic field and temperature field of TPMLWG are analyzed using finite element method. It can be included that the sinusoidal characteristics of air gap flux density of the new secondary structure TPMLWG are improved, the cogging force as well as mechanical vibration is reduced in the process of operation, and the stable temperature rise of generator meets the design requirements when adopting the new secondary structure of the TPMLWG.

  2. Gravity wave and tidal influences on equatorial spread F based on observations during the Spread F Experiment (SpreadFEx)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritts, D. C.; Vadas, S. L.; Riggin, D. M.; Abdu, M. A.; Batista, I. S.; Takahashi, H.; Medeiros, A.; Kamalabadi, F.; Liu, H.-L.; Fejer, B. G.; Taylor, M. J.

    2008-10-01

    The Spread F Experiment, or SpreadFEx, was performed from September to November 2005 to define the potential role of neutral atmosphere dynamics, primarily gravity waves propagating upward from the lower atmosphere, in seeding equatorial spread F (ESF) and plasma bubbles extending to higher altitudes. A description of the SpreadFEx campaign motivations, goals, instrumentation, and structure, and an overview of the results presented in this special issue, are provided by Fritts et al. (2008a). The various analyses of neutral atmosphere and ionosphere dynamics and structure described in this special issue provide enticing evidence of gravity waves arising from deep convection in plasma bubble seeding at the bottomside F layer. Our purpose here is to employ these results to estimate gravity wave characteristics at the bottomside F layer, and to assess their possible contributions to optimal seeding conditions for ESF and plasma instability growth rates. We also assess expected tidal influences on the environment in which plasma bubble seeding occurs, given their apparent large wind and temperature amplitudes at these altitudes. We conclude 1) that gravity waves can achieve large amplitudes at the bottomside F layer, 2) that tidal winds likely control the orientations of the gravity waves that attain the highest altitudes and have the greatest effects, 3) that the favored gravity wave orientations enhance most or all of the parameters influencing plasma instability growth rates, and 4) that gravity wave and tidal structures acting together have an even greater potential impact on plasma instability growth rates and plasma bubble seeding.

  3. A global morphology of gravity wave activity in the stratosphere revealed by the 8-year SABER/TIMED data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Xiong, J.; Liu, L.; Wan, W.

    2011-11-01

    From 8 years' SABER/TIMED temperature profiles between January 2002 and December 2009, we studied the activity of gravity waves in the stratosphere globally. Global distribution of stratospheric gravity wave potential energy was calculated from the temperature perturbations. Seasonal comparison of gravity wave potential energy Ep shows an annual variation in middle and high latitudes and a semiannual variation in the tropics. Around the equator, gravity wave interannual enhancements are identified just below the zonal wind zero (u = 0) contours corresponding to descending eastward shear phase of the QBO. Furthermore, we provide observation evidence to support the conclusion that the deep convection is a major source for the observed tropical gravity wave activity. The considerable longitude variations of largest potential energy around the equator are related not only to the specific topography and tropical convections but also to many other factors. We can infer that topography and tropical deep convection are the important sources of the gravity waves in the stratosphere, but the observed gravity waves in the tropical/subtropical stratosphere are strongly affected by winds with different QBO phases.

  4. A global morphology of gravity wave activity in the stratosphere revealed by the 8-year SABER/TIMED data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Xiong, J.; Liu, L.; Wan, W.

    2012-11-01

    From 8 years' SABER/TIMED temperature profiles between January 2002 and December 2009, we studied the activity of gravity waves in the stratosphere globally. Global distribution of stratospheric gravity wave potential energy was calculated from the temperature perturbations. Seasonal comparison of gravity wave potential energy Ep shows an annual variation in middle and high latitudes and a semiannual variation in the tropics. Around the equator, gravity wave interannual enhancements are identified just below the zonal wind zero (u = 0) contours corresponding to descending eastward shear phase of the QBO. Furthermore, we provide observation evidence to support the conclusion that the deep convection is a major source for the observed tropical gravity wave activity. The considerable longitude variations of largest potential energy around the equator are related not only to the specific topography and tropical convections but also to many other factors. We can infer that topography and tropical deep convection are the important sources of the gravity waves in the stratosphere, but the observed gravity waves in the tropical/subtropical stratosphere are strongly affected by winds with different QBO phases.

  5. Characteristics of atmospheric gravity waves observed using the MU (Middle and Upper atmosphere) radar and GPS (Global Positioning System) radio occultation

    PubMed Central

    TSUDA, Toshitaka

    2014-01-01

    The wind velocity and temperature profiles observed in the middle atmosphere (altitude: 10–100 km) show perturbations resulting from superposition of various atmospheric waves, including atmospheric gravity waves. Atmospheric gravity waves are known to play an important role in determining the general circulation in the middle atmosphere by dynamical stresses caused by gravity wave breaking. In this paper, we summarize the characteristics of atmospheric gravity waves observed using the middle and upper atmosphere (MU) radar in Japan, as well as novel satellite data obtained from global positioning system radio occultation (GPS RO) measurements. In particular, we focus on the behavior of gravity waves in the mesosphere (50–90 km), where considerable gravity wave attenuation occurs. We also report on the global distribution of gravity wave activity in the stratosphere (10–50 km), highlighting various excitation mechanisms such as orographic effects, convection in the tropics, meteorological disturbances, the subtropical jet and the polar night jet. PMID:24492645

  6. Characteristics of atmospheric gravity waves observed using the MU (Middle and Upper atmosphere) radar and GPS (Global Positioning System) radio occultation.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Toshitaka

    2014-01-01

    The wind velocity and temperature profiles observed in the middle atmosphere (altitude: 10-100 km) show perturbations resulting from superposition of various atmospheric waves, including atmospheric gravity waves. Atmospheric gravity waves are known to play an important role in determining the general circulation in the middle atmosphere by dynamical stresses caused by gravity wave breaking. In this paper, we summarize the characteristics of atmospheric gravity waves observed using the middle and upper atmosphere (MU) radar in Japan, as well as novel satellite data obtained from global positioning system radio occultation (GPS RO) measurements. In particular, we focus on the behavior of gravity waves in the mesosphere (50-90 km), where considerable gravity wave attenuation occurs. We also report on the global distribution of gravity wave activity in the stratosphere (10-50 km), highlighting various excitation mechanisms such as orographic effects, convection in the tropics, meteorological disturbances, the subtropical jet and the polar night jet.

