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Sample records for lineatissima sauria teiidae

  1. Methodological congruence in phylogenomic analyses with morphological support for teiid lizards (Sauria: Teiidae).

    PubMed

    Tucker, Derek B; Colli, Guarino R; Giugliano, Lilian G; Hedges, S Blair; Hendry, Catriona R; Lemmon, Emily Moriarty; Lemmon, Alan R; Sites, Jack W; Pyron, R Alexander

    2016-10-01

    A well-known issue in phylogenetics is discordance among gene trees, species trees, morphology, and other data types. Gene-tree discordance is often caused by incomplete lineage sorting, lateral gene transfer, and gene duplication. Multispecies-coalescent methods can account for incomplete lineage sorting and are believed by many to be more accurate than concatenation. However, simulation studies and empirical data have demonstrated that concatenation and species tree methods often recover similar topologies. We use three popular methods of phylogenetic reconstruction (one concatenation, two species tree) to evaluate relationships within Teiidae. These lizards are distributed across the United States to Argentina and the West Indies, and their classification has been controversial due to incomplete sampling and the discordance among various character types (chromosomes, DNA, musculature, osteology, etc.) used to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships. Recent morphological and molecular analyses of the group resurrected three genera and created five new genera to resolve non-monophyly in three historically ill-defined genera: Ameiva, Cnemidophorus, and Tupinambis. Here, we assess the phylogenetic relationships of the Teiidae using "next-generation" anchored-phylogenomics sequencing. Our final alignment includes 316 loci (488,656bp DNA) for 244 individuals (56 species of teiids, representing all currently recognized genera) and all three methods (ExaML, MP-EST, and ASTRAL-II) recovered essentially identical topologies. Our results are basically in agreement with recent results from morphology and smaller molecular datasets, showing support for monophyly of the eight new genera. Interestingly, even with hundreds of loci, the relationships among some genera in Tupinambinae remain ambiguous (i.e. low nodal support for the position of Salvator and Dracaena).

  2. Tegu (teiu) bite: report of human injury caused by a Teiidae lizard.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Vidal; Duarte, Marcelo R; Neto, Domingos Garrone

    2008-01-01

    Lizards of the Teiidae family are large reptiles measuring up to 2 meters long. If threatened, they can demonstrate aggressive behavior by whipping their tail and occasionally biting. Here, we report a severe injury following a Teiidae lizard bite on the right index finger of a human. There was significant soft tissue damage and an avulsion fracture of the distal phalanx. He was treated with conservative wound care and prophylactic antibiotics. He developed no evidence of secondary infection and underwent delayed skin grafting.

  3. Redescription of Tejidotaenia appendiculata (Baylis, 1947) (Cestoda: proteocephalidea), a parasite of Tupinambis teguixin (Sauria: teiidae) from South America.

    PubMed

    Rego, A A; de Chambrier, A

    2000-01-01

    The species Tejidotaenia appendiculata (Baylis, 1947), a parasite found in teju, Tupinambis teguixin is redescribed and a new diagnosis is provided. The species is characterized by the anterior position of the ovary and the peculiar shape of suckers. It is the first record of this species in Brazil.

  4. Distribution, habitat, size, and color pattern of Cnemidophorus lemniscatus (Sauria: Teiidae) on Cayo Cochino Pequeño, Honduras

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Montgomery, Chad E.; Reed, Robert N.; Shaw, Hayley J.; Boback, Scott M.; Walker, James M.

    2007-01-01

    Cayo Cochino Pequeño is a 0.64-km2 Caribbean island in the Cayos Cochinos archipelago, Department of Islas de la Bahía, Honduras. One published report noted the presence of the rainbow whiptail (Cnemidophorus lemniscatus) on Cayo Cochino Pequeño, but nothing is known about the biology of this insular population. During a part of the dry season in July and August 2004, we used drift fences, pitfall traps, and separate observational transects to elucidate the distribution and habitat use of C. lemniscatus on the island. The only population of this species was located in a narrow coastal zone (width to 60 m and length to 450 m) on the southern half of the eastern windward side of the island. We analyzed the percentage of the canopy cover and the percentage of 4 ground coverage types along 2 transects 200 m long in this area to understand the basis of the suitability of the habitat for C. lemniscatus. Descriptively, the area harboring this species on Cayo Cochino Pequeño consisted of the remnants of a coconut palm grove with low-lying herbaceous vegetation and grasses, in which a mosaic of small, open areas of sandy soil and coral fragments, with or without accumulations of debris, were the foci of lizard activities. Also observed in this habitat were 2 individuals of the brown racer (Dryadophis melanolomus), an actively foraging snake and likely predator on C. lemniscatus. Data obtained on rainbow whiptails captured in pitfall traps and subsequently released were used to determine the size and color patterns of hatchlings and adult males and females.

  5. Predatory behavior inTupinambis teguixin (Sauria: Teiidae). I. Tongue-flicking responses to chemical food stimuli.

    PubMed

    Yanosky, A A; Iriart, D E; Mercolli, C

    1993-02-01

    Black tegu lizards (Tupinambis teguixin) have the ability to detect food odors and discriminate between them and nonfood odors. This was tested by offering chemical stimuli on cotton-tipped applicators to the animals. Stimuli were from two plant and two animal species known to be principal items in these lizards' diets, demineralized water as an odorless control, and eaude-cologne as an odorous control lacking feeding or social importance. Tongueflick attack score, latency to attack, preattack tongue-flicks, and number of attacks were analyzed. The results clearly demonstrated that this species responds to chemical food stimuli, but does not respond to odorless nonfood stimuli. Responses differed among food types. There were no sex differences. These results are in agreement with the prediction that lizards having forked tongues and an active foraging mode rely on chemical cues for feeding.

  6. The complete mitochondrial genome of Leiolepis reevesii (Sauria, Agamidae).

    PubMed

    Tong, Qing-Lin; Du, Yu; Lin, Long-Hui; Ji, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we report the complete mitochondrial genome of Leiolepis reevesii (Sauria, Agamidae), which is a circular molecule of 16,908 bp in size and consists of 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNAs, 22 transfer RNAs and a control region. The A+T content of overall base composition of H-strand is 59.8% (T: 25.1%, C: 27.5%, A: 34.7%, G: 12.7%). Some short microsatellite-like repeat regions (polyA and polyT) are scattered in the control region. All the results provide powerful data to further study of the molecular systematics, species identification and conservation genetics.

  7. Comparative study of sperm ultrastructure of five species of teiid lizards (Teiidae, Squamata), and Cercosaura ocellata (Gymnophthalmidae, Squamata).

    PubMed

    Colli, G R; Teixeira, R D; Scheltinga, D M; Mesquita, D O; Wiederhecker, H C; Báo, S N

    2007-02-01

    Sperm ultrastructure of five teiid lizards (Callopistes flavipunctatus, Crocodilurus amazonicus, Dicrodon guttulatum, Dracaena guianensis, and Teius oculatus), and the gymnophthalmid Cercosaura ocellata is described for the first time. Comparisons of sperm ultrastructure among these species and with those of previously examined teiids and gymnophthalmids revealed that the two groups of Teiioidea (Gymnophthalmidae and Teiidae), and the two subfamilies of Teiidae (Teiinae and Tupinambinae) could be distinguished on the basis of sperm ultrastructure data. Significant differences in sperm dimensions between Cnemidophorus and Aspidoscelis support the recent splitting of these two lineages into different genera. Our results revealed high levels of inter-generic variability in sperm ultrastructure within Teiidae, which produces a data set useful in analyzing relationships between genera and families. In phylogenetic analyses, however, sampling multiple species within teiid genera is essential and recording sperm measurements may profitably complement qualitative ultrastructural characters, maximizing the information content of these structures.

  8. Cryptic, Sympatric Diversity in Tegu Lizards of the Tupinambis teguixin Group (Squamata, Sauria, Teiidae) and the Description of Three New Species.

    PubMed

    Murphy, John C; Jowers, Michael J; Lehtinen, Richard M; Charles, Stevland P; Colli, Guarino R; Peres, Ayrton K; Hendry, Catriona R; Pyron, R Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Tegus of the genera Tupinambis and Salvator are the largest Neotropical lizards and the most exploited clade of Neotropical reptiles. For three decades more than 34 million tegu skins were in trade, about 1.02 million per year. The genus Tupinambis is distributed in South America east of the Andes, and currently contains four recognized species, three of which are found only in Brazil. However, the type species of the genus, T. teguixin, is known from Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, French Guyana, Guyana, Peru, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, and Venezuela (including the Isla de Margarita). Here we present molecular and morphological evidence that this species is genetically divergent across its range and identify four distinct clades some of which are sympatric. The occurrence of cryptic sympatric species undoubtedly exacerbated the nomenclatural problems of the past. We discuss the species supported by molecular and morphological evidence and increase the number of species in the genus Tupinambis to seven. The four members of the T. teguixin group continue to be confused with Salvator merianae, despite having a distinctly different morphology and reproductive mode. All members of the genus Tupinambis are CITES Appendix II. Yet, they continue to be heavily exploited, under studied, and confused in the minds of the public, conservationists, and scientists.

  9. Cryptic, Sympatric Diversity in Tegu Lizards of the Tupinambis teguixin Group (Squamata, Sauria, Teiidae) and the Description of Three New Species

    PubMed Central

    Jowers, Michael J.; Lehtinen, Richard M.; Charles, Stevland P.; Colli, Guarino R.; Peres, Ayrton K.; Hendry, Catriona R.; Pyron, R. Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Tegus of the genera Tupinambis and Salvator are the largest Neotropical lizards and the most exploited clade of Neotropical reptiles. For three decades more than 34 million tegu skins were in trade, about 1.02 million per year. The genus Tupinambis is distributed in South America east of the Andes, and currently contains four recognized species, three of which are found only in Brazil. However, the type species of the genus, T. teguixin, is known from Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, French Guyana, Guyana, Peru, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, and Venezuela (including the Isla de Margarita). Here we present molecular and morphological evidence that this species is genetically divergent across its range and identify four distinct clades some of which are sympatric. The occurrence of cryptic sympatric species undoubtedly exacerbated the nomenclatural problems of the past. We discuss the species supported by molecular and morphological evidence and increase the number of species in the genus Tupinambis to seven. The four members of the T. teguixin group continue to be confused with Salvator merianae, despite having a distinctly different morphology and reproductive mode. All members of the genus Tupinambis are CITES Appendix II. Yet, they continue to be heavily exploited, under studied, and confused in the minds of the public, conservationists, and scientists. PMID:27487019

  10. Chemical constituents of the femoral gland secretions of male tegu lizards (Tupinambis merianae) (Family teiidae).

    PubMed

    Martín, José; Chamut, Silvia; Manes, Mario E; López, Pilar

    2011-01-01

    In spite of the importance of chemical signals (pheromones) in the reproductive behaviour of lizards, the chemical compounds secreted by their femoral glands, which may be used as sexual signals, are only known for a few lizard species. Based on mass spectra, obtained by GC-MS, we found 49 lipophilic compounds in femoral gland secretions of male tegu lizards (Tupinambis merianae) (fam. Teiidae), including a very high proportion of carboxylic acids and their esters ranging between n-C8 and n-C20 (mainly octadecanoic and 9,12-octadecadienoic acids), with much less proportions of steroids, tocopherol, aldehydes, and squalene. We discuss the potential function of these compounds in secretions, and compare the compounds found here with those documented for other lizard species.

  11. New species of Spauligodon (Nematoda: Pharyngodonidae) in Lepidodactylus novaeguineae (Sauria: Gekkonidae) from Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Bursey, Charles R; Goldberg, Stephen R; Kraus, Fred

    2005-04-01

    Spauligodon zweifeli n. sp. (Nematoda: Pharyngodonidae) from the large intestines of a gecko, Lepidodactylus novaeguineae (Sauria: Gekkonidae), is described and illustrated. Prevalence of infection was 57% (mean intensity 8.5, range 1-23). Spauligodon zweifeli n. sp. is the 43rd species to be assigned to this genus and differs from other species in the genus by possessing asymmetrical fusiform eggs in which the ends are extended as digitiform processes. It is the second species to be described from the Australian biogeographical realm.

  12. Thubunaea eleodori sp. nov. (Nematoda: Physalopteridae) from Liolaemus eleodori (Sauria: Liolaemidae) from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Ramallo, Geraldine; Goldberg, Stephen; Bursey, Charles; Castillo, Gabriel; Acosta, Juan Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Thubunaea eleodori sp. nov. is described from the stomach of Liolaemus eleodori (Sauria: Liolaemidae) from San Guillermo National Park, Province of San Juan, Argentina. T. eleodori is most similar to those species lacking spicules, T. cnemidophorus, T. fitsimonsi, T. parkeri, T. schukurovi, and T. smogorzhewskii. T. eleodori is separated from these species based on the papilla pattern. T. eleodori has 12 pedunculate papillae and 14 sessile papillae, T. smogorzhewskii lacks pedunculate papillae, T. fitsimonsi and T. parkeri lack sessile papillae, and T. cnemidophorus has14-16 pedunculate papillae and 12 sessile papillae. T. eleodori represents the first member of the genus to be reported from Argentina.

  13. Ultrastructural examination of spermiogenesis within the testis of the ground skink, Scincella laterale (Squamata, Sauria, Scincidae).

    PubMed

    Gribbins, Kevin M; Mills, Erin M; Sever, David M

    2007-02-01

    Although the events of spermiogenesis are commonly studied in amniotes, the amount of research available for lizards (Sauria) is lacking. Many studies have described the morphological characteristics of mature spermatozoa in lizards, but few detail the ultrastructural changes that occur during spermiogenesis. The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of the subcellular events of spermiogenesis within the temperate ground skink (Scincella laterale). The morphological data presented here represent the first complete ultrastructural study of spermiogenesis within the Scincidae clade. Samples of testes from 20 specimens were prepared using standard techniques for transmission electron microscopy. Many of the ultrastructural changes occurring during spermiogenesis within the ground skink are similar to that of other saurians. However, there were a few unique characteristics that to date have not been described during spermiogenesis in other lizards. For example, during early round spermatid development within the ground skink testis, proacrosomal granules begin to form within the acrosomal vesicle before making contact with the apex of the nucleus. Also, a prominent microtubular manchette develops during spermiogenesis; however, the circular component of the manchete is absent in this species of skink. This developmental difference in manchette formation may lead to the more robust and straight mature spermatozoa that are common within the Scincidae family. These anatomical character differences may be valuable nontraditional sources that along with more traditional sources (i.e., mitochondrial DNA) may help elucidate phylogenetic relationships, which are historically considered controversial at best, among species within Scincidae and Sauria.

  14. Catalogue of distribution of lizards (Reptilia: Squamata) from the Brazilian Amazonia. III. Anguidae, Scincidae, Teiidae.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-Júnior, Marco A; Amaral, Silvana

    2016-12-09

    We present distribution data of all Anguidae, Scincidae, and Teiidae lizards known from the Brazilian Amazonia, totaling 29 species-level taxa, belonging to 14 genera. This represents 11 more species-level taxa than previously reported for these families in this area. Data were based on literature and 46,806 specimens deposited in three North American and eight Brazilian museums, including the main collections harboring Amazonian material. Most species (~55%) are endemic to Amazonia. Except for Ameiva ameiva, that is present in several environments and domains, non-endemic species are either associated with open dry (semideciduous) forest or open vegetation (savanna) enclaves in Amazonia, occupying similar environments outside Amazonia, gallery forests within the Cerrado, or present disjunct populations in the Atlantic Forest. As a whole, six taxa are widespread in Amazonia, four are restricted to eastern Amazonia, four to western Amazonia, three to southwestern Amazonia, one to northern Amazonia, and seven to the southern peripheral portion of Amazonia. Besides, two species present apparently more restricted, unique distributions. Only three species have a distribution that is congruent with one of the areas of endemism (AE) recognized for other organisms (birds and primates), of which two occur in AE Guiana and one in AE Inambari.

  15. Cytogenetic analyses of five amazon lizard species of the subfamilies Teiinae and Tupinambinae and review of karyotyped diversity the family Teiidae.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Natália Dayane Moura; Arias, Federico José; da Silva, Francijara Araújo; Schneider, Carlos Henrique; Gross, Maria Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Lizards of the family Teiidae (infraorder Scincomorpha) were formerly known as Macroteiidae. There are 13 species of such lizards in the Amazon, in the genera Ameiva (Meyer, 1795), Cnemidophorus (Wagler, 1830), Crocodilurus (Spix, 1825), Dracaena (Daudin, 1801), Kentropyx (Spix, 1825) and Tupinambis (Daudin, 1802). Cytogenetic studies of this group are restricted to karyotype macrostructure. Here we give a compilation of cytogenetic data of the family Teiidae, including classic and molecular cytogenetic analysis of Ameiva ameiva (Linnaeus, 1758), Cnemidophorus sp.1, Kentropyx calcarata (Spix, 1825), Kentropyx pelviceps (Cope, 1868) and Tupinambis teguixin (Linnaeus, 1758) collected in the state of Amazonas, Brazil. Ameiva ameiva, Kentropyx calcarata and Kentropyx pelviceps have 2n=50 chromosomes classified by a gradual series of acrocentric chromosomes. Cnemidophorus sp.1 has 2n=48 chromosomes with 2 biarmed chromosomes, 24 uniarmed chromosomes and 22 microchromosomes. Tupinambis teguixin has 2n=36 chromosomes, including 12 macrochromosomes and 24 microchromosomes. Constitutive heterochromatin was distributed in the centromeric and terminal regions in most chromosomes. The nucleolus organizer region was simple, varying in its position among the species, as evidenced both by AgNO3 impregnation and by hybridization with 18S rDNA probes. The data reveal a karyotype variation with respect to the diploid number, fundamental number and karyotype formula, which reinforces the importance of increasing chromosomal analyses in the Teiidae.

  16. Cytogenetic analyses of five amazon lizard species of the subfamilies Teiinae and Tupinambinae and review of karyotyped diversity the family Teiidae

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Natália Dayane Moura; Arias, Federico José; da Silva, Francijara Araújo; Schneider, Carlos Henrique; Gross, Maria Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Lizards of the family Teiidae (infraorder Scincomorpha) were formerly known as Macroteiidae. There are 13 species of such lizards in the Amazon, in the genera Ameiva (Meyer, 1795), Cnemidophorus (Wagler, 1830), Crocodilurus (Spix, 1825), Dracaena (Daudin, 1801), Kentropyx (Spix, 1825) and Tupinambis (Daudin, 1802). Cytogenetic studies of this group are restricted to karyotype macrostructure. Here we give a compilation of cytogenetic data of the family Teiidae, including classic and molecular cytogenetic analysis of Ameiva ameiva (Linnaeus, 1758), Cnemidophorus sp.1, Kentropyx calcarata (Spix, 1825), Kentropyx pelviceps (Cope, 1868) and Tupinambis teguixin (Linnaeus, 1758) collected in the state of Amazonas, Brazil. Ameiva ameiva, Kentropyx calcarata and Kentropyx pelviceps have 2n=50 chromosomes classified by a gradual series of acrocentric chromosomes. Cnemidophorus sp.1 has 2n=48 chromosomes with 2 biarmed chromosomes, 24 uniarmed chromosomes and 22 microchromosomes. Tupinambis teguixin has 2n=36 chromosomes, including 12 macrochromosomes and 24 microchromosomes. Constitutive heterochromatin was distributed in the centromeric and terminal regions in most chromosomes. The nucleolus organizer region was simple, varying in its position among the species, as evidenced both by AgNO3 impregnation and by hybridization with 18S rDNA probes. The data reveal a karyotype variation with respect to the diploid number, fundamental number and karyotype formula, which reinforces the importance of increasing chromosomal analyses in the Teiidae. PMID:26753079

  17. Two new species of the genus Pterygosoma (Acariformes: Pterygosomatidae) parasitizing agamid lizards (Sauria: Agamidae) from the Indian subcontinent.

