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Sample records for lingual tonsil size

  1. Application of lingual tonsillectomy to sleep apnea syndrome involving lingual tonsils.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kenji; Kawakatsu, Kenji; Hattori, Chikaya; Hattori, Hirokazu; Nishimura, Yoichi; Yonekura, Arata; Yagisawa, Mikio; Nishimura, Tadao

    2003-01-01

    In sleep apnea syndrome, surgical treatment is applied in obstructive-type cases and some mixed-type cases. If the obstructive part is in the root of the tongue, forward transfer of the tongue, lingual tonsillectomy and laser midline glossectomy are applied. In this study, we demonstrate the surgical technique of lingual tonsillectomy using an ultrasonic coagulating dissector (SonoSurg) with a blade tip shape developed in our department. We conclude that lingual tonsillectomy using SonoSurg, which we have frequently used, should be the first choice of treatment for snoring and sleep apnea caused by hypertrophy of the lingual tonsils from the viewpoints of effectiveness, prevention of hemorrhage, safety and handling.

  2. [Effectiveness of the GlideScope video laryngoscope in a case of unexpected difficult airway due to lingual tonsil hypertrophy].

    PubMed

    Cruz, P; Alarcón, L; Del Castillo, T; Cabrerizo, P; Díaz, S

    2015-05-01

    Lingual tonsil hypertrophy can cause varying degrees of airway obstruction and is considered a risk factor for difficult mask ventilation and tracheal intubation. We report a case of unexpected difficult airway in a patient with unknown lingual tonsil hypertrophy that was solved with the use of the GlideScope video laryngoscope.

  3. Tonsillitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... e., acute, recurrent, chronic). What causes tonsillitis? The herpes simplex virus, Streptococcus pyogenes (GABHS), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), ... small ulcers on their surfaces in individuals with herpes simplex virus (HSV) tonsillitis. • Unilateral bulging above and to ...

  4. Tonsillitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... The tonsils may be red and may have white spots on them. The lymph nodes in the jaw ... child aspirin. Aspirin has been linked to Reye syndrome . Some people who have repeated infections may need ...

  5. Tuberculous tonsillitis.

    PubMed

    Celik, O; Yalçin, S; Hançer, A; Celik, P; Ozercan, R

    1995-10-01

    The epidemiology of tuberculosis has changed recently with an increasing incidence of unusual presentations. A case of tuberculous tonsillitis, which is a rare condition, is presented in this report. The manifestations of this entity are tonsillar hypertrophy and painful ulceration. Final diagnosis of tuberculous tonsillitis is usually made after histopathologic examination of tonsillectomy material. Cultures should be obtained from the tissue specimens, and acid-fast bacilli must be investigated to confirm the diagnosis. Systemic signs of tuberculosis may not be seen in this clinical form. These features may confuse tuberculous tonsillitis with malignancies. In this article, general information and literature about tuberculous tonsillitis are reviewed, and a case of tuberculous tonsillitis is reported to draw attention to this rare clinical form of tuberculosis.

  6. The size of palatine tonsils cannot be used to decide the indication of tonsillectomy for IgA nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Mika; Kosukegawa, Hideyuki; Nomura, Yuri; Watanabe, Kenichi; Sato, Toshinobu; Taguma, Yoshio

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background. Tonsillectomy is one of the treatment strategies for immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN). The relationship between the indication of tonsillectomy and the size of palatine tonsils (PTs) in patients with IgAN remains controversial. Methods. This retrospective cohort study investigated 57 patients with IgAN who underwent tonsillectomy combined with steroid pulse therapy (SPT). They were classified into two groups, the hypertrophy group and the nonhypertrophy group, according to the weight of their excised PTs. The effects of tonsillectomy combined with SPT on clinical remission (CR) and the histopathological findings of PTs were compared between the two groups. Results. During the mean follow-up period of 45.5 (range 6–133) months, 78.9% of the patients achieved CR (79.3 versus 78.6%, P = 0.945) and the baseline serum creatinine doubled only in one patient in the nonhypertrophy group (0 versus 3.6%, P = 0.491). No significant difference was observed in the incidence of CR between the two groups by the Kaplan–Meier method (P = 0.839). The predictor for CR, identified in Cox proportional hazards models, was baseline proteinuria [hazard ratio 0.14 (95% CI 0.032–0.621) P = 0.010]. Although macroscopic pus plugs were observed on the surface of PTs in almost 60% of patients in each group, microscopic pus plugs in the crypt and the enlarged interfollicular area were observed in all patients. Conclusions. The treatment effect of tonsillectomy combined with SPT and the pathological features of PTs in IgAN were equal, regardless of the size of the PTs. Therefore, the size of PTs should not be included as a factor when deciding the indication of tonsillectomy for IgAN.

  7. Tonsillitis (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading Taking Care of Your Ears Taking ... Video: Getting an X-ray Tonsillitis KidsHealth > For Kids > Tonsillitis Print A A A en español Amigdalitis ...

  8. Palatine tonsil volume estimation using different methods after tonsillectomy.

    PubMed

    Sağıroğlu, Ayşe; Acer, Niyazi; Okuducu, Hacı; Ertekin, Tolga; Erkan, Mustafa; Durmaz, Esra; Aydın, Mesut; Yılmaz, Seher; Zararsız, Gökmen

    2016-06-15

    This study was carried out to measure the volume of the palatine tonsil in otorhinolaryngology outpatients with complaints of adenotonsillar hypertrophy and chronic tonsillitis who had undergone tonsillectomy. To date, no study has investigated palatine tonsil volume using different methods and compared with subjective tonsil size in the literature. For this purpose, we used three different methods to measure palatine tonsil volume. The correlation of each parameter with tonsil size was assessed. After tonsillectomy, palatine tonsil volume was measured by Archimedes, Cavalieri and Ellipsoid methods. Mean right-left palatine tonsil volumes were calculated as 2.63 ± 1.34 cm(3) and 2.72 ± 1.51 cm(3) by the Archimedes method, 3.51 ± 1.48 cm(3) and 3.37 ± 1.36 cm(3) by the Cavalieri method, and 2.22 ± 1.22 cm(3) and 2.29 ± 1.42 cm(3) by the Ellipsoid method, respectively. Excellent agreement was found among the three methods of measuring volumetric techniques according to Bland-Altman plots. In addition, tonsil grade was correlated significantly with tonsil volume.

  9. Lingual thyroid: a clinical case.

    PubMed

    Quarracino, María; Aguas, Silvia

    2003-01-01

    Lingual thyroid is an abnormal formation appearing as the result of a deficient descent during embryological development of the thyroid gland through the thyroglossal duct to its normal pretracheal location. The lesion consists of a tumor mass of thyroid tissue located at the base of the tongue, in the region of the foramen caecum linguae. The size can vary from a few millimeters to several centimeters in diameter. More than 400 cases of lingual thyroid have been documented in the literature to date. Lingual thyroid has been identified in 10% of the tongues examined in some autopsy series. Its identification is of great significance, since it may constitute the only functional thyroid tissue in the body, and may inadvertently be destroyed as a result of histological biopsy procedures. The present study presents a clinical case of lingual thyroid in a 17-year-old female.

  10. Tonsillitis (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... don't use that person's cups, glasses, silverware, toothbrush, or other utensils. And if you have tonsillitis, ... brushing your teeth, make sure to rinse your toothbrush well with tap water, and let it dry ...

  11. [Lithiasis of the tonsil. Questions, answers].

    PubMed

    Bourdon, A J; Vermeulin, G; Beudez, C; Atassi, R; Abbar, H; Lemasson, P; Cikurel, M; Heran, J; Le-Quang, V; Roussy, M

    1994-01-01

    Imaging, clinical and frequency of the tonsil's calculi in function of the size of the calculi: inframillimetric calculi much frequent, not visible by imaging; small calculi from 1 to 7 mm frequent, visible by the imaging and much often asymptomatic; big ones superior of 7 mm rare, becoming exceptional and much often symptomatic above 15 mm.

  12. Tonsil concretions and tonsilloliths.

    PubMed

    Pruet, C W; Duplan, D A

    1987-05-01

    Although infrequently seen in many clinical practices, tonsillar concretions can be the source of both fetor oris and physical and social concern for the patient. Though stones rarely form in the tonsil or peritonsillar area, the findings of calcified objects or stones anywhere within the body has long been a subject of interest. The salient features of these entities and their relevance to clinical practice are discussed in this article.

  13. Tonsillitis: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Here Tonsillitis (American Academy of Otolaryngology--Head and Neck Surgery) Tonsillitis (Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research) ... Adenoids PostOp (American Academy of Otolaryngology--Head and Neck Surgery) Tonsils and Tonsillectomies (For Parents) (Nemours Foundation) Also ...

  14. Ankyloglossia and Lingual Frenotomy.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Jonathan; Links, Anne; Boss, Emily; Tunkel, David

    2017-02-01

    Objectives (1) Describe trends in the diagnosis of ankyloglossia and the use of lingual frenotomy and (2) analyze patient- and hospital-level factors as compared with the total pediatric discharge population. Study Design National database analysis. Methods We reviewed available data from 1997 to 2012 using the Kids' Inpatient Database, Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. All weighted pediatric discharges with ankyloglossia, newborn feeding difficulty, or lingual frenotomy were analyzed for variables of sex, payer, zip code median income, hospital ownership, location/teaching status, bed size, region, and children's hospital status. Chi-square analysis with 95% CIs and odds ratio were used to identify differences between the study group and the total database discharge population. Results Diagnosis of ankyloglossia increased each year of publication (every third year)-with 3934, 5430, 7785, 11,397, 19,459, and 32,837 children, respectively, from 1997 to 2012-with the largest increase in the last 6 years. Similarly, frenotomy increased with 1279, 1633, 2538, 3988, 6900, and 12,406 procedures. Compared with the total discharge population, children with ankyloglossia or frenotomy were more often male (63.6% ankyloglossia, 65.3% frenotomy vs 51.2%), privately insured (60.1%, 62.1% vs 43.6%), from a higher median-income zip code (78.1%, 78.2% vs 68.6%), and in Midwest region (29.3%, 32.3% vs 21.7%). Conclusion These pilot data show increases in diagnoses of ankyloglossia and use of frenotomy. There is a preponderance of children who are male, privately insured, or Midwest residents being diagnosed and treated for ankyloglossia. This broad variation may reflect local practice patterns or imply cultural and socioeconomic bias.

  15. Habits of Household Lingualism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamek, Philip M.

    2004-01-01

    This essay contrasts two approaches to household bilingual education with respect to the notion of identity. The notion of lingualism is presented. Lingualism emphasizes the continuum between monolinguals and bilinguals through a nonquantifying understanding of language (including speech, writing, gestures, and language potential). Kouritzin's…

  16. Tonsils and Tonsillectomies (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to normal activities. Intracapsular tonsillectomy , a variation on traditional tonsillectomy techniques, is surgery in which all involved ... after surgery is significantly less than with a traditional tonsillectomy. Since residual tonsil tissue remains, there is ...

  17. Quantification of cells expressing markers of proliferation and apoptosis in chronic tonsilitis.

    PubMed

    Avramović, V; Petrović, V; Jović, M; Vlahović, P

    2015-10-01

    During chronic tonsillitis, the relationship between proliferation and apoptosis of lymphocytes in tonsillar follicles can be disturbed, which gives rise to attenuation of tonsil immunocompetence and diminishing its contribution in systemic immunity. In this study, we have quantified the cells expressing the markers of proliferation and apoptosis in the follicles of the palatine tonsil. Six tonsils from patients aged 10-29 years with hypertrophic tonsillitis and five tonsils from patients aged 18-22 years with recurrent tonsillitis were studied. The sections of paraffin blocks of tonsillar tissue were stained by the immunohistochemical LSAB/HRP method with the utilisation of antibodies for: Ki-67 antigen-cell marker of proliferation; Bcl-2 and survivin anti-apoptotic factors and Fas/CD95, caspase-3 and Bax pro-apoptotic factors. The size of lymphoid follicles, i.e. mean follicle area and number of lymphoid follicle immunopositive cells per mm2 of a slice area, i.e. numerical areal density were determined by the quantitative image analysis. The localisation of Ki-67, Bcl-2, survivin, Fas/CD95, caspase-3 and Bax- immunopositive cells inside the palatine tonsil was similar in both types of tonsillitis. The number of Ki-67 immunopositive cells was significantly (p < 0.01) larger in the tonsils with hypertrophic tonsillitis (14681.4 ± 1460.5) in comparison to those with recurrent tonsillitis (12491.4 ± 2321.6), although the number of survivin and caspase-3 immunopositive cells was significantly (p < 0.05) larger in recurrent tonsillitis (survivin, 406.9 ± 98.4; caspase-3, 350.4 ± 119.4) when compared to those with hypertrophic tonsillitis (survivin, 117.4 ± 14.5; caspase-3, 210 ± 24). Our results show that the rate of the proliferation and apoptosis of follicular lymphocytes is different in various types of tonsillitis. This suggests that the immunological potential of the palatine tonsil varies in patients with hypertrophic and recurrent tonsillitis, which in

  18. [Submucosal lingual schwannoma].

    PubMed

    Ulusoy, Bülent; Bozdemir, Kazım; Ersoy Çallıoğlu, Elif; Kutluhan, Ahmet; Korkmaz, Mehmet Hakan

    2015-01-01

    Schwannoma or neurilemmoma is a slow growing, solitary, and encapsulated benign tumor originating from Schwann cells of the peripheral nerves. Lingual schwannomas are rare. A 46-year-old male patient admitted with a complaint of swelling on the right half of the tongue for one year. An approximately 1x1 cm submucosal mass was detected on the right side of the tongue. The submucosal mass was totally excised under local anesthesia. Pathological examination was consistent with schwannoma. Lingual schwannomas should be considered in the differential diagnosis of tongue masses.

  19. [Current techniques in tonsil surgery].

    PubMed

    Coromina Isern, Jordi; Esteller Moré, Eduard

    2010-12-01

    In recent years, consolidation of tonsillar hypertrophy as the principal surgical procedure has led to the emergence of new techniques. Most aim to reduce volume (tonsillectomy or tonsil reduction). These techniques have considerably decreased intra- and postoperative hemorrhages and pain intensity. The present article describes the mechanisms and the advantages and disadvantages of the various techniques, including electro-dissection using electrical scalpels, reduction using a microdebrider, ultrasonic scalpel, radiofrequency (with its different variations) and CO(2) laser. When techniques that reduce tonsil volume are used, the possibility of recurrence of the tonsillar hypertrophy is high if less than 85% of the tonsil is removed. There is also a considerable possibility of infection of the remaining tonsils, whichever technique is used, and therefore these techniques are not valid in the case of repetitive tonsillitis. Recently, alternatives to classical adenoidectomy using adenoid curette have also appeared. Bleeding can be minimized by using a microdebrider, radiofrequency or a blood coagulator. We also discuss the concept of partial adenoidectomy, which is preferred in patients at risk of velopharyngeal insufficiency.

  20. Having Your Tonsils Taken Out (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading Taking Care of Your Ears Taking ... ray Having Your Tonsils Taken Out KidsHealth > For Kids > Having Your Tonsils Taken Out Print A A ...

  1. Transient lingual papillitis.

    PubMed

    Kornerup, Ida M; Senye, Mireya; Peters, Edmund

    2016-01-01

    A case of recurrent, clinically innocuous, but painful papules involving the tongue dorsum of a 25-year-old man is presented. The lesions were interpreted to represent a transient lingual papillitis. This a poorly understood, but benign and self-limited condition involving the tongue fungiform papillae, which does not appear to be widely recognized.

  2. Laser midline glossectomy and lingual tonsillectomy as treatments for sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yonekura, Arata; Kawakatsu, Kenji; Suzuki, Kenji; Nishimura, Tadao

    2003-01-01

    Preservation treatments for sleep respiratory disorders, such as the use of a dental device and the technique of nasal continuous positive air pressure, cause discomfort to the patient and are not radical treatments. Therefore, we performed operative therapy instead. Laser midline glossectomy was performed to treat constriction at the root of the tongue in 16 patients diagnosed with sleep apnea syndrome. We also tried lingual tonsil excision using the Harmonic Scalpel in three patients with stenosis at the base of the tongue.

  3. Morphology of the lingual papillae of the eland (Taurotragus oryx).

    PubMed

    Emura, Shoichi

    2016-01-01

    We examined the dorsal lingual surfaces of an adult eland (Taurotragus oryx) by scanning electron microscopy. Filiform, fungiform and vallate papillae were observed. The filiform papillae of the lingual apex consisted of a larger main papilla and smaller secondary papillae. The connective tissue core of the filiform papilla was U-shaped. The fungiform papillae were round in shape. The connective tissue core of the fungiform papilla was flower-bud shaped. The filiform papillae of the lingual body consisted of a main papilla and were big as compared to that of the lingual apex. The connective tissue core of the filiform papilla resembled that of the lingual apes. The lenticular papillae of large size were limited on the lingual prominence. The connective tissue core of the lenticular papilla consisted of numerous small spines. The vallate papillae were located on both sides of the posterolateral aspects. The vallate papillae were flattened-oval shaped and the papillae were surrounded by a semicircular trench. The connective tissue core of the vallate papilla was covered with numerous small spines. The lingual surface of the eland closely resembled that of the family Bovidae.

  4. Extraction treatment in lingual orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Robert B

    2013-09-01

    Contemporary lingual orthodontic appliances offer an aesthetic and accurate means of treating malocclusion. Managing extraction-based treatments with lingual appliances presents a number of challenges. This article discusses the specific biomechanical considerations associated with extraction treatment and outlines clinical techniques that can optimize treatment outcome in these cases.

  5. [History of the tonsil surgery].

    PubMed

    De Diego, J I; Prim, M P; Sánchez-Carrión, S

    2007-01-01

    Tonsillectomy is one of the more frequent surgical techniques in the otolaryngological practice. In the first century A. D., Cornelius Celsus in Rome described the removal of the tonsils. Since them, devices used for tonsillectomy included a wide variety of instruments as snares, guillotines, scalpels ("cold" and ultrasonic), forceps and lasers. Likewise, the improvement of the anesthetic procedures and the perioperative management have contributed greatly to success with this surgical procedure. To sum up, the instruments and procedures used for tonsillectomy have evolved to render it a precise operation.

  6. Anaerobic Bacteriological Microbiota in Surface and Core of Tonsils in Chronic Tonsillitis

    PubMed Central

    Ankle, Nitin R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tonsillar infection may stem from bacteria within tonsillar crypts or parenchyma rather than from those on the surface. Pathogens isolated from surface culture may be colonizing the tonsil, but not essentially infecting it. Anaerobes though not often studied, are known to cause chronic tonsillitis. Aim To study the correlation of anaerobic bacterial isolates in surface and core cultures from recurrently infected and inflamed tonsils. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in Charitable Hospital and Medical Research Centre, Belagavi from January 2014 to December 2014 on 100 patients of chronic tonsillitis who underwent tonsillectomy. Swabs were obtained from tonsil surface and core and analysed for anaerobes as per standard protocol. Chi-square test and Fischer-Exact test were used for statistical analysis. Results Twenty eight out of 63 (44.4%) patients had anaerobic growth on tonsil surface and 30 out of 62 (48.4%) patients had anaerobic growth in tonsil core. Porphyromonas sp. was the most common anaerobe isolated from the surface as well as from the core. There was no statistical significance between anaerobes isolated in the tonsil surface and core. Conclusion Anaerobic organisms obtained from tonsil surface and core cultures were similar. A throat swab satisfactorily depicts the core organism and is reliable in recognizing the bacteriology of chronic tonsillitis. Anaerobic organisms known to inhabit the surface as well as the core of tonsils may be treated with suitable antibiotic therapy. PMID:28050412

  7. Tonsillitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... your doctor will prescribe a course of antibiotics. Penicillin taken by mouth for 10 days is the ... A streptococcus. If your child is allergic to penicillin, your doctor will prescribe an alternative antibiotic. Your ...

  8. Lingual articulation in songbirds

    PubMed Central

    Suthers, Roderick A.; Rothgerber, John R.; Jensen, Kenneth Kragh

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lingual articulation in humans is one of the primary means of vocal tract resonance filtering that produces the characteristic vowel formants of speech. In songbirds, the function of the tongue in song has not been thoroughly examined, although recent research has identified the oropharyngeal–esophageal cavity as a resonance filter that is actively tuned to the frequency of the song. In northern cardinals (Cardinalis cardinalis), the volume of this cavity is inversely proportional to the frequency of the song above 2 kHz. However, cardinal song extends below this range, leaving the question of whether and how the vocal tract is tracking these low frequencies. We investigated the possible role of the tongue in vocal tract filtering using X-ray cineradiography of northern cardinals. Below 2 kHz, there was prominent tongue elevation in which the tip of the tongue was raised until it seemed to touch the palate. These results suggest that tongue elevation lowers the resonance frequency below 2 kHz by reducing the area of the passage from the oral cavity into the beak. This is consistent with a computational model of the songbird vocal tract in which resonance frequencies are actively adjusted by both changing the volume of the oropharyngeal–esophageal cavity and constricting the opening into the beak. PMID:26685174

  9. Correlation between nasopharyngoscopy and cephalometry in the diagnosis of hyperplasia of the pharyngeal tonsils

    PubMed Central

    Ritzel, Rodrigo Agne; Berwig, Luana Cristina; da Silva, Ana Maria Toniolo; Corrêa, Eliane Castilhos Rodrigues; Serpa, Eliane Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Hyperplasia of the pharyngeal tonsil is one of the main causes of mouth breathing, and accurate diagnosis of this alteration is important for proper therapeutic planning. Therefore, studies have been conducted in order to provide information regarding the procedures that can be used for the diagnosis of pharyngeal obstruction. Objective: To verify the correlation between nasopharyngoscopy and cephalometric examinations in the diagnosis of pharyngeal tonsil hyperplasia. Method: This was a cross-sectional, clinical, experimental, and quantitative study. Fifty-five children took part in this study, 30 girls and 25 boys, aged between 7 and 11 years. The children underwent nasofibropharyngoscopic and cephalometric evaluation to determine the grade of nasopharyngeal obstruction. The Spearman's rank correlation coefficient at the 5% significance level was used to verify the correlation between these exams. Results: In the nasopharyngoscopy evaluation, most children showed grade 2 and 3 hyperplasia of the pharyngeal tonsil, which was followed by grade 1. In the cephalometry assessment, most children showed grade 1 hyperplasia of the pharyngeal tonsil, which was followed by grade 2. A statistically significant regular positive correlation was observed between the exams. Conclusion: It was concluded that the evaluation of the pharyngeal tonsil hyperplasia could be carried out by fiber optic nasopharyngoscopy and cephalometry, as these examinations were regularly correlated. However, it was found that cephalometry tended to underestimate the size of the pharyngeal tonsil relative to nasopharyngoscopy. PMID:25991937

  10. Should More Kids Have Their Tonsils Out?

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgical guidelines might be warranted for sore throat, sleep problems To use the sharing features on this page, ... infections and 80 percent of the time for sleep problems, according to the academy. Swollen tonsils can block ...

  11. Beryllium concentration in pharyngeal tonsils in children.

    PubMed

    Nogaj, Ewa; Kwapulinski, Jerzy; Misiołek, Maciej; Golusiński, Wojciech; Kowol, Jolanta; Wiechuła, Danuta

    2014-01-01

    Power plant dust is believed to be the main source of the increased presence of the element beryllium in the environment which has been detected in the atmospheric air, surface waters, groundwater, soil, food, and cigarette smoke. In humans, beryllium absorption occurs mainly via the respiratory system. The pharyngeal tonsils are located on the roof of the nasopharynx and are in direct contact with dust particles in inhaled air. As a result, the concentration levels of beryllium in the pharyngeal tonsils are likely to be a good indicator of concentration levels in the air. The presented study had two primary aims: to investigate the beryllium concentration in pharyngeal tonsils in children living in southern Poland, and the appropriate reference range for this element in children's pharyngeal tonsils. Pharyngeal tonsils were extracted from a total of 379 children (age 2-17 years, mean 6.2 ± 2.7 years) living in southern Poland. Tonsil samples were mineralized in a closed cycle in a pressure mineralizer PDS 6, using 65% spectrally pure nitric acid. Beryllium concentration was determined using the ICP-AES method with a Perkin Elmer Optima 5300DVTM. The software Statistica v. 9 was used for the statistical analysis. It was found that girls had a significantly greater beryllium concentration in their pharyngeal tonsils than boys. Beryllium concentration varies greatly, mostly according to the place of residence. Based on the study results, the reference value for beryllium in pharyngeal tonsils of children is recommended to be determined at 0.02-0.04 µg/g.

  12. Pharmacokinetics of tildipirosin in pig tonsils.

    PubMed

    Torres, F; Santamaria, R; Jimenez, M; Menjón, R; Ibanez, A; Collell, M; Azlor, O; Fraile, L

    2016-04-01

    The penetration of antimicrobials in pig tonsils is hardly known. The objective of the study was to quantify the tildipirosin (TD) penetration in tonsils. Animals were randomly divided into six groups (control, T1, T2 (1), T2(5), T2(10), and T2(15)) of eight animals. T1 and T2 groups received a dose of 2 and 4 mg of TD/kg bw in one shot (Zuprevo® MSD Animal Health), respectively, and the control group received 2 mL of saline solution. The animals were sacrificed by intravenous administration of pentobarbital sodium 24 h after finishing the treatment for the control, T1, and T2(1) groups, whereas animals of T2(5), T2(10), and T2(15) groups were sacrificed at 5, 10, and 15 days, post-treatment, respectively. Tonsils and blood samples were taken at necropsy to obtain plasma, and the tildipirosin concentration was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry detection. The concentration in plasma was always significantly lower than in tonsil. Average TD tonsil concentrations increased significantly in a dose-dependent manner, and the tonsil TD vs. plasma TD concentration ratio was approximately 75 for the doses of 2 and 4 mg of TD/kg bw at 24 h post-treatment. Moreover, the maximum concentration of tildipirosin in tonsil was observed at 1 day postadministration, and this concentration decreased gradually from this day until 15 days postadministration for the dose of 4 mg of TD/kg bw. Finally, the ratio AUCtonsil/AUCplasma was 97.9, and the T1/2 (h) was clearly higher in tonsil than in plasma.

  13. Effortless way of bonding a lingual retainer.

    PubMed

    Pai, Vikram; Pai, Ramya; Revenkar, Ameet; Jasoria, Gaurav

    2013-01-01

    Post orthodontic treatment, retention is one of the most important step for prevention of relapse. Over the years many direct and indirect techniques for placing a bonded lingual retainer have been practiced clinically. Present clinical practice demands a much convenient and effortless technique for bonding a lingual retainer. This article describes a simplified technique of bonding a lingual retainer.

  14. Lingual thyroid: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Amr, Bassem; Monib, Sherif

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Lingual thyroid (LT) gland is a rare clinical entity which was found to occur due to the failure of the thyroid gland to descend to its normal cervical location during embryogenesis. The presence of an ectopic thyroid gland located at the base of the tongue may present with symptoms like dysphagia, dysphonia, upper airway obstruction or even hemorrhage at any time from infancy through adulthood. Presentation of case We are presenting a case of 5-year-old girl who presented with lingual thyroid, treated with Suppression treatment followed by elective surgical resection. Discussion Incidence of ectopic lingual thyroid gland is reported as 1:100,000. It is more common in females. Most of presentations due to oropharyngeal obstruction, including dysphagia, dyspnea and dysphonia. Investigations include thyroid function tests, neck US, Technetium scanning and C.T. Conclusion Lingual thyroid is a rare anomaly. Dysphagia and dysphonia are common presenting symptoms. Pathogenesis of this ectopic is unknown. Different types of surgical approaches have been described in the management. PMID:22096763

  15. Lingual thyroid. Diagnosis and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kansal, P.; Sakati, N.; Rifai, A.; Woodhouse, N.

    1987-11-01

    We describe four patients who presented with a lingual thyroid condition (three females and one male, aged between 7 and 22 years). Only the male patient was symptomatic with mild dysphagia and hemoptysis. The diagnosis was suspected in three patients, and was confirmed by iodine 123 or 131 scanning in all patients and by a computed tomographic scan in the one patient studied. The patient with dysphagia received a 10-mCl therapeutic dose of iodine 131 before thyroxine replacement was started. The diagnosis and management of lingual thyroid is discussed. All patients need lifelong thyroxine suppression. Unenhanced computed tomographic scans have a diagnostic appearance due to the iodine content of the ectopic thyroid tissue.

  16. A frequent phenotype for paediatric sleep apnoea: short lingual frenulum

    PubMed Central

    Huseni, Shehlanoor; Lo, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    A short lingual frenulum has been associated with difficulties in sucking, swallowing and speech. The oral dysfunction induced by a short lingual frenulum can lead to oral-facial dysmorphosis, which decreases the size of upper airway support. Such progressive change increases the risk of upper airway collapsibility during sleep. Clinical investigation of the oral cavity was conducted as a part of a clinical evaluation of children suspected of having sleep disordered breathing (SDB) based on complaints, symptoms and signs. Systematic polysomnographic evaluation followed the clinical examination. A retrospective analysis of 150 successively seen children suspected of having SDB was performed, in addition to a comparison of the findings between children with and without short lingual frenula. Among the children, two groups of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) were found: 1) absence of adenotonsils enlargement and short frenula (n=63); and 2) normal frenula and enlarged adenotonsils (n=87). Children in the first group had significantly more abnormal oral anatomy findings, and a positive family of short frenulum and SDB was documented in at least one direct family member in 60 cases. A short lingual frenulum left untreated at birth is associated with OSAS at later age, and a systematic screening for the syndrome should be conducted when this anatomical abnormality is recognised. PMID:27730205

  17. A frequent phenotype for paediatric sleep apnoea: short lingual frenulum.

    PubMed

    Guilleminault, Christian; Huseni, Shehlanoor; Lo, Lauren

    2016-07-01

    A short lingual frenulum has been associated with difficulties in sucking, swallowing and speech. The oral dysfunction induced by a short lingual frenulum can lead to oral-facial dysmorphosis, which decreases the size of upper airway support. Such progressive change increases the risk of upper airway collapsibility during sleep. Clinical investigation of the oral cavity was conducted as a part of a clinical evaluation of children suspected of having sleep disordered breathing (SDB) based on complaints, symptoms and signs. Systematic polysomnographic evaluation followed the clinical examination. A retrospective analysis of 150 successively seen children suspected of having SDB was performed, in addition to a comparison of the findings between children with and without short lingual frenula. Among the children, two groups of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) were found: 1) absence of adenotonsils enlargement and short frenula (n=63); and 2) normal frenula and enlarged adenotonsils (n=87). Children in the first group had significantly more abnormal oral anatomy findings, and a positive family of short frenulum and SDB was documented in at least one direct family member in 60 cases. A short lingual frenulum left untreated at birth is associated with OSAS at later age, and a systematic screening for the syndrome should be conducted when this anatomical abnormality is recognised.

  18. Protrusive Lingual Force and Lingual Diadochokinetic Rates: A Comparative Analysis Between Normal and Lisping Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dworkin, James P.

    1978-01-01

    Examined were protrusive lingual force and lingual diadochokinetic rates in 45 normal and 45 front-lisping speakers (7-12-years old). Results revealed that normal speaking Ss scored significantly higher on lingual force and diadochokinetic rate measurements, challenging the theory that lisping is purely a functional articulatory disorder. (CL)

  19. Lingual Kinematics and Coordination in Speech-Disordered Children Exhibiting Differentiated versus Undifferentiated Lingual Gestures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goozee, Justine; Murdoch, Bruce; Ozanne, Anne; Cheng, Yan; Hill, Anne; Gibbon, Fiona

    2007-01-01

    Background: Electropalatographic investigations have revealed that a proportion of children with articulation/phonological disorders exhibit undifferentiated lingual gestures, whereby the whole of the tongue contacts the palate simultaneously during lingual consonant production. These undifferentiated lingual gestures have been interpreted to…

  20. Morphology of the lingual surface of South American fur seal (Arctocephalus australis) and sea lion (Otaria flavescens).

    PubMed

    Erdoğan, Serkan; Villar Arias, Silvia; Pérez, William

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we aimed to describe the morphological characteristics of the lingual papillae in two species of Otariidae family by stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. We used tongues of two South American Otariidae species. The tongues were elongated and terminated in bifid apex and there was no median sulcus on the dorsal lingual surface. The most numerous type of lingual papilla was filiform in the South American fur seal (SASL) and entire dorsal lingual surface was covered by these filiform papillae but the dorsal surface of the tongue of the South American sea lion was covered by numerous polygonal projections, which were different in size. Fungiform papillae were detected in only SASL and they randomly distributed on the lingual apex and body, and some fungiform papillae were collected into twosome or threesome groups on the posterior part of the lingual body. Circumvallate papilla was found in the center of the lingual radix of South American sea lion. Thread-like conical papillae were common for both species and they located on the lingual radix. We determined that lingual surface morphology was completely different in each species, although they were members of the same family, Otariidae.

  1. A simple technique for bonding lingual retainer.

    PubMed

    Hattarki, Rohan S; Rastogi, Shikha

    2015-01-01

    The present article describes an easy method to place a bonded lingual retainer. This technique is also helpful in limiting the flow of the acid etchant used for etching and also limiting the flow of the adhesive on to the lingual surfaces of the teeth.

  2. Unusual complication of dental extraction: lingual abscess.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Lalee; Agarwal, Pratibha; Rupa, Vedantam

    2013-01-01

    Acute lingual swelling is a potentially life threatening clinical condition which is encountered very rarely, the differential diagnosis of which includes hemorrhage, infarction, abscess, tumor and edema. Herein we report a case of lingual abscess that presented with acute tongue swelling and respiratory distress after extraction of lower two incisor teeth.

  3. Lymphoid papillary hyperplasia of the palatine tonsils.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Farga, J; Abbud-Neme, F; Deutsch, E

    1983-09-01

    A rare case of papillary hyperplasia of the palatine tonsils is reported in a 9-year-old girl who presented with pharyngeal obstruction. The obstruction was due to the bilateral enlargement of the palatine tonsils with a papillary surface configuration so atypical that a diagnosis of malignant neoplasm was clinically considered. Histopathological study showed a peculiar form of lymphoid hyperplasia. No other members of the family were affected. As far as we know, this is the only case reported in recent years in an Occidental patient although a few similar cases have been reported from Japan. The importance of recognizing this peculiar abnormality rests in the fact that in spite of the clinical features simulating a cancer or multiple epithelial papillomas, the process is benign, probably non-neoplastic, and easily cured by bilateral tonsillectomy.

  4. [A case of palatine tonsil stone].

    PubMed

    Wedrychowicz, B; Pogorzelski, A

    1993-01-01

    The authors presented a case of big stone of palatine tonsil surgical treated successfully. Qualitative and quantitative examination of tonsillith chemical composition was carried out with a LINK 90 spectrometer. It was found that the main components were calcium (Ca/K alpha), (Ca/K beta) about 60% and phosphorus (P) about 30%. Potassium (K), chlorine (Cl), sulphur (S), aluminum (Al and magnesium (Mg) were found in trace amounts.

  5. Laser Doppler flowmetry in diagnoses of chronic tonsillitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mareew, Gleb O.; Mareew, Oleg V.; Maslyakova, Galina N.; Ivliev, Igor I.; Fedosov, Ivan V.; Lychagov, Vladislav V.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2005-06-01

    Chronic tonsillitis is one of the most common diseases in ENT all over the world. There are two ways of treatment-surgical tonsillectomy and conservative therapeutically treatment. But still doctors have no possibility to make objective decisions for this painful and tonsil-destructive operation. In this article we try to research how the degree of sclerosis in tonsillar tissue affects the blood flow in tonsils, by using laser Doppler flowmetry.

  6. Tonsillitis and sore throat in children.

    PubMed

    Stelter, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Surgery of the tonsils is still one of the most frequent procedures during childhood. Due to a series of fatal outcomes after hemorrhage in children in Austria in 2006, the standards and indications for tonsillectomy have slowly changed in Germany. However, no national guidelines exist and the frequency of tonsil surgery varies across the country. In some districts eight times more children were tonsillectomized than in others. A tonsillectomy in children under six years should only be done if the child suffers from recurrent acute bacterially tonsillitis. In all other cases (i.e. hyperplasia of the tonsils) the low risk partial tonsillectomy should be the first line therapy. Postoperative pain and the risk of hemorrhage are much lower in partial tonsillectomy (=tonsillotomy). No matter whether the tonsillotomy is done by laser, radiofrequency, shaver, coblation, bipolar scissor or Colorado needle, as long as the crypts are kept open and some tonsil tissue is left behind. Total extracapsular tonsillectomy is still indicated in severely affected children with recurrent infections of the tonsils, allergy to antibiotics, PFAPA syndrome (periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis) and peritonsillar abscess. With regard to the frequency and seriousness of the recurrent tonsillitis the indication for tonsillectomy in children is justified if 7 or more well-documented, clinically important, adequately treated episodes of throat infection occur in the preceding year, or 5 or more of such episodes occur in each of the 2 preceding years (according to the paradise criteria). Diagnosis of acute tonsillitis is clinical, but sometimes it is hard to distinguish viral from bacterial infections. Rapid antigen testing has a very low sensitivity in the diagnosis of bacterial tonsillitis and swabs are highly sensitive but take a long time. In all microbiological tests the treating physician has to keep in mind, that most of the bacterials, viruses and

  7. [Tonsillitis and sore throat in childhood].

    PubMed

    Stelter, K

    2014-03-01

    Surgery of the tonsils is still one of the most frequent procedures during childhood. Due to a series of fatal outcome after hemorrhage in children in Austria in 2006, the standards and indications for tonsillectomy slowly change in Germany since that. However, there exist no national guidelines and the frequency of tonsil surgery varies in the country. In some districts eight times more children were tonsillectomized than in others. A tonsillectomy in children under 6 years should only be done if the child suffers from recurrent acute bacterially tonsillitis. In all other cases (i. e. hyperplasia of the tonsils) the low risk partial tonsillectomy should be the first line therapy. Postoperative pain and the risk of hemorrhage are much lower in partial tonsillectomy (= tonsillotomy). No matter whether the tonsillotomy is done by laser, radiofrequency, shaver, coblation, bipolar scissor or Colorado needle, as long as the crypts are kept open and some tonsil tissue is left behind. Total extracapsular tonsillectomy is still indicated in severely affected children with recurrent infections of the tonsils, allergy to antibiotics, PFAPA syndrome (periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis) and peritonsillar abscess. With regard to the frequency and seriousness of the recurrent tonsillitis the indication for tonsillectomy in children is justified if 7 or more well-documented, clinically important, adequately treated episodes of throat infection occur in the preceding year, or 5 or more such episodes occur in each of the 2 preceding years (according to the paradise criteria). Diagnosis of acute tonsillitis is clinical, but sometimes it is hard to distinguish viral from bacterial infections. Rapid antigen testing has a very low sensitivity in the diagnosis of bacterial tonsillitis and swabs are highly sensitive but take a long time. In all microbiological tests the treating physician has to keep in mind, that most of the bacterials, viruses and

  8. Tonsillitis and sore throat in children

    PubMed Central

    Stelter, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Surgery of the tonsils is still one of the most frequent procedures during childhood. Due to a series of fatal outcomes after hemorrhage in children in Austria in 2006, the standards and indications for tonsillectomy have slowly changed in Germany. However, no national guidelines exist and the frequency of tonsil surgery varies across the country. In some districts eight times more children were tonsillectomized than in others. A tonsillectomy in children under six years should only be done if the child suffers from recurrent acute bacterially tonsillitis. In all other cases (i.e. hyperplasia of the tonsils) the low risk partial tonsillectomy should be the first line therapy. Postoperative pain and the risk of hemorrhage are much lower in partial tonsillectomy (=tonsillotomy). No matter whether the tonsillotomy is done by laser, radiofrequency, shaver, coblation, bipolar scissor or Colorado needle, as long as the crypts are kept open and some tonsil tissue is left behind. Total extracapsular tonsillectomy is still indicated in severely affected children with recurrent infections of the tonsils, allergy to antibiotics, PFAPA syndrome (periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis) and peritonsillar abscess. With regard to the frequency and seriousness of the recurrent tonsillitis the indication for tonsillectomy in children is justified if 7 or more well-documented, clinically important, adequately treated episodes of throat infection occur in the preceding year, or 5 or more of such episodes occur in each of the 2 preceding years (according to the paradise criteria). Diagnosis of acute tonsillitis is clinical, but sometimes it is hard to distinguish viral from bacterial infections. Rapid antigen testing has a very low sensitivity in the diagnosis of bacterial tonsillitis and swabs are highly sensitive but take a long time. In all microbiological tests the treating physician has to keep in mind, that most of the bacterials, viruses and

  9. Detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Isolates from Tonsils and Posterior Oropharynx

    PubMed Central

    Whiley, D. M.; Lee, D. M.; Snow, A. F.; Fairley, C. K.; Peel, J.; Bradshaw, C. S.; Hocking, J. S.; Lahra, M. M.; Chen, M. Y.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the factors influencing gonorrhea detection at the pharynx. One hundred men infected with Neisseria gonorrhoeae were swabbed from the tonsils and posterior oropharynx. N. gonorrhoeae was reisolated from the tonsils and posterior oropharynx in 62% and 52%, respectively (P = 0.041). Culture positivity was greater with higher gonococcal DNA loads at the tonsils (P = 0.001) and oropharynx (P < 0.001). N. gonorrhoeae can be cultured from the tonsils and posterior oropharynx with greater isolation rates where gonococcal loads are higher. PMID:26292303

  10. Morphofunctional structure of the lingual papillae in three species of South American Camelids: Alpaca, guanaco, and llama.

    PubMed

    Erdoğan, Serkan; Villar Arias, Silvia; Pérez, William

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the anatomical and functional characteristics of the lingual papilla among the Camelidae. For this purpose, tongues of alpaca, guanaco, and llama were used. Numerous long and thin filiform papillae were located in the median groove and none were detected on the rest of the dorsal surface of the lingual apex in alpaca. Secondary papillae originated from the base of some filiform papillae on the ventral surface of alpaca tongue. The bases of some filiform papillae of the lateral surface of the lingual apex were inserted into conspicuous grooves in guanaco and tips of filiform papillae on the dorsal surface of the lingual body were ended by bifurcated apex. On the dorsal surface of the lingual apex of llama, there were no filiform papillae but there were numerous filiform papillae on both the lateral margins of the ventral surface of the lingual apex. Fungiform papillae were distributed randomly on dorsal lingual surface and ventral margins of the tongues of all camelid species. Lenticular papillae were located on the lingual torus and varied in size and topographical distribution for each species. Circumvallate papillae had irregular surfaces in llama and alpaca, and smooth surface in guanaco. In conclusion, llama and alpaca tongues were more similar to each other, and tongues of all camelid species displayed more similarities to those of Bactrian and dromedary camels in comparison with other herbivores and ruminants.

  11. [Tonsil calculi in the orthopantomography image].

    PubMed

    Crameri, Manuel; Bassetti, Renzo; Werder, Peter; Kuttenberger, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Tonsilloliths are calcifications within the tonsillar crypts. Affected are especially the palatine tonsils. The prevalence is ranging between 16 and 46.1%. Tonsilloliths can be the reason for chronic halitosis, irritating cough, dysphagia, otalgia, foreign body sensation or foul taste in the mouth. They are often asymptomatic. Tonsilloliths can be discovered incidentally in orthopantomography (OPT) as singular or multiple radioopacities in the area of the ramus mandibulae. The aim of this case report is to present two cases with asymptomatic tonsilloliths detected based on an OPT and confirmed in a computed tomography (CT) or by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

  12. Morphology of the lingual papillae in the Japanese marten.

    PubMed

    Emura, Shoichi; Okumura, Toshihiko; Chen, Huayue

    2007-08-01

    The dorsal lingual surfaces of two adult Japanese marten (Martes melampus) were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Filiform, fungiform, vallate and foliate papillae were observed. A small filiform papilla on the apical surface of the tongue had several pointed processes. A small filiform papilla contained the connective tissue core consisting of several small processes. A large filiform papilla of the lingual body consisted of a main papilla and some secondary papillae. A large filiform papilla contained the connective tissue core consisting of processes of various size. The fungiform papillae are round in shape. The connective tissue core of the fungiform papilla had a top with several round depressions. The four vallate papillae were located on both sides of the posterior end of the lingual body and each papilla was surrounded by groove and crescent pad. A zigzag surface structure appeared on the connective tissue core of the vallate papilla. The foliate papillae were seen on the dorsolateral aspect of the tongue and some ridges and grooves were exposed reciprocally. A zigzag surface structures appeared on the connective tissue cores of the ridges of the foliate papillae.

  13. Fibroepithelial Polyp of the Tonsil: Report of a Rare Case

    PubMed Central

    Ashish, Gaurav

    2015-01-01

    Pedunculated polyps of the palatine tonsil are rare benign tumours of tonsil. Most of the cases have been reported in adults with varying presenting symptoms. We report a 12-year-old male child who presented with 6 months history of difficulty in swallowing. There was no history of breathing difficulty, change in voice or history of trauma. Clinical examination revealed a 2x1 cm small pedunculated polyp arising from the superior pole of right tonsil which was excised under general anaesthesia. Left tonsil was normal. A diagnosis of fibroepithelial polyp of right palatine tonsil was made based on histopathological findings. An unusual presentation of a rare condition in a paediatric patient has been discussed along with the clinical and histopathological features of this lesion. PMID:26816905

  14. Fibroepithelial Polyp of the Tonsil: Report of a Rare Case.

    PubMed

    Telugu, Ramesh Babu; Ashish, Gaurav

    2015-12-01

    Pedunculated polyps of the palatine tonsil are rare benign tumours of tonsil. Most of the cases have been reported in adults with varying presenting symptoms. We report a 12-year-old male child who presented with 6 months history of difficulty in swallowing. There was no history of breathing difficulty, change in voice or history of trauma. Clinical examination revealed a 2x1 cm small pedunculated polyp arising from the superior pole of right tonsil which was excised under general anaesthesia. Left tonsil was normal. A diagnosis of fibroepithelial polyp of right palatine tonsil was made based on histopathological findings. An unusual presentation of a rare condition in a paediatric patient has been discussed along with the clinical and histopathological features of this lesion.

  15. Coblation cryptolysis to treat tonsil stones: a retrospective case series.

    PubMed

    Chang, Christopher Y; Thrasher, Richard

    2012-06-01

    We introduce a novel and potentially effective approach in the treatment of tonsil stones using Coblation technology. A retrospective pilot case series was performed demonstrating the effectiveness of a technique that we call Coblation tonsil cryptolysis. This technique is unique in that it can be performed in adult patients without sedation using only local anesthesia, much like laser tonsil cryptolysis. As with laser cryptolysis, pain is significant for only a few days and most adults can resume normal diet and activity within 1 week. In contrast, tonsillectomy entails significant morbidity for several weeks. However, Coblation avoids the significant disadvantages of laser use, including the potential for airway fire, retinal damage from reflected scatter, dealing with plume from vaporized tissues, oral/facial burns, and the high cost of purchasing and maintaining laser equipment. After a single session of Coblation tonsil cryptolysis, a significant decrease and even elimination of tonsil stones can potentially be achieved.

  16. Influence of radiofrequency surgery on architecture of the palatine tonsils.

    PubMed

    Plzak, Jan; Macokova, Pavla; Zabrodsky, Michal; Kastner, Jan; Lastuvka, Petr; Astl, Jaromir

    2014-01-01

    Radiofrequency surgery is a widely used modern technique for submucosal volume reduction of the tonsils. So far there is very limited information on morphologic changes in the human tonsils after radiofrequency surgery. We performed histopathological study of tonsillectomy specimens after previous bipolar radiofrequency induced thermotherapy (RFITT). A total of 83 patients underwent bipolar RFITT for hypertrophy of palatine tonsils. Tonsil volume reduction was measured by 3D ultrasonography. Five patients subsequently underwent tonsillectomy. Profound histopathological examination was performed to determine the effect of RFITT on tonsillar architecture. All tonsillectomy specimens showed the intact epithelium, intact germinal centers, normal vascularization, and no evidence of increased fibrosis. No microscopic morphological changes in tonsillectomy specimens after bipolar RFITT were observed. RFITT is an effective submucosal volume reduction procedure for treatment of hypertrophic palatine tonsils with no destructive effect on microscopic tonsillar architecture and hence most probably no functional adverse effect.

  17. 1125-nm quantum dot laser for tonsil thermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Kathleen

    2011-03-01

    Thermal therapy has the potential to provide a nonexcisional alternative to tonsillectomy. Clinical implementation requires that the lymphoid tissue of tonsils is heated homogeneously to produce an amount of primary thermal injury that corresponds to gradual postoperative tonsil shrinkage, with minimal risk of damage to underlying critical blood vessels. Optical constants are derived for tonsils from tissue components and used to calculate the depth of 1/e of irradiance. The 1125 nm wavelength is shown to correspond to both deep penetration and minimal absorption by blood. A probe for tonsil thermal therapy that comprises two opposing light emitting, temperature controlled surfaces is described. For ex vivo characterization of tonsil heating, a prototype 1125 nm diode laser is used in an experimental apparatus that splits the laser output into two components, and delivers the radiation to sapphire contact window surfaces of two temperature controlled cells arranged to irradiate human tonsil specimens from opposing directions. Temperatures are measured with thermocouple microprobes at located points within the tissue during and after irradiation. Primary thermal damage corresponding to the recorded thermal histories are calculated from Arrhenius parameters for human tonsils. Results indicate homogeneous heating to temperatures corresponding to the threshold of thermal injury and above can be achieved in advantageously short irradiation times.

  18. A Rare Complication of Radiofrequency Tonsil Ablation: Horner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ozbay, Isa; Yildirim, Nadir; Zeybek Sivas, Zuhal; Canbaz Kabay, Sibel

    2015-01-01

    Chronic tonsillitis is a common disease, and several different surgical techniques are used to treat this condition. In recent years, techniques such as radiofrequency ablation and coblation have been commonly used for tonsil surgery. In this report, we present the cases of two pediatric patients who developed ptosis, miosis, and enophthalmos (Horner syndrome) after radiofrequency ablation for tonsil reduction and discuss the technique of radiofrequency ablation of the tonsils. In the early postoperative period, miosis and ptosis were observed on the right side in one patient and on the left side in the other patient. Both patients were treated with 1 mg/kg/day methylprednisolone, which were tapered by halving the dose every 3 days. Miosis and ptosis improved after treatment in both patients. Along with the case presentation, we discuss the effectiveness and complications of radiofrequency ablation of the tonsils. These unusual complications of tonsil ablation may help ENT physicians who do not yet have a preferred surgical technique for tonsillectomy to make an informed decision. Limited data are available about the possible complications of radiofrequency ablation of the tonsils. The present report contributes to the literature on this topic. PMID:26064747

  19. Determination of in vivo protein synthesis in human palatine tonsil.

    PubMed

    Januszkiewicz, Anna; Klaude, Maria; Loré, Karin; Andersson, Jan; Ringdén, Olle; Rooyackers, Olav; Wernerman, Jan

    2005-02-01

    The palatine tonsils are constantly exposed to ingested or inhaled antigens which, in turn, lead to a permanent activation of tonsillar immune cells, even in a basic physiological state. The aim of the present study was to investigate if the immunological activation of the human palatine tonsil is reflected by a high metabolic activity, as determined by in vivo measurement of protein synthesis. The protein synthesis rate of the tonsil was also compared with that of the circulating T-lymphocytes, the total blood mononuclear cells and the whole population of blood leucocytes. Phenotypic characterization of immune-competent cells in tonsil tissue and blood was performed by flow cytometry. Pinch tonsil biopsies were taken after induction of anaesthesia in healthy adult patients (n=12) scheduled for ear surgery, uvulopalatopharyngoplasty or nose surgery. Protein synthesis was quantitatively determined during a 90-min period by a flooding-dose technique. The in vivo protein synthesis rate in the palatine tonsils was 22.8+/-5.7%/24 h (mean+/-S.D.), whereas protein synthesis in the circulating T-lymphocytes was 10.7+/-3.4%/24 h, in mononuclear cells was 10.8+/-2.8%/24 h and in leucocytes was 3.2+/-1.2%/24 h. CD3+ lymphocytes were the most abundant cell population in the tonsil. The in vivo protein synthesis rate in human tonsils was higher compared with the circulating immune cells. This high metabolic rate may reflect the permanent immunological activity present in human tonsils, although cell phenotypes and activity markers do not explain the differences.

  20. Specified data for tonsil surgery in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Windfuhr, Jochen P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tonsillectomy rates vary considerably among different states, regions, and times. This study was conducted to identify the prevalence of “chronic” tonsillitis, peritonsillar abscess, hypertrophy of the tonsils with and without adenoids in absolute and relative numbers in an 80 million people nation. Moreover, the number and rates of different surgical procedures to resolve either “chronic” tonsillitis, peritonsillar abscess, or upper airway obstruction due to (adeno)tonsillar hypertrophy over several years was evaluated in this study (tonsillectomy, adenotonsillectomy, tonsillotomy, abscess tonsillectomy, transoral incision and drainage). Finally, the post-tonsillectomy hemorrhage rate was calculated and analyzed in relation to age and gender. Material and methods: Calculations were based on data as published by the Federal Institute of Statistics or on request, if needed. The latest data were provided for 2013. Results: The total number of the aforementioned diseases (stratified by ICD-10) decreased from 142,574 (in 2000) to 87,624 in 2013 (38.5%). Tonsillectomy, with or without adenoidectomy, was performed in a total of 833,896 patients between 2006 and 2013 in Germany. The yearly number decreased continually from 120,993 in 2006 to 84,332 procedures in 2013 (30.3%). The most significant decrease was registered in patients younger than 20 years of age for this time period: 70.92 per 10,000 in 2010 to 58.68 per 10,000 in 2013. If all age groups were included, the rate decreased from 13.34 per 10,000 to 10.90 per 10,000. In contrast, an increasing number of tonsillotomies was observed between 2007 (4,659 procedures) and 2013 (11,493). The cumulated number of procedures was 59,049. A constant number of 15,000 cases with peritonsillar abscess were diagnosed per year in Germany (19 patients per 100,000). The prevalence increased significantly at an age of 15 years and there was a preponderance of female patients below that age. Compared to the

  1. Mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the tonsil: a very rare presentation.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, S J; Giangrande, V; Brennan, P A

    2013-08-01

    Mucoepidermoid carcinoma is the most common malignant salivary gland tumour. However, short series or individual case reports have identified this tumour in the maxilla, mandible, breast tissue and thymus. Mucoepidermoid carcinoma originates from minor salivary glands, and it is therefore surprising that it is not more commonly seen in the tonsil. To date, we believe there has been only one previously reported case in the world literature of mucoepidermoid carcinoma occurring in the tonsil 1. We present a very rare case of mucoepidermoid carcinoma arising from within the structure of the palatine tonsil, rather from the adjacent pharyngeal wall, together with a short review of the literature.

  2. Chondroid choriostoma of palatine tonsil - a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Jyotsna Naresh; Ghosh, Nivedita; Arora, Prerna; Goyal, Vasudha

    2013-08-01

    A choristoma or heterotopias is an aggregate of microscopically normal cells or tissues which occurs in aberrant locations. A choristoma is a tumour like mass, whereas heterotopias refers to a displaced tissue which is necessarily not a swelling or a neoplasm. We are reporting a case of a 24 year old female who presented with recurrent tonsillitis and halitosis. On examination, the tonsils were found to be enlarged. Because of the persistent symptoms, a tonsillectomy was performed. The histopathological examination showed features of chronic tonsillitis, along with presence of mature islands of hyaline cartilage which were surrounded by lymphoid follicles and focal areas of calcification and osseous metaplasia.

  3. Effect of phonetics training on lingual awareness.

    PubMed

    Lohman, Patricia; Fucci, Donald

    2003-02-01

    This investigation assessed the effect of phonetics training on lingual awareness in normal adult speakers of English. The study also compared Trained subjects' scores from a study in 2000 by Lohman and Fucci to subjects' posttraining scores in this investigation. Subjects were 36 students (M age=19.7, SD=.7) enrolled in an undergraduate phonetics class. All passed a speech and hearing screening. A pretest-posttest design was used. Subjects received approximately 40 hours of phonetics training over a 10-wk. period. The lingual awareness test required subjects imitate seven syllables and respond to four multiple-choice questions about each syllable. Subjects were aided by a line drawing of the oral cavity. A significant improvement in lingual awareness was found following training. However, scores for only two phonemes (sh and k) improved significantly. No significant difference was found between posttest scores and scores from Lohman and Fucci's Trained group.

  4. Relationship between phonemic and lingual awareness.

    PubMed

    Lohman, Patricia; Fucci, Donald

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this preliminary investigation was to assess the relationship between knowledge of speech sounds (phonemes) and lingual awareness in normal adult speakers of English. The study also examined subjects' descriptions of lingual contact. 36 subjects (M age=19.6, SD=.71) who were enrolled in an undergraduate phonetics class participated. All passed a speech and hearing screening and reported having received no prior speech therapy or classes in articulation, phonetics, or speech science. During the first class meeting, the subjects were given two tests. The measure of phonemic awareness consisted of (a) judging which two (out of three) printed words began (or ended) with the same phoneme, (b) counting, substituting, reversing phonemes in words, and (c) indicating primary stress in two-syllable words. The lingual awareness test consisted of subjects imitating a syllable, then responding to a multiple-choice question regarding (a) tongue position (front to back), (b) tongue height (high to low), (c) contact with the teeth, and (d) contact with other oral cavity structures. Subjects were requested to imitate the syllable prior to answering each question, e.g., "Say tuh. Did you feel your tongue in the front, middle, or back of your mouth?" Seven English phonemes (t, k, s, sh, r, l, and voiceless th) were presented in a consonant-vowel syllable with the central vowel "uh." Subjects were aided by a line drawing of the oral cavity. A significant correlation of .53 was found between the two tests, suggesting that individuals who possess greater awareness of speech sounds tend to exhibit heightened lingual awareness. Sound-symbol knowledge was the best predictor of lingual awareness. Subjects had the most difficulty describing lingual contact for phonemes that are often troublesome for children to articulate (sh, r, l, and s).

  5. Effects of Directional Exercise on Lingual Strength

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Heather M.; O'Brien, Katy; Calleja, Aimee; Corrie, Sarah Newcomb

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the application of known muscle training principles to tongue strengthening exercises and to answer the following research questions: (a) Did lingual strength increase following 9 weeks of training? (b) Did training conducted using an exercise moving the tongue in one direction result in strength changes for tongue movements in…

  6. [Lingual orthodontics: why is it progressing?].

    PubMed

    Fillion, D; Leclerc, J F

    1991-01-01

    At the early stages of the 80's, most of the practitioners and the patients have been seduced by lingual orthodontic. But the difficulties of the technic have rapidly given a disappointment. Today ten years later the authors present the progress which have been realized: the evolution of the brackets, the accuracy of their placement in the lab procedure with the new targ, the making of the wire, the patient's comfort increase. The placement brackets are customized by making an anatomical resin pad. Placement of the brackets have evoluted from a quantized system in two dimensions (Targ 1) to a no quantized system in three dimensions (Class System) and finally to a real quantized system in three dimensions (Targ 2 with a compass of thickness with measures the first order band). Data System DALI (Drawing Arch Lingual Ideal) allows to draw the exact design of the wire. A video tape shows the different laboratory and clinical phases. By using light cured periodontal protection like Barricaid from Caulk: the patients have a greater adaptation with their appliance. All this progress give to lingual orthodontic credibility. Lingual is a reality to day and it's the first concept with customized brackets extremely accuracy, full quantized in the three orders, using the computer progress.

  7. [Lingualized occlusion in the South African context].

    PubMed

    Oberholzer, T G; Geerts, G A V M

    2002-01-01

    The search for the ideal artificial tooth arrangement that maximizes denture stability, comfort, aesthetics, and function has occupied the dental literature for many years and still continues to do so. Of the many occlusal schemes that have been presented to the dental profession, that of lingualized occlusion has emerged as one of the more popular. The popularity of lingualized occlusion stems from the simplicity and flexibility of the concept and from its wide application to clinical practice (Parr & Ivanhoe, 1996). The registration of a repeatable correct centric jaw relation is not always possible. We don't know whether the patient will use centric relation during normal function. It is therefore useful to provide the patient with some freedom of movement around centric. lingualized occlusion provides freedom in centric. For many dentists the arrangement of artificial denture teeth into balanced occlusion is difficult and time consuming. As a result this task is most often performed by the dental technician. In the South African countryside dental laboratories are often far away. If dentists perform the arrangement of the denture teeth, time and costs can be saved. The mounting of denture teeth in lingualized occlusion is simple and fast. This will motivate dentists to arrange denture teeth themselves, with obvious benefits for both the patient and the dentist. The School of Oral Health Sciences of the University of Stellenbosch teaches this concept to its undergraduate students in order to improve the prosthetic service to the large edentulous population of South Africa.

  8. Lingualized occlusion. An occlusion for all reasons.

    PubMed

    Parr, G R; Ivanhoe, J R

    1996-01-01

    This authors make practical recommendations for a wide variety of clinical situations, including various anteroposterior and buccolingual arch discrepancies. Many of the ideals of the anatomical and mechanical schools of thought are blended. In addition to being a valuable clinical adjunct, Lingualized Occlusion also has great application in undergraduate dental education. It is a simpler occlusal scheme to teach and learn.

  9. A lingual abscess caused by Streptococcus intermedius.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Amanda T; Hsia, Jennifer C; Mendez, Eduardo; Clarridge, Jill E

    2012-04-01

    Lingual abscesses are rare. We describe a case in a healthy female with no recent history of trauma. The organism recovered by culture of drainage material collected prior to antibiotic treatment was Streptococcus intermedius, an organism recognized as flora of the oropharynx and associated with abscess formation. The isolate was resistant to clindamycin, which was the antibiotic therapy that the patient received.

  10. Piezosurgery for the Lingual Split Technique in Lingual Positioned Impacted Mandibular Third Molar Removal

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Jing; Yang, Chi; Zheng, Jiawei; Qian, Wentao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect and safety of lingual split technique using piezosurgery for the extraction of lingual positioned impacted mandibular 3rd molars with the goal of proposing a more minimally invasive choice for this common surgery. Eighty-nine consecutive patients with 110 lingual positioned impacted mandibular 3rd molars requiring extraction were performed the lingual split technique using piezosurgery. One sagittal osteotomy line and 2 transverse osteotomy line were designed for lingual and occlusal bone removal. The success rate, operative time, postoperative outcome, and major complications (including nerve injury, mandible fracture, severe hematoma or edema, and severe pyogenic infection) were documented and analyzed. All impacted mandibular 3rd molars were successfully removed (110/110). The average time of operation was 14.6 minutes (ranged from 7 to 28 minutes). One hundred and seven extraction sites (97.3%) were primary healing. Pain, mouth opening, swelling, and PoSSe scores on postoperative 7-day were 0.34 ± 0.63, 3.88 ± 0.66(cm), 2.4 ± 0.2(cm), and 23.7 ± 5.9, respectively. There were 6 cases (5.5%) had lingual nerve disturbance and 3 cases (2.7%) developed inferior alveolar nerve impairment, and achieved full recovery within 2 months by neurotrophic drug treatment. Our study suggested piezosurgery for lingual split technique provided an effective way for the extraction of lingual positioned and deeply impacted mandibular 3rd molar. PMID:27015214

  11. Phenotypic Characterization of Five Dendritic Cell Subsets in Human Tonsils

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Kelly L.; Hock, Barry D.; McKenzie, Judith L.; Hart, Derek N. J.

    2001-01-01

    Heterogeneous expression of several antigens on the three currently defined tonsil dendritic cell (DC) subsets encouraged us to re-examine tonsil DCs using a new method that minimized DC differentiation and activation during their preparation. Three-color flow cytometry and dual-color immunohistology was used in conjunction with an extensive panel of antibodies to relevant DC-related antigens to analyze lin− HLA-DR+ tonsil DCs. Here we identify, quantify, and locate five tonsil DC subsets based on their relative expression of the HLA-DR, CD11c, CD13, and CD123 antigens. In situ localization identified four of these DC subsets as distinct interdigitating DC populations. These included three new interdigitating DC subsets defined as HLA-DRhi CD11c+ DCs, HLA-DRmod CD11c+ CD13+ DCs, and HLA-DRmod CD11c− CD123− DCs, as well as the plasmacytoid DCs (HLA-DRmod CD11c− CD123+). These subsets differed in their expression of DC-associated differentiation/activation antigens and co-stimulator molecules including CD83, CMRF-44, CMRF-56, 2-7, CD86, and 4-1BB ligand. The fifth HLA-DRmod CD11c+ DC subset was identified as germinal center DCs, but contrary to previous reports they are redefined as lacking the CD13 antigen. The definition and extensive phenotypic analysis of these five DC subsets in human tonsil extends our understanding of the complexity of DC biology. PMID:11438475

  12. [Palatine tonsil lymphoma in children with tonsillar asymmetry. Case report].

    PubMed

    Cuestas, Giselle; Martínez Font, Agustín; Demarchi, María Victoria; Martínez Corvalán, María Pía; García Rivello, Hernán; Morandi, Ana; Razetti, Juan; Boccio, Carlos

    2015-08-01

    Tonsil malignancy is uncommon in children. Tonsillar asymmetry is usually secondary to a benign process, either inflammatory conditions, differences in the tonsillar fossa depth or anterior pillar asymmetry. However, it may indicate a serious underlying disorder such as lymphoma. Lymphoma is the most common childhood malignancy in the head and neck. Approximately, 15% of the cases affect the Waldeyer's ring. The most common clinical manifestations of palatine tonsils lymphoma are unilateral tonsillar hypertrophy, alteration in the appearance of the mucosa and ipsilateral cervical lymphadenopathy. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are of great importance in the prognosis. We present a case of palatine tonsil lymphoma in a child with tonsillar asymmetry and we emphasize the importance of the examination of the oral cavity and the neck to identify suspicious alterations compatible with tonsillar lymphoma.

  13. The association of sore throat and psoriasis might be explained by histologically distinctive tonsils and increased expression of skin-homing molecules by tonsil T cells

    PubMed Central

    Sigurdardottir, S L; Thorleifsdottir, R H; Valdimarsson, H; Johnston, A

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the involvement of the palatine tonsils in the pathogenesis of psoriasis, particularly among patients with recurrent throat infections. However, the underlying immunological mechanism is not well understood. In this study we confirm that psoriasis tonsils are infected more frequently by β-haemolytic Streptococci, in particular Group C Streptococcus, compared with recurrently infected tonsils from patients without skin disease. Moreover, we show that tonsils from psoriasis patients contained smaller lymphoid follicles that occupied a smaller tissue area, had a lower germinal centre to marginal zone area ratio and contained fewer tingible body macrophages per unit area compared with recurrently infected tonsils from individuals without skin disease. Psoriasis patients' tonsils had a higher frequency of skin-homing [cutaneous lymphocyte-associated antigen (CLA+)] CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and this correlated significantly with their frequency of blood CLA+ T cells. The psoriasis patients also had a higher frequency of tonsil T cells expressing the interleukin (IL)-23 receptor that was expressed preferentially by the CLA+ T cell population. In contrast, recurrently infected tonsils of individuals without skin disease had a higher frequency of tonsil T cells expressing the activation marker CD69 and a number of chemokine receptors with unknown relevance to psoriasis. These findings suggest that immune responses in the palatine tonsils of psoriasis patients are dysregulated. The elevated expression of CLA and IL-23 receptor by tonsil T cells may promote the egression of effector T cells from tonsils to the epidermis, suggesting that there may be functional changes within the tonsils, which promote triggering or exacerbation of psoriasis. PMID:23750651

  14. [Report of a case: large tonsillolith in palatine tonsil].