  7. Characteristics of atmospheric gravity waves observed using the MU (Middle and Upper atmosphere) radar and GPS (Global Positioning System) radio occultation.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Toshitaka

    2014-01-01

    The wind velocity and temperature profiles observed in the middle atmosphere (altitude: 10-100 km) show perturbations resulting from superposition of various atmospheric waves, including atmospheric gravity waves. Atmospheric gravity waves are known to play an important role in determining the general circulation in the middle atmosphere by dynamical stresses caused by gravity wave breaking. In this paper, we summarize the characteristics of atmospheric gravity waves observed using the middle and upper atmosphere (MU) radar in Japan, as well as novel satellite data obtained from global positioning system radio occultation (GPS RO) measurements. In particular, we focus on the behavior of gravity waves in the mesosphere (50-90 km), where considerable gravity wave attenuation occurs. We also report on the global distribution of gravity wave activity in the stratosphere (10-50 km), highlighting various excitation mechanisms such as orographic effects, convection in the tropics, meteorological disturbances, the subtropical jet and the polar night jet. PMID:24492645

  8. The Quasi-Biennial Oscillation Based on Double Gaussian Distributional Parameterization of Inertial Gravity Waves in WACCM Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, C.; Xue, X.; Dou, X.; Wu, J.

    2015-12-01

    The adjustment of gravity wave parameterization associated with model convection has made possible the spontaneous generation of the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) in the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM 4.0), although there are some mismatching when compared with the observation. The parameterization is based on Lindzen's linear saturation theory which can better describe inertia-gravity waves (IGW) by taking the Coriolis effects into consideration. In this work we improve the parameterization by importing a more realistic double Gaussian distribution IGW spectrum, which is calculated from tropical radiosonde observations. A series of WACCM simulations are performed to determine the relationship between the period and amplitude of equatorial zonal wind oscillations and the feature of parameterized IGW. All of these simulations are capable of generating equatorial wind oscillations in the stratosphere using the standard spatial resolution settings. The period of the oscillation is associate inversely with the strength of the IGW forcing, but the central values of double Gaussian distribution IGW have influence both on the magnitude and period of the oscillation. In fact, the eastward and westward IGWs affect the amplitude of the QBO wind, respectively, and the strength of IGWs forcing determines the accelerating rate of the QBO wind. Furthermore, stronger forcing of IGWs can lead to a deeper propagate of the QBO phase, which can extend the lowest altitude of the constant zonal wind amplitudes to about 100 hPa.

  9. Mesoscale variations in acoustic signals induced by atmospheric gravity waves.

    PubMed

    Chunchuzov, Igor; Kulichkov, Sergey; Perepelkin, Vitaly; Ziemann, Astrid; Arnold, Klaus; Kniffka, Anke

    2009-02-01

    The results of acoustic tomographic monitoring of the coherent structures in the lower atmosphere and the effects of these structures on acoustic signal parameters are analyzed in the present study. From the measurements of acoustic travel time fluctuations (periods 1 min-1 h) with distant receivers, the temporal fluctuations of the effective sound speed and wind speed are retrieved along different ray paths connecting an acoustic pulse source and several receivers. By using a coherence analysis of the fluctuations near spatially distanced ray turning points, the internal wave-associated fluctuations are filtered and their spatial characteristics (coherences, horizontal phase velocities, and spatial scales) are estimated. The capability of acoustic tomography in estimating wind shear near ground is shown. A possible mechanism describing the temporal modulation of the near-ground wind field by ducted internal waves in the troposphere is proposed.

  10. Nonlinear Interactions between Gravity Waves in Water of Constant Depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szmidt, Kazimierz; Hedzielski, Benedykt

    2015-06-01

    The paper deals with interactions between water waves propagating in fluid of constant depth. In formulation of this problem, a nonlinear character of these interactions is taken into account. In particular, in order to simplify a solution to nonlinear boundary conditions at the free surface, a system of material coordinates is employed as independent variables in the description of the phenomenon. The main attention is focused on the transient solutions corresponding to fluid motion starting from rest. With respect to the initial value problem considered, we confine our attention to a finite fluid domain. For a finite elapse of time, measured from the starting point, the solution in a finite fluid area mimics a solution within an infinite domain, inherent for wave propagation problems. Because of the complicated structure of equations describing nonlinear waves, an approximate formulation is considered, which is based on a power series expansion of dependent variables with respect to a small parameter. Such a solution is assumed to be accurate in describing the main features of the phenomenon. Numerical experiments are conducted to illustrate the approximate formulation developed in this paper.

  11. Randomly driven acoustic-gravity waves in the solar atmosphere: cutoff period and its observational verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murawski, K.; Musielak, Z. E.

    2016-09-01

    We study the propagation of acoustic-gravity waves in the solar atmosphere. The waves are excited by a space- and time-dependent random driver, whose action mimics turbulence in the upper part of the solar convection zone. Our main goal is to find vertical variations of wave periods of these waves and compare the obtained results to the recent observations of Wiśniewska et al. (2016). We solve numerically the hydrodynamic equations in the solar atmosphere whose temperature is given by the semi-empirical model of Avrett & Loeser (2008). The obtained numerical results show that wave periods vary along vertical direction in agreement with the recent observational data. We discuss physical consequences of our theoretical results.

  12. Model for density waves in gravity-driven granular flow in narrow pipes.

    PubMed

    Ellingsen, Simen A; Gjerden, Knut S; Grøva, Morten; Hansen, Alex

    2010-06-01

    A gravity-driven flow of grains through a narrow pipe in vacuum is studied by means of a one-dimensional model with two coefficients of restitution. Numerical simulations show clearly how density waves form when a strikingly simple criterion is fulfilled: that dissipation due to collisions between the grains and the walls of the pipe is greater per collision than that which stems from collisions between particles. Counterintuitively, the highest flow rate is observed when the number of grains per density wave grows large. We find strong indication that the number of grains per density wave always approaches a constant as the particle number tends to infinity, and that collapse to a single wave, which was often observed also in previous simulations, occurs because the number of grains is insufficient for multiple wave formation.