    PubMed

    Fajfer, Monika

    2016-03-01

    Two new species of scale-mites parasitizing lizards of the family Agamidae (Sauria) are described: Pterygosoma blandfordi n. sp. from Psammophilus blanfordanus (Stoliczka) (Agamidae: Draconinae) from South India and Pterygosoma balochistani n. sp. from Laudakia nupta nupta (De Filippi) (Agamidae: Agaminae) from Pakistan. Pterygosoma blandfordi n. sp. (female) differs from P. foliosetis Jack, 1961 by the shape of the idiosoma which is much wider than long (vs. rounded idiosoma in P. foliosetis), the presence of 110-139 pairs of the dorsal anterolateral setae (vs. presence of about 35 pairs of these setae), 20-26 pairs of the peripheral setae (vs. 10-19 pairs), 3 pairs of the genital setae (vs. 1 pair), 6 pairs of the pseudoanal setae (vs. 4 pairs), the absence of leg setae vGII and presence of setae vGIV (vs. presence of setae vGII and absence of setae vGIV). P. balochistani n. sp. (female) differs from P. persicum Hirst, 1917 by the chelicerae 325-350 long (vs. 190-230 long in P. persicum), the fixed cheliceral digit bearing small tines (vs. spinous fixed cheliceral digit), presence of subcapitular setae n (vs. absence of setae n), serrate peripheral setae (vs. smooth peripheral setae), presence of leg setae vGII-III (vs. absence of setae vGII-III), 4 pairs of the genital setae (vs. 3 pairs) and 7 pairs of the pseudoanal serrate setae (vs. 9-11 pairs of filiform setae ps).

  18. New genus, new species of Cestoda (Anoplocephalidae), new species of Nematoda (Cosmocercidae) and other helminths in Cyrtodactylus louisiadensis (Sauria: Gekkonidae) from Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Bursey, Charles R; Goldberg, Stephen R; Kraus, Fred

    2005-08-01

    Gekkotaenia novaeguineaensis n. gen., n. sp. (Cestoda: Anoplocephalidae) from the small intestine and Cosmocerca zugi n. sp. (Nematoda: Cosmocercidae) from the large intestine of the ring-tailed gecko, Cyrtodactylus louisiadensis (Sauria: Gekkonidae) are described and illustrated. Gekkotaenia novaeguineaensis n. gen., n. sp. is unique among the acraspedote Linstowiinae in possessing a poral female reproductory system. Cosmocerca zugi n. sp. is the 22nd species to be assigned to the genus and differs from other species in the genus by possessing 4 pairs of rosette papillae on plectanes and having a gubernaculum longer than the spicules. It is the fifth species to be described from the Australian biogeographical region. Eight additional helminth species were found: the digenean, Allopharynx macallisteri; 2 cestodes, cysticercoids of Cyclophyllidea gen. sp. and tetrathyridia of Mesocestoides sp.; 5 nematodes, larvae in cysts of Abbreviata sp., Aplectana macintoshii, Oswaldocruzia bakeri, Parapharyngodon maplestonei, and an undescribed species of Physalopteroides. Cyrtodactylus louisiadensis represents a new host record for each of these helminths.

  19. The Origin and Early Evolution of Sauria: Reassessing the Permian Saurian Fossil Record and the Timing of the Crocodile-Lizard Divergence

    PubMed Central

    Ezcurra, Martín D.; Scheyer, Torsten M.; Butler, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Sauria is the crown-group of Diapsida and is subdivided into Lepidosauromorpha and Archosauromorpha, comprising a high percentage of the diversity of living and fossil tetrapods. The split between lepidosauromorphs and archosauromorphs (the crocodile-lizard, or bird-lizard, divergence) is considered one of the key calibration points for molecular analyses of tetrapod phylogeny. Saurians have a very rich Mesozoic and Cenozoic fossil record, but their late Paleozoic (Permian) record is problematic. Several Permian specimens have been referred to Sauria, but the phylogenetic affinity of some of these records remains questionable. We reexamine and review all of these specimens here, providing new data on early saurian evolution including osteohistology, and present a new morphological phylogenetic dataset. We support previous studies that find that no valid Permian record for Lepidosauromorpha, and we also reject some of the previous referrals of Permian specimens to Archosauromorpha. The most informative Permian archosauromorph is Protorosaurus speneri from the middle Late Permian of Western Europe. A historically problematic specimen from the Late Permian of Tanzania is redescribed and reidentified as a new genus and species of basal archosauromorph: Aenigmastropheus parringtoni. The supposed protorosaur Eorasaurus olsoni from the Late Permian of Russia is recovered among Archosauriformes and may be the oldest known member of the group but the phylogenetic support for this position is low. The assignment of Archosaurus rossicus from the latest Permian of Russia to the archosauromorph clade Proterosuchidae is supported. Our revision suggests a minimum fossil calibration date for the crocodile-lizard split of 254.7 Ma. The occurrences of basal archosauromorphs in the northern (30°N) and southern (55°S) parts of Pangea imply a wider paleobiogeographic distribution for the group during the Late Permian than previously appreciated. Early archosauromorph growth

  20. Physaloptera bainae n. sp. (Nematoda: Physalopteridae) parasitic in Salvator merianae (Squamata: Teiidae), with a key to Physaloptera species parasitizing reptiles from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Felipe B; Alves, Philippe V; Rocha, Bárbara M; de Souza Lima, Sueli; Luque, José L

    2014-04-01

    Physaloptera bainae n. sp. (Nematoda: Physalopteridae) from stomach of the large "tegú" lizard Salvator merianae (Squamata: Teiidae), collected in an ecological park that is part of the Atlantic Rainforest biome in Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais, Brazil, is described. The new species which has females with didelphic uterus, is the only species of the genus exhibiting external teeth in the form of 4 spines that are organized in a cross-shaped pattern at the anterior apical end, with 2 minute adcloacal papillae on the anterior part of cloacal aperture in males and a large cuticular expansion at the anterior end of females. Moreover, P. bainae n. sp. can be differentiated from the other congeners by the combination of other features, e.g., number (23) and pattern of caudal papillae, spicule size (left 554-600; right 589-617) and vulval position (on the first third of body), and because the specimens are particularly large and robust. Physaloptera monodens is considered a junior synonym of P. obtusissima. In addition, a key to Physaloptera species parasitizing reptiles from Brazil is provided.

  1. Strong support for Rensch's rule in an American clade of lizards (Teiidae and Gymnophtalmidae) and a paradox of the largest tejus.

    PubMed

    Frýdlová, Petra; Frynta, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    Rensch's rule predicts an allometric relationship between male and female body size stating that the sexual size dimorphism (SSD) increases with body size in male-larger taxa and decreases in female-larger taxa in groups of related species. It means that the relationship between the male and female body size is hyperallometric, i.e., the allometric exponent of this relationship exceeds the unity. We explored the relationship between the male and female body size in a New World clade of lizards consisting of sister families Teiidae and Gymnophthalmidae, which exhibit a great variation in both their adult body sizes and SSD. All our estimates of the reduced major axis regression slopes ranged from 1.067 to 1.229 and clearly followed a pattern consistent with the Rensch's rule. Despite a clear general trend, giant species from the subfamily Tupinambinae show paradoxically only poor SSD. The cases of extreme male-larger SSD were found in species of moderate body size belonging to the genera Ameiva and Cnemidophorus. The abovementioned deviations from the hyperallometric relationship between the male and female body size are surprising and require further examination.

  2. New species of Bakeria (Nematoda; Strongylida; Molineidae), new species of Falcaustra (Nematoda; Ascaridida; Kathlaniidae) and other helminths in Cnemaspis mcguirei (Sauria; Gekkonidae) from Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Bursey, Charles R; Goldberg, Stephen R; Grismer, L Lee

    2014-10-01

    Two new nematode species, Bakeria schadi sp. nov. and Falcaustra malaysiaia sp. nov. from the gastrointestinal tract of McGuire's rock gecko, Cnemaspis mcguirei (Sauria: Gekkonidae) collected in Peninsular Malaysia are described. The two species now assigned to Bakeria are separated on the bases of male bursa type and location of the excretory pore: type II in B. schadi sp. nov. and type I in B. bakeri; location of excretory pore, anterior to nerve ring in B. schadi sp. nov. and posterior to nerve ring in B. bakeri. Falcaustra malaysiaia sp. nov. is most similar to F. chabaudi, F. concinnae, F. condorcanquii, F. barbi, F. dubia, and F. tchadi in that these 7 species possess 1 pseudosucker, 1 median papilla plus 10 pairs caudal papillae, and spicules with lengths between 1 and 2 mm. F. barbi and F. tchadi lack adcloacal papillae; the remaining 5 species possess 1 pair of adcloacal papillae. Falcaustra chabaudi is known from Nearctic salamanders; F. concinnae from Nearctic turtles; F. condorcanquii from Neotropical frogs, F. dubia from Oriental frogs, and F. malaysiaia sp. nov. from Oriental geckos. Two additional species of Nematoda were found, Cosmocerca ornata and Meteterakis singaporensis. Cnemaspis mcguirei represents a new host record for Cosmocerca ornata and Meteterakis singaporensis.

  3. Chemosensory recognition of the marbled whiptail lizard, Aspidoscelis marmorata (Squamata: Teiidae) to odors of sympatric lizards (Crotophytus collaris, Coleonyx brevis, Eumeces obsoletus and Uta stansburiana) that represent different predation risks.

    PubMed

    Punzo, F

    2008-01-01

    The ability of the whiptail lizard Aspidoscelis marmorata (Teiidae) to detect and discriminate chemical stimuli associated with the integument of a sympatric saurophagous lizard (Crotaphytus collaris) was tested. Females of A. marmorata were presented with cotton swabs containing chemical cues from C. collaris and three species of nonsaurophagous lizards, as well as water and cologne (pungency control), and total number of tongue-flick (TF) recorded. Other responses were assessed including directed TF rate, time from initial presentation of the stimulus to first TF (latency), time spent fleeing from the stimulus, and number of flight bouts. The number of TFs, directed TF rate, and number of attempts at fleeing exhibited by were significantly greater when females were presented with swabs containing cues from C. collaris as compared to nonsaurophagous lizards and both control treatments. A. marmorata required significantly less time to elicit their first TF when presented with cues from C. collaris as compared to all other treatments. Most previous studies have focused on the responses of lizards to cues associated with snake predators. This study provides the first available data on responses of a teiid to cues associated with a saurophagous lizard.

  4. Six new species of coccidia (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from endangered Phelsuma spp. geckoes (Sauria: Gekkonidae) of the Black River Gorges National Park, Mauritius.

    PubMed

    Daszak, Peter; Ball, Stanley J; Jones, Carl G; Streicker, Daniel G; Snow, Keith R

    2009-12-01

    Six new species of coccidia are described from endangered Phelsuma spp. geckoes (Sauria: Gekkonidae) endemic to Mauritius, Indian Ocean. Five new species (3 Eimeria and 2 Isospora species) are described from Phelsuma rosagularis Vinson et Vinson; all lack a micropyle and an oocyst residuum, and all have a sporocyst residuum. Oocysts of Eimeria swinnertonae sp. n. are ellipsoidal, 22.2 x 17.8 (20.8-24.8 x 16.8-18.4) microm; SI 1.25; polar granule absent. Sporocysts are ellipsoidal, 8.8 x 7.0 (8.0-9.6 x 6.4-8.0) microm; SI 1.3; Stieda body absent. Oocysts of Eimeria stebbinsi sp. n. are ellipsoidal, 17.4 x 11.7 (16.0-19.2 x 11.2-12.8) microm; SI 1.5; polar granules present. Sporocysts are elongate-ellipsoidal, 7.7 x 4.0 (7.2-8.0 x 3.2-5.6) microm; SI 1.9; Stieda body present. Oocysts of Eimeria raleighi sp. n. are spheroidal to sub-spheroidal, 17.0 x 15.5 (16.0-19.2 x 14.4-16.8) microm; SI 1.1; polar granule present. Sporocysts are sub-spheroidal, 7.8 x 6.6 (7.2-8.0 x 6.4-7.2) microm; SI 1.2; Stieda body absent. Oocysts of Isospora cottinghamae sp. n. are ellipsoidal, 19.8 x 15.5 (17.6-21.6 x 14.4-17.6) microm; SI 1.3; polar granules present. Sporocysts are ellipsoidal, 10.8 x 6.9 (9.6-12.8 x 6.4-8.0) microm; SI 1.6; Stieda body present. Oocysts of Isosporapearlae sp. n. are ellipsoidal, 16.0 x 11.5 (15.2-17.6 x 9.6-12.8) microm; SI 1.4; polar granule present. Sporocysts are ellipsoidal, 8.8 x 5.4 (8.0-9.6 x 4.8-6.4) microm; SI 1.6; Stieda and substieda bodies present. One new Eimeria species is described from the blue-tailed day gecko, Phelsuma cepediana Merrem. Oocysts of Eimeria hartleyi sp. n. are sub-spheroidal to ellipsoidal, 18.2 x 14.5 (16.0-20.8 x 13.6-16.0) microm; SI 1.26; polar granules present. Sporocysts are ellipsoidal to cylindroidal, 7.5 x 5.3 (6.4-8.0 x 4.8-6.4) microm; SI 1.4; Stieda body present. We report the presence of tetrazoic spheroidal to sub-spheroidal oocysts or sporocysts 10.2 x 8.5 (9.9-10.4 x 8.3-8.8) microm; SI 1.2 from an individual

  5. Acanthocephala Larvae parasitizing Ameiva ameiva ameiva (Linnaeus, 1758) (Squamata: Teiidae).

    PubMed

    Macedo, Lilian Cristina; Melo, Francisco Tiago de Vasconcelos; Ávila-Pires, Teresa Cristina Sauer; Giese, Elane Guerreiro; Santos, Jeannie Nascimento Dos

    2016-03-11

    Knowledge concerning the taxonomy and biology of species of Acanthocephala, helminth parasites of the helminth species of the phylum Acanthocephala, parasites of lizards in Brazilian Amazonia, is still insufficient, but reports of Acanthocephala in reptiles are becoming increasingly common in the literature. Cystacanth-stage Acanthocephalan larvae have been found in the visceral peritoneum during necropsy of Ameiva ameiva ameivalizards from the "Osvaldo Rodrigues da Cunha" Herpetology Collection of the Emílio Goeldi Museum, Belém, Pará, Brazil. The aim of this study was to present the morphological study of the Acanthocephala larvae found in A. ameiva ameiva lizard.

  6. Acanthocephala Larvae parasitizing Ameiva ameiva ameiva (Linnaeus, 1758) (Squamata: Teiidae).

    PubMed

    Macedo, Lilian Cristina; Melo, Francisco Tiago de Vasconcelos; Ávila-Pires, Teresa Cristina Sauer; Giese, Elane Guerreiro; dos Santos, Jeannie Nascimento

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge concerning the taxonomy and biology of species of Acanthocephala, helminth parasites of the helminth species of the phylum Acanthocephala, parasites of lizards in Brazilian Amazonia, is still insufficient, but reports of Acanthocephala in reptiles are becoming increasingly common in the literature. Cystacanth-stage Acanthocephalan larvae have been found in the visceral peritoneum during necropsy of Ameiva ameiva ameivalizards from the "Osvaldo Rodrigues da Cunha" Herpetology Collection of the Emílio Goeldi Museum, Belém, Pará, Brazil. The aim of this study was to present the morphological study of the Acanthocephala larvae found in A. ameiva ameiva lizard.

  7. Ultrastructural analysis of spermiogenesis in Iguana iguana (Reptilia: Sauria: Iguanidae).

    PubMed

    Ferreira, A; Dolder, H

    2002-04-01

    Spermiogenesis in the lizard, Iguana iguana, was studied by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. During this process, structures such as the acrosomal complex in the spermatid head and the axonemal complex in the mid and principal pieces of the flagellum are formed. The nuclear content is initially compacted into thick, longitudinal chromatin filaments. Nuclear shape is determined by further compaction and by the manchette, a layer of microtubules surrounding the head. The acrosomal complex originates from Golgi vesicles and the interaction between the proacrosomal vesicle and the nucleus. The midpiece consists of a pair of centrioles, surrounded by a fibrous sheath and rings of simple and modified mitochondria. The centrioles sustain the axoneme that appears at the end of the midpiece. The axoneme extends throughout the principal piece of the flagellum with the 9 + 2 pattern, still surrounded by the fibrous sheath. In the endpiece, the axoneme continues, surrounded only by the plasma membrane. In the lumen of seminiferous tubules, immature spermatozoa retain abundant residual cytoplasm.

  8. Differential staining and microchromosomal variation in karyotypes of four Brazilian species of Tupinambinae lizards (Squamata: Teiidae).

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Rodrigo Marques Lima; Rodrigues, Miguel Trefaut; Yonenaga-Yassuda, Yatiyo; Pellegrino, Katia Cristina Machado

    2008-11-01

    Kayotypes of four neotropical teiid lizard species (Tupinambinae) were herein studied after conventional as well as silver staining and CBG-banding: Crocodilurus amazonicus (2n = 34), Tupinambis teguixin (2n = 36), Tupinambis merianae and Tupinambis quadrilineatus (2n = 38). The karyological data for T. quadrilineatus as well as those obtained using differential staining for all species were unknown until now. The karyotypes of all species presented 12 macrochromosomes identical in morphology, but differed in the number of microchromosomes: 22 in C. amazonicus, 24 in T. teguixin and 26 in T. quadrilineatus and T. merianae. The Ag-NOR located at the secondary constriction at the distal end of pair 2 is shared by all species, contrasting with the variability observed for this character in species of the related Teiinae. CBG-banding revealed a species-specific pattern in T. quadrilineatus with conspicuous interstitial C-blocks at the proximal region of the long arm of pair 4 and the whole heterochromatic short arm of pair 6. The karyological data reported here corroborates the relationship hypothesis obtained for Tupinambis based on molecular characters. T. teguixin presents the putative ancestral karyotype for the genus with 2n = 36 whereas T. merianae and T. quadrilineatus exhibit 2n = 38, due to an additional pair of microchromosomes.