    PubMed

    Cogolludo Pérez, F J; Martín del Guayo, G; Olalla Tabar, A; Poch Broto, J

    2002-03-01

    A 69-year-old woman presented with a one-year history of dysphagia and a hard overgrowth of the right palatine tonsil visible in oral examination. Computerized Tomography scan showed a big calcified lesion inside the tonsil not seen in a pharyngoscopy. Tonsillectomy was performed and a giant tonsillolith was found inside the resected piece. The calculus was 3 x 2 x 2.3 cm and with an irregular-pyramidal shape. Normal tonsillar tissue with many colonies of Actionomyces inside the tonsillar crypts was the definitive pathological feature.

  15. Morphology of the lingual papillae in the tiger.

    PubMed

    Emura, Shoichi; Hayakawa, Daisuke; Chen, Huayue; Shoumura, Shizuko

    2004-08-01

    The dorsal lingual surfaces of an adult tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) was examined by macroscopical and scanning electron microscopical observations. Filiform, fungiform and vallate papillae were observed. The filiform papillae were distributed over the entire dosal surface of the tongue. The fungiform papillae were present rounded bodies, and more densely distributed on the lingual apex. There were 4 vallate papillae in total on borderline between the lingual body and lingual radix. Each papilla was surrounded by a groove. No foliate papillae were seen on the dorsal surface. Openings of the glandular ducts on the regions of the vallate papillae were found.

  16. Incidence of lingual nerve paraesthesia following mandibular third molar surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lata, Jeevan; Tiwari, Arunesh K.

    2011-01-01

    Context: The surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molar is associated with minor but expected complications like pain, swelling, bruising and trismus. The lingual nerve damage sometimes occurs after the removal of mandibular third molar producing impaired sensation or permanent sensory loss. This complication is usually unexpected and unacceptable for the patients particularly if no prior warning has been given. Aims: The aim of the present clinical prospective study was to determine the clinical incidence of lingual nerve injury following mandibular third molar removal and to analyze possible factors for the lingual nerve injury. Settings and Design: Clinical prospective study in the Department of Oral Surgery, Punjab Government Dental College and Hospital, Amritsar. Materials and Methods: Ninety patients were selected randomly, amongst the patients, who reported to our department from January 2009 to December 2009 for the surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molar. To minimize the risk of lingual nerve injury, the standard terence wards incision was made in all cases and only buccal flap was raised. Statistical Analysis: The small number of paraesthesia precluded statistical analysis. Results: Out of 90 patients, six patients were diagnosed with lingual nerve paraesthesia. The overall incidence rate of lingual nerve injury was 6.6%. Conclusions: It can be concluded that lingual nerve paraesthesia can occur with or without reflection of lingual flap in spite of all the measures taken to protect it. It may be contributed to the fact of anatomical variations of lingual nerve. PMID:22639500

  17. Examination of the reticular epithelium of the bovine pharyngeal tonsil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nasopharyngeal tonsil (adenoid), located at the posterior of the nasopharynx is ideally positioned to sample antigens entering through the nasal cavity or oral cavity. Entering antigens will first contact tonsilar epithelium. To better understand the cellular composition of this important epithe...

  18. First report: Yersinia enterocolitica recovered from canine tonsils.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Brenda P; Drummond, Niall; Ringwood, Tamara; O'Sullivan, Edmund; Buckley, James F; Whyte, Paul; Prentice, Mike B; Fanning, Séamus

    2010-12-15

    Yersinia enterocolitica (Y. enterocolitica) is a known zoonotic pathogen and is often found in pig tonsils as the primary site of colonisation. In this study we investigated whether or not Y. enterocolitica could be recovered from canine tonsils. During a study on the prevalence of Y. enterocolitica in animal populations in Ireland, 144 canine tonsils and 72 canine rectal swabs were procured over a ten-month period and subjected to microbiological examination for the presence of this human pathogen. Molecular methods were used to determine virulence and all strains were negative for the chromosomally mediated virulence factor (ail) and plasmid-encoded adhesion molecule (pYad). Y. enterocolitica was recovered from 25 of 216 (12%) samples. Twenty-four strains were from tonsils along with one from a rectal swab. All were biotype 1A. Antimicrobial resistance profiling showed two of 25 (8%) were resistant to cephalothin and the remaining strains were resistant to ampicillin and cephalothin with six of these additionally resistant to streptomycin. Our evidence that a human pathogen may be harboured in the oral cavity of dogs' adds a new dimension to the epidemiology of this organism, identifying a potential public health risk following exposure to dogs.

  19. Motor evoked potentials in unilateral lingual paralysis after monohemispheric ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Muellbacher, W.; Artner, C.; Mamoli, B.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—The occurrence of a lingual paralysis after unilateral upper motor neuron lesions is an infrequent clinical phenomenon, and the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms are poorly understood. We studied the cortical motor representations of ipsilateral and contralateral lingual muscles in healthy controls and in a selected group of stroke patients, to clarify the variable occurrence of a lingual paralysis after recent monohemispheric ischaemia.
METHODS—A special bipolar surface electrode was used to record the ipsilateral and contralateral compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) from the lingual muscles after transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the human motor cortex and peripheral electrical stimulation (PES) of the hypoglossal nerve medial to the angle of the jaw. Four patients with a lingual paralysis (group 1) and four patients with symmetric lingual movements (group 2) after monohemispheric first ever stroke were studied and compared with 40 healthy controls.
RESULTS—In controls, TMS of either hemisphere invariably produces CAMPs in the ipsilateral and contralateral lingual muscles, elicited through crossed and uncrossed central motor pathways, respectively. In the 40 healthy controls, TMS of either hemisphere elicited CMAPs of significantly greater amplitudes and shorter onset latencies from the contralateral muscles compared with the ipsilateral responses (p<0.0001). In the patient groups, TMS of the affected hemisphere failed to evoke any CMAP from either lingual side; TMS of the unsevered hemisphere always produced normal ipsilateral and contralateral responses, irrespective of whether the ipsilateral muscles were paralysed or not.
CONCLUSIONS—Bilateral crossed and uncrossed corticonuclear projections are invariably existent in humans. After unilateral interruption of these pathways, some people do exhibit a lingual paralysis whereas others do not. The development of a central lingual paralysis is most likely dependent on

  20. Detection of the archetypal regulatory region of JC virus from the tonsil tissue of patients with tonsillitis and tonsilar hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Kato, Atsushi; Kitamura, Tadaichi; Takasaka, Tomokazu; Tominaga, Takashi; Ishikawa, Akira; Zheng, Huai-Ying; Yogo, Yoshiaki

    2004-08-01

    The regulatory regions of JC virus (JCV) DNAs in the brain of patients with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) (designated as PML-type regulatory regions) are hypervariable, whereas those in the urine and renal tissue of individuals without PML have the same basic structure, designated as the archetype. It is thought that JCV strains with the archetypal regulatory region circulate in the human population. Nevertheless, Monaco et al (J Virol 70: 7004-7012, 1996) reported that PML-type regulatory regions occur in human tonsil tissue. The purpose of this study is to confirm their findings. Using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR), the authors detected the regulatory region of JCV DNA in the tonsil tissue from 14 (44%) of 32 donors with tonsillitis and tonsilar hypertrophy. Sequencing of the detected regulatory regions indicated that they were identical with the archetypal regulatory regions detected previously or, in a few cases, slightly deviated from the archetype. This finding suggests not only that tonsil tissue is the potential site of initial JCV infection but also that archetypal JCV strains circulate in the human population.

  1. Effects of Lingual Effort on Swallow Pressures Following Radiation Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenius, Kerry; Stierwalt, Julie; LaPointe, Leonard L.; Bourgeois, Michelle; Carnaby, Giselle; Crary, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This article investigated the effects of increased oral lingual pressure on pharyngeal pressures during swallowing in patients who have undergone radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. It was hypothesized that increased oral lingual pressure would result in increased pharyngeal pressures. Method: A within-subject experimental design was…

  2. Lingual Epithelial Stem Cells and Organoid Culture of Them

    PubMed Central

    Hisha, Hiroko; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Ueno, Hiroo

    2016-01-01

    As tongue cancer is one of the major malignant cancers in the world, understanding the mechanism of maintenance of lingual epithelial tissue, which is known to be the origin of tongue cancer, is unquestionably important. However, the actual stem cells that are responsible for the long-term maintenance of the lingual epithelium have not been identified. Moreover, a simple and convenient culture method for lingual epithelial stem cells has not yet been established. Recently, we have shown that Bmi1-positive cells, residing at the second or third layer of the epithelial cell layer at the base of the interpapillary pit (IPP), were slow-cycling and could supply keratinized epithelial cells for over one year, indicating that Bmi1-positive cells are long-term lingual epithelial stem cells. In addition, we have developed a novel lingual epithelium organoid culture system using a three-dimensional matrix and growth factors. Here, we discuss current progress in the identification of lingual stem cells and future applications of the lingual culture system for studying the regulatory mechanisms of the lingual epithelium and for regenerative medicine. PMID:26828484

  3. Spatial and Temporal Lingual Coarticulation and Motor Control in Preadolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zharkova, Natalia; Hewlett, Nigel; Hardcastle, William J.; Lickley, Robin J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors compared coarticulation and lingual kinematics in preadolescents and adults in order to establish whether preadolescents had a greater degree of random variability in tongue posture and whether their patterns of lingual coarticulation differed from those of adults. Method: High-speed ultrasound tongue contour…

  4. A pilot to examine the logistical and feasibility issues in testing deceased tissue donors for vCJD using tonsil as the analyte.

    PubMed

    Warwick, Ruth M; Armitage, W John; Chandrasekar, Akila; Mallinson, Gary; Poniatowski, Stefan; Clarkson, Anthony

    2012-03-01

    Transplanted tissues have transmitted transmissible spongiform encephalopathies and in the UK there have been more cases of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) than elsewhere in the world. A pilot study was undertaken to look at the feasibility of testing for vCJD in deceased donors using tonsillar tissue. This pilot showed that obtaining consent for removal and testing tonsil tissue was feasible. Donor eligibility for inclusion in the pilot was limited to tissue donors from the National Health Service Blood and Transplant, Tissue Services and to donors shared with the Corneal Transplant Service Eye Banks. Obtaining tonsillar tissue in the immediate post-mortem period was limited by the presence of rigor mortis. Tonsillar tissue was suitable for routine analysis for the presence of prion associated with vCJD in deceased tissue donors. Production and processing of tissue was straightforward and a low assay background was obtained from most samples. Since palatine and lingual tonsil tissue can be obtained in pairs it was possible, in the majority of cases, to set aside an intact sample for confirmatory testing if required. In one instance a sample was reactive by Western blot. However, the pattern of reactivity was not typical for that obtained from vCJD patients. Unfortunately the sample was not of sufficient quality for the confirmatory test to provide a conclusive result.

  5. Morphology of the lingual papillae in the eastern grey kangaroo.

    PubMed

    Emura, Shoichi

    2016-01-01

    We examined the dorsal lingual surface of an adult eastern grey kangaroo (Macropus gigantues) by scanning electron microscopy. The filiform papillae on the lingual apex and anterior body consisted of a main papilla and secondary papillae. The connective tissue core of the filiform papillae on the lingual apex had several processes. The filiform papillae on the lingual posterior body were thread-like in shape. The connective tissue core of the filiform papillae on the lingual posterior body consisted of many slender processes. The fungiform papillae were round in shape. Three vallate papillae with the apex of the triangle directed posteriorly consisted of a groove and pad. Several conical papillae derived from the posterolateral margin of the tongue where foliate papillae have been shown to be distributed in many other animal species. The surface structure of the tongue in the eastern grey kangaroo resembles that of the red kangaroo.

  6. Arch development with trans-force lingual appliances.

    PubMed

    Clark, William J

    2005-01-01

    Trans-Force lingual appliances are designed to correct arch form in patients with contracted dental arches. Interceptive treatment with this new series of pre-activated lingual appliances offers new possibilities for arch development, in combination with fixed appliances. Palatal and lingual appliances insert in horizontal lingual sheaths in molar bands. No activation is required after the appliance is fitted, and this principle is extended to a series of appliances for sagittal and transverse arch development. Both sagittal and transverse appliances have additional components to achieve 3-way expansion where this is indicated. The invisible lingual appliances may be used in correction of all classes of malocclusion at any stage of development, from mixed dentition through permanent dentition, and this approach has wide indications in adult treatment.

  7. Determining shapes and dimensions of dental arches for the use of straight-wire arches in lingual technique

    PubMed Central

    Kairalla, Silvana Allegrini; Scuzzo, Giuseppe; Triviño, Tarcila; Velasco, Leandro; Lombardo, Luca; Paranhos, Luiz Renato

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This study aims to determine the shape and dimension of dental arches from a lingual perspective, and determine shape and size of a straight archwire used for lingual Orthodontics. METHODS: The study sample comprised 70 Caucasian Brazilian individuals with normal occlusion and at least four of Andrew's six keys. Maxillary and mandibular dental casts were digitized (3D) and the images were analyzed by Delcam Power SHAPET 2010 software. Landmarks on the lingual surface of teeth were selected and 14 measurements were calculated to determine the shape and size of dental arches. RESULTS: Shapiro-Wilk test determined small arch shape by means of 25th percentile (P25%) - an average percentile for the medium arch; and a large one determined by means of 75th percentile (P75%). T-test revealed differences between males and females in the size of 12 dental arches. CONCLUSION: The straight-wire arch shape used in the lingual straight wire technique is a parabolic-shaped arch, slightly flattened on its anterior portion. Due to similarity among dental arch sizes shown by males and females, a more simplified diagram chart was designed. PMID:25715725

  8. The curious case of the orange coloured tonsils.

    PubMed

    Ravesloot, M J L; Bril, H; Braamskamp, M J; Wiegman, A; Wong Chung, R P

    2014-12-01

    Tangier disease is an extremely rare and severe form of high density lipoprotein deficiency. Even though there is no specific therapy for patients with Tangier disease, it is important to recognize the clinical presentation as patients are at an increased risk of developing atherosclerosis and subsequent CVD. The case discussed in this report, illustrates the importance of recognizing that orange discoloured tonsils are an indication that the patient could be suffering from Tangier's disease.

  9. Unilateral Radiotherapy for the Treatment of Tonsil Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chronowski, Gregory M.; Garden, Adam S.; Morrison, William H.; Frank, Steven J.; Schwartz, David L.; Shah, Shalin J.; Beadle, Beth M.; Gunn, G. Brandon; Kupferman, Michael E.; Ang, Kian K.; Rosenthal, David I.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To assess, through a retrospective review, clinical outcomes of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil treated at the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center with unilateral radiotherapy techniques that irradiate the involved tonsil region and ipsilateral neck only. Methods and Materials: Of 901 patients with newly diagnosed squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil treated with radiotherapy at our institution, we identified 102 that were treated using unilateral radiotherapy techniques. All patients had their primary site of disease restricted to the tonsillar fossa or anterior pillar, with <1 cm involvement of the soft palate. Patients had TX (n = 17 patients), T1 (n = 52), or T2 (n = 33) disease, with Nx (n = 3), N0 (n = 33), N1 (n = 23), N2a (n = 21), or N2b (n = 22) neck disease. Results: Sixty-one patients (60%) underwent diagnostic tonsillectomy before radiotherapy. Twenty-seven patients (26%) underwent excision of a cervical lymph node or neck dissection before radiotherapy. Median follow-up for surviving patients was 38 months. Locoregional control at the primary site and ipsilateral neck was 100%. Two patients experienced contralateral nodal recurrence (2%). The 5-year overall survival and disease-free survival rates were 95% and 96%, respectively. The 5-year freedom from contralateral nodal recurrence rate was 96%. Nine patients required feeding tubes during therapy. Of the 2 patients with contralateral recurrence, 1 experienced an isolated neck recurrence and was salvaged with contralateral neck dissection only and remains alive and free of disease. The other patient presented with a contralateral base of tongue tumor and involved cervical lymph node, which may have represented a second primary tumor, and died of disease. Conclusions: Unilateral radiotherapy for patients with TX-T2, N0-N2b primary tonsil carcinoma results in high rates of disease control, with low rates of contralateral nodal failure and a low incidence of acute toxicity

  10. Lingual Nerve Entrapment in Muscular and Osseous Structures

    PubMed Central

    Piagkou, Maria; Demesticha, Theano; Piagkos, Giannoulis; Georgios, Androutsos; Panagiotis, Skandalakis

    2010-01-01

    Running through the infratemporal fossa is the lingual nerve (i.e. the third branch of the posterior trunk of the mandibular nerve). Due to its location, there are various anatomic structures that might entrap and potentially compress the lingual nerve. These anatomical sites of entrapment are: (a) the partially or completely ossified pterygospinous or pterygoalar ligaments; (b) the large lamina of the lateral plate of the pterygoid process; and (c) the medial fibers of the anterior region of the lateral pterygoid muscle. Due to the connection between these nerve and anatomic structures, a contraction of the lateral pterygoid muscle, for example, might cause a compression of the lingual nerve. Any variations in the course of the lingual nerve can be of clinical significance to surgeons and neurologists because of the significant complications that might occur. To name a few of such complications, lingual nerve entrapment can lead to: (a) numbness, hypoesthesia or even anesthesia of the tongue's mucous glands; (b) anesthesia and loss of taste in the anterior two-thirds of the tongue; (c) anesthesia of the lingual gums; and (d) pain related to speech articulation disorder. Dentists should, therefore, be alert to possible signs of neurovascular compression in regions where the lingual nerve is distributed. PMID:21404967

  11. Medullary carcinoma in a lingual thyroid.

    PubMed

    Yaday, S; Singh, I; Singh, J; Aggarwal, N

    2008-03-01

    Total ectopia of thyroid is a rare phenomenon and malignant change in an ectopic thyroid is even rarer. We report a case of medullary carcinoma in a total ectopic lingual thyroid occurring in a 45-year-old woman who presented with dysphagia, plummy voice and a round sessile mass at the base of the tongue. The mass was extirpated using Trotter's midline approach. Upon examination, it was found to be medullary carcinoma in an ectopic thyroid. Permanent substitution therapy with thyroxine secured the euthyroid status of the patient. The embrylogical basis and a review of literature regarding carcinomatous change in an ectopic thyroid are also discussed. There is a need to investigate for an ectopic thyroid, or even total ectopia, in the case of any smooth mass found at the base of the tongue.

  12. Thyroid cancer in lingual thyroid and thyroglossal duct cyst.

    PubMed

    Sturniolo, Giacomo; Vermiglio, Francesco; Moleti, Mariacarla

    2016-11-04

    Ectopy is the most common embryogenetic defect of the thyroid gland, representing between 48 and 61% of all thyroid dysgeneses. Persistence of thyroid tissue in the context of a thyroglossal duct remnant and lingual thyroid tissue are the most common defects. Although most cases of ectopic thyroid are asymptomatic, any disease affecting the thyroid may potentially involve the ectopic tissue, including malignancies. The prevalence of differentiated thyroid carcinoma in lingual thyroid and thyroglossal duct cyst is around 1% of patients affected with the above thyroid ectopies. We here review the current literature concerning primary thyroid carcinomas originating from thyroid tissue on thyroglossal duct cysts and lingual thyroid.

  13. [Simultaneous pulmonar, laryngeal and lingual affectation by Mycobacterium tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Díaz Manzano, J A; Castillo Romero, J L; Padilla Romero, M J; Sánchez Laínez, J J; Castillo Aguilar, C; Cegarra Navarro, M F

    2007-01-01

    The incidence of tuberculosis has lately increased in developed countries. The most frequent affectation is the pulmonar one and in the ORL area the laryngeal. The lingual affectation is exceptional. We present a case of a man 39 years old, with bilateral pulmonar, left vocal cord and mobile tongue affectation, negative Mantoux, positive spit culture and presence of acido-alcohol resistent bacillus in lingual and laryngeal biopsies. After antituberculosis treatment during 6 months the laryngeal and lingual lesions disappeared. We have only found two cases published of simultaneous tuberculosis in these three localisations in the last 30 years.

  14. Fabrication of lingual orthodontic appliances: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Ian; Lee, Jang Yeol

    2013-09-01

    Lingual orthodontics is increasing in popularity, with more adults receiving orthodontic treatment and opting for truly invisible appliances that do not have any limitations on the type of tooth movement they can achieve. In addition, there are a growing number of children receiving lingual appliances as they have been shown to significantly reduce the incidence of decalcification. Combining this growth in popularity with advances in computer technology, it is possible to treatment plan, design the appliance and have it custom made all with the click of a button. This article highlights the different methods that have been utilized in the fabrication of lingual appliances.

  15. Clinical practice guideline: tonsillitis I. Diagnostics and nonsurgical management.

    PubMed

    Windfuhr, Jochen P; Toepfner, Nicole; Steffen, Gregor; Waldfahrer, Frank; Berner, Reinhard

    2016-04-01

    More than 120,000 patients are treated annually in Germany to resolve repeated episodes of acute tonsillitis. Therapy is aiming at symptom regression, avoidance of complications, reduction in the number of disease-related absences in school or at work, increased cost-effectiveness and improved quality of life. The purpose of this part of the guideline is to provide clinicians in any setting with a clinically focused multi-disciplinary guidance through different conservative treatment options in order to reduce inappropriate variation in clinical care, improve clinical outcome and reduce harm. Surgical management in terms of intracapsular as well as extracapsular tonsillectomy (i.e. tonsillotomy) is the subject of part II of this guideline. To estimate the probability of tonsillitis caused by β-hemolytic streptococci, a diagnostic scoring system according to Centor or McIsaac is suggested. If therapy is considered, a positive score of ≥3 should lead to pharyngeal swab or rapid test or culture in order to identify β-hemolytic streptococci. Routinely performed blood tests for acute tonsillitis are not indicated. After acute streptococcal tonsillitis, there is no need to repeat a pharyngeal swab or any other routine blood tests, urine examinations or cardiological diagnostics such as ECG. The determination of the antistreptolysin O-titer (ASLO titer) and other antistreptococcal antibody titers do not have any value in relation to acute tonsillitis with or without pharyngitis and should not be performed. First-line therapy of β-hemolytic streptococci consists of oral penicillin. Instead of phenoxymethylpenicillin-potassium (penicillin V potassium), also phenoxymethlpenicillin-benzathine with a clearly longer half-life can be used. Oral intake for 7 days of one of both the drugs is recommended. Alternative treatment with oral cephalosporins (e.g. cefadroxil, cefalexin) is indicated only in cases of penicillin failure, frequent recurrences, and whenever a more

  16. Carbon-dioxide laser-assisted tonsil ablation for adults with chronic tonsillitis: a 6-month follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Remacle, Marc; Keghian, Jerome; Lawson, Georges; Jamart, Jacques

    2003-09-01

    Sixty-six adult patients with a mean age of 44 years (range: 16-78) with chronic tonsillitis underwent laser-assisted tonsil ablation between January 1998 and January 2002. Instead of vaporization of the tonsil surface, extended serial tonsillectomy was performed, namely, vaporizing 80-90% of the palatine lymphoid tissue. Of the 66 patients, 49 (74%) underwent local anesthesia (LA group) and 17 (26%) general anesthesia (GA group). In the LA group, one surgical session sufficed for 40 patients (82%); two sessions were required for seven patients (14%) and three sessions for two patients (4%). Monopolar electrocautery was necessary to ensure hemostasis in two patients (3%). Median value results revealed a pain-intensity score of 4.5 (range: 0-10) for the GA group and 5 (range: 0-10) for the LA group. Pain lasted for 3 days (range: 0-15) in both groups (nonsignificant difference). A satisfaction score of 10 (range: 1-10) was recorded for the GA group and 8 (range: 1-10) for the LA group (P=0.029). The minimum follow-up was 6 months. Forty of the 49 LA group patients (82%) and 16 of the 17 GA group patients (94%) would recommend the surgical procedure and would accept undergoing the same operation again (nonsignificant difference).

  17. Cross-Lingual Lexical Triggers in Statistical Language Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    significant reductions in both perplexity and recognition errors. We also compare our cross-lingual adaptation scheme to monolingual language model adaptation...as an intermedi- ate step. In a monolingual setting, the mutual infor- mation between lexical pairs co-occurring anywhere within a long “window” of...inspiration to propose the follow- ing notion of cross-lingual lexical triggers. In a monolingual setting, a pair of words xyQz is considered a trigger

  18. [Disphagia caused by a lingual thyroid: report of one case].

    PubMed

    Rocha-Ruiz, Ana; Beltrán, Constanza; Harris, Paul R; Orellana, Pilar; García, Cristián; Martínez-Aguayo, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    We report an 11 year-old boy who presented with difficulty in swallowing without symptoms of hypothyroidism. The physical examination revealed a mass at the base of the tongue. The thyroid hormone profile showed a primary hypothyroidism (a serum TSH of 10.8 IU/mL with normal-low thyroxin of 6.0 microg/dL and low triiodothyronine of 57.8 ng/dL). Antithyroid antibodies were negative. The fiberoptic endoscopy showed a reddish mass, without evidence of haemorrhage or ulceration, confirmed as a well circumscribed, hypodense mass in the base of the tongue by computed tomography of the oropharynx and neck. Tc-99-pertechnetate scanning showed an abnormal area of uptake at the base of the tongue and no uptake in the normal thyroid location, concordant with an ectopic lingual thyroid gland. Levothyroxine in a suppressive dose was started that resulted in a reduction of the size of the mass and disappearance of dysphagia.

  19. Lingual Thyroid Excision with Transoral Robotic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ersoy Callıoglu, Elif; Bozdemir, Kazım; Ulusoy, Bulent; Oguzhan, Tolga; Korkmaz, M. Hakan

    2015-01-01

    Ectopic thyroid gland may be detected at any place between foramen caecaum and normal thyroid localization due to inadequacy of the embryological migration of the thyroid gland. It has a prevalence varying between 1/10.000 and 1/100000 in the community. Usually follow-up without treatment is preferred except for obstructive symptoms, bleeding, and suspicion of malignity. Main symptoms are dysphagia, dysphonia, bleeding, dyspnea, and obstructive sleep apnea. In symptomatic cases, the first described method in surgical treatment is open approach since it is a region difficult to have access to. However, this approach has an increased risk of morbidity and postoperative complications. Transoral robotic surgery, which is a minimally invasive surgical procedure, has advantages such as larger three-dimensional point of view and ease of manipulation due to robotic instruments. In this report, a case at the age of 49 who presented to our clinic with obstructive symptoms increasing within the last year and was found to have lingual thyroid and underwent excision of ectopic thyroid tissue by da Vinci surgical system is presented. PMID:26064746

  20. A rare cause of tonsil mass in a child: Lymphoid polyp

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hongzhao; Ulualp, Seckin O; Sengupta, Anita

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Solitary mass lesions of the palatine tonsils are rare in children. While a tonsillar mass can be concerning for a neoplasm, benign conditions may present with a mass arising from the surface of the palatine tonsils in children. We describe clinical and histopathological characteristics of a lymphoid polyp in a child with unilateral tonsillar mass. Methods: Retrospective chart review. Results: A 6-year-old girl presented for evaluation of recurrent acute tonsillitis and a mass on the left palatine tonsil. A pedunculated mass with the base attached to the left palatine tonsil was observed. The mass was completely removed by tonsillectomy. The final diagnosis was lymphoid polyp. Conclusion: Pediatricians, otolaryngologists, and pathologists should be aware of the occurrence of tonsillar lymphoid polyp in the pediatric age group. PMID:28228963

  1. Spatial organisation of microbiota in quiescent adenoiditis and tonsillitis

    PubMed Central

    Swidsinski, A; Göktas, Ö; Bessler, C; Loening‐Baucke, V; Hale, L P; Andree, H; Weizenegger, M; Hölzl, M; Scherer, H; Lochs, H

    2007-01-01

    Background The reasons for recurrent adenotonsillitis are poorly understood. Methods The in situ composition of microbiota of nasal (5 children, 25 adults) and of hypertrophied adenoid and tonsillar tissue (50 children, 20 adults) was investigated using a broad range of fluorescent oligonucleotide probes targeted to bacterial rRNA. None of the patients had clinical signs of infection at the time of surgery. Results Multiple foci of ongoing purulent infections were found within hypertrophied adenoid and tonsillar tissue in 83% of patients, including islands and lawns of bacteria adherent to the epithelium, with concomitant marked inflammatory response, fissures filled with bacteria and pus, and diffuse infiltration of the tonsils by bacteria, microabscesses, and macrophages containing phagocytosed microorganisms. Haemophilusinfluenzae mainly diffusely infiltrated the tissue, Streptococcus and Bacteroides were typically found in fissures, and Fusobacteria,Pseudomonas and Burkholderia were exclusively located within adherent bacterial layers and infiltrates. The microbiota were always polymicrobial. Conclusions Purulent processes persist during asymptomatic periods of adenotonsillitis. Most bacteria involved in this process are covered by a thick inflammatory infiltrate, are deeply invading, or are located within macrophages. The distribution of the bacteria within tonsils may be responsible for the failure of antibiotic treatment. PMID:16698947

  2. Morphology of the lingual papillae in the jaguar.

    PubMed

    Emura, Shoichi; Okumura, Toshihiko; Chen, Huayue

    2013-01-01

    We examined the dorsal lingual surfaces of an adult jaguar (Panthera onca) by scanning electron microscopy. The tongue of the jaguar was about 17 cm long, and the center of the lingual apex became hollow. There were 7 vallate papillae in total. The filiform papilla on the lingual apex consisted of a larger main papilla and some secondary papillae. The connective tissue core of the filiform papilla was mountain-like in shape. The connective tissue core of the fungiform papilla was mushroom-like in shape. The filiform papilla on the anterior part of the lingual body was large and cylinder-like in shape. The connective tissue core of the filiform papilla consisted of a big conical papilla and many rod-like papillae. The filiform papilla on the central part of the lingual body was a big conical papilla. The connective tissue core of the filiform papilla consisted of a rod process and bowl-like structure. The vallate papillae were located on both sides of the posterolateral aspects. The vallate papillae were flattened-oval in shape and the papillae were surrounded by a groove and pad. The top of the connective tissue core of the vallate papilla had a rough surface with no spines.

  3. Congenital Midline Tongue Base Mass in An Infant: Lingual Hamartoma

    PubMed Central

    Azman, Mawaddah; See, Goh Bee

    2016-01-01

    Lingual hamartoma is a rare finding of congenital midline posterior tongue mass. The lesion may be seen as a single anomaly or maybe associated with syndrome especially the Oral Facial Digital Syndrome (OFDS). Here, we report an otherwise normal and healthy two-month-old boy with a congenital midline base of tongue mass presented with snoring and episodic vomiting since the age of 1 month. Tumour excision from the area of foramen of caecum recovered a pinkish pedunculated tumour. Histopathology examination confirmed the diagnosis of leiomyomatous lingual hamartoma. Differential diagnosis, especially for midline tongue mass and other paediatric tongue lesions are discussed. We also discuss the epidemiology, histopathologic features, treatment and prognosis of lingual hamartoma based on the literature review. PMID:27790477

  4. Ectopic lingual goiter treated by transoral robotic surgery.

    PubMed

    Pellini, R; Mercante, G; Ruscito, P; Cristalli, G; Spriano, G

    2013-10-01

    Multinodular goiter in lingual thyroid is quite rare. Surgical removal is indicated in symptomatic patients and when cancer is suspected. An external approach is most often used, but is associated with morbidity and sequelae. In this study, we present for the first time the technique of transoral robotic surgery (TORS) for removal of a massive lingual goiter. Prospective patient data were collected, including demographics, medical history, symptoms, comorbidities and drugs prescribed. The da Vinci Surgical System was used for a transoral approach to the oropharynx. The technique was validated in a 31-year-old woman with signs and symptoms of multinodular goiter presenting since childhood. The procedure required 115 min, with intervals as follows: tracheotomy, 25 min; robot setting time, 20 min; and console time, 70 min. TOR S is feasible in cases of multinodular goiter in a lingual thyroid. The procedure appears to be safe, with quick recovery of swallowing and speech.

  5. Variation in Lingual Nerve Course: A Human Cadaveric Study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Amery, Samah M.; Nambiar, Phrabhakaran; Naidu, Murali

    2016-01-01

    The lingual nerve is a terminal branch of the mandibular nerve. It is varied in its course and in its relationship to the mandibular alveolar crest, submandibular duct and also the related muscles in the floor of the mouth. This study aims to understand the course of the lingual nerve from the molar area until its insertion into the tongue muscle. This cadaveric research involved the study of 14 hemi-mandibles and consisted of two parts: (i) obtaining morphometrical measurements of the lingual nerve to three landmarks on the alveolar ridge, and (b) understanding non-metrical or morphological appearance of its terminal branches inserting in the ventral surface of the tongue. The mean distance between the fourteen lingual nerves and the alveolar ridge was 12.36 mm, and they were located 12.03 mm from the lower border of the mandible. These distances were varied when near the first molar (M1), second molar (M2) and third molar (M3). The lingual nerve coursed on the floor of the mouth for approximately 25.43 mm before it deviated toward the tongue anywhere between the mesial of M1 and distal of M2. Thirteen lingual nerves were found to loop around the submandibular duct for an average distance of 6.92 mm (95% CI: 5.24 to 8.60 mm). Their looping occurred anywhere between the M2 and M3. In 76.9% of the cases the loop started around the M3 region and the majority (69.2%) of these looping ended at between the first and second molars and at the lingual developmental groove of the second molar. It gave out as many as 4 branches at its terminal end at the ventral surface of the tongue, with the presence of 2 branches being the most common pattern. An awareness of the variations of the lingual nerve is important to prevent any untoward complications or nerve injury and it is hoped that these findings will be useful for planning of surgical procedures related to the alveolar crest, submandibular gland/ duct and surrounding areas. PMID:27662622

  6. Morphology of the filiform lingual papillae in porcupine (Hystrix cristata).

    PubMed

    Karan, M; Yilmaz, S; Aydin, A

    2011-04-01

    The light and scanning electron microscopic structure of the filiform lingual papillae was studied in five adult porcupine (three males and two females). The tongue was characterised by a round tip, a rostral median sulcus and a deep lingual fossa which was situated just rostral to a prominent inter-molar eminence corresponding to a torus linguae. The filiform papillae were curved, enclosed a large connective tissue core and were separated by wide inter-papillary zones covered by a thick epithelium. Most filiform papillae had a cylindrical shape, but the rostral and central parts of the tongue contained a number of flat, comb-shaped papillae with rounded tips.

  7. Lingual Propulsive Pressures across Consistencies Generated by the Anteromedian and Posteromedian Tongue by Healthy Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gingrich, Laura L.; Stierwalt, Julie A. G.; Hageman, Carlin F.; LaPointe, Leonard L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In the present study, the authors investigated lingual propulsive pressures generated in the normal swallow by the anterior and posterior lingual segments for various consistencies and maximum isometric tasks. Method: Lingual pressures for saliva, thin, and honey-thick liquid boluses were measured via the Iowa Oral Performance Instrument…

  8. [A comparative analysis of tonsillectomy and ablation of the palatine tonsils with CO2 laser].

    PubMed

    Zbyshko, Ia B

    2007-01-01

    Efficacy and toletance of two methods were compared: ablation of the palatine tonsils with CO2 laser and tonsillectomy. 270 case histories (118 after tonsillectomy and 152 after laser ablation of the palatine tonsils) have been analysed and 50 patients from each group have been examined. The comparison of the methods leads to conclusion that laser ablation of the palatine tonsils prevents intraoperative and postoperative complications; makes postoperative hemostatic therapy unnecessary; allows conduction of the operations in outpatient clinics or day hospitals; causes minimal pain in the postoperative period; shortens duration of disability.

  9. Separate and distinctive roles for Wnt5a in tongue, lingual tissue and taste papilla development

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong-Xiang; Grosse, Ann S.; Iwatsuki, Ken; Mishina, Yuji; Gumucio, Deborah L.; Mistretta, Charlotte M.

    2012-01-01

    Although canonical Wnt signaling is known to regulate taste papilla induction and numbers, roles for noncanonical Wnt pathways in tongue and taste papilla development have not been explored. With mutant mice and whole tongue organ cultures we demonstrate that Wnt5a protein and message are within anterior tongue mesenchyme across embryo stages from the initiation of tongue formation, through papilla placode appearance and taste papilla development. The Wnt5a mutant tongue is severely shortened, with an ankyloglossia, and lingual mesenchyme is disorganized. However, fungiform papilla morphology, number and innervation are preserved, as is expression of the papilla marker, Shh. These data demonstrate that the genetic regulation for tongue size and shape can be separated from that directing lingual papilla development. Preserved number of papillae in a shortened tongue results in an increased density of fungiform papillae in the mutant tongues. In tongue organ cultures, exogenous Wnt5a profoundly suppresses papilla formation and simultaneously decreases canonical Wnt signaling as measured by the TOPGAL reporter. These findings suggest that Wnt5a antagonizes canonical Wnt signaling to dictate papilla number and spacing. In all, distinctive roles for Wnt5a in tongue size, fungiform papilla patterning and development are shown and a necessary balance between non-canonical and canonical Wnt paths in regulating tongue growth and fungiform papillae is proposed in a model, through the Ror2 receptor. PMID:22024319

  10. Multi-Lingual Rehabilitation Terminology; A Preliminary Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Elizabeth M.

    In order to assess the need and status of sources of multi-lingual rehabilitation terminology references, a questionnaire was sent to 96 related national and international organizations and selected individuals inquiring about the existance of present or developing terminology references. Results of the questionnaires indicated the availability of…

  11. Swallowing Disorders in Parkinson's Disease: Impact of Lingual Pumping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Argolo, Natalie; Sampaio, Marília; Pinho, Patrícia; Melo, Ailton; Nóbrega, Ana Caline

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lingual pumping (LP) is a repetitive, involuntary, anteroposterior movement of the tongue on the soft palate that is executed prior to transferring the food bolus to the pharynx, but we also observed LP when multiple swallows were taken. LP may be associated with rigidity and bradykinesia in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). This…

  12. A permeability barrier surrounds taste buds in lingual epithelia.

    PubMed

    Dando, Robin; Pereira, Elizabeth; Kurian, Mani; Barro-Soria, Rene; Chaudhari, Nirupa; Roper, Stephen D

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial tissues are characterized by specialized cell-cell junctions, typically localized to the apical regions of cells. These junctions are formed by interacting membrane proteins and by cytoskeletal and extracellular matrix components. Within the lingual epithelium, tight junctions join the apical tips of the gustatory sensory cells in taste buds. These junctions constitute a selective barrier that limits penetration of chemosensory stimuli into taste buds (Michlig et al. J Comp Neurol 502: 1003-1011, 2007). We tested the ability of chemical compounds to permeate into sensory end organs in the lingual epithelium. Our findings reveal a robust barrier that surrounds the entire body of taste buds, not limited to the apical tight junctions. This barrier prevents penetration of many, but not all, compounds, whether they are applied topically, injected into the parenchyma of the tongue, or circulating in the blood supply, into taste buds. Enzymatic treatments indicate that this barrier likely includes glycosaminoglycans, as it was disrupted by chondroitinase but, less effectively, by proteases. The barrier surrounding taste buds could also be disrupted by brief treatment of lingual tissue samples with DMSO. Brief exposure of lingual slices to DMSO did not affect the ability of taste buds within the slice to respond to chemical stimulation. The existence of a highly impermeable barrier surrounding taste buds and methods to break through this barrier may be relevant to basic research and to clinical treatments of taste.

  13. Idiopathic Lingual Artery Aneurysm: CT Findings and Endovascular Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Brindle, R.S.; Fernandez, P.M.; Sattenberg, R.J.; Flynn, M.B.; Heidenreich, J.O.

    2010-01-01

    Summary We describe a 65-year-old woman with an asymptomatic idiopathic lingual artery aneurysm which is suspected to be congenital. We review the literature on external carotid artery branch aneurysms, diagnostic evaluation and discuss treatment options for the various types and the specific chosen in the case presented. PMID:20377988

  14. A System for Supporting Cross-Lingual Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capstick, Joanne; Diagne, Abdel Kader; Erbach, Gregor; Uszkoreit, Hans; Leisenberg, Anne; Leisenberg, Manfred

    2000-01-01

    Describes the MULINEX system that supports cross-lingual searching of the World Wide Web. Users can formulate queries, filter the search results and read documents by using their native language. Discusses dictionary-based query translation, multilingual document categorization, and automatic translation that supports French, German, and English.…

  15. Lingual Kinematics during Rapid Syllable Repetition in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Min Ney; Murdoch, Bruce E.; Whelan, Brooke-Mai

    2012-01-01

    Background: Rapid syllable repetition tasks are commonly used in the assessment of motor speech disorders. However, little is known about the articulatory kinematics during rapid syllable repetition in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). Aims: To investigate and compare lingual kinematics during rapid syllable repetition in dysarthric…

  16. Multi-Lingual, but Not Making It in International Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kusuma-Powell, Ochan

    2004-01-01

    International schools are increasingly identifying Functionally Multi-Lingual children in their student populations. These students, bilingual or multilingual at surface levels of conversation, have not established academic competence in any single language. In many cases, the teacher may assume that another, more robust language exists, when in…

  17. Techniques for Field Application of Lingual Ultrasound Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gick, Bryan; Bird, Sonya; Wilson, Ian

    2005-01-01

    Techniques are discussed for using ultrasound for lingual imaging in field-related applications. The greatest challenges we have faced distinguishing the field setting from the laboratory setting are the lack of controlled head/transducer movement, and the related issue of tissue compression. Two experiments are reported. First, a pilot study…

  18. Distribution of the lingual foramina in mandibular cortical bone in Koreans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Hyun; Kim, Moon Yong

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The interforminal region, between the mandibular foramen, is known as a relatively safe area that is free of anatomic structures, such as inferior alveolar nerve, submandibular fossa, and lingual side of the mandible is occasionally neglected for its low clinical importance. Even in the case of a severely constricted alveolus, perforation of the lingual cortical bone had been intended. However, anterior extension of the inferior alveolar canal, important anatomic structure, such as concavity of lingual bone, lingual foramina, and lingual canal, has recently been reported through various studies, and untypical bleeding by perforation of the lingual plate on implantation has also been reported. Therefore, in this study, we performed radiographic and statistical analysis on distribution and appearance frequencies of the lingual foramina that causes perforation of the mandibular lingual cortical bone to prevent complications, such as untypical bleeding, during surgical procedure. Materials and Methods We measured the horizontal length from a midline of the mandible to the lingual foramina, as well as the horizontal length from the alveolar crest to the lingual foramina and from the lingual foramina to the mandibular border by multi-detector computed tomography of 187 patients, who visited Dankook University Dental Hospital for various reasons from January 1, 2008 to August 31, 2012. Results From a total of 187 human mandibles, 110 (58.8%) mandibles had lingual foramina; 39 (20.9%) had bilateral lingual foramen; 34 (18.2%) had the only left lingual foramen; and 37 (19.8%) had the only right lingual foramen. Conclusion When there is consistent bleeding during a surgical procedure, clinicians must consider damages on the branches of the sublingual artery, which penetrate the lingual foramina. Also, when there is a lingual foramina larger than 1 mm in diameter on a pre-implantation computed tomography, clinicians must beware of vessel damage. In order to prevent

  19. Botulinum toxin in the treatment of lingual dystonia induced by speaking.

    PubMed

    Budak, F; Aydın, E; Koçkaya, A; Ilbay, G

    2013-01-01

    Primary lingual dystonia is a rare condition, especially when it is only induced by speaking. Trihexyphenidyl failed to improve the symptoms. Several case series have demonstrated the effectiveness of botulinum toxin injection for the management of focal lingual movement disorders. Only 1 case of botulinum toxin injection for primary lingual dystonia induced by speaking has been reported, but this treatment has limited effectiveness. Our patient was treated with botulinum toxin using a superficial approach for injection into the tongue with continuing excellent results. Lingual botulinum toxin injection is a fairly simple, safe and viable treatment option for lingual dystonia induced by speaking.

  20. Contour of lingual surface in lower complete denture formed by polished surface impression

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to analyze the shapes of lingual polished surfaces in lower complete dentures formed by polished surface impressions and to provide reference data for use when manufacturing edentulous trays and lower complete dentures. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twenty-six patients with mandibular edentulism were studied. After lower wax dentures were fabricated, wax was removed from the lingual side of the wax denture and a lingual polished surface impression was obtained with tissue conditioner. The definitive denture was scanned with a three-dimensional scanner, and scanned images were obtained. At the cross-sections of the lingual frenum, lateral incisors, first premolars, first molars, and anterior border of the retromolar pads, three points were marked and eight measurements were taken. The Kruskal-Wallis test and a post hoc analysis with the Mann-Whitney test were performed. RESULTS Each patient showed similar values for the same areas on the left and right sides without a statistically significant difference. The height of the contour of the lingual polished surface at the lingual frenum was halfway between the occlusal plane and lingual border, it moved gradually in a downward direction. The angle from the occlusal plane to the height of the contour of the lingual polished surface was increased as it progressed from the lingual frenum towards the retromolar pads. CONCLUSION The shape of the mandibular lingual polished surface was convex at the lingual frenum, lateral incisors and gradually flattened towards the first molars and retromolar pads. PMID:28018565

  1. Lingual access for third molar surgery: a 20-year retrospective audit.

    PubMed

    Moss, C E; Wake, M J

    1999-08-01

    We describe a technique for obtaining lingual access for the insertion of a wide metal retractor to protect the lingual nerve from accidental damage during third molar surgery. We also report an audit of a single practice over a 20-year period using the technique described. The approach involves raising soft tissues on the lingual side of the lower third molar tooth to allow insertion of a broad Hovell's lingual retractor. We conclude that raising lingual tissues to form a wide tension-free flap and inserting a specifically designed retractor does not increase the incidence of lingual nerve morbidity. Indeed, the overall incidence of lingual nerve damage was particularly low compared with those in other published series.

  2. Mechanisms of cerebellar tonsil herniation in patients with Chiari malformations as guide to clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, Misao; Kula, Roger W.; Dlugacz, Yosef D.

    2010-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of Chiari malformations is incompletely understood. We tested the hypothesis that different etiologies have different mechanisms of cerebellar tonsil herniation (CTH), as revealed by posterior cranial fossa (PCF) morphology. Methods In 741 patients with Chiari malformation type I (CM-I) and 11 patients with Chiari malformation type II (CM-II), the size of the occipital enchondrium and volume of the PCF (PCFV) were measured on reconstructed 2D-CT and MR images of the skull. Measurements were compared with those in 80 age- and sex-matched healthy control individuals, and the results were correlated with clinical findings. Results Significant reductions of PCF size and volume were present in 388 patients with classical CM-I, 11 patients with CM-II, and five patients with CM-I and craniosynostosis. Occipital bone size and PCFV were normal in 225 patients with CM-I and occipitoatlantoaxial joint instability, 55 patients with CM-I and tethered cord syndrome (TCS), 30 patients with CM-I and intracranial mass lesions, and 28 patients with CM-I and lumboperitoneal shunts. Ten patients had miscellaneous etiologies. The size and area of the foramen magnum were significantly smaller in patients with classical CM-I and CM-I occurring with craniosynostosis and significantly larger in patients with CM-II and CM-I occurring with TCS. Conclusions Important clues concerning the pathogenesis of CTH were provided by morphometric measurements of the PCF. When these assessments were correlated with etiological factors, the following causal mechanisms were suggested: (1) cranial constriction; (2) cranial settling; (3) spinal cord tethering; (4) intracranial hypertension; and (5) intraspinal hypotension. PMID:20440631

  3. Staphylococcus aureus isolated from tonsillectomized adult patients with recurrent tonsillitis.

    PubMed

    Katkowska, Marta; Garbacz, Katarzyna; Stromkowski, Józef

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence and antibiotic resistance of Staphylococcus aureus strains from 118 tonsillectomized adults due to recurrent tonsillitis (RT). The study included strains isolated from the tonsillar surface prior to tonsillectomy, recovered from the tonsillar core at the time of surgery, and from the posterior throat 2-4 weeks after the procedure. Susceptibility of isolates to 19 antibiotics was tested in line with the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommendations. Irrespective of the stage, the most commonly isolated bacteria were gram-positive cocci, and among them S. aureus. The tonsillar core was the most common site of S. aureus isolation (30.5%), followed by the tonsillar surface (10.8%) and the posterior pharynx (5.9%). This difference turned out to be statistically significant (p < 0.001). Beta-hemolytic streptococci, most often Streptococcus pyogenes (5.1%), were isolated from 2.5% to 10.2% of patients. Staphylococcal isolates were susceptible to most tested antibiotics (except from penicillin and ampicillin) and rarely showed methicillin resistance (n = 1). Staphylococcus aureus seems to be the most common pathogen isolated from patients tonsillectomized due to RT. Staphylococcal isolates associated with RT are present mostly within the tonsillar core and susceptible to most antibiotics. They are typically isolated from patients between 21 and 30 years of age. Tonsillectomy results in less frequent isolation of S. aureus strains.

  4. Extravasation Mucocele Arising from a Lingual Thyroglossal Duct Remnant

    PubMed Central

    Nakahira, Mitsuhiko; Nakatani, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Although a thyroglossal duct cyst is a congenital anomaly, it can also appear in adults. Despite the presence of embryological remnants, it is still unclear why the cyst should suddenly develop later in life. We report a case of a 46-year-old male with an extravasation mucocele arising from a long-standing lingual thyroglossal duct remnant. MRI demonstrated a lingual cystic lesion near the hyoid bone associated with a suprahyoid tract-like structure masquerading as a thyroglossal duct cyst. However, histopathological examination demonstrated a mucocele secondary to a rupture of a thyroglossal duct remnant with numerous intramural heterotopic salivary glands. We propose a new mechanism of an acquired cystic formation of this congenital disease that excessive production of mucus from heterotopic salivary glands and a physical trauma such as swallowing may lead to extravasation of mucus from the thyroglossal duct. PMID:25861502

  5. Direct molecular detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis suspected to be the specific infection in a case of recurrent tonsillitis.

    PubMed

    Lukšić, Boris; Kljajić, Zlatko; Roje, Zeljka; Forempoher, Gea; Grgić, Duška; Janković-Katalinić, Vera; Goić-Barišić, Ivana

    2013-12-01

    We report a case of a 21-year-old man with recurrent tonsillitis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. For a period of 5 months, the patient had tonsillitis seven times and was treated with several oral or parenteral antibiotics. On one of these occasions, tonsillitis was complicated with a peritonsillar abscess that was treated by incision. According to relevant bibliographic data, this is the first case of Mycobacterium tuberculosis confirmed by direct molecular microbiology methods from the tonsillar tissue of a young immunocompetent male reported in Europe. In a case of recurrent tonsillitis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection should be considered as a possible cause.

  6. slan/M-DC8+ cells constitute a distinct subset of dendritic cells in human tonsils

    PubMed Central

    Micheletti, Alessandra; Finotti, Giulia; Calzetti, Federica; Lonardi, Silvia; Zoratti, Elisa; Bugatti, Mattia; Stefini, Stefania; Vermi, William; Cassatella, Marco A.

    2016-01-01

    Human blood dendritic cells (DCs) include three main distinct subsets, namely the CD1c+ and CD141+ myeloid DCs (mDCs) and the CD303+ plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs). More recently, a population of slan/M-DC8+ cells, also known as “slanDCs”, has been described in blood and detected even in inflamed secondary lymphoid organs and non-lymphoid tissues. Nevertheless, hallmarks of slan/M-DC8+ cells in tissues are poorly defined. Herein, we report a detailed characterization of the phenotype and function of slan/M-DC8+ cells present in human tonsils. We found that tonsil slan/M-DC8+ cells represent a unique DC cell population, distinct from their circulating counterpart and also from all other tonsil DC and monocyte/macrophage subsets. Phenotypically, slan/M-DC8+ cells in tonsils display a CD11c+HLA-DR+CD14+CD11bdim/negCD16dim/negCX3CR1dim/neg marker repertoire, while functionally they exhibit an efficient antigen presentation capacity and a constitutive secretion of TNFα. Notably, such DC phenotype and functions are substantially reproduced by culturing blood slan/M-DC8+ cells in tonsil-derived conditioned medium (TDCM), further supporting the hypothesis of a full DC-like differentiation program occurring within the tonsil microenvironment. Taken together, our data suggest that blood slan/M-DC8+ cells are immediate precursors of a previously unrecognizedcompetent DC subset in tonsils, and pave the way for further characterization of slan/M-DC8+ cells in other tissues. PMID:26695549

  7. slan/M-DC8+ cells constitute a distinct subset of dendritic cells in human tonsils.

    PubMed

    Micheletti, Alessandra; Finotti, Giulia; Calzetti, Federica; Lonardi, Silvia; Zoratti, Elisa; Bugatti, Mattia; Stefini, Stefania; Vermi, William; Cassatella, Marco A

    2016-01-05

    Human blood dendritic cells (DCs) include three main distinct subsets, namely the CD1c+ and CD141+ myeloid DCs (mDCs) and the CD303+ plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs). More recently, a population of slan/M-DC8+ cells, also known as "slanDCs", has been described in blood and detected even in inflamed secondary lymphoid organs and non-lymphoid tissues. Nevertheless, hallmarks of slan/M-DC8+ cells in tissues are poorly defined. Herein, we report a detailed characterization of the phenotype and function of slan/M-DC8+ cells present in human tonsils. We found that tonsil slan/M-DC8+ cells represent a unique DC cell population, distinct from their circulating counterpart and also from all other tonsil DC and monocyte/macrophage subsets. Phenotypically, slan/M-DC8+ cells in tonsils display a CD11c+HLA-DR+CD14+CD11bdim/negCD16dim/negCX3CR1dim/neg marker repertoire, while functionally they exhibit an efficient antigen presentation capacity and a constitutive secretion of TNFα. Notably, such DC phenotype and functions are substantially reproduced by culturing blood slan/M-DC8+ cells in tonsil-derived conditioned medium (TDCM), further supporting the hypothesis of a full DC-like differentiation program occurring within the tonsil microenvironment. Taken together, our data suggest that blood slan/M-DC8+ cells are immediate precursors of a previously unrecognizedcompetent DC subset in tonsils, and pave the way for further characterization of slan/M-DC8+ cells in other tissues.

  8. Identification of lingual glands and ducts ventrally in pigs' tongues.

    PubMed Central

    Sanford, S E; Josephson, G K

    1989-01-01

    Hitherto unreported tubulo-acinar mucous lingual glands were located ventrally in the free tip of the tongue, just cranial to the attachment of the frenulum linguae in 186 of 400 (47%) of pigs' tongues. The glands were bilateral in 126 (32%) of the tongues. These glands emptied by several ducts onto the ventral surface of the tongue. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:2606778

  9. Interventions in the Alteration on Lingual Frenum: Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Priscilla Poliseni; Cardoso, Carolina Louise; Gomes, Erissandra

    2015-01-01

    Introduction  Altered lingual frenum modifies the normal tongue mobility, which may influence the stomatognathic functions, resulting in anatomical, physiological and social damage to the subject. It is necessary that health professionals are aware of the process of evaluation, diagnostics and treatment used today, guiding their intervention. Objective  To perform a systematic review of what are the treatment methods used in cases of lingual frenum alteration. Data Synthesis  The literature searches were conducted in MEDLINE, LILACS, SciELO, Cochrane and IBECS, delimited by language (Portuguese, English, Spanish), date of publication (January 2000 to January 2014) and studies performed in humans. The selection order used to verify the eligibility of the studies were related to: full text availability; review the abstract; text analysis; final selection. Of the total 443 publications, 26 remained for analysis. The surgical approach was used in all studies, regardless of the study population (infants, children and adults), with a range of tools and techniques employed; speech therapy was recommended in the post surgical in 4 studies. Only 4 studies, all with infants, showed scientific evidence. Conclusion  Surgical intervention is effective for the remission of the limitations caused by the alteration on lingual frenum, but there is a deficit of studies with higher methodological quality. The benefits of speech therapy in the post surgical period are described from improvement in the language of mobility aspects and speech articulation. PMID:27413412

  10. Spatial and temporal lingual coarticulation and motor control in preadolescents.

    PubMed

    Zharkova, Natalia; Hewlett, Nigel; Hardcastle, William J; Lickley, Robin J

    2014-04-01

    PURPOSE In this study, the authors compared coarticulation and lingual kinematics in preadolescents and adults in order to establish whether preadolescents had a greater degree of random variability in tongue posture and whether their patterns of lingual coarticulation differed from those of adults. METHOD High-speed ultrasound tongue contour data synchronized with the acoustic signal were recorded from 15 children (ages 10-12 years) and 15 adults. Tongue shape contours were analyzed at 9 normalized time points during the fricative phase of schwa-fricative-/a/ and schwa-fricative-/i/ sequences with the consonants /s/ and /ʃ/. RESULTS There was no significant age-related difference in random variability. Where a significant vowel effect occurred, the amount of coarticulation was similar in the 2 groups. However, the onset of the coarticulatory effect on preadolescent /ʃ/ was significantly later than on preadolescent /s/, and also later than on adult /s/ and /ʃ/. CONCLUSIONS Preadolescents have adult-like precision of tongue control and adult-like anticipatory lingual coarticulation with respect to spatial characteristics of tongue posture. However, there remains some immaturity in the motor programming of certain complex tongue movements.

  11. Defining the "core microbiome" of the microbial communities in the tonsils of healthy pigs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Porcine tonsils are the colonization site for many pathogenic as well as commensal microorganisms and are the primary lymphoid tissue encountered by organisms entering through the mouth or nares. The goal of this study was to provide an in-depth characterization of the composition and structure of the tonsillar microbial communities and to define the core microbiome in the tonsils of healthy pigs, using high throughput bar-coded 454-FLX pyrosequencing. Results Whole tonsils were collected at necropsy from 12 16-week-old finisher pigs from two healthy herds. Tonsil brushes were also used to collect samples from four of these animals. Bacterial DNA was isolated from each sample, amplified by PCR with universal primers specific for the bacterial 16S rRNA genes, and the PCR products sequenced using pyrosequencing. An average of 13,000 sequences were generated from each sample. Microbial community members were identified by sequence comparison to known bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences. The microbiomes of these healthy herds showed very strong similarities in the major components as well as distinct differences in minor components. Pasteurellaceae dominated the tonsillar microbiome in all animals, comprising ~60% of the total, although the relative proportions of the genera Actinobacillus, Haemophilus, and Pasteurella varied between the herds. Also found in all animals were the genera Alkanindiges, Peptostreptococcus, Veillonella, Streptococcus and Fusobacterium, as well as Enterobacteriaceae and Neisseriaceae. Treponema and Chlamydia were unique to Herd 1, while Arcanobacterium was unique to Herd 2. Tonsil brushes yielded similar results to tissue specimens, although Enterobacteriaceae and obligate anaerobes were more frequently found in tissue than in brush samples, and Chlamydia, an obligately intracellular organism, was not found in brush specimens. Conclusions We have extended and supported our previous studies with 16S clone libraries, using 16S r

  12. Retrospective study of the bone morphology in the posterior mandibular region. Evaluation of the prevalence and the degree of lingual concavity and their possible complications

    PubMed Central

    Herranz-Aparicio, Judit; Marques, José; Almendros-Marqués, Nieves

    2016-01-01

    Background In order to choose the appropriate implant size and to prevent complications, an oral surgeon must know the size and shape of the mandible. In the posterior mandibular region, a lingual undercut is often found and could represent a difficulty hard to manage if a lingual or buccal perforation occur. A large series of computed tomography (CT) images of the mandibular first molar was evaluated and the bone morphology, the prevalence and the degree of the lingual concavity in the first molar region were studied. Material and Methods One hundred and fifty-one computed tomography (CT) examinations of patients were retrospectively evaluated to determine anatomical variations in bone morphology in the submandibular fossa region. Results A total of 151 subjects were included, consisting of 64 males (M) (42.4%) and 87 females (F) (57.6%). The under-cut type ridge was present in 64.2% of the cases. The concavity angle was 66.6 ± 8.9° (M) and 71.6 ± 8.4° (F) and the linear concavity depth 4.5 ± 2.3 mm (M) and 3.1 ± 1.7 mm (F) (p>0.05). Conclusions Mandibles with any lingual concavity present a potential increased risk of lingual cortical perforation during implant placement surgery. CT imaging allows characterizing the anatomy of the submandibular fossa and provides other important information for the preoperative assessment of the posterior mandible for dental implants placement. Key words:Anatomy, computed tomography, dental implants, intraoperative complications, mandible, panoramic radiography, radiographic examination. PMID:27694785

  13. Angiosarcoma: A Case Report of Gingival Disease with Both Palatine Tonsils Localization

    PubMed Central

    Chamberland, Frédéric; Maurina, Tristan; Degano-Valmary, Séverine; Spicarolen, Thierry; Chaigneau, Loïc

    2016-01-01

    Angiosarcomas are one of the rarest subtypes of sarcomas; those are malignant vascular tumors arising from vascular endothelial cells. Occurrence of intra-oral angiosarcoma is extremely rare (0.0077% of all cancers in Europe). We present here, to our knowledge, the first case of a 83-year-old man with gingival and both palatine tonsils localization of a grade-two angiosarcoma discovered after a two months history of a painful lesion followed by hematoma and spontaneous bleeding. Chemotherapy with paclitaxel and hemostatic radiotherapy were inefficient and he died seven months after the first symptoms. It is essential to use the vascular markers, such as CD34, CD31, ERG and FLI1, for a correct histological diagnosis, which remains difficult because it displays a wide range of morphological appearances and multiple patterns may be present in the same tumor. The main prognostic factors are chronic pre-existing lymphedema and tumor size greater than five centimeters. Malignancy grade and stage classification should be provided in all cases in which this is feasible because of predictive meaning. When possible, wide surgical resection with negative margins remains the cornerstone for the treatment of localized angiosarcomas, but despite the improvement of surgical techniques the prognosis is poor with more than half of patients died within the first year. Adjuvant radiotherapy is the standard treatment of high–grade (two and three), deep lesions, regardless of size, because it improved the local recurrence-free survival. For advanced disease, if possible, metastasectomy should be considered. The first-line chemotherapy with doxorubicin or paclitaxel should be discussed compared to best supportive care according to patient comorbidities and preference. PMID:27746875

  14. Tonsils--place of botulinum toxin production: results of routine laboratory diagnosis in farm animals.

    PubMed

    Böhnel, H; Wagner, C; Gessler, F

    2008-08-25

    Since a case of a veterinarian was reported, who was likely to be infected/intoxicated by Clostridium botulinum during the handling of a diseased animal, tonsils in animals were tested for botulinum neurotoxin and bacterial forms of neurotoxic Clostridium botulinum during routine botulism laboratory examinations including standard samples (intestinal tract and liver) from 48 cattle, 11 horses, and 14 goats. Ten out of 60 samples from tonsils contained free botulinum toxin, and 12 out of 59 were positive for live toxin producing bacteria. In 32 out of 162 intestinal samples toxin was detected. Toxin producing bacteria were found in 37 samples. Eight of 56 liver samples contained free toxin, and 15 out of 43 toxigenic bacteria. Samples from 10 slaughter pigs were all negative, whereas from slaughter cattle tonsils had a high incidence of toxin (7 of 10) or toxigenic bacteria (2 of 8). The results are discussed in the context of effects on animal health and botulism as zoonosis.

  15. Herpes simplex induced necrotizing tonsillitis in an immunocompromised patient with ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Laura; Vos, Xander G; Löwenberg, Mark

    2016-01-01

    We here present the case of a 22-year-old female of Suriname ethnicity with ulcerative colitis who received treatment with mercaptopurine and infliximab. She presented herself with a severe necrotizing tonsillitis due to herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1). Combination therapy consisting of immunomodulators and anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents is increasingly being used. Anti-TNF therapy is associated with an increased risk of developing serious infections, and especially patients receiving combination treatment with thiopurines are at an increased risk. We here show that HSV infections can cause a severe tonsillitis in immunocompromised patients. Early recognition is essential when there is no improvement with initial antibiotic therapy within the first 24 to 72 h. HSV infections should be in the differential diagnosis of immunocompromised patients presenting with a necrotizing tonsillitis and can be confirmed by polymerase chain reaction. Early treatment with antiviral agents should be considered especially if antibiotic treatment fails in such patients. PMID:26881193

  16. Tuberculosis of Waldeyer’s Ring with an Atypical Presentation as Chronic Adeno-Tonsilitis

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Vijendra S; M, Nirupama; Prasad, Vishnu; Majeed, Nazeem A

    2015-01-01

    Primary tuberculosis of the oropharynx and nasopharynx is a rare clinical entity.It usually arises secondary to pulmonary tuberculosis. We report a rare case of a 20-year-female, who presented with fever and throat pain. Examination revealed hypertrophied adenoids and tonsils, which was ultimately proved as tuberculosis.Enlargement of the palatine tonsils could be due to a multitude of causes, and a thorough evaluation is necessary to arrive at the right diagnosis.Increased awareness of nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal tuberculosis is important in tropical countries, as the disease may be overlooked resulting in inappropriate management. PMID:25859475

  17. Purification of human NK cell developmental intermediates from lymph nodes and tonsils.

    PubMed

    Freud, Aharon G; Caligiuri, Michael A

    2010-01-01

    Accumulating data indicate that human natural killer (NK) cells undergo terminal maturation in secondary lymphoid tissues (SLTs) including lymph nodes (LNs) and tonsils. In addition, recent studies have revealed that maturing NK cells progress through at least five functionally discrete stages of development within SLTs. These discoveries provide unique possibilities for researchers to investigate the natural processes governing human NK cell development, as they exist in vivo, through analysis of NK cell maturational intermediates found in situ. Herein we describe a detailed, yet simple, four-step protocol for the viable enrichment and purification of human NK cell developmental intermediates from LNs and tonsils.

  18. [Surgical treatment of short lingual frenulum in children].

    PubMed

    Cuestas, Giselle; Demarchi, Victoria; Martínez Corvalán, María Pía; Razetti, Juan; Boccio, Carlos

    2014-12-01

    Ankyloglossia is a congenital anomaly characterized by an abnormally short lingual frenulum resulting in varying degrees of difficulty of tongue mobility. It may be asymptomatic or it may present with breastfeeding difficulties, speech and dentition disorders, and social problems related to the functional limitation of the tongue. While it is a common and known pathology, controversies and diversity of opinions persist regarding the indication, timing and method of surgical correction. We describe our experience with 35 children presenting this condition; they underwent successful surgical treatment.

  19. The Role of Ethno-Lingual Relativity in Second Language Acquisition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Citron, James L.

    1993-01-01

    The term "ethno-lingual relativity" is defined as a perspective that is not limited by one's own cultural and linguistic experiences, but rather is open to the contrasting cultural and linguistic patterns of other peoples. It is hypothesized that having an ethno-lingually relative perspective can facilitate one's ability to learn a new language.…

  20. The Mutual Symbiosis between Inclusive Bi-Lingual Education and Multicultural Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irby, Beverly J.; Tong, Fuhui; Lara-Alecio, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    In this article the authors postulate a mutual symbiosis between multicultural and inclusive bi-lingual education. Combining bi-lingual and multicultural education to create a symbiotic relationship can stimulate reform in schools and can promote inclusive educational systems, thereby keeping native languages and cultures alive for minority…

  1. Simultaneous paresthesia of the lingual nerve and inferior alveolar nerve caused by a radicular cyst.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Yoshiki; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Hamada, Akiko; Kondoh, Toshirou; Suzuki, Mami; Noguchi, Kazuhide; Ito, Ko; Seto, Kanichi

    2005-10-01

    The inferior alveolar nerve is sometimes affected by periapical pathoses and mandibular cysts. However, mandibular intraosseous lesions have not been reported to disturb the lingual nerve. A case of simultaneous paresthesia of the right lingual nerve and the right inferior alveolar nerve is presented. The possible mechanisms of this extremely uncommon condition are discussed.