  13. Satellite observations of middle atmosphere gravity wave absolute momentum flux and of its vertical gradient during recent stratospheric warmings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ern, Manfred; Trinh, Quang Thai; Kaufmann, Martin; Krisch, Isabell; Preusse, Peter; Ungermann, Jörn; Zhu, Yajun; Gille, John C.; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Russell, James M., III; Schwartz, Michael J.; Riese, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Sudden stratospheric warmings (SSWs) are circulation anomalies in the polar region during winter. They mostly occur in the Northern Hemisphere and affect also surface weather and climate. Both planetary waves and gravity waves contribute to the onset and evolution of SSWs. While the role of planetary waves for SSW evolution has been recognized, the effect of gravity waves is still not fully understood, and has not been comprehensively analyzed based on global observations. In particular, information on the gravity wave driving of the background winds during SSWs is still missing.We investigate the boreal winters from 2001/2002 until 2013/2014. Absolute gravity wave momentum fluxes and gravity wave dissipation (potential drag) are estimated from temperature observations of the satellite instruments HIRDLS and SABER. In agreement with previous work, we find that sometimes gravity wave activity is enhanced before or around the central date of major SSWs, particularly during vortex-split events. Often, SSWs are associated with polar-night jet oscillation (PJO) events. For these events, we find that gravity wave activity is strongly suppressed when the wind has reversed from eastward to westward (usually after the central date of a major SSW). In addition, gravity wave potential drag at the bottom of the newly forming eastward-directed jet is remarkably weak, while considerable potential drag at the top of the jet likely contributes to the downward propagation of both the jet and the new elevated stratopause. During PJO events, we also find some indication for poleward propagation of gravity waves. Another striking finding is that obviously localized gravity wave sources, likely mountain waves and jet-generated gravity waves, play an important role during the evolution of SSWs and potentially contribute to the triggering of SSWs by preconditioning the shape of the polar vortex. The distribution of these hot spots is highly variable and strongly depends on the zonal and

  14. Three-dimensional turbulence-resolving modeling of the Venusian cloud layer and associated gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefevre, Maxence; Spiga, Aymeric; Lebonnois, Sebastien

    2016-10-01

    One of the main questions that remains unclear about the dynamics of the atmosphere of Venus and its interaction with the photochemistry is the characterization of the cloud convective layer which mixes momentum, heat, chemical species and generates gravity waves observed by Venus Express. This dynamical forcing induced by the cloud layer has been proposed as a significant contribution to the maintenance of the super-rotation. However these waves develop from regional to local scales and can not be resolved by global circulation models (GCM) developed insofar. Therefore we developed an unprecedented 3D Venusian mesoscale model based on the Martian mesoscale model using the Weather Research and Forecast terrestrial model. We report the first application of this model : simulating convection in the Venusian cloud layer and associated gravity waves by 3D turbulent-resolving simulations (Large-Eddy Simulations). The model employs an offline radiative forcing based on heating rates extracted from the LMD Venus GCM consisting of three distinct kind of rates. Two radiative ones for short wave (solar) and long wave (IR) and one for the adiabatic cooling/warming due to the global dynamics of the atmosphere (mainly the Hadley cell) with 2 different cloud models. Therefore we are able to characterize the convection and associated gravity waves in function of latitude and local time. To assess the impact of the general circulation on the convection we ran simulations with forcing from a 1D radiative model.The resolved convective layer takes place between 1.0 105 and 3.8 104 Pa with vertical wind between ± 3 m/s, is organized as polygonal closed cells of about 8x8km2, and emits gravity waves on either side with temperature perturbations of about 0.5 K with vertical wavelength of 1 km and horizontal wavelength from 1 to almost 20 km. The order of magnitude of the resolved plumes is consistent with observations though underestimated.We are working on coupling the model with a

  15. Higher order dispersion in the propagation of a gravity wave packet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, K. C.; Dong, B.

    1989-01-01

    To the first order of approximation, the complex amplitude of a wave packet in an anisotropic and dispersive medium is convected with the group of velocity. However, a gravity wave is a vector wave. Its wave packet must be formed by superposition of various wave numbers with corresponding frequencies, as is the case for scalar waves, and additionally by superposing many eigenmodes which also depend on the wave number. To represent the vector wave packet self-consistently, it is found that a gradient term must be included in the expansion. For a Guassian wave packet, this gradient term is shown to have important implications on the velocity vector as represented by its hodograph. Numerical results show that the hodograph is influenced by the location of the relative position of interest from the center of a Gaussian pulse. Higher order expansion shows that an initial Gaussian wave packet will retain its Gaussian shape as it propagates, but the pulse will spread in all directions with its major axis undergoing a rotation. Numerical results indicate that these higher order dispersive effects may be marginally observable in the atmosphere.

  16. Goose Bay radar observations of earth-reflected atmospheric gravity waves in the high-latitude ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Ruohoniemi, J.M.; Greenwald, R.A.; Baker, K.B.; Samson, J.C.

    1990-05-03

    An HF backscatter radar at Goose Bay, Labrador made it possible to observe irregularities in the distribution of ionospheric ionization at E and F region altitudes (100 - 600 km) in the high-latitude (65 - 85 deg Lambda) ionosphere. Recently it has been established that the passage of atmospheric gravity waves perturbs the ionosphere in ways that are readily detected in returns that reflect off the ionospheric layers. The particular strength of the technique lies in the nearly instantaneous measurement of gravity wave effects over large areas ( 1 million sq. km). With this information the propagation of gravity waves can be accurately modelled. Generally gravity waves are observed during daylight hours propagating away from the auroral electrojets. The propagation mode involves penetration of wave energy through the lower atmosphere and subsequent reflection by the earth's surface. The frequencies associated with the waves lie in the 0.4 - 0.6 mHz range and the wavelengths vary from 300 to 500 km. The excitation sources appear to lie in the vicinity of the high-latitude electrojets. In this paper we outline the analysis of gravity wave effects on HF propagation and present an example of a modelled gravity wave event.

  17. Impact of the Gravity Wave Parameterization on the Transport of Nitrogen Oxides in the Middle Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meraner, Katharina; Schmidt, Hauke; Manzini, Elisa

    2016-04-01

    Gravity waves strongly influence the mesospheric circulation and hence, the transport processes in the middle atmosphere. After particularly strong sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) event as in January 2009, satellite observations measured an up to 50 times higher amount of nitrogen oxides in the stratosphere descended from the thermosphere than under undisturbed conditions (Randall et al., 2009; GRL). However, the international working group on High Energy Particle Precipitation in the Atmosphere (HEPPA) stated that the mesospheric descent of nitrogen oxides in models is in general too weak after the SSW in 2009. McLandress et al., (2013; JAS) showed that the non-orographic gravity wave drag determines the strength of the downward transport of atmospheric tracers after a sudden stratospheric warming. It also controls the descent of the elevated stratopause, which is known to be too quick in the Hamburg Model of Neutral and Ionized Atmosphere (HAMMONIA) and in other models covering this altitude region (Pedatella et al., 2014; JGR). Here, we discuss how sensitive the dynamics of the middle atmosphere in HAMMONIA are to changes of the parameterized gravity wave sources. Discussed are both, changes in a homogeneous background source and a source related to frontal activity. We concentrate on the descent of nitrogen oxides and of the elevated stratopause for the winter 2009 including the major stratospheric warming in January 2009. We will show that the strength of the downward transport depends on the wave amplitude, which is partly defined by the source parameters, and on the breaking height

  18. Rayleigh lidar observations of gravity wave activity in the stratosphere and lower mesosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. S.; Gardner, C. S.; Liu, C. H.