  9. Baseline values of micronuclei and comet assay in the lizard Tupinambis merianae (Teiidae, Squamata).

    PubMed

    Schaumburg, Laura G; Poletta, Gisela L; Siroski, Pablo A; Mudry, Marta D

    2012-10-01

    The Micronucleus test (MN) and Comet assay (CA) are currently the most widely used methods that allow the characterization of DNA damage induced by physical and chemical agents in wild species. The continuous expansion of the cultivated areas in Argentina, since the introduction of transgenic crops, mainly soy, in association with the increased use of pesticides, transformed deeply the natural environments where the lizard Tupinambis merianae (tegu lizard) occurs. Despite the fact that reptiles have shown to be excellent bioindicators of environmental contaminants, there is no record of genotoxicity studies in T. merianae. The aim of the present study was to adjust the MN test and CA protocols to be applied in erythrocytes of T. merianae, and determine the baseline values of DNA damage in this species. We used 20 adult lizards (10 males: 10 females) from Estación Zoológica Experimental "Granja La Esmeralda" (Santa Fe, Argentina). Peripheral blood samples were collected from all animals and the MN test and CA applied according to the protocols established for other reptilian species. We test critical parameters of CA protocol (cell density, unwinding and electrophoresis times) using increasing concentrations of H2O2 (10, 25 and 50 μM) as a known genotoxic agent to induce DNA damage. Based on this, we determined the most suitable conditions for the CA in this species: a cell density of 4×10(3) erythrocytes per slide, 10 min of unwinding and 15 min of electrophoresis at 0.90 V/cm approximately. The baseline frequency of micronuclei (BFMN=MN/1000 erythrocytes counted) determined for this species was 0.95±0.27 and the basal damage index (BDI: calculated from 100 comet images classified in arbitrary units)=103.85±0.97. No differences were observed between sexes in the BFMN or BDI (p>0.05), and no relation was found between baseline values and length or weight of the analyzed animals (p>0.05). These results demonstrated the sensitivity of both biomarkers of genotoxicity to be applied in erythrocytes of this species, with baseline values comparable to those reported in other reptilian species. These results allow us to propose the tegu lizard for future in vivo studies to assess the genotoxicity of different agents, including those possibly affecting it in its natural geographic distribution.

  10. Brumation of introduced Black and White Tegus, Tupinambis merianae (Squamata: Teiidae), in southern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McEachern, Michelle; Yackel Adams, Amy A.; Klug, Page E.; Fitzgerald, Lee A; Reed, Robert N.

    2015-01-01

    An established population of Tupinambis merianae (Black and White Tegu) in southeastern Florida threatens the Everglades ecosystem. Understanding the behavioral ecology of Black and White Tegus could aid in management and control plans. Black and White Tegus are seasonally active and brumate during the winter in their native range, but brumation behavior is largely unstudied in either the native or the invasive range. We describe the first observations of Black and White Tegu brumation in southeastern Florida after monitoring 5 free-ranging, adult male Black and White Tegus through an inactive season using radiotelemetry and automated cameras. Duration of brumation averaged 137 days, beginning in September and ending by February. One of the 5 Black and White Tegus emerged to bask regularly during brumation, which to our knowledge represents the first documented instance of a free-ranging Black and White Tegu basking during brumation. These preliminary findings provide a basis for future research o f brumation behavior.

  11. The effects of early experience on subsequent feeding responses in the Tegu, Tupinambis teguixin (Squamata : Teiidae).

    PubMed

    Punzo, F

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of early feeding experiences on subsequent responses to prey in the tegu, Tupinambis teguixin. Five-day old lizards were exposed to the odors of various prey and control substances on cotton-tipped applicators with the tongue-flick attack score (TFAS) chosen as the dependent variable. Each lizard was exposed to four stimuli: two controls (deionised water and cologne), and extracts from a mouse Mus musculus, and a lizard Ameiva ameiva, in a repeated measures, randomized block design, receiving one stimulus training session / day over a 40-day period. Tongue-flicks directed toward the applicator were counted over a 1 min period as well as the amount of time that elapsed from the first tongue flick to any bite that may have occurred. Live neonatal mice (but not A. ameiva), offered on a weekly basis, were used as a food source for tegus over a 10-month period. After 10 months, tegus were exposed to applicators containing control odors as well as those containing extracts from mice and lizards (A. ameiva). Mouse extracts elicited significantly higher TFAS as compared to those elicited by A. ameiva or control odors, suggesting that prey odors encountered in the environment shortly after hatching can influence prey preferences by these lizards later in life. These results also indicate that tegu lizards can learn to use specific odor cues associated with naturally occurring prey as releasers for subsequent hunting behaviors.

  12. Helminths of the Lizard Salvator merianae (Squamata, Teiidae) in the Caatinga, Northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, A A M; Brito, S V; Teles, D A; Ribeiro, S C; Araujo-Filho, J A; Lima, V F; Pereira, A M A; Almeida, W O

    2016-08-29

    The lizard Salvator merianae is a widely distributed species in South America, occurring from southern Amazonia to the eastern Andes and northern Patagonia. Studies on the parasitic fauna of this lizard have revealed that it is a host for helminths in various Brazilian biomes. The present work provides new parasitological data on the gastrointestinal nematodes associated with the lizard S. merianae. Sixteen specimens were analyzed from nine different locations in a semi-arid region in northeastern Brazil. Five species of nematodes were identified. Oswaldofilaria petersi was first recorded as a parasite of the S. merianae, thus increasing the knowledge of the fauna of parasites that infect large Neotropical lizards.

  13. The Organization of Repetitive DNA in the Genomes of Amazonian Lizard Species in the Family Teiidae.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Natalia D M; Pinheiro, Vanessa S S; Carmo, Edson J; Goll, Leonardo G; Schneider, Carlos H; Gross, Maria C

    2015-01-01

    Repetitive DNA is the largest fraction of the eukaryote genome and comprises tandem and dispersed sequences. It presents variations in relation to its composition, number of copies, distribution, dynamics, and genome organization, and participates in the evolutionary diversification of different vertebrate species. Repetitive sequences are usually located in the heterochromatin of centromeric and telomeric regions of chromosomes, contributing to chromosomal structures. Therefore, the aim of this study was to physically map repetitive DNA sequences (5S rDNA, telomeric sequences, tropomyosin gene 1, and retroelements Rex1 and SINE) of mitotic chromosomes of Amazonian species of teiids (Ameiva ameiva, Cnemidophorus sp. 1, Kentropyx calcarata, Kentropyx pelviceps, and Tupinambis teguixin) to understand their genome organization and karyotype evolution. The mapping of repetitive sequences revealed a distinct pattern in Cnemidophorus sp. 1, whereas the other species showed all sequences interspersed in the heterochromatic region. Physical mapping of the tropomyosin 1 gene was performed for the first time in lizards and showed that in addition to being functional, this gene has a structural function similar to the mapped repetitive elements as it is located preferentially in centromeric regions and termini of chromosomes.

  14. Endoparasites in Sphenomorphus jobiensis (Sauria: Scincidae) from Papua New Guinea with description of three new species.

    PubMed

    Bursey, Charles R; Goldberg, Stephen R; Kraus, Fred

    2005-12-01

    One species of digenean, Zeylanurotrema sphenomorphi n. sp., and 2 nematode species, Meteterakis crombiei n. sp. and Physalopteroides milnensis n. sp., from the intestine of Sphenomorphus jobiensis, are described and illustrated. Zeylanurotrema sphenomorphi n. sp. represents the second species, Meteterakis crombiei n. sp. the 18th species, and Physalopteroides milnensis n. sp. the 19th species assigned to each respective genus. In addition, 1 species of cestode, Oochoristica javaensis; 7 nematode species, Abbreviata oligopapillata, Aplectana macintoshii, Aplectana zweifli, Cosmocerca zugi, Maxvachonia adamsoni, Oswaldocruzia bakeri, Parapharyngodon maplestonei; 1 species of acanthocephalan, Acanthocephalus bufonis; and 1 species of pentastome, Kiricephalus sp., were found. With the exception of Abbreviata oligopapillata, Sphenomorphus jobiensis represents a new host record for each species of endoparasite.

  15. A check-list of the nematode parasites of South African Serpentes (snakes) and Sauria (lizards).

    PubMed

    Hering-Hagenbeck, S F; Boomker, J

    2000-03-01

    Published records, in combination with own data have been brought together to provide data on parasite/host relationships of reptiles that occur in the Republic of South Africa. A total of 62 nematode species belonging to 23 genera and 11 families are recorded from 20 snake and 21 lizard species. The genera Kalicephalus, Spauligodon, Ophidascaris and Abbreviata are especially well represented with between five and eight species per genus. The most nematode species were recorded from the flap-neck chameleon, Chamaeleo dilepis (eight), the puff-adder, Bitis arietans (eight) and the water monitor, Varanus niloticus (seven). All synonyms of parasites and hosts are given.

  16. New satellite DNA in Lacerta s. str. lizards (Sauria: Lacertidae): evolutionary pathways and phylogenetic impact.

    PubMed

    Ciobanu, Doina; Grechko, Vernata V; Darevsky, Ilya S; Kramerov, Dmitri A

    2004-11-15

    A new tandemly repeated (satellite) DNA family namely Agi160, from Lacerta agilis and Lacerta strigata (Lacerta sensu stricto (s. str.), Linnaeus 1758) have been cloned and sequenced. Agi160 is found in the above two species, as well as two other representatives of the same genus, L. viridis and L. media. DNA hybridization did not reveal it in Darevskia, Podarcis, Zootoca, Eremias, Ophisops, and Gallotia - the other genera of the family Lacertidae. The results suggest that Agi160 is a Lacerta s. str. specific family of tandem DNA repeats. However, a comparison between sequences of Agi160 and CLsat repeat units revealed 60 bp regions 62-74% identical. The latter is a satellite DNA family typical for Darevskia (syn. "L. saxicola complex") (Grechko et al., Molecular-genetic classification and phylogenetic relatedness of some species of Lacertidae lizards by taxonoprint data. Mol Biol 32:172-183, 1988.). Both Agi160 and CLsat tandem repeats share several common features (e.g., the same AT content and distribution of multiple short A-T runs, internal structure of repeated units, the presence of conservative regions). These data are indicative of their common origin and a possibly strong selective pressure upon conserving both satellites. A comparative analysis of structure, organization, and abundance of these two families of satDNA reveals evolutionary pathways that led to their formation and divergence. The data are consistent with the hypotheses of the concerted evolution of satellite DNA families. The possibility of use of Agi160 as a phylogenetic tool, defining relationships within Lacerta s. str., as well as within the whole family of Lacertidae is discussed.

  17. Nuclear and mtDNA-based phylogeny of southern African sand lizards, Pedioplanis (Sauria: Lacertidae).

    PubMed

    Makokha, Jane S; Bauer, Aaron M; Mayer, Werner; Matthee, Conrad A

    2007-08-01

    The diversity of lacertid lizards in Africa is highest in the southern African subcontinent, where over two-thirds of the species are endemic. With eleven currently recognized species, Pedioplanis is the most diverse among the southern African genera. In this study we use 2200 nucleotide positions derived from two mitochondrial markers (ND2 and 16S rRNA) and one nuclear gene (RAG-1) to (i) assess the phylogeny of Pedioplanis and (ii) estimate divergence time among lineages using the relaxed molecular clock method. Individual analyses of each gene separately supported different nodes in the phylogeny and the combined analysis yielded more well supported relationships. We present the first, well-resolved gene tree for the genus Pedioplanis and this is largely congruent with a phylogeny derived from morphology. Contrary to previous suggestions Heliobolus/Nucras are sister to Pedioplanis. The genus Pedioplanis is monophyletic, with P. burchelli/P. laticeps forming a clade that is sister to all the remaining congeners. Two distinct geographic lineages can be identified within the widespread P. namaquensis; one occurs in Namibia, while the other occurs in South Africa. The P. undata species complex is monophyletic, but one of its constituent species, P. inornata, is paraphyletic. Relationships among the subspecies of P. lineoocellata are much more complex than previously documented. An isolated population previously assigned to P. l. pulchella is paraphyletic and sister to the three named subspecies. The phylogeny identifies two biogeographical clades that probably diverged during the mid-Miocene, after the development of the Benguella Current. This probably led to habitat changes associated with climate and, in conjunction with physical barriers (Great Escarpment), contributed towards speciation within the genus Pedioplanis.

  18. A new species of Andean semiaquatic lizard of the genus Potamites (Sauria, Gymnophtalmidae) from southern Peru

    PubMed Central

    Chávez, Germán; Vásquez, Diego

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We describe a new lizard species of the genus Potamites from the montane forests of the Cordillera de Vilcabamba (Cusco region) and Apurimac River valley (Ayacucho region), between 1500 and 2000 meters of elevation, in southern Peru. The new species is distinguishable from all other species of the genus mainly by having highly keeled scattered scales on dorsum and females lacking femoral pores. PMID:22423189

  19. A new species of Andean semiaquatic lizard of the genus Potamites (Sauria, Gymnophtalmidae) from southern Peru.

    PubMed

    Chávez, Germán; Vásquez, Diego

    2012-01-01

    We describe a new lizard species of the genus Potamites from the montane forests of the Cordillera de Vilcabamba (Cusco region) and Apurimac River valley (Ayacucho region), between 1500 and 2000 meters of elevation, in southern Peru. The new species is distinguishable from all other species of the genus mainly by having highly keeled scattered scales on dorsum and females lacking femoral pores.

  20. A new Andean lizard of the genus Potamites (Sauria, Gymnophthalmidae) from Manu National Park, southeastern Peru.

    PubMed

    Chávez, Germán; Catenazzi, Alessandro

    2014-03-04

    We describe a new lizard of the genus Potamites from elevations of 1000-2100 m in the montane forests of the Cordillera de Paucartambo and the upper Kosñipata valley, Region of Cusco, Peru. The new species differs from other species of Potamites by having scattered keeled scales on dorsum, an undivided frontonasal and absence of femoral pores in females.

  1. Two new species of the genus Goniurosaurus (Squamata: Sauria: Eublepharidae) from southern China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian-Huan; Chan, Bosco Pui-Lok

    2015-06-26

    Two new species of large geckos in the genus Goniurosaurus are described based on specimens collected from karst areas of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, southern China: Goniurosaurus kadoorieorum sp. nov. and Goniurosaurus kwangsiensis sp. nov. Data on natural history of the new species are provided, as well as discussions on the current conservation status of Goniurosaurus species in southern China. Due to the popularity of this genus as novelty pets, and recurring cases of scientific descriptions driving herpetofauna to near-extinction by commercial collectors, we do not disclose the collecting localities of these restricted-range species in this publication. However, such information has been presented to relevant government agencies, and is available upon request by fellow scientists.

  2. [Characteristics of tooth system in gekkonid lizards ( Teratoscincus, Gekkonidae) and other lizards (Gekkota, Sauria, Reptilia)].

    PubMed

    Nikitina, N G; Anan'eva, N B

    2009-01-01

    The dentition and tooth crown microstructure of gekkonids and eublepharids are examined. Scanning electron microscopy shows that the lingual surface of teeth in these lizards has one, two, or, occasionally, several cusps separated by grooves. The teeth of geckoes usually have two (lingual and labial) cusps in the apical region. With respect to the number of teeth, the majority of Gekkota fall into two groups. The first includes a few species with many teeth (50 or more) in the dentary and maxilla, the eublepharids Goniurosaurus and Aeluroscalabotes, and the gekkonid Cyrtopodion louisiadensis. The second group, comprising most of the species, is subdivided into two subgroups, species with 20-30 or 30-40 teeth in jaw bones. Teratoscincus belongs to the first subgroup of the second group.

  3. A new species of the genus Tropiocolotes Peters, 1880 from western Iran (Squamata: Sauria: Gekkonidae).

    PubMed

    Krause, Valentina; Ahmadzadeh, Faraham; Moazeni, Mostafa; Wagner, Philipp; Wilms, Thomas M

    2013-01-01

    The genus Tropiocolotes comprises small, naked toed, ground dwelling and nocturnal desert geckos, ranging from Morocco and Mauritania in northern Africa to south and central Arabia as well as coastal Iran. Herein, we describe a new species of the genus Tropiocolotes from western Iran based on five specimens from Nayband region. This new taxon is described with a statistical approach based on 34 meristic, metric and qualitative morphological characters of more than 300 individuals of related species.

  4. A new species of the genus Microgecko Nikolsky, 1907 (Sauria: Gekkonidae) from southern Iran.

    PubMed

    Gholamifard, Ali; Rastegar-Pouyani, Nasrullah; Rastegar-Pouyani, Eskandar; Khosravani, Azar; Yousefkhani, Seyyed Saeed Hosseinian; Oraei, Hamzeh

    2016-03-20

    The dwarf geckos of the recently revived genus Microgecko Nikolsky, 1907 comprise four species, ranging from western Iran to northwestern India. Iran hosts three species of the four recognized species of the genus Microgecko. Here, we describe a new species of this genus based on two and single specimens from southeastern and southern Iran, respectively. Combinations of scalation characters and distinct morphology, coloration and habitat peculiarities in calcareous mountains distinguish Microgecko chabaharensis sp. nov. from its congeners. Detailed information and an updated identification key for the genus Microgecko are also presented.

  5. A new species of Acanthodactylus Fitzinger 1834 (Sauria: Lacertidae) from southern Iran.

    PubMed

    Nastaran, Heidari; Nasrullah Rastegar, Pouyani; Eskandar, Rastegar-Pouyani; Mehdi, Rajabizadeh

    2013-01-01

    A new and distinctive species of lacertid genus Acanthodactylus Fitzinger, 1834 is described from 7 km east of Khamir Port, Hormozgan Province, southern Iran at an elevation of 30-40m above sea level (asl). Analyses of morphological characters and the comparison with other formerly known species of this genus have proven the status of this taxon as a new, distinct species. Combinations of scalation characters and distinct morphology, coloration and habitat peculiarities in calcareous mountains distinguish Acanthodactylus khamirensis sp.nov from all remaining species of the genus in the area. In order to show the validity of the new species, we carried out a comparative statistical analysis using 13 metric and six meristic morphological characters on all of the neighboring congeners of the new species using descriptive (one-way ANOVA) as well as multivariate analyses (PCA and DFA). The results confirm the specific status of the new taxon. Detailed information and an updated identification key for the genus A canthodactylus in Iran are presented.

  6. A description of Isospora amphiboluri (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the inland bearded dragon, Pogona vitticeps (Sauria: Agamidae).

    PubMed

    McAllister, C T; Upton, S J; Jacobson, E R; Kopit, W

    1995-04-01

    Fecal samples from 50 captive inland bearded dragons, Pogona vitticeps (Ahl, 1926), bred in California, were examined for coccidian parasites. Sixteen (32%) of the lizards were found to be passing oocysts of Isospora amphiboluri Cannon, 1967, previously described from bearded dragons Pogona barbata (Cuvier, 1829) from Australia. Sporulated oocytes were spherical to subspherical, 25.3 x 25.1 (23-26 x 23-26) microns, with a shape index (length/width) of 1.0 (1.0-1.1). A micropyle, oocyst residuum, and polar granule were absent. Sporocyts were ovoidal, 17.0 x 11.4 (16-18 x 11-12) microns, with a shape index of 1.5 (1.4-1.7). A sporocyst residuum, Stieda, and substieda bodies were present, but parastieda bodies were absent. Sporozoites were elongated, 13.9 x 3.5 (12-15 x 3-4) microns in situ, containing spherical anterior and posterior refractile bodies. The occurrence of I. amphiboluri in P. vitticeps is a new host and geographic record for the parasite. Photomicrographs of the oocysts and endogenous life cycle stages of I. amphiboluri are presented for the first time.