  2. Lingual lipase activity in the orosensory detection of fat by humans.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Bhushan V; Mattes, Richard D

    2014-06-15

    Lingual lipase generates nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) from dietary fats during oral processing by lipolysis. Lingual lipase in rodents has strong lipolytic activity and plays a critical role in oral detection of fats. The functional activity of lingual lipase during oral processing of high-fat foods in humans remains poorly characterized. Five commonly consumed high-fat foods varying in physical states and fatty acid composition (almond, almond butter, olive oil, walnut, and coconut) were masticated by 15 healthy human subjects at the rate of one chew per second with and without lipase inhibitor orlistat. Salivary NEFA concentrations were measured. To determine the role of lingual lipase in oral fat detection, sensory ratings were obtained from the same 15 human subjects for almond butter with and without orlistat. Lingual lipase was active during oral processing of almond and coconut. No activity of lingual lipase was detected during processing of almond butter. There was only weak evidence lingual lipase is a determinant of oral fat detection. Lingual lipase may only contribute to NEFA generation and oral fat detection of fatty foods that require stronger oral processing effort.

  3. Lingual lipase activity in the orosensory detection of fat by humans

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Bhushan V.

    2014-01-01

    Lingual lipase generates nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) from dietary fats during oral processing by lipolysis. Lingual lipase in rodents has strong lipolytic activity and plays a critical role in oral detection of fats. The functional activity of lingual lipase during oral processing of high-fat foods in humans remains poorly characterized. Five commonly consumed high-fat foods varying in physical states and fatty acid composition (almond, almond butter, olive oil, walnut, and coconut) were masticated by 15 healthy human subjects at the rate of one chew per second with and without lipase inhibitor orlistat. Salivary NEFA concentrations were measured. To determine the role of lingual lipase in oral fat detection, sensory ratings were obtained from the same 15 human subjects for almond butter with and without orlistat. Lingual lipase was active during oral processing of almond and coconut. No activity of lingual lipase was detected during processing of almond butter. There was only weak evidence lingual lipase is a determinant of oral fat detection. Lingual lipase may only contribute to NEFA generation and oral fat detection of fatty foods that require stronger oral processing effort. PMID:24694384

  4. The Multi-Lingual Supplement to the Astronomy Thesaurus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shobbrook, R. M.

    The compilers and translators of the recently released IAU "Astronomy Thesaurus" (affectionately known as TREX), are pleased to announce the availability of the new multi-lingual supplement (ML-TREX) in French, German, Italian and Spanish. The primary terms as well as the non-preferred terms have been translated in the supplement and it is designed enhance the main thesaurus as an online reference tool. Some review copies have been sent out on a limited distribution basis. Although much of current scientific research is reported in English there is a need by librarians to have a reference resource of terminology in a variety of languages. Librarians are aware of the amount of literature in their libraries in all languages both current and historical which must be dealt with and few of us have the multi-lingual skills to cope with it. The supplement is designed to be used as an online reference resource and therefore has been made available via the World Wide Web and an anonymous ftp account at the Anglo-Australian Observatory. The files can be down- loaded directly into any preferred word processor or into a computer system as a "knowledge base" together with the main thesaurus. For more information: LIB@aaoepp.aao.gov.au or http://www.aao.gov.au or the thesaurus directory via anonymous ftp access.

  5. Dorsal Lingual Surface and Halitosis: a Morphological Point of View

    PubMed Central

    Giuseppe, Marzo; Adelaide, Continenza Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objective The interest in the study of the tongue papillary niches and the related biofilm has increased in recent years because they form a suitable source of periodontal microorganisms and are associated with development of halitosis. Tongue dorsum structure represents a factor favoring a particular and complex bacterial biofilm where periodontal pathogens are frequently found. The aim of this preliminary study was to associate the tongue papillary structure with the biofilm causing halitosis by means of a new clinical protocol. Material and Methods In this study, one subject affected by oral malodor was selected and included. A photograph of lingual dorsum was taken to spot the areas with visible lingual coating. A tongue dorsum impression was obtained, divided and cut with a blade in six parts, according to Winkel Tongue Coated Index by means of the 2-step double-mix impression technique. The contours of the six parts were observed by the stereomicroscope LEICA LED2000 and analyzed by ImageJ software. Results The results showed that the depth of papillae was associated with visible presence of the tongue biofilm and indirectly correlated with halitosis in patients.. Conclusions The morphological papillary structure of the tongue dorsal surface influences the presence of the tongue biofilm. The presented protocol can be further considered in clinical application for a correct diagnosis and a personalized treatment of halitosis. PMID:27789913

  6. Morphology of the lingual papillae in the raccoon dog and fox.

    PubMed

    Emura, Shoichi; Okumura, Toshihiko; Chen, Huayue; Shoumura, Shizuko

    2006-11-01

    The dorsal lingual surfaces of the raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides) and fox (Vulpes vulpes japonica) were examined by scanning electron microscopical (SEM) observations. The distribution and type of the lingual papillae found in the raccoon dog were similar to those in the fox. Filiform, fungiform, foliate and vallate papillae were observed. The filiform papillae were distributed over the entire dosal surface of the tongue. Each filiform papilla on the apical surface of the tongue had several pointed processes. The filiform papillae of the lingual body consisted of a main papilla and some secondary papillae. The fungiform papillae were present rounded bodies, and more densely distributed on the lingual apex. The foliate papillae were seen on the dorsolateral aspect of the tongue. The vallate papillae were located on both sides of the posterior end of the lingual body. Each papilla was surrounded by groove and crescent pad. On the periphery of the papillae, large conical papillae were observed.

  7. [Relationship between repeating tonsillitis and Berger's disease. Report of A case and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Pino Rivero, V; González Palomino, A; Pantoja Hernández, C G; Marcos García, M; Trinidad Ruíz, G; Marqués Rebollo, L; Blasco Huelva, A

    2006-01-01

    Berger's disease, so called IgA nephropathy, is a mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis characterized by recurrent episodes of gross hematuria in relation with ENT infections like tonsillitis. We report a clinical case which presented that association and make a review of the literature about the possible advantages of tonsillectomy on the evolutive course and prognosis of the nephropathy.

  8. Volume estimation of tonsil phantoms using an oral camera with 3D imaging

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anshuman J.; Valdez, Tulio A.; Vargas, Jose Arbouin; Saksupapchon, Punyapat; Rachapudi, Pushyami; Ge, Zhifei; Estrada, Julio C.; Raskar, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) visualization of oral cavity and oropharyngeal anatomy may play an important role in the evaluation for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Although computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MRI) imaging are capable of providing 3D anatomical descriptions, this type of technology is not readily available in a clinic setting. Current imaging of the oropharynx is performed using a light source and tongue depressors. For better assessment of the inferior pole of the tonsils and tongue base flexible laryngoscopes are required which only provide a two dimensional (2D) rendering. As a result, clinical diagnosis is generally subjective in tonsillar hypertrophy where current physical examination has limitations. In this report, we designed a hand held portable oral camera with 3D imaging capability to reconstruct the anatomy of the oropharynx in tonsillar hypertrophy where the tonsils get enlarged and can lead to increased airway resistance. We were able to precisely reconstruct the 3D shape of the tonsils and from that estimate airway obstruction percentage and volume of the tonsils in 3D printed realistic models. Our results correlate well with Brodsky’s classification of tonsillar hypertrophy as well as intraoperative volume estimations. PMID:27446667

  9. Innate Response Activator (IRA) B Cells Reside in Human Tonsils and Internalize Bacteria In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Chiappini, Nico; Cantisani, Rocco; Pancotto, Laura; Ruggiero, Paolo; Rosa, Domenico; Manetti, Andrea; Romano, Antonio; Montagnani, Francesca; Bertholet, Sylvie; Castellino, Flora; Del Giudice, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Innate response activator (IRA) B cells have been described in mice as a subset of B-1a B cells that produce granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and have been found in the spleen upon activation. In humans, identification, tissue localization and functionality of these lymphocytes are poorly understood. We hypothesized that IRA B cells could reside in human palatine tonsils, which are a first line of defense from infection of the upper respiratory tract. In the present work, we used flow cytometry and confocal microscopy to identify and characterize human IRA (hIRA) B cells in tonsils. We show that CD19⁺CD20⁺GM-CSF⁺ B cells are present in the tonsils of all the subjects studied at a frequency ranging between ~0.2% and ~0.4% of the conventional CD19⁺CD20⁺GM-CSF⁻ B cells. These cells reside within the B cell follicles, are mostly IgM⁺IgD⁺, express CD5 and show phagocytic activity. Our results support a role for hIRA B cells in the effector immune response to infections in tonsils.

  10. Marek’s disease virus induced transient atrophy of cecal tonsils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although bursal and thymic atrophy associated with Marek’s disease (MD) is well established and characterized, the effect of Marek's disease virus (MDV) infection on lymphoid aggregates within the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) is not known. The cecal tonsils (CT) are the two largest lympho...

  11. Assessment of adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity and oxidative stress in patients with chronic tonsillitis.

    PubMed

    Garca, Mehmet Fatih; Demir, Halit; Turan, Mahfuz; Bozan, Nazım; Kozan, Ahmet; Belli, Şeyda Bayel; Arslan, Ayşe; Cankaya, Hakan

    2014-06-01

    To emphasize the effectiveness of adenosine deaminase (ADA) enzyme, which has important roles in the differentiation of lymphoid cells, and oxidative stress in patients with chronic tonsillitis. Serum and tissue samples were obtained from 25 patients who underwent tonsillectomy due to recurrent episodes of acute tonsillitis. In the control group, which also had 25 subjects, only serum samples were taken as obtaining tissue samples would not have been ethically appropriate. ADA enzyme activity, catalase (CAT), carbonic anhydrase (CA), nitric oxide (NO) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured in the serum and tissue samples of patients and control group subjects. The serum values of both groups were compared. In addition, the tissue and serum values of patients were compared. Serum ADA activity and the oxidant enzymes MDA and NO values of the patient group were significantly higher than those of the control group (p < 0.001), the antioxidant enzymes CA and CAT values of the patient group were significantly lower than those of the control group (p < 0.001). In addition, while CA, CAT and NO enzyme levels were found to be significantly higher in the tonsil tissue of the patient group when compared to serum levels (p < 0.05), there was no difference between tissue and serum MDA and ADA activity (p > 0.05). Elevated ADA activity may be effective in the pathogenesis of chronic tonsillitis both by impairing tissue structure and contributing to SOR formation.

  12. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA levels in palatine tonsils and autologous serum from EBV carriers.

    PubMed

    Nadal, David; Blasius, Martin; Niggli, Felix K; Meier, Gabriela; Berger, Christoph

    2002-05-01

    A real-time polymerase chain reaction was employed to detect and quantitate Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA in tonsils and autologous sera from EBV-seropositive children. EBV DNA was found in 95% of tonsils from 21 children and in 50% from 18 children with serum IgG titers to the virus capsid antigen (VCA) of > or =1:160 and 1:10 to 1:80, respectively (P = 0.002). Tonsils from children with titers > or =1:160 harbored more EBV DNA copies per mg tissue (mean, 1,237; range, < 2-13,998) than from children with titers 1:10 to 1:80 (mean, 23; range, < 2-226; P < 0.0001). By contrast, EBV DNA was detected only in serum from 25% of 20 children with titers > or = 1:160. Thus, ample differences in tonsillar EBV replication are mirrored inconstantly by detectable EBV in autologous serum suggesting that EBV DNA quantitation in tonsils may serve for refined monitoring of individuals at risk of EBV-associated lymphoproliferation.

  13. Histology, Immunohistochemistry and Ultrastructure of the Bovine Palatine Tonsil with Special Emphasis on Reticular Epithelium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The paired palatine tonsils are located at the junction of the nasopharynx and oropharynx; ideally positioned to sample antigens entering through either the nasal cavity or oral cavity. Entering antigens will first contact tonsilar epithelium. To better understand the cellular and functional composi...

  14. Marek’s disease virus induces transient atrophy of cecal tonsils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease of domestic chickens caused by an immunosupperessive alpha herpesvirus, Marek’s disease virus (MDV). Clinical signs of MD include bursal/thymic atrophy and neurological disorders. The cecal tonsils (CT) are the largest lymphoid aggregates of avia...

  15. Innate Response Activator (IRA) B Cells Reside in Human Tonsils and Internalize Bacteria In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Pancotto, Laura; Ruggiero, Paolo; Rosa, Domenico; Manetti, Andrea; Romano, Antonio; Montagnani, Francesca; Bertholet, Sylvie; Castellino, Flora; Del Giudice, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Innate response activator (IRA) B cells have been described in mice as a subset of B-1a B cells that produce granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and have been found in the spleen upon activation. In humans, identification, tissue localization and functionality of these lymphocytes are poorly understood. We hypothesized that IRA B cells could reside in human palatine tonsils, which are a first line of defense from infection of the upper respiratory tract. In the present work, we used flow cytometry and confocal microscopy to identify and characterize human IRA (hIRA) B cells in tonsils. We show that CD19+CD20+GM-CSF+ B cells are present in the tonsils of all the subjects studied at a frequency ranging between ~0.2% and ~0.4% of the conventional CD19+CD20+GM-CSF- B cells. These cells reside within the B cell follicles, are mostly IgM+IgD+, express CD5 and show phagocytic activity. Our results support a role for hIRA B cells in the effector immune response to infections in tonsils. PMID:26066485

  16. A Retrospective Cohort Study of Glossopharyngeal Nerve Taste in Children with Recurrent Acute Tonsillitis.

    PubMed

    Hill, Courtney A; Dang, Suveera; Beach, Michael; Chen, Eunice Y

    2017-01-01

    Objective To compare glossopharyngeal taste between healthy children and those with recurrent acute tonsillitis. Study Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Pediatric clinics in a tertiary care medical center and satellite location. Subjects and Methods Smell and taste testing was administered to 80 well children and 64 children with recurrent acute tonsillitis (age range, 6-17 years). Smell testing was performed with the NIH Toolbox Odor Identification Test, with scores based on national averages for age and sex. Validated Taste Strips were placed on the midline of the tongue at the circumvallate papillae in random tastant order and in increasing concentrations to test sweet, salty, sour, and bitter. Ordinal logistic regression was used for multivariate analysis. Results The healthy and tonsillitis groups were similar, with mean ages of 11.3 and 10.8 years ( P = .34), respectively. The tonsillitis group had fewer boys (n = 18 vs 43, P = .002), higher mean body mass index (BMI) percentile (n = 72.2 vs 59.8, P = .01), and more subjects with public or no insurance (n = 24 vs 13, P = .004). Univariate analysis revealed no statistically significant differences in rate of normal overall taste (67.2% vs 60%, P = .39) and in sweet (79.7% vs 82.5%, P = .67), salty (85.9% vs 82.8%, P = .82), sour (64.1% vs 70%, P = .48), and bitter (90.6% vs 86.3%, P = .45). In multivariate analysis, smell ability, sex, BMI percentile, parent BMI, and insurance type did not affect overall taste or sweet, salty, sour, or bitter alone. Conclusion Despite controlling for potential intrinsic (sex, smell, BMI) and extrinsic (parent BMI, insurance type) confounders, there was no statistically significant difference in taste among children with recurrent acute tonsillitis as compared with healthy children.

  17. Primary Lymphangioma of the Palatine Tonsil in a 9-Year-Old Boy: A Case Presentation and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Iliadou, Eleftheria; Papapetropoulos, Nektarios; Karamatzanis, Eleftherios; Saravakos, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Primary lymphangiomas or lymphangiomatous polyps of the palatine tonsil are rare benign lesions that are described infrequently in the literature. The majority of the published cases concern adults. We report a case of a lymphangiomatous lesion of the right palatine tonsil of a 9-year-old boy. Our clinical suspicion was confirmed by the histological examination after tonsillectomy and the diagnosis of primary lymphangioma of the tonsil was made. In this case we discuss the clinical and histopathological features of this lesion and present a short review of the current literature. PMID:27872780

  18. Selectivity of lingual nerve fibers to chemical stimuli

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The cell bodies of the lingual branch of the trigeminal nerve were localized in the trigeminal ganglion using extracellular recordings together with horseradish peroxidase labeling from the tongue. Individual lingual nerve fibers were characterized with regard to their conduction velocities, receptive fields, and response to thermal, mechanical, and chemical stimuli. Fibers were classified as C, A delta, A beta, cold, and warm. The chemical stimuli included NaCl, KCl, NH4Cl, CaCl2, menthol, nicotine, hexanol, and capsaicin. With increasing salt concentration the latency of the response decreased and the activity increased. The responses elicited by salts (to 2.5 M), but not nonpolar stimuli such as menthol, were reversibly inhibited by 3.5 mM of the tight junction blocker, LaCl3. These data suggest that salts diffuse into stratified squamous epithelia through tight junctions in the stratum corneum and stratum granulosum, whereupon they enter the extracellular space. 11 C fibers were identified and 5 were characterized as polymodal nociceptors. All of the C fibers were activated by one or more of the salts NaCl, KCl, or NH4Cl. Three C fibers were activated by nicotine (1 mM), but none were affected by CaCl2 (1 M), menthol (1 mM), or hexanol (50 mM). However, not all C fibers or even the subpopulation of polymodals were activated by the same salts or by nicotine. Thus, it appears that C fibers display differential responsiveness to chemical stimuli. A delta fibers also showed differential sensitivity to chemicals. Of the 35 characterized A delta mechanoreceptors, 8 responded to NaCl, 9 to KCl, 9 to NH4Cl, 0 to CaCl2, menthol, or hexanol, and 2 to nicotine. 8 of 9 of the cold fibers (characterized as A delta's) responded to menthol, none responded to nicotine, 8 of 16 were inhibited by hexanol, 9 of 19 responded to 2.5 M NH4Cl, 5 of 19 responded to 2.5 M KCl, and 1 of 19 responded to 2.5 M NaCl. In summary, lingual nerve fibers exhibit responsiveness to chemicals

  19. Effect of artificial rearing of piglets on the volume densities of M cells in the tonsils of the soft palate and ileal Peyer's patches.

    PubMed

    Prims, S; Pintens, N; Vergauwen, H; Van Cruchten, S; Van Ginneken, C; Casteleyn, C

    2017-02-01

    The high prolificacy of modern hybrid sows has increased the mean litter size during the last decades. However, rearing large litters is challenging and has increased the use of alternative management strategies such as euthanasia of weak piglets, cross-fostering, supplementing piglets with milk, split-nursing and split-weaning. The latter includes artificial rearing on brooders where piglets have ad libitum access to milk replacer. The effect of this artificial rearing on the immune system of the piglet is the subject of various studies. The present study focused on the M cells in the tonsil of the soft palate and in the ileal Peyer's patch (iPP). These epithelial cells are specialized in antigen sampling and play a pivotal role in the induction of adaptive immune responses. The volume densities of the M cells were assessed by stereological analysis of tissue samples from piglets of 0, 3, 8 and 19days of age. During the first three days, piglets suckled the sow, permitting them to ingest colostrum. At the third day, the piglets were either allowed to continue to suckle the sow or were transferred to brooders. The six experimental groups, each containing six piglets, thus consisted of newborn piglets, 3-day-old sow-suckled piglets, and conventionally and artificially reared piglets of 8 and 19days of age. To identify M cells, tissue samples were immersed in 4% phosphate-buffered paraformaldehyde and paraffin sections were immunohistochemically stained against cytokeratin 18. The volume densities of M cells in both the crypt epithelium of the tonsils of the soft palate and the follicle-associated epithelium of the iPPs did not show any difference between the various age groups of conventionally reared piglets. However, values were twice as high in the iPPs compared to the tonsils of the soft palate. In contrast, a decrease in volume densities of M cells was observed in the iPPs of piglets after they had been transferred to commercial brooders (P=0.05), resulting in

  20. Anatomical Relationship of Lingual Nerve to the Region of Mandibular Third Molar

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho Leite Leal Nunes, Carla Maria; de Almeida Lopes, Maria Cândida

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives This study evaluated the relationship of the lingual nerve with the adjacent anatomical structures of the mandibular third molar region, influencing the dentist to be aware of the variability of these relationships. Material and Methods Samples of 24 human corpse half-heads were selected and divided according with the presence or absence of the mandibular third molars. The lingual nerve (LN) was explored, showing its run from the oblique line until its crossing with the submandibular gland duct. The measurements along the LN and the adjacent anatomical structures were taken at the retromolar, molar and sublingual region with the use of a digital caliper. Results The distance from the LN and the third molar socket, which represents the horizontal distance of the lingual plate to the nerve, on average, was 4.4 mm (SD 2.4 mm). The distance from the LN and the lingual alveolar rim, which represents the vertical relationship between the nerve and the lingual alveolar rim of the third molar socket, on average, was 16.8 mm (SD 5.7 mm). The LN has a varied topography that leaves it very vulnerable during any procedure executed in this region. Conclusions Unless adequate protection of the lingual nerve is acquired by following an adequate surgical technique, the lingual nerve will always be vulnerable to damage during surgical intervention or manipulation in this region. PMID:24478912

  1. An evaluation of torque (moment) on implant/prosthesis with staggered buccal and lingual offset.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, L A; Kruger, B

    1996-06-01

    The supposition that staggered buccal and lingual implant offset is biomechanically advantageous was examined mathematically. The method of evaluation utilized a standard hypothetical geometric configuration from which implants could be staggered buccally and/or lingually in both arches. Torque (moment) values were calculated at the gold screw, abutment screw, and 3.5 mm apical to the head of the implant. Comparisons were made in percentages of change from the hypothetical standard to the buccal and/or lingual implant offset. In the maxillary arch, buccal offset decreased the torque (moment) while lingual offset increased it. If more lingually offset implants were present in the maxillary restoration, the total torque would be greater than if they were all in a straight line. Staggered buccolingual implant alignment often requires abutment reangulation. The resultant line of force produced by occlusal anatomy usually results in buccal inclination in the maxillary arch and lingual inclination in the mandibular arch. As a result, mandibular implant/prostheses are greatly favored over similar maxillary configurations because the mandibular resultant line of force usually passes lingually, closer to the components and supporting bone and considerably less torque is produced. Therefore, the concept of staggered offset for multiple implant-supported prostheses can be utilized on the mandible but is not recommended for the maxilla where maximum uniform buccal implant orientation is advised.

  2. Regimes of oscillation and reed vibrations in lingual organ pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Eric; Rossing, Thomas D.

    2002-05-01

    We compare the sound generation in six lingual organ pipes including two trompette pipes, two oboes pipes, a krummhorn, and a rankett, the latter two of which were described in a previous paper [Cox and Rossing, paper 2aMU8, 142nd ASA meeting]. With the resonator attached, each pipe sounds in distinct regimes of oscillation, separated by discontinuities. The nominal frequencies of the pipes are generally slightly lower than the resonance frequency of the resonator but slightly higher than the natural frequency of the reed. The air mass loading of both the resonator and shallot lowers the reed frequency. Changing the blowing pressure has little effect on the sounding frequency but a modest effect on sound level.

  3. Olanzapine-related repetitive focal seizures with lingual dystonia.

    PubMed

    Anzellotti, Francesca; Capasso, Margherita; Frazzini, Valerio; Onofrj, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Olanzapine-related seizures have rarely been reported despite associated proconvulsant risk factors described in the literature: myoclonic status, increased frequency of seizures, tonic-clonic seizures, as well as fatal status epilepticus. We present a psychiatric patient who developed repetitive focal motor seizures and lingual dystonia when olanzapine was added for psychomotor agitation and aggressiveness. Olanzapine was immediately suspended and the seizures progressively disappeared. A control EEG showed no paroxysmal discharges. Olanzapine shares some pharmacological similarities with clozapine, a neuroleptic with a high risk of dose-dependent seizures. This adverse effect should be taken into account, and olanzapine should be used with caution if concomitant circumstances decrease the seizure threshold. [Published with video sequence online].

  4. Changes of the lingual epithelium in Ambystoma mexicanum.

    PubMed

    Wistuba, J; Clemen, G

    1998-12-01

    Changes in the lingual epithelium during ontogenesis and after induced metamorphosis in Ambystoma mexicanum are described as observed by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The epithelium of the tongue is always multilayered in the larva as well as in the adult. It consists of a stratum germinativum with little differentiated basal cells and a stratum superficiale (superficial layer) with specialized superficial cells and goblet cells. Usually, there are more than two layers because of a stratum intermedium consisting of replacement cells. The apical cell membrane of the superficial cells is perforated by fine pores. Its most typical feature are microridges. Maturing superficial cells possess microvilli. Goblet cells occur in early larvae primarily in the centre of the tongue. They spread throughout the dorsal face of the tongue as their numbers increase during ontogenesis. The small apices of the goblet cells are intercalated in the wedges between the superficial cells. Leydig cells are not found on the larval tongue but on that of adults. Due to metamorphosis, the epithelium of the tongue changes. It is furrowed in its anterior part. The furrows house the openings of the lingual glands. The surface is further modulated by ridges which are densely coated by microvilli and which bear the taste buds. The villi of the tongue which lack extrusion pores show cilia and microvilli but lack microridges. The Leydig cells disappear during metamorphosis. In addition to the two types of goblet cells found in different regions of the glandular tubules, goblet cells occur in the caudal part. They secrete directly into the cavity of the mouth. The posterior part is characterised by a dense coat of cilia.

  5. Histology and scanning electron microscopy of the tubal tonsil of goats

    PubMed Central

    Indu, V. R.; Lucy, K. M.; Chungath, J. J.; Ashok, N.; Maya, S.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To observe the light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the caprine tubal tonsil. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on six crossbred male goats of 6 months of age. From the median sections of the head, tissue pieces from the nasopharynx around the auditory tube were collected and fixed for histology and SEM. Results: Tonsillar lymphoid tissue was located in the nasopharynx ventral to the auditory tube opening in the lateral wall of the pharynx. The height of the surface epithelium of the tubal tonsil measured 80.17±1.08 µm and was a pseudostratified ciliated columnar type with basal, supporting, and goblet cells. Above the dome of lymphoid nodules, the epithelium was modified into a follicle associated epithelium (FAE), also called lympho-epithelium or reticular epithelium and was characterized by the absence of goblet cells and cilia, reduced number of cell layers, and a large number of lymphoid cells due to interrupted basement membrane. The height of FAE was smaller than that of the surface epithelium and measured 34.33±0.92 µm. The surface of tubal tonsil showed folds and invaginations, which formed crypts. The lamina propria-submucosa underneath the epithelium was formed by the meshwork of reticular and, thin and loose collagen fibers with dome-like accumulation of lymphoid nodules. In the secondary lymphoid nodules, a corona, parafollicular area, and interfnodular area were observed. The average number of lymphoid nodules counted per field under low power magnification of microscope was 1.17±0.17, and the internodular distance was 34.00±4.37 µm. The mean diameter of lymphoid nodules was 566.67±11.45 µm and the lymphocyte count per nodule was 14741.67±174.36. The number of plasma cells counted per field under low power was 44.38±2.90 below the surface epithelium. The tubal tonsil was not encapsulated. In SEM, the surface epithelium of the tubal tonsils presented ciliated cells, microvillus (MV) cells, and goblet cells. The

  6. A cyclin D1-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of germinal center B-cell-like subtype in the right tonsil

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Changrui; Shi, Xiuying; Fan, Chuifeng

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Cyclin D1-positive tumor cells are commonly found in mantle cell lymphoma but they are very rare in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Clinical findings/Patient concerns: Here we present a rare case of cyclin D1-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in the right tonsil of a 50-year-old man. Computed tomographic imaging detected a mass, about 2.5 cm × 1.8 cm in size, in the left side of the oropharynx. Diagnoses: Microscopically, the tumor cells were located under the pharyngeal mucosa and diffusely arranged. The tumor cells were large, with marked nuclear atypia. On performing immunohistochemistry, the tumor cells showed diffuse positive staining for CD10, CD20, cyclin D1, and Pax-5, and negative staining for CD3, CD15, CD30, CD56, and CK. Bcl-6 and Mum-1 expression were observed in 60% and 80% of tumor cells, respectively. The tumor Ki67 index was about 60%. Based on these findings, The tumor was diagnosed as a rare cyclin D1-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma rather than a mantle cell lymphoma. Conclusion: Cyclin D1-positive large B-cell lymphoma is rare, but as large B-cell lymphoma is a common type of lymphoma, cyclin D1-positive large B-cell lymphoma should be considered a major possibility during differential diagnosis, including in the tonsils. PMID:28296741

  7. Tonsillotomy or tonsillectomy?--a prospective study comparing histological and immunological findings in recurrent tonsillitis and tonsillar hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Reichel, Oliver; Mayr, Doris; Winterhoff, Jan; de la Chaux, Richard; Hagedorn, Hjalmar; Berghaus, Alexander

    2007-03-01

    We evaluated the differences in histological and immunological findings in children with recurrent tonsillitis and tonsillar hyperplasia and assessed the risk for relapsing tonsillar hyperplasia or recurrent tonsillitis after tonsillotomy in a prospective clinical study. Sixty-four children with recurrent tonsillitis underwent traditional (total) blunt dissection tonsillectomy between October 2003 and July 2004. Partial tonsillectomy (tonsillotomy) using CO(2)-laser technique was performed on 49 children with tonsillar hyperplasia and no history of recurrent tonsillitis between August 2003 and March 2005. The present study compares preoperative serum anti-streptolysin-O antibody and immunoglobulin levels (IgG, IgA and IgM), C-reactive protein levels (CRP) and blood leukocyte counts of the two study groups. Additionally the tonsillar tissue removed by tonsillotomy or tonsillectomy was histologically examined in order to determine the grade of hyperplasia, chronic inflammation and fibrosis. Furthermore, the grade of fresh inflammation within the tonsillar crypts of the specimens was analysed. The parents of 40 patients treated by laser tonsillotomy were surveyed in average 16 months. There was no statistically significant difference in preoperative serum anti-streptolysin-O antibody and immunoglobulin levels, C-reactive protein levels and blood leukocyte counts between the two study groups. All specimens showed the histological picture of hyperplasia. There was no statistically significant difference in the grades of hyperplasia between the two study groups. Signs of fresh but mild inflammation within the tonsillar crypts could be found in over 70% of both study groups. Fibrosis only occurred in children with recurrent tonsillitis (9%). In all specimens signs of chronic inflammation could be detected. The histological examinations of specimens from children with repeated throat infections more frequently showed a moderate chronic inflammation of the tonsillar tissue

  8. Lymphoid papillary hyperplasia of the palatine tonsil: a Chinese case report.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming; Yu, Jingjing; Li, Changshui

    2013-01-01

    Lymphoid papillary hyperplasia is a rare abnormality of the tonsils with a predilection for affecting young Asian girls. Herein, we report a 31-year-old Chinese woman presented as right lateral recurrent tonsillar hypertrophy with odynophagia and dysphagia over the past 5 years, worsening over a period of for half a year. Clinically, this lesion was similar to papillomatosis or lymphoid polyposis. However, histopathologic study showed a distinctive form of lymphoid hyperplasia with considerable distinct finger-like projections composed of many phyllodes which contained remarkable follicular lymphoid hyperplasia. This is the only Chinese case of lymphoid papillary hyperplasia of the palatine tonsils that has been reported in the most recent English literature so far. The importance of recognizing this disorder rests in the fact that in spite of the clinical features suggestive of both a benign and a malignant tumor, however, the process is a benign tumor-like proliferation, probably non-neoplastic, could easily be cured by tonsillectomy.

  9. Effect of surface neuromuscular electrical stimulation on labial and lingual muscles in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Safi, Mohammed F; Wright-Harp, Wilhelmina; Lucker, Jay R; Payne, Joan C

    2017-01-31

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) may have potential as a treatment for muscle weakness as it may improve strength when applied to the orofacial muscles. However, before incorporating this procedure into clinical practice, research is needed to investigate its effects on lingual and facial muscles of speech and mastication. The aim of this study was to determine what effect(s) submental and labial NMES would have on lingual and labial muscle strength in healthy participants. Fourteen healthy adults (27-49 years old) were assigned to two groups (treatment and control). A pretreatment and post-treatment test using the Iowa Oral Performance Instrument was used to measure the strength of labial and lingual muscles in both groups. Participants in the treatment group received labial and submental NMES while performing a structured labial, buccal, and lingual exercise program. In contrast, participants in the control group completed the same oral motor exercise program without stimulation.

  10. Morphology of the lingual papillae in the brush-tailed rat kangaroo.

    PubMed

    Emura, Shoichi; Okumura, Toshihiko; Chen, Huayue

    2014-01-01

    We examined the dorsal lingual surface of an adult brush-tailed rat kangaroo (Bettongia penicillata) by scanning electron microscopy. The filiform and fungiform papillae on the lingual apex and body consisted of a main papilla and secondary papillae. The connective tissue core of the filiform papillae on the lingual apex was cylindrical in shape with a crushed top. The connective tissue core of the filiform papillae on the lingual body had one large and several small processes. The fungiform papillae were round in shape. The connective tissue core of the fungiform papillae had several depressions on its top. The surface of the vallate papillae was rough and the papillae were surrounded by a groove and a pad. Several long conical papillae derived from the posterolateral margin of the tongue where foliate papillae have been shown to be distributed in many other animal species. The long conical papillae were very similar to those of the koala and opossum.

  11. Lingual nerve injury after third molar removal: Unilateral atrophy of fungiform papillae

    PubMed Central

    de-Pablo-Garcia-Cuenca, Alba; Bescós-Atín, Maria S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pain and sensory changes due to lingual nerve injury are one of the most common alterations that follow surgical removal of third molar. They are usually transient but other less common complications, such as the atrophy of fungiform papillae, have an uncertain prognosis. Case Description: We report a case of a 34-year-old woman who presented a unilateral lingual atrophy of fungiform papillae after third molar extraction accompanied by severe dysesthesia that altered her daily life significantly during the following months and how this complication evolved over time. We conducted a literature review on the different factors that can lead to a lingual nerve injury. Clinical Implications: The clinical evolution of temporary and permanent somatosensitve injuries is an important fact to take into consideration during the postoperative management because it will indicate the lesion prognosis. Key words:Lingual nerve, third molar removal, somatosensitive alteration, papillae atrophy, permanent injury, temporary injury. PMID:24790723

  12. Transient lingual papillitis associated with confirmed herpes simplex virus 1 in a patient with kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Krakowski, Andrew C; Kim, Silvia S; Burns, Jane C

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of transient lingual papillitis associated with confirmed herpes simplex virus 1 that developed after a child received intravenous immunoglobulin and infliximab for acute Kawasaki disease.

  13. Role of Palatine Tonsils as a Prion Entry Site in Classical and Atypical Experimental Sheep Scrapie

    PubMed Central

    Cancedda, Maria G.; Di Guardo, Giovanni; Chiocchetti, Roberto; Demontis, Francesca; Marruchella, Giuseppe; Sorteni, Caterina; Maestrale, Caterina; Lai, Alfio

    2014-01-01

    Atypical and classical scrapie-infected sheep brain tissue was monolaterally injected into the tonsils of lambs to investigate their role as a prion entry point. We first detected classical PrPSc within the inoculated tonsil and in the ipsilateral retropharyngeal lymph node at 3 months postinoculation (p.i.). At 7 months p.i., PrPSc colonized other lymphoid tissues bilaterally, including ileal Peyer's patches. The earliest PrPSc deposition within the brain was ipsilaterally observed at 9 months p.i. in the substantia reticularis of the medulla oblongata. At 12 months p.i., PrPSc deposition was present bilaterally in the nucleus parasympathicus nervi vagi, as well as in the intermediolateral cell column of the thoracolumbar spinal cord. No PrPSc was detected in the lambs inoculated with atypical scrapie. These findings suggest that neuroinvasion may naturally occur from the tonsil after a widespread prion replication within the lymphoid tissues during classical scrapie only, thus mimicking the pathogenesis after oral ingestion. PMID:24198416

  14. Histology of palate and soft palate tonsil of collared peccary (Tayassu tajacu).

    PubMed

    Teófilo, T S; Morais, M R P T; Dias, G F; Diniz, A N; Chaves, H S A; Fontenele-Neto, J D

    2014-10-01

    Peccaries are characterized by a prominent skin gland, known as scent gland, which is located in the middle of the rump. These animals are able to survive in a great variety of habitats, from humid tropical forests to semi-arid areas. They are omnivorous animals, and their diet includes fibrous material, vegetables, fruits, small vertebrates and insects. Collared peccary hard palate and soft palate tonsils were studied, macroscopic morphometric data were collected and tissue samples were paraffin-embedded. Sections were stained with HE, Gomori's trichrome and von Kossa; the first two were used to study general organization and the latter to detect calcium deposits. The hard palate showed one incisive papilla followed by several rugae united by a distinct raphe. The hard palate is lined by a keratinised squamous epithelium resting on a dense connective, whereas in the soft palate, the epithelium is parakeratinised and showed lymphocyte infiltration. The palate showed several pacinian corpuscles in the propria-submucosa. Two ovoid-shaped tonsils were found in the soft palate, and several crypts were observed on its surface. The epithelium was highly infiltrated by lymphocytes, and within the crypts, tonsilloliths were frequently observed. The study showed that the general organization of collared peccary palate is similar to other species, but in its oropharynx, only the soft palate tonsil was present and the pacinian corpuscles formed small aggregates.

  15. Dual ectopic thyroid gland: sonography and scintigraphy of lingual and sublingual thyroid.

    PubMed

    Marković, Vinko; Glavina, Gordana; Eterović, Davor; Punda, Ante; Brdar, Dubravka

    2014-06-01

    Dual ectopic lingual and sublingual thyroid gland is an extraordinarily rare condition. We present 1 patient with subclinical hypothyroidism. The clinical examination revealed that the thyroid gland was not palpable in its usual cervical location, whereas ultrasonography confirmed an empty thyroid bed without any ectopic thyroid tissue in the rest of the neck. The final diagnosis of dual ectopic lingual and sublingual thyroid was established by ultrasound examination through the mouth floor and confirmed by scintigraphy and CT thereafter.

  16. Details of the intralingual topography and morphology of the lingual nerve.

    PubMed

    Rusu, M C; Nimigean, V; Podoleanu, L; Ivaşcu, R V; Niculescu, M C

    2008-09-01

    The lingual nerve supplies the tongue with trigeminal sensory fibers and sensory fibers that originate from the chorda tympani. The aim of this study was to investigate, by dissection, the anatomical features of the lingual nerve at the level of the tongue and to correlate the findings with existing data. Six human adult cadavers dissected bilaterally and 6 specimens of tongue-pharynx-larynx from autopsied adult cadavers were studied. The lingual nerve gives off its terminal branches at the anterior border of the hyoglossus muscle where the anastomotic loops between the lingual and hypoglossal nerves are found. Two morphological types of terminal division of the lingual nerve were seen: a single primary trunk or two primary trunks, a medial one distributed in the middle third of the tongue and a lateral one for the anterior third of the tongue. The primary terminal branches of the lingual nerve were located on the outer surface of the genioglossus muscle, forming a nervous layer over the deep artery of the tongue. The following emerged from the primary trunk(s): thin branches for the ipsilateral mucosa of the ventral surface of the tongue and 4-9 thick secondary trunks, with palisade disposition and translingual courses that followed the outer surface of the genioglossus muscle towards the dorsal mucosa of the ipsilateral part of the tongue, anterior to the circumvallate papillae.

  17. Effect of Salmonella infection on cecal tonsil regulatory T cell properties in chickens.

    PubMed

    Shanmugasundaram, Revathi; Kogut, Michael H; Arsenault, Ryan J; Swaggerty, Christina L; Cole, Kimberly; Reddish, John M; Selvaraj, Ramesh K

    2015-08-01

    Two studies were conducted to study regulatory T cell [Treg (CD4⁺CD25⁺)] properties during the establishment of a persistent intestinal infection in broiler chickens. Four-day-old broiler chicks were orally gavaged with 5 × 10⁶ CFU/mL Salmonella enteritidis (S. enteritidis) or sterile PBS (control). Samples were collected at 4, 7, 10, and 14 d postinfection. There was a significant (P < 0.05) increase in the number of CD4⁺CD25⁺ cells by d 4 postinfection that increased steadily throughout the course of the 14-d infection, whereas the number of CD4⁺CD25⁺ cells in the noninfected controls remained steady throughout the study. CD4⁺CD25⁺ cells from cecal tonsils of S. enteritidis-infected birds had a higher (P < 0.05) IL-10 mRNA content than CD4⁺CD25⁺ cells from the noninfected controls at all time-points studied. The amount of IL-2 mRNA content in the cecal tonsil CD4⁺CD25⁻ cells from the infected birds did not differ (P > 0.05) when compared to that of noninfected control birds. At a lower effector/responder cell ratio of 0.25:1, CD4⁺CD25⁺ cells from cecal tonsils of Salmonella-infected birds suppressed T cell proliferation at d 7 and 14 post-S. enteritidis infection, while CD4⁺CD25⁺ cells from noninfected control groups did not suppress T cell proliferation. In the second studu, 1-day-old chickens were orally gavaged with PBS (control) or 1.25 × 10⁸ CFU/bird S. enteritidis. At 7 and 21 d post-Salmonella infection, CD25⁺ cells collected from cecal tonsils of S. enteritidis-infected birds and restimulated in vitro with Salmonella antigen had higher (P < 0.05) IL-10 mRNA content compared to those in the control group. Spleen CD4⁺CD25⁺, CD4⁺, and CD8⁺ cell percentage did not differ (P > 0.05) between the Salmonella-infected and control birds. In conclusion, a persistent intestinal S. enteritidis infection increased the Treg percentage, suppressive properties, and IL-10 mRNA amounts in the cecal tonsils of broiler birds.

  18. The Impact of Tobacco Smoking Upon Chronic/Recurrent Tonsillitis and Post Tonsillectomy Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Cinamon, Udi; Goldfarb, Abraham; Marom, Tal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Smoking has many adverse effects on the oral and pharyngeal mucosa. Outcomes may be developing tonsillar infections and predisposing for post tonsillectomy bleeding (PTB). Objective The objective of our study was to determine whether smokers have more chronic/recurrent tonsillitis indicating for tonsillectomy or develop more PTB episodes. Methods We conducted a retrospective study on two groups of adults (age ≥18 years). Cohort 1: Smoking among patients who underwent tonsillectomy for recurrent/chronic tonsillitis. Cohort 2: Smoking among patients requiring control of PTB that were operated primarily for recurrent/chronic tonsillitis. Cohort 1 served as a population-reference for the second. We retrieved the data from medical records. Results Cohort 1: 206 adults aged 18–50 years (mean 26 ± 7.6). 28% (57 patients) were smokers, versus 24% and 20% in the general population (in the years 2000 and 2010; p = 0.5, p = 0.18, respectively). Cohort 2: 114 adults aged 18–73 years (mean 26 ± 7.6). 43% were smokers, double the incidence in the general population (p = 0.004, p = 0.0004, in 2000 and 2010, respectively), and 1.5 times cohort 1 (p = 0.02). Smoking rates among bleeders on post-operative days 8–10 and later than day 10 were 53% and 60% (p = 0.0005 and p < 0.0001, respectively). Five of ten patients presenting a second PTB were smokers. Timing of re-bleedings was similar to their first PTB and dated similarly as first PTB of the entire group, mean 5.6 days (SD ± 3.2). Conclusion Smokers may encounter more chronic/recurrent tonsillitis episodes, indicating tonsillectomy and significantly are more prone for PTB. Smoking cessation may perhaps diminish recurrent/chronic tonsillitis. Whether pre-operative abstinence or its length would reduce PTB incidence is yet to be determined. PMID:28382125

  19. Lingual nerve lesion during ranula surgical treatment: case report.

    PubMed

    Biglioli, F; Battista, V; Marelli, S; Valassina, D; Colombo, V; Bardazzi, A; Tarabbia, F; Colletti, G; Rabbiosi, D; Autelitano, L

    2010-10-01

    Iatrogenic lingual nerve (LN) injuries are quite common in oral surgery both in maxillo-facial surgery and in oral surgery. LN runs superficially into the lateral mouth floor just beneath the mucous layer and this position enhances damage frequency. This article lists the different aetiologies of iatrogenic LN injuries and it almost focuses on lesions due to surgical treatment of ranulas. In the case report a LN lesion due to oral ranula excision is discussed; the patient experienced anaesthesia and hyperpatia in the corrisponded tongue side. It was treated with a microneurosugical anastomosis of LN, after amputation neuroma excision. The partial and definitive recovery of perception happened in six months and was deemed satisfying with 70% of functionality restored (results compared with the functionality of the contralateral side). An algorithm for diagnosis and therapy indication for iatrogenic injuries to nerves is also proposed. In case of surgical treatment, funcitonal recovery manifests after 4-6 month; a functional recovery of 70% of total nerve function is possible. The variable that most affects nerve functional recovery is surgical treatment timing; it must be performed as soon as possible.

  20. Use of CO2 laser in lingual and labial frenectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorotti, Renata C.; Bellini, Bruno S.; Cassitas, Nilceu P.; Baldin, Diva H. Z.; Nicola, Ester M. D.

    2000-03-01

    Ankiloglossia or frenum lingual alteration leads to important tongue dysfunction, which, besides discomfort and pain during function, is generally responsible for the difficulty to express specific phonemes. In other cases, a heavy muscular abnormal attachment of labial frenum can promote clinical changes. In such case, an eventual orthodontic therapy is indicated and aesthetic alteration is observed. In both cases, surgical removal is indicated. The surgery, for prevention purposes, must be done as soon as possible, but considering that the majority of patients are young (5 - 14 years old), difficulties during surgery are expected to occur. Correction of speech or orthodontic dysfunction in advanced ages is much more complex and difficult than in childhood. In the present work we demonstrate that the use of CO2 lasers in these cases are advantageous and simple. The laser energy causes the tissue of the frenum to open in the classic shape with no bleeding and no need for suture, reducing the risk of cross- contamination and of postoperative infection. Scarring and other complications are also minimized. A CO2 laser (continuous, 8 W, 10.6 micrometers) was used assisted with local anesthesia. The major advantage of laser is the possibility of its application in early ages, preventing further problems.

  1. Reed vibration in lingual organ pipes without the resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miklós, András; Angster, Judit; Pitsch, Stephan; Rossing, Thomas D.

    2003-02-01

    Vibrations of plucked and blown reeds of lingual organ pipes without the resonators have been investigated. Three rather surprising phenomena are observed: the frequency of the reed plucked by hand is shifted upwards for large-amplitude plucking, the blown frequency is significantly higher than the plucked one, and peaks halfway between the harmonics of the fundamental frequency appear in the spectrum of the reed velocity. The dependence of the plucked frequency on the length of the reed reveals that the vibrating length at small vibrations is 3 mm shorter than the apparent free length. The frequency shift for large-amplitude plucking is explained by the periodic change of the vibrating length during the oscillation. Reed vibrations of the blown pipe can be described by a physical model based on the assumption of air flow between the reed and the shallot. Aerodynamic effects may generate and sustain the oscillation of the reed without acoustic feedback. The appearance of subharmonics is explained by taking into account the periodic modulation of the stress in the reed material by the sound field. Therefore, a parametric instability appears in the differential equation of vibration, leading to the appearance of subharmonics.

  2. Towards cross-lingual alerting for bursty epidemic events

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Online news reports are increasingly becoming a source for event-based early warning systems that detect natural disasters. Harnessing the massive volume of information available from multilingual newswire presents as many challanges as opportunities due to the patterns of reporting complex spatio-temporal events. Results In this article we study the problem of utilising correlated event reports across languages. We track the evolution of 16 disease outbreaks using 5 temporal aberration detection algorithms on text-mined events classified according to disease and outbreak country. Using ProMED reports as a silver standard, comparative analysis of news data for 13 languages over a 129 day trial period showed improved sensitivity, F1 and timeliness across most models using cross-lingual events. We report a detailed case study analysis for Cholera in Angola 2010 which highlights the challenges faced in correlating news events with the silver standard. Conclusions The results show that automated health surveillance using multilingual text mining has the potential to turn low value news into high value alerts if informed choices are used to govern the selection of models and data sources. An implementation of the C2 alerting algorithm using multilingual news is available at the BioCaster portal http://born.nii.ac.jp/?page=globalroundup. PMID:22166371

  3. Positional targets for lingual consonants defined using electromagnetic articulography.

    PubMed

    Yunusova, Yana; Rosenthal, Jeffrey S; Rudy, Krista; Baljko, Melanie; Daskalogiannakis, John

    2012-08-01

    The study examined the positional targets for lingual consonants defined using a point-parameterized approach with Wave (NDI, Waterloo, ON, Canada). The overall goal was to determine which consonants had unique tongue positions with respect to other consonants. Nineteen talkers repeated vowel-consonant-vowel (VCV) syllables that included consonants /t, d, s, z, , k, g/ in symmetrical vowel contexts /i, u, a/, embedded in a carrier phrase. Target regions for each consonant, characterized in terms of x,y,z tongue positions at the point of maximum tongue elevation, were extracted. Distances and overlaps were computed between all consonant pairs and compared to the distances and overlaps of their contextual targets. Cognates and postalveolar homorganics were found to share the location of their target regions. On average, alveolar stops showed distinctively different target regions than alveolar fricatives, which in turn showed different target region locations than the postalveolar consonants. Across talker variability in target locations was partially explained by differences in habitual speaking rate and hard palate characteristics.

  4. Vocal-tract filtering by lingual articulation in a parrot.

    PubMed

    Beckers, Gabriël J L; Nelson, Brian S; Suthers, Roderick A

    2004-09-07

    Human speech and bird vocalization are complex communicative behaviors with notable similarities in development and underlying mechanisms. However, there is an important difference between humans and birds in the way vocal complexity is generally produced. Human speech originates from independent modulatory actions of a sound source, e.g., the vibrating vocal folds, and an acoustic filter, formed by the resonances of the vocal tract (formants). Modulation in bird vocalization, in contrast, is thought to originate predominantly from the sound source, whereas the role of the resonance filter is only subsidiary in emphasizing the complex time-frequency patterns of the source (e.g., but see ). However, it has been suggested that, analogous to human speech production, tongue movements observed in parrot vocalizations modulate formant characteristics independently from the vocal source. As yet, direct evidence of such a causal relationship is lacking. In five Monk parakeets, Myiopsitta monachus, we replaced the vocal source, the syrinx, with a small speaker that generated a broad-band sound, and we measured the effects of tongue placement on the sound emitted from the beak. The results show that tongue movements cause significant frequency changes in two formants and cause amplitude changes in all four formants present between 0.5 and 10 kHz. We suggest that lingual articulation may thus in part explain the well-known ability of parrots to mimic human speech, and, even more intriguingly, may also underlie a speech-like formant system in natural parrot vocalizations.

  5. Profile of inflammatory mediators in tonsils of patients with periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Patricia M; Araya, Andrea; Pérez, Claudio I; Maul, Ximena; Serrano, Carolina; Beltrán, Constanza; Harris, Paul R; Talesnik, Eduardo

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the levels of white blood cells and profile of proinflammatory Th1, Th2, Th17, and T regulatory tissue cytokines in the tonsils of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA) patients to contribute to the pathophysiological understanding of the PFAPA syndrome. A cohort of PFAPA patients who had tonsillectomy during 2010 and 2011 was included and compared to control patients who had tonsillectomy for tonsillar hypertrophy. White blood cell counts were measured during flares in PFAPA patients and before tonsillectomy in the control group. Cytokine gene expression was analyzed in removed tonsils by real-time PCR. Nine PFAPA patients with a median age of 5.3 years (1.7-8 years) and 17 hypertrophic tonsils of patients with a median age of 4.8 years (2.3-8.4 years) participated in this study. Tonsillectomy was performed during afebrile period between PFAPA flares. Three of the nine patients had recurrent episodes of aphthous stomatitis without fever after tonsillectomy. Leukocyte and neutrophil counts were higher in PFAPA patients compared to controls (p < 0.05). Eosinophil counts were lower in PFAPA patients during flares (p = 0.006). IL-1β, TNF-α, TGF-β, IL-17, and IFN-γ levels were similar in the tonsils of patients and controls. IL-4 gene expression in the tonsils was lower in PFAPA patients compared to those of the controls (p = 0.04). Proinflammatory, effector, and regulatory cytokine gene expression in tonsil tissue of PFAPA children removed in a noninflammatory asymptomatic interval and in control patients were similar. However, IL-4 cytokine gene expression in the tonsils and peripheral blood eosinophils were lower in the PFAPA patients suggesting a potential pathogenesis pathway based on an inhibition of Th2 responses.

  6. Light and scanning electron microscopic study on the tongue and lingual papillae of the common hippopotamus, Hippopotamus amphibius amphibius.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Ken; Hama, Natsuki; Shindo, Junji; Kobayashi, Kan; Kageyama, Ikuo

    2009-07-01

    We observed the three-dimensional structures of the external surface and connective tissue cores CTCs, after exfoliation of the epithelium of the lingual papillae (filiform, fungiform, and foliate papillae) of the common hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius amphibius) using scanning electron microscopy and conventional light microscopy. Following unique features were found; typical vallate papillae with a circumferential furrow were not observable. Instead, numerous large fungiform papillae were rather densely distributed on the posterior of the lingual prominence. Taste buds were observable only on the dorsal epithelium. Serous lingual gland was not seen in the lamina propria; however, mucous-rich mixed lingual glands were found and in a few of orifices were seen on the large fungiform tops. Lingual prominence was diminished their width. Rather long and slender conical papillae were distributed on the lingual prominence and were similar to nonruminant herbivore, that is donkey. Beside this narrow lingual prominence, lateral slopes were situated with numerous short spine-like protrusions. After removal of the epithelium, CTCs of lateral slopes exhibited attenuated flower bud structures. Large-conical papillae were situated on the root of the tongue. These large conical papillae were not seen among ruminants and seen on the lingual root of omnivores and carnivores. It implies that lingual structure of common hippopotamus possessed mixed characteristics between Perissodactyls, Ruminantia, and nonherbivores such as Suiformes because of their unique evolutionally taxonomic position. Moreover, adaptation for soft grass diet and associating easier mastication may be also affecting these mixed morphological features of the tongue.

  7. [A Case of Cystic Cervical Lymph Node Metastasis of HPV-positive Tonsil Cancer, Being Discriminated as the Branchiogenic Carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Kambara, Rumi; Tamai, Masamitsu; Horii, Arata

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal carcinomas have been increasing. The first manifestation of these tumors is frequently as cystic metastasis to cervical lymph nodes that may precede recognition of the primary tumor, so, they often result in misdiagnosis as branchial cleft cysts. We report a case of cystic cervical lymph node metastasis of HPV-positive tonsil cancer. The patient was a 70-years-old man who noticed a mass on his left neck. The tumor was large and soft, and it was diagnosed as benign in fine-needle aspiration cytology. We diagnosed the tumor as a branchial cleft cyst and undertook surgery. The histopathological diagnosis was squamous cell carcinoma arising from a branchiogenic cyst. However, because it did not satisfy the diagnostic criteria, we diagnosed the tumor as an unknown primary tumor. One year later, left tonsil cancer was suspected based on PET-CT imaging and a left tonsillectomy was undertaken, whereafter tonsil cancer was found. In p16 immunostaining, it was positive in both cystic mass and tonsil. The cervical mass was cystic lymph node metastasis of HPV-positive tonsil cancer. It is important to investigate the oropharynx, when we found cystic cervical mass, because HPV-positive oropharyngeal carcinoma frequently results in cystic neck metastasis.

  8. Morphology of the Lingual and Buccal Papillae in Alpaca (Vicugna pacos) - Light and Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Goździewska-Harłajczuk, K; Klećkowska-Nawrot, J; Janeczek, M; Zawadzki, M

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was the description of the lingual and buccal papillae in adult alpaca (Vicugna pacos) by light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The tongue consisted of apex, body and root. Four types of lingual papillae (filiform, fungiform, conical and circumvallate) in addition to two types of buccal papillae were observed. The filiform papillae, some with secondary papillae, were distributed on both the corpus and apex of the tongue, with stratified epithelium, and layer of keratin coat were recognized. The short (small) cone papillae had pointed top, while bunoform papillae were wide with smooth apex. The much less numerous circumvallate papillae with pseudopapillae on the each rim of the caudal lingual body were present with weak layer of keratin and intra-epithelial taste buds. The small fungiform papillae were found on the dorsal lingual surface, while the large fungiform papillae were situated on the ventral surface of the tongue, especially, in rostral part and were round in shape with numerous gustatory pores and very thin keratin coat. Pseudopapillae were present on the buccal conical 'bunoform' papillae surface, while 'elongate' buccal papillae surface was rather softly folded with thin coat of keratin. Microridges were observed in the less keratinized parts of each type of papillae. The orientation of either lingual or buccal papillae into the throat side facilitates the emptying of oral cavity from nutrient and swallowing of food. In conclusion, the anatomical features of the alpaca tongue are an adaptation to the feeding habits.

  9. [Microbiological aspects of effective antibiotic therapy early after operation in chronic maxillary ethmoiditis and tonsillitis].

    PubMed

    Luchsheva, Iu V; Istratov, V G; Zhukhovitskiĭ, V G

    2004-01-01

    Microbiological and chromato-mass-spectrometric examinations were made in 53 patients with chronic maxillary ethmoiditis and 52 patients with chronic tonsillitis. The microflora showed strong resistance to unprotected penicillines and cephalosporins, 100% sensitivity to amoxicilline clavulanate and mupirocine. The role of opportunistic microflora as pathogens of ENT inflammation is growing as well as the percentage of anaerobic microorganisms detected chromato-mass-spectrometrically in chronic inflammation. Administration of mupirocine on polyethylenglicol base early after operation in patients with chronic maxillary ethmoiditis accelerated recovery of the study group patients by 2-3 days vs control patients.

  10. Lingual CD36 and nutritional status differentially regulate fat preference in obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats.

    PubMed

    Douglas Braymer, H; Zachary, Hannah; Schreiber, Allyson L; Primeaux, Stefany D

    2017-03-14

    Lingual fatty acid receptors (i.e. CD36) mediate the orosensory perception of fat/fatty acids and may contribute to the susceptibility to develop obesity. The current study tested the hypothesis that fat/fatty acid preference in obesity-prone (OP, Osborne-Mendel) and obesity-resistant (OR, S5B/Pl) rats is mediated by nutritional status and lingual CD36. To determine if nutritional status affected linoleic acid (LA) preference in OP and OR rats, rats were either fasted overnight or fed a high fat diet (60% kcal from fat). In OR rats, fasting increased the preference for higher concentrations of LA (1.0%), while consumption of a high fat diet decreased LA preference. In OP rats, fasting increased the preference for lower concentrations of LA (0.25%), however high fat diet consumption did not alter LA preference. To determine if lingual CD36 mediated the effects of an overnight fast on LA preference, the expression of lingual CD36 mRNA was assessed and the effect of lingual application of CD36 siRNA on LA preference was determined. Fasting increased lingual CD36 mRNA expression in OR rats, but failed to alter lingual CD36 mRNA in OP rats. Following an overnight fast, application of lingual CD36 siRNA led to a decrease in LA preference in OR, but not OP rats. Lingual application of CD36 siRNA was also used to determine if lingual CD36 mediated the intake and preference for a high fat diet in OP and OR rats. CD36 siRNA decreased the preference and intake of high fat diet in OR rats, but not OP rats. The results from this study suggest that the dysregulation of lingual CD36 in OP rats is a potential factor leading to increased fat intake and fat preference and an enhanced susceptibility to develop obesity.

  11. Trends and changes in paediatric tonsil surgery in Sweden 1987–2013: a population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Borgström, Anna; Nerfeldt, Pia; Friberg, Danielle; Sunnergren, Ola; Stalfors, Joacim

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to longitudinally describe the history of tonsil surgery in Swedish children and adolescents regarding incidence, indications for surgery, surgical methods and the age and gender distributions. Setting A retrospective longitudinal population-based cohort study based on register data from the Swedish National Patient Register (NPR) and population data from Statistics Sweden. Participants All Swedish children 1–<18 years registered in the NPR with a tonsil surgery procedure 1987–2013. Results 167 894 tonsil surgeries were registered in the NPR 1987–2013. An increase in the total incidence rate was observed, from 22/10 000 person years in 1987 to 47/10 000 in 2013. The most marked increase was noted in children 1–3 years of age, increasing from 17 to 73/10 000 person years over the period. The proportion children with obstructive/sleep disordered breathing (SDB) indications increased from 42.4% in 1987 to 73.6% in 2013. Partial tonsillectomy, tonsillotomy (TT), increased since 1996 and in 2013 55.1% of all tonsil procedures were TTs. Conclusions There have been considerable changes in clinical practice for tonsil surgery in Swedish children over the past few decades. Overall, a doubling in the total incidence rate was observed. This increase consisted mainly of an increase in surgical procedures due to obstructive/SDB indications, particularly among the youngest age group (1–3 years old). TT has gradually replaced tonsillectomy as the predominant method for tonsil surgery. PMID:28087550

  12. Mortality after tonsil surgery, a population study, covering eight years and 82,527 operations in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Østvoll, Eirik; Sunnergren, Ola; Ericsson, Elisabeth; Hemlin, Claes; Hultcrantz, Elisabeth; Odhagen, Erik; Stalfors, Joacim

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this retrospective cohort study was to evaluate mortality rate and cause of death after tonsil surgery in Sweden. Two national registries were used, both run by The Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare, an agency of the Ministry of Health and Social Affairs. In the National Patient register all tonsil surgeries performed in Sweden from 2004 through 2011 were identified. The result from this search was matched with the National Cause of Death Register to identify all deaths that occurred within 30 days of tonsil surgery. Personal identity numbers were used to do the matching of registers. Details on the cause of death were obtained from the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare. Two deaths were identified in 82,527 operations. Both patients were male, otherwise healthy, children under the age of five, operated due to tonsil-related upper airway obstruction/snoring with coblation technique. Cause of death was bleeding-related airway obstruction in both cases and hemodynamic failure caused by blood loss. Both deaths occurred after discharge from the hospital within the first postoperative week. No abnormal levels of analgesics were found in the postmortal investigations. Two deaths related to tonsil surgery (performed on benign indications) were identified in 82,527 operations (2004-2011) in a well-defined national population. Both deaths were due to postoperative bleeding. Based on our findings, the frequency of post-tonsil-surgery mortality in Sweden was 1/41,263, 2004-2011. Level of evidence 2b retrospective cohort study.

  13. Cephalometric appraisal of patients treated with fixed lingual orthodontic appliances: historic review and analysis of cases.

    PubMed

    Fulmer, D T; Kuftinec, M M

    1989-06-01

    In the first part of this article, a retrospective look was taken of evolvement and progression in design of the lingual fixed orthodontic appliance. The second part is a retrospective study of treated lingual cases. By the use of standardized cephalometric radiographs, selected treatment parameters were analyzed:--namely, bite opening, changes in mandibular position, inclination, torque and intrusion of incisors, and soft-tissue effects. For the clinician who uses this treatment modality, the most significant effects are the bite opening, intrusion of the mandibular incisors (particularly in extraction cases), and limited reduction of lower lip protrusion. The mandibular plane angle and torque and inclination of incisors did not follow a consistent and predictable pattern. On the basis of the study's findings, it is suggested that lingual fixed appliance therapy is a useful supplement to our treatment modalities; good results are both realistic and possible.

  14. Lingual and fusiform gyri in visual processing: a clinico-pathologic study of superior altitudinal hemianopia.

    PubMed Central

    Bogousslavsky, J; Miklossy, J; Deruaz, J P; Assal, G; Regli, F

    1987-01-01

    A macular-sparing superior altitudinal hemianopia with no visuo-psychic disturbance, except impaired visual learning, was associated with bilateral ischaemic necrosis of the lingual gyrus and only partial involvement of the fusiform gyrus on the left side. It is suggested that bilateral destruction of the lingual gyrus alone is not sufficient to affect complex visual processing. The fusiform gyrus probably has a critical role in colour integration, visuo-spatial processing, facial recognition and corresponding visual imagery. Involvement of the occipitotemporal projection system deep to the lingual gyri probably explained visual memory dysfunction, by a visuo-limbic disconnection. Impaired verbal memory may have been due to posterior involvement of the parahippocampal gyrus and underlying white matter, which may have disconnected the intact speech areas from the left medial temporal structures. Images PMID:3585386

  15. Gray Matter Volume of the Lingual Gyrus Mediates the Relationship between Inhibition Function and Divergent Thinking

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lijie; Qiao, Lei; Chen, Qunlin; Yang, Wenjing; Xu, Mengsi; Yao, Xiaonan; Qiu, Jiang; Yang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Although previous research provides converging evidence for the role of posterior regions of the brain (including temporal, occipital, and parietal regions) involved in inhibition on creative thinking, it remains unclear as to how these regions influence individual differences in creative thinking. Thus, we explored the relationship between posterior regions (i.e., hippocampal, parahippocampal, lingual gyrus, precuneus, and cuneus), inhibition function, and divergent thinking (DT) in 128 healthy college students. The results revealed that lower inhibition was associated with larger gray matter volume (GMV) in the lingual gyrus, which in turn was associated with higher DT. In addition, GMV in the lingual gyrus mediated the association between inhibition and DT. These results provide new evidence for the role of inhibition in creative thinking. Inhibition may affect the amount of information stored in long-term memory, which, in turn influences DT. PMID:27752250

  16. Gray Matter Volume of the Lingual Gyrus Mediates the Relationship between Inhibition Function and Divergent Thinking.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijie; Qiao, Lei; Chen, Qunlin; Yang, Wenjing; Xu, Mengsi; Yao, Xiaonan; Qiu, Jiang; Yang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Although previous research provides converging evidence for the role of posterior regions of the brain (including temporal, occipital, and parietal regions) involved in inhibition on creative thinking, it remains unclear as to how these regions influence individual differences in creative thinking. Thus, we explored the relationship between posterior regions (i.e., hippocampal, parahippocampal, lingual gyrus, precuneus, and cuneus), inhibition function, and divergent thinking (DT) in 128 healthy college students. The results revealed that lower inhibition was associated with larger gray matter volume (GMV) in the lingual gyrus, which in turn was associated with higher DT. In addition, GMV in the lingual gyrus mediated the association between inhibition and DT. These results provide new evidence for the role of inhibition in creative thinking. Inhibition may affect the amount of information stored in long-term memory, which, in turn influences DT.

  17. Fine structure of bat deep posterior lingual glands (von Ebner's)

    PubMed

    Azzali, G; Gatti, R; Bucci, G; Orlandini, G

    1989-10-01

    We studied the morphology and ultrastructure of the bat (Pipistrellus k.k. and Rhinolophus f.e.) deep posterior lingual glands (Ebner's glands) during hibernation, summer and after stimulation with pilocarpine. Ebner's glands are formed by serous tubulo-alveolar adenomeres and by an excretory system organized in intercalated ducts, long excretory ducts and a main excretory duct. The latter opens in the vallum which surrounds the circumvallate papillae and in the groove of the foliate papillae. The secretory cells, which lack basal folds, show abundant and dense granules (PAS+, Alcian blue -), microvilli (scarce during hibernation), a Golgi apparatus (well developed during summer and after stimulation with pilocarpine), a large nucleus and RER cisternae stacked at the basal pole. Centrioles, lipid droplets, heterogeneous bodies (in content and density, probably lipofuscin bodies), lysosomal multivesicular bodies and large, dense granules with a microcrystalline structure were also encountered. The lateral membranes of adjacent cells are joined by desmosomes; their interdigitations are neither numerous nor prominent during summer. Microfilaments, often gathered in small bundles, lie in the lateral, peripheral cytoplasm without any relation with desmosomes. In summer and particularly after stimulation with pilocarpine, the apical pole of the secretory cells is characterized by many long microvilli, pedunculated hyaloplasmic protrusions and secretory granules. During hibernation the lumen is filled with secretory material. Myoepithelial cells are arranged among secretory cells or between them and the basal lamina. The short intercalated ducts show similarities with the analogous ducts of the parotid gland. Striated ducts are absent. Excretory ducts are endowed with: a) an inner layer of cuboidal cells characterized by poorly developed cytoplasmic organelles, rare dense granules and a few small microvilli; b) an outer layer of basal cells lying on the basal lamina

  18. Predicting Differential Item Functioning in Cross-Lingual Testing: The Case of a High Stakes Test in the Kyrgyz Republic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drummond, Todd W.