    1987-01-01

    Forty-two monochromatic gravity wave events were observed in the 25 to 55 km altitude region during 16 nights of Rayleigh lidar measurements at Poker Flat, Alaska and Urbana, Illinois. The measured wave parameters were compared to previous radar and lidar measurements of gravity wave activity. Vertical wavelengths, lambda(z), between 2 and 11.5 km with vertical phase velocities, c(z), between 0.1 and 1 m/s were observed. Measured values of lambda(z) and c(z) were used to infer observed wave periods, T(ob), between 50 and 1000 minutes and horizontal wavelengths, lambda(x), from 25 to 2000 km. Dominant wave activity was found at vertical wavelengths between 2 to 4 km and 7 to 10 km. No seasonal variations were evident in the observed wave parameters. Vertical and horizontal wavelengths showed a clear tendency to increase with T(ob), which is consistent with recent sodium lidar studies of monochromatic wave events near the mesopause. Measured power law relationships between the wave parameters were lambda(z) varies as T(ob) sup 0.96, lambda(x) varies as T(ob) sup 1.8, and c(z) varies as T(ob) sup -0.85. The kinetic energy calculated for the monochromatic wave events varied as k(z) sup -2, k(x) sup -1, and f(ob) sup -1.7. The atmospheric scale heights calculated for each observation date range from 6.5 to 7.6 km with a mean value of 7 km. The increase of rms wind perturbations with altitude indicated an amplitude growth length of 20.9 km. The altitude profile of kinetic energy density decreased with height, suggesting that waves in this altitude region were subject to dissipation or saturation effects.

  19. Radar observations of simultaneous traveling ionospheric disturbances and atmospheric gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nygrén, T.; Aikio, A. T.; Voiculescu, M.; Cai, L.

    2015-05-01

    Simultaneous observations of atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs) and traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) measured by an incoherent scatter radar at high latitudes are shown. The measurements were made using a beam swing experiment of the EISCAT UHF radar. The F region TID is seen as wavefronts in electron density, whereas the E region AGW is seen in the oscillations of the neutral wind. The wave vector of the TID has a downward component indicating that energy propagates upward. The periods of AGWs and TIDs are approximately the same (52-57min), so it is concluded that the observed gravity wave in the E region propagates to the F region causing the TID there. Two interesting properties of the waves are observed. First, the neutral wind oscillations have an amplitude minimum at about 115km. It is suggested that this could be related to the minimum of the vertical refractive index around 120km. Second, in the course of time, the wave vector of the TID turns more in the downward direction, which leads to an increase in the horizontal wave length from 400 to 1450km. A possible explanation is that the background wind increases with altitude and turns the wavefronts more horizontal when distance from a stationary source increases. We suggest that the source is the sunrise terminator, since the horizontal direction of propagation of the TID in the morning hours is from the west, where both the auroral and thunderstorm activity are low.

  20. Kludge modified gravity inspiral-merger-ringdown waveforms: Testing gravitational-wave tests of general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson-McDaniel, Nathan; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Samajdar, Anuradha; Ajith, Parameswaran; Del Pozzo, Walter

    2016-03-01

    We describe a variety of self-consistent modifications of the effective-one-body framework that yield kludge modified gravity inspiral-merger-ringdown (IMR) waveforms. These waveforms do not correspond to any particular modified theory of gravity, but offer parametrized deviations from general relativity in various regimes. They can thus be used to test the performance of various gravitational wave tests of general relativity (GR). As an example, we introduce the IMR consistency test, which tests for consistency between the estimations of the final mass and spin from the inspiral and merger-ringdown portions of a binary black hole waveform. We show that for reasonable source parameters and SNRs in Advanced LIGO, this test is able to detect a deviation from GR with high confidence for certain modifications of the GR energy flux that are not constrained by observations of the double pulsar. We also consider the performance of a parameterized test of GR on these kludge modified gravity waveforms.

  1. Effect of flux surface curvature on the linear coupling of electron cyclotron waves in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khusainov, T. A.; Gospodchikov, E. D.; Shalashov, A. G.

    2012-02-01

    Specific features of the linear interaction of ordinary and extraordinary electromagnetic waves in the electron cyclotron frequency range in a nonuniform plasma confined in a toroidal magnetic trap are considered. Reduced wave equations taking into account the curvature of the cut-off surfaces in toroidal geometry are formulated. Using these equations, the distributions of the wave fields in the coupling region are analyzed. A method for calculating quasi-optical beams passed through the region of linear wave interaction is proposed.

  2. Linear analysis of a backward wave oscillator with triangular corrugated slow wave structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saber, Md. Ghulam; Sagor, Rakibul Hasan; Amin, Md. Ruhul

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a backward wave oscillator (BWO) with triangularly corrugated periodic metallic slow wave structure (TrCSWS) driven by an infinitely thin annular electron beam is studied using linear theory. The electron beam is assumed to be guided by a strong magnetic field. The triangular axial profile of the SWS is approximated by a Fourier series in order to apply the linear Rayleigh-Fourier (R-F) theory that has long been used in the theoretical analysis of BWOs with sinusoidally corrugated SWS (SCSWS). The dispersion equation for various beam parameters has been solved and the temporal growth rate (TGR) of the electromagnetic wave for the fundamental TM_{01} mode is calculated numerically. The TGR values for different beam parameters have been compared with those of the BWO with SCSWS, semi-circularly corrugated SWS (SCCSWS) and trapezoidally corrugated SWS (TCSWS). In order to compare the TGR values, the amplitude of corrugation of the TrCSWS is varied so that its dispersion curve of TM_{01} mode almost coincides with that of the SCSWS and TCSWS. The study reveals that the performance (in terms of TGR) of the proposed BWO with TrCSWS is comparable to that of other BWOs with SCSWS and TCSWS for the same set of beam parameters and it provides significantly better performance than SCCSWS. So, the proposed TrCSWS that can easily be constructed may replace SCSWS, SCCSWS or TCSWS as their viable alternative.