  7. The mitochondrial genome of the gold-dust day gecko, Phelsuma laticauda (Sauria, Gekkota, Gekkonidae).

    PubMed

    Yan, Jie; Tian, Chao; Bauer, Aaron M; Zhou, Kaiya

    2016-01-01

    We sequenced the nearly complete mitochondrial genome of the gold-dust day gecko, Phelsuma laticauda, which is native to northern Madagascar. The mitogenome is 15,416 bp in size, consisting of 37 genes coding for 13 proteins, 22 tRNAs, and 2 rRNAs. Due to the unsuccessful sequencing of the control region, the length is relatively shorter than that of other gekkonids. The gene organization conforms to the vertebrate consesus gene arrangement.

  8. Helminth records from eleven species of Emoia (Sauria: Scincidae) from Oceania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldberg, S.R.; Bursey, C.R.; Fisher, R.N.

    2005-01-01

    As part of an ongoing study of the biogeography of helminth parasites of lizards from Oceania, 53 specimens of Emoia (11 species) were examined, as follows: E. atrocostata, E. boettgeri, E. caerulocauda, E. cyanogaster, E. cyanura, E. impar, E. nigra, E. nigromarginata, E. ponapea, E. sanfordi, E. trossula. One species of Digenea, Paradistomoides gregarium, and six species of Nematoda, Hedruris hanleyae, Maxvachonia chabaudi, Parapharyngodon maplestoni, Physalopteroides arnoensis, Spauligodon gehyrae, and Moaciria sp. indet., were found. These helminths have been reported previously from other lizard species. Seventeen new host records and eight new locality records are reported. ?? 2005 by University of Hawai'i Press All rights reserved.

  9. [Independence of the Central Asian faunistic region (according to the distribution of lizards (Reptilia, Sauria))].

    PubMed

    Bobrov, V V

    2005-01-01

    Central Asian area above 2000 m was studied to test the independence of the Central Asian Mountain region in the herpetogeographical map of the Palearctic Region and the neighboring Sahara-Gobi Desert region. According to the range and origin similarity, all species inhabiting this area were assigned to several groups: mountain Central Asian species (the bulk of the range lies within the studied area), Western Asian upland species (the bulk of the range lies in the Near Eastern uplands), plain desert species (the bulk of the range is below 2000 m), Indo-Malayan species (the bulk of the range lies within the Indo-Malayan Kingdom), European species (the bulk of the range lies in the forest and steppe zones of Europe and West Siberia), and mountain desert species (equal parts of the range lie in the deserts and mountains of Central Asia). The distribution of species density was mapped by range superposition for each group. The dominance (over 50% of the total number of species) of mountain Central Asian or other species groups allowed us to assign the studied area to either the Central Asian mountain region or Sahara-Gobi desert region. The areas where neither of the specified groups exceeded the 50% threshold were recognized as transitional. Considering a large number of endemic species (28% of the total fauna), the Central Asian mountain area should be recognized as an independent region rather than a subregion of the Sahara-Gobi Desert region.

  10. A new species of Choleoeimeria (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Meller's chameleon, Trioceros melleri (Sauria: Chamaeleonidae).

    PubMed

    McAllister, Chris T

    2012-10-01

    A captive specimen of Meller's chameleon, Trioceros melleri (Gray), originally from Tanzania and housed at the Oklahoma City Zoological Park Herpetarium, Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, was found to be passing an undescribed species of Choleoeimeria in its feces. Oocysts of Choleoeimeria steveuptoni n. sp. were cylindroidal, 38.5 × 17.8 (36-42 × 17-19) µm with a bilayered wall and a shape index (length/width) of 2.2. A micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a fragmented polar granule was often present. Ovoidal sporocysts were composed of 2 valves joined by a suture and measured 11.3 × 9.1 (11-12 × 9-10) µm; shape index of 1.3. Stieda, sub-Stieda, and para-Stieda bodies were absent. The sporocyst residuum consists of multiple globules dispersed along the perimeter of the sporocyst and between sporozoites. Sporozoites were elongate, 13.1 × 2.9 (12-15 × 2.6-3.2) µm with an elongate posterior refractile body. The new species represents the second coccidian documented from this lizard.

  11. A new species of Choleoeimeria (apicomplexa: eimeriidae) from oustalet's chameleon, Furcifer oustaleti (Sauria: Chamaeleonidae).

    PubMed

    McAllister, Chris T

    2012-02-01

    One of three (33%) captive specimens of Oustalet's chameleon, Furcifer oustaleti (Mocquard) originally from Madagascar and housed at the Oklahoma City Zoological Park Herpetarium, Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, USA, was found to be passing an undescribed species of Choleoeimeria in its faeces. Oocysts of Choleoeimeria fischeri sp. n. were cylindroidal, 30.3 x 16.8 (28-34 x 15-18) microm, with a smooth, bilayered wall and a length/width ratio (L/W) of 1.8. A micropyle and oocyst residuum was absent but a fragmented polar granule was often present. Sporocysts were ovoidal, 9.6 x 8.0 (9-10 x 7-9) jm, with an L/W of 1.2. Stieda, sub-Stieda, and para-Stieda bodies were absent. The sporocyst residuum consists of large globules dispersed between sporozoites. Sporozoites were elongate, 8.6 x 2.9 (8-10 x 2-3) microm, with an elongate posterior refractile body. The new species represents the second coccidian described from this lizard.

  12. Three new species of Coccidia (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Skinks, Lipinia spp. (Sauria: Scincidae), from Oceania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McAllister, Chris T.; Duszynski, Donald W.; Austin, Christopher C.; Fisher, Robert N.

    2013-01-01

    Between September 1991 and March 1993, 25 moth skinks (Lipinia noctua) were collected from various localities on the Cook Islands, Fiji, Papua New Guinea (PNG), and Vanuatu and examined for coccidians. In addition, a single Roux's lipinia skink (Lipinia rouxi) was collected from PNG and examined for coccidia. Sixteen (64%) L. noctua were found to harbor 2 new eimerians, and L. rouxi harbored another new Eimeria sp. Oocysts of Eimeria lipinia n. sp. from 9 (36%) L. noctua from the Cook Islands, Fiji, and PNG were subspherical with a bilayered wall and measured (L × W) 18.6 × 16.9 μm, with a L/W ratio of 1.1. Both micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a polar granule was present. Oocysts of Eimeria melanesia n. sp. from 6 (24%) L. noctua from Fiji and Vanuatu and a single L. rouxi from PNG were subspherical to ellipsoidal with a bilayered wall and measured 19.8 × 17.5 μm, and L/W was 1.1. Both micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a single or fragmented polar granule was present. Oocysts of Eimeria lessoni n. sp. from 1 (4%) L. noctua from PNG were cylindroidal with a bilayered wall and measured 28.1 × 15.7 μm, and L/W was 1.8. Both micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a single polar granule was present. These represent the third report of Eimeria spp. reported from any host on PNG and the only coccidians, to our knowledge, ever described from L. noctua and L. rouxi and from the Cook Islands and Vanuatu.

  13. Differential repetitive DNA composition in the centromeric region of chromosomes of Amazonian lizard species in the family Teiidae.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Natalia D M; Carmo, Edson; Neves, Rogerio O; Schneider, Carlos Henrique; Gross, Maria Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Differences in heterochromatin distribution patterns and its composition were observed in Amazonian teiid species. Studies have shown repetitive DNA harbors heterochromatic blocks which are located in centromeric and telomeric regions in Ameiva ameiva (Linnaeus, 1758), Kentropyx calcarata (Spix, 1825), Kentropyx pelviceps (Cope, 1868), and Tupinambis teguixin (Linnaeus, 1758). In Cnemidophorus sp.1, repetitive DNA has multiple signals along all chromosomes. The aim of this study was to characterize moderately and highly repetitive DNA sequences by C ot1-DNA from Ameiva ameiva and Cnemidophorus sp.1 genomes through cloning and DNA sequencing, as well as mapping them chromosomally to better understand its organization and genome dynamics. The results of sequencing of DNA libraries obtained by C ot1-DNA showed that different microsatellites, transposons, retrotransposons, and some gene families also comprise the fraction of repetitive DNA in the teiid species. FISH using C ot1-DNA probes isolated from both Ameiva ameiva and Cnemidophorus sp.1 showed these sequences mainly located in heterochromatic centromeric, and telomeric regions in Ameiva ameiva, Kentropyx calcarata, Kentropyx pelviceps, and Tupinambis teguixin chromosomes, indicating they play structural and functional roles in the genome of these species. In Cnemidophorus sp.1, C ot1-DNA probe isolated from Ameiva ameiva had multiple interstitial signals on chromosomes, whereas mapping of C ot1-DNA isolated from the Ameiva ameiva and Cnemidophorus sp.1 highlighted centromeric regions of some chromosomes. Thus, the data obtained showed that many repetitive DNA classes are part of the genome of Ameiva ameiva, Cnemidophorus sp.1, Kentroyx calcarata, Kentropyx pelviceps, and Tupinambis teguixin, and these sequences are shared among the analyzed teiid species, but they were not always allocated at the same chromosome position.

  14. Structure of the posthepatic septum and its influence on visceral topology in the tegu lizard, Tupinambis merianae (Teiidae: Reptilia).

    PubMed

    Klein, Wilfried; Abe, Augusto S; Andrade, Denis V; Perry, Steven F

    2003-11-01

    The posthepatic septum (PHS) divides the body cavity of Tupinambis merianae into two parts: the cranial one containing the lungs and liver and the caudal one containing the remaining viscera. The PHS is composed of layers of collagenous fibers and bundles of smooth muscle, neither of which show systematic orientation, as well as isolated blood vessels, lymphatic vessels, and nerves. Striated muscle of the abdominal wall does not invade the PHS. The contractions of the smooth muscles may stabilize the pleurohepatic cavity under conditions of elevated aerobic needs rather than supporting breathing on a breath-by-breath basis. Surgical removal of the PHS changes the anatomical arrangement of the viscera significantly, with stomach and intestine invading the former pleurohepatic cavity and reducing the space for the lungs. Thus, the PHS is essential to maintain the visceral topography in Tupinambis.

  15. An endemic new species of Ameiva (Squamata: Teiidae) from an isolated dry   forest in southern Peru.

    PubMed

    Landauro, Caroll Z; García-Bravo, Antonio; Venegas, Pablo J

    2015-04-10

    We describe a new species of Ameiva from an interandean dry forest in central-southern Peru. Ameiva reticulata sp. nov. represents the fifth species in the genus known to occur in Peru. The new species is similar to the species of the A. ameiva complex such as A. ameiva, A. atrigularis, A. pantherina, and A. praesignis, and is distinguished from these by a smaller size, a lower count of dorsal scales along the middorsal line and scales across the midbody, and by the gular coloration.

  16. [Home range of Aspidoscelis cozumela (Squamata: Teiidae): a parthenogenetic lizard microendemic to Cozumel Island, México].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Gallegos, Oswaldo; López-Moreno, Ana Esthela; Méndez-Sánchez, José Fernando; Rheubert, Justin Lloyd; Méndez-de la Cruz, Fausto Roberto

    2015-09-01

    Home range is defined as the area within which an individual moves to acquire resources necessary to increase their fitness and may vary inter and intra-specifically with biotic and abiotic factors. This study details the home range of the parthenogenic lizard, Aspidoscelis cozumela, an active forager microendemic to Cozumel Island, México, with high preference for open sand beaches. The home range of A. cozumela was compared with other species of Aspidoscelis (gonochoric and parthenogenetic) and other lizards that occupy coastal habitats. Furthermore, the biotic and abiotic factors that may influence home range were analyzed. This study was conducted in the beach located on the East side of the island (area of 4,000 M2) that is composed primarily of halophyte vegetation with high levels of sunlight. From 1999 to 2001, nine samples were taken which included the dry, rainy, "nortes", and breeding seasons. During each sampling, capture-mark-recapture techniques were conducted and the date, time of day, and snout-vent length (SVL) were recorded to the nearest millimeter. Individuals were located in the study area using a bi-coordinate reference using 10 x 10 m subdivisions of the habitat. Home range and home range overlap were calculated using the convex polygon method in McPaal and home range/SVL correlation was tested using Pearson's correlation. To calculate females home range, three or more recaptures were considered. A total of 20 home ranges that averaged 45.1 ± 14.0 m2 were obtained and no correlation between SVL and home range size was detected (p = 0.9229, n = 20). However, removing individuals with outlier home ranges (females with home ranges > 100 m2, n = 2) resulted in a positive correlation with SVL (r = 0.61, p = 0.0072, n = 18). A 22.9 ± 5.7% overlap in home range was also detected. The small home range of A. cozumela represents the smallest home range within the Aspidoscelis genus recorded to date (including both parthenogenetic and gonochoric species) and contrasts the theoretical predictions of broad home ranges for widely foraging species. Thermoregulatory benefits and a high population density may explain the small home range of A. cozumela. Although this species is highly adapted to the environmental conditions present on the open sand beaches, anthropogenic effects on these habitats by the development of tourism infrastructure may jeopardize their existence on Cozumel Island.

  17. Differential repetitive DNA composition in the centromeric region of chromosomes of Amazonian lizard species in the family Teiidae

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Natalia D. M.; Carmo, Edson; Neves, Rogerio O.; Schneider, Carlos Henrique; Gross, Maria Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Differences in heterochromatin distribution patterns and its composition were observed in Amazonian teiid species. Studies have shown repetitive DNA harbors heterochromatic blocks which are located in centromeric and telomeric regions in Ameiva ameiva (Linnaeus, 1758), Kentropyx calcarata (Spix, 1825), Kentropyx pelviceps (Cope, 1868), and Tupinambis teguixin (Linnaeus, 1758). In Cnemidophorus sp.1, repetitive DNA has multiple signals along all chromosomes. The aim of this study was to characterize moderately and highly repetitive DNA sequences by Cot1-DNA from Ameiva ameiva and Cnemidophorus sp.1 genomes through cloning and DNA sequencing, as well as mapping them chromosomally to better understand its organization and genome dynamics. The results of sequencing of DNA libraries obtained by Cot1-DNA showed that different microsatellites, transposons, retrotransposons, and some gene families also comprise the fraction of repetitive DNA in the teiid species. FISH using Cot1-DNA probes isolated from both Ameiva ameiva and Cnemidophorus sp.1 showed these sequences mainly located in heterochromatic centromeric, and telomeric regions in Ameiva ameiva, Kentropyx calcarata, Kentropyx pelviceps, and Tupinambis teguixin chromosomes, indicating they play structural and functional roles in the genome of these species. In Cnemidophorus sp.1, Cot1-DNA probe isolated from Ameiva ameiva had multiple interstitial signals on chromosomes, whereas mapping of Cot1-DNA isolated from the Ameiva ameiva and Cnemidophorus sp.1 highlighted centromeric regions of some chromosomes. Thus, the data obtained showed that many repetitive DNA classes are part of the genome of Ameiva ameiva, Cnemidophorus sp.1, Kentroyx calcarata, Kentropyx pelviceps, and Tupinambis teguixin, and these sequences are shared among the analyzed teiid species, but they were not always allocated at the same chromosome position. PMID:27551343

  18. An investigation into the Swan Island Honduras collecting event of Tiaporus fuliginosus Cope (Reptilia: Teiidae) and its systematic status

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCranie, James R.; Gotte, Steve W.

    2015-01-01

    Confusion exists in the literature concerning the collecting event of the teiid lizard Tiaporus fuliginosus. We investigated the literature and documents stored at the Smithsonian Institution Archives involving the collector of those specimens in an effort to resolve that confusion. We conclude that the type series was collected on the Swan Islands of Honduras by Charles H. Townsend during 1887. We also provide a redescription of that nominal form and show that it is a valid species that should be called Ameiva fuliginosa. We also examined the type series of A. panchlora from Old Providence, Colombia and confirm that its 1950 placement as a junior synonym of A. fuliginosa is correct.

  19. Treerunners, cryptic lizards of the Plica plica group (Squamata, Sauria, Tropiduridae) of northern South America.

    PubMed

    Murphy, John C; Jowers, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    The arboreal, Neotropical lizard Plica plica (Linnaeus, 1758) has been long considered a widespread species with a distribution east of the Andes. A preliminary examination of 101 specimens from about 28 locations mostly north of the Amazon suggests that Plica plica is a cryptic species complex with taxa that can be distinguished on the basis of the number of scale rows at mid-body; the arrangement, shape and ornamentation of scales on the snout; the number of lamellae on the fourth toe; the number of subocular plates; as well as other commonly used external morphological traits. The allopatric species discussed here are concordant with northern South American geography. Plica plica (Linnaeus, 1758) is associated with the Guiana Shield (Suriname, Guyana and Venezuela). A second species, P. caribeana sp. n. is associated with the Caribbean Coastal Range of Venezuela including Trinidad and Tobago. A third, distinctive species, P. rayi sp. n. is associated with the middle Orinoco at the eastern edge of the Guiana Shield. Two other species, P. kathleenae sp. n. and P. medemi sp. n., each based upon a single specimen, one from the Sierra Acarai Mountains of Guyana, and the other from southern Meta, Colombia are described. In addition to morphological analyses, we sequenced 12S and 16S rDNA gene fragments from one Plica plica from Trinidad to assess its relationship and taxonomy to other mainland Plica cf. plica. The results suggest Plica caribeana sp. n. likely diverged prior to the separation of Trinidad from northern Venezuela. Isolation in the Caribbean Coastal Range during its rapid uplift in the late Miocene, combined with a marine incursion into northern Venezuela may have contributed to their genetic divergence from other populations.

  20. Treerunners, cryptic lizards of the Plica plica group (Squamata, Sauria, Tropiduridae) of northern South America

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, John C.; Jowers, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The arboreal, Neotropical lizard Plica plica (Linnaeus, 1758) has been long considered a widespread species with a distribution east of the Andes. A preliminary examination of 101 specimens from about 28 locations mostly north of the Amazon suggests that Plica plica is a cryptic species complex with taxa that can be distinguished on the basis of the number of scale rows at mid-body; the arrangement, shape and ornamentation of scales on the snout; the number of lamellae on the fourth toe; the number of subocular plates; as well as other commonly used external morphological traits. The allopatric species discussed here are concordant with northern South American geography. Plica plica (Linnaeus, 1758) is associated with the Guiana Shield (Suriname, Guyana and Venezuela). A second species, P. caribeana sp. n. is associated with the Caribbean Coastal Range of Venezuela including Trinidad and Tobago. A third, distinctive species, P. rayi sp. n. is associated with the middle Orinoco at the eastern edge of the Guiana Shield. Two other species, P. kathleenae sp. n. and P. medemi sp. n., each based upon a single specimen, one from the Sierra Acarai Mountains of Guyana, and the other from southern Meta, Colombia are described. In addition to morphological analyses, we sequenced 12S and 16S rDNA gene fragments from one Plica plica from Trinidad to assess its relationship and taxonomy to other mainland Plica cf. plica. The results suggest Plica caribeana sp. n. likely diverged prior to the separation of Trinidad from northern Venezuela. Isolation in the Caribbean Coastal Range during its rapid uplift in the late Miocene, combined with a marine incursion into northern Venezuela may have contributed to their genetic divergence from other populations. PMID:24363569

  1. Systematics of the Podarcis hispanicus complex (Sauria, Lacertidae) III: valid nomina of the western and central Iberian forms.

    PubMed

    Geniez, Philippe; Sá-Sousa, Paulo; Guillaume, Claude P; Cluchier, Alexandre; Crochet, Pierre-André

    2014-05-05

    Recent genetic works have suggested that the Iberian wall lizard Podarcis hispanicus (Steindachner, 1870) sensu lato is a species complex. Several forms have already been elevated to species rank and linked to available nomina, but at least three still have to be formally named, including the western Iberian forms currently designated as Podarcis hispanicus "type 1A", "type 1B" and "type 2". The aim of the present work is to assign a valid nomen to these taxa. Using multivariate analyses, we first checked that the morphological differences reported in Portugal between type 1 and type 2 are maintained over their distribution range. We then investigated phenotypic differentiation between type 1A and type 1B, which were found to be so similar that identification based on phenotype is currently not advisable. We propose to treat type 1 and type 2 as distinct species because of their level of genetic and phenotypic divergence, large area of distribution and ample evidence for reduced or absent introgression in contact zones. We maintain type 1A and 1B as subspecies for the time being, pending further analyses of their contact zone. The valid nomen for "Podarcis hispanica type 1 (sensu lato)" is Lacerta muralis guadarramae Boscá, 1916 which becomes Podarcis guadarramae (Boscá, 1916). Lineage type 1A is here described as a new taxon: P. guadarramae lusitanicus ssp. nov., inhabiting northern Portugal and northwestern Spain. The type 1B lineage corresponds to the nominotypical subspecies that inhabits Spain, mostly the Central Iberian Mountains. We were unable to locate an available nomen for "Podarcis hispanica type 2", which is here described as Podarcis virescens sp. nov. This species is widely distributed in the plains and plateaus of central and parts of south-western Spain as well as central and southern Portugal.

  2. A new species of Eimeria (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from brown anole, Anolis sagrei (Sauria: Dactyloidae) from Florida, USA

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Chris T.; Seville, R. Scott; Connior, Matthew B.; Trauth, Stanley E.

    2016-01-01

    During July 2014, 14 brown anoles, Anolis sagrei Duméril and Bibron were collected from Orange County, Florida, U.S.A., and their faeces examined for coccidian parasites. One (7%) harboured an eimerian that we describe here as new. Oöcysts of Eimeria garmani sp. n. were ellipsoidal with a uni-layered wall and measured (length × width, L × W) 19.3 × 12.5 μm, with a length/width (L/W) ratio of 1.5. A micropyle, oöcyst residuum and polar granule were absent. Sporocysts were subspheroidal, 6.8 × 6.3 μm, L/W 1.1. Stieda, substieda and parastieda bodies were absent. A sporocyst residuum was present as dispersed granules. Endogenous stages were observed within the small intestine. This is the first coccidian reported from the brown anole and the third eimerian reported from anoles in the United States. PMID:25962466

  3. Temporal germ cell development strategy during spermatogenesis within the testis of the Ground Skink, Scincella lateralis (Sauria: Scincidae).

    PubMed

    Rheubert, J L; McHugh, H H; Collier, M H; Sever, D M; Gribbins, K M

    2009-07-01

    Ground Skink (Scincella lateralis) testes were examined histologically to determine the testicular organization and germ cell development strategy employed during spermatogenesis. Testicular tissues were collected from 19 ground skinks from Aiken County, South Carolina during the months of March-June, August, and October. The testes consisted of seminiferous tubules lined with germinal epithelia in which germ cells matured in close association with Sertoli cells. As germ cells matured, they migrated away from the basal lamina of the epithelia towards the lumina of the seminiferous tubules. The testes were spermatogenically active during the months of March, April, May, June, and October (largest seminiferous tubule diameters and epithelial heights), but entered a quiescent period in August (smallest seminiferous tubule diameter and epithelial height) where only spermatogonia type A and B and early spermatocytes were present in low numbers within the seminiferous epithelium. Although the testicular organization was similar to other amniotes, a temporal germ cell development strategy was employed during spermatogenesis within Ground Skinks, similar to that of anamniotes. Thus, this skink's germ cell development strategy, which also has been recently reported in all other major reptilian clades, may represent an evolutionary intermediate in terms of testicular organization between anamniotes and birds and mammals.

  4. Hidden diversity in the Podarcis tauricus (Sauria, Lacertidae) species subgroup in the light of multilocus phylogeny and species delimitation.

    PubMed

    Psonis, Nikolaos; Antoniou, Aglaia; Kukushkin, Oleg; Jablonski, Daniel; Petrov, Boyan; Crnobrnja-Isailović, Jelka; Sotiropoulos, Konstantinos; Gherghel, Iulian; Lymberakis, Petros; Poulakakis, Nikos

    2017-01-01

    The monophyletic species subgroup of Podarcis tauricus is distributed in the western and southern parts of the Balkans, and includes four species with unresolved and unstudied inter- and intra-specific phylogenetic relationships. Using sequence data from two mitochondrial and three nuclear genes and applying several phylogenetic methods and species delimitation approaches to an extensive dataset, we have reconstructed the phylogeny of the Podarcis wall lizards in the Balkans, and re-investigated the taxonomic status of the P. tauricus species subgroup. Multilocus analyses revealed that the aforementioned subgroup consists of five major clades, with P. melisellensis as its most basal taxon. Monophyly of P. tauricus sensu stricto is not supported, with one of the subspecies (P. t. ionicus) displaying great genetic diversity (hidden diversity or cryptic species). It comprises five, geographically distinct, subclades with genetic distances on the species level. Species delimitation approaches revealed nine species within the P. tauricus species subgroup (P. melisellensis, P. gaigeae, P. milensis, and six in the P. tauricus complex), underlining the necessity of taxonomic re-evaluation. We thus synonymize some previously recognized subspecies in this subgroup, elevate P. t. tauricus and P. g. gaigeae to the species level and suggest a distinct Albanian-Greek clade, provisionally named as the P. ionicus species complex. The latter clade comprises five unconfirmed candidate species that call for comprehensive studies in the future.

  5. Two new species of Isospora (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from skinks Emoia spp. (Sauria: Scincidae), from Fiji and Papua New Guinea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McAllister, Chris T.; Duszynski, Donald W.; Fisher, Robert N.

    2013-01-01

    Between September and October 1991 and again during September 1992, skinks (Emoia spp.) were collected from various localities on Fiji and Papua New Guinea (PNG) and examined for coccidians. One of 4 (25%) De Vis' emo skinks (Emoia pallidiceps) from PNG harbored an undescribed species of Isospora in its feces. Oocysts of Isospora grinbikpelapalai n. sp. were ellipsoidal to subspheroidal, 18.1 × 14.9 (17–20 × 14–16) μm, with a bilayered wall and a length/width index (L/W) of 1.2. Both micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a prominent polar granule was present. Sporocysts were ovoidal, 10.7 × 7.6 (10–11 × 7–8) μm, with a L/W index of 1.4. Stieda and sub-Stieda bodies were present, but para-Stieda bodies were absent. The sporocyst residuum consisted of large scattered globules dispersed between sporozoites. Sporozoites were elongate with spheroidal anterior and posterior refractile bodies. Isospora grinbikpelapalai was also found in 1 of 2 (50%) Pope's emo skinks (Emoia popei) from PNG. One of 13 (8%) white-bellied copper-striped skinks (Emoia cyanura), from Fiji, was passing another undescribed species of Isospora in its feces. Oocysts of Isospora casei n. sp. were elongate, 31.8 × 21.3 (28–35 × 18–24) μm, with a bilayered wall and a L/W index of 1.5. Micropyle, oocyst residuum, and polar granule were all absent. Sporocysts were ovoidal, 15.3 × 10.6 (14–16 × 10–12) μm, with a L/W index of 1.4. Stieda and sub-Stieda bodies were present, but para-Stieda bodies were absent. The sporocyst residuum consisted of scattered globules among sporozoites or as a cluster surrounding sporozoites. Sporozoites were elongate with spheroidal anterior and posterior refractile bodies. Isospora casei was also found in 1 of 2 (50%) Fiji slender treeskinks (Emoia concolor) from Fiji. This represents the first report of coccidia from Emoia spp. and, to our knowledge, the initial documentation of reptilian coccidia from herpetofauna from Papua New Guinea.

  6. Sex recognition in the leopard gecko,Eublepharis macularius (Sauria: Gekkonidae) Possible mediation by skin-derived semiochemicals.

    PubMed

    Mason, R T; Gutzke, W H

    1990-01-01

    Male leopard geckoes,Eublepharis macularius, rely on skin-derived semiochemicals to determine the sex of conspecifics. Males respond to other males with agonistic behavior while females elicit courtship behavior from males. While females were shedding, males responded to them with agonistic behavior. The same females were courted both before and after shedding. An initial survey of hexane-extracted skin lipids from male and female geckoes revealed fatty acids common to both sexes. Several steroid analogs of cholesterol were unique to males while long-chain methyl ketones were unique to females. Results are discussed in the context of skin lipids serving as pheromones in reptiles.

  7. New species of Pseudabbreviata (Nematoda: Physalopteridae) and other helminths in two species of Hypsilurus (Sauria: Agamidae) from Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Bursey, Charles R; Goldberg, Stephen R; Kraus, Fred

    2009-08-01

    Pseudabbreviata novaeguineaensis n. sp. from the stomach of Hypsilurus modestus (Agamidae) from Papua New Guinea is described and illustrated. The new species was also found in the stomach of Hypsilurus papuensis from Papua New Guinea. Pseudabbreviata novaeguineaensis n. sp. represents the sixth species assigned to the genus and the first from the Australo-Papuan Region. The new species differs from other species assigned to Pseudabbreviata by the vulva position in the female and pedunculate papillae arrangement in the male tail morphology. In addition to the new species, H. modestus harbored Meteterakis crombiei, Strongyluris gonyocephali, and larvae of Abbreviata sp. (in cysts).

  8. Dermatitis in the Fringe-Toed Lizard, Acanthodactylus nilsoni Rastegar-Pouyani, 1998 (Sauria: Lacertidae) Associated with Fusarium proliferatum.

    PubMed

    Chehri, Khosrow; Rastegar-Pouyani, Nasrullah; Sayyadi, Farkhondeh

    2015-11-01

    From July to October 2013, nine out of 40 Acanthodactylus nilsoni collected from Western Iran, showed clinical signs of dermatitis in the dorsal and ventral surface of neck and fingers. Therefore, the aim of this survey was to identify the fungal flora colonizing the skin of A. nilsoni using morphological and molecular studies. Nine isolates of Fusarium were obtained from infected lizard samples and identified as Fusarium proliferatum through study of morphological characters. In the present study, selected F. proliferatum isolates (USMGFSC 230-112, USMGFSC 186-113, and USMGFSC 33-114) were examined and phylogenetically analysed on the basis of partial sequences of the tef1 and tub2 genes. Sequence analysis supported the morphological data, and all isolates were placed within F. proliferatum species. This is the first report on morphological and molecular identification of F. proliferatum isolated from lizards' dermatitis in Iran.

  9. Complete mitochondrial genome of the San Lucan gecko, Phyllodactylus unctus (Sauria, Gekkota, Phyllodactylidae), in comparison with Tarentola mauritanica.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jie; Tian, Chao; Lv, Linna; Bauer, Aaron M; Zhou, Kaiya

    2014-06-01

    We sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome of the San Lucan gecko, Phyllodactylus unctus, which is endemic to Mexico. The complete mitochondrial genome was 16,881 bp in size, consisting of 37 genes coding for 13 proteins, 2 rRNAs, 22 tRNAs and 1 control region. Its gene arrangement pattern was identical with most vertebrates. We compared the mitochondrial genome of P. unctus with that of the Moorish gecko, Tarentola mauritanica, which is the only other sequenced species from Phyllodactylidae. Nucleotide sequence divergence (p distance) between two mitochondrial genomes was 31.32%. The detailed comparison between the mitochondrial genomes of two species was done.

  10. Nematode parasites of some reptiles (Sauria: Testudines: Ophidia) from the northern and Western Cape Provinces, South Africa.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Chris T; Bursey, Charles R; Freed, Paul S

    2010-10-01

    One hundred and seven reptiles (11 families, 32 species) from the Northern and Western Cape Provinces of South Africa were examined for helminths. Twenty-three (22%) individual reptiles were found to harbor at least 1 species of nematode; 3 (7%) reptiles harbored multiple infections of 2 nematode species. Eight species within 5 families of Nematoda were found in the reptiles surveyed including 1 atractid, 1 diaphanocephalid, 1 heterakid, 3 pharyngodonids, and 2 physalopterans. Ten new host records are reported. A summary of the nematode parasites identified from South African reptiles is provided.

  11. A new species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875 (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Carlia spp. (Sauria: Scincidae) from Papua New Guinea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McAllister, Chris T.; Duszynski, Donald W.; Fisher, Robert N.; Austin, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    A new species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875 from rainbow skinks, Carlia ailanpalai Zug and Carlia eothen Zug is described from specimens collected in Papua New Guinea (PNG). Oöcysts of Eimeria zugi n. sp. from one of one (100%) C. eothen are ellipsoidal to cylindroidal, with a smooth, colourless, bi-layered wall, measure 25.1 × 15.5 μm and have a length/width ratio of 1.6. The micropyle and the oöcyst residuum are absent, but a polar granule is present. The sporocysts are ovoidal to ellipsoidal and 10.3 × 7.1 μm in size and do not contain Stieda, sub-Stieda or para-Stieda bodies; and the sporocyst residuum is composed of a compact mass of large globules. The sporozoites are elongate, 12.8 × 2.9 μm in size, and contain anterior and posterior refractile bodies with a nucleus between them. This is the ninth species of coccidium described from skinks from PNG, and the new species described herein is apparently endemic to the skink genus Carlia (Gray).

  12. Two new species of Eimeria (Apicomplexa, Eimeriidae) from tree skinks, Prasinohaema spp. (Sauria: Scincidae), from Papua New Guinea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McAllister, Chris T.; Duszynski, Donald W.; Fisher, Robert N.; Austin, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    Between September 1991 and June 1992, feces from 4 species of tree skinks, Prasinohaema spp. from Papua New Guinea, were collected and examined for coccidia. Two species, P. flavipes and P. prehensicauda were found to harbor eimerians which are described as new. Oocysts of Eimeria krausi sp. nov. from P. flavipes were ellipsoidal to subspheroidal with a smooth bilayered wall and measured (L × W) 19.2 × 16.9 μm, with a length/width (L/W) ratio of 1.1. Micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent but a fragmented polar granule was present. Sporocysts were ellipsoidal, 9.7 × 6.7 μm, L/W of 1.5. Stieda, subStieda and paraStieda bodies were absent. The sporocyst residuum was composed of many small granules in a compact mass between sporozoites. The sporozoites were sausage-shaped, 11.7 × 2.7 μm, in situ, with an ellipsoidal posterior refractile body and a spheroidal anterior refractile body. Oocysts of Eimeria greeri sp. nov. from P. prehensicauda were ellipsoidal with a smooth bilayered wall, (L × W) 23.0 × 18.3 μm, with a L/W of 1.3. Micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent but a fragmented polar granule was present. Sporocysts were ellipsoidal, 9.7 × 8.4 μm, with a L/W of 1.2. Stieda, subStieda and paraStieda bodies were absent. The sporocyst residuum was composed of many large granules in a compact mass between sporozoites. The sporozoites were sausage-shaped, with an ellipsoidal posterior refractile body and a spheroidal anterior refractile body. We document here the first report of coccidia from skinks of the genus Prasinohaema.

  13. Four new species of coccidia (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Owen Stanley Skinks, Papuascincus stanleyanus (Sauria: Scincidae), from Papua New Guinea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McAllister, Chris T.; Duszynski, Donald W.; Fisher, Robert N.; Austin, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    Between September and November 1991, 12 Owen Stanley skinks, Papuascincus stanleyanus (Booulenger) were collected from various localities on Papua New Guinea and examined for coccidians. Six (50%) were found to harbour four eimerians that we describe here as new. Oocysts of Eimeria burseyi sp. n. were elongate to ellipsoidal with a bilayered wall and measured (length x width, L x W) 36.0 x 24.0 microm, with a L/W ratio of 1.5. Both micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a polar granule was present. Oocysts of Eimeria goldbergi sp. n. were ellipsoidal, with a bilayered wall, and measured 21.4 x 16.1 microm; L/W ratio was 1.3. Both micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a single or fragmented polar granule was present. Oocysts of Eimeria boulengeri sp. n. were spheroidal to slightly subspheroidal, with a thin, single-layered wall that readily collapses, and measured 16.0 microm, L/W ratio was 1.0. Both micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but usually one (sometimes two) polar granule(s) were present. Oocysts of Eimeria niuginiensis sp. n. were oblong to tapered with a bilayered wall, and measured 20.0 x 13.1 microm; L/W ratio was 1.5. A micropyle, oocyst residuum and polar granule were absent. To our knowledge, these represent the only coccidians ever described from P. stanleyanus.

  14. Description of the hemipenial morphology of Tupinambis quadrilineatus Manzani and Abe, 1997 (Squamata, Teiidae) and new records from Piauí, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Marcélia Basto; de Lima-Filho, Geraldo Rodrigues; Cronemberger, Áurea Aguiar; Carvalho, Leonardo Sousa; Manzani, Paulo Roberto; Vieira, Jânia Brito

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Few data are available on the morphology of the hemipenis of teiid lizards, especially those of the recently-defined genus Tupinambis, a widely-distributed group of large-bodied lizards. This study provides an illustrated description of the hemipenis of Tupinambis quadrilineatus, which is similar to that of other representatives of the Tupinambinae subfamily. New records of the species from the state of Piauí, in northeastern Brazil, are also presented. PMID:24363597

  15. Two new endemic species of Ameiva (Squamata: Teiidae) from the dry forest of northwestern Peru and additional information on Ameiva concolor Ruthven, 1924.

    PubMed

    Koch, Claudia; Venegas, Pablo J; Rödder, Dennis; Flecks, Morris; Böhme, Wolfgang

    2013-12-04

    We describe two new species of Ameiva Meyer, 1795 from the dry forest of the Northern Peruvian Andes. The new species Ameiva nodam sp. nov. and Ameiva aggerecusans sp. nov. share a divided frontal plate and are differentiated from each other and from their congeners based on genetic (12S and 16S rRNA genes) and morphological characteristics. A. nodam sp. nov. has dilated postbrachials, a maximum known snout-vent length of 101 mm, 10 longitudinal rows of ventral plates, 86-113 midbody granules, 25-35 lamellae under the fourth toe, and a color pattern with 5 longitudinal yellow stripes on the dorsum. Ameiva aggerecusans sp. nov. has not or only hardly dilated postbrachials, a maximum known snout-vent length of 99.3 mm, 10-12 longitudinal rows of ventral plates, 73-92 midbody granules, 31-39 lamellae under the fourth toe, and the females and juveniles of the species normally exhibit a cream-colored vertebral stripe on a dark dorsum ground color. We provide information on the intraspecific variation and distribution of A. concolor. Furthermore, we provide information on the environmental niches of the taxa and test for niche conservatism. 

  16. Spatial-temporal variation of parasites in Cnemidophorus ocellifer (Teiidae) and Tropidurus hispidus and Tropidurus semitaeniatus (Tropiduridae) from Caatinga areas in northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Brito, Samuel V; Ferreira, Felipe S; Ribeiro, Samuel C; Anjos, Luciano A; Almeida, Waltécio O; Mesquita, Daniel O; Vasconcellos, Alexandre

    2014-03-01

    Parasites are natural regulators of their host populations. Despite this, little is known about variations in parasite composition (spatially or temporally) in environments subjected to water-related periodic stress such as the arid and semiarid regions. The objective of this study was to evaluate the spatial-temporal variation in endoparasite species' abundance and richness in populations of Neotropical Cnemidophorus ocellifer, Tropidurus hispidus, and Tropidurus semitaeniatus lizards in the semiarid northeast of Brazil. The location influenced the abundance of parasites in all analyzed lizard species, while season (dry and rainy) only influenced the total abundance for T. hispidus. In all seasons, males significantly showed more endoparasites than females in all lizard species, although for T. hispidus, this difference was only found in the dry season. Seasonal variations affect the abundance patterns of parasites. Likely, variables include environmental variations such as humidity and temperature, which influence the development of endoparasite eggs when outside of the host. Further, the activity of the intermediate hosts and the parasites of heteroxenous life cycles could be affected by an environmental condition. The variation in the abundance of parasites between the sampling areas could be a reflection of variations in climate and physiochemical conditions. Also, it could be due to differences in the quality of the environment in which each host population lives.

  17. Haemogregarine blood parasites in the lizards Podarcis bocagei (Seoane) and P. carbonelli (Pérez-Mellado) (Sauria: Lacertidae) from NW Portugal.

    PubMed

    Roca, V; Galdón, M A

    2010-01-01

    In Iberian and Canarian lizards, haemogregarines have been recorded infecting erythrocytes, but most of the records correspond to mature gametocytes. We analysed blood smears from 75 specimens of Podarcis bocagei (Seoane) and 33 specimens of P. carbonelli (Pérez-Mellado) from localities of north-western Portugal. We found haemogregarines in 74.7% of P. bocagei and 69.7% of P. carbonelli. Our observations show characteristics of the haemogregarines other than the morphology of the mature gametocytes. In histological sections of the liver of four hosts latent cysts with sporozoites and meronts with merozoites were detected. Both traits have been described as typical of the genera Hepatozoon Miller, 1908 and Hemolivia Petit, Landau, Baccam & Lainson, 1990. We suggest that not only P. bocagei and P. carbonelli from Portugal but other species of Iberian and Canarian lacertids might also be infected by species belonging to one or both genera.

  18. Two new species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875 (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from emerald tree skinks, Lamprolepis smaragdina (Lesson) (Sauria: Scincidae) from Papua New Guinea and the Philippines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McAllister, Chris T.; Seville, R. Scott; Duszynski, Donald W.; Bush, Sarah E.; Fisher, Robert N.; Austin, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    Two new species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875, from emerald tree skinks, Lamprolepis smaragdina (Lesson) are described from specimens collected in Papua New Guinea (PNG) and the Philippines. Oöcysts of Eimeria nuiailan n. sp. from the only L. smaragdina from PNG are ovoidal, with a smooth, colourless, bi-layered wall, measure 23.7 × 19.1 μm, and have a length/width (L/W) ratio of 1.3; both micropyle and oöcyst residuum are absent, but a fragmented polar granule is present. Sporocysts are ovoidal to ellipsoidal, 11.9 × 7.0 μm, L/W 1.7, and the wall is composed of two valves joined by a longitudinal suture; neither Stieda nor sub-Stieda bodies are present; a sporocyst residuum is present as a compact mass of granules. Sporozoites are elongate, 14.6 × 2.6 μm, and contain anterior and posterior refractile bodies with a nucleus between them. Oöcysts of Eimeria auffenbergi n. sp. from L. smaragdina collected in the Philippines are ovoidal, with a smooth, colourless, bi-layered wall, measure 19.9 × 15.8 μm, L/W 1.3; both micropyle and oöcyst residuum are absent, but one to four polar granules are present. Sporocysts are ovoidal to ellipsoidal, 10.3 × 5.8 μm, L/W 1.8, and the wall is composed of two valves joined by a longitudinal suture; neither Stieda nor sub-Stieda bodies are present; a sporocyst residuum is composed of dispersed granules.

  19. A review of the genus Trachylepis (Sauria: Scincidae) from the Gulf of Guinea, with descriptions of two new species in the Trachylepis maculilabris (Gray, 1845) species complex.

    PubMed

    Ceríaco, Luis M P; Marques, Mariana P; Bauer, Aaron M

    2016-05-09

    The scincid genus Trachylepis is represented in the oceanic islands of the Gulf of Guinea by four species, Trachylepis maculilabris, T. affinis, T. adamastor and T. ozorii. Here we describe two new species, Trachylepis thomensis sp. nov., endemic to São Tomé Island and Rolas Islet, and Trachylepis principensis sp. nov., endemic to Príncipe Island. Phylogenetic analysis using the mitochondrial gene 16S shows that both new species are genetically divergent and reciprocally monophyletic, and confirms evidence for the uniqueness of these lineages presented in previous studies. Morphological data (scalation and morphometry) identify consistent phenotypic differences between these two island species. We were also able to confirm that the T. affinis population of Príncipe Island is conspecific with the African mainland population and most probably the result of recent introductions. These findings raise the number of known Trachylepis species in the Gulf of Guinea islands group to five, four of which are endemic, although the phylogenetic and phylogeographic relationships of T. adamastor and T. ozorii remain unknown and require further investigation.

  20. Two new species of coccidia (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from leaf-tailed geckos, Uroplatus spp. (Sauria: Gekkonidae) from Madagascar, including a new host of Eimeria brygooi Upton & Barnard, 1987.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Chris T; Scott Seville, R; Hartdegen, Ruston

    2016-10-01

    During May and June 2015, four common leaf-tailed geckos, Uroplatus fimbriatus (Schneider), five satanic leaf-tailed geckos, Uroplatus phantasticus (Boulenger), and four mossy leaf-tailed geckos, Uroplatus sikorae Boettger originally collected from Madagascar and housed at the Dallas Zoo, USA, had their faeces examined for coccidian parasites. Eight (62%) geckos were found to be passing oöcysts, including a new eimerian, a new isosporan and a previously described eimerian. Three of four (75%) U. fimbratus (type-host) and one of five (20%) U. phantasticus were infected with Eimeria schneideri n. sp.; oöcysts were subspheroidal to ellipsoidal with a bi-layered wall and measured (mean length × width, L × W) 15.1 × 13.5 µm, with a length/width (L/W) ratio of 1.1. A micropyle and oöcyst residuum were absent but one to many polar granules were present. Sporocysts were ovoidal, 6.9 × 5.3 µm, L/W = 1.3. Stieda, sub-Stieda and para-Stieda bodies were absent. A globular sporocyst residuum was present as dispersed granules. Four of five (80%) U. phantasticus harboured Isospora boulengeri n. sp.; oöcysts were subpheroidal to ellipsoidal with a bi-layered wall and measured 17.3 × 16.0 µm, L/W = 1.1. A micropyle and oöcyst residuum were absent but a polar granule was present. Sporocysts were ellipsoidal, 9.5 × 6.9 µm, L/W = 1.4. Stieda and sub-Stieda bodies were present but a para-Stieda body was absent. A globular sporocyst residuum was present with dispersed granules. In addition, one of four (25%) U. sikorae was infected with an eimerian indistinguishable from Eimeria brygooi Upton & Barnard, 1987, previously reported from Madagascar day gecko, Phelsuma grandis Gray and golddust day gecko, Phelsuma laticauda (Boettger) from Madagascar. These are the first coccidians described from Uroplatus spp.

  1. Anatomy of the Enigmatic Reptile Elachistosuchus huenei Janensch, 1949 (Reptilia: Diapsida) from the Upper Triassic of Germany and Its Relevance for the Origin of Sauria.

    PubMed

    Sobral, Gabriela; Sues, Hans-Dieter; Müller, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    The holotype and only known specimen of the enigmatic small reptile Elachistosuchus huenei Janensch, 1949 from the Upper Triassic (Norian) Arnstadt Formation of Saxony-Anhalt (Germany) is redescribed using μCT scans of the material. This re-examination revealed new information on the morphology of this taxon, including previously unknown parts of the skeleton such as the palate, braincase, and shoulder girdle. Elachistosuchus is diagnosed especially by the presence of the posterolateral process of the frontal, the extension of the maxillary tooth row to the posterior margin of the orbit, the free posterior process of the jugal, and the notched anterior margin of the interclavicle. Phylogenetic analyses using two recently published character-taxon matrices recovered conflicting results for the phylogenetic position of Elachistosuchus-either as an archosauromorph, as a lepidosauromorph or as a more basal, non-saurian diapsid. These different placements highlight the need of a thorough revision of critical taxa and new character sets used for inferring neodiapsid relationships.

  2. Anatomy of the Enigmatic Reptile Elachistosuchus huenei Janensch, 1949 (Reptilia: Diapsida) from the Upper Triassic of Germany and Its Relevance for the Origin of Sauria

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The holotype and only known specimen of the enigmatic small reptile Elachistosuchus huenei Janensch, 1949 from the Upper Triassic (Norian) Arnstadt Formation of Saxony-Anhalt (Germany) is redescribed using μCT scans of the material. This re-examination revealed new information on the morphology of this taxon, including previously unknown parts of the skeleton such as the palate, braincase, and shoulder girdle. Elachistosuchus is diagnosed especially by the presence of the posterolateral process of the frontal, the extension of the maxillary tooth row to the posterior margin of the orbit, the free posterior process of the jugal, and the notched anterior margin of the interclavicle. Phylogenetic analyses using two recently published character-taxon matrices recovered conflicting results for the phylogenetic position of Elachistosuchus–either as an archosauromorph, as a lepidosauromorph or as a more basal, non-saurian diapsid. These different placements highlight the need of a thorough revision of critical taxa and new character sets used for inferring neodiapsid relationships. PMID:26352985

  3. A reinvestigation of phylogeny and divergence times of the Ablepharus kitaibelii species complex (Sauria, Scincidae) based on mtDNA and nuDNA genes.

    PubMed

    Skourtanioti, Eirini; Kapli, Paschalia; Ilgaz, Çetin; Kumlutaş, Yusuf; Avcı, Aziz; Ahmadzadeh, Faraham; Crnobrnja-Isailović, Jelka; Gherghel, Iulian; Lymberakis, Petros; Poulakakis, Nikos

    2016-10-01

    Morphological and DNA data support that the East Mediterranean snake-eyed skink Ablepharus kitaibelii represents a species complex that includes four species A. kitaibelii, A. budaki, A. chernovi, and A. rueppellii, highlighting the need of its taxonomic reevaluation. Here, we used Bayesian and Maximum Likelihood methods to estimate the phylogenetic relationships of all members of the complex based on two mitochondrial (cyt b, 16S rRNA) and two nuclear markers (MC1R, and NKTR) and using Chalcides, Eumeces, and Eutropis as outgroups. The biogeographic history of the complex was also investigated through the application of several phylogeographic (BEAST) and biogeographic (BBM) analyses. Paleogeographic and paleoclimatic data were used to support the inferred phylogeographic patterns. The A. kitaibelli species complex exhibits high genetic diversity, revealing cases of hidden diversity and cases of non-monophyletic species such as A. kitaibelii and A. budaki. Our results indicate that A. pannonicus branches off first and a group that comprises specimens of A. kitaibelli and A. budaki from Kastelorizo Island group (southeast Greece) and southwest Turkey, respectively is differentiated from the rest A. kitaibelli and A. budaki populations and may represent a new species. The estimated divergence times place the origin of the complex in the Middle Miocene (∼16Mya) and the divergence of most currently recognized species in the Late Miocene. The inferred ancestral distribution suggests that the complex originated in Anatolia, supposing that several vicariance and dispersal events that are related with the formation of the Mid-Aegean Trench, the Anatolian Diagonal and the orogenesis of the mountain chains in southern and eastern Anatolia have led to current distribution pattern of A. kitaibelii species complex in the Balkans and Middle East.

  4. The mitochondrial phylogeography and intraspecific taxonomy of the Steppe Racerunner, Eremias arguta (Pallas) (Lacertidae: Sauria, Reptilia), reflects biogeographic patterns in Middle Asia.

    PubMed

    Poyarkov, Nikolay A; Orlova, Valentina F; Chirikova, Marina A

    2014-12-15

    Steppe racerunner, Eremias (Eremias) arguta, is one of the most widespread species of the Asian racerunners (genus Eremias). Several subspecies were traditionally recognized however, morphological variability is so high that delimitation of these subspecies was always problematic. Here we present a phylogenetic hypothesis for this species based on cytochrome b sequences (55 samples from 35 populations, 900 bp partial sequences), infer it biogeography and the revise its subspecific structure. Six major phylogenetic lineages were revealed. The southernmost populations (E. a. uzbekistanica) from Uzbekistan form a clade together with the Issyk-Kul Lake subspecies (E. a. darevskii) based on both molecular and morphological evidence. Within more northern populations, there is a split between populations from Northern Caucasus, Europe and Western Kazakhstan (E. a. deserti) and Central and Eastern Kazakhstan populations (E. a. arguta). Transcaucasian (E. a. transcaucasica) steppe racerunners are grouped with Middle Asian populations. Finally, the easternmost samples, assigned to "E. a. potanini" are nested within the E. a. arguta clade. Populations from the Ili River Valley form a separate lineage sister to the clade joining all other E. arguta lineages and might represent a yet undescribed taxon. Species distribution in relation to historical biogeography of Middle Asia is discussed. 

  5. Description of the oocysts of three new species of Eimeria (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from iguanid lizards (Sauria: Iguanidae) of Central and South America.

    PubMed

    Daszak, P; Ball, S J

    1998-01-01

    Three new species of Eimeria are described from iguanid lizards of Central and South America. The oocysts of each species have no micropyles or residua and the sporocysts lack Stieda bodies, but all have a sporocyst residuum. Eimeria sanctaluciae n.sp. was found in the St. Lucia tree lizard, Anolis luciae, collected from the Maria Islands, Lesser Antilles. The oocysts are spherical to subspherical, averaging 17.3 x 16.5 microns, with a single layered colourless wall; about 60% contain polar granules. The sporocysts are ellipsoidal and average 7.7 x 5.5 microns. Eimeria liolaemi n.sp. was recovered from the blue-gold swift, Liolaemus taenius, from Chile. The oocysts are spherical to subspherical, measuring 21 x 20.1 microns with a single-layered colourless wall. The sporocysts are subspherical and average 7.4 x 6.8 microns. Eimeria caesicia n.sp. is described from the Brazilian collared iguanid, Tropidurus torquatus. The oocysts measure 27.4 x 23.7 microns, are spherical to subspherical, with a bilayered wall, the outer surface of which appears pale blue in colour, the thin, inner wall appearing brown, when viewed by direct light under the optical microscope. The sporocysts are subspherical and average 9.4 x 7.2 microns. Unnamed polysporocystid oocysts with dizoic sporocysts are reported from the faeces of the lesser St. Vincent tree lizard, Anolis trinitatis and the possibility of spurious parasitism briefly discussed. In addition, oocysts of an unnamed Isospora sp. with a smooth oocyst wall which closely resembles I. reui were recovered from A. trinitatis.

  6. Cnemaspis rammalensis sp. nov., Sri Lanka's largest day-gecko (Sauria: Gekkonidae: Cnemaspis) from Rammalakanda Man and Biosphere Reserve in southern Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Vidanapathirana, Dulan Ranga; Rajeev, M D Gehan; Wickramasinghe, Nethu; Fernando, Samantha Suranjan; Wickramasinghe, L J Mendis

    2014-01-22

    A new species of rock dwelling gecko belonging to the genus Cnemaspis is described from Sri Lanka based on a suite of morphological features. The species is the largest of its genus described from Sri Lanka so far (snout-vent length 52-54 mm) and is the second largest of the Western Ghats-Sri Lanka Biodiversity Hotspot. It may be diagnosed in details of both scalation (ventrals186-207; mid-subcaudals large; absence of precloacal pores; 15 femoral pores on each side; 22-23 and 23-25 subdigital lamellae on finger IV and on toe IV, respectively; smooth scales on tail dorsum) and colouration (five prominent trilobate shaped cream markings pointing towards head and extending from neck to vent).The species is found in a unique habitat in the Rammalakanda Forest, where it is threatened by deforestation.

  7. Four New Species of Eimeria (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Emoia spp. Skinks (Sauria: Scincidae), from Papua New Guinea and the Insular Pacific.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Chris T; Duszynski, Donald W; Austin, Christopher C; Fisher, Robert N

    2017-02-01

    Between September and November 1991, 54 adult skinks from 15 species were collected by hand or blowpipe from several localities on Rarotonga, Cook Islands, Ovalau Island, Fiji, and Papua New Guinea (PNG), and their feces were examined for coccidians. Species included 5 seaside skinks (Emoia atrocostata), 1 Pacific blue-tailed skink (Emoia caeroleocauda), 2 Fiji slender treeskinks (Emoia concolor), 15 white-bellied copper-striped skinks (Emoia cyanura), 1 Bulolo River forest skink (Emoia guttata), 6 dark-bellied copper-striped skinks (Emoia impar), 5 Papua five-striped skinks (Emoia jakati), 2 Papua slender treeskinks (Emoia kordoana), 3 Papua robust treeskinks (Emoia longicauda), 1 brown-backed forest skink (Emoia loveridgei), 3 Papua black-sided skinks (Emoia pallidiceps), 2 Papua white-spotted skinks (Emoia physicae), 2 Papua yellow-head skinks (Emoia popei), 1 Papua brown forest skink (Emoia submetallica), and 5 Fiji barred treeskinks (Emoia trossula) Species of Eimeria (Ei.) were detected from these Emoia (Em.) spp. and are described here as new. Oocysts of Eimeria iovai n. sp. from Em. pallidiceps from PNG were ellipsoidal with a bilayered wall (L × W) 26.5 × 18.1 μm, with a length/width ratio (L/W) of 1.1. Both micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a fragmented polar granule was present. This eimerian also was found in Em. atrocostata from PNG. Oocysts of Eimeria kirkpatricki n. sp. from Em. atrocostata from PNG were ellipsoidal with a bilayered wall, 18.6 × 13.5 μm, L/W 1.4. A micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a fragmented polar granule was present. This eimerian was also shared by Em. cyanura from the Cook Islands and Fiji, Em. impar from the Cook Islands, Em. loveridgei from PNG, Em. pallidiceps from PNG, Em. popei from PNG, and Em. submetallica from PNG. Oocysts of Eimeria stevejayuptoni n. sp. from Em. longicauda were subspheroidal to ellipsoidal with a bilayered wall, 18.7 × 16.6 μm, L/W 1.1. A micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a fragmented polar granule was present. Oocysts of Eimeria emoia n. sp. from Em. longicauda from PNG were cylindroidal with a bilayered wall, 29.2 × 15.7 μm, L/W 1.9. A micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a polar granule was present. These are the first eimerians reported from Emoia spp. and they add to our growing knowledge of the coccidian fauna of scincid lizards of the South Pacific.

  8. New host and distributional records for Cryptosporidium sp. (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae) from lizards (Sauria: Gekkonidae, Scincidae) from the Cook Islands and Vanuatu, South Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McAllister, Chris T.; Duszynski, Donald W.; Fisher, Robert N.

    2013-01-01

    Between 1991 and 1993, 295 lizards, comprising 21 species in 2 families (Gekkonidae, Scincidae) from the Cook Islands, Fiji, Palau, Takapoto, and Vanuatu in the South Pacific, were examined for Cryptosporidium oocysts. Only 6 lizards (2%) were found to be passing Cryptosporidium oocysts in their feces, including 2 of 30 (7%) Oceania geckos, Gehyra oceanica, from Rarotonga, Cook Islands, and 4 of 26 (15%) Pacific blue-tailed skinks, Emoia caeruleocauda, from Efate Island, Vanuatu. This represents the largest survey for Cryptosporidium in Pacific island lizards, and we document 2 new host and 2 new locality records for this parasite genus.

  9. Two new species of Isospora Schneider, 1881 (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the flap-necked chameleon Chamaeleo dilepis (Sauria: Chamaeleonidae) in the Republic of Namibia.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Chris T

    2012-09-01

    Two new species of Isospora Schneider, 1881 from flap-necked chameleons Chamaeleo dilepis Leach are described from the faeces of specimens collected in the Republic of Namibia. Oöcysts of Isospora freedi n. sp. from one of four (25%) C. dilepis collected in the East Caprivi District are spherical to subspherical, with a smooth, colourless, bilayered wall, measure 23.7 × 21.2 μm and have a length/width (L/W) ratio of 1.1. The micropyle and the oöcyst residuum are absent but a polar granule is sometimes present. Sporocysts are ovoidal to ellipsoidal and 13.9 × 10.3 μm in size with prominent Stieda and sub-Stieda bodies; and the sporocyst residuum is composed of a compact mass of large globules. The sporozoites contain anterior and posterior refractile bodies with a nucleus between them. Oöcysts of Isopora mandelai n. sp. from three of seven (43%) C. dilepis collected in the Outjo District are ellipsoidal to cylindroidal, with a smooth, colourless, bilayered wall, measure 36.9 × 31.0 μm and have an L/W ratio of 1.2. The micropyle, oöcyst residuum and polar granule are absent. Sporocysts are ovoidal to ellipsoidal, 15.3 × 11.1 μm in size and contain Stieda and sub-Stieda bodies; and the non-membranous sporocyst residuum is composed of granules of various sizes. The sporozoites contain anterior and posterior refractile bodies with a nucleus between them. These two new taxa represent the third and fourth coccidian species reported from C. dilepis.

  10. A new species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875 (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the Solomon ground skink, Sphenomorphus solomonis (Boulenger) (Sauria: Scincidae) from Papua New Guinea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McAllister, Chris T.; Duszynski, Donald W.; Fisher, Robert N.; Austin, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    Between September 1990 and November 1991, 19 Sphenomorphus spp. skinks, including nine S. jobiense, three S. simus, and seven Solomon ground skinks, S. solomonis (Boulenger), were collected from Madang and Morobe Provinces, Papua New Guinea (PNG), and examined for coccidia. A single S. solomonis was found to be infected with a new species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875. Oöcysts of Eimeria perkinsae n. sp. are ellipsoidal with a smooth, colourless, bi-layered wall, measure 18.6 × 14.7 μm, and have a length/width (L/W) ratio of 1.3; both micropyle and oöcyst residuum are absent, but a fragmented polar granule is present. Sporocysts are ovoidal, 8.9 × 6.4 μm, L/W 1.4; neither Stieda, sub-Stieda or para-Stieda bodies are present; a sporocyst residuum consisted of a loose cluster of granules dispersed between sporozoites. Sporozoites are comma-shaped with spheroidal anterior and posterior refractile bodies. This represents the first report of coccidia from this skink genus.

  11. A lost species or the loss of stripes? The case of Contomastix lizards from Cabo Polonio, Uruguay, with observations on C. lacertoides (Duméril & Bibron) and Cnemidophorus grandensis Cope (Squamata, Teiidae).

    PubMed

    Borteiro, Claudio; Kolenc, Francisco; Prigioni, Carlos; Lyra, Mariana L; Baldo, Diego

    2013-01-01

    The main goal of this manuscript is the reevaluation of the taxonomic status of the teiid lizard Contomastix charrua, known only from Cabo Polonio, a small coastal rocky outcrop in southeastern Uruguay. This species was erected on the basis of the presence of a second pair of ceratobranchials and longer cornua in the hyoid bone, in addition to a reduced expression of the pattern of coloration as compared with C. lacertoides. Nevertheless, we found that both species have indistinguishable hyoid morphology, bearing C. lacertoides a noticeable second pair of ceratobranchials. Besides, we realized that the pattern of coloration in this species is more variable than previously considered. As a result of the present work, C. charrua is included in the synonymy of C. lacertoides. In addition, we provide some observations on the holotype of Cnemidophorus grandensis, a junior synonym of C. lacertoides.

  12. Contributions to the herpetofauna of the Albertine Rift: Two new species of chameleon (Sauria: Chamaeleonidae) from an isolated montane forest, south eastern Democratic Republic of Congo.

    PubMed

    Tilbury, Colin R; Tolley, Krystal A

    2015-01-13

    Two new species of chameleons from the genera Rhampholeon and Kinyongia are described from an isolated montane forest remnant situated toward the southern end of the Albertine Rift bordering Lake Tanganyika. The closest known localities of species from these genera are 200km and 400km to the north respectively, separated by large intervening tracts of lowland savannah and Brachystegia (Miombo) woodland - habitats not normally inhabited by species of these genera. Rhampholeon hattinghi sp. nov. and Kinyongia mulyai sp. nov. bear superficial resemblances to previously described species (Rh. boulengeri Steindachner and K. adolfifriderici  (Sternfeld)). Rhampholeon hattinghi sp. nov. has a relatively smooth supra-orbital ridge, deep axillary but absent inguinal mite pockets, prominent white spots on the base of the tail and a uniquely derived hemipenal morphology with billowing parasulcal evaginations. Like K. adolfifriderici, Kinyongia mulyai sp. nov. is devoid of a rostral appendage but differs in having a longer and narrower head, a higher upper labial scale count and by the absence of a dorsal crest in the male. To place these new chameleons within the context of their respective genera, Bayesian and maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses were carried out utilising two mitochondrial (ND2 and 16S) and one nuclear marker (RAG1).  Both chameleons were found to have morphological features that distinguish them from other congeners. Based on phylogenetic analysis they are clearly separate evolutionary lineages and are described as new species. 

  13. Hepatozoon langii n. sp. and Hepatozoon vacuolatus n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Adele-orina: Hepatozoidae) from the crag lizard (Sauria: Cordylidae) Pseudocordylus langi from the North Eastern Drakensberg escarpment, Eastern Free State, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Van As, Johann; Davies, Angela J; Smit, Nico J

    2013-01-22

    Two new haemogregarine species, Hepatozoon langii n. sp. and Hepatozoon vacuolatus n. sp., are described from the pe-ripheral blood of the high altitude crag lizard, Pseudocordylus langi, collected between October 2006 and April 2009 from the North Eastern Drakensberg, Eastern Free State. Hepatozoon langii n. sp. has maturing and mature gamonts that appear encapsulated and have narrow, curved tails. Their cytoplasm stains pinkish-purple with Giemsa, while their nuclei are pur-ple stained with stranded chromatin. Mature gamonts measure 19.1 ± 1.0 (15.4-28.1) μm long by 6.2 ± 1.1 (3.5-7.9) μm wide. Hepatozoon vacuolatus n. sp. gamonts are mostly broader at one pole than the other, have bluish-pink cytoplasm characterised by distinctive rounded and oval vacuoles, and demonstrate pink granules with Giemsa staining. Nuclei stain purple and are mainly coarsely granular. Mature gamonts measure 16.5 ± 1.0 (14.7 - 17.6) μm long by 5.9 ± 1.2 (4.0 - 7.7) μm wide. Both species parasitize erythroblasts, as well as erythrocytes and can dehaemoglobinize the cytoplasm of their host cells. Hepatozoon langii n. sp occurred in the absence of H. vacuolatus n. sp., but the latter haemogregarine always formed mixed infections with the former; no stages intermediate between the two haemogregarine types were observed.

  14. The type localities of Anolis aequatorialis Werner, 1894 (Sauria: Iguania: Dactyloidae) and Pristimantis appendiculatus (Werner, 1894) (Amphibia: Anura: Craugastoridae).

    PubMed

    Cisneros-Heredia, Diego F

    2017-01-04

    The eminent Austrian zoologist Franz Werner described several new species of amphibians and reptiles from America, including Anolis aequatorialis Werner, 1894 and Hylodes appendiculatus Werner, 1894. Both species were described based on single specimens, with no more specific type localities than "Ecuador" (Werner 1894a,b). After its description, A. aequatorialis remained unreported until Peters (1967) and Fitch et al. (1976) published information on its distribution and natural history. Anolis aequatorialis is currently known to inhabit low montane and cloud forest on the western slopes of the Andes from extreme southern Colombia to central Ecuador, between 1300 and 2300 m elevation (Ayala-Varela & Velasco 2010; Ayala-Varela et al. 2014; Lynch et al. 2014; D.F. Cisneros-Heredia pers. obs.). Likewise, Hylodes appendiculatus (now Pristimantis appendiculatus) remained only known from its type description until Lynch (1971) and Miyata (1980) provided certain localities and information on its natural history. Pristimantis appendiculatus is currently known to occur in low montane, cloud, and high montane forests on the western slopes of the Andes from extreme southern Colombia to northern Ecuador between 1460 and 2800 m elevation (Lynch 1971; Miyata 1980; Lynch & Burrowes 1990; Lynch & Duellman 1997; Frost 2016). To this date, the type localities of both species remain obscure. The purpose of this paper is to restrict the type localities of Hylodes appendiculatus Werner, 1894 and Anolis aequatorialis Werner, 1894 based on analyses of the travel journals of their original collector.

  15. Plasma lipid concentrations for some Brazilian lizards.

    PubMed

    Gillett, M P; Lima, V L; Costa, J C; Sibrian, A M

    1979-01-01

    1. Plasma concentrations of cholesterol, cholesteryl esters, phospholipids and triglycerides were determined for ten species of Brazilian lizards, Iguana iguana, Tropidurus torquatos and T. semitaeniatus (Iguanidae), Tupinambis teguixin, Ameiva ameiva and Cnemidophorus ocellifer (Teiidae), Mabuya maculata (Scincidae), Hemidactylus mabouia (Gekkonidae), Amphisbaenia vermicularis and Leposternon polystegum (Amphisbaenidae). 2. Considerable inter- and intra-species variations in plasma lipid concentrations were observed. 3. The percentage of total cholesterol esterified and the individual phospholipid composition of plasma were relatively constant for each species. 4. Over 60% of the cholesteryl esters present in plasma from three species each of iguanid and teiid lizards were polyenoic.

  16. [Reptiles from Cerro Colorado and its surroundings, Cumana, Sucre State, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Oliveros, O; Prieto, A; Comejo, P

    2000-01-01

    An inventory of the reptiles that inhabit in Cerro Colorado and its surroundings, was performed from March, 1994 to March, 1995. There were reported 8 species of snakes and 7 of lizards enclosed in 4 and 5 families repectively. Aspects observed were ecolology as habitat, activity, reproduction and relative abundance. The more abundant species of lizards were: Cnemidophorus femniscatus, Ameiva bifrontata, (Teiidae), Tropidurus hispidus (Tropiduridae), Gonatodes vittatus and Hemidactylus mabouia (Gekkonidae) and the ophidians: Leptodeira annulata and Mastigodryas amarali (Colubridae). It is believed that the changes occurred in the zone influenced the increase of the relative abundance of the species Leptotyphlops goudotii (Leptotyphlopidae) arid Gymnophthalmus speciosus(Gymnophthalmidae) and perhaps in the disappearance of others that have been reported at the xerophitic or semixerophitic zones of the Sucre State of Venezuela.

  17. A taxonomic revision of small neotropical saurian Malarias allied to Plasmodium minasense.

    PubMed

    Telford, S R

    1979-01-01

    Saurian malaria species which produce schizonts smaller than normal erythrocyte nuclei, with 4-8 merozoietes and gametocytes equal to or smaller than erythrocyte nuclei in size, parasitizing hosts of the lizard families Scincidae, Iguanidae and Teiidae in the Neotropics are considered to be Plasmodium minasense Carini and Rudolph, 1912. Subspecific designations are given to distinctive populations parasitizing different host species: P. minasense minasense is recognized from the type host, Mabuya mabouya of Brasil; P. minasense carinii Leger and Mouzels, 1917 from Iguana iguana of coastal South America; P. minasense anolisi subsp. nov. from Anolis limifrons of Panama; P. minasense capitoi subsp. nov. from Anolis capito of Panama; P. minasense plicae subsp. nov. from Plica umbra of Guyana; P. minasense tegui subsp. nov. from Tupinambis teguixin of Venezuela; and P. minasense diminutivum Telford, 1973, new combination, from Ameiva ameiva of Panama. Plasmodium rhadinurum Thompson and Huff, 1944 is recognized as a distinct species at present on the basis of possessing schizonts of different shape, asexual stages with filamentous projections in most portions of its range, and larger gametocytes, as well as apparent sympatry with P. minasense carinii in some areas.

  18. An overview of the South American fossil squamates.

    PubMed

    Albino, Adriana María; Brizuela, Santiago

    2014-03-01

    The evolution of squamates in South America is the result of the complex geological and paleoclimatic history of this part of the world. The incomplete and episodic fossil record allows us to know only a small part of this evolution. Most Mesozoic squamate remains come from the Patagonian region, but remarkable specimens have also been recovered from Brazil. Both major squamate clades (Iguania and Scleroglossa) are present in the South American Mesozoic. Remains of Mesozoic snakes are common and diverse in Cretaceous deposits, including some of the most primitive terrestrial forms. Paleogene and Neogene squamate remains have been recognized from Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela. Paleogene lizard record appears to be scarce in comparison to that of the Mesozoic, whereas snakes show an important Paleogene diversity. At least two extant boid snakes appeared during this epoch (Boa and Corallus). The South American Miocene included some extant genera of Iguania, Teiidae, and Boidae but extinct genera were also present. "Colubrids" appeared at the early Miocene, whereas the first viperid is known from the late Miocene. Most of the Paleogene and early Neogene squamate families and genera have been recognized outside their current range of distribution following favorable climatic conditions for ectothermic vertebrates. During the latest Miocene and Pliocene few extant squamate taxa are found to occur outside their present distribution. The earliest amphisbaenian of South America is known from the Pliocene. Most Pleistocene and Holocene squamate remains are assigned to living genera, and some extant species were recognized.

  19. Distribution of RPTLN Genes Across Reptilia: Hypothesized Role for RPTLN in the Evolution of SVMPs.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Soler, Raquel; Sanz, Libia; Calvete, Juan J

    2016-11-01

    We report the cloning, full-length sequencing, and broad distribution of reptile-specific RPTLN genes across a number of Anapsida (Testudines), Diapsida (Serpentes, Sauria), and Archosauria (Crocodylia) taxa. The remarkable structural conservation of RPTLN genes in species that had a common ancestor more than 250 million years ago, their low transcriptional level, and the lack of evidence for RPTLN translation in any reptile organ investigated, suggest for this ancient gene family a yet elusive function as long noncoding RNAs. The high conservation in extant snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs) of the signal peptide sequence coded for by RPTLN genes strongly suggests that this region may have played a key role in the recruitment and restricted expression of SVMP genes in the venom gland of Caenophidian snakes, some 60-50 Mya. More recently, 23-16 Mya, the neofunctionalization of an RPTLN copy in the venom gland of snakes of the genera Macrovipera and Daboia marked the beginning of the evolutionary history of a new family of disintegrins, the α1β1-collagen binding antagonists, short-RTS/KTS disintegrins. This evolutionary scenario predicts that venom gland RPTLN and SVMP genes may share tissue-specific regulatory elements. Future genomic studies should support or refute this hypothesis.

  20. Relationships of Afroablepharus Greer, 1974 skinks from the Gulf of Guinea islands based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA: patterns of colonization and comments on taxonomy.

    PubMed

    Jesus, José; Harris, D James; Brehm, António

    2007-12-01

    Partial sequences of three mitochondrial DNA genes, 12S rDNA, 16S rDNA and cytochrome b, and one nuclear gene, c-mos, were used to assess the phylogenetic relationships of species belonging to the genus Afroablepharus from the volcanic islands of the Gulf of Guinea (West Africa) and neighboring continental Africa. Additionally, partial sequences of cytochrome b were used to compare levels of sequence divergence within populations. The three forms from São Tomé, Príncipe and Annobon (one per island) are genetically distinct, with high levels of divergence, supporting the recognition of a distinct species in each island. Populations within each island contain very low levels of genetic diversity. These three forms form a monophyletic group suggesting a single initial colonization followed by radiation to the other islands, possibly from São Tomé to Príncipe and Annobon. This is contrary to what was found in other reptiles from these islands such as Mabuya (sensu lato) and Hemidactylus, which colonized the islands multiple times. Assuming a molecular clock for cytochrome b of about 2% divergence per million years (usually applied to Sauria), the lineage on Annobon island exceeds the age of the island, thus casting further doubt on this widely used divergence estimate. Partial sequences of c-mos showed no variation within islands. Five to seven sites were variable among islands, which is a high value further supporting the treatment of each island form as a distinct species.

  1. Histological analysis of spermatogenesis and the germ cell development strategy within the testis of the male Western Cottonmouth Snake, Agkistrodon piscivorus leucostoma.

    PubMed

    Gribbins, Kevin M; Rheubert, Justin L; Collier, Matthew H; Siegel, Dustin S; Sever, David M

    2008-11-20

    Cottonmouth (Agkistrodon piscivorus leucostoma) testes were examined histologically to determine the germ cell development strategy employed during spermatogenesis. Testicular tissues from Cottonmouths were collected monthly from swamps around Hammond, Louisiana. Pieces of testis were fixed in Trump's fixative, dehydrated in ethanol, embedded in Spurr's plastic, sectioned with an ultramicrotome, and stained with toluidine blue and basic fuchsin. Spermatogenesis within Cottonmouths occurs in two independent events within a single calendar year. The testes are active during the months of March-June and August-October with spermiation most heavily observed during April-May and October. To our knowledge, this is the first study that describes bimodal spermatogenesis occurring in the same year within the subfamily Crotalinae. During spermatogenesis, no consistent spatial relationships are observed between germ cell generations. Typically, either certain cell types were missing (spermatocytes) or the layering of 3-5 spermatids and/or spermatocytes within the same cross-section of seminiferous tubule prevented consistent spatial stages from occurring. This temporal pattern of sperm development is different from the spatial development found within birds and mammals, being more reminiscent of that seen in amphibians, and has now been documented within every major clade of reptile (Chelonia, Serpentes, Sauria, Crocodylia). This primitive-like sperm development, within a testis structurally similar to mammals and birds, may represent an intermediate testicular model within the basally positioned (phylogenetically) reptiles that may be evolutionarily significant.

  2. Molecular phylogenetic and dating analyses using mitochondrial DNA sequences of eyelid geckos (Squamata: Eublepharidae).

    PubMed

    Jonniaux, Pierre; Kumazawa, Yoshinori

    2008-01-15

    Mitochondrial DNA sequences of approximately 2.3 kbp including the complete NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 gene and its flanking genes, as well as parts of 12S and 16S rRNA genes were determined from major species of the eyelid gecko family Eublepharidae sensu [Kluge, A.G. 1987. Cladistic relationships in the Gekkonoidea (Squamata, Sauria). Misc. Publ. Mus. Zool. Univ. Michigan 173, 1-54.]. In contrast to previous morphological studies, phylogenetic analyses based on these sequences supported that Eublepharidae and Gekkonidae form a sister group with Pygopodidae, raising the possibility of homoplasious character change in some key features of geckos, such as reduction of movable eyelids and innovation of climbing toe pads. The phylogenetic analyses also provided a well-resolved tree for relationships between the eublepharid species. The Bayesian estimation of divergence times without assuming the molecular clock suggested the Jurassic divergence of Eublepharidae from Gekkonidae and radiations of most eublepharid genera around the Cretaceous. These dating results appeared to be robust against some conditional changes for time estimation, such as gene regions used, taxon representation, and data partitioning. Taken together with geological evidence, these results support the vicariant divergence of Eublepharidae and Gekkonidae by the breakup of Pangea into Laurasia and Gondwanaland, and recent dispersal of two African eublepharid genera from Eurasia to Africa after these landmasses were connected in the Early Miocene.

  3. Locomotor loading mechanics in the hindlimbs of tegu lizards (Tupinambis merianae): comparative and evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Sheffield, K Megan; Butcher, Michael T; Shugart, S Katherine; Gander, Jennifer C; Blob, Richard W

    2011-08-01

    Skeletal elements are usually able to withstand several times their usual load before they yield, and this ratio is known as the bone's safety factor. Limited studies on amphibians and non-avian reptiles have shown that they have much higher limb bone safety factors than birds and mammals. It has been hypothesized that this difference is related to the difference in posture between upright birds and mammals and sprawling ectotherms; however, limb bone loading data from a wider range of sprawling species are needed in order to determine whether the higher safety factors seen in amphibians and non-avian reptiles are ancestral or derived conditions. Tegus (family Teiidae) are an ideal lineage with which to expand sampling of limb bone loading mechanics for sprawling taxa, particularly for lizards, because they are from a different clade than previously sampled iguanas and exhibit different foraging and locomotor habits (actively foraging carnivore versus burst-activity herbivore). We evaluated the mechanics of locomotor loading for the femur of the Argentine black and white tegu (Tupinambus merianae) using three-dimensional measurements of the ground reaction force and hindlimb kinematics, in vivo bone strains and femoral mechanical properties. Peak bending stresses experienced by the femur were low (tensile: 10.4 ± 1.1 MPa; compressive: -17.4 ± 0.9 MPa) and comparable to those in other reptiles, with moderate shear stresses and strains also present. Analyses of peak femoral stresses and strains led to estimated safety factor ranges of 8.8-18.6 in bending and 7.8-17.5 in torsion, both substantially higher than typical for birds and mammals but similar to other sprawling tetrapods. These results broaden the range of reptilian and amphibian taxa in which high femoral safety factors have been evaluated and further indicate a trend for the independent evolution of lower limb bone safety factors in endothermic taxa.

  4. Renal sexual segment of the ground skink, Scincella laterale (Reptilia, Squamata, Scincidae).

    PubMed

    Sever, David M; Hopkins, William A

    2005-10-01

    Mature squamates possess hypertrophied regions of the distal urinary ducts, the renal sexual segment (RSS). The RSS is believed to provide seminal fluid that mixes with sperm and is released into the female cloaca during coitus. This study is the first to describe ultrastructure of the RSS in a lizard collected throughout the active season. The species examined, Scincella laterale, represents the largest family (Scincidae: 1,200 species) of lizards. Although sperm are present in the posterior ductus deferens of male S. laterale throughout the year, an annual spermatogenic cycle occurs that results in spermiation in spring, coinciding with maximum development of the RSS. Female S. laterale may possess stored sperm in vaginal crypts from March-May and large oviductal eggs April-June. Thus, the correlation between mating and RSS activity observed in other squamates is also found in S. laterale. Cytologically, the active RSS consists of columnar cells with numerous apical, electron-dense secretory vacuoles which are released by an apocrine process. The granules stain positively for proteins with bromphenol blue and react with PAS for neutral carbohydrates. After the mating season the RSS undergoes recrudescence and the electron-dense granules are replaced by a mucoid secretion that characterizes more proximal portions of the nephric tubules throughout the year. Little variation in ultrastructure of the RSS occurs between S. laterale and Cnemidophorus lemniscatus (Teiidae), the only other lizard in which seasonal variation of the RSS has been studied using similar methods. Females exhibit differentiation similar to that of males in the distal urinary tubules, but to a lesser degree. This is only the second such report for female squamates, and the differentiation of the region in females is proposed to result from adrenal androgens.

  5. Molecular systematics and historical biogeography of the green lizards (Lacerta) in Greece: insights from mitochondrial and nuclear DNA.

    PubMed

    Sagonas, Kostas; Poulakakis, Nikos; Lymberakis, Petros; Parmakelis, Aristeidis; Pafilis, Panayiotis; Valakos, Efstratios D

    2014-07-01

    The green lizards of the genus Lacerta (Sauria, Lacertidae) comprise nine recognized species, which in Europe are mainly restricted to the southern peninsulas. Four of them (L. trilineata, L. viridis, L. bilineata and L. agilis) occur in Greece. The uncertainty of morphological diversification renders the taxonomic assignment into species and subspecies problematic. In this study sequence data derived from two mitochondrial (cytochrome b and 16S rRNA) genes and one nuclear (NKTR) gene were used to (a) evaluate the taxonomic status of the genus Lacerta in Greece with emphasis on L. trilineata group and (b) investigate the evolutionary history of the genus through the application of phylogenetic and phylogeographic analyses, using Gallotia and Timon as outgroups. The phylogenetic analyses revealed the existence of four major clades. The first clade corresponds to L. trilineata group, the second to L. media, the third to L. agilis and the fourth to a complex of L. viridis and L. bilineata. However, the produced phylogenetic relationships are not congruent with the current taxonomy, especially in the first clade in which L. trilineata appeared to be paraphyletic in regard to L. pamphylica. Six distinct lineages were inferred within L. trilineata, despite the current recognition of nine morphological subspecies, the genetic differentiation of which exceeds that of other Lacerta species, imposing a thorough taxonomic revision of the species. Our results suggested a rapid diversification of L. trilineata group during the late Miocene. We believe that the present distribution of the genus in Greece is the result of several dispersal and vicariant events that took place during the late Miocene and early Pliocene.

  6. A new Cosmocercoides species (Nematoda: Cosmocercidae), C. tonkinensis n. sp., in the scale-bellied tree lizard (Acanthosaura lepidogaster) from Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Tran, Binh Thi; Sato, Hiroshi; Luc, Pham Van

    2015-09-01

    A new cosmocercid nematode species, Cosmocercoides tonkinensis n. sp., is described from the scale-bellied tree lizard (Acanthosaura lepidogaster) in the northern and central parts of Vietnam. The new species is characterized by medium-sized male worms (4.2-5.1 mm in length and 0.34-0.37 mm in width) relative to known members of the genus, with lateral alae, two sharply pointed spicules of equal length (0.22-0.26 mm in length), a gubernaculum (0.113-0.122 mm in length), 16 or 17 pairs of caudal rosettes, and the presence of somatic papillae. Female worms are slightly larger than male worms (5.3-5.5 mm in length and 0.32-0.42 mm in width), with the vulva situated at 3/5 from the anterior end, and elliptical embryonated eggs, 0.064- 0.084 mm long by 0.040-0.048 mm wide. From 19 recorded species of the genus, the morphology of C. tonkinensis n. sp. is closest to C. multipapillata, C. bufonis, and C. pulcher reported from toads and frogs in East Asia. The present new species is differentiated from them by the number of caudal rosettes, tail length relative to body length, presence of somatic papillae and lateral alae, and embryonated eggs. Furthermore, after C. variabilis in North America and C. sauria in Brazil, this new species is only the third species to be recorded from a reptilian host. The 18S ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) of the new species is almost identical to that of C. dukae infecting land snails and slugs in North America. Between the present new species and C. pulcher from a toad (Bufo japonicus) in Japan, remarkably fewer nucleotide changes were noticed in the 18S to 28S rDNA including the internal transcribed spacer regions. The molecular phylogenetic position of the genus Cosmocercoides is briefly discussed.

  7. [Alfa and beta diversity of reptilian assemblages in Zapatosa wetland complex, Colombia].

    PubMed

    Medina-Rangel, Guido Fabián

    2011-06-01

    Diversity is a property of community that can described, characterized, and understood according to the functioning of ecosystems. To study the richness and local abundance and species replacement between habitats around the Zapatosa's wetland complex (El Cesar Department), I carried out four field trips between November of 2006 and October of 2007. A total of 640 sampling hours/man analyzed five habitat types chasmophyte forest, dry forest, riparian forest, palm-grove and tree-lined savanna; with the exception of the palm-grove sampled at its 75%, the others were sampled up to their 80%. I found 847 reptiles that were distributed in 48 species. The group with the highest number of species was Colubridae with 14, followed by Gekkonidae with five. Five endemic species and eight with some conservation threat grade at a national level are reported. The riparian forest was the richest and most abundant habitat with 34 species and 196 individuals. For each habitat, Colubridae had the highest number of species, followed by the families Polychrotidae, Gekkonidae and Teiidae, in that order. The reptile species composition was not different between the tree-lined savanna and the chasmophyte forest, but differed among the tree-lined savanna and the riparian forest, palm-grove and dry forest habitats. The most important differences in the species composition among almost all the habitats were influenced by the species Anolis tropidogaster and Gonatodes albogularis, and the higher occurrence of Stenocercus erythrogaster in the chasmophyte forest. The species replacement had an average value of 50%; the biggest amounts of shared species were the lizards, while the snake Leptodeira septentrionalis was the only one present in all habitat types. The forest grows-among-rocks showed the biggest complementarity and number of unique species compared to the other habitats. The wetland complex provides two thirds of the reptile's species reported until now for the Caribbean region, and

  8. The phylogenetic relationships of basal archosauromorphs, with an emphasis on the systematics of proterosuchian archosauriforms

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The early evolution of archosauromorphs during the Permo-Triassic constitutes an excellent empirical case study to shed light on evolutionary radiations in deep time and the timing and processes of recovery of terrestrial faunas after a mass extinction. However, macroevolutionary studies of early archosauromorphs are currently limited by poor knowledge of their phylogenetic relationships. In particular, one of the main early archosauromorph groups that need an exhaustive phylogenetic study is “Proterosuchia,” which as historically conceived includes members of both Proterosuchidae and Erythrosuchidae. A new data matrix composed of 96 separate taxa (several of them not included in a quantitative phylogenetic analysis before) and 600 osteological characters was assembled and analysed to generate a comprehensive higher-level phylogenetic hypothesis of basal archosauromorphs and shed light on the species-level interrelationships of taxa historically identified as proterosuchian archosauriforms. The results of the analysis using maximum parsimony include a polyphyletic “Prolacertiformes” and “Protorosauria,” in which the Permian Aenigmastropheus and Protorosaurus are the most basal archosauromorphs. The enigmatic choristoderans are either found as the sister-taxa of all other lepidosauromorphs or archosauromorphs, but consistently placed within Sauria. Prolacertids, rhynchosaurs, allokotosaurians and tanystropheids are the major successive sister clades of Archosauriformes. The Early Triassic Tasmaniosaurus is recovered as the sister-taxon of Archosauriformes. Proterosuchidae is unambiguosly restricted to five species that occur immediately after and before the Permo-Triassic boundary, thus implying that they are a short-lived “disaster” clade. Erythrosuchidae is composed of eight nominal species that occur during the Early and Middle Triassic. “Proterosuchia” is polyphyletic, in which erythrosuchids are more closely related to Euparkeria and more

  9. Empirical and Bayesian approaches to fossil-only divergence times: A study across three reptile clades

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Alan H.; Pritchard, Adam C.; Matzke, Nicholas J.

    2017-01-01

    Estimating divergence times on phylogenies is critical in paleontological and neontological studies. Chronostratigraphically-constrained fossils are the only direct evidence of absolute timing of species divergence. Strict temporal calibration of fossil-only phylogenies provides minimum divergence estimates, and various methods have been proposed to estimate divergences beyond these minimum values. We explore the utility of simultaneous estimation of tree topology and divergence times using BEAST tip-dating on datasets consisting only of fossils by using relaxed morphological clocks and birth-death tree priors that include serial sampling (BDSS) at a constant rate through time. We compare BEAST results to those from the traditional maximum parsimony (MP) and undated Bayesian inference (BI) methods. Three overlapping datasets were used that span 250 million years of archosauromorph evolution leading to crocodylians. The first dataset focuses on early Sauria (31 taxa, 240 chars.), the second on early Archosauria (76 taxa, 400 chars.) and the third on Crocodyliformes (101 taxa, 340 chars.). For each dataset three time-calibrated trees (timetrees) were calculated: a minimum-age timetree with node ages based on earliest occurrences in the fossil record; a ‘smoothed’ timetree using a range of time added to the root that is then averaged over zero-length internodes; and a tip-dated timetree. Comparisons within datasets show that the smoothed and tip-dated timetrees provide similar estimates. Only near the root node do BEAST estimates fall outside the smoothed timetree range. The BEAST model is not able to overcome limited sampling to correctly estimate divergences considerably older than sampled fossil occurrence dates. Conversely, the smoothed timetrees consistently provide node-ages far older than the strict dates or BEAST estimates for morphologically conservative sister-taxa when they sit on long ghost lineages. In this latter case, the relaxed-clock model appears

  10. Empirical and Bayesian approaches to fossil-only divergence times: A study across three reptile clades.

    PubMed

    Turner, Alan H; Pritchard, Adam C; Matzke, Nicholas J

    2017-01-01

    Estimating divergence times on phylogenies is critical in paleontological and neontological studies. Chronostratigraphically-constrained fossils are the only direct evidence of absolute timing of species divergence. Strict temporal calibration of fossil-only phylogenies provides minimum divergence estimates, and various methods have been proposed to estimate divergences beyond these minimum values. We explore the utility of simultaneous estimation of tree topology and divergence times using BEAST tip-dating on datasets consisting only of fossils by using relaxed morphological clocks and birth-death tree priors that include serial sampling (BDSS) at a constant rate through time. We compare BEAST results to those from the traditional maximum parsimony (MP) and undated Bayesian inference (BI) methods. Three overlapping datasets were used that span 250 million years of archosauromorph evolution leading to crocodylians. The first dataset focuses on early Sauria (31 taxa, 240 chars.), the second on early Archosauria (76 taxa, 400 chars.) and the third on Crocodyliformes (101 taxa, 340 chars.). For each dataset three time-calibrated trees (timetrees) were calculated: a minimum-age timetree with node ages based on earliest occurrences in the fossil record; a 'smoothed' timetree using a range of time added to the root that is then averaged over zero-length internodes; and a tip-dated timetree. Comparisons within datasets show that the smoothed and tip-dated timetrees provide similar estimates. Only near the root node do BEAST estimates fall outside the smoothed timetree range. The BEAST model is not able to overcome limited sampling to correctly estimate divergences considerably older than sampled fossil occurrence dates. Conversely, the smoothed timetrees consistently provide node-ages far older than the strict dates or BEAST estimates for morphologically conservative sister-taxa when they sit on long ghost lineages. In this latter case, the relaxed-clock model appears to

  11. Morphological and molecular genetic diversity of Strongyluris calotis (Nematoda: Ascaridida: Heterakidae) in South East and East Asian lizards.

    PubMed

    Tran, Binh Thi; Ong, An Vinh; Luc, Pham Van; Sato, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Strongyluris calotis is a heterakid nematode in the large intestine of agamid lizards (Reptilia: Sauria: Agamidae) from the Oriental Region. The standard light microscopic definition of the species counts the "caudal papillae" as 10 pairs on male worms. However, previous work from our group using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) on the heterakid from agamid lizards in Japan, Taiwan, and Singapore revealed that this counting contained a pair of phasmids and that two pairs of postcloacal papillae were completely fused to form a pair of united papillae, thus resulting in "10 pairs." In the present study, we examined S. calotis specimens from the Emma Gray's forest lizard, Calotes emma (Agamidae), living in the plain forest at low altitude, and the Vietnam false bloodsucker, Pseudocalotes brevipes (Agamidae), living in the mountainous forest at high altitude in the northern part of Vietnam. Using SEM, the arrangement of caudal papillae in male worms from an Emma Gray's forest lizard was found to be comparable to classical S. calotis specimens from agamid lizards collected in Japan, Taiwan, and Singapore. However, male worms from Vietnam false bloodsuckers did not have a pair of united papillae but had 10 pairs of independent caudal papillae with a pair of phasmids. Molecular genetic analyses of the ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) of worms of the classical S. calotis morphotype from Japan and Singapore and two S. calotis morphotypes from Vietnam demonstrated absolutely identical nucleotide sequences of partial 18S rDNA (at least 1764 base pairs (bp)) and 5.8S rDNA (158 bp). However, intraspecific differences were detected in other regions of the rDNA, related to the geographical distribution of hosts regardless of morphotype: 97.8-98.5 % identity (443-446 bp/453 bp) in the internal transcribed spacer (ITS)-1 region, 96.6-98.0 % identity (425-431 bp/440 bp) in the ITS-2 region, and 99.6-99.7 % identity (1149-1151 bp/1154 bp) in the 28S rDNA. Thus, in the future, taxonomic

  12. The phylogenetic relationships of basal archosauromorphs, with an emphasis on the systematics of proterosuchian archosauriforms.

    PubMed

    Ezcurra, Martín D

    2016-01-01

    The early evolution of archosauromorphs during the Permo-Triassic constitutes an excellent empirical case study to shed light on evolutionary radiations in deep time and the timing and processes of recovery of terrestrial faunas after a mass extinction. However, macroevolutionary studies of early archosauromorphs are currently limited by poor knowledge of their phylogenetic relationships. In particular, one of the main early archosauromorph groups that need an exhaustive phylogenetic study is "Proterosuchia," which as historically conceived includes members of both Proterosuchidae and Erythrosuchidae. A new data matrix composed of 96 separate taxa (several of them not included in a quantitative phylogenetic analysis before) and 600 osteological characters was assembled and analysed to generate a comprehensive higher-level phylogenetic hypothesis of basal archosauromorphs and shed light on the species-level interrelationships of taxa historically identified as proterosuchian archosauriforms. The results of the analysis using maximum parsimony include a polyphyletic "Prolacertiformes" and "Protorosauria," in which the Permian Aenigmastropheus and Protorosaurus are the most basal archosauromorphs. The enigmatic choristoderans are either found as the sister-taxa of all other lepidosauromorphs or archosauromorphs, but consistently placed within Sauria. Prolacertids, rhynchosaurs, allokotosaurians and tanystropheids are the major successive sister clades of Archosauriformes. The Early Triassic Tasmaniosaurus is recovered as the sister-taxon of Archosauriformes. Proterosuchidae is unambiguosly restricted to five species that occur immediately after and before the Permo-Triassic boundary, thus implying that they are a short-lived "disaster" clade. Erythrosuchidae is composed of eight nominal species that occur during the Early and Middle Triassic. "Proterosuchia" is polyphyletic, in which erythrosuchids are more closely related to Euparkeria and more crownward