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Sample records for linker substructure common

  1. Interactions of linker proteins with the phycobiliproteins in the phycobilisome substructures of Gloeobacter violaceus.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Pérez-Gómez, Bertha; Krogmann, David W; Gutiérrez-Cirlos, Emma Berta; Gómez-Lojero, Carlos

    2010-12-01

    Gloeobacter violaceus PCC 7421 is a unicellular oxygenic photosynthetic organism, which precedes the diversification of cyanobacteria in the phylogenetic tree. It is the only cyanobacterium that does not contain internal membranes. The unique structure of the rods of the phycobilisome (PBS), grouped as one bundle of six parallel rods, distinguishes G. violaceus from the other PBS-containing cyanobacteria. It has been proposed that unique multidomain rod-linkers are responsible for this peculiarly organized shape. However, the localization of the multidomain linkers Glr1262 and Glr2806 in the PBS-rods remains controversial (Koyama et al. 2006, FEBS Lett 580:3457-3461; Krogmann et al. 2007, Photosynth Res 93:27-43). To further increase our understanding of the structure of the G. violaceus PBS, the identification of the proteins present in fractions obtained from sucrose gradient centrifugation and from native electrophoresis of partially dissociated PBS was conducted. The identification of the proteins, after electrophoresis, was done by spectrophotometry and mass spectrometry. The results support the localization of the multidomain linkers as previously proposed by us. The Glr1262 (92 kDa) linker protein was found to be the rod-core linker L(RC) (92), and Glr2806 (81 kDa), a special rod linker L(R) (81) that joins six disks of hexameric PC. Consequently, we propose to designate glr1262 as gene cpcGm (encoding L(RC) (92)) and glr2806 as gene cpcJm (encoding L(R) (81)). We also propose that the cpeC (glr1263) gene encoding L(R) (31.8) forms the interface that binds PC to PE.

  2. Common substructure in otoacoustic emission spectra of land vertebrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manley, Geoffrey A.; Köppl, Christine; Bergevin, Christopher

    2015-12-01

    In humans, a similar spectral periodicity is found in all otoacoustic emission types and in threshold fine structure. This may reflect travelling wave phase and reflectance from "structural roughness" in the organ of Corti, or entrainment and suppressive interactions between emissions. To further understand these phenomena, we have examined spontaneous otoacoustic emission (SOAE) spectra in 9 lizard species and the barn owl and find a comparable periodicity. Importantly, the frequency spacing between SOAE peaks was independent of the physical spacing and of the frequency space constants in hearing organs. In 9 lizard species, median spectral gaps lay between 219 and 461 Hz, with no correlation to papillar length (0.3 to 2.1 mm). Similarly in much longer organs: In humans (35 mm), SOAE spectral gaps vary up to 220 Hz at 4 kHz; in the barn owl (11 mm), the median SOAE peak spacing was 395Hz. In the barn owl, a very large space constant between 5 and 10 kHz (5 mm/octave) contrasts with stable SOAE spacing between 1 and 11 kHz. Similar SOAE spectral gaps across all species suggests they represent a basic frequency grating revealing local phase-dependent interactions between active hair cells, a feature not determined by macro-structural anatomy. Emission spectral spacing is independent of cochlear length, of the frequency space constant, of the existence of travelling waves or of a tectorial membrane. Our data suggest that there are greater similarities between frequency selectivity reflected at the level of the hair cells' spontaneous mechanical output (OAEs) than there are at the level of the auditory nerve, where macro-structural anatomy links hair-cell activity differentially to the neural output. Apparently, all hair-cell arrays show a similar frequency substructure not directly replicated in neural tuning.

  3. Design of chemical space networks using a Tanimoto similarity variant based upon maximum common substructures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bijun; Vogt, Martin; Maggiora, Gerald M; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2015-10-01

    Chemical space networks (CSNs) have recently been introduced as an alternative to other coordinate-free and coordinate-based chemical space representations. In CSNs, nodes represent compounds and edges pairwise similarity relationships. In addition, nodes are annotated with compound property information such as biological activity. CSNs have been applied to view biologically relevant chemical space in comparison to random chemical space samples and found to display well-resolved topologies at low edge density levels. The way in which molecular similarity relationships are assessed is an important determinant of CSN topology. Previous CSN versions were based on numerical similarity functions or the assessment of substructure-based similarity. Herein, we report a new CSN design that is based upon combined numerical and substructure similarity evaluation. This has been facilitated by calculating numerical similarity values on the basis of maximum common substructures (MCSs) of compounds, leading to the introduction of MCS-based CSNs (MCS-CSNs). This CSN design combines advantages of continuous numerical similarity functions with a robust and chemically intuitive substructure-based assessment. Compared to earlier version of CSNs, MCS-CSNs are characterized by a further improved organization of local compound communities as exemplified by the delineation of drug-like subspaces in regions of biologically relevant chemical space.

  4. O-xylosylation in a recombinant protein is directed at a common motif on glycine-serine linkers.

    PubMed

    Spencer, David; Novarra, Shabazz; Zhu, Liang; Mugabe, Sheila; Thisted, Thomas; Baca, Manuel; Depaz, Roberto; Barton, Christopher

    2013-11-01

    Glycine-serine (GS) linkers are commonly used in recombinant proteins to connect domains. Here, we report the posttranslational O-glycosylation of a GS linker in a novel fusion protein. The structure of the O-glycan moiety is a xylose-based core substituted with hexose and sulfated hexauronic acid residues. The total level of O-xylosylation was approximately 30% in the material expressed in HEK-293 cell lines. There was an approximate 10-fold reduction in O-xylosylation levels when the material was expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cell lines. Similar O-glycan structures have been reported for human urinary thrombomodulin and represent the initial building block for proteoglycans such as chondroitin sulfate and heparin. The sites of attachment, determined by electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry, were localized to serine in the linker regions of the recombinant fusion protein. This attachment could be attributed, in part, to the inherent xylosyltransferase motif present in GS linkers. Elimination of the O-glycan moiety was achieved with modified linkers containing only glycine residues. The aggregation and fragmentation behavior of the GGG construct were comparable to the GSG-linked material during thermal stress. The O-xylosylation reported has implications for the manufacturing consistency of recombinant proteins containing GS linkers. PMID:24105735

  5. Substructuring techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whetstone, W. D.; Jones, C. E.

    1971-01-01

    The substructure function generator program is discussed. Input to this program consists of a definition of a finite element model of a substructure, and specification of the type and number of displacement functions to be generated. Primary output is a substructure data file containing the substructure mass and stiffness matrices expressing kinetic and potential energies as quadratic forms in coefficients of the displacement functions, etc. The substructure synthesis program forms complete system mass, stiffness, and damping matrices, computes system modes and frequencies, and executes transient response calculations. Input to this program consists of the array of substructure data files generated by the function generator program for individual substructures, and data cards defining the position and interconnection of the substructures, damping data, forcing function details, and function control parameters.

  6. The optimization of running time for a maximum common substructure-based algorithm and its application in drug design.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Sheng, Jia; Lv, Dijing; Zhong, Yang; Zhang, Guoqing; Nan, Peng

    2014-02-01

    In the field of drug discovery, it is particularly important to discover bioactive compounds through high-throughput virtual screening. The maximum common substructure-based (MCS) algorithm is a promising method for the virtual screening of drug candidates. However, in practical applications, there is always a trade-off between efficiency and accuracy. In this paper, we optimized this method by running time evaluation using essential drugs defined by WHO and FDA-approved small-molecule drugs. The amount of running time allocated to the MCS-based virtual screening was varied, and statistical analysis was conducted to study the impact of computation running time on the screening results. It was determined that the running time efficiency can be improved without compromising accuracy by setting proper running time thresholds. In addition, the similarity of compound structures and its relevance to biological activity are analyzed quantitatively, which highlight the applicability of the MCS-based methods in predicting functions of small molecules. 15-30s was established as a reasonable range for selecting a candidate running time threshold. The effect of CPU speed is considered and the conclusion is generalized. The potential biological activity of small molecules with unknown functions can be predicted by the MCS-based methods.

  7. Automated design of flexible linkers.

    PubMed

    Manion, Charles; Arlitt, Ryan; Campbell, Matthew I; Tumer, Irem; Stone, Rob; Greaney, P Alex

    2016-03-14

    This paper presents a method for the systematic and automated design of flexible organic linkers for construction of metal organic-frameworks (MOFs) in which flexibility, compliance, or other mechanically exotic properties originate at the linker level rather than from the framework kinematics. Our method couples a graph grammar method for systematically generating linker like molecules with molecular dynamics modeling of linkers' mechanical response. Using this approach we have generated a candidate pool of >59,000 hypothetical linkers. We screen linker candidates according to their mechanical behaviors under large deformation, and extract fragments common to the most performant candidate materials. To demonstrate the general approach to MOF design we apply our system to designing linkers for pressure switching MOFs-MOFs that undergo reversible structural collapse after a stress threshold is exceeded. PMID:26687337

  8. Chapter 6: Energy Storage in Cellulase Linker Peptides?

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, C.; Zhao, X.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter, we discuss the use of molecular dynamics simulations and free-energy calculations to investigate the possible role the linker polypeptide, common to many cellulase enzymes, plays in the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. In particular, we focus on the linker polypeptide from cellobiohydrolase I (CBH I) from Trichoderma reesei, which is one of the most active cellulase enzymes. CBH I is a multi-domain enzyme, consisting of a large catalytic domain containing an active site tunnel and a small cellulose binding module, which are joined together by a 27-amino-acid residue linker peptide. CBH I is believed to hydrolyze cellulose in a 'processive' manner; however, the exact mechanism of the depolymerization of cellulose by CBH I is not fully understood. It has been hypothesized that the flexible interdomain linker mediates a caterpillar-like motion that enables the enzyme to move along the cellodextrin strand. Although the linker polypeptide sequence is known, the spatial conformation adopted by the linker domain and its role in the hydrolysis process, if any, has yet to be determined. The simulation results obtained to date indicate that the CBH I linker's free energy is critically dependent on the existence of the cellulose substrate and the stretching/compression pathway adopted. In the presence of a cellulose surface, simulations suggest that the linker exhibits two stable states, which would support the hypothesis that the linker peptide has the capacity to store energy in a manner similar to a spring and facilitate a caterpillar-like motion.

  9. Are target-family-privileged substructures truly privileged?

    PubMed

    Schnur, Dora M; Hermsmeier, Mark A; Tebben, Andrew J

    2006-03-23

    One of the early and effective approaches to G-coupled protein receptor target family library design was the analysis of a set of ligands for frequently occurring chemical moieties or substructures. Various methods ranging from frameworks analysis to pharmacophores have been employed to find these so-called target-family-privileged substructures. Although the use of these substructures is common practice in combinatorial library design and has produced leads, the methods used for finding them rarely verified their selectivity for the particular target family from which they were derived. The frequency of occurrence among ligands associated with a target receptor family is not a sufficient criterion for those substructures to receive the label of target-family-privileged substructure. This study explores the question of selectivity of ClassPharmer generated fragments for a series of target families: GPCRs, nuclear hormone receptors, serine proteases, protein kinases, and ligand-gated ion channels. In addition, a GPCR focused library and a random set of 10k compounds are examined in terms of their target-family-privileged-substructure composition. The results challenge the combinatorial chemistry concept of target-family-privileged substructures and suggest that many of these fragments may simply be drug-like or attractive for various receptors in accordance with the original definition of privileged substructures.

  10. Current ADC Linker Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Jain, Nareshkumar; Smith, Sean W; Ghone, Sanjeevani; Tomczuk, Bruce

    2015-11-01

    The list of ADCs in the clinic continues to grow, bolstered by the success of first two marketed ADCs: ADCETRIS® and Kadcyla®. Currently, there are 40 ADCs in various phases of clinical development. However, only 34 of these have published their structures. Of the 34 disclosed structures, 24 of them use a linkage to the thiol of cysteines on the monoclonal antibody. The remaining 10 candidates utilize chemistry to surface lysines of the antibody. Due to the inherent heterogeneity of conjugation to the multiple lysines or cysteines found in mAbs, significant research efforts are now being directed toward the production of discrete, homogeneous ADC products, via site-specific conjugation. These site-specific conjugations may involve genetic engineering of the mAb to introduce discrete, available cysteines or non-natural amino acids with an orthogonally-reactive functional group handle such as an aldehyde, ketone, azido, or alkynyl tag. These site-specific approaches not only increase the homogeneity of ADCs but also enable novel bio-orthogonal chemistries that utilize reactive moieties other than thiol or amine. This broadens the diversity of linkers that can be utilized which will lead to better linker design in future generations of ADCs.

  11. Proposed definition of crystal substructure and substructural similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lusann; Dacek, Stephen; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2014-08-01

    There is a clear need for a practical and mathematically rigorous description of local structure in inorganic compounds so that structures and chemistries can be easily compared across large data sets. Here a method for decomposing crystal structures into substructures is given, and a similarity function between those substructures is defined. The similarity function is based on both geometric and chemical similarity. This construction allows for large-scale data mining of substructural properties, and the analysis of substructures and void spaces within crystal structures. The method is validated via the prediction of Li-ion intercalation sites for the oxides. Tested on databases of known Li-ion-containing oxides, the method reproduces all Li-ion sites in an oxide with a maximum of 4 incorrect guesses 80% of the time.

  12. Cleavable linkers in chemical biology.

    PubMed

    Leriche, Geoffray; Chisholm, Louise; Wagner, Alain

    2012-01-15

    Interest in cleavable linkers is growing due to the rapid development and expansion of chemical biology. The chemical constrains imposed by the biological conditions cause significant challenges for organic chemists. In this review we will present an overview of the cleavable linkers used in chemical biology classified according to their cleavage conditions by enzymes, nucleophilic/basic reagents, reducing agents, photo-irradiation, electrophilic/acidic reagents, organometallic and metal reagents, oxidizing reagents.

  13. Cellulase Linkers Are Optimized Based on Domain Type and Function: Insights from Sequence Analysis, Biophysical Measurements, and Molecular Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Sammond, Deanne W.; Payne, Christina M.; Brunecky, Roman; Himmel, Michael E.; Crowley, Michael F.; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2012-01-01

    Cellulase enzymes deconstruct cellulose to glucose, and are often comprised of glycosylated linkers connecting glycoside hydrolases (GHs) to carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs). Although linker modifications can alter cellulase activity, the functional role of linkers beyond domain connectivity remains unknown. Here we investigate cellulase linkers connecting GH Family 6 or 7 catalytic domains to Family 1 or 2 CBMs, from both bacterial and eukaryotic cellulases to identify conserved characteristics potentially related to function. Sequence analysis suggests that the linker lengths between structured domains are optimized based on the GH domain and CBM type, such that linker length may be important for activity. Longer linkers are observed in eukaryotic GH Family 6 cellulases compared to GH Family 7 cellulases. Bacterial GH Family 6 cellulases are found with structured domains in either N to C terminal order, and similar linker lengths suggest there is no effect of domain order on length. O-glycosylation is uniformly distributed across linkers, suggesting that glycans are required along entire linker lengths for proteolysis protection and, as suggested by simulation, for extension. Sequence comparisons show that proline content for bacterial linkers is more than double that observed in eukaryotic linkers, but with fewer putative O-glycan sites, suggesting alternative methods for extension. Conversely, near linker termini where linkers connect to structured domains, O-glycosylation sites are observed less frequently, whereas glycines are more prevalent, suggesting the need for flexibility to achieve proper domain orientations. Putative N-glycosylation sites are quite rare in cellulase linkers, while an N-P motif, which strongly disfavors the attachment of N-glycans, is commonly observed. These results suggest that linkers exhibit features that are likely tailored for optimal function, despite possessing low sequence identity. This study suggests that cellulase

  14. Fatigue of fiberglass beam substructures

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, J.F.; Combs, D.W.; Samborsky, D.D.

    1995-09-01

    Composite material beams representative of wind turbine blade substructure have been designed, fabricated, and tested under constant amplitude flexural fatigue loading. Beam stiffness, strength, and fatigue life are predicted based on detailed finite element analysis and the materials fatigue database developed using standard test coupons and special high frequency minicoupons.Beam results are in good agreement with predictions when premature adhesive and delamination failures are avoided in the load transfer areas. The results show that fiberglass substructures can be designed and fabricated to withstand maximum strain levels on the order of 8,000 microstrain for about 10{sup 6} cycles with proper structural detail design and the use of fatigue resistant laminate constructions. The study also demonstrates that the materials fatigue database and accurate analysis can be used to predict the fatigue life of composite substructures typical of blades.

  15. Signatures of Kinematic Substructure in the Galactic Stellar Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisanti, Mariangela; Spergel, David N.; Madau, Piero

    2015-07-01

    Tidal debris from infalling satellites can leave observable structure in the phase-space distribution of the Galactic halo. Such substructure can be manifest in the spatial and/or velocity distributions of the stars in the halo. This paper focuses on a class of substructure that is purely kinematic in nature, with no accompanying spatial features. To study its properties, we use a simulated stellar halo created by dynamically populating the Via Lactea II high-resolution N-body simulation with stars. A significant fraction of the stars in the inner halo of Via Lactea share a common speed and metallicity, despite the fact that they are spatially diffuse. We argue that this kinematic substructure is a generic feature of tidal debris from older mergers and may explain the detection of radial-velocity substructure in the inner halo made by the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration. The GAIA satellite, which will provide the proper motions of an unprecedented number of stars, should further characterize the kinematic substructure in the inner halo. Our study of the Via Lactea simulation suggests that the stellar halo can be used to map the speed distribution of the local dark matter (DM) halo, which has important consequences for DM direct-detection experiments.

  16. Gene structure and molecular phylogeny of the linker chains from the giant annelid hexagonal bilayer hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Chabasse, Christine; Bailly, Xavier; Sanchez, Sophie; Rousselot, Morgane; Zal, Franck

    2006-09-01

    Giant extracellular hexagonal bilayer hemoglobin (HBL-Hb), found only in annelids, is an approximately 3500-kDa heteropolymeric structure involved in oxygen transport. The HBL-Hbs are comprised of globin and linker chains, the latter being required for the assembly of the quaternary structure. The linker chains, varying in size from 225 to 283 amino acids, have a conserved cysteine-rich domain within their N-terminal moiety that is homologous to the cysteine-rich modules constituting the ligand binding domain of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) protein family found in many metazoans. We have investigated the gene structure of linkers from Arenicola marina, Alvinella pompejana, Nereis diversicolor, Lumbricus terrestris, and Riftia pachyptila. We found, contrary to the results obtained earlier with linker genes from N. diversicolor and L. terrestris, that in all of the foregoing cases, the linker LDL-A module is flanked by two phase 1 introns, as in the human LDLR gene, with two more introns in the 3' side whose positions varied with the species. In addition, we obtained 13 linker cDNAs that have been determined experimentally or found in the EST database LumbriBASE. A molecular phylogenetic analysis of the linker primary sequences demonstrated that they cluster into two distinct families of linker proteins. We propose that the common gene ancestor to annelid linker genes exhibited a four-intron and five-exon structure and gave rise to the two families subsequent to a duplication event. PMID:16838215

  17. Chemical substructure analysis in toxicology

    SciTech Connect

    Beauchamp, R.O. Jr.

    1990-12-31

    A preliminary examination of chemical-substructure analysis (CSA) demonstrates the effective use of the Chemical Abstracts compound connectivity file in conjunction with the bibliographic file for relating chemical structures to biological activity. The importance of considering the role of metabolic intermediates under a variety of conditions is illustrated, suggesting structures that should be examined that may exhibit potential activity. This CSA technique, which utilizes existing large files accessible with online personal computers, is recommended for use as another tool in examining chemicals in drugs. 2 refs., 4 figs.

  18. MASS SUBSTRUCTURE IN ABELL 3128

    SciTech Connect

    McCleary, J.; Dell’Antonio, I.; Huwe, P.

    2015-05-20

    We perform a detailed two-dimensional weak gravitational lensing analysis of the nearby (z = 0.058) galaxy cluster Abell 3128 using deep ugrz imaging from the Dark Energy Camera (DECam). We have designed a pipeline to remove instrumental artifacts from DECam images and stack multiple dithered observations without inducing a spurious ellipticity signal. We develop a new technique to characterize the spatial variation of the point-spread function that enables us to circularize the field to better than 0.5% and thereby extract the intrinsic galaxy ellipticities. By fitting photometric redshifts to sources in the observation, we are able to select a sample of background galaxies for weak-lensing analysis free from low-redshift contaminants. Photometric redshifts are also used to select a high-redshift galaxy subsample with which we successfully isolate the signal from an interloping z = 0.44 cluster. We estimate the total mass of Abell 3128 by fitting the tangential ellipticity of background galaxies with the weak-lensing shear profile of a Navarro–Frenk–White (NFW) halo and also perform NFW fits to substructures detected in the 2D mass maps of the cluster. This study yields one of the highest resolution mass maps of a low-z cluster to date and is the first step in a larger effort to characterize the redshift evolution of mass substructures in clusters.

  19. Mass Substructure in Abell 3128

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCleary, J.; dell'Antonio, I.; Huwe, P.

    2015-05-01

    We perform a detailed two-dimensional weak gravitational lensing analysis of the nearby (z = 0.058) galaxy cluster Abell 3128 using deep ugrz imaging from the Dark Energy Camera (DECam). We have designed a pipeline to remove instrumental artifacts from DECam images and stack multiple dithered observations without inducing a spurious ellipticity signal. We develop a new technique to characterize the spatial variation of the point-spread function that enables us to circularize the field to better than 0.5% and thereby extract the intrinsic galaxy ellipticities. By fitting photometric redshifts to sources in the observation, we are able to select a sample of background galaxies for weak-lensing analysis free from low-redshift contaminants. Photometric redshifts are also used to select a high-redshift galaxy subsample with which we successfully isolate the signal from an interloping z = 0.44 cluster. We estimate the total mass of Abell 3128 by fitting the tangential ellipticity of background galaxies with the weak-lensing shear profile of a Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) halo and also perform NFW fits to substructures detected in the 2D mass maps of the cluster. This study yields one of the highest resolution mass maps of a low-z cluster to date and is the first step in a larger effort to characterize the redshift evolution of mass substructures in clusters.

  20. Solid colloids with surface-mobile linkers.

    PubMed

    van der Meulen, Stef A J; Helms, Gesa; Dogterom, Marileen

    2015-06-17

    In this report we review the possibilities of using colloids with surface mobile linkers for the study of colloidal self-assembly processes. A promising route to create systems with mobile linkers is the use of lipid (bi-)layers. These lipid layers can be either used in the form of vesicles or as coatings for hard colloids and emulsion droplets. Inside the lipid bilayers molecules can be inserted via membrane anchors. Due to the fluidity of the lipid bilayer, the anchored molecules remain mobile. The use of different lipid mixtures even allows creating Janus-like particles that exhibit directional bonding if linkers are used which have a preference for a certain lipid phase. In nature mobile linkers can be found e.g. as receptors in cells. Therefore, towards the end of the review, we also briefly address the possibility of using colloids with surface mobile linkers as model systems to mimic cell-cell interactions and cell adhesion processes.

  1. Substructure Main Bridge, River Piers A & V ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Substructure - Main Bridge, River Piers A & V - Huey P. Long Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River approximately midway between nine & twelve mile points upstream from & west of New Orleans, Jefferson, Jefferson Parish, LA

  2. Chemical substructure search in SQL.

    PubMed

    Golovin, Adel; Henrick, Kim

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel technique for a fast chemical substructure search on a relational database by use of a standard SQL query. The symmetry of a query graph is analyzed to give additional constraints. Our method is based on breadth-first search (BFS) algorithms implementation using Relational Database Management Systems (RDBMS). In addition to the chemical search we apply our technique to the field of intermolecular interactions which involves nonplanar graphs and describe how to achieve linear time performance along with the suggestion on how to sufficiently reduce the linear coefficient. From the algorithms theory perspective these results mean that subgraph isomorphism is a polynomial time problem, hence equal problems have the same complexity. The application to subgraph isomorphism in chemical search is available at http://www.ebi.ac.uk/msd-srv/chemsearch and http://www.ebi.ac.uk/msd-srv/msdmotif/chem . The application to the network of molecule interactions is available at http://www.ebi.ac.uk/msd-srv/msdmotif .

  3. Algebraic sub-structuring for electromagnetic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Chao; Gao, Weiguo; Bai, Zhaojun; Li, Xiaoye; Lee, Lie-Quan; Husbands, Parry; Ng, Esmond G.

    2004-09-14

    Algebraic sub-structuring refers to the process of applying matrix reordering and partitioning algorithms to divide a large sparse matrix into smaller submatrices from which a subset of spectral components are extracted and combined to form approximate solutions to the original problem. In this paper, we show that algebraic sub-structuring can be effectively used to solve generalized eigenvalue problems arising from the finite element analysis of an accelerator structure.

  4. Algebraic Sub-Structuring for Electromagnetic Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C.; Gao, W.G.; Bai, Z.J.; Li, X.Y.S.; Lee, L.Q.; Husbands, P.; Ng, E.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Davis /SLAC

    2006-06-30

    Algebraic sub-structuring refers to the process of applying matrix reordering and partitioning algorithms to divide a large sparse matrix into smaller submatrices from which a subset of spectral components are extracted and combined to form approximate solutions to the original problem. In this paper, they show that algebraic sub-structuring can be effectively used to solve generalized eigenvalue problems arising from the finite element analysis of an accelerator structure.

  5. A structural design decomposition method utilizing substructuring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J.

    1994-01-01

    A new method of design decomposition for structural analysis and optimization is described. For this method, the structure is divided into substructures where each substructure has its structural response described by a structural-response subproblem, and its structural sizing determined from a structural-sizing subproblem. The structural responses of substructures that have rigid body modes when separated from the remainder of the structure are further decomposed into displacements that have no rigid body components, and a set of rigid body modes. The structural-response subproblems are linked together through forces determined within a structural-sizing coordination subproblem which also determines the magnitude of any rigid body displacements. Structural-sizing subproblems having constraints local to the substructures are linked together through penalty terms that are determined by a structural-sizing coordination subproblem. All the substructure structural-response subproblems are totally decoupled from each other, as are all the substructure structural-sizing subproblems, thus there is significant potential for use of parallel solution methods for these subproblems.

  6. Substructure synthesis methods for viscoelastic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Duan

    1993-09-01

    Viscoelastic damping models are necessary for accurate dynamic analysis of flexible aerospace structures. The method of substructure synthesis is extended to systems with general linear viscoelastic damping. The stationary variational principles for discrete symmetric and nonsymmetric viscoelastic systems are first developed in parallel for the time, Laplace, and frequency domain. The corresponding substructure synthesis methods are then formulated. On the basis of the Rayleigh-Ritz method, each substructure is represented by a set of admissible trial vectors. Real trial vectors, such as eigenvectors and Lanczos vectors of the corresponding undamped substructure as well as Ritz vectors obtained by spatial discretization of simple functions, are recommended. The geometric compatibility between substructures can be approximated by a weighted residual method, and the traditional state space formulation is avoided. The effort involved in the reduction process is almost independent of the complexity of viscoelastic models. Beam and plate examples are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the substructure synthesis method in terms of reducing the size of final equations to obtain accurate solutions of eigenvalues, frequency responses, and transient responses for viscoelastic symmetric systems.

  7. Modeling Substructure in the Milky Way Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishaw-Jones, Claire; Thorman, P.; Iyer, T.; Guhathakurta, P.; Deep Lens Survey Collaboration

    2013-01-01

    We model substructure in the Milky Way halo using data taken from the five fields of the Deep Lens Survey (DLS). We select DLS objects that are consistent with the PSF to create color-magnitude Hess diagrams for each field. We observe significant substructure in at least two out of the five fields. To enhance the visibility of the substructure, we model and subtract the population of unresolved background galaxies, and subtract a smooth model of the Milky Way halo. This halo model is constructed by remapping the observed Hess diagram of stars in DLS Field 5 (F5), which has a smooth appearance. We use colors and absolute magnitudes from the Yonsei-Yale isochrones to create a map of distance modulus for main sequence stars in color-magnitude space for each DLS field. An Einasto model of the galaxy is used to predict the model density ratio of stars in each field as a function of distance modulus. The F5 Hess diagram is then multiplied by the model density ratio maps for F1 - F4 to yield semi-empirical model Hess diagrams. Subtracting these models from the observed Hess diagrams emphasizes the substructure of a given field. We fit simple models to the residual substructure in each DLS field using a Gaussian with three free parameters: distance of enhancement, depth along the LOS, and amplitude (i.e. strength). We discuss the use of this galaxy substructure model in calculating the overall density profile of the Milky Way.

  8. Hydroquinone–pyrrole dyads with varied linkers

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hao; Karlsson, Christoffer; Strømme, Maria; Sjödin, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Summary A series of pyrroles functionalized in the 3-position with p-dimethoxybenzene via various linkers (CH2, CH2CH2, CH=CH, C≡C) has been synthesized. Their electronic properties have been deduced from 1H NMR, 13C NMR, and UV–vis spectra to detect possible interactions between the two aromatic subunits. The extent of conjugation between the subunits is largely controlled by the nature of the linker, with the largest conjugation found with the trans-ethene linker and the weakest with the aliphatic linkers. DFT calculations revealed substantial changes in the HOMO–LUMO gap that correlated with the extent of conjugation found experimentally. The results of this work are expected to open up for use of the investigated compounds as components of redox-active materials in sustainable, organic electrical energy storage devices. PMID:26877811

  9. Singular behavior of jet substructure observables

    DOE PAGES

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Moult, Ian

    2016-01-20

    Jet substructure observables play a central role at the Large Hadron Collider for identifying the boosted hadronic decay products of electroweak scale resonances. The complete description of these observables requires understanding both the limit in which hard substructure is resolved, as well as the limit of a jet with a single hard core. In this paper we study in detail the perturbative structure of two prominent jet substructure observables, N-subjettiness and the energy correlation functions, as measured on background QCD jets. In particular, we focus on the distinction between the limits in which two-prong structure is resolved or unresolved. Dependingmore » on the choice of subjet axes, we demonstrate that at fixed order, N-subjettiness can manifest myriad behaviors in the unresolved region: smooth tails, end-point singularities, or singularities in the physical region. The energy correlation functions, by contrast, only have non-singular perturbative tails extending to the end point. We discuss the effect of hadronization on the various observables with Monte Carlo simulation and demonstrate that the modeling of these effects with non-perturbative shape functions is highly dependent on the N-subjettiness axes definitions. Lastly, our study illustrates those regions of phase space that must be controlled for high-precision jet substructure calculations, and emphasizes how such calculations can be facilitated by designing substructure observables with simple singular structures.« less

  10. Solid colloids with surface-mobile linkers.

    PubMed

    van der Meulen, Stef A J; Helms, Gesa; Dogterom, Marileen

    2015-06-17

    In this report we review the possibilities of using colloids with surface mobile linkers for the study of colloidal self-assembly processes. A promising route to create systems with mobile linkers is the use of lipid (bi-)layers. These lipid layers can be either used in the form of vesicles or as coatings for hard colloids and emulsion droplets. Inside the lipid bilayers molecules can be inserted via membrane anchors. Due to the fluidity of the lipid bilayer, the anchored molecules remain mobile. The use of different lipid mixtures even allows creating Janus-like particles that exhibit directional bonding if linkers are used which have a preference for a certain lipid phase. In nature mobile linkers can be found e.g. as receptors in cells. Therefore, towards the end of the review, we also briefly address the possibility of using colloids with surface mobile linkers as model systems to mimic cell-cell interactions and cell adhesion processes. PMID:25993272

  11. THE ORIGIN OF THE VIRGO STELLAR SUBSTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Yam, William; Willett, Benjamin A.; Newberg, Heidi J.; Casetti-Dinescu, Dana I.; Girard, Terrence M.; Majewski, Steven R.

    2012-07-10

    We present three-dimensional space velocities of stars selected to be consistent with membership in the Virgo stellar substructure. Candidates were selected from SA 103, a single 40' Multiplication-Sign 40' field from our proper-motion (PM) survey in Kapteyn's Selected Areas (SAs), based on the PMs, Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometry, and follow-up spectroscopy of 215 stars. The signature of the Virgo substructure is clear in the SDSS color-magnitude diagram (CMD) centered on SA 103, and 16 stars are identified that have high Galactocentric-frame radial velocities (V{sub GSR} > 50 km s{sup -1}) and lie near the CMD locus of Virgo. The implied distance to the Virgo substructure from the candidates is 14 {+-} 3 kpc. We derive mean kinematics from these 16 stars, finding a radial velocity V{sub GSR} = 153 {+-} 22 km s{sup -1} and proper motions ({mu}{sub {alpha}}cos {delta}, {mu}{sub {delta}}) = (- 5.24, -0.91) {+-} (0.43, 0.46) mas yr{sup -1}. From the mean kinematics of these members, we determine that the Virgo progenitor was on an eccentric (e {approx} 0.8) orbit that recently passed near the Galactic center (pericentric distance R{sub p} {approx} 6 kpc). This destructive orbit is consistent with the idea that the substructure(s) in Virgo originated in the tidal disruption of a Milky Way satellite. N-body simulations suggest that the entire cloud-like Virgo substructure (encompassing the 'Virgo Overdensity' and the 'Virgo Stellar Stream') is likely the tidal debris remnant from a recently disrupted massive ({approx}10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }) dwarf galaxy. The model also suggests that some other known stellar overdensities in the Milky Way halo (e.g., the Pisces Overdensity and debris near NGC 2419 and SEGUE 1) are explained by the disruption of the Virgo progenitor.

  12. Linker histones: History and current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Crane-Robinson, C

    2016-03-01

    Although the overall structure of the fifth histone (linker histone, H1) is understood, its location on the nucleosome is only partially defined. Whilst it is clear that H1 helps condense the chromatin fibre, precisely how this is achieved remains to be determined. H1 is not a general gene repressor in that although it must be displaced from transcription start sites for activity to occur, there is only partial loss along the body of genes. How the deposition and removal of H1 occurs in particular need of further study. Linker histones are highly abundant nuclear proteins about which we know too little. PMID:26459501

  13. Particle Substructure. A Common Theme of Discovery in this Century

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Panofsky, W. K. H.

    1984-02-01

    Some example of modern developments in particle physics are given which demonstrate that the fundamental rules of quantum mechanics, applied to all forces in nature as they became understood, have retained their validity. The well-established laws of electricity and magnetism, reformulated in terms of quantum mechanics, have exhibited a truly remarkable numerical agreement between theory and experiment over an enormous range of observation. As experimental techniques have grown from the top of a laboratory bench to the large accelerators of today, the basic components of experimentation have changed vastly in scale but only little in basic function. More important, the motivation of those engaged in this type of experimentation has hardly changed at all.

  14. Particel substructure. A common theme of discovery in this century

    SciTech Connect

    Panofsky, W.K.H.

    1984-02-01

    Some example of modern developments in particel physics are given which demonstrate that the fundamental rules of quantum mechanics, applied to all forces in nature as they became understood, have retained their validity. The well-established laws of electricity and magnetism, reformulated in terms of quantum mechanics, have exhibited a truly remarkable numerical agreement between theory and experiment over an enormous range of observation. As experimental techniques have grown from the top of a laboratory bench to the large accelerators of today, the basic components of experimentation have changed vastly in scale but only little in basic function. More important, the motivation of those engaged in this type of experimentation has hardly changed at all.

  15. Consultant/Linker Knowledge and Skills Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smink, Jay

    The Consultant/Linker Knowledge and Skills Inventory is used to assess both existing and needed levels of knowledge and skills for consulting with school staff. The inventory is self-administered, and requires 20 to 30 minutes to complete. For each item, knowledge and skill are rated low, medium, or high; and need for improvement is rated none,…

  16. Hadronic calorimeter shower size: Challenges and opportunities for jet substructure in the superboosted regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressler, Shikma; Flacke, Thomas; Kats, Yevgeny; Lee, Seung J.; Perez, Gilad

    2016-05-01

    Hadrons have finite interaction size with dense material, a basic feature common to known forms of hadronic calorimeters (HCAL). We argue that substructure variables cannot use HCAL information to access the microscopic nature of jets much narrower than the hadronic shower size, which we call superboosted massive jets. It implies that roughly 15% of their transverse energy profile remains inaccessible due to the presence of long-lived neutral hadrons. This part of the jet substructure is also subject to order-one fluctuations. We demonstrate that the effects of the fluctuations are not reduced when a global correction to jet variables is applied. The above leads to fundamental limitations in the ability to extract intrinsic information from jets in the superboosted regime. The neutral fraction of a jet is correlated with its flavor. This leads to an interesting and possibly useful difference between superboosted W / Z / h / t jets and their corresponding backgrounds. The QCD jets that form the background to the signal superboosted jets might also be qualitatively different in their substructure as their mass might lie at or below the Sudakov mass peak. Finally, we introduce a set of zero-cone longitudinal jet substructure variables and show that while they carry information that might be useful in certain situations, they are not in general sensitive to the jet substructure.

  17. The gamma-ray-flux PDF from galactic halo substructure

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Samuel K.; Ando, Shin'ichiro; Kamionkowski, Marc E-mail: ando@tapir.caltech.edu

    2009-07-01

    One of the targets of the recently launched Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope is a diffuse gamma-ray background from dark-matter annihilation or decay in the Galactic halo. N-body simulations and theoretical arguments suggest that the dark matter in the Galactic halo may be clumped into substructure, rather than smoothly distributed. Here we propose the gamma-ray-flux probability distribution function (PDF) as a probe of substructure in the Galactic halo. We calculate this PDF for a phenomenological model of halo substructure and determine the regions of the substructure parameter space in which the PDF may be distinguished from the PDF for a smooth distribution of dark matter. In principle, the PDF allows a statistical detection of substructure, even if individual halos cannot be detected. It may also allow detection of substructure on the smallest microhalo mass scales, ∼ M{sub ⊕}, for weakly-interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Furthermore, it may also provide a method to measure the substructure mass function. However, an analysis that assumes a typical halo substructure model and a conservative estimate of the diffuse background suggests that the substructure PDF may not be detectable in the lifespan of Fermi in the specific case that the WIMP is a neutralino. Nevertheless, for a large range of substructure, WIMP annihilation, and diffuse background models, PDF analysis may provide a clear signature of substructure.

  18. An online substructure identification method for local structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Jilin; Jankowski, Łukasz; Ou, Jinping

    2013-09-01

    This paper proposes a substructure isolation method, which uses time series of measured local response for online monitoring of substructures. The proposed monitoring process consists of two key steps: construction of the isolated substructure, and its identification. The isolated substructure is an independent virtual structure, which is numerically isolated from the global structure by placing virtual supports on the interface. First, the isolated substructure is constructed by a specific linear combination of time series of its measured local responses. Then, the isolated substructure is identified using its local natural frequencies extracted from the combined responses. The substructure is assumed to be linear; the outside part of the global structure can have any characteristics. The method has no requirements on the initial state of the structure, and so the process can be carried out repetitively for online monitoring. Online isolation and monitoring is illustrated in a numerical example with a frame model, and then verified in a cantilever beam experiment.

  19. Substructure coupling in the frequency domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Frequency domain analysis was found to be a suitable method for determining the transient response of systems subjected to a wide variety of loads. However, since a large number of calculations are performed within the discrete frequency loop, the method loses it computational efficiency if the loads must be represented by a large number of discrete frequencies. It was also discovered that substructure coupling in the frequency domain work particularly well for analyzing structural system with a small number of interface and loaded degrees of freedom. It was discovered that substructure coupling in the frequency domain can lead to an efficient method of obtaining natural frequencies of undamped structures. It was also found that the damped natural frequencies of a system may be determined using frequency domain techniques.

  20. Practical applications of substructuring in shell dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Sane, A.D.; Bitner, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    Transient dynamic stress analysis of large shell structures is often required in many industrial designs. The asymmetry features of the structure often require a full three dimensional analysis. The difficulties experienced in performing the dynamic analysis of such large and complex structures result from economic feasibility and limitations on the available computer core memory. Substructuring techniques provide a way of overcoming these difficulties. The advantages and features associated with substructuring methods are discussed in general terms. The technique is then applied to perform a transient dynamic analysis of a typical shell structure. The discussion of the example problem focused to highlight the economy, flexibility and the data handling aspects of this method. The example problem demonstrates that this method can be applied with success to a wide range of structural dynamic problems and results in significant cost savings.

  1. Wang linker free of side reactions.

    PubMed

    Castro, Vida; Rodriguez, Hortensia; Albericio, Fernando

    2013-01-18

    A new resin for the solid-phase synthesis of peptide acids was developed. It was based on a linker with two unique features: methoxy groups as the only activating groups of the phenyl ring and a copper(I)-catalyzed Click chemistry reaction to anchor it to the solid support. The efficiency of this new resin in solid phase peptide synthesis was compared with that of Wang resin.

  2. Star formation and substructure in galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Seth A.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Wegner, Gary A.; Einasto, Maret; Vennik, Jaan

    2014-03-10

    We investigate the relationship between star formation (SF) and substructure in a sample of 107 nearby galaxy clusters using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Several past studies of individual galaxy clusters have suggested that cluster mergers enhance cluster SF, while others find no such relationship. The SF fraction in multi-component clusters (0.228 ± 0.007) is higher than that in single-component clusters (0.175 ± 0.016) for galaxies with M{sub r}{sup 0.1}<−20.5. In both single- and multi-component clusters, the fraction of star-forming galaxies increases with clustercentric distance and decreases with local galaxy number density, and multi-component clusters show a higher SF fraction than single-component clusters at almost all clustercentric distances and local densities. Comparing the SF fraction in individual clusters to several statistical measures of substructure, we find weak, but in most cases significant at greater than 2σ, correlations between substructure and SF fraction. These results could indicate that cluster mergers may cause weak but significant SF enhancement in clusters, or unrelaxed clusters exhibit slightly stronger SF due to their less evolved states relative to relaxed clusters.

  3. Design sensitivity analysis of boundary element substructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, James H.; Saigal, Sunil; Gallagher, Richard H.

    1989-01-01

    The ability to reduce or condense a three-dimensional model exactly, and then iterate on this reduced size model representing the parts of the design that are allowed to change in an optimization loop is discussed. The discussion presents the results obtained from an ongoing research effort to exploit the concept of substructuring within the structural shape optimization context using a Boundary Element Analysis (BEA) formulation. The first part contains a formulation for the exact condensation of portions of the overall boundary element model designated as substructures. The use of reduced boundary element models in shape optimization requires that structural sensitivity analysis can be performed. A reduced sensitivity analysis formulation is then presented that allows for the calculation of structural response sensitivities of both the substructured (reduced) and unsubstructured parts of the model. It is shown that this approach produces significant computational economy in the design sensitivity analysis and reanalysis process by facilitating the block triangular factorization and forward reduction and backward substitution of smaller matrices. The implementatior of this formulation is discussed and timings and accuracies of representative test cases presented.

  4. Analysis of structures with rotating, flexible substructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, A. Stewart; Likins, Peter

    1987-01-01

    A new methodology has been developed for the dynamic analysis of flexible structures, parts of which may be experiencing discrete motion relative to other parts. This methodology provides the capability of representing the continuum deformations typically treated using finite element methods. In addition, it provides the capability of representing the discrete motion at joints traditionally available with multibody methods. After decomposing the structure into substructures and associating a frame of reference with each substructure, the equations of motion for each substructure can be written explicitly including contributions due to the frame of reference generalized coordinates. By expanding the set of constraints to include constraints that eliminate the redundancy introduced by the frame generalized coordinates, the equations of motion become amenable to solution. The first digital computer program using this methodology, the General Rotorcraft Aeromechanical Stability Program (GRASP), was introduced in 1986. Although GRASP is limited to applications involving steady-state rotation, extension to arbitrary motions (including spin-up) can be accomplished by the selective retention of nonlinear terms in this formulation.

  5. Composite Octet Searches with Jet Substructure

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Yang; Shelton, Jessie; /Yale U.

    2012-02-14

    Many new physics models with strongly interacting sectors predict a mass hierarchy between the lightest vector meson and the lightest pseudoscalar mesons. We examine the power of jet substructure tools to extend the 7 TeV LHC sensitivity to these new states for the case of QCD octet mesons, considering both two gluon and two b-jet decay modes for the pseudoscalar mesons. We develop both a simple dijet search using only the jet mass and a more sophisticated jet substructure analysis, both of which can discover the composite octets in a dijet-like signature. The reach depends on the mass hierarchy between the vector and pseudoscalar mesons. We find that for the pseudoscalar-to-vector meson mass ratio below approximately 0.2 the simple jet mass analysis provides the best discovery limit; for a ratio between 0.2 and the QCD-like value of 0.3, the sophisticated jet substructure analysis has the best discovery potential; for a ratio above approximately 0.3, the standard four-jet analysis is more suitable.

  6. Improving the Serum Stability of Site-Specific Antibody Conjugates with Sulfone Linkers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Current routes for synthesizing antibody–drug conjugates commonly rely on maleimide linkers to react with cysteine thiols. However, thioether exchange with metabolites and serum proteins can compromise conjugate stability and diminish in vivo efficacy. We report the application of a phenyloxadiazole sulfone linker for the preparation of trastuzumab conjugates. This sulfone linker site-specifically labeled engineered cysteine residues in THIOMABs and improved antibody conjugate stability in human plasma at sites previously shown to be labile for maleimide conjugates. Similarly, sulfone conjugation with selenocysteine in an anti-ROR1 scFv-Fc improved human plasma stability relative to maleimide conjugation. Kinetically controlled labeling of a THIOMAB containing two cysteine substitutions was also achieved, offering a strategy for producing antibody conjugates with expanded valency. PMID:25099687

  7. Spectroscopic study of the light-harvesting protein C-phycocyanin associated with colorless linker peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Pizarro, Shelly A.

    2000-05-12

    The phycobilisome (PBS) light-harvesting antenna is composed of chromophore-containing biliproteins and 'colorless' linker peptides and is structurally designed to support unidirectional transfer of excitation energy from the periphery of the PBS to its core. The linker peptides have a unique role in this transfer process by modulating the spectral properties of the associated biliprotein. There is only one three-dimensional structure of a biliprotein/linker complex available to date (APC/LC7.8) and the mechanism of interaction between these two proteins remains unknown. This study brings together a detailed spectroscopic characterization of C-Phycocyanin (PC)-linker complexes (isolated from Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002) with proteomic analysis of the linker amino acid sequences to produce a model for biliprotein/linker interaction. The amino acid sequences of the rod linkers [LR8.9, LR32.3 and LRC28.5] were examined to identify evolutionarily conserved regions important to either the structure or function of this protein family. Although there is not one common homologous site among all the linkers, there are strong trends across each separate subset (LC, LR and LRC) and the N-terminal segments of both LR32.3 and LRC28.5 display multiple regions of similarity with other linkers. Predictions of the secondary structure of LR32.3 and LRC28.5, and comparison to the crystal structure of LC7.8, further narrowed the candidates for interaction sites with the PC chromophores. Measurements of the absorption, fluorescence, CD and excitation anisotropy of PC trimer, PC/LR32.3, and PC/LRC28.5, document the spectroscopic effect of each linker peptide on the PC chromophores at a series of temperatures (298 to 77 K). Because LR32.3 and LRC28.5 modulate the PC trimer spectral properties in distinct manners, it suggests different chromophore-interaction mechanisms for each linker. The low temperature absorbance spectrum of the PC trimer is consistent with an excitonic coupling

  8. 4. VIEW NORTH, DETAIL OF SUBSTRUCTURE CONNECTIONS ON EAST END ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW NORTH, DETAIL OF SUBSTRUCTURE CONNECTIONS ON EAST END OF BRIDGE - Cincinnati, Jackson & Mackinaw Railroad Bridge, Abandonned Penn Central Route, spanning Tom's Run, Farmersville, Montgomery County, OH

  9. 5. DOWNSTREAM ELEVATION OF BRIDGE AND SUBSTRUCTURE (with graduated meter ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. DOWNSTREAM ELEVATION OF BRIDGE AND SUBSTRUCTURE (with graduated meter pole); VIEW TO NORTH-NORTHEAST. - Auwaiakeakua Bridge, Spanning Auwaiakekua Gulch at Mamalahoa Highway, Waikoloa, Hawaii County, HI

  10. Substructurability: the effect of interface location on a real-time dynamic substructuring test

    PubMed Central

    Neild, S. A.; Lowenberg, M.; Szalai, R.; Krauskopf, B.

    2016-01-01

    A full-scale experimental test for large and complex structures is not always achievable. This can be due to many reasons, the most prominent one being the size limitations of the test. Real-time dynamic substructuring is a hybrid testing method where part of the system is modelled numerically and the rest of the system is kept as the physical test specimen. The numerical–physical parts are connected via actuators and sensors and the interface is controlled by advanced algorithms to ensure that the tested structure replicates the emulated system with sufficient accuracy. The main challenge in such a test is to overcome the dynamic effects of the actuator and associated controller, that inevitably introduce delay into the substructured system which, in turn, can destabilize the experiment. To date, most research concentrates on developing control strategies for stable recreation of the full system when the interface location is given a priori. Therefore, substructurability is mostly studied in terms of control. Here, we consider the interface location as a parameter and study its effect on the stability of the system in the presence of delay due to actuator dynamics and define substructurability as the system’s tolerance to delay in terms of the different interface locations. It is shown that the interface location has a major effect on the tolerable delays in an experiment and, therefore, careful selection of it is necessary.

  11. Substructurability: the effect of interface location on a real-time dynamic substructuring test

    PubMed Central

    Neild, S. A.; Lowenberg, M.; Szalai, R.; Krauskopf, B.

    2016-01-01

    A full-scale experimental test for large and complex structures is not always achievable. This can be due to many reasons, the most prominent one being the size limitations of the test. Real-time dynamic substructuring is a hybrid testing method where part of the system is modelled numerically and the rest of the system is kept as the physical test specimen. The numerical–physical parts are connected via actuators and sensors and the interface is controlled by advanced algorithms to ensure that the tested structure replicates the emulated system with sufficient accuracy. The main challenge in such a test is to overcome the dynamic effects of the actuator and associated controller, that inevitably introduce delay into the substructured system which, in turn, can destabilize the experiment. To date, most research concentrates on developing control strategies for stable recreation of the full system when the interface location is given a priori. Therefore, substructurability is mostly studied in terms of control. Here, we consider the interface location as a parameter and study its effect on the stability of the system in the presence of delay due to actuator dynamics and define substructurability as the system’s tolerance to delay in terms of the different interface locations. It is shown that the interface location has a major effect on the tolerable delays in an experiment and, therefore, careful selection of it is necessary. PMID:27616930

  12. Substructurability: the effect of interface location on a real-time dynamic substructuring test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terkovics, N.; Neild, S. A.; Lowenberg, M.; Szalai, R.; Krauskopf, B.

    2016-08-01

    A full-scale experimental test for large and complex structures is not always achievable. This can be due to many reasons, the most prominent one being the size limitations of the test. Real-time dynamic substructuring is a hybrid testing method where part of the system is modelled numerically and the rest of the system is kept as the physical test specimen. The numerical-physical parts are connected via actuators and sensors and the interface is controlled by advanced algorithms to ensure that the tested structure replicates the emulated system with sufficient accuracy. The main challenge in such a test is to overcome the dynamic effects of the actuator and associated controller, that inevitably introduce delay into the substructured system which, in turn, can destabilize the experiment. To date, most research concentrates on developing control strategies for stable recreation of the full system when the interface location is given a priori. Therefore, substructurability is mostly studied in terms of control. Here, we consider the interface location as a parameter and study its effect on the stability of the system in the presence of delay due to actuator dynamics and define substructurability as the system's tolerance to delay in terms of the different interface locations. It is shown that the interface location has a major effect on the tolerable delays in an experiment and, therefore, careful selection of it is necessary.

  13. Desmosine-Inspired Cross-Linkers for Hyaluronan Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagel, Valentin; Mateescu, Markus; Southan, Alexander; Wegner, Seraphine V.; Nuss, Isabell; Haraszti, Tamás; Kleinhans, Claudia; Schuh, Christian; Spatz, Joachim P.; Kluger, Petra J.; Bach, Monika; Tussetschläger, Stefan; Tovar, Günter E. M.; Laschat, Sabine; Boehm, Heike

    2013-06-01

    We designed bioinspired cross-linkers based on desmosine, the cross-linker in natural elastin, to prepare hydrogels with thiolated hyaluronic acid. These short, rigid cross-linkers are based on pyridinium salts (as in desmosine) and can connect two polymer backbones. Generally, the obtained semi-synthetic hydrogels are form-stable, can withstand repeated stress, have a large linear-elastic range, and show strain stiffening behavior typical for biopolymer networks. In addition, it is possible to introduce a positive charge to the core of the cross-linker without affecting the gelation efficiency, or consequently the network connectivity. However, the mechanical properties strongly depend on the charge of the cross-linker. The properties of the presented hydrogels can thus be tuned in a range important for engineering of soft tissues by controlling the cross-linking density and the charge of the cross-linker.

  14. Origin of H1 linker histones.

    PubMed

    Kasinsky, H E; Lewis, J D; Dacks, J B; Ausió, J

    2001-01-01

    In which taxa did H1 linker histones appear in the course of evolution? Detailed comparative analysis of the histone H1 and histone H1-related sequences available to date suggests that the origin of histone H1 can be traced to bacteria. The data also reveal that the sequence corresponding to the 'winged helix' motif of the globular structural domain, a domain characteristic of all metazoan histone H1 molecules, is evolutionarily conserved and appears separately in several divergent lines of protists. Some protists, however, appear to have only a lysine-rich basic protein, which has compositional similarity to some of the histone H1-like proteins from eubacteria and to the carboxy-terminal domain of the H1 linker histones from animals and plants. No lysine-rich basic proteins have been described in archaebacteria. The data presented in this review provide the surprising conclusion that whereas DNA-condensing H1-related histones may have arisen early in evolution in eubacteria, the appearance of the sequence motif corresponding to the globular domain of metazoan H1s occurred much later in the protists, after and independently of the appearance of the chromosomal core histones in archaebacteria.

  15. Traceless cross-linker for photocleavable bioconjugation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Yan, Funing; Qiu, Dengli; Jeong, Jae-Sun; Jin, Qiaoling; Kim, Tae-Young; Chen, Liaohai

    2012-04-18

    Photoresponsive bioconjugation empowers the development of novel methods for drug discovery, disease diagnosis, and high-throughput screening, among others. In this paper, we report on the characteristics of a traceless photocleavable cross-linker, di-6-(3-succinimidyl carbonyloxymethyl-4-nitro-phenoxy)-hexanoic acid disulfide diethanol ester (SCNE). The traceless feature and the biocompatibility of this photocleavable cross-linking reagent were corroborated. Consequently, we demonstrated its application in reversible phage particle immobilization that could provide a platform for direct single-phage screening. We also applied it in protein-photoprinting, where SCNE acts as a "photo-eraser" to remove the cross-linked protein molecules at a desired region in a simple, clean, and light-controllable fashion. We further demonstrated the two-tier atomic force microscopic (AFM) method that uses SCNE to carry out two subsequent AFM tasks in situ. The approach allows guided protein delivery and subsequent high-resolution imaging at the same local area, thus opening up the possibility of monitoring protein functions in live cells. The results imply that SCNE is a versatile cross-linker that can be used for a wide range of applications where photocleavage ensures clean and remote-controllable release of biological molecules from a substrate. PMID:22432929

  16. Jet substructures of boosted polarized top quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitadono, Yoshio; Li, Hsiang-nan

    2014-06-01

    We study jet substructures of a boosted polarized top quark, which undergoes the semileptonic decay t→bℓν, in the perturbative QCD framework. The jet mass distribution (energy profile) is factorized into the convolution of a hard top-quark decay kernel with the bottom-quark jet function (jet energy function). Computing the hard kernel to the leading order in QCD and inputting the latter functions from the resummation formalism, we observe that the jet mass distribution is not sensitive to the helicity of the top quark, but the energy profile is: energy is accumulated faster within a left-hand top jet than within a right-hand one, a feature related to the V-A structure of weak interaction. It is pointed out that the energy profile is a simple and useful jet observable for helicity discrimination of a boosted top quark, which helps identification of physics beyond the standard model at the Large Hadron Collider. The extension of our analysis to other jet substructures, including those associated with a hadronically decaying polarized top quark, is proposed.

  17. Optimal numbers of residues in linkers of DNA polymerase I, T7 primase and DNA polymerase IV

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yi-Ben; Wang, Zhan-Feng; Wang, Peng-Ye; Xie, Ping

    2016-01-01

    DNA polymerase I (PolI), T7 primase and DNA polymerase IV (Dpo4) have a common feature in their structures that the two main domains are connected by an unstructured polypeptide linker. To perform their specific enzymatic activities, the enzymes are required to rearrange the position and orientation of one domain relative to the other into an active mode. Here, we show that the three enzymes share the same mechanism of the transition from the inert to active modes and use the minimum numbers of residues in their linkers to achieve the most efficient transitions. The transition time to the finally active mode is sensitively dependent on the stretched length of the linker in the finally active mode while is insensitive to the position and orientation in the initially inert state. Moreover, we find that for any enzyme whose two domains are connected by an unstructured flexible linker, the stretched length (L) of the linker in the finally active mode and the optimal number (Nopt) of the residues in the linker satisfy relation L ≈ αNopt, with α = 0.24–0.27 nm being a constant insensitive to the system. PMID:27364863

  18. 8. Detail showing concrete abutment, showing substructure of bridge, specifically ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Detail showing concrete abutment, showing substructure of bridge, specifically west side of arch and substructure. - Presumpscot Falls Bridge, Spanning Presumptscot River at Allen Avenue extension, 0.75 mile west of U.S. Interstate 95, Falmouth, Cumberland County, ME

  19. Calculation of substructural analysis weights using a genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Holliday, John D; Sani, Nor; Willett, Peter

    2015-02-23

    This work describes a genetic algorithm for the calculation of substructural analysis for use in ligand-based virtual screening. The algorithm is simple in concept and effective in operation, with simulated virtual screening experiments using the MDDR and WOMBAT data sets showing it to be superior to substructural analysis weights based on a naive Bayesian classifier.

  20. Substructure synthesis method for simulating large molecular complexes

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Dengming; Kong, Yifei; Wu, Yinghao; Ma, Jianpeng

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports a computational method for describing the conformational flexibility of very large biomolecular complexes using a reduced number of degrees of freedom. It is called the substructure synthesis method, and the basic concept is to treat the motions of a given structure as a collection of those of an assemblage of substructures. The choice of substructures is arbitrary and sometimes quite natural, such as domains, subunits, or even large segments of biomolecular complexes. To start, a group of low-frequency substructure modes is determined, for instance by normal mode analysis, to represent the motions of the substructure. Next, a desired number of substructures are joined together by a set of constraints to enforce geometric compatibility at the interface of adjacent substructures, and the modes for the assembled structure can then be synthesized from the substructure modes by applying the Rayleigh–Ritz principle. Such a procedure is computationally much more desirable than solving the full eigenvalue problem for the whole assembled structure. Furthermore, to show the applicability to biomolecular complexes, the method is used to study F-actin, a large filamentous molecular complex involved in many cellular functions. The results demonstrate that the method is capable of studying the motions of very large molecular complexes that are otherwise completely beyond the reach of any conventional methods. PMID:12518058

  1. Support Substructures: Support-Induced Part-Level Structural Representation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shi-Sheng; Fu, Hongbo; Wei, Ling-Yu; Hu, Shi-Min

    2016-08-01

    In this work we explore a support-induced structural organization of object parts. We introduce the concept of support substructures, which are special subsets of object parts with support and stability. A bottom-up approach is proposed to identify such substructures in a support relation graph. We apply the derived high-level substructures to part-based shape reshuffling between models, resulting in nontrivial functionally plausible model variations that are difficult to achieve with symmetry-induced substructures by the state-of-the-art methods. We also show how to automatically or interactively turn a single input model to new functionally plausible shapes by structure rearrangement and synthesis, enabled by support substructures. To the best of our knowledge no single existing method has been designed for all these applications. PMID:26336128

  2. Effects of the linker region on the structure and function of modular GH5 cellulases.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Diego M; Turowski, Valeria R; Murakami, Mario T

    2016-01-01

    The association of glycosyl hydrolases with catalytically inactive modules is a successful evolutionary strategy that is commonly used by biomass-degrading microorganisms to digest plant cell walls. The presence of accessory domains in these enzymes is associated with properties such as higher catalytic efficiency, extension of the catalytic interface and targeting of the enzyme to the proper substrate. However, the importance of the linker region in the synergistic action of the catalytic and accessory domains remains poorly understood. Thus, this study examined how the inter-domain region affects the structure and function of modular GH5 endoglucanases, by using cellulase 5A from Bacillus subtilis (BsCel5A) as a model. BsCel5A variants featuring linkers with different stiffnesses or sizes were designed and extensively characterized, revealing that changes in flexibility or rigidity in this region differentially affect kinetic behavior. Regarding the linker length, we found that precise inter-domain spacing is required to enable efficient hydrolysis because excessively long or short linkers were equally detrimental to catalysis. Together, these findings identify molecular and structural features that may contribute to the rational design of chimeric and multimodular glycosyl hydrolases. PMID:27334041

  3. Effects of the linker region on the structure and function of modular GH5 cellulases

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Diego M.; Turowski, Valeria R.; Murakami, Mario T.

    2016-01-01

    The association of glycosyl hydrolases with catalytically inactive modules is a successful evolutionary strategy that is commonly used by biomass-degrading microorganisms to digest plant cell walls. The presence of accessory domains in these enzymes is associated with properties such as higher catalytic efficiency, extension of the catalytic interface and targeting of the enzyme to the proper substrate. However, the importance of the linker region in the synergistic action of the catalytic and accessory domains remains poorly understood. Thus, this study examined how the inter-domain region affects the structure and function of modular GH5 endoglucanases, by using cellulase 5A from Bacillus subtilis (BsCel5A) as a model. BsCel5A variants featuring linkers with different stiffnesses or sizes were designed and extensively characterized, revealing that changes in flexibility or rigidity in this region differentially affect kinetic behavior. Regarding the linker length, we found that precise inter-domain spacing is required to enable efficient hydrolysis because excessively long or short linkers were equally detrimental to catalysis. Together, these findings identify molecular and structural features that may contribute to the rational design of chimeric and multimodular glycosyl hydrolases. PMID:27334041

  4. Versatile hemidesmosomal linker proteins: structure and function.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Pratik R; Vaidya, Milind M

    2015-04-01

    Hemidesmosomes are anchoring junctions which connect basal epidermal cells to the extracellular matrix. In complex epithelia like skin, hemidesmosomes are composed of transmembrane proteins like α6β4 integrin, BP180, CD151 and cytoplasmic proteins like BPAG1e and plectin. BPAG1e and plectin are plakin family cytolinker proteins which anchor intermediate filament proteins i.e. keratins to the hemidesmosomal transmembrane proteins. Mutations in BPAG1e and plectin lead to severe skin blistering disorders. Recent reports indicate that these hemidesmosomal linker proteins play a role in various cellular processes like cell motility and cytoskeleton dynamics apart from their known anchoring function. In this review, we will discuss their role in structural and signaling functions.

  5. Exploring dark matter with Milky Way substructure.

    PubMed

    Kuhlen, Michael; Madau, Piero; Silk, Joseph

    2009-08-21

    The unambiguous detection of dark matter annihilation in our Galaxy would unravel one of the most outstanding puzzles in particle physics and cosmology. Recent observations have motivated models in which the annihilation rate is boosted by the Sommerfeld effect, a nonperturbative enhancement arising from a long-range attractive force. We applied the Sommerfeld correction to Via Lactea II, a high-resolution N-body simulation of a Milky Way-sized galaxy, to investigate the phase-space structure of the galactic halo. We found that the annihilation luminosity from kinematically cold substructure could be enhanced by orders of magnitude relative to previous calculations, leading to the prediction of gamma-ray fluxes from as many as several hundred dark clumps that should be detectable by the Fermi satellite.

  6. Exploring Dark Matter with Milky Way Substructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlen, Michael; Madau, Piero; Silk, Joseph

    2009-08-01

    The unambiguous detection of dark matter annihilation in our Galaxy would unravel one of the most outstanding puzzles in particle physics and cosmology. Recent observations have motivated models in which the annihilation rate is boosted by the Sommerfeld effect, a nonperturbative enhancement arising from a long-range attractive force. We applied the Sommerfeld correction to Via Lactea II, a high-resolution N-body simulation of a Milky Way-sized galaxy, to investigate the phase-space structure of the galactic halo. We found that the annihilation luminosity from kinematically cold substructure could be enhanced by orders of magnitude relative to previous calculations, leading to the prediction of gamma-ray fluxes from as many as several hundred dark clumps that should be detectable by the Fermi satellite.

  7. On jet substructure methods for signal jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Mrinal; Powling, Alexander; Siodmok, Andrzej

    2015-08-01

    We carry out simple analytical calculations and Monte Carlo studies to better understand the impact of QCD radiation on some well-known jet substructure methods for jets arising from the decay of boosted Higgs bosons. Understanding differences between taggers for these signal jets assumes particular significance in situations where they perform similarly on QCD background jets. As an explicit example of this we compare the Y-splitter method to the more recently proposed Y-pruning technique. We demonstrate how the insight we gain can be used to significantly improve the performance of Y-splitter by combining it with trimming and show that this combination outperforms the other taggers studied here, at high p T . We also make analytical estimates for optimal parameter values, for a range of methods and compare to results from Monte Carlo studies.