  3. Imaging gravity waves in lower stratospheric AMSU-A radiances, Part 1: Simple forward model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckermann, S. D.; Wu, D. L.

    2006-08-01

    Using a simplified model of in-orbit radiance acquisition by the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU-A), we derive three-dimensional temperature weighting functions for Channel 9 measurements (peaking at ~60-90 hPa) at all 30 cross-track beam positions and use them to investigate the sensitivity of these radiances to gravity waves. The vertical widths of the weighting functions limit detection to waves with vertical wavelengths of ≳10 km, with slightly better vertical wavelength sensitivity at the outermost scan angles due to the limb effect. Fourier Transforms of two-dimensional cross-track weighting functions reveal optimal sensitivity to cross-track wavelengths at the near-nadir scan angles, where horizontal measurement footprints are smallest. This sensitivity is greater for the AMSU-A on the Aqua satellite than for the identical instruments on the NOAA meteorological satellites, due to a lower orbit altitude and thus smaller horizontal footprints from antenna spreading. Small cross-track asymmetries in the radiance response to gravity waves are found that peak at the mid-range scan angles, with more symmetric responses at near-nadir and far off-nadir scan angles. Three-dimensional simulations show gravity wave oscillations imaged in horizontal AMSU-A radiance maps swept out by the scan pattern and satellite motion. A distorting curvature is added to imaged wave phase lines due to vertical variations in weighting function peaks with cross-track scan angle. This wave distortion is analogous to the well-known "limb darkening" and "limb brightening" of microwave radiances acquired from purely vertical background temperature profiles by cross-track scanners. Waves propagating along track are more visible in these images at the outermost scan angles than those propagating cross track, due to oversampling and narrower widths of the horizontal measurement footprints in the along track direction. Based on nominal noise floors and representative lower stratospheric

  4. Imaging gravity waves in lower stratospheric AMSU-A radiances, Part 1: simple forward model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckermann, S. D.; Wu, D. L.

    2006-03-01

    Using a simplified model of in-orbit radiance acquisition by the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU-A), we derive three-dimensional temperature weighting functions for Channel 9 measurements (peaking at ~60-90 hPa) at all 30 cross-track beam positions and use them to investigate the sensitivity of these radiances to gravity waves. The vertical widths of the weighting functions limit detection to waves with vertical wavelengths of ≳10 km, with slightly better vertical wavelength sensitivity at the outermost scan angles due to the limb effect. Fourier Transforms of two-dimensional cross-track weighting functions reveal optimal sensitivity to cross-track wavelengths at the near-nadir scan angles, where horizontal measurement footprints are smallest. This sensitivity is greater for the AMSU-A on the Aqua satellite than for the identical instruments on the NOAA meteorological satellites, due to a lower orbit altitude and thus smaller horizontal footprints from antenna spreading. Small cross-track asymmetries in the radiance response to gravity waves are found that peak at the mid-range scan angles, with more symmetric responses at near-nadir and far off-nadir scan angles. Three-dimensional simulations show gravity wave oscillations imaged in horizontal AMSU-A radiance maps swept out by the scan pattern and satellite motion. A distorting curvature is added to imaged wave phase lines due to vertical variations in weighting function peaks with cross-track scan angle. This wave distortion is analogous to the well-known ''limb darkening'' and ''limb brightening'' of microwave radiances acquired from purely vertical background temperature profiles by cross-track scanners. Waves propagating along track are more visible in these images at the outermost scan angles than those propagating cross track, due to oversampling and narrower widths of the horizontal measurement footprints in the along track direction. Based on nominal noise floors and representative lower

  5. Linear versus nonlinear response of a forced wave turbulence system.

    PubMed

    Cadot, Olivier; Touzé, Cyril; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2010-10-01

    A vibrating plate is set into a chaotic state of wave turbulence by a forcing having periodic and random components. Both components are weighted in order to explore continuously intermediate forcing from the periodic to the random one, but keeping constant its rms value. The transverse velocity of the plate is measured at the application point of the force. It is found that whatever the detail of the forcing is, the velocity spectra exhibit a universal cascade for frequencies larger than the forcing frequency range. In contrast, the velocity spectra strongly depend on the nature of the forcing within the range of forcing frequencies. The coherence function is used to extract the contribution of the velocity fluctuations that display a linear relationship with the forcing. The nonlinear contribution to the velocity fluctuations is found to be almost constant, about 55% of the total velocity fluctuations whatever the nature of the forcing from random to periodic. On the other hand, the nonlinear contribution to the fluctuations of the injected power depends on the nature of the forcing; it is significantly larger for the periodic forcing (60%) and decreases continuously as the randomness is increased, reaching a value of 40% for the pure random forcing. For all the cases of intermediate forcing from random to periodic, a simple model of the velocity response recovers in a fairly good agreement the probability density function of the injected power. The consequence of the existence of a linear-response component is discussed in the context of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem validation in experiments of out-of-equilibrium systems. PMID:21230369

  6. Ducted Gravity Wave Propagation in the Dynamic Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snively, J. B.; Hickey, M. P.; Walterscheid, R. L.

    2012-12-01

    Ducted gravity waves are commonly observed in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) region; airglow data reveal typical horizontal wavelengths of ˜15-35 km and periods of ˜4-8 minutes [e.g., textit{Simkhada et al.}, Ann. Geophys., 27, 3213, 2009]. Typical airglow intensity perturbations suggest amplitudes on the order of a few to tens of Kelvin [textit{Snively et al.}, JGR, 115, A11311, 2010]; radar measurements have identified ducted wave wind perturbations on the order of a few to tens of m/s [e.g., textit{Fritts and Janches}, JGR, 113, D05112, 2008]. Waves become trapped by the combination of thermal and wind structure, and propagate as ideal ducted modes [textit{Walterscheid and Hickey}, 114, D19109, 2009] and non-ideal ducted wave packets that effectively ``bounce'' between layered regions of evanescence [textit{Yu and Hickey}, GRL, 34, L02821, 2007]. Here, we investigate the effects of time-varying MLT region structure on the trapping of ducted waves, and the transfer of energy between ideal ducted modes and non-ideally ducted or freely-propagating wave packets. Using first a steady-state 1D full-wave model to identify available duct modes and their dispersion curves, we investigate the evolutions of duct environments occurring within the MLT as they vary over time scales of several hours. Specific case studies are constructed within a 2D nonlinear compressible model, to investigate the time-dependent tuning and de-tuning of MLT-region ducts, and the transfers of energy to and from ducted modes. Results suggest that the dynamic and variable structure of the MLT region modulates the observability of ducted waves that may be seen in airglow data, while also contributing to the redistribution, and occasional dissipation, of gravity waves at these short periods.

  7. Long-Term Observation of Small and Medium-Scale Gravity Waves over the Brazilian Equatorial Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essien, Patrick; Buriti, Ricardo; Wrasse, Cristiano M.; Medeiros, Amauri; Paulino, Igo; Takahashi, Hisao; Campos, Jose Andre

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports the long term observations of small and medium-scale gravity waves over Brazilian equatorial region. Coordinated optical and radio measurements were made from OLAP at Sao Joao do Cariri (7.400S, 36.500W) to investigate the occurrences and properties and to characterize the regional mesospheric gravity wave field. All-sky imager measurements were made from the site. for almost 11 consecutive years (September 2000 to November 2010). Most of the waves propagated were characterized as small-scale gravity. The characteristics of the two waves events agreed well with previous gravity wave studies from Brazil and other sites. However, significant differences in the wave propagation headings indicate dissimilar source regions. The observed medium-scale gravity wave events constitute an important new dataset to study their mesospheric properties at equatorial latitudes. These data exhibited similar propagation headings to the short period events, suggesting they originated from the same source regions. It was also observed that some of the medium-scale were capable of propagating into the lower thermosphere where they may have acted directly as seeds for the Rayleigh-Taylor instability development. The wave events were primarily generated by meteorological processes since there was no correlation between the evolution of the wave events and solar cycle F10.7.

  8. On the development of packets of surface gravity waves moving over an uneven bottom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djordjevic, V. D.; Redekopp, L. G.

    1978-01-01

    The object of study is the evolution of packets of gravity waves moving over variable depth, in particular, the transformation of packets moving into a shelf of increased or decreased depth. The variable-coefficient nonlinear Schroedinger equation with inhomogeneous term is derived for gravity waves moving over an uneven bottom. A solution for an envelope-hole soliton moving over variable depth is obtained when the amplitude-length ratio of the soliton is small. For the shelf problem, it is shown that the first soliton on the shelf will be the one with smallest depression, and the last will have greatest depression. This is in contrast to Korteweg-de Vries soliton fission.

  9. An observation of atmospheric gravity wave cause and effect during October 1985 WAGS campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, D. D.; Hunsucker, R. D.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Crowley, G.; Williams, P. J. S.

    1988-01-01

    Moderate geomagnetic activity followed by a large scale TID was observed in Europe and eastern North America near 1200 UT on October 18, 1985 during the Worldwide Atmospheric Gravity Wave Study. The speed and direction of the TID are estimated, suggesting that it was caused by an atmospheric gravity wave expanding from a localized source over the Arctic Ocean. Auroral imaging shows that the source region was located near the westward edge of an expanding auroral bulge and may have been associated with a westward traveling surge. The TID periods increased with distance from the source region and the largest TID amplitudes were seen along a line perpendicular to the orientation of the auroral oval.

  10. Ernst formulation of axisymmetric fields in f (R ) gravity: Applications to neutron stars and gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suvorov, Arthur George; Melatos, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    The Ernst formulation of the Einstein equations is generalized to accommodate f (R ) theories of gravity. It is shown that, as in general relativity, the axisymmetric f (R ) field equations for a vacuum spacetime that is either stationary or cylindrically symmetric reduce to a single, nonlinear differential equation for a complex-valued scalar function. As a worked example, we apply the generalized Ernst equations to derive a f (R ) generalization of the Zipoy-Voorhees metric, which may be used to describe the gravitational field outside of an ellipsoidal neutron star. We also apply the theory to investigate the phase speed of large-amplitude gravitational waves in f (R ) gravity in the context of solitonlike solutions that display shock-wave behavior across the causal boundary.

  11. TIMED/SABER observations of global gravity wave climatology and their interannual variability from stratosphere to mesosphere lower thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Sherine Rachel; Kumar, Karanam Kishore

    2012-09-01

    The present study for the first time reports the global gravity wave activity in terms of their potential energy derived from TIMED/SABER observations right from the stratosphere to the mesosphere lower thermosphere (MLT) region. The potential energy profiles obtained from SABER temperature are validated by comparing them with ground based LIDAR observations over a low latitude site, Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E). The stratospheric and mesospheric global maps of gravity wave energy showed pronounced maxima over high and polar latitudes of the winter hemisphere. The interannual variability of the stratospheric gravity wave activity exhibited prominent annual oscillation over mid-latitudes. The equatorial gravity wave activity exhibited quasi-biennial oscillation in the lower stratosphere and semi-annual oscillation in the upper stratosphere. The MLT region maps revealed summer hemispheric maxima over polar latitudes and secondary maxima over the equatorial region. The results are discussed in the light of present understanding of global gravity wave observations. The significance of the present study lies in emphasizing the importance of satellite measurements in elucidating gravity waves, which is envisaged to have profound impact on parameterizing these waves.

  12. Water Surface Currents, Short Gravity-Capillary Waves and Radar Backscatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atakturk, Serhad S.; Katsaros, Kristina B.

    1993-01-01

    Despite their importance for air-sea interaction and microwave remote sensing of the ocean surface, intrinsic properties of short gravity-capillary waves are not well established. This is largely due to water surface currents and their effects on the direct measurements of wave parameters conducted at a fixed point. Frequencies of small scale waves propagating on a surface which itself is in motion, are subject to Doppler shifts. Hence, the high frequency tail of the wave spectra obtained from such temporal observations is smeared. Conversion of this smeared measured-frequency spectra to intrinsic-frequency (or wavenumber) spectra requires corrections for the Doppler shifts. Such attempts in the past have not been very successful in particular when field data were used. This becomes evident if the amplitude modulation of short waves by underlying long waves is considered. Microwave radar studies show that the amplitude of a short wave component attains its maximum value near the crests and its minimum in the troughs of the long waves. Doppler-shifted wave data yield similar results but much larger in modulation magnitude, as expected. In general, Doppler shift corrections reduce the modulation magnitude. Overcorrection may result in a negligible modulation or even in a strong modulation with the maximum amplitude in the wave troughs. The latter situation is clearly contradictory to our visual observations as well as the radar results and imply that the advection by currents is overestimated. In this study, a differential-advection approach is used in which small scale waves are advected by the currents evaluated not at the free surface, but at a depth proportional to their wavelengths. Applicability of this approach is verified by the excellent agreement in phase and magnitude of short-wave modulation between results based on radar and on wave-gauge measurements conducted on a lake.

  13. Monodromy in the CMB: Gravity waves and string inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Silverstein, Eva; Westphal, Alexander

    2008-11-15

    We present a simple mechanism for obtaining large-field inflation, and hence a gravitational wave signature, from string theory compactified on twisted tori. For nil manifolds, we obtain a leading inflationary potential proportional to {phi}{sup 2/3} in terms of the canonically normalized field {phi}, yielding predictions for the tilt of the power spectrum and the tensor-to-scalar ratio, n{sub s}{approx_equal}0.98 and r{approx_equal}0.04 with 60 e-foldings of inflation; we note also the possibility of a variant with a candidate inflaton potential proportional to {phi}{sup 2/5}. The basic mechanism involved in extending the field range--monodromy in D-branes as they move in circles on the manifold--arises in a more general class of compactifications, though our methods for controlling the corrections to the slow-roll parameters require additional symmetries.

  14. Testing Modified Gravity Models using Gravitational Waves Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahya, Emre

    2016-07-01

    Rotation curves of spiral galaxies and weak lensing as well as CMBR Power Spectrum point towards a need for different kind of matter in the universe that is not interacting electromagnetically. Alternatively one can explain rotation curves by modifying Newton's Laws which is called MOND. Relativistic versions of MOND work surprisingly good in producing structure and the community started taking these models seriously. We would like to offer a test which can test the validity of these class of models where one would get non-coincident arrival for gravitational waves and photons. We will explain why one should get a time lag between these two massless particles in the context of these so-called Dark Matter Emulators. And give an order of magnitude estimate for Shapiro delay for object which are very far away as well as more accurate ones for sources in Milky-way.

  15. The mean flow and long waves induced by two-dimensional internal gravity wavepackets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Bremer, T. S.; Sutherland, B. R.

    2014-10-01

    Through theory supported by numerical simulations, we examine the induced local and long range response flows resulting from the momentum flux divergence associated with with a two-dimensional Boussinesq internal gravity wavepacket in a uniformly stratified ambient. Our theoretical approach performs a perturbation analysis that takes advantage of the separation of scales between waves and the amplitude envelope of a quasi-monochromatic wavepacket. We first illustrate our approach by applying it to the well-studied case of deep water surface gravity waves, showing that the induced flow, UDF, resulting from the divergence of the horizontal momentum flux is equal to the Stokes drift. For a localized surface wavepacket, UDF is itself a divergent flow and so there is the well-known non-local response manifest in the form of a deep return flow beneath the wavepacket. For horizontally periodic and vertically localized internal wavepackets, the divergent-flux induced flow, uDF, is found from consideration of the vertical gradient of the vertical flux of horizontal momentum associated with the waves. Because uDF is itself a non-divergent flow field, this accounts entirely for the wave-induced flow; there is no response flow. Our focus is upon internal wavepackets that are localized in the horizontal and vertical. We derive a formula for the divergent-flux induced flow that, as in this case of surface wavepackets, is itself a divergent flow. We show that the response is a horizontally long internal wave that translates vertically with the wavepacket at its group velocity. Scaling relationships are used to estimate the wavenumber, horizontal extent, and amplitude of this induced long wave. At higher order in perturbation theory we derive an explicit integral formula for the induced long wave. Thus, we provide validation of Bretherton's analysis of flows induced by two-dimensional internal wavepackets [F. P. Bretherton, "On the mean motion induced by gravity waves," J. Fluid

  16. Convective gravity wave propagation and breaking in the stratosphere: comparison between WRF model simulations and lidar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantino, Lorenzo; Heinrich, Philippe; Mzé, Nahoudha; Hauchecorne, Alain

    2016-04-01

    In this work we perform numerical simulations of convective gravity waves (GWs), using the WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) model. We first run an idealized, simplified and highly resolved simulation with model top at 80 km. Below 60 km of altitude, a vertical grid spacing smaller than 1 km is supposed to reliably resolve the effects of GW breaking. An eastward linear wind shear interacts with the GW field generated by a single convective thunderstorm. After 70 min of integration time, averaging within a radius of 300 km from the storm centre, results show that wave breaking in the upper stratosphere is largely dominated by saturation effects, driving an average drag force up to -41 m s -1 day -1. In the lower stratosphere, mean wave drag is positive and equal to 4.4 m s -1 day -1. In a second step, realistic WRF simulations are compared with lidar measurements from the NDACC network (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Changes) of gravity wave potential energy (E p) over OHP (Haute-Provence Observatory, southern France). Using a vertical grid spacing smaller than 1 km below 50 km of altitude, WRF seems to reliably reproduce the effect of GW dynamics and capture qualitative aspects of wave momentum and energy propagation and transfer to background mean flow. Averaging within a radius of 120 km from the storm centre, the resulting drag force for the study case (2 h storm) is negative in the higher (-1 m s -1 day -1) and positive in the lower stratosphere (0.23 m s -1 day -1). Vertical structures of simulated potential energy profiles are found to be in good agreement with those measured by lidar. E p is mostly conserved with altitude in August while, in October, E p decreases in the upper stratosphere to grow again in the lower mesosphere. On the other hand, the magnitude of simulated wave energy is clearly underestimated with respect to lidar data by about 3-4 times. Keywords: Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (mesoscale meteorology middle

  17. Convective gravity wave propagation and breaking in the stratosphere: comparison between WRF model simulations and lidar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantino, Lorenzo; Heinrich, Philippe; Mzé, Nahoudha; Hauchecorne, Alain

    2016-04-01

    In this work we perform numerical simulations of convective gravity waves (GWs), using the WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) model. We first run an idealized, simplified and highly resolved simulation with model top at 80 km. Below 60 km of altitude, a vertical grid spacing smaller than 1 km is supposed to reliably resolve the effects of GW breaking. An eastward linear wind shear interacts with the GW field generated by a single convective thunderstorm. After 70 min of integration time, averaging within a radius of 300 km from the storm centre, results show that wave breaking in the upper stratosphere is largely dominated by saturation effects, driving an average drag force up to ‑41 m s ‑1 day ‑1. In the lower stratosphere, mean wave drag is positive and equal to 4.4 m s ‑1 day ‑1. In a second step, realistic WRF simulations are compared with lidar measurements from the NDACC network (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Changes) of gravity wave potential energy (E p) over OHP (Haute-Provence Observatory, southern France). Using a vertical grid spacing smaller than 1 km below 50 km of altitude, WRF seems to reliably reproduce the effect of GW dynamics and capture qualitative aspects of wave momentum and energy propagation and transfer to background mean flow. Averaging within a radius of 120 km from the storm centre, the resulting drag force for the study case (2 h storm) is negative in the higher (‑1 m s ‑1 day ‑1) and positive in the lower stratosphere (0.23 m s ‑1 day ‑1). Vertical structures of simulated potential energy profiles are found to be in good agreement with those measured by lidar. E p is mostly conserved with altitude in August while, in October, E p decreases in the upper stratosphere to grow again in the lower mesosphere. On the other hand, the magnitude of simulated wave energy is clearly underestimated with respect to lidar data by about 3-4 times. Keywords: Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics

  18. Sensitivity of Middle Atmospheric Analyses to the Representation of Gravity-Wave Drag in the DAO's Data Assimilation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Shuhua; Chern, Jiundar; Joiner, Joanna; Lin, Shian-Jiann; Pawson, Steven; daSilva, Arlindo; Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The damping of mesoscale gravity waves has important effects on the global circulation, structure, and composition of the atmosphere. A number of assimilation and forecast experiments have been conducted to examine the sensitivity of meteorological analyses and forecasts to the representation of gravity wave impacts in a data assimilation system (DAS). The experiments were conducted with the Finite-Volume (FV) DAS developed at NASA's Data Assimilation Office (DAO), The main purpose of this research is to determine the optimal combination of wave number, phase speed, wavelength, etc. for representing gravity-wave drag (GWD) in FVDAS. The GWD included in FVDAS includes a spectrum of waves, as would be forced by topography and transient motions (e.g., convection) in the troposphere. The sensitivity experiments are performed by modifying several parameters, such as the number of waves allowed, their wavelength, the background stress amplitude, etc. The results show that the assimilated fields are very sensitive to the number of gravity waves represented in the system, especially at high latitudes of the middle and upper stratosphere and mesosphere in winter. The analyzed stratopause temperature varies by up to 10K when the GWD scheme is modified from a multiple-wave scheme (using a stationary wave and waves with phase speeds of 10, 20, 30 and 40 m/s in each direction) to a single, stationary wave. Insight into the reality of the various versions of the GWD can be obtained by examining the "Observation minus Forecast" residuals from the FVDAS.

  19. The COBE cosmic 3 K anisotropy experiment: A gravity wave and cosmic string probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Charles L.; Smoot, George F.

    1989-01-01

    Among the experiments to be carried into orbit next year, by the COBE satellite, are differential microwave radiometers. They will make sensitive all-sky maps of the temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation at three frequencies, giving dipole, quadrupole, and higher order multipole measurements of the background radiation. The experiment will either detect, or place significant constraints on, the existence of cosmic strings and long wavelength gravity waves.

  20. Acoustic and gravity waves in the neutral atmosphere and the ionosphere, generated by severe storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balachandran, N. K.

    1983-01-01

    Gravity waves in the neutral atmosphere and their propagation in the ionosphere and the study of infrasonic signals from thunder were investigated. Doppler shifts of the order of 0.1 Hz are determined and they provide high-resolution measurements of the movements in the ionosphere. By using an array of transmitters with different frequencies and at different locations, the horizontal and vertical propagation vectors of disturbances propagating through the ionosphere are determined.

  1. Arrival-time fluctuations of coherent reflections from surface gravity water waves.

    PubMed

    Badiey, Mohsen; Eickmeier, Justin; Song, Aijun

    2014-05-01

    Arrival time fluctuations of coherent reflections from surface gravity waves are examined. A two-dimensional ray model with an evolving rough sea surface is used to explain the mechanism and formation of the deterministic striation patterns due to the surface reflection. Arrival time predictions from the ray model match qualitatively well with the measurements from bidirectional acoustic transmissions in a water depth of 100 m. PMID:24815293

  2. Arrival-time fluctuations of coherent reflections from surface gravity water waves.

    PubMed

    Badiey, Mohsen; Eickmeier, Justin; Song, Aijun

    2014-05-01

    Arrival time fluctuations of coherent reflections from surface gravity waves are examined. A two-dimensional ray model with an evolving rough sea surface is used to explain the mechanism and formation of the deterministic striation patterns due to the surface reflection. Arrival time predictions from the ray model match qualitatively well with the measurements from bidirectional acoustic transmissions in a water depth of 100 m.

  3. Development of the plane wave transformer photoelectron linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xiaodong

    2000-11-01

    The design, fabrication and characterization of the UCLA integrated S-Band RF photocathode electron linear accelerator (Linac) based on the plane wave transformer (PWT) structure is presented. This new generation photoinjector integrates a photocathode directly into a PWT linac making the structure simple and compact. Due to the strong coupling between each adjacent cell, the PWT structure is relatively easy to fabricate and operate. This photoinjector can provide high brightness beams at energies of 15 to 20MeV, with emittance less than 1mm.mrad at charge of 1 nC [3]. These short-pulse beams can be used in various applications: space charge dominated beam physics studies, plasma lenses, plasma accelerators, free-electron laser microbunching techniques, and SASE-FEL physics studies. It will also provide commercial opportunities in chemistry, biology and medicine. The principle of photoelectron gun setup, accelerating structure design and beam dynamic study is described. The design, fabrication and testing of this UCLA 10 full cell and 2 half cell PWT structure is discussed in detail. The results of Microwave measurements and first step high power test have showed the success of the UCLA PWT photoinjector design. The measurement results met all the design goals and operation requirements. The experimental requirements for the beam diagnostics are also presented.

  4. Gravitational waves from quasicircular black-hole binaries in dynamical Chern-Simons gravity.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Kent; Yunes, Nicolás; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2012-12-21

    Dynamical Chern-Simons gravity cannot be strongly constrained with current experiments because it reduces to general relativity in the weak-field limit. This theory, however, introduces modifications in the nonlinear, dynamical regime, and thus it could be greatly constrained with gravitational