    2011-01-01

    Cross-lingual tests are assessment instruments created in one language and adapted for use with another language group. Practitioners and researchers use cross-lingual tests for various descriptive, analytical and selection purposes both in comparative studies across nations and within countries marked by linguistic diversity (Hambleton, 2005).…

  19. Memory B lymphocytes in human tonsil do not express surface IgD.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, I C; Brisco, M J; Zola, H

    1995-02-01

    To clarify the phenotype of memory B lymphocytes, we have determined the frequency of somatic hypermutations in purified tonsil B cell populations. Our particular interest was the controversial question of whether any memory B-cells express IgD. Ig heavy chain gene rearrangements that used the nonpolymorphic VH6 gene were amplified by PCR, cloned, and sequenced. All eight sequences obtained from the surface IgD (sIgD)-negative fraction contained point mutations, with frequency of one mutation in every 24 bases of sequence. In contrast, only 4 of 12 sequences obtained from the sIgD-positive fraction contained point mutations, with a mutation frequency of one in 600. This frequency was similar to that found for cord blood B cells (one in 550), a population that does not contain memory B cells. These results indicate that although memory B cells are present in the sIgD-negative fraction, no memory cells can be detected in the sIgD-positive fraction of tonsil B lymphocytes.

  20. Cervical necrotising fasciitis and descending mediastinitis secondary to unilateral tonsillitis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Asad; Oko, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Cervical necrotizing fasciitis is an aggressive infection with high morbidity and mortality. We present a case of cervical necrotizing fasciitis and descending mediastinitis in a healthy young man, caused by unilateral tonsillitis with a successful outcome without aggressive debridement. Case presentation A 41-year-old man was admitted to our unit with a diagnosis of severe acute unilateral tonsillitis. On admission, he had painful neck movements and the skin over his neck was red, hot and tender. Computed tomography scan of his neck and chest showed evidence of cervical necrotizing fasciitis and descending mediastinitis secondary to underlying pharyngeal disease. He was treated with broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics. His condition improved over the next 3 days but a tender and fluctuant swelling appeared in the suprasternal region. A repeat scan showed the appearance of an abscess extending from the pretracheal region to the upper mediastinum which was drained through a small transverse anterior neck incision. After surgery, the patient's condition quickly improved and he was discharged on the 18th day of admission. Conclusion Less invasive surgical techniques may replace conventional aggressive debridement as the treatment of choice for cervical necrotizing fasciitis and descending necrotizing mediastinitis. PMID:19055812

  1. Loracarbef (LY163892) vs. penicillin VK in the treatment of streptococcal pharyngitis and tonsillitis.

    PubMed

    Disney, F A; Hanfling, M J; Hausinger, S A

    1992-08-01

    A double blind, randomized clinical trial compared loracarbef (LY163892) with penicillin VK. Two hundred thirty-three pediatric patients (less than or equal to 12 years) with a diagnosis of pharyngitis or tonsillitis resulting from Group A beta-hemolytic streptococci were randomized to treatment. Patients in the loracarbef group (n = 120) received loracarbef as a 15-mg/kg/day oral suspension or 200-mg capsule taken twice daily for 10 days. Patients in the penicillin group (n = 113) received penicillin VK as a 20-mg/kg/day oral suspension or 250-mg capsule taken four times daily for 10 days. Successful clinical responses were demonstrated in 101 of the 104 (97.1%) evaluable patients treated with loracarbef compared with 83 of 88 (94.3%) of evaluable patients treated with penicillin. The clinical relapse rate for the loracarbef group was 2.9% vs. 5.7% for the penicillin group. Bacteriologic response data approximated the clinical response data, as eradication of Group A beta-hemolytic streptococci was found in 86.5 and 81.8% of the loracarbef group and the penicillin group, respectively. No statistically significant difference in the incidence of treatment-emergent adverse reactions was noted between the two groups. The results indicate that loracarbef taken twice daily was comparable in safety and efficacy to penicillin VK taken four times daily in the treatment of Group A beta-hemolytic Streptococcus-associated pharyngitis and tonsillitis in children.

  2. Carcinoma of the tonsil: the effect of dose-time-volume factors on local control

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, P.G.; Beale, F.A.; Cummings, B.J.; Harwood, A.R.; Keane, T.J.; Payne, D.G.; Rider, W.D.

    1985-04-01

    Between 1970 and 1979, 372 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil were treated with primary irradiation therapy, with salvage surgery for failures. The median age was 60 years and the male to female ratio was 2:1. All patients received external beam radiation which was supplemented in 68 patients with a radioactive implant for disease into adjacent tongue. The overall survival for all patients was 38% at 5 years and 54% when corrected for intercurrent disease. Local control was 87% for T1 lesions, 68% for T2 lesions and 50% for T3 lesions. Regional control was 96% for NO, 67% for N1 and 37% for N2-3. A detailed dose-time-volume analysis revealed that increasing volume improved local control in T1 and T2 lesions. Increasing the dose in the range of 5000 to 6500 rad had no significant effect on primary control in any stage of disease. The addition of a radioactive implant did not increase local control if disease extended into the tongue. This study demonstrates the significance of adequate treatment volume in local control for carcinoma of the tonsil. No significant dose response was found and subsequent surgery was not compromised when a moderate dose of radiation was used.

  3. Haemophilus influenzae resides in tonsils and uses immunoglobulin D binding as an evasion strategy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kalpana; Nordström, Therése; Mörgelin, Matthias; Brant, Marta; Cardell, Lars-Olaf; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2014-05-01

    Haemophilus influenzae (Hi) causes respiratory tract infections and is also considered to be a commensal, particularly in preschool children. Tonsils from patients (n = 617) undergoing tonsillectomy due to chronic infection or hypertrophy were examined. We found that 51% of tonsils were positive for Hi, and in 95% of cases analyzed in detail (n = 39) Hi resided intracellularly in the core tonsillar tissue. Patients harbored several intracellular unique strains and the majority were nontypeable Hi (NTHi). Interestingly, the isolated NTHi bound soluble immunoglobulin (Ig) D at the constant heavy chain domain 1 as revealed by recombinant IgD/IgG chimeras. NTHi also interacted with B lymphocytes via the IgD B-cell receptor, resulting in internalization of bacteria, T-cell-independent activation via Toll-like receptor 9, and differentiation into non-NTHi-specific IgM-producing cells. Taken together, IgD-binding NTHi leads to an unspecific immune response and may support the bacteria to circumvent the host defense.

  4. Case report: Paraneoplastic neurologic syndrome associated with squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil.

    PubMed

    Janus, Jeffrey R; Chinnadurai, Sivakumar; Moore, Eric J

    2013-01-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes include a variety of disorders that affect the neurologic, endocrine, mucocutaneous, hematologic, and other systems as a result of neoplastic disease. Although their presentations vary, syndromes occur when tumor antigens exhibit cross-reactivity to similar antigens expressed by these systems. The antigens in the nervous system are called "onconeural" antigens. Although many disorders are associated with a comparatively high incidence of paraneoplastic neurologic syndromes, only a few cases have been associated with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the tonsil. We report the case of a 69-year-old man who initially presented with weakness and spastic gait. He was subsequently found to have a characteristic paraneoplastic tractopathy on thoracic magnetic resonance imaging. The subsequent workup and operative intervention identified a T2N0M0 SCC of the tonsil. Following resection, the patient's overall symptoms were significantly alleviated, and his gait improved. A thorough literature search yielded no other report of a tonsillar SCC with associated paraneoplastic thoracic spine tractopathy.

  5. Lymph drainage from the ovine tonsils: an anatomical study of the tonsillar lymph vessels.

    PubMed

    Casteleyn, C; Cornillie, P; Van Ginneken, C; Simoens, P; Van Cruchten, S; Vandevelde, K; Van den Broeck, W

    2014-12-01

    Although the tonsils of sheep have gained much attention during the last decade, only few data are available on their lymph vessel architecture. Tonsillar lymph vessels are immunologically important as they form the efferent routes for locally activated immune cells to reach the draining lymph nodes. To gain insight into the tonsillar lymph drainage in the sheep, Indian ink and a casting polymer were injected into the interstitium of the five tonsils present in the heads of slaughtered sheep. This enabled us to determine the draining lymph node and to examine the microscopic organization of lymph vessels using light and scanning electron microscopy. No lymph vessels were observed within the tonsillar lymphoid follicles. The corrosion casts demonstrated that the lymphoid follicles are surrounded by numerous sacculated lymph sinuses that drain into a dense interfollicular lymph vessel network. From here, the lymph flows into single small lymph vessels that in turn drain into larger lymph vessels extending towards the medial retropharyngeal lymph node. The presented results can be valuable for immunological studies, for example during oral or intranasal vaccine development.

  6. Intraoral Neurinoma of the Lingual Nerve: An Uncommon Tumor in Floor of the Mouth

    PubMed Central

    Kumar kuppusamy, Santhosh; Ramkumar, Subramaniyam; Narasimhan, Malathi; Azariah Dhiravia Sargunam, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Neurinoma or schwannoma is an uncommon benign tumor that arises primarily from the nerve sheath of Schwann cells. About 25% has been reported in head and neck region extracranially, but only 1% in the intraoral origin. Intraorally, the tongue is the most common site followed by the palate, floor of the mouth, lips and buccal mucosa. In review of literature, intraoral schwannoma of the lingual nerve origin has not been reported frequently. So, we present a case of intraoral neurinoma of the lingual nerve. PMID:24639903

  7. Guided Tissue Regeneration Involving Piercing-Induced Lingual Recession: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Parra, Carlos; Jeong, Y Natalie; Hawley, Charles E

    Recession on the lingual aspect of mandibular incisors may occur in patients with history of tongue piercing and other factitious traumatic habits. Treatment of these areas is challenging due to the site-specific anatomical features of the region. This case report presents a novel approach for a specific type of mandibular lingual defect caused by tongue piercing. A nonresorbable titanium-reinforced barrier membrane combined with an allograft and enamel matrix derivatives was used to promote regeneration of periodontal attachment. Reentry surgery for membrane removal was performed at 8 weeks. The time from initial surgery to final follow-up was 18 months.

  8. Enlarged Tonsils

    Cancer.gov

    A cohort of about 3,000 individuals who were irradiated during childhood for benign head and neck conditions at Michael Reese Hospital was assembled and monitored for the risk of thyroid and other cancers.

  9. Accumulation of CD5(+)CD19(+) B lymphocytes expressing PD-1 and PD-1L in hypertrophied pharyngeal tonsils.

    PubMed

    Wlasiuk, Paulina; Niedzielski, Artur; Skorka, Katarzyna; Karczmarczyk, Agnieszka; Zaleska, Joanna; Zajac, Malgorzata; Putowski, Maciej; Pac-Kozuchowska, Elzbieta; Giannopoulos, Krzysztof

    2016-11-01

    Programmed death-1 (PD-1) is one of the most important inhibitory co-receptors expressed predominantly on activated T and B lymphocytes whose expression could be sustained by permanent antigenic stimulation accompanying chronic or recurrent tonsillitis. The expression of PD-1 and PD-1L was analyzed using flow cytometry on hypertrophied tonsils collected from 57 children. We observed high expression of PD-1 and PD-1L on certain lymphocytes subpopulations of hypertrophied tonsils; among T cells, the expression of PD-1 on protein level was higher on CD4(+) cells (70.3 %) than on CD8(+) cells (35 %). Interestingly, a limited expression of PD-1 was observed on CD19(+) B lymphocytes (6.5 %), while CD5(+)CD19(+) B cells overexpressed PD-1 (52.5 %). Moreover, the expression of PD-1L was also higher on CD5(+)CD19(+) B cells (16.5 %) than on CD19(+) B cells (3.5 %) and on CD4(+) T cells (20 %) than on CD8(+) T cells (10 %). PD-1 and PD-1L expressions correlated only on CD5(+)CD19(+) cells. In conclusion, high expression of PD-1 and PD-1L on T and B cells could represent hallmark of immune system adaptation to chronic antigenic exposition in patients with tonsillitis.

  10. Microbes of the tonsils in PFAPA (Periodic Fever, Aphtous stomatitis, Pharyngitis and Adenitis) syndrome - a possible trigger of febrile episodes.

    PubMed

    Lantto, Ulla; Koivunen, Petri; Tapiainen, Terhi; Glumoff, Virpi; Hirvikoski, Pasi; Uhari, Matti; Renko, Marjo

    2015-06-01

    Periodic Fever, Aphtous stomatitis, Pharyngitis, and Adenitis (PFAPA) is a childhood febrile syndrome that is often cured by tonsillectomy (TE). We hypothesized that microbes present in the tonsils may act as a trigger for the activation of inflammasomes and investigated the microbiology of the tonsils in PFAPA patients and controls. We recruited 31 consecutive children who underwent TE due to PFAPA; 24 children who underwent TE due to other reasons served as controls. We cultured all the samples for bacteria, mycobacteria, yeasts, and viruses and used PCR for 15 viruses. Also biofilm formation and histologic findings were identified. The samples of the patients yielded Candida albicans more often than did the controls (16 vs 0%, p = 0.003). Staphylococcus aureus occurred in only 10% of the patients, but in 38% of the controls (p = 0.01). Varicella zoster and Herpes simplex viruses occurred less often in patients than in controls. Biofilm was present in 55% of PFAPA tonsils, but in only 24% of the controls (p = 0.03). The microbes found in the tonsils of PFAPA patients showed significant differences from those of controls. This may in part explain the efficacy of TE in PFAPA.

  11. Prevalence of Salmonella spp. and Yersinia enterocolitica in/on tonsils and mandibular lymph nodes of slaughtered pigs.

    PubMed

    Zdolec, Nevijo; Dobranić, Vesna; Filipović, Ivana

    2015-03-01

    A total of 156 tonsils and 156 mandibular lymph nodes from fattening pigs originating from 13 farms were sampled in Croatian slaughterhouses and examined for Salmonella spp. (n=78 per organ) and Yersinia enterocolitica (n=78 per organ) by cultural methods. Salmonella was isolated from two tonsils only, both originated from animals from the same farm (5.12%), while Y. enterocolitica were recovered from 26 tonsils (33.33%) which could be traced back to 10 farms. Salmonella was absent in mandibular lymph nodes, and Y. enterocolitica was isolated from eight lymph nodes (10.25%) which originated from six farms. Y. enterocolitica was present inside the lymph nodes of two pigs. The high prevalence of Y. enterocolitica in/on pig tonsils could be the result of cross-contamination during splitting the carcasses with head. This procedure may result in higher prevalence of Y. enterocolitica on surface of mandibular lymph nodes than in their depth. Traditional veterinary postmortem examination of pig halves will not necessarily contribute to cross-contamination with Salmonella or Yersinia under conditions of present slaughter practice.

  12. Developing Bi-Lingual Skills for Translation through an Online Multimedia-Supported Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eser, Oktay; Saltan, Fatih; Ersanli, Ceylan Yangin; Erdem, Gamze

    2016-01-01

    Recent research shows that bi-lingual competence is one of the necessary skills that a translator needs in order to translate (PACTE, 2003). Apart from the mother tongue, a translator must have a command of other working languages. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the online multimedia-supported learning environment concerning…

  13. Do flexible acrylic resin lingual flanges improve retention of mandibular complete dentures?

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed Elmorsy, Ayman Elmorsy; Ahmed Ibraheem, Eman Mostafa; Ela, Alaa Aboul; Fahmy, Ahmed; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the retention of conventional mandibular complete dentures with that of mandibular complete dentures having lingual flanges constructed with flexible acrylic resin “Versacryl.” Materials and Methods: The study sample comprised 10 completely edentulous patients. Each patient received one maxillary complete denture and two mandibular complete dentures. One mandibular denture was made of conventional heat-cured acrylic resin and the other had its lingual flanges made of flexible acrylic resin Versacryl. Digital force-meter was used to measure retention of mandibular dentures at delivery and at 2 weeks and 45 days following denture insertion. Results: The statistical analysis showed that at baseline and follow-up appointments, retention of mandibular complete dentures with flexible lingual flanges was significantly greater than retention of conventional mandibular dentures (P < 0.05). In both types of mandibular dentures, retention of dentures increased significantly over the follow-up period (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The use of flexible acrylic resin lingual flanges in the construction of mandibular complete dentures improved denture retention. PMID:26539387

  14. Congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis: A case with accompanying short lingual frenulum

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Ehsan; Rabbani, Masoud; Jafarpishe, Mohammad Saleh; Nazem, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis (CNPAS) is a rare cause of nasal obstruction. We presented a case of CNPAS with accompanying short lingual frenulum. Surgical dilatation without osteotomy was used, and the infant had normal growth and development. In these cases, the less invasive surgical methods can be effective. PMID:27656604

  15. Scanning Electron Microscopic Structure of the Lingual Papillae of the Common Opossum (Didelphis marsupialis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Shigenori; Schraufnagel, Dean E.

    2005-08-01

    The mammalian tongue has evolved for specialized functions in different species. The structure of its papillae tells about the animal's diet, habit, and taxonomy. The opossum has four kinds of lingual papillae (filiform, conical, fungiform, vallate). Scanning electron microscopy of the external features, connective tissue cores, and corrosion casts of the microvasculature show the filiform papillae have a spearhead-like main process and spiny accessory processes around the apical part of the main process. The shape and number of both processes depend on their position on the tongue. On the apex, the main processes have shovel-like capillary networks and the accessory processes have small conical networks. On the lingual radix, the processes have small capillary loops. In the patch region, conical papillae have capillaries arranged as a full sail curving posteriorly. The fungiform papillae are scattered among the filiform papillae and have capillary baskets beneath each taste bud. Giant fungiform papillae on the tongue tip are three to four times larger than the ones on the lingual body. Capillaries of giant papillae form a fan-shaped network. The opossum has three vallate papillae arranged in a triangle. Their tops have secondary capillary loops but not their lateral surfaces. Mucosal folds on the posterolateral border have irregular, fingerlike projections with cylindrical capillary networks. These findings and the structure of the rest of the masticatory apparatus suggest the lingual papillae of opossum have kept their ancestral carnivorous features but also developed the herbivore characteristics of other marsupials.

  16. Treatment of mandibular anterior crowding with incisor extraction using lingual orthodontics: a case report.

    PubMed

    Viswanath, Divya; Shetty, Sandeep; Mascarenhas, Rohan; Husain, Akhter

    2010-01-01

    A 20-year-old woman presented with a labially displaced mandibular right central incisor with severe attrition. Her maxillary dentition was well-aligned, and she had a straight profile. The respective central incisor was extracted. Subsequently, all teeth were aligned and the extraction space was closed with 2D lingual brackets. The result was esthetically pleasing.

  17. Cognitive Learning Styles in "Traditional" Audio-Lingual and Suggestopedic Language Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayuk, Milla

    The need for cognitive style mapping and student grouping in order to enhance learning and retention in foreign language instruction is examined. The four components of classical audio-lingual language instruction, listening, speaking, reading, and writing, are discussed. Different learning modalities are considered, including visual, auditory,…

  18. Bi-Lingual Newspaper as an Expression of a Fake Multicultural Educational Policy in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baratz, Lea; Reingold, Roni; Abuhatzira, Hannah

    2011-01-01

    The current paper analyzes a unique educational text that may be used to follow the educational policy of the State of Israel towards the community of Jewish immigrants from Ethiopia. The text which was analyzed was a bi-lingual newspaper called "Nugget News" which is published under the sponsorship of the Israeli Ministry of Education,…

  19. Quantitative Lingual, Pharyngeal and Laryngeal Ultrasonography in Swallowing Research: A Technical Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chi-Fishman, Gloria

    2005-01-01

    Because of its distinct advantage in radiation-free soft tissue imaging, ultrasonography has been widely used to study lingual, pharyngeal, hyoid, laryngeal, and even esophageal action during swallowing in individuals of all ages. Qualitative ultrasonographic observations have made considerable contributions to our understanding of deglutition.…

  20. Kinematic Investigation of Lingual Movement in Words of Increasing Length in Acquired Apraxia of Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartle-Meyer, Carly J.; Goozee, Justine V.; Murdoch, Bruce E.

    2009-01-01

    The current study aimed to use electromagnetic articulography (EMA) to investigate the effect of increasing word length on lingual kinematics in acquired apraxia of speech (AOS). Tongue-tip and tongue-back movement was recorded for five speakers with AOS and a concomitant aphasia (mean age = 53.6 years; SD = 12.60) during target consonant…

  1. [Comparative studies on the vestibular and lingual osteotomy in the removal of lower wisdom teeth].

    PubMed

    Strukmeier, A; Pape, H D

    1980-01-01

    Retained third molars and/or buds in the left and right mandible were removed unilaterally via a vestibular and lingual osteotomy in 50 patients at the department for oral surgery. Postoperative edema in addition to the operative course was registered with a measurement technique developed by the authors: wound healing and general subjective complaints were also compared.

  2. The use of the CO2 laser for lingual frenectomy and excisional biopsy.

    PubMed

    Bullock, N

    1995-11-01

    With the availability of CO2 laser technology, surgical cases that were previously referred out of the general dental practice to specialists can now be treated by the general dentist, with less difficulty than is commonly associated with traditional surgical procedures. This article will demonstrate two cases using the CO2 laser: lingual frenectomy and excisional biopsy.

  3. Frenectomy with anterior lingual sulcoplasty for an implant-supported overdenture: A clinical report.

    PubMed

    Perri de Carvalho, Paulo Sergio; Janjacomo, Luiz Antonio; Ponzoni, Daniela

    2016-04-01

    This clinical report describes the deepening of a patient's anterior mandibular lingual sulcus in combination with frenectomy and the use of an acrylic resin guiding device fixed to an osseointegrated dental implant to maintain the patency of the new sulcular depth.

  4. A comparative assessment of torque generated by lingual and conventional brackets.

    PubMed

    Sifakakis, Iosif; Pandis, Nikolaos; Makou, Margarita; Eliades, Theodore; Katsaros, Christos; Bourauel, Christoph

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of bracket type on the labiopalatal moments generated by lingual and conventional brackets. Incognito™ lingual brackets (3M Unitek), STb™ lingual brackets (Light Lingual System; ORMCO), In-Ovation L lingual brackets (DENTSPLY GAC), and conventional 0.018 inch slot brackets (Gemini; 3M Unitek) were bonded on identical maxillary acrylic resin models with levelled and aligned teeth. Each model was mounted on the orthodontic measurement and simulation system and 10 0.0175 × 0.0175 TMA wires were used for each bracket type. The wire was ligated with elastomerics into the Incognito, STb, and conventional brackets and each measurement was repeated once after religation. A 15 degrees buccal root torque (+15 degrees) and then a 15 degrees palatal root torque (-15 degrees) were gradually applied to the right central incisor bracket. After each activation, the bracket returned to its initial position and the moments in the sagittal plane were recorded during these rotations of the bracket. One-way analysis of variance with post hoc multiple comparisons (Tukey test at 0.05 error rate) was conducted to assess the effect on bracket type on the generated moments. The magnitude of maximum moment at +15 degrees ranged 8.8, 8.2, 7.1, and 5.8 Nmm for the Incognito, STb, conventional Gemini, and the In-Ovation L brackets, respectively; similar values were recorded at -15 degrees: 8.6, 8.1, 7.0, and 5.7 Nmm, respectively. The recorded differences of maximum moments were statistically significant, except between the Incognito and STb brackets. Additionally, the torque angles were evaluated at which the crown torque fell well below the minimum levels of 5.0 Nmm, as well as the moment/torque ratio at the last part of the activation/deactivation curve, between 10 and 15 degrees. The lowest torque expression was observed at the self-ligating lingual brackets, followed by the conventional brackets. The Incognito and STb lingual brackets

  5. Effect of different labio-lingual spaces in tray designs on the displacement of and pressure against a mobile tooth.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Y; Tsuru, K; Kishita, C; Kamashita, Y; Hamano, T; Nagaoka, E

    2008-09-01

    The present study aimed to examine the effect of custom tray designs on the displacement of mobile tooth and local impression pressures during the impression procedure, using partially edentulous simulation models with six anterior teeth containing a mobile tooth prepared in previous studies. The custom trays were designed by altering the thickness of the respective spaces on the labial and lingual sides of the remaining tooth arch. In previous studies, the mobile tooth was displaced in the labial direction and local impression pressures of the mobile tooth were greater against the lingual side than the labial side for all custom tray designs. Furthermore, the custom trays perforated with holes on the lingual side were effective to reduce mobile tooth displacement, labial and lingual impression pressures against the mobile tooth, and the differences between them. Therefore, the present study was performed focusing on the labial and lingual thickness of spaces in custom tray designs. It was found that mobile tooth displacement, labial and lingual impression pressures against the mobile teeth and their differences were less in trays with spaces>3.0 mm thick on both the labial and lingual sides, but markedly greater in trays with a 1.5 mm-thick space on the labial side. These results indicate that the thickness of spaces on the labial side in the tray should not be reduced to prevent mobile tooth displacement.

  6. USE OF NEUTROPHILS TO LYMPHOCYTES RATIO AS AN INFLAMMATION MARKER IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC TONSILLITIS.

    PubMed

    Sahin, C; Varim, C; Uyanık, M

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) as an inflammation marker in patients with chronic tonsillitis and to compare the NLR values to other inflammation markers, such as antistreptolysin-O (ASO), C-Reactive Protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). Thirty patients aged between 4 and 15 y.o. who had undergone surgery for chronic tonsillitis were included in this retrospective study. Blood samples including haemogram, ASO, CRP and ESR were taken from the patients the day before and one month after the surgery and were analysed retrospectively. Preoperative ASO values were 170±75.5 U, CRP values were 7.6±5 mg/L, ESR values were 15.7±10 mm/H and NLR values were 0.9±0.2. Postoperative ASO values were 140.9±58.5 U, CRP values were 6.8±3.4 mg/L, ESR values were 12.5±5.4 mm/H and NLR values were 1.2±0.4. Statistically significant decreases were observed in the white blood cell count (WBC), lymphocytes, ASO and ESR results, with increase in NLR values after the surgery (p<0.05). The neutrophil and CRP values after the surgery have shown statistically insignificant decrease (p>0.05). The NLR values were compared with the ASO, CRP and ESR values, which were used as inflammation markers. Negative correlation was found between decrease in ASO and ESR and increase in the NLR values after the surgery.

  7. Markers of squamocolumnar junction cells in normal tonsils and oropharyngeal cancer with and without HPV infection.

    PubMed

    Morbini, Patrizia; Capello, Gian Luca; Alberizzi, Paola; Benazzo, Marco; Paglino, Chiara; Comoli, Patrizia; Pedrazzoli, Paolo

    2015-07-01

    HPV infection has been identified recently as the causative agent of a subset of squamous cell carcinomas arising in oropharyngeal tonsils. Factors influencing the susceptibility of tonsillar epithelium to HPV-induced oncogenesis are far from being elucidated. A 5-protein signature including cytokeratin (CK)7, anterior gradient (AGR)2, cluster differentiation (CD)63, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)7, and guanine deaminase (GDA) has recently been found to identify a residual embryonic cell population in the squamocolumnar (SC) junction of the cervix, susceptible to HPV infection, and cancers originating from these cells. The expression of SC junction markers was investigated with immunohistochemistry in normal tonsils and in oropharyngeal carcinomas (OPC) fully characterised for HPV. All markers were constantly expressed in the reticulated epithelial cells of the tonsillar crypts, with variable diffusion and intensity; in OPC, positivity was observed in 36,5%, 29,2%, 39%, 17%, and 25% of cases with respectively AGR2, CK7, GDA, CD63, and MMP7 antibodies. No OPC was positive for all markers; 6 were completely negative. AGR2 and CK7 showed significant association with tumor- and HPV-related parameters. AGR2 expression was associated with tumor origin in the tongue base (p=0.013); CK7 was associated with non-keratinising morphology (p=0.013). p16 tumor cell expression was associated with AGR2 (p=0.021); transcriptionally active HPV infection was associated with AGR2 and CK7 (p=0.024 and 0.043). Expression of SC junction markers in tonsillar crypt cells might be related to the embryological development of tonsillar structures; their partial association with HPV oncogenic infection could help to identify HPV-susceptible cells and related OPC.

  8. Role of monochromatic light on development of cecal tonsil in young broilers.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Wang, Z; Cao, J; Dong, Y L; Chen, Y X

    2014-07-01

    Previously, the different monochromatic lights have been demonstrated to affect splenocyte proliferation and melatonin (MEL) secretion in broilers. The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of different monochromatic lights on the development and immune function of broiler cecal tonsils, and to disclose the mechanisms underlying these phenomena. A total of 185 broilers (P0) including intact, sham-operated, and pinealectomized groups were exposed to blue light (BL), green light (GL), red light (RL), and white light (WL) by a light-emitting diode system for 14 days. Compared with RL groups, the GL in the intact and sham-operated groups showed larger follicle areas (66.70%), higher percentages of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-positive cells (33.33%), increased numbers of IgA(+) cells (48.60%), and increased antioxidase activity (33.33%-61.37%), whereas, the density of iNOS and MDA content in GL were lower (43.63%-54.43%) than that of RL. In contrast, after pinealectomy, the area of follicles, the percentage of PCNA-positive cells, the number of IgA(+) cells, and the antioxidase activity decreased in the different light treatments, but the density of iNOS and MDA content increased substantially. There was no significant difference in these parameters between broilers exposed to GL and other lights (P = 0.085-1.000). The results suggested that the enhanced effects of GL on the development and immune function of cecal tonsils in young broilers were mediated by elevated antioxidative status via up-regulation of MEL.

  9. Loracarbef versus penicillin VK in the treatment of streptococcal pharyngitis and tonsillitis in adults.

    PubMed

    McCarty, J; Hernon, Y; Linn, L; Therasse, D G; Molina, A; Bleile, N

    1992-01-01

    Loracarbef, a member of a unique class of beta-lactam compounds (carbacephems), has excellent chemical and beta-lactamase stability, as well as documented clinical effectiveness against a broad spectrum of bacteria. Ten-day treatment regimens of loracarbef (200-mg capsule BID or 15 mg/kg/day suspension) and penicillin VK (250-mg capsule QID or 20 mg/kg/day suspension) were compared in the treatment of group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal (GABHS) pharyngitis and tonsillitis. Adults (greater than or equal to 12 years of age) were administered loracarbef (n = 58) or penicillin (n = 58) in a double-blind, randomized, parallel study of clinical and bacteriologic response to treatment. Favorable clinical responses among qualified (evaluable) patients in the loracarbef-treated group (46/47; 97.9%) were similar to those for evaluable patients in the penicillin-treated group (43/43; 100%). Forty-one of 47 (87.2%) of the evaluable loracarbef-treated patients and 100% (43/43) of the evaluable penicillin-treated patients had negative posttherapy throat cultures for GABHS. Thirty-nine evaluable patients in each treatment group were assessed 28 to 35 days after completion of therapy: 2.6% of patients in each group experienced relapse of symptoms; and 7.7% of loracarbef-treated patients had positive cultures, compared to 12.8% of penicillin-treated patients. Two (1.9%) loracarbef-treated patients with rashes and one (0.9%) penicillin-treated patient with diarrhea withdrew from the study due to these adverse events. Diarrhea, the most frequently occurring adverse event during therapy in the loracarbef group, was reported by 8.6% of the loracarbef group and by 5.2% of the penicillin group. These data support the conclusion that loracarbef is comparable in safety and efficacy to penicillin VK for the treatment of streptococcal pharyngitis and tonsillitis in adults.

  10. Loracarbef versus penicillin VK in the treatment of streptococcal pharyngitis and tonsillitis in an adult population.

    PubMed

    McCarty, J

    1992-06-22

    Loracarbef, a member of the carbacephem class of beta-lactam antibiotics, is a potent anti-bacterial agent. In a double-blind, randomized clinical trial to assess the efficacy and safety of loracarbef in the treatment of streptococcal pharyngitis and tonsillitis, 107 adult patients were treated with loracarbef (200 mg capsules twice a day or 15 mg/kg/day suspension) and 111 patients were treated with penicillin VK (250 mg capsules four times a day or 20 mg/kg/day suspension) for 10 days. In the loracarbef treatment group, 96.6% of the evaluable patients had a favorable clinical response 3-5 days after therapy, a result that compared favorably with the 93.9% response rate achieved in the penicillin group. The clinical failure/relapse rates were 3.4% for loracarbef-treated patients and 6.1% for patients receiving penicillin. Bacteriologic response data approximated the clinical results, with a successful response in 89.9% of the loracarbef-treated patients and 91.5% of the penicillin recipients. Two (1.9%) loracarbef-treated patients with rash and one (0.9%) penicillin-treated patient with diarrhea discontinued the study early because of these adverse events. The incidence of adverse events was comparable in the two treatment groups except for increased cough, which was reported by 3.7% of the loracarbef-treated patients and none of the penicillin recipients. These data support the conclusion that loracarbef is comparable to penicillin VK in the treatment of streptococcal pharyngitis and tonsillitis in adults.

  11. Autophagy induction in the skeletal myogenic differentiation of human tonsil-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Saeyoung; Choi, Yoonyoung; Jung, Namhee; Kim, Jieun; Oh, Seiyoon; Yu, Yeonsil; Ahn, Jung-Hyuck; Jo, Inho; Choi, Byung-Ok; Jung, Sung-Chul

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are capable of self-renewal and differentiation and are thus a valuable source for the replacement of diseased or damaged organs. Previously, we reported that the tonsils can be an excellent reservoir of MSCs for the regeneration of skeletal muscle (SKM) damage. However, the mechanisms involved in the differentiation from tonsil-derived MSCs (T-MSCs) to myocytes via myoblasts remain unclear. To clarify these mechanisms, we analyzed gene expression profiles of T-MSCs during differentiation into myocytes compared with human skeletal muscle cells (hSKMCs). Total RNA was extracted from T-MSCs, T-MSC-derived myoblasts and myocytes, and hSKMCs and was subjected to analysis using a microarray. Microarray analysis of the three phases of myogenic differentiation identified candidate genes associated with myogenic differentiation. The expression pattern of undifferentiated T-MSCs was distinguishable from the myogenic differentiated T-MSCs and hSKMCs. In particular, we selected FNBP1L, which among the upregulated genes is essential for antibacterial autophagy, since autophagy is related to SKM metabolism and myogenesis. T-MSCs differentiated toward myoblasts and skeletal myocytes sequentially, as evidenced by increased expression of autophagy-related markers (including Beclin-1, LC3B and Atg5) and decreased expression of Bcl-2. Furthermore, we reconfirmed that autophagy has an effect on the mechanism of skeletal myogenic differentiation derived from T-MSCs by treatment with 5-azacytidine and bafilomycin A1. These data suggest that the transcriptome of the T-MSC-derived myocytes is similar to that of hSKMCs, and that autophagy has an important role in the mechanism of myogenic differentiation of T-MSCs. PMID:28259927

  12. Autophagy induction in the skeletal myogenic differentiation of human tonsil-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Saeyoung; Choi, Yoonyoung; Jung, Namhee; Kim, Jieun; Oh, Seiyoon; Yu, Yeonsil; Ahn, Jung-Hyuck; Jo, Inho; Choi, Byung-Ok; Jung, Sung-Chul

    2017-04-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are capable of self-renewal and differentiation and are thus a valuable source for the replacement of diseased or damaged organs. Previously, we reported that the tonsils can be an excellent reservoir of MSCs for the regeneration of skeletal muscle (SKM) damage. However, the mechanisms involved in the differentiation from tonsil-derived MSCs (T-MSCs) to myocytes via myoblasts remain unclear. To clarify these mechanisms, we analyzed gene expression profiles of T-MSCs during differentiation into myocytes compared with human skeletal muscle cells (hSKMCs). Total RNA was extracted from T-MSCs, T-MSC-derived myoblasts and myocytes, and hSKMCs and was subjected to analysis using a microarray. Microarray analysis of the three phases of myogenic differentiation identified candidate genes associated with myogenic differentiation. The expression pattern of undifferentiated T-MSCs was distinguishable from the myogenic differentiated T-MSCs and hSKMCs. In particular, we selected FNBP1L, which among the upregulated genes is essential for antibacterial autophagy, since autophagy is related to SKM metabolism and myogenesis. T-MSCs differentiated toward myoblasts and skeletal myocytes sequentially, as evidenced by increased expression of autophagy-related markers (including Beclin-1, LC3B and Atg5) and decreased expression of Bcl-2. Furthermore, we reconfirmed that autophagy has an effect on the mechanism of skeletal myogenic differentiation derived from T-MSCs by treatment with 5-azacytidine and bafilomycin A1. These data suggest that the transcriptome of the T-MSC-derived myocytes is similar to that of hSKMCs, and that autophagy has an important role in the mechanism of myogenic differentiation of T-MSCs.

  13. Evidence for a stepwise program of extrathymic T cell development within the human tonsil.

    PubMed

    McClory, Susan; Hughes, Tiffany; Freud, Aharon G; Briercheck, Edward L; Martin, Chelsea; Trimboli, Anthony J; Yu, Jianhua; Zhang, Xiaoli; Leone, Gustavo; Nuovo, Gerard; Caligiuri, Michael A

    2012-04-01

    The development of a broad repertoire of T cells, which is essential for effective immune function, occurs in the thymus. Although some data suggest that T cell development can occur extrathymically, many researchers remain skeptical that extrathymic T cell development has an important role in generating the T cell repertoire in healthy individuals. However, it may be important in the setting of poor thymic function or congenital deficit and in the context of autoimmunity, cancer, or regenerative medicine. Here, we report evidence that a stepwise program of T cell development occurs within the human tonsil. We identified 5 tonsillar T cell developmental intermediates: (a) CD34⁺CD38dimLin⁻ cells, which resemble multipotent progenitors in the bone marrow and thymus; (b) more mature CD34⁺CD38brightLin⁻ cells; (c) CD34⁺CD1a⁺CD11c⁻ cells, which resemble committed T cell lineage precursors in the thymus; (d) CD34⁻CD1a⁺CD3⁻CD11c⁻ cells, which resemble CD4⁺CD8⁺ double-positive T cells in the thymus; and (e) CD34⁻CD1a⁺CD3⁺CD11c⁻ cells. The phenotype of each subset closely resembled that of its thymic counterpart. The last 4 populations expressed RAG1 and PTCRA, genes required for TCR rearrangement, and all 5 subsets were capable of ex vivo T cell differentiation. TdT⁺ cells found within the tonsillar fibrous scaffold expressed CD34 and/or CD1a, indicating that this distinct anatomic region contributes to pre-T cell development, as does the subcapsular region of the thymus. Thus, we provide evidence of a role for the human tonsil in a comprehensive program of extrathymic T cell development.

  14. Removal of the residual roots of mandibular wisdom teeth in the lingual space of the mandible via endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Z Q; Huang, Z X; Wang, Y Y; Hu, W J; Fan, S; Zhang, D M; Chen, W L

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we aimed to evaluate the reliability of the use of endoscopy for removal of the residual roots of mandibular wisdom teeth in the lingual space of the mandible. Seven patients with residual roots of the mandibular wisdom teeth remaining in the lingual space were treated via endoscopy, and the results of their treatments were reviewed retrospectively. The study found that the residual roots of the mandibular wisdom teeth in the lingual space were removed successfully via endoscopy. The average duration of surgery for each case was 5 min, and no complications were observed in any case. There is little risk involved with removing the residual roots of mandibular wisdom teeth in the lingual space via endoscopy and the procedure is safe and fast. We conclude that it is worth promoting this clinical procedure for current and future use.

  15. Immunohistochemical analysis of type III collagen expression in the lingual mucosa of rats during organogenesis of the tongue.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Shin-Ichi; Asami, Tomoichiro; Wanichanon, Chaitip; Yoshizawa, Hideki; Aoyagi, Hidekazu

    2008-07-01

    We examined the distribution of immunofluorescence due to immunostaining of type III collagen, differential interference contrast (DIC) images and images obtained in the transmission mode after toluidine blue staining by laser-scanning microscopy of semi-ultrathin sections of epoxy resin-embedded samples, during morphogenesis of the filiform papillae, keratinization of the lingual epithelium, and myogenesis of the rat tongue. Immunoreactivity specific for type III collagen was distributed widely in the mesenchymal connective tissue in fetuses on day 15 after conception (E15), at which time the lingual epithelium was composed of one or two layers of cuboidal cells and the lingual muscle was barely recognizable. Immunoreactivity specific for type III collagen was clearly detected on the lamina propria in fetuses on E17 and E19, and it was relatively distinct just beneath the lingual epithelium. Immunoreactivity specific for type III collagen was sparsely distributed on the connective tissue around the developing lingual muscle. In fetuses on E19, the epithelium became clearly stratified and squamous. At postnatal stages from newborn (P0) to postnatal day 14 (P14), keratinization of the lingual epithelium advanced gradually with the development of filiform papillae. On P0, myogenesis of the tongue was almost completed. The intensity of the fluorescence immunoreactivity specific for type III collagen at postnatal stages was almost same as that on E19. The immunoreactivity around the fully mature muscle was relatively distinct between P0 and P14. Thus, type III collagen appeared in conjunction with the morphogenesis of filiform papillae and the keratinization of the lingual epithelium as well as in the connective tissue that surrounded the lingual muscle during myogenesis of the rat tongue.

  16. Topographic relationship between root apex of mesially and horizontally impacted mandibular third molar and lingual plate: cross-sectional analysis using CBCT

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dongmiao; He, Xiaotong; Wang, Yanling; Zhou, Guangchao; Sun, Chao; Yang, Lianfeng; Bai, Jianling; Gao, Jun; Wu, Yunong; Cheng, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The present study was aimed to determine the topographic relationship between root apex of the mesially and horizontally impacted mandibular third molar and lingual plate of mandible. The original cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) data of 364 teeth from 223 patients were retrospectively collected and analyzed. The topographic relationship between root apex and lingual plate on cross-sectional CBCT images was classified as non-contact (99), contact (145) and perforation (120). The cross-sectional morphology of lingual plate at the level of root apex was defined as parallel (28), undercut (38), slanted (29) and round (4). The distribution of topographic relationship between root apex and lingual plate significantly associated with gender, impaction depth, root number and lingual plate morphology. Moreover, the average bone thickness of lingual cortex and distance between root apex and the outer surface of lingual plate were 1.02 and 1.39 mm, respectively. Furthermore, multivariate regression analyses identified impaction depth and lingual plate morphology as the risk factors for the contact and perforation subtypes between root apex and lingual plate. Collectively, our findings reveal the topographic proximity of root apex of impacted mandibular third molar to the lingual plate, which might be associated with intraoperative and postoperative complications during tooth extraction. PMID:27991572

  17. Topographic relationship between root apex of mesially and horizontally impacted mandibular third molar and lingual plate: cross-sectional analysis using CBCT.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongmiao; He, Xiaotong; Wang, Yanling; Zhou, Guangchao; Sun, Chao; Yang, Lianfeng; Bai, Jianling; Gao, Jun; Wu, Yunong; Cheng, Jie

    2016-12-19

    The present study was aimed to determine the topographic relationship between root apex of the mesially and horizontally impacted mandibular third molar and lingual plate of mandible. The original cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) data of 364 teeth from 223 patients were retrospectively collected and analyzed. The topographic relationship between root apex and lingual plate on cross-sectional CBCT images was classified as non-contact (99), contact (145) and perforation (120). The cross-sectional morphology of lingual plate at the level of root apex was defined as parallel (28), undercut (38), slanted (29) and round (4). The distribution of topographic relationship between root apex and lingual plate significantly associated with gender, impaction depth, root number and lingual plate morphology. Moreover, the average bone thickness of lingual cortex and distance between root apex and the outer surface of lingual plate were 1.02 and 1.39 mm, respectively. Furthermore, multivariate regression analyses identified impaction depth and lingual plate morphology as the risk factors for the contact and perforation subtypes between root apex and lingual plate. Collectively, our findings reveal the topographic proximity of root apex of impacted mandibular third molar to the lingual plate, which might be associated with intraoperative and postoperative complications during tooth extraction.

  18. Effects of auditory disruption of lingual tactile sensitivity in skilled and unskilled speaking conditions.

    PubMed

    Krummel, S; Petrosino, L; Fucci, D

    1991-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of disruption of the auditory feedback channel on lingual vibrotactile thresholds obtained under skilled and unskilled speaking conditions. Each of 22 adults was asked to read an English (skilled) and French (unskilled) passage under conditions of normal and altered auditory feedback. Bilateral presentation of masking noise was utilized to disrupt auditory feedback. Before each of the experimental sessions and immediately following a reading, lingual vibrotactile thresholds were obtained. Analysis indicated that the mean differences in the pre- and postvibrotactile threshold measurements of the skilled auditory disrupted condition varied significantly from the mean differences in the pre- and postvibrotactile threshold measurements of the three other conditions. The role of feedback in the speech production of skilled and unskilled speakers is discussed.

  19. Lingual frenectomy and alveolar tap production: an acoustic and perceptual study.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Zuleica A; Marchesan, I Q; Oliveira, L R; Svicero, M A F; Pereira, L C K; Madureira, S

    2013-12-01

    In this phonetic study, productions of the consonant in the stressed syllable position of the word arara as produced by 13 subjects with short and/or anterior lingual frenulum were compared before and after lingual frenectomy. The results from the measurement of the stressed consonant duration and from the identification of the consonant manners of articulation based on the inspection of spectral characteristics are discussed and related to the answers to a perceptual identification test. After surgery, the number of tap productions did not increase, but alveolar productions did. These clinically relevant findings show frenectomy improved tongue mobility, but, as temporal controls were not totally re-established after surgery and 6-month speech therapy sessions, the production of the alveolar tap remained largely unchanged.

  20. Reduction of neonatal pain following administration of 25% lingual dextrose: a randomized control trial.

    PubMed

    Nimbalkar, Somashekhar; Sinojia, Ankit; Dongara, Ashish

    2013-06-01

    Neonates experience painful procedures during routine care. Orally administered, sweet tasting solutions are commonly used in management of neonatal pain. We conducted a double-blind randomized control trial in neonates admitted to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Shri Krishna Hospital, Karamsad-Gujarat-India, of lingual administration of 25% dextrose vs. no intervention, to evaluate reduction of pain following oropharyngeal infant feeding tube insertions. Pain was assessed using Premature Infant Pain Profile score. Almost all the patients in the control group (98%) experienced moderate-to-severe pain as compared with the intervention group (71%). Mean Premature Infant Pain Profile score was statistically significantly lower in the intervention group (8.21) as compared with control group (10.31). (p < 0.001, 95% CI 1.090-3.102). Lingual 25% dextrose is an effective analgesic for relieving pain during orogastric tube insertion.

  1. Transient unilateral combined paresis of the hypoglossal nerve and lingual nerve following intubation anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Ulusoy, Hulya; Besir, Ahmet; Cekic, Bahanur; Kosucu, Muge; Geze, Sukran

    2014-01-01

    Nerve damage may occur in the pharyngolaryngeal region during general anesthesia. The most frequently injured nerves are the hypoglossal, lingual and recurrent laryngeal. These injuries may arise in association with several factors, such as laryngoscopy, endotracheal intubation and tube insertion, cuff pressure, mask ventilation, the triple airway maneuver, the oropharyngeal airway, manner of intubation tube insertion, head and neck position and aspiration. Nerve injuries in this region may take the form of an isolated single nerve or of paresis of two nerves together in the form of hypoglossal and recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy (Tapia's syndrome). However, combined injury of the lingual and hypoglossal nerves following intubation anesthesia is a much rarer condition. The risk of this damage can be reduced with precautionary measures. We describe a case of combined unilateral nervus hypoglossus and nervus lingualis paresis developing after intubation anesthesia.

  2. Variations in the buccal-lingual alveolar bone thickness of impacted mandibular third molar: our classification and treatment perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Jing; Zheng, Jia-Wei; Yang, Chi; Qian, Wen-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Selecting either buccal or lingual approach for the mandibular third molar surgical extraction has been an intense debate for years. The aim of this observational retrospective study was to classify the molar based on the proximity to the external cortical bone, and analyze the position of inferior alveolar canal (IAC) of each type. Cone-beam CT (CBCT) data of 110 deeply impacted mandibular third molars from 91 consecutive patients were analyzed. A new classification based on the mean deduction value (MD) of buccal-lingual alveolar bone thickness was proposed: MD≥1 mm was classified as buccal position, 1 mm>MD>−1 mm was classified as central position, MD≤−1 mm was classified as lingual position. The study samples were distributed as: buccal position (1.8%) in 2 subjects, central position (10.9%) in 12 and lingual position (87.3%) in 96. Ninety-six molars (87.3%) contacted the IAC. The buccal and inferior IAC course were the most common types in impacted third molar, especially in lingually positioned ones. Our study suggested that amongst deeply impacted mandibular third molars, lingual position occupies the largest proportion, followed by the central, and then the buccal type. PMID:26759181

  3. Minimally Invasive Approach to the Lingual and Hypoglossal Nerves in the Adult Rat.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Edward John; Phillips, Grady W; Gratton, Michael Anne; Long, John P; Varvares, Mark A

    2016-06-01

    Surgical manipulation of the sensory and motor nerves of the rat tongue is often employed in studies evaluating the oral cavity functions of mastication and deglutition. A noninvasive, atraumatic approach that will then facilitate sufficient manipulation of these structures is required. In this study, we detail an approach that consistently allows identification of the hypoglossal (motor) and lingual (sensory) nerves of the rat. Six Wistar rats (250-500 g) were anesthetized and dissected either as fresh tissue (N = 3) or following transcardial perfusion with 4% paraformaldehyde (N = 3). Both fixed and non-fixed specimens of the rat head and neck were incised in the right submandibular region. The first animal in each group was used to gain a basic understanding of the regional muscular anatomy with reference to the hypoglossal and lingual nerves. Subsequent animals were used for the development of an efficient and minimally invasive approach to these nerves. The resultant approach begins as an incision through skin and platysma, followed by medial reflection of the digastric muscle. This allows visualization of the hypoglossal nerve in the region of the bifurcation of the common trunk into medial and lateral subdivisions. Next, the lingual nerve dissection is approached by reflection rostrally of the transversus mandibularis muscle and a caudal reflection of the mylohyoid muscle. This dissection reveals the geniohyoid muscle which when separated bluntly using forceps, exposes the lingual nerve. The anatomical approach described and illustrated herein will aid investigators in consistent identification of these two nerves as fundamental methods of their projects.

  4. C. dubliniensis in an immunocompetent patient with metal lingual frenulum piercing.

    PubMed

    Ventolini, Gary; Tsai, Peihsuan; Moore, Lee David

    2016-12-01

    Candida spp. are opportunistic unicellular fungi, known to cause oral, vaginal, lung and occasionally systemic infections. Characteristically, they colonize the oral cavity, the mucosal surfaces of the cheek, palate, and tongue. Usually harmless, oral Candidas may become pathogenic under immunosuppressive conditions, dentures presence, or salivary flow impairment. Accurate species identification is important because C. dubliniensis can rapidly develop fluconazole resistance. We report C. dubliniensis in an immunocompetent patient with a metal lingual frenulum piercing.

  5. Carbon Dioxide Laser Microsurgical Median Glossotomy for Resection of Lingual Dermoid Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Corvers, Kristien; Hens, Greet; Meulemans, Jeroen; Delaere, Pierre; Hermans, Robert; Vander Poorten, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Dermoid cysts are epithelial-lined cavities with skin adnexae in the capsule. Only 7% is present in the head and neck. Between 2004 and 2013, four patients with a lingual dermoid cyst underwent a microsurgical carbon dioxide laser resection via a median sagittal glossotomy approach. This approach is an elegant technique combining superior visualization, hemostasis, and little postoperative edema with good wound healing, allowing for perfect function preservation of the tongue. PMID:27504448

  6. Mucocele of the glands of Blandin-Nuhn after lingual frenectomy.

    PubMed

    Santos, Thiago de Santana; Filho, Paulo Ricardo Saquete Martins; Piva, Marta Rabello; Khalil Karam, Frederick

    2012-11-01

    Mucoceles are the most common lesions of the minor salivary glands and typically appear as a fluctuant, bluish, nontender, submucosal swelling with a normal overlying mucosa. Mucoceles of the glands of Blandin-Nuhn (in the anterior portion of the ventral surface of the tongue) have been considered to be uncommon. This article reports an unusual case of a large extravasation mucocele involving the ventral surface of the tongue, which appeared after a lingual frenectomy.

  7. Detection and molecular typing of Streptococcus suis in tonsils from live pigs in France

    PubMed Central

    Marois, Corinne; Le Devendec, Laëtitia; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Kobisch, Marylène

    2007-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is an important pathogen of swine, causing meningitis, arthritis, polyserositis, septicemia, and sudden death in weaning piglets as well as fattening pigs. Recently, 3 molecular tests have been developed in our laboratory: a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (m-PCR) assay for the detection of S. suis species and serotypes 2 and 1/2, and 2 molecular typing methods, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and an approach based on PCR amplification of a fragment of rRNA genes, including a part of the 16S and 23S genes and the 16S–23S rDNA intergenic spacer region (ISR), followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis (ISR-RFLP). In the present study, we used these tests to analyze tonsil samples from clinically healthy pigs and to identify individual isolates of S. suis during epidemiologic investigations of 8 related herds with a history of septicemia caused by S. suis serotype 2. Capsular typing showed that 58% of the strains were nontypable. Of the 17 serotypes present, serotype 22 was the most prevalent. In the 7 farms without clinical signs on the day of sampling, we detected S. suis serotype 2 or 1/2, or both, in less than 5% of the pigs by m-PCR or by bacteriologic culture. In the 8th farm, on which 2 pigs had clinical signs of septicemia on the day of sampling, we detected S. suis serotype 2 or 1/2, or both, by m-PCR in the tonsils of 40% of fattening pigs (21 wk old) that lacked symptoms. Molecular typing of the serotype 2 strains showed a common origin of contamination in these herds, given that 1 pattern (C1) was detected in the isolates from 6 of the 8 herds. However, up to 4 patterns were associated with septicemia and sudden death. Several patterns of S. suis serotype 2 can be responsible for disease in the same herd. These molecular tools may be useful for confident studies of the transmission of S. suis, thereby contributing to the control of S. suis infection. PMID:17193877

  8. Lingual ultrastructure of the long-finned pilot whale (Globicephala melas).

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, D C; Wang, A; Nicolas, J; Pfeiffer, C J

    2001-12-01

    Microscopic studies on the cetacean tongue are limited and, to date, only a few ultrastructural reports on dolphins have been published. This report presents the initial description of the lingual ultrastructure of the long-finned pilot whale. The lingual integumental surface was smooth, lacking papillae, although flaking of outer stratum corneum cells could be observed at high resolution. The keratinocytes of the stratum spinosum of the epidermis resembled those of cetacean skin on other regions of the body. The similarities included the presence of cytoplasmic lipid droplets around the nuclei of stratutm spinosum cells, a lingual feature not seen in terrestrial mammals. Keratin intermediate filaments were numerous and occasionally formed aggregates of circular whorls. At cell surfaces, bundles of keratin intermediate filaments were frequently observed inserting into desmosomal plaques. Pigment granules were not evident and organelles were sparse. Stratum corneal cells contained nuclear remnants (parakeratosis) and small multivesicular bodies, and the corneal layer was approximately 18 cells thick. The nuclei of the stratum basale keratinocytes possessed exceptionally numerous and deep clefts. The dermis was nondistinctive. The skeletal muscle of the tongue was arranged in widely separated fasiculi containing small numbers of muscle fibres. Typical fine structure of skeletal muscle bands and tubular elements was observed by transmission electron microscopy.

  9. A case of difficult airway due to lingual tonsillar hypertrophy in a patient with Down's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Koichi; Ikeda, Daisuke; Ishikawa, Seiji; Makita, Koshi

    2003-09-01

    In this report, we describe airway management of symptomatic lingual tonsillar hypertrophy in a pediatric patient with Down's syndrome. Besides obstructive sleep apnea, the history included a small atrial septal defect with mild aortic regurgitation and Moyamoya disease. Anesthesia was induced with IV administration of 1 mg/kg of propofol, followed by inhalation of sevoflurane in 100% oxygen. Muscle relaxants were not used on induction. Rigid laryngoscopy could not visualize the epiglottis because of hypertrophied tonsillar tissue, and mask ventilation became difficult when spontaneous breathing stopped. We avoided using a laryngeal mask airway because of a slight bleeding tendency presumably caused by preoperative antiplatelet therapy. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy through the nasal cavity in combination with jet ventilation successfully identified the glottis and allowed nasotracheal intubation to be accomplished. After lingual tonsillectomy, the patient was extubated on the seventh postoperative day, after supraglottic edema had resolved. Fiberoptic nasotracheal intubation under inhaled anesthesia may therefore be preferable in pediatric or uncooperative patients with symptomatic lingual tonsillar hypertrophy.

  10. Induction of ectopic taste buds by SHH reveals the competency and plasticity of adult lingual epithelium.

    PubMed

    Castillo, David; Seidel, Kerstin; Salcedo, Ernesto; Ahn, Christina; de Sauvage, Frederic J; Klein, Ophir D; Barlow, Linda A

    2014-08-01

    Taste buds are assemblies of elongated epithelial cells, which are innervated by gustatory nerves that transmit taste information to the brain stem. Taste cells are continuously renewed throughout life via proliferation of epithelial progenitors, but the molecular regulation of this process remains unknown. During embryogenesis, sonic hedgehog (SHH) negatively regulates taste bud patterning, such that inhibition of SHH causes the formation of more and larger taste bud primordia, including in regions of the tongue normally devoid of taste buds. Here, using a Cre-lox system to drive constitutive expression of SHH, we identify the effects of SHH on the lingual epithelium of adult mice. We show that misexpression of SHH transforms lingual epithelial cell fate, such that daughter cells of lingual epithelial progenitors form cell type-replete, onion-shaped taste buds, rather than non-taste, pseudostratified epithelium. These SHH-induced ectopic taste buds are found in regions of the adult tongue previously thought incapable of generating taste organs. The ectopic buds are composed of all taste cell types, including support cells and detectors of sweet, bitter, umami, salt and sour, and recapitulate the molecular differentiation process of endogenous taste buds. In contrast to the well-established nerve dependence of endogenous taste buds, however, ectopic taste buds form independently of both gustatory and somatosensory innervation. As innervation is required for SHH expression by endogenous taste buds, our data suggest that SHH can replace the need for innervation to drive the entire program of taste bud differentiation.

  11. Induction of ectopic taste buds by SHH reveals the competency and plasticity of adult lingual epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, David; Seidel, Kerstin; Salcedo, Ernesto; Ahn, Christina; de Sauvage, Frederic J.; Klein, Ophir D.; Barlow, Linda A.

    2014-01-01

    Taste buds are assemblies of elongated epithelial cells, which are innervated by gustatory nerves that transmit taste information to the brain stem. Taste cells are continuously renewed throughout life via proliferation of epithelial progenitors, but the molecular regulation of this process remains unknown. During embryogenesis, sonic hedgehog (SHH) negatively regulates taste bud patterning, such that inhibition of SHH causes the formation of more and larger taste bud primordia, including in regions of the tongue normally devoid of taste buds. Here, using a Cre-lox system to drive constitutive expression of SHH, we identify the effects of SHH on the lingual epithelium of adult mice. We show that misexpression of SHH transforms lingual epithelial cell fate, such that daughter cells of lingual epithelial progenitors form cell type-replete, onion-shaped taste buds, rather than non-taste, pseudostratified epithelium. These SHH-induced ectopic taste buds are found in regions of the adult tongue previously thought incapable of generating taste organs. The ectopic buds are composed of all taste cell types, including support cells and detectors of sweet, bitter, umami, salt and sour, and recapitulate the molecular differentiation process of endogenous taste buds. In contrast to the well-established nerve dependence of endogenous taste buds, however, ectopic taste buds form independently of both gustatory and somatosensory innervation. As innervation is required for SHH expression by endogenous taste buds, our data suggest that SHH can replace the need for innervation to drive the entire program of taste bud differentiation. PMID:24993944

  12. Transient lingual papillitis: A retrospective study of 11 cases and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Tosios, Konstantinos I.; Nikitakis, Nikolaos G.; Kamperos, Georgios; Sklavounou, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    Background Transient lingual papillitis (TLP) is a common, under-diagnosed, inflammatory hyperplasia of one or multiple fungiform lingual that has an acute onset, and is painful and transient in nature. Material and Methods Eleven cases of TLP were diagnosed based on their clinical features. Information on demographics, clinical characteristics, symptoms, individual or family history of similar lesions, medical history, management and follow-up were extracted from the patients’ records. The English literature was reviewed on TLP differential diagnosis, pathogenesis and management. Results The study group included 8 females and 3 males (age: 10-53 years, mean age 31.7±12.88 years). Seven cases were classified as generalized form of TLP and 4 as localized form. Nine cases were symptomatic. Time to onset ranged from 1 to 14 days. A specific causative factor was not identified in any case and management was symptomatic. Conclusions Although TLP is not considered as a rare entity, available information is limited. Diagnosis is rendered clinically, while biopsy is required in cases with a differential diagnostic dilemma. TLP should be included in the differential diagnosis of acute, painful tongue nodules. Key words:Transient lingual papillitis, fungiform papillary glossitis, tongue, nodules. PMID:28149482

  13. Comparative morphological study on the tongue and lingual papillae of horses (Perissodactyla) and selected ruminantia (Artiodactyla).

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, K; Jackowiak, H; Frackowiak, H; Yoshimura, K; Kumakura, M; Kobayashi, K

    2005-01-01

    A common characteristic of horses, Rocky Mountain goats, and cattle is that they all have a well developed lingual prominence on the dorsal surface of the posterior area of the tongue. Foliate papillae were found in the horse studied but not in the goat or in cattle. The horse filiform papillae had a long and slender external form with a thin and slender CTC, while in the goat and cattle the external form consisted of a large thick main process and the CTC consisted of a bundle of numerous rod-shaped protrusions. The special papilla found on the lingual prominence resembled larger filiform-like papillae in the horses; however, in the goat and cattle it was a very thick and large tongue like papillae. The horses had two large vallate papillae, while the goat and cattle had 15 or more vallate papillae at the posterior area of the lingual prominence. This suggests that the fine structure of horse tongues may display a more primitive pattern than that present in goats and cattle.

  14. Stafne's bone cavity: An unusual case with involvement of the buccal and lingual mandibular plates.

    PubMed

    Herranz-Aparicio, Judit; Figueiredo, Rui; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2014-02-01

    Lingual mandibular bone defects, also known as Stafne bone cavity (SC), are unilateral asymptomatic radiolucencies, generally seen in the mandibular angle, below the inferior alveolar canal. Although panoramic radiographies normally offer enough information to make a correct diagnosis, additional studies are often required, especially in atypical cases. The present report describes an atypical presentation of a Stafne's bone cavity in a 78 years-old male patient. In this particular case, an asymptomatic and radiolucid lesion was observed during a routine dental examination. The computed tomography (CT) showed an involvement of both lingual and buccal mandibular plates producing a tunnel-like lesion. No history of mandibular trauma or surgery was refered. An additional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was made to discard submandibular gland pathology and to confirm the diagnosis. Since SC is asymptomatic and nonprogressive, a conservative approach based in clinical and radiological follow-ups was considered to be the most suitable treatment option. Key words:Stafne bone cavity, lingual mandibular bone defect, case report.

  15. Debonding forces of three different customized bases of a lingual bracket system

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Jang-Won; Kwon, Tae-Yub

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate whether extension of the custom base is necessary for enhancement of bond strength, by comparing the debonding forces and residual adhesives of 3 different lingual bracket systems. Methods A total of 42 extracted upper premolars were randomly divided into 3 groups of 14 each for bonding with brackets having (1) a conventional limited resin custom base; (2) an extended gold alloy custom base: Incognito™; and (3) an extended resin custom base: KommonBase™. The bonding area was measured by scanning the bracket bases with a 3-dimensional digital scanner. The debonding force was measured with an Instron universal testing machine, which applied an occlusogingival shear force. Results The mean debonding forces were 60.83 N (standard deviation [SD] 10.12), 69.29 N (SD 9.59), and 104.35 N (SD17.84) for the limited resin custom base, extended gold alloy custom base, and extended resin custom base, respectively. The debonding force observed with the extended resin custom base was significantly different from that observed with the other bases. In addition, the adhesive remnant index was significantly higher with the extended gold alloy custom base. Conclusions All 3 custom-base lingual brackets can withstand occlusal and orthodontic forces. We conclude that effective bonding of lingual brackets can be obtained without extension of the custom base. PMID:24228238

  16. A Reproducible Method for Isolation and In Vitro Culture of Functional Human Lymphoid Stromal Cells from Tonsils

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Ephraim, Yotam E.; Konijn, Tanja; Gönültas, Mehmet; Mebius, Reina E.

    2016-01-01

    The stromal compartment of secondary lymphoid organs is classicaly known for providing a mechanical scaffold for the complex interactions between hematopoietic cells during immune activation as well as for providing a niche which is favorable for survival of lymphocytes. In recent years, it became increasingly clear that these cells also play an active role during such a response. Currently, knowledge of the interactions between human lymphoid stroma and hematopoietic cells is still lacking and most insight is based on murine systems. Although methods to isolate stromal cells from tonsils have been reported, data on stability in culture, characterization, and functional properties are lacking. Here, we describe a reproducible and easy method for isolation and in vitro culture of functional human lymphoid stromal cells from palatine tonsils. The cells isolated express markers and characteristics of T cell zone fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs) and react to inflammatory stimuli by upregulating inflammatory cytokines and chemokines as well as adhesion molecules, as previously described for mouse lymphoid stroma. Also, cultured tonsil stromal cells support survival of human innate lymphoid cells, showing that these stromal cells can function as bone fide FRCs, providing a favorable microenvironment for hematopoietic cells. PMID:27907202

  17. Modulation of prey capture kinematics and the role of lingual sensory feedback in the lizard Pogona vitticeps.

    PubMed

    Schaerlaeken, Vicky; Meyers, Jay J; Herrel, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    Most organisms feed on a variety of prey that may differ dramatically in their physical and behavioural characteristics (e.g. mobility, mass, texture, etc.). Thus the ability to modulate prey capture behaviour in accordance with the characteristics of the food appears crucial. In animals that use rapid tongue movements to capture prey (frogs and chameleons), the coordination of jaws and tongue is based on visual cues gathered prior to the prey capture event. However, most iguanian lizards have much slower tongue-based prey capture systems suggesting that sensory feedback from the tongue may play an important role in coordinating jaw and tongue movements. We investigated the modulation of prey capture kinematics in the agamid lizard Pogona vitticeps when feeding on a range of food items differing in their physical characteristics. As the lizard is a dietary generalist, we expected it to be able to modulate its prey capture kinematics as a function of the (mechanical) demands imposed by the prey. Additionally, we investigated the role of lingual sensory feedback by transecting the trigeminal sensory afferents. Our findings demonstrated that P. vitticeps modulates its prey capture kinematics according to specific prey properties (e.g. size). In addition, transection of the trigeminal sensory nerves had a strong effect on prey capture kinematics. However, significant prey type effects and prey type by transection effects suggest that other sources of sensory information are also used to modulate the prey capture kinematics in P. vitticeps.

  18. Characterization of putative Haemophilus somnus isolates from tonsils of American bison (Bison bison).

    PubMed Central

    Ward, A C; Dyer, N W; Corbeil, L B

    1999-01-01

    Three Haemophilus somnus isolates (2a, 3a, and 27b) and one H. somnus-like (13b) isolate from tonsils of commercially reared American bison were compared with 2 known H. somnus isolates from cattle, namely, 2336, shown to cause respiratory disease, and 129Pt, from the prepuce of an asymptomatic bull. All H. somnus isolates, but not the H. somnus-like isolate, required CO2 for growth. Biochemical utilization profiles were identical for bison and bovine H. somnus isolates with the exception of alpha-fucosidase production by isolate 3a. Isolate 27a varied from 2a, 2336 and 129Pt by hemolysis of bovine erythrocytes. Isolate 13b hemolyzed sheep but not bovine or bison erythrocytes and varied from other isolates in biochemical utilization tests. Outer membrane protein profiles of 2a, 3a and 27a were almost identical with those of bovine isolate 2336 and similar to that of 129Pt, but quite different from that of 13b. Western blots of bison isolates were similar to that of the virulent bovine 2336 isolate, including detection of high molecular mass antigens above 100 kDa and the 76 kDa antigens associated with bovine IgG2 Fc binding characteristic of virulent strains, as well as antigens of approximately 78, 60 and 40 kDa. Producers and veterinarians should be aware that H. somnus may be carried by bison and may have potential for causing diseases in bison similar to those described in cattle and sheep. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. PMID:10480457

  19. Herniation of cerebellar tonsils in acromegaly: prevalence, pathogenesis and clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Manara, Renzo; Bommarito, Giulia; Rizzati, Silvia; Briani, Chiara; Della Puppa, Alessandro; Citton, Valentina; Zanchetta, Eva; Zerbo, Fabio; Ermani, Mario; Martini, Chiara; Mantero, Franco; Sicolo, Nicola; Maffei, Pietro; Scaroni, Carla

    2013-03-01

    Herniation of cerebellar tonsils (CTH) might occur in acromegaly patients and improve after acromegaly treatment. Our study investigated CTH prevalence in acromegaly, its relationship with clinical, laboratory and neuroimaging findings and its possible pathogenesis and clinical impact. 150 acromegaly patients (median-age 56 years, age-range 21-88, 83 females) underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Clinical data, laboratory and pituitary adenoma imaging findings were recorded. CTH, posterior cranial fossa area, tentorial angle, clivus, supraocciput and Twining's line length were measured in acromegaly patients and controls, who included MRI of 115 consecutive subjects with headache or transient neurological deficits (control group-1) and 24 symptomatic classic Chiari 1 malformation patients (control group-2). Acromegaly patients were interviewed for symptoms known to be related with CTH. 22/150 acromegaly patients (15 %) and 8/115 control group-1 subjects presented with CTH (p = 0.04). In acromegaly patients, CTH correlated positively with younger age and inversely with GH-receptor antagonist treatment. Control group-2 had a shorter clivus than CTH acromegaly patients (40.4 ± 3.2 mm vs 42.5 ± 3.3 mm, p < 0.05), while posterior fossa measures did not differ among acromegaly subgroups (with and without CTH) and control group-1. Headache and vision problems were more frequent in CTH acromegaly patients (p < 0.05); two acromegaly patients presented with imaging and neurological signs of syringomyelia. Despite no signs of posterior fossa underdevelopment or cranial constriction, CTH is more frequent in acromegaly patients and seems to contribute to some disabling neurological symptoms.

  20. Detection, seroprevalence and antimicrobial resistance of Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in pig tonsils in Northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Bonardi, S; Bruini, I; D'Incau, M; Van Damme, I; Carniel, E; Brémont, S; Cavallini, P; Tagliabue, S; Brindani, F

    2016-10-17

    Yersiniosis is the third most common reported zoonoses in Europe, with Y. enterocolitica and Y. pseudotuberculosis responsible for 98.66% and 0.94% of the confirmed human cases in 2013. From June 2013 to October 2014, 201 pigs at slaughter belonging to 67 batches were tested for Y. enterocolitica and Y. pseudotuberculosis in tonsils. Diaphragm muscle samples were tested for antibodies against Yersinia by a commercially available ELISA test. Y. enterocolitica 4/O:3 was detected in 55/201 pig tonsils (27.4%; 95% CI 23.1-37.1). The positive pigs came from 38/67 batches (56.7%) and were reared in 36/61 farms (59.0%). There was no statistical difference between farrow-to-finish and finishing farms. The mean count of Y. enterocolitica was 3.56±0.85log10CFU/g with a minimum of 2.0log10CFU/g and a maximum of 4.78log10CFU/g. Y. pseudotuberculosis was isolated from 4/201 pig tonsils (2.0%; 95% CI 0.0-4.5). Three isolates belonged to serotype O:3 and one to serotype O:1. The positive pigs belonged to 4/67 batches (6.0%) and came from finishing farms only. Y. pseudotuberculosis could be enumerated in one sample only (4.27log10CFU/g). The ELISA test demonstrated that 56.1% of the meat juice samples were positive for Yersinia antibodies. Serological positivity was found in 67.9% (36/53) of the Y. enterocolitica- and 75.0% (3/4) of the Y. pseudotuberculosis positive pigs. A significant association was found between serological results and the presence of Y. enterocolitica in tonsils (OR=1.97, p=0.044). All the Y. enterocolitica 4/O:3 isolates were susceptible to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, gentamicin, ceftazidime, ertapenem and meropenem, 94.5% to cefotaxime, 89.1% to kanamycin and 78.2% to tetracycline. The highest resistance rates were observed for ampicillin (100%), sulphonamides (98.2%) and streptomycin (78.2%). Y. pseudotuberculosis strains were sensitive to all the antimicrobials tested, i.e. amoxicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, azithromycin, cephalothin, cefoxitin

  1. Lingual orthodontics in the new era treatment according to criteria for occlusion and aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Fukawa, Ryuzo

    2009-12-01

    There has been remarkable progress in the field of orthodontics with the advent of CAD/CAM technology since the beginning of the 21st century. In lingual orthodontics, brackets designed and manufactured with a CAD/CAM system [1] are now available to produce more efficient tooth movement with reduced frictional resistance. The use of implant anchors for absolute anchorage has eliminated the need for excessive tipping of the molars with anchorage bends, which compromises periodontal health, as well as the need for application of heavy extraoral forces, thus providing more reasonable treatment options for both the patient and orthodontist.

  2. Accessory mental foramina, incisive nerve plexus and lingual canals with unusual emergence paths: Report of two rare cases

    PubMed Central

    Haghanifar, Sina; Poorsattar Bejeh Mir, Arash

    2015-01-01

    Being knowledgeable of neurovascularization of anterior mandible is crucial for successful local anesthesia and for safe minor and major oral surgeries of this part. The first case was 62 years old and was found to have two accessory mental foramina with buccal emergence on the left side and two accessory mental foramina with buccal and lingual emergence paths on the right side (overall five mental foramina). Incisive nerve plexus with multiple cephalic branching was obvious on both sides. The second case was 60 years of age and had two lingual foramina on the lingual side with two accessory foramina on the buccal side of the symphysis. Considering our findings, a pre-operation limited cone beam computed tomography is suggested to avoid inadvertent damage, especially when planning a surgery in the mandibular inter-mental region. PMID:25767360

  3. Marginal zone lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue with prominent plasma cell differentiation affecting the palatine tonsil: histopathological and immunohistochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Carlos Bregni, Román; Nuyens, Michel; Vassallo, José; Soares, Fernando Augusto; Romañach, Mário José; León, Jorge Esquiche; Almeida, Oslei Paes

    2012-04-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) of the oral cavity and oropharynx constitute 13% of all primary extranodal NHLs. Marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma) in the palatine tonsil is rare, corresponding to 6% of the NHLs of the Waldeyer ring. Some cases of MALT lymphoma can present prominent plasma cell differentiation, and less commonly, monoclonal gammopathy. The differential diagnosis of these cases from other NHLs with plasmacytic differentiation or plasma cell neoplasms is very difficult. In this article, we describe a rare case of MALT lymphoma in a 34-year-old man presenting as a swelling of the palatine tonsil. The tumor mass was diagnosed as MALT lymphoma with prominent plasma cell differentiation. Systemic evaluation was noncontributory. This is the first report of MALT lymphoma showing extensive plasmacytic differentiation of the palatine tonsil, and reinforces a possible relationship between extramedullary plasmacytoma and MALT lymphoma.

  4. Management of a coronally advanced lingual flap in regenerative osseous surgery: a case series introducing a novel technique.

    PubMed

    Ronda, Marco; Stacchi, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    One of the crucial factors in the success of guided bone regeneration procedures is the correct management of the soft tissues. This allows for stable primary wound closure without tension, which can result in premature exposure of the augmentation area, jeopardizing the final outcome. The use of vertical and periosteal incisions to passivate buccal and lingual flaps in the posterior mandible is often limited by anatomical factors. This paper reports on a series of 69 consecutive cases introducing a novel surgical technique to release and advance the lingual flap coronally in a safe and predictable manner.

  5. [Treatment of advanced periodontal and periapical lesion caused by malformed lingual groove with guided tissue regeneration: report of one case].

    PubMed

    Yu, Yi-ming; Sun, Qing-Feng; Yang, Pi-shan

    2005-08-01

    This paper reported one case with severe periodontal lesions caused by malformed lingual groove treated by guided tissue regeneration. The periodontal lesion was exposed palatally after the tooth had been treated with root canal therapy, the alveolar bone and the root surface was prepared, an unabsorbable member of e-PTFE was placed into the wound,and removed after 4 weeks, the patient was followed up for 3 years. The lesion recovered well three years after the operation, all of the periodontal tissue was in a healthy condition. It is advisable that guided periodontal tissue regeneration can be used as a new method to treat periodontal destruction induced by malformed lingual groove.

  6. Early lingual frenectomy assisted by CO2 laser helps prevention and treatment of functional alterations caused by ankyloglossia.

    PubMed

    Fiorotti, Renata C; Bertolini, Milene M; Nicola, Jorge H; Nicola, Ester M D

    2004-11-01

    Incorrectly produced speech sounds, the presence of dentofacial alterations and acquired functional adaptations may be due to a short and inadequate lingual frenum. When frenectomy is indicated, it should be performed as early as possible to prevent functional alterations. This study presents a literature review on correct lingual positioning in relation to orthodontic and phonetic function as well as an assessment of 15 patients who underwent frenectomy utilizing the carbon dioxide laser. The results demonstrated that this technique is safe, effective and perfect for use in young children and can be performed in an outpatient unit.

  7. Identification of stem cells that maintain and regenerate lingual keratinized epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toshihiro; Komai, Yoshihiro; Tokuyama, Yoko; Yanai, Hirotsugu; Ohe, Shuichi; Okazaki, Kazuichi; Ueno, Hiroo

    2013-05-01

    Lingual keratinized epithelial cells, which constitute the filiform papillae of the tongue, have one of the most rapid tissue turnover rates in the mammalian body and are thought to be the source of squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue. However, the mechanism of tissue maintenance and regeneration is largely unknown for these cells. Here, we show that stem cells positive for Bmi1, keratin 14 and keratin 5 are present in the base but not at the very bottom of the interpapillary pit (observed most frequently in the second or third layer (position +2 or +3) from the basal cells). Using a multicolour lineage tracing method, we demonstrated that one stem cell per interpapillary pit survives long-term. The cells were shown to be unipotent stem cells for keratinized epithelial cells but not for taste bud cells, and were found to usually be in a slow-growing or resting state; however, on irradiation-induced injury, the cells rapidly entered the cell cycle and regenerated tongue epithelium. The elimination of Bmi1-positive stem cells significantly suppressed the regeneration. Taken together, these results suggest that the stem cells identified in this study are important for tissue maintenance and regeneration of the lingual epithelium.

  8. The lingual dorsal surface of the blue-tongue skink (Tiliqua scincoides).

    PubMed

    Abbate, F; Latella, G; Montalbano, G; Guerrera, M C; Germanà, G P; Levanti, M B

    2009-10-01

    The blue-tongue lizard (Tiliqua scincoides) is a variety of large skink common throughout Australia. There are seven species of Tiliqua and all of them have long bodies, short limbs and short and robust tails. T. scincoides occurs in a wide range of habitats; its diet is omnivorous. When threatened, it opens the mouth and protrudes its characteristic large fleshy cobalt blue tongue. It is currently found as a popular species and also as a pet animal in the European countries. No data are available in literature about the morphology of the tongue of T. scincoides; therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate by means of scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy, the anatomy of the dorsal lingual surface. Our results demonstrate the presence of a tongue tip with a smooth surface without papillae. The foretongue was characterized by a stratified epithelium with foliate-like papillae and deep inter-papillar spaces in the middle part and cylindrical papillae with a flat surface in the lateral parts. All the posterior area of the tongue was characterized by more compacted papillae and the inter-papillar spaces were very narrow. Light microscopy showed the presence of melanin throughout the tongue. No taste buds were recognized on the lingual dorsal surface. Therefore, the papillae probably have a mechanical function showing an important role in the swallowing phase. The morphology of the tongue surface can be correlated to the diet and, different roles, as in other examined species, can be hypothesized for different areas.

  9. [Morpho-functional characteristics of the lingual epithelium after administration of hydra peptide morphogen].

    PubMed

    Kulaeva, V V; Bykov, V L

    2007-01-01

    Using histological, morphometric and quantitative histoenzymological methods, the changes of lingual epithelium were studied in 40 outbred albino mice after 5 intraperitoneal injections of 100 micrograms of hydra peptide morphogen (HPM) per 1 kg of body weight. Administration of HPM was found to increase the total thickness of epithelial layer on the dorsal tongue surface in the interpapillary regions, while in the area of filiform papillae these changes were not significant. On the ventral tongue surface HPM induced a marked increase of total thickness of the epithelial layer as compared to that in control animals. Mitotic activity was increased in the epithelium covering the ventral surface and in the interpapillary regions on the dorsal tongue surface. Histoenzymologic study which involved the demonstration of NADH-diaphorase, succinate- and lactate-dehydrogenase (LDH) activities, followed by a cytophotometric evaluation of enzyme activity, has shown a stimulatory effect of HPM on the activity of all the enzymes studied, which was most pronounced in respect to LDH and was maximally expressed on the dorsal tongue surface. These findings collectively suggest that HPM exerts a stimulatory effect on proliferation activity and metabolism of lingual epithelium, which is differentially expressed in its variuoe topographical zones.

  10. Torque control in lingual orthodontics with lever arm mechanics: a case report.

    PubMed

    Aravind, M; Shivaprakash, G; Ramesh, G C

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this report is to illustrate treatment mechanics for torque control in lingual mechanotherapy using a lever arm and transpalatal arch (TPA) tab system during en masse retraction of anterior teeth. An 18-year-old female with bimaxillary dentoalveolar proclination with crowding was treated with a lever arm-TPA tab system. The retraction tabs bent into the TPA placed across the maxillary second molars were used as anchorage. The retraction force on the maxillary anterior teeth was applied using lever arm hooks soldered between the lateral incisors and canines on a lingual mushroom archwire. By applying a retraction force to the lever arm hooks, the maxillary anterior teeth experienced greater palatal root movement as compared to the conventional retraction forces applied at the crown level. The tabs, placed high in the TPA, produced a distal tipping moment on the maxillary second molars, reinforcing their anchorage. The retraction force applied to the long lever arm hooks from the TPA tabs at the level of center of resistance (CRes) of anterior and posterior teeth is advantageous mainly in two aspects. First, it reinforces the anchorage, and second, it favors the palatal root movement of anterior teeth, thus obtaining better control over the torque during en masse retraction.

  11. Evaluating lingual carcinoma for surgical management: what does volumetric measurement with MRI offer?

    PubMed Central

    Boland, P W; Watt-Smith, S R; Pataridis, K; Alvey, C; Golding, S J

    2010-01-01

    MRI plays a crucial but under utilized role in the surgical management of lingual squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Measurement of three-dimensional tumour volume (TV) has the potential to guide management of clinically negative cervical lymph nodes and address deficiencies in current TNM staging criteria This work studied the value of MRI-measured TV as a predictor of 2 year disease-related survival (DRS) and disease-free survival (DFS), as well as occult cervical lymph node metastasis (OM) in lingual cancer. TV was determined by manually segmenting the tumour contour in each image slice and using the resulting pixel value to calculate the three-dimensional extent of disease. TV was also compared with the more established measure of tumour thickness (TT) Significant differences in DRS (χ2(1) = 7.7, Hazard ratio (HR) = 7.3, p = 0.005) and DFS (χ2(1) = 5.6, HR = 4.3, p = 0.02) at two years were found using a cut-off of 8 cm3. Similarly, a significant relationship between TV and occult cervical lymph node metastasis was discovered using a 3 cm3 cut-off (OR = 6.7, p = 0.02, Fisher's Exact Test). PMID:20965903

  12. Comparison of three different orthodontic wires for bonded lingual retainer fabrication

    PubMed Central

    Uysal, Tancan; Gul, Nisa; Alan, Melike Busra; Ramoglu, Sabri Ilhan

    2012-01-01

    Objective We evaluated the detachment force, amount of deformation, fracture mode, and pull-out force of 3 different wires used for bonded lingual retainer fabrication. Methods We tested 0.0215-inch five-stranded wire (PentaOne, Masel; group I), 0.016 × 0.022-inch dead-soft eight-braided wire (Bond-A-Braid, Reliance; group II), and 0.0195-inch dead-soft coaxial wire (Respond, Ormco; group III). To test detachment force, deformation, and fracture mode, we embedded 94 lower incisor teeth in acrylic blocks in pairs. Retainer wires were bonded to the teeth and vertically directed force was applied to the wire. To test pull-out force, wires were embedded in composite that was placed in a hole at the center of an acrylic block. Tensile force was applied along the long axis of the wire. Results Detachment force and mode of fracture were not different between groups. Deformation was significantly higher in groups II and III than in group I (p < 0.001). Mean pull-out force was significantly higher for group I compared to groups II and III (p < 0.001). Conclusions Detachment force and fracture mode were similar for all wires, but greater deformations were seen in dead-soft wires. Wire pull-out force was significantly higher for five-stranded coaxial wire than for the other wires tested. Five-stranded coaxial wires are suggested for use in bonded lingual retainers. PMID:23112930

  13. Neural network pattern recognition of lingual-palatal pressure for automated detection of swallow.

    PubMed

    Hadley, Aaron J; Krival, Kate R; Ridgel, Angela L; Hahn, Elizabeth C; Tyler, Dustin J

    2015-04-01

    We describe a novel device and method for real-time measurement of lingual-palatal pressure and automatic identification of the oral transfer phase of deglutition. Clinical measurement of the oral transport phase of swallowing is a complicated process requiring either placement of obstructive sensors or sitting within a fluoroscope or articulograph for recording. Existing detection algorithms distinguish oral events with EMG, sound, and pressure signals from the head and neck, but are imprecise and frequently result in false detection. We placed seven pressure sensors on a molded mouthpiece fitting over the upper teeth and hard palate and recorded pressure during a variety of swallow and non-swallow activities. Pressure measures and swallow times from 12 healthy and 7 Parkinson's subjects provided training data for a time-delay artificial neural network to categorize the recordings as swallow or non-swallow events. User-specific neural networks properly categorized 96 % of swallow and non-swallow events, while a generalized population-trained network was able to properly categorize 93 % of swallow and non-swallow events across all recordings. Lingual-palatal pressure signals are sufficient to selectively and specifically recognize the initiation of swallowing in healthy and dysphagic patients.

  14. Morphological study of the lingual papillae of the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) by scanning electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pastor, J F; Barbosa, M; De Paz, F J

    2008-01-01

    Due to the scarcity of giant pandas, there are few descriptions of their morphology and even fewer of their microscopic anatomy and the ultrastructure of their organs. In this study of the complete tongue of an adult male giant panda, we describe the morphology of its lingual surface, the different types of papillae, their characteristics and topographic distribution. It was seen that there are four main types of lingual papillae: filiform, conical, fungiform and vallate. There was no sign of foliate papillae, tuberculum intermolare or sublingua. Papilla distribution was not limited to the dorsum of the tongue, but was also seen on the anterior and ventral surfaces of the tongue. In the anterior third of the midline there is a smooth area with no papillae at all. Morphology of the microgrooves and pores is similar to that observed in other mammals. The papillae share characteristics encountered in Carnivora and herbivorous species of mammals. A narrow bamboo-based diet and specialized manner of eating have together resulted in modification of the tongue of a carnivoran, giving it some characteristics typical of an herbivore. PMID:18254792

  15. Effects of thermocycling on the degree of cure of two lingual retainer composites.

    PubMed

    Catalbas, Bulent; Uysal, Tancan; Nur, Metin; Demir, Abdullah; Gunduz, Beniz

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of thermocycling on the degree of cure (DC) and water sorption behavior of two lingual retainer composites. A total of 50 composite specimens, 5 mm diameter and 2 mm height, were prepared using Light Cure Retainer (LCR) (Reliance) and Transbond Lingual Retainer (TLR) (3M Unitek). After 40-second curing with a halogen light and after 24-hour water storage, the composite specimens were subjected to different thermocycling regimes. Absorbance peaks to monitor the DC were recorded using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, while water sorption was calculated in microg/mm(3). On DC, significant differences among the different thermocycling regimes were observed only for the TLR specimens (p<0.05). On water sorption behavior, an increase in the number of thermal cycles resulted in increased water sorption for both composites, but the statistical differences in these groups were not significant. On the effect of thermocycling up to 20,000 cycles, present findings showed that LCR was less affected than TLR. Further, LCR exhibited higher DC and lower water sorption values than TLR after thermal cycling.

  16. A concept to transfer a therapeutic splint position into permanent occlusion with a customized lingual appliance

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The role of occlusion concerning temporomandibular disorder is still unclear but seems to be the only component of the stomathognathic system dentists are able to change morphologically. The aim of the paper is to describe the orthodontist’s approach for transferring and maintaining a therapeutic splint position into permanent occlusion using a fully customized lingual appliance. Methods Fixed acrylic bite planes on lower molars were used to maintain a symptom-free condyle position prior to orthodontic treatment. Silicone impressions of the arches including the fixed bite planes were used for the Incognito laboratory procedure. Two digital setups were made. One setup represents the target occlusion. A second setup including the bite planes was used to fabricate an additional set of lower molar brackets. In the leveling stage all teeth except the lower molars were settled to maintain the therapeutic condyle position. Finally, the fixed bite planes were stepwise removed and molar brackets were replaced to establish the permanent occlusion planned with the first setup. Results and discussion The advantage of an individual lingual appliance consists in the high level of congruence between the fabricated setups and the final clinical result. Both the individual scope for design and the precision of the appliance were vitally important in the treatment of a patient with a functional disorder of the masticatory system. PMID:22613064

  17. Adaptation of the communicative brain to post-lingual deafness. Evidence from functional imaging.

    PubMed

    Lazard, Diane S; Innes-Brown, Hamish; Barone, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Not having access to one sense profoundly modifies our interactions with the environment, in turn producing changes in brain organization. Deafness and its rehabilitation by cochlear implantation offer a unique model of brain adaptation during sensory deprivation and recovery. Functional imaging allows the study of brain plasticity as a function of the times of deafness and implantation. Even long after the end of the sensitive period for auditory brain physiological maturation, some plasticity may be observed. In this way the mature brain that becomes deaf after language acquisition can adapt to its modified sensory inputs. Oral communication difficulties induced by post-lingual deafness shape cortical reorganization of brain networks already specialized for processing oral language. Left hemisphere language specialization tends to be more preserved than functions of the right hemisphere. We hypothesize that the right hemisphere offers cognitive resources re-purposed to palliate difficulties in left hemisphere speech processing due to sensory and auditory memory degradation. If cochlear implantation is considered, this reorganization during deafness may influence speech understanding outcomes positively or negatively. Understanding brain plasticity during post-lingual deafness should thus inform the development of cognitive rehabilitation, which promotes positive reorganization of the brain networks that process oral language before surgery. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Human Auditory Neuroimaging.

  18. Subepithelial B cells in the human palatine tonsil. II. Functional characterization.

    PubMed

    Dono, M; Zupo, S; Augliera, A; Burgio, V L; Massara, R; Melagrana, A; Costa, M; Grossi, C E; Chiorazzi, N; Ferrarini, M

    1996-09-01

    This study investigates the main functional features of subepithelial (SE) B cells and compares them with those of purified germinal center (GC) and follicular mantle (FM) B cells isolated from the same tonsils. Unlike FM B cells, SE B cells failed to produce polyspecific antibodies in vitro; unlike GC B cells, SE B cells expressed high levels of Bcl-2 and failed to undergo spontaneous apoptosis in vitro. The most striking function of SE B cells was their ability to produce IgM antibodies to T cell-independent type-2 (TI-2) (but not to TI-1) antigens (Ag). These antibodies could not be detected when both FM and GC B cells were stimulated with TI-2 Ag in vitro. Moreover, B cells isolated from peripheral blood were unable to mount a response to TI-2 Ag. The latter finding is consistent with the observation that B cells with the phenotypic features of SE B cells were virtually absent in the peripheral blood and emphasizes the notion that SE B cells belong to a subset of non-recirculating B cells. SE B cells were by far superior to FM B cells in mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) stimulation of allogeneic T cells in vitro, although they were not as efficient as dendritic cells (DC). In order to stimulate T cells efficiently, SE B cells had to be exposed to anti-mu antibody, a treatment which induced expression of activation markers such as CD80, CD86, CD69 and CD39, usually absent in resting SE B cells. CD80 and CD86 molecules expressed by SE B cells participated in the chain of events required to promote the proliferation of allogeneic T cells as demonstrated by inhibition tests with the appropriate mAb. The expression of CD80 and CD86 by anti-mu-treated SE B cells was not, however, the sole explanation for their good antigen presenting capacities since the exposure of FM B cells to anti-mu antibody also induced expression of these surface structures. Nevertheless, these cells failed to become good MLR stimulators. Collectively, the above data contribute further to the

  19. CXCR5+ CCR7- CD8 T cells are early effector memory cells that infiltrate tonsil B cell follicles.

    PubMed

    Quigley, Máire F; Gonzalez, Veronica D; Granath, Anna; Andersson, Jan; Sandberg, Johan K

    2007-12-01

    Naive and central memory CD8 T cells use CCR7 to recirculate through T cell zones of secondary lymphoid organs where they can encounter antigen. Here we describe a subset of human CD8 T cells expressing CXCR5 which enables homing in response to CXCL13 produced within B cell follicles. CXCR5+ CD8 T cells were found in tonsil B cell follicles, and isolated cells migrated towards CXCL13 in vitro. They expressed CD27, CD28, CD45RO, CD69, and were CD7low, and produced IFN-gamma and granzyme A but lacked perforin, a functional profile suggesting that these cells are early effector memory cells in the context of contemporary T cell differentiation models. Receptors important in the interaction with B cells, including CD70, OX40 and ICOS, were induced upon activation, and CXCR5+ CD8 T cells could to some extent support survival and IgG production in tonsil B cells. Furthermore, CXCR5+ CD8 T cells expressed CCR5 but no CCR7, suggesting a migration pattern distinct from that of follicular CD4 T cells. The finding that a subset of early effector memory CD8 T cells use CXCR5 to locate to B cell follicles indicates that MHC class I-restricted CD8 T cells are part of the follicular T cell population.

  20. Can Cross-Cultural Understanding Aid Second Language Acquisition? Toward a Theory of Ethno-Lingual Relativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Citron, James L.

    1995-01-01

    The term "ethno-lingual relativity" is a perspective that is not limited by one's own cultural and linguistic experiences, but rather is open to the contrasting cultural and linguistic patterns of other peoples. This article explores the hypothesis that having such a perspective might facilitate second language acquisition. (19 references)…

  1. Displacement pattern of the anterior segment using antero-posterior lingual retractor combined with a palatal plate

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Kyung-Won; Kwon, Soon-Yong; Kim, Kyung A; Park, Ki-Ho; Kim, Seong-Hun; Nelson, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate and compare the effects of two appliances on the en masse retraction of the anterior teeth anchored by temporary skeletal anchorage devices (TSADs). Methods The sample comprised 46 nongrowing hyperdivergent adult patients who planned to undergo upper first premolar extraction using lingual retractors. They were divided into three groups, based on the lingual appliance used: the C-lingual retractor (CLR) group (group 1, n = 16) and two antero-posterior lingual retractor (APLR) groups (n = 30, groups 2 and 3). The APLR group was divided by the posterior tube angulation; posterior tube parallel to the occlusal plane (group 2, n = 15) and distally tipped tube (group 3, n = 15). A retrospective clinical investigation of the skeletal, dental, and soft tissue relationships was performed using lateral cephalometric radiographs obtained pretreatment and post en masse retraction of the anterior teeth. Results All groups achieved significant incisor and canine retraction. The upper posterior teeth did not drift significantly during the retraction period. The APLR group had less angulation change in the anterior dentition, compared to the CLR group. By changing the tube angulation in the APLR, the intrusive force significantly increased in the distally tipped tube of group 3 patients and remarkably reduced the occlusal plane angle. Conclusions Compared to the CLR, the APLR provides better anterior torque control and canine tipping while achieving bodily translation. Furthermore, changing the tube angulation will affect the amount of incisor intrusion, even in patients with similar palatal vault depth, without the need for additional TSADs. PMID:26629475

  2. Changes in force associated with the amount of aligner activation and lingual bodily movement of the maxillary central incisor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaowei; Ren, Chaochao; Wang, Zheyao; Zhao, Pai; Wang, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purposes of this study were to measure the orthodontic forces generated by thermoplastic aligners and investigate the possible influences of different activations for lingual bodily movements on orthodontic forces, and their attenuation. Methods Thermoplastic material of 1.0-mm in thickness was used to manufacture aligners for 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, and 0.6 mm activations for lingual bodily movements of the maxillary central incisor. The orthodontic force in the lingual direction delivered by the thermoplastic aligners was measured using a micro-stress sensor system for the invisible orthodontic technique, and was monitored for 2 weeks. Results Orthodontic force increased with the amount of activation of the aligner in the initial measurements. The attenuation speed in the 0.6 mm group was faster than that of the other groups (p < 0.05). All aligners demonstrated rapid relaxation in the first 8 hours, which then decreased slowly and plateaued on day 4 or 5. Conclusions The amount of activation had a substantial influence on the orthodontic force imparted by the aligners. The results suggest that the activation of lingual bodily movement of the maxillary central incisor should not exceed 0.5 mm. The initial 4 or 5 days is important with respect to orthodontic treatment incorporating an aligner. PMID:27019820

  3. Establishment of a novel lingual organoid culture system: generation of organoids having mature keratinized epithelium from adult epithelial stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hisha, Hiroko; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Kanno, Shohei; Tokuyama, Yoko; Komai, Yoshihiro; Ohe, Shuichi; Yanai, Hirotsugu; Omachi, Taichi; Ueno, Hiroo

    2013-11-15

    Despite the strong need for the establishment of a lingual epithelial cell culture system, a simple and convenient culture method has not yet been established. Here, we report the establishment of a novel lingual epithelium organoid culture system using a three-dimensional matrix and growth factors. Histological analyses showed that the generated organoids had both a stratified squamous epithelial cell layer and a stratum corneum. Very recently, we showed via a multicolor lineage tracing method that Bmi1-positive stem cells exist at the base of the epithelial basal layer in the interpapillary pit. Using our new culture system, we found that organoids could be generated by single Bmi1-positive stem cells and that in the established organoids, multiple Bmi1-positive stem cells were generated at the outermost layer. Moreover, we observed that organoids harvested at an early point in culture could be engrafted and maturate in the tongue of recipient mice and that the organoids generated from carcinogen-treated mice had an abnormal morphology. Thus, this culture system presents valuable settings for studying not only the regulatory mechanisms of lingual epithelium but also lingual regeneration and carcinogenesis.

  4. Intercultural Interactions of Mono-Cultural, Mono-Lingual Local Students in Small Group Learning Activities: A Bourdieusian Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colvin, Cassandra; Fozdar, Farida; Volet, Simone

    2015-01-01

    This research examines the understandings and experiences of mono-cultural, mono-lingual local students in relation to intercultural interactions within small group learning activities at university. Bourdieu's concepts of field, habitus and capital are employed to illuminate a number of barriers to intercultural interaction. Using qualitative…

  5. The Role of Music in Speech Intelligibility of Learners with Post Lingual Hearing Impairment in Selected Units in Lusaka District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katongo, Emily Mwamba; Ndhlovu, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to establish the role of music in speech intelligibility of learners with Post Lingual Hearing Impairment (PLHI) and strategies teachers used to enhance speech intelligibility in learners with PLHI in selected special units for the deaf in Lusaka district. The study used a descriptive research design. Qualitative and quantitative…

  6. Establishment of a Novel Lingual Organoid Culture System: Generation of Organoids Having Mature Keratinized Epithelium from Adult Epithelial Stem Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisha, Hiroko; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Kanno, Shohei; Tokuyama, Yoko; Komai, Yoshihiro; Ohe, Shuichi; Yanai, Hirotsugu; Omachi, Taichi; Ueno, Hiroo

    2013-11-01

    Despite the strong need for the establishment of a lingual epithelial cell culture system, a simple and convenient culture method has not yet been established. Here, we report the establishment of a novel lingual epithelium organoid culture system using a three-dimensional matrix and growth factors. Histological analyses showed that the generated organoids had both a stratified squamous epithelial cell layer and a stratum corneum. Very recently, we showed via a multicolor lineage tracing method that Bmi1-positive stem cells exist at the base of the epithelial basal layer in the interpapillary pit. Using our new culture system, we found that organoids could be generated by single Bmi1-positive stem cells and that in the established organoids, multiple Bmi1-positive stem cells were generated at the outermost layer. Moreover, we observed that organoids harvested at an early point in culture could be engrafted and maturate in the tongue of recipient mice and that the organoids generated from carcinogen-treated mice had an abnormal morphology. Thus, this culture system presents valuable settings for studying not only the regulatory mechanisms of lingual epithelium but also lingual regeneration and carcinogenesis.

  7. Analysis of Speech Disorders in Acute Pseudobulbar Palsy: a Longitudinal Study of a Patient with Lingual Paralysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leroy-Malherbe, V.; Chevrie-Muller, C.; Rigoard, M. T.; Arabia, C.

    1998-01-01

    This case report describes the case of a 52-year-old man with bilateral central lingual paralysis following a myocardial infarction. Analysis of speech recordings 15 days and 18 months after the attack were acoustically analyzed. The case demonstrates the usefulness of acoustic analysis to detect slight acoustic differences. (DB)

  8. A Cross-Lingual Similarity Measure for Detecting Biomedical Term Translations

    PubMed Central

    Bollegala, Danushka; Kontonatsios, Georgios; Ananiadou, Sophia

    2015-01-01

    Bilingual dictionaries for technical terms such as biomedical terms are an important resource for machine translation systems as well as for humans who would like to understand a concept described in a foreign language. Often a biomedical term is first proposed in English and later it is manually translated to other languages. Despite the fact that there are large monolingual lexicons of biomedical terms, only a fraction of those term lexicons are translated to other languages. Manually compiling large-scale bilingual dictionaries for technical domains is a challenging task because it is difficult to find a sufficiently large number of bilingual experts. We propose a cross-lingual similarity measure for detecting most similar translation candidates for a biomedical term specified in one language (source) from another language (target). Specifically, a biomedical term in a language is represented using two types of features: (a) intrinsic features that consist of character n-grams extracted from the term under consideration, and (b) extrinsic features that consist of unigrams and bigrams extracted from the contextual windows surrounding the term under consideration. We propose a cross-lingual similarity measure using each of those feature types. First, to reduce the dimensionality of the feature space in each language, we propose prototype vector projection (PVP)—a non-negative lower-dimensional vector projection method. Second, we propose a method to learn a mapping between the feature spaces in the source and target language using partial least squares regression (PLSR). The proposed method requires only a small number of training instances to learn a cross-lingual similarity measure. The proposed PVP method outperforms popular dimensionality reduction methods such as the singular value decomposition (SVD) and non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) in a nearest neighbor prediction task. Moreover, our experimental results covering several language pairs such as

  9. Attenuation of pressor response following intubation: Efficacy of nitro-glycerine lingual spray

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Indira; Naithani, Udita; Dadheech, Vinod Kumar; Pradeep, D. S.; Meena, Khemraj; Verma, Devendra

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The role of nitro-glycerine (NTG) lingual spray for attenuation of the hemodynamic response associated with intubation is not much investigated. We conducted this study to evaluate the efficacy of NTG lingual pump or pen spray in attenuation of intubation induced hemodynamic responses and to elucidate the optimum dose. Material and Methods: In a prospective randomized controlled trial, 90 adult patients of ASA I, II, 18-60 year posted for elective general surgery under general anesthesia with intubation were randomly allocated to three groups as Group C (control) - receiving no NTG spray, Group N1 – receiving 1 NTG spray and Group N2 – receiving 2 NTG spray one minute before intubation. Systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate were recorded at baseline, just before intubation (i.e., 60 s just after induction and NTG spray), immediately after intubation, at 1, 2, 5 and 10 min after intubation. Results: Incidence of hypertension was significantly higher in Group C (60%, n = 18) as compared to Group N1 and N2 (10%, n = 3 each), P < 0.01. Mean value of SBP, DBP and MAP showed a significant rise as compared to baseline, following intubation in control group (15.31% in SBP, 12.12% in DBP, 17.77% in MAP) that persisted till 5 min, while no significant rise was observed in Group N1 and N2. There was a trend toward fall in blood pressure in Group N2 (4.95% fall in SBP, 4.72% fall in MAP) 1-min following spray, which was clinically insignificant. Mean value of SBP, DBP and MAP was significantly higher in Group C than in Group N1, which was in turn greater than Group N2 (Group C > N1> N2), P < 0.05. However, incidence of tachycardia was comparable in three groups (70% in group C, 63.33% in Group N1 and 67.77% in Group N2, P > 0.05). Conclusions: We concluded that the NTG lingual spray in dose of 0.4 mg (1 spray) or 0.8 mg (2 sprays) was effective in attenuation of intubation induced

  10. A cross-lingual similarity measure for detecting biomedical term translations.

    PubMed

    Bollegala, Danushka; Kontonatsios, Georgios; Ananiadou, Sophia

    2015-01-01

    Bilingual dictionaries for technical terms such as biomedical terms are an important resource for machine translation systems as well as for humans who would like to understand a concept described in a foreign language. Often a biomedical term is first proposed in English and later it is manually translated to other languages. Despite the fact that there are large monolingual lexicons of biomedical terms, only a fraction of those term lexicons are translated to other languages. Manually compiling large-scale bilingual dictionaries for technical domains is a challenging task because it is difficult to find a sufficiently large number of bilingual experts. We propose a cross-lingual similarity measure for detecting most similar translation candidates for a biomedical term specified in one language (source) from another language (target). Specifically, a biomedical term in a language is represented using two types of features: (a) intrinsic features that consist of character n-grams extracted from the term under consideration, and (b) extrinsic features that consist of unigrams and bigrams extracted from the contextual windows surrounding the term under consideration. We propose a cross-lingual similarity measure using each of those feature types. First, to reduce the dimensionality of the feature space in each language, we propose prototype vector projection (PVP)--a non-negative lower-dimensional vector projection method. Second, we propose a method to learn a mapping between the feature spaces in the source and target language using partial least squares regression (PLSR). The proposed method requires only a small number of training instances to learn a cross-lingual similarity measure. The proposed PVP method outperforms popular dimensionality reduction methods such as the singular value decomposition (SVD) and non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) in a nearest neighbor prediction task. Moreover, our experimental results covering several language pairs such as

  11. Dietary high fluorine induces apoptosis and alters Bcl-2, Bax, and caspase-3 protein expression in the cecal tonsil lymphocytes of broilers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juan; Cui, Hengmin; Peng, Xi; Fang, Jing; Zuo, Zhicai; Wang, Hesong; Wu, Bangyuan; Deng, Yuanxin; Wang, Kangping

    2013-04-01

    Long-term excessive fluoride intake is known to be toxic and can lead to fluorosis and bone pathologies. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying sodium fluoride-induced cytotoxicity in the cecal tonsil lymphocytes are not well understood. The aims of this study were to investigate the effects of high dietary fluorine on apoptosis and the expression of the Bcl-2, Bax, and caspase-3 in the cecal tonsil lymphocytes of broilers. The broilers were fed on high-fluorine diets containing 0, 400, 800, and 1,200 mg/kg fluorine. As measured by flow cytometry, the percentage of apoptotic lymphocytes was significantly increased in the high-fluorine groups II and III when compared with those in the control group. Meanwhile, immunohistochemical tests showed that the Bcl-2 protein expression decreased, and the Bax and caspase-3 protein expression increased in the high-fluorine groups II and III. In conclusion, dietary fluorine in the range of 800-1,200 mg/kg increased lymphocyte apoptosis in the cecal tonsil of broilers, suggesting that the lymphocyte apoptosis in the cecal tonsil was mediated by direct effects of fluoride on the expression of Bcl-2, Bax, and caspase-3.

  12. [The rationale for the conservative treatment of chronic tonsillitis in the patients of the older age groups by the «soft» therapy methods].

    PubMed

    Lavrenova, G V; Nesterova, K I; Yaremenko, K V; Nesterova, A A

    The objective of the present study was to develop an efficient system for the treatment of chronic tonsillitis in the patients of advanced and middle age based on the application of polyvalent bacteriophages in the combination with the physical factors and herbal medicines. The study involved 65 patients (39 women and 276 men) at the age from 65 to 73 years presenting with chronic tonsillitis. The treatment included washing the tonsillar lacunae with herbal infusion consisting of a tetterwort (Choledoniummajus) extract. This procedure was followed by phonophoresiswith the use of the combined polyvalent bacteriophage preparation in the non-liquid formulation during 7-10 days. The effectiveness of such treatment was evaluated based on the results of clinical examination and the analysis of the subjective feelings reported by the patients. In addition, the rosette-forming function of lymphocytes was estimated and palatine tonsil microbiotas in different patients were compared. The effectiveness of therapy was estimated at 89.2%. The positive outcome of the proposed treatment was documented in 78.6% of the cases within 6 months after the onset of therapy. It is concluded that the treatment of chronic tonsillitis with bacteriophagal preparations and herbal infusions in combination with thetraditionallow-frequency ultrasound treatment is highly efficacious (favourable outcome in 78.6% of the patients of middle and advanced age) without the use of antibiotic medications.

  13. Exploratory studies on the therapeutic effects of Kumarabharana Rasa in the management of chronic tonsillitis among children at a tertiary care hospital of Karnataka

    PubMed Central

    Arun Raj, G.R.; Shailaja, U.; Debnath, Parikshit; Banerjee, Subhadip; Rao, Prasanna N.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of an Ayurvedic poly-herbo-mineral formulation Kumarabharana Rasa (KR) in the management of chronic tonsillitis (Tundikeri) in children has been assessed in this study. This clinical study was a double-arm study with a pre- and post-test design at the outpatient level in a tertiary Ayurveda hospital attached to a teaching institute located in district headquarters in Southern India. Patients (n = 40) with chronic tonsillitis satisfying diagnostic criteria and aged between 5 and 10 years were selected from the outpatient Department of Kaumarbhritya, SDM College of Ayurveda and Hospital, Hassan. Among them, 20 patients were treated with Kumarabharana rasa (tablet form) at a dose of 500 mg once daily for 30 days (Group A). The other 20 patients were treated with Godhuma Vati (placebo) at a dose of 500 mg once daily for 30 days (Group B). In both groups, Madhu was the Anupana advised. After completion of 30 days of treatment, the patients were assessed on the following day and another investigation took place 15 days later. Statistically significant effects (p < 0.05) in the reduction of all signs and symptoms of chronic tonsillitis after KR treatment were observed. These results indicate that Kumarabharana Rasa has an ameliorative effect in reducing the signs and symptoms of chronic tonsillitis. PMID:26870676

  14. [Surgery of AVM of the inferior medullary velum by the uvulotonsillar approach--advantage of moving of the cerebellar tonsil: technical case report].

    PubMed

    Shigeno, Taku; Kumai, Junichiro; Endo, Masaru; Hotta, Shinji

    2002-01-01

    An incidentally found arteriovenous malformation (AVM) of the inferior medullary velum behind the medulla was removed by the lateral approach to the fourth ventricle originally described by Seeger in 1980. A wide posterior fossa craniotomy was performed to move the cerebellar tonsil laterally with C-1 laminectomy. The tela chroidea and inferior medullary velum, the two main sheets of tissue that form the lower half of the roof of the fourth ventricle can be exposed by gently displacing the tonsils laterally without splitting the vermis. Both the cerebellomedullary and uvulotonsillar spaces were exposed. Because the lateral cerebellomedullary cistern was also exposed, the moving of the cerebellar tonsil in a lateral direction was easy to do without injuring the cerebellar tissues. The nidus was located mainly in the extrapial plane that received feeding arteries from the posterior inferior cerebellar artery. The nidus was removed in a dry field without bleeding. This report is the first report of surgical removal of unruptured AVM of the inferior medullary velum through the so-called telovelar or transcerebellomedullary fissure approach. We propose to call this approach the uvulotonsillar approach to emphasize the dissecting plane between the uvula and the tonsil.

  15. Effects of fast halogen and plasma arc curing lights on the surface hardness of orthodontic adhesives for lingual retainers.

    PubMed

    Uşümez, Serdar; Büyükyilmaz, Tamer; Karaman, Ali Ihya

    2003-06-01

    The aims of this study were to (1) identify the optimum cure times of 2 different lingual retainer adhesives with a conventional halogen, a fast halogen, and a plasma arc light by measuring Vickers surface hardness, and (2) determine whether different lights produce similar surface hardness values for the same adhesive resin material. The investigated plasma arc curing unit was the PowerPac (American Dental Technologies, Corpus Christi, Tex), and the fast halogen unit was the Optilux 501 (Kerr, Orange, Calif). A conventional curing unit, the Ortholux XT (3M Dental Products, St. Paul, Minn) was used as the control. Two orthodontic lingual retainer adhesives were used: Transbond Lingual Retainer (3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif) and Light Cure Retainer (Reliance Orthodontic Products, Itasca, Ill). Concise (3M Dental Products) and diluted Concise were used as controls. Transbond Lingual Retainer was polymerized by the PowerPac light in 6 seconds, by the Optilux in 10 seconds, and by the conventional halogen light in 20 seconds. The minimum curing times for Light Cure Retainer adhesive were 15 seconds for PowerPac, 10 seconds for Optilux, and 40 seconds for conventional halogen. Surface hardness values for each resin did not differ significantly with different curing units. However, different adhesives demonstrated significantly different surface hardness values. Final Vickers surface hardness values (averaged across curing units) of Transbond Lingual Retainer, Concise, diluted Concise, and Light Cure Retainer were 62.8, 52.4, 46.0, and 40.4, respectively. Plasma arc or fast halogen units polymerize resin composite adhesive in much shorter times than do conventional curing units, without a significant loss in surface hardness. Therefore, these units are suggested for clinical use to save chairside time.

  16. Lingual ulcer as the only sign of recurrent mycobacterial infection in an HIV/AIDS-infected patient.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Amador, Velia; Anaya-Saavedra, Gabriela; González-Ramírez, Imelda; Mosqueda-Gómez, Juan Luis; Esquivel-Pedraza, Lilly; Reyes-Gutiérrez, Edgardo; Sierra-Madero, Juan

    2005-01-01

    The report describes an HIV/AIDS patient seen at a referral center in Mexico City, in whom a mycobacterial infection in the oral mucosa, probably tuberculosis (TB) was identified. The purpose is to describe the clinical and histological findings in an HIV-infected patient, who after being treated successfully for tuberculous lymphangitis 4 years ago, presented with a lingual ulcer as the only suggestive sign of recurrence of mycobacterial infection, probably M. tuberculosis. A 39-year-old man seen in the HIV clinic of the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición "Salvador Zubirán" in Mexico City since 1991 for HIV infection. In 1999 the patient developed tuberculous lymphangitis; he was managed with a 4-drug regimen for 12 months, with improvement of local and systemic symptoms. In May of 2003, the patient presented a painful superficial lingual ulcer, 0.7 cm in diameter, well circumscribed, crateriform with slightly elevated, irregular and indurated borders, of 4 months duration. The histopathological examination showed chronic granulomatous inflammation with giant multinucleated cells, suggestive of mycobacterial infection, and recurrence of TB was considered. Rifampin, isoniazide, pyrazinamide, ethambutol and streptomycin were administered. The lingual lesion improved with partial healing at the first week and total remission at 45 days after the beginning of the antituberculous treatment. In June, 2003, the patient began highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) that included two NRTIs and one NNRTI. At 7 months of follow-up, the patient remains free of lingual lesions. The particularity of the present case is that the lingual ulcer was the only sign of infection by mycobacteria, suggestive of TB, in an HIV/AIDS patient that probably represented a recurrence of a previous episode.

  17. Japanese/English Blog Distillation and Cross-Lingual Blog Analysis with Multilingual Wikipedia Entries as Fundamental Knowledge Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakasaki, Hiroyuki; Kawaba, Mariko; Yokomoto, Daisuke; Utsuro, Takehito; Fukuhara, Tomohiro

    The overall goal of this paper is to cross-lingually analyze multilingual blogs collected with a topic keyword. The framework of collecting multilingual blogs with a topic keyword is designed as the blog feed retrieval procedure. In this paper, we take an approach of collecting blog feeds rather than blog posts, mainly because we regard the former as a larger information unit in the blogosphere and prefer it as the information source for cross-lingual blog analysis. In the blog feed retrieval procedure, we also regard Wikipedia as a large scale ontological knowledge base for conceptually indexing the blogosphere. The underlying motivation of employing Wikipedia is in linking a knowledge base of well known facts and relatively neutral opinions with rather raw, user generated media like blogs, which include less well known facts and much more radical opinions. In our framework, first, in order to collect candidates of blog feeds for a given query, we use existing Web search engine APIs, which return a ranked list of blog posts, given a topic keyword. Next, we re-rank the list of blog feeds according to the number of hits of the topic keyword as well as closely related terms extracted from the Wikipedia entry in each blog feed. We compare the proposed blog feed retrieval method to existing Web search engine APIs and achieve significant improvement. We then apply the proposed blog distillation framework to the task of cross-lingually analyzing multilingual blogs collected with a topic keyword. Here, we cross-lingually and cross-culturally compare less well known facts and opinions that are closely related to a given topic. Results of cross-lingual blog analysis support the effectiveness of the proposed framework.

  18. Subepithelial B cells in the human palatine tonsil. I. Morphologic, cytochemical and phenotypic characterization.

    PubMed

    Dono, M; Burgio, V L; Tacchetti, C; Favre, A; Augliera, A; Zupo, S; Taborelli, G; Chiorazzi, N; Grossi, C E; Ferrarini, M

    1996-09-01

    This study describes the purification of a subset of tonsillar B cells which share phenotypic, morphologic and cytochemical features with subepithelial (SE) B cells. These cells, which represented the 5-10% of the total tonsillar B cells, were found in the Percoll gradient fraction of highest density, together with resting follicular mantle (FM) B cells. The latter B cells, however, expressed surface CD5 and could be removed by an immune rosetting procedure. The remaining small CD5- B cells had a surface phenotype (IgM+, IgD+, CD23-, CD38+/-, CD10-, CD44+) that was different from that of FM (IgM+, IgD+, CD23+, CD39+, CD38-, CD10-, CD44+2) and of germinal center (GC) (CD23-, CD39-, CD38+, CD10+, CD44+/-, IgG+) B cells isolated from the same cell suspensions. Furthermore, the absence of surface activation markers (CD71 and CD69) and of surface IgG allowed us to distinguish small CD5- B cells from activated and memory cells migrating within Percoll fractions of lower density. In situ immunohistochemical studies revealed that B cells with an identical phenotype as that of small CD5- B cells could be detected predominantly in the SE region (lamina propria) of the tonsil, and also within the epithelium lining the cryptae. This area was also comprised of a relatively minor proportion of activated B cells, not found in the small CD5- B cell fraction owing to the separation procedure used. Consistent with the notion that the SE area could be a site of B cell activation was also the presence of activated macrophages and of plasma cells. Thirty to forty percent of small CD5- B cells isolated in suspension were positive for the endogeneous alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. In contrast, only a few FM B cells were ALP+, while GC cells were consistently ALP-. In situ studies also demonstrated a prevalent expression of ALP activity by the B cells in the SE area. At the ultrastructural level, small CD5- B cells were clearly different from both FM and GC B cells. They displayed a

  19. Bond strengths of lingual orthodontic brackets bonded with light-cured composite resins cured by transillumination.

    PubMed

    King, L; Smith, R T; Wendt, S L; Behrents, R G

    1987-04-01

    A method of curing light-cured composite resins by transillumination to cement acid-etched fixed partial dentures was adapted to bond solid mesh-backed lingual orthodontic brackets. Results of this investigation showed that the bond strengths of the orthodontic brackets bonded with light-cured composite resins were significantly less (P less than 0.05) than the bond strengths of the orthodontic brackets cemented with traditional adhesives and orthodontic composite resins. Notwithstanding, the bond strengths achieved with the transilluminated light-cured composite resins should be adequate to withstand the forces of mastication and orthodontic movements. There was no correlation of bond strengths of the brackets cemented with the transilluminated light-cured composite resins when compared to the faciolingual widths of the teeth.

  20. Lingualized integration: tooth molds and an occlusal scheme for edentulous implant patients.

    PubMed

    Lang, B R; Razzoog, M E

    1992-01-01

    The interface of bone and soft tissue to dental implants has been extensively documented, while the influence of biomechanics and the occlusal interface continues to be overlooked. Yet that same occlusal interface may ultimately be the prime factor in the lifetime survival rate of dental implants. What is lacking, for the practitioner, is a clear concept of the occlusal rehabilitation which is required and appropriate for the totally edentulous implant patient. Lingualized integration represents an occlusal scheme using specific tooth molds designed to improve the likelihood of maximum intercuspation and an absence of deflective occlusal contacts, provide cusp height for selective occlusal reshaping, and achieve a natural and pleasing appearance. Factors in the articulation and arrangement of the posterior teeth to assure the attainment of the fundamental goals of comfort, function, and appearance in occlusal rehabilitation for edentulous implant patients are included.

  1. Clinical ergotism with lingual ischemia induced by clarithromycin-ergotamine interaction.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, R S; Dart, R C; Gomez, H F

    1996-02-26

    The macrolide class of antibiotics, including erythromycin and troleandomycin, is associated with clinically significant adverse drug interactions. This results from macrolide inhibition of cytochrome P-450 metabolism of numerous xenobiotics, resulting in elevated serum drug levels and clinical intoxication. Animal studies, however, suggest that clarithromycin, the newest approved macrolide antibiotic, has has less potential for adverse drug reactions. We describe a patient who, on her fifth day of clarithromycin therapy, developed clinical ergotism (i.e., hypertension, lingual ischemia, and peripheral cyanosis) several hours after administration of her usual 2-mg dose of ergotamine tartrate. To our knowledge, this is the first report of clinical ergotism precipitated by clarithromycin-ergotamine interaction and suggests that, like other macrolide antibiotics, ergot preparations should be avoided in patients who are taking clarithromycin.

  2. Determining the distance from the lingual frenum anterior attachment to the lower incisors' incisal edges.

    PubMed

    Mahboub, Farhang; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Molavi, Elahe

    2016-01-01

    Background. Occlusal rims are used to determine the jaw relationships in the transverse and vertical dimensions and estimate the inter-occlusal distance in edentulous patients. It is important to find ways to determine the height and shape of the occlusal rims correctly. This study was undertaken to determine the exact distance from the oral cavity floor to the incisal edges of mandibular incisors to serve as a guide for adjusting the height of the mandibular occlusal rim. Methods. Forty patients were selected and special trays were fabricated to prepare accurate stone casts on which the measurements were made at 0.01-mm accuracy. Two marks were placed on the casts at the incisal edges of mandibular incisors and at anterior attachment of lingual frenum. Then the distance between these two marks was determined on the vertical spindle of a surveyor using a digital Vernier measuring tool and recorded. Results. The results showed that the mean and standard deviation of the distances between the oral cavity floor and the incisal edges of lower incisors were 14.35 ± 1.68 mm, with a range of 10.2‒17.02 mm. The mean distances in males and females were 15.42 ± 0.97 and 13.28 ± 1.57 mm, respectively. T-test showed significant differences in this distance between males and females, with greater distances in males. Conclusion. The distance between the oral cavity floor and the incisal edges of mandibular incisors at anterior attachment of lingual frenum might be a proper criterion for the initial adjustment of occlusal rims.

  3. Determining the distance from the lingual frenum anterior attachment to the lower incisors’ incisal edges

    PubMed Central

    Mahboub, Farhang; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Molavi, Elahe

    2016-01-01

    Background. Occlusal rims are used to determine the jaw relationships in the transverse and vertical dimensions and estimate the inter-occlusal distance in edentulous patients. It is important to find ways to determine the height and shape of the occlusal rims correctly. This study was undertaken to determine the exact distance from the oral cavity floor to the incisal edges of mandibular incisors to serve as a guide for adjusting the height of the mandibular occlusal rim. Methods. Forty patients were selected and special trays were fabricated to prepare accurate stone casts on which the measurements were made at 0.01-mm accuracy. Two marks were placed on the casts at the incisal edges of mandibular incisors and at anterior attachment of lingual frenum. Then the distance between these two marks was determined on the vertical spindle of a surveyor using a digital Vernier measuring tool and recorded. Results. The results showed that the mean and standard deviation of the distances between the oral cavity floor and the incisal edges of lower incisors were 14.35 ± 1.68 mm, with a range of 10.2‒17.02 mm. The mean distances in males and females were 15.42 ± 0.97 and 13.28 ± 1.57 mm, respectively. T-test showed significant differences in this distance between males and females, with greater distances in males. Conclusion. The distance between the oral cavity floor and the incisal edges of mandibular incisors at anterior attachment of lingual frenum might be a proper criterion for the initial adjustment of occlusal rims. PMID:28096953

  4. CD1c-Related DCs that Express CD207/Langerin, but Are Distinguishable from Langerhans Cells, Are Consistently Present in Human Tonsils.

    PubMed

    De Monte, Anne; Olivieri, Charles-Vivien; Vitale, Sébastien; Bailleux, Sonanda; Castillo, Laurent; Giordanengo, Valérie; Maryanski, Janet L; Segura, Elodie; Doglio, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Several subsets of dendritic cells (DCs) are present in the oropharyngeal tonsillar tissues and are thought to behave as major actors in development and regulation of immunity by acting as a first line of recognition for airborne and alimentary antigens. We previously discovered in human adult tonsils infected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a subset of DCs that expressed langerin/CD207, a lectin usually recognized as a hallmark of epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs). In the present study, we analyzed the content of several child and adult tonsils in order to characterize in more detail the phenotype of these tonsillar CD207-expressing DCs (tCD207 DCs) and to compare it with that of other human DC subsets. We showed that all the human tonsils studied (n = 12) contained significant proportions of tCD207 DCs among tonsillar cells expressing HLA-DR. Moreover, the presence of tCD207 DCs in tonsils from young children free of EBV infection indicated that these cells could be established early in the tonsil independently of EBV infection. We also showed that tCD207 DCs, that were found mainly located within the tonsillar lymphoid stroma, were distinguishable from LCs by the level of expression of CD1a and EpCAM, and also from human inflammatory DCs by the lack of CD1a, CD206, and CD14 expression. Detailed analysis of cell surface DC markers showed that tCD207 DCs were unrelated to CD141(+) DCs or macrophages, but defined a subtype of tonsillar DCs closely related to myeloid resident CD1c DCs. Since it was established that blood CD1c myeloid DCs exhibit plasticity and are capable of expressing CD207 notably in the presence of inflammatory cytokines, it is tempting to speculate that CD207(+) CD1c(+) DCs may play a specific immune role.

  5. CD1c-Related DCs that Express CD207/Langerin, but Are Distinguishable from Langerhans Cells, Are Consistently Present in Human Tonsils

    PubMed Central

    De Monte, Anne; Olivieri, Charles-Vivien; Vitale, Sébastien; Bailleux, Sonanda; Castillo, Laurent; Giordanengo, Valérie; Maryanski, Janet L.; Segura, Elodie; Doglio, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Several subsets of dendritic cells (DCs) are present in the oropharyngeal tonsillar tissues and are thought to behave as major actors in development and regulation of immunity by acting as a first line of recognition for airborne and alimentary antigens. We previously discovered in human adult tonsils infected with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV), a subset of DCs that expressed langerin/CD207, a lectin usually recognized as a hallmark of epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs). In the present study, we analyzed the content of several child and adult tonsils in order to characterize in more detail the phenotype of these tonsillar CD207-expressing DCs (tCD207 DCs) and to compare it with that of other human DC subsets. We showed that all the human tonsils studied (n = 12) contained significant proportions of tCD207 DCs among tonsillar cells expressing HLA-DR. Moreover, the presence of tCD207 DCs in tonsils from young children free of EBV infection indicated that these cells could be established early in the tonsil independently of EBV infection. We also showed that tCD207 DCs, that were found mainly located within the tonsillar lymphoid stroma, were distinguishable from LCs by the level of expression of CD1a and EpCAM, and also from human inflammatory DCs by the lack of CD1a, CD206, and CD14 expression. Detailed analysis of cell surface DC markers showed that tCD207 DCs were unrelated to CD141+ DCs or macrophages, but defined a subtype of tonsillar DCs closely related to myeloid resident CD1c DCs. Since it was established that blood CD1c myeloid DCs exhibit plasticity and are capable of expressing CD207 notably in the presence of inflammatory cytokines, it is tempting to speculate that CD207+ CD1c+ DCs may play a specific immune role. PMID:27252701

  6. A rare occurrence of lymphoepithelial cyst in the palatine tonsil: a case report and discussion of the etiopathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Castro, João Gabriel L; Ferreira, Geovane M; Mendonça, Elismauro F; Castro, Luciano A

    2015-01-01

    Lymphoepithelial cysts are uncommon benign lesions that present as painless yellowish nodules arising from various sites in the oral cavity and other parts of the body. Their etiopathogenesis is controversial, but most authors have assumed that they develop from obstruction of crypts in oral lymphoid aggregates, thus they are not true cysts but pseudocysts of retention. This paper describes a case of a large lymphoepithelial cyst located in the tonsil of a 21-year-old man complaining of a lump in the throat for four months. The patient underwent excisional biopsy, and the histopathological features showed squamous epithelium surrounded by lymphoid tissue, which were characteristically consistent with a lymphoepithelial cyst. We discuss the etiopathogenesis of these lesions and treatment modalities, which can consist of conservative surgery or only follow-up examination. PMID:26097623

  7. A rare occurrence of lymphoepithelial cyst in the palatine tonsil: a case report and discussion of the etiopathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Castro, João Gabriel L; Ferreira, Geovane M; Mendonça, Elismauro F; Castro, Luciano A

    2015-01-01

    Lymphoepithelial cysts are uncommon benign lesions that present as painless yellowish nodules arising from various sites in the oral cavity and other parts of the body. Their etiopathogenesis is controversial, but most authors have assumed that they develop from obstruction of crypts in oral lymphoid aggregates, thus they are not true cysts but pseudocysts of retention. This paper describes a case of a large lymphoepithelial cyst located in the tonsil of a 21-year-old man complaining of a lump in the throat for four months. The patient underwent excisional biopsy, and the histopathological features showed squamous epithelium surrounded by lymphoid tissue, which were characteristically consistent with a lymphoepithelial cyst. We discuss the etiopathogenesis of these lesions and treatment modalities, which can consist of conservative surgery or only follow-up examination.

  8. Detection, enumeration and characterization of Yersinia enterocolitica 4/O:3 in pig tonsils at slaughter in Northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Bonardi, Silvia; Alpigiani, Irene; Pongolini, Stefano; Morganti, Marina; Tagliabue, Silvia; Bacci, Cristina; Brindani, Franco

    2014-05-02

    Tonsils from 150 pigs slaughtered at 270 days or older were tested for Yersinia enterocolitica with different cultural methods. Samples were collected in three different abattoirs of Northern Italy between April and November 2012 and were analysed by direct plating on cefsulodin-irgasan-novobiocin (CIN) agar and by enrichment procedures following the ISO 10273:2003 reference method. Twenty-three (15.3%) samples were positive: 22 tonsils (14.7%) were positive for human pathogenic Y. enterocolitica bio-serotype 4/O:3 and one tonsil (0.7%) for Y. enterocolitica bio-serotype 1A/7,8-8,8,19. Seventeen samples out of 23 (73.9%) were positive by direct plating method. Among the enrichment procedures, the best recovery rate (8 positives out of 23; 34.8%) was obtained by the two-day enrichment in peptone-sorbitol-bile (PSB) broth followed by plating on CIN agar plates. The two-day enrichment in PSB followed by potassium hydroxide (KOH) treatment before plating onto CIN agar gave 7 positives out of 23 (30.4%), decreasing to 3 positives (13.0%) without KOH treatment. The worst results were obtained by prolonged (five days) enrichment in PSB, with or without KOH treatment, followed by plating on CIN agar: 4.3% (1 out of 23) and 0.0% recovery rates, respectively. The mean concentration was 1.9 × 10(4)CFU/g, with a minimum of 1.0 × 10(2)CFU/g and a maximum of 5.8 × 10(4)CFU/g, thus demonstrating that tonsils may play an important role in contamination of pluck sets, carcasses, and slaughterhouse environment. Prevalence of virulence genes among the Y. enterocolitica 4/O:3 isolates was as follows: 12/22 (54.5%) for yadA, 21/22 (95.5%) for ail, 21/22 (95.5%) for inv and 22/22 (100%) for ystA. All Y. enterocolitica 4/O:3 isolates were sensitive to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, ciprofloxacin and ceftazidime and resistant to ampicillin and cephalotin. High proportions of 4/O:3 isolates (95%) were sensitive to cefotaxime, gentamicin, kanamicin and nalidixic acid. High levels of

  9. A study of immunoglobulin classes present on the membrane and in the cytoplasm of human tonsil plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Ferrarini, M; Viale, G; Risso, A; Pernis, B

    1976-08-01

    The problem of whether immunoglobulin (Ig)-containing plasma cells expressed membrane Ig has been investigated using cells from human tonsils. In tonsils, IgG-containing cells are predominant, but a certain number of IgM, IgA and IgD-containing cells are also present. By using a double staining immunofluorescent technique for the simultaneous detection of membrane and intracytoplasmic Ig, it has been possible to ascertain that the large majority of IgA, IgM and IgD-containing cells had membrane immunoglobulin (mIg) of a class coincident with that of intracytoplasmic Ig. In addition a noticeable proportion of IgM-containing cells expressed membrane IgD, thus indicating that a certain number of these cells bore both membrane IgM and IgD. About 60% of IgG-containing cells had membrane IgG, while the remaining cells did not express mIg. Furthermore the surface staining of these cells was generally fainter than that of the cells containing other Ig classes. Experiments on the surface light chain type expressed by the single Ig-containing cells (IgCC) as compared to that found in the cytoplasm have shown that in the large majority of IgCC the light chain type of mIg coincided with that of intracytoplasmic Ig. Discordant light chain types of membrane and cytoplasmic Ig were found on about 12% of IgCC only. These values can be taken as a measure of how many IgCC had passively acquired mIg.

  10. Goodness, gracious, great balls of fire: A case of transient lingual papillitis following consumption of an Atomic Fireball.

    PubMed

    Raji, Kehinde; Ranario, Jennifer; Ogunmakin, Kehinde

    2016-05-15

    Transient lingual papillitis is a benign condition characterized by the inflammation of one or more fungiform papillae on the dorsolateral tongue. Although it is a common condition that affects more than half of the population, few cases have been reported in the dermatological literature. Therefore, it is a condition uncommonly recognized by dermatologists though it has a distinct clinical presentation that may be easily diagnosed by clinicians familiar with the entity. We report an interesting case of transient lingual papillitis in a 27 year-old healthy woman following the consumption of the hard candy, Atomic Fireball. We describe treatment and resolution of the condition, and its recurrence following re-exposure to the identified culprit. This report further reviews the literature to illustrate the clinical manifestations, etiology, differential diagnosis, course, and treatment of this condition.

  11. Sensory disturbances of buccal and lingual nerve by muscle compression: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Alvira-González, Joaquín

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Several studies on cadavers dissection have shown that collateral branches of the trigeminal nerve cross muscle bundles on their way, being a possible etiological factor of some nerve disturbances. Case Report A 45-year-old man attended to the Temporomandibular Joint and Orofacial Pain Unit of the Master of Oral Surgery and Implantology in Hospital Odontològic of Barcelona University, referring tingling in the left hemifacial región and ipsilateral lingual side for one year, with discomfort when shaving or skin compression. Discussion Several branches of the trigeminal nerve follow a path through the masticatory muscles, being the lingual nerve and buccal nerve the most involved. The hyperactivity of the muscle bundles that are crossed by nerve structures generates a compression that could explain certain orofacial neuropathies (numbness and / or pain) in which a clear etiologic factor can not be identified. Key words:Buccal nerve, paresthesia, idiopathic trigeminal sensory neuropathy. PMID:26855715

  12. Comparative morphological study on the stereo-structure of the lingual papillae and their connective tissue cores of the American beaver (Castor canadensis).

    PubMed

    Shindo, Junji; Yoshimura, Ken; Kobayashi, Kan

    2006-02-01

    The lingual papillae and the connective tissue cores (CTC) of the American beaver were examined by light and scanning electron microscopy. The tongue of American beaver was about 9 cm in length, 3.5 cm in width, and has a lingual prominence. Four types of papillae (filiform, fungiform, vallate and foliate papillae) were observed. The filiform papillae can be classified into three types (filiform, large filiform and dorm-like papillae). Filiform papillae distributed on the anterior tongue and posterior of the lingual prominence consisted of a posterior thick main process and several small accessory processes. After removal of the epithelium, the CTCs of the filiform papillae had U-shaped, horseshoe-like primary cores with 10-15 rod-shaped small accessory cores. Large filiform papillae were distributed at the anterior margin of the lingual prominence. Dome-like papillae were distributed at the top of lingual prominence. Fungiform papillae were observed two types. Fungiform papillae, which were distributed at the anterior tongue, were round shaped. Fungiform papillae of the posterior of the lingual prominence were large and surrounded with a papillary groove. At the posterior of the tongue, three vallate papillae were arranged in a triangular pattern. Foliate papillae were on 22 to 25 parallel ridges and grooves.

  13. Microvasculature of the lingual papillae in primates and insectivores--fungiform, vallate and foliate papillae.

    PubMed

    Matsukawa, N; Okada, S

    1994-10-01

    The microvascular architecture of the fungiform, vallate and foliate papillae was investigated under scanning electron microscope in man, common squirrel monkeys, common marmosets, common tree shrews (primates), large Japanese moles and dwarf shrews (insectivores) utilizing microvascular corrosion casts. The fungiform papilla of the lingual apex in man was supplied by an intrapapillary capillary network with a globular pattern. It was composed of 10-15 capillary loops in a circular arrangement and 5-7 thick capillaries in the center. The fungiform papilla of the lingual body was supplied by a dense capillary network on the top and lateral surfaces. That in other primates was supplied by a cylindrical capillary network and loop formation was seen on the top surface. That in insectivores was supplied by a thin cylindrical network with coarse meshes, at the tips of which were observed 2 or 3 capillary rings in the mole and only one in the dwarf shrew. The vallate papilla in primates was supplied by an intrapapillary capillary network with a globular pattern, and showed irregularly tortuous capillary loops on its top surface. The vallum was supplied by a capillary network in man and usually one or two rows of loops arranged in a circle in other primates. The vallate papilla in insectivores was supplied by a doughnut-like capillary network with a recess on the top surface, and an indistinctly low vallum by a low undulating network. The foliate papillae were most developed in man, and each lobule was supplied by capillaries passing longitudinal to it and capillary loops in 5-10 regular rows on the top, but 3-5 rudimentary lobules in the squirrel monkey and marmoset. In the two species, each lobule was supplied by one arteriole, one venule and a coarse capillary network continuing from the interpapillary network. No foliate papilla was observed, but large conical papillae were noted in the tree shrew and insectivores. In conclusion, the intrapapillary vasculature appeared

  14. Sugar-activated ion transport in canine lingual epithelium. Implications for sugar taste transduction

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    There is good evidence indicating that ion-transport pathways in the apical regions of lingual epithelial cells, including taste bud cells, may play a role in salt taste reception. In this article, we present evidence that, in the case of the dog, there also exists a sugar- activated ion-transport pathway that is linked to sugar taste transduction. Evidence was drawn from two parallel lines of experiments: (a) ion-transport studies on the isolated canine lingual epithelium, and (b) recordings from the canine chorda tympani. The results in vitro showed that both mono- and disaccharides in the mucosal bath stimulate a dose-dependent increase in the short-circuit current over the concentration range coincident with mammalian sugar taste responses. Transepithelial current evoked by glucose, fructose, or sucrose in either 30 mM NaCl or in Krebs-Henseleit buffer (K-H) was partially blocked by amiloride. Among current carriers activated by saccharides, the current response was greater with Na than with K. Ion flux measurements in K-H during stimulation with 3-O-methylglucose showed that the sugar-evoked current was due to an increase in the Na influx. Ouabain or amiloride reduced the sugar-evoked Na influx without effect on sugar transport as measured with tritiated 3-O-methylglucose. Amiloride inhibited the canine chorda tympani response to 0.5 M NaCl by 70-80% and the response to 0.5 M KCl by approximately 40%. This agreed with the percent inhibition by amiloride of the short-circuit current supported in vitro by NaCl and KCl. Amiloride also partially inhibited the chorda tympani responses to sucrose and to fructose. The results indicate that in the dog: (a) the ion transporter subserving Na taste also subserves part of the response to K, and (b) a sugar-activated, Na- preferring ion-transport system is one mechanism mediating sugar taste transduction. Results in the literature indicate a similar sweet taste mechanism for humans. PMID:3171536

  15. A quantitative study of the size of benign and malignant lymphoid follicles.

    PubMed Central

    Crocker, J; Jones, E L; Curran, R C

    1983-01-01

    The mean areas of lymphoid follicles have been determined in 20 specimens of malignant follicular (centrocytic-centroblastic) lymphoma, 15 specimens of reactive follicular hyperplasia and 10 palatine tonsils. In all of the benign specimens and whenever possible for those showing malignancy, the areas of both the whole follicles (including the "mantle" zones) and of the follicle centres were measured; this procedure was facilitated by means of the Reichert-Jung (Kontron) MOP-AMO3 image-analyser. Reactive lymph nodes were found to have larger mean follicle areas than centrocytic-centroblastic lymphomas; the areas of reactive follicles also show greater variation than do those of their malignant counterparts. In addition, the "mantle" zone is usually absent from malignant follicles but may account for up to 65.5% of the mean total follicle size in reactive lymph nodes and tonsils. Images PMID:6350370

  16. Functional and comparative study of lingual papillae in four species of bear (Ursidae) by scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pastor, J F; Barbosa, M; de Paz, F J; García, M; Ferrero, E

    2011-10-01

    The eight current species of bear (Ursidae) are widely distributed throughout Europe, Asia, and America. They are mainly encountered in the northern hemisphere, except for the spectacled bear and the sun bear, which are also found in the south of the equator. Adaptations of the masticatory apparatus (teeth, tongue, and musculature) to diet are one of the factors that imply the greatest structural changes in the cranium. This diet may be carnivorous, herbivorous, melliferous, or insectivorous, with one type of food predominating according to the time of year. The way in which food is eaten determines the morphology of the lingual surface; generally speaking, all bears put their mouth to the food, which, initially, they lick or they let the food stick to their tongue, as occurs when insects are eaten. As in all mammals, a distinction can be made between mechanical and gustatory papillae and the development and distribution of which depend on the species and their eating habits. In this study of the complete tongues of four species of adult bears, we describe the morphology of the lingual surfaces, the different types of papillae, their characteristics, and topographic distribution. It was seen that there were five main types of lingual papillae: filiform, conical, fungiform, foliate, and vallate. Morphology of the microgrooves and pores was similar to that observed in other mammals. In general, there were no great differences among the four species of bears studied, perhaps due to the similarity in the kind of food they consume in captivity.

  17. Stafne’s bone cavity: An unusual case with involvement of the buccal and lingual mandibular plates

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Rui; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2014-01-01

    Lingual mandibular bone defects, also known as Stafne bone cavity (SC), are unilateral asymptomatic radiolucencies, generally seen in the mandibular angle, below the inferior alveolar canal. Although panoramic radiographies normally offer enough information to make a correct diagnosis, additional studies are often required, especially in atypical cases. The present report describes an atypical presentation of a Stafne’s bone cavity in a 78 years-old male patient. In this particular case, an asymptomatic and radiolucid lesion was observed during a routine dental examination. The computed tomography (CT) showed an involvement of both lingual and buccal mandibular plates producing a tunnel-like lesion. No history of mandibular trauma or surgery was refered. An additional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was made to discard submandibular gland pathology and to confirm the diagnosis. Since SC is asymptomatic and nonprogressive, a conservative approach based in clinical and radiological follow-ups was considered to be the most suitable treatment option. Key words:Stafne bone cavity, lingual mandibular bone defect, case report. PMID:24596643

  18. 3D evaluation of the lingual fracture line after a bilateral sagittal split osteotomy of the mandible.

    PubMed

    Plooij, J M; Naphausen, M T P; Maal, T J J; Xi, T; Rangel, F A; Swennnen, G; de Koning, M; Borstlap, W A; Bergé, S J

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this prospective observational study was to evaluate whether cone beam CT (CBCT) is a useful tool for analyzing the fracture line in a bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO). The patient group consisted of 40 consecutive patients (9 males and 31 females) with a mandibular hypoplasia who underwent a BSSO advancement (Hunsuck modification; n=80 splits) between September 2006 and July 2008. The mean age at the time of surgery was 34 years (range 17-61 years). A newly developed lingual split scale was used to categorize the path of the fracture line on the lingual side of the ramus based on one-day postoperative data sets reconstructed from CBCT data. Although all splits (n=80) were performed according to the standardized protocol, only 51% of the fracture lines run according to the Hunsuck's description, whereas 33% ran through the mandibular canal and 16% split otherwise. The split pattern was influenced by the length of the medial osteotomy (p=0.01). In conclusion, 3D imaging is a useful tool for analyzing the surgical outcome of a BSSO and has the potential to provide substantial data on the position of the proximal segments as a result of the lingual fracture line.

  19. [Peculiarities of blood supply of palatal tonsils and the potential risk of hemorrhage during tonsillectomy: the literature review and case report].

    PubMed

    Nosulia, E V

    2014-01-01

    The present review encompasses the publications concerning peculiarities of blood supply of palatal tonsils, the frequency and variants of the anomalous structure of internal carotid artery. Analysis of the literature data has shown that the anomalous vascular structure is one of the important risk factors of the development of intra- and postoperative hemorrhage, besides redundant blood supply of the oropharynx, inflammatory changes in the tissue of tonsils and peritonsillar region. Special attention is given to the peculiarities of diagnostics of such conditions. The emphasis is laid on the importance of timely diagnostics of the anomalous structural changes in the main vessels of the neck prior to the surgical intervention on the pharynx. The analysis of the anomalous structure of internal carotid artery is presented.

  20. Snapshots of the Universe: A Multi-Lingual Astronomy Art Book

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaton, Rachael; Jackson, L.; Carlberg, J.; Johnson, K.; Marchand, R.; Sivakoff, G.; Czekala, I.; Damke, G.; Dean, J.; Drosback, M.; Gugliucci, N.; Martinez, O.; Wong, A.; Zasowski, G.; Skies, Dark; Kids, Bright

    2012-05-01

    Dark Skies, Bright Kids! (DSBK) is a dynamic education and public outreach organization at the University of Virginia, focused on enhancing elementary level science education in rural and underserved communities. DSBK thrives on the efforts of undergraduate, graduate and post-doctoral volunteers. Early in the program, our volunteers encountered difficulties connecting with “English as a second language” students. To meet that challenge, DSBK volunteers created art with short descriptions of astronomical objects in both Spanish and English to help communicate concepts across the language barrier. Building on this initial success, our simple art project has evolved into a full educational children’s book targeted at 2nd - 5th grade students. Though originally in Spanish and English, a partnership with the University of Alberta (Canada) has produced a French translation of the text, broadening the outreach potential of the book. Here we present our 'Snapshots of the Universe' for broad distribution to classrooms, school libraries and homes, with emphasis on those serving multi-lingual populations, as a unique tool for introducing astronomy concepts at the elementary school level.

  1. Extraoral surgical correction of lingual entrapment in a Chinese goose (Anser cygnoides).

    PubMed

    Grosset, Claire; Guzman, David Sanchez-Migallon; Waymire, Andrew; Puchalski, Sarah M; Steffey, Michele A

    2013-12-01

    An adult female Chinese goose (Anser cygnoides) presented with a ventral displacement of the hyoid apparatus, associated with distension of the intermandibular sublingual space and of the gular skin, causing difficulties with prehension and deglutition of food and water. Physical examination revealed that the tongue was able to move normally and could be replaced into a normal anatomical position by external compression of the distended ventral intermandibular region. A mild hypoalbuminemia was the only remarkable finding of the biochemistry panel. Radiographs and computed tomography scan of the head and neck regions confirmed a normal hyoid apparatus. An extraoral surgical reconstruction of the distended intermandibular skin was performed: the excess skin was incised and resected and the margins of the incision were sutured with appropriate tissue tension to obtain a good apposition and prevent ventral displacement of the hyoid apparatus. Postoperative complication included airway obstruction by a large amount of respiratory secretions, which were successfully aspirated from the trachea. A supportive elastic bandage was placed at the level of the beak commissure during the following 24 hours in order to reduce downward pressure on the suture line and minimize the risk of dehiscence of the suture. The goose resumed eating within 4 hours following the surgery and oxygen supplementation was discontinued after 24 hours. Respiration was assessed as normal and the tongue remained permanently in normal position. The lingual entrapment did not recur during the following 18 months.

  2. Multiscale structural analysis of mouse lingual myoarchitecture employing diffusion spectrum magnetic resonance imaging and multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gaige, Terry A; Kwon, Hyuk Sang; Dai, Guangping; Cabral, Victor C; Wang, Ruopeng; Nam, Yoon Sung; Engelward, Bevin P; Wedeen, Van J; So, Peter T C; Gilbert, Richard J

    2008-01-01

    The tongue consists of a complex, multiscale array of myofibers that comprise the anatomical underpinning of lingual mechanical function. 3-D myoarchitecture was imaged in mouse tongues with diffusion spectrum magnetic resonance imaging (DSI) at 9.4 T (b(max) 7000 smm, 150-microm isotropic voxels), a method that derives the preferential diffusion of water/voxel, and high-throughput (10 fps) two-photon microscope (TPM). Net fiber alignment was represented for each method in terms of the local maxima of an orientational distribution function (ODF) derived from the local diffusion (DSI) and 3-D structural autocorrelation (TPM), respectively. Mesoscale myofiber tracts were generated by alignment of the principal orientation vectors of the ODFs. These data revealed a consistent relationship between the properties of the respective ODFs and the virtual superimposition of the distributed mesoscale myofiber tracts. The identification of a mesoscale anatomical construct, which specifically links the microscopic and macroscopic spatial scales, provides a method for relating the orientation and distribution of cells and subcellular components with overall tissue morphology, thus contributing to the development of multiscale methods for mechanical analysis.

  3. Scanning electron microscopical study of the lingual epithelium of green iguana (Iguana iguana).

    PubMed

    Abbate, F; Latella, G; Montalbano, G; Guerrera, M C; Levanti, M B; Ciriaco, E

    2008-08-01

    During the last few years, green iguanas (Iguana iguana) have turned out to be one of the most popular pets. They are omnivorous. In their way of feeding, this crucial function is performed by capturing of the preys and mostly, this is carried out by the tongue. The role of the tongue is also fundamental during the intra-oral transport and during the swallowing of food. This has been reported in several studies about chameleons, agamids and iguanids, nevertheless published data about the mechanisms of capturing and swallowing the prey, and the morphological descriptions about the tongue epithelium, are scarce. Therefore, the aim of this present study was to analyse the morphology of the lingual epithelium in green iguanas by scanning electron microscopy. Three different areas were demonstrated on the tongue surface: the tongue tip, characterized by a smooth epithelium without papillae, a foretongue, completely covered by numerous closely packed cylindriform papillae, and a hindtongue with conical-like papillae. Some taste buds were recognized on the middle and the posterior parts of the tongue. Different functional roles could be hypothesized for the three tongue areas: the tongue tip could have a role related to the movements of the prey immediately after the capturing, while the middle papillae and the hindtongue could have an important role concerning the swallowing phase.

  4. Stereo architecture of the connective tissue cores of the lingual papillae in the treeshrew (Tupaia glis).

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, K; Wanichanon, C

    1992-12-01

    The stereo architecture of the lingual connective tissue cores (CTC) in the treeshrew (Tupaia glis) (which has the primitive characteristics of primates) was observed by scanning electron microscopy, and compared to that of other animal orders. The tongue of the treeshrew has three vallate papillae which are situated in the posterior part of the tongue, while some macaques have several vallate papillae. Among numerous filiform papillae, fungiform papillae are sporadically distributed. A filiform papilla consists of a bundle of several slender spine-like processes arranged in a circle at the basal margin. After removal of the epithelium, the CTC of the filiform papilla looks like a human hand raised with the palm facing towards the tongue tip. The fungiform CTC in the threeshrew is columnar in shape (rather similar to that of Insectivora and Rodentia) and at the top there are several round depressions for taste buds. In the treeshrew several large rod-shaped processes are derived from the postero-lateral margin of the tongue, as in Carnivora (dogs and cats), where foliate papillae are located in many other animal species. The treeshrew has numerous characteristics similar to those of the crab-eating macaque (Primates), but at the same time it has some characteristics similar to those of Insectivora, Rodentia, Carnivora and Artiodactyla.

  5. Isolated blunt lingual artery injury secondary to a road traffic accident: diagnostic and therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Mawaddah, Azman; Goh, Bee See; Kew, Thean Yean; Rozman, Zakaria

    2012-04-01

    Neurologic and airway compromise as a result of traumatic vascular injuries to the neck region often lead to more severe complications and thus require special consideration. Furthermore, these cases pose diagnostic and therapeutic challenges to healthcare providers. Here, we report a case of a 28-year-old motorcyclist presenting with progressively enlarged Zone 2 neck swelling on the left side following a high impact collision. There were no symptoms or signs suggesting neurologic or laryngeal injury. Computed tomography angiogram of the neck revealed signs of an active arterial bleed. The apparent vascular injury was managed by close observation for signs of airway compromise, urgent angiogram, and selective catheter embolisation of the left lingual artery. The patient subsequently recovered without further operative exploration of the neck. At 6 months post-trauma, the neck swelling fully subsided with no complications from angioembolisation. This case illustrates the individualised treatment and multidisciplinary approach in managing such cases. We review our rationale for this diagnostic and therapeutic approach.

  6. Lingual frenectomy: a comparison between the conventional surgical and laser procedure.

    PubMed

    De Santis, D; Gerosa, R; Graziani, P F; Zanotti, G; Rossini, N; Castellani, R; Bissolotti, G; Chiarini, L; Nocini, P F; Bertossi, D

    2013-08-01

    Aim: Ankyloglossia, commonly known as tongue-tie, is a congenital oral anomaly characterized by a short lingual frenulum that may contribute to feeding, speech and mechanical problems. The purpose of this study is to compare the advantages of laser vis-à-vis conventional frenectomy in both intra- and post-surgical phases. Methods: This study took into consideration two patients, who were respectively 9 and 10-year-old. The first one underwent a common surgical procedure. A Nd:Yap laser device with a micropulsed wavelength of 1340 nm and power of 8 watts was used for the second. The postsurgical discomfort and healing characteristics were evaluated. Results: The results indicated that the Nd:Yap laser has the following advantages when compared to the conventional frenectomy: 1) soft tissue cutting was efficient, with no bleeding, giving a clear operative field; 2) there was no need to use sutures; 3) the surgery was less time-consuming; 4) there was no postsurgical infection and no need for analgesics or antibiotics; 5) wound contraction and scarring were decreased or eliminated; 6) despite the initial slowness of the healing process, the complete and final recovery was faster. Conclusion: Considering the above elements, it is possible to assert that the laser frenectomy has a series of unquestionable advantages if compared to the conventional surgical technique.

  7. Course and distribution of the lingual nerve in the ventral tongue region: anatomical considerations for frenectomy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hun-Mu; Woo, Yong-Je; Won, Sung-Yoon; Kim, Da-Hye; Hu, Kyung-Seok; Kim, Hee-Jin

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the sublingual and intralingual courses of the lingual nerve (LN) in the ventral tongue region, providing a clinical guide for safe surgical procedures such as frenectomy. We evaluated 16 specimens (32 sides) by gross observation after detailed dissections, and a further 6 specimens were examined after Sihler staining. All specimens were harvested from embalmed Korean cadavers. We classified the innervation patterns of the LN into 5 types and confirmed the distribution of the LN in the tip of the tongue. The classification of the LN was made with reference to a line formed by the interlacing of the styloglossus and genioglossus muscles. Based on the course of LN and the presence of a tiny twig (twigs directly innervating the ventral mucosa of the tongue, TM) directly innervating the sublingual mucosa, the course of the LN was classified as being straight, curved, or vertical and with or without the TM. Straight, curved, and vertical courses without the TM were seen in 9.4%, 46.9%, and 18.8% of the cases, respectively. Straight and curved courses with the TM were observed in 6.3% and 18.8% of the cases, respectively. Sihler staining revealed that the tongue tip is innervated by the LN. These findings indicate that surgical manipulations at the ventral tongue region might damage the LN and result in numbness of the tongue tip, and provide a useful anatomic reference for various surgical procedures involving the ventral tongue region.

  8. Tonsils of the Soft Palate Do Not Mediate the Response of Pigs to Oral Vaccination with Heat-Inactivated Mycobacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    Beltrán-Beck, Beatriz; Romero, Beatriz; Boadella, Mariana; Casal, Carmen; Bezos, Javier; Mazariegos, María; Martín, MariPaz; Galindo, Ruth C.; Pérez de la Lastra, José M.; Villar, Margarita; Garrido, Joseba M.; Sevilla, Iker A.; Asensio, Fernando; Sicilia, Javier; Lyashchenko, Konstantin P.; Domínguez, Lucas; Juste, Ramón A.; de la Fuente, José

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis causes animal tuberculosis (TB) in cattle, humans, and other mammalian species, including pigs. The goal of this study was to experimentally assess the responses of pigs with and without a history of tonsillectomy to oral vaccination with heat-inactivated M. bovis and challenge with a virulent M. bovis field strain, to compare pig and wild boar responses using the same vaccination model as previously used in the Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa), to evaluate the use of several enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and lateral flow tests for in vivo TB diagnosis in pigs, and to verify if these tests are influenced by oral vaccination with inactivated M. bovis. At necropsy, the lesion and culture scores were 20% to 43% higher in the controls than those in the vaccinated pigs. Massive M. bovis growth from thoracic tissue samples was observed in 4 out of 9 controls but in none of the 10 vaccinated pigs. No effect of the presence or absence of tonsils was observed on these scores, suggesting that tonsils are not involved in the protective response to this vaccine in pigs. The serum antibody levels increased significantly only after challenge. At necropsy, the estimated sensitivities of the ELISAs and dual path platform (DPP) assays ranged from 89% to 94%. In the oral mucosa, no differences in gene expression were observed in the control group between the pigs with and without tonsils. In the vaccinated group, the mRNA levels for chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 7 (CCR7), interferon beta (IFN-β), and methylmalonyl coenzyme A mutase (MUT) were higher in pigs with tonsils. Complement component 3 mRNA levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) increased with vaccination and decreased after M. bovis challenge. This information is relevant for pig production in regions that are endemic for M. bovis and for TB vaccine research. PMID:24920604

  9. Oral inoculation of young dairy calves with Mycoplasma bovis results in colonization of tonsils, development of otitis media and local immunity.

    PubMed

    Maunsell, Fiona; Brown, Mary B; Powe, Joshua; Ivey, James; Woolard, Matthew; Love, Wees; Simecka, Jerry W

    2012-01-01

    Because M. bovis otitis media is an economically important problem, there is a need to understand the pathogenesis of disease, not only to improve our understanding of the factors contributing to the development of this disease but also to inform the development of improved diagnostic tests and therapy. Oral ingestion of M. bovis-contaminated milk is linked, but not definitively proven, to development of otitis media. In the current study, we demonstrate that oral ingestion of M. bovis infected colostrum can result in an ascending infection and development of otitis media. Importantly, M. bovis was found to have a previously unrecognized tendency for colonization of the tonsils of calves, which most likely contributed to the subsequent development of otitis media. In contrast, transtracheal inoculation failed to produce clinically significant upper respiratory tract disease, although did induce lower respiratory tract disease. The upper respiratory tract was the major site of M. bovis-specific B cell and mucosal IgA responses in calves inoculated by the oral route. The oral inoculation route of infection presented here is particularly suited to the study of host-pathogen interactions during initial colonization of the tonsils, expansion of infection and dissemination to the lower respiratory tract and middle ear. In addition, it could be used to investigate potential new preventative or control strategies, especially those aimed at limiting colonization of the tonsils and/or spread to the middle ear.

  10. IgA nephropathy and tonsils--an approach from the structure of IgA1 produced by tonsillar lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Hiki, Yoshiyuki; Horie, Akeyo; Yasuda, Yoshinari; Iwase, Hitoo; Sugiyama, Satoshi

    2004-12-01

    Human immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1), which is the predominant subtype to be deposited in glomeruli in IgA nephropathy (IgAN), has a unique mucine-like structure in its hinge region. Namely, it contains O-glycans and proline-rich peptides We previously observed underglycosylation of the hinge region in serum and deposited IgA1 in IgAN. On the other hand, clinical development and exacerbation of IgAN are frequently preceded by episodes of upper respiratory tract infection, and palatine tonsils represent the predominant immunocompetent tissue of the upper respiratory tract. Therefore, we hypothesized that tonsils were one of the origins of glomerular IgA1 in IgAN, and investigated the O-glycan structure of IgA1 produced by tonsillar lymphocytes (tonsillar IgA1). A significant increase in asialo-agalacto type O-glycans was found in the tonsillar IgA1 hinge in IgAN. These results suggest that the tonsils produce underglycosylated IgA1 molecules, which enter the bloodstream and are then deposited in the glomeruli.

  11. A multicentric, open label, randomised, postmarketing efficacy study comparing multidose of lincomycin hydrochloride capsule 500 mg with multidose cefpodoxime proxetil tablet 200 mg in patients with tonsillitis, sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Kothadiya, Ajay

    2012-08-01

    Tonsillitis causes considerable short and medium term morbidity, and can be recurrent. Sinusitis can be acute (less than 4 weeks), subacute (4-8 weeks) or chronic (8 weeks or more). To study the comparative efficacy and safety of multidose treatments of lincomycin hydrochloride 500 mg capsules against cefpodoxime proxetil 200 mg tablets on its outcome in the Indian scenario are the aims and objective of the study. A total of 41 tonsillitis, sinusitis cases of either gender aged above 18 years were enrolled in the study. The diagnosis of sonsillitis, sinusitis was made based on examination of symptoms and throat swab. A randomised treatment of either lincomycin hydrochloride 500 mg capsules or cefpodoxime proxetil 200 mg tablets twice daily for five days alongwith other concomitant medications depending on related symptoms was given to 40 patients. At the end of study, all patients were re-evaluated and the response rate was assessed. The most common clinical symptoms were body temperature, headache, throat pain, postnasal discharge, mucopus, odynophagia, sinus tenderness, nasal congestion, pharyngeal congestion and tonsillar congestion. The overall response rate of lincomycin hydrochloride in all the symptoms except headache was more effective than cefpodoxime proxetil. Out of 100% (n = 20) patients in each group, 67.89% in lincomycin and 52.27% in cefpodoxime patients achieved complete relief, in all the clinical symptoms. The study suggests that lincomycin hydrochloride capsules, a conventional antibiotic indicates effective treatment for relief from tonsillitis and sinusitis, as compared to new third generation antibiotic.

  12. Applicability of three anti-PrP peptide sera including staining of tonsils and brainstem of sheep with scrapie.

    PubMed

    Garssen, G J; Van Keulen, L J; Farquhar, C F; Smits, M A; Jacobs, J G; Bossers, A; Meloen, R H; Langeveld, J P

    2000-07-01

    Three rabbit antibodies (R521, R505, R524) were produced, and raised to synthetic peptides corresponding to residues 94-105, 100-111, and 223-234, respectively, of the sheep prion protein (PrP). Epitope mapping analysis revealed the monospecific character of antisera R505 and R524. In addition to the amino acid sequence against which it was raised, R521 also recognized other small epitopes. ELISA and radio-immunoprecipitation were used to assess the relative immunoreactivities of the antisera to the normal sheep prion protein (PrP(c)). Highest reactivity was found for R521, followed by R505 and R524. According to Western blot analysis, all three sera specifically reacted with the prion proteins PrP(Sc) and PrP27-30, extracted from the brain stem of a scrapie-affected sheep. Yet, with R505 not all of the lower molecular weight deglycosylated forms could be detected. Contrary to the immunoreactivities found with the PrP(Sc) and PrP27-30 isoforms, only R521 recognised PrP(c) from a healthy sheep. The usefulness of all three anti-peptide sera in the immunohistochemical detection of PrP(Sc) in brain stem and tonsils of scrapie-affected sheep was demonstrated and compared with an established rabbit anti-PrP serum.

  13. Characterization of Epithelial Progenitors in Normal Human Palatine Tonsils and Their HPV16 E6/E7-Induced Perturbation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sung Yoon Catherine; Kannan, Nagarajan; Zhang, Lewei; Martinez, Victor; Rosin, Miriam P.; Eaves, Connie J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Human palatine tonsils are oropharyngeal lymphoid tissues containing multiple invaginations (crypts) in which the continuity of the outer surface epithelium is disrupted and the isolated epithelial cells intermingle with other cell types. We now show that primitive epithelial cells detectable in vitro in 2D colony assays and in a 3D culture system are CD44+NGFR+ and present in both surface and crypt regions. Transcriptome analysis indicated a high similarity between CD44+NGFR+ cells in both regions, although those isolated from the crypt contained a higher proportion of the most primitive (holo)clonogenic cells. Lentiviral transduction of CD44+NGFR+ cells from both regions with human papillomavirus 16-encoded E6/E7 prolonged their growth in 2D cultures and caused aberrant differentiation in 3D cultures. Our findings therefore reveal a shared, site-independent, hierarchical organization, differentiation potential, and transcriptional profile of normal human tonsillar epithelial progenitor cells. They also introduce a new model for investigating the mechanisms of their transformation. PMID:26527383

  14. Tonsil-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Differentiate into a Schwann Cell Phenotype and Promote Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Namhee; Park, Saeyoung; Choi, Yoonyoung; Park, Joo-Won; Hong, Young Bin; Park, Hyun Ho Choi; Yu, Yeonsil; Kwak, Geon; Kim, Han Su; Ryu, Kyung-Ha; Kim, Jae Kwang; Jo, Inho; Choi, Byung-Ok; Jung, Sung-Chul

    2016-01-01

    Schwann cells (SCs), which produce neurotropic factors and adhesive molecules, have been reported previously to contribute to structural support and guidance during axonal regeneration; therefore, they are potentially a crucial target in the restoration of injured nervous tissues. Autologous SC transplantation has been performed and has shown promising clinical results for treating nerve injuries and donor site morbidity, and insufficient production of the cells have been considered as a major issue. Here, we performed differentiation of tonsil-derived mesenchymal stem cells (T-MSCs) into SC-like cells (T-MSC-SCs), to evaluate T-MSC-SCs as an alternative to SCs. Using SC markers such as CAD19, GFAP, MBP, NGFR, S100B, and KROX20 during quantitative real-time PCR we detected the upregulation of NGFR, S100B, and KROX20 and the downregulation of CAD19 and MBP at the fully differentiated stage. Furthermore, we found myelination of axons when differentiated SCs were cocultured with mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons. The application of T-MSC-SCs to a mouse model of sciatic nerve injury produced marked improvements in gait and promoted regeneration of damaged nerves. Thus, the transplantation of human T-MSCs might be suitable for assisting in peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:27834852

  15. Tonsil-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Differentiate into a Schwann Cell Phenotype and Promote Peripheral Nerve Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Jung, Namhee; Park, Saeyoung; Choi, Yoonyoung; Park, Joo-Won; Hong, Young Bin; Park, Hyun Ho Choi; Yu, Yeonsil; Kwak, Geon; Kim, Han Su; Ryu, Kyung-Ha; Kim, Jae Kwang; Jo, Inho; Choi, Byung-Ok; Jung, Sung-Chul

    2016-11-09

    Schwann cells (SCs), which produce neurotropic factors and adhesive molecules, have been reported previously to contribute to structural support and guidance during axonal regeneration; therefore, they are potentially a crucial target in the restoration of injured nervous tissues. Autologous SC transplantation has been performed and has shown promising clinical results for treating nerve injuries and donor site morbidity, and insufficient production of the cells have been considered as a major issue. Here, we performed differentiation of tonsil-derived mesenchymal stem cells (T-MSCs) into SC-like cells (T-MSC-SCs), to evaluate T-MSC-SCs as an alternative to SCs. Using SC markers such as CAD19, GFAP, MBP, NGFR, S100B, and KROX20 during quantitative real-time PCR we detected the upregulation of NGFR, S100B, and KROX20 and the downregulation of CAD19 and MBP at the fully differentiated stage. Furthermore, we found myelination of axons when differentiated SCs were cocultured with mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons. The application of T-MSC-SCs to a mouse model of sciatic nerve injury produced marked improvements in gait and promoted regeneration of damaged nerves. Thus, the transplantation of human T-MSCs might be suitable for assisting in peripheral nerve regeneration.

  16. Tonsil-derived mesenchymal stem cells ameliorate CCl4-induced liver fibrosis in mice via autophagy activation.

    PubMed

    Park, Minhwa; Kim, Yu-Hee; Woo, So-Youn; Lee, Hye Jin; Yu, Yeonsil; Kim, Han Su; Park, Yoon Shin; Jo, Inho; Park, Joo-Won; Jung, Sung-Chul; Lee, Hyukjin; Jeong, Byeongmoon; Ryu, Kyung-Ha

    2015-02-27

    Liver transplantation is the treatment of choice for chronic liver failure, although it is complicated by donor shortage, surgery-related complications, and immunological rejection. Cell transplantation is an alternative, minimally invasive treatment option with potentially fewer complications. We used human palatine tonsil as a novel source of mesenchymal stem cells (T-MSCs) and examined their ability to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells in vivo and in vitro. Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) mouse model was used to investigate the ability of T-MSCs to home to the site of liver injury. T-MSCs were only detected in the damaged liver, suggesting that they are disease-responsive. Differentiation of T-MSCs into hepatocyte-like cells was confirmed in vitro as determined by expression of hepatocyte markers. Next, we showed resolution of liver fibrosis by T-MSCs via reduction of TGF-β expression and collagen deposition in the liver. We hypothesized that autophagy activation was a possible mechanism for T-MSC-mediated liver recovery. In this report, we demonstrate for the first time that T-MSCs can differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells and ameliorate liver fibrosis via autophagy activation and down-regulation of TGF-β. These findings suggest that T-MSCs could be used as a novel source for stem cell therapy targeting liver diseases.

  17. Neural crest contribution to lingual mesenchyme, epithelium and developing taste papillae and taste buds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-Xiang; Komatsu, Yoshihiro; Mishina, Yuji; Mistretta, Charlotte M

    2012-08-15

    The epithelium of mammalian tongue hosts most of the taste buds that transduce gustatory stimuli into neural signals. In the field of taste biology, taste bud cells have been described as arising from "local epithelium", in distinction from many other receptor organs that are derived from neurogenic ectoderm including neural crest (NC). In fact, contribution of NC to both epithelium and mesenchyme in the developing tongue is not fully understood. In the present study we used two independent, well-characterized mouse lines, Wnt1-Cre and P0-Cre that express Cre recombinase in a NC-specific manner, in combination with two Cre reporter mouse lines, R26R and ZEG, and demonstrate a contribution of NC-derived cells to both tongue mesenchyme and epithelium including taste papillae and taste buds. In tongue mesenchyme, distribution of NC-derived cells is in close association with taste papillae. In tongue epithelium, labeled cells are observed in an initial scattered distribution and progress to a clustered pattern between papillae, and within papillae and early taste buds. This provides evidence for a contribution of NC to lingual epithelium. Together with previous reports for the origin of taste bud cells from local epithelium in postnatal mouse, we propose that NC cells migrate into and reside in the epithelium of the tongue primordium at an early embryonic stage, acquire epithelial cell phenotypes, and undergo cell proliferation and differentiation that is involved in the development of taste papillae and taste buds. Our findings lead to a new concept about derivation of taste bud cells that include a NC origin.

  18. Effects of varying fixed lingual apex positions on tongue pressure during straw drinking.

    PubMed

    Hara, M; Ishida, R; Ohkubo, M; Sugiyama, T; Abe, S

    2014-05-01

    We investigated the impact of tongue-thrusting on lingual pressure during fluid intake with a straw. In this study, 12 healthy young dentate individuals (two women and 10 men; 19-33 years) were instructed to drink 15 mL of water with a regular drinking straw at 37 °C, when indicated by the investigator. Participants drank after adjusting tongue position to one of the following patterns: (i) Holding the tip of the straw between the lips (Normal Position: NP), (ii) Sticking out the tongue to the vermilion zone of the lower lip and inserting the straw 1 cm past the front teeth (Tongue-thrusting Position: TP). Five recordings were conducted for each participant in a randomised order. To measure tongue pressure during swallowing, a specially designed 0.1-mm thick sensor sheet (Nitta, Osaka, Japan) with a tactile system for measurement of pressure distribution (I-SCAN; Nitta) was used. Duration, maximal magnitude and integrated value of tongue pressure were analysed based on the wave of tongue pressure recorded while water was swallowed. Magnitude, duration and integrated value of tongue pressure were significantly lower in TP than in NP at the median line (Ch1-3). Magnitude and integrated value of tongue pressure at the lateral part of the tongue (Ch5) were significantly lower in TP than in NP. When duration, maximal magnitude and integrated values were compared by channel, no significant differences were observed in NP, but a significant difference was found between Ch3 and the lateral areas Ch4/Ch 5 in TP. When the tongue was thrust forward, movement dynamics of the entire tongue changed and influenced contact between the tongue and palate during liquid intake with a straw. The impact was noticeably weaker on the median line than in lateral areas.

  19. Ephrin-B/EphB signaling is required for normal innervation of lingual gustatory papillae

    PubMed Central

    Treffy, Randall William; Collins, David; Hoshino, Natalia; Ton, Son; Katsevman, Gennadiy Aleksandrovich; Oleksiak, Michael; Runge, Elizabeth Marie; Cho, David; Russo, Matthew; Spec, Andrej; Gomulka, Jennifer; Henkemeyer, Mark; Rochlin, Michael William

    2016-01-01

    The innervation of taste buds is an excellent model system for studying the guidance of axons during targeting because of their discrete nature and the high fidelity of innervation. The pre-gustatory epithelium of fungiform papillae is known to secrete diffusible axon guidance cues such as BDNF and Sema3A that attract and repel, respectively, geniculate ganglion axons during targeting, but diffusible factors alone are unlikely to explain how taste axon terminals are restricted to their territories within the taste bud. Non-diffusible cell surface proteins such as Ephs and ephrins can act as receptors and/or ligands for one another and are known to control axon terminal positioning in several parts of the nervous system, but they have not been studied in the gustatory system. We report that ephrin-B2 linked β-galactosidase staining and immunostaining was present along the dorsal epithelium of the mouse tongue as early as E15.5, but was not detected at E14.5, when axons first enter the epithelium. Ephrin-B1 immunolabeling was barely detected in the epithelium and found at a somewhat higher concentration in the mesenchyme subjacent to the epithelium. EphB1 and EphB2 were detected in lingual sensory afferents in vivo and geniculate neurites in vitro. Ephrin-B1 and ephrin-B2 were similarly effective in repelling or suppressing outgrowth by geniculate neurites in vitro. These in vitro effects were independent of the neurotrophin used to promote outgrowth, but were reduced by elevated levels of laminin. In vivo, mice null for EphB1 and EphB2 exhibited decreased gustatory innervation of fungiform papillae. These data provide evidence that ephrin-B forward signaling is necessary for normal gustatory innervation of the mammalian tongue. PMID:27035151

  20. One-stage dorsal lingual mucosal graft urethroplasty for the treatment of failed hypospadias repair

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong-Bin; Xu, Yue-Min; Fu, Qiang; Sa, Ying-Long; Zhang, Jiong; Xie, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively investigate the outcomes of patients who underwent one-stage onlay or inlay urethroplasty using a lingual mucosal graft (LMG) after failed hypospadias repairs. Inclusion criteria included a history of failed hypospadias repair, insufficiency of the local skin that made a reoperation with skin flaps difficult, and necessity of an oral mucosal graft urethroplasty. Patients were excluded if they had undergone a failed hypospadias repair using the foreskin or a multistage repair urethroplasty. Between January 2008 and December 2012, 110 patients with failed hypospadias repairs were treated in our center. Of these patients, 56 underwent a one-stage onlay or inlay urethroplasty using LMG. The median age was 21.8 years (range: 4–45 years). Of the 56 patients, one-stage onlay LMG urethroplasty was performed in 42 patients (group 1), and a modified Snodgrass technique using one-stage inlay LMG urethroplasty was performed in 14 (group 2). The median LMG urethroplasty length was 5.6 ± 1.6 cm (range: 4–13 cm). The mean follow-up was 34.7 months (range: 10–58 months), and complications developed in 12 of 56 patients (21.4%), including urethrocutaneous fistulas in 7 (6 in group 1, 1 in group 2) and neourethral strictures in 5 (4 in group 1, 1 in group 2). The total success rate was 78.6%. Our survey suggests that one-stage onlay or inlay urethroplasty with LMG may be an effective option to treat the patients with less available skin after failed hypospadias repairs; LMG harvesting is easy and safe, irrespective of the patient's age. PMID:26228042

  1. Single stage circumferential lingual mucosal graft urethroplasty in near obliterative bulbar urethra stricture: A novel technique

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Umesh; Yadav, Sher Singh; Tomar, Vinay; Garg, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Aims: This is a prospective study of the use and efficacy of a novel technique of circumferential tubularised lingual mucosal graft (LMG) in obliterative and near obliterative bulbar urethral stricture of >2 cm where excisional and augmented anastomotic urethroplasty are not feasible. Materials and Methods: The stenotic urethral segment was opened dorsally in midline and fibrosed urethra was excised taking care to preserve the healthy spongiosum tissue. LMG (av. Length 3 cm) was placed from one end of corporal body towards spongy tissue in a circumferential manner. Another LMG was placed in similar manner to deal with longer stricture. The urethra was tubularised over 14 Fr silicone catheter. Results: A total of 12 men, of mean age 47 years underwent this procedure. The mean follow up period was 11 months starting from July 2014 till manuscript submission. Follow up included voiding cystourethrogram at 3 weeks, cystoscopy at 3 months (one patient didn’t turned up) and subsequent follow up. Mean stricture length was 4.66 cm (range, 3–8.5 cm) and mean operative time was 195 min. (range, 160 to 200 min.). The technique was successful (normal voiding with no need for any post-operative procedure) in 11(91.6%) patients. One patient developed early recurrence at 4 month of surgery and had anastomotic stricture which was successfully managed by direct visual internal urethrotomy. Conclusion: Single stage circumferential tubularised graft urethroplasty is an excellent technique for strictures that include segments of obliterative and near obliterative diseased urethra. It provide a wider neourethra than patch graft urethroplasty. PMID:27141182

  2. Structure-function studies of Bubalus bubalis lingual antimicrobial peptide analogs.

    PubMed

    Kalita, Dhruba Jyoti; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Satish

    2009-02-01

    Antimicrobial peptides expressed on different epithelial lining are major components of the innate immune system. Based on the deduced amino acid sequence of Bubalus bubalis lingual antimicrobial peptide (LAP) cDNA (Accession No. DQ458768), five overlapping peptides LAP(23-55), LAP(42-64), LAP(21-64), LAP(1-26) and LAP(1-64) were synthesized using solid phase fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl (Fmoc) chemistry. Circular Dichroism spectroscopy of synthesized peptides revealed predominantly beta-structure for LAP(23-55,) LAP(42-64) and LAP(21-64) with less alpha-helix in different solutions. Quantitation of secondary structure indicated the highest beta-structure for all these three peptides in membrane mimetic SDS solution. The helicogenic solvent TFE could not induce helix in LAP(23-55) however TFE induced helical propensity was observed in LAP(42-64) and LAP(21-64). The quantitation of secondary structure indicated the highest ordered structure for LAP(23-55) followed by LAP(42-64) and LAP(21-64). The antibacterial activity of LAP(23-55) was found to be more potent against Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogens, Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium followed by LAP(42-64) and LAP(21-64). Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) also showed similar trend with lowest value for LAP(23-55) followed by LAP(42-64) and LAP(21-64). Haemolysis and cytotoxicity was observed above 3 fold for LAP(21-64,) above six fold for LAP(23-55) and LAP(42-64) of their MIC. The LAP(1-26) and LAP(1-64) could not produce any characteristic CD spectra and did not show any antimicrobial activity, indicating that N- terminal of the peptide negates the antimicrobial activity.

  3. Influence of ligation method on friction resistance of lingual brackets with different second-order angulations: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Graziane Olímpio; Gimenez, Carla Maria Melleiro; Prieto, Lucas; Prieto, Marcos Gabriel do Lago; Basting, Roberta Tarkany

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate stainless steel archwire static friction in active and passive self-ligating lingual and conventional brackets with second-order angulations. Methods: Two conventional lingual brackets for canines (STb light/Ormco; PSWb/Tecnident), and two self-ligating brackets, one active (In-Ovation L/GAC) and the other passive (3D/ Forestadent), were evaluated. A stainless steel archwire was used at 0°, 3° and 5° angulations. Metal ligatures, conventional elastic ligatures, and low friction elastic ligatures were also tested. A universal testing machine applied friction between brackets and wires, simulating sliding mechanics, to produce 2-mm sliding at 3 mm/minute speed. Results: Two-way analysis of variance demonstrated a significant effect of the interaction between brackets and angulations (p < 0.001). Tukey test indicated that the highest frictional resistance values were observed at 5° angulation for In-Ovation L, PSWb bracket with non conventional ligature, and STb bracket with metal ligature. As for 3D, PSWb with conventional or metal ligatures, and STb brackets with non conventional ligature, showed significantly lower static frictional resistance with 0° angulation. At 0° angulation, STb brackets with metal ties, In-Ovation L brackets and 3D brackets had the lowest frictional resistance. Conclusions: As the angulation increased from 0° to 3°, static friction resistance increased. When angulation increased from 3° to 5°, static friction resistance increased or remained the same. Self-ligating 3D and In-Ovation L brackets, as well as conventional STb brackets, seem to be the best option when sliding mechanics is used to perform lingual orthodontic treatment. PMID:27653262

  4. Focal lingual dystonia, urinary incontinence, and sensory deficits secondary to low voltage electrocution: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Baskerville, J R; McAninch, S A

    2002-07-01

    Electrocution injuries are well reported in review articles and cases of high voltage electrocution injury are abundant. However, reports of low voltage electrocution injury are few. A case is presented of low voltage shock from a 120 volt AC source with presentation, acute and chronic course, and a five year follow up. The patient experienced several unusual complications of low voltage electrocution: a persistent right tongue deviation, which initially presents as an isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy, but subsequently manifests as a focal lingual dystonia; total body paresthesia with urinary incontinence; and persistent sensory deficits to the face and tongue.

  5. Tooth surface floss loss: unusual interproximal and lingual cervical lesions as a result of bizarre dental flossing.

    PubMed

    Gow, Alex M; Kelleher, Martin G

    2003-01-01

    There are many reported cases of cervical abrasion/erosion cavities in the literature with various theories offered in support of their pathogenesis. The vast majority of these cases involve the labial cervical regions of the affected teeth. This case report describes an unusual dental presentation of severe lingual cervical and interproximal lesions predominantly affecting the upper and lower anterior and premolar teeth. The differential diagnosis is presented, along with the likely cause of the lesions: in this case, a bizarre oral hygiene technique. The proposed treatment plan is outlined and the problems associated with restoring such cavities are highlighted.

  6. Urethral reconstruction with a 3D porous bacterial cellulose scaffold seeded with lingual keratinocytes in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian-Wen; Lv, Xiang-Guo; Li, Zhe; Song, Lu-Jie; Feng, Chao; Xie, Min-Kai; Li, Chao; Li, Hong-Bin; Wang, Ji-Hong; Zhu, Wei-Dong; Chen, Shi-Yan; Wang, Hua-Ping; Xu, Yue-Min

    2015-09-11

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of urethral reconstruction with a three-dimensional (3D) porous bacterial cellulose (BC) scaffold seeded with lingual keratinocytes in a rabbit model. A novel 3D porous BC scaffold was prepared by gelatin sponge interfering in the BC fermentation process. Rabbit lingual keratinocytes were isolated, expanded, and seeded onto 3D porous BC. BC alone (group 1, N  =  10), 3D porous BC alone (group 2, N  =  10), and 3D porous BC seeded with lingual keratinocytes (group 3, N  =  10) were used to repair rabbit ventral urethral defects (2.0   ×   0.8 cm). Scanning electron microscopy revealed that BC consisted of a compact laminate while 3D porous BC was composed of a porous sheet buttressed by a dense outer layer. The average pore diameter and porosity of the 3D porous BC were 4.23   ±   1.14 μm and 67.00   ±   6.80%, respectively. At 3 months postoperatively, macroscopic examinations and retrograde urethrograms of urethras revealed that all urethras maintained wide calibers in group 3. Strictures were found in all rabbits in groups 1 and 2. Histologically, at 1 month postoperatively, intact epithelium occurred in group 3, and discontinued epithelium was found in groups 1 and 2. However, groups 2 and 3 exhibited similar epithelial regeneration, which was superior to that of group 1 at 3 months (p  <  0.05). Comparisons of smooth muscle content and endothelia density among the three groups revealed a significant increase at each time point (p  <  0.05). Our results demonstrated that 3D porous BC seeded with lingual keratinocytes enhanced urethral tissue regeneration. 3D porous BC could potentially be used as an optimized scaffold for urethral reconstruction.

  7. Endodontic-periodontal management of a maxillary lateral incisor with an associated radicular lingual groove and severe periapical osseous destruction--a case report.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Amit; Yadav, Priya; Gandhi, Taru

    2012-01-01

    Radicular lingual grooves are morphological defects, which are found most frequently in maxillary anterior teeth and are a predisposing factor for periodontal disease. They are easily overlooked as aetiologic factors, as these grooves are covered by periodontal tissues. This case report presents a successful management of a case of a maxillary lateral incisor with an associated radicular lingual groove and severe periapical osseous destruction in a 30-year-old female patient. A combination of endodontic treatment, radiculoplasty to eliminate the radicular lingual groove, and periapical surgery to eliminate the periapical osseous defect was used. At two-year follow-up, the patient was comfortable and complete resolution of the periapical pathology was evident.

  8. Composition of the adult digestive tract bacterial microbiome based on seven mouth surfaces, tonsils, throat and stool samples

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To understand the relationship between our bacterial microbiome and health, it is essential to define the microbiome in the absence of disease. The digestive tract includes diverse habitats and hosts the human body's greatest bacterial density. We describe the bacterial community composition of ten digestive tract sites from more than 200 normal adults enrolled in the Human Microbiome Project, and metagenomically determined metabolic potentials of four representative sites. Results The microbiota of these diverse habitats formed four groups based on similar community compositions: buccal mucosa, keratinized gingiva, hard palate; saliva, tongue, tonsils, throat; sub- and supra-gingival plaques; and stool. Phyla initially identified from environmental samples were detected throughout this population, primarily TM7, SR1, and Synergistetes. Genera with pathogenic members were well-represented among this disease-free cohort. Tooth-associated communities were distinct, but not entirely dissimilar, from other oral surfaces. The Porphyromonadaceae, Veillonellaceae and Lachnospiraceae families were common to all sites, but the distributions of their genera varied significantly. Most metabolic processes were distributed widely throughout the digestive tract microbiota, with variations in metagenomic abundance between body habitats. These included shifts in sugar transporter types between the supragingival plaque, other oral surfaces, and stool; hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide production were also differentially distributed. Conclusions The microbiomes of ten digestive tract sites separated into four types based on composition. A core set of metabolic pathways was present across these diverse digestive tract habitats. These data provide a critical baseline for future studies investigating local and systemic diseases affecting human health. PMID:22698087

  9. Identification of intracellular bacteria in adenoid and tonsil tissue specimens: the efficiency of culture versus fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Stępińska, M; Olszewska-Sosińska, O; Lau-Dworak, M; Zielnik-Jurkiewicz, B; Trafny, E A

    2014-01-01

    Monocyte/macrophage cells from human nasopharyngeal lymphoid tissue can be a source of bacteria responsible for human chronic and recurrent upper respiratory tract infection. Detection and characterization of pathogens surviving intracellularly could be a key element in bacteriological diagnosis of the infections as well as in the study on interactions between bacteria and their host. The present study was undertaken to assess the possibility of isolation of viable bacteria from the cells expressing monocyte/macrophage marker CD14 in nasopharyngeal lymphoid tissue. Overall, 74 adenotonsillectomy specimens (adenoids and tonsils) from 37 children with adenoid hypertrophy and recurrent infections as well as 15 specimens from nine children with adenoid hypertrophy, which do not suffer from upper respiratory tract infections (the control group), were studied. The suitability of immunomagnetic separation for extraction of CD14(+) cells from lymphoid tissue and for further isolation of the intracellular pathogens has been shown. The coexistence of living pathogens including Haemophilus influenzae, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pyogenes with the bacteria representing normal nasopharyngeal microbiota inside CD14(+) cells was demonstrated. Twenty-four strains of these pathogens from 32.4 % of the lysates of CD14(+) cells were isolated. Concurrently, the fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with a universal EUB388, and the species-specific probes demonstrated twice more often the persistence of these bacterial species in the lysates of CD14(+) cells than conventional culture. Although the FISH technique appears to be more sensitive than traditional culture in the intracellular bacteria identification, the doubts on whether the bacteria are alive, and therefore, pathogenic would still exist without the strain cultivation.

  10. Injectable Polypeptide Thermogel as a Tissue Engineering System for Hepatogenic Differentiation of Tonsil-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ja Hye; Lee, Hyun Jung; Jeong, Byeongmoon

    2017-04-05

    A poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(l-alanine) (PEG-l-PA) hydrogel incorporating tonsil-derived mesenchymal stem cells (TMSCs), tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), and fibroblast growth factor 4 (FGF4) was prepared through thermal gelation of an aqueous polymer solution for an injectable tissue engineering application. The thermal gelation accompanied conformational changes of both PA and PEG blocks. The gel modulus at 37 °C was controlled to be 1000 Pa by using a 14.0 wt % aqueous polymer solution. The gel preserved its physical integrity during the 3D culture of the cells. TUDCA, HGF, and FGF4 were released from the PEG-l-PA hydrogel over 21 days of the 3D cell culture period. TMSCs initially exhibited a spherical shape, whereas some fibers protruded from the cells on days 14-21 of 3D culture. The injectable system exhibited pronounced expressions of the hepatic biomarkers at both mRNA and protein levels, which are significantly better than the commercially available hyaluronic acid gel. In particular, the hepatogenically differentiated cells from the TMSCs in the injectable system demonstrated hepatic biofunctions comparable to HepG2 cells for the uptakes of low density lipoproteins (52%) and indocyanine green (76%), and the production of albumin (40%) and urea (52%), which are also significantly better than the 3D-cultured cells in the commercially available hyaluronic acid gel. Our studies suggest that the PEG-l-PA thermogel incorporating TMSCs, TUDCA, and growth factors is highly promising as an in situ forming tissue engineering system.

  11. Bmi1-positive cells in the lingual epithelium could serve as cancer stem cells in tongue cancer.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toshihiro; Atsumi, Naho; Nakamura, Naohiro; Yanai, Hirotsugu; Komai, Yoshihiro; Omachi, Taichi; Tanaka, Kiyomichi; Ishigaki, Kazuhiko; Saiga, Kazuho; Ohsugi, Haruyuki; Tokuyama, Yoko; Imahashi, Yuki; Hisha, Hiroko; Yoshida, Naoko; Kumano, Keiki; Okazaki, Kazuichi; Ueno, Hiroo

    2016-12-22

    We recently reported that the polycomb complex protein Bmi1 is a marker for lingual epithelial stem cells (LESCs), which are involved in the long-term maintenance of lingual epithelial tissue in the physiological state. However, the precise role of LESCs in generating tongue tumors and Bmi1-positive cell lineage dynamics in tongue cancers are unclear. Here, using a mouse model of chemically (4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide: 4-NQO) induced tongue cancer and the multicolor lineage tracing method, we found that each unit of the tumor was generated by a single cell and that the assembly of such cells formed a polyclonal tumor. Although many Bmi1-positive cells within the tongue cancer specimens failed to proliferate, some proliferated continuously and supplied tumor cells to the surrounding area. This process eventually led to the formation of areas derived from single cells after 1-3 months, as determined using the multicolor lineage tracing method, indicating that such cells could serve as cancer stem cells. These results indicate that LESCs could serve as the origin for tongue cancer and that cancer stem cells are present in tongue tumors.

  12. Scanning electron microscopic study on the tongue and lingual papillae of the adult Spotted seal, Phoca largha.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Ken; Shindo, Junji; Miyawaki, Yoshiko; Kobayashi, Kan; Kageyama, Ikuo

    2007-11-01

    We observed the external surface and connective tissue cores (CTCs) of the lingual papillae (filiform, fungiform and vallate papillae) of adult Spotted seals (Phoca largha) using SEM and light microscopy. The tongue was V-shaped and its apex was rather rounded. On the dorsal surface from apex to the one-third posterior of the tongue, the lingual mucosa was densely covered by filiform papillae, with a scatted distribution of dome-like fungiform papillae, which have orthokeratinized epithelium. At the posterior part of the tongue, filiform papillae were totally diminished and their epithelium was parakeratinized. Approximately 6-7 vallate papillae were arranged in a V-shape on the posterior of the tongue. After removal of the epithelium, the CTCs of the filiform papillae that were distributed at apex consisted of a primary core and approximately 5-6 rod-shaped small accessory cores. The CTCs of filiform papillae that were distributed at anterior part of the tongue lacked primary protrusions and possessed approximately 10-15 rod shaped small accessory cores that were arranged in a horseshoe manner. The CTCs offungiform papillae had cylindrical primary cores and were fringed with accessory protrusion. In the Vallate papillae, taste buds were only seen at the dorsal epithelium.

  13. Bmi1-positive cells in the lingual epithelium could serve as cancer stem cells in tongue cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Toshihiro; Atsumi, Naho; Nakamura, Naohiro; Yanai, Hirotsugu; Komai, Yoshihiro; Omachi, Taichi; Tanaka, Kiyomichi; Ishigaki, Kazuhiko; Saiga, Kazuho; Ohsugi, Haruyuki; Tokuyama, Yoko; Imahashi, Yuki; Hisha, Hiroko; Yoshida, Naoko; Kumano, Keiki; Okazaki, Kazuichi; Ueno, Hiroo

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported that the polycomb complex protein Bmi1 is a marker for lingual epithelial stem cells (LESCs), which are involved in the long-term maintenance of lingual epithelial tissue in the physiological state. However, the precise role of LESCs in generating tongue tumors and Bmi1-positive cell lineage dynamics in tongue cancers are unclear. Here, using a mouse model of chemically (4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide: 4-NQO) induced tongue cancer and the multicolor lineage tracing method, we found that each unit of the tumor was generated by a single cell and that the assembly of such cells formed a polyclonal tumor. Although many Bmi1-positive cells within the tongue cancer specimens failed to proliferate, some proliferated continuously and supplied tumor cells to the surrounding area. This process eventually led to the formation of areas derived from single cells after 1–3 months, as determined using the multicolor lineage tracing method, indicating that such cells could serve as cancer stem cells. These results indicate that LESCs could serve as the origin for tongue cancer and that cancer stem cells are present in tongue tumors. PMID:28004815

  14. β-Catenin Signaling Biases Multipotent Lingual Epithelial Progenitors to Differentiate and Acquire Specific Taste Cell Fates.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, Dany; Xu, Mingang; Liu, Fei; Millar, Sarah E; Barlow, Linda A

    2015-05-01

    Continuous taste bud cell renewal is essential to maintain taste function in adults; however, the molecular mechanisms that regulate taste cell turnover are unknown. Using inducible Cre-lox technology, we show that activation of β-catenin signaling in multipotent lingual epithelial progenitors outside of taste buds diverts daughter cells from a general epithelial to a taste bud fate. Moreover, while taste buds comprise 3 morphological types, β-catenin activation drives overproduction of primarily glial-like Type I taste cells in both anterior fungiform (FF) and posterior circumvallate (CV) taste buds, with a small increase in Type II receptor cells for sweet, bitter and umami, but does not alter Type III sour detector cells. Beta-catenin activation in post-mitotic taste bud precursors likewise regulates cell differentiation; forced activation of β-catenin in these Shh+ cells promotes Type I cell fate in both FF and CV taste buds, but likely does so non-cell autonomously. Our data are consistent with a model where β-catenin signaling levels within lingual epithelial progenitors dictate cell fate prior to or during entry of new cells into taste buds; high signaling induces Type I cells, intermediate levels drive Type II cell differentiation, while low levels may drive differentiation of Type III cells.

  15. β-Catenin Signaling Biases Multipotent Lingual Epithelial Progenitors to Differentiate and Acquire Specific Taste Cell Fates

    PubMed Central

    Gaillard, Dany; Xu, Mingang; Liu, Fei; Millar, Sarah E.; Barlow, Linda A.

    2015-01-01

    Continuous taste bud cell renewal is essential to maintain taste function in adults; however, the molecular mechanisms that regulate taste cell turnover are unknown. Using inducible Cre-lox technology, we show that activation of β-catenin signaling in multipotent lingual epithelial progenitors outside of taste buds diverts daughter cells from a general epithelial to a taste bud fate. Moreover, while taste buds comprise 3 morphological types, β-catenin activation drives overproduction of primarily glial-like Type I taste cells in both anterior fungiform (FF) and posterior circumvallate (CV) taste buds, with a small increase in Type II receptor cells for sweet, bitter and umami, but does not alter Type III sour detector cells. Beta-catenin activation in post-mitotic taste bud precursors likewise regulates cell differentiation; forced activation of β-catenin in these Shh+ cells promotes Type I cell fate in both FF and CV taste buds, but likely does so non-cell autonomously. Our data are consistent with a model where β-catenin signaling levels within lingual epithelial progenitors dictate cell fate prior to or during entry of new cells into taste buds; high signaling induces Type I cells, intermediate levels drive Type II cell differentiation, while low levels may drive differentiation of Type III cells. PMID:26020789

  16. Effect of Ligation Method on Maxillary Arch Force/Moment Systems for a Simulated Lingual Incisor Malalignment

    PubMed Central

    Seru, Surbhi; Romanyk, Dan L; Toogood, Roger W; Carey, Jason P; Major, Paul W

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The objectives of this study were to determine whether there is a difference in the magnitude of forces and moments produced by elastic ligation when compared to passive ligation, and whether these forces and moments propagate differently along the arch for the two ligation types. A lingual incisor malalignment was used in this study. Methods: The Orthodontic Simulator (OSIM) was used to quantify the three-dimensional forces and moments applied on the teeth given a lingually displaced incisor. A repeated measures MANOVA was performed to statistically analyze the data. Results: The interaction factor illustrated convincing evidence that there is a difference in maximum force and moment values for all outcome variables between ligation types considering all tooth positions along the arch. The mean differences for FX and FY between ligation types were found to be clinically significant, with values for elastic ligation consistently higher than passive ligation. Conclusion: It was found that the maximum forces and moments produced by elastic ligation are greater than those produced by passive ligation and that the magnitude of this difference for the mesiodistal and buccolingual forces is clinically relevant. Additionally, it was determined that elastic ligation causes forces and moments to propagate further along the arch than passive ligation for all outcome variables. PMID:25400715

  17. A comparative study of lingual mucosal graft urethroplasty with buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty in urethral stricture disease: An institutional experience

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Dilip Kumar; Gupta, Depak Kumar; Ghosh, Bastab; Bera, Malay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Aims: A prospective study to compare the outcomes of lingual versus buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty in patients with long segment anterior urethral strictures disease. Materials and Methods: The study included 30 patients for buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty (group I) and 30 patients for lingual mucosal graft urethroplasty (group II) for treatment of long segment (>3 cm) incomplete anterior urethral stricture disease using single-stage dorsal onlay free oral mucosal graft urethroplasty by Barbagli's technique between February 2013 to September 2014. All patients underwent complete evaluation of the stricture including inspection of the oral cavity. Results: The results of urethroplasty in between two group were not significant (P > 0.05) in terms of Qmax (P = 0.63), mean postoperative AUA symptom score (P = 0.83), operative time (P = 0.302) intra operative blood loss (P = 0.708), duration of postoperative hospitalization (P = 0.83), but slurring of speech complications was seen in group II, but not in group I. Long-term complications of salivary disturbance, tightness of the mouth, persistent pain at graft site, perioral numbness, seen only in group I (BMGU). Conclusion: LMG urethroplasty is an excellent alternative to BMG urethroplasty with comparable results of urethroplasty and minimal donor site complications. PMID:27141184

  18. Tracheostomy, lingular tonsillectomy and sleep-related breathing disorders.

    PubMed

    Conache, I D; Meikle, D; O'Brien, C

    2002-05-01

    Laser resection of lingual tonsils and formal closure of a tracheostomy improved the airway in a 14-yr-old patient with Down's syndrome. Non-invasive airway support to treat obstructive sleep apnoea was postponed with this treatment. During the anaesthetic a laryngeal mask airway was used to support the airway after lingual tonsillectomy, to assess the suitability of defunctioning the tracheostomy. Laryngeal mask airways assist management of lingual tonsils. Lingual tonsillar hypertrophy can lead to obstructive sleep disorders.

  19. Anatomical and histological structure of the tongue and histochemical characteristics of the lingual salivary glands in the Chukar partridge (Alectoris chukar, Gray 1830).

    PubMed

    Erdoğan, S; Sağsöz, H; Akbalik, M E

    2012-01-01

    1. The aim of the study was to examine the morphology of the tongue and the histochemical features of the lingual salivary glands in this species. 2. The tongue was elongated, terminating in a rather sharp, dagger-like apex. On the surface of the tongue and situated between the body and root of the tongue, two rows of conical papillae, the sharp apices of which pointed towards the posterior part of the tongue, were observed. The keratinised epithelium lining the dorsal surface lacked typical gustatory papillae. However, it was observed that taste buds were present in the epithelium of the lingual body and root. The tongue was supported by a structure composed of hyaline cartilage, the paraglossum, which extended from the lingual root to the apex. Simple branched tubular glands, which were encapsulated by connective tissue, were embedded within the submucosa in the body (anterior salivary glands) and root (posterior salivary glands) of the tongue. It was observed that the secretion of the lingual glands contained neutral mucins, proteoglycans containing carboxylic acid, weak and strong sulphated groups, N-acetylated sialomucins, but lacked glycogen. 3. It was demonstrated that, the general morphological features, papillary distribution of the tongue and the histological structure of the mucosa epithelium and the supportive elements displayed similarity to those of other domestic avian species. It was also determined that, in view of the particular feeding types, in the partridge, the presence of the papillary crest was not correlated with diet.

  20. Tyfu i Fyny/Growing up Interactive Bi-Lingual Resources to Support the Delivery of Sex and Relationships Education for Students Aged 5 to 12 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of new interactive, bi-lingual Sex and Relationships Education (SRE) resources called Tyfu i Fyny/Growing Up, suitable for students aged between five and 12 years. It also discusses the evidence used to support the development of the resources, the support provided for teachers and…

  1. Comparison of clinical efficacy between 3-day combined clavulanate/amoxicillin preparation treatment and 10-day amoxicillin treatment in children with pharyngolaryngitis or tonsillitis.

    PubMed

    Kuroki, Haruo; Ishiwada, Naruhiko; Inoue, Nobue; Ishikawa, Nobuyasu; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Himi, Kyoko; Kurosaki, Tomomichi

    2013-02-01

    The efficacy of 3-day treatment with a combined clavulanate/amoxicillin preparation (Clavamox combination dry syrup for pediatric cases) and 10-day treatment with amoxicillin against pediatric pharyngolaryngitis and tonsillitis caused by Group A β-hemolytic Streptococcus was compared. Among the patients included in the efficacy evaluation (54 from the clavulanate/amoxicillin group and 43 from the amoxicillin group), the clinical response rate on completion of treatment was 98.1 % in the clavulanate/amoxicillin group and 92.9 % in the amoxicillin group, thus supporting the equivalent efficacy of these two therapies. The Group A β-hemolytic Streptococcus eradication rate at approximately 1-2 weeks after completion/discontinuation of treatment was 65.4 % in the clavulanate/amoxicillin group and 85.4 % in the amoxicillin group. Even in cases from which the pathogen continued to be isolated, relapse/recurrence of clinical symptoms was seldom seen. Urinalysis, conducted to assess the presence or absence of acute glomerulonephritis, revealed no abnormality in any patient. These results suggest that 3-day treatment with this clavulanate/amoxicillin preparation is expected to provide a valid means of treating pediatric pharyngolaryngitis and tonsillitis caused by Group A β-hemolytic Streptococcus.

  2. Effect of lingual plates on generating intra-oral pressure during swallowing: an experimental study in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although palatal augmentation prostheses (PAPs) can improve dysphagia, their application is compromised in the absence of maxillary abutment teeth. Experimental lingual plates (ELPs) used for raising the tongue may be employed as alternative to PAPs. Methods Influence of different ELP designs, plateau (P–type) and drop-shaped (D–type), on the intra–oral pressure during swallowing were tested. Eleven healthy dentate volunteers, with a mean age of 35.5±10.5 years, participated in this study. Tongue pressure on the hard palate was measured using an ultra-thin sensor sheet with five measuring points, whilst performing dry, 5–ml and 15–ml water swallows, with and without the ELPs in situ. Additional pressure sensors were installed in the lingual aspects of the ELPs, and on the vestibular aspect of the lower molars for measuring sublingual and oral vestibule pressures, respectively. Each measurement was recorded thrice. A repeated measures ANOVA was employed to verify differences in duration, maximal magnitude and integrated value for the different experimental situations. Tukey’s post hoc test was performed for comparison testing. Statistical significance was set at p<0.05. Results The sequence of tongue–palate contact on the median line of the hard palate without ELPs was maintained, except for the 15 ml P–type swallow. Tongue pressure started earlier with the D–type but reached its peak nearly at the same time as without ELPs. The peak magnitude and cumulative tongue pressure against the hard palate decreased by wearing ELPs (p<0.05), but was inconsistent between the two types of ELPs and for the different swallowing volumes. Both, maximum and cumulative vestibular pressures were mostly similar or larger with P–type than that with D–type. Conclusion D-type and P-type ELPs seem to have the inverse effect of PAPs on the palatal tongue pressure during swallowing. These first counterintuitive findings do not yet justify rejecting the

  3. The Development of a Bi-Lingual Assessment Instrument to Measure Agentic and Communal Consumer Motives in English and French.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Mike; Bartier, Anne-Laure; Lown, Josh; Hopwood, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Consumer behavior is driven, in part, by the degree to which goods and services appeal to underlying motives for agency and communion. The purpose of this research was to develop a brief individual differences measure of these motivations for use in behavioral research and theoretical and applied consumer psychology and marketing studies. We employed a bi-lingual scale development procedure to create the 10-item Agentic and Communal Consumer Motivation Inventory (ACCMI) in English and French. Two studies show that the ACCMI is language invariant, demonstrates convergent and discriminant validity with consumer, motivational, and interpersonal constructs, and predicts evaluations of products described in agentic and communal terms, respectively, in both languages. The general conclusion of this research is that agency and communion provide a useful framework for understanding and studying consumer buying motivations. Discussion focuses on the relevance of motivational factors for studying human behavior and the applied utility of the ACCMI.

  4. Outcome of buccal mucosa and lingual mucosa graft urethroplasty in the management of urethral strictures: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Sharad; Yadav, Sher Singh; Tomar, Vinay

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the study was to compare the outcome of buccal and lingual mucosa graft (LMG) augmentation urethroplasty along with donor sites morbidities in anterior urethra stricture. Subjects and Methods: From September 2010 to January 2014, 125 patients underwent single stage augmentation urethroplasty. They were randomly divided into two groups to receive either buccal mucosa graft (BMG) or LMG. The patients were prospectively followed for complications and outcome. Results: Baseline characteristics such as mean age, etiology, stricture length, and location were comparable in both groups. Overall success rate for Group 1 and Group 2 were 69.2% and 80%, respectively. Mean follow-up periods were 28.2 and 25 months in Group 1 and Group 2, respectively. Conclusions: LMG provides the better outcome with fewer immediate and delayed complications as compared to BMG. The length of stricture and width of graft were main factors affecting the outcome. PMID:26834399

  5. The Development of a Bi-Lingual Assessment Instrument to Measure Agentic and Communal Consumer Motives in English and French

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Mike; Bartier, Anne-Laure; Lown, Josh; Hopwood, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Consumer behavior is driven, in part, by the degree to which goods and services appeal to underlying motives for agency and communion. The purpose of this research was to develop a brief individual differences measure of these motivations for use in behavioral research and theoretical and applied consumer psychology and marketing studies. We employed a bi-lingual scale development procedure to create the 10-item Agentic and Communal Consumer Motivation Inventory (ACCMI) in English and French. Two studies show that the ACCMI is language invariant, demonstrates convergent and discriminant validity with consumer, motivational, and interpersonal constructs, and predicts evaluations of products described in agentic and communal terms, respectively, in both languages. The general conclusion of this research is that agency and communion provide a useful framework for understanding and studying consumer buying motivations. Discussion focuses on the relevance of motivational factors for studying human behavior and the applied utility of the ACCMI. PMID:27563295

  6. Tonsils and Adenoids

    MedlinePlus

    ... an ENT News About Us Our Campaigns Foundation Governance Diversity Honorary Awards & Lectures Specialty Society Advisory Council ... Disclosure Form News About Us Our Campaigns Foundation Governance Diversity Honorary Awards & Lectures Specialty Society Advisory Council ...

  7. Tonsillitis (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... En Español Making a Change – Your Personal Plan Hot Topics Am I in a Healthy Relationship? Who Can Get Weight ... prefer softer foods, like applesauce, flavored gelatin, or ice cream. If you don't feel like eating, try drinking liquids that contain ...

  8. Tonsillitis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... that eating is difficult, try serving liquids and soft foods, like soups, milkshakes, smoothies, ice pops, or ice cream. Make sure that your child drinks lots of fluids and gets plenty of rest. ...

  9. Light and scanning electron microscopic study on the tongue and lingual papillae of the common raccoon, Procyon lotor.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Yoshiko; Yoshimura, Ken; Shindo, Junji; Kageyama, Ikuo

    2010-08-01

    We observed the external surface and connective tissue cores (CTCs), after exfoliation of the epithelium of the lingual papillae (filiform, fungiform, foliate and vallate papillae) of the common raccoon (Procyon lotor) using scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy. The tongue was elongated and their two-third width was almost fixed. Numerous filiform papillae were distributed along the anterior two-thirds of the tongue and fungiform papillae were distributed between the filiform papillae. Eight vallate papillae that had a weak circumferential ridge were distributed in a V-shape in the posterior part of the tongue and numerous taste buds were observable in the circumferential furrows of vallate papillae. Weak fold-like foliate papillae were observable at the lateral edge in the posterior part of the tongue and a few salivary duct orifices were observable beneath the foliate papillae. An islet-like structure with numerous taste buds, was observable on the deep part of the salivary duct of foliate papillae. Large conical papillae were distributed at the posterior part and root of the tongue. After removal of epithelium, filiform papillae of CTCs were appeared to be a thumb or cone-like main core and associating several finger-like short accessory cores. These cores were surrounded an oval concavity. The main core was situated behind the concavity and associated with accessory cores. CTCs of fungiform papillae were cylinder-like with numerous vertically running ridges and with a few concavities seen at the top of the cores. CTCs of vallate papillae and their surrounded circumferential ridge were covered with numerous pimple-like protrusions. The lingual papillae of Common raccoon's tongue had morphological feature of carnivore species.

  10. Class Size.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Siobhan; Lumsden, Linda S.

    1994-01-01

    The items featured in this annotated bibliography touch on several aspects of the multifaceted class-size debate. Allen Odden reviews the literature and contends that class-size reduction should be used "sparingly and strategically." C. M. Achilles and colleagues examines two different class-size situations and find student test…

  11. Subcellular Size

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Wallace F.

    2016-01-01

    All of the same conceptual questions about size in organisms apply equally at the level of single cells. What determines the size, not only of the whole cell, but of all its parts? What ensures that subcellular components are properly proportioned relative to the whole cell? How does alteration in organelle size affect biochemical function? Answering such fundamental questions requires us to understand how the size of individual organelles and other cellular structures is determined. Knowledge of organelle biogenesis and dynamics has advanced rapidly in recent years. Does this knowledge give us enough information to formulate reasonable models for organelle size control, or are we still missing something? PMID:25957302

  12. Occurrence and severity of enamel decalcification adjacent to bracket bases and sub-bracket lesions during orthodontic treatment with two different lingual appliances

    PubMed Central

    Klang, Elisabeth; Helms, Hans-Joachim; Wiechmann, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background: Using lingual enamel surfaces for bracket placement not only has esthetic advantages, but may also be suitable in terms of reducing frequencies of enamel decalcifications. Objective: To test the null-hypothesis that there is no significant difference in enamel decalcification or cavitation incidence adjacent to and beneath bracket bases between two lingual multi-bracket (MB) appliances that are different in terms of design, material composition, and manufacturing technology (group A: WIN, DW-LingualSystems; group B: Incognito, 3M-Unitek), taking into account patient- and treatment-related variables on white spot lesion (WSL) formation. Methods: Standardized, digital, top-view photographs of 630 consecutive subjects (16214 teeth; n Incognito = 237/6076 teeth; n WIN = 393/10138 teeth; mean age: 17.47±7.8; m/f 43.2/56.8%) with completed lingual MB treatment of the upper and lower permanent teeth 1–7 were screened for decalcification or cavitation adjacent to and beneath the bracket bases before and after treatment, scored from 0 to 7. Non-parametric ANOVA was used for main effects ‘appliance type’, ‘gender’, ‘treatment complexity’, ‘grouped age’ (≤16/>16 years), and ‘treatment duration’ as covariable, at an α-level of 5%. Results: About 2.57% [5.94%] of all teeth in group A [B] developed decalcifications. Subject-related incidence was 9.59% [16.17%] for upper incisors in group A [B], and 12.98% [25.74%] for all teeth 16–46. There were significant effects by gender, age, and treatment duration. Conclusion: The null-hypothesis was rejected: sub-bracket lesions were significantly less frequent in group A, while frequencies of WSL adjacent to brackets were not significantly affected by appliance type. In view of the overall low incidences of lingual post-orthodontic white-spot lesions, the use of lingual appliances is advocated as a valid strategy for a reduction of enamel decalcifications during orthodontic treatment. PMID

  13. CD25(+) Bcl6(low) T follicular helper cells provide help to maturing B cells in germinal centers of human tonsil.

    PubMed

    Li, Haishan; Pauza, C David

    2015-01-01

    The majority of CXCR5(+) PD1(+) CD4(+) T follicular helper (Tfh) cells (>90%) are CD25(-) Bcl6(hi) , while a small subpopulation (<10%) are CD25(+) Bcl6(low) but do not express FoxP3 and are not T regulatory cells. We purified T:B-cell conjugates from tonsils and found they were enriched for the CD25(+) Bcl6(low) Tfh-cell subpopulation. In response to IL-2, these CD25(+) Tfh cells increased expression of costimulatory molecules ICOS or OX40, upregulated transcription factor cMaf, produced cytokines IL-21, IL-17, and IL-10, and raised the levels of antiapoptotic protein Bcl2. Conjugates formed with CD25(+) BCl6(low) Tfh cells included B cells expressing higher levels of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), memory marker CD45RO, surface IgG or IgA, and MHC class II compared to B-cell conjugates including CD25(-) Bcl6(hi) Tfh cells. While IL-2 suppresses early Tfh-cell differentiation, Tfh-cell recognition of antigen-presenting B cells and signaling through the T-cell receptor likely triggers expression of the high-affinity IL-2 receptor and responses to IL-2 including downregulation of Bcl6. CD25 expression on Tfh cells and local production of IL-2 in tonsil or lymph node may support B helper T-cell function during later stages of B-cell maturation and the development of immune memory.

  14. Immunoglobulin systems of human tonsils. I. Control subjects of various ages: qualification of Ig-producing cells, tonsillar morphometry and serum Ig concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Brandtzaeg, P.; Surjan, L.; Berdal, P.

    1978-01-01

    Specimens of clinically normal palatine tonsils were studied by morphometry and immunohistochemistry, with regard to the relative tissue contribution and the content of Ig-producing immunocytes of four morphological compartments: the germinal centres of lymphoid follicles, their mantle zones, the extrafollicular area and the reticular parts of the crypt epithelium. Ig-producing cells occurred in all compartments; most of them were located in the extrafollicular area, although their density was highest in the reticular epithelium. There was a general predominance of IgG cells—including the blasts present in germinal centres. In subjects 4–25 years old, the tonsillar immunocyte population showed overall IgG:IgA:IgM:IgD class ratios of 65·2:30·1:3·5:1·2. IgE-producing cells were virtually absent. A reticular distribution of non-diffusible immunoglobulins, especially IgM, was observed in the germinal centres—apparently bound to dendritic reticular cells. The mantle zones commonly contained numerous lymphocytes with membrane-related immunofluorescence, particularly prominent for IgD and less distinct for IgM. These B-cells were probably derived from local clonal expansion processes. There was no indication of active immunoglobulin transport through the tonsillar epithelium, which was devoid of `secretory component'. In subjects 30–81 years old, lymphoid elements of the tonsils were reduced, especially the follicular mantles and the reticular crypt epithelium, as well as their content of Ig-producing immunocytes. Such cells were also fewer in the germinal centres and in the extrafollicular area. Moreover, some shifts in the immunocyte class ratios had occurred in the various tissue compartments. In this age group, the number of tonsillar IgA cells showed a significant negative correlation with the rate of synthesis of serum IgA. Imagesp374-a PMID:350457

  15. Freedom From Local and Regional Failure of Contralateral Neck With Ipsilateral Neck Radiotherapy for Node-Positive Tonsil Cancer: Results of a Prospective Management Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Rusthoven, Kyle E. Raben, David; Schneider, Charles; Witt, Robert; Sammons, Sarah; Raben, Adam

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: To review the outcomes of a prospective management approach using ipsilateral neck radiotherapy in the treatment of node-positive squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil with a well-lateralized primary lesion. Methods and Materials: Between August 2003 and June 2007, 20 patients who presented with squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil, without involvement of the base of the tongue or midline soft palate, and with Stage N1-N2b disease were prospectively treated with radiotherapy to the primary site and ipsilateral neck. In addition, 18 patients received concurrent chemotherapy. The actuarial freedom from contralateral nodal and in-field progression was determined. Acute and late toxicity were prospectively evaluated using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3, and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Results: The nodal disease was Stage N1 in 4 patients, N2a in 3 patients, and N2b in 13 patients. At a median follow-up 19 months (range, 12-40), no in-field or contralateral nodal recurrences had been observed. The 2-year freedom from distant metastasis rate was 87.4%. The actuarial 2-year disease-free and overall survival rates were both 79.5%. Late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade 2 xerostomia occurred in 1 patient (5%). No late Grade 3 or greater toxicity was observed. No patient was feeding tube dependent at their last follow-up visit. Conclusion: In carefully selected patients with node-positive, lateralized tonsillar cancer, treatment of the ipsilateral neck and primary site does not appear to increase the risk of contralateral nodal failure and reduces late morbidity compared with historical controls. Although the outcomes with ipsilateral radiotherapy in the present series were promising, these findings require longer follow-up and validation in a larger patient cohort.

  16. Fracture resistance of porcelain veneered zirconia crowns with exposed lingual zirconia for anterior teeth after thermal cycling: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Amir Rad, Fatemeh A.; Succaria, Faysal G.; Morgano, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Statement of problem In some clinical conditions minimally invasive complete crown tooth preparations are indicated. This is especially true when gross removal of tooth structure would weaken the remaining tooth or violate the vitality of the dental pulp. Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of (1) exposed lingual zirconia with veneered zirconia crowns, and (2) reduced lingual thickness of monolithic lithium disilicate crowns on the fracture resistance of the crowns after cyclic loading. Metal-ceramic crowns with exposed lingual metal served as controls. Materials and methods Twenty-four maxillary central incisor crowns were fabricated in identical shape on metal testing dies in 3 groups: metal-ceramic crowns (MC, n = 8), veneered zirconia crowns (VZ, n = 8), and monolithic lithium disilicate crowns (MO, n = 8). A conservative preparation design with 0.75 mm lingual clearance was used for each crown system. All crowns were cemented to their corresponding crown preparations with self-adhesive resin cement (Multilink Automix). The crowns were subjected to 1000 cycles of thermal cycling, then cyclic loading of 111 N by means of a stainless steel ball, and 50,000 cycles of loading were applied for the fatigue test. Fatigue loading was followed by a continuously increasing compressive load, at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min until failure. The compressive load (N) required to cause failure was recorded. Means were calculated and analyzed with one-way ANOVA and the Tukey HSD test (α = .05). Results There was a significant difference between MO vs. MC (P = .0001), MO vs. VZ (P = .0001), and VZ vs. MC (P = .012). Conclusions There was a significant difference in the mean fracture resistance of MC, VZ, and MO crowns in this in vitro study. The MC group recorded the highest mean fracture strength. PMID:26082571

  17. Effects of Age, Gender, Bolus Volume, Bolus Viscosity, and Gustation on Swallowing Apnea Onset Relative to Lingual Bolus Propulsion Onset in Normal Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiss, Susan G.; Strauss, Monica; Treole, Kathleen; Stuart, Andrew; Boutilier, Susan

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain the normal relation of swallowing apnea (SA) onset relative to lingual bolus propulsion along with factors that may alter this relation. Forty adults, composed of 10 men and 10 women in each of 2 age groups (i.e., 20-30 and 63-79 years) participated. SA onset was assessed during 5- and 20-ml bolus volumes…

  18. Comparison between the collagen intensity and mast cell density in the lingual muscles and myocardium of autopsied chronic chagasic and nonchagasic patients.

    PubMed

    Roldão, José A; Beghini, Marcela; Ramalho, Luciana S; Porto, Carla Souza; Rodrigues, Denise B R; Teixeira, Vicente P A; de Lima Pereira, Sanívia A

    2012-08-01

    In chronic Chagas' disease (CD), an increase in collagen intensity and mast cell density has been described individually in the myocardium and tongue muscles. The aim of this study was to compare the percentage of collagen, mast cell tryptase (MCT) density, and mast cell chymase (MCH) density in the lingual muscles and myocardium from autopsied chagasic (CP) and nonchagasic patients (NCP). The selected cases were divided into two groups: (1) CP (n = 10) and (2) NCP (n = 10). Fragments were removed from the tongue and heart. After histological processing, the slices were stained with picrosirius, and immunohistochemistry was performed for MCH and MCT. The CP group showed the highest MCH and MCT densities and the highest percentage of collagen in the lingual muscles and myocardium when compared with the NCP group (p < 0.05). A significant positive correlation was observed between the collagen intensity and MCH density in the myocardium of the CP group. Although there are no reports in the literature of MCT and MCH in CD, its higher densities as well as higher percentage of collagen were found in the lingual muscles and myocardium in the CP group, suggesting that tryptase and chymase are associated with the pathogenesis of CD in these organs. Furthermore, the positive and significant correlation between the percentage of collagen and MCH density in the myocardium of the CP group suggests that the chymase is associated with fibrosis in CD, as demonstrated in other diseases.

  19. The effect of masking noise on acoustic-phonetic contrasts in post-lingually deafened cochlear implant users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vick, Jennell C.; Perkell, Joseph S.; Stockmann, Ellen; Zandipour, Majid; Lane, Harlan; Tiede, Mark

    2003-10-01

    This study examined the effect on the vowel contrast distance (average inter-vowel distance in the F1-F2 plane) of gradually decreasing the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the auditory feedback of a post-lingually deafened cochlear implant (CI) user at 1-month and 1-year following CI processor activation. Masking noise, mixed with normal levels of speech feedback, was presented through the headpiece of a research sound processor to the CI user. As a control, an analogous procedure was used for a normal-hearing speaker where the masking noise and speech feedback were delivered over headphones. The SNR was gradually decreased over seven steps as the speakers produced ten repetitions of two vowel contrasts (æ\\/[g\\/] and i\\/u). Speech SPL and vowel contrast distance were measured at all seven masking noise levels. Data from both subjects showed that SPL gradually increased with decreased SNR, while contrast distance decreased. The effect was greater after 1 year of experience with a CI than at 1 month. The effect in the NH speaker was similar to that noted in the CI user after 1 year of experience. Data from additional subjects will be analyzed and reported. [Work supported by NIH Grant No. R01 DC03007.

  20. Assessing the feasibility of yttria-stabilized zirconia in novel designs as mandibular anterior fixed lingual retention following orthodontic treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stout, Matthew

    The purpose of this study is to explore the feasibility of yttria-stabilized zirconia (Y-TZP) in fixed lingual retention as an alternative to stainless steel. Exploratory Y-TZP specimens were milled to establish design parameters. Next, specimens were milled according to ASTM standard C1161-13 and subjected to four-point flexural test to determine materials properties. Finite Element (FE) Analysis was employed to evaluate nine novel cross-sectional designs and compared to stainless steel wire. Each design was analyzed under the loading conditions to determine von Mises and bond stress. The most promising design was fabricated to assess accuracy and precision of current CAD/CAM milling technology. The superior design had a 1.0 x 0.5 mm semi-elliptical cross section and was shown to be fabricated reliably. Overall, the milling indicated a maximum percent standard deviation of 9.3 and maximum percent error of 13.5 with a cost of $30 per specimen. Y-TZP can be reliably milled to dimensions comparable to currently available metallic retainer wires. Further research is necessary to determine the success of bonding protocol and clinical longevity of Y-TZP fixed retainers. Advanced technology is necessary to connect the intraoral scan to an aesthetic and patient-specific Y-TZP fixed retainer.

  1. Histopathologic Finding of Both Gastric and Respiratory Epithelia in a Lingual Foregut Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yangfan; Shillingford, Nick; Koempel, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Foregut cysts are uncommon, mucosa-lined congenital lesions that may occur anywhere along the gastrointestinal or respiratory tract and typically present within the first year of life. Although infrequent, these cysts may generate feeding or respiratory difficulties depending on the size and location of the lesion. Foregut cysts of the oral cavity are rarely seen and of those cases localized to the tongue are even more uncommon. We describe a 4-month-old girl with a foregut cyst involving the floor of mouth and anterior tongue. Subsequent histologic analysis demonstrated a cyst lined with both gastric and respiratory epithelia. This case represents an extremely rare finding of both gastric and respiratory epithelia lined within a single cystic structure in the tongue. Although a very rare finding, a foregut cyst should be on the differential diagnosis of any lesion involving the floor of mouth or tongue in an infant or child. PMID:26294913

  2. Chronic lingual ulceration caused by lipoma of the oral cavity. Case report.

    PubMed

    Del Castillo Pardo de Vera, Jose Luis; Cebrián Carretero, Jose Luis; Gómez García, Elena

    2004-01-01

    Although lipomas are among the most frequent tumors in the human body, their presentation in the oral cavity is not common. Oral cavity lipomas usually show a slow painless and assymptomatic growing. When these tumors reach big sizes, they can cause compressive symptons and deformities. In this paper we present the case of a patient in whom oral lipoma was the final finding in the differential diagnosis of a chronic mucosal ulcer. CT scan and MRI images and microscopical examination after fine-needle aspiration were the clue for the final diagnosis. The surgical excision of the tumor was the basis for the healing of the ulcer. We also review the most relevant and recent literature about clinic, diagnosis and treatment for these tumors.

  3. Characterization of long-term in vitro culture-related alterations of human tonsil-derived mesenchymal stem cells: role for CCN1 in replicative senescence-associated increase in osteogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yeonsil; Park, Yoon Shin; Kim, Han Su; Kim, Ha Yeong; Jin, Yoon Mi; Jung, Sung-Chul; Ryu, Kyung-Ha; Jo, Inho

    2014-11-01

    Although mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) isolated from bone marrow and adipose tissues are known to be subjected to in vitro culture-related alterations in their stem cell properties, such data have not been reported in human tonsil-derived MSC (T-MSC). Here, we investigated the culture-related changes of phenotypes, the senescence, and the differentiation potential of T-MSC. T-MSC were serially passaged by a standard protocol, and their characteristics were assessed, including MSC-specific surface antigen profiles, the senescence, and the differentiation potentials into adipocytes, chondrocytes and osteocytes. Up to at least passage 15, we found no alterations in either MSC-specific surface marker, CD14, CD34, CD45, CD73 and CD90, or the mRNA expression of embryonic stem cell gene markers, Nanog, Oct4-A and Sox-2. However, the expression of CD146, recently identified another MSC marker, dramatically decreased with increasing passages from ~ 23% at passage 3 to ~ 1% at passage 15. The average doubling time increased significantly from ~ 38 h at passage 10 to ~ 46 h at passage 15. From passage 10, the cell size increased slightly and SA-β-gal staining was evident. Both Alizarin Red S staining and osteocalcin expression showed that the osteogenic differentiation potential increased up to passage 10 and decreased thereafter. However, the adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation potential decreased passage-dependently from the start, as evidenced by staining of Oil Red O and Alcian Blue, respectively. Consistent with a passage-dependent osteogenic differentiation, the expression of CCN1, an angiogenic protein known to be related to both senescence and osteogenesis, also increased up to passage 10. Furthermore, ectopic expression of small interfering RNA against CCN1 at passage 10 significantly reversed Alizarin Red S staining and osteocalcin expression. Altogether, our study demonstrates the characterization of long-term in vitro cultured T-MSC and that CCN1 may

  4. Exploring Size.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    "Exploring" is a magazine of science, art, and human perception that communicates ideas museum exhibits cannot demonstrate easily by using experiments and activities for the classroom. This issue concentrates on size, examining it from a variety of viewpoints. The focus allows students to investigate and discuss interconnections among…

  5. HIV-gp160 modulates differentially the production in vitro of IgG, IgA and cytokines by blood and tonsil B lymphocytes from HIV-negative individuals

    PubMed Central

    COGNASSE, F; BÉNIGUEL, L; EL HABIB, R; SABIDO, O; CHAVARIN, P; GENIN, C; GARRAUD, O

    2003-01-01

    HIV1-gp160 holds promises in anti-HIV vaccinal strategies. However, this molecule has been described to exhibit superantigenic activities. The present study aimed at examining the effect(s) of HIV1-gp160 on human B cells and in particular on B cells originating from HIV− donors. We purified human B cells of various origins, i.e. from blood and from tonsils (representing a mucosal-type origin), and we tested these cells (stimulated with a polyclonal B cell activator, interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-10 as cytokines, and recombinant HIV1-gp160) for the production of IgG and IgA in an in vitro model. Gp160 induced significantly less total IgG by blood − but not tonsil-originating − B cells and did not affect total IgA production. Further, HIV1-gp160 up-regulated IL-2-, IL-4- and IL-10-mRNA levels in stimulated blood B cells (these cytokines are known to be active on B cell activation and differentiation). Interestingly, HIV1-gp160 also up-regulated IL-1β-, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β-, interferon (IFN)-γ- and IL-12-mRNA levels in stimulated mucosal-type, tonsil-originating, B cells. As these latter cytokines are involved in proinflammatory activities, HIV-gp160 delivery at the mucosal sites would be compatible with an adjuvant activity. PMID:12699421

  6. Modulation of cytokine gene expression by selected Lactobacillus isolates in the ileum, caecal tonsils and spleen of Salmonella-challenged broilers.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jie-Lun; Yu, Hai; Kulkarni, Raveendra R; Sharif, Shayan; Cui, Steve W; Xie, Ming-Yong; Nie, Shao-Ping; Gong, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics have been used to control Salmonella colonization in the chicken intestine. Recently, we demonstrated that certain selected Lactobacillus isolates were able to reduce Salmonella infection in the chicken spleen and liver as well as down-regulated Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 virulence gene expression in the chicken caecum. To further understand the mechanisms through which Lactobacillus protected chickens from Salmonella infection, the present study has investigated the Lactobacillus isolate(s)-induced host immune response of chickens to Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection. A thorough examination of cytokine gene expression in the ileum, caecal tonsils, and spleen on days 1 and 3 post-Salmonella infection showed a dynamic spatial and temporal response to Salmonella infection and Lactobacillus treatments. In most instances, it was evident that treatment of chickens with Lactobacillus isolates could significantly attenuate Salmonella-induced changes in the gene expression profile. These included the genes encoding pro-inflammatory cytokines [lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF factor, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-8], T helper 1 cytokines [IL-12 and interferon (IFN)-γ], and T helper 2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10). Another important observation from the present investigation was that the response induced by a combination of Lactobacillus isolates was generally more effective than that induced by a single Lactobacillus isolate. Our results show that administration of certain selected Lactobacillus isolates can effectively modulate Salmonella-induced cytokine gene expression, and thus help reduce Salmonella infection in chickens.

  7. Sustained release of parathyroid hormone via in situ crosslinking gelatin hydrogels improves the therapeutic potential of tonsil-derived mesenchymal stem cells for hypoparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoon Shin; Lee, Yunki; Jin, Yoon Mi; Kim, Gyungah; Jung, Sung Chul; Park, Yoon Jeong; Park, Ki Dong; Jo, Inho

    2017-02-28

    Biomimetic parathyroid regeneration with sustained release of parathyroid hormone (PTH) into the blood stream is a considerable challenge in hypoparathyroidism treatment. We recently reported that tonsil-derived mesenchymal stem cells (TMSC), if these cells were both differentiated in vitro before implantation and incorporated into a scaffold Matrigel, are a good cell source for parathyroid regeneration in a parathyroidectomized (PTX) animal model. Here, we present a new strategy for improved clinical application that enhances the sustained release of PTH by controlling mechanical stiffness using in situ-forming gelatin-hydroxyphenyl propionic acid (GH) hydrogels (GHH). Differentiated TMSC (dTMSC) embedded in a GHH with a strength of 4.4 kPa exhibited the best sustained release of PTH and were the most effective in hypoparathyroidism treatment, showing improved blood calcium homeostasis compared with Matrigel-embedded dTMSC. Interestingly, undifferentiated control TMSC (cTMSC) also released PTH in a sustained manner if incorporated into GHH. Collectively, these findings may establish a new paradigm for parathyroid regeneration that could ultimately evolve into an improved clinical application.

  8. A Study of Healthy Adults' Oro-lingual Effort During Swallowing Using OroPress, A New Portable Wireless Measurement Tool.

    PubMed

    Manning, Molly; Casey, Vincent; Conway, Richard; Saunders, Jean; Perry, Alison

    2016-06-01

    OroPress is a new, low profile, portable, wireless tool that enables stable measurement of tongue pressure during isometric ('pushing') tasks and, more importantly, during swallowing. Using this tool, a pressure-time product, the OroPress Absolute (OPA) parameter, has been developed as a representative measure of lingual effort during swallowing. In a sample of 57 adults aged 20-80+ years, of both sexes and without dysphagia, tongue-palate contact pressures generated while swallowing 5 ml, 10 ml of water and 5 ml custard, were recorded using OroPress. Data were examined for effects of gender, age and bolus condition (consistency, volume). OPA was tested for stability of measure and then correlated with the criterion standard, peak pressure recorded when swallowing (PMax(SW)). Swallowing pressures (PMax(SW), OPA) were positively correlated with bolus viscosity. No significant age and gender differences were found. Excellent stability of measure (test, re-test reliability) was demonstrated and OPA was positively correlated with PMax(SW). OroPress produces valid, reliable and reproducible measurements and improved accuracy of oro-lingual pressure measurement during swallowing. With such a tool, interventions/therapy can be proactive and principled as outcomes are better validated. To enhance specificity of intervention, measurement parameters need to reflect the pressure and temporal qualities of swallow function. OPA has the potential to describe differences in effort made, and ability to sustain pressures, in adults without dysphagia. The results of these studies will enable more accurate examination of the oral phase of swallowing as we establish this highly accurate sensor as a criterion standard for oro-lingual pressure measurement in clinical populations.

  9. Multiple lingual cusps trait on mandibular premolars and hypoconulid reduction trait on mandibular first molar in living Jordanian population. Intra- and inter-trait interactions.

    PubMed

    Khraisat, Ameen; Alsoleihat, Firas; Subramani, Karthikeyan; Al-Rabab'ah, Mohammad A; Al-Omiri, Mahmoud K; Abu-Tahun, Ibrahim

    2013-09-01

    The objective was to determine the expression and fluctuating asymmetry of two dental morphological traits in the living Jordanians: The lingual cusp number on the lower premolars (LP1 and LP2) and the hypoconulid (distal cusp) reduction on the lower first molar (LM1). In addition, both intra- trait and inter- trait interactions were analyzed. Three hundred school children (15.5 +/- 0.4 years) were involved. Impressions for the mandibular dental arches were taken, and dental casts were reproduced. The above-mentioned traits were observed. Paired sample t test and nonparametric correlation analysis were used for data analysis. Three-cusped LP1 was found in 11.40 % of the examined students, while the two-cusped LP1 was found in 88.60%. In comparison, the Three-cusped LP2 was found in 61.40% while the two-cusped LP2 was found in 38.60% of the observed subjects. The frequencies of the 4-cusped and 5-cusped LM1 were found to be 8.65% and 91.35%, respectively. Nonparametric correlation analysis revealed positive and statistically significant association between the expression of two lingual cusps on LP1 and on LP2 in both genders (p < 0.01), while there was no significant correlation between expression of two lingual cusps on either LP1 or LP2 and the hypoconulid loss on LM1 in both genders (p > 0.05). Bilateralism was highly significant in the tested traits in both genders (p < 0.001). This finding might be a sign of relatively low environmental stresses experienced by the living Jordanians and/or great ability of its individuals to buffer the adverse effects of such stresses on dental development. This study is a useful addition to the existing literature in that it examines a previously poorly characterized population and assists in placing the contemporary Jordanian population within the current framework of human population groups globally.

  10. Dimensional changes in height of labial alveolar bone of proclined lower incisor after lingual positioning by orthodontic treatment: A cephalometric study on adult Bengali population

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The study aims to know whether modern orthodontic treatment procedure do actually cause permanent bone loss at the alveolar bone crest or improve alveolar bone morphology on labial aspect of permanent incisors which are to be moved lingually. Settings and Design: Manual tracings of pre and post treatment lateral cephalometric radiographs were used. Material and Method: The cephalometric radiographs of 34 adult bengali subjects whose orthodontic treatment involved lingual positioning of procumbent mandibular central incisors were examined to determine the morphologic changes (bone height) in the labial alveolar bone that resulted from orthodontic treatment. Result: Comparison of tracings of radiographs taken before and after treatment indicated that 57.6% shows an increase in labial alveolar bone height, 30.3% shows decreased value and 12.1% shows no change with the decrease in the angulation between long axis of lower incisor and mandibular plane (GoGn). In the increase group there is a significant increase in the distance ‘incisal edge to D point’ whereas this dimension decreased significantly in the rest of the cases. In addition, a significant positive correlation (r = 0.56) was found between the changes in the distance from the incisal edge to the ‘D’ point and the alveolar bone height. But no significant relation was found between alveolar bone height and decrease in angulation of lower incisor either in the ‘increase group’ (r = 0.13, p > 0.05) or in the ‘decrease group’ (r = 0.37, p > 0.05). Conclusion: These findings indicate that during orthodontic treatment that involves lingual positioning of procumbent teeth but no intrusion, an increase in the amount of buccal alveolar bone may take place. PMID:25684908

  11. Effects of voltage perturbation of the lingual receptive field on chorda tympani responses to Na+ and K+ salts in the rat: implications for gustatory transduction

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Taste sensory responses from the chorda tympani nerve of the rat were recorded with the lingual receptive field under current or voltage clamp. Consistent with previous results (Ye, Q., G. L. Heck, and J. A. DeSimone. 1993. Journal of Neurophysiology. 70:167-178), responses to NaCl were highly sensitive to lingual voltage clamp condition. This can be attributed to changes in the electrochemical driving force for Na+ ions through apical membrane transducer channels in taste cells. In contrast, responses to KCl over the concentration range 50-500 mM were insensitive to the voltage clamp condition of the receptive field. These results indicate the absence of K+ conductances comparable to those for Na+ in the apical membranes of taste cells. This was supported by the strong anion dependence of K salt responses. At zero current clamp, the potassium gluconate (KGlu) threshold was > 250 mM, and onset kinetics were slow (12 s to reach half-maximal response). Faster onset kinetics and larger responses to KGlu occurred at negative voltage clamp (-50 mV). This indicates that when K+ ion is transported as a current, and thereby uncoupled from gluconate mobility, its rate of delivery to the K+ taste transducer increases. Analysis of conductances shows that the paracellular pathway in the lingual epithelium is 28 times more permeable to KCl than to KGlu. Responses to KGlu under negative voltage clamp were not affected by agents that are K+ channel blockers in other systems. The results indicate that K salt taste transduction is under paracellular diffusion control, which limits chemoreception efficiency. We conclude that rat K salt taste occurs by means of a subtight junctional transducer for K+ ions with access limited by anion mobility. The data suggest that this transducer is not cation selective which also accounts for the voltage and amiloride insensitive part of the response to NaCl. PMID:7876827

  12. Is the lingual forming part of the incisor a structural entity? Evidences from the fragilitas ossium (fro/fro) mouse mutation and the TGFbeta1 overexpressing transgenic strain.

    PubMed

    Opsahl, S; Septier, D; Aubin, I; Guenet, J-L; Sreenath, T; Kulkarni, A; Vermelin, L; Goldberg, M

    2005-02-01

    Our objective was to study the teeth of a mutant mice fro/fro that display severe forms of osteogenesis imperfecta. One day and 8 week-old fro/fro and +/fro heterozygote mice (wild type, WT) were processed for light and scanning electron microscopy. The genetic defect, shown to be located on chromosome 8, induced alveolar bone and teeth hypomineralisation. Due to defective cell proliferation in the fro/fro, the distal growth of the mandibular incisors was impaired. Immunolabelling revealed an increase of chondroitin/dermatan sulphate, whereas no difference was detected in dental tissues for decorin and biglycan. Amelogenin expression was decreased in the incisor and enhanced in the molar. Dentin sialoprotein was below the level of detection in the fro/fro, whereas osteonectin and osteopontin were unchanged. The main target of the mutation was seen in the lingual part of the incisor near the apex where dentine formation was delayed. In the molars, bulbous roots with obliteration of the pulp chamber were seen. In the TGFbeta1 overexpressing mice, the lingual root-analogue part of the incisor was missing. In the molar, short roots, circumpulpal dentine of the osteodentine type and pulp obliteration were seen. It may be noted that, although the mutant and transgenic strains mutations are two different genetic alterations not related to the same defective gene, in both cases the expression of the dentin sialoprotein is altered. Altogether, the present data suggest that the lingual forming part of the incisor seems to be an anatomical entity bearing its own biological specificities.

  13. Size Matters

    PubMed Central

    Long, Kimberly; Abuelenen, Toaa; Pava, Libia; Bastille, Maya

    2011-01-01

    We tallied the number of possible mutant amino acids in proteins thought to be inactivated early in tumorigenesis and in proteins thought to be inactivated late in tumorigenesis, respectively. Proteins thought to be inactivated early in tumorigenesis, on average, have a greater number of alternative, mutant possibilities, which raises the possibility that the sequential order of mutations associated with cancer development reflects the random chance, throughout life, of a mutagen inactivating a larger versus a smaller target. The hypothesis that the temporal order of genetic changes in cancer reflects mutagen target sizes leads to novel considerations of 1) the mechanisms of the acquisition of cancer hallmarks and 2) cancer screening strategies. PMID:22701759

  14. The moon illusion and size-distance scaling--evidence for shared neural patterns.

    PubMed

    Weidner, Ralph; Plewan, Thorsten; Chen, Qi; Buchner, Axel; Weiss, Peter H; Fink, Gereon R

    2014-08-01

    A moon near to the horizon is perceived larger than a moon at the zenith, although--obviously--the moon does not change its size. In this study, the neural mechanisms underlying the "moon illusion" were investigated using a virtual 3-D environment and fMRI. Illusory perception of an increased moon size was associated with increased neural activity in ventral visual pathway areas including the lingual and fusiform gyri. The functional role of these areas was further explored in a second experiment. Left V3v was found to be involved in integrating retinal size and distance information, thus indicating that the brain regions that dynamically integrate retinal size and distance play a key role in generating the moon illusion.

  15. Three-Dimensional Aspects of the Lingual Papillae and Their Connective Tissue Cores in the Tongue of Rats: A Scanning Electron Microscope Study

    PubMed Central

    Reginato, Gabriela de Souza; Watanabe, Ii-sei; Ciena, Adriano Polican

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the tridimensional morphological characteristics of the lingual papillae and their connective tissue cores (CTCs) in Sprague Dawley rats. Four types of papillae were reported on the dorsal surface. Filiform papillae were distributed on the tongue surface and after epithelial maceration a conic and multifilamentary shape of the CTCs was revealed. Fungiform papillae were reported on the rostral and middle regions covered by a squamous epithelium. After the removal of the epithelium, the shape of a volcano with the taste orifice at its top was noted. Foliate papillae were composed of five pairs of epithelial folds situated on the lateral-caudal margin of the tongue. After the removal of the epithelium, they were shown to be limited by thin laminar projections. The vallate papilla with an oval shape was present in the caudal region and delimited by an incomplete groove. The morphological characteristics of the lingual papillae of Sprague Dowley rats, three-dimensional SEM images, and the types of papillae on the dorsal surface were similar to those reported previously in other rodent mammals. The maceration technique revealed the details of extracellular matrix with varied shapes form of connective tissue cores. PMID:25436229

  16. Changes in the bucco-lingual thickness of the mandibular alveolar process and skeletal bone mineral density in dentate women: a 5-yr prospective study.

    PubMed

    Jonasson, Grethe; Kiliaridis, Stavros

    2005-04-01

    After tooth extraction there is a great interindividual variation in the remodelling pattern of the alveolar process in edentulous areas, with some individuals losing little bone and others undergoing extensive resorption. However, little is known about possible longitudinal changes in the dentate region of the alveolar process of adults and if these are related to alterations in the skeletal bone mineral density (BMD). In a prospective study, on two occasions, 5-yr apart, the BMD of 117 women was determined in the distal forearm by using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and the bucco-lingual thickness of the mandibular alveolar process was measured on dental casts by using a dial calliper. A decrease in the mean alveolar thickness, exceeding a cut-off value of 0.1 mm, was found in 60% of the women and an increase was found in 3% of the individuals. This decrease was 0.22 +/- 0.20 mm in the posterior region and 0.16 +/- 0.19 mm in the anterior region. The changes in alveolar thickness in the posterior region were significantly correlated to the BMD changes both on the mid-crestal level site and on the cervical level site. We conclude that the bucco-lingual thickness decreases with age in the dentate alveolar process, possibly owing to periosteal resorption related to skeletal bone loss.

  17. Three-dimensional aspects of the lingual papillae and their connective tissue cores in the tongue of rats: a scanning electron microscope study.

    PubMed

    Reginato, Gabriela de Souza; Bolina, Cristina de Sousa; Watanabe, Ii-sei; Ciena, Adriano Polican

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the tridimensional morphological characteristics of the lingual papillae and their connective tissue cores (CTCs) in Sprague Dawley rats. Four types of papillae were reported on the dorsal surface. Filiform papillae were distributed on the tongue surface and after epithelial maceration a conic and multifilamentary shape of the CTCs was revealed. Fungiform papillae were reported on the rostral and middle regions covered by a squamous epithelium. After the removal of the epithelium, the shape of a volcano with the taste orifice at its top was noted. Foliate papillae were composed of five pairs of epithelial folds situated on the lateral-caudal margin of the tongue. After the removal of the epithelium, they were shown to be limited by thin laminar projections. The vallate papilla with an oval shape was present in the caudal region and delimited by an incomplete groove. The morphological characteristics of the lingual papillae of Sprague Dowley rats, three-dimensional SEM images, and the types of papillae on the dorsal surface were similar to those reported previously in other rodent mammals. The maceration technique revealed the details of extracellular matrix with varied shapes form of connective tissue cores.

  18. Comparative Morphology of the Papillae Linguales and their Connective Tissue Cores in the Tongue of the Greater Japanese Shrew-mole, Urotrichus talpoides

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, K; Shindo, J; Kageyama, I

    2013-01-01

    The external morphology of the papillae linguales (papillae filiformes, papillae fungiformes and papillae vallatae) and their connective tissue cores (CTCs) of the greater Japanese shrew-mole (Urotrichus talpoides) were analysed by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Papillae filiformes were distributed over the dorsal surface of the apex linguae, and on the rostral and caudal regions of the corpus linguae but were less numerous in the mid-region. They were absent from the radix linguae. A pair of oval papillae vallatae was situated at the border between the corpus linguae and the radix linguae. Papillae foliatae were absent. The epithelial surface of each papilla filiformis consisted of a circular concavity, a ring-like wall and either a single thumb-like process or 2–3 slender pointed processes, depending on their location. The morphology of the CTCs of the papillae filiformes also varied regionally. The papillae linguales of the Japanese shrew-mole were morphologically similar to those of other Talpidae and Soricidae, including the common shrew, particularly with respect to the papillae filiformes in the mid- and caudal regions of the corpus linguae. PMID:22571539

  19. CCN1 secreted by tonsil-derived mesenchymal stem cells promotes endothelial cell angiogenesis via integrin αv β3 and AMPK.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoon Shin; Hwang, Soojin; Jin, Yoon Mi; Yu, Yeonsil; Jung, Sung-Ae; Jung, Sung-Chul; Ryu, Kyung-Ha; Kim, Han Su; Jo, Inho

    2015-01-01

    CCN1 is highly expressed in cancer cells and has been identified in the secretome of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSC). Although secreted CCN1 is known to promote angiogenesis, its underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here, we examined whether our recently-established tonsil-derived MSC (T-MSC) secrete CCN1 and, if any, how CCN1 promotes the angiogenesis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Compared with untreated control T-MSC, a higher level of CCN1 was secreted by T-MSC treated with activin A and sonic hedgehog, drugs known to induce endodermal differentiation. Expectedly, conditioned medium collected from differentiated T-MSC (DCM) significantly increased HUVEC migration and tube formation compared with that from control T-MSC (CCM), and these stimulatory effects were reversed by neutralization with anti-CCN1 antibody. Treatment with recombinant human CCN1 (rh-CCN1) alone also mimicked the stimulatory effects of DCM. Furthermore, treatment with either DCM or rh-CCN1 increased the phosphorylation of AMP kinase (AMPK), and ectopic expression of siRNA of the AMPK gene inhibited all observed effects of both DCM and rh-CCN1. However, no alteration of intracellular ATP levels or phosphorylation of LKB1, a well-known upstream factor of AMPK activation, was observed under our conditions. Finally, the neutralization of integrin α(v) β(3) with anti-integrin α(v) β(3) antibody almost completely reversed the effects of CCN1 on AMPK phosphorylation, and EC migration and tube formation. Taken together, we demonstrated that T-MSC increase the secretion of CCN1 in response to endodermal differentiation and that integrin α(v) β(3) and AMPK mediate CCN1-induced EC migration and tube formation independent of intracellular ATP levels alteration.

  20. A systematic review of Fusobacterium necrophorum-positive acute tonsillitis: prevalence, methods of detection, patient characteristics, and the usefulness of the Centor score.

    PubMed

    Klug, T E; Rusan, M; Fuursted, K; Ovesen, T; Jorgensen, A W

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the current evidence for an association between Fusobacterium necrophorum (FN) and acute tonsillitis (AT), to assess the prevalence of FN in AT, to identify the better FN detection method, and to characterize the clinical characteristics of FN-positive patients with uncomplicated AT. A systematic literature search was conducted in the PubMed, EMBASE, and SweMed+ databases for studies reporting on the recovery rates of FN in patients with AT. A total of 498 unique records were identified. Eleven studies were included in a qualitative synthesis and six studies were included in a meta-analysis. Considerable heterogeneity (I(2) = 60 %) and risk of bias and confounders was found among the studies, though a subset of studies (prospective) had lower heterogeneity and higher study quality. FN was recovered significantly more frequently from patients (21.2 %) compared to healthy controls (7.6 %) (p < 0.001). FN recovery rates were similar between culture-based studies (20.3 %) and studies using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methodology (22.2 %) (p = 0.462). The typical FN-positive AT patient was a smoking young (15-25 years) male presenting with tonsillar exudates and a Centor score of 2 or higher. A clear association between FN and AT was found. FN is likely to be a significant and prevalent pathogen in AT, especially in teenagers and young adults. However, no evidence for causality between FN and AT has been established and it is unexplored if timely antibiotic therapy directed against FN accelerates the resolution of symptoms and decreases the risk of complications.

  1. Detection of germinal center B-cell lymphoma in archival specimens: critical evaluation of Bcl-6 protein expression in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the tonsil.

    PubMed

    Ree, Howe J; Ohsima, Koichi; Aozasa, Katsuyuki; Takeuchi, Kengo; Kim, Chul Woo; Yang, Woo Ick; Huh, Joor Yung; Lee, Seung-Sook; Ko, Yong-Hye; Kwon, Mi Seon; Cho, Eun Yoon; Choi, Yoon-La; Rhee, Jong Chul; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Mori, Shigeo

    2003-06-01

    Expression of Bcl-6 and CD10, markers for the tumor of the germinal center (GC) B-cell derivation, has been studied in primary diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCLs) of the lymph node, gastrointestinal tract, and mediastinum. In these studies, the coexpression rate of CD10 and Bcl-6 was relatively constant at 30% approximately 40%, but the frequency of Bcl-6+ tumors varied from 55% to 100%, raising doubts about the usefulness of Bcl-6 expression in identifying the tumor of GC B-cell derivation. Because the expression of Bcl-6 in tumors of non-GC B-cell origin has recently been reported, we critically evaluated the expression of Bcl-6 and CD10 in primary DLBCLs of the tonsil, a relatively common tumor in Japan and Korea. The cases (n = 51) represented a consecutive series for any recent 2-year period at several teaching hospitals in Korea and Japan. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens were used for immunostaining. Staining for Bcl-6 and CD10 was positive in 44 (86%) and 22 cases (45%), respectively. However, among those positive for Bcl-6 (>10% Bcl-6+ tumor cells), 2 basic patterns were recognized: uniform and nonuniform. The uniform pattern was characterized by a dense population (>75%) and a consistent density in any given area, resembling the staining pattern observed in GC or follicular lymphoma (FL) (the "GC/FL" pattern). In contrast, the nonuniform pattern exhibited a varying density from area to area, as well as a less-dense population (<75%). The uniform pattern was observed in 26 cases (51%). All but 1 (95%) of the CD10+ tumors coexpressed Bcl-6, with most (82%) displaying the uniform pattern. We conclude that tumors showing a uniform pattern of Bcl-6 expression should be distinguished from those showing a nonuniform pattern, because the former most likely represent tumors of GC B-cell derivation and the latter most likely represent tumors of non-GC derivation. GC B-cell lymphoma thus defined accounted for 51% of tonsillar DLBCL, a proportion

  2. Class III malocclusion with complex problems of lateral open bite and severe crowding successfully treated with miniscrew anchorage and lingual orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Yanagita, Takeshi; Kuroda, Shingo; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko; Yamashiro, Takashi

    2011-05-01

    In this article, we report the successful use of miniscrews in a patient with an Angle Class III malocclusion, lateral open bite, midline deviation, and severe crowding. Simultaneously resolving such problems with conventional Class III treatment is difficult. In this case, the treatment procedure was even more challenging because the patient preferred to have lingual brackets on the maxillary teeth. As a result, miniscrews were used to facilitate significant asymmetric tooth movement in the posterior and downward directions; this contributed to the camouflage of the skeletal mandibular protrusion together with complete resolution of the severe crowding and lateral open bite. Analysis of the jaw motion showed that irregularities in chewing movement were also resolved, and a stable occlusion was achieved. Improvements in the facial profile and dental arches remained stable at the 18-month follow-up.

  3. A comparison between two lingual orthodontic brackets in terms of speech performance and patients' acceptance in correcting Class II, Division 1 malocclusion: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Haj-Younis, Samiha; Khattab, Tarek Z.; Hajeer, Mohammad Y.; Farah, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To compare speech performance and levels of oral impairment between two types of lingual brackets. Methods: A parallel-group randomized controlled trial was carried out on patients with Class II, Division 1 malocclusion treated at the University of Hama School of Dentistry in Hama, Syria. A total of 46 participants (mean age: 22.3 ± 2.3 years) with maxillary dentoalveolar protrusion were randomly distributed into two groups with 23 patients each (1:1 allocation ratio). Either STb (Ormco) or 7th Generation (Ormco) lingual brackets were applied. Fricative sound/s/ spectrograms were analyzed directly before intervention (T0), one week following premolar extraction prior to bracket placement (T1), within 24 hours of bracket bonding (T2), one month after (T3), and three months after (T4) bracket placement. Patients′ acceptance was assessed by means of standardized questionnaires. Results: After bracket placement, significant deterioration in articulation was recorded at all assessment times in the 7th Generation group, and up to T3 in the STb group. Significant intergroup differences were detected at T2 and T3. No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups in reported tongue irritation levels, whereas chewing difficulty was significantly higher in the 7th Generation group one month after bracket placement. Conclusions: 7th Generation brackets have more interaction with sound production than STb ones. Although patients in both groups complained of some degree of oral impairment, STb appliances appeared to be more comfortable than the 7th Generation ones, particularly within the first month of treatment. PMID:27653268

  4. Frictional property comparisons of conventional and self-ligating lingual brackets according to tooth displacement during initial leveling and alignment: an in vitro mechanical study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do-Yoon; Lim, Bum-Soon

    2016-01-01

    Objective We evaluated the effects of tooth displacement on frictional force when conventional ligating lingual brackets (CL-LBs), CL-LBs with a narrow bracket width, and self-ligating lingual brackets (SL-LBs) were used with initial leveling and alignment wires. Methods CL-LBs (7th Generation), CL-LBs with a narrow bracket width (STb), and SL-LBs (In-Ovation L) were tested under three tooth displacement conditions: no displacement (control); a 2-mm palatal displacement (PD) of the maxillary right lateral incisor (MXLI); and a 2-mm gingival displacement (GD) of the maxillary right canine (MXC) (nine groups, n = 7 per group). A stereolithographic typodont system and artificial saliva were used. Static and kinetic frictional forces (SFF and KFF, respectively) were measured while drawing a 0.013-inch copper-nickel-titanium archwire through brackets at 0.5 mm/min for 5 minutes at 36.5℃. Results The In-Ovation L exhibited lower SFF under control conditions and lower KFF under all displacement conditions than the 7th Generation and STb (all p < 0.001). No significant difference in SFF existed between the In-Ovation L and STb for a 2-mm GD of the MXC and 2-mm PD of the MXLI. A 2-mm GD of the MXC produced higher SFF and KFF than a 2-mm PD of the MXLI in all brackets (all p < 0.001). Conclusions CL-LBs with narrow bracket widths exhibited higher KFF than SL-LBs under tooth displacement conditions. CL-LBs and ligation methods should be developed to produce SFF and KFF as low as those in SL-LBs during the initial and leveling stage. PMID:27019823

  5. Expression of keratin 14 in the basal cells of the lingual epithelium of mice during the morphogenesis of filiform papillae: visualization by fluorescent immunostaining and confocal laser-scanning microscopy in the transmission mode.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Shin-Ichi; Aoyagi, Hidekazu

    2007-07-01

    We examined the expression of keratin 14 (K14) on the lingual epithelium by immunofluorescent staining while monitoring morphological changes in the filiform papillae of mice by confocal laser-scanning microscopy in the transmission mode of the same sections to define both the histology and the morphology of cells. It is difficult to visualize histological details of the fetal lingual epithelium of the mouse on semi-ultrathin sections by light microscopy after immunohistochemical staining because the histological structures in such sections cannot be distinguished by standard counterstaining. To solve this problem and to visualize the immunoreactivity specific for K14, we analyzed the results of immunofluorescent staining of semi-ultrathin sections in combination with an examination of the corresponding images by laser-scanning microscopy in the transmission mode after staining of specimens with toluidine blue. No immunoreactivity specific for K14 was detected on the lingual epithelium of fetuses on embryonic day 15 (E15), but immunoreactivity was distinct at all postnatal stages from postnatal day 0 (P0) to P21.

  6. Effect of Ca2+, cyclic GMP, and cyclic AMP added to artificial solution perfusing lingual artery on frog gustatory nerve responses

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    The lingual artery of the bullfrog was perfused with artificial solution and the effects of Ca2+, Ca-channel blockers (MnCl2 and verapamil), cGMP, and cAMP added to the perfusing solution of the gustatory nerve responses were examined. The responses to chemical stimuli of group 1 (CaCl2, NaCl, distilled water, D-galactose, and L- threonine) applied to the tongue surface were greatly decreased by a decrease in Ca2+ concentration in the perfusing solution, suppressed by the Ca-channel blockers, enhanced by cGMP, and suppressed by cAMP. The responses to chemical stimuli of group 2 (quinine hydrochloride, theophylline, ethanol, and HCl) were practically not affected by a decrease in Ca2+ concentration, the Ca-channel blockers, cGMP, and cAMP. The responses to the stimuli of group 1 seem to be induced by Ca influx into a taste cell that is triggered by depolarization and modulated by the cyclic nucleotides in a taste cell. The responses to group 2 seem to be induced without accompanying Ca influx. PMID:6294223

  7. Why is the tongue of blue-tongued skinks blue? Reflectance of lingual surface and its consequences for visual perception by conspecifics and predators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramjan, Andran; Bauerová, Anna; Somerová, Barbora; Frynta, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    Blue-tongued skinks of the genus Tiliqua (Scincidae) are characterized by their large blue melanin-pigmented tongues, often displayed during open-mouth threats, when the animal feels endangered. It is not clear whether this unusual coloration is a direct anti-predation adaptation or it may rather serve intraspecific communication, as ultraviolet-blue color is a frequent visual signal in a number of lizard species. We used spectrophotometry and visual modeling to compare blue tongues of Tiliqua gigas with tongues and skin coloration of other lizard species, and to examine their appearance through the eyes of both the conspecifics and avian predators. Our results show that (1) the tongue coloration is probably not substantially influenced by the amount of melanin in the skin, (2) lingual and oral tissues are UV-reflective in general, with blue colored tongues having chromatic qualities similar to UV-blue skin patches of other lizard species, (3) UV-blue tongues are more conspicuous than pink tongues, especially in the visual model of conspecifics. We hypothesize that blue tongues may possibly serve as a semantic (honest) signal analogous to UV-blue skin patches of other lizard species due to greater UV-bias in the vision of diurnal lizards. Regarding the social behavior and high aggressiveness in Tiliqua and their relatives, such signal might serve, e.g., in intraspecific long-distance communication between conspecifics in order to avoid aggression, and its anti-predation effect may only be a secondary function (exaptation).

  8. Modulation, individual variation and the role of lingual sensory afferents in the control of prey transport in the lizard Pogona vitticeps.

    PubMed

    Schaerlaeken, Vicky; Herrel, Anthony; Meyers, J J

    2008-07-01

    Most organisms feed on a variety of food items that may differ dramatically in their physical and behavioural characteristics (e.g. mobility, mass, texture, etc.). Thus the ability to modulate prey transport behaviour in accordance with the characteristics of the food appears crucial. Consequently, prey reduction and transport movements must be adjusted to the natural variation in material properties of the food, between and within feeding sequences and transport cycles. Here we describe an investigation of (1) the ability of the agamid lizard Pogona vitticeps to modulate prey transport kinematics when feeding on a range of food items differing in their physical characteristics and (2) the role of sensory feedback in controlling jaw and tongue movements by bilateral transection of the lingual trigeminal sensory afferents. Our findings demonstrate that P. vitticeps modulates the kinematics of its feeding behaviour in response to the mechanical demands imposed by different food types. In addition, transection of the trigeminal sensory afferents has an effect on the movements of jaws and tongue during transport, and increases the duration of transport cycles needed to process a given food type. However, after transection, transport cycles were still different for different food types suggesting that other sources of sensory information are also used to modulate prey transport in the lizard P. vitticeps.

  9. Nerve Sharing Between the Lingual and Mental Nerve to Restore Lower Lip Sensation After Segmental Resection of the Mandible.

    PubMed

    Murata, Takuya; Abukawa, Harutsugi; Satomi, Takafumi; Chikazu, Daichi

    2016-09-01

    This report demonstrates a successful new procedure for reconstructing the inferior alveolar nerve by transplanting the great auricular nerve (GAN) between the mental nerve and the remaining submandibular ganglion to achieve nerve sharing of the lingual nerve. A 59-year-old woman with discomfort in the left mandibular retromolar region and ipsilateral neck was referred to our hospital by a local dentist. Physical examination showed mild swelling and redness at the left mandibular retromolar region. The histologic diagnosis showed central mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the jaw. With the patient under general anesthesia, segmental resection of the mandible followed by level 1 selective neck dissection was performed. The resected mandible was reconstructed with a titanium plate. The submandibular incision was extended to the lower edge of the tragus for harvesting of the GAN. The GAN was grafted, and an epineural neurorrhaphy was carried out with the mental nerve, as well as the submandibular ganglion, under a microscope. After the operation, submental sensation was evaluated with a Semmes-Weinstein pressure esthesiometer. The Semmes-Weinstein pressure esthesiometer test showed a loss of perception at the third week after surgery. Within 12 months, nerve sensation was substantially improved and the patient was free from discomfort.

  10. Passive restriction of blood flow and counter-current heat exchange via lingual retia in the tongue of a neonatal gray whale Eschrichtius robustus (Cetacea, Mysticeti).

    PubMed

    Ekdale, Eric G; Kienle, Sarah S

    2015-04-01

    Retia mirabilia play broad roles in cetacean physiology, including thermoregulation during feeding and pressure regulations during diving. Vascular bundles of lingual retia are described within the base of the tongue of a neonatal female gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus). Each rete consists of a central artery surrounded by four to six smaller veins. The retia and constituent vessels decrease in diameter as they extend anteriorly within the hyoglossus muscle from a position anterior to the basihyal cartilage toward the apex of the tongue. The position of the retia embedded in the hyoglossus and the anterior constriction of the vessels differs from reports of similar vascular bundles that were previously identified in gray whales. The retia likely serve as a counter-current heat exchange system to control body temperature during feeding. Cold blood flowing toward the body center within the periarterial veins would accept heat from warm blood in the central artery flowing toward the anterior end of the tongue. Although thermoregulatory systems have been identified within the mouths of a few mysticete species, the distribution of such vascular structures likely is more widespread among baleen whales than has previously been described.

  11. On Effect Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Ken; Preacher, Kristopher J.

    2012-01-01

    The call for researchers to report and interpret effect sizes and their corresponding confidence intervals has never been stronger. However, there is confusion in the literature on the definition of effect size, and consequently the term is used inconsistently. We propose a definition for effect size, discuss 3 facets of effect size (dimension,…

  12. Obesity alters the gustatory perception of lipids in the mouse: plausible involvement of lingual CD36[S

    PubMed Central

    Chevrot, Michael; Bernard, Arnaud; Ancel, Déborah; Buttet, Marjorie; Martin, Céline; Abdoul-Azize, Souleymane; Merlin, Jean-François; Poirier, Hélène; Niot, Isabelle; Khan, Naim Akhtar; Passilly-Degrace, Patricia; Besnard, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    A relationship between orosensory detection of dietary lipids, regulation of fat intake, and body mass index was recently suggested. However, involved mechanisms are poorly understood. Moreover, whether obesity can directly modulate preference for fatty foods remains unknown. To address this question, exploration of the oral lipid sensing system was undertaken in diet-induced obese (DIO) mice. By using a combination of biochemical, physiological, and behavioral approaches, we found that i) the attraction for lipids is decreased in obese mice, ii) this behavioral change has an orosensory origin, iii) it is reversed in calorie-restricted DIO mice, revealing an inverse correlation between fat preference and adipose tissue size, iv) obesity suppresses the lipid-mediated downregulation of the lipid-sensor CD36 in circumvallate papillae, usually found during the refeeding of lean mice, and v) the CD36-dependent signaling cascade controlling the intracellular calcium levels ([Ca2+]i) in taste bud cells is decreased in obese mice. Therefore, obesity alters the lipid-sensing system responsible for the oral perception of dietary lipids. This phenomenon seems to take place through a CD36-mediated mechanism, leading to changes in eating behavior. PMID:23840049

  13. Distinct roles for Sema3A, Sema3F, and an unidentified trophic factor in controlling the advance of geniculate axons to gustatory lingual epithelium.

    PubMed

    Vilbig, Ryan; Cosmano, Jason; Giger, Roman; Rochlin, M William

    2004-12-01

    Geniculate ganglion axons arrive in the lingual mesenchyme on embryonic day 13 (E13), 3-4 days before penetrating fungiform papilla epithelium (E17). This latency may result from chemorepulsion by epithelial Sema3A (Dillon et al. (2004) Journal of Comparative Neurology 470, 13-24), or Sema3F, which we report is also expressed in this epithelium. Sema3A and Sema3F repelled or suppressed geniculate neurite outgrowth, respectively, and these effects were stage and neurotrophic factor dependent. BDNF-stimulated outgrowth is repelled by Sema3A until E17, but insensitive to Sema3F from E16. NT-4-stimulated neurite outgrowth is sensitive to Sema3A and Sema3F through E18, but NT-4 has not been detected in E15-18 tongue. E15-18 tongue explants did not exhibit net chemorepulsion of geniculate neurites, but the ability of tongue explants to support geniculate neurite outgrowth fluctuates: E12-13 (Rochlin et al. (2000), Journal of Comparative Neurology, 422, 579-593) and E17-18 explants promote and may attract geniculate neurites, but stages corresponding to intralingual arborization do not. The E18 trophic and tropic effects were evident even in the presence of BDNF or NT-4, suggesting that some other factor is responsible. Intrinsic neurite outgrowth capability (without exogenous neurotrophic factors) fluctuated similarly: ganglia deteriorated at E15, but exhibited moderate outgrowth at E18. The chemorepulsion studies are consistent with a role for Sema3A, not Sema3F, in restricting geniculate axons from the epithelium until E17, when axons penetrate the epithelium. The transient inability of tongue explants to promote geniculate neurite outgrowth may signify an alternative mechanism for restricting geniculate axons from the epithelium: limiting trophic factor access.

  14. Tonsil-derived mesenchymal stem cells (T-MSCs) prevent Th17-mediated autoimmune response via regulation of the programmed death-1/programmed death ligand-1 (PD-1/PD-L1) pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Yon; Park, Minhwa; Kim, Yu-Hee; Ryu, Kyung-Ha; Lee, Kyung Ho; Cho, Kyung-Ah; Woo, So-Youn

    2017-01-20

    Our knowledge of the immunomodulatory role of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in both the innate and adaptive immune systems has dramatically expanded, providing great promise for treating various autoimmune diseases. However, the contribution of MSCs to Th17 dominant immune disease, such as psoriasis and its underlying mechanism remains elusive. In this study, we demonstrated that human palatine tonsil-derived MSCs (T-MSCs) constitutively express both the membrane-bound and soluble forms of programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1), which enables T-MSCs to be distinguished from MSCs originating from other organs (i.e., bone marrow or adipose tissue). We also found that T-MSC-derived PD-L1 effectively represses Th17 differentiation via both cell-to-cell contact and a paracrine effect. Further, T-MSCs increase PD-1 expression on T cells by secreting IFN-β, which may enhance engagement with PD-L1. Finally, transplantation of T-MSCs into imiquimod induced psoriatic skin inflammation in mice significantly abrogated disease symptoms, mainly by blunting the Th17 response in a PD-L1 dependent manner. This study suggests that T-MSCs might be a promising cell source to treat autoimmune diseases such as psoriasis, via its unique immunoregulatory features.

  15. Sample size calculations.

    PubMed

    Noordzij, Marlies; Dekker, Friedo W; Zoccali, Carmine; Jager, Kitty J

    2011-01-01

    The sample size is the number of patients or other experimental units that need to be included in a study to answer the research question. Pre-study calculation of the sample size is important; if a sample size is too small, one will not be able to detect an effect, while a sample that is too large may be a waste of time and money. Methods to calculate the sample size are explained in statistical textbooks, but because there are many different formulas available, it can be difficult for investigators to decide which method to use. Moreover, these calculations are prone to errors, because small changes in the selected parameters can lead to large differences in the sample size. This paper explains the basic principles of sample size calculations and demonstrates how to perform such a calculation for a simple study design.

  16. Lingual ulceration in disseminated histoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Guttal, Kruthika S; Naikmasur, Venkatesh G; Bathi, Renuka J; Rao, Ravikala

    2010-03-01

    Histoplasmosis is a rare systemic fungal infection commonly presenting as mucosal ulceration of the oral cavity. It has been increasingly reported in India as disseminated disease with lesions in the oral cavity as a consequence of rapid spread of HIV infection. The authors report a case of disseminated histoplasmosis with oral manifestation in a 40-year-old male patient.

  17. Particle-Size Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, Glendon W. ); Or, Dani; J.H. Dane and G.C. Topp

    2002-11-01

    Book Chapter describing methods of particle-size analysis for soils. Includes a variety of classification schemes. Standard methods for size distributions using pipet and hydrometer techniques are described. New laser-light scattering and related techniques are discussed. Complete with updated references.

  18. The Class Size Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishel, Lawrence, Ed.; Rothstein, Richard, Ed.

    This collection of papers debates the merits of smaller class sizes and research methods used to evaluate the efficacy of this education reform measure. Four chapters focus on (1) "Understanding the Magnitude and Effect of Class Size on Student Achievement" (Alan B. Krueger), which discusses expenditures per student and economic criterion; (2)…

  19. Modeling Raindrop Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Roger W.; Kliche, Donna V.; Smith, Paul L.

    2015-01-01

    Being able to characterize the size of raindrops is useful in a number of fields including meteorology, hydrology, agriculture and telecommunications. Associated with this article are data sets containing surface (i.e. ground-level) measurements of raindrop size from two different instruments and two different geographical locations. Students may…

  20. Cell-Size Control

    PubMed Central

    Amodeo, Amanda A.; Skotheim, Jan M.

    2015-01-01

    Cells of a given type maintain a characteristic cell size to function efficiently in their ecological or organismal context. They achieve this through the regulation of growth rates or by actively sensing size and coupling this signal to cell division. We focus this review on potential size-sensing mechanisms, including geometric, external cue, and titration mechanisms. Mechanisms that titrate proteins against DNA are of particular interest because they are consistent with the robust correlation of DNA content and cell size. We review the literature, which suggests that titration mechanisms may underlie cell-size sensing in Xenopus embryos, budding yeast, and Escherichia coli, whereas alternative mechanisms may function in fission yeast. PMID:26254313

  1. Does size matter?

    SciTech Connect

    Carreras, B. A.; Newman, D. E.; Dobson, Ian

    2014-06-15

    Failures of the complex infrastructures society depends on having enormous human and economic cost that poses the question: Are there ways to optimize these systems to reduce the risks of failure? A dynamic model of one such system, the power transmission grid, is used to investigate the risk from failure as a function of the system size. It is found that there appears to be optimal sizes for such networks where the risk of failure is balanced by the benefit given by the size.

  2. Particle Size Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barth, Howard G.; Sun, Shao-Tang

    1989-01-01

    Presents a review of research focusing on scattering, elution techniques, electrozone sensing, filtration, centrifugation, comparison of techniques, data analysis, and particle size standards. The review covers the period 1986-1988. (MVL)

  3. The size of earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kanamori, H.

    1980-01-01

    How we should measure the size of an earthquake has been historically a very important, as well as a very difficult, seismological problem. For example, figure 1 shows the loss of life caused by earthquakes in recent times and clearly demonstrates that 1976 was the worst year for earthquake casualties in the 20th century. However, the damage caused by an earthquake is due not only to its physical size but also to other factors such as where and when it occurs; thus, figure 1 is not necessarily an accurate measure of the "size" of earthquakes in 1976. the point is that the physical process underlying an earthquake is highly complex; we therefore cannot express every detail of an earthquake by a simple straightforward parameter. Indeed, it would be very convenient if we could find a single number that represents the overall physical size of an earthquake. This was in fact the concept behind the Richter magnitude scale introduced in 1935. 

  4. Estimating Commit Sizes Efficiently

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Philipp; Riehle, Dirk

    The quantitative analysis of software projects can provide insights that let us better understand open source and other software development projects. An important variable used in the analysis of software projects is the amount of work being contributed, the commit size. Unfortunately, post-facto, the commit size can only be estimated, not measured. This paper presents several algorithms for estimating the commit size. Our performance evaluation shows that simple, straightforward heuristics are superior to the more complex text-analysis-based algorithms. Not only are the heuristics significantly faster to compute, they also deliver more accurate results when estimating commit sizes. Based on this experience, we design and present an algorithm that improves on the heuristics, can be computed equally fast, and is more accurate than any of the prior approaches.

  5. Exploring Planet Sizes

    NASA Video Gallery

    This lesson combines a series of activities to compare models of the size of Earth to other planets and the distances to other planets. Activities highlight space missions to other planets in our s...

  6. Paper Sizes and Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Mestre, Neville

    2007-01-01

    Reams of paper come in a standardised system of related sheet sizes. Most people are familiar with the international paper sizes A4, A3 and B4, but there are others. The ratio of the sides of any sheet in the series is such that if the paper is cut or folded in half on itself then the ratio of the sides remains unchanged. Due to this property of…

  7. Platelet size in man.

    PubMed

    Paulus, J M

    1975-09-01

    The shape and parameters of platelet size distributions were studied in 50 normal persons and 97 patients in order to test the proposed thesis that platelet size heterogeneity results mainly from aging in the circulation. This thesis was contradicted (1) by size distributions of age-homogeneous, newly-born cell populations which were lognormal with increased (instead of decreased) dispersion of volumes and (2) by the macrothrombocytosis found in some populations with normal age distribution. For these reasons, thrombocytopoiesis appeared to play the major role in determining platelet size. A model was built in which the volume variation of platelet territories due to megakaryocyte growth and membrane demarcation at each step of maturation was a random proportion of the previous value of the volume. This model explains the lognormal shape of both newborn and circulating platelet size distributions. It also implies that (1) the mean and standard deviation of platelet logvolumes depend on the rates of volume change of the individual platelet territories (growth rate minus demarcation rate) as well as on megakaryocyte maturation time; (2) platelet hyperdestruction causes an increase in the mean and dispersion of the rates of territory volume change; (3) Mediterranean macrothrombocytosis and some hereditary macrothrombocytotic thrombocytopenias or dysthrombocytopoieses reflect a diminished rate of territory demarcation, and (4) platelet size heterogeneity is caused mainly by the variations in territory growth and demarcation and not by aging in the circulation.

  8. Structure Size Enhanced Histogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesarg, Stefan; Kirschner, Matthias

    Direct volume visualization requires the definition of transfer functions (TFs) for the assignment of opacity and color. Multi-dimensional TFs are based on at least two image properties, and are specified by means of 2D histograms. In this work we propose a new type of a 2D histogram which combines gray value with information about the size of the structures. This structure size enhanced (SSE) histogram is an intuitive approach for representing anatomical features. Clinicians — the users we are focusing on — are much more familiar with selecting features by their size than by their gradient magnitude value. As a proof of concept, we employ the SSE histogram for the definition of two-dimensional TFs for the visualization of 3D MRI and CT image data.

  9. The Size of Pluto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tholen, David J.

    2014-11-01

    The presence of a thin atmosphere around Pluto prevents the stellar occultation method from probing all the way down to the surface of Pluto. As such, the most accurate method for measuring the size of Pluto is fitting the mutual event photometry from 1985 to 1990. Previous fits solved for not only the size of Pluto, but also the size and orbit of Charon. Since that era, the size and orbit of Charon have been determined independently and more accurately via other means. Stellar occultation measurements have established the diameter of Charon as 1212 km, while the orbit of Charon has been determined via direct images obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope over a period of two decades. By imposing the known values for the size and orbit of Charon on the fits to the mutual event photometry, a new size for Pluto can be derived with considerably fewer free parameters. To perform this fit, the extensive set of mutual event photometry acquired at Mauna Kea Observatory was utilized. A fit to all the data yields a diameter for Pluto of 2317 km. To avoid the question of limb darkening on Pluto and the effect of albedo variation over the surface of Pluto, even fewer free parameters can be solved for by restricting attention to just the superior mutual events, during which Charon was behind Pluto. In this case the diameter of Pluto increases to 2379 km. Work is currently being done to determine how weighting of the data affects the result. The true value will become known in a few months when New Horizons flies past Pluto. These fits also show that there is still room for improvement in the orbit of Charon.

  10. Financing Class Size Reduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achilles, C. M.

    2005-01-01

    Class size reduction has been shown to, among other things, improve academic achievement for all students and particularly for low-income and minority students. With the No Child Left Behind Act's heavy emphasis on scientifically based research, adequate yearly progress, and disaggregated results, one wonders why all children aren't enrolled in…

  11. Lasers of All Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcou, Philippe; Forget, Sébastien Robert-Philip, Isabelle

    2015-10-01

    * Introduction * The Laser in All Its Forms * Gas lasers * Dye lasers * Solid-state lasers * Lasers for Every Taste * The rise of lasers * Lasers of all sizes * The colors of the rainbow... and beyond * Shorter and shorter lasers * Increasingly powerful lasers * Lasers: A Universal Tool? * Cutting, welding, and cleaning * Communicating * Treating illnesses * Measuring * Supplying energy? * Entertaining * Understanding * Conclusion

  12. Preference for newspaper size.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Steve N H; Hoffmann, Errol R; Chan, Alan H S

    2014-05-01

    The past few years has seen a change in the size of newspapers, with publishers moving to a smaller size format. Five 'standard' newspaper sizes are used in different countries: Broadsheet, Rhensch, Tabloid, Tall Tabloid and Berliner. These papers vary in both width and height of pages and hence there are implications for human reading comfort, which may be dependent on reading location such as on a lounge chair or on a train. Experiments were carried out to determine preferences for the different sizes and to relate these preferences to the geometric characteristics of the newspapers. For both comfortable and cramped/uncomfortable reading conditions, the rank order of preference for paper types was, from least to most-preferred, Broadsheet, Rhensch, Berliner, Tall Tabloid and Tabloid. Preferences were much stronger when determined in cramped/uncomfortable reading conditions, where most comparisons were significantly different. There was good correlation between participant ratings on several scales and preference, where most factors were related to comfort of holding and controlling the paper.

  13. Sizing Up What Matters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCluskey, Neal

    "Smaller is better" is often the mantra of school leaders with regard to class size, while the benefits of smaller schools are ignored. Benefits of small classes seem obvious--teachers with fewer students could devote more time to each student. Conducted in 1985-89, Tennessee's Project STAR (Student/Teacher Achievement Ratio) found that…

  14. Asteroid sizes and albedos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, D.

    1977-01-01

    The radiometric method of determining asteroid diameters is described, and a synthesis of radiometric and polarimetric measurements of the diameters and geometric albedos of a total of 187 asteroids is presented. An analysis is offered of the size distributions of different albedo classes down to 80-km diameter for the entire main asteroid belt (2.0-3.5 AU). The distribution of albedos is found to be strongly bimodal, with mean albedos for the C and S group of 0.035 and 0.15, respectively. The C asteroids outnumber the S asteroids at all sizes and all values of semimajor axis, with the proportion of C asteroids increasing from a little over half inside 2.5 AU to more than 95% beyond 3.0 AU. Other aspects of the distribution of C, S, and M asteroids are discussed, and the total mass of main-belt asteroids larger than 70 km is estimated.

  15. Sizing Determination Final Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-01

    the other hand bring the tape- downward an6 forward so that it crosses the center of the lower jaw at a poiot just in front of the jaw/ neck junction...SCOTT S* ~ ,n.... ..~a- a - a SAVON USIO 9. I S S I . Height: 171.5 cm 2 . Weig.it: 146 lbs cAn 3- -Face Size - Adjustable Metric Tempate Circuference

  16. Coal-Sizing Auger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, E. V.

    1985-01-01

    Aft end of auger, like forward, face-piercing end, equipped with hard cutting bits such as diamonds. As auger breaks face, pulls broken coal lumps into jaws and forces them into hardened throat section. There, cutting bits chew up lumps: Clearance between throat and auger shaft sets maximum size for coal particles that pass through. Auger motion pushes coal particles into mixing chamber, where paddles combine them with water.

  17. Energy and institution size

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Why do institutions grow? Despite nearly a century of scientific effort, there remains little consensus on this topic. This paper offers a new approach that focuses on energy consumption. A systematic relation exists between institution size and energy consumption per capita: as energy consumption increases, institutions become larger. I hypothesize that this relation results from the interplay between technological scale and human biological limitations. I also show how a simple stochastic model can be used to link energy consumption with firm dynamics. PMID:28178339

  18. Renal Clear Cell Carcinoma and Tonsil Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Marcotullio, Dario; Iannella, Giannicola; Zelli, Melissa; Magliulo, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is the most common renal tumor in adults. Clear cell carcinoma represents 85% of all histological subtypes. In February 2012 a 72-year-old woman came to our department due to the appearance of massive hemoptysis and pharyngodinia. Previously, this patient was diagnosed with a renal cell carcinoma treated with left nephrectomy. We observed an exophytic, grayish, and ulcerated mass in the left tonsillar lodge and decided to subject the patient to an immediate tonsillectomy. Postoperative histology showed nests of cells with highly hyperchromatic nuclei and clear cytoplasm. These features enabled us to make the diagnosis of renal clear cell carcinoma metastasis. Only few authors described metastasis of renal cell carcinoma in this specific site. PMID:24455373

  19. Renal clear cell carcinoma and tonsil metastasis.

    PubMed

    Marcotullio, Dario; Iannella, Giannicola; Macri, Gian Franco; Marinelli, Caterina; Zelli, Melissa; Magliulo, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is the most common renal tumor in adults. Clear cell carcinoma represents 85% of all histological subtypes. In February 2012 a 72-year-old woman came to our department due to the appearance of massive hemoptysis and pharyngodinia. Previously, this patient was diagnosed with a renal cell carcinoma treated with left nephrectomy. We observed an exophytic, grayish, and ulcerated mass in the left tonsillar lodge and decided to subject the patient to an immediate tonsillectomy. Postoperative histology showed nests of cells with highly hyperchromatic nuclei and clear cytoplasm. These features enabled us to make the diagnosis of renal clear cell carcinoma metastasis. Only few authors described metastasis of renal cell carcinoma in this specific site.

  20. Sizing pumps for slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Akhtar, S.Z.

    1996-11-01

    Slurry characteristics have a significant impact on centrifugal pump performance. For instance, as particle size increases or the percent solids concentration increases, pump head and efficiency decrease. Therefore, before a slurry pump is selected, it is important to define the slurry characteristics as accurately as possible. The effect of the slurry characteristics on the head and efficiency of the centrifugal pump will be emphasized (the effect on flowrate is less significant). The effect of slurry characteristics is more predominant in smaller pumps (with smaller diameter impellers) than in larger pumps. The data and relationship between the various slurry parameters have been developed from correlations and nomographs published by pump vendors from their field data and test results. The information helps to avoid specifying an undersized pump/motor assembly for slurry service.

  1. Effect Sizes, Confidence Intervals, and Confidence Intervals for Effect Sizes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    The present article provides a primer on (a) effect sizes, (b) confidence intervals, and (c) confidence intervals for effect sizes. Additionally, various admonitions for reformed statistical practice are presented. For example, a very important implication of the realization that there are dozens of effect size statistics is that "authors must…

  2. Size reduction machine

    SciTech Connect

    Fricke, V.

    1999-12-15

    The Size Reduction Machine (SRM) is a mobile platform capable of shearing various shapes and types of metal components at a variety of elevations. This shearing activity can be performed without direct physical movement and placement of the shear head by the operator. The base unit is manually moved and roughly aligned to each cut location. The base contains the electronics: hydraulic pumps, servos, and actuators needed to move the shear-positioning arm. The movable arm allows the shear head to have six axes of movement and to cut to within 4 inches of a wall surface. The unit has a slick electrostatic capture coating to assist in external decontamination. Internal contamination of the unit is controlled by a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter on the cooling inlet fan. The unit is compact enough to access areas through a 36-inch standard door opening. This paper is an Innovative Technology Summary Report designed to provide potential users with the information they need to quickly determine if a technology would apply to a particular environmental management problem. They also are designed for readers who may recommend that a technology be considered by prospective users.

  3. Industrial-size photobioreactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ogbonna, J.C.; Tanaka, Hideo

    1997-07-01

    Photosynthetic microorganisms can be engineered to produce pharmaceuticals, chemical intermediates, and clean energy (e.g., hydrogen). They also fix atmospheric carbon dioxide--an important consideration as increased levels of carbon dioxide are linked to global warming. As a first step in the photobioreactor design, the authors investigated the relative significance of the exponential and the linear growth rates during light-limited batch cultivation of photosynthetic cells using various types and sizes of photobioreactors. They also developed a mathematical model that could explain the existence of the various growth phases during the light-limited batch cultivation. Because the cost of electricity is high, use of solar energy is obviously desirable, because it is abundant and free. However, an appropriate method for harvesting the solar energy and distributing the light inside the photobioreactor is required. A light collection device consisting of Fresnel lenses is used to collect the solar light, which is then distributed inside the reactor through the optical fibers. Because the position of the sun changes continuously, the device is equipped with a light-tracking sensor so that the lenses rotate with the position of the sun. Because of diurnal and seasonal changes in the sunlight intensity, however, high volumetric productivity is difficult to achieve if only solar energy is used for reactor illumination. For maximum productivity, therefore, the solar light should be supplemented with an artificial light source at night and on cloudy days.

  4. Sizing of microdrops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Irwin T.; Fan, Sewan; Halyo, Valerie; Kim, Peter C.; Lee, Eric R.; Perl, Martin L.; Rogers, Howard

    2004-04-01

    Several techniques for determining the size of small fluid microdrops with diameters ranging from 5 to 30 μm have been developed and evaluated using an automated variation on the Millikan oil drop experiment. The average diameter of a large sample of monodisperse fluid drops was determined by measuring their terminal velocity in air, or if charged, their motion under the influence of an electric field, as well as by measurement of the magnitude of their Brownian motion. The diameter of individual drops was determined optically, by direct observation using an imaging system based on a charge-coupled-device camera. The technique used to analyze the image data is based on a best-fit technique taking the point spread function of the lens into account, and yields results accurate to 1% (based on a single image) without the need for any calibration. By combining this technique with terminal velocity measurements, the density of the fluid can be determined to similar accuracy.

  5. Microstructure versus substructure size effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghassemali, Ehsan; Jarfors, Anders E. W.; Tan, Ming-Jen; Wah, Chua Beng

    2016-10-01

    In metal deformation, size effect is generally attributed to the interactive effect of grain size and specimen dimension. This work shows, however, that relative substructure dimensions should also be considered. Micro-compression tests on the micro-pins having different grain sizes revealed no significant size effect with respect to the mechanical behavior, even if the number of grains over the diameter of the micro-pins falls below its critical value. To justify the reason laying under this fact, a recovery annealing cycle was applied on the micro-pins to change the substructure properties without altering the mean grain size. A surprising drop in the flow stress of the recovery-annealed micro-pins implied the importance of considering subgrain size rather than grain size over the diameter of component for the size effect investigation.

  6. Sizing Up the Situation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Hailstorm damage to the Space Shuttle's External Tank inspired a NASA innovation with extensive photography applications. In order to measure the defects caused by the storm, Kennedy Space Center used telephoto lenses to zoom in on the tank and view the damage clearly. However, since there was no reference object in the image, the engineers could not determine the scale of the damage. In photographic situations similar to this, an object, such as a ruler, is placed within the field of view. This allows a person to look at a photograph and have a visual indication of the scale of the objects in it. In the External Tank situation, however, this procedure was not possible. As a solution, Kennedy developed the Scaling and Measurement Device for Photographic Images, which provides a non-intrusive means of adding a scale to a photograph. In addition to meeting Kennedy's needs, scaling images is extremely important in crime and accident scene investigations, oil and chemical tank monitoring, and aerial photography. The innovation consists of a tool that attaches directly to a camera or charge coupled device using a standard screw. Two lasers fitted to the device provide parallel beams that are set 1 inch apart. These lasers enable the device to project a pattern into the field of view. When a photograph is taken, the image of the laser pattern appears, along with the image of the object under investigation, allowing the viewer quantifiable information as to the size of the object. The laser beams are accurate to approximately 200 feet. Windows-based software was developed to work with the scaling device tool. The software provides further techniques to measure objects in photographs and digital images. By using the software, any object in the image can be measured diagonally, vertically, and horizontally. The device and its software enable the user to determine two-dimensional measurements within a photograph.

  7. Cell size versus body size in geophilomorph centipedes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretto, Marco; Minelli, Alessandro; Fusco, Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    Variation in animal body size is the result of a complex interplay between variation in cell number and cell size, but the latter has seldom been considered in wide-ranging comparative studies, although distinct patterns of variation have been described in the evolution of different lineages. We investigated the correlation between epidermal cell size and body size in a sample of 29 geophilomorph centipede species, representative of a wide range of body sizes, from 6 mm dwarf species to gigantic species more than 200 mm long, exploiting the marks of epidermal cells on the overlying cuticle in the form of micro-sculptures called scutes. We found conspicuous and significant variation in average scute area, both between suprageneric taxa and between genera, while the within-species range of variation is comparatively small. This supports the view that the average epidermal cell size is to some extent taxon specific. However, regression analyses show that neither body size nor the number of leg-bearing segments explain this variation, which suggests that cell size is not an usual target of change for body size evolution in this group of arthropods, although there is evidence of its correlation with other morphological variables, like cuticle thickness. Scute sizes of miniaturized geophilomorph species are well within the range of the lineage to which the species belong, suggesting recent evolutionary transitions to smaller body size.

  8. Is cell size a spandrel?

    PubMed Central

    Amir, Ariel

    2017-01-01

    All organisms control the size of their cells. We focus here on the question of size regulation in bacteria, and suggest that the quantitative laws governing cell size and its dependence on growth rate may arise as byproducts of a regulatory mechanism which evolved to support multiple DNA replication forks. In particular, we show that the increase of bacterial cell size during Lenski’s long-term evolution experiments is a natural outcome of this proposal. This suggests that, in the context of evolution, cell size may be a 'spandrel' DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22186.001 PMID:28102818

  9. Coagulation algorithms with size binning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statton, David M.; Gans, Jason; Williams, Eric

    1994-01-01

    The Smoluchowski equation describes the time evolution of an aerosol particle size distribution due to aggregation or coagulation. Any algorithm for computerized solution of this equation requires a scheme for describing the continuum of aerosol particle sizes as a discrete set. One standard form of the Smoluchowski equation accomplishes this by restricting the particle sizes to integer multiples of a basic unit particle size (the monomer size). This can be inefficient when particle concentrations over a large range of particle sizes must be calculated. Two algorithms employing a geometric size binning convention are examined: the first assumes that the aerosol particle concentration as a function of size can be considered constant within each size bin; the second approximates the concentration as a linear function of particle size within each size bin. The output of each algorithm is compared to an analytical solution in a special case of the Smoluchowski equation for which an exact solution is known . The range of parameters more appropriate for each algorithm is examined.

  10. Sauropod dinosaurs evolved moderately sized genomes unrelated to body size.

    PubMed

    Organ, Chris L; Brusatte, Stephen L; Stein, Koen

    2009-12-22

    Sauropodomorph dinosaurs include the largest land animals to have ever lived, some reaching up to 10 times the mass of an African elephant. Despite their status defining the upper range for body size in land animals, it remains unknown whether sauropodomorphs evolved larger-sized genomes than non-avian theropods, their sister taxon, or whether a relationship exists between genome size and body size in dinosaurs, two questions critical for understanding broad patterns of genome evolution in dinosaurs. Here we report inferences of genome size for 10 sauropodomorph taxa. The estimates are derived from a Bayesian phylogenetic generalized least squares approach that generates posterior distributions of regression models relating genome size to osteocyte lacunae volume in extant tetrapods. We estimate that the average genome size of sauropodomorphs was 2.02 pg (range of species means: 1.77-2.21 pg), a value in the upper range of extant birds (mean = 1.42 pg, range: 0.97-2.16 pg) and near the average for extant non-avian reptiles (mean = 2.24 pg, range: 1.05-5.44 pg). The results suggest that the variation in size and architecture of genomes in extinct dinosaurs was lower than the variation found in mammals. A substantial difference in genome size separates the two major clades within dinosaurs, Ornithischia (large genomes) and Saurischia (moderate to small genomes). We find no relationship between body size and estimated genome size in extinct dinosaurs, which suggests that neutral forces did not dominate the evolution of genome size in this group.

  11. Sauropod dinosaurs evolved moderately sized genomes unrelated to body size

    PubMed Central

    Organ, Chris L.; Brusatte, Stephen L.; Stein, Koen

    2009-01-01

    Sauropodomorph dinosaurs include the largest land animals to have ever lived, some reaching up to 10 times the mass of an African elephant. Despite their status defining the upper range for body size in land animals, it remains unknown whether sauropodomorphs evolved larger-sized genomes than non-avian theropods, their sister taxon, or whether a relationship exists between genome size and body size in dinosaurs, two questions critical for understanding broad patterns of genome evolution in dinosaurs. Here we report inferences of genome size for 10 sauropodomorph taxa. The estimates are derived from a Bayesian phylogenetic generalized least squares approach that generates posterior distributions of regression models relating genome size to osteocyte lacunae volume in extant tetrapods. We estimate that the average genome size of sauropodomorphs was 2.02 pg (range of species means: 1.77–2.21 pg), a value in the upper range of extant birds (mean = 1.42 pg, range: 0.97–2.16 pg) and near the average for extant non-avian reptiles (mean = 2.24 pg, range: 1.05–5.44 pg). The results suggest that the variation in size and architecture of genomes in extinct dinosaurs was lower than the variation found in mammals. A substantial difference in genome size separates the two major clades within dinosaurs, Ornithischia (large genomes) and Saurischia (moderate to small genomes). We find no relationship between body size and estimated genome size in extinct dinosaurs, which suggests that neutral forces did not dominate the evolution of genome size in this group. PMID:19793755

  12. Variations of sediment size and size distribution along a river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jan, C. D.; Tsai, Y. C.; Yang, S. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Sediment material of a river bed is an important factor for river morphodynamics. Typically, alluvial rivers construct their own geometries based on the sediment size and its distribution that affect the sediment transport capacity in river channel networks, involving the issues of watershed sediment yield, flood controls and the evolution of flood plain, habitats, deltas and adjacent coastline. Hence, investigating grain size and size distribution of sediment materials on riverbeds is important for practical river management and assessment of landscape evolution. In this study, we collected total 43 sediment samplings along the Koaping River in southern Taiwan to analyze the grain size and its distribution along the river. Spatial distributions of different representative grain sizes, such as D50 and D90, and the size corresponding Manning's n values are analyzed and discussed in this paper. An exponential grain size distribution (GSD) formula is used to explore the relation between the frequency and size of riverbed sediment. Results show that the grain size has a wide range distribution in the river upstream but displays a narrow-range variation in the river downstream. For example, the sediment medium size D50 ranges from 1.25 mm to 391.27 mm with an average of 49.36 mm in the upstream while it ranges from 0.135 mm to 0.625 mm with an average of 0.338 mm in the downstream. The best fitting curves of GSD with exponential scaling are analyzed with an empirical parameter Dc that is used to normalize the sediment grain size. This study finds that the empirical parameter Dc could be replaced by the sediment resentative size D65 (65% of sediment smaller than it). The results obtained herein could be useful not only in analyzing sediment transport of a river but also in river management.

  13. Effective sizes for subdivided populations

    SciTech Connect

    Chesser, R.K. Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA ); Rhodes, O.E. Jr.; Sugg, D.W.; Schnabel, A. )

    1993-12-01

    Many derivations of effective population sizes have been suggested in the literature; however, few account for the breeding structure and none can readily be expanded to subdivided populations. Breeding structures influence gene correlations through their effects on the number of breeding individuals of each sex, the mean number of progeny per female, and the variance in the number of progeny produced by males and females. Additionally, hierarchical structuring in a population is determined by the number of breeding groups and the migration rates of males and females among such groups. This study derives analytical solutions for effective sizes that can be applied to subdivided populations. Parameters that encapsulate breeding structure and subdivision are utilized to derive the traditional inbreeding and variance effective sizes. Also, it is shown that effective sizes can be determined for any hierarchical level of population structure for which gene correlations can accrue. Derivations of effective sizes for the accumulation of gene correlations within breeding groups (coancestral effective size) and among breeding groups (intergroup effective size) are given. The results converge to traditional single population measures when similar assumptions are applied. In particular, inbreeding and intergroup effective sizes are shown to be special cases of the coancestral effective size, and intergroup and variance effective sizes will be equal if the population census remains constant. Instantaneous solutions for effective size, at any time after gene correlation begins to accrue, are given in terms of traditional F statistics or transition equations. All effective sizes are shown to converge upon a common asymptotic value when breeding tactics and migration rates are constant. The asymptotic effective size can be expressed in terms of the fixation indices and the number of breeding groups; however, the rate of approach to the asymptote is dependent upon dispersal rates.

  14. Size Matters: Individual Variation in Ectotherm Growth and Asymptotic Size

    PubMed Central

    King, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    Body size, and, by extension, growth has impacts on physiology, survival, attainment of sexual maturity, fecundity, generation time, and population dynamics, especially in ectotherm animals that often exhibit extensive growth following attainment of sexual maturity. Frequently, growth is analyzed at the population level, providing useful population mean growth parameters but ignoring individual variation that is also of ecological and evolutionary significance. Our long-term study of Lake Erie Watersnakes, Nerodia sipedon insularum, provides data sufficient for a detailed analysis of population and individual growth. We describe population mean growth separately for males and females based on size of known age individuals (847 captures of 769 males, 748 captures of 684 females) and annual growth increments of individuals of unknown age (1,152 males, 730 females). We characterize individual variation in asymptotic size based on repeated measurements of 69 males and 71 females that were each captured in five to nine different years. The most striking result of our analyses is that asymptotic size varies dramatically among individuals, ranging from 631–820 mm snout-vent length in males and from 835–1125 mm in females. Because female fecundity increases with increasing body size, we explore the impact of individual variation in asymptotic size on lifetime reproductive success using a range of realistic estimates of annual survival. When all females commence reproduction at the same age, lifetime reproductive success is greatest for females with greater asymptotic size regardless of annual survival. But when reproduction is delayed in females with greater asymptotic size, lifetime reproductive success is greatest for females with lower asymptotic size when annual survival is low. Possible causes of individual variation in asymptotic size, including individual- and cohort-specific variation in size at birth and early growth, warrant further investigation. PMID

  15. Size Matters: Individual Variation in Ectotherm Growth and Asymptotic Size.

    PubMed

    King, Richard B; Stanford, Kristin M; Jones, Peter C; Bekker, Kent

    2016-01-01

    Body size, and, by extension, growth has impacts on physiology, survival, attainment of sexual maturity, fecundity, generation time, and population dynamics, especially in ectotherm animals that often exhibit extensive growth following attainment of sexual maturity. Frequently, growth is analyzed at the population level, providing useful population mean growth parameters but ignoring individual variation that is also of ecological and evolutionary significance. Our long-term study of Lake Erie Watersnakes, Nerodia sipedon insularum, provides data sufficient for a detailed analysis of population and individual growth. We describe population mean growth separately for males and females based on size of known age individuals (847 captures of 769 males, 748 captures of 684 females) and annual growth increments of individuals of unknown age (1,152 males, 730 females). We characterize individual variation in asymptotic size based on repeated measurements of 69 males and 71 females that were each captured in five to nine different years. The most striking result of our analyses is that asymptotic size varies dramatically among individuals, ranging from 631-820 mm snout-vent length in males and from 835-1125 mm in females. Because female fecundity increases with increasing body size, we explore the impact of individual variation in asymptotic size on lifetime reproductive success using a range of realistic estimates of annual survival. When all females commence reproduction at the same age, lifetime reproductive success is greatest for females with greater asymptotic size regardless of annual survival. But when reproduction is delayed in females with greater asymptotic size, lifetime reproductive success is greatest for females with lower asymptotic size when annual survival is low. Possible causes of individual variation in asymptotic size, including individual- and cohort-specific variation in size at birth and early growth, warrant further investigation.

  16. Size Effect in Continuum Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wei-Yang; James W. Foulk; Huestis, Edwin M.; Connelly, Kevin; Song, Bo; Yang, Nancy Y. C.

    2008-09-01

    The mechanical properties of some materials (Cu, Ni, Ag, etc.) have been shown to develop strong dependence on the geometric dimensions, resulting in a size effect. Several theories have been proposed to model size effects, but have been based on very few experiments conducted at appropriate scales. Some experimental results implied that size effects are caused by increasing strain gradients and have been used to confirm many strain gradient theories. On the other hand, some recent experiments show that a size effect exists in the absence of strain gradients. This report describes a brief analytical and experimental study trying to clarify the material and experimental issues surrounding the most influential size-effect experiments by Fleck et al (1994). This effort is to understand size effects intended to further develop predictive models.

  17. Size sensors in bacteria, cell cycle control, and size control.

    PubMed

    Robert, Lydia

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria proliferate by repetitive cycles of cellular growth and division. The progression into the cell cycle is admitted to be under the control of cell size. However, the molecular basis of this regulation is still unclear. Here I will discuss which mechanisms could allow coupling growth and division by sensing size and transmitting this information to the division machinery. Size sensors could act at different stages of the cell cycle. During septum formation, mechanisms controlling the formation of the Z ring, such as MinCD inhibition or Nucleoid Occlusion (NO) could participate in the size-dependence of the division process. In addition or alternatively, the coupling of growth and division may occur indirectly through the control of DNA replication initiation. The relative importance of these different size-sensing mechanisms could depend on the environmental and genetic context. The recent demonstration of an incremental strategy of size control in bacteria, suggests that DnaA-dependent control of replication initiation could be the major size control mechanism limiting cell size variation.

  18. Size sensors in bacteria, cell cycle control, and size control

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Lydia

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria proliferate by repetitive cycles of cellular growth and division. The progression into the cell cycle is admitted to be under the control of cell size. However, the molecular basis of this regulation is still unclear. Here I will discuss which mechanisms could allow coupling growth and division by sensing size and transmitting this information to the division machinery. Size sensors could act at different stages of the cell cycle. During septum formation, mechanisms controlling the formation of the Z ring, such as MinCD inhibition or Nucleoid Occlusion (NO) could participate in the size-dependence of the division process. In addition or alternatively, the coupling of growth and division may occur indirectly through the control of DNA replication initiation. The relative importance of these different size-sensing mechanisms could depend on the environmental and genetic context. The recent demonstration of an incremental strategy of size control in bacteria, suggests that DnaA-dependent control of replication initiation could be the major size control mechanism limiting cell size variation. PMID:26074903

  19. Effective Sizes for Subdivided Populations

    PubMed Central

    Chesser, R. K.; Rhodes-Jr., O. E.; Sugg, D. W.; Schnabel, A.

    1993-01-01

    Many derivations of effective population sizes have been suggested in the literature; however, few account for the breeding structure and none can readily be expanded to subdivided populations. Breeding structures influence gene correlations through their effects on the number of breeding individuals of each sex, the mean number of progeny per female, and the variance in the number of progeny produced by males and females. Additionally, hierarchical structuring in a population is determined by the number of breeding groups and the migration rates of males and females among such groups. This study derives analytical solutions for effective sizes that can be applied to subdivided populations. Parameters that encapsulate breeding structure and subdivision are utilized to derive the traditional inbreeding and variance effective sizes. Also, it is shown that effective sizes can be determined for any hierarchical level of population structure for which gene correlations can accrue. Derivations of effective sizes for the accumulation of gene correlations within breeding groups (coancestral effective size) and among breeding groups (intergroup effective size) are given. The results converge to traditional, single population measures when similar assumptions are applied. In particular, inbreeding and intergroup effective sizes are shown to be special cases of the coancestral effective size, and intergroup and variance effective sizes will be equal if the population census remains constant. Instantaneous solutions for effective sizes, at any time after gene correlation begins to accrue, are given in terms of traditional F statistics or transition equations. All effective sizes are shown to converge upon a common asymptotic value when breeding tactics and migration rates are constant. The asymptotic effective size can be expressed in terms of the fixation indices and the number of breeding groups; however, the rate of approach to the asymptote is dependent upon dispersal

  20. Radiation therapy treatment of Stage I and II extranodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the head and neck. [Efficacy and complications

    SciTech Connect

    Mill, W.B.; Lee, F.A.; Franssila, K.O.

    1980-02-15

    We have reviewed the records of 76 patients with Stage I or II extranodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma who were referred to the Division of Radiation Oncology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, during the years 1964 through 1974. The histologic slides were reviewed in the 67 cases in which they were available. Forty-three percent of Ann Arbor Stage I and II patients relapsed after primary radiation treatment. Seventy-three percent of these failed in sites distant from the irradiated volume. Failures in the treated volume were infrequent (7%) except in those patients presenting with primary lesions of the brain (4/5). Those patients presenting with lesions of Waldeyer's ring experienced a decrease in survival with increasing tumor size. Because of the high rate of failure in distant sites with tumors in the lingual and palatine tonsils, we are recommending the study of adjuvant chemotherapy in these cases, after primary radiation treatment.

  1. Sample Size for Correlation Estimates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    graphs, and computer programs are developed to find the sample number needed for a desired confidence interval size. Nonparametric measures of...correlation (Spearman’s ra and Kendall’s tau) are also examined for appropriate sample numbers when a specific confidence interval size desired.

  2. My Child Has Tonsillitis. Will He Need to Have His Tonsils Removed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... any of the following: Breathing stops for a short period of time at night during snoring or loud breathing (this is called "sleep apnea"). Choking or gasping during sleep. Difficulty swallowing, ...

  3. Cell Size Regulation in Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amir, Ariel

    2014-05-01

    Various bacteria such as the canonical gram negative Escherichia coli or the well-studied gram positive Bacillus subtilis divide symmetrically after they approximately double their volume. Their size at division is not constant, but is typically distributed over a narrow range. Here, we propose an analytically tractable model for cell size control, and calculate the cell size and interdivision time distributions, as well as the correlations between these variables. We suggest ways of extracting the model parameters from experimental data, and show that existing data for E. coli supports partial size control, and a particular explanation: a cell attempts to add a constant volume from the time of initiation of DNA replication to the next initiation event. This hypothesis accounts for the experimentally observed correlations between mother and daughter cells as well as the exponential dependence of size on growth rate.

  4. Container size influences snack food intake independently of portion size.

    PubMed

    Marchiori, David; Corneille, Olivier; Klein, Olivier

    2012-06-01

    While larger containers have been found to increase food intake, it is unclear whether this effect is driven by container size, portion size, or their combination, as these variables are usually confounded. The study was advertised as examining the effects of snack food consumption on information processing and participants were served M&M's for free consumption in individual cubicles while watching a TV show. Participants were served (1) a medium portion of M&M's in a small (n=30) or (2) in a large container (n=29), or (3) a large portion in a large container (n=29). The larger container increased intake by 129% (199 kcal) despite holding portion size constant, while controlling for different confounding variables. This research suggests that larger containers stimulate food intake over and above their impact on portion size.

  5. Biological motion distorts size perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veto, Peter; Einhäuser, Wolfgang; Troje, Nikolaus F.

    2017-02-01

    Visual illusions explore the limits of sensory processing and provide an ideal testbed to study perception. Size illusions – stimuli whose size is consistently misperceived – do not only result from sensory cues, but can also be induced by cognitive factors, such as social status. Here we investigate, whether the ecological relevance of biological motion can also distort perceived size. We asked observers to judge the size of point-light walkers (PLWs), configurations of dots whose movements induce the perception of human movement, and visually matched control stimuli (inverted PLWs). We find that upright PLWs are consistently judged as larger than inverted PLWs, while static point-light figures do not elicit the same effect. We also show the phenomenon using an indirect paradigm: observers judged the relative size of a disc that followed an inverted PLW larger than a disc following an upright PLW. We interpret this as a contrast effect: The upright PLW is perceived larger and thus the subsequent disc is judged smaller. Together, these results demonstrate that ecologically relevant biological-motion stimuli are perceived larger than visually matched control stimuli. Our findings present a novel case of illusory size perception, where ecological importance leads to a distorted perception of size.

  6. Cell Size Control in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Chien, An-Chun; Hill, Norbert S.; Levin, Petra Anne

    2012-01-01

    Like eukaryotes, bacteria must coordinate division with growth to ensure cells are the appropriate size for a given environmental condition or developmental fate. As single-celled organisms, nutrient availability is one of the strongest influences on bacterial cell size. Classic physiological experiments conducted over four decades ago first demonstrated that cell size is directly correlated with nutrient source and growth rate in the Gram-negative bacterium Salmonella typhimurium. This observation subsequently served as the basis for studies revealing a role for cell size in cell cycle progression in a closely related organism, Escherichia coli. More recently, the development of powerful genetic, molecular, and imaging tools has allowed us to identify and characterize the nutrient-dependent pathway responsible for coordinating cell division and cell size with growth rate in the Gram-positive model organism B. subtilis. Here, we discuss the role of cell size in bacterial growth and development and propose a broadly applicable model for cell size control in this important and highly divergent domain of life. PMID:22575476

  7. Biological motion distorts size perception

    PubMed Central

    Veto, Peter; Einhäuser, Wolfgang; Troje, Nikolaus F.

    2017-01-01

    Visual illusions explore the limits of sensory processing and provide an ideal testbed to study perception. Size illusions – stimuli whose size is consistently misperceived – do not only result from sensory cues, but can also be induced by cognitive factors, such as social status. Here we investigate, whether the ecological relevance of biological motion can also distort perceived size. We asked observers to judge the size of point-light walkers (PLWs), configurations of dots whose movements induce the perception of human movement, and visually matched control stimuli (inverted PLWs). We find that upright PLWs are consistently judged as larger than inverted PLWs, while static point-light figures do not elicit the same effect. We also show the phenomenon using an indirect paradigm: observers judged the relative size of a disc that followed an inverted PLW larger than a disc following an upright PLW. We interpret this as a contrast effect: The upright PLW is perceived larger and thus the subsequent disc is judged smaller. Together, these results demonstrate that ecologically relevant biological-motion stimuli are perceived larger than visually matched control stimuli. Our findings present a novel case of illusory size perception, where ecological importance leads to a distorted perception of size. PMID:28205639

  8. Numerosity perception after size adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Eckart; Fink, Gereon R.

    2016-01-01

    While some researchers propose the existence of a special numerosity sense, others challenge this view and argue that numerosity is derived from low-level features as density information. Here, we used size adaptation to manipulate the apparent area size of an object set without changing its physical density. After size adaptation, two probe patches were shown, each of which contained a specific numerosity of dots. Subjects were required to report, which probe patch contained more dots. Numerosity perception was compared between conditions where probe patches were adapted to appear smaller or larger. Size adaptation affected numerosity perception in a logarithmic fashion, increasing with the numerosity in the probe patch. No changes in density perception were found after size adaptation. Data suggest that size and density information play only a minor role in the estimation of low numerosities. In stark contrast, high numerosities strongly depend on size and density information. The data reinforce recent claims of separate mechanism for the perception of low and high numerosities. PMID:27650296

  9. Nanofluidic Size-Exclusion Chromatograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, Sabrina; Svehla, Danielle; Grunthaner, Frank; Feldman, Jason; Shakkottai, P.

    2004-01-01

    Efforts are under way to develop a nanofluidic size-exclusion chromatograph (SEC), which would be a compact, robust, lightweight instrument for separating molecules of interest according to their sizes and measuring their relative abundances in small samples. About as large as a deck of playing cards, the nanofluidic SEC would serve, in effect, as a laboratory on a chip that would perform the functions of a much larger, conventional, bench-top SEC and ancillary equipment, while consuming much less power and much smaller quantities of reagent and sample materials. Its compactness and low power demand would render it attractive for field applications in which, typically, it would be used to identify and quantitate a broad range of polar and nonpolar organic compounds in soil, ice, and water samples. Size-exclusion chromatography is a special case of high-performance liquid chromatography. In a conventional SEC, a sample plug is driven by pressure along a column packed with silica or polymer beads that contain uniform nanopores. The interstices between, and the pores in, the beads collectively constitute a size-exclusion network. Molecules follow different paths through the size-exclusion network, such that characteristic elution times can be related to sizes of molecules: basically, smaller molecules reach the downstream end of the column after the larger ones do because the smaller ones enter minor pores and stay there for a while, whereas the larger ones do not enter the pores. The volume accessible to molecules gradually diminishes as their size increases. All molecules bigger than a pore size elute together. For most substances, the elution times and sizes of molecules can be correlated directly with molecular weights. Hence, by measuring the flux of molecules arriving at the downstream end as a function of time, one can obtain a liquid mass spectrum for the molecules present in a sample over a broad range of molecular weights.

  10. Size Bias in Galaxy Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Fabian; Rozo, Eduardo; Dodelson, Scott; Hui, Lam; Sheldon, Erin

    2009-07-01

    Only certain galaxies are included in surveys: those bright and large enough to be detectable as extended sources. Because gravitational lensing can make galaxies appear both brighter and larger, the presence of foreground inhomogeneities can scatter galaxies across not only magnitude cuts but also size cuts, changing the statistical properties of the resulting catalog. Here we explore this size bias and how it combines with magnification bias to affect galaxy statistics. We demonstrate that photometric galaxy samples from current and upcoming surveys can be even more affected by size bias than by magnification bias.

  11. Cavitation erosion size scale effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, P. V.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    Size scaling in cavitation erosion is a major problem confronting the design engineers of modern high speed machinery. An overview and erosion data analysis presented in this paper indicate that the size scale exponent n in the erosion rate relationship as a function of the size or diameter can vary from 1.7 to 4.9 depending on the type of device used. There is, however, a general agreement as to the values of n if the correlations are made with constant cavitation number.

  12. Method for sizing hollow microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Farnum, E.H.; Fries, R.J.

    1975-10-29

    Hollow Microspheres may be effectively sized by placing them beneath a screen stack completely immersed in an ultrasonic bath containing a liquid having a density at which the microspheres float and ultrasonically agitating the bath.

  13. Computer sizing of fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coen, P. G.; Foss, W. E., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The computer sizing technique has been applied to a number of military mission profiles. Performance data can be determined for all segments of the selected profile, which typically include takeoff, climb, cruise, loiter, reserve and landing segments. Options are available for detailed calculation of combat performance and energy-maneuverability characteristics. Configuration changes, such as external fuel tank drop and weapon expenditure, can be included in the mission. In the sizing mode, aircraft gross weight, wing loading, and thrust-to-weight ratio are varied automatically to determine which combinations meet the design mission radius. The resulting performance data can be used to create a thumbprint plot. This plot is useful in determining the configuration size that best satisfies the mission and performance requirements. The sizing mode can also be used to perform parametric studies such as sensitivity of gross weight to alternate design conditions.

  14. Computer sizing of fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coen, P. G.; Foss, W. E., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The computer sizing technique has been applied to a number of military mission profiles. Performance data can be determined for all segments of the selected profile, which typically include takeoff, climb, cruise, loiter, reserve and landing segments. Options are available for detailed calculation of combat performance and energy-maneuverability characteristics. Configuration changes, such as external fuel tank drop and weapon expenditure, can be included in the mission. In the sizing mode, aircraft gross weight, wing loading, and thrust-to-weight ratio are varied automatically to determine which combinations meet the design mission radius. The resulting performance data can be used to create a thumbprint plot. This plot is useful in determining the configuration size that best satisfies the mission and performance requirements. The sizing mode can also be used to perform parametric studies such as sensitivity of gross weight to alternate design conditions.

  15. Centaur size distribution with DECam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes, Cesar; Trilling, David E.; Schlichting, Hilke

    2014-11-01

    We present the results of the 2014 centaur search campaign on the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) in Tololo, Chile. This is the largest debiased Centaur survey to date, measuring for the first time the size distribution of small Centaurs (1-10km) and the first time the sizes of planetesimals from which the entire Solar System formed are directly detected.The theoretical model for the coagulation and collisional evolution of the outer solar system proposed in Schlichting et al. 2013 predicts a steep rise in the size distribution of TNOs smaller than 10km. These objects are below the detection limit of current TNO surveys but feasible for the Centaur population. By constraining the number of Centaurs and this feature in their size distribution we can confirm the collisional evolution of the Solar System and estimate the rate at which material is being transferred from the outer to the inner Solar System. If the shallow power law behavior from the TNO size distribution at ~40km can be extrapolated to 1km, the size of the Jupiter Family of Comets (JFC), there would not be enough small TNOs to supply the JFC population (Volk & Malhotra, 2008), debunking the link between TNOs and JFCs.We also obtain the colors of small Centaurs and TNOs, providing a signature of collisional evolution by measuring if there is in fact a relationship between color and size. If objects smaller than the break in the TNO size distribution are being ground down by collisions then their surfaces should be fresh, and then appear bluer in the optical than larger TNOs that are not experiencing collisions.

  16. Portable Slot-Sizing Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuver, Nelson T.

    1987-01-01

    Portable milling tool consisting of air-motor-driven cutter held in adjustable moving slide made possible local removal of chromium plating in close-tolerance, onsite remachining and sizing of half-hole slots on longeron bridges. Made from commercially available parts, including air motor capable of variable speeds up to 900 rpm, ball end mill, revolving handle, two miter gears, and ball slide. Adaptation of portable sizing tool useful for field modification of such large equipment as trucks, aircraft, and ships.

  17. Sexual size dimorphism in anurans.

    PubMed Central

    Monnet, Jean-Matthieu; Cherry, Michael I

    2002-01-01

    Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the direction and extent of sexual size dimorphism in anurans (in which males are usually smaller than females) as a result of sexual selection. Here, we present an analysis to test the hypothesis that sexual dimorphism in anurans is largely a function of differences between the sexes in life-history strategies. Morphological and demographic data for anurans were collected from the literature, and the mean size and age in each sex were calculated for 51 populations, across 30 species and eight genera. Comparisons across 14 Rana species, eight Bufo species and across the genera showed a highly significant relationship between size dimorphism, measured using the female-male size ratio, and mean female-male age difference. A comparison of a subset of 17 of these species for which phylogenetic information was available, using the method of independent contrasts, yielded a similar result. These results indicate that most of the variation in size dimorphism in the anura can be explained in terms of differences in the age structure between the sexes in breeding populations. If sexual selection has an effect on size dimorphism in anurans, it is likely to be only a secondary one. PMID:12495496

  18. Experimental determination of size distributions: analyzing proper sample sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffo, A.; Alopaeus, V.

    2016-04-01

    The measurement of various particle size distributions is a crucial aspect for many applications in the process industry. Size distribution is often related to the final product quality, as in crystallization or polymerization. In other cases it is related to the correct evaluation of heat and mass transfer, as well as reaction rates, depending on the interfacial area between the different phases or to the assessment of yield stresses of polycrystalline metals/alloys samples. The experimental determination of such distributions often involves laborious sampling procedures and the statistical significance of the outcome is rarely investigated. In this work, we propose a novel rigorous tool, based on inferential statistics, to determine the number of samples needed to obtain reliable measurements of size distribution, according to specific requirements defined a priori. Such methodology can be adopted regardless of the measurement technique used.

  19. Cyclopamine and jervine in embryonic rat tongue cultures demonstrate a role for Shh signaling in taste papilla development and patterning: fungiform papillae double in number and form in novel locations in dorsal lingual epithelium.

    PubMed

    Mistretta, Charlotte M; Liu, Hong-Xiang; Gaffield, William; MacCallum, Donald K

    2003-02-01

    furrow, nor was development of the single circumvallate papilla altered. The results demonstrate a prominent role for Shh in fungiform papilla induction and patterning and indicate differences in morphogenetic control of fungiform and circumvallate papilla development and numbers. Furthermore, a previously unknown, broad competence of dorsal lingual epithelium to form fungiform papillae on both anterior and posterior oral tongue is revealed.

  20. Modeling Size Polydisperse Granular Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lueptow, Richard M.; Schlick, Conor P.; Isner, Austin B.; Umbanhowar, Paul B.; Ottino, Julio M.

    2014-11-01

    Modeling size segregation of granular materials has important applications in many industrial processes and geophysical phenomena. We have developed a continuum model for granular multi- and polydisperse size segregation based on flow kinematics, which we obtain from discrete element method (DEM) simulations. The segregation depends on dimensionless control parameters that are functions of flow rate, particle sizes, collisional diffusion coefficient, shear rate, and flowing layer depth. To test the theoretical approach, we model segregation in tri-disperse quasi-2D heap flow and log-normally distributed polydisperse quasi-2D chute flow. In both cases, the segregated particle size distributions match results from full-scale DEM simulations and experiments. While the theory was applied to size segregation in steady quasi-2D flows here, the approach can be readily generalized to include additional drivers of segregation such as density and shape as well as other geometries where the flow field can be characterized including rotating tumbler flow and three-dimensional bounded heap flow. Funded by The Dow Chemical Company and NSF Grant CMMI-1000469.

  1. Genome size variation in Begonia.

    PubMed

    Dewitte, Angelo; Leus, Leen; Eeckhaut, Tom; Vanstechelman, Ives; Van Huylenbroeck, Johan; Van Bockstaele, Erik

    2009-10-01

    The genome sizes of a Begonia collection comprising 37 species and 23 hybrids of African, Asiatic, Middle American, and South American origin were screened using flow cytometry. Within the collection, 1C values varied between 0.23 and 1.46 pg DNA. Genome sizes were, in most cases, not positively correlated with chromosome number, but with pollen size. A 12-fold difference in mean chromosome size was found between the genotypes with the largest and smallest chromosomes. In general, chromosomes from South American genotypes were smaller than chromosomes of African, Asian, or Middle American genotypes, except for B. boliviensis and B. pearcei. Cytological chromosome studies in different genotypes showed variable chromosome numbers, length, width, and total chromosome volume, which confirmed the diversity in genome size. Large secondary constrictions were present in several investigated genotypes. These data show that chromosome number and structure exhibit a great deal of variation within the genus Begonia, and likely help to explain the large number of taxa found within the genus.

  2. Body Size in Mammalian Paleobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damuth, John; MacFadden, Bruce J.

    1990-11-01

    This valuable collection of essays presents and evaluates techniques of body-mass estimation and reviews current and potential applications of body-size estimates in paleobiology. Papers discuss explicitly the errors and biases of various regression techniques and predictor variables, and the identification of functionally similar groups of species for improving the accuracy of estimates. At the same time other chapters review and discuss the physiological, ecological, and behavioral correlates of body size in extant mammals; the significance of body-mass distributions in mammalian faunas; and the ecology and evolution of body size in particular paleofaunas. Coverage is particularly detailed for carnivores, primates, and ungulates, but information is also presented on marsupials, rodents, and proboscideans.

  3. Size effect in thermoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Jun; Liu, Zihang; Ren, Zhifeng

    2016-12-01

    Thermoelectric applications have attracted increasing interest recently due to its capability of converting waste heat into electricity without hazardous emissions. Materials with enhanced thermoelectric performance have been reported in recent two decades. The revival of research for thermoelectric materials began in early 1990s when the size effect is considered. Low-dimensional materials with exceptionally high thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) have been presented, which broke the limit of ZT around unity. The idea of size effect in thermoelectric materials even inspired the later nanostructuring and band engineering strategies, which effectively enhanced the thermoelectric performance of bulk materials. In this overview, the size effect in low-dimensional thermoelectric materials is reviewed. We first discuss the quantum confinement effect on carriers, including the enhancement of electronic density of states, semimetal to semiconductor transition and carrier pocket engineering. Then, the effect of assumptions on theoretical calculations is presented. Finally, the effect of phonon confinement and interface scattering on lattice thermal conductivity is discussed.

  4. [Lingual involvement in progressive systemic sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Pila Pérez, R; Pila Peláez, R; Pila Peláez, M; Guerra Rodríguez, C; Rojas Casanova, C

    2000-01-01

    A case of a 40 year old female patient who began to present alterations in the tongue and who was diagnosed of Progressive Sclerosis of that organ is presented. The manifestation and diagnostic tools used in this case, as well as the treatment use, is given. The rareness of this disease, which is possible in systemic diseases, stands out.

  5. [Progressive anarthria: one case without lingual apraxia].

    PubMed

    Infante, J; Sánchez Guerra, M; Polo, J M; Carril, J M; Berciano, J; Oterino, A

    2000-05-01

    Progressive anarthria is a focal cortical degenerative disorder characterized by a profound, progressive alteration in speech without impairment in other cognitive domains. The first symptoms consist of an alteration in the articulation of speech producing telegraphic speech. The disorder invariably progress towards anarthria by deprogramming of the phonation and orolingual movements (bucophonetic apraxia). This type of apraxia is usually associated with orolinguofacial apraxia and it has been anatomofunctionally correlated with frontal opercular involvement of left predominance. The patient presented as progressive anarthria in the absence of manifest orolingual apraxia associated with a predominance of cortical atrophy in the right frontal operculum. This semiological dissociation emphasizes the importance of bucophonatory apraxia in the pathophysiology of progressive anarthria.

  6. Inadvertent tooth movement with fixed lingual retainers.

    PubMed

    Shaughnessy, Timothy G; Proffit, William R; Samara, Said A

    2016-02-01

    Fixed retainers are effective in maintaining the alignment of the anterior teeth more than 90% of the time, but they can produce inadvertent tooth movement that in the most severe instances requires orthodontic retreatment managed with a periodontist. This is different from relapse into crowding when a fixed retainer is lost. These problems arise when the retainer breaks but remains bonded to some or all teeth, or when an intact retainer is distorted by function or was not passive when bonded. In both instances, torque of the affected teeth is the predominant outcome. A fixed retainer made with dead soft wire is the least likely to create torque problems but is the most likely to break. Highly flexible twist wires bonded to all the teeth appear to be the most likely to produce inadvertent tooth movement, but this also can occur with stiffer wires bonded only to the canines. Orthodontists, general dentists, and patients should be aware of possible problems with fixed retainers, especially those with all teeth bonded, because the patient might not notice partial debonding. Regular observations of patients wearing fixed retainers by orthodontists in the short term and family dentists in the long term are needed.

  7. From Iconic to Lingual: Interpreting Visual Statements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtiss, Deborah

    In this age of proliferating visual communications, there is a permissiveness in subject matter, content, and meaning that is exhilarating, yet overwhelming to interpret in a meaningful or consensual way. By recognizing visual statements, whether a piece of sculpture, an advertisement, a video, or a building, as communication, one can approach…

  8. Molecular Size and Raoult's Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovac, Jeffrey

    1985-01-01

    The concept of an ideal solution is ordinarily introduced in freshman chemistry by means of Raoult's Law, which states that the vapor pressure of a volatile component of a solution is proportional to its mole fraction. The relationship of this law to molecular size is discussed. (JN)

  9. Center Size and Center Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helburn, Suzanne; Morris, John

    1996-01-01

    Examined the impact of child care center size on cost, quality, and profits per child. Examined centers ranging from 40 to 80 children and found total cost and revenue per child were similar for small, medium, and large centers. Found profits per child were highest in large centers and that there was no relationship between center quality and…

  10. Variability in human body size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Annis, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    The range of variability found among homogeneous groups is described and illustrated. Those trends that show significantly marked differences between sexes and among a number of racial/ethnic groups are also presented. Causes of human-body size variability discussed include genetic endowment, aging, nutrition, protective garments, and occupation. The information is presented to aid design engineers of space flight hardware and equipment.

  11. Reference Works in Reduced Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennessey, David

    1977-01-01

    Lower cost and less shelf space requirements have made major reference works in miniaturized print editions attractive to small libraries. The major disadvantage is the necessity of a magnifying glass for reading entries. A bibliography of reduced-size editions is included. (JAB)

  12. Computer program determines inventory size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaspar, H.

    1966-01-01

    FORTRAN 4 computer program calculates optimum size of a small inventory of relatively complex or expensive items. This program can be used in situations where the initial cost of purchase is large or when there is a need for a balanced inventory on a short production run.

  13. Samurai sword sets spindle size.

    PubMed

    Reber, Simone; Hyman, Anthony A

    2011-12-09

    Although the parts list is nearly complete for many cellular structures, mechanisms that control their size remain poorly understood. Loughlin and colleagues now show that phosphorylation of a single residue of katanin, a microtubule-severing protein, largely accounts for the difference in spindle length between two closely related frogs.

  14. Shape and size discrimination compared.

    PubMed

    Nachmias, Jacob

    2011-02-23

    Observers presented with pairs of figures differing in area (SIZE) or aspect ratio (SHAPE) spontaneously make use of both height and width differences. whether or not they are forced to do so by between-interval jittering or even instructed to do so. SHAPE discrimination is considerably better than SIZE discrimination. The superiority of SHAPE discrimination is probably due to partial correlation between the encoding noise of height and width of a figure. Discrimination of height differences is seemingly increased (decreased) by negatively (positively) correlated width differences, relative to leaving width unchanged. This is true whether the different types of trials are presented in separate blocks or intermixed. Perhaps SIZE and SHAPE comparisons are always made and their decision variables are optimally combined. The difference between SIZE and SHAPE discrimination is reduced, if not reversed, when figures are presented simultaneously rather than successively. This interaction between type of task and mode of presentation, may be due to the increased amount of correlation between test and standard figures of the encoding noise common to the two dimensions of each figure.

  15. Mesh Size Control of Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitenis, Angela; Uruena, Juan Manuel; Schulze, Kyle D.; Cooper, Andrew C.; Angelini, Thomas E.; Sawyer, W. Gregory

    Soft, permeable sliding interfaces in aqueous environments are ubiquitous in nature but their ability to maintain high lubricity in a poor lubricant (water) has not been well understood. Hydrogels are excellent materials for fundamental soft matter and biotribology studies due to their high water content. While mesh size controls the material and transport properties of a hydrogel, its effects on friction were only recently explored. Polyacrylamide hydrogels slid in a Gemini (self-mated) interface produced low friction under low speeds, low pressures, macroscopic contact areas, and room temperature aqueous environments. The friction coefficients at these interfaces are lowest at low speeds and are speed-independent. This behavior is due to thermal fluctuations at the interface separating the surfaces, with water shearing in this region being the main source of dissipation. We found that mesh size had an inverse correlation with friction. We further investigated a transition from this behavior at higher speeds, and found that the transition speed correlated with the mesh size and relaxation time of the polymer network. Very soft and correspondingly large mesh size Gemini hydrogels show superlubricity under specific conditions with friction being less than 0.005.

  16. Automated measurement of diatom size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spaulding, Sarah A.; Jewson, David H.; Bixby, Rebecca J.; Nelson, Harry; McKnight, Diane M.

    2012-01-01

    Size analysis of diatom populations has not been widely considered, but it is a potentially powerful tool for understanding diatom life histories, population dynamics, and phylogenetic relationships. However, measuring cell dimensions on a light microscope is a time-consuming process. An alternative technique has been developed using digital flow cytometry on a FlowCAM® (Fluid Imaging Technologies) to capture hundreds, or even thousands, of images of a chosen taxon from a single sample in a matter of minutes. Up to 30 morphological measures may be quantified through post-processing of the high resolution images. We evaluated FlowCAM size measurements, comparing them against measurements from a light microscope. We found good agreement between measurement of apical cell length in species with elongated, straight valves, including small Achnanthidium minutissimum (11-21 µm) and largeDidymosphenia geminata (87–137 µm) forms. However, a taxon with curved cells, Hannaea baicalensis (37–96 µm), showed differences of ~ 4 µm between the two methods. Discrepancies appear to be influenced by the choice of feret or geodesic measurement for asymmetric cells. We describe the operating conditions necessary for analysis of size distributions and present suggestions for optimal instrument conditions for size analysis of diatom samples using the FlowCAM. The increased speed of data acquisition through use of imaging flow cytometers like the FlowCAM is an essential step for advancing studies of diatom populations.

  17. School Size and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggen, Vicki

    2013-01-01

    This study examined whether a relationship between high school size and student achievement exists in Illinois public high schools in reading and math, as measured by the Prairie State Achievement Exam (PSAE), which is administered to all Illinois 11th-grade students. This study also examined whether the factors of socioeconomic status, English…

  18. 7 CFR 51.1216 - Size requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Peaches Size § 51.1216 Size requirements. (a) The numerical count or a count-size based on equivalent tray pack size designations or the minimum diameter of the peaches packed in a... count, of peaches in any lot may be below the specified minimum size and not more than 15 percent may...

  19. 7 CFR 51.1216 - Size requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Peaches Size § 51.1216 Size requirements. (a) The numerical count or a count-size based on equivalent tray pack size designations or the minimum diameter of the peaches packed in a... count, of peaches in any lot may be below the specified minimum size and not more than 15 percent may...

  20. 7 CFR 51.1216 - Size requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Peaches Size § 51.1216 Size requirements. (a) The numerical count or a count-size based on equivalent tray pack size designations or the minimum diameter of the peaches packed in a... count, of peaches in any lot may be below the specified minimum size and not more than 15 percent may...