  8. A case of poor substructure diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Thomas G.

    1992-01-01

    The NASTRAN Manuals in the substructuring area are all geared toward instant success, but the solution paths are fraught with many traps for human error. Thus, the probability of suffering a fatal abort is high. In such circumstances, the necessity for diagnostics that are user friendly is paramount. This paper is written in the spirit of improving the diagnostics as well as the documentation in one area where the author felt he was backed into a blind corner as a result of his having committed a data oversight. This topic is aired by referring to an analysis of a particular structure. The structure, under discussion, used a number of local coordinate systems that simplified the preparation of input data. The principle features of this problem are introduced by reference to a series of figures.

  9. Forced unraveling of chromatin fibers with nonuniform linker DNA lengths

    PubMed Central

    Ozer, Gungor; Collepardo-Guevara, Rosana; Schlick, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    The chromatin fiber undergoes significant structural changes during the cell’s life cycle to modulate DNA accessibility. Detailed mechanisms of such structural transformations of chromatin fibers as affected by various internal and external conditions such as the ionic conditions of the medium, the linker DNA length, and the presence of linker histones, constitute an open challenge. Here we utilize Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of a coarse grained model of chromatin with nonuniform linker DNA lengths as found in vivo to help explain some aspects of this challenge. We investigate the unfolding mechanisms of chromatin fibers with alternating linker lengths of 26-62 bp and 44-79 bp using a series of end-to-end stretching trajectories with and without linker histones and compare results to uniform-linker-length fibers. We find that linker histones increase overall resistance of nonuniform fibers and lead to fiber unfolding with superbeads-on-a-string cluster transitions. Chromatin fibers with nonuniform linker DNA lengths display a more complex, multi-step yet smoother process of unfolding compared to their uniform counterparts, likely due to the existence of a more continuous range of nucleosome-nucleosome interactions. This finding echoes the theme that some heterogeneity in fiber component is biologically advantageous. PMID:25564319

  10. Early dynamical evolution of substructured stellar clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorval, Julien; Boily, Christian

    2015-08-01

    It is now widely accepted that stellar clusters form with a high level of substructure (Kuhn et al. 2014, Bate 2009), inherited from the molecular cloud and the star formation process. Evidence from observations and simulations also indicate the stars in such young clusters form a subvirial system (Kirk et al. 2007, Maschberger et al. 2010). The subsequent dynamical evolution can cause important mass loss, ejecting a large part of the birth population in the field. It can also imprint the stellar population and still be inferred from observations of evolved clusters. Nbody simulations allow a better understanding of these early twists and turns, given realistic initial conditions. Nowadays, substructured, clumpy young clusters are usually obtained through pseudo-fractal growth (Goodwin et al. 2004) and velocity inheritance. Such models are visually realistics and are very useful, they are however somewhat artificial in their velocity distribution. I introduce a new way to create clumpy initial conditions through a "Hubble expansion" which naturally produces self consistent clumps, velocity-wise. A velocity distribution analysis shows the new method produces realistic models, consistent with the dynamical state of the newly created cores in hydrodynamic simulation of cluster formation (Klessen & Burkert 2000). I use these initial conditions to investigate the dynamical evolution of young subvirial clusters, up to 80000 stars. I find an overall soft evolution, with hierarchical merging leading to a high level of mass segregation. I investigate the influence of the mass function on the fate of the cluster, specifically on the amount of mass loss induced by the early violent relaxation. Using a new binary detection algorithm, I also find a strong processing of the native binary population.

  11. A Helix-Stabilizing Linker Improves Subcutaneous Bioavailability of a Helical Peptide Independent of Linker Lipophilicity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Navaratna, Tejas; Thurber, Greg M

    2016-07-20

    Stabilized peptides address several limitations to peptide-based imaging agents and therapeutics such as poor stability and low affinity due to conformational flexibility. There is also active research in developing these compounds for intracellular drug targeting, and significant efforts have been invested to determine the effects of helix stabilization on intracellular delivery. However, much less is known about the impact on other pharmacokinetic parameters such as plasma clearance and bioavailability. We investigated the effect of different fluorescent helix-stabilizing linkers with varying lipophilicity on subcutaneous (sc) bioavailability using the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor ligand exendin as a model system. The stabilized peptides showed significantly higher protease resistance and increased bioavailability independent of linker hydrophilicity, and all subcutaneously delivered conjugates were able to successfully target the islets of Langerhans with high specificity. The lipophilic peptide variants had slower absorption and plasma clearance than their respective hydrophilic conjugates, and the absolute bioavailability was also lower likely due to the longer residence times in the skin. Their ease and efficiency make double-click helix stabilization chemistries a useful tool for increasing the bioavailability of peptide therapeutics, many of which suffer from rapid in vivo protease degradation. Helix stabilization using linkers of varying lipophilicity can further control sc absorption and clearance rates to customize plasma pharmacokinetics. PMID:27327034

  12. Novel Polymer Linkers for Single Molecule AFM Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Zenghan; Mikheikin, Andrey; Krasnoslobodtsev, Alexey; Lv, Zhengjian; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2013-01-01

    Flexible polymer linkers play an important role in various imaging and probing techniques that require surface immobilization, including atomic force microscopy (AFM). In AFM force spectroscopy, polymer linkers are necessary for the covalent attachment of molecules of interest to the AFM tip and the surface. The polymer linkers tether the molecules and provide their proper orientation in probing experiments. Additionally, the linkers separate specific interactions from nonspecific short-range adhesion and serve as a reference point for the quantitative analysis of single molecule probing events. In this report, we present our results on the synthesis and testing of a novel polymer linker and the identification of a number of potential applications for its use in AFM force spectroscopy experiments. The synthesis of the linker is based on the well-developed phosphoramidate (PA) chemistry that allows the routine synthesis of linkers with predetermined lengths and PA composition. These linkers are homogeneous in length and can be terminated with various functional groups. PA linkers with different functional groups were synthesized and tested in experimental systems utilizing different immobilization chemistries. We probed interactions between complementary DNA oligonucleotides; DNA and protein complexes formed by the site-specific binding protein SfiI; and interactions between amyloid peptide (Aβ42). The results of the AFM force spectroscopy experiments validated the feasibility of the proposed approach for the linker design and synthesis. Furthermore, the properties of the tether (length, functional groups) can be adjusted to meet the specific requirements for different force spectroscopy experiments and system characteristics, suggesting that it could be used for a large number of various applications. PMID:23624104

  13. Mutations in Biosynthetic Enzymes for the Protein Linker Region of Chondroitin/Dermatan/Heparan Sulfate Cause Skeletal and Skin Dysplasias

    PubMed Central

    Mizumoto, Shuji; Yamada, Shuhei; Sugahara, Kazuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans, including chondroitin, dermatan, and heparan sulfate, have various roles in a wide range of biological events such as cell signaling, cell proliferation, tissue morphogenesis, and interactions with various growth factors. Their polysaccharides covalently attach to the serine residues on specific core proteins through the common linker region tetrasaccharide, -xylose-galactose-galactose-glucuronic acid, which is produced through the stepwise addition of respective monosaccharides by four distinct glycosyltransferases. Mutations in the human genes encoding the glycosyltransferases responsible for the biosynthesis of the linker region tetrasaccharide cause a number of genetic disorders, called glycosaminoglycan linkeropathies, including Desbuquois dysplasia type 2, spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and Larsen syndrome. This review focused on recent studies on genetic diseases caused by defects in the biosynthesis of the common linker region tetrasaccharide. PMID:26582078

  14. Mutations in Biosynthetic Enzymes for the Protein Linker Region of Chondroitin/Dermatan/Heparan Sulfate Cause Skeletal and Skin Dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Mizumoto, Shuji; Yamada, Shuhei; Sugahara, Kazuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans, including chondroitin, dermatan, and heparan sulfate, have various roles in a wide range of biological events such as cell signaling, cell proliferation, tissue morphogenesis, and interactions with various growth factors. Their polysaccharides covalently attach to the serine residues on specific core proteins through the common linker region tetrasaccharide, -xylose-galactose-galactose-glucuronic acid, which is produced through the stepwise addition of respective monosaccharides by four distinct glycosyltransferases. Mutations in the human genes encoding the glycosyltransferases responsible for the biosynthesis of the linker region tetrasaccharide cause a number of genetic disorders, called glycosaminoglycan linkeropathies, including Desbuquois dysplasia type 2, spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and Larsen syndrome. This review focused on recent studies on genetic diseases caused by defects in the biosynthesis of the common linker region tetrasaccharide. PMID:26582078

  15. Quasar Mesolensing --- Direct Probe to Substructures around Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonehara, Atsunori; Umemura, Masayuki; Susa, Hajime

    2003-12-01

    Recently, a ``CDM crisis'' is being discussed. The main point of this crisis is that the number of substructures presented by cosmological N-body simulations based on the CDM scenario for structure formation is much larger than the observed substructures. Therefore, it is crucial for this crisis to discriminate whether the expected number of CDM substructures really exist without detectable radiation, or do not exist. In this paper, we present a new idea to detect such invisible substructures by utilizing gravitational lensing. Here, we consider quasars that are gravitationally lensed by a foreground galaxy. A substructure around a lensing galaxy may superposed on one of the lensed images of such quasars. In this situation, additional image splitting should occur in the image behind the substructure, and additional multiple images are created. From our estimations, the separation and time delay between the additional multiple images are expected to be 1-30 milli-arcsecond and 1-103 second, respectively. Furthermore, we evaluate that the optical depth for such events is sim 0.1. Consequently, future fine-resolution imaging and/or high-speed monitoring will unable us to find invisible substructures in one of a few multiple quasars.

  16. Damage identification of a target substructure with moving load excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Law, S. S.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents a substructural damage identification approach under moving vehicular loads based on a dynamic response reconstruction technique. The relationship between two sets of time response vectors from the substructure subject to moving loads is formulated with the transmissibility matrix based on impulse response function in the wavelet domain. Only the finite element model of the intact target substructure and the measured dynamic acceleration responses from the target substructure in the damaged state are required. The time-histories of moving loads and interface forces on the substructure are not required in the proposed algorithm. The dynamic response sensitivity-based method is adopted for the substructural damage identification with the local damage modeled as a reduction in the elemental stiffness factor. The adaptive Tikhonov regularization technique is employed to have an improved identification result when noise effect is included in the measurements. Numerical studies on a three-dimensional box-section girder bridge deck subject to a single moving force or a two-axle three-dimensional moving vehicle are conducted to investigate the performance of the proposed substructural damage identification approach. The simulated local damage can be identified with 5% noise in the measured data.

  17. Substructure System Identification for Finite Element Model Updating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Roy R., Jr.; Blades, Eric L.

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted under a NASA grant on the topic 'Substructure System Identification for Finite Element Model Updating.' The research concerns ongoing development of the Substructure System Identification Algorithm (SSID Algorithm), a system identification algorithm that can be used to obtain mathematical models of substructures, like Space Shuttle payloads. In the present study, particular attention was given to the following topics: making the algorithm robust to noisy test data, extending the algorithm to accept experimental FRF data that covers a broad frequency bandwidth, and developing a test analytical model (TAM) for use in relating test data to reduced-order finite element models.

  18. Substructuring by Lagrange multipliers for solids and plates

    SciTech Connect

    Mandel, J.; Tezaur, R.; Farhat, C.

    1996-12-31

    We present principles and theoreretical foundation of a substructuring method for large structural problems. The algorithm is preconditioned conjugate gradients on a subspace for the dual problem. The preconditioning is proved asymptotically optimal and the method is shown to be parallel scalable, i.e., the condition number is bounded independently of the number of substructures. For plate problems, a special modification is needed that retains continuity of the displacement solution at substructure crosspoints, resulting in an asymptically optimal method. The results are confirmed by numerical experiments.

  19. Tandem oligonucleotide synthesis using linker phosphoramidites

    PubMed Central

    Pon, Richard T.; Yu, Shuyuan

    2005-01-01

    Multiple oligonucleotides of the same or different sequence, linked end-to-end in tandem can be synthesized in a single automated synthesis. A linker phosphoramidite [R. T. Pon and S. Yu (2004) Nucleic Acids Res., 32, 623–631] is added to the 5′-terminal OH end of a support-bound oligonucleotide to introduce a cleavable linkage (succinic acid plus sulfonyldiethanol) and the 3′-terminal base of the new sequence. Conventional phosphoramidites are then used for the rest of the sequence. After synthesis, treatment with ammonium hydroxide releases the oligonucleotides from the support and cleaves the linkages between each sequence. Mixtures of one oligonucleotide with both 5′- and 3′-terminal OH ends and other oligonucleotides with 5′-phosphorylated and 3′-OH ends are produced, which are deprotected and worked up as a single product. Tandem synthesis can be used to make pairs of PCR primers, sets of cooperative oligonucleotides or multiple copies of the same sequence. When tandem synthesis is used to make two self-complementary sequences, double-stranded structures spontaneously form after deprotection. Tandem synthesis of oligonucleotide chains containing up to six consecutive 20mer (120 bases total), various trinucleotide codons and primer pairs for PCR, or self-complementary strands for in situ formation of double-stranded DNA fragments has been demonstrated. PMID:15814811

  20. 65. VIEW LOOKING UPSTREAM FROM FLUME SUBSTRUCTURE, SHOWING COLUMBIA IMPROVEMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    65. VIEW LOOKING UPSTREAM FROM FLUME SUBSTRUCTURE, SHOWING COLUMBIA IMPROVEMENT COMPANY'S NEISSON CREEK SAWMILL. Print No. 177, November 1903 - Electron Hydroelectric Project, Along Puyallup River, Electron, Pierce County, WA

  1. Dynamically Substructured System Testing for Railway Vehicle Pantographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoten, D. P.; Yamaguchi, T.; Yamashita, Y.

    2016-09-01

    ]The overall objective of this paper is to establish a dynamically substructured system (DSS) testing approach for railway vehicle pantographs. In this approach a pilot study quasi-pantograph (QP) is tested within a laboratory environment, where the catenary wire, contact wire and catenary support (abbreviated as ‘catenary’ in this paper) are modelled as a numerical substructure. This is simulated in real time and in parallel with the operation of the physical substructure, i.e. the QP rig itself. The entire DSS is driven by parametric excitation within the catenary model, whilst the numerical and physical substructures are synchronised at their interface via the DSS control technique of [1]. Simulation and physical experimental investigations of the pilot QP rig, constructed within the Advanced Control and Test Laboratory at the University of Bristol, UK, demonstrate the efficacy of the method when subjected to parametric variations, unknown parameter values and parametric excitation.

  2. Portal frame inertia and stiffness matrices by substructure synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, C. A.

    2005-05-01

    Generic expressions of mass and stiffness matrices of the portal frame are presented. These are derived by means of the substructure synthesis method. This method is exceptionally characterised by low-order eigenvalue problems and highly accurate eigensolutions.

  3. Substructure view of the Young's Bay Bridge, view looking east, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Substructure view of the Young's Bay Bridge, view looking east, north side of the bascule trusswork - Old Young's Bay Bridge, Spanning Young's Bay at Milepoint 6.89 on Warrenton-Astoria Highway (Highway No. 9), Astoria, Clatsop County, OR

  4. 10. DETAIL OF BRIDGE SUBSTRUCTURE, SHOWING ORIGINAL CONNECTION WITH IRON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DETAIL OF BRIDGE SUBSTRUCTURE, SHOWING ORIGINAL CONNECTION WITH IRON PINS. VIEW LOOKING WEST FROM FACE OF EAST ABUTMENT. - Annisquam Bridge, Spanning Lobster Cove between Washington & River Streets, Gloucester, Essex County, MA

  5. Substructure Main Bridge, Pier A Huey P. Long ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Substructure - Main Bridge, Pier A - Huey P. Long Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River approximately midway between nine & twelve mile points upstream from & west of New Orleans, Jefferson, Jefferson Parish, LA

  6. 22. VIEW OF FIXED SPAN SUBSTRUCTURE, EAST SPAN, SHOWING CANTILEVEREDBEAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. VIEW OF FIXED SPAN SUBSTRUCTURE, EAST SPAN, SHOWING CANTILEVERED-BEAM SIDEWALK SUPPORTS, LONGITUDINAL GIRDER AND TRANSVERSE ROADBED BEAMS, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Congress Street Bascule Bridge, Spanning Fort Point Channel at Congress Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  7. Substructure view illustrating the continuous concrete Tbeams, piers, sidewalk brackets ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Substructure view illustrating the continuous concrete T-beams, piers, sidewalk brackets and arched longitudinal beams - A Canal Bridge, Spanning the A Canal on Wall Street, Klamath Falls, Klamath County, OR

  8. 98. DETAIL VIEW OF STORM DAMAGE AND EXPOSED SUBSTRUCTURE, NORTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    98. DETAIL VIEW OF STORM DAMAGE AND EXPOSED SUBSTRUCTURE, NORTHWEST SIDE OF 4TH TEE, LOOKING WEST - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  9. 10. Substructure of bridge, showing timber bents, piles, crossbracing, caps ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Substructure of bridge, showing timber bents, piles, cross-bracing, caps and stringers under deck. View to northeast. - Outlet Creek Bridge, Sullivan Lake Ranger Administrative Site, Metaline Falls, Pend Oreille County, WA

  10. Detail view of Fanno Creek trestle, showing trestle substructure, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of Fanno Creek trestle, showing trestle substructure, view looking north - Oregon Electric Railroad, Fanno Creek Trestle, Garden Home to Wilsonville Segment, Milepost 34.7, Garden Home, Washington County, OR

  11. Using Network Methodology to Infer Population Substructure

    PubMed Central

    Prokopenko, Dmitry; Hecker, Julian; Silverman, Edwin; Nöthen, Markus M.; Schmid, Matthias; Lange, Christoph; Loehlein Fier, Heide

    2015-01-01

    One of the main caveats of association studies is the possible affection by bias due to population stratification. Existing methods rely on model-based approaches like structure and ADMIXTURE or on principal component analysis like EIGENSTRAT. Here we provide a novel visualization technique and describe the problem of population substructure from a graph-theoretical point of view. We group the sequenced individuals into triads, which depict the relational structure, on the basis of a predefined pairwise similarity measure. We then merge the triads into a network and apply community detection algorithms in order to identify homogeneous subgroups or communities, which can further be incorporated as covariates into logistic regression. We apply our method to populations from different continents in the 1000 Genomes Project and evaluate the type 1 error based on the empirical p-values. The application to 1000 Genomes data suggests that the network approach provides a very fine resolution of the underlying ancestral population structure. Besides we show in simulations, that in the presence of discrete population structures, our developed approach maintains the type 1 error more precisely than existing approaches. PMID:26098940

  12. Finding Nonoverlapping Substructures of a Sparse Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Pinar, Ali; Vassilevska, Virginia

    2005-08-11

    Many applications of scientific computing rely on computations on sparse matrices. The design of efficient implementations of sparse matrix kernels is crucial for the overall efficiency of these applications. Due to the high compute-to-memory ratio and irregular memory access patterns, the performance of sparse matrix kernels is often far away from the peak performance on a modern processor. Alternative data structures have been proposed, which split the original matrix A into A{sub d} and A{sub s}, so that A{sub d} contains all dense blocks of a specified size in the matrix, and A{sub s} contains the remaining entries. This enables the use of dense matrix kernels on the entries of A{sub d} producing better memory performance. In this work, we study the problem of finding a maximum number of nonoverlapping dense blocks in a sparse matrix, which is previously not studied in the sparse matrix community. We show that the maximum nonoverlapping dense blocks problem is NP-complete by using a reduction from the maximum independent set problem on cubic planar graphs. We also propose a 2/3-approximation algorithm that runs in linear time in the number of nonzeros in the matrix. This extended abstract focuses on our results for 2x2 dense blocks. However we show that our results can be generalized to arbitrary sized dense blocks, and many other oriented substructures, which can be exploited to improve the memory performance of sparse matrix operations.

  13. Is there substructure around M87?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, L. J.; Evans, N. W.

    2016-10-01

    We present a general method to identify infalling substructure in discrete data sets with position and line-of-sight velocity data. We exploit the fact that galaxies falling on to a brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in a virialized cluster, or dwarf satellites falling on to a central galaxy like the Milky Way, follow nearly radial orbits. If the orbits are exactly radial, we show how to find the probability distribution for a satellite's energy, given a tracer density for the satellite population, by solving an Abel integral equation. This is an extension of Eddington's classical formula for the isotropic distribution function. When applied to a system of galaxies, clustering in energy space can then be quantified using the Kullback-Leibler divergence, and groups of objects can be identified which, though separated in the sky, may be falling in on the same orbit. This method is tested using mock data and applied to the satellite galaxy population around M87, the BCG in Virgo, and a number of associations that are found, which may represent infalling galaxy groups.

  14. Sub-structure of A Map Streamer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liniger, M. A.; Davies, H. C.

    A study is undertaken of the sub-structure of an upper-level PV streamer that ap- proached the European Alps during the field phase of the Mesoscale Alpine Pro- gramme (MAP) in November 1999. The diagnosis is based upon a Lagrangian For- ward Projection (LFP) technique that can provide a spatial refinement of the opera- tional ECMWF analysis fields and relate the past Lagrangian history to these. The re- constructed fields capture several notable fine-scale features of the streamer's structure that include: -spiral arms of a vortex-like feature; -a richly structured western flank to the streamer comprising a deep primary fold surmounted by a significant secondary fold with an intermediate distinctive striation that extends back into the stratosphere. The features are not at variance with independent high-resolution satellite water vapour images and measurements gathered in a flight mission using an airbourne wa- ter vapour DIAL instrument, and hence lend a measure of credence to both the LFP approach and the DIAL measurements. Moreover the analysis sheds light on the evo- lution and dynamics of the streamer's vortices, the origin of the folds, and it also has implications for stratosphere-troposphere exchange and the accompanying chemical mixing.

  15. The SEGUE K Giant Survey. III. Quantifying Galactic Halo Substructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janesh, William; Morrison, Heather L.; Ma, Zhibo; Rockosi, Constance; Starkenburg, Else; Xue, Xiang Xiang; Rix, Hans-Walter; Harding, Paul; Beers, Timothy C.; Johnson, Jennifer; Lee, Young Sun; Schneider, Donald P.

    2016-01-01

    We statistically quantify the amount of substructure in the Milky Way stellar halo using a sample of 4568 halo K giant stars at Galactocentric distances ranging over 5-125 kpc. These stars have been selected photometrically and confirmed spectroscopically as K giants from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey’s Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration project. Using a position-velocity clustering estimator (the 4distance) and a model of a smooth stellar halo, we quantify the amount of substructure in the halo, divided by distance and metallicity. Overall, we find that the halo as a whole is highly structured. We also confirm earlier work using blue horizontal branch (BHB) stars which showed that there is an increasing amount of substructure with increasing Galactocentric radius, and additionally find that the amount of substructure in the halo increases with increasing metallicity. Comparing to resampled BHB stars, we find that K giants and BHBs have similar amounts of substructure over equivalent ranges of Galactocentric radius. Using a friends-of-friends algorithm to identify members of individual groups, we find that a large fraction (˜33%) of grouped stars are associated with Sgr, and identify stars belonging to other halo star streams: the Orphan Stream, the Cetus Polar Stream, and others, including previously unknown substructures. A large fraction of sample K giants (more than 50%) are not grouped into any substructure. We find also that the Sgr stream strongly dominates groups in the outer halo for all except the most metal-poor stars, and suggest that this is the source of the increase of substructure with Galactocentric radius and metallicity.

  16. Computational comparison of CPDT to other conjugated linkers in triarylamine-based organic dyes.

    PubMed

    Climent, Clàudia; Casanova, David

    2013-01-01

    The use of the cyclopentadithiophene (cpdt) fragment to chemically link electron donor and acceptor groups has become a rather common procedure to design new organic dyes with enhanced light harvesting properties. The photo-to-current efficiencies obtained by sensitized solar cells with dyes incorporating the cpdt moiety are commonly improved with respect to other similar π-fragments as separators. In many cases, the advantages of cpdt can be related to the larger extinction coefficients obtained. In this work we perform a detailed computational study of triarylamine-based organic dyes with the cyanoacrylic acid as the acceptor group and considering a variety of conjugated linkers with cpdt as the reference case. The influence of slightly different linkers and donor groups in the computed excitation energies and oscillator strengths is discussed by means of molecular geometries and frontier orbitals. The structural characteristics imposed by cpdt compared to similar conjugated bridges are responsible for its larger computed oscillator strengths. The insertion of an ethylene unit between the donor group and the linker systematically reduces the energy gap to the first excited singlet state and yields larger oscillator strengths of the optical transition. These results could be very helpful in the quest of new organic dyes with improved properties as sensitizers in Grätzel cells.

  17. Optimization of selenium substructures as obtained from SHELXD.

    PubMed

    Dall'Antonia, Fabio; Baker, Patrick J; Schneider, Thomas R

    2003-11-01

    Using the signal of naturally inbuilt or artificially introduced anomalous scatterers to derive initial phases in a macromolecular crystal structure determination has become routine in recent years. In the context of high-throughput crystallography in particular, MAD and SAD (multiple- and single-wavelength anomalous dispersion) methods are central tools. For both techniques, a crucial step is the determination of the substructure of anomalous scatterers; subsequent phasing procedures will profit from a substructure model that is as accurate as possible. The choice of the subset of the diffraction data to be used for the substructure determination has a strong influence on the quality of the substructure and can make the difference between success and failure. The accuracy of selenium substructures obtained using F(A) values or various anomalous differences truncated to different resolutions has been investigated by comparing the sites determined by SHELXD with the selenium positions in the refined models. Based on the analysis, some recommendations for obtaining accurate and precise substructures are derived.

  18. Photocleavable linker for the patterning of bioactive molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegner, Seraphine V.; Sentürk, Oya I.; Spatz, Joachim P.

    2015-12-01

    Herein, we report the use of a versatile photocleavable nitrobenzyl linker to micropattern a wide variety of bioactive molecules and photorelease them on demand. On one end, the linker has an NHS group that can be coupled with any amine, such as peptides, proteins or amine-linkers, and on the other end an alkyne for convenient attachment to materials with an azide functional group. This linker was conjugated with NTA-amine or the cell adhesion peptide cRGD to enable straightforward patterning of His6-tagged proteins or cells, respectively, on PEGylated glass surfaces. This approach provides a practical way to control the presentation of a wide variety of bioactive molecules with high spatial and temporal resolution. The extent of photocleavage can also be controlled to tune the biomolecule density and degree of cell attachment to the surface.

  19. Linker-Mediated Self-Assembly Dynamics of Charged Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lin, Guanhua; Chee, See Wee; Raj, Sanoj; Král, Petr; Mirsaidov, Utkur

    2016-08-23

    Using in situ liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we visualized a stepwise self-assembly of surfactant-coated and hydrated gold nanoparticles (NPs) into linear chains or branched networks. The NP binding is facilitated by linker molecules, ethylenediammonium, which form hydrogen bonds with surfactant molecules of neighboring NPs. The observed spacing between bound neighboring NPs, ∼15 Å, matches the combined length of two surfactants and one linker molecule. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that for lower concentrations of linkers, NPs with charged surfactants cannot be fully neutralized by strongly binding divalent linkers, so that NPs carry higher effective charges and tend to form chains, due to poor screening. The highly polar NP surfaces polarize and partly immobilize nearby water molecules, which promotes NPs binding. The presented experimental and theoretical approach allows for detail observation and explanation of self-assembly processes in colloidal nanosystems. PMID:27494560

  20. Linker histones in hormonal gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Vicent, G P; Wright, R H G; Beato, M

    2016-03-01

    In the present review, we summarize advances in our knowledge on the role of the histone H1 family of proteins in breast cancer cells, focusing on their response to progestins. Histone H1 plays a dual role in gene regulation by hormones, both as a structural component of chromatin and as a dynamic modulator of transcription. It contributes to hormonal regulation of the MMTV promoter by stabilizing a homogeneous nucleosome positioning, which reduces basal transcription whereas at the same time promoting progesterone receptor binding and nucleosome remodeling. These combined effects enhance hormone dependent gene transcription, which eventually requires H1 phosphorylation and displacement. Various isoforms of histone H1 have specific functions in differentiated breast cancer cells and compact nucleosomal arrays to different extents in vitro. Genome-wide studies show that histone H1 has a key role in chromatin dynamics of hormone regulated genes. A complex sequence of enzymatic events, including phosphorylation by CDK2, PARylation by PARP1 and the ATP-dependent activity of NURF, are required for H1 displacement and gene de-repression, as a prerequisite for further nucleosome remodeling. Similarly, during hormone-dependent gene repression a dedicated enzymatic mechanism controls H1 deposition at promoters by a complex containing HP1γ, LSD1 and BRG1, the ATPase of the BAF complex. Thus, a broader vision of the histone code should include histone H1, as the linker histone variants actively participate in the regulation of the chromatin structure. How modifications of the core histones tails affect H1 modifications and vice versa is one of the many questions that remains to be addressed to provide a more comprehensive view of the histone cross-talk mechanisms.

  1. The importance of the cosmic web and halo substructure for power spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, Francesco; Manera, Marc; Bacon, David J.; Crittenden, Robert; Percival, Will J.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we study the relevance of the cosmic web and substructures on the matter and lensing power spectra measured from halo mock catalogues extracted from the N-body simulations. Since N-body simulations are computationally expensive, it is common to use faster methods that approximate the dark matter field as a set of haloes. In this approximation, we replace mass concentrations in N-body simulations by a spherically symmetric Navarro-Frenk-White halo density profile. We also consider the full mass field as the sum of two distinct fields: dark matter haloes (M > 9 × 1012 M⊙ h-1) and particles not included into haloes. Mock haloes reproduce well the matter power spectrum, but underestimate the lensing power spectrum on large and small scales. For sources at zs = 1 the lensing power spectrum is underestimated by up to 40 per cent at ℓ ≈ 104 with respect to the simulated haloes. The large-scale effect can be alleviated by combining the mock catalogue with the dark matter distribution outside the haloes. In addition, to evaluate the contribution of substructures we have smeared out the intrahalo substructures in an N-body simulation while keeping the halo density profiles unchanged. For the matter power spectrum the effect of this smoothing is only of the order of 5 per cent, but for lensing substructures and ellipticity are much more important: for ℓ ≈ 104 modifications to the internal structure contribute to 30 per cent of the total spectrum. These findings have important implications in the way mock catalogues have to be created, suggesting that some approximate methods currently used for galaxy surveys will be inadequate for future weak lensing surveys.

  2. Functional Genomics Reveals Linkers Critical for Influenza Virus Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lulan; Wu, Aiping; Wang, Yao E.; Quanquin, Natalie; Li, Chunfeng; Wang, Jingfeng; Chen, Hsiang-Wen; Liu, Suyang; Liu, Ping; Zhang, Hong; Qin, F. Xiao-Feng

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza virus mRNA synthesis by the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase involves binding and cleavage of capped cellular mRNA by the PB2 and PA subunits, respectively, and extension of viral mRNA by PB1. However, the mechanism for such a dynamic process is unclear. Using high-throughput mutagenesis and sequencing analysis, we have not only generated a comprehensive functional map for the microdomains of individual subunits but also have revealed the PA linker to be critical for polymerase activity. This PA linker binds to PB1 and also forms ionic interactions with the PA C-terminal channel. Nearly all mutants with five-amino-acid insertions in the linker were nonviable. Our model further suggests that the PA linker plays an important role in the conformational changes that occur between stages that favor capped mRNA binding and cleavage and those associated with viral mRNA synthesis. IMPORTANCE The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of influenza virus consists of the PB1, PB2, and PA subunits. By combining genome-wide mutagenesis analysis with the recently discovered crystal structure of the influenza polymerase heterotrimer, we generated a comprehensive functional map of the entire influenza polymerase complex. We identified the microdomains of individual subunits, including the catalytic domains, the interaction interfaces between subunits, and nine linkers interconnecting different domains. Interestingly, we found that mutants with five-amino-acid insertions in individual linkers were nonviable, suggesting the critical roles these linkers play in coordinating spatial relationships between the subunits. We further identified an extended PA linker that binds to PB1 and also forms ionic interactions with the PA C-terminal channel. PMID:26719244

  3. Linkers Having a Crucial Role in Antibody–Drug Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jun; Jiang, Feng; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Antibody–drug conjugates (ADCs) comprised of a desirable monoclonal antibody, an active cytotoxic drug and an appropriate linker are considered to be an innovative therapeutic approach for targeted treatment of various types of tumors and cancers, enhancing the therapeutic parameter of the cytotoxic drug and reducing the possibility of systemic cytotoxicity. An appropriate linker between the antibody and the cytotoxic drug provides a specific bridge, and thus helps the antibody to selectively deliver the cytotoxic drug to tumor cells and accurately releases the cytotoxic drug at tumor sites. In addition to conjugation, the linkers maintain ADCs’ stability during the preparation and storage stages of the ADCs and during the systemic circulation period. The design of linkers for ADCs is a challenge in terms of extracellular stability and intracellular release, and intracellular circumstances, such as the acid environment, the reducing environment and cathepsin, are considered as the catalysts to activate the triggers for initiating the cleavage of ADCs. This review discusses the linkers used in the clinical and marketing stages for ADCs and details the fracture modes of the linkers for the further development of ADCs. PMID:27089329

  4. Linkers Having a Crucial Role in Antibody-Drug Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Jiang, Feng; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) comprised of a desirable monoclonal antibody, an active cytotoxic drug and an appropriate linker are considered to be an innovative therapeutic approach for targeted treatment of various types of tumors and cancers, enhancing the therapeutic parameter of the cytotoxic drug and reducing the possibility of systemic cytotoxicity. An appropriate linker between the antibody and the cytotoxic drug provides a specific bridge, and thus helps the antibody to selectively deliver the cytotoxic drug to tumor cells and accurately releases the cytotoxic drug at tumor sites. In addition to conjugation, the linkers maintain ADCs' stability during the preparation and storage stages of the ADCs and during the systemic circulation period. The design of linkers for ADCs is a challenge in terms of extracellular stability and intracellular release, and intracellular circumstances, such as the acid environment, the reducing environment and cathepsin, are considered as the catalysts to activate the triggers for initiating the cleavage of ADCs. This review discusses the linkers used in the clinical and marketing stages for ADCs and details the fracture modes of the linkers for the further development of ADCs. PMID:27089329

  5. Substructure and Dynamics of the Fornax Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drinkwater, Michael J.; Gregg, Michael D.; Colless, Matthew

    2001-02-01

    We present the first dynamical analysis of a galaxy cluster to include a large fraction of dwarf galaxies. Our sample of 108 Fornax Cluster members measured with the UK Schmidt Telescope FLAIR-II spectrograph contains 55 dwarf galaxies (15.5>bJ>18.0 or -16>MB>-13.5). Hα emission shows that 36%+/-8% of the dwarfs are star forming, twice the fraction implied by morphological classifications. The total sample has a mean velocity of 1493+/-36 km s-1 and a velocity dispersion of 374+/-26 km s-1. The dwarf galaxies form a distinct population: their velocity dispersion (429+/-41 km s-1) is larger than that of the giants (308+/-30 km s-1) at the 98% confidence level. This suggests that the dwarf population is dominated by infalling objects whereas the giants are virialized. The Fornax system has two components, the main Fornax Cluster centered on NGC 1399 with cz=1478 km s-1 and σcz=370 km s-1 and a subcluster centered 3° to the southwest including NGC 1316 with cz=1583 km s-1 and σcz=377 km s-1. This partition is preferred over a single cluster at the 99% confidence level. The subcluster, a site of intense star formation, is bound to Fornax and probably infalling toward the cluster core for the first time. We discuss the implications of this substructure for distance estimates of the Fornax Cluster. We determine the cluster mass profile using the method of Diaferio, which does not assume a virialized sample. The mass within a projected radius of 1.4 Mpc is (7+/-2)×1013 Msolar, and the mass-to-light ratio is 300+/-100 Msolar/Lsolar. The mass is consistent with values derived from the projected mass virial estimator and X-ray measurements at smaller radii.

  6. An isotopically tagged azobenzene-based cleavable linker for quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yu; Martell, Julianne; Pace, Nicholas J; Ballard, T Eric; Johnson, Douglas S; Weerapana, Eranthie

    2013-08-19

    Putting a number on it: Cleavable linkers are widely utilized in proteomics applications. In particular, the azobenzene-based linker cleaves under mild conditions that are mass-spectrometry-compatible. Here, we adapt this linker for quantitative proteomic applications by incorporating an isotopic label. These light- and heavy-tagged linkers enable the identification and quantitation of labeled peptides from multiple proteomes.

  7. Detecting dark matter substructure spectroscopically in strong gravitational lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Metcalf, R. Benton

    2003-03-01

    The cold dark matter (CDM) model for galaxy formation predicts that a significant fraction of mass in the dark matter haloes that surround L~L* galaxies is bound in substructures of mass 104-107 Msolar. The number of observable baryonic substructures (such as dwarf galaxies and globular clusters) falls short of these predictions by at least an order of magnitude. We present a method for searching for substructure in the haloes of gravitational lenses that produce multiple images of quasi-stellar objects (QSOs), such as four-image Einstein Cross lenses. Current methods based on broad-band flux ratios cannot cleanly distinguish between substructure, differential extinction, scattering in the radio by ionized regions in the lens galaxy, microlensing by stars and, most importantly, ambiguities in the host lens model. These difficulties may be overcome by utilizing the prediction that, when substructure is present, the magnification will be a function of source size. QSO broad-line and narrow-line emission regions are ~1 pc and >100 pc in size, respectively. The radio emission region is typically intermediate to these and the continuum emission region is much smaller. When narrow-line region (NLR) features are used as a normalization, the relative intensity and equivalent width of broad-line region (BLR) features will respectively reflect substructure-lensing and microlensing effects. Spectroscopic observations of just a few image pairs would probably be able to extract the desired substructure signature cleanly and distinguish it from microlensing - depending on the actual level of projected mass in substructure. In the rest-optical, the Hβ/[OIII] region is ideal, since the narrow wavelength range also largely eliminates differential reddening problems. In the rest-ultraviolet, the region longward of and including Lyα may also work. Simulations of Q2237+0305 are done as an example, to determine the level of substructure that is detectable in this way. Possible

  8. Gamma-ray probes of dark matter substructure

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Sheldon

    2014-06-24

    The substructure content of dark matter halos is interesting because it can be affected by complex galaxy physics and dark matter particle physics. However, observing the small scale structure of dark matter is a challenge. The subhalo abundance (mass function, minimum mass) and morphology (density profile, subhalo shape, subsubstructure) contain information about complex astrophysics (halo formation processes) and new exotic fundamental physics (dark matter interactions). Indirect detection of dark matter annihilation radiation (DMAR) in gamma rays may be the most direct method for observing small scale structure. I outline the ways in which gamma rays may probe halo substructure. If substructure is bountiful, it may be responsible for the eventual discovery of DMAR, for instance in galaxy clusters or the diffuse gamma-ray background. Otherwise, the observation of DMAR in places without much substructure, such as the Galactic center, would lead to strict limits on the properties of small scale structure. Properties of the gamma-ray angular power spectrum will also provide information or constraints on Milky Way halo substructure.

  9. On substructuring algorithms and solution techniques for the numerical approximation of partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunzburger, M. D.; Nicolaides, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Substructuring methods are in common use in mechanics problems where typically the associated linear systems of algebraic equations are positive definite. Here these methods are extended to problems which lead to nonpositive definite, nonsymmetric matrices. The extension is based on an algorithm which carries out the block Gauss elimination procedure without the need for interchanges even when a pivot matrix is singular. Examples are provided wherein the method is used in connection with finite element solutions of the stationary Stokes equations and the Helmholtz equation, and dual methods for second-order elliptic equations.

  10. Construction of multiform scFv antibodies using linker peptide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shihua; Zheng, Cengjie; Liu, Ying; Zheng, Huirong; Wang, Zonghua

    2008-05-01

    Multiform single chain variable fragments (scFvs) including different length linker scFvs and bispecific scFv were constructed. The linker lengths of 0, 3, 5, 8, 12, and 15 amino acids between V(H) and V(L) of antideoxynivalenol (anti-DON) scFv were used to analyze the affinities of scFvs. The affinity constants of these scFvs increased when the linker was lower than 12 amino acids. The affinity constant would not change when the linker was longer than 12 amino acids. Fusion gene of anti-DON scFv and antizearalenone (anti-ZEN) scFv was also constructed through connection by a short peptide linker DNA to express a bispecific scFv. The affinity constants assay showed that the two scFvs of fusion bispecific scFv remained their own affinity compared to their parental scFvs. Competitive direct enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect DON and ZEN in contaminated wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) samples, and the results indicated that this bispecific scFv was applicable in DON and ZEN detection. This work confirmed that bispecific scFv could be successfully obtained, and might also have an application in diagnosing fungal infection, and breeding transgenic plants.

  11. Functional Group and Substructure Searching as a Tool in Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Kotera, Masaaki; McDonald, Andrew G.; Boyce, Sinéad; Tipton, Keith F.

    2008-01-01

    Background A direct link between the names and structures of compounds and the functional groups contained within them is important, not only because biochemists frequently rely on literature that uses a free-text format to describe functional groups, but also because metabolic models depend upon the connections between enzymes and substrates being known and appropriately stored in databases. Methodology We have developed a database named “Biochemical Substructure Search Catalogue” (BiSSCat), which contains 489 functional groups, >200,000 compounds and >1,000,000 different computationally constructed substructures, to allow identification of chemical compounds of biological interest. Conclusions This database and its associated web-based search program (http://bisscat.org/) can be used to find compounds containing selected combinations of substructures and functional groups. It can be used to determine possible additional substrates for known enzymes and for putative enzymes found in genome projects. Its applications to enzyme inhibitor design are also discussed. PMID:18253485

  12. EFFECT OF DARK MATTER HALO SUBSTRUCTURES ON GALAXY ROTATION CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Nirupam

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, the effect of halo substructures on galaxy rotation curves is investigated using a simple model of dark matter clustering. A dark matter halo density profile is developed based only on the scale-free nature of clustering that leads to a statistically self-similar distribution of the substructures at the galactic scale. A semi-analytical method is used to derive rotation curves for such a clumpy dark matter density profile. It is found that the halo substructures significantly affect the galaxy velocity field. Based on the fractal geometry of the halo, this self-consistent model predicts a Navarro-Frenk-White-like rotation curve and a scale-free power spectrum of the rotation velocity fluctuations.

  13. A Robust Control Design Framework for Substructure Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Kyong B.

    1994-01-01

    A framework for designing control systems directly from substructure models and uncertainties is proposed. The technique is based on combining a set of substructure robust control problems by an interface stiffness matrix which appears as a constant gain feedback. Variations of uncertainties in the interface stiffness are treated as a parametric uncertainty. It is shown that multivariable robust control can be applied to generate centralized or decentralized controllers that guarantee performance with respect to uncertainties in the interface stiffness, reduced component modes and external disturbances. The technique is particularly suited for large, complex, and weakly coupled flexible structures.

  14. Phenotypic variation of erythrocyte linker histone H1.c in a pheasant (Phasianus colchicus L.) population.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Andrzej; Pa Yga, Jan; Górnicka-Michalska, Ewa; Bernacki, Zenon; Adamski, Marek

    2010-07-01

    Our goal was to characterize a phenotypic variation of the pheasant erythrocyte linker histone subtype H1.c. By using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis three histone H1.c phenotypes were identified. The differently migrating allelic variants H1.c1 and H1.c2 formed either two homozygous phenotypes, c1 and c2, or a single heterozygous phenotype, c1c2. In the pheasant population screened, birds with phenotype c2 were the most common (frequency 0.761) while individuals with phenotype c1 were rare (frequency 0.043).

  15. A substructure coupling procedure applicable to general linear time-invariant dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howsman, T. G.; Craig, R. R., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A substructure synthesis procedure applicable to structural systems containing general nonconservative terms is presented. In their final form, the non-self-adjoint substructure equations of motion are cast in state vector form through the use of a variational principle. A reduced-order model for each substructure is implemented by representing the substructure as a combination of a small number of Ritz vectors. For the method presented, the substructure Ritz vectors are identified as a truncated set of substructure eigenmodes, which are typically complex, along with a set of generalized real attachment modes. The formation of the generalized attachment modes does not require any knowledge of the substructure flexible modes; hence, only the eigenmodes used explicitly as Ritz vectors need to be extracted from the substructure eigenproblem. An example problem is presented to illustrate the method.

  16. A substructure coupling procedure applicable to general linear time-invariant dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howsman, T. G.; Craig, R. R., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A substructure synthesis procedure applicable to structural systems containing general nonconservative terms is presented. In their final form, the nonself-adjoint substructure equations of motion are cast in state vector form through the use of a variational principle. A reduced-order mode for each substructure is implemented by representing the substructure as a combination of a small number of Ritz vectors. For the method presented, the substructure Ritz vectors are identified as a truncated set of substructure eigenmodes, which are typically complex, along with a set of generalized real attachment modes. The formation of the generalized attachment modes does not require any knowledge of the substructure flexible modes; hence, only the eigenmodes used explicitly as Ritz vectors need to be extracted from the substructure eigenproblem. An example problem is presented to illustrate the method.

  17. 7. General view of substructure of bridge, taken from hills ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. General view of substructure of bridge, taken from hills to northeast of bridge. Note old stone abutment under existing bridge, detailing of arch and abutments. - Presumpscot Falls Bridge, Spanning Presumptscot River at Allen Avenue extension, 0.75 mile west of U.S. Interstate 95, Falmouth, Cumberland County, ME

  18. QUANTIFYING KINEMATIC SUBSTRUCTURE IN THE MILKY WAY'S STELLAR HALO

    SciTech Connect

    Xue Xiangxiang; Zhao Gang; Luo Ali; Rix, Hans-Walter; Bell, Eric F.; Koposov, Sergey E.; Kang, Xi; Liu, Chao; Yanny, Brian; Beers, Timothy C.; Lee, Young Sun; Bullock, James S.; Johnston, Kathryn V.; Morrison, Heather; Rockosi, Constance

    2011-09-01

    We present and analyze the positions, distances, and radial velocities for over 4000 blue horizontal-branch (BHB) stars in the Milky Way's halo, drawn from SDSS DR8. We search for position-velocity substructure in these data, a signature of the hierarchical assembly of the stellar halo. Using a cumulative 'close pair distribution' as a statistic in the four-dimensional space of sky position, distance, and velocity, we quantify the presence of position-velocity substructure at high statistical significance among the BHB stars: pairs of BHB stars that are close in position on the sky tend to have more similar distances and radial velocities compared to a random sampling of these overall distributions. We make analogous mock observations of 11 numerical halo formation simulations, in which the stellar halo is entirely composed of disrupted satellite debris, and find a level of substructure comparable to that seen in the actually observed BHB star sample. This result quantitatively confirms the hierarchical build-up of the stellar halo through a signature in phase (position-velocity) space. In detail, the structure present in the BHB stars is somewhat less prominent than that seen in most simulated halos, quite possibly because BHB stars represent an older sub-population. BHB stars located beyond 20 kpc from the Galactic center exhibit stronger substructure than at r{sub gc} < 20 kpc.

  19. A Frequency-Domain Substructure System Identification Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blades, Eric L.; Craig, Roy R., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    A new frequency-domain system identification algorithm is presented for system identification of substructures, such as payloads to be flown aboard the Space Shuttle. In the vibration test, all interface degrees of freedom where the substructure is connected to the carrier structure are either subjected to active excitation or are supported by a test stand with the reaction forces measured. The measured frequency-response data is used to obtain a linear, viscous-damped model with all interface-degree of freedom entries included. This model can then be used to validate analytical substructure models. This procedure makes it possible to obtain not only the fixed-interface modal data associated with a Craig-Bampton substructure model, but also the data associated with constraint modes. With this proposed algorithm, multiple-boundary-condition tests are not required, and test-stand dynamics is accounted for without requiring a separate modal test or finite element modeling of the test stand. Numerical simulations are used in examining the algorithm's ability to estimate valid reduced-order structural models. The algorithm's performance when frequency-response data covering narrow and broad frequency bandwidths is used as input is explored. Its performance when noise is added to the frequency-response data and the use of different least squares solution techniques are also examined. The identified reduced-order models are also compared for accuracy with other test-analysis models and a formulation for a Craig-Bampton test-analysis model is also presented.

  20. Experimentally implementable criteria revealing substructures of genuine multipartite entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, Marcus; Schimpf, Hans; Gabriel, Andreas; Spengler, Christoph; Bruss, Dagmar; Hiesmayr, Beatrix C.

    2011-02-15

    We present a general framework that reveals substructures of genuine multipartite entanglement. Via simple inequalities it is possible to discriminate different sets of multipartite qubit states. These inequalities are beneficial regarding experimental examinations as only local measurements are required. Furthermore, the number of observables scales favorably with system size. In exemplary cases we demonstrate the noise resistance and discuss implementations.

  1. SUBSTRUCTURE AND RAMP DETAIL VIEW OF FIRST AVENUE ON AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SUBSTRUCTURE AND RAMP DETAIL VIEW OF FIRST AVENUE ON- AND OFF-RAMPS, LOOKING SOUTHEAST AT FIRST AVENUE (DEARBORN AND RAILROAD AVENUES SOUTH INTERSECTION). NOTE STEEL AND CONCRETE GIRDERS AND CONCRETE COLUMNS. - Alaskan Way Viaduct and Battery Street Tunnel, Seattle, King County, WA

  2. Detail view of substructure, view looking south at the center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of substructure, view looking south at the center in-water frame bent - North Fork Butter Creek Bridge, Spanning North Fork Butter Creek Bridge at Milepost 76.63 on Heppner Highway (Oregon Route 74), Pilot Rock, Umatilla County, OR

  3. Synthesis of a novel photoactivatable glucosylceramide cross-linker.

    PubMed

    Budani, Monique; Mylvaganam, Murugesapillai; Binnington, Beth; Lingwood, Clifford

    2016-09-01

    The biosynthesis of glucosylceramide (GlcCer) is a key rate-limiting step in complex glycosphingolipid (GSL) biosynthesis. To further define interacting partners of GlcCer, we have made a cleavable, biotinylated, photoreactive GlcCer analog in which the reactive nitrene is closely apposed to the GlcCer head group, by substituting the native fatty acid with d, l-2-aminohexadecanoic acid. Two amino-GlcCer diastereomer cross-linkers (XLA and XLB) were generated. XLB proved an effective lactosylceramide (LacCer) synthase substrate while XLA was inhibitory. Both probes specifically bound and cross-linked the GlcCer binding protein, glycolipid transfer protein (GLTP), but not other GSL binding proteins (Shiga toxin and cholera toxin). GlcCer inhibited GLTP cross-linking. Both GlcCer cross-linkers competed with microsomal nitrobenzoxadiazole (NBD)-GlcCer anabolism to NBD-LacCer. GLTP showed marked, ATP-dependent enhancement of cell-free intact microsomal LacCer synthesis from endogenous or exogenous liposomal GlcCer, supporting a role in the transport/membrane translocation of cytosolic and extra-Golgi GlcCer. GLTP was specifically labeled by either XLA or XLB GlcCer cross-linker during this process, together with a (the same) small subset of microsomal proteins. These cross-linkers will serve to probe physiologically relevant GlcCer-interacting cellular proteins. PMID:27412675

  4. Steric spacing of molecular linkers on passivated Si(111) photoelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Basile, Victoria M; Pekarek, Ryan T; Rose, Michael J

    2014-11-26

    Surfaces with high photoelectrochemical and electronic quality can be prepared by tethering small molecules to single-crystalline Si(111) surfaces using a two-step halogenation/alkylation method (by Lewis and co-workers).1-7 We report here that the surface coverage of custom-synthesized, phenyl-based molecular linkers can be controlled by varying the steric size of R-groups (R=CH3, C6H11, 2-ethylhexyl) at the periphery of the linker. Additionally, the linkers possess a para triflate group (-O2SCF3) that serves as a convenient analytical marker and as a point of covalent attachment for a redox active label. Quantitative X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements revealed that the surface coverage systematically varies according to the steric size of the linker: CH3 (6.7±0.8%), CyHex (2.9±1.2%), EtHex (2.1±0.9%). The stability of the photoelectrochemical cyclic voltammetry (PEC-CV) behavior was dependent on an additional methylation step (with CH3MgCl) to passivate residual Si(111)-Cl bonds. Subsequently, the triflate functional group was utilized to perform Pd-catalyzed Heck coupling of vinylferrocene to the surface-attached linkers. Ferrocene surface coverages measured from cyclic voltammetry on the ferrocene-functionalized surfaces Si(111)-8a/CH3-Fc (R=CH3) and Si(111)-8c/CH3-Fc (R=2-EtHex) are consistent with the corresponding Fe 2p XPS coverages and suggest a ∼1:1 conversion of surface triflate groups to vinyl-Fc sites. The surface defect densities of the linker/CH3 modified surfaces are dependent on the coverage and composition of the organic layer. Surface recombination velocity (SRV) measurements indicated that n-Si(111)-8a/CH3 and the ferrocene coupled n-Si(111)-8a/CH3-Fc exhibited relatively high surface carrier lifetimes (4.51 and 3.88 μs, respectively) and correspondingly low S values (3880 and 4510 cm s(-1)). Thus, the multistep, linker/Fc functionalized surfaces exhibit analogously low trap state densities as compared to the fully

  5. Cold Dark Matter Substructure and Galactic Disks I: Morphological Signatures of Hierarchical SatelliteAccretion

    SciTech Connect

    Kazantzidis, Stelios; Bullock, James S.; Zentner, Andrew R.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Moustakas, Leonidas A.

    2007-12-03

    We conduct a series of high-resolution, fully self-consistent dissipation less N-body simulations to investigate the cumulative effect of substructure mergers onto thin disk galaxies in the context of the {Lambda}CDM paradigm of structure formation. Our simulation campaign is based on a hybrid approach combining cosmological simulations and controlled numerical experiments. Substructure mass functions, orbital distributions, internal structures, and accretion times are culled directly from cosmological simulations of galaxy-sized cold dark matter (CDM) halos. We demonstrate that accretions of massive subhalos onto the central regions of host halos, where the galactic disk resides, since z {approx} 1 should be common occurrences. In contrast, extremely few satellites in present-day CDM halos are likely to have a significant impact on the disk structure. This is due to the fact that massive subhalos with small orbital pericenters that are most capable of strongly perturbing the disk become either tidally disrupted or suffer substantial mass loss prior to z = 0. One host halo merger history is subsequently used to seed controlled N-body experiments of repeated satellite impacts on an initially-thin Milky Way-type disk galaxy. These simulations track the effects of six dark matter substructures, with initial masses in the range {approx} (0.7-2) x 10{sup 10} M{sub {circle_dot}} ({approx} 20-60% of the disk mass), crossing the disk in the past {approx} 8 Gyr. We show that these accretion events produce several distinctive observational signatures in the stellar disk including: a long-lived, low-surface brightness, ring-like feature in the outskirts; a significant flare; a central bar; and faint filamentary structures that (spuriously) resemble tidal streams in configuration space. The final distribution of disk stars exhibits a complex vertical structure that is well-described by a standard 'thin-thick' disk decomposition, where the 'thick' disk component has emerged

  6. Floating substructure flexibility of large-volume 10MW offshore wind turbine platforms in dynamic calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borg, Michael; Melchior Hansen, Anders; Bredmose, Henrik

    2016-09-01

    Designing floating substructures for the next generation of 10MW and larger wind turbines has introduced new challenges in capturing relevant physical effects in dynamic simulation tools. In achieving technically and economically optimal floating substructures, structural flexibility may increase to the extent that it becomes relevant to include in addition to the standard rigid body substructure modes which are typically described through linear radiation-diffraction theory. This paper describes a method for the inclusion of substructural flexibility in aero-hydro-servo-elastic dynamic simulations for large-volume substructures, including wave-structure interactions, to form the basis of deriving sectional loads and stresses within the substructure. The method is applied to a case study to illustrate the implementation and relevance. It is found that the flexible mode is significantly excited in an extreme event, indicating an increase in predicted substructure internal loads.

  7. Tableau-based protein substructure search using quadratic programming

    PubMed Central

    Stivala, Alex; Wirth, Anthony; Stuckey, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    Background Searching for proteins that contain similar substructures is an important task in structural biology. The exact solution of most formulations of this problem, including a recently published method based on tableaux, is too slow for practical use in scanning a large database. Results We developed an improved method for detecting substructural similarities in proteins using tableaux. Tableaux are compared efficiently by solving the quadratic program (QP) corresponding to the quadratic integer program (QIP) formulation of the extraction of maximally-similar tableaux. We compare the accuracy of the method in classifying protein folds with some existing techniques. Conclusion We find that including constraints based on the separation of secondary structure elements increases the accuracy of protein structure search using maximally-similar subtableau extraction, to a level where it has comparable or superior accuracy to existing techniques. We demonstrate that our implementation is able to search a structural database in a matter of hours on a standard PC. PMID:19450287

  8. SUBSTRUCTURE IN THE STELLAR HALOS OF THE AQUARIUS SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Helmi, Amina; Cooper, A. P.; Cole, S.; Frenk, C. S.; White, S. D. M.; Navarro, J. F.

    2011-05-20

    We characterize the substructure in the simulated stellar halos of Cooper et al. which were formed by the disruption of satellite galaxies within the cosmological N-body simulations of galactic halos of the Aquarius project. These stellar halos exhibit a wealth of tidal features: broad overdensities and very narrow faint streams akin to those observed around the Milky Way. The substructures are distributed anisotropically on the sky, a characteristic that should become apparent in the next generation of photometric surveys. The normalized RMS of the density of stars on the sky appears to be systematically larger for our halos compared with the value estimated for the Milky Way from main-sequence turnoff stars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We show that this is likely to be due in part to contamination by faint QSOs and redder main-sequence stars, and might suggest that {approx}10% of the Milky Way halo stars have formed in situ.

  9. Fold Recognition Using Sequence Fingerprints of Protein Local Substructures

    SciTech Connect

    Kryshtafovych, A A; Hvidsten, T; Komorowski, J; Fidelis, K

    2003-06-04

    A protein local substructure (descriptor) is a set of several short non-overlapping fragments of the polypeptide chain. Each descriptor describes local environment of a particular residue and includes only those segments that are located in the proximity of this residue. Similar descriptors from the representative set of proteins were analyzed to reveal links between the substructures and sequences of their segments. Using detected sequence-based fingerprints specific geometrical conformations are assigned to new sequences. The ability of the approach to recognize correct SCOP folds was tested on 273 sequences from the 49 most popular folds. Good predictions were obtained in 85% of cases. No performance drop was observed with decreasing sequence similarity between target sequences and sequences from the training set of proteins.

  10. Towards an understanding of the correlations in jet substructure

    DOE PAGES

    Adams, D.; Arce, A.; Asquith, L.; Backovic, M.; Barillari, T.; Berta, P.; Bertolini, D.; Buckley, A.; Butterworth, J.; Camacho Toro, R.  C.; et al

    2015-09-09

    Over the past decade, a large number of jet substructure observables have been proposed in the literature, and explored at the LHC experiments. Such observables attempt to utilize the internal structure of jets in order to distinguish those initiated by quarks, gluons, or by boosted heavy objects, such as top quarks and W bosons. This report, originating from and motivated by the BOOST2013 workshop, presents original particle-level studies that aim to improve our understanding of the relationships between jet substructure observables, their complementarity, and their dependence on the underlying jet properties, particularly the jet radius and jet transverse momentum. Thismore » is explored in the context of quark/gluon discrimination, boosted W boson tagging and boosted top quark tagging.« less

  11. Towards an understanding of the correlations in jet substructure

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.; Arce, A.; Asquith, L.; Backovic, M.; Barillari, T.; Berta, P.; Bertolini, D.; Buckley, A.; Butterworth, J.; Camacho Toro, R.  C.; Caudron, J.; Chien, Y. -T.; Cogan, J.; Cooper, B.; Curtin, D.; Debenedetti, C.; Dolen, J.; Eklund, M.; El Hedri, S.; Ellis, S.  D.; Embry, T.; Ferencek, D.; Ferrando, J.; Fleischmann, S.; Freytsis, M.; Giulini, M.; Han, Z.; Hare, D.; Harris, P.; Hinzmann, A.; Hoing, R.; Hornig, A.; Jankowiak, M.; Johns, K.; Kasieczka, G.; Kogler, R.; Lampl, W.; Larkoski, A.  J.; Lee, C.; Leone, R.; Loch, P.; Lopez Mateos, D.; Lou, H. K.; Low, M.; Maksimovic, P.; Marchesini, I.; Marzani, S.; Masetti, L.; McCarthy, R.; Menke, S.; Miller, D.  W.; Mishra, K.; Nachman, B.; Nef, P.; O’Grady, F.  T.; Ovcharova, A.; Picazio, A.; Pollard, C.; Potter-Landua, B.; Potter, C.; Rappoccio, S.; Rojo, J.; Rutherfoord, J.; Salam, G.  P.; Schabinger, R.  M.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwartz, M.  D.; Shuve, B.; Sinervo, P.; Soper, D.; Sosa Corral, D.  E.; Spannowsky, M.; Strauss, E.; Swiatlowski, M.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, C.; Thompson, E.; Tran, N.  V.; Tseng, J.; Usai, E.; Valery, L.; Veatch, J.; Vos, M.; Waalewijn, W.; Wacker, J.; Young, C.

    2015-09-09

    Over the past decade, a large number of jet substructure observables have been proposed in the literature, and explored at the LHC experiments. Such observables attempt to utilize the internal structure of jets in order to distinguish those initiated by quarks, gluons, or by boosted heavy objects, such as top quarks and W bosons. This report, originating from and motivated by the BOOST2013 workshop, presents original particle-level studies that aim to improve our understanding of the relationships between jet substructure observables, their complementarity, and their dependence on the underlying jet properties, particularly the jet radius and jet transverse momentum. This is explored in the context of quark/gluon discrimination, boosted W boson tagging and boosted top quark tagging.

  12. Substructure of the inner core of the Earth.

    PubMed Central

    Herndon, J M

    1996-01-01

    The rationale is disclosed for a substructure within the Earth's inner core, consisting of an actinide subcore at the center of the Earth, surrounded by a subshell composed of the products of nuclear fission and radioactive decay. Estimates are made as to possible densities, physical dimensions, and chemical compositions. The feasibility for self-sustaining nuclear fission within the subcore is demonstrated, and implications bearing on the structure and geodynamic activity of the inner core are discussed. PMID:11607625

  13. Fast antibody fragment motion: flexible linkers act as entropic spring.

    PubMed

    Stingaciu, Laura R; Ivanova, Oxana; Ohl, Michael; Biehl, Ralf; Richter, Dieter

    2016-03-29

    A flexible linker region between three fragments allows antibodies to adjust their binding sites to an antigen or receptor. Using Neutron Spin Echo Spectroscopy we observed fragment motion on a timescale of 7 ns with motional amplitudes of about 1 nm relative to each other. The mechanistic complexity of the linker region can be described by a spring model with Brownian motion of the fragments in a harmonic potential. Displacements, timescale, friction and force constant of the underlying dynamics are accessed. The force constant exhibits a similar strength to an entropic spring, with friction of the fragment matching the unbound state. The observed fast motions are fluctuations in pre-existing equilibrium configurations. The Brownian motion of domains in a harmonic potential is the appropriate model to examine functional hinge motions dependent on the structural topology and highlights the role of internal forces and friction to function.

  14. Fast antibody fragment motion: flexible linkers act as entropic spring

    DOE PAGES

    Stingaciu, Laura R.; Ivanova, Oxana; Ohl, Michael; Biehl, Ralf; Richter, Dieter

    2016-03-29

    A flexible linker region between three fragments allows antibodies to adjust their binding sites to an antigen or receptor. Using Neutron Spin Echo Spectroscopy we observed fragment motion on a timescale of 7 ns with motional amplitudes of about 1 nm relative to each other. The mechanistic complexity of the linker region can be described by a spring model with Brownian motion of the fragments in a harmonic potential. Displacements, timescale, friction and force constant of the underlying dynamics are accessed. The force constant exhibits a similar strength to an entropic spring, with friction of the fragment matching the unboundmore » state. The observed fast motions are fluctuations in pre-existing equilibrium configurations. In conclusion, the Brownian motion of domains in a harmonic potential is the appropriate model to examine functional hinge motions dependent on the structural topology and highlights the role of internal forces and friction to function.« less

  15. Fast antibody fragment motion: flexible linkers act as entropic spring.

    PubMed

    Stingaciu, Laura R; Ivanova, Oxana; Ohl, Michael; Biehl, Ralf; Richter, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    A flexible linker region between three fragments allows antibodies to adjust their binding sites to an antigen or receptor. Using Neutron Spin Echo Spectroscopy we observed fragment motion on a timescale of 7 ns with motional amplitudes of about 1 nm relative to each other. The mechanistic complexity of the linker region can be described by a spring model with Brownian motion of the fragments in a harmonic potential. Displacements, timescale, friction and force constant of the underlying dynamics are accessed. The force constant exhibits a similar strength to an entropic spring, with friction of the fragment matching the unbound state. The observed fast motions are fluctuations in pre-existing equilibrium configurations. The Brownian motion of domains in a harmonic potential is the appropriate model to examine functional hinge motions dependent on the structural topology and highlights the role of internal forces and friction to function. PMID:27020739

  16. Actin Cross-Linkers and the Shape of Stereocilia

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Martin; Prost, Jacques; Joanny, Jean-François

    2010-01-01

    Stereocilia are actin-based cellular protrusions essential for hearing. We propose that they are shaped by the detachment dynamics of actin cross-linkers, in particular espin. We account for experimentally observed stereocilium shapes, treadmilling velocity to length relationship, espin 1 localization profile, and microvillus length to espin level relationship. If the cross-linkers are allowed to reattach, our model yields a dynamical phase transition toward unbounded growth. Considering the simplified case of a noninteracting, one-filament system, we calculate the length probability distribution in the growing phase and its stationary form in a continuum approximation of the finite-length phase. Numerical simulations of interacting filaments suggest an anomalous power-law divergence of the protrusion length at the growth transition, which could be a universal feature of cross-linked depolymerizing systems. PMID:20959082

  17. Peptide linkers for the assembly of semiconductor quantum dot bioconjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeneman, Kelly; Mei, Bing C.; Deschamps, Jeffrey R.; Delehanty, James B.; Mattoussi, Hedi; Medintz, Igor

    2009-02-01

    The use of semiconductor luminescent quantum dots for the labeling of biomolecules is rapidly expanding, however it still requires facile methods to attach functional globular proteins to biologically optimized quantum dots. Here we discuss the development of controlled variable length peptidyl linkers to attach biomolecules to poly(ethylene) glycol (PEG) coated quantum dots for both in vitro and in vivo applications. The peptides chosen, β-sheets and alpha helices are appended to polyhistidine sequences and this allows for control of the ratio of peptide bioconjugated to QD and the distance from QD to the biomolecule. Recombinant DNA engineering, bacterial peptide expression and Ni-NTA purification of histidine labeled peptides are utilized to create the linkers. Peptide length is confirmed by in vitro fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET).

  18. Fast antibody fragment motion: flexible linkers act as entropic spring

    PubMed Central

    Stingaciu, Laura R.; Ivanova, Oxana; Ohl, Michael; Biehl, Ralf; Richter, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    A flexible linker region between three fragments allows antibodies to adjust their binding sites to an antigen or receptor. Using Neutron Spin Echo Spectroscopy we observed fragment motion on a timescale of 7 ns with motional amplitudes of about 1 nm relative to each other. The mechanistic complexity of the linker region can be described by a spring model with Brownian motion of the fragments in a harmonic potential. Displacements, timescale, friction and force constant of the underlying dynamics are accessed. The force constant exhibits a similar strength to an entropic spring, with friction of the fragment matching the unbound state. The observed fast motions are fluctuations in pre-existing equilibrium configurations. The Brownian motion of domains in a harmonic potential is the appropriate model to examine functional hinge motions dependent on the structural topology and highlights the role of internal forces and friction to function. PMID:27020739

  19. Modal Substructuring of Geometrically Nonlinear Finite-Element Models

    DOE PAGES

    Kuether, Robert J.; Allen, Matthew S.; Hollkamp, Joseph J.

    2016-02-01

    The efficiency of a modal substructuring method depends on the component modes used to reduce each subcomponent model. Methods such as Craig–Bampton have been used extensively to reduce linear finite-element models with thousands or even millions of degrees of freedom down orders of magnitude while maintaining acceptable accuracy. A novel reduction method is proposed here for geometrically nonlinear finite-element models using the fixed-interface and constraint modes of the linearized system to reduce each subcomponent model. The geometric nonlinearity requires an additional cubic and quadratic polynomial function in the modal equations, and the nonlinear stiffness coefficients are determined by applying amore » series of static loads and using the finite-element code to compute the response. The geometrically nonlinear, reduced modal equations for each subcomponent are then coupled by satisfying compatibility and force equilibrium. This modal substructuring approach is an extension of the Craig–Bampton method and is readily applied to geometrically nonlinear models built directly within commercial finite-element packages. The efficiency of this new approach is demonstrated on two example problems: one that couples two geometrically nonlinear beams at a shared rotational degree of freedom, and another that couples an axial spring element to the axial degree of freedom of a geometrically nonlinear beam. The nonlinear normal modes of the assembled models are compared with those of a truth model to assess the accuracy of the novel modal substructuring approach.« less

  20. Population substructure and isolation by distance in three continental regions.

    PubMed

    Eller, E

    1999-02-01

    Isolation by distance and divergence from a shared population history are two sources of population substructure. Isolation by distance erases population history as populations approach migration-drift equilibrium, while diverging populations descended from a single ancestral population will accumulate genetic differences with time. Here I investigate how much of the worldwide genetic diversity from Jorde et al.'s ([1997] Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 94:3100-3103) 60 tetranucleotide short tandem repeat (STR) data can be explained by isolation by distance. I use Slatkin's measure of population substructure, R(ST), principal components analyses, and Mantel tests to investigate the pattern of genetic diversity at both the intercontinental and intracontinental levels. Geographic distance accounts for almost 60% of world-wide interpopulation genetic relationships. Within continents, the correlations are less, although not significantly so because of wide confidence intervals. These results suggest that populations have not reached migration-drift equilibrium and that there is information in STR data to reconstruct population history. The level of population substructure worldwide is consistent with previous observations, but at the intracontinental level substructure is less. When one examines diversity against distance from the centroid, one sees excess heterozygosity in Africa, a pattern also noted by Stoneking et al. ([1998] Genome Research 7:1061-1071). A larger effective population size in Africa could explain the excess diversity. Greater gene flow in Africa is an unlikely explanation because the African R(ST) value is slightly larger than the Asian and European R(ST)s, pointing to less gene flow and greater substructure among African populations. Furthermore, there are differences in patterns between heterozygosity and allele size variance. Heterozygosity has a higher correlation with distance from the centroid than does allele size variance, and this may reflect

  1. Formation of disordered dislocational substructures and fracture of Cu-Mn polycrystal solid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koneva, N. A.; Trishkina, L. I.; Cherkasova, T. V.; Kozlov, E. V.

    2015-10-01

    The evolution of dislocational substructures (DSS) during deformation was investigated using the TEM method. The process was held up to the fracture of Cu-Mn polycrystalline solid solutions with various grain sizes. The interconnection of microcracks formation in the alloys with the dislocation substructures being formed was revealed. It was established that the microcracks are formed along the grain boundaries and the disoriented substructure boundaries. The reasons for different plasticity of alloys with small and large Mn content are discussed.

  2. Construction of a linker library with widely controllable flexibility for fusion protein design.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Huang, Ziliang; Zhang, Chong; Dong, Bo-Jun; Guo, Ruo-Hai; Yue, Hong-Wei; Yan, Li-Tang; Xing, Xin-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Flexibility or rigidity of the linker between two fused proteins is an important parameter that affects the function of fusion proteins. In this study, we constructed a linker library with five elementary units based on the combination of the flexible (GGGGS) and the rigid (EAAAK) units. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation showed that more rigid units in the linkers lead to more helical conformation and hydrogen bonds, and less distance fluctuation between the N- and C-termini of the linker. The diversity of linker flexibility of the linker library was then studied by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) of cyan fluorescent protein (CFP)-yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) fusion proteins, which showed that there is a wide range of distribution of the FRET efficiency. Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulation of CFP-YFP with different linkers also gave identical results with that of FRET efficiency analysis, and we further found that the combination manner of the linker peptide had a remarkable effect on the orientation of CFP and YFP domains. Our studies demonstrated that the construction of the linker library with the widely controllable flexibility could provide appropriate linkers with the desirable characteristics to engineer the fusion proteins with the expected functions. PMID:26394862

  3. Construction of a linker library with widely controllable flexibility for fusion protein design.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Huang, Ziliang; Zhang, Chong; Dong, Bo-Jun; Guo, Ruo-Hai; Yue, Hong-Wei; Yan, Li-Tang; Xing, Xin-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Flexibility or rigidity of the linker between two fused proteins is an important parameter that affects the function of fusion proteins. In this study, we constructed a linker library with five elementary units based on the combination of the flexible (GGGGS) and the rigid (EAAAK) units. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation showed that more rigid units in the linkers lead to more helical conformation and hydrogen bonds, and less distance fluctuation between the N- and C-termini of the linker. The diversity of linker flexibility of the linker library was then studied by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) of cyan fluorescent protein (CFP)-yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) fusion proteins, which showed that there is a wide range of distribution of the FRET efficiency. Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulation of CFP-YFP with different linkers also gave identical results with that of FRET efficiency analysis, and we further found that the combination manner of the linker peptide had a remarkable effect on the orientation of CFP and YFP domains. Our studies demonstrated that the construction of the linker library with the widely controllable flexibility could provide appropriate linkers with the desirable characteristics to engineer the fusion proteins with the expected functions.

  4. GLAST And Dark Matter Substructure in the Milky Way

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlen, Michael; Diemand, Jurg; Madau, Piero; /UC, Santa Cruz, Astron. Astrophys. /Garching, Max Planck Inst.

    2011-11-29

    We discuss the possibility of GLAST detecting gamma-rays from the annihilation of neutralino dark matter in the Galactic halo. We have used 'Via Lactea', currently the highest resolution simulation of cold dark matter substructure, to quantify the contribution of subhalos to the annihilation signal. We present a simulated allsky map of the expected gamma-ray counts from dark matter annihilation, assuming standard values of particle mass and cross section. In this case GLAST should be able to detect the Galactic center and several individual subhalos. One of the most exciting discoveries that the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) could make, is the detection of gamma-rays from the annihilation of dark matter (DM). Such a measurement would directly address one of the major physics problems of our time: the nature of the DM particle. Whether or not GLAST will actually detect a DM annihilation signal depends on both unknown particle physics and unknown astrophysics theory. Particle physics uncertainties include the type of particle (axion, neutralino, Kaluza-Klein particle, etc.), its mass, and its interaction cross section. From the astrophysical side it appears that DM is not smoothly distributed throughout the Galaxy halo, but instead exhibits abundant clumpy substructure, in the form of thousands of so-called subhalos. The observability of DM annihilation radiation originating in Galactic DM subhalos depends on their abundance, distribution, and internal properties. Numerical simulations have been used in the past to estimate the annihilation flux from DM substructure, but since the subhalo properties, especially their central density profile, which determines their annihilation luminosity, are very sensitive to numerical resolution, it makes sense to re-examine their contribution with higher resolution simulations.

  5. Tides, Interactions, and Fine-Scale Substructures in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conselice, Christopher J.; Gallagher, John S., III

    1999-01-01

    We present the results of a study on galaxy interactions, tides, and other processes that produce luminous fine-scale substructures in the galaxy clusters: Coma, Perseus, Abell 2199, AWM 3, and AWM 5. All unusual structures in these clusters can be categorized into seven morphologies: interacting galaxies, multiple galaxies (noninteracting), distorted galaxies, tailed galaxies, line galaxies, dwarf galaxy groups, and galaxy aggregates. The various morphologies are described, and a catalog is presented, of 248 objects in these five clusters along with color, and positional information obtained from CCD images taken with the WIYN 3.5 m telescope in broadband B and R filters. Distorted, interacting, and fine-scale substructures have a range of colors extending from blue objects with B-R~0 to redder colors at B-R~2.5. We also find that the structures with the most disturbed morphology have the bluest colors. In addition, the relative number distributions of these structures suggest that two separate classes of galaxy clusters exist: one dominated by distorted structures and the other dominated by galaxy associations. The Coma and Perseus clusters, respectively, are proposed as models for these types of clusters. These structures avoid the deep potentials of the dominant D or cD galaxies in the Coma and Perseus clusters, and tend to clump together. Possible mechanisms for the production of fine-scale substructure are reviewed and compared with observations of z~0.4 Butcher-Oemler clusters. We conclude, based on color, positional, and statistical data, that the most likely mechanism for the creation of these structures is through an interaction with the gravitational potential of the cluster, possibly coupled with effects of weak interactions with cluster ellipticals.

  6. Short PEG-linkers improve the performance of targeted, activatable monoclonal antibody-indocyanine green optical imaging probes.

    PubMed

    Sano, Kohei; Nakajima, Takahito; Miyazaki, Kiminori; Ohuchi, Yuya; Ikegami, Takashi; Choyke, Peter L; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2013-05-15

    The ability to switch optical imaging probes from the quenched (off) to the active state (on) has greatly improved target to background ratios. The optimal activation efficiency of an optical probe depends on complete quenching before activation and complete dequenching after activation. For instance, monoclonal antibody-indocyanine green (mAb-ICG) conjugates, which are promising agents for clinical translation, are normally quenched, but can be activated when bound to a cell surface receptor and internalized. However, the small fraction of commonly used ICG derivative (ICG-Sulfo-OSu) can bind noncovalently to its mAb and is, thus, gradually released from the mAb leading to relatively high background signal especially in the liver and the abdomen. In this study, we re-engineered a mAb-ICG conjugate, (Panitumumab-ICG) using bifunctional ICG derivatives (ICG-PEG4-Sulfo-OSu and ICG-PEG8-Sulfo-OSu) with short polyethylene glycol (PEG) linkers. Higher covalent binding (70-86%) was observed using the bifunctional ICG with short PEG linkers resulting in less in vivo noncovalent dissociation. Panitumumab-ICG conjugates with short PEG linkers were able to detect human epidermal growth factor receptor 1 (EGFR)-positive tumors with high tumor-to-background ratios (15.8 and 6.9 for EGFR positive tumor-to-negative tumor and tumor-to-liver ratios, respectively, at 3 d postinjection).

  7. The flexibility of modified-linker MIL-53 materials.

    PubMed

    Munn, Alexis S; Pillai, Renjith S; Biswas, Shyam; Stock, Norbert; Maurin, Guillaume; Walton, Richard I

    2016-03-14

    The flexibility of eight aluminium hydroxo terephthalates [Al(OH)(BDC-X)]·n(guest) (BDC = 1,4-benzene-dicarboxylate; X = -H, -CH3, -Cl, -Br, -NH2, -NO2, -(OH)2, -CO2H) crystallising in the MIL-53-type structure was investigated upon thermal dehydration of as-made samples, superhydration and methanol adsorption/desorption using in situ powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD). Profile fitting was used to determine lattice parameters as a function of time and/or temperature to describe their structural evolution. It has thus been shown that while methanol vapour adsorption induces an opening of all the modified frameworks, except the -NH2 material, superhydration only leads to open structures for Al-MIL-53-NO2, -Br and -(OH)2. All the MIL-53 solids, except Al-MIL-53-(OH)2 are present in the open structures upon thermal dehydration. In addition to the exploration of the breathing behavior of this MIL-53 series, the issue of disorder in the distribution of the functional groups between the organic linkers was explored. As a typical illustration, density functional theory calculations were carried out on different structures of Al-MIL-53-Cl, in which the distribution of -Cl within two adjacent BDC linkers is varied. The results show that the most energetically stable configuration leads to the best agreement with the experimental PXRD pattern. This observation supports that the distribution of the selected linker substituent in the functionalised solid is governed by energetics and that there is a preference for an ordering of this arrangement. PMID:26465320

  8. Simulating and Synthesizing Substructures Using Neural Network and Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Youhua; Kapania, Rakesh K.; VanLandingham, Hugh F.

    1997-01-01

    The feasibility of simulating and synthesizing substructures by computational neural network models is illustrated by investigating a statically indeterminate beam, using both a 1-D and a 2-D plane stress modelling. The beam can be decomposed into two cantilevers with free-end loads. By training neural networks to simulate the cantilever responses to different loads, the original beam problem can be solved as a match-up between two subsystems under compatible interface conditions. The genetic algorithms are successfully used to solve the match-up problem. Simulated results are found in good agreement with the analytical or FEM solutions.

  9. The construction of preconditioners for elliptic problems by substructuring, IV

    SciTech Connect

    Bramble, J.H.; Pasciak, J.E.; Schatz, A.H.

    1987-06-01

    We consider the problem of solving the algebraic system of equations which result from the discretization of elliptic boundary value problems defined on three dimensional Euclidean space. We develop preconditioners for such systems based on substructuring (also known as domain decomposition). The resulting algorithms are well suited to emerging parallel computing architectures. We describe two techniques for developing these precondictioners. A theory for the analysis of the condition number for the resulting preconditioned system is given and the results of supporting numerical experiments are presented. 16 refs., 2 tabs.

  10. The construction of preconditioners for elliptic problems by substructuring, IV

    SciTech Connect

    Bramble, J.H.; Pasciak, J.E.; Schatz, A.H.

    1989-07-01

    We consider the problem of solving the algebraic system of equations which result from the discretization of elliptic boundary value problems defined on three-dimensional Euclidean space. We develop preconditioners for such systems based on substructuring (also known as domain decomposition). The resulting algorithms are well suited to emerging parallel computing architectures. We describe two techniques for developing these preconditioners. A theory for the analysis of the condition number for the resulting preconditioned system is given and the results of supporting numerical experiments are presented.

  11. Fatigue reassessment for lifetime extension of offshore wind monopile substructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Lisa; Muskulus, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Fatigue reassessment is required to decide about lifetime extension of aging offshore wind farms. This paper presents a methodology to identify important parameters to monitor during the operational phase of offshore wind turbines. An elementary effects method is applied to analyze the global sensitivity of residual fatigue lifetimes to environmental, structural and operational parameters. Therefore, renewed lifetime simulations are performed for a case study which consists of a 5 MW turbine with monopile substructure in 20 m water depth. Results show that corrosion, turbine availability, and turbulence intensity are the most influential parameters. This can vary strongly for other settings (water depth, turbine size, etc.) making case-specific assessments necessary.

  12. Hierarchically parallelized constrained nonlinear solvers with automated substructuring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padovan, J.; Kwang, A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper develops a parallelizable multilevel constrained nonlinear equation solver. The substructuring process is automated to yield appropriately balanced partitioning of each succeeding level. Due to the generality of the procedure, both sequential, partially and fully parallel environments can be handled. This includes both single and multiprocessor assignment per individual partition. Several benchmark examples are presented. These illustrate the robustness of the procedure as well as its capacity to yield significant reductions in memory utilization and calculational effort due both to updating and inversion.

  13. Hierarchically Parallelized Constrained Nonlinear Solvers with Automated Substructuring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padovan, Joe; Kwang, Abel

    1994-01-01

    This paper develops a parallelizable multilevel multiple constrained nonlinear equation solver. The substructuring process is automated to yield appropriately balanced partitioning of each succeeding level. Due to the generality of the procedure,_sequential, as well as partially and fully parallel environments can be handled. This includes both single and multiprocessor assignment per individual partition. Several benchmark examples are presented. These illustrate the robustness of the procedure as well as its capability to yield significant reductions in memory utilization and calculational effort due both to updating and inversion.

  14. Probing charmonium production through jet substructure at ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjergaard, David; Arce, Ayana; Atlas Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    There are many open questions regarding charmonium production at hadron colliders. The color octet production mechanism of non-relativistic QCD (NRQCD) was introduced in order to describe the pT spectrum of prompt J / Ψ particles. This mechanism is expected to be characterized by enhanced hadronic activity around the J / Ψ . Recently it has been suggested that jet substructure techniques may be able to discriminate between the octet and singlet production mechanisms. An ATLAS measurement of N-subjettiness and the J / Ψ -jet momentum fraction in 8 TeV LHC proton-proton collisions will be described. Supervisor.

  15. Convergence of a Substructuring Method with LaGrange Multipliers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandel, Jan; Tezaur, Radek

    1996-01-01

    We analyze the convergence of a substructuring iterative method with Lagrange multipliers, proposed recently by Farhat and Roux. The method decomposes finite element discretization of an elliptic boundary value problem into Neumann problems on the subdomains and a coarse problem for the subdomain nullspace components. For linear conforming elements and preconditioning by the Dirichlet problems on the subdomains, we prove the asymptotic bound on the condition number C(1 + log(H/h))(sup gamma), gamma = 2 or 3, where h is the characteristic element size and H is the subdomain size.

  16. Dark Matter Halos:. Shapes, the Substructure Crisis, and Indirect Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zentner, A. R.; Koushiappas, S. M.; Kazantzidis, S.

    2005-04-01

    In this proceeding, we review three recent results. First, we show that halos formed in simulations with gas cooling are significantly rounder than halos formed in dissipationless N-body simulations. The increase in principle axis ratios is ~ 0.2 - 0.4 in the inner halo and remains significant at large radii. Second, we discuss the CDM substructure crisis and demonstrate the sensitivity of the crisis to the spectrum of primordial density fluctuations on small scales. Third, we assess the ability of experiments like VERITAS and GLAST to detect γ-rays from neutralino dark matter annihilation in dark subhalos about the MW.

  17. A traceless perfluoroalkylsulfonyl (PFS) linker for the deoxygenation of phenols.

    PubMed

    Pan, Y; Holmes, C P

    2001-08-23

    [reaction: see text]. The synthesis of a novel perfluoroalkylsulfonyl (PFS) fluoride is described for use as a traceless linker in solid-phase organic synthesis. Attachment to the resin and subsequent coupling of a phenol affords a stable arylsulfonate that behaves as a support-bound aryl triflate. Palladium-mediated reductive cleavage of a wide variety of phenols generated the parent arenes. The resin-bound aryl triflate was shown to be stable to reductive amination conditions, and the traceless synthesis of Meclizine is reported. PMID:11506630

  18. Genetically encoded cleavable protein photo-cross-linker.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shixian; He, Dan; Long, Teng; Zhang, Shuai; Meng, Rong; Chen, Peng R

    2014-08-27

    We have developed a genetically encoded, selenium-based cleavable photo-cross-linker that allows for the separation of bait and prey proteins after protein photo-cross-linking. We have further demonstrated the efficient capture of the in situ generated selenenic acid on the cleaved prey proteins. Our strategy involves tagging the selenenic acid with an alkyne-containing dimethoxyaniline molecule and subsequently labeling with an azide-bearing fluorophore or biotin probe. This cleavage-and-capture after protein photo-cross-linking strategy allows for the efficient capture of prey proteins that are readily accessible by two-dimensional gel-based proteomics and mass spectrometry analysis.

  19. Increasing the Depth of Mass-Spectrometry-Based Structural Analysis of Protein Complexes through the Use of Multiple Cross-Linkers.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yue-He; Fan, Sheng-Bo; Li, Shuang; Feng, Bo-Ya; Gao, Ning; Ye, Keqiong; He, Si-Min; Dong, Meng-Qiu

    2016-04-19

    Chemical cross-linking of proteins coupled with mass spectrometry (CXMS) is a powerful tool to study protein folding and to map the interfaces between interacting proteins. The most commonly used cross-linkers in CXMS are BS(3) and DSS, which have similar structures and generate the same linkages between pairs of lysine residues in spatial proximity. However, there are cases where no cross-linkable lysine pairs are present at certain regions of a protein or at the interface of two interacting proteins. In order to find the cross-linkers that can best complement the performance of BS(3) and DSS, we tested seven additional cross-linkers that either have different spacer arm structures or that target different amino acids (BS(2)G, EGS, AMAS, GMBS, Sulfo-GMBS, EDC, and TFCS). Using BSA, aldolase, the yeast H/ACA protein complex, and E. coli 70S ribosomes, we showed that, in terms of providing structural information not obtained through the use of BS(3) and DSS, EGS and Sulfo-GMBS worked better than the other cross-linkers that we tested. EGS generated a large number of cross-links not seen with the other amine-specific cross-linkers, possibly due to its hydrophilic spacer arm. We demonstrate that incorporating the cross-links contributed by the EGS and amine-sulfhydryl cross-linkers greatly increased the accuracy of Rosetta in docking the structure of the yeast H/ACA protein complex. Given the improved depth of useful information it can provide, we suggest that the multilinker CXMS approach should be used routinely when the amount of a sample permits. PMID:27010980

  20. Investigation of the redox property of a metalloprotein layer self-assembled on various chemical linkers.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yong-Ho; Lee, Taek; Min, Junhong; Choi, Jeong-Woo

    2011-10-01

    Myogloblin, a well-known metalloprotein, was immobilized on a gold surface using various chemical linkers to investigate the length effect of chemical linker on the electron transfer in protein layers, because chemical linkers play roles in the pathway that transfers the electron from the protein to the gold substrate and act as protein immobilization reagents. Chemical linkers with 2, 6, 11, and 16 carbons were utilized to confirm length-effects. The immobilization of protein and chemical linker was validated with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The electrochemical property was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronocoulometry (CC). In those results, redox peaks of immobilized protein were controlled via the length of chemical linkers, and it could be directly applied to the realization of bioelectronic device.

  1. Quantum-chemical foundations of the topological substructural molecular design.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Ernesto

    2008-06-12

    The topological substructural molecular design (TOPS-MODE) approach is formulated as a tight-binding quantum-chemical method. The approach is based on certain postulates that permit to express any molecular property as a function of the spectral moments of certain types of molecular and environment-dependent energies. We use several empirical potentials to account for these intrinsic and external molecular energies. We prove that any molecular property expressed in terms of a quantitative structure-property and structure-activity relationships (QSPR/QSAR) model developed by using the TOPS-MODE method can be expressed as a bond additivity function. In addition, such a property can also be expressed as a substructural cluster expansion function. The conditions for such bond contributions being transferable are also analyzed here. Several new statistical-mechanical electronic functions are introduced as well as a bond-bond thermal Green's function or a propagator accounting for the electronic hopping between pairs of bonds. All these new concepts are applied to the development and application of a new QSAR model for describing the toxicity of polyhalogenated-dibenzo-1,4-dioxins. The QSAR model obtained displays a significant robustness and predictability. It permits an easy structural interpretation of the structure-activity relationship in terms of bond additivity functions, which display some resemblances with other theoretical parameters obtained from first principle quantum-chemical methods.

  2. Jet substructures of boosted polarized hadronic top quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitadono, Yoshio; Li, Hsiang-nan

    2016-03-01

    We study jet substructures of a boosted polarized top quark, which undergoes the hadronic decay t →b u d ¯, in the perturbative QCD framework, focusing on the energy profile and the differential energy profile. These substructures are factorized into the convolution of a hard top-quark decay kernel with a bottom-quark jet function and a W -boson jet function, where the latter is further factorized into the convolution of a hard W -boson decay kernel with two light-quark jet functions. Computing the hard kernels to leading order in QCD and including the resummation effect in the jet functions, we show that the differential jet energy profile is a useful observable for differentiating the helicity of a boosted hadronic top quark: a right-handed top jet exhibits quick descent of the differential energy profile with the inner test cone radius r , which is attributed to the V -A structure of weak interaction and the dead-cone effect associated with the W -boson jet. The above helicity differentiation may help reveal the chiral structure of physics beyond the standard model at high energies.

  3. An Efficient Crankshaft Dynamic Analysis Using Substructuring with Ritz Vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MOURELATOS, Z. P.

    2000-11-01

    A structural analysis using dynamic substructuring with Ritz vectors is presented for predicting the dynamic response of an engine crankshaft, based on the finite-element method. A two-level dynamic substructuring is performed using a set of load-dependent Ritz vectors. The rotating crankshaft is properly coupled with the non-rotating, compliant engine block. The block compliance is represented by a distributed linear elastic foundation at each main bearing location. The stiffness of the elastic foundation can be different in the vertical and horizontal planes, thereby considering the anisotropy of the engine block compliance with respect to the crankshaft rotation. The analysis accounts for the kinematic non-linearity resulting from the crankangle-dependent circumferential contact location between each journal and the corresponding bore of the engine block. Crankshaft “bent” and block “misboring” effects due to manufacturing imperfections are considered in the analysis. The superior accuracy and reduced computational effort of the present method as compared with the equivalent superelement analysis in MSC/NASTRAN, are demonstrated using the free and forced vibrations of a slender cylindrical beam and free vibrations of a four-cylinder engine crankshaft. Subsequently, the accuracy of the present method in calculating the dynamic response of engine crankshafts is shown through comparisons between the analytical predictions and experimental results for the torsional vibrations of an in-line five cylinder engine and the bending vibrations of the crankshaft-flywheel assembly of a V6 engine.

  4. Dependence of effective molarity on linker length for an intramolecular protein-ligand system.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Vijay M; Semetey, Vincent; Bracher, Paul J; Shen, Nan; Whitesides, George M

    2007-02-01

    This paper reports dissociation constants and "effective molarities" (M(eff)) for the intramolecular binding of a ligand covalently attached to the surface of a protein by oligo(ethylene glycol) (EG(n)) linkers of different lengths (n = 0, 2, 5, 10, and 20) and compares these experimental values with theoretical estimates from polymer theory. As expected, the value of M(eff) is lowest when the linker is too short (n = 0) to allow the ligand to bind noncovalently at the active site of the protein without strain, is highest when the linker is the optimal length (n = 2) to allow such binding to occur, and decreases monotonically as the length increases past this optimal value (but only by a factor of approximately 8 from n = 2 to n = 20). These experimental results are not compatible with a model in which the single bonds of the linker are completely restricted when the ligand has bound noncovalently to the active site of the protein, but they are quantitatively compatible with a model that treats the linker as a random-coil polymer. Calorimetry revealed that enthalpic interactions between the linker and the protein are not important in determining the thermodynamics of the system. Taken together, these results suggest that the manifestation of the linker in the thermodynamics of binding is exclusively entropic. The values of M(eff) are, theoretically, intrinsic properties of the EG(n) linkers and can be used to predict the avidities of multivalent ligands with these linkers for multivalent proteins. The weak dependence of M(eff) on linker length suggests that multivalent ligands containing flexible linkers that are longer than the spacing between the binding sites of a multivalent protein will be effective in binding, and that the use of flexible linkers with lengths somewhat greater than the optimal distance between binding sites is a justifiable strategy for the design of multivalent ligands.

  5. Germline-specific H1 variants: the "sexy" linker histones.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Montero, Salvador; Carbonell, Albert; Azorín, Fernando

    2016-03-01

    The eukaryotic genome is packed into chromatin, a nucleoprotein complex mainly formed by the interaction of DNA with the abundant basic histone proteins. The fundamental structural and functional subunit of chromatin is the nucleosome core particle, which is composed by 146 bp of DNA wrapped around an octameric protein complex formed by two copies of each core histone H2A, H2B, H3, and H4. In addition, although not an intrinsic component of the nucleosome core particle, linker histone H1 directly interacts with it in a monomeric form. Histone H1 binds nucleosomes near the exit/entry sites of linker DNA, determines nucleosome repeat length and stabilizes higher-order organization of nucleosomes into the ∼30 nm chromatin fiber. In comparison to core histones, histone H1 is less well conserved through evolution. Furthermore, histone H1 composition in metazoans is generally complex with most species containing multiple variants that play redundant as well as specific functions. In this regard, a characteristic feature is the presence of specific H1 variants that replace somatic H1s in the germline and during early embryogenesis. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge about their structural and functional properties.

  6. Germline-specific H1 variants: the "sexy" linker histones.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Montero, Salvador; Carbonell, Albert; Azorín, Fernando

    2016-03-01

    The eukaryotic genome is packed into chromatin, a nucleoprotein complex mainly formed by the interaction of DNA with the abundant basic histone proteins. The fundamental structural and functional subunit of chromatin is the nucleosome core particle, which is composed by 146 bp of DNA wrapped around an octameric protein complex formed by two copies of each core histone H2A, H2B, H3, and H4. In addition, although not an intrinsic component of the nucleosome core particle, linker histone H1 directly interacts with it in a monomeric form. Histone H1 binds nucleosomes near the exit/entry sites of linker DNA, determines nucleosome repeat length and stabilizes higher-order organization of nucleosomes into the ∼30 nm chromatin fiber. In comparison to core histones, histone H1 is less well conserved through evolution. Furthermore, histone H1 composition in metazoans is generally complex with most species containing multiple variants that play redundant as well as specific functions. In this regard, a characteristic feature is the presence of specific H1 variants that replace somatic H1s in the germline and during early embryogenesis. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge about their structural and functional properties. PMID:25921218

  7. Flexible Linker Modulates Glycosaminoglycan Affinity of Decorin Binding Protein A.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Ashli; Sepuru, Krishna Mohan; Feng, Wei; Rajarathnam, Krishna; Wang, Xu

    2015-08-18

    Decorin binding protein A (DBPA) is a glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-binding adhesin found on the surface of the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi (B. burgdorferi), the causative agent of Lyme disease. DBPA facilitates bacterial adherence to extracellular matrices of human tissues and is crucial during the early stage of the infection process. Interestingly, DBPA from different strains (B31, N40, and PBr) show significant differences in GAG affinities, but the structural basis for the differences is not clear. In this study, we show that GAG affinity of N40 DBPA is modulated in part by flexible segments that control access to the GAG binding site, such that shortening of the linker leads to higher GAG affinity when analyzed using ELISA, gel mobility shift assay, solution NMR, and isothermal titration calorimetry. Our observation that GAG affinity differences among different B. burgdorferi strains can be attributed to a flexible linker domain regulating access to the GAG-binding domain is novel. It also provides a rare example of how neutral amino acids and dynamic segments in GAG binding proteins can have a large influence on GAG affinity and provides insights into why the number of basic amino acids in the GAG-binding site may not be the only factor determining GAG affinity of proteins. PMID:26223367

  8. DISEASES OF EPIDERMAL KERATINS AND THEIR LINKER PROTEINS

    PubMed Central

    Uitto, Jouni; Richard, Gabriele; McGrath, John A.

    2007-01-01

    Epidermal keratins, a diverse group of structural proteins, form intermediate filament networks responsible for the structural integrity of keratinocytes. The networks extend from the nucleus of the epidermal cells to the plasma membrane where the keratins attach to linker proteins which are part of desmosomal and hemidesmosomal attachment complexes. The expression of specific keratin genes is regulated by differentiation of the epidermal cells within the stratifying squamous epithelium. Progress in molecular characterization of the epidermal keratins and their linker proteins has formed the basis to identify mutations which are associated with distinct cutaneous manifestations in patients with genodermatoses. The precise phenotype of each disease apparently reflects the spatial level of expression of the mutated genes, as well as the types and positions of the mutations and their consequences at mRNA and protein levels. Identification of specific mutations in keratinization disorders has provided the basis for improved diagnosis and subclassification with prognostic implications and has formed the platform for prenatal testing and preimplantation genetic diagnosis. Finally, precise knowledge of the mutations is a prerequisite for development of gene therapy approaches to counteract, and potentially cure, these often devastating and currently intractable diseases. PMID:17531221

  9. Resolving the chemical substructure of Orion-KL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, S.; Beuther, H.; Henning, Th.; Semenov, D.; Palau, A.; Mills, E. A. C.

    2015-09-01

    Context. The Kleinmann-Low nebula in Orion (Orion-KL) is the nearest example of a high-mass star-forming environment. Studying the resolved chemical substructures of this complex region provides important insight into the chemistry of high-mass star-forming regions (HMSFRs), as it relates to their evolutionary states. Aims: The goal of this work is to resolve the molecular line emission from individual substructures of Orion-KL at high spectral and spatial resolution and to infer the chemical properties of the associated gas. Methods: We present a line survey of Orion-KL obtained from combined Submillimeter Array (SMA) interferometric and IRAM 30 m single-dish observations. Covering a 4 GHz bandwidth in total, this survey contains over 160 emission lines from 20 species (25 isotopologues), including 11 complex organic molecules (COMs). Spectra are extracted from individual substructures and the intensity-integrated distribution map for each species is provided. We then estimate the rotation temperature for each substructure, along with their molecular column densities and abundances. Results: For the first time, we complement 1.3 mm interferometric data with single-dish observations of the Orion-KL region and study small-scale chemical variations in this region. (1) We resolve continuum substructures on ~3'' angular scale. (2) We identify lines from the low-abundance COMs CH3COCH3 and CH3CH2OH, as well as tentatively detect CH3CHO and long carbon-chain molecules C6H and HC7N. (3) We find that while most COMs are segregated by type, peaking either towards the hotcore (e.g., nitrogen-bearing species) or the compact ridge (e.g., oxygen-bearing species like HCOOCH3 and CH3OCH3), the distributions of others do not follow this segregated structure (e.g., CH3CH2OH, CH3OH, CH3COCH3). (4) We find a second velocity component of HNCO, SO2, 34SO2, and SO lines, which may be associated with a strong shock event in the low-velocity outflow. (5) Temperatures and molecular

  10. Evolutionary correlation between linker histones and microtubular structures.

    PubMed

    Kaczanowski, S; Jerzmanowski, A

    2001-07-01

    Histones of the H1 group (linker histones) are abundant components of chromatin in eukaryotes, occurring on average at one molecule per nucleosome. The recent reports on the lack of a clear phenotypic effect of knock-out mutations as well as overexpression of histone H1 genes in different organisms have seriously undermined the long-held view that linker histones are essential for the basic functions of eukaryotic cells. In an attempt to resolve the paradox of an abundant conserved protein without a clear function, we re-examined the molecular and phylogenetic data on linker histones to see if they could reveal any correlation between the features of H1 and the functional or morphological characteristics of cells or organisms. Because of an earlier demonstration that in sea urchin the chromatin-type histone H1 is also found in the flagellar microtubules (Multigner et al. 1992), we focused on the correlation between the features of H1 and those of microtubular structures. A phylogenetic tree based on multiple alignment of over 100 available HI sequences suggests that the first divergence of the globular domain of H1 (GH1) resulted in branching into separate types characteristic for plants/Dictyostelium and for animals/ascomycetes, respectively. The GH1s of these two types differ by a short region (usually 5 amino acids) placed at a specific location within the C-terminal wing subdomain of GH1. Evolutionary analysis of the diversification of H1 mRNA into cell-cycle-dependent (polyA-) and independent (polyA+) forms showed a mosaic occurrence of these two forms in plants and animals, despite the fact that the H1 proteins of plants and animals belong to two well-distinguished groups. However, among organisms from both animal and plant kingdom, only those with H1 mRNA of a polyA- type have flagellated gametes. This correlation as well as the demonstration that in Volvox carteri the accumulation of polyA- mRNA of H1 occurs concurrently with the production of new flagella

  11. The LabelHash algorithm for substructure matching

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There is an increasing number of proteins with known structure but unknown function. Determining their function would have a significant impact on understanding diseases and designing new therapeutics. However, experimental protein function determination is expensive and very time-consuming. Computational methods can facilitate function determination by identifying proteins that have high structural and chemical similarity. Results We present LabelHash, a novel algorithm for matching substructural motifs to large collections of protein structures. The algorithm consists of two phases. In the first phase the proteins are preprocessed in a fashion that allows for instant lookup of partial matches to any motif. In the second phase, partial matches for a given motif are expanded to complete matches. The general applicability of the algorithm is demonstrated with three different case studies. First, we show that we can accurately identify members of the enolase superfamily with a single motif. Next, we demonstrate how LabelHash can complement SOIPPA, an algorithm for motif identification and pairwise substructure alignment. Finally, a large collection of Catalytic Site Atlas motifs is used to benchmark the performance of the algorithm. LabelHash runs very efficiently in parallel; matching a motif against all proteins in the 95% sequence identity filtered non-redundant Protein Data Bank typically takes no more than a few minutes. The LabelHash algorithm is available through a web server and as a suite of standalone programs at http://labelhash.kavrakilab.org. The output of the LabelHash algorithm can be further analyzed with Chimera through a plugin that we developed for this purpose. Conclusions LabelHash is an efficient, versatile algorithm for large-scale substructure matching. When LabelHash is running in parallel, motifs can typically be matched against the entire PDB on the order of minutes. The algorithm is able to identify functional homologs beyond

  12. O-glycosylation of glycine-serine linkers in recombinant Fc-fusion proteins: attachment of glycosaminoglycans and other intermediates with phosphorylation at the xylose sugar subunit.

    PubMed

    Spahr, Chris; Shi, Stone D-H; Lu, Hsieng S

    2014-01-01

    A xylose-based glycosaminoglycan (GAG) core was recently identified at a Ser residue in the linker sequence of a recombinant Fc fusion protein. The linker sequence, G-S-G-G-G-G, and an upstream acidic residue were serving as a substrate for O-xylosyltransferase, resulting in a major glycan composed of Xyl-Gal-Gal-GlcA and other minor intermediates. In this paper, a portion of an unrelated protein was fused to the C-terminus of an IgG Fc domain using the common (G4S) 4 linker repeat. This linker resulted in a heterogenous population of xylose-based glycans all containing at least a core Xyl. Commonly observed glycan structures include GAG-related di-, tri-, tetra-, and penta-saccharides (e.g., Xyl-Gal, Xyl-Gal-Gal, Xyl-Gal-Gal-GlcA, and Xyl-Gal-Gal-GlcA-HexNAc), as well as Xyl-Gal-Neu5Ac. Following alkaline phosphatase or sialidase treatment combined with CID fragmentation, low-level glycans with a mass addition of 79.9 Da were confirmed to be a result of phosphorylated xylose. A minute quantity of phosphorylated GAG pentasaccharides may also be sulfated (also 79.9 Da), possibly at the HexNAc moiety due to non-reactivity to alkaline phosphatase. The xylose moiety may be randomly incorporated in one of the three G-S-G sequence motifs; and the linker peptide shows evidence for multiple additions of xylose at very low levels.

  13. A Single-Chain Antibody Using LoxP511 as the Linker Enables Large-Content Phage Library Construction via Cre/LoxP Recombination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, Wei; Lv, Ming; Lin, Zhou; Geng, Jing; Li, Yali; Shen, Beifen; Ma, Yuanfang; Li, Yan; Qiao, Chunxia; Feng, Jiannan

    2014-07-01

    To obtain natural or "me-better" antibodies (e.g., affinity-maturated antibodies), phage display libraries are widely used. However, the likelihood of obtaining satisfactory antibodies depends on the library content. Here, we used computer-aided design to model the use of the LoxP511 site as a linker between the heavy and light variable domains of an antibody for construction of a large single-chain fragment (scFv) antibody phage library by using the Cre/LoxP recombinant system. Then, we constructed two novel scFvs based on 2C4, namely, AH_scFv15 (15 amino acid [aa] linker; common [SG4]3 sequence) and AH_scFv21 (21-aa linker; LoxP511 sequence), to verify the use of the LoxP511 site as a linker. Our results indicate that LoxP511 could be used effectively for the construction of a large (e.g., 5 × 10(12)) phage display library of scFv antibodies from which it was possible to isolate an antibody with the same epitope as 2C4 but with higher affinity.

  14. Linker scanner mutagenesis of the Xenopus laevis ribosomal gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Reeder, R H; Pennock, D; McStay, B; Roan, J; Tolentino, E; Walker, P

    1987-01-01

    We have assayed a series of linker scanner mutants which cover the Xenopus laevis ribosomal gene promoter at approximately ten base pair intervals. All of these mutations adversely affect promoter activity with the exception of one mutation which stimulates activity. Thus, none are neutral. We show that most of the mutations can be partially rescued by ligating a block of enhancer elements upstream of the promoter. In addition, we have made extracts from liver nuclei which produce DNaseI protection footprints over the promoter. Analysis of both strands reveals a prominent footprinting domain from about -5 to -30. However, lesser changes in the digestion pattern are detected over most of the promoter. Previously published analyses have suggested that this promoter might be composed of three functional domains. The experiments presented here suggest that either 1) the three putative domains are so closely arranged that the boundaries are difficult to discern, or 2) the situation is more complex. Images PMID:3658698

  15. Formation of spiral waves with substructure in a bursting media.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Huijun; Hou, Zhonghuai

    2015-12-01

    Formation of spiral waves in a bursting media is investigated. Due to the multiple timescale oscillation of the local dynamics, an interesting substructure of traveling wave (STW) is observed in the spiral arm. As a result of the special moving media formed by neurons in the spiral arm, STWs propagate from the spiral tip to far field with an increasing wave length and move faster along the front of the spiral arm than along the back, leading to the formation of fragments in STWs. Moreover, we find that a sharp change of stimulus current can lead to backfiring of STWs, which may break the spiral wave front and further result in the formation of a multi-spiral pattern. PMID:26723144

  16. Resolving the Chemical Substructure of Orion-KL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Siyi; Beuther, Henrik; Semenov, Dmitry; Henning, Thomas; Palau, Aina

    2013-07-01

    Context. The Kleinmann-Low nebula in Orion (Orion-KL) is the closest example of a high-mass star forming environment. Studying the resolved chemical structure of this complex region can provide important insight for relating the chemistry of high mass star forming regions with their evolutionary state. We present a line survey of Orion-KL obtained from the combined Submillimeter Array (SMA) and IRAM 30 m single-dish data. Covering 4 GHz bandwidth in total, this survey contains at least 160 emission lines from 27 chemical species. Aims. The goal of this work is to resolve the molecular line emission from individual substructure in Orion-KL at high spectral and spatial resolution, inferring the chemical properties of the associated gas. Methods. The spectra from different substructures are extracted and the intensity-integrated distribution maps for different molecules are imaged. We then calculate column densities, and abundances for each molecule in each identified substructure, assuming local thermal equilibrium (LTE), and that the lines are both optically thin and have uniform widths for all species. Results. By complementing interferometric data of the Orion-KL region with single-dish data to recover the short spacing information, we are able to study spatial abundance variations in this region for the first time. On one hand, at the spatial resolution of 4 arcsec, several substructures appear on the continuum map. The strongest emission from nitrogen-bearing molecules comes from the main hot core, which has chemistry typical of an active region, while sulfur-bearing and carbon monoxides have extended emission covering the cooler southern ridge and outflow regions. In contrast, the distribution of saturated complex organics is more complicated. Most of them peak at either the hot core (e.g., CH3OH) or the compact ridge (e.g., HCOOCH3), while others peak at intermediate positions between the hot core and the compact ridge (e.g., CH3CH2OH). But nevertheless, no

  17. Construction of preconditioners for elliptic problems by substructuring. I

    SciTech Connect

    Bramble, J.H.; Pasciak, J.E.; Schatz, A.H.

    1986-07-01

    We consider the problem of solving the algebraic system of equations which arise from the discretization of symmetric elliptic boundary value problems via finite element methods. A new class of preconditioners for the discrete system is developed based on substructuring (also known as domain decomposition). The resulting preconditioned algorithms are well suited to emerging parallel computing architectures. The proposed methods are applicable to problems on general domains involving differential operators with rather general coefficients. A basic theory for the analysis of the condition number of the preconditioned system (which determines the iterative convergence rate of the algorithm) is given. Techniques for applying the theory and algorithms to problems with irregular geometry are discussed and the results of extensive numerical experiments are reported.

  18. Formation of spiral waves with substructure in a bursting media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Huijun; Hou, Zhonghuai

    2015-12-01

    Formation of spiral waves in a bursting media is investigated. Due to the multiple timescale oscillation of the local dynamics, an interesting substructure of traveling wave (STW) is observed in the spiral arm. As a result of the special moving media formed by neurons in the spiral arm, STWs propagate from the spiral tip to far field with an increasing wave length and move faster along the front of the spiral arm than along the back, leading to the formation of fragments in STWs. Moreover, we find that a sharp change of stimulus current can lead to backfiring of STWs, which may break the spiral wave front and further result in the formation of a multi-spiral pattern.

  19. Cold Dark Matter Substructures in Early-type Galaxy Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiacconi, Davide; Madau, Piero; Potter, Doug; Stadel, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    We present initial results from the “Ponos” zoom-in numerical simulations of dark matter substructures in massive ellipticals. Two very highly resolved dark matter halos with M vir = 1.2 × 1013 {M}⊙ and M vir = 6.5 × 1012 {M}⊙ and different (“violent” versus “quiescent”) assembly histories have been simulated down to z = 0 in a ΛCDM cosmology with a total of 921,651,914 and 408,377,544 particles, respectively. Within the virial radius, the total mass fraction in self-bound M sub > 106 {M}⊙ subhalos at the present epoch is 15% for the violent host and 16.5% for the quiescent one. At z = 0.7, these fractions increase to 19% and 33%, respectively, as more recently accreted satellites are less prone to tidal destruction. In projection, the average fraction of surface mass density in substructure at a distance of R/R vir = 0.02 (˜5-10 kpc) from the two halo centers ranges from 0.6% to ≳2%, significantly higher than that measured in simulations of Milky Way-sized halos. The contribution of subhalos with M sub < 109 {M}⊙ to the projected mass fraction is between one-fifth and one-third of the total, with the smallest share found in the quiescent host. We assess the impact of baryonic effects via twin, lower-resolution hydrodynamical simulations that include metallicity-dependent gas cooling, star formation, and a delayed-radiative-cooling scheme for supernova feedback. Baryonic contraction produces a super-isothermal total density profile and increases the number of massive subhalos in the inner regions of the main host. The host density profiles and projected subhalo mass fractions appear to be broadly consistent with observations of gravitational lenses.

  20. Cold Dark Matter Substructures in Early-type Galaxy Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiacconi, Davide; Madau, Piero; Potter, Doug; Stadel, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    We present initial results from the “Ponos” zoom-in numerical simulations of dark matter substructures in massive ellipticals. Two very highly resolved dark matter halos with M vir = 1.2 × 1013 {M}ȯ and M vir = 6.5 × 1012 {M}ȯ and different (“violent” versus “quiescent”) assembly histories have been simulated down to z = 0 in a ΛCDM cosmology with a total of 921,651,914 and 408,377,544 particles, respectively. Within the virial radius, the total mass fraction in self-bound M sub > 106 {M}ȯ subhalos at the present epoch is 15% for the violent host and 16.5% for the quiescent one. At z = 0.7, these fractions increase to 19% and 33%, respectively, as more recently accreted satellites are less prone to tidal destruction. In projection, the average fraction of surface mass density in substructure at a distance of R/R vir = 0.02 (˜5–10 kpc) from the two halo centers ranges from 0.6% to ≳2%, significantly higher than that measured in simulations of Milky Way-sized halos. The contribution of subhalos with M sub < 109 {M}ȯ to the projected mass fraction is between one-fifth and one-third of the total, with the smallest share found in the quiescent host. We assess the impact of baryonic effects via twin, lower-resolution hydrodynamical simulations that include metallicity-dependent gas cooling, star formation, and a delayed-radiative-cooling scheme for supernova feedback. Baryonic contraction produces a super-isothermal total density profile and increases the number of massive subhalos in the inner regions of the main host. The host density profiles and projected subhalo mass fractions appear to be broadly consistent with observations of gravitational lenses.

  1. TA-Doc Linker Role. Draft. Documentation and Technical Assistance in Urban Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Manford L.

    One of the aims of the Documentation and Technical Assistance (DTA) Project is to apply educational information that has been utilized for problem solving in one organization to other settings with their own unique characteristics. Within the staff of the DTA project, the position of Technical Assistance-Documentation Linker (TA-Doc Linker) was…

  2. Linker Installation: Engineering Pore Environment with Precisely Placed Functionalities in Zirconium MOFs.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shuai; Chen, Ying-Pin; Qin, Jun-Sheng; Lu, Weigang; Zou, Lanfang; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Xuan; Sun, Xing; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2016-07-20

    Precise placement of multiple functional groups in a highly ordered metal-organic framework (MOF) platform allows the tailoring of the pore environment, which is required for advanced applications. To realize this, we present a comprehensive study on the linker installation method, in which a stable MOF with coordinatively unsaturated Zr6 clusters was employed and linkers bearing different functional groups were postsynthetically installed. A Zr-MOF with inherent missing linker sites, namely, PCN-700, was initially constructed under kinetic control. Twelve linkers with different substituents were then designed to study their effect on MOF formation kinetics and therefore resulting MOF structures. Guided by the geometrical analysis, linkers with different lengths were installed into a parent PCN-700, giving rise to 11 new MOFs and each bearing up to three different functional groups in predefined positions. Systematic variation of the pore volume and decoration of pore environment were realized by linker installation, which resulted in synergistic effects including an enhancement of H2 adsorption capacities of up to 57%. In addition, a size-selective catalytic system for aerobic alcohol oxidation reaction is built in PCN-700 through linker installation, which shows high activity and tunable size selectivity. Altogether, these results exemplify the capability of the linker installation method in the pore environment engineering of stable MOFs with multiple functional groups, giving an unparalleled level of control. PMID:27345035

  3. Flexibility of C3h -Symmetrical Linkers in Tris-oligonucleotide-Based Tetrahedral Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Panagiotidis, Christos; Kath-Schorr, Stephanie; von Kiedrowski, Günter

    2016-02-01

    Flexibility of tris-oligonucleotides is determined by the length of their connecting hydrocarbon chains. Tris-oligonucleotides are branched DNA building blocks with three oligonucleotide arms attached to a C3h -symmetrical linker core at these chains. Four tris-oligonucleotides hybridise into a tetrahedral nanocage by sequence-determined self-assembly. The influence of methylene, ethylene and propylene chains was studied by synthesising sets of tris-oligonucleotides and analysing the relative stability of the hybridisation products against digestion by mung bean nuclease by using gel electrophoresis. Linkers with ethylene chains showed sufficient flexibility, whereas methylene-chain linkers were too rigid. Tris-oligonucleotides based on the latter still formed tetrahedral scaffolds in intermixing experiments with linkers of higher flexibility. Thus, a new generation of versatile isocyanurate-based linkers was established.

  4. Flexibility of C3h -Symmetrical Linkers in Tris-oligonucleotide-Based Tetrahedral Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Panagiotidis, Christos; Kath-Schorr, Stephanie; von Kiedrowski, Günter

    2016-02-01

    Flexibility of tris-oligonucleotides is determined by the length of their connecting hydrocarbon chains. Tris-oligonucleotides are branched DNA building blocks with three oligonucleotide arms attached to a C3h -symmetrical linker core at these chains. Four tris-oligonucleotides hybridise into a tetrahedral nanocage by sequence-determined self-assembly. The influence of methylene, ethylene and propylene chains was studied by synthesising sets of tris-oligonucleotides and analysing the relative stability of the hybridisation products against digestion by mung bean nuclease by using gel electrophoresis. Linkers with ethylene chains showed sufficient flexibility, whereas methylene-chain linkers were too rigid. Tris-oligonucleotides based on the latter still formed tetrahedral scaffolds in intermixing experiments with linkers of higher flexibility. Thus, a new generation of versatile isocyanurate-based linkers was established. PMID:26593127

  5. Synthesis of macrolones with central piperazine ring in the linker and its influence on antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Kapić, Samra; Cipčić Paljetak, Hana; Palej Jakopović, Ivana; Fajdetić, Andrea; Ilijaš, Marina; Stimac, Vlado; Brajša, Karmen; Holmes, David J; Berge, John; Alihodžić, Sulejman

    2011-12-01

    Three macrolides, clarithromycin, azithromycin and 11-O-Me-azithromycin have been selected for the construction of a series of new macrolone derivatives. Quinolone-linker intermediates are prepared by Sonogashira-type C(6)-alkynylation of 6-iodoquinolone precursors. The final macrolones, differing by macrolide moiety and substituents at the position N-1 of the quinolone or by the presence of an ethyl ester or free acid on the quinolone unit attached via a linker. The linker comprises of a central piperazine ring bonded to the 4″-O position of cladinose by 3-carbon ester or ether functionality. Modifications of the linker did not improve antibacterial properties compared to the previously reported macrolone compounds. Linker flexibility seems to play an important role for potency against macrolide resistant respiratory pathogens.

  6. Thermodynamic Insight in the High-Pressure Behavior of UiO-66: Effect of Linker Defects and Linker Expansion

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In this Article, we present a molecular-level understanding of the experimentally observed loss of crystallinity in UiO-66-type metal–organic frameworks, including the pristine UiO-66 to -68 as well as defect-containing UiO-66 materials, under the influence of external pressure. This goal is achieved by constructing pressure-versus-volume profiles at finite temperatures using a thermodynamic approach relying on ab initio derived force fields. On the atomic level, the phenomenon is reflected in a sudden drop in the number of symmetry operators for the crystallographic unit cell because of the disordered displacement of the organic linkers with respect to the inorganic bricks. For the defect-containing samples, a reduced mechanical stability is observed, however, critically depending on the distribution of these defects throughout the material, hence demonstrating the importance of judiciously characterizing defects in these materials. PMID:27594765

  7. Thermodynamic Insight in the High-Pressure Behavior of UiO-66: Effect of Linker Defects and Linker Expansion

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In this Article, we present a molecular-level understanding of the experimentally observed loss of crystallinity in UiO-66-type metal–organic frameworks, including the pristine UiO-66 to -68 as well as defect-containing UiO-66 materials, under the influence of external pressure. This goal is achieved by constructing pressure-versus-volume profiles at finite temperatures using a thermodynamic approach relying on ab initio derived force fields. On the atomic level, the phenomenon is reflected in a sudden drop in the number of symmetry operators for the crystallographic unit cell because of the disordered displacement of the organic linkers with respect to the inorganic bricks. For the defect-containing samples, a reduced mechanical stability is observed, however, critically depending on the distribution of these defects throughout the material, hence demonstrating the importance of judiciously characterizing defects in these materials.

  8. THE EFFECTS OF HALO-TO-HALO VARIATION ON SUBSTRUCTURE LENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jacqueline; Koushiappas, Savvas M.; Zentner, Andrew R. E-mail: koushiappas@brown.edu

    2011-11-10

    We explore the halo-to-halo variation of dark matter (DM) substructure in galaxy-sized DM halos, focusing on its implications for strongly gravitational lensed systems. We find that the median value for projected substructure mass fractions within projected radii of 3% of the host halo virial radius is approximately f{sub sub} Almost-Equal-To 0.25%, but that the variance is large with a 95 percentile range of 0 {<=} f{sub sub} {<=} 1%. We quantify possible effects of substructure on quadruply imaged lens systems using the cusp relation and the simple statistic, R{sub cusp}. We estimate that the probability of obtaining the large values of the R{sub cusp} which have been observed from substructure effects is roughly {approx}10{sup -3} to {approx}10{sup -2}. We consider a variety of possible correlations between host halo properties and substructure properties in order to probe possible sample biases. In particular, low-concentration host DM halos have more large substructures and give rise to large values of R{sub cusp} more often. However, there is no known observational bias that would drive observed quadruply imaged quasars to be produced by low-concentration lens halos. Finally, we show that the substructure mass fraction is a relatively reliable predictor of the value of R{sub cusp}.

  9. KCF-S: KEGG Chemical Function and Substructure for improved interpretability and prediction in chemical bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In order to develop hypothesis on unknown metabolic pathways, biochemists frequently rely on literature that uses a free-text format to describe functional groups or substructures. In computational chemistry or cheminformatics, molecules are typically represented by chemical descriptors, i.e., vectors that summarize information on its various properties. However, it is difficult to interpret these chemical descriptors since they are not directly linked to the terminology of functional groups or substructures that the biochemists use. Methods In this study, we used KEGG Chemical Function (KCF) format to computationally describe biochemical substructures in seven attributes that resemble biochemists' way of dealing with substructures. Results We established KCF-S (KCF-and-Substructures) format as an additional structural information of KCF. Applying KCF-S revealed the specific appearance of substructures from various datasets of molecules that describes the characteristics of the respective datasets. Structure-based clustering of molecules using KCF-S resulted the clusters in which molecular weights and structures were less diverse than those obtained by conventional chemical fingerprints. We further applied KCF-S to find the pairs of molecules that are possibly converted to each other in enzymatic reactions, and KCF-S clearly improved predictive performance than that presented previously. Conclusions KCF-S defines biochemical substructures with keeping interpretability, suggesting the potential to apply more studies on chemical bioinformatics. KCF and KCF-S can be automatically converted from Molfile format, enabling to deal with molecules from any data sources. PMID:24564846

  10. Association of systemic lupus erythematosus clinical features with European population genetic substructure.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Perez, Elisa; Suarez-Gestal, Marian; Calaza, Manuel; Witte, Torsten; Papasteriades, Chryssa; Marchini, Maurizio; Migliaresi, Sergio; Kovacs, Attila; Ordi-Ros, Josep; Bijl, Marc; Santos, Maria Jose; Ruzickova, Sarka; Pullmann, Rudolf; Carreira, Patricia; Skopouli, Fotini N; D'Alfonso, Sandra; Sebastiani, Gian Domenico; Suarez, Ana; Blanco, Francisco J; Gomez-Reino, Juan J; Gonzalez, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with a very varied spectrum of clinical manifestations that could be partly determined by genetic factors. We aimed to determine the relationship between prevalence of 11 clinical features and age of disease onset with European population genetic substructure. Data from 1413 patients of European ancestry recruited in nine countries was tested for association with genotypes of top ancestry informative markers. This analysis was done with logistic regression between phenotypes and genotypes or principal components extracted from them. We used a genetic additive model and adjusted for gender and disease duration. Three clinical features showed association with ancestry informative markers: autoantibody production defined as immunologic disorder (P = 6.8×10(-4)), oral ulcers (P = 6.9×10(-4)) and photosensitivity (P = 0.002). Immunologic disorder was associated with genotypes more common in Southern European ancestries, whereas the opposite trend was observed for photosensitivity. Oral ulcers were specifically more common in patients of Spanish and Portuguese self-reported ancestry. These results should be taken into account in future research and suggest new hypotheses and possible underlying mechanisms to be investigated. A first hypothesis linking photosensitivity with variation in skin pigmentation is suggested. PMID:22194982

  11. Association of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Clinical Features with European Population Genetic Substructure

    PubMed Central

    Calaza, Manuel; Witte, Torsten; Papasteriades, Chryssa; Marchini, Maurizio; Migliaresi, Sergio; Kovacs, Attila; Ordi-Ros, Josep; Bijl, Marc; Santos, Maria Jose; Ruzickova, Sarka; Pullmann, Rudolf; Carreira, Patricia; Skopouli, Fotini N.; D'Alfonso, Sandra; Sebastiani, Gian Domenico; Suarez, Ana; Blanco, Francisco J.; Gomez-Reino, Juan J.; Gonzalez, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with a very varied spectrum of clinical manifestations that could be partly determined by genetic factors. We aimed to determine the relationship between prevalence of 11 clinical features and age of disease onset with European population genetic substructure. Data from 1413 patients of European ancestry recruited in nine countries was tested for association with genotypes of top ancestry informative markers. This analysis was done with logistic regression between phenotypes and genotypes or principal components extracted from them. We used a genetic additive model and adjusted for gender and disease duration. Three clinical features showed association with ancestry informative markers: autoantibody production defined as immunologic disorder (P = 6.8×10−4), oral ulcers (P = 6.9×10−4) and photosensitivity (P = 0.002). Immunologic disorder was associated with genotypes more common in Southern European ancestries, whereas the opposite trend was observed for photosensitivity. Oral ulcers were specifically more common in patients of Spanish and Portuguese self-reported ancestry. These results should be taken into account in future research and suggest new hypotheses and possible underlying mechanisms to be investigated. A first hypothesis linking photosensitivity with variation in skin pigmentation is suggested. PMID:22194982

  12. Jet Substructure: Boosting the Search for New Physics at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaler, Jesse

    2016-03-01

    Collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are dominated by jets, collimated sprays of particles that are proxies for underlying quarks and gluons. With the remarkable performance of the ATLAS and CMS detectors, jets can now be characterized not just by their overall direction and energy but also by their substructure. In this talk, I highlight the ways that jet substructure has enhanced the search for new physics at the LHC, including recent excitement over a possible diboson excess. I also explain how theoretical studies of jet substructure have taught us surprising lessons about the nature of the strong force.

  13. Effect of load eccentricity and substructure deformation on ultimate strength of shuttle orbiter thermal protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of load eccentricity and substructure deformation on the ultimate strength and stress displacement properties of the shuttle orbiter thermal protection system (TPS) was determined. The LI-900 Reusable Surface Insulation (RSI) tiles mounted on the .41 cm thick Strain Isolator Pad (SIP) were investigated. Substructure deformations reduce the ultimate strength of the SIP/tile TPS and increase the scatter in the ultimate strength data. Substructure deformations that occur unsymmetric to the tile can cause the tile to rotate when subjected to a uniform applied load. Load eccentricity reduces SIP/tile TPS ultimate strength and causes tile rotation.

  14. Immunochemical analysis of cartilage proteoglycans. Antigenic determinants of substructures.

    PubMed Central

    Wieslander, J; Heinegård, D

    1979-01-01

    Antibodies were raised in rabbits by injection of cartilage proteoglycan monomers, isolated hyaluronic acid-binding region, polysaccharide-peptides prepared by trypsin digestion of proteoglycans and link-protein. The rabbits injected with the proteoglycan monomers made antibodies reacting with the intact proteoglycan. The antiserum contained antibodies specific for, and also reacting with, the isolated hyaluronic acid-binding region and the keratan sulphate-rich region. In addition there were probably antibodies reacting with other structures of the proteoglycan monomer. When isolated hyaluronic acid-binding region was used for immunization the antibodies obtained reacted specifically with the hyaluronic acid-binding region. The antibodies obtained from rabbits immunized with the polysaccharide-peptides reacted with the proteoglycan monomers and showed a reaction identical with that of the chondroitin sulphate-peptides isolated after trypsin digestion of proteoglycans. The antibodies prepared with the link-protein as the antigen reacted only with the link-protein and not with any preparation from the proteoglycan monomer. Neither did any of the antisera raised against the proteoglycan monomer or its substructures react with the link-protein. Separately it was shown that the peptide 'maps' prepared from trypsin digests of the link-protein and the hyaluronic acid-binding region were different. Therefore it appears that the link-protein is not structurally related to the proteoglycan or the hyaluronic acid-binding region. Digestion of proteoglycan monomers or isolated hyaluronic acid-binding region with trypsin did not destroy the antigenic sites of the hyaluronic acid-binding region. In contrast trypsin digests of previously reduced and alkylated preparations did not react with the anti-(hyaluronic acid-binding region). The trypsin digests, however, reacted with both the antibodies directed against the chondroitin sulphate-peptides and those against the keratan

  15. Stability, Intracellular Delivery, and Release of siRNA from Chitosan Nanoparticles Using Different Cross-Linkers

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Ghafoor Raja, Maria; Katas, Haliza; Jing Wen, Thum

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan (CS) nanoparticles have been extensively studied for siRNA delivery; however, their stability and efficacy are highly dependent on the types of cross-linker used. To address this issue, three common cross-linkers; tripolyphosphate (TPP), dextran sulphate (DS) and poly-D-glutamic acid (PGA) were used to prepare siRNA loaded CS-TPP/DS/PGA nanoparticles by ionic gelation method. The resulting nanoparticles were compared with regard to their physicochemical properties including particle size, zeta potential, morphology, binding and encapsulation efficiencies. Among all the formulations prepared with different cross linkers, CS-TPP-siRNA had the smallest particle size (ranged from 127 ± 9.7 to 455 ± 12.9 nm) with zeta potential ranged from +25.1 ± 1.5 to +39.4 ± 0.5 mV, and high entrapment (>95%) and binding efficiencies. Similarly, CS-TPP nanoparticles showed better siRNA protection during storage at 4˚C and as determined by serum protection assay. TEM micrographs revealed the assorted morphology of CS-TPP-siRNA nanoparticles in contrast to irregular morphology displayed by CS-DS-siRNA and CS-PGA-siRNA nanoparticles. All siRNA loaded CS-TPP/DS/PGA nanoparticles showed initial burst release followed by sustained release of siRNA. Moreover, all the formulations showed low and concentration-dependent cytotoxicity with human colorectal cancer cells (DLD-1), in vitro. The cellular uptake studies with CS-TPP-siRNA nanoparticles showed successful delivery of siRNA within cytoplasm of DLD-1 cells. The results demonstrate that ionically cross-linked CS-TPP nanoparticles are biocompatible non-viral gene delivery system and generate a solid ground for further optimization studies, for example with regard to steric stabilization and targeting. PMID:26068222

  16. Stability, Intracellular Delivery, and Release of siRNA from Chitosan Nanoparticles Using Different Cross-Linkers.

    PubMed

    Raja, Maria Abdul Ghafoor; Katas, Haliza; Jing Wen, Thum

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan (CS) nanoparticles have been extensively studied for siRNA delivery; however, their stability and efficacy are highly dependent on the types of cross-linker used. To address this issue, three common cross-linkers; tripolyphosphate (TPP), dextran sulphate (DS) and poly-D-glutamic acid (PGA) were used to prepare siRNA loaded CS-TPP/DS/PGA nanoparticles by ionic gelation method. The resulting nanoparticles were compared with regard to their physicochemical properties including particle size, zeta potential, morphology, binding and encapsulation efficiencies. Among all the formulations prepared with different cross linkers, CS-TPP-siRNA had the smallest particle size (ranged from 127 ± 9.7 to 455 ± 12.9 nm) with zeta potential ranged from +25.1 ± 1.5 to +39.4 ± 0.5 mV, and high entrapment (>95%) and binding efficiencies. Similarly, CS-TPP nanoparticles showed better siRNA protection during storage at 4˚C and as determined by serum protection assay. TEM micrographs revealed the assorted morphology of CS-TPP-siRNA nanoparticles in contrast to irregular morphology displayed by CS-DS-siRNA and CS-PGA-siRNA nanoparticles. All siRNA loaded CS-TPP/DS/PGA nanoparticles showed initial burst release followed by sustained release of siRNA. Moreover, all the formulations showed low and concentration-dependent cytotoxicity with human colorectal cancer cells (DLD-1), in vitro. The cellular uptake studies with CS-TPP-siRNA nanoparticles showed successful delivery of siRNA within cytoplasm of DLD-1 cells. The results demonstrate that ionically cross-linked CS-TPP nanoparticles are biocompatible non-viral gene delivery system and generate a solid ground for further optimization studies, for example with regard to steric stabilization and targeting. PMID:26068222

  17. Linker histone partial phosphorylation: effects on secondary structure and chromatin condensation

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Rita; Sarg, Bettina; Lindner, Herbert; Bartolomé, Salvador; Ponte, Inma; Suau, Pedro; Roque, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Linker histones are involved in chromatin higher-order structure and gene regulation. We have successfully achieved partial phosphorylation of linker histones in chicken erythrocyte soluble chromatin with CDK2, as indicated by HPCE, MALDI-TOF and Tandem MS. We have studied the effects of linker histone partial phosphorylation on secondary structure and chromatin condensation. Infrared spectroscopy analysis showed a gradual increase of β-structure in the phosphorylated samples, concomitant to a decrease in α-helix/turns, with increasing linker histone phosphorylation. This conformational change could act as the first step in the phosphorylation-induced effects on chromatin condensation. A decrease of the sedimentation rate through sucrose gradients of the phosphorylated samples was observed, indicating a global relaxation of the 30-nm fiber following linker histone phosphorylation. Analysis of specific genes, combining nuclease digestion and qPCR, showed that phosphorylated samples were more accessible than unphosphorylated samples, suggesting local chromatin relaxation. Chromatin aggregation was induced by MgCl2 and analyzed by dynamic light scattering (DLS). Phosphorylated chromatin had lower percentages in volume of aggregated molecules and the aggregates had smaller hydrodynamic diameter than unphosphorylated chromatin, indicating that linker histone phosphorylation impaired chromatin aggregation. These findings provide new insights into the effects of linker histone phosphorylation in chromatin condensation. PMID:25870416

  18. Linker histone partial phosphorylation: effects on secondary structure and chromatin condensation.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Rita; Sarg, Bettina; Lindner, Herbert; Bartolomé, Salvador; Ponte, Inma; Suau, Pedro; Roque, Alicia

    2015-05-19

    Linker histones are involved in chromatin higher-order structure and gene regulation. We have successfully achieved partial phosphorylation of linker histones in chicken erythrocyte soluble chromatin with CDK2, as indicated by HPCE, MALDI-TOF and Tandem MS. We have studied the effects of linker histone partial phosphorylation on secondary structure and chromatin condensation. Infrared spectroscopy analysis showed a gradual increase of β-structure in the phosphorylated samples, concomitant to a decrease in α-helix/turns, with increasing linker histone phosphorylation. This conformational change could act as the first step in the phosphorylation-induced effects on chromatin condensation. A decrease of the sedimentation rate through sucrose gradients of the phosphorylated samples was observed, indicating a global relaxation of the 30-nm fiber following linker histone phosphorylation. Analysis of specific genes, combining nuclease digestion and qPCR, showed that phosphorylated samples were more accessible than unphosphorylated samples, suggesting local chromatin relaxation. Chromatin aggregation was induced by MgCl2 and analyzed by dynamic light scattering (DLS). Phosphorylated chromatin had lower percentages in volume of aggregated molecules and the aggregates had smaller hydrodynamic diameter than unphosphorylated chromatin, indicating that linker histone phosphorylation impaired chromatin aggregation. These findings provide new insights into the effects of linker histone phosphorylation in chromatin condensation.

  19. Linker histone partial phosphorylation: effects on secondary structure and chromatin condensation.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Rita; Sarg, Bettina; Lindner, Herbert; Bartolomé, Salvador; Ponte, Inma; Suau, Pedro; Roque, Alicia

    2015-05-19

    Linker histones are involved in chromatin higher-order structure and gene regulation. We have successfully achieved partial phosphorylation of linker histones in chicken erythrocyte soluble chromatin with CDK2, as indicated by HPCE, MALDI-TOF and Tandem MS. We have studied the effects of linker histone partial phosphorylation on secondary structure and chromatin condensation. Infrared spectroscopy analysis showed a gradual increase of β-structure in the phosphorylated samples, concomitant to a decrease in α-helix/turns, with increasing linker histone phosphorylation. This conformational change could act as the first step in the phosphorylation-induced effects on chromatin condensation. A decrease of the sedimentation rate through sucrose gradients of the phosphorylated samples was observed, indicating a global relaxation of the 30-nm fiber following linker histone phosphorylation. Analysis of specific genes, combining nuclease digestion and qPCR, showed that phosphorylated samples were more accessible than unphosphorylated samples, suggesting local chromatin relaxation. Chromatin aggregation was induced by MgCl2 and analyzed by dynamic light scattering (DLS). Phosphorylated chromatin had lower percentages in volume of aggregated molecules and the aggregates had smaller hydrodynamic diameter than unphosphorylated chromatin, indicating that linker histone phosphorylation impaired chromatin aggregation. These findings provide new insights into the effects of linker histone phosphorylation in chromatin condensation. PMID:25870416

  20. Gelatin-based biomaterial engineering with anhydride-containing oligomeric cross-linkers.

    PubMed

    Loth, Tina; Hötzel, Rudi; Kascholke, Christian; Anderegg, Ulf; Schulz-Siegmund, Michaela; Hacker, Michael C

    2014-06-01

    Chemically cross-linked gelatin hydrogels are versatile cell-adhesive hydrogel materials that have been established for a variety of biomedical applications. The most prominent cross-linker is glutaraldehyde, which, however, has been described to cause compatibility problems and loss of microscopic but relevant structural features. A recently developed oligomeric cross-linker that contains anhydride functionalities was evaluated as cross-linker for the fabrication of gelatin-based hydrogels and microparticles. In a fast curing reaction, hydrogels composed of gelatin and oligomeric cross-linker were fabricated with good conversion over a wide concentration range of constituents and with cross-linkers of different anhydride contents. Hydrogel properties, such as dry weight and mechanics, could be controlled by hydrogel composition and rheological properties correlated to elastic moduli from 1 to 10 kPa. The gels were shown to be cytocompatible and promoted cell adhesion. In soft formulations, cells migrated into the hydrogel bulk. Gelatin microparticles prepared by a standard water-in-oil emulsion technique were also treated with the novel oligomers, and cross-linking degrees matching those obtained with glutaraldehyde were obtained. At the same time, fewer interparticular cross-links were observed. Fluorescein-derivatized cross-linkers yielded labeled microparticles in a concentration-dependent manner. The oligomeric cross-linkers are presented as an efficient and possibly more functional and compatible alternative to glutaraldehyde. The engineered hydrogel materials hold potential for various biomedical applications.

  1. Novel Phosphate Modified Cathepsin B Linkers: Improving Aqueous Solubility and Enhancing Payload Scope of ADCs.

    PubMed

    Kern, Jeffrey C; Dooney, Deborah; Zhang, Rena; Liang, Linda; Brandish, Philip E; Cheng, Mangeng; Feng, Guo; Beck, Andrew; Bresson, Damien; Firdos, Juhi; Gately, Dennis; Knudsen, Nick; Manibusan, Anthony; Sun, Ying; Garbaccio, Robert M

    2016-09-21

    In an effort to examine the utility of antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) beyond oncology indications, a novel phosphate bridged Cathepsin B sensitive linker was developed to enable the targeted delivery of glucocorticoids. Phosphate bridging of the Cathepsin B sensitive linkers allows for payload attachment at an aliphatic alcohol. As small molecule drug-linkers, these aqueous soluble phosphate containing drug-linkers were found to have robust plasma stability coupled with rapid release of payload in a lysosomal environment. Site-specific ADCs were successfully made between these drug-linkers and an antibody against human CD70, a receptor specifically expressed in immune cells but also found aberrantly expressed in multiple human carcinomas. These ADCs demonstrated in vitro targeted delivery of glucocorticoids to a representative cell line as measured by changes in glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mediated gene mRNA levels. This novel linker expands the scope of potential ADC payloads by allowing an aliphatic alcohol to be a stable, yet cleavable attachment site. This phosphate linker may have broad utility for internalizing ADCs as well as other targeted delivery platforms.

  2. Exploring the effects of linker composition on site-specifically modified antibody-drug conjugates.

    PubMed

    Albers, Aaron E; Garofalo, Albert W; Drake, Penelope M; Kudirka, Romas; de Hart, Gregory W; Barfield, Robyn M; Baker, Jeanne; Banas, Stefanie; Rabuka, David

    2014-12-17

    In the context of antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs), noncleavable linkers provide a means to deliver cytotoxic small molecules to cell targets while reducing systemic toxicity caused by nontargeted release of the free drug. Additionally, noncleavable linkers afford an opportunity to change the chemical properties of the small molecule to improve potency or diminish affinity for multidrug transporters, thereby improving efficacy. We employed the aldehyde tag coupled with the hydrazino-iso-Pictet-Spengler (HIPS) ligation to generate a panel of site-specifically conjugated ADCs that varied only in the noncleavable linker portion. The ADC panel comprised antibodies carrying a maytansine payload ligated through one of five different linkers. Both the linker-maytansine constructs alone and the resulting ADC panel were characterized in a variety of in vitro and in vivo assays measuring biophysical and functional properties. We observed that slight differences in linker design affected these parameters in disparate ways, and noted that efficacy could be improved by selecting for particular attributes. These studies serve as a starting point for the exploration of more potent noncleavable linker systems. PMID:25176286

  3. New Structural-Dynamics Module for Offshore Multimember Substructures within the Wind Turbine Computer-Aided Engineering Tool FAST: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Song, H.; Damiani, R.; Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.

    2013-08-01

    FAST, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is a computer-aided engineering (CAE) tool for aero-hydro-servo-elastic analysis of land-based and offshore wind turbines. This paper discusses recent upgrades made to FAST to enable loads simulations of offshore wind turbines with fixed-bottom, multimember support structures (e.g., jackets and tripods, which are commonly used in transitional-depth waters). The main theory and strategies for the implementation of the multimember substructure dynamics module (SubDyn) within the new FAST modularization framework are introduced. SubDyn relies on two main engineering schematizations: 1) a linear frame finite-element beam (LFEB) model and 2) a dynamics system reduction via Craig-Bampton's method. A jacket support structure and an offshore system consisting of a turbine atop a jacket substructure were simulated to test the SubDyn module and to preliminarily assess results against results from a commercial finite-element code.

  4. Glycosylated linkers in multimodular lignocellulose-degrading enzymes dynamically bind to cellulose.

    PubMed

    Payne, Christina M; Resch, Michael G; Chen, Liqun; Crowley, Michael F; Himmel, Michael E; Taylor, Larry E; Sandgren, Mats; Ståhlberg, Jerry; Stals, Ingeborg; Tan, Zhongping; Beckham, Gregg T

    2013-09-01

    Plant cell-wall polysaccharides represent a vast source of food in nature. To depolymerize polysaccharides to soluble sugars, many organisms use multifunctional enzyme mixtures consisting of glycoside hydrolases, lytic polysaccharide mono-oxygenases, polysaccharide lyases, and carbohydrate esterases, as well as accessory, redox-active enzymes for lignin depolymerization. Many of these enzymes that degrade lignocellulose are multimodular with carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) and catalytic domains connected by flexible, glycosylated linkers. These linkers have long been thought to simply serve as a tether between structured domains or to act in an inchworm-like fashion during catalytic action. To examine linker function, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the Trichoderma reesei Family 6 and Family 7 cellobiohydrolases (TrCel6A and TrCel7A, respectively) bound to cellulose. During these simulations, the glycosylated linkers bind directly to cellulose, suggesting a previously unknown role in enzyme action. The prediction from the MD simulations was examined experimentally by measuring the binding affinity of the Cel7A CBM and the natively glycosylated Cel7A CBM-linker. On crystalline cellulose, the glycosylated linker enhances the binding affinity over the CBM alone by an order of magnitude. The MD simulations before and after binding of the linker also suggest that the bound linker may affect enzyme action due to significant damping in the enzyme fluctuations. Together, these results suggest that glycosylated linkers in carbohydrate-active enzymes, which are intrinsically disordered proteins in solution, aid in dynamic binding during the enzymatic deconstruction of plant cell walls. PMID:23959893

  5. Glycosylated linkers in multimodular lignocellulose-degrading enzymes dynamically bind to cellulose

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Christina M.; Resch, Michael G.; Chen, Liqun; Crowley, Michael F.; Himmel, Michael E.; Taylor, Larry E.; Sandgren, Mats; Ståhlberg, Jerry; Stals, Ingeborg; Tan, Zhongping; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2013-01-01

    Plant cell-wall polysaccharides represent a vast source of food in nature. To depolymerize polysaccharides to soluble sugars, many organisms use multifunctional enzyme mixtures consisting of glycoside hydrolases, lytic polysaccharide mono-oxygenases, polysaccharide lyases, and carbohydrate esterases, as well as accessory, redox-active enzymes for lignin depolymerization. Many of these enzymes that degrade lignocellulose are multimodular with carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) and catalytic domains connected by flexible, glycosylated linkers. These linkers have long been thought to simply serve as a tether between structured domains or to act in an inchworm-like fashion during catalytic action. To examine linker function, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the Trichoderma reesei Family 6 and Family 7 cellobiohydrolases (TrCel6A and TrCel7A, respectively) bound to cellulose. During these simulations, the glycosylated linkers bind directly to cellulose, suggesting a previously unknown role in enzyme action. The prediction from the MD simulations was examined experimentally by measuring the binding affinity of the Cel7A CBM and the natively glycosylated Cel7A CBM-linker. On crystalline cellulose, the glycosylated linker enhances the binding affinity over the CBM alone by an order of magnitude. The MD simulations before and after binding of the linker also suggest that the bound linker may affect enzyme action due to significant damping in the enzyme fluctuations. Together, these results suggest that glycosylated linkers in carbohydrate-active enzymes, which are intrinsically disordered proteins in solution, aid in dynamic binding during the enzymatic deconstruction of plant cell walls. PMID:23959893

  6. Lecithin-Linker Microemulsion Gelatin Gels for Extended Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Xuan, Xiao-Yue; Cheng, Yu-Ling; Acosta, Edgar

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces the formulation of alcohol-free, lecithin microemulsion-based gels (MBGs) prepared with gelatin as gelling agent. The influence of oil, water, lecithin and hydrophilic and lipophilic additives (linkers) on the rheological properties and appearance of these gels was systematically explored using ternary phase diagrams. Clear MBGs were obtained in regions of single phase microemulsions (μEs) at room temperature. Increasing the water content in the formulation increased the elastic modulus of the gels, while increasing the oil content had the opposite effect. The hydrophilic additive (PEG-6-caprylic/capric glycerides) was shown to reduce the elastic modulus of gelatin gels, particularly at high temperatures. In contrast to anionic (AOT) μEs, the results suggest that in lecithin (nonionic) μEs, the introduction of gelatin “dehydrates” the μE. Finally, when the transdermal transport of lidocaine formulated in the parent μE and the resulting MBG were compared, only a minor retardation in the loading and release of lidocaine was observed. PMID:24300183

  7. Mobile linkers on DNA-coated colloids: valency without patches.

    PubMed

    Angioletti-Uberti, Stefano; Varilly, Patrick; Mognetti, Bortolo M; Frenkel, Daan

    2014-09-19

    Colloids coated with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) can bind selectively to other colloids coated with complementary ssDNA. The fact that DNA-coated colloids (DNACCs) can bind to specific partners opens the prospect of making colloidal "molecules." However, in order to design DNACC-based molecules, we must be able to control the valency of the colloids, i.e., the number of partners to which a given DNACC can bind. One obvious, but not very simple approach is to decorate the colloidal surface with patches of single-stranded DNA that selectively bind those on other colloids. Here we propose a design principle that exploits many-body effects to control the valency of otherwise isotropic colloids. Using a combination of theory and simulation, we show that we can tune the valency of colloids coated with mobile ssDNA, simply by tuning the nonspecific repulsion between the particles. Our simulations show that the resulting effective interactions lead to low-valency colloids self-assembling in peculiar open structures, very different from those observed in DNACCs with immobile DNA linkers.

  8. 20. Top 30/3. Plan of exposed substructure elevations. Wyoming ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Top 30/3. Plan of exposed substructure elevations. - Wyoming Valley Flood Control System, Woodward Pumping Station, East of Toby Creek crossing by Erie-Lackawanna Railroad, Edwardsville, Luzerne County, PA

  9. COLUMN DETAIL WITH SUBSTRUCTURE/STEEL BEAM/CONCRETE BEAM AT FIRST AVENUE ONRAMP. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    COLUMN DETAIL WITH SUBSTRUCTURE/STEEL BEAM/CONCRETE BEAM AT FIRST AVENUE ON-RAMP. TRIANGLE BUILDING AT RIGHT SIDE OF PHOTOGRAPH. - Alaskan Way Viaduct and Battery Street Tunnel, Seattle, King County, WA

  10. Flexibility of NS5 Methyltransferase-Polymerase Linker Region Is Essential for Dengue Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yongqian; Soh, Tingjin Sherryl; Chan, Kitti Wing Ki; Fung, Sarah Suet Yin; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam; Lim, Siew Pheng; Shi, Pei-Yong; Huber, Thomas; Lescar, Julien

    2015-01-01

    We examined the function of the conserved Val/Ile residue within the dengue virus NS5 interdomain linker (residues 263 to 272) by site-directed mutagenesis. Gly substitution or Gly/Pro insertion after the conserved residue increased the linker flexibility and created slightly attenuated viruses. In contrast, Pro substitution abolished virus replication by imposing rigidity in the linker and restricting NS5's conformational plasticity. Our biochemical and reverse genetics experiments demonstrate that NS5 utilizes conformational regulation to achieve optimum viral replication. PMID:26269182

  11. Direct detection of linker DNA bending in defined-length oligomers of chromatin.

    PubMed Central

    Yao, J; Lowary, P T; Widom, J

    1990-01-01

    Linker DNA, which connects between nucleosomes in chromatin, is short and, therefore, may be essentially straight and inflexible. We have carried out hydrodynamic and electron microscopic studies of dinucleosomes--fragments of chromatin containing just two nucleosomes--to test the ability of linker DNA to bend. We find that ionic conditions that stabilize the folding of long chromatin cause linker DNA in dinucleosomes to bend, bringing the two nucleosomes into contact. The results uphold a key prediction of the solenoid model of chromosome folding and suggest a mechanism by which proteins that are separated along the DNA can interact by direct contact. Images PMID:2217191

  12. Virtual sensing of structural vibrations using dynamic substructuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kullaa, Jyrki

    2016-10-01

    Virtual sensing techniques use information available from a limited set of physical sensors together with the finite element model to calculate an estimate of the quantity of interest. In structural dynamics applications, analytical mode shapes from the finite element model are typically used as a basis to estimate the response at unmeasured locations by an expansion algorithm. An alternative is to model only the interesting part of the structure using substructuring techniques, in which the natural modes are replaced by component modes consisting of a selected number of fixed interface modes plus the interface constraint modes. They are mutually independent and compose a valid subspace for estimating the unmeasured response. If the number of interface degrees of freedom is large, interface reduction is applied. The main advantage of the proposed approach is that the modelling effort can be substantially decreased, because only part of the structure is modelled and the modelling uncertainties, non-linearities, or changes in the omitted structure can be ignored. The method is validated by numerical simulations of three different structures under unknown excitation. Different types and locations of virtual sensors are studied. Also, the effects of noise and model errors are investigated. The most accurate estimation is obtained if the virtual sensor is located away from the interface and close to a physical sensor.

  13. Substructural influence in the hot rolling of Al alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQueen, H. J.

    1998-06-01

    The industrial rolling of aluminum alloys is generally conducted in multistage schedules of 10-15 passes partly on reversing mills and partly on continuous mills with temperature declining from 500°C to between 300°C and 250°C. Static recrystallization may take place in long intervals after passes with higher temperature and strain. During lower temperature intervals, only static recovery takes place so that in the following passes the flow curves exhibit higher initial stresses. Dynamic recovery decreases gradually through the hot-, warm-, and cold-working ranges but is reduced as the concentration of solutes and particles increase. Recrystallization is much more sensitive to temperature and alloying and is retarded by increased dynamic recovery. The texture of sheet depends on lattice-dependent Taylor rotations during dislocation slip, enhanced recovery of certain deformation band orientations, and preferred nucleation and growth during interpass pauses or annealing. Schedule optimization can be guided by physical simulation or modeling based on recrystallization kinetics to attain selected strengthening substructure, recrystallized grain size, and texture for product earing control.

  14. A NEW METHOD TO QUANTIFY X-RAY SUBSTRUCTURES IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Andrade-Santos, Felipe; Lima Neto, Gastao B.; Lagana, Tatiana F.

    2012-02-20

    We present a new method to quantify substructures in clusters of galaxies, based on the analysis of the intensity of structures. This analysis is done in a residual image that is the result of the subtraction of a surface brightness model, obtained by fitting a two-dimensional analytical model ({beta}-model or Sersic profile) with elliptical symmetry, from the X-ray image. Our method is applied to 34 clusters observed by the Chandra Space Telescope that are in the redshift range z in [0.02, 0.2] and have a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) greater than 100. We present the calibration of the method and the relations between the substructure level with physical quantities, such as the mass, X-ray luminosity, temperature, and cluster redshift. We use our method to separate the clusters in two sub-samples of high- and low-substructure levels. We conclude, using Monte Carlo simulations, that the method recuperates very well the true amount of substructure for small angular core radii clusters (with respect to the whole image size) and good S/N observations. We find no evidence of correlation between the substructure level and physical properties of the clusters such as gas temperature, X-ray luminosity, and redshift; however, analysis suggest a trend between the substructure level and cluster mass. The scaling relations for the two sub-samples (high- and low-substructure level clusters) are different (they present an offset, i.e., given a fixed mass or temperature, low-substructure clusters tend to be more X-ray luminous), which is an important result for cosmological tests using the mass-luminosity relation to obtain the cluster mass function, since they rely on the assumption that clusters do not present different scaling relations according to their dynamical state.

  15. Application of Resin Transfer Molding to the Manufacture of Wind Turbine Blade Substructures. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hedley, C. W.; Ritter, W. J.; Ashwill, T.

    2001-07-26

    The U.S. has generally lacked the capability for an iterative process of detailed structural design, manufacturing, and testing at the full blade level to achieve specific structural performance, cost, and weight targets. This project examined the effects that different composites processing methods had on the performance of representative blade substructures. In addition, the results of the testing of these substructures was used to validate NuMAD, the design tool developed at Sandia National Laboratories.

  16. Gravitational focusing and substructure effects on the rate modulation in direct dark matter searches

    SciTech Connect

    Nobile, Eugenio Del; Gelmini, Graciela B.; Witte, Samuel J.

    2015-08-21

    We study how gravitational focusing (GF) of dark matter by the Sun affects the annual and biannual modulation of the expected signal in non-directional direct dark matter searches, in the presence of dark matter substructure in the local dark halo. We consider the Sagittarius stream and a possible dark disk, and show that GF suppresses some, but not all, of the distinguishing features that would characterize substructure of the dark halo were GF neglected.

  17. AFM friction and adhesion mapping of the substructures of human hair cuticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, James R.; Tsibouklis, John; Nevell, Thomas G.; Breakspear, Steven

    2013-11-01

    Using atomic force microscopy, values of the microscale friction coefficient, the tip (silicon nitride) - surface adhesion force and the corresponding adhesion energy, for the substructures that constitute the surface of human hair (European brown hair) have been determined from Amonton plots. The values, mapped for comparison with surface topography, corresponded qualitatively with the substructures' plane surface characteristics. Localised maps and values of the frictional coefficient, extracted avoiding scale edge effects, are likely to inform the formulation of hair-care products and treatments.

  18. Gap comparison between single crown and three-unit bridge zirconia substructures

    PubMed Central

    Charoenchitt, Masnisa; Asvanund, Chanavut

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE To compare marginal and internal gaps of zirconia substructure of single crowns with those of three-unit fixed dental prostheses. MATERIALS AND METHODS Standardized Co-Cr alloy simulated second premolar and second molar abutments were fabricated and subsequently duplicated into type-III dental stone for working casts. After that, all zirconia substructures were made using Lava™ system. Marginal and internal gaps were measured in 2 planes (mesial-distal plane and buccal-palatal plane) at 5 locations: marginal opening (MO), chamfer area (CA), axial wall (AW), cusp tip (CT) and mid-occlusal (OA) using Replica technique. RESULTS There were significant differences between gaps at all locations. The mean ± SD of marginal gap in premolar was 43.6 ± 0.4 µm and 46.5 ± 0.5 µm for single crown and 3-unit bridge substructure respectively. For molar substructure the mean ± SD of marginal gap was 48.5 ± 0.4 µm and 52.6 ± 0.4 µm for single crown and 3-unit bridge respectively. The largest gaps were found at the occlusal area, which was 150.5 ± 0.5 µm and 154.5 ± 0.4 µm for single and 3-unit bridge premolar substructures respectively and 146.5 ± 0.4 µm and 211.5 ± 0.4 µm for single and 3-unit bridge molar substructure respectively. CONCLUSION Independent-samples t-test showed significant differences of gap in zirconia substructure between single crowns and three-unit bridge (P<.001). Therefore, the span length has the effect on the fit of zirconia substructure that is fabricated using CAD/CAM technique especially at the occlusal area. PMID:25177467

  19. Substructure of the galaxy clusters in the REXCESS sample: observed statistics and comparison to numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhringer, H.; Pratt, G. W.; Arnaud, M.; Borgani, S.; Croston, J. H.; Ponman, T. J.; Ameglio, S.; Temple, R. F.; Dolag, K.

    2010-05-01

    We study the substructure statistics of a representative sample of galaxy clusters by means of two currently popular substructure characterisation methods, power ratios and centroid shifts. We use the 31 clusters from the REXCESS sample, compiled from the southern ROSAT All-Sky cluster survey (REFLEX) with a morphologically unbiased selection in X-ray luminosity and redshift, all of which have been reobserved with XMM-Newton. The main goals of this work are to study the relationship between cluster morphology and other bulk properties, and the comparison of the morphology statistics between observations and numerical simulations. We investigate the uncertainties of the substructure parameters via newly-developed Monte Carlo methods, and examine the dependence of the results on projection effects (via the viewing angle of simulated clusters), finding that the uncertainties of the parameters can be quite substantial. Thus while the quantification of the dynamical state of individual clusters with these parameters should be treated with extreme caution, these substructure measures provide powerful statistical tools to characterise trends of properties in large cluster samples. The centre shift parameter, w, is found to be more sensitive in general and offers a larger dynamic range than the power ratios. For the REXCESS sample neither the occurence of substructure nor the presence of cool cores depends on cluster mass; however a weak correlation with X-ray luminosity is present, which is interpreted as selection effect. There is a significant anti-correlation between the existence of substantial substructure and cool cores. The simulated clusters show on average larger substructure parameters than the observed clusters, a trend that is traced to the fact that cool regions are more pronounced in the simulated clusters, leading to stronger substructure measures in merging clusters and clusters with offset cores. Moreover, the frequency of cool regions is higher in the

  20. Combining allele frequency uncertainty and population substructure corrections in forensic DNA calculations.

    PubMed

    Cowell, Robert

    2016-07-01

    In forensic DNA calculations of relatedness of individuals and in DNA mixture analyses, at least two sources of uncertainty are present concerning the allele frequencies used for evaluating genotype probabilities when evaluating likelihoods. They are: (i) imprecision in the estimates of the allele frequencies in the population by using an inevitably finite database of DNA profiles to estimate them; and (ii) the existence of population substructure. Green and Mortera [6] showed that these effects may be taken into account individually using a common Dirichlet model within a Bayesian network formulation, but that when taken in combination this is not the case; however they suggested an approximation that could be used. Here we develop a slightly different approximation that is shown to be exact in the case of a single individual. We demonstrate the numerical closeness of the approximation using a published database of allele counts, and illustrate the effect of incorporating the approximation into calculations of a recently published statistical model of DNA mixtures. PMID:27231804

  1. Systematic benchmark of substructure search in molecular graphs - From Ullmann to VF2

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Searching for substructures in molecules belongs to the most elementary tasks in cheminformatics and is nowadays part of virtually every cheminformatics software. The underlying algorithms, used over several decades, are designed for the application to general graphs. Applied on molecular graphs, little effort has been spend on characterizing their performance. Therefore, it is not clear how current substructure search algorithms behave on such special graphs. One of the main reasons why such an evaluation was not performed in the past was the absence of appropriate data sets. Results In this paper, we present a systematic evaluation of Ullmann’s and the VF2 subgraph isomorphism algorithms on molecular data. The benchmark set consists of a collection of 1235 SMARTS substructure expressions and selected molecules from the ZINC database. The benchmark evaluates substructures search times for complete database scans as well as individual substructure-molecule pairs. In detail, we focus on the influence of substructure formulation and size, the impact of molecule size, and the ability of both algorithms to be used on multiple cores. Conclusions The results show a clear superiority of the VF2 algorithm in all test scenarios. In general, both algorithms solve most instances in less than one millisecond, which we consider to be acceptable. Still, in direct comparison, the VF2 is most often several folds faster than Ullmann’s algorithm. Additionally, Ullmann’s algorithm shows a surprising number of run time outliers. PMID:22849361

  2. A Chandra Study of Temperature Substructures in Intermediate-Redshift Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Liyi; Xu, Haiguang; Gu, Junhua; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Zhongli; Wang, Jingying; Qin, Zhenzhen; Cui, Haijuan; Wu, Xiang-Ping

    2009-08-01

    By analyzing the gas temperature maps created from the Chandra archive data, we reveal the prevailing existence of temperature substructures on ~100 h -1 70 kpc scales in the central regions of nine intermediate-redshift (z ≈ 0.1) galaxy clusters, which resemble those found in the Virgo and Coma Clusters. Each substructure contains a clump of hot plasma whose temperature is about 2-3 keV higher than the environment, corresponding to an excess thermal energy of ~1058-1060 erg per clump. If there were no significant nongravitational heating sources, these substructures would have perished in 108-109 yr due to thermal conduction and turbulent flows, whose velocity is found to range from about 200 to 400 km s-1, we conclude that the substructures cannot be created and sustained by inhomogeneous radiative cooling. We also eliminate the possibilities that the temperature substructures are caused by supernova explosions, or by the nonthermal X-ray emission due to the inverse-Comptonization of the cosmic microwave background photons. By calculating the rising time of active galactic nucleus (AGN)-induced buoyant bubbles, we speculate that the intermittent AGN outbursts (>=1060 erg per burst) may have played a crucial role in the formation of the high-temperature substructures. Our results are supported by the recent study of McNamara and Nulsen, posing a tight observational constraint on future theoretical and numerical studies.

  3. Theoretical and software considerations for general dynamic analysis using multilevel substructured models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. J.; Dodds, R. H., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The dynamic analysis of complex structural systems using the finite element method and multilevel substructured models is presented. The fixed-interface method is selected for substructure reduction because of its efficiency, accuracy, and adaptability to restart and reanalysis. This method is extended to reduction of substructures which are themselves composed of reduced substructures. The implementation and performance of the method in a general purpose software system is emphasized. Solution algorithms consistent with the chosen data structures are presented. It is demonstrated that successful finite element software requires the use of software executives to supplement the algorithmic language. The complexity of the implementation of restart and reanalysis porcedures illustrates the need for executive systems to support the noncomputational aspects of the software. It is shown that significant computational efficiencies can be achieved through proper use of substructuring and reduction technbiques without sacrificing solution accuracy. The restart and reanalysis capabilities and the flexible procedures for multilevel substructured modeling gives economical yet accurate analyses of complex structural systems.

  4. Nuclear substructure reorganization during late stageerythropoiesis is selective and does not involve caspase cleavage ofmajor nuclear substructural proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, Sharon Wald; Lo, Annie J.; Short, Sarah A.; Koury, MarkJ.; Mohandas, Narla; Chasis, Joel Anne

    2005-04-06

    Enucleation, a rare feature of mammalian differentiation, occurs in three cell types: erythroblasts, lens epithelium and keratinocytes. Previous investigations suggest that caspase activation functions in lens epithelial and keratinocyte enucleation, as well as in early erythropoiesis encompassing BFU-E differentiation to proerythroblast. To determine whether caspase activation contributes to later erythropoiesis and whether nuclear substructures other than chromatin reorganize, we analyzed distributions of nuclear subcompartment proteins and assayed for caspase-induced cleavage of subcompartmental target proteins in mouse erythroblasts. We found that patterns of lamin B in the filamentous network interacting with both the nuclear envelope and DNA, nuclear matrix protein NuMA, and splicing factors Sm and SC35 persisted during nuclear condensation, consistent with effective transcription of genes expressed late in differentiation. Thus nuclear reorganization prior to enucleation is selective, allowing maintenance of critical transcriptional processes independent of extensive chromosomal reorganization. Consistent with these data, we found no evidence for caspase-induced cleavage of major nuclear subcompartment proteins during late erythropoiesis, in contrast to what has been observed in early erythropoiesis and in lens epithelial and keratinocyte differentiation. These findings imply that nuclear condensation and extrusion during terminal erythroid differentiation involve novel mechanisms that do not entail major activation of apoptotic machinery.

  5. LRRC45 is a centrosome linker component required for centrosome cohesion.

    PubMed

    He, Runsheng; Huang, Ning; Bao, Yitian; Zhou, Haining; Teng, Junlin; Chen, Jianguo

    2013-09-26

    During interphase, centrosomes are connected by a proteinaceous linker between the proximal ends of the centrioles, which is important for the centrosomes to function as a single microtubule-organizing center. However, the composition and regulation of centrosomal linker remain largely unknown. Here, we show that LRRC45 is a centrosome linker that localizes at the proximal ends of the centrioles and forms fiber-like structures between them. Depletion of LRRC45 results in centrosome splitting during interphase. Moreover, LRRC45 interacts with both C-Nap1 and rootletin and is phosphorylated by Nek2A at S661 during mitosis. After phosphorylation, both LRRC45 centrosomal localization and fiber-like structures are significantly reduced, which subsequently leads to centrosome separation. Thus, LRRC45 is a critical component of the proteinaceous linker between two centrioles and is required for centrosome cohesion. PMID:24035387

  6. Sequential Linker Installation: Precise Placement of Functional Groups in Multivariate Metal-Organic Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, S; Lu, WG; Chen, YP; Zhang, Q; Liu, TF; Feng, DW; Wang, X; Qin, JS; Zhou, HC

    2015-03-11

    A unique strategy, sequential linker installation (SLI), has been developed to construct multivariate MOFs with functional groups precisely positioned. PCN-700, a Zr-MOF with eight-connected Zr6O4(OH)(8)(H2O)(4) clusters, has been judiciously designed; the Zr-6 clusters in this MOF are arranged in such a fashion that, by replacement of terminal OH-/H2O ligands, subsequent insertion of linear dicarboxylate linkers is achieved. We demonstrate that linkers with distinct lengths and functionalities can be sequentially installed into PCN-700. Single-crystal to single-crystal transformation is realized so that the positions of the subsequently installed linkers are pinpointed via single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. This methodology provides a powerful tool to construct multivariate MOFs with precisely positioned functionalities in the desired proximity, which would otherwise be difficult to achieve.

  7. Structural analysis of the S4-S5 linker of the human KCNQ1 potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Gayen, Shovanlal; Li, Qingxin; Kang, CongBao

    2015-01-01

    KCNQ1 plays important roles in the cardiac action potential and consists of an N-terminal domain, a voltage-sensor domain, a pore domain and a C-terminal domain. KCNQ1 is a voltage-gated potassium channel and its channel activity is regulated by membrane potentials. The linker between transmembrane helices 4 and 5 (S4-S5 linker) is important for transferring the conformational changes from the voltage-sensor domain to the pore domain. In this study, the structure of the S4-S5 linker of KCNQ1 was investigated by solution NMR, circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopic studies. The S4-S5 linker adopted a helical structure in detergent micelles. The W248 may interact with the cell membrane.

  8. Composite materials with metal oxide attached to lead chalcogenide nanocrystal quantum dots with linkers

    DOEpatents

    Fuke, Nobuhiro; Koposov, Alexey Y; Sykora, Milan; Hoch, Laura

    2014-12-16

    Composite materials useful for devices such as photoelectrochemical solar cells include a substrate, a metal oxide film on the substrate, nanocrystalline quantum dots (NQDs) of lead sulfide, lead selenide, and lead telluride, and linkers that attach the NQDs to the metal oxide film. Suitable linkers preserve the 1s absorption peak of the NQDs. A suitable linker has a general structure A-B-C where A is a chemical group adapted for binding to a MO.sub.x and C is a chemical group adapted for binding to a NQD and B is a divalent, rigid, or semi-rigid organic spacer moiety. Other linkers that preserve the 1s absorption peak may also be used.

  9. The Use of Aryl Hydrazide Linkers for the Solid Phase Synthesis of Chemically Modified Peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Y; Mitchell, A R; Camarero, J A

    2006-11-03

    Since Merrifield introduced the concept of solid phase synthesis in 1963 for the rapid preparation of peptides, a large variety of different supports and resin-linkers have been developed that improve the efficiency of peptide assembly and expand the myriad of synthetically feasible peptides. The aryl hydrazide is one of the most useful resin-linkers for the synthesis of chemically modified peptides. This linker is completely stable during Boc- and Fmoc-based solid phase synthesis and yet it can be cleaved under very mild oxidative conditions. The present article reviews the use of this valuable linker for the rapid and efficient synthesis of C-terminal modified peptides, head-to-tail cyclic peptides and lipidated peptides.

  10. Two Principles of Reticular Chemistry Uncovered in a Metal-Organic Framework of Heterotritopic Linkers and Infinite Secondary Building Units.

    PubMed

    Catarineu, Noelle R; Schoedel, Alexander; Urban, Philipp; Morla, Maureen B; Trickett, Christopher A; Yaghi, Omar M

    2016-08-31

    Structural diversity of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) has been largely limited to linkers with at most two different types of coordinating groups. MOFs constructed from linkers with three or more nonidentical coordinating groups have not been explored. Here, we report a robust and porous crystalline MOF, Zn3(PBSP)2 or MOF-910, constructed from a novel linker PBSP (phenylyne-1-benzoate, 3-benzosemiquinonate, 5-oxidopyridine) bearing three distinct types of coordinative functionality. The MOF adopts a complex and previously unreported topology termed tto. Our study suggests that simple, symmetric linkers are not a necessity for formation of crystalline extended structures and that new, more complex topologies are attainable with irregular, heterotopic linkers. This work illustrates two principles of reticular chemistry: first, selectivity for helical over straight rod secondary building units (SBUs) is achievable with polyheterotopic linkers, and second, the pitch of the resulting helical SBUs may be fine-tuned based on the metrics of the polyheterotopic linker. PMID:27517606

  11. Two Principles of Reticular Chemistry Uncovered in a Metal-Organic Framework of Heterotritopic Linkers and Infinite Secondary Building Units.

    PubMed

    Catarineu, Noelle R; Schoedel, Alexander; Urban, Philipp; Morla, Maureen B; Trickett, Christopher A; Yaghi, Omar M

    2016-08-31

    Structural diversity of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) has been largely limited to linkers with at most two different types of coordinating groups. MOFs constructed from linkers with three or more nonidentical coordinating groups have not been explored. Here, we report a robust and porous crystalline MOF, Zn3(PBSP)2 or MOF-910, constructed from a novel linker PBSP (phenylyne-1-benzoate, 3-benzosemiquinonate, 5-oxidopyridine) bearing three distinct types of coordinative functionality. The MOF adopts a complex and previously unreported topology termed tto. Our study suggests that simple, symmetric linkers are not a necessity for formation of crystalline extended structures and that new, more complex topologies are attainable with irregular, heterotopic linkers. This work illustrates two principles of reticular chemistry: first, selectivity for helical over straight rod secondary building units (SBUs) is achievable with polyheterotopic linkers, and second, the pitch of the resulting helical SBUs may be fine-tuned based on the metrics of the polyheterotopic linker.

  12. Synthesis and properties of macrolones characterized by two ether bonds in the linker.

    PubMed

    Jakopović, Ivana Palej; Kragol, Goran; Forrest, Andrew K; Frydrych, Catherine S V; Stimac, Vlado; Kapić, Samra; Skugor, Maja Matanović; Ilijas, Marina; Paljetak, Hana Cipcić; Jelić, Dubravko; Holmes, David J; Hickey, Deirdre M B; Verbanac, Donatella; Eraković Haber, Vesna; Alihodzić, Sulejman

    2010-09-01

    In this paper synthesis of macrolones 1-18 starting from azithromycin is reported. Two key steps in the construction of the linker between macrolide and quinolone moiety, are formation of central ether bond by alkylation of unactivated OH group, and formation of terminal C-C bond at 6-position of the quinolone unit. Due to the difficulty in formation of these two bonds the study of alternative synthetic methodologies and optimization of the conditions for the selected routes was required. Formation of C-4''-O-ether bond was completed by modified Michael addition, whereas O-alkylation via diazonium cation proved to be the most effective in formation of the central allylic or propargylic ether bond. Comparison of Heck and Sonogashira reaction revealed the former as preferred route to the C-C bond formation at C(6) position of the quinolone unit. Most of the target compounds exhibited highly favorable antibacterial activity against common respiratory pathogens, without significant cytotoxicity profile when tested in vitro on eukaryotic cell lines.

  13. Design and synthesis of fluorescence-labeled nucleotide with a cleavable azo linker for DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lianjiang; Liu, Yazhi; Yang, Qinglai; Li, Xiaowei; Wu, Xin-Yan; Gong, Bing; Shen, Yu-Mei; Shao, Zhifeng

    2016-01-18

    A cleavable azo linker was synthesized and reacted with 5-(6)-carboxytetramethyl rhodamine succinimidyl ester, followed by further reactions with di(N-succinimidyl) carbonate and 5-(3-amino-1-propynyl)-2'-deoxyuridine 5'-triphosphate [dUTP(AP3)] to obtain the terminal product dUTP-azo linker-TAMRA as a potential reversible terminator for DNA sequencing by synthesis with no need for 3'-OH blocking. PMID:26587573

  14. Glycosylation efficiencies on different solid supports using a hydrogenolysis-labile linker

    PubMed Central

    Collot, Mayeul; Eller, Steffen; Weishaupt, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Summary Automated oligosaccharide assembly requires suitable linkers to connect the first monosaccharide to a solid support. A new hydrogenolysis-labile linker that is stable under both acidic and basic conditions was designed, synthesized and coupled to different resins. Glycosylation and cleavage efficiencies on these functionalized solid supports were investigated, and restrictions for the choice of solid support for oligosaccharide synthesis were found. PMID:23400514

  15. Discovering Higgs Bosons of the MSSM using Jet Substructure

    SciTech Connect

    Kribs, Graham D.; Martin, Adam; Roy, Tuhin S.; Spannowsky, Michael

    2010-06-01

    We present a qualitatively new approach to discover Higgs bosons of the MSSM at the LHC using jet substructure techniques applied to boosted Higgs decays. These techniques are ideally suited to the MSSM, since the lightest Higgs boson overwhelmingly decays to b{bar b} throughout the entire parameter space, while the heavier neutral Higgs bosons, if light enough to be produced in a cascade, also predominantly decay to b{bar b}. The Higgs production we consider arises from superpartner production where superpartners cascade decay into Higgs bosons. We study this mode of Higgs production for several superpartner hierarchies: m{sub {tilde q}},m{sub {tilde g}} > m{sub {tilde W}},{sub {tilde B}} > m{sub h} + {mu}; m{tilde q};m{sub {tilde q}},m{sub {tilde g}} > m{sub {tilde W}},{sub {tilde B}} > m {sub h,H,A} + {mu}; and m{sub {tilde q}},m{sub {tilde g}} > m{sub {tilde W}} > m{sub h} + {mu} with m{sub {tilde B}} {approx} {mu}. In these cascades, the Higgs bosons are boosted, with pT > 200 GeV a large fraction of the time. Since Higgs bosons appear in cascades originating from squarks and/or gluinos, the cross section for events with at least one Higgs boson can be the same order as squark/gluino production. Given 10 fb{sup -1} of 14 TeV LHC data, with m{sub {tilde q}} {approx}< 1 TeV, and one of the above superpartner mass hierarchies, our estimate of S{radical} B of the Higgs signal is sufficiently high that the b{bar b} mode can become the discovery mode of the lightest Higgs boson of the MSSM.

  16. The Effects of Varying Cosmological Parameters on Halo Substructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dooley, Gregory A.; Griffen, Brendan F.; Zukin, Phillip; Ji, Alexander P.; Vogelsberger, Mark; Hernquist, Lars E.; Frebel, Anna

    2014-05-01

    We investigate how different cosmological parameters, such as those delivered by the WMAP and Planck missions, affect the nature and evolution of the dark matter halo substructure. We use a series of flat Λ cold dark matter cosmological N-body simulations of structure formation, each with a different power spectrum but with the same initial white noise field. Our fiducial simulation is based on parameters from the WMAP seventh year cosmology. We then systematically vary the spectral index, ns ; matter density, Ω M ; and normalization of the power spectrum, σ8, for seven unique simulations. Across these, we study variations in the subhalo mass function, mass fraction, maximum circular velocity function, spatial distribution, concentration, formation times, accretion times, and peak mass. We eliminate dependence of subhalo properties on host halo mass and average the values over many hosts to reduce variance. While the "same" subhalos from identical initial overdensity peaks in higher σ8, ns , and Ω m simulations accrete earlier and end up less massive and closer to the halo center at z = 0, the process of continuous subhalo accretion and destruction leads to a steady state distribution of these properties across all subhalos in a given host. This steady state mechanism eliminates cosmological dependence on all of the properties listed above except for subhalo concentration and V max, which remain greater for higher σ8, ns , and Ω m simulations, and subhalo formation time, which remains earlier. We also find that the numerical technique for computing the scale radius and the halo finder that were used can significantly affect the concentration-mass relationship as computed for a simulation.

  17. The effects of varying cosmological parameters on halo substructure

    SciTech Connect

    Dooley, Gregory A.; Griffen, Brendan F.; Ji, Alexander P.; Vogelsberger, Mark; Frebel, Anna; Zukin, Phillip; Hernquist, Lars E.

    2014-05-01

    We investigate how different cosmological parameters, such as those delivered by the WMAP and Planck missions, affect the nature and evolution of the dark matter halo substructure. We use a series of flat Λ cold dark matter cosmological N-body simulations of structure formation, each with a different power spectrum but with the same initial white noise field. Our fiducial simulation is based on parameters from the WMAP seventh year cosmology. We then systematically vary the spectral index, n{sub s} ; matter density, Ω {sub M}; and normalization of the power spectrum, σ{sub 8}, for seven unique simulations. Across these, we study variations in the subhalo mass function, mass fraction, maximum circular velocity function, spatial distribution, concentration, formation times, accretion times, and peak mass. We eliminate dependence of subhalo properties on host halo mass and average the values over many hosts to reduce variance. While the 'same' subhalos from identical initial overdensity peaks in higher σ{sub 8}, n{sub s} , and Ω {sub m} simulations accrete earlier and end up less massive and closer to the halo center at z = 0, the process of continuous subhalo accretion and destruction leads to a steady state distribution of these properties across all subhalos in a given host. This steady state mechanism eliminates cosmological dependence on all of the properties listed above except for subhalo concentration and V {sub max}, which remain greater for higher σ{sub 8}, n{sub s} , and Ω {sub m} simulations, and subhalo formation time, which remains earlier. We also find that the numerical technique for computing the scale radius and the halo finder that were used can significantly affect the concentration-mass relationship as computed for a simulation.

  18. Role of the S4-S5 linker in CNG channel activation.

    PubMed

    Kusch, Jana; Zimmer, Thomas; Holschuh, Jascha; Biskup, Christoph; Schulz, Eckhard; Nache, Vasilica; Benndorf, Klaus

    2010-10-20

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels mediate sensory signal transduction in retinal and olfactory cells. The channels are activated by the binding of cyclic nucleotides to a cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD) in the C-terminus that is located at the intracellular side. The molecular events translating the ligand binding to the pore opening are still unknown. We investigated the role of the S4-S5 linker in the activation process by quantifying its interaction with other intracellular regions. To this end, we constructed chimeric channels in which the N-terminus, the S4-S5 linker, the C-linker, and the CNBD of the retinal CNGA1 subunit were systematically replaced by the respective regions of the olfactory CNGA2 subunit. Macroscopic concentration-response relations were analyzed, yielding the apparent affinity to cGMP and the Hill coefficient. The degree of functional coupling of intracellular regions in the activation gating was determined by thermodynamic double-mutant cycle analysis. We observed that all four intracellular regions, including the relatively short S4-S5 linker, are involved in controlling the apparent affinity of the channel to cGMP and, moreover, in determining the degree of cooperativity between the subunits, as derived from the Hill coefficient. The interaction energies reveal an interaction of the S4-S5 linker with both the N-terminus and the C-linker, but no interaction with the CNBD.

  19. An energetically beneficial leader-linker interaction abolishes ligand-binding cooperativity in glycine riboswitches.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Eileen M; Esquiaqui, Jackie; Elsayed, Galal; Ye, Jing-Dong

    2012-03-01

    Comprised of two aptamers connected by a short nucleotide linker, the glycine riboswitch was the first example of naturally occurring RNA elements reported to bind small organic molecules cooperatively. Earlier works have shown binding of glycine to the second aptamer allows tertiary interactions to be made between the two aptamers, which facilitates binding of a separate glycine molecule to the first aptamer, leading to glycine-binding cooperativity. Prompted by a distinctive protection pattern in the linker region of a minimal glycine riboswitch construct, we have identified a highly conserved (>90%) leader-linker duplex involving leader nucleotides upstream of the previously reported consensus glycine riboswitch sequences. In >50% of the glycine riboswitches, the leader-linker interaction forms a kink-turn motif. Characterization of three glycine ribsowitches showed that the leader-linker interaction improved the glycine-binding affinities by 4.5- to 86-fold. In-line probing and native gel assays with two aptamers in trans suggested synergistic action between glycine-binding and interaptamer interaction during global folding of the glycine riboswitch. Mutational analysis showed that there appeared to be no ligand-binding cooperativity in the glycine riboswitch when the leader-linker interaction is present, and the previously measured cooperativity is simply an artifact of a truncated construct missing the leader sequence.

  20. Modulation of the Shaker K+Channel Gating Kinetics by the S3–S4 Linker

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Carlos; Rosenman, Eduardo; Bezanilla, Francisco; Alvarez, Osvaldo; Latorre, Ramon

    2000-01-01

    In Shaker K+ channels depolarization displaces outwardly the positively charged residues of the S4 segment. The amount of this displacement is unknown, but large movements of the S4 segment should be constrained by the length and flexibility of the S3–S4 linker. To investigate the role of the S3–S4 linker in the ShakerH4Δ(6–46) (ShakerΔ) K+ channel activation, we constructed S3–S4 linker deletion mutants. Using macropatches of Xenopus oocytes, we tested three constructs: a deletion mutant with no linker (0 aa linker), a mutant containing a linker 5 amino acids in length, and a 10 amino acid linker mutant. Each of the three mutants tested yielded robust K+ currents. The half-activation voltage was shifted to the right along the voltage axis, and the shift was +45 mV in the case of the 0 aa linker channel. In the 0 aa linker, mutant deactivation kinetics were sixfold slower than in ShakerΔ. The apparent number of gating charges was 12.6 ± 0.6 eo in ShakerΔ, 12.7 ± 0.5 in 10 aa linker, and 12.3 ± 0.9 in 5 aa linker channels, but it was only 5.6 ± 0.3 eo in the 0 aa linker mutant channel. The maximum probability of opening (Pomax) as measured using noise analysis was not altered by the linker deletions. Activation kinetics were most affected by linker deletions; at 0 mV, the 5 and 0 aa linker channels' activation time constants were 89× and 45× slower than that of the ShakerΔ K+ channel, respectively. The initial lag of ionic currents when the prepulse was varied from −130 to −60 mV was 0.5, 14, and 2 ms for the 10, 5, and 0 aa linker mutant channels, respectively. These results suggest that: (a) the S4 segment moves only a short distance during activation since an S3–S4 linker consisting of only 5 amino acid residues allows for the total charge displacement to occur, and (b) the length of the S3–S4 linker plays an important role in setting ShakerΔ channel activation and deactivation kinetics. PMID:10653896

  1. A genetic screen and transcript profiling reveal a shared regulatory program for Drosophila linker histone H1 and chromatin remodeler CHD1.

    PubMed

    Kavi, Harsh; Lu, Xingwu; Xu, Na; Bartholdy, Boris A; Vershilova, Elena; Skoultchi, Arthur I; Fyodorov, Dmitry V

    2015-01-27

    Chromatin structure and activity can be modified through ATP-dependent repositioning of nucleosomes and posttranslational modifications of core histone tails within nucleosome core particles and by deposition of linker histones into the oligonucleosome fiber. The linker histone H1 is essential in metazoans. It has a profound effect on organization of chromatin into higher-order structures and on recruitment of histone-modifying enzymes to chromatin. Here, we describe a genetic screen for modifiers of the lethal phenotype caused by depletion of H1 in Drosophila melanogaster. We identify 41 mis-expression alleles that enhance and 20 that suppress the effect of His1 depletion in vivo. Most of them are important for chromosome organization, transcriptional regulation, and cell signaling. Specifically, the reduced viability of H1-depleted animals is strongly suppressed by ubiquitous mis-expression of the ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzyme CHD1. Comparison of transcript profiles in H1-depleted and Chd1 null mutant larvae revealed that H1 and CHD1 have common transcriptional regulatory programs in vivo. H1 and CHD1 share roles in repression of numerous developmentally regulated and extracellular stimulus-responsive transcripts, including immunity-related and stress response-related genes. Thus, linker histone H1 participates in various regulatory programs in chromatin to alter gene expression.

  2. Towards quantitative metagenomics of wild viruses and other ultra-low concentration DNA samples: a rigorous assessment and optimization of the linker amplification method

    PubMed Central

    Duhaime, Melissa B; Deng, Li; Poulos, Bonnie T; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2012-01-01

    Metagenomics generates and tests hypotheses about dynamics and mechanistic drivers in wild populations, yet commonly suffers from insufficient (< 1 ng) starting genomic material for sequencing. Current solutions for amplifying sufficient DNA for metagenomics analyses include linear amplification for deep sequencing (LADS), which requires more DNA than is normally available, linker-amplified shotgun libraries (LASLs), which is prohibitively low throughput, and whole-genome amplification, which is significantly biased and thus non-quantitative. Here, we adapt the LASL approach to next generation sequencing by offering an alternate polymerase for challenging samples, developing a more efficient sizing step, integrating a ‘reconditioning PCR’ step to increase yield and minimize late-cycle PCR artefacts, and empirically documenting the quantitative capability of the optimized method with both laboratory isolate and wild community viral DNA. Our optimized linker amplification method requires as little as 1 pg of DNA and is the most precise and accurate available, with G + C content amplification biases less than 1.5-fold, even for complex samples as diverse as a wild virus community. While optimized here for 454 sequencing, this linker amplification method can be used to prepare metagenomics libraries for sequencing with next-generation platforms, including Illumina and Ion Torrent, the first of which we tested and present data for here. PMID:22713159

  3. Towards quantitative metagenomics of wild viruses and other ultra-low concentration DNA samples: a rigorous assessment and optimization of the linker amplification method.

    PubMed

    Duhaime, Melissa B; Deng, Li; Poulos, Bonnie T; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2012-09-01

    Metagenomics generates and tests hypotheses about dynamics and mechanistic drivers in wild populations, yet commonly suffers from insufficient (< 1 ng) starting genomic material for sequencing. Current solutions for amplifying sufficient DNA for metagenomics analyses include linear amplification for deep sequencing (LADS), which requires more DNA than is normally available, linker-amplified shotgun libraries (LASLs), which is prohibitively low throughput, and whole-genome amplification, which is significantly biased and thus non-quantitative. Here, we adapt the LASL approach to next generation sequencing by offering an alternate polymerase for challenging samples, developing a more efficient sizing step, integrating a 'reconditioning PCR' step to increase yield and minimize late-cycle PCR artefacts, and empirically documenting the quantitative capability of the optimized method with both laboratory isolate and wild community viral DNA. Our optimized linker amplification method requires as little as 1 pg of DNA and is the most precise and accurate available, with G + C content amplification biases less than 1.5-fold, even for complex samples as diverse as a wild virus community. While optimized here for 454 sequencing, this linker amplification method can be used to prepare metagenomics libraries for sequencing with next-generation platforms, including Illumina and Ion Torrent, the first of which we tested and present data for here.

  4. Efficient substructure searching of large chemical libraries: the ABCD chemical cartridge.

    PubMed

    Agrafiotis, Dimitris K; Lobanov, Victor S; Shemanarev, Maxim; Rassokhin, Dmitrii N; Izrailev, Sergei; Jaeger, Edward P; Alex, Simson; Farnum, Michael

    2011-12-27

    Efficient substructure searching is a key requirement for any chemical information management system. In this paper, we describe the substructure search capabilities of ABCD, an integrated drug discovery informatics platform developed at Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research & Development, L.L.C. The solution consists of several algorithmic components: 1) a pattern mapping algorithm for solving the subgraph isomorphism problem, 2) an indexing scheme that enables very fast substructure searches on large structure files, 3) the incorporation of that indexing scheme into an Oracle cartridge to enable querying large relational databases through SQL, and 4) a cost estimation scheme that allows the Oracle cost-based optimizer to generate a good execution plan when a substructure search is combined with additional constraints in a single SQL query. The algorithm was tested on a public database comprising nearly 1 million molecules using 4,629 substructure queries, the vast majority of which were submitted by discovery scientists over the last 2.5 years of user acceptance testing of ABCD. 80.7% of these queries were completed in less than a second and 96.8% in less than ten seconds on a single CPU, while on eight processing cores these numbers increased to 93.2% and 99.7%, respectively. The slower queries involved extremely generic patterns that returned the entire database as screening hits and required extensive atom-by-atom verification.

  5. Formulation of an experimental substructure model using a Craig-Bampton based transmission simulator

    DOE PAGES

    Kammer, Daniel C.; Allen, Matthew S.; Mayes, Randall L.

    2015-09-26

    An experimental–analytical substructuring is attractive when there is motivation to replace one or more system subcomponents with an experimental model. This experimentally derived substructure can then be coupled to finite element models of the rest of the structure to predict the system response. The transmission simulator method couples a fixture to the component of interest during a vibration test in order to improve the experimental model for the component. The transmission simulator is then subtracted from the tested system to produce the experimental component. This method reduces ill-conditioning by imposing a least squares fit of constraints between substructure modal coordinatesmore » to connect substructures, instead of directly connecting physical interface degrees of freedom. This paper presents an alternative means of deriving the experimental substructure model, in which a Craig–Bampton representation of the transmission simulator is created and subtracted from the experimental measurements. The corresponding modal basis of the transmission simulator is described by the fixed-interface modes, rather than free modes that were used in the original approach. Moreover, these modes do a better job of representing the shape of the transmission simulator as it responds within the experimental system, leading to more accurate results using fewer modes. The new approach is demonstrated using a simple finite element model based example with a redundant interface.« less

  6. Formulation of an experimental substructure model using a Craig-Bampton based transmission simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammer, Daniel C.; Allen, Mathew S.; Mayes, Randy L.

    2015-12-01

    Experimental-analytical substructuring is attractive when there is motivation to replace one or more system subcomponents with an experimental model. This experimentally derived substructure can then be coupled to finite element models of the rest of the structure to predict the system response. The transmission simulator method couples a fixture to the component of interest during a vibration test in order to improve the experimental model for the component. The transmission simulator is then subtracted from the tested system to produce the experimental component. The method reduces ill-conditioning by imposing a least squares fit of constraints between substructure modal coordinates to connect substructures, instead of directly connecting physical interface degrees of freedom. This paper presents an alternative means of deriving the experimental substructure model, in which a Craig-Bampton representation of the transmission simulator is created and subtracted from the experimental measurements. The corresponding modal basis of the transmission simulator is described by the fixed-interface modes, rather than free modes that were used in the original approach. These modes do a better job of representing the shape of the transmission simulator as it responds within the experimental system, leading to more accurate results using fewer modes. The new approach is demonstrated using a simple finite element model based example with a redundant interface.

  7. Formulation of an experimental substructure model using a Craig-Bampton based transmission simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Kammer, Daniel C.; Allen, Matthew S.; Mayes, Randall L.

    2015-09-26

    An experimental–analytical substructuring is attractive when there is motivation to replace one or more system subcomponents with an experimental model. This experimentally derived substructure can then be coupled to finite element models of the rest of the structure to predict the system response. The transmission simulator method couples a fixture to the component of interest during a vibration test in order to improve the experimental model for the component. The transmission simulator is then subtracted from the tested system to produce the experimental component. This method reduces ill-conditioning by imposing a least squares fit of constraints between substructure modal coordinates to connect substructures, instead of directly connecting physical interface degrees of freedom. This paper presents an alternative means of deriving the experimental substructure model, in which a Craig–Bampton representation of the transmission simulator is created and subtracted from the experimental measurements. The corresponding modal basis of the transmission simulator is described by the fixed-interface modes, rather than free modes that were used in the original approach. Moreover, these modes do a better job of representing the shape of the transmission simulator as it responds within the experimental system, leading to more accurate results using fewer modes. The new approach is demonstrated using a simple finite element model based example with a redundant interface.

  8. DARK MATTER SUBSTRUCTURE DETECTION USING SPATIALLY RESOLVED SPECTROSCOPY OF LENSED DUSTY GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hezaveh, Yashar; Holder, Gilbert; Dalal, Neal; Kuhlen, Michael; Marrone, Daniel; Murray, Norman; Vieira, Joaquin

    2013-04-10

    We investigate how strong lensing of dusty, star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) by foreground galaxies can be used as a probe of dark matter halo substructure. We find that spatially resolved spectroscopy of lensed sources allows dramatic improvements to measurements of lens parameters. In particular, we find that modeling of the full, three-dimensional (angular position and radial velocity) data can significantly facilitate substructure detection, increasing the sensitivity of observables to lower mass subhalos. We carry out simulations of lensed dusty sources observed by early ALMA (Cycle 1) and use a Fisher matrix analysis to study the parameter degeneracies and mass detection limits of this method. We find that even with conservative assumptions, it is possible to detect galactic dark matter subhalos of {approx}10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} with high significance in most lensed DSFGs. Specifically, we find that in typical DSFG lenses, there is a {approx}55% probability of detecting a substructure with M > 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} with more than 5{sigma} detection significance in each lens, if the abundance of substructure is consistent with previous lensing results. The full ALMA array, with its significantly enhanced sensitivity and resolution, should improve these estimates considerably. Given the sample of {approx}100 lenses provided by surveys such as the South Pole Telescope, our understanding of dark matter substructure in typical galaxy halos is poised to improve dramatically over the next few years.

  9. An algebraic sub-structuring method for large-scale eigenvaluecalculation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C.; Gao, W.; Bai, Z.; Li, X.; Lee, L.; Husbands, P.; Ng, E.

    2004-05-26

    We examine sub-structuring methods for solving large-scalegeneralized eigenvalue problems from a purely algebraic point of view. Weuse the term "algebraic sub-structuring" to refer to the process ofapplying matrix reordering and partitioning algorithms to divide a largesparse matrix into smaller submatrices from which a subset of spectralcomponents are extracted and combined to provide approximate solutions tothe original problem. We are interested in the question of which spectralcomponentsone should extract from each sub-structure in order to producean approximate solution to the original problem with a desired level ofaccuracy. Error estimate for the approximation to the small esteigen pairis developed. The estimate leads to a simple heuristic for choosingspectral components (modes) from each sub-structure. The effectiveness ofsuch a heuristic is demonstrated with numerical examples. We show thatalgebraic sub-structuring can be effectively used to solve a generalizedeigenvalue problem arising from the simulation of an acceleratorstructure. One interesting characteristic of this application is that thestiffness matrix produced by a hierarchical vector finite elements schemecontains a null space of large dimension. We present an efficient schemeto deflate this null space in the algebraic sub-structuringprocess.

  10. AN EXAMINATION OF THE OPTICAL SUBSTRUCTURE OF GALAXY CLUSTERS HOSTING RADIO SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Wing, Joshua D.; Blanton, Elizabeth L.

    2013-04-20

    Using radio sources from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm survey, and optical counterparts in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we have identified a large number of galaxy clusters. The radio sources within these clusters are driven by active galactic nuclei, and our cluster samples include clusters with bent, and straight, double-lobed radio sources. We also included a single-radio-component comparison sample. We examine these galaxy clusters for evidence of optical substructure, testing the possibility that bent double-lobed radio sources are formed as a result of large-scale cluster mergers. We use a suite of substructure analysis tools to determine the location and extent of substructure visible in the optical distribution of cluster galaxies, and compare the rates of substructure in clusters with different types of radio sources. We found no preference for significant substructure in clusters hosting bent double-lobed radio sources compared to those with other types of radio sources.

  11. Thermodynamically Guided Synthesis of Mixed-Linker Zr-MOFs with Enhanced Tunability.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shuai; Qin, Jun-Sheng; Zou, Lanfang; Chen, Ying-Pin; Wang, Xuan; Zhang, Qiang; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2016-05-25

    Guided by thermodynamics, we have synthesized two mixed-linker zirconium-based metal-organic frameworks (Zr-MOFs), namely, PCN-133 and PCN-134. Both of them possess a layer-pillar structure, in which the connection between Zr6 clusters and primary BTB linkers form a (3,6)-connected kdg layer that is further extended into 3D frameworks by auxiliary DCDPS/TCPP linkers (BTB = benzene tribenzoate, DCDPS = 4,4'-dicarboxydiphenyl sulfone, TCPP = tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)porphyrin). PCN-134 demonstrates high porosity (N2 uptake of 717 cm(3)·g(-1) and BET surface area of 1946 cm(2)·g(-1)) and excellent chemical stability in aqueous solutions with pH values ranging from 0 to 13. More importantly, PCN-134 tolerates the partial absence of auxiliary linkers leading to structural defects during the assembly process while preserving its framework integrity. Furthermore, the defect density can be systematically controlled by tuning the occupancy of the auxiliary linker, which in turn affects the MOF properties. For instance, the dichromate uptake of PCN-134 is tuned by adjusting the BTB/TCPP ratios, which gives rise to an efficient dichromate absorbent when the TCPP molar ratio in linkers is set as 22%. In addition, the photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) in aqueous solution was also performed by PCN-134-22%TCPP which exhibits excellent catalytic activity. This work not only opens up a new synthetic route toward mixed-linker MOFs, but also provides tunable control of MOF defects and, in turn, the properties.

  12. Modeling studies of chromatin fiber structure as a function of DNA linker length

    PubMed Central

    Perišić, Ognjen; Collepardo-Guevara, Rosana; Schlick, Tamar

    2010-01-01

    Chromatin fibers encountered in various species and tissues are characterized by different nucleosome repeat lengths (NRL) of the linker DNA connecting the nucleosomes. While single cellular organisms and rapidly growing cells with high protein production have short NRL ranging from 160 to 189 base pairs (bp), mature cells usually have longer NRL ranging between 190 and 220 bp. Recently, various experimental studies have examined the effect of NRL on the internal organization of chromatin fiber. Here we investigate by mesoscale modeling of oligonucleosomes the folding patterns for different NRL, with and without linker histone, under typical monovalent salt conditions using both one-start solenoid and two-start zigzag starting configurations. We find that short to medium NRL chromatin fibers (173 to 209 bp) with linker histone condense into irregular zigzag structures, and that solenoid-like features are viable only for longer NRL (226 bp). We suggest that medium NRL are more advantageous for packing and various levels of chromatin compaction throughout the cell cycle than their shortest and longest brethren; the former (short NRL) fold into narrow fibers, while the latter (long NRL) arrays do not easily lead to high packing ratios due to possible linker DNA bending. Moreover, we show that the linker histone has a small effect on the condensation of short-NRL arrays but an important condensation effect on medium-NRL arrays which have linker lengths similar to the linker histone lengths. Finally, we suggest that the medium-NRL species, with densely packed fiber arrangements, may be advantageous for epigenetic control because their histone tail modifications can have a greater effect compared to other fibers due to their more extensive nucleosome interaction network. PMID:20709077

  13. Theory and Simulations of Refractive Substructure in Resolved Scatter-broadened Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Michael D.; Gwinn, Carl R.

    2015-06-01

    At radio wavelengths, scattering in the interstellar medium distorts the appearance of astronomical sources. Averaged over a scattering ensemble, the result is a blurred image of the source. However, Narayan & Goodman and Goodman & Narayan showed that for an incomplete average, scattering introduces refractive substructure in the image of a point source that is both persistent and wideband. We show that this substructure is quenched but not smoothed by an extended source. As a result, when the scatter-broadening is comparable to or exceeds the unscattered source size, the scattering can introduce spurious compact features into images. In addition, we derive efficient strategies to numerically compute realistic scattered images, and we present characteristic examples from simulations. Our results show that refractive substructure is an important consideration for ongoing missions at the highest angular resolutions, and we discuss specific implications for RadioAstron and the Event Horizon Telescope.

  14. Reconstruction of small-scale galaxy cluster substructure with lensing flexion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, Benjamin; Bradač, Maruša; Levinson, Rebecca

    2016-09-01

    We present reconstructions of galaxy-cluster-scale mass distributions from simulated gravitational lensing data sets including strong lensing, weak lensing shear, and measurements of quadratic image distortions - flexion. The lensing data is constructed to make a direct comparison between mass reconstructions with and without flexion. We show that in the absence of flexion measurements, significant galaxy-group scale substructure can remain undetected in the reconstructed mass profiles, and that the resulting profiles underestimate the aperture mass in the substructure regions by ˜25 - 40%. When flexion is included, subhaloes down to a mass of ˜3 × 1012 M⊙ can be detected at an angular resolution smaller than 10″. Aperture masses from profiles reconstructed with flexion match the input distribution values to within an error of ˜13%, including both statistical error and scatter. This demonstrates the important constraint that flexion measurements place on substructure in galaxy clusters and its utility for producing high-fidelity mass reconstructions.

  15. Non-linear substructure approach for dynamic analysis of rigid-flexible multibody systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, A. Q.; Liew, K. M.

    1994-04-01

    This paper presents a substructure synthesis method (SSM) for nonlinear analysis of multibody systems. The detailed derivation of the equation of motion which takes into account the geometric nonlinear effects of large rotation undergoing small strain elastic deformation is presented. Using the substructure synthesis approach, the equation of motion is condensed through the boundary conditions at the interface between the flexible and rigid substructures. As a result, equations of motion for multi-flexible-body systems including the geometric non-linear effects of large rotation are derived. To demonstrate the applicability and accuracy of the proposed approach, an example of a two-link manipulator was chosen for this presentation. The results using the linear and nonlinear models are presented to highlight the effects of geometric nonlinearities.

  16. Design studies for the transmission simulator method of experimental dynamic substructuring.

    SciTech Connect

    Mayes, Randall Lee; Arviso, Michael

    2010-05-01

    In recent years, a successful method for generating experimental dynamic substructures has been developed using an instrumented fixture, the transmission simulator. The transmission simulator method solves many of the problems associated with experimental substructuring. These solutions effectively address: (1) rotation and moment estimation at connection points; (2) providing substructure Ritz vectors that adequately span the connection motion space; and (3) adequately addressing multiple and continuous attachment locations. However, the transmission simulator method may fail if the transmission simulator is poorly designed. Four areas of the design addressed here are: (1) designating response sensor locations; (2) designating force input locations; (3) physical design of the transmission simulator; and (4) modal test design. In addition to the transmission simulator design investigations, a review of the theory with an example problem is presented.

  17. A High-Throughput Small Molecule Screen for C. elegans Linker Cell Death Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Schwendeman, Andrew R.; Shaham, Shai

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death is a ubiquitous process in metazoan development. Apoptosis, one cell death form, has been studied extensively. However, mutations inactivating key mammalian apoptosis regulators do not block most developmental cell culling, suggesting that other cell death pathways are likely important. Recent work in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans identified a non-apoptotic cell death form mediating the demise of the male-specific linker cell. This cell death process (LCD, linker cell-type death) is morphologically conserved, and its molecular effectors also mediate axon degeneration in mammals and Drosophila. To develop reagents to manipulate LCD, we established a simple high-throughput screening protocol for interrogating the effects of small molecules on C. elegans linker cell death in vivo. From 23,797 compounds assayed, 11 reproducibly block linker cell death onset. Of these, five induce animal lethality, and six promote a reversible developmental delay. These results provide proof-of principle validation of our screening protocol, demonstrate that developmental progression is required for linker cell death, and suggest that larger scale screens may identify LCD-specific small-molecule regulators that target the LCD execution machinery. PMID:27716809

  18. Conformational selection and dynamic adaptation upon linker histone binding to the nucleosome.

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Mehmet Ali; Pachov, Georgi V; Wade, Rebecca C; Cojocaru, Vlad

    2016-08-19

    Linker histones are essential for DNA compaction in chromatin. They bind to nucleosomes in a 1:1 ratio forming chromatosomes. Alternative configurations have been proposed in which the globular domain of the linker histone H5 (gH5) is positioned either on- or off-dyad between the nucleosomal and linker DNAs. However, the dynamic pathways of chromatosome assembly remain elusive. Here, we studied the conformational plasticity of gH5 in unbound and off-dyad nucleosome-bound forms with classical and accelerated molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the unbound gH5 converts between open and closed conformations, preferring the closed form. However, the open gH5 contributes to a more rigid chromatosome and restricts the motion of the nearby linker DNA through hydrophobic interactions with thymidines. Moreover, the closed gH5 opens and reorients in accelerated simulations of the chromatosome. Brownian dynamics simulations of chromatosome assembly, accounting for a range of amplitudes of nucleosome opening and different nucleosome DNA sequences, support the existence of both on- and off-dyad binding modes of gH5 and reveal alternative, sequence and conformation-dependent chromatosome configurations. Taken together, these findings suggest that the conformational dynamics of linker histones and nucleosomes facilitate alternative chromatosome configurations through an interplay between induced fit and conformational selection. PMID:27270081

  19. The measles virus phosphoprotein interacts with the linker domain of STAT1

    SciTech Connect

    Devaux, Patricia Priniski, Lauren; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2013-09-15

    The measles virus (MV) phosphoprotein (P) and V proteins block the interferon (IFN) response by impeding phosphorylation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) by the Janus kinase 1 (JAK1). We characterized how STAT1 mutants interact with P and JAK1 phosphorylation. Certain mutants of the linker, the Src-homology 2 domain (SH2), or the transactivation domain had reduced or abolished phosphorylation through JAK1 after IFN treatment. Other mutants, mainly localized in the linker, failed to interact with P as documented by the lack of interference with nuclear translocation. Thus the functional footprint of P on STAT1 localizes mainly to the linker domain; there is also some overlap with the STAT1 phosphorylation functional footprint on the SH2 domain. Based on these observations, we discuss how the MV-P might operate to inhibit the JAK/STAT pathway. - Highlights: • Residue in the linker and SH2 domains of STAT1 are important for MV-P interaction. • Residue in the linker and SH2 domains of STAT1 are important for STAT1 phosphorylation. • Residues interferring with both functions have similar location on STAT1. • The viral P and V proteins may operate in concert to inhibit the JAK/STAT pathway.

  20. A quantitative investigation of linker histone interactions with nucleosomes and chromatin

    PubMed Central

    White, Alison E.; Hieb, Aaron R.; Luger, Karolin

    2016-01-01

    Linker histones such as H1 are abundant basic proteins that bind tightly to nucleosomes, thereby acting as key organizers of chromatin structure. The molecular details of linker histone interactions with the nucleosome, and in particular the contributions of linker DNA and of the basic C-terminal tail of H1, are controversial. Here we combine rigorous solution-state binding assays with native gel electrophoresis and Atomic Force Microscopy, to quantify the interaction of H1 with chromatin. We find that H1 binds nucleosomes and nucleosomal arrays with very tight affinity by recognizing a specific DNA geometry minimally consisting of a solitary nucleosome with a single ~18 base pair DNA linker arm. The association of H1 alters the conformation of trinucleosomes so that only one H1 can bind to the two available linker DNA regions. Neither incorporation of the histone variant H2A.Z, nor the presence of neighboring nucleosomes affects H1 affinity. Our data provide a comprehensive thermodynamic framework for this ubiquitous chromatin architectural protein. PMID:26750377

  1. Common Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... nose, coughing - everyone knows the symptoms of the common cold. It is probably the most common illness. In ... avoid colds. There is no cure for the common cold. For relief, try Getting plenty of rest Drinking ...

  2. A tale of tails: How histone tails mediate chromatin compaction in different salt and linker histone environments

    PubMed Central

    Arya, Gaurav; Schlick, Tamar

    2009-01-01

    To elucidate the role of the histone tails in chromatin compaction and in higher-order folding of chromatin under physiological conditions, we extend a mesoscale model of chromatin [Arya, Zhang, and Schlick, Biophys. J. 91, 133 (2006); Arya and Schlick, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 103, 16236 (2006)] to account for divalent cations (Mg2+) and linker histones. Configurations of 24-nucleosome oligonucleosomes in different salt environments and in the presence and absence of linker histones are sampled by a mixture of local and global Monte Carlo methods. Analyses of the resulting ensembles reveals a dynamic synergism between the histone tails, linker histones, and physiological ions in forming compact higher-order structures of chromatin. In the presence of monovalent salt alone, oligonucleosomes remain relatively unfolded and the histone tails do not mediate many internucleosomal interactions. Upon the addition of linker histones and divalent cations, the oligonucleosomes undergo a significant compaction triggered by: a dramatic increase in the internucleosomal interactions mediated by the histone tails; formation of a rigid linker DNA “stem” around the linker histones' C-terminal domains; and reducion in the electrostatic repulsion between linker DNAs via sharp bending in some linker DNAs caused by the divalent cations. Among all histone tails, the H4 tails mediate the most internucleosomal interactions, consistent with experimental observations, followed by the H3, H2A, and H2B tails in decreasing order. Apart from mediating internucleosomal interactions, the H3 tails also contribute to chromatin compaction by attaching to the entering and exiting linker DNA to screen electrotatic repulsion among the linker DNAs. This tendency of the H3 tails to attach to linker DNA, however, decreases significantly upon the addition of linker histones due to competition effects. The H2A and H2B tails do not mediate significant internucleosomal interactions but are important for

  3. Lactase persistence-related genetic variant: population substructure and health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Smith, George Davey; Lawlor, Debbie A; Timpson, Nic J; Baban, Jamil; Kiessling, Matt; Day, Ian N M; Ebrahim, Shah

    2009-03-01

    Lactase persistence is an autosomal-dominant trait that is common in European-derived populations. A basic tendency for lactase persistence to increase from the southeast to the northwest across European populations has been noted, but such trends within countries have not been extensively studied. We genotyped the C/T(-13910) variant (rs4988235) that constitutes the putatively causal allele for lactase persistence (T allele representing persistence) in a general population sample of 3344 women aged 60-79 years from 23 towns across Britain. We found an overall frequency of 0.253 for the C (lactase non-persistence) allele, but with considerable gradients of decreasing frequency from the south to the north and from the east to the west of Britain for this allele. Daily sunlight was positively related to C (non-persistence) allele prevalence. However, sunlight exposure and latitude are strongly correlated, and it was not possible to identify which is the primary factor statistically underlying the distribution of lactase persistence. The C/T(-13910) variant (rs4988235) was not related to drinking milk or bone health (although drinking milk itself was protective of bone health), and was essentially unrelated to a wide range of other lifestyle, health and demographic characteristics. One exception was general health being rated as being poor or fair, for which there was an odds ratio of 1.38 (1.04, 1.84) for women homozygous for the C allele; on adjustment for latitude and longitude of place of birth, this attenuated to 1.19 (0.87, 1.64). The lactase persistence variant could contribute to the examination of data for the existence of, and then statistical control for, population substructure in genetic association studies.

  4. Ligand scaffold hopping combining 3D maximal substructure search and molecular similarity

    PubMed Central

    Quintus, Flavien; Sperandio, Olivier; Grynberg, Julien; Petitjean, Michel; Tuffery, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Background Virtual screening methods are now well established as effective to identify hit and lead candidates and are fully integrated in most drug discovery programs. Ligand-based approaches make use of physico-chemical, structural and energetics properties of known active compounds to search large chemical libraries for related and novel chemotypes. While 2D-similarity search tools are known to be fast and efficient, the use of 3D-similarity search methods can be very valuable to many research projects as integration of "3D knowledge" can facilitate the identification of not only related molecules but also of chemicals possessing distant scaffolds as compared to the query and therefore be more inclined to scaffolds hopping. To date, very few methods performing this task are easily available to the scientific community. Results We introduce a new approach (LigCSRre) to the 3D ligand similarity search of drug candidates. It combines a 3D maximum common substructure search algorithm independent on atom order with a tunable description of atomic compatibilities to prune the search and increase its physico-chemical relevance. We show, on 47 experimentally validated active compounds across five protein targets having different specificities, that for single compound search, the approach is able to recover on average 52% of the co-actives in the top 1% of the ranked list which is better than gold standards of the field. Moreover, the combination of several runs on a single protein target using different query active compounds shows a remarkable improvement in enrichment. Such Results demonstrate LigCSRre as a valuable tool for ligand-based screening. Conclusion LigCSRre constitutes a new efficient and generic approach to the 3D similarity screening of small compounds, whose flexible design opens the door to many enhancements. The program is freely available to the academics for non-profit research at: . PMID:19671127

  5. A CHANDRA STUDY OF TEMPERATURE SUBSTRUCTURES IN INTERMEDIATE-REDSHIFT GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Liyi; Xu Haiguang; Gu Junhua; Wang Yu; Wang Jingying; Qin Zhenzhen; Cui Haijuan; Zhang Zhongli; Wu Xiangping

    2009-08-01

    By analyzing the gas temperature maps created from the Chandra archive data, we reveal the prevailing existence of temperature substructures on {approx}100 h{sup -1}{sub 70} kpc scales in the central regions of nine intermediate-redshift (z {approx} 0.1) galaxy clusters, which resemble those found in the Virgo and Coma Clusters. Each substructure contains a clump of hot plasma whose temperature is about 2-3 keV higher than the environment, corresponding to an excess thermal energy of {approx}10{sup 58}-10{sup 60} erg per clump. If there were no significant nongravitational heating sources, these substructures would have perished in 10{sup 8}-10{sup 9} yr due to thermal conduction and turbulent flows, whose velocity is found to range from about 200 to 400 km s{sup -1}, we conclude that the substructures cannot be created and sustained by inhomogeneous radiative cooling. We also eliminate the possibilities that the temperature substructures are caused by supernova explosions, or by the nonthermal X-ray emission due to the inverse-Comptonization of the cosmic microwave background photons. By calculating the rising time of active galactic nucleus (AGN)-induced buoyant bubbles, we speculate that the intermittent AGN outbursts ({>=}10{sup 60} erg per burst) may have played a crucial role in the formation of the high-temperature substructures. Our results are supported by the recent study of McNamara and Nulsen, posing a tight observational constraint on future theoretical and numerical studies.

  6. Jet substructure templates: data-driven QCD backgrounds for fat jet searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Timothy; Jankowiak, Martin; Lisanti, Mariangela; Lou, Hou Keong; Wacker, Jay G.

    2014-05-01

    QCD is often the dominant background to new physics searches for which jet substructure provides a useful handle. Due to the challenges associated with modeling this background, data-driven approaches are necessary. This paper presents a novel method for determining QCD predictions using templates — probability distribution functions for jet substructure properties as a function of kinematic inputs. Templates can be extracted from a control region and then used to compute background distributions in the signal region. Using Monte Carlo, we illustrate the procedure with two case studies and show that the template approach effectively models the relevant QCD background. This work strongly motivates the application of these techniques to LHC data.

  7. Substructure based modeling of nickel single crystals cycled at low plastic strain amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Dong

    In this dissertation a meso-scale, substructure-based, composite single crystal model is fully developed from the simple uniaxial model to the 3-D finite element method (FEM) model with explicit substructures and further with substructure evolution parameters, to simulate the completely reversed, strain controlled, low plastic strain amplitude cyclic deformation of nickel single crystals. Rate-dependent viscoplasticity and Armstrong-Frederick type kinematic hardening rules are applied to substructures on slip systems in the model to describe the kinematic hardening behavior of crystals. Three explicit substructure components are assumed in the composite single crystal model, namely "loop patches" and "channels" which are aligned in parallel in a "vein matrix," and persistent slip bands (PSBs) connected in series with the vein matrix. A magnetic domain rotation model is presented to describe the reverse magnetostriction of single crystal nickel. Kinematic hardening parameters are obtained by fitting responses to experimental data in the uniaxial model, and the validity of uniaxial assumption is verified in the 3-D FEM model with explicit substructures. With information gathered from experiments, all control parameters in the model including hardening parameters, volume fraction of loop patches and PSBs, and variation of Young's modulus etc. are correlated to cumulative plastic strain and/or plastic strain amplitude; and the whole cyclic deformation history of single crystal nickel at low plastic strain amplitudes is simulated in the uniaxial model. Then these parameters are implanted in the 3-D FEM model to simulate the formation of PSB bands. A resolved shear stress criterion is set to trigger the formation of PSBs, and stress perturbation in the specimen is obtained by several elements assigned with PSB material properties a priori. Displacement increment, plastic strain amplitude control and overall stress-strain monitor and output are carried out in the user

  8. Effect of temperature on the formation of creep substructure in sodium chloride single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, Sai V.; Pharr, George M.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the substructure morphology and the cell and subgrain size was investigated experimentally in NaCl single crystals under creep in the temperature range 573-873 K. It is found that the effect of temperature on the cell and subgrain sizes is weak in comparison with the effect of stress. However, there was a qualitative change in the substructure morphology with temperature, with the cells and subgrains better defined at higher temperatures. The volume fraction of the cell boundaries decreased with increasing temperature, thereby indicating a refinement of the microstructure at higher temperatures.

  9. Linker length and flexibility induces new cellobiohydrolase activity of PoCel6A from Penicillium oxalicum.

    PubMed

    Gao, Le; Wang, Lushan; Jiang, Xukai; Qu, Yinbo

    2015-06-01

    In a previous study, a novel cellobiohydrolase, PoCel6A, with new enzymatic activity against p-nitrophenyl-β-D-cellobioside (pNPC), was purified from Penicillium oxalicum. The cellulose-binding module and catalytic domain of PoCel6A showed a high degree of sequence similarity with other fungal Cel6As. However, PoCel6A had 11 more amino acids in the linker region than other Cel6As. To evaluate the relationship between the longer linker of PoCel6A and its enzymatic activity, 11 amino acids were deleted from the linker region of PoCel6A. The shortened PoCel6A linker nullified the enzymatic activity against pNPC but dramatically increased the enzyme's capacity for crystalline cellulose degradation. The shortened linker segment appeared to have no effect on the secondary structural conformation of PoCel6A. Another variant (PoCel6A-6pro) with six consecutive proline residues in the interdomain linker had a higher rigid linker, and no enzymatic activity was observed against soluble and insoluble substrate. The flexibility of the linker had an important function in the formation of active cellulase. The length and flexibility of the linker is clearly able to modify the function of PoCel6A and induce new characteristics of Cel6A.

  10. Linker length and flexibility induces new cellobiohydrolase activity of PoCel6A from Penicillium oxalicum.

    PubMed

    Gao, Le; Wang, Lushan; Jiang, Xukai; Qu, Yinbo

    2015-06-01

    In a previous study, a novel cellobiohydrolase, PoCel6A, with new enzymatic activity against p-nitrophenyl-β-D-cellobioside (pNPC), was purified from Penicillium oxalicum. The cellulose-binding module and catalytic domain of PoCel6A showed a high degree of sequence similarity with other fungal Cel6As. However, PoCel6A had 11 more amino acids in the linker region than other Cel6As. To evaluate the relationship between the longer linker of PoCel6A and its enzymatic activity, 11 amino acids were deleted from the linker region of PoCel6A. The shortened PoCel6A linker nullified the enzymatic activity against pNPC but dramatically increased the enzyme's capacity for crystalline cellulose degradation. The shortened linker segment appeared to have no effect on the secondary structural conformation of PoCel6A. Another variant (PoCel6A-6pro) with six consecutive proline residues in the interdomain linker had a higher rigid linker, and no enzymatic activity was observed against soluble and insoluble substrate. The flexibility of the linker had an important function in the formation of active cellulase. The length and flexibility of the linker is clearly able to modify the function of PoCel6A and induce new characteristics of Cel6A. PMID:25866282

  11. The O-Glycosylated Linker from the Trichoderma reesei Family 7 Cellulase Is a Flexible, Disordered Protein

    PubMed Central

    Beckham, Gregg T.; Bomble, Yannick J.; Matthews, James F.; Taylor, Courtney B.; Resch, Michael G.; Yarbrough, John M.; Decker, Steve R.; Bu, Lintao; Zhao, Xiongce; McCabe, Clare; Wohlert, Jakob; Bergenstråhle, Malin; Brady, John W.; Adney, William S.; Himmel, Michael E.; Crowley, Michael F.

    2010-01-01

    Fungi and bacteria secrete glycoprotein cocktails to deconstruct cellulose. Cellulose-degrading enzymes (cellulases) are often modular, with catalytic domains for cellulose hydrolysis and carbohydrate-binding modules connected by linkers rich in serine and threonine with O-glycosylation. Few studies have probed the role that the linker and O-glycans play in catalysis. Since different expression and growth conditions produce different glycosylation patterns that affect enzyme activity, the structure-function relationships that glycosylation imparts to linkers are relevant for understanding cellulase mechanisms. Here, the linker of the Trichoderma reesei Family 7 cellobiohydrolase (Cel7A) is examined by simulation. Our results suggest that the Cel7A linker is an intrinsically disordered protein with and without glycosylation. Contrary to the predominant view, the O-glycosylation does not change the stiffness of the linker, as measured by the relative fluctuations in the end-to-end distance; rather, it provides a 16 Å extension, thus expanding the operating range of Cel7A. We explain observations from previous biochemical experiments in the light of results obtained here, and compare the Cel7A linker with linkers from other cellulases with sequence-based tools to predict disorder. This preliminary screen indicates that linkers from Family 7 enzymes from other genera and other cellulases within T. reesei may not be as disordered, warranting further study. PMID:21112302

  12. Assembly into chromatin and subtype-specific transcriptional effects of exogenous linker histones directly introduced into a living Physarum cell.

    PubMed

    Thiriet, C; Hayes, J J

    2001-03-01

    The apparent diversity of linker histone subtypes may be related to their specific roles in defining functional states of chromatin in vivo. We have developed a novel method to study constitutive peptides throughout the cell cycle and have demonstrated that an exogenous linker histone could be introduced into a living cell of the slime mold Physarum polycephalum. Here, we have used this method to assess the functional differences between three somatic linker histone subtypes in vivo, and to demonstrate the general applicability of this method. Exogenous linker histone proteins H1 degrees, H5 and H1 were directly absorbed into living cell segments of the naturally synchronous Physarum macroplasmodia at precise cell cycle stages. Fluorescence microscopy, native nucleoprotein gels and immunoblotting of nuclei and chromatin with subtype-specific antibodies revealed that exogenous linker histones were efficiently transported into nuclei and were integrated into chromatin. The immunoreactivity of a preparation of anti-H1 degrees antibodies that are blocked from binding to specific H1 degrees epitopes in native chromatin indicates that the exogenous linker histones were similarly associated into Physarum chromatin. Interestingly, linker histones were found to be less stably associated with Physarum chromatin during S-phase than during G(2)-phase. Furthermore, we show that exogenous linker histones incorporated in early G(2)-phase inhibited transcription and that the level of inhibition correlates with the apparent role of the linker histone subtype in regulating transcription in cells where it normally occurs. PMID:11181179

  13. Chaperone-like effect of the linker on the isolated C-terminal domain of rabbit muscle creatine kinase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhe; Chen, Xiang-Jun; Xia, Mengdie; He, Hua-Wei; Wang, Sha; Liu, Huihui; Gong, Haipeng; Yan, Yong-Bin

    2012-08-01

    Intramolecular chaperones (IMCs), which are specific domains/segments encoded in the primary structure of proteins, exhibit chaperone-like activity against the aggregation of the other domains in the same molecule. In this research, we found that the truncation of the linker greatly promoted the thermal aggregation of the isolated C-terminal domain (CTD) of rabbit muscle creatine kinase (RMCK). Either the existence of the linker covalently linked to CTD or the supply of the synthetic linker peptide additionally could successfully protect the CTD of RMCK against aggregation in a concentration-dependent manner. Truncated fragments of the linker also behaved as a chaperone-like effect with lower efficiency, revealing the importance of its C-terminal half in the IMC function of the linker. The aggregation sites in the CTD of RMCK were identified by molecular dynamics simulations. Mutational analysis of the three key hydrophobic residues resulted in opposing effects on the thermal aggregation between the CTD with intact or partial linker, confirming the role of linker as a lid to protect the hydrophobic residues against exposure to solvent. These observations suggested that the linkers in multidomain proteins could act as IMCs to facilitate the correct folding of the aggregation-prone domains. Furthermore, the intactness of the IMC linker after proteolysis modulates the production of off-pathway aggregates, which may be important to the onset of some diseases caused by the toxic effects of aggregated proteolytic fragments.

  14. Parametric studies of stitching effectiveness for preventing substructure disbond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flanagan, Gerry; Furrow, Keith

    1995-01-01

    A methodology is desired that will allow a designer to select appropriate amounts of through-thickness reinforcement needed to meet design requirements. The goal is to use a relatively simple analysis to minimize the amount of testing that needs to be performed, and to make test results from simple configurations applicable to more general structures. Using this methodology one should be able to optimize the selection of stitching materials, the weight of the yarn, and the stitching density. The analysis approach is to treat substructure disbond as a crack propagation problem. In this approach, the stitches have little influence until a delamination begins to grow. Once the delamination reaches, or extends beyond a stitch, the stitch serves to reduce the strain-energy-release-rate (G) at the crack tip for a given applied load. The reduced G can then be compared to the unstitched materials toughness to predict the load required to further extend the crack. The current model treats the stitch as a simple spring which responds to displacements in the vertical (through-thickness) direction. In concept, this approach is similar to that proposed by other authors. Test results indicate that the model should be refined to include the shearing stiffness of the stitch. The strain-energy-release-rate calculations are performed using a code which uses interconnected higher-order plates to model built-up composite cross-sections. When plates are stacked vertically, the interfacial tractions between the plates can be computed. The plate differential equations are solved in closed-form. The code, called SUBLAM, was developed as part of this section in one dimension. Because of this limitation, rows of stitches are treated as a two-dimensional sheet. The spring stiffness of a row of stitches can be estimated from the stitch material, weight, and density. As a practical and conservative approach, we can assume that the stitch is bonded until a crack passes the stitch location

  15. Linker design for the modular assembly of multifunctional and targeted platinum(ii)-containing anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Ding, S; Bierbach, U

    2016-08-16

    A versatile and efficient modular synthetic platform was developed for assembling multifunctional conjugates and targeted forms of platinum-(benz)acridines, a class of highly cytotoxic DNA-targeted hybrid agents. The synthetic strategy involved amide coupling between succinyl ester-modified platinum compounds (P1, P2) and a set of 11 biologically relevant primary and secondary amines (N1-N11). To demonstrate the feasibility and versatility of the approach, a structurally and functionally diverse range of amines was introduced. These include biologically active molecules, such as rucaparib (a PARP inhibitor), E/Z-endoxifen (an estrogen receptor antagonist), and a quinazoline-based tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Micro-scale reactions in Eppendorf tubes or on 96-well plates were used to screen for optimal coupling conditions in DMF solution with carbodiimide-, uronium-, and phosphonium-based compounds, as well as other common coupling reagents. Reactions with the phosphonium-based coupling reagent PyBOP produced the highest yields and gave the cleanest conversions. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the chemistry can also be performed in aqueous media and is amenable to parallel synthesis based on multiple consecutive reactions in DMF in a "one-tube" format. In-line LC-MS was used to assess the stability of the conjugates in physiologically relevant buffers. Hydrolysis of the conjugates occurs at the ester moiety and is facilitated by the aquated metal moiety under low-chloride ion conditions. The rate of ester cleavage greatly depends on the nature of the amine component. Potential applications of the linker technology are discussed. PMID:27251881

  16. Wheat Gluten Blends with Maleic Anhydride-Functionalized Polyacrylate Cross-Linkers for Improved Properties.

    PubMed

    Diao, Cheng; Xia, Hongwei; Parnas, Richard S

    2015-10-14

    A family of polyacrylate-based cross-linkers was synthesized to maximize the toughness of high Tg, high modulus wheat gluten blends in the glassy state. Mechanical testing and damping measurements were conducted to provide an example where the work of fracture and strength of the blend substantially exceeds polystyrene while maintaining flexure stiffness in excess of 3 GPa. The new rubbery cross-linkers, polymethyl acrylate-co-maleic anhydride and polyethyl acrylate-co-maleic anhydride, improve WG mechanical properties and reduce water absorption simultaneously. MDSC, FTIR, HPLC, and NMR data confirmed the cross-linking reaction with wheat gluten. Flexural, DMA, and water absorption testing were carried out to characterize the property improvements. DMA was conducted to investigate the relationship between energy damping and mechanical property improvement. If the cross-linker damping temperature is close to the testing temperature, the entire sample exhibits high damping, toughness, and strength.

  17. Development of a Multifunctional Benzophenone Linker for Peptide Stapling and Photoaffinity Labelling

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuteng; Olsen, Lasse B.; Lau, Yu Heng; Jensen, Claus Hatt; Rossmann, Maxim; Baker, Ysobel R.; Sore, Hannah F.; Collins, Súil

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Photoaffinity labelling is a useful method for studying how proteins interact with ligands and biomolecules, and can help identify and characterise new targets for the development of new therapeutics. We present the design and synthesis of a novel multifunctional benzophenone linker that serves as both a photo‐crosslinking motif and a peptide stapling reagent. Using double‐click stapling, we attached the benzophenone to the peptide via the staple linker, rather than by modifying the peptide sequence with a photo‐crosslinking amino acid. When applied to a p53‐derived peptide, the resulting photoreactive stapled peptide was able to preferentially crosslink with MDM2 in the presence of competing protein. This multifunctional linker also features an extra alkyne handle for downstream applications such as pull‐down assays, and can be used to investigate the target selectivity of stapled peptides. PMID:26919579

  18. Development of a Multifunctional Benzophenone Linker for Peptide Stapling and Photoaffinity Labelling.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuteng; Olsen, Lasse B; Lau, Yu Heng; Jensen, Claus Hatt; Rossmann, Maxim; Baker, Ysobel R; Sore, Hannah F; Collins, Súil; Spring, David R

    2016-04-15

    Photoaffinity labelling is a useful method for studying how proteins interact with ligands and biomolecules, and can help identify and characterise new targets for the development of new therapeutics. We present the design and synthesis of a novel multifunctional benzophenone linker that serves as both a photo-crosslinking motif and a peptide stapling reagent. Using double-click stapling, we attached the benzophenone to the peptide via the staple linker, rather than by modifying the peptide sequence with a photo-crosslinking amino acid. When applied to a p53-derived peptide, the resulting photoreactive stapled peptide was able to preferentially crosslink with MDM2 in the presence of competing protein. This multifunctional linker also features an extra alkyne handle for downstream applications such as pull-down assays, and can be used to investigate the target selectivity of stapled peptides. PMID:26919579

  19. Enhanced tumor retention of radioiodinated anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibody using novel bifunctional iodination linker for radioimmunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    KIM, EUN JUNG; KIM, BYOUNG SOO; CHOI, DAN BEE; CHI, SUNG-GIL; CHOI, TAE HYUN

    2016-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) uses an antibody labeled with a radionuclide to deliver cytotoxic radiation to a target tumor cells. Radioiodine is most commonly employed to prepare radiolabeled proteins (antibodies, peptides) for in vitro and in vivo applications. A major shortcoming of radioiodinated proteins prepared by direct labeling methods is their deiodination in vivo. For the preparation of more stable radioiodinated antibodies, we developed a new linker (N-(4-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-2-(3-(tributylstannyl)phenyl) acetamide (IBPA). This study evaluated the usefulness of IBPA as a linker for the stable radioiodinated internalizing antibody, cetuximab. Directly labeled cetuximab ([125I]-cetuximab) was prepared by the chloramine T method. To prepare indirectly labeled cetuximab using IBPA ([125I]-IBPA-cetuximab), IBPA was radioiodinated using chloramine-T to give N-(4-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-2-(3-[125I]phenyl)acetamide ([125I]-IBPA), which was purified by high performance liquid chromatography. [125I]-IBPA was then conjugated to cetuximab. In vitro target binding and internalizing assays were performed in PC9, LS174T, and FaDu cell lines. In vivo planar images were obtained using an Inveon SPECT scanner 3, 24, 48, and 168 h after i.v. injection of [125I]-cetuximab or [125I]-IBPA-cetuximab in athymic mice bearing LS174T tumor xenografts. Specific binding and internalized radioactivity of [125I]-IBPA-cetuximab were higher than those of [125I]-cetuximab in PC9, LS174T, and FaDu cell lines. In planar images scant radioactivity was evident in thyroid glands after injection of [125I]-IBPA-cetuximab, while a high level of radioactivity was present in thyroid glands after injection of [125I]-cetuximab. Tumor uptake value of [125I]-IBPA-cetuximab was higher than that of [125I]-cetuximab for up to 168 h. [125I]-IBPA-cetuximab is stable and resistant to deiodination in vivo. IBPA is a promising bi-functional linker for radioiodination of internalizing monoclonal antibodies for in

  20. The centrosomal linker and microtubules provide dual levels of spatial coordination of centrosomes.

    PubMed

    Panic, Marko; Hata, Shoji; Neuner, Annett; Schiebel, Elmar

    2015-05-01

    The centrosome is the principal microtubule organizing center in most animal cells. It consists of a pair of centrioles surrounded by pericentriolar material. The centrosome, like DNA, duplicates exactly once per cell cycle. During interphase duplicated centrosomes remain closely linked by a proteinaceous linker. This centrosomal linker is composed of rootletin filaments that are anchored to the centrioles via the protein C-Nap1. At the onset of mitosis the linker is dissolved by Nek2A kinase to support the formation of the bipolar mitotic spindle. The importance of the centrosomal linker for cell function during interphase awaits characterization. Here we assessed the phenotype of human RPE1 C-Nap1 knockout (KO) cells. The absence of the linker led to a modest increase in the average centrosome separation from 1 to 2.5 μm. This small impact on the degree of separation is indicative of a second level of spatial organization of centrosomes. Microtubule depolymerisation or stabilization in C-Nap1 KO cells dramatically increased the inter-centrosomal separation (> 8 μm). Thus, microtubules position centrosomes relatively close to one another in the absence of linker function. C-Nap1 KO cells had a Golgi organization defect with a two-fold expansion of the area occupied by the Golgi. When the centrosomes of C-Nap1 KO cells showed considerable separation, two spatially distinct Golgi stacks could be observed. Furthermore, migration of C-Nap1 KO cells was slower than their wild type RPE1 counterparts. These data show that the spatial organization of centrosomes is modulated by a combination of centrosomal cohesion and microtubule forces. Furthermore a modest increase in centrosome separation has major impact on Golgi organization and cell migration. PMID:26001056

  1. The Centrosomal Linker and Microtubules Provide Dual Levels of Spatial Coordination of Centrosomes

    PubMed Central

    Panic, Marko; Hata, Shoji; Neuner, Annett; Schiebel, Elmar

    2015-01-01

    The centrosome is the principal microtubule organizing center in most animal cells. It consists of a pair of centrioles surrounded by pericentriolar material. The centrosome, like DNA, duplicates exactly once per cell cycle. During interphase duplicated centrosomes remain closely linked by a proteinaceous linker. This centrosomal linker is composed of rootletin filaments that are anchored to the centrioles via the protein C-Nap1. At the onset of mitosis the linker is dissolved by Nek2A kinase to support the formation of the bipolar mitotic spindle. The importance of the centrosomal linker for cell function during interphase awaits characterization. Here we assessed the phenotype of human RPE1 C-Nap1 knockout (KO) cells. The absence of the linker led to a modest increase in the average centrosome separation from 1 to 2.5 μm. This small impact on the degree of separation is indicative of a second level of spatial organization of centrosomes. Microtubule depolymerisation or stabilization in C-Nap1 KO cells dramatically increased the inter-centrosomal separation (> 8 μm). Thus, microtubules position centrosomes relatively close to one another in the absence of linker function. C-Nap1 KO cells had a Golgi organization defect with a two-fold expansion of the area occupied by the Golgi. When the centrosomes of C-Nap1 KO cells showed considerable separation, two spatially distinct Golgi stacks could be observed. Furthermore, migration of C-Nap1 KO cells was slower than their wild type RPE1 counterparts. These data show that the spatial organization of centrosomes is modulated by a combination of centrosomal cohesion and microtubule forces. Furthermore a modest increase in centrosome separation has major impact on Golgi organization and cell migration. PMID:26001056

  2. Pyrene-terminated phenylenethynylene rigid linkers anchored to metal oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Taratula, Olena; Rochford, Jonathan; Piotrowiak, Piotr; Galoppini, Elena; Carlisle, Rachael A; Meyer, Gerald J

    2006-08-17

    Phenylenethynylene (PE) rigid linkers (para and meta) were used to anchor pyrene to the surface of TiO2 (anatase) and ZrO2 nanoparticle thin films through the two COOH groups of an isophthalic acid (Ipa) unit. Four chromophore-linker models were studied in solution and bound. Two are novel meta-pyrene-PE linker systems: dimethyl 5-(3-(1-pyrenylethynyl)phenylethynyl)-isophthalate, carrying one pyrene, and dimethyl 5-(bis-3,5-(1-pyrenylethynyl)phenylethynyl)-isophthalate, carrying two. These were compared with para rigid-rods dimethyl 5-(1-pyrenylethynyl)isophthalate and dimethyl 5-(4-(1-pyrenylethynyl)phenylethynyl)-isophthalate, each carrying one pyrene but varying in length. The length of the PE linkers and the para or meta substitution influence the photophysical properties of the compounds. The extinction coefficient increased, and the long wavelength absorbance of the pyrene chromophore was shifted to the red with increasing conjugation. Compared to unsubstituted pyrene, the pyrene-linker systems were characterized by short fluorescence lifetimes (tau approximately 2 ns in tetrahydrofuran solutions), but quantum yields were close to unity. ZINDO/S CI calculations attribute this effect to a switching in the order of the two lowest-lying singlet states of pyrene. High surface coverages, approximately 10(-8) mol/cm2, and carboxylate binding modes on nanostructured TiO2 films were obtained in all cases. The appearance of a pyrene excimer emission on ZrO2, an insulator, indicates that the pyrene-linker system is closely packed (Py-Py < 4 A) on the surface. The fluorescence emission on TiO2 was completely quenched, consistent with quantitative and rapid electron injection into the semiconductor indicating that the pyrene excimer acts as a sensitizer. Photoelectrochemical studies in regenerative solar cells with I3-/I- as the redox mediator indicated near-quantitative conversion of absorbed photons into an electrical current. PMID:16898719

  3. Improving solubilization in microemulsions with additives. 1. The lipophilic linker role

    SciTech Connect

    Graciaa, A.; Lachaise, J.; Cucuphat, C. ); Bourrel, M. ); Salager, J.L. )

    1993-03-01

    Very lipophilic additives are able to substantially improve the solubilization in surfactant-oil-water microemulsions. The so-called lipophilic linker effect is studied, and its role is discussed. It is shown that the presence of a very lipophilic amphiphilic additive may improve substantially the solubilization in microemulsions. This substance is called a lipophilic linker because its preferential orientation in the oil layers next to the interface might provide some ordering of the oil molecules as well as an additional link with the surfactant. Both effects result in a higher interaction on the oil side of the interface. 21 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Impact of metal-alkoxide functionalized linkers on H2 binding: A density functional study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banu, Tahamida; Ghosh, Avik; Das, Abhijit K.

    2016-08-01

    The effect of metal-alkoxide functionalization of different organic linkers on the H2 binding is investigated employing DFT approach. While analyzing the H2 binding interaction of magnesium-alkoxide modified benzene, naphthalene, anthracene and pyrene linkers, we find their comparable affinity toward H2 molecules. Six-member alkoxide ring containing naphthalene and pyrene systems interact with the H2 molecules in a comparatively better way than their five-member analogues. AIM, NBO and LMO-EDA analyses have been performed to comprehend the bonding nature between Mg center and the H2 molecules. Polarization along with the charge transfer interactions play significant role in stabilizing the systems.

  5. Exploring the reality of density substructures in the Palomar 5 stellar stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Guillaume F.; Ibata, R.; Famaey, B.; Martin, N. F.; Lewis, G. F.

    2016-08-01

    We present an analysis of the presence of substructures in the stellar stream of the Palomar 5 globular cluster, as derived from Sloan Digital Sky Survey data. Using a matched filter technique, we recover the positions and sizes of overdensities reported in previous studies. To explore the reality of these structures, we also create an artificial model of the stream, in which we construct a realistic background on top of which we add a perfectly smooth stream structure, taking into account the effects of photometric completeness and interstellar extinction. We find that the smooth artificial stream then shows similarly pronounced substructures as the real structure. Interestingly, our best-fitting N-body simulation does display real projected density variations linked to stellar epicyclic motions, but these become less significant when taking into account the SDSS star-count constraints. The substructures found when applying our matched filter technique to the N-body particles converted into observable stars are thus mostly unrelated to these epicyclic motions. This analysis suggests that the majority of the previously detected substructures along the tidal tail of Palomar 5 are artefacts of observational inhomogeneities.

  6. Substructure Evolution in Energetic-Driven Spherically Shock-Loaded Copper

    SciTech Connect

    Sinitsyna, L. M.; Novikov, S. A.; Gray, G. T. III; Cerreta, E.; Henrie, B.; Lopez, M.; Yablinsky, C.

    2006-07-28

    Post-shock-recovered metallurgical analysis of solid metal spheres shock loaded via spherical energetic(HE) loading provides a unique opportunity to quantify the substructure evolution in a material subjected to converging Taylor-wave (triangular-shock pulse) loading. In this paper detailed quantitative metallographic, orientation-imaging microscopy (OIM), and texture analysis is presented characterizing the gradient in substructure generated in Cu subjected to a spherical HE shock loading pulse at VNIIEF. The substructure in the recovered sphere is seen to include: 1) a spherical cavity generated in the center of the sphere due to shock-wave convergence and release, displaying ductile dimpled failure and no evidence of melting, 2) a gradient in deformation (slip and deformation twins) from the center outward to the surface, and 3) numerous shear cracks and/or spall planes. The substructure evolution is discussed relative to that previously observed in Cu shock prestrained via either 1-D triangular-shaped shockwave loading or 1-D square-topped pulse shock loading.

  7. Property Graph vs RDF Triple Store: A Comparison on Glycan Substructure Search

    PubMed Central

    Alocci, Davide; Mariethoz, Julien; Horlacher, Oliver; Bolleman, Jerven T.; Campbell, Matthew P.; Lisacek, Frederique

    2015-01-01

    Resource description framework (RDF) and Property Graph databases are emerging technologies that are used for storing graph-structured data. We compare these technologies through a molecular biology use case: glycan substructure search. Glycans are branched tree-like molecules composed of building blocks linked together by chemical bonds. The molecular structure of a glycan can be encoded into a direct acyclic graph where each node represents a building block and each edge serves as a chemical linkage between two building blocks. In this context, Graph databases are possible software solutions for storing glycan structures and Graph query languages, such as SPARQL and Cypher, can be used to perform a substructure search. Glycan substructure searching is an important feature for querying structure and experimental glycan databases and retrieving biologically meaningful data. This applies for example to identifying a region of the glycan recognised by a glycan binding protein (GBP). In this study, 19,404 glycan structures were selected from GlycomeDB (www.glycome-db.org) and modelled for being stored into a RDF triple store and a Property Graph. We then performed two different sets of searches and compared the query response times and the results from both technologies to assess performance and accuracy. The two implementations produced the same results, but interestingly we noted a difference in the query response times. Qualitative measures such as portability were also used to define further criteria for choosing the technology adapted to solving glycan substructure search and other comparable issues. PMID:26656740

  8. A Computer Process for Substructure Searches on Compound Structures Ciphered in the IUPAC Notation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polton, D. J.

    1972-01-01

    Computer programs have been written which enable substructure searches to be carried out on a file of compounds ciphered using a modified version of the IUPAC (Dyson) notation. The search system outlined is to be linked with one which uses input from the chemical structure typewriter. (3 references) (Author)

  9. VIEW OF BRIDGE SUBSTRUCTURE CONCRETE PIERS “III”, “II”, “I” AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF BRIDGE SUBSTRUCTURE CONCRETE PIERS “III”, “II”, “I” AND “A” AND SUPERSTRUCTURE MAIN BRIDGE, CANTILEVER THROUGH TRUSS CANTILEVER SECTION LOOKING SOUTH AND UP. - Huey P. Long Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River approximately midway between nine & twelve mile points upstream from & west of New Orleans, Jefferson, Jefferson Parish, LA

  10. VIEW OF BRIDGE SUBSTRUCTURE CONCRETE PIERS “II”, “III”, “1V” AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF BRIDGE SUBSTRUCTURE CONCRETE PIERS “II”, “III”, “1V” AND “V” AND SUPERSTRUCTURE MAIN BRIDGE CANTILEVER THROUGH TRUSS CANTILEVER SPAN AND SIMPLE THROUGH TRUSS SPAN LOOKING NORTHWEST AND UP. - Huey P. Long Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River approximately midway between nine & twelve mile points upstream from & west of New Orleans, Jefferson, Jefferson Parish, LA

  11. Modelling and control issues of dynamically substructured systems: adaptive forward prediction taken as an example

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Jia-Ying; Hsiao, Wei-De; Chen, Chih-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Testing techniques of dynamically substructured systems dissects an entire engineering system into parts. Components can be tested via numerical simulation or physical experiments and run synchronously. Additional actuator systems, which interface numerical and physical parts, are required within the physical substructure. A high-quality controller, which is designed to cancel unwanted dynamics introduced by the actuators, is important in order to synchronize the numerical and physical outputs and ensure successful tests. An adaptive forward prediction (AFP) algorithm based on delay compensation concepts has been proposed to deal with substructuring control issues. Although the settling performance and numerical conditions of the AFP controller are improved using new direct-compensation and singular value decomposition methods, the experimental results show that a linear dynamics-based controller still outperforms the AFP controller. Based on experimental observations, the least-squares fitting technique, effectiveness of the AFP compensation and differences between delay and ordinary differential equations are discussed herein, in order to reflect the fundamental issues of actuator modelling in relevant literature and, more specifically, to show that the actuator and numerical substructure are heterogeneous dynamic components and should not be collectively modelled as a homogeneous delay differential equation. PMID:25104902

  12. Common Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... News & Events Volunteer NIAID > Health & Research Topics > Common Cold Skip Website Tools Website Tools Print this page ... Help people who are suffering from the common cold by volunteering for NIAID clinical studies on ClinicalTrials. ...

  13. A JAK2 interdomain linker relays Epo receptor engagement signals to kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lequn; Dong, Hongyun; Zhang, Cheng Cheng; Kinch, Lisa; Osawa, Mitsujiro; Iacovino, Michelina; Grishin, Nikolai V; Kyba, Michael; Huang, Lily Jun-shen

    2009-09-25

    JAK2 (Janus kinase 2) is essential for cytokine receptor signaling, and several lines of evidence support a causal role of an activating JAK2 mutation in myeloproliferative disorders. JAK2 activity is autoinhibited by its pseudokinase domain in the basal state, and the inhibition is released by cytokine stimulation; how engagement of the cognate receptor triggers this release is unknown. From a functional screen for gain-of-function JAK2 mutations, we discovered 13 missense mutations, nine in the pseudokinase domain and four in the Src homology 2 (SH2)-pseudokinase domain linker. These mutations identified determinants for autoinhibition and inducible activation in JAK2. Two of the mutants, K539I and N622I, resulted in erythrocytosis in mice. Scanning mutagenesis of the SH2-pseudokinase domain linker indicated that its N-terminal part was essential for interaction of JAK2 with the Epo receptor, whereas certain mutations in the C-terminal region conferred constitutive activation. We further showed that substitutions for Glu(543)-Asp(544) in this linker or Leu(611), Arg(683), or Phe(694) in the hinge proximal region of the pseudokinase domain resulted in activated JAK2 mutants that could not be further stimulated by Epo. These results suggest that the SH2-pseudokinase domain linker acts as a switch that relays cytokine engagement to JAK2 activation by flexing the pseudokinase domain hinge. PMID:19638629

  14. Influence of linker length and composition on enzymatic activity and ribosomal binding of neomycin dimers.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Derrick; Kumar, Sunil; Green, Keith D; Arya, Dev P; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2015-07-01

    The human and bacterial A site rRNA binding as well as the aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme (AME) activity against a series of neomycin B (NEO) dimers is presented. The data indicate that by simple modifications of linker length and composition, substantial differences in rRNA selectivity and AME activity can be obtained. We tested five different AMEs with dimeric NEO dimers that were tethered via triazole, urea, and thiourea linkages. We show that triazole-linked dimers were the worst substrates for most AMEs, with those containing the longer linkers showing the largest decrease in activity. Thiourea-linked dimers that showed a decrease in activity by AMEs also showed increased bacterial A site binding, with one compound (compound 14) even showing substantially reduced human A site binding. The urea-linked dimers showed a substantial decrease in activity by AMEs when a conformationally restrictive phenyl linker was introduced. The information learned herein advances our understanding of the importance of the linker length and composition for the generation of dimeric aminoglycoside antibiotics capable of avoiding the action of AMEs and selective binding to the bacterial rRNA over binding to the human rRNA.

  15. Assembly of bipolar microtubule structures by passive cross-linkers and molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johann, D.; Goswami, D.; Kruse, K.

    2016-06-01

    During cell division, sister chromatids are segregated by the mitotic spindle, a bipolar assembly of interdigitating antiparallel polar filaments called microtubules. The spindle contains the midzone, a stable region of overlapping antiparallel microtubules, that is essential for maintaining bipolarity. Although a lot is known about the molecular players involved, the mechanism underlying midzone formation and maintenance is still poorly understood. We study the interaction of polar filaments that are cross-linked by molecular motors moving directionally and by passive cross-linkers diffusing along microtubules. Using a particle-based stochastic model, we find that the interplay of motors and passive cross-linkers can generate a stable finite overlap between a pair of antiparallel polar filaments. We develop a mean-field theory to study this mechanism in detail and investigate the influence of steric interactions between motors and passive cross-linkers on the overlap dynamics. In the presence of interspecies steric interactions, passive cross-linkers mimic the behavior of molecular motors and stable finite overlaps are generated even for non-cross-linking motors. Finally, we develop a mean-field theory for a bundle of aligned polar filaments and show that they can self-organize into a spindlelike pattern. Our work suggests possible ways as to how cells can generate spindle midzones and control their extensions.

  16. Novel nucleosomal particles containing core histones and linker DNA but no histone H1.

    PubMed

    Cole, Hope A; Cui, Feng; Ocampo, Josefina; Burke, Tara L; Nikitina, Tatiana; Nagarajavel, V; Kotomura, Naoe; Zhurkin, Victor B; Clark, David J

    2016-01-29

    Eukaryotic chromosomal DNA is assembled into regularly spaced nucleosomes, which play a central role in gene regulation by determining accessibility of control regions. The nucleosome contains ∼147 bp of DNA wrapped ∼1.7 times around a central core histone octamer. The linker histone, H1, binds both to the nucleosome, sealing the DNA coils, and to the linker DNA between nucleosomes, directing chromatin folding. Micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digests the linker to yield the chromatosome, containing H1 and ∼160 bp, and then converts it to a core particle, containing ∼147 bp and no H1. Sequencing of nucleosomal DNA obtained after MNase digestion (MNase-seq) generates genome-wide nucleosome maps that are important for understanding gene regulation. We present an improved MNase-seq method involving simultaneous digestion with exonuclease III, which removes linker DNA. Remarkably, we discovered two novel intermediate particles containing 154 or 161 bp, corresponding to 7 bp protruding from one or both sides of the nucleosome core. These particles are detected in yeast lacking H1 and in H1-depleted mouse chromatin. They can be reconstituted in vitro using purified core histones and DNA. We propose that these 'proto-chromatosomes' are fundamental chromatin subunits, which include the H1 binding site and influence nucleosome spacing independently of H1.

  17. Technology Transfer and Utilization Methodology; Further Analysis of the Linker Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jolly, James A.; Creighton, J. W.

    This study is based on a comparison of data from two independent studies of technology utilization and dissemination methodology that sought to identify the behavior characteristics of "linkers" and "stabilizers" and their relative existence within different groups of technical personnel. Hypothesis for this study is that the distribution of the…

  18. Conserved interdomain linker promotes phase separation of the multivalent adaptor protein Nck

    PubMed Central

    Banjade, Sudeep; Wu, Qiong; Mittal, Anuradha; Peeples, William B.; Pappu, Rohit V.; Rosen, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    The organization of membranes, the cytosol, and the nucleus of eukaryotic cells can be controlled through phase separation of lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. Collective interactions of multivalent molecules mediated by modular binding domains can induce gelation and phase separation in several cytosolic and membrane-associated systems. The adaptor protein Nck has three SRC-homology 3 (SH3) domains that bind multiple proline-rich segments in the actin regulatory protein neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) and an SH2 domain that binds to multiple phosphotyrosine sites in the adhesion protein nephrin, leading to phase separation. Here, we show that the 50-residue linker between the first two SH3 domains of Nck enhances phase separation of Nck/N-WASP/nephrin assemblies. Two linear motifs within this element, as well as its overall positively charged character, are important for this effect. The linker increases the driving force for self-assembly of Nck, likely through weak interactions with the second SH3 domain, and this effect appears to promote phase separation. The linker sequence is highly conserved, suggesting that the sequence determinants of the driving forces for phase separation may be generally important to Nck functions. Our studies demonstrate that linker regions between modular domains can contribute to the driving forces for self-assembly and phase separation of multivalent proteins. PMID:26553976

  19. Characterization, structure and function of linker polypeptides in phycobilisomes of cyanobacteria and red algae: an overview.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu-Ning; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Zhang, Yu-Zhong; Zhou, Bai-Cheng

    2005-06-30

    Cyanobacteria and red algae have intricate light-harvesting systems comprised of phycobilisomes that are attached to the outer side of the thylakoid membrane. The phycobilisomes absorb light in the wavelength range of 500-650 nm and transfer energy to the chlorophyll for photosynthesis. Phycobilisomes, which biochemically consist of phycobiliproteins and linker polypeptides, are particularly wonderful subjects for the detailed analysis of structure and function due to their spectral properties and their various components affected by growth conditions. The linker polypeptides are believed to mediate both the assembly of phycobiliproteins into the highly ordered arrays in the phycobilisomes and the interactions between the phycobilisomes and the thylakoid membrane. Functionally, they have been reported to improve energy migration by regulating the spectral characteristics of colored phycobiliproteins. In this review, the progress regarding linker polypeptides research, including separation approaches, structures and interactions with phycobiliproteins, as well as their functions in the phycobilisomes, is presented. In addition, some problems with previous work on linkers are also discussed.

  20. Loop-linker PCR: an advanced PCR technique for genome walking.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Quoclinh; Shi, Hui; Xu, Wentao; Hao, Junran; Luo, Yunbo; Huang, Kunlun

    2012-10-01

    In this article, we developed a novel PCR method, termed loop-linker PCR, to isolate flanking sequences in transgenic crops. The novelty of this approach is its use of a stem-loop structure to design a loop-linker adapter. The adapter is designed to form a nick site when ligated with restricted DNA. This modification not only can prevent the self-ligation of adapters but also promotes the elongation of the 3' end of the loop-linker adapter to generate a stem-loop structure in the ligation products. Moreover, the suppressive effect of the stem-loop structure decreases nonspecific amplification and increases the success rate of the approach; all extension products will suppress exponential amplification except from the ligation product that contains the specific primer binding site. Using this method, 442, 1830, 107, and 512 bp left border flanking sequences were obtained from the transgenic maizes LY038, DAS-59122-7, Event 3272, and the transgenic soybean MON89788, respectively. The experimental results demonstrated that loop-linker PCR is an efficient, reliable, and cost-effective method for identifying flanking sequences in transgenic crops and could be applied for other genome walking applications.

  1. Detection of Ligation Products of DNA Linkers with 5′-OH Ends by Denaturing PAGE Silver Stain

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Zhang, Xuerong

    2012-01-01

    To explore if DNA linkers with 5′-hydroxyl (OH) ends could be joined by commercial T4 and E. coli DNA ligase, these linkers were synthesized by using the solid-phase phosphoramidite method and joined by using commercial T4 and E. coli DNA ligases. The ligation products were detected by using denaturing PAGE silver stain and PCR method. About 0.5–1% of linkers A–B and E–F, and 0.13–0.5% of linkers C–D could be joined by T4 DNA ligases. About 0.25–0.77% of linkers A–B and E–F, and 0.06–0.39% of linkers C–D could be joined by E. coli DNA ligases. A 1-base deletion (-G) and a 5-base deletion (-GGAGC) could be found at the ligation junctions of the linkers. But about 80% of the ligation products purified with a PCR product purification kit did not contain these base deletions, meaning that some linkers had been correctly joined by T4 and E. coli DNA ligases. In addition, about 0.025–0.1% of oligo 11 could be phosphorylated by commercial T4 DNA ligase. The phosphorylation products could be increased when the phosphorylation reaction was extended from 1 hr to 2 hrs. We speculated that perhaps the linkers with 5′-OH ends could be joined by T4 or E. coli DNA ligase in 2 different manners: (i) about 0.025–0.1% of linkers could be phosphorylated by commercial T4 DNA ligase, and then these phosphorylated linkers could be joined to the 3′-OH ends of other linkers; and (ii) the linkers could delete one or more nucleotide(s) at their 5′-ends and thereby generated some 5′-phosphate ends, and then these 5′-phosphate ends could be joined to the 3′-OH ends of other linkers at a low efficiency. Our findings may probably indicate that some DNA nicks with 5′-OH ends can be joined by commercial T4 or E. coli DNA ligase even in the absence of PNK. PMID:22761747

  2. Second-Generation Tunable pH-Sensitive Phosphoramidate-Based Linkers for Controlled Release.

    PubMed

    Choy, Cindy J; Ley, Corinne R; Davis, Austen L; Backer, Brian S; Geruntho, Jonathan J; Clowers, Brian H; Berkman, Clifford E

    2016-09-21

    We developed a second generation of tunable pH-sensitive linkers based on our phosphoramidate scaffold to release amine-containing drugs under acidic conditions. The pH-triggered phosphoramidate-based linkers are responsive to pH and do not require intracellular enzymatic action to initiate drug release. On the basis of the model scaffolds examined, phosphoramidate-based linkers were selected for particular properties for controlled release applications such as amine type, stability under physiological conditions, or release rates at various pH values such as intracellular endosomal conditions. Key to the pH-triggered amine release from these linker is a proximal carboxylic acid to promote hydrolysis of the phosphoramidate P-N bond, presumably through an intramolecular general acid-type mechanism. Phosphoramidate hydrolysis is largely governed by the pKa of the leaving amine. However, the proximity of the neighboring carboxylic acid attenuates the stability of the P-N bond to hydrolysis, thus allowing for control over the release of an amine from the phosphoramidate center. In addition, we observed that the Thorpe-Ingold effect and rigidification of the scaffold could further enhance the rate of release. Esterification of the neighboring carboxylic acid was found to protect the scaffold from rapid release at low pH. This latter observation is particularly noteworthy as it suggests that the phosphoramidate-based drug-conjugate scaffold can be protected as an ester prodrug for oral administration. While the tunability phosphoramidate linkers is attractive for applications in intracellular trafficking studies in which pH changes can trigger release of turn-on dyes, antibody drug conjugates, small-molecule drug conjugates, and drug eluting stents (DES), the promise of oral delivery of drug conjugates is expected to have broad impact in controlled release applications. PMID:27562353

  3. Boosted objects and jet substructure at the LHC: Report of BOOST2012, held at IFIC Valencia, 23rd-27th of July 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Altheimer, A.

    2014-03-21

    This report of the BOOST2012 workshop presents the results of four working groups that studied key aspects of jet substructure. We discuss the potential of first-principle QCD calculations to yield a precise description of the substructure of jets and study the accuracy of state-of-the-art Monte Carlo tools. Limitations of the experiments’ ability to resolve substructure are evaluated, with a focus on the impact of additional (pile-up) proton proton collisions on jet substructure performance in future LHC operating scenarios. The final section summarizes the lessons learnt from jet substructure analyses in searches for new physics in the production of boosted top quarks.

  4. Boosted objects and jet substructure at the LHC. Report of BOOST2012, held at IFIC Valencia, 23rd-27th of July 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altheimer, A.; Arce, A.; Asquith, L.; Backus Mayes, J.; Kuutmann, E. Bergeaas; Berger, J.; Bjergaard, D.; Bryngemark, L.; Buckley, A.; Butterworth, J.; Cacciari, M.; Campanelli, M.; Carli, T.; Chala, M.; Chapleau, B.; Chen, C.; Chou, J. P.; Cornelissen, Th.; Curtin, D.; Dasgupta, M.; Davison, A.; de Almeida Dias, F.; de Cosa, A.; de Roeck, A.; Debenedetti, C.; Doglioni, C.; Ellis, S. D.; Fassi, F.; Ferrando, J.; Fleischmann, S.; Freytsis, M.; Gonzalez Silva, M. L.; de la Hoz, S. Gonzalez; Guescini, F.; Han, Z.; Hook, A.; Hornig, A.; Izaguirre, E.; Jankowiak, M.; Juknevich, J.; Kaci, M.; Kar, D.; Kasieczka, G.; Kogler, R.; Larkoski, A.; Loch, P.; Lopez Mateos, D.; Marzani, S.; Masetti, L.; Mateu, V.; Miller, D. W.; Mishra, K.; Nef, P.; Nordstrom, K.; Oliver Garcia, E.; Penwell, J.; Pilot, J.; Plehn, T.; Rappoccio, S.; Rizzi, A.; Rodrigo, G.; Safonov, A.; Salam, G. P.; Salt, J.; Schaetzel, S.; Schioppa, M.; Schmidt, A.; Scholtz, J.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwartz, M. D.; Segala, M.; Son, M.; Soyez, G.; Spannowsky, M.; Stewart, I.; Strom, D.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Takeuchi, M.; Thaler, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Tran, N. V.; Vermilion, C.; Villaplana, M.; Vos, M.; Wacker, J.; Walsh, J.

    2014-03-01

    This report of the BOOST2012 workshop presents the results of four working groups that studied key aspects of jet substructure. We discuss the potential of first-principle QCD calculations to yield a precise description of the substructure of jets and study the accuracy of state-of-the-art Monte Carlo tools. Limitations of the experiments' ability to resolve substructure are evaluated, with a focus on the impact of additional (pile-up) proton proton collisions on jet substructure performance in future LHC operating scenarios. A final section summarizes the lessons learnt from jet substructure analyses in searches for new physics in the production of boosted top quarks.

  5. Clays, common

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    Part of a special section on the state of industrial minerals in 1997. The state of the common clay industry worldwide for 1997 is discussed. Sales of common clay in the U.S. increased from 26.2 Mt in 1996 to an estimated 26.5 Mt in 1997. The amount of common clay and shale used to produce structural clay products in 1997 was estimated at 13.8 Mt.

  6. Analysis of structures with rotating, flexible substructures applied to rotorcraft aeroelasticity in GRASP. [General Rotorcraft Aeromechanical Stability Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, Dewey H.; Hopkins, A. Stewart; Kunz, Donald L.

    1987-01-01

    Application to the General Rotorcraft Aeromechanical Stability Program (GRASP) of new methodology for structural dynamic analysis, including substructuring, frames of reference, nodes, finite elements, and constraints, is discussed. The structure is decomposed into a hierarchy of substructures, and discrete relative motion between substructures is analyzed exactly. The finite element method is used to treat deformation of continua, and the library of finite elements includes a nonlinear beam element incorporating aeroelastic effects. Analytical bases for the aeroelastic beam element and the screw constraint are considered, and the important role of geometric stiffness in the formulation is shown.

  7. Studies of Substructure in Clusters of Galaxies: A Two-Dimensional Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriessler, J. R.

    1997-12-01

    I explore a procedure for the detection and quantification of substructure in the projected positions of galaxies in clusters. The method is first tested by application to the 56 well-studied galaxy clusters that make up the morphological sample of Dressler (1980). This method is then applied to a much larger sample of 119 Abell clusters which includes all Abell clusters with distance class <=4 and richness class >0 with | b | >30. Galaxy positions are obtained from digitized copies of the POSS I plates carried out by the Minnesota Automated Plate Scanner project. Adaptive-kernel contour maps are constructed for each sample cluster and possible secondary peaks identified within one Abell radius (1.5h(-1) Mpc with H_0=100h km s(-1) Mpc(-1) ) of the cluster center. Two tests for substructure, one parametric and one nonparametric, are then applied to the galaxy positions and the results are compared. After removal of background/foreground groups determined by applying a K-S test to the distribution of apparent galaxy magnitudes, 64% +/- 15% of the large cluster sample is found to contain significant substructure. Radial number-density profiles are calculated for each of the sample clusters using a maximum penalized likelihood estimator. An average core radius of 112 +/- 75h(-1) kpc is obtained. Inside of 1 Mpc, the space density is found to vary as rho ~ r({-1.9) +/- 0.3}. The large fraction of clusters with presently-detectable substructure, as well as the shallow space-density profiles, are used to argue that rich clusters of galaxies are still in the process of formation during the present epoch through accretion of smaller groups of galaxies and are not in general well described by equilibrium models. With the assumption that substructure in the projected galaxy distribution is erased on a time scale of 4 cluster crossing times, then Omega gtrsim 0.4. On the other hand, if Omega_0 ~ 0.2, as currently predicted, then substructure in the projected galaxy positions

  8. Student Commons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Student commons are no longer simply congregation spaces for students with time on their hands. They are integral to providing a welcoming environment and effective learning space for students. Many student commons have been transformed into spaces for socialization, an environment for alternative teaching methods, a forum for large group meetings…

  9. 1D coordination polymers with polychalcogenides as linkers between metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Kysliak, Oleksandr; Beck, Johannes

    2013-07-15

    The reactions of zinc metal with elemental selenium and selenium/sulfur mixtures in liquid ammonia or methylamine under solvothermal conditions in closed glass ampoules at 50 °C lead within some days specifically to [Zn(NH{sub 3}){sub 2}Se{sub 4}]{sub n} (1), [Zn(MeNH{sub 2}){sub 2}Se{sub 4}]{sub n} (2), [Zn(NH{sub 3}){sub 2}Se{sub 2.23}S{sub 1.77}]{sub n} (3). From MnCl{sub 2}, Rb{sub 2}Se and excess Se in n-butylamine [Mn({sup n}BuNH{sub 2}){sub 4}Se{sub 6}]{sub n} (4) is obtained after prolonged reaction time at ambient temperature. The compounds are sensitive towards air and loss of NH{sub 3} or the amine ligands. The crystal structures were determined by single crystal diffraction at low temperatures. As a common structural feature, all compounds represent 1D coordination polymers with polychalcogenide chains as linkers between the metal atoms and consist of infinite [M–Ch{sub m}–]{sub n} chains (M=Zn, Mn; Ch{sub m}=Se{sub 4}, (S/Se){sub 4}, Se{sub 6}). The Zn central atoms in 1–3 have tetrahedral coordination with two amine ligands, the Mn atoms in 4 have octahedral coordination with four amine ligands and cis position of the two Se atoms. Raman spectra of 1–3 show the stretching mode vibrations of the Ch{sub 4} groups. The observation of S–S, S–Se, and Se–Se vibration bands in the spectrum of 3 indicates the presence of mixed S/Se polyanions. An optical band gap of 1.86(5) eV was determined for 2 by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. - Graphical abstract: The reaction of Zn and Se in liquid methylamine yields dark red [Zn(NH{sub 2}CH{sub 3})Se{sub 4}], a 1D coordination polymer consisting of helical Zn–Se{sub 4}–Zn– chains. - Highlights: • A series of 1D coordination polymers consisting of metal amine complexes concatenated by polychalcogenide ions is presented. • Syntheses were performed as solvothermal reactions in liquid ammonia, liquid methylamine and n-butylamine. • Crystal structures are dominated by helices [M–Ch{sub m

  10. The Domain II S4-S5 Linker in Nav1.9: A Missense Mutation Enhances Activation, Impairs Fast Inactivation, and Produces Human Painful Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Han, Chongyang; Yang, Yang; de Greef, Bianca T A; Hoeijmakers, Janneke G J; Gerrits, Monique M; Verhamme, Camiel; Qu, Jian; Lauria, Giuseppe; Merkies, Ingemar S J; Faber, Catharina G; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Waxman, Stephen G

    2015-06-01

    Painful small fiber neuropathy is a challenging medical condition with no effective treatment. Non-genetic causes can be identified in one half of the subjects. Gain-of-function variants of sodium channels Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 have recently been associated with painful small fiber neuropathy. More recently, mutations of sodium channel Nav1.9 have been linked to human pain disorders, with two gain-of-function mutations found in patients with painful small fiber neuropathy. Here we report a novel Nav1.9 mutation, a glycine 699 substitution by arginine (G699R) in the domain II S4-S5 linker, identified in a patient with painful small fiber neuropathy. In this study, we assayed the mutant channels by voltage-clamp in superior cervical ganglion neurons, which do not produce endogenous Nav1.8 or Nav1.9 currents, and provide a novel platform where Nav1.9 is expressed at relatively high levels. Voltage-clamp analysis showed that the mutation hyperpolarizes (-10.1 mV) channel activation, depolarizes (+6.3 mV) steady-state fast inactivation, slows deactivation, and enhances ramp responses compared with wild-type Nav1.9 channels. Current-clamp analysis showed that the G699R mutant channels render dorsal root ganglion neurons hyperexcitable, via depolarized resting membrane potential, reduced current threshold and increased evoked firing. These observations show that the domain II S4-S5 linker plays an important role in the gating of Nav1.9 and demonstrates that a mutation in this linker is linked to a common pain disorder. PMID:25791876

  11. The Domain II S4-S5 Linker in Nav1.9: A Missense Mutation Enhances Activation, Impairs Fast Inactivation, and Produces Human Painful Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Han, Chongyang; Yang, Yang; de Greef, Bianca T A; Hoeijmakers, Janneke G J; Gerrits, Monique M; Verhamme, Camiel; Qu, Jian; Lauria, Giuseppe; Merkies, Ingemar S J; Faber, Catharina G; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Waxman, Stephen G

    2015-06-01

    Painful small fiber neuropathy is a challenging medical condition with no effective treatment. Non-genetic causes can be identified in one half of the subjects. Gain-of-function variants of sodium channels Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 have recently been associated with painful small fiber neuropathy. More recently, mutations of sodium channel Nav1.9 have been linked to human pain disorders, with two gain-of-function mutations found in patients with painful small fiber neuropathy. Here we report a novel Nav1.9 mutation, a glycine 699 substitution by arginine (G699R) in the domain II S4-S5 linker, identified in a patient with painful small fiber neuropathy. In this study, we assayed the mutant channels by voltage-clamp in superior cervical ganglion neurons, which do not produce endogenous Nav1.8 or Nav1.9 currents, and provide a novel platform where Nav1.9 is expressed at relatively high levels. Voltage-clamp analysis showed that the mutation hyperpolarizes (-10.1 mV) channel activation, depolarizes (+6.3 mV) steady-state fast inactivation, slows deactivation, and enhances ramp responses compared with wild-type Nav1.9 channels. Current-clamp analysis showed that the G699R mutant channels render dorsal root ganglion neurons hyperexcitable, via depolarized resting membrane potential, reduced current threshold and increased evoked firing. These observations show that the domain II S4-S5 linker plays an important role in the gating of Nav1.9 and demonstrates that a mutation in this linker is linked to a common pain disorder.

  12. The tumor suppressor proteins ASPP1 and ASPP2 interact with C-Nap1 and regulate centrosome linker reassembly.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yuqi; Wei, Youheng; Ma, Jian; Peng, Jingtao; Wumaier, Reziya; Shen, Suqin; Zhang, Pingzhao; Yu, Long

    2015-03-13

    Centrosome linker tethers interphase centrosomes together allowing them to function as a single microtubule organization center. The centrosome linker is disrupted at the onset of mitosis to ensure timely centrosome disjunction and bipolar spindle formation and is reassembled at the end of mitosis. While the mechanism controlling centrosome linker disassembly at early mitosis has been well explored, little is known about how the linker is subsequently reassembled before mitotic exit. Here we report that ASPP1 and ASPP2, two members of the apoptosis stimulating proteins of p53 (ASPP) family, are involved in centrosome linker reassembly. We showed that ASPP1/2 interacted with centrosome linker protein C-Nap1. Co-depletion of ASPP1 and ASPP2 inhibited re-association of C-Nap1 with centrosome at the end of mitosis. Moreover, ASPP1/2 facilitated the interaction between C-Nap1 and PP1α, and this interaction was significantly reduced by co-depletion of ASPP1/2. ASPP1/2 antagonized the NEK2A-mediated C-Nap1 Ser2417/2421 phosphorylation in a PP1-dependent manner. Co-depletion of ASPP1 and ASPP2 inhibited dephosphorylation of C-Nap1 (Ser2417/2421) at the end of mitosis. Based on these findings, we propose that ASPP1/2 act as PP1-targeting subunits to facilitate C-Nap1 dephosphorylation and centrosome linker reassembly at the end of mitosis. PMID:25660448

  13. Onset of grain filling is associated with a change in properties of linker histone variants in maize kernels.

    PubMed

    Kalamajka, Rainer; Finnie, Christine; Grasser, Klaus D

    2010-04-01

    In maize kernel development, the onset of grain-filling represents a major developmental switch that correlates with a massive reprogramming of gene expression. We have isolated chromosomal linker histones from developing maize kernels before (11 days after pollination, dap) and after (16 dap) initiation of storage synthesis. Six linker histone gene products were identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. A marked shift of around 4 pH units was observed for the linker histone spot pattern after 2D-gel electrophoresis when comparing the proteins of 11 and 16 dap kernels. The shift from acidic to more basic protein forms suggests a reduction in the level of post-translational modifications of linker histones during kernel development. Analysis of their DNA-binding affinity revealed that the different linker histone gene products bind double-stranded DNA with similar affinity. Interestingly, the linker histones isolated from 16 dap kernels consistently displayed a lower affinity for DNA than the proteins isolated from 11 dap kernels. These findings suggest that the affinity for DNA of the linker histones may be regulated by post-translational modification and that the reduction in DNA affinity could be involved in a more open chromatin during storage synthesis.

  14. Cellular organization and substructure measured using angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry.

    PubMed Central

    Wax, Adam; Yang, Changhuei; Backman, Vadim; Badizadegan, Kamran; Boone, Charles W; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Feld, Michael S

    2002-01-01

    We measure the organization and substructure of HT29 epithelial cells in a monolayer using angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry. This new technique probes cellular structure by measuring scattered light, as in flow cytometry, but offers an advantage in that the structure can be examined in situ, avoiding the need to disrupt the cell monolayer. We determine the size distribution of the cell nuclei by fitting measured light-scattering spectra to the predictions of Mie theory. In addition, we obtain information about the cellular organization and substructure by examining the spatial correlations within the monolayer. A remarkable finding is that the spatial correlations over small length scales take the form of an inverse power law, indicating the fractal nature of the packing of the subcellular structures. We also identify spatial correlations on a scale large compared with the size of a cell, indicating an overlying order within the monolayer. PMID:11916880

  15. Triptolide Induced Transcriptional Arrest is Associated with Changes in Nuclear Sub-Structure

    PubMed Central

    Leuenroth, Stephanie J.; Crews, Craig M.

    2008-01-01

    Triptolide, an active component of the medicinal herb, lei gong teng, is a potent anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory therapeutic. It potently inhibits NFκB transcriptional activation subsequent to DNA binding, although a precise mechanism is as yet unknown. Here, we report that triptolide also induces distinct nuclear sub-structural changes in HeLa cells. These changes in the nucleolus and nuclear speckles are reversible and dependent on both time and concentration. Furthermore, nuclear changes occurred within hours of triptolide treatment and were calcium and caspase independent. Rounding of nuclear speckles, an indication of transcriptional arrest was evident and was associated with a decrease in RNA Polymerase II CTD Ser2 phosphorylation. Additionally, the nucleolus disassembled and RNA Pol I activity declined subsequent to RNA Pol II inhibition. We therefore conclude that triptolide causes global transcriptional arrest as evidenced by inactivity of RNA polymerases I and II and the subsequent alteration in nuclear sub-structure. PMID:18593926

  16. A Substructure inside Spiral Arms, and a Mirror Image across the Galactic Meridian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallée, Jacques P.

    2016-04-01

    Though the galactic density wave theory is over 50 years old and is well known in science, it has been difficult to say whether it fits our own Milky Way disk. Here we show a substructure inside the spiral arms. This substructure is reversing with respect to the Galactic Meridian (longitude zero), and crosscuts of the arms at negative longitudes appear as mirror images of crosscuts of the arms at positive longitudes. Four lanes are delineated: a mid-arm (extended 12CO gas at the mid-arm, H i atoms), an in-between offset by about 100 pc (synchrotron, radio recombination lines), an in-between offset by about 200 pc (masers, colder dust), and an inner edge (hotter dust seen in mid-IR and near-IR).

  17. Visualization of podocyte substructure with structured illumination microscopy (SIM): a new approach to nephrotic disease

    PubMed Central

    Pullman, James M.; Nylk, Jonathan; Campbell, Elaine C.; Gunn-Moore, Frank J.; Prystowsky, Michael B.; Dholakia, Kishan

    2016-01-01

    A detailed microscopic analysis of renal podocyte substructure is essential to understand and diagnose nephrotic kidney disease. Currently only time consuming electron microscopy (EM) can resolve this substructure. We used structured illumination microscopy (SIM) to examine frozen sections of renal biopsies stained with an immunofluorescence marker for podocin, a protein localized to the perimeter of the podocyte foot processes and compared them with EM in both normal and nephrotic disease biopsies. SIM images of normal glomeruli revealed curvilinear patterns of podocin densely covering capillary walls similar to podocyte foot processes seen by EM. Podocin staining of all nephrotic disease biopsies were significantly different than normal, corresponding to and better visualizing effaced foot processes seen by EM. The findings support the first potential use of SIM in the diagnosis of nephrotic disease. PMID:26977341

  18. The extended stellar substructures of four metal-poor globular clusters in the Galactic bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Sang-Hyun; Sohn, Young-Jong

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the stellar density substructures around four metal-poor globular clusters (NGC 6266, NGC 6626, NGC 6642, and NGC 6723) in the Galactic bulge. Wide-field near-infrared (JHK s ) imaging data were obtained from WFCAM of UKIRT telescope. Field stars contamination around the globular clusters was reduced by using a statistical weighted filtering algorithm. Tidal stripping stellar substructures in the form of tidal tail (NGC 6266 and NGC 6626) or small density lobes/chunk (NGC 6642 and NGC 6723) were found around the four globular clusters in the two-dimensional density contour maps. We also find the overdensity features, which deviate from the theoretical models, in the outer region of radial density profiles. The observed results imply that the four globular clusters have experienced a strong tidal force or the bulge/disk shock effect of the Galaxy.

  19. Serous cutaneous glands in anurans: Fourier transform analysis of the repeating secretory granule substructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosi, D.; Delfino, G.; Quercioli, F.

    2013-03-01

    A combined transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transform analysis has been performed on the secretory granules storing active peptides/proteins in serous cutaneous glands of n = 12 anuran species. Previous TEM investigation showed that the granules are provided with remarkable repeating substructures based on discrete subunits, arranged into a consistent framework. Furthermore, TEM findings revealed that this recurrent arrangement is acquired during a prolonged post-Golgian (or maturational) processing that affects the secretory product. Maturation leads to a variety of patterns depending on the degree of subunit clustering. This variety of recurrent patterns has been plotted into a range of frequency spectra. Through this quantitative approach, we found that the varying granule substructure can be reduced to a single mechanism of peptide/protein aggregation.

  20. The Aspen Framework for Dark Matter Substructure Inference from Strong Gravitational Lensing Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; Keeton, Charles R.

    2016-01-01

    The properties of the dark matter particle or particles lead to different small scale halo populations, distributions, and evolution over cosmic time. We introduce a new method for characterizing the properties of substructure within galaxies through the power spectrum of potential fluctuations, and demonstrate how complete sets of multiwavelength imaging and time domain observations can be processed directly to infer all facets of the strong gravitational lensing components and source properties, including the dark matter substructure power spectrum constraints. We are able to take advantage of analysis parallels with cosmic background radiation techniques, and furthermore demonstrate how this technique, dubbed The Aspen Framework, reduces to the long-standing approach of working with reduced or derived observable quantities in lensing.

  1. Characterization Method for 3D Substructure of Nuclear Cell Based on Orthogonal Phase Images

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Ying; Liang, Minjie; Hua, Tingting; Xu, Yuanyuan; Xin, Zhiduo; Wang, Yawei

    2015-01-01

    A set of optical models associated with blood cells are introduced in this paper. All of these models are made up of different parts possessing symmetries. The wrapped phase images as well as the unwrapped ones from two orthogonal directions related to some of these models are obtained by simulation technique. Because the phase mutation occurs on the boundary between nucleus and cytoplasm as well as on the boundary between cytoplasm and environment medium, the equation of inflexion curve is introduced to describe the size, morphology, and substructure of the nuclear cell based on the analysis of the phase features of the model. Furthermore, a mononuclear cell model is discussed as an example to verify this method. The simulation result shows that characterization with inflexion curve based on orthogonal phase images could describe the substructure of the cells availably, which may provide a new way to identify the typical biological cells quickly without scanning. PMID:26355740

  2. Dynamics of flexible multibody systems using loaded-interface substructure synthesis approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, S. P.; Liu, A. Q.; Liew, K. M.

    1994-12-01

    A simple numerical method for dynamic simulation of multibody systems consisting of rigid and flexible bodies is presented. This paper investigates the multibody systems with inertia properties of flexible components that undergo large angular rotations. The equation of motion is derived using the finite element/Lagrange formulation. A substructure synthesis method is employed to reduce the number of elastic coordinates of the multibody system. A modification to the traditional boundary conditions at the free interface has been incorporated. An example is given to demonstrate the accuracy of the computed results which obtained from this new free interface method. This example has been analyzed using the present free interface method and also the finite element method in order to compare the efficient and accuracy of both methods. It was shown that the new free interface substructure synthesis method provides accurate results even with lesser elements.

  3. Visualization of podocyte substructure with structured illumination microscopy (SIM): a new approach to nephrotic disease.

    PubMed

    Pullman, James M; Nylk, Jonathan; Campbell, Elaine C; Gunn-Moore, Frank J; Prystowsky, Michael B; Dholakia, Kishan

    2016-02-01

    A detailed microscopic analysis of renal podocyte substructure is essential to understand and diagnose nephrotic kidney disease. Currently only time consuming electron microscopy (EM) can resolve this substructure. We used structured illumination microscopy (SIM) to examine frozen sections of renal biopsies stained with an immunofluorescence marker for podocin, a protein localized to the perimeter of the podocyte foot processes and compared them with EM in both normal and nephrotic disease biopsies. SIM images of normal glomeruli revealed curvilinear patterns of podocin densely covering capillary walls similar to podocyte foot processes seen by EM. Podocin staining of all nephrotic disease biopsies were significantly different than normal, corresponding to and better visualizing effaced foot processes seen by EM. The findings support the first potential use of SIM in the diagnosis of nephrotic disease. PMID:26977341

  4. Interference substructure of above-threshold ionization peaks in the stabilization regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyota, Koudai; Tolstikhin, Oleg I.; Morishita, Toru; Watanabe, Shinichi

    2008-09-01

    The photoelectron spectra produced in the photodetachment of H- (treated in the single-active-electron approximation) by strong high-frequency laser pulses with adequately chosen laser parameters in the stabilization regime are theoretically studied for elliptic polarization over an extended parameter range. An oscillating substructure in the above-threshold ionization peaks is observed, which confirms similar findings in the one-dimensional (1D) [K. Toyota , Phys. Rev. A 76, 043418 (2007)] and 3D calculations for linear polarization [O. I. Tolstikhin, Phys. Rev. A 77, 032712 (2008)]. The mechanism is an interference between the photoelectron wave packets created in the rising and falling parts of the pulse which is specific to the stabilization regime. We thus conclude that this interference substructure is robust for any polarization and over a wide range of the laser parameters, and hence should be observable experimentally.

  5. Aromatic fumaronitrile core-based donor-linker-acceptor-linker-donor (D-pi-A-pi-D) compounds: synthesis and photophysical properties.

    PubMed

    Panthi, Krishna; Adhikari, Ravi M; Kinstle, Thomas H

    2010-04-01

    A new class of aromatic fumaronitrile core-based compounds with different donors and linkers has been synthesized and well characterized. Compounds 1 and 2 have indole and 2-phenylindole groups as electron donors, respectively. Compounds 3 and 4 have a diphenylamino group as the electron donor, and compound 5 has a 3,6-di-tert-butylcarbazole group as an electron donor. These compounds absorb in the blue-to-green region and emit in the blue-to-red region depending on the electron donor, linker, and solvents. The quantum yields of fluorescence of these compounds in solution are measured and found to be moderate, but in solid states, they are high. These compounds display strong emission solvatochromism that is reflected by a large shift in their fluorescence emission maxima on changing the solvents. This change is accompanied by a successive decrease in fluorescence intensity. The fluorescence lifetimes of these compounds are measured in different solvent and found to vary from <1 to 7 ns. Optical switching of these compounds with solvents, concentration, and excitation energy have been studied. The correlation between the functional group and optical properties has been established to some extent. The ability of these compounds to function as colorimetric and luminescence pH sensors is demonstrated with color changes and luminescence switching upon the addition of trifluoroacetic acid. The potentiality of these compounds for application in optoelectronics has been optically assessed.

  6. 3dLOGO: a web server for the identification, analysis and use of conserved protein substructures.

    PubMed

    Via, Allegra; Peluso, Daniele; Gherardini, Pier Federico; de Rinaldis, Emanuele; Colombo, Teresa; Ausiello, Gabriele; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela

    2007-07-01

    3dLOGO is a web server for the identification and analysis of conserved protein 3D substructures. Given a set of residues in a PDB (Protein Data Bank) chain, the server detects the matching substructure(s) in a set of user-provided protein structures, generates a multiple structure alignment centered on the input substructures and highlights other residues whose structural conservation becomes evident after the defined superposition. Conserved residues are proposed to the user for highlighting functional areas, deriving refined structural motifs or building sequence patterns. Residue structural conservation can be visualized through an expressly designed Java application, 3dProLogo, which is a 3D implementation of a sequence logo. The 3dLOGO server, with related documentation, is available at http://3dlogo.uniroma2.it/ PMID:17488847

  7. Thinking outside the ROCs: Designing decorrelated taggers (DDT) for jet substructure

    DOE PAGES

    Dolen, James; Harris, Philip; Marzani, Simone; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Tran, Nhan

    2016-05-26

    Here, we explore the scale-dependence and correlations of jet substructure observables to improve upon existing techniques in the identification of highly Lorentz-boosted objects. Modified observables are designed to remove correlations from existing theoretically well-understood observables, providing practical advantages for experimental measurements and searches for new phenomena. We study such observables in W jet tagging and provide recommendations for observables based on considerations beyond signal and background efficiencies.

  8. Thinking outside the ROCs: Designing Decorrelated Taggers (DDT) for jet substructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolen, James; Harris, Philip; Marzani, Simone; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Tran, Nhan

    2016-05-01

    We explore the scale-dependence and correlations of jet substructure observables to improve upon existing techniques in the identification of highly Lorentz-boosted objects. Modified observables are designed to remove correlations from existing theoretically well-understood observables, providing practical advantages for experimental measurements and searches for new phenomena. We study such observables in W jet tagging and provide recommendations for observables based on considerations beyond signal and background efficiencies.

  9. Detection of Lensing Substructure Using ALMA Observations of the Dusty Galaxy SDP.81

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hezaveh, Yashar D.; Dalal, Neal; Marrone, Daniel P.; Mao, Yao-Yuan; Morningstar, Warren; Wen, Di; Blandford, Roger D.; Carlstrom, John E.; Fassnacht, Christopher D.; Holder, Gilbert P.; Kemball, Athol; Marshall, Philip J.; Murray, Norman; Perreault Levasseur, Laurence; Vieira, Joaquin D.; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2016-05-01

    We study the abundance of substructure in the matter density near galaxies using ALMA Science Verification observations of the strong lensing system SDP.81. We present a method to measure the abundance of subhalos around galaxies using interferometric observations of gravitational lenses. Using simulated ALMA observations we explore the effects of various systematics, including antenna phase errors and source priors, and show how such errors may be measured or marginalized. We apply our formalism to ALMA observations of SDP.81. We find evidence for the presence of a M = 108.96±0.12 M ⊙ subhalo near one of the images, with a significance of 6.9σ in a joint fit to data from bands 6 and 7; the effect of the subhalo is also detected in both bands individually. We also derive constraints on the abundance of dark matter (DM) subhalos down to M ˜ 2 × 107 M ⊙, pushing down to the mass regime of the smallest detected satellites in the Local Group, where there are significant discrepancies between the observed population of luminous galaxies and predicted DM subhalos. We find hints of additional substructure, warranting further study using the full SDP.81 data set (including, for example, the spectroscopic imaging of the lensed carbon monoxide emission). We compare the results of this search to the predictions of ΛCDM halos, and find that given current uncertainties in the host halo properties of SDP.81, our measurements of substructure are consistent with theoretical expectations. Observations of larger samples of gravitational lenses with ALMA should be able to improve the constraints on the abundance of galactic substructure.

  10. Detection of Lensing Substructure Using Alma Observations of the Dusty Galaxy SDP.81

    DOE PAGES

    Hezaveh, Yashar D.; Dalal, Neal; Marrone, Daniel P.; Mao, Yao-Yuan; Morningstar, Warren; Wen, Di; Blandford, Roger D.; Carlstrom, John E.; Fassnacht, Christopher D.; Holder, Gilbert P.; et al

    2016-05-19

    We study the abundance of substructure in the matter density near galaxies using ALMA Science Verification observations of the strong lensing system SDP.81. We present a method to measure the abundance of subhalos around galaxies using interferometric observations of gravitational lenses. Using simulated ALMA observations we explore the effects of various systematics, including antenna phase errors and source priors, and show how such errors may be measured or marginalized. We apply our formalism to ALMA observations of SDP.81. We find evidence for the presence of a M = 108.96±0.12 M⊙ subhalo near one of the images, with a significance ofmore » 6.9σ in a joint fit to data from bands 6 and 7; the effect of the subhalo is also detected in both bands individually. We also derive constraints on the abundance of dark matter (DM) subhalos down to M ~ 2 × 107 M⊙, pushing down to the mass regime of the smallest detected satellites in the Local Group, where there are significant discrepancies between the observed population of luminous galaxies and predicted DM subhalos. We find hints of additional substructure, warranting further study using the full SDP.81 data set (including, for example, the spectroscopic imaging of the lensed carbon monoxide emission). We compare the results of this search to the predictions of ΛCDM halos, and find that given current uncertainties in the host halo properties of SDP.81, our measurements of substructure are consistent with theoretical expectations. Finally, observations of larger samples of gravitational lenses with ALMA should be able to improve the constraints on the abundance of galactic substructure.« less

  11. Common cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... been tried for colds, such as vitamin C, zinc supplements, and echinacea. Talk to your health care ... nih.gov/pubmed/22962927 . Singh M, Das RR. Zinc for the common cold. Cochrane Database of Systematic ...

  12. cis-Apa: a practical linker for the microwave-assisted preparation of cyclic pseudopeptides via RCM cyclative cleavage.

    PubMed

    Baron, Alice; Verdié, Pascal; Martinez, Jean; Lamaty, Frédéric

    2011-02-01

    A new linker cis-5-aminopent-3-enoic acid (cis-Apa) was prepared for the synthesis of cyclic pseudopeptides by cyclization-cleavage by using ring-closing methatesis (RCM). We developed a new synthetic pathway for the preparation of the cis-Apa linker that was tested in the cyclization-cleavage process of different RGD peptide sequences. Different macrocyclic peptidomimetics were prepared by using this integrated microwave-assisted method, showing that the readily available cis-Apa amino acid is well adapted as a linker in the cyclization-cleavage process.

  13. Calibration of TDR Test Probe for Measuring Moisture in the Body of the Railway Substructure and its Subgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobeš, Peter

    2015-12-01

    In the introduction of the paper there is characterized a way of monitoring the moisture in the railway substructure in the experimental stand, which is a part of the experimental workplace of the Department of Railway Engineering and Track Management. A substantial part of the paper is devoted to the calibration of TDR test probe for selected rock materials as a basic prerequisite for the determination of the actual moisture in the body of the railway substructure and subgrade.

  14. RAG-3D: A search tool for RNA 3D substructures

    DOE PAGES

    Zahran, Mai; Sevim Bayrak, Cigdem; Elmetwaly, Shereef; Schlick, Tamar

    2015-08-24

    In this study, to address many challenges in RNA structure/function prediction, the characterization of RNA's modular architectural units is required. Using the RNA-As-Graphs (RAG) database, we have previously explored the existence of secondary structure (2D) submotifs within larger RNA structures. Here we present RAG-3D—a dataset of RNA tertiary (3D) structures and substructures plus a web-based search tool—designed to exploit graph representations of RNAs for the goal of searching for similar 3D structural fragments. The objects in RAG-3D consist of 3D structures translated into 3D graphs, cataloged based on the connectivity between their secondary structure elements. Each graph is additionally describedmore » in terms of its subgraph building blocks. The RAG-3D search tool then compares a query RNA 3D structure to those in the database to obtain structurally similar structures and substructures. This comparison reveals conserved 3D RNA features and thus may suggest functional connections. Though RNA search programs based on similarity in sequence, 2D, and/or 3D structural elements are available, our graph-based search tool may be advantageous for illuminating similarities that are not obvious; using motifs rather than sequence space also reduces search times considerably. Ultimately, such substructuring could be useful for RNA 3D structure prediction, structure/function inference and inverse folding.« less

  15. RAG-3D: A search tool for RNA 3D substructures

    SciTech Connect

    Zahran, Mai; Sevim Bayrak, Cigdem; Elmetwaly, Shereef; Schlick, Tamar

    2015-08-24

    In this study, to address many challenges in RNA structure/function prediction, the characterization of RNA's modular architectural units is required. Using the RNA-As-Graphs (RAG) database, we have previously explored the existence of secondary structure (2D) submotifs within larger RNA structures. Here we present RAG-3D—a dataset of RNA tertiary (3D) structures and substructures plus a web-based search tool—designed to exploit graph representations of RNAs for the goal of searching for similar 3D structural fragments. The objects in RAG-3D consist of 3D structures translated into 3D graphs, cataloged based on the connectivity between their secondary structure elements. Each graph is additionally described in terms of its subgraph building blocks. The RAG-3D search tool then compares a query RNA 3D structure to those in the database to obtain structurally similar structures and substructures. This comparison reveals conserved 3D RNA features and thus may suggest functional connections. Though RNA search programs based on similarity in sequence, 2D, and/or 3D structural elements are available, our graph-based search tool may be advantageous for illuminating similarities that are not obvious; using motifs rather than sequence space also reduces search times considerably. Ultimately, such substructuring could be useful for RNA 3D structure prediction, structure/function inference and inverse folding.

  16. The CaterPillar project - Exploring the dark matter substructure of Milky Way Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frebel, Anna; Zukin, Phillip; Dooley, Gregory

    2012-09-01

    Galaxies grow hierarchically by accreting smaller objects. The abundance of dark matter substructure in simulated Milky Way like galaxies shows evidence for this assembly process. The luminous satellites of our Galaxy are believed to be the visible counterparts to some of these substructures. Existing high-resolution galactic halo simulations show that the variations in substructure distributions and other properties among Milky Way like halos today are significant (a factor of at least 2-3). This, coupled with a few number of high resolution simulated halos, makes the interpretation of many results cosmic variance limited. In order to quantify the scatter in halo properties in a statistically meaningful way, we have initiated the CaterPillar project to perform zoom-In simulations of at least 60 highly resolved galactic size halos. Here we present our overall science goals. We aim to quantify the uniqueness of the Milky Way, to study the role that dwarf galaxies play in shaping large galaxies, to determine whether there really is a missing satellite problem, and to examine the origin of the old, metal-poor stellar halo of the Galaxy.

  17. DISCOVERY OF SUBSTRUCTURE IN THE SCATTER-BROADENED IMAGE OF SGR A*

    SciTech Connect

    Gwinn, C. R.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Soglasnov, V. A.

    2014-10-10

    We have detected substructure within the smooth scattering disk of the celebrated Galactic center radio source Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*). We observed this structure at 1.3 cm wavelength with the Very Long Baseline Array together with the Green Bank Telescope, on baselines of up to 3000 km, long enough to completely resolve the average scattering disk. Such structure is predicted theoretically as a consequence of refraction by large-scale plasma fluctuations in the interstellar medium. Along with the much-studied θ{sub d}∝λ{sup 2} scaling of angular broadening θ{sub d} with observing wavelength λ, our observations indicate that the spectrum of interstellar turbulence is shallow with an inner scale larger than 300 km. The substructure is consistent with an intrinsic size of about 1 mas at 1.3 cm wavelength, as inferred from deconvolution of the average scattering. Further observations of the substructure can set stronger constraints on the properties of scattering material and on the intrinsic size of Sgr A*. These constraints will guide our understanding of the effects of scatter broadening and the emission physics near the black hole in images with the Event Horizon Telescope at millimeter wavelengths.

  18. Acoustic harmonic generation from fatigue-generated dislocation substructures in copper single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apple, T. M.; Cantrell, J. H.; Amaro, C. M.; Mayer, C. R.; Yost, W. T.; Agnew, S. R.; Howe, J. M.

    2013-07-01

    Dislocations generated during cyclic loading of metals self-organize into substructures that produce substantial changes in the nonlinear response. The nonlinearity is quantified by the material nonlinearity parameter ? extracted from acoustic harmonic generation measurements. Measurements of ? on copper single crystals oriented for single-slip ([1 2 3] loading axis) and fatigued in plastic strain control are compared to calculations of ? obtained from the Cantrell model for which measured values of model parameters associated with the substructures are required. Transmission electron microscopy measurements of the volume fractions of veins and persistent slip bands, dislocation loop lengths, dipole heights and the densities of primary and secondary dislocations in the fatigue-generated substructures are obtained for input into the model calculations. The model predictions agree with the values observed experimentally. In particular, the experimental data show an increase in ? proportional to ? where ? is the cumulative plastic strain and m is 0.7 and 0.4, respectively, for acoustic wave propagation along the ? and ? crystal axes. Such dependence is consistent with the Cantrell model and at variance with models, based on assumed variations in the third-order elastic constants, which predict an exponential dependence on ? .

  19. RAG-3D: a search tool for RNA 3D substructures

    PubMed Central

    Zahran, Mai; Sevim Bayrak, Cigdem; Elmetwaly, Shereef; Schlick, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    To address many challenges in RNA structure/function prediction, the characterization of RNA's modular architectural units is required. Using the RNA-As-Graphs (RAG) database, we have previously explored the existence of secondary structure (2D) submotifs within larger RNA structures. Here we present RAG-3D—a dataset of RNA tertiary (3D) structures and substructures plus a web-based search tool—designed to exploit graph representations of RNAs for the goal of searching for similar 3D structural fragments. The objects in RAG-3D consist of 3D structures translated into 3D graphs, cataloged based on the connectivity between their secondary structure elements. Each graph is additionally described in terms of its subgraph building blocks. The RAG-3D search tool then compares a query RNA 3D structure to those in the database to obtain structurally similar structures and substructures. This comparison reveals conserved 3D RNA features and thus may suggest functional connections. Though RNA search programs based on similarity in sequence, 2D, and/or 3D structural elements are available, our graph-based search tool may be advantageous for illuminating similarities that are not obvious; using motifs rather than sequence space also reduces search times considerably. Ultimately, such substructuring could be useful for RNA 3D structure prediction, structure/function inference and inverse folding. PMID:26304547

  20. A hybrid system identification methodology for wireless structural health monitoring systems based on dynamic substructuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragos, Kosmas; Smarsly, Kay

    2016-04-01

    System identification has been employed in numerous structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. Traditional system identification methods usually rely on centralized processing of structural response data to extract information on structural parameters. However, in wireless SHM systems the centralized processing of structural response data introduces a significant communication bottleneck. Exploiting the merits of decentralization and on-board processing power of wireless SHM systems, many system identification methods have been successfully implemented in wireless sensor networks. While several system identification approaches for wireless SHM systems have been proposed, little attention has been paid to obtaining information on the physical parameters (e.g. stiffness, damping) of the monitored structure. This paper presents a hybrid system identification methodology suitable for wireless sensor networks based on the principles of component mode synthesis (dynamic substructuring). A numerical model of the monitored structure is embedded into the wireless sensor nodes in a distributed manner, i.e. the entire model is segmented into sub-models, each embedded into one sensor node corresponding to the substructure the sensor node is assigned to. The parameters of each sub-model are estimated by extracting local mode shapes and by applying the equations of the Craig-Bampton method on dynamic substructuring. The proposed methodology is validated in a laboratory test conducted on a four-story frame structure to demonstrate the ability of the methodology to yield accurate estimates of stiffness parameters. Finally, the test results are discussed and an outlook on future research directions is provided.

  1. A New Channel for Detecting Dark Matter Substructure in Galaxies: Gravitational Lens Time Delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeton, Charles R.; Moustakas, Leonidas A.

    2009-07-01

    We show that dark matter substructure in galaxy-scale halos perturbs the time delays between images in strong gravitational lens systems. The variance of the effect depends on the subhalo mass function, scaling as the product of the substructure mass fraction, and a characteristic mass of subhalos (namely langm 2rang/langmrang). Time delay perturbations therefore complement gravitational lens flux ratio anomalies and astrometric perturbations by measuring a different moment of the subhalo mass function. Unlike flux ratio anomalies, "time delay millilensing" is unaffected by dust extinction or stellar microlensing in the lens galaxy. Furthermore, we show that time delay ratios are immune to the radial profile degeneracy that usually plagues lens modeling. We lay out a mathematical theory of time delay perturbations and find it to be tractable and attractive. We predict that in "cusp" lenses with close triplets of images, substructure may change the arrival-time order of the images (compared with smooth models). We discuss the possibility that this effect has already been observed in RX J1131-1231.

  2. Modeling the Role of Dislocation Substructure During Class M and Exponential Creep. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Iskovitz, Ilana Seiden; Freed, A. D.

    1995-01-01

    The different substructures that form in the power-law and exponential creep regimes for single phase crystalline materials under various conditions of stress, temperature and strain are reviewed. The microstructure is correlated both qualitatively and quantitatively with power-law and exponential creep as well as with steady state and non-steady state deformation behavior. These observations suggest that creep is influenced by a complex interaction between several elements of the microstructure, such as dislocations, cells and subgrains. The stability of the creep substructure is examined in both of these creep regimes during stress and temperature change experiments. These observations are rationalized on the basis of a phenomenological model, where normal primary creep is interpreted as a series of constant structure exponential creep rate-stress relationships. The implications of this viewpoint on the magnitude of the stress exponent and steady state behavior are discussed. A theory is developed to predict the macroscopic creep behavior of a single phase material using quantitative microstructural data. In this technique the thermally activated deformation mechanisms proposed by dislocation physics are interlinked with a previously developed multiphase, three-dimensional. dislocation substructure creep model. This procedure leads to several coupled differential equations interrelating macroscopic creep plasticity with microstructural evolution.

  3. Constraining dark matter sub-structure with the dynamics of astrophysical systems

    SciTech Connect

    González-Morales, Alma X.; Valenzuela, Octavio; Aguilar, Luis A. E-mail: octavio@astro.unam.mx

    2013-03-01

    The accuracy of the measurements of some astrophysical dynamical systems allows to constrain the existence of incredibly small gravitational perturbations. In particular, the internal Solar System dynamics (planets, Earth-Moon) opens up the possibility, for the first time, to prove the abundance, mass and size, of dark sub-structures at the Earth vicinity. We find that adopting the standard dark matter density, its local distribution can be composed by sub-solar mass halos with no currently measurable dynamical consequences, regardless of the mini-halo fraction. On the other hand, it is possible to exclude the presence of dark streams with linear mass densities higher than λ{sub st} > 10{sup −10}M{sub ☉}/AU (about the Earth mass spread along the diameter of the SS up to the Kuiper belt). In addition, we review the dynamics of wide binaries inside the dwarf spheroidal galaxies in the Milky Way. The dynamics of such kind of binaries seem to be compatible with the presence of a huge fraction of dark sub-structure, thus their existence is not a sharp discriminant of the dark matter hypothesis as been claimed before. However, there are regimes where the constraints from different astrophysical systems may reveal the sub-structure mass function cut-off scale.

  4. Change of deformation characteristics and dislocation substructure of nonferrous metals under influence of magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagulyaev, D. V.; Konovalov, S. V.; Shlyarov, V. V.; Anuchina, E. A.; Komissarova, I. A.; Gromov, V. E.

    2016-09-01

    The objects of the study were polycrystalline copper of M00b grade and commercially pure titanium BT1-0. Microindentation was carried out on the samples of titanium BT1-0 in the initial state, immediately after magnetic field exposure of 0.4 T and after certain time intervals. The defect substructure of cooper samples M00b, subjected to loading to failure in the creep mode under the influence of magnetic field of 0.35 T and without it, was investigated by the methods of electron diffraction microscopy. It was revealed that the effect of magnetic field exposure on commercially pure titanium BT1-0 leads to the decrease in microhardness with the subsequent stabilization during the time that depends on the processing parameters. And the effect of the magnetic field exposure on copper during the process of creeping results in the redistribution of dislocation substructure types. Also, there are changes in quantitative characteristics of dislocation substructures.

  5. Factorization for groomed jet substructure beyond the next-to-leading logarithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frye, Christopher; Larkoski, Andrew J.; Schwartz, Matthew D.; Yan, Kai

    2016-07-01

    Jet grooming algorithms are widely used in experimental analyses at hadron colliders to remove contaminating radiation from within jets. While the algorithms perform a great service to the experiments, their intricate algorithmic structure and multiple parameters has frustrated precision theoretic understanding. In this paper, we demonstrate that one particular groomer called soft drop actually makes precision jet substructure easier. In particular, we derive a factorization formula for a large class of soft drop jet substructure observables, including jet mass. The essential observation that allows for this factorization is that, without the soft wide-angle radiation groomed by soft drop, all singular contributions are collinear. The simplicity and universality of the collinear limit in QCD allows us to show that to all orders, the normalized differential cross section has no contributions from non-global logarithms. It is also independent of process, up to the relative fraction of quark and gluon jets. In fact, soft drop allows us to define this fraction precisely. The factorization theorem also explains why soft drop observables are less sensitive to hadronization than their ungroomed counterparts. Using the factorization theorem, we resum the soft drop jet mass to next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy. This requires calculating some clustering effects that are closely related to corresponding effects found in jet veto calculations. We match our resummed calculation to fixed order results for both e + e - → dijets and pp → Z + j events, producing the first jet substructure predictions (groomed or ungroomed) to this accuracy for the LHC.

  6. Model validation of the Sandia 34-Meter Test Bed Turbine using substructure modal-testing

    SciTech Connect

    Carne, T.G.; Lauffer, J.P.; Gomez, A.J.; Ashwill, T.D.

    1989-01-01

    The Sandia 34-Meter Test Bed Turbine is a vertical-axis wind turbine, thirty-four meters in diameter, designed to provide a test-bed for research in aerodynamics, structures and control. In order to design a large wind turbine, knowledge of the modal frequencies and mode shapes is essential for predicting structural response. During the design, analytical or finite element models are utilized for estimates of these modal parameters. However, when hardware becomes available, modal testing can be used to verify or update the models. The concept of substructure modal testing was developed for the Sandia 34-Meter Test Bed in order to more fully evaluate the accuracy of the finite element model. Instead of performing only one test on the entire turbine, separate tests and analyses were performed on major substructures of the turbine, including three separate blade sections, the tower supported by the guy cables, and the entire turbine. The results were then compared to analytical predictions from the finite element models of the substructures and the entire turbine. 8 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Connecting two proteins using a fusion alpha helix stabilized by a chemical cross linker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Woo Hyeon; Lee, Haerim; Song, Dong Hyun; Eom, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Sun Chang; Lee, Hee-Seung; Lee, Hayyoung; Lee, Jie-Oh

    2016-03-01

    Building a sophisticated protein nano-assembly requires a method for linking protein components in a predictable and stable structure. Most of the cross linkers available have flexible spacers. Because of this, the linked hybrids have significant structural flexibility and the relative structure between their two components is largely unpredictable. Here we describe a method of connecting two proteins via a `fusion α helix' formed by joining two pre-existing helices into a single extended helix. Because simple ligation of two helices does not guarantee the formation of a continuous helix, we used EY-CBS, a synthetic cross linker that has been shown to react selectively with cysteines in α-helices, to stabilize the connecting helix. Formation and stabilization of the fusion helix was confirmed by determining the crystal structures of the fusion proteins with and without bound EY-CBS. Our method should be widely applicable for linking protein building blocks to generate predictable structures.

  8. Application of linker technique to trap transiently interacting protein complexes for structural studies

    PubMed Central

    Reddy Chichili, Vishnu Priyanka; Kumar, Veerendra; Sivaraman, J.

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are key events controlling several biological processes. We have developed and employed a method to trap transiently interacting protein complexes for structural studies using glycine-rich linkers to fuse interacting partners, one of which is unstructured. Initial steps involve isothermal titration calorimetry to identify the minimum binding region of the unstructured protein in its interaction with its stable binding partner. This is followed by computational analysis to identify the approximate site of the interaction and to design an appropriate linker length. Subsequently, fused constructs are generated and characterized using size exclusion chromatography and dynamic light scattering experiments. The structure of the chimeric protein is then solved by crystallization, and validated both in vitro and in vivo by substituting key interacting residues of the full length, unlinked proteins with alanine. This protocol offers the opportunity to study crucial and currently unattainable transient protein interactions involved in various biological processes. PMID:26985443

  9. Dynein motors: How AAA+ ring opening and closing coordinates microtubule binding and linker movement.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Helgo

    2015-05-01

    Dyneins are a family of motor proteins that move along the microtubule. Motility is generated in the motor domain, which consists of a ring of six AAA+ (ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities) domains, the linker and the microtubule-binding domain (MTBD). The cyclic ATP-hydrolysis in the AAA+ ring causes the remodelling of the linker, which creates the necessary force for movement. The production of force has to be synchronized with cycles of microtubule detachment and rebinding to efficiently create movement along the microtubule. The analysis of four dynein motor domain crystal structures in the essay presented here provides evidence that this crucial coordination is carried out by open/closed AAA+ ring conformations.

  10. Destabilization of the Outer and Inner Mitochondrial Membranes by Core and Linker Histones

    PubMed Central

    Cascone, Annunziata; Bruelle, Celine; Lindholm, Dan; Bernardi, Paolo; Eriksson, Ove

    2012-01-01

    Background Extensive DNA damage leads to apoptosis. Histones play a central role in DNA damage sensing and may mediate signals of genotoxic damage to cytosolic effectors including mitochondria. Methodology/Principal Findings We have investigated the effects of histones on mitochondrial function and membrane integrity. We demonstrate that both linker histone H1 and core histones H2A, H2B, H3, and H4 bind strongly to isolated mitochondria. All histones caused a rapid and massive release of the pro-apoptotic intermembrane space proteins cytochrome c and Smac/Diablo, indicating that they permeabilize the outer mitochondrial membrane. In addition, linker histone H1, but not core histones, permeabilized the inner membrane with a collapse of the membrane potential, release of pyridine nucleotides, and mitochondrial fragmentation. Conclusions We conclude that histones destabilize the mitochondrial membranes, a mechanism that may convey genotoxic signals to mitochondria and promote apoptosis following DNA damage. PMID:22523586

  11. The H1 linker histones: multifunctional proteins beyond the nucleosomal core particle

    PubMed Central

    Hergeth, Sonja P; Schneider, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The linker histone H1 family members are a key component of chromatin and bind to the nucleosomal core particle around the DNA entry and exit sites. H1 can stabilize both nucleosome structure and higher-order chromatin architecture. In general, H1 molecules consist of a central globular domain with more flexible tail regions at both their N- and C-terminal ends. The existence of multiple H1 subtypes and a large variety of posttranslational modifications brings about a considerable degree of complexity and makes studying this protein family challenging. Here, we review recent progress in understanding the function of linker histones and their subtypes beyond their role as merely structural chromatin components. We summarize current findings on the role of H1 in heterochromatin formation, transcriptional regulation and embryogenesis with a focus on H1 subtypes and their specific modifications. PMID:26474902

  12. Linking two DNA duplexes with a rigid linker for DNA nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Tashiro, Ryu; Iwamoto, Masahiro; Morinaga, Hironobu; Emura, Tomoko; Hidaka, Kumi; Endo, Masayuki; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    DNA has recently emerged as a promising material for the construction of nanosized architectures. Chemically modified DNA has been suggested to be an important component of such architectural building blocks. We have designed and synthesized a novel H-shaped DNA oligonucleotide dimer that is cross-linked with a structurally rigid linker composed of phenylene and ethynylene groups. A rotatable DNA unit was constructed through the self-assembly of this H-shaped DNA component and two complementary DNA oligonucleotides. In addition to the rotatable unit, a locked DNA unit containing two H-shaped DNA components was also constructed. As an example of an extended locked structure, a hexagonal DNA origami dimer and oligomer were constructed by using H-shaped DNA as linkers. PMID:26130712

  13. Connecting two proteins using a fusion alpha helix stabilized by a chemical cross linker

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Woo Hyeon; Lee, Haerim; Song, Dong Hyun; Eom, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Sun Chang; Lee, Hee-Seung; Lee, Hayyoung; Lee, Jie-Oh

    2016-01-01

    Building a sophisticated protein nano-assembly requires a method for linking protein components in a predictable and stable structure. Most of the cross linkers available have flexible spacers. Because of this, the linked hybrids have significant structural flexibility and the relative structure between their two components is largely unpredictable. Here we describe a method of connecting two proteins via a ‘fusion α helix' formed by joining two pre-existing helices into a single extended helix. Because simple ligation of two helices does not guarantee the formation of a continuous helix, we used EY-CBS, a synthetic cross linker that has been shown to react selectively with cysteines in α-helices, to stabilize the connecting helix. Formation and stabilization of the fusion helix was confirmed by determining the crystal structures of the fusion proteins with and without bound EY-CBS. Our method should be widely applicable for linking protein building blocks to generate predictable structures. PMID:26980593

  14. Gold nanoparticles functionalised with fast water exchanging Gd3+ chelates: linker effects on the relaxivity.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Miguel F; Gonçalves, Janaina; Mousavi, Bibimaryam; Prata, Maria I M; Rodrigues, Sérgio P J; Calle, Daniel; López-Larrubia, Pilar; Cerdan, Sebastian; Rodrigues, Tiago B; Ferreira, Paula M; Helm, Lothar; Martins, José A; Geraldes, Carlos F G C

    2015-03-01

    The relaxivity displayed by Gd(3+) chelates immobilized onto gold nanoparticles is the result of the complex interplay between the nanoparticle size, the water exchange rate and the chelate structure. In this work we study the effect of the length of ω-thioalkyl linkers, anchoring fast water exchanging Gd(3+) chelates onto gold nanoparticles, on the relaxivity of the immobilized chelates. Gold nanoparticles functionalized with Gd(3+) chelates of mercaptoundecanoyl and lipoyl amide conjugates of the DO3A-N-(α-amino)propionate chelator were prepared and studied as potential CA for MRI. High relaxivities per chelate, of the order of magnitude 28-38 mM(-1) s(-1) (30 MHz, 25 °C), were attained thanks to simultaneous optimization of the rotational correlation time and of the water exchange rate. Fast local rotational motions of the immobilized chelates around connecting linkers (internal flexibility) still limit the attainable relaxivity. The degree of internal flexibility of the immobilized chelates seems not to be correlated with the length of the connecting linkers. Biodistribution and MRI studies in mice suggest that the in vivo behavior of the gold nanoparticles was determined mainly by size. Small nanoparticles (HD = 3.9 nm) undergo fast renal clearance and avoidance of the RES organs while larger nanoparticles (HD = 4.8 nm) undergo predominantly hepatobiliary excretion. High relaxivities, allied to chelate and nanoparticle stability and fast renal clearance in vivo suggest that functionalized gold nanoparticles hold great potential for further investigation as MRI contrast agents. This study contributes to a better understanding of the effect of linker length on the relaxivity of gold nanoparticles functionalized with Gd(3+) complexes. It is a relevant contribution towards "design rules" for nanostructures functionalized with Gd(3+) chelates as Contrast Agents for MRI and multimodal imaging.

  15. DFLpred: High-throughput prediction of disordered flexible linker regions in protein sequences

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fanchi; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Disordered flexible linkers (DFLs) are disordered regions that serve as flexible linkers/spacers in multi-domain proteins or between structured constituents in domains. They are different from flexible linkers/residues because they are disordered and longer. Availability of experimentally annotated DFLs provides an opportunity to build high-throughput computational predictors of these regions from protein sequences. To date, there are no computational methods that directly predict DFLs and they can be found only indirectly by filtering predicted flexible residues with predictions of disorder. Results: We conceptualized, developed and empirically assessed a first-of-its-kind sequence-based predictor of DFLs, DFLpred. This method outputs propensity to form DFLs for each residue in the input sequence. DFLpred uses a small set of empirically selected features that quantify propensities to form certain secondary structures, disordered regions and structured regions, which are processed by a fast linear model. Our high-throughput predictor can be used on the whole-proteome scale; it needs <1 h to predict entire proteome on a single CPU. When assessed on an independent test dataset with low sequence-identity proteins, it secures area under the receiver operating characteristic curve equal 0.715 and outperforms existing alternatives that include methods for the prediction of flexible linkers, flexible residues, intrinsically disordered residues and various combinations of these methods. Prediction on the complete human proteome reveals that about 10% of proteins have a large content of over 30% DFL residues. We also estimate that about 6000 DFL regions are long with ≥30 consecutive residues. Availability and implementation: http://biomine.ece.ualberta.ca/DFLpred/. Contact: lkurgan@vcu.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27307636

  16. Comparison of anti-EGFR-Fab’ conjugated immunoliposomes modified with two different conjugation linkers for siRNa delivery in SMMC-7721 cells

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Li; Zhang, Yingying; Ma, Lulu; Jing, Xiaolong; Ke, Xingfa; Lian, Jianhao; Zhao, Qiang; Yan, Bo; Zhang, Jinfeng; Yao, Jianzhong; Chen, Jianming

    2013-01-01

    Background Targeted liposome-polycation-DNA complex (LPD), mainly conjugated with antibodies using functionalized PEG derivatives, is an effective nanovector for systemic delivery of small interference RNA (siRNA). However, there are few studies reporting the effect of different conjugation linkers on LPD for gene silencing. To clarify the influence of antibody conjugation linkers on LPD, we prepared two different immunoliposomes to deliver siRNA in which DSPE-PEG-COOH and DSPE-PEG-MAL, the commonly used PEG derivative linkers, were used to conjugate anti-EGFR Fab’ with the liposome. Methods First, 600 μg of anti-EGFR Fab’ was conjugated with 28.35 μL of a micelle solution containing DSPE-PEG-MAL or DSPE-PEG-COOH, and then post inserted into the prepared LPD. Various liposome parameters, including particle size, zeta potential, stability, and encapsulation efficiency were evaluated, and the targeting ability and gene silencing activity of TLPD-FPC (DSPE-PEG-COOH conjugated with Fab’) was compared with that of TLPD-FPM (DSPE-PEG-MAL conjugated with Fab’) in SMMC-7721 hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Results There was no significant difference in particle size between the two TLPDs, but the zeta potential was significantly different. Further, although there was no significant difference in siRNA encapsulation efficiency, cell viability, or serum stability between TLPD-FPM and TLPD-FPC, cellular uptake of TLPD-FPM was significantly greater than that of TLPD-FPC in EGFR-overexpressing SMMC-7721 cells. The luciferase gene silencing efficiency of TLPD-FPM was approximately three-fold high than that of TLPD-FPC. Conclusion Different conjugation linkers whereby antibodies are conjugated with LPD can affect the physicochemical properties of LPD and antibody conjugation efficiency, thus directly affecting the gene silencing effect of TLPD. Immunoliposomes prepared by DSPE-PEG-MAL conjugation with anti-EGFR Fab’ are more effective than TLPD containing DSPE

  17. Data from computational analysis of the peptide linkers in the MocR bacterial transcriptional regulators.

    PubMed

    Angelaccio, Sebastiana; Milano, Teresa; Tramonti, Angela; Di Salvo, Martino Luigi; Contestabile, Roberto; Pascarella, Stefano

    2016-12-01

    Detailed data from statistical analyses of the structural properties of the inter-domain linker peptides of the bacterial regulators of the family MocR are herein reported. MocR regulators are a recently discovered subfamily of bacterial regulators possessing an N-terminal domain, 60 residue long on average, folded as the winged-helix-turn-helix architecture responsible for DNA recognition and binding, and a large C-terminal domain (350 residue on average) that belongs to the fold type-I pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) dependent enzymes such aspartate aminotransferase. Data show the distribution of several structural characteristics of the linkers taken from bacterial species from five different phyla, namely Actinobacteria, Alpha-, Beta-, Gammaproteobacteria and Firmicutes. Interpretation and discussion of reported data refer to the article "Structural properties of the linkers connecting the N- and C- terminal domains in the MocR bacterial transcriptional regulators" (T. Milano, S. Angelaccio, A. Tramonti, M. L. Di Salvo, R. Contestabile, S. Pascarella, 2016) [1]. PMID:27668276

  18. Dishevelled is a NEK2 kinase substrate controlling dynamics of centrosomal linker proteins.

    PubMed

    Cervenka, Igor; Valnohova, Jana; Bernatik, Ondrej; Harnos, Jakub; Radsetoulal, Matej; Sedova, Katerina; Hanakova, Katerina; Potesil, David; Sedlackova, Miroslava; Salasova, Alena; Steinhart, Zachary; Angers, Stephane; Schulte, Gunnar; Hampl, Ales; Zdrahal, Zbynek; Bryja, Vitezslav

    2016-08-16

    Dishevelled (DVL) is a key scaffolding protein and a branching point in Wnt signaling pathways. Here, we present conclusive evidence that DVL regulates the centrosomal cycle. We demonstrate that DVL dishevelled and axin (DIX) domain, but not DIX domain-mediated multimerization, is essential for DVL's centrosomal localization. DVL accumulates during the cell cycle and associates with NIMA-related kinase 2 (NEK2), which is able to phosphorylate DVL at a multitude of residues, as detected by a set of novel phospho-specific antibodies. This creates interfaces for efficient binding to CDK5 regulatory subunit-associated protein 2 (CDK5RAP2) and centrosomal Nek2-associated protein 1 (C-NAP1), two proteins of the centrosomal linker. Displacement of DVL from the centrosome and its release into the cytoplasm on NEK2 phosphorylation is coupled to the removal of linker proteins, an event necessary for centrosomal separation and proper formation of the mitotic spindle. Lack of DVL prevents NEK2-controlled dissolution of loose centrosomal linker and subsequent centrosomal separation. Increased DVL levels, in contrast, sequester centrosomal NEK2 and mimic monopolar spindle defects induced by a dominant negative version of this kinase. Our study thus uncovers molecular crosstalk between centrosome and Wnt signaling. PMID:27486244

  19. Design of CID-Cleavable Protein Cross-linkers: Identical Mass Modifications for Simpler Sequence Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kandur, Wynne V.; Kao, Athit; Vellucci, Danielle; Huang, Lan; Rychnovsky, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    The cross-linking Mass Spectrometry (XL-MS) technique has enormous potential for studying the interactions between proteins, and it can provide detailed structural information about the interaction interfaces in large protein complexes. Such information has been difficult to obtain by conventional structural methods. One of the primary impediments to the wider use of the XL-MS technique is the extreme challenge in sequencing cross-linked peptides because of their complex fragmentation patterns in MS. A recent innovation is the development of MS-cleavable cross-linkers, which allows direct sequencing of component peptides for facile identification. Sulfoxides are an intriguing class of thermally-cleavable compounds that have been shown to fragment selectively during low-energy collisional induced dissociation (CID) analysis. Current CID-cleavable cross-linkers create fragmentation patterns in MS2 of multiple peaks for each cross-linked peptide. Reducing the complexity of the fragmentation pattern in MS2 facilitates subsequent MS3 sequencing of the cross-linked peptides. The first authentic identical mass linker (IML) has now been designed, prepared, and evaluated. Multistage tandem mass spectrometry (MSn) analysis has demonstrated that the IML cross-linked peptides indeed yield one peak per peptide constituent in MS2 as predicted, thus allowing effective and sensitive MS3 analysis for unambiguous identification. Selective fragmentation for IML cross-linked peptides from the 19S proteasome complex was observed, providing a proof-of-concept demonstration for XL-MS studies on protein complexes. PMID:26269432

  20. Hydrophilic Linkers and Polar Contacts Affect Aggregation of FG Repeat Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Dölker, Nicole; Zachariae, Ulrich; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Transport of large proteins into the nucleus involves two events, binding of the cargo protein to a transport receptor in the cytoplasm and passage of the cargo-transporter complex through the selective permeability barrier of the nuclear pore complex. The permeability barrier is formed by largely disordered polypeptides, each containing a number of conserved hydrophobic phenylalanine-glycine (FG) sequence motifs, connected by hydrophilic linkers of varying sequence (FG nups). How the motifs interact to form the permeability barrier, however, is not yet known. We have, therefore, carried out molecular dynamics simulations on various model FG repeat peptides to study the aggregation propensity of FG nups and the specific roles of the hydrophobic FG motifs and the hydrophilic linkers. Our simulations show spontaneous aggregation of the model nups into hydrated aggregates, which exhibit structural features assumed to be part of the permeability barrier. Our simulations suggest that short β-sheets are an important structural feature of the aggregates and that Phe residues are sufficiently exposed to allow rapid binding of transport receptors. A surprisingly large influence of the amino acid composition of the hydrophilic linkers on aggregation is seen, as well as a major contribution of hydrogen-bonding patterns. PMID:20513410

  1. Tuning of coordination behavior of thiosulfate ion by organic linkers in cadmium thiosulfate compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Avijit Kumar

    2016-12-01

    Three new inorganic-organic hybrid molecular cadmium thiosulfate compounds, [Cd(S2O3) (C3H10N2)2], I, [Cd2(C10H8N2)4(S2O3)2](C10H8N2)·2H2O, II and [Cd2(C10H8N2)2(H2O)2(S2O3)2](C10H8N2)·2H2O, III have been synthesized using different organic linkers as co-ligand and characterized them thoroughly. The compounds have connectivity between the Cd-centers, the thiosulfate units and the organic ligands forming molecular (zero-dimensional) structures. The ligating behaviors of thiosulfate unit have been triggered by organic linkers. The coordination number of thiosulfate ion to the metal ion can also be enhanced by varying the aromatic ligands instead of aliphatic ligand. The molecular structures are stabilized and formed three-dimensional packing structures through extensive hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions. The free aromatic bipyridine ligands are observed in the crystal structures II and III. The unique type of π⋯π interactions play an important role for the stabilization of these two structures. Theoretical studies also revealed that the value of π⋯π interactions are comparable with the classical hydrogen bond interactions. The present study illustrates the usefulness of the organic linkers for the structural modifications in inorganic-organic hybrid compounds.

  2. Triazole bridges as versatile linkers in electron donor-acceptor conjugates

    PubMed Central

    de Miguel, Gustavo; Wielopolski, Mateusz; Schuster, David I.; Fazio, Michael A; Lee, Olivia P.; Haley, Christopher K.; Ortiz, Angy L.; Echegoyen, Luis; Clark, Timothy; Guldi, Dirk M.

    2011-01-01

    Aromatic triazoles have been frequently used as π-conjugated linkers in intramolecular electron transfer processes. To gain a deeper understanding of the electron mediating function of triazoles, we have synthesized a family of new triazole-based electron donor-acceptor conjugates. We have connected porphyrins and fullerenes through a central triazole moiety – (ZnP-Tri-C60) – each with a single change in their connection through the linker. An extensive photophysical and computational investigation reveals that the electron transfer dynamics – charge separation and charge recombination – in the different ZnP-Tri-C60 conjugates reflect a significant influence of the connectivity at the triazole linker. Except for m4m-ZnP-Tri-C60 17, the conjugates exhibit through-bond electron transfer with varying rate constants. Since the through-bond distance is nearly equal in the ZnP-Tri-C60 conjugates, the variation in charge separation and charge recombination dynamics is mainly associated with the electronic properties of the conjugates, including orbital energies, electron affinity, and the energies of the excited states. The changes of the electronic couplings are, in turn, a consequence of the different connectivity patterns at the triazole moieties. PMID:21702513

  3. The human histone chaperone sNASP interacts with linker and core histones through distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huanyu; Ge, Zhongqi; Walsh, Scott T R; Parthun, Mark R

    2012-01-01

    Somatic nuclear autoantigenic sperm protein (sNASP) is a human homolog of the N1/N2 family of histone chaperones. sNASP contains the domain structure characteristic of this family, which includes a large acidic patch flanked by several tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) motifs. sNASP possesses a unique binding specificity in that it forms specific complexes with both histone H1 and histones H3/H4. Based on the binding affinities of sNASP variants to histones H1, H3.3, H4 and H3.3/H4 complexes, sNASP uses distinct structural domains to interact with linker and core histones. For example, one of the acidic patches of sNASP was essential for linker histone binding but not for core histone interactions. The fourth TPR of sNASP played a critical role in interactions with histone H3/H4 complexes, but did not influence histone H1 binding. Finally, analysis of cellular proteins demonstrated that sNASP existed in distinct complexes that contained either linker or core histones.

  4. PDP-CON: prediction of domain/linker residues in protein sequences using a consensus approach.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Piyali; Basu, Subhadip; Zubek, Julian; Kundu, Mahantapas; Nasipuri, Mita; Plewczynski, Dariusz

    2016-04-01

    The prediction of domain/linker residues in protein sequences is a crucial task in the functional classification of proteins, homology-based protein structure prediction, and high-throughput structural genomics. In this work, a novel consensus-based machine-learning technique was applied for residue-level prediction of the domain/linker annotations in protein sequences using ordered/disordered regions along protein chains and a set of physicochemical properties. Six different classifiers-decision tree, Gaussian naïve Bayes, linear discriminant analysis, support vector machine, random forest, and multilayer perceptron-were exhaustively explored for the residue-level prediction of domain/linker regions. The protein sequences from the curated CATH database were used for training and cross-validation experiments. Test results obtained by applying the developed PDP-CON tool to the mutually exclusive, independent proteins of the CASP-8, CASP-9, and CASP-10 databases are reported. An n-star quality consensus approach was used to combine the results yielded by different classifiers. The average PDP-CON accuracy and F-measure values for the CASP targets were found to be 0.86 and 0.91, respectively. The dataset, source code, and all supplementary materials for this work are available at https://cmaterju.org/cmaterbioinfo/ for noncommercial use.

  5. A reactive peptidic linker for self-assembling hybrid quantum dot-DNA bioconjugates.

    PubMed

    Medintz, Igor L; Berti, Lorenzo; Pons, Thomas; Grimes, Amy F; English, Douglas S; Alessandrini, Andrea; Facci, Paolo; Mattoussi, Hedi

    2007-06-01

    Self-assembly of proteins, peptides, DNA, and other biomolecules to semiconductor quantum dots (QD) is an attractive bioconjugation route that can circumvent many of the problems associated with covalent chemistry and subsequent purification. Polyhistidine sequences have been shown to facilitate self-assembly of proteins and peptides to ZnS-overcoated CdSe QDs via complexation to unoccupied coordination metal sites on the nanocrystal surface. We describe the synthesis and characterization of a thiol-reactive hexahistidine peptidic linker that can be chemically attached to thiolated-DNA oligomers and mediate their self-assembly to CdSe-ZnS core-shell QDs. The self-assembly of hexahistidine-appended DNA to QDs is probed with gel electrophoresis and fluorescence resonance energy transfer techniques, and the results confirm high-affinity conjugate formation with control over the average molar ratio of DNA assembled per QD. To demonstrate the potential of this reactive peptide linker strategy, a prototype QD-DNA-dye molecular beacon is self-assembled and tested against both specific and nonspecific target DNAs. This conjugation route is potentially versatile, as altering the reactivity of the peptide linker may allow targeting of different functional groups such as amines and facilitate self-assembly of other nanoparticle-biomolecule structures.

  6. Two distinct promoter elements in the human rRNA gene identified by linker scanning mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Haltiner, M M; Smale, S T; Tjian, R

    1986-01-01

    A cell-free RNA polymerase I transcription system was used to evaluate the transcription efficiency of 21 linker scanning mutations that span the human rRNA gene promoter. Our analysis revealed the presence of two major control elements, designated the core and upstream elements, that affect the level of transcription initiation. The core element extends from -45 to +18 relative to the RNA start site, and transcription is severely affected (up to 100-fold) by linker scanning mutations in this region. Linker scanning and deletion mutations in the upstream element, located between nucleotides -156 and -107, cause a three- to fivefold reduction in transcription. Under certain reaction conditions, such as the presence of a high ratio of protein to template or supplementation of the reaction with partially purified protein fractions, sequences upstream of the core element can have an even greater effect (20- to 50-fold) on RNA polymerase I transcription. Primer extension analysis showed that RNA synthesized from all of these mutant templates is initiated at the correct in vivo start site. To examine the functional relationship between the core and the upstream region, mutant promoters were constructed that alter the orientation, distance, or multiplicity of these control elements relative to each other. The upstream control element appears to function in only one orientation, and its position relative to the core is constrained within a fairly narrow region. Moreover, multiple core elements in close proximity to each other have an inhibitory effect on transcription. Images PMID:3785147

  7. Prediction of carcinogenicity for diverse chemicals based on substructure grouping and SVM modeling.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Kazutoshi; Lučić, Bono; Amić, Dragan; Kurita, Takio; Kaihara, Mikio; Onodera, Natsuo; Suzuki, Takahiro

    2010-11-01

    The Carcinogenicity Reliability Database (CRDB) was constructed by collecting experimental carcinogenicity data on about 1,500 chemicals from six sources, including IARC, and NTP databases, and then by ranking their reliabilities into six unified categories. A wide variety of 911 organic chemicals were selected from the database for QSAR modeling, and 1,504 kinds of different molecular descriptors were calculated, based on their 3D molecular structures as modeled by the Dragon software. Positive (carcinogenic) and negative (non-carcinogenic) chemicals containing various substructures were counted using atom and functional group count descriptors, and the statistical significance of ratios of positives to negatives was tested for those substructures. Very few were judged to be strongly related to carcinogenicity, among substructures known to be responsible for carcinogens as revealed from biomedical studies. In order to develop QSAR models for the prediction of the carcinogenicities of a wide variety of chemicals with a satisfactory performance level, the relationship between the carcinogenicity data with improved reliability and a subset of significant descriptors selected from 1,504 Dragon descriptors was analyzed with a support vector machine (SVM) method: the classification function (SVC) for weighted data in LIBSVM program was used to classify chemicals into two carcinogenic categories (positive or negative), where weights were set depending on the reliabilities of the carcinogenicity data. The quality and stability of the models presented were tested by performing a dual cross-validation procedure. A single SVM model as the first step was developed for all the 911 chemicals using 250 selected descriptors, achieving an overall accuracy level, i.e., positive and negative correct estimate, of about 70%. In order to improve the accuracy of the final model, the 911 chemicals were classified into 20 mutually overlapping subgroups according to contained substructures

  8. How to remain nonfolded and pliable: the linkers in modular α-amylases as a case study.

    PubMed

    Feller, Georges; Dehareng, Dominique; Lage, Jean-Luc Da

    2011-07-01

    The primary structure of linkers in a new class of modular α-amylases constitutes a paradigm of the structural basis that allows a polypeptide to remain nonfolded, extended and pliable. Unfolding is mediated through a depletion of hydrophobic residues and an enrichment of hydrophilic residues, amongst which Ser and Thr are over-represented. An extended and flexible conformation is promoted by the sequential arrangement of Pro and Gly, which are the most abundant residues in these linkers. This is complemented by charge repulsion, charge clustering and disulfide-bridged loops. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest the existence of conformational transitions resulting from a transient and localized hydrophobic collapse, arising from the peculiar composition of the linkers. Accordingly, these linkers should not be regarded as fully disordered, but rather as possessing various discrete structural patterns allowing them to fulfill their biological function as a free energy reservoir for concerted motions between structured domains.

  9. Incorporation of different bridge length linkers in enzyme and its use in the preparation of enzyme conjugates for immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Shrivastav, Tulsidas G

    2004-01-01

    An enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP), as a starting material, has been used to introduce different bridge length linkers, and its use in the preparation of enzyme conjugates for immunoassay is described. HRP was conjugated to adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH), gamma amino butyric acid (GABA), followed by ADH and 6-amino caproic acid (6ACA) followed by ADH. The different bridge length linkers-incorporated enzyme was coupled to a carboxylic derivative of cortisol. Four enzyme conjugates with different bridge length were prepared, such as cortisol-21-hemisuccinate-HRP (cortisol-21-HS-HRP), cortisol-21-HS-ADH-HRP, cortisol-21-HS-ADH-GABA-HRP, and cortisol-21-HS-ADH-6ACA-HRP. The influence of linker on sensitivity and specificity of the cortisol assay was studied. The study revealed that incorporation of a linker between hapten and enzyme increases the sensitivity and specificity of the assay. PMID:15461384

  10. Endothelial dysfunction exacerbates renal interstitial fibrosis through enhancing fibroblast Smad3 linker phosphorylation in the mouse obstructed kidney.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu Bo Yang; Qu, Xinli; Li, Xueling; Nikolic-Paterson, David J; Li, Jinhua

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and enhanced transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/Smad3 signalling are common features of progressive renal fibrosis. This study investigated a potential link between these mechanisms. In unilateral ureteric obstruction (UUO) we observed an acute (6 hr) down-regulation of nitric oxide synthase 3 (NOS3/eNOS) levels and increased phosphorylation of the linker region of Smad3 at T179 and S208 in Smad3/JNK complexes. These events preceded Smad3 C-terminal domain phosphorylation and the induction of myofibroblast proliferation at 48 hrs. Mice deficient in NOS3 showed enhanced myofibroblast proliferation and collagen accumulation compared to wild type mice in a 7 day UUO model. This was associated with enhanced phosphorylation of Smad3 T179 and S208 by 92% and 88%, respectively, whereas Smad3-C-terminal phosphorylation was not affected. Resolvin D1 (RvD1) can suppress renal fibrosis in the UUO model, and further analysis herein showed that RvD1 protected against endothelial dysfunction and suppressed Smad3/JNK complex formation with a consequent reduction in phosphorylation of Smad3 T179 and S208 by 78% and 65%, respectively, while Smad3 C-terminal phosphorylation was unaltered. In vitro, conditioned media from mouse microvascular endothelial cells (MMEC) treated with a general inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (L-NAME) augmented the proliferation and collagen production of renal fibroblasts (NRK49F cells) compared to control MMEC media and this was associated with increased phosphorylation of JNK and Smad3 T179 and S208, whereas Smad3-C-terminal domain phosphorylation was unaffected. The addition of RvD1 to L-NAME treated MMEC abrogated these effects of the conditioned media on renal fibroblasts. Finally, Smad3 T179/V and S208/A mutations significantly inhibit TGF-β1 induced up-regulation collagen I promoter. In conclusion, these data suggest that endothelial dysfunction can exacerbate renal interstitial fibrosis through increased fibroblast

  11. Measurement of Residual Flexibility for Substructures Having Prominent Flexible Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinker, Michael L.; Bookout, Paul S.

    1994-01-01

    Verification of a dynamic model of a constrained structure requires a modal survey test of the physical structure and subsequent modification of the model to obtain the best agreement possible with test data. Constrained-boundary or fixed-base testing has historically been the most common approach for verifying constrained mathematical models, since the boundary conditions of the test article are designed to match the actual constraints in service. However, there are difficulties involved with fixed-base testing, in some cases making the approach impractical. It is not possible to conduct a truly fixed-base test due to coupling between the test article and the fixture. In addition, it is often difficult to accurately simulate the actual boundary constraints, and the cost of designing and constructing the fixture may be prohibitive. For use when fixed-base testing proves impractical or undesirable, alternate free-boundary test methods have been investigated, including the residual flexibility technique. The residual flexibility approach has been treated analytically in considerable detail and has had limited frequency response measurements for the method. This concern is well-justified for a number of reasons. First, residual flexibilities are very small numbers, typically on the order of 1.0E-6 in/lb for translational diagonal terms, and orders of magnitude smaller for off-diagonal values. This poses difficulty in obtaining accurate and noise-free measurements, especially for points removed from the excitation source. A second difficulty encountered in residual measurements lies in obtaining a clean residual function in the process of subtracting synthesized modal data from a measured response function. Inaccuracies occur since modes are not subtracted exactly, but only to the accuracy of the curve fits for each mode; these errors are compounded with increasing distance from the excitation point. In this paper, the residual flexibility method is applied to a simple

  12. Amino acid residues required for fast Na(+)-channel inactivation: charge neutralizations and deletions in the III-IV linker.

    PubMed Central

    Patton, D E; West, J W; Catterall, W A; Goldin, A L

    1992-01-01

    The cytoplasmic linker connecting domains III and IV of the voltage-gated Na+ channel is thought to be involved in fast inactivation. This linker is highly conserved among the various Na+ channels that have been cloned. In the rat brain IIA Na+ channel, it consists of 53 amino acids of which 15 are charged. To investigate the role of this linker in inactivation, we mutated all 15 of the charged residues in various combinations. All but one of these mutants expressed functional channels, and all of these inactivated with kinetics similar to the wild-type channel. We then constructed a series of deletion mutations that span the III-IV linker to determine if any region of the linker is essential for fast inactivation. Deletion of the first 10 amino acids completely eliminated fast inactivation in the channel, whereas deletion of the last 10 amino acids had no substantial effect on inactivation. These results demonstrate that some residues in the amino end of the III-IV linker are critical for fast Na(+)-channel inactivation, but that the highly conserved positively charged and paired negatively charged residues are not essential. PMID:1332059

  13. Hydrogen physisorption on metal-organic framework linkers and metalated linkers: a computational study of the factors that control binding strength.

    PubMed

    Tsivion, Ehud; Long, Jeffrey R; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2014-12-24

    In order for hydrogen gas to be used as a fuel, it must be stored in sufficient quantity on board the vehicle. Efforts are being made to increase the hydrogen storage capabilities of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) by introducing unsaturated metal sites into their linking element(s), as hydrogen adsorption centers. In order to devise successful hydrogen storage strategies there is a need for a fundamental understanding of the weak and elusive hydrogen physisorption interaction. Here we report our findings from the investigation of the weak intermolecular interactions of adsorbed hydrogen molecules on MOF-linkers by using cluster models. Since physical interactions such as dispersion and polarization have a major contribution to attraction energy, our approach is to analyze the adsorption interaction using energy decomposition analysis (EDA) that distinguishes the contribution of the physical interactions from the charge-transfer (CT) "chemical" interaction. Surprisingly, it is found that CT from the adsorbent to the σ*(H2) orbital is present in all studied complexes and can contribute up to approximately -2 kJ/mol to the interaction. When metal ions are present, donation from the σ(H2) → metal Rydberg-like orbital, along with the adsorbent → σ*(H2) contribution, can contribute from -2 to -10 kJ/mol, depending on the coordination mode. To reach a sufficient adsorption enthalpy for practical usage, the hydrogen molecule must be substantially polarized. Ultimately, the ability of the metalated linker to polarize the hydrogen molecule is highly dependent on the geometry of the metal ion coordination site where a strong electrostatic dipole or quadrupole moment is required.

  14. Making the Common Good Common

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    How are independent schools to be useful to the wider world? Beyond their common commitment to educate their students for meaningful lives in service of the greater good, can they educate a broader constituency and, thus, share their resources and skills more broadly? Their answers to this question will be shaped by their independence. Any…

  15. Expression and identification of the ADF-linker-3-1E gene of Eimeria acervulina of chicken.

    PubMed

    Yuelan, Zhao; Yiwei, Liu; Liyuan, Liu; Yue, Zhao; Wenbo, Cao; Yongzhan, Bao; Jianhua, Qin

    2016-04-01

    Coccidiosis is a widely distributed disease with higher mortality and morbidity, which is caused by several species of protozoan parasites belonging to the genus Eimeria and recognized as a serious challenge for the poultry industry. This research was conducted to construct the recombinant plasmid pET32a(+)-ADF-linker-3-1E of Eimeria acervulina (E. acervulina) of the chicken and test the bioactivity of the ADF-linker-3-1E protein. The ADF-linker-3-1E gene of E. acervulina of the chicken was cloned by splicing by overlap extension by the polymerase chain reaction (SOE-PCR) and then inserted into the pET32a(+) to construct the recombinant plasmid pET32a(+)-ADF-linker-3-1E. The recombinant plasmid was transformed into Escherichia coli Rosetta (DE3) competent cells and then induced by IPTG (0.6 mmol/L). The expressed product in the culture medium was identified by the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The bioactivity of the ADF-linker-3-1E protein was tested by Western blotting. The result showed that the amplified ADF-linker-3-1E gene was about 1346 bp. The PCR amplification with the recombinant plasmid pET-32a(+)-ADF-linker-3-1E as a template resulted in a special band of 1346 bp. The digested products resulted in two fragments of 1346 bp target fragment and 5.9 kb pET-32a(+)-vector fragment. The results indicated that the ADF-linker3-1E gene was successfully inserted into the pET-32a(+)-vector. The expressed products in the culture medium resulted in a single band of approximately 54.8 kDa by SDS-PAGE. Western blotting analysis indicated that the recombinant protein could be reacted specifically with His-Tag(2A8) Mouse mAb. This study indicated that the ADF-linker-3-1E protein with good bioactivity was successfully obtained, which laid a foundation for the exploitation of the nuclear vaccine by using the ADF-linker-3-1E protein. PMID:26767375

  16. KAT-7 science verification: cold gas, star formation, and substructure in the nearby Antlia Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Kelley M.; Jarrett, T. H.; Carignan, Claude; Passmoor, Sean S.; Goedhart, Sharmila

    2015-09-01

    The Antlia Cluster is a nearby, dynamically young structure, and its proximity provides a valuable opportunity for detailed study of galaxy and group accretion on to clusters. We present a deep H I mosaic completed as part of spectral line commissioning of the Karoo Array Telescope (KAT-7), and identify infrared counterparts from the Widefield Infrared Survey Explorer extended source catalogue to study neutral atomic gas content and star formation within the cluster. We detect 37 cluster members out to a radius of ˜0.9 Mpc with M_{H I}>5× 10^7 M⊙. Of these, 35 are new H I detections, 27 do not have previous spectroscopic redshift measurements, and one is the Compton thick Seyfert II, NGC 3281, which we detect in H I absorption. The H I galaxies lie beyond the X-ray-emitting region 200 kpc from the cluster centre and have experienced ram pressure stripping out to at least 600 kpc. At larger radii, they are distributed asymmetrically suggesting accretion from surrounding filaments. Combining H I with optical redshifts, we perform a detailed dynamical analysis of the internal substructure, identify large infalling groups, and present the first compilation of the large-scale distribution of H I and star-forming galaxies within the cluster. We find that elliptical galaxy NGC 3268 is at the centre of the oldest substructure and argue that NGC 3258 and its companion population are more recent arrivals. Through the presence of H I and ongoing star formation, we rank substructures with respect to their relative time since accretion on to Antlia.

  17. The Extraordinary Amount of Substructure in the Hubble Frontier Fields Cluster Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauzac, M.; Eckert, D.; Schwinn, J.; Harvey, D.; Baugh, C. M.; Robertson, A.; Bose, S.; Massey, R.; Owers, M.; Ebeling, H.; Shan, H. Y.; Jullo, E.; Kneib, J.-P.; Richard, J.; Atek, H.; Clément, B.; Egami, E.; Israel, H.; Knowles, K.; Limousin, M.; Natarajan, P.; Rexroth, M.; Taylor, P.; Tchernin, C.

    2016-09-01

    We present a joint optical/X-ray analysis of the massive galaxy cluster Abell 2744 (z=0.308). Our strong- and weak-lensing analysis within the central region of the cluster, i.e., at R < 1 Mpc from the brightest cluster galaxy, reveals eight substructures, including the main core. All of these dark-matter halos are detected with a significance of at least 5σ and feature masses ranging from 0.5 to 1.4× 1014M⊙ within R < 150 kpc. Merten et al. (2011) and Medezinski et al. (2016) substructures are also detected by us. We measure a slightly higher mass for the main core component than reported previously and attribute the discrepancy to the inclusion of our tightly constrained strong-lensing mass model built on Hubble Frontier Fields data. X-ray data obtained by XMM-Newton reveal four remnant cores, one of them a new detection, and three shocks. Unlike Merten et al. (2011), we find all cores to have both dark and luminous counterparts. A comparison with clusters of similar mass in the MXXL simulations yields no objects with as many massive substructures as observed in Abell 2744, confirming that Abell 2744 is an extreme system. We stress that these properties still do not constitute a challenge to ΛCDM, as caveats apply to both the simulation and the observations: for instance, the projected mass measurements from gravitational lensing and the limited resolution of the sub-haloes finders. We discuss implications of Abell 2744 for the plausibility of different dark-matter candidates and, finally, measure a new upper limit on the self-interaction cross-section of dark matter of σDM < 1.28 cm2g-1(68% CL), in good agreement with previous results from Harvey et al. (2015).

  18. Development of a 3'-amino linker with high conjugation activity and its application to conveniently cross-link blunt ends of a duplex.

    PubMed

    Kowata, Keiko; Kojima, Naoshi; Komatsu, Yasuo

    2016-05-01

    The 2-aminoethyl carbamate linker (ssH linker) exhibits high activity in modifying the 5'-termini of oligonucleotides; however, the ssH linker is not appropriate for 3'-terminal modification because it undergoes intramolecular trans-acylation under heat-aqueous ammonia conditions. We developed an N-(2-aminoethyl)carbamate linker (revH linker), in which the carbamate is oriented in the reverse direction relative to that in 2-aminoethyl carbamate. The revH linker was tolerant to heat-alkaline conditions and retained its high reactivity in conjugation with exogenous molecules. The 3'-revH linker was efficiently linked with the 5'-ssH linker at the termini of complementary double strands with a bifunctional molecule, producing a synthetic loop structure. An anti-microRNA oligonucleotide (AMO) was prepared from the chemical ligation of three-stranded 2'-O-methyl RNAs, and the AMO with two alkyl loops exhibited high inhibition activity toward miRNA function. The revH linker is not only useful for 3'-terminal modification of oligonucleotides but also expands the utility range in combination with the 5'-ssH linker.

  19. Exclusive processes: Tests of coherent QCD phenomena and nucleon substructure at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1994-07-01

    Measurements of exclusive processes such as electroproduction, photoproduction, and Compton scattering are among the most sensitive probes of proton structure and coherent phenomena in quantum chromodynamics. The continuous electron beam at CEBAF, upgraded in laboratory energy to 10--12 GeV, will allow a systematic study of exclusive, semi-inclusive, and inclusive reactions in a kinematic range well-tuned to the study of fundamental nucleon and nuclear substructure. I also discuss the potential at CEBAF for studying novel QCD phenomena at the charm production threshold, including the possible production of nuclear-bound quarkonium.

  20. The Search for Milky Way Halo Substructure WIMP Annihilations Using the GLAST LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Wai, Larry; /SLAC

    2007-02-05

    The GLAST LAT Collaboration is one among several experimental groups, covering a wide range of approaches, pursuing the search for the nature of dark matter. The GLAST LAT has the unique ability to find new sources of high energy gamma radiation emanating directly from WIMP annihilations in situ in the universe. Using it's wide band spectral and full sky spatial capabilities, the GLAST LAT can form ''images'' in high energy gamma-rays of dark matter substructures in the gamma-ray sky. We describe a preliminary feasibility study for indirect detection of milky way dark matter satellites using the GLAST LAT.

  1. Bidirectional Connected Control Method Applied to an Experimental Structural Model Split into Four Substructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, T.; Seto, K.; Toyoda, H.; Takano, T.

    2016-09-01

    Connected Control Method (CCM) is a well-known mechanism in the field of civil structural vibration control that utilizes mutual reaction forces between plural buildings connected by dampers as damping force. However, the fact that CCM requires at least two buildings to obtain reaction force prevents CCM from further development. In this paper, a novel idea to apply CCM onto a single building by splitting the building into four substructures is presented. An experimental model structure split into four is built and CCM is applied by using four magnetic dampers. Experimental analysis is carried out and basic performance and effectiveness of the presented idea is confirmed.

  2. SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF AN EVOLVING FLARE RIBBON SUBSTRUCTURE SUGGESTING ORIGIN IN CURRENT SHEET WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Brannon, S. R.; Longcope, D. W.; Qiu, J.

    2015-09-01

    We present imaging and spectroscopic observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph of the evolution of the flare ribbon in the SOL2014-04-18T13:03 M-class flare event, at high spatial resolution and time cadence. These observations reveal small-scale substructure within the ribbon, which manifests as coherent quasi-periodic oscillations in both position and Doppler velocities. We consider various alternative explanations for these oscillations, including modulation of chromospheric evaporation flows. Among these, we find the best support for some form of wave localized to the coronal current sheet, such as a tearing mode or Kelvin–Helmholtz instability.

  3. Substructures with luminosity modulation and horizontal oscillation in pulsating patch: Principal component analysis application to pulsating aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Takanori; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Katoh, Yuto; Sakanoi, Takeshi; Kataoka, Ryuho; Okano, Shoichi

    2016-03-01

    We observed a mesoscale aurora (100 km × 100 km) with patchy structure and equatorward propagation at Poker Flat Research Range on 1 December 2011. Fast Fourier transform (FFT) analysis revealed that this pulsating patch clearly exhibited temporal variations that can be categorized into two types: on-off pulsation (7.8-10 s) with large amplitudes and luminosity modulations excited during on phase with a frequency of about 3.0 Hz. In addition, we applied principal component analysis (PCA) to time series image data of the pulsating aurora for the first time. Time coefficients were estimated by PCA for the whole patch and the substructures were consistent with those obtained from the FFT analysis, and therefore, we concluded that PCA is capable of decomposing several structures that have different coherent spatiotemporal characteristics. Another new insight in this study is that the rapid variations were highly localized; they were excited in only the substructures embedded in the whole structure. Moreover, the whole patch propagated equatorward because of E × B drift of cold plasma, while the substructures did not show such systematic propagation but rather forward-backward oscillations. The horizontal scale of the substructures was estimated to be no smaller than 410 km at the magnetic equator, which is comparable to that of the wave packet structure of a whistler mode chorus perpendicular to the field line. We suggest that the apparent horizontal oscillation of the substructures is associated with field-aligned propagations of the whistler mode chorus in a duct.

  4. Preparation and in vivo evaluation of linkers for 211At labeling of humanized anti-Tac.

    PubMed

    Yordanov, A T; Garmestani, K; Zhang, M; Zhang, Z; Yao, Z; Phillips, K E; Herring, B; Horak, E; Beitzel, M P; Schwarz, U P; Gansow, O A; Plascjak, P S; Eckelman, W C; Waldmann, T A; Brechbiel, M W

    2001-10-01

    The syntheses, radiolabeling, antibody conjugation, and in vivo evaluation of new linkers for 211At labeling of humanized anti-Tac (Hu-anti-Tac), an antibody to the alpha-chain of the IL-2 receptor (IL-2Ralpha) shown to be a useful target for radioimmunotherapy are described. Synthesis of the organometallic linker precursors is accomplished by reaction of the corresponding bromo- or iodoaryl esters with bis(tributyltin) in the presence of a palladium catalyst. Subsequent conversion to the corresponding N-succinimidyl ester and labeling with 211At of two new linkers, N-succinimidyl 4-[211At]astato-3-methylbenzoate and N-succinimidyl N-(4-[211At]astatophenethyl)succinamate (SAPS), together with the previously reported N-succinimidyl 4-[211At]astatobenzoate and N-succinimidyl 3-[211At]astato-4-methylbenzoate, are each conjugated to Hu-anti-Tac. The plasma survival times of these conjugates are compared to those of directly iodinated (125I) Hu-anti-Tac. The N-succinimidyl N-(4-[211At]astatophenethyl)succinamate compound (SAPS) emerged from this assay as the most viable candidate for 211At-labeling of Hu-anti-Tac. SAPS, along with the directly analogous radio-iodinated reagent, N-succinimidyl N-(4-[125I]astatophenethyl)succinamate (SIPS), are evaluated in a biodistribution study along with directly iodinated (125I) Hu-anti-Tac. Blood clearance and biological accretion results indicate that SAPS is a viable candidate for further evaluation for radioimmunotherapy of cancer. PMID:11578907

  5. Influence of Linker Structure on the Anion Binding Affinity of Biscyclopeptides

    SciTech Connect

    Reyheller, Carsten; Hay, Benjamin; Kubik, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    A systematic analysis is presented on the influence of the linking unit between two cyclopeptide rings on the affinity of such biscyclopeptide-based anion receptors in aqueous solvent mixtures. Although the differences in the affinity and selectivity of these receptors toward a given anion are not very pronounced, there are profound differences in the thermodynamics of anion complexation. Enthalpic and entropic contributions both (1) play a role in determining the binding affinity and (2) show significant variation as the linking structure is changed. A decrease in conformational rigidity of the linker improves the entropic advantage for complex formation, but not necessarily the overall complex stability. This effect may be due, in part, to the fact that structural constraints within more rigid linkers might prevent efficient interactions between the host and guest. The optimal linker, which exhibits both favourable enthalpic and entropic contributions, was identified using de novo structure-based design methods as implemented in the HostDesigner software. The submitted manuscript has been authored by a contractor of the U. S. Government under contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725. Accordingly, the U. S. Government retains a non-exclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for the U. S. Government purposes. This research was sponsored by the following program of the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Science: the Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (ORNL FWP No. ERKKC08. Oak Ridge National Laboratory is managed and operated by UT-Battelle, LLC under contract number DE-AC05-00OR22725 with the U. S. Department of Energy.

  6. Dihydroxybenzoquinone as Linker for the Synthesis of Permanently Porous Aluminum Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Halis, Selda; Inge, A Ken; Dehning, Niklas; Weyrich, Thomas; Reinsch, Helge; Stock, Norbert

    2016-08-01

    Two new dihydroxybenzoquinone-based metal-organic frameworks, ((CH3)2NH2)3[Al4(L1)3(L1(•))3]·3DMF (1, denoted CAU-20) and ((CH3)2NH2)3[Al4(L2)3(L2(•))3]·9DMF (2, denoted CAU-20-Cl2), were synthesized at 120 °C in DMF using 2,5-dihydroxy-p-benzoquinone ((C6H2(OH)2(O)2), H2L1) and 2,5-dichloro-3,6-dihydroxy-p-benzoquinone ((C6Cl2(OH)2(O)2), H2L2), respectively. Compared to other Al-MOFs, which contain carboxylate or phosphonate groups that connect the metal sites, in 1 and 2 the Al(3+) are coordinated by oxido groups. The metal ions are octahedrally surrounded by oxygen atoms of the deprotonated linker molecules to generate honeycomb layers with a metal to linker ratio of Al: L1/L2 = 2:3. The layers contain L1(2-) and L2(2-) ions as well as linker radical ions L1(•3-) and L2(•3-) in a molar ratio of 1 to 1. The presence of radical ions was confirmed by EPR and UV-vis-spectroscopic measurements, and the composition was determined from a combination of PXRD, (1)H NMR, TG, and elemental analyses. Charge balance is accomplished through intercalation of (CH3)2NH2(+) ions which are formed by partial hydrolysis of DMF. In the structures of 1 and 2 the eclipsed layers are AA and ABAB stacked, respectively, and one-dimensional hexagonal channels with diameters of ca. 9 and 6 Å are formed. Both compounds exhibit permanent porosity and have specific surface areas of 1440 and 1430 m(2) g(-1), respectively.

  7. Structural Evolution of Environmentally Responsive Cationic Liposome–DNA Complexes with a Reducible Lipid Linker

    PubMed Central

    Shirazi, Rahau S.; Ewert, Kai K.; Silva, Bruno F. B.; Leal, Cecilia; Li, Youli; Safinya, Cyrus R.

    2012-01-01

    Environmentally responsive materials, i.e., materials that respond to changes in their environment with a change in their properties or structure, are attracting an increasing amount of interest. We recently designed and synthesized a series of cleavable multivalent lipids (CMVLn, with n = 2 to 5 the number of positive headgroup charges at full protonation) with a disulfide bond in the linker between cationic headgroup and hydrophobic tails. The self-assembled complexes of the CMVLs and DNA are a prototypical environmentally responsive material, undergoing extensive structural rearrangement when exposed to reducing agents. We investigated the structural evolution of CMVL–DNA complexes at varied complex composition, temperature and incubation time using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). A related lipid with a stable linker, TMVL4, was used as a control. In a nonreducing environment CMVL–DNA complexes form the lamellar (LαC) phase, with DNA rods sandwiched between lipid bilayers. However, new self-assembled phases form when the disulfide linker is cleaved by dithiothreitol or the biologically relevant reducing agent glutathione. The released DNA and cleaved CMVL headgroups form a “loosely organized” phase, giving rise to a characteristic broad SAXS correlation profile. CMVLs of high headgroup charge also form condensed DNA bundles. Intriguingly, the cleaved hydrophobic tails of the CMVLs reassemble into tilted chain-ordered Lβ′ phases upon incubation at physiological temperature (37 °C), as indicated by characteristic WAXS peaks. X-ray scattering further reveals that two of the three phases (LβF, LβL, and LβI) comprised by the Lβ′ phase coexist in these samples. The described system may have applications in lipid-based nanotechnologies. PMID:22616637

  8. Reaction of Oxidized Polysialic Acid and a Diaminooxy Linker: Characterization and Process Optimization Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ray, G Joseph; Siekmann, Jürgen; Scheinecker, Richard; Zhang, Zhenqing; Gerasimov, Mikhail V; Szabo, Christina M; Kosma, Paul

    2016-09-21

    Native polysialic acid (natPSA) is a high-molecular-weight glycan composed of repeat units of α-(2 → 8) linked N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac). Mild periodate oxidation of PSA selectively targets the end sialic acid ring containing three adjacent alcohols generating a putative aldehyde, which can be used, after attachment of a linker molecule, for terminal attachment of PSA to protein. Previously, we showed that the oxidized PSA (oxoPSA) contained a hemiacetal at the oxidation site and can react with a linker containing an aminooxy group in a conjugation reaction to form a stable oxime linkage. Thus, reagents containing an aminooxy group may be prepared for conjugation of PSA to the carbohydrate moiety of therapeutic proteins, thereby increasing their half-life. These aminooxy-PSA reagents can selectively react with aldehyde groups generated by mild NaIO4 oxidation of glycans on the surface of the target protein. To comprehend the conjugation, unoxidized tetrasialic acid and Neu5Ac were reacted in model reactions with a diaminooxy linker to define the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts. Based on these data, we were able to show that, in the case of PSA, the reaction with the linker occurs not only at the expected oxidized end to form an aldoxime but also at the end distal to the oxidation to form a ketoxime. We determined that, in aged solutions, both oxoPSA and PSA aldoxime were hydrolyzed. PSA aldoxime was also shown to disproportionate to form a dimer (PSA-linker-PSA), which then could react further with the released linker at one of its PSA termini. Furthermore, NMR was used to monitor the effects of deliberate process changes so that conditions could be optimized for attachment of linker at the desired end of the PSA chain, which led to a well-defined product.

  9. [Construction of cTnC-linker-TnI (P) Genes, Expression of Fusion Protein and Preparation of Lyophilized Protein].

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaoli; Liu, Xiaoyun; Cai, Lei; Wu, Jianwei; Wang, Jihua

    2015-12-01

    In order to construct and express human cardiac troponin C-linker-troponin I(P) [ cTnC-linker-TnI(P)] fusion protein, detect its activity and prepare lyophilized protein, we searched the CDs of human cTnC and cTnI from GenBank, synthesized cTnC and cTnI(30-110aa) into cloning vector by a short DNA sequence coding for 15 neutral amino acid residues. pCold I-cTnC-linker-TnI(P) was constructed and transformed into E. coli BL21(DE3). Then, cTnC-linker-TnI(P) fusion protein was induced by isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). Soluable expression of cTnC-linker-TnI(P) in prokaryotic system was successfully obtained. The fusion protein was purified by Ni²⁺ Sepharose 6 Fast Flow affinity chromatography with over 95% purity and prepared into lyophilized protein. The activity of purified cTnC-linker-TnI(P) and its lyophilized protein were detected by Wondfo Finecare™ cTnI Test. Lyophilized protein of cTnC-linker-TnI(P) was stable for 10 or more days at 37 °C and 4 or more months at 25 °C and 4 °C. The expression system established in this research is feasible and efficient. Lyophilized protein is stable enough to be provided as biological raw materials for further research. PMID:27079099

  10. Dynamics of linker residues modulate the nucleic acid binding properties of the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein zinc fingers.

    PubMed

    Zargarian, Loussiné; Tisné, Carine; Barraud, Pierre; Xu, Xiaoqian; Morellet, Nelly; René, Brigitte; Mély, Yves; Fossé, Philippe; Mauffret, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NC) is a small basic protein containing two zinc fingers (ZF) separated by a short linker. It is involved in several steps of the replication cycle and acts as a nucleic acid chaperone protein in facilitating nucleic acid strand transfers occurring during reverse transcription. Recent analysis of three-dimensional structures of NC-nucleic acids complexes established a new property: the unpaired guanines targeted by NC are more often inserted in the C-terminal zinc finger (ZF2) than in the N-terminal zinc finger (ZF1). Although previous NMR dynamic studies were performed with NC, the dynamic behavior of the linker residues connecting the two ZF domains remains unclear. This prompted us to investigate the dynamic behavior of the linker residues. Here, we collected 15N NMR relaxation data and used for the first time data at several fields to probe the protein dynamics. The analysis at two fields allows us to detect a slow motion occurring between the two domains around a hinge located in the linker at the G35 position. However, the amplitude of motion appears limited in our conditions. In addition, we showed that the neighboring linker residues R29, A30, P31, R32, K33 displayed restricted motion and numerous contacts with residues of ZF1. Our results are fully consistent with a model in which the ZF1-linker contacts prevent the ZF1 domain to interact with unpaired guanines, whereas the ZF2 domain is more accessible and competent to interact with unpaired guanines. In contrast, ZF1 with its large hydrophobic plateau is able to destabilize the double-stranded regions adjacent to the guanines bound by ZF2. The linker residues and the internal dynamics of NC regulate therefore the different functions of the two zinc fingers that are required for an optimal chaperone activity.

  11. The DEK1 Calpain Linker Functions in Three-Dimensional Body Patterning in Physcomitrella patens1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Demko, Viktor; Mekhlif, Ahmed Khaleel

    2016-01-01

    The DEFECTIVE KERNEL1 (DEK1) calpain is a conserved 240-kD key regulator of three-dimensional body patterning in land plants acting via mitotic cell plane positioning. The activity of the cytosolic C-terminal calpain protease is regulated by the membrane-anchored DEK1 MEM, which is connected to the calpain via the 600-amino acid residue Linker. Similar to the calpain and MEM domains, the Linker is highly conserved in the land plant lineage, the similarity dropping sharply compared with orthologous charophyte sequences. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we studied the effect on Physcomitrella patens development by deleting the Linker and two conserved Linker motifs. The results show that removal of the Linker has nearly the same effect as removal of the entire DEK1 gene. In contrast, deletion of the conserved Laminin_G3 (LG3) domain had a milder effect, perturbing leafy gametophore patterning and archegonia development. The LG3 domain from Marchantia polymorpha is fully functional in P. patens, whereas angiosperm sequences are not functional. Deletion of a C-terminal Linker subsegment containing a potential calpain autolytic site severely disturbs gametophore development. Finally, changing one of the three calpain active-site amino acid residues results in the same phenotype as deleting the entire DEK1 gene. Based on the conserved nature of animal and DEK1 calpains, we propose that the DEK1 MEM-Linker complex inactivates the calpain by forcing apart the two calpain subunits carrying the three amino acids of the active site. PMID:27506240

  12. Regional flexibility in the S4-S5 linker regulates hERG channel closed-state stabilization.

    PubMed

    Hull, Christina M; Sokolov, Stanislav; Van Slyke, Aaron C; Claydon, Tom W

    2014-10-01

    hERG K(+) channel function is vital for normal cardiac rhythm, yet the mechanisms underlying the unique biophysical characteristics of the channel, such as slow activation and deactivation gating, are incompletely understood. The S4-S5 linker is thought to transduce voltage sensor movement to opening of the pore gate, but may also integrate signals from cytoplasmic domains. Previously, we showed that substitutions of G546 within the S4-S5 linker destabilize the closed state of the channel. Here, we present results of a glycine-scan in the background of 546L. We demonstrate site-specific restoration of WT-like activation which suggests that flexibility in the N-terminal portion of the S4-S5 linker is critical for the voltage dependence of hERG channel activation. In addition, we show that the voltage dependence of deactivation, which was recently shown to be left-shifted from that of activation due to voltage sensor mode-shift, is also modulated by the S4-S5 linker. The G546L mutation greatly attenuated the coupling of voltage sensor mode-shift to the pore gate without altering the mode-shift itself. Indeed, all of the S4-S5 linker mutations tested similarly reduced coupling of the mode-shift to the pore gate. These data demonstrate a key role for S4-S5 linker in the unique activation and deactivation gating of hERG channels. Furthermore, uncoupling of the mode-shift to the pore by S4-S5 linker mutations parallels the effects of mutations in the N-terminus suggestive of functional interactions between the two regions.

  13. Intracellular Catabolism of an Antibody Drug Conjugate with a Noncleavable Linker.

    PubMed

    Rock, Brooke M; Tometsko, Mark E; Patel, Sonal K; Hamblett, Kevin J; Fanslow, William C; Rock, Dan A

    2015-09-01

    Antibody drug conjugates are emerging as a powerful class of antitumor agents with efficacy across a range of cancers; therefore, understanding the disposition of this class of therapeutic is crucial. Reported here is a method of enriching a specific organelle (lysosome) to understand the catabolism of an anti-CD70 Ab-MCC-DM1, an antibody drug conjugate with a noncleavable linker. With such techniques a higher degree of concentration-activity relationship can be established for in vitro cell lines; this can aid in understanding the resultant catabolite concentrations necessary to exert activity.

  14. A push-pull organic dye with a quinoidal thiophene linker: Photophysical properties and solvent effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Climent, Clàudia; Carreras, Abel; Alemany, Pere; Casanova, David

    2016-10-01

    In the present work we perform a computational study of the properties of a push-pull organic dye with a quinoidal thiophene unit as the conjugated linker between the electron donor and acceptor groups. We investigate the photophysical properties of the dye related to its potential use as a molecular sensitizer in dye-sensitized solar cells. We rationalize the solvation effects on the absorption band of the dye in protic and aprotic solvents, identifying the interaction of alcohol solvents with the amine in the donor group as the source for the blue shift of the absorption band with respect to aprotic solvents.

  15. Dimeric peptides with three different linkers self-assemble with phospholipids to form peptide nanodiscs that stabilize membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Andreas N; Sørensen, Kasper K; Johansen, Nicolai T; Martel, Anne; Kirkensgaard, Jacob J K; Jensen, Knud J; Arleth, Lise; Midtgaard, Søren Roi

    2016-07-01

    Three dimers of the amphipathic α-helical peptide 18A have been synthesized with different interhelical linkers inserted between the two copies of 18A. The dimeric peptides were denoted 'beltides' where Beltide-1 refers to the 18A-dimer without a linker, Beltide-2 is the 18A-dimer with proline (Pro) as a linker and Beltide-3 is the 18A-dimer linked by two glycines (Gly-Gly). The self-assembly of the beltides with the phospholipid DMPC was studied with and without the incorporated membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin (bR) through a combination of coarse-grained MD simulations, size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, small-angle scattering (SAS), static light scattering (SLS) and UV-Vis spectroscopy. For all three beltides, MD and combined small-angle X-ray and -neutron scattering were consistent with a disc structure composed by a phospholipid bilayer surrounded by a belt of peptides and with a total disc diameter of approximately 10 nm. CD confirmed that all three beltides were α-helical in the free form and with DMPC. However, as shown by SEC the different interhelical linkers clearly led to different properties of the beltides. Beltide-3, with the Gly-Gly linker, was very adaptable such that peptide nanodiscs could be formed for a broad range of different peptide to lipid stoichiometries and therefore also possible disc-sizes. On the other hand, both Beltide-2 with the Pro linker and Beltide-1 without a linker were less adaptable and would only form discs of certain peptide to lipid stoichiometries. SLS revealed that the structural stability of the formed peptide nanodiscs was also highly affected by the linkers and it was found that Beltide-1 gave more stable discs than the other two beltides. With respect to membrane protein stabilization, each of the three beltides in combination with DMPC stabilizes the seven-helix transmembrane protein bacteriorhodopsin significantly better than the detergent octyl glucoside, but no

  16. Dimeric peptides with three different linkers self-assemble with phospholipids to form peptide nanodiscs that stabilize membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Andreas N; Sørensen, Kasper K; Johansen, Nicolai T; Martel, Anne; Kirkensgaard, Jacob J K; Jensen, Knud J; Arleth, Lise; Midtgaard, Søren Roi

    2016-07-01

    Three dimers of the amphipathic α-helical peptide 18A have been synthesized with different interhelical linkers inserted between the two copies of 18A. The dimeric peptides were denoted 'beltides' where Beltide-1 refers to the 18A-dimer without a linker, Beltide-2 is the 18A-dimer with proline (Pro) as a linker and Beltide-3 is the 18A-dimer linked by two glycines (Gly-Gly). The self-assembly of the beltides with the phospholipid DMPC was studied with and without the incorporated membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin (bR) through a combination of coarse-grained MD simulations, size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, small-angle scattering (SAS), static light scattering (SLS) and UV-Vis spectroscopy. For all three beltides, MD and combined small-angle X-ray and -neutron scattering were consistent with a disc structure composed by a phospholipid bilayer surrounded by a belt of peptides and with a total disc diameter of approximately 10 nm. CD confirmed that all three beltides were α-helical in the free form and with DMPC. However, as shown by SEC the different interhelical linkers clearly led to different properties of the beltides. Beltide-3, with the Gly-Gly linker, was very adaptable such that peptide nanodiscs could be formed for a broad range of different peptide to lipid stoichiometries and therefore also possible disc-sizes. On the other hand, both Beltide-2 with the Pro linker and Beltide-1 without a linker were less adaptable and would only form discs of certain peptide to lipid stoichiometries. SLS revealed that the structural stability of the formed peptide nanodiscs was also highly affected by the linkers and it was found that Beltide-1 gave more stable discs than the other two beltides. With respect to membrane protein stabilization, each of the three beltides in combination with DMPC stabilizes the seven-helix transmembrane protein bacteriorhodopsin significantly better than the detergent octyl glucoside, but no

  17. On the Origin of Temperature Substructure within Merging Clusters of Galaxies: Abell 2256

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roettiger, Kurt; Burns, Jack O.; Pinkney, Jason

    1995-11-01

    Recent ROSA T PSPC and ASCA observations of several rich clusters of galaxies have revealed complex temperature substructure within the X-ray emitting gas. One of the best and most detailed examples is A2256. Briel & Henry (1994) show four distinct temperature components within the central (<12') of A2256. The purpose of this paper is to suggest a plausible model, within reasonable parameter space, that explains the origin of the hottest (>8 keV) gas near the core of A2256. We find the temperature substructure in A2256 to be consistent with a model in which A2256 is currently in the early stages of a merger. We attempt to quantify this model by comparison with results from our parameter study of merging clusters of galaxies conducted with a numerical Hydro/N-body code. From this, we estimate that A2256 is actually two systems with a 2:1 mass ratio, whose cores are separated by ˜0.5 Mpc with a relative velocity of nearly 3000 km s-1. The proposed merger axis is projected into the plane of the sky by 45°-50° such that the less massive of the two clusters is approaching the observer. Within the frame work of this model, we find the hot gas (>8 keV) to be the result of shock heating during the merger event. We also use this model to explain the discrepancy between X-ray and galaxy-based mass estimates for A2256.

  18. The Substructure of the Solar Corona Observed in the Hi-C Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winebarger, A.; Cirtain, J.; Golub, L.; DeLuca, E.; Savage, S.; Alexander, C.; Schuler, T.

    2014-01-01

    In the summer of 2012, the High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) flew aboard a NASA sounding rocket and collected the highest spatial resolution images ever obtained of the solar corona. One of the goals of the Hi-C flight was to characterize the substructure of the solar corona. We therefore calculate how the intensity scales from a low-resolution (AIA) pixels to high-resolution (Hi-C) pixels for both the dynamic events and "background" emission (meaning, the steady emission over the 5 minutes of data acquisition time). We find there is no evidence of substructure in the background corona; the intensity scales smoothly from low-resolution to high-resolution Hi-C pixels. In transient events, however, the intensity observed with Hi-C is, on average, 2.6 times larger than observed with AIA. This increase in intensity suggests that AIA is not resolving these events. This result suggests a finely structured dynamic corona embedded in a smoothly varying background.

  19. Reheating effects in the matter power spectrum and implications for substructure

    SciTech Connect

    Erickcek, Adrienne L.; Sigurdson, Kris

    2011-10-15

    The thermal and expansion history of the Universe before big bang nucleosynthesis is unknown. We investigate the evolution of cosmological perturbations through the transition from an early matter era to radiation domination. We treat reheating as the perturbative decay of an oscillating scalar field into relativistic plasma and cold dark matter. After reheating, we find that subhorizon perturbations in the decay-produced dark matter density are significantly enhanced, while subhorizon radiation perturbations are instead suppressed. If dark matter originates in the radiation bath after reheating, this suppression may be the primary cutoff in the matter power spectrum. Conversely, for dark matter produced nonthermally from scalar decay, enhanced perturbations can drive structure formation during the cosmic dark ages and dramatically increase the abundance of compact substructures. For low reheat temperatures, we find that as much as 50% of all dark matter is in microhalos with M > or approx. 0.1M{sub +} at z{approx_equal}100, compared to a fraction of {approx}10{sup -10} in the standard case. In this scenario, ultradense substructures may constitute a large fraction of dark matter in galaxies today.

  20. Band structure and transmission characteristics of complex phononic crystals by multi-level substructure scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, H. W.; Chen, B. S.

    2015-10-01

    A fast scheme based on the multi-level substructure technique is proposed for the band structure and transmission characteristics calculation of phononic crystals uniformly. The main idea is that finite element models of phononic crystals are divided into several domains by a special multi-level decomposition. For the band structure calculation, the upscaling calculation is employed to condense the internal stiffness matrix of the unit cell into the Bloch boundary. Due to the internal stiffness matrix does not change along with reduced wave vectors in an iteration process, the scheme can reduce the computational scale and improve the efficiency greatly, meanwhile it does not introduce approximation into the traditional finite element model. For the transmission characteristics calculation, the unit cell of the phononic crystal is periodic which is taken as a substructure with the same coefficient matrix. Moreover, the downscaling calculation of internal displacements can be selected flexibly. Some closely watched examples of the three-dimensional locally resonant, defect state of Lamb wave and Bragg waveguide are analyzed. Numerical results indicate that the proposed scheme is efficient and accurate, which may widely be applicable and suitable for complex phononic crystal problems, and provides a reliable numerical tool to optimize and design crystal devices.

  1. A Synoptic Map of Halo Substructures from the Pan-STARRS1 3π Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Edouard J.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Schlafly, Edward F.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Bell, Eric F.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Goldman, Bertrand; Martínez-Delgado, David; Sesar, Branimir; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Burgett, William S.; Chambers, Kenneth C.; Draper, Peter W.; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Kaiser, Nicholas; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Magnier, Eugene A.; Metcalfe, Nigel; Wainscoat, Richard J.; Waters, Christopher

    2016-08-01

    We present a panoramic map of the entire Milky Way halo north of δ ˜ -30° (˜ 30,000 deg2), constructed by applying the matched-filter technique to the Pan-STARRS1 3π Survey dataset. Using single-epoch photometry reaching to g ˜22, we are sensitive to stellar substructures with heliocentric distances between 3.5 and ˜35 kpc. We recover almost all previously-reported streams in this volume and demonstrate that several of these are significantly more extended than earlier datasets have indicated. In addition, we also report five new candidate stellar streams. One of these features appears significantly broader and more luminous than the others and is likely the remnant of a dwarf galaxy. The other four streams are consistent with a globular cluster origin, and three of these are rather short in projection (≲ 10°), suggesting that streams like Ophiuchus may not be that rare. Finally, a significant number of more marginal substructures are also revealed by our analysis; many of these features can also be discerned in matched-filter maps produced by other authors from SDSS data, and hence they are very likely to be genuine. However, the extant 3π data is currently too shallow to determine their properties or produce convincing CMDs. The global view of the Milky Way provided by Pan-STARRS1 provides further evidence for the important role of both globular cluster disruption and dwarf galaxy accretion in building the Milky Way's stellar halo.

  2. Mexican mestizo population sub-structure: effects on genetic and forensic statistical parameters.

    PubMed

    Noris, Gino; Santana, Carla; Meraz-Ríos, Marco Antonio; de Lourdes Munoz, María; Majluf-Cruz, Abraham; Magaña, Jonathan J; Granados, Julio; Quezada, Rosa; Revilla, María Cristina; Martínez-Salas, Sergio; Xihuitl, Salvador; Martínez de la Escalera, Gonzalo; Díaz-Badillo, Alvaro; Calderon-Aranda, Emma S; Gómez, Rocío

    2012-12-01

    Since Mexican mestizos are an admixed population, it is necessary to determine the effects that the substructure of the population has on genetic and forensic parameters. With this aim, a study was performed with 15 STR loci (CODIS plus D2S1338 and D19S433) on 1,640 unrelated Mexican mestizos. We determine allele and genotypic frequencies observing departure from Hardy-Weinberg expectation (12 out of 15 loci, with an excess of homozygotes, Fis > 0), as well as pairs of loci in an apparent linkage disequilibrium (13 of 92 loci). We conducted a test for genetic population stratification, the results show that the Mexican mestizo population is substructured into three subgroups, which are in HW and linkage equilibrium. The combination of the 15 loci in the whole population has high forensic efficiency with the capacity to genetically discriminate one individual in one quintillion (1/10(18)). Our data potentially validates the use of these 15 STR loci to establish forensic identity and parentage testing for legal purposes, and offers a powerful tool for genetic variation analysis. However, given that the population is stratified, we highly recommend applying a correction with the inbreeding coefficient in calculations of paternity and forensic studies to avoid erroneous assumptions.

  3. In silico Prediction of Drug Induced Liver Toxicity Using Substructure Pattern Recognition Method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen; Cheng, Feixiong; Li, Weihua; Liu, Guixia; Lee, Philip W; Tang, Yun

    2016-04-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a leading cause of acute liver failure in the US and less severe liver injury worldwide. It is also one of the major reasons of drug withdrawal from the market. Thus, DILI has become one of the most important concerns of drugs, and should be predicted in very early stage of drug discovery process. In this study, a comprehensive data set containing 1317 diverse compounds was collected from publications. Then, high accuracy classification models were built using five machine learning methods based on MACCS and FP4 fingerprints after evaluating by substructure pattern recognition method. The best model was built using SVM method together with FP4 fingerprint at the IG value threshold of 0.0005. Its overall predictive accuracies were 79.7 % and 64.5 % for the training and test sets, separately, which yielded overall accuracy of 75.0 % for the external validation dataset, consisting of 88 compounds collected from a benchmark DILI database - the Liver Toxicity Knowledge Base. This model could be used for drug-induced liver toxicity prediction. Moreover, some key substructure patterns correlated with drug-induced liver toxicity were also identified as structural alerts. PMID:27491923

  4. Structural health monitoring system of Ironton-Russell bridge during substructure construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalvi, Aditi; Norouzi, Mehdi; Hunt, Victor; Helmicki, Arthur

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring a complex structure has gained popularity worldwide to ensure safety and longevity of the structure. Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) systems have been employed for highway bridges to increase the effectiveness of their in-service inspection, to help measure its degradation or damage, and hence, to ensure it's safe and reliable operation. SHM may also be employed during the construction of a structure in order to ensure the safety and performance of the construction process. Monitoring during construction can also help designers compare the actual behavior of a structure with design models especially because of increasing development of accelerated or otherwise novel construction techniques. Analyzing the behavior of a structure at different stages of construction may also help later define some of the abnormal responses during the lifespan of a bridge. This paper overviews the SHM system of the Ironton-Russell Bridge, Ohio at the construction stage of its substructure. The stages involved in monitoring such as instrumentation of sensors, acquiring data from the sensors, data processing that includes a warning system, static analysis of the data collected and website are detailed in this paper. In addition to this, the effect of construction events as observed by the sensor data for the substructure is analyzed in detail thus validating the capability of the monitoring system.

  5. Application of finite element substructuring to composite micromechanics. M.S. Thesis - Akron Univ., May 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    Finite element substructuring is used to predict unidirectional fiber composite hygral (moisture), thermal, and mechanical properties. COSMIC NASTRAN and MSC/NASTRAN are used to perform the finite element analysis. The results obtained from the finite element model are compared with those obtained from the simplified composite micromechanics equations. A unidirectional composite structure made of boron/HM-epoxy, S-glass/IMHS-epoxy and AS/IMHS-epoxy are studied. The finite element analysis is performed using three dimensional isoparametric brick elements and two distinct models. The first model consists of a single cell (one fiber surrounded by matrix) to form a square. The second model uses the single cell and substructuring to form a nine cell square array. To compare computer time and results with the nine cell superelement model, another nine cell model is constructed using conventional mesh generation techniques. An independent computer program consisting of the simplified micromechanics equation is developed to predict the hygral, thermal, and mechanical properties for this comparison. The results indicate that advanced techniques can be used advantageously for fiber composite micromechanics.

  6. deconSTRUCT: general purpose protein database search on the substructure level.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zong Hong; Bharatham, Kavitha; Sherman, Westley A; Mihalek, Ivana

    2010-07-01

    deconSTRUCT webserver offers an interface to a protein database search engine, usable for a general purpose detection of similar protein (sub)structures. Initially, it deconstructs the query structure into its secondary structure elements (SSEs) and reassembles the match to the target by requiring a (tunable) degree of similarity in the direction and sequential order of SSEs. Hierarchical organization and judicious use of the information about protein structure enables deconSTRUCT to achieve the sensitivity and specificity of the established search engines at orders of magnitude increased speed, without tying up irretrievably the substructure information in the form of a hash. In a post-processing step, a match on the level of the backbone atoms is constructed. The results presented to the user consist of the list of the matched SSEs, the transformation matrix for rigid superposition of the structures and several ways of visualization, both downloadable and implemented as a web-browser plug-in. The server is available at http://epsf.bmad.bii.a-star.edu.sg/struct_server.html.

  7. In silico Prediction of Drug Induced Liver Toxicity Using Substructure Pattern Recognition Method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen; Cheng, Feixiong; Li, Weihua; Liu, Guixia; Lee, Philip W; Tang, Yun

    2016-04-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a leading cause of acute liver failure in the US and less severe liver injury worldwide. It is also one of the major reasons of drug withdrawal from the market. Thus, DILI has become one of the most important concerns of drugs, and should be predicted in very early stage of drug discovery process. In this study, a comprehensive data set containing 1317 diverse compounds was collected from publications. Then, high accuracy classification models were built using five machine learning methods based on MACCS and FP4 fingerprints after evaluating by substructure pattern recognition method. The best model was built using SVM method together with FP4 fingerprint at the IG value threshold of 0.0005. Its overall predictive accuracies were 79.7 % and 64.5 % for the training and test sets, separately, which yielded overall accuracy of 75.0 % for the external validation dataset, consisting of 88 compounds collected from a benchmark DILI database - the Liver Toxicity Knowledge Base. This model could be used for drug-induced liver toxicity prediction. Moreover, some key substructure patterns correlated with drug-induced liver toxicity were also identified as structural alerts.

  8. Synthesis, characterization, monolayer assembly and 2D lanthanide coordination of a linear terphenyl-di(propiolonitrile) linker on Ag(111)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhi; Urgel, José I; Écija, David; Fuhr, Olaf; Auwärter, Willi

    2015-01-01

    Summary As a continuation of our work employing polyphenylene-dicarbonitrile molecules and in particular the terphenyl derivative 1 (TDCN), we have synthesized a novel ditopic terphenyl-4,4"-di(propiolonitrile) (2) linker for the self-assembly of organic monolayers and metal coordination at interfaces. The structure of the organic linker 2 was confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). On the densely packed Ag(111) surface, the terphenyl-4,4"-di(propiolonitrile) linkers self-assemble in a regular, molecular chevron arrangement exhibiting a Moiré pattern. After the exposure of the molecular monolayer to a beam of Gd atoms, the propiolonitrile groups get readily involved in metal–ligand coordination interactions. Distinct coordination motifs evolve with coordination numbers varying between three and six for the laterally-bound Gd centers. The linker molecules retain an overall flat adsorption geometry. However, only networks with restricted local order were obtained, in marked contrast to previously employed, simpler polyphenylene-dicarbonitrile 1 linkers. PMID:25821671

  9. S3-S4 linker length modulates the relaxed state of a voltage-gated potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Priest, Michael F; Lacroix, Jérôme J; Villalba-Galea, Carlos A; Bezanilla, Francisco

    2013-11-19

    Voltage-sensing domains (VSDs) are membrane protein modules found in ion channels and enzymes that are responsible for a large number of fundamental biological tasks, such as neuronal electrical activity. The VSDs switch from a resting to an active conformation upon membrane depolarization, altering the activity of the protein in response to voltage changes. Interestingly, numerous studies describe the existence of a third distinct state, called the relaxed state, also populated at positive potentials. Although some physiological roles for the relaxed state have been suggested, little is known about the molecular determinants responsible for the development and modulation of VSD relaxation. Several lines of evidence have suggested that the linker (S3-S4 linker) between the third (S3) and fourth (S4) transmembrane segments of the VSD alters the equilibrium between resting and active conformations. By measuring gating currents from the Shaker potassium channel, we demonstrate here that shortening the S3-S4 linker stabilizes the relaxed state, whereas lengthening the linker or splitting it and coinjecting two fragments of the channel have little effect. We propose that natural variations of the length of the S3-S4 linker in various VSD-containing proteins may produce differential VSD relaxation in vivo.

  10. Superposed epoch study of ICME sub-structures near Earth and their effects on Galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masías-Meza, J. J.; Dasso, S.; Démoulin, P.; Rodriguez, L.; Janvier, M.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) are the interplanetary manifestations of solar eruptions. The overtaken solar wind forms a sheath of compressed plasma at the front of ICMEs. Magnetic clouds (MCs) are a subset of ICMEs with specific properties (e.g. the presence of a flux rope). When ICMEs pass near Earth, ground observations indicate that the flux of Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) decreases. Aims: The main aims of this paper are to find common plasma and magnetic properties of different ICME sub-structures and which ICME properties affect the flux of GCRs near Earth. Methods: We used a superposed epoch method applied to a large set of ICMEs observed in situ by the spacecraft ACE, between 1998 and 2006. We also applied a superposed epoch analysis on GCRs time series observed with the McMurdo neutron monitors. Results: We find that slow MCs at 1 AU have on average more massive sheaths. We conclude that this is because they are more effectively slowed down by drag during their travel from the Sun. Slow MCs also have a more symmetric magnetic field and sheaths expanding similarly as their following MC, while in contrast, fast MCs have an asymmetric magnetic profile and a sheath in compression. In all types of MCs, we find that the proton density and the temperature and the magnetic fluctuations can diffuse within the front of the MC due to 3D reconnection. Finally, we derive a quantitative model that describes the decrease in cosmic rays as a function of the amount of magnetic fluctuations and field strength. Conclusions: The obtained typical profiles of sheath, MC and GCR properties corresponding to slow, middle, and fast ICMEs, can be used for forecasting or modelling these events, and to better understand the transport of energetic particles in ICMEs. They are also useful for improving future operative space weather activities.

  11. A structured interdomain linker directs self-polymerization of human uromodulin

    PubMed Central

    Bokhove, Marcel; Nishimura, Kaoru; Brunati, Martina; Han, Ling; de Sanctis, Daniele; Rampoldi, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Uromodulin (UMOD)/Tamm–Horsfall protein, the most abundant human urinary protein, plays a key role in chronic kidney diseases and is a promising therapeutic target for hypertension. Via its bipartite zona pellucida module (ZP-N/ZP-C), UMOD forms extracellular filaments that regulate kidney electrolyte balance and innate immunity, as well as protect against renal stones. Moreover, salt-dependent aggregation of UMOD filaments in the urine generates a soluble molecular net that captures uropathogenic bacteria and facilitates their clearance. Despite the functional importance of its homopolymers, no structural information is available on UMOD and how it self-assembles into filaments. Here, we report the crystal structures of polymerization regions of human UMOD and mouse ZP2, an essential sperm receptor protein that is structurally related to UMOD but forms heteropolymers. The structure of UMOD reveals that an extensive hydrophobic interface mediates ZP-N domain homodimerization. This arrangement is required for filament formation and is directed by an ordered ZP-N/ZP-C linker that is not observed in ZP2 but is conserved in the sequence of deafness/Crohn’s disease-associated homopolymeric glycoproteins α-tectorin (TECTA) and glycoprotein 2 (GP2). Our data provide an example of how interdomain linker plasticity can modulate the function of structurally similar multidomain proteins. Moreover, the architecture of UMOD rationalizes numerous pathogenic mutations in both UMOD and TECTA genes. PMID:26811476

  12. Linker-induced anomalous emission of organic-molecule conjugated metal-oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Turkowski, Volodymyr; Babu, Suresh; Le, Duy; Kumar, Amit; Haldar, Manas K; Wagh, Anil V; Hu, Zhongjian; Karakoti, Ajay S; Gesquiere, Andre J; Law, Benedict; Mallik, Sanku; Rahman, Talat S; Leuenberger, Michael N; Seal, Sudipta

    2012-06-26

    Semiconductor nanoparticles conjugated with organic- and dye-molecules to yield high efficiency visible photoluminescence (PL) hold great potential for many future technological applications. We show that folic acid (FA)-conjugated to nanosize TiO(2) and CeO(2) particles demonstrates a dramatic increase of photoemission intensity at wavelengths between 500 and 700 nm when derivatized using aminopropyl trimethoxysilane (APTMS) as spacer-linker molecules between the metal oxide and FA. Using density-functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT calculations we demonstrate that the strong increase of the PL can be explained by electronic transitions between the titania surface oxygen vacancy (OV) states and the low-energy excited states of the FA/APTMS molecule anchored onto the surface oxygen bridge sites in close proximity to the OVs. We suggest this scenario to be a universal feature for a wide class of metal oxide nanoparticles, including nanoceria, possessing a similar band gap (∼3 eV) and with a large surface-vacancy-related density of electronic states. We demonstrate that the molecule-nanoparticle linker can play a crucial role in tuning the electronic and optical properties of nanosystems by bringing optically active parts of the molecule and of the surface close to each other. PMID:22559229

  13. Linker-Induced Anomalous Emission of Organic-Molecule Conjugated Metal-Oxide Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Turkowski, Volodymyr; Babu, Suresh; Le, Duy; Kumar, Amit; Haldar, Manas K.; Wagh, Anil V.; Hu, Zhongjian; Karakoti, Ajay S.; Gesquiere, Andre J.; Law, Benedict; Mallik, Sanku; Rahman, Talat S.; Leuenberger, Michael N.; Seal, Sudipta

    2012-06-26

    Semiconductor nanoparticles conjugated with organic- and dye-molecules to yield high efficiency visible photoluminescence (PL) hold great potential for many future technological applications. We show that folic acid (FA)-conjugated to nanosize TiO2 and CeO2 particles demonstrates a dramatic increase of photoemission intensity at wavelengths between 500 and 700 nm when derivatized using aminopropyl trimethoxysilane (APTMS) as spacer-linker molecules between the metal oxide and FA. Using density-functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT calculations we demonstrate that the strong increase of the PL can be explained by electronic transitions between the titania surface oxygen vacancy (OV) states and the low-energy excited states of the FA/APTMS molecule anchored onto the surface oxygen bridge sites in close proximity to the OVs. We suggest this scenario to be a universal feature for a wide class of metal oxide nanoparticles, including nanoceria, possessing a similar band gap (3 eV) and with a large surface-vacancy-related density of electronic states. We demonstrate that the molecule-nanoparticle linker can play a crucial role in tuning the electronic and optical properties of nanosystems by bringing optically active parts of the molecule and of the surface close to each other.

  14. A minimal phycobilisome: fusion and chromophorylation of the truncated core-membrane linker and phycocyanin.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kun; Zeng, Xiao-Li; Yang, Yi; Wang, Zhi-Bin; Wu, Xian-Jun; Zhou, Ming; Noy, Dror; Scheer, Hugo; Zhao, Kai-Hong

    2012-07-01

    Phycobilisomes, the light-harvesting antennas in cyanobacteria and red algae, consist of an allophycocyanin core that is attached to the membrane via a core-membrane linker, and rods comprised of phycocyanin and often also phycoerythrin or phycoerythrocyanin. Phycobiliproteins show excellent energy transfer among the chromophores that renders them biomarkers with large Stokes-shifts absorbing over most of the visible spectrum and into the near infrared. Their application is limited, however, due to covalent binding of the chromophores and by solubility problems. We report construction of a water-soluble minimal chromophore-binding unit of the red-absorbing and fluorescing core-membrane linker. This was fused to minimal chromophore-binding units of phycocyanin. After double chromophorylation with phycocyanobilin, in E. coli, the fused phycobiliproteins absorbed light in the range of 610-660nm, and fluoresced at ~670nm, similar to phycobilisomes devoid of phycoerythr(ocyan)in. The fused phycobiliprotein could also be doubly chromophorylated with phycoerythrobilin, resulting in a chromoprotein absorbing around 540-575nm, and fluorescing at ~585nm. The broad absorptions and the large Stokes shifts render these chromoproteins candidates for imaging; they may also be helpful in studying phycobilisome assembly. PMID:22465853

  15. Minibody-indocyanine green based activatable optical imaging probes: the role of short polyethylene glycol linkers.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Rira; Sato, Kazuhide; Hanaoka, Hirofumi; Harada, Toshiko; Nakajima, Takahito; Kim, Insook; Paik, Chang H; Wu, Anna M; Choyke, Peter L; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2014-04-10

    Minibodies show rapider blood clearance than IgGs due to smaller size that improves target-to-background ratio (TBR) in in vivo imaging. Additionally, the ability to activate an optical probe after binding to the target greatly improves the TBR. An optical imaging probe based on a minibody against prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA-MB) and conjugated with an activatable fluorophore, indocyanine green (ICG), was designed to fluoresce only after binding to cell-surface PSMA. To further reduce background signal, short polyethylene glycol (PEG) linkers were employed to improve the covalent bonding ratio of ICG. New PSMA-MBs conjugated with bifunctional ICG derivatives specifically visualized PSMA-positive tumor xenografts in mice bearing both PSMA-positive and -negative tumors within 6 h postinjection. The addition of short PEG linkers significantly improved TBRs; however, it did not significantly alter the biodistribution. Thus, minibody-ICG conjugates could be a good alternative to IgG-ICG in the optical cancer imaging for further clinical applications.

  16. Bimane Fluorescence Scanning Suggests Secondary Structure near the S3-S4 Linker of BK Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Semenova, Nina P.; Abarca-Heidemann, Karin; Loranc, Eva; Rothberg, Brad S.

    2009-01-01

    Gating of large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (BK or maxi-K channels) is controlled by a Ca2+-sensor, formed by the channel cytoplasmic C-terminal domain, and a voltage sensor, formed by its S0-S4 transmembrane helices. Here we analyze structural properties of a portion of the BK channel voltage sensing domain, the S3-S4 linker, using fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy. Single residues in the S3-S4 linker region were substituted with cysteine, and the cysteine-substituted mutants were expressed in CHO cells and covalently labeled with the sulfhydryl-reactive fluorophore monobromo-trimethylammonio-bimane (qBBr). qBBr fluorescence is quenched by tryptophan and, to a lesser extent, tyrosine side chains. We found that qBBr fluorescence in several of the labeled cysteine-substituted channels shows position-specific quenching, as indicated by increase of the brief lifetime component of the qBBr fluorescence decay. Quenching was reduced with the mutation W203F (in the S4 segment), suggesting that Trp-203 acts as a quenching group. Our results suggest a working hypothesis for the secondary structure of the BK channel S3-S4 region, and places residues Leu-204, Gly-205, and Leu-206 within the extracellular end of the S4 helix. PMID:19244238

  17. A minimal phycobilisome: fusion and chromophorylation of the truncated core-membrane linker and phycocyanin.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kun; Zeng, Xiao-Li; Yang, Yi; Wang, Zhi-Bin; Wu, Xian-Jun; Zhou, Ming; Noy, Dror; Scheer, Hugo; Zhao, Kai-Hong

    2012-07-01

    Phycobilisomes, the light-harvesting antennas in cyanobacteria and red algae, consist of an allophycocyanin core that is attached to the membrane via a core-membrane linker, and rods comprised of phycocyanin and often also phycoerythrin or phycoerythrocyanin. Phycobiliproteins show excellent energy transfer among the chromophores that renders them biomarkers with large Stokes-shifts absorbing over most of the visible spectrum and into the near infrared. Their application is limited, however, due to covalent binding of the chromophores and by solubility problems. We report construction of a water-soluble minimal chromophore-binding unit of the red-absorbing and fluorescing core-membrane linker. This was fused to minimal chromophore-binding units of phycocyanin. After double chromophorylation with phycocyanobilin, in E. coli, the fused phycobiliproteins absorbed light in the range of 610-660nm, and fluoresced at ~670nm, similar to phycobilisomes devoid of phycoerythr(ocyan)in. The fused phycobiliprotein could also be doubly chromophorylated with phycoerythrobilin, resulting in a chromoprotein absorbing around 540-575nm, and fluorescing at ~585nm. The broad absorptions and the large Stokes shifts render these chromoproteins candidates for imaging; they may also be helpful in studying phycobilisome assembly.

  18. Multivalent linkers for improved covalent binding of oligonucleotides to dye-doped silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, S M; Nooney, R I; Flynn, S P; Clancy, E; Burke, M; Daly, S; Smith, T J; Daniels, S; McDonagh, C

    2015-09-11

    This paper describes the fabrication of oligonucleotide-coated Cy5-doped silica nanoparticles using a combination of multivalent linkers and their use in surface-based DNA sandwich hybridization assays. Dipodal silane is introduced as a means to fabricate amine-coated silica nanoparticles and its advantages compared to monopodal silanes are discussed. The use of dipodal silane in conjunction with three different polymer linkers (oxidized dextran, linear and 8-arm polyethylene glycol (PEG)) to immobilize single-stranded DNA to Cy5-doped nanoparticles is investigated and dynamic light scattering measurements and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy are used to follow the progression of the functionalization of the nanoparticles. We observe a significant improvement in the binding stability of the single-stranded DNA when the dipodal silane and 8-arm PEG are used in combination, when compared to alternative conjugation strategies. Both 8mer and 22mer oligonucleotides are securely conjugated to the high-brightness nanoparticles and their availability to hybridize with a complementary strand is confirmed using solution-based DNA hybridization experiments. In addition, a full surface-based sandwich assay demonstrates the potential these nanoparticles have in the detection of less than 500 femtomolar of a DNA analogue of micro RNA, miR-451. PMID:26294441

  19. G-CSF receptor-binding cyclic peptides designed with artificial amino-acid linkers

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, Kenji . E-mail: kshibata@kyowa.co.jp; Maruyama-Takahashi, Kumiko; Yamasaki, Motoo; Hirayama, Noriaki . E-mail: hirayama@is.icc.u-tokai.ac.jp

    2006-03-10

    Designing small molecules that mimic the receptor-binding local surface structure of large proteins such as cytokines or growth factors is fascinating and challenging. In this study, we designed cyclic peptides that reproduce the receptor-binding loop structures of G-CSF. We found it is important to select a suitable linker to join two or more discontinuous sequences and both termini of the peptide corresponding to the receptor-binding loop. Structural simulations based on the crystallographic structure of KW-2228, a stable and potent analog of human G-CSF, led us to choose 4-aminobenzoic acid (Abz) as a part of the linker. A combination of 4-Abz with {beta}-alanine or glycine, and disulfide bridges between cysteins or homocysteins, gave a structure suitable for receptor binding. In this structure, the side-chains of several amino acids important for the interactions with the receptor are protruding from one side of the peptide ring. This artificial peptide showed G-CSF antagonistic activity in a cell proliferation assay.

  20. Evaluation of the antibacterial and antibiofilm activities of novel CRAMP-vancomycin conjugates with diverse linkers.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Nigam M; Briers, Yves; Lamberigts, Chris; Steenackers, Hans; Robijns, Stijn; Landuyt, Bart; Vanderleyden, Jos; Schoofs, Liliane; Lavigne, Rob; Luyten, Walter; Van der Eycken, Erik V

    2015-07-21

    We report the design, synthesis and antibacterial activity analysis of conjugates of vancomycin and cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptides (CRAMP). Vancomycin inhibits the nascent peptidoglycan synthesis and is highly active against Gram-positive bacteria, whereas Gram-negative bacteria are generally insensitive due to a protective outer membrane. CRAMP is known to translocate across the Gram-negative outer membrane by a self-promoted uptake mechanism. Vancomycin-CRAMP conjugates were synthesized using click chemistry with diverse hydrophilic and hydrophobic linkers, with CRAMP functioning as a carrier peptide for the transfer of vancomycin through the outer membrane. Small hydrophobic linkers with an aromatic group result in the most active conjugates against planktonic Gram-negative bacteria, while maintaining the high activity of vancomycin against Gram-positive bacteria. These conjugates thus show a broad-spectrum activity, which is absent in CRAMP or vancomycin alone, and which is strongly improved compared to an equimolar mixture of CRAMP and vancomycin. In addition, these conjugates also show a strong inhibitory activity against S. Typhimurium biofilm formation. PMID:26068402

  1. Peroxisomes move by hitchhiking on early endosomes using the novel linker protein PxdA.

    PubMed

    Salogiannis, John; Egan, Martin J; Reck-Peterson, Samara L

    2016-02-01

    Eukaryotic cells use microtubule-based intracellular transport for the delivery of many subcellular cargos, including organelles. The canonical view of organelle transport is that organelles directly recruit molecular motors via cargo-specific adaptors. In contrast with this view, we show here that peroxisomes move by hitchhiking on early endosomes, an organelle that directly recruits the transport machinery. Using the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans we found that hitchhiking is mediated by a novel endosome-associated linker protein, PxdA. PxdA is required for normal distribution and long-range movement of peroxisomes, but not early endosomes or nuclei. Using simultaneous time-lapse imaging, we find that early endosome-associated PxdA localizes to the leading edge of moving peroxisomes. We identify a coiled-coil region within PxdA that is necessary and sufficient for early endosome localization and peroxisome distribution and motility. These results present a new mechanism of microtubule-based organelle transport in which peroxisomes hitchhike on early endosomes and identify PxdA as the novel linker protein required for this coupling.

  2. Bimane fluorescence scanning suggests secondary structure near the S3-S4 linker of BK channels.

    PubMed

    Semenova, Nina P; Abarca-Heidemann, Karin; Loranc, Eva; Rothberg, Brad S

    2009-04-17

    Gating of large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (BK or maxi-K channels) is controlled by a Ca(2+)-sensor, formed by the channel cytoplasmic C-terminal domain, and a voltage sensor, formed by its S0-S4 transmembrane helices. Here we analyze structural properties of a portion of the BK channel voltage sensing domain, the S3-S4 linker, using fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy. Single residues in the S3-S4 linker region were substituted with cysteine, and the cysteine-substituted mutants were expressed in CHO cells and covalently labeled with the sulfhydryl-reactive fluorophore monobromo-trimethylammonio-bimane (qBBr). qBBr fluorescence is quenched by tryptophan and, to a lesser extent, tyrosine side chains. We found that qBBr fluorescence in several of the labeled cysteine-substituted channels shows position-specific quenching, as indicated by increase of the brief lifetime component of the qBBr fluorescence decay. Quenching was reduced with the mutation W203F (in the S4 segment), suggesting that Trp-203 acts as a quenching group. Our results suggest a working hypothesis for the secondary structure of the BK channel S3-S4 region, and places residues Leu-204, Gly-205, and Leu-206 within the extracellular end of the S4 helix.

  3. Allosteric N-WASP activation by an inter-SH3 domain linker in Nck

    PubMed Central

    Okrut, Julia; Prakash, Sumit; Wu, Qiong; Kelly, Mark J. S.; Taunton, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Actin filament networks assemble on cellular membranes in response to signals that locally activate neural Wiskott–Aldrich-syndrome protein (N-WASP) and the Arp2/3 complex. An inactive conformation of N-WASP is stabilized by intramolecular contacts between the GTPase binding domain (GBD) and the C helix of the verprolin-homology, connector-helix, acidic motif (VCA) segment. Multiple SH3 domain-containing adapter proteins can bind and possibly activate N-WASP, but it remains unclear how such binding events relieve autoinhibition to unmask the VCA segment and activate the Arp2/3 complex. Here, we have used purified components to reconstitute a signaling cascade driven by membrane-localized Src homology 3 (SH3) adapters and N-WASP, resulting in the assembly of dynamic actin networks. Among six SH3 adapters tested, Nck was the most potent activator of N-WASP–driven actin assembly. We identify within Nck a previously unrecognized activation motif in a linker between the first two SH3 domains. This linker sequence, reminiscent of bacterial virulence factors, directly engages the N-WASP GBD and competes with VCA binding. Our results suggest that animals, like pathogenic bacteria, have evolved peptide motifs that allosterically activate N-WASP, leading to localized actin nucleation on cellular membranes. PMID:26554011

  4. Trifunctional cross-linker for mapping protein-protein interaction networks and comparing protein conformational states

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Dan; Li, Qiang; Zhang, Mei-Jun; Liu, Chao; Ma, Chengying; Zhang, Pan; Ding, Yue-He; Fan, Sheng-Bo; Tao, Li; Yang, Bing; Li, Xiangke; Ma, Shoucai; Liu, Junjie; Feng, Boya; Liu, Xiaohui; Wang, Hong-Wei; He, Si-Min; Gao, Ning; Ye, Keqiong; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Lei, Xiaoguang

    2016-01-01

    To improve chemical cross-linking of proteins coupled with mass spectrometry (CXMS), we developed a lysine-targeted enrichable cross-linker containing a biotin tag for affinity purification, a chemical cleavage site to separate cross-linked peptides away from biotin after enrichment, and a spacer arm that can be labeled with stable isotopes for quantitation. By locating the flexible proteins on the surface of 70S ribosome, we show that this trifunctional cross-linker is effective at attaining structural information not easily attainable by crystallography and electron microscopy. From a crude Rrp46 immunoprecipitate, it helped identify two direct binding partners of Rrp46 and 15 protein-protein interactions (PPIs) among the co-immunoprecipitated exosome subunits. Applying it to E. coli and C. elegans lysates, we identified 3130 and 893 inter-linked lysine pairs, representing 677 and 121 PPIs. Using a quantitative CXMS workflow we demonstrate that it can reveal changes in the reactivity of lysine residues due to protein-nucleic acid interaction. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12509.001 PMID:26952210

  5. Developing new isotope-coded mass spectrometry-cleavable cross-linkers for elucidating protein structures.

    PubMed

    Yu, Clinton; Kandur, Wynne; Kao, Athit; Rychnovsky, Scott; Huang, Lan

    2014-02-18

    Structural characterization of protein complexes is essential for the understanding of their function and regulation. However, it remains challenging due to limitations in existing tools. With recent technological improvements, cross-linking mass spectrometry (XL-MS) has become a powerful strategy to define protein-protein interactions and elucidate structural topologies of protein complexes. To further advance XL-MS studies, we present here the development of new isotope-coded MS-cleavable homobifunctional cross-linkers: d0- and d10-labeled dimethyl disuccinimidyl sulfoxide (DMDSSO). Detailed characterization of DMDSSO cross-linked peptides further demonstrates that sulfoxide-containing MS-cleavable cross-linkers offer robust and predictable MS2 fragmentation of cross-linked peptides, permitting subsequent MS3 analysis for simplified, unambiguous identification. Concurrent usage of these reagents provides a characteristic doublet pattern of DMDSSO cross-linked peptides, thus aiding in the confidence of cross-link identification by MS(n) analysis. More importantly, the unique isotopic profile permits quantitative analysis of cross-linked peptides and therefore expands the capability of XL-MS strategies to analyze both static and dynamic protein interactions. Together, our work has established a new XL-MS workflow for future studies toward the understanding of structural dynamics of protein complexes.

  6. Nuclear substructure reorganization during late-stage erythropoiesis is selective and does not involve caspase cleavage of major nuclear substructural proteins.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Sharon Wald; Lo, Annie J; Short, Sarah A; Koury, Mark J; Mohandas, Narla; Chasis, Joel Anne

    2005-09-15

    Enucleation, a rare feature of mammalian differentiation, occurs in 3 cell types: erythroblasts, lens epithelium, and keratinocytes. Previous investigations suggest that caspase activation functions in lens epithelial and keratinocyte enucleation, as well as in early erythropoiesis encompassing erythroid burst-forming unit (BFU-E) differentiation to proerythroblast. To determine whether caspase activation contributes to later erythropoiesis and whether nuclear substructures other than chromatin reorganize, we analyzed distributions of nuclear subcompartment proteins and assayed for caspase-induced cleavage of subcompartmental target proteins in mouse erythroblasts. We found that patterns of lamin B in the filamentous network interacting with both the nuclear envelope and DNA, nuclear matrix protein NuMA (Nuclear mitotic apparatus), and splicing factors Sm and SC35 persisted during nuclear condensation, consistent with effective transcription of genes expressed late in differentiation. Thus, nuclear reorganization prior to enucleation is selective, allowing maintenance of critical transcriptional processes independent of extensive chromosomal reorganization. Consistent with these data, we found no evidence for caspase-induced cleavage of major nuclear subcompartment proteins during late erythropoiesis, in contrast to what has been observed in early erythropoiesis and in lens epithelial and keratinocyte differentiation. These findings imply that nuclear condensation and extrusion during terminal erythroid differentiation involve novel mechanisms that do not entail major activation of apoptotic machinery.

  7. Revealing substructures of H4 and H5 hole traps in p-type InP using Laplace deep-level transient spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Darwich, R.; Mani, A. A.

    2010-08-15

    New substructures of H4 and H5 hole traps have been revealed using Laplace deep-level transient spectroscopy. Our measurements show that the hole traps H4 and H5 can have at least three components for each. Moreover, the activation energies are deduced and the microscopic nature of these substructures is discussed.

  8. Rigidifying Fluorescent Linkers by Metal–Organic Framework Formation for Fluorescence Blue Shift and Quantum Yield Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Zhangwen; Gu, Zhi-Yuan; Arvapally, Ravi K.; Chen, Ying-Pin; Ivy, Joshua F.; Yakovenko, Andrey A.; Feng, Dawei; Omary, Mohammad A.; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2014-06-11

    We demonstrate that rigidifying the structure of fluorescent linkers by structurally constraining them in metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) to control their conformation effectively tunes the fluorescence energy and enhances the quantum yield. Thus, a new tetraphenylethylene-based zirconium MOF exhibits a deep-blue fluorescent emission at 470 nm with a unity quantum yield (99.9 ± 0.5%) under Ar, representing ca. 3600 cm⁻¹ blue shift and doubled radiative decay efficiency vs the linker precursor. An anomalous increase in the fluorescence lifetime and relative intensity takes place upon heating the solid MOF from cryogenic to ambient temperatures. The origin of these unusual photoluminescence properties is attributed to twisted linker conformation, intramolecular hindrance, and framework rigidity.

  9. Rigidifying Fluorescent Linkers by Metal-Organic Framework Formation for Fluorescence Blue Shift and Quantum Yield Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, ZW; Gu, ZY; Arvapally, RK; Chen, YP; McDougald, RN; Ivy, JF; Yakovenko, AA; Feng, DW; Omary, MA; Zhou, HC

    2014-06-11

    We demonstrate that rigidifying the structure of fluorescent linkers by structurally constraining them in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) to control their conformation effectively tunes the fluorescence energy and enhances the quantum yield. Thus, a new tetraphenylethylene-based zirconium MOF exhibits a deep-blue fluorescent emission at 470 nm with a unity quantum yield (99.9 +/- 0.5%) under Ar, representing ca. 3600 cm(-1) blue shift and doubled radiative decay efficiency vs the linker precursor. An anomalous increase in the fluorescence lifetime and relative intensity takes place upon heating the solid MOF from cryogenic to ambient temperatures. The origin of these unusual photoluminescence properties is attributed to twisted linker conformation, intramolecular hindrance, and framework rigidity.

  10. Cross-linked polyelectrolyte for direct methanol fuel cells applications based on a novel sulfonated cross-linker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mingyu; Zhang, Gang; Xu, Shuai; Zhao, Chengji; Han, Miaomiao; Zhang, Liyuan; Jiang, Hao; Liu, Zhongguo; Na, Hui

    2014-06-01

    A novel type of cross-linked proton exchange membrane of lower methanol permeation and high proton conductivity is prepared, based on a newly synthesized sulfonated cross-linker: carboxyl terminated benzimidazole trimer bearing sulfonic acid groups (s-BI). Compared to membranes cross-linked with non-sulfonated cross-linker (BI), SPEEK/s-BI-n membranes show higher IEC values and proton conductivities. Meanwhile, oxidative stability and mechanical property of SPEEK/s-BI-n membranes are obviously improved. Among SPEEK/s-BI-n membranes, SPEEK/s-BI-2 exhibits high proton conductivity, low swelling ratio (0.122 S cm-1 and 15.2% at 60 °C, respectively) and low methanol permeability coefficient. These results imply that the cross-linked membranes prepared with the newly sulfonated cross-linker are promising for the direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) application.

  11. Tyrosine Residues from the S4-S5 Linker of Kv11.1 Channels Are Critical for Slow Deactivation.

    PubMed

    Ng, Chai-Ann; Gravel, Andrée E; Perry, Matthew D; Arnold, Alexandre A; Marcotte, Isabelle; Vandenberg, Jamie I

    2016-08-12

    Slow deactivation of Kv11.1 channels is critical for its function in the heart. The S4-S5 linker, which joins the voltage sensor and pore domains, plays a critical role in this slow deactivation gating. Here, we use NMR spectroscopy to identify the membrane-bound surface of the S4S5 linker, and we show that two highly conserved tyrosine residues within the KCNH subfamily of channels are membrane-associated. Site-directed mutagenesis and electrophysiological analysis indicates that Tyr-542 interacts with both the pore domain and voltage sensor residues to stabilize activated conformations of the channel, whereas Tyr-545 contributes to the slow kinetics of deactivation by primarily stabilizing the transition state between the activated and closed states. Thus, the two tyrosine residues in the Kv11.1 S4S5 linker play critical but distinct roles in the slow deactivation phenotype, which is a hallmark of Kv11.1 channels.

  12. Paclitaxel delivery systems: the use of amino acid linkers in the conjugation of paclitaxel with carboxymethyldextran to create prodrugs.

    PubMed

    Sugahara, Shu-ichi; Kajiki, Masahiro; Kuriyama, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, To-ru

    2002-05-01

    Paclitaxel was bound via its hydroxyl group to carboxymethyldextran (CMDex, 150 kDa) by means of an amino acid linker; the linker was introduced into the 2'- or 7-hydroxyl group of the paclitaxel through an ester bond. These conjugates--CMDex-2'-paclitaxel and CMDex-7-paclitaxel--were designed to be water-soluble with a paclitaxel content between 6-8% (w/w) with a degree of subsititution (DS) of the CM groups at 0.6 per sugar residue. The release of the paclitaxel from the conjugates was influenced by the hydroxyl group (2'- or 7-) of paclitaxel to which the amino acid linker was introduced, and by what amino acid was used as the linker. In mouse plasma incubated at 37 degrees C for 72 h, the most paclitaxel was released using CMDex-paclitaxel conjugate with 2'gly followed by, in descending order, 2'-ala, 2'-leu, 2'-ile, and 7-gly as the amino linkers. Colon 26, a Taxol resistant cancer, was introduced into mice and the conjugates were intravenously administered by bolus injection for a tumor distribution study, and intermittently intravenously administered for a tumor growth regression study. In both studies the highest amount of paclitaxel release was found in the CMDex-2'-gly-paclitaxel followed by CMDex-2'-ala-paclitaxel, CMDex-2'-leu-paclitaxel and paclitaxel. There was a direct correlation between the amount of paclitaxel released and the observed efficacy. CMDex-2'-ile-paclitaxel and CMDex-7-gly-paclitaxel did not show any anti-tumor activity. These results clearly demonstrate that a CMDex-paclitaxel with an appropriate amino acid linker has significant anti-tumor activity against colon 26, and that these anti-tumor effects appear to correlate with the amounts of paclitaxel released in the tumor. PMID:12033505

  13. The S4-S5 linker acts as a signal integrator for HERG K+ channel activation and deactivation gating.

    PubMed

    Ng, Chai Ann; Perry, Matthew D; Tan, Peter S; Hill, Adam P; Kuchel, Philip W; Vandenberg, Jamie I

    2012-01-01

    Human ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG) K(+) channels have unusual gating kinetics. Characterised by slow activation/deactivation but rapid inactivation/recovery from inactivation, the unique gating kinetics underlie the central role hERG channels play in cardiac repolarisation. The slow activation and deactivation kinetics are regulated in part by the S4-S5 linker, which couples movement of the voltage sensor domain to opening of the activation gate at the distal end of the inner helix of the pore domain. It has also been suggested that cytosolic domains may interact with the S4-S5 linker to regulate activation and deactivation kinetics. Here, we show that the solution structure of a peptide corresponding to the S4-S5 linker of hERG contains an amphipathic helix. The effects of mutations at the majority of residues in the S4-S5 linker of hERG were consistent with the previously identified role in coupling voltage sensor movement to the activation gate. However, mutations to Ser543, Tyr545, Gly546 and Ala548 had more complex phenotypes indicating that these residues are involved in additional interactions. We propose a model in which the S4-S5 linker, in addition to coupling VSD movement to the activation gate, also contributes to interactions that stabilise the closed state and a separate set of interactions that stabilise the open state. The S4-S5 linker therefore acts as a signal integrator and plays a crucial role in the slow deactivation kinetics of the channel.

  14. Core substructure of the hemiellipsoidal phycobilisome from the red alga Porphyridium cruentum.

    PubMed

    Redecker, D; Wehrmeyer, W; Reuter, W

    1993-12-01

    The allophycocyanin core of hemiellipsoidal phycobilisomes from the red alga, Porphyridium cruentum, was isolated by chromatography on hydroxylapatite and subsequent density gradient centrifugation. Electron microscopy of negatively stained core complexes revealed a tricylindrical structure with a width of 21 to 23 nm in face view and a depth of 12 to 14 nm in side view. Fluorescence emission spectra of these complexes were similar to those of whole phycobilisomes confirming the presence of the two "terminal energy acceptors" allophycocyanin B (APB) and the high molecular linker polypeptide LCM. The polypeptide composition analyzed by SDS-PAGE showed the "anchor" polypeptide LCM, alpha AP, alpha APB, beta AP subunits, a low molecular weight linker with M(r) 13,500 and a blue-colored polypeptide of M(r) 19,800. A complex containing APB could be isolated from a "trimeric" allophycocyanin fraction of the density gradient by agarose gel electrophoresis in the presence of ampholytes. This complex shows a polypeptide composition of (alpha APB alpha AP2 beta AP3).L13.5C and contributes to the core with 30 to 35% of total "trimers". In comparison to the allophycocyanin cores from hemidiscoidal phycobilisomes of cyanobacteria and red algae, all data concerning the core of the hemiellipsoidal phycobilisomes from Porphyridium cruentum strongly suggest that there is no increase in size but an increase in its APB content. A model comprising the allophycocyanin core and the membrane integral photosystem II particles presents the structural and possible functional consequences of the results.

  15. Boosted objects and jet substructure at the LHC: Report of BOOST2012, held at IFIC Valencia, 23rd-27th of July 2012

    DOE PAGES

    Altheimer, A.

    2014-03-21

    This report of the BOOST2012 workshop presents the results of four working groups that studied key aspects of jet substructure. We discuss the potential of first-principle QCD calculations to yield a precise description of the substructure of jets and study the accuracy of state-of-the-art Monte Carlo tools. Limitations of the experiments’ ability to resolve substructure are evaluated, with a focus on the impact of additional (pile-up) proton proton collisions on jet substructure performance in future LHC operating scenarios. The final section summarizes the lessons learnt from jet substructure analyses in searches for new physics in the production of boosted topmore » quarks.« less

  16. Effect of modification of the length and flexibility of the acyl carrier protein-thioesterase interdomain linker on functionality of the animal fatty acid synthase.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Anil K; Witkowski, Andrzej; Berman, Harvey A; Zhang, Lei; Smith, Stuart

    2005-03-15

    A natural linker of approximately 20 residues connects the acyl carrier protein with the carboxy-terminal thioesterase domain of the animal fatty acid synthase. This study examines the effects of changes in the length and amino acid composition of this linker on catalytic activity, product composition, and segmental motion of the thioesterase domain. Deletion of 10 residues, almost half of the interdomain linker, had no effect on either mobility of the thioesterase domain, estimated from fluorescence polarization of a pyrenebutyl methylphosphono moiety bound covalently to the active site serine residue, or functionality of the fatty acid synthase; further shortening of the linker limited mobility of the thioesterase domain and resulted in reduced fatty acid synthase activity and an increase in product chain length from 16 to 18 and 20 carbon atoms. Surprisingly, however, even when the entire linker region was deleted, the fatty acid synthase retained 28% activity. Lengthening of the linker, by insertion of an unusually long acyl carrier protein-thioesterase linker from a modular polyketide synthase, increased mobility of the thioesterase domain without having any significant effect on catalytic properties of the complex. Interdomain linkers could also be used to tether, to the acyl carrier protein domain of the fatty acid synthase, a thioesterase active toward shorter chain length acyl thioesters generating novel short-chain fatty acid synthases. These studies reveal that although truncation of the interdomain linker partially impacts the ability of the thioesterase domain to terminate growth of the acyl chain, the overall integrity of the fatty acid synthase is quite tolerant to moderate changes in linker length and flexibility. The retention of fatty acid synthesizing activity on deletion of the entire linker region implies that the inherent flexibility of the phosphopantetheine "swinging arm" also contributes significantly to the successful docking of the long

  17. Developing an Acidic Residue Reactive and Sulfoxide-Containing MS-Cleavable Homobifunctional Cross-Linker for Probing Protein–Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cross-linking mass spectrometry (XL-MS) has become a powerful strategy for defining protein–protein interactions and elucidating architectures of large protein complexes. However, one of the inherent challenges in MS analysis of cross-linked peptides is their unambiguous identification. To facilitate this process, we have previously developed a series of amine-reactive sulfoxide-containing MS-cleavable cross-linkers. These MS-cleavable reagents have allowed us to establish a common robust XL-MS workflow that enables fast and accurate identification of cross-linked peptides using multistage tandem mass spectrometry (MSn). Although amine-reactive reagents targeting lysine residues have been successful, it remains difficult to characterize protein interaction interfaces with little or no lysine residues. To expand the coverage of protein interaction regions, we present here the development of a new acidic residue-targeting sulfoxide-containing MS-cleavable homobifunctional cross-linker, dihydrazide sulfoxide (DHSO). We demonstrate that DHSO cross-linked peptides display the same predictable and characteristic fragmentation pattern during collision induced dissociation as amine-reactive sulfoxide-containing MS-cleavable cross-linked peptides, thus permitting their simplified analysis and unambiguous identification by MSn. Additionally, we show that DHSO can provide complementary data to amine-reactive reagents. Collectively, this work not only enlarges the range of the application of XL-MS approaches but also further demonstrates the robustness and applicability of sulfoxide-based MS-cleavability in conjunction with various cross-linking chemistries. PMID:27417384

  18. Substructure analysis using NICE/SPAR and applications of force to linear and nonlinear structures. [spacecraft masts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Razzaq, Zia; Prasad, Venkatesh; Darbhamulla, Siva Prasad; Bhati, Ravinder; Lin, Cai

    1987-01-01

    Parallel computing studies are presented for a variety of structural analysis problems. Included are the substructure planar analysis of rectangular panels with and without a hole, the static analysis of space mast, using NICE/SPAR and FORCE, and substructure analysis of plane rigid-jointed frames using FORCE. The computations are carried out on the Flex/32 MultiComputer using one to eighteen processors. The NICE/SPAR runstream samples are documented for the panel problem. For the substructure analysis of plane frames, a computer program is developed to demonstrate the effectiveness of a substructuring technique when FORCE is enforced. Ongoing research activities for an elasto-plastic stability analysis problem using FORCE, and stability analysis of the focus problem using NICE/SPAR are briefly summarized. Speedup curves for the panel, the mast, and the frame problems provide a basic understanding of the effectiveness of parallel computing procedures utilized or developed, within the domain of the parameters considered. Although the speedup curves obtained exhibit various levels of computational efficiency, they clearly demonstrate the excellent promise which parallel computing holds for the structural analysis problem. Source code is given for the elasto-plastic stability problem and the FORCE program.

  19. Tuning the thermal conductivity of methylammonium lead halide by the molecular substructure.

    PubMed

    Caddeo, Claudia; Melis, Claudio; Saba, Maria Ilenia; Filippetti, Alessio; Colombo, Luciano; Mattoni, Alessandro

    2016-09-21

    By using state-of-the-art atomistic methods we provide an accurate estimate of thermal conductivity of methylammonium lead halide as a function of sample size and temperature, in agreement with experimental works. We show that the thermal conductivity of methylammonium lead halide is intrinsically low, due to the low sound velocity of the PbI lattice. Furthermore, by selectively analyzing the effect of different molecular degrees of freedom, we clarify the role of the molecular substructure by showing that the internal modes above 150 cm(-1) (in addition to rotations) are effective in reducing the thermal conductivity of hybrid perovskites. This analysis suggests strategies to tailor the thermal conductivity by modifying the internal structure of organic cations. PMID:27531063

  20. Hints of Thermal Fragmentation in the Primordial Substructure of NGC2264

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, P. S.; Lada, C. J.; Young, E. T.; Marengo, M.; Muench, A.; Muzerolle, J.; Siegler, N.; Rieke, G.; Hartmann, L.; Megeath, T.; Fazio, G.

    2005-12-01

    We present Spitzer observations of a young star forming region within NGC2264. These observations reveal new 24 micron sources in curious linear alignments, extending radially like spokes on a wheel from a previously known luminous young protostar. These 24 micron sources are found to be mostly ( ˜60%) Class I protostars that are highly embedded within dense filamentary molecular material. The protostars still retain the primordial substructuring of the parental cloud. We find the protostars to be separated by regular intervals that are consistent with the Jeans length for the average density of the associated molecular material, suggesting that thermal fragmentation played an important role during the star forming process in this region. The figure shows a false color image of this young region built from MIPS 24 micron (red), IRAC 8 micron (green), and IRAC 3.6 micron (blue) data. PT acknowledges support from the scholarship SFRH/BD/13984/2003 FCT, Portugal.

  1. Multi-objective optimization of two-dimensional phoxonic crystals with multi-level substructure scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Yin, J.; Zhang, H. W.; Chen, B. S.

    2016-03-01

    Phoxonic crystal (PXC) is a promising artificial periodic material for optomechanical systems and acousto-optical devices. The multi-objective topology optimization of dual phononic and photonic max relative bandgaps in a kind of two-dimensional (2D) PXC is investigated to find the regular pattern of topological configurations. In order to improve the efficiency, a multi-level substructure scheme is proposed to analyze phononic and photonic band structures, which is stable, efficient and less memory-consuming. The efficient and reliable numerical algorithm provides a powerful tool to optimize and design crystal devices. The results show that with the reduction of the relative phononic bandgap (PTBG), the central dielectric scatterer becomes smaller and the dielectric veins of cross-connections between different dielectric scatterers turn into the horizontal and vertical shape gradually. These characteristics can be of great value to the design and synthesis of new materials with different topological configurations for applications of the PXC.

  2. Extended stellar substructure surrounding the Boötes I dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roderick, T. A.; Mackey, A. D.; Jerjen, H.; Da Costa, G. S.

    2016-10-01

    We present deep stellar photometry of the Boötes I dwarf spheroidal galaxy in g- and i-band filters, taken with the Dark Energy Camera at Cerro Tololo in Chile. Our analysis reveals a large, extended region of stellar substructure surrounding the dwarf, as well as a distinct overdensity encroaching on its tidal radius. A radial profile of the Boötes I stellar distribution shows a break radius indicating the presence of extra-tidal stars. These observations strongly suggest that Boötes I is experiencing tidal disruption, although not as extreme as that exhibited by the Hercules dwarf spheroidal. Combined with revised velocity dispersion measurements from the literature, we see evidence suggesting the need to review previous theoretical models of the Boötes I dwarf spheroidal galaxy.

  3. Guided Iterative Substructure Search (GI-SSS) - A New Trick for an Old Dog.

    PubMed

    Weskamp, Nils

    2016-07-01

    Substructure search (SSS) is a fundamental technique supported by various chemical information systems. Many users apply it in an iterative manner: they modify their queries to shape the composition of the retrieved hit sets according to their needs. We propose and evaluate two heuristic extensions of SSS aimed at simplifying these iterative query modifications by collecting additional information during query processing and visualizing this information in an intuitive way. This gives the user a convenient feedback on how certain changes to the query would affect the retrieved hit set and reduces the number of trial-and-error cycles needed to generate an optimal search result. The proposed heuristics are simple, yet surprisingly effective and can be easily added to existing SSS implementations. PMID:27492243

  4. Guided Iterative Substructure Search (GI-SSS) - A New Trick for an Old Dog.

    PubMed

    Weskamp, Nils

    2016-07-01

    Substructure search (SSS) is a fundamental technique supported by various chemical information systems. Many users apply it in an iterative manner: they modify their queries to shape the composition of the retrieved hit sets according to their needs. We propose and evaluate two heuristic extensions of SSS aimed at simplifying these iterative query modifications by collecting additional information during query processing and visualizing this information in an intuitive way. This gives the user a convenient feedback on how certain changes to the query would affect the retrieved hit set and reduces the number of trial-and-error cycles needed to generate an optimal search result. The proposed heuristics are simple, yet surprisingly effective and can be easily added to existing SSS implementations.

  5. The substructure of a flux transfer event observed by the MMS spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, K.-J.; Sibeck, D. G.; Giles, B. L.; Pollock, C. J.; Gershman, D.; Avanov, L.; Paterson, W. R.; Dorelli, J. C.; Ergun, R. E.; Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.; Mauk, B.; Cohen, I. J.; Torbert, R. B.; Burch, J. L.

    2016-09-01

    On 15 August 2015, MMS (Magnetospheric Multiscale mission), skimming the dusk magnetopause, detected an isolated region of an increased magnetic strength and bipolar Bn, indicating a flux transfer event (FTE). The four spacecraft in a tetrahedron allowed for investigations of the shape and motion of the FTE. In particular, high-resolution particle data facilitated our exploration of FTE substructures and their magnetic connectivity inside and surrounding the FTE. Combined field and plasma observations suggest that the core fields are open, magnetically connected to the northern magnetosphere from which high-energy particles leak; ion "D" distributions characterize the axis of flux ropes that carry old-opened field lines; counterstreaming electrons superposed by parallel-heated components populate the periphery surrounding the FTE; and the interface between the core and draped regions contains a separatrix of newly opened magnetic field lines that emanate from the X line above the FTE.

  6. Numerical modal analysis of structures based on a revised substructure synthesis approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, C. W.; Johnson, D. A.; Dubois, F.

    1995-02-01

    The classical substructuring approach to the problem of modal analysis of structures suffers from a number of drawbacks which can sometimes lead the analyst to prefer other, often more cumbersome, techniques. A modified Rayleigh-Ritz based approach is presented which circumvents most of the drawbacks and improves the precision of the method while also enhancing its applicability to complex structures. The scheme is also particularly well suited to symbolic implementation, in view of its systematic, problem-independent formulation. The theoretical results are validated by case studies chosen to highlight various features of the approach, viz., a beam structure, a hinged simple square plate, a hinged plate structure of fairly complicated shape, and a rectangular plate with two cutouts.

  7. Tuning the thermal conductivity of methylammonium lead halide by the molecular substructure.

    PubMed

    Caddeo, Claudia; Melis, Claudio; Saba, Maria Ilenia; Filippetti, Alessio; Colombo, Luciano; Mattoni, Alessandro

    2016-09-21

    By using state-of-the-art atomistic methods we provide an accurate estimate of thermal conductivity of methylammonium lead halide as a function of sample size and temperature, in agreement with experimental works. We show that the thermal conductivity of methylammonium lead halide is intrinsically low, due to the low sound velocity of the PbI lattice. Furthermore, by selectively analyzing the effect of different molecular degrees of freedom, we clarify the role of the molecular substructure by showing that the internal modes above 150 cm(-1) (in addition to rotations) are effective in reducing the thermal conductivity of hybrid perovskites. This analysis suggests strategies to tailor the thermal conductivity by modifying the internal structure of organic cations.

  8. ATPase-Modulated Stress Granules Contain a Diverse Proteome and Substructure.

    PubMed

    Jain, Saumya; Wheeler, Joshua R; Walters, Robert W; Agrawal, Anurag; Barsic, Anthony; Parker, Roy

    2016-01-28

    Stress granules are mRNA-protein granules that form when translation initiation is limited, and they are related to pathological granules in various neurodegenerative diseases. Super-resolution microscopy reveals stable substructures, referred to as cores, within stress granules that can be purified. Proteomic analysis of stress granule cores reveals a dense network of protein-protein interactions and links between stress granules and human diseases and identifies ATP-dependent helicases and protein remodelers as conserved stress granule components. ATP is required for stress granule assembly and dynamics. Moreover, multiple ATP-driven machines affect stress granules differently, with the CCT complex inhibiting stress granule assembly, while the MCM and RVB complexes promote stress granule persistence. Our observations suggest that stress granules contain a stable core structure surrounded by a dynamic shell with assembly, disassembly, and transitions between the core and shell modulated by numerous protein and RNA remodeling complexes. PMID:26777405

  9. Human genetics. The genetics of Mexico recapitulates Native American substructure and affects biomedical traits.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Estrada, Andrés; Gignoux, Christopher R; Fernández-López, Juan Carlos; Zakharia, Fouad; Sikora, Martin; Contreras, Alejandra V; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Sandoval, Karla; Eng, Celeste; Romero-Hidalgo, Sandra; Ortiz-Tello, Patricia; Robles, Victoria; Kenny, Eimear E; Nuño-Arana, Ismael; Barquera-Lozano, Rodrigo; Macín-Pérez, Gastón; Granados-Arriola, Julio; Huntsman, Scott; Galanter, Joshua M; Via, Marc; Ford, Jean G; Chapela, Rocío; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Rodríguez-Santana, Jose R; Romieu, Isabelle; Sienra-Monge, Juan José; del Rio Navarro, Blanca; London, Stephanie J; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés; Garcia-Herrera, Rodrigo; Estrada, Karol; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Jimenez-Sanchez, Gerardo; Carnevale, Alessandra; Soberón, Xavier; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Rangel-Villalobos, Héctor; Silva-Zolezzi, Irma; Burchard, Esteban Gonzalez; Bustamante, Carlos D

    2014-06-13

    Mexico harbors great cultural and ethnic diversity, yet fine-scale patterns of human genome-wide variation from this region remain largely uncharacterized. We studied genomic variation within Mexico from over 1000 individuals representing 20 indigenous and 11 mestizo populations. We found striking genetic stratification among indigenous populations within Mexico at varying degrees of geographic isolation. Some groups were as differentiated as Europeans are from East Asians. Pre-Columbian genetic substructure is recapitulated in the indigenous ancestry of admixed mestizo individuals across the country. Furthermore, two independently phenotyped cohorts of Mexicans and Mexican Americans showed a significant association between subcontinental ancestry and lung function. Thus, accounting for fine-scale ancestry patterns is critical for medical and population genetic studies within Mexico, in Mexican-descent populations, and likely in many other populations worldwide.

  10. The Genetics of Mexico Recapitulates Native American Substructure and Affects Biomedical Traits

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Estrada, Andrés; Gignoux, Christopher R.; Fernández-López, Juan Carlos; Zakharia, Fouad; Sikora, Martin; Contreras, Alejandra V.; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Sandoval, Karla; Eng, Celeste; Romero-Hidalgo, Sandra; Ortiz-Tello, Patricia; Robles, Victoria; Kenny, Eimear E.; Nuño-Arana, Ismael; Barquera-Lozano, Rodrigo; Macín-Pérez, Gastón; Granados-Arriola, Julio; Huntsman, Scott; Galanter, Joshua M.; Via, Marc; Ford, Jean G.; Chapela, Rocío; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Rodríguez-Santana, Jose R.; Romieu, Isabelle; Sienra-Monge, Juan José; Navarro, Blanca del Rio; London, Stephanie J.; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés; Garcia-Herrera, Rodrigo; Estrada, Karol; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Jimenez-Sanchez, Gerardo; Carnevale, Alessandra; Soberón, Xavier; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Rangel-Villalobos, Héctor; Silva-Zolezzi, Irma; Burchard, Esteban Gonzalez; Bustamante, Carlos D.

    2014-01-01

    Mexico harbors great cultural and ethnic diversity, yet fine-scale patterns of human genome-wide variation from this region remain largely uncharacterized. We studied genomic variation within Mexico from over 1,000 individuals representing 20 indigenous and 11 mestizo populations. We found striking genetic stratification among indigenous populations within Mexico at varying degrees of geographic isolation. Some groups were as differentiated as Europeans are from East Asians. Pre-Columbian genetic substructure is recapitulated in the indigenous ancestry of admixed mestizo individuals across the country. Furthermore, two independently phenotyped cohorts of Mexicans and Mexican Americans showed a significant association between sub-continental ancestry and lung function. Thus, accounting for fine-scale ancestry patterns is critical for medical and population genetic studies within Mexico, in Mexican-descent populations, and likely in many other populations worldwide. PMID:24926019

  11. Investigating dark matter substructure with pulsar timing - II. Improved limits on small-scale cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Hamish A.; Lewis, Geraint F.; Scott, Pat

    2016-02-01

    Ultracompact minihaloes (UCMHs) have been proposed as a type of dark matter substructure seeded by large-amplitude primordial perturbations and topological defects. UCMHs are expected to survive to the present era, allowing constraints to be placed on their cosmic abundance using observations within our own Galaxy. Constraints on their number density can be linked to conditions in the early Universe that impact structure formation, such as increased primordial power on small scales, generic weak non-Gaussianity, and the presence of cosmic strings. We use new constraints on the abundance of UCMHs from pulsar timing to place generalized limits on the parameters of each of these cosmological scenarios. At some scales, the limits are the strongest to date, exceeding those from dark matter annihilation. Our new limits have the added advantage of being independent of the particle nature of dark matter, as they are based only on gravitational effects.

  12. A model for Quick Load Analysis for monopile-type offshore wind turbine substructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schløer, Signe; Garcia Castillo, Laura; Fejerskov, Morten; Stroescu, Emanuel; Bredmose, Henrik

    2016-09-01

    A model for Quick Load Analysis, QuLA, of an offshore wind turbine substructure is presented. The aerodynamic rotor loads and damping are precomputed for a load-based configuration. The dynamic structural response is represented by the first global fore-aft mode only and is computed in the frequency domain using the equation of motion. The model is compared against the state of the art aeroelastic code, Flex5, and both life time fatigue and extreme loads are considered in the comparison. In general there is good similarity between the two models. Some derivation for the sectional forces are explained in terms of the model simplifications. The difference in the sectional moments are found to be within 14% for the fatigue load case and 10% for the extreme load condition.

  13. A Macrocyclic Fluorophore Dimer with Flexible Linkers: Bright Excimer Emission with a Long Fluorescence Lifetime.

    PubMed

    Osaki, Hiroshi; Chou, Chih-Ming; Taki, Masayasu; Welke, Kai; Yokogawa, Daisuke; Irle, Stephan; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Saito, Shohei; Fukazawa, Aiko; Yamaguchi, Shigehiro

    2016-06-13

    Bright fluorescent molecules with long fluorescence lifetimes are important for the development of lifetime-based fluorescence imaging techniques. Herein, a molecular design is described for simultaneously attaining long fluorescence lifetime (τ) and high brightness (ΦF ×ɛ) in a system that features macrocyclic dimerization of fluorescent π-conjugated skeletons with flexible linkers. An alkylene-linked macrocyclic dimer of bis(thienylethynyl)anthracene was found to show excimer emission with a long fluorescence lifetime (τ≈19 ns) in solution, while maintaining high brightness. A comparison with various relevant derivatives revealed that the macrocyclic structure and the length of the alkylene chains play crucial roles in attaining these properties. In vitro time-gated imaging experiments were conducted as a proof-of-principle for the superiority of this macrocyclic fluorophore relative to the commercial fluorescent dye Alexa Fluor 488. PMID:27121201

  14. TENSION ON THE LINKER GATES THE ATP-DEPENDENT RELEASE OF DYNEIN FROM MICROTUBULES

    PubMed Central

    Cleary, Frank B.; Dewitt, Mark A.; Bilyard, Thomas; Htet, Zaw Min; Belyy, Vladislav; Chan, Danna D.; Chang, Amy Y.; Yildiz, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a dimeric motor that transports intracellular cargoes towards the minus-end of microtubules (MTs). In contrast to other processive motors, stepping of the dynein motor domains (heads) is not precisely coordinated. Therefore, the mechanism of dynein processivity remains unclear. Here, by engineering the mechanical and catalytic properties of the motor, we show that dynein processivity minimally requires a single active head and a second inert MT binding domain. Processivity arises from a high ratio of MT-bound to unbound time, and not from interhead communication. Additionally, nucleotide-dependent microtubule release is gated by tension on the linker domain. Intramolecular tension sensing is observed in dynein’s stepping motion at high interhead separations. We developed a quantitative model for the stepping characteristics of dynein and its response to chemical and mechanical perturbation. PMID:25109325

  15. Linker phosphoramidite reagents for the attachment of the first nucleoside to underivatized solid-phase supports

    PubMed Central

    Pon, Richard T.; Yu, Shuyuan

    2004-01-01

    New linker phosphoramidite reagents containing a cleavable 3′-ester linkage are used for attaching the first nucleoside to the surface of a solid- phase support. Inexpensive, underivatized amino supports, such as long chain alkylamine controlled-pore glass, can serve as universal supports. No modifications to phosphoramidite coupling conditions are required and, after synthesis, treatment with NH4OH releases the products with 3′-OH ends. No 3′-dephosphorylation is required. Phosphoramidite reagents containing a succinate and sulfonyl diethanol linkage between the nucleoside and phosphoramidite group are particularly advantageous and can be used to create both 3′-OH and 5′-phosphate ends on oligonucleotides. Reproducibility and quality of oligonucleotide synthesis is demonstrated for either column and 96-well plate formats on low-, medium- or high-loading CPG supports. PMID:14752050

  16. Solid-phase organic synthesis of polyisoprenoid alcohols with traceless sulfone linker.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi-Fan; Liu, Chen-Yu; Guo, Chih-Wei; Wang, Yen-Chih; Fang, Jim-Min; Cheng, Wei-Chieh

    2008-09-19

    Solid-phase organic synthesis of polyprenols with a traceless sulfone linker is described. The polymer-bound benezenesulfinate is first linked with the "tail" building blocks of isoprenyl chlorides via S-alkylation. With use of dimsyl anion as an appropriate base, the polymer-bound alpha-sulfonyl carbanion is generated and coupled with other "body" building blocks in an efficient manner. After repeated processes and a global palladium-catalyzed desulfonation with LiEt 3BH as the reducing agent, the desired polyprenols with various chain lengths and geometrical configurations are obtained in 32-59% overall yields. The solid-phase synthesis offers the advantage in facile isolation of polyprenols without tedious operation or time-consuming purification.

  17. Tension on the linker gates the ATP-dependent release of dynein from microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, Frank B.; Dewitt, Mark A.; Bilyard, Thomas; Htet, Zaw Min; Belyy, Vladislav; Chan, Danna D.; Chang, Amy Y.; Yildiz, Ahmet

    2014-08-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a dimeric motor that transports intracellular cargoes towards the minus end of microtubules (MTs). In contrast to other processive motors, stepping of the dynein motor domains (heads) is not precisely coordinated. Therefore, the mechanism of dynein processivity remains unclear. Here, by engineering the mechanical and catalytic properties of the motor, we show that dynein processivity minimally requires a single active head and a second inert MT-binding domain. Processivity arises from a high ratio of MT-bound to unbound time, and not from interhead communication. In addition, nucleotide-dependent microtubule release is gated by tension on the linker domain. Intramolecular tension sensing is observed in dynein’s stepping motion at high interhead separations. On the basis of these results, we propose a quantitative model for the stepping characteristics of dynein and its response to chemical and mechanical perturbation.

  18. A Highly Selective Hsp90 Affinity Chromatography Resin with a Cleavable Linker

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Philip F; Barrott, Jared J; Carlson, David A; Loiselle, David R; Speer, Brittany L; Bodoor, Khaldon; Rund, Lauretta A; Haystead, Timothy A J

    2012-01-01

    Over 200 proteins have been identified that interact with the protein chaperone Hsp90, a recognized therapeutic target thought to participate in non-oncogene addiction in a variety of human cancers. However, defining Hsp90 clients is challenging because interactions between Hsp90 and its physiologically relevant targets involve low affinity binding and are thought to be transient. Using a chemo-proteomic strategy, we have developed a novel orthogonally cleavable Hsp90 affinity resin that allows purification of the native protein and is quite selective for Hsp90 over its immediate family members, GRP94 and TRAP 1. We show that the resin can be used under low stringency conditions for the rapid, unambiguous capture of native Hsp90 in complex with a native client. We also show that the choice of linker used to tether the ligand to the insoluble support can have a dramatic effect on the selectivity of the affinity media. PMID:22520629

  19. In situ spatiotemporal measurements of the detailed azimuthal substructure of the substorm current wedge

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, C; Fazakerley, A N; Rae, I J; J Watt, C E; Murphy, K; Wild, J A; Karlsson, T; Mutel, R; Owen, C J; Ergun, R; Masson, A; Berthomier, M; Donovan, E; Frey, H U; Matzka, J; Stolle, C; Zhang, Y

    2014-01-01

    The substorm current wedge (SCW) is a fundamental component of geomagnetic substorms. Models tend to describe the SCW as a simple line current flowing into the ionosphere toward dawn and out of the ionosphere toward dusk, linked by a westward electrojet. We use multispacecraft observations from perigee passes of the Cluster 1 and 4 spacecraft during a substorm on 15 January 2010, in conjunction with ground-based observations, to examine the spatial structuring and temporal variability of the SCW. At this time, the spacecraft traveled east-west azimuthally above the auroral region. We show that the SCW has significant azimuthal substructure on scales of 100 km at altitudes of 4000–7000 km. We identify 26 individual current sheets in the Cluster 4 data and 34 individual current sheets in the Cluster 1 data, with Cluster 1 passing through the SCW 120–240 s after Cluster 4 at 1300–2000 km higher altitude. Both spacecraft observed large-scale regions of net upward and downward field-aligned current, consistent with the large-scale characteristics of the SCW, although sheets of oppositely directed currents were observed within both regions. We show that the majority of these current sheets were closely aligned to a north-south direction, in contrast to the expected east-west orientation of the preonset aurora. Comparing our results with observations of the field-aligned current associated with bursty bulk flows (BBFs), we conclude that significant questions remain for the explanation of SCW structuring by BBF-driven “wedgelets.” Our results therefore represent constraints on future modeling and theoretical frameworks on the generation of the SCW. Key Points The substorm current wedge (SCW) has significant azimuthal structure Current sheets within the SCW are north-south aligned The substructure of the SCW raises questions for the proposed wedgelet scenario PMID:26167439

  20. Two-body wear of dental porcelain and substructure oxide ceramics.

    PubMed

    Rosentritt, Martin; Preis, Verena; Behr, Michael; Hahnel, Sebastian; Handel, Gerhard; Kolbeck, Carola

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the two-body wear of different ceramics. Two-body wear tests were performed in a chewing simulator with steatite and enamel antagonists, respectively. Specimens were loaded in a pin-on-block design with a vertical load of 50 N for 1.2 × 10(5) cycles; (f = 1.6 Hz; lateral movement, 1 mm; mouth opening: 2 mm). Human enamel was used as a reference. Three zirconia ceramics, three veneering porcelains, two glass-infiltrated and one lithium disilicate ceramic were investigated. Veneering and lithium disilicate ceramics were glazed before testing. Surface roughness Ra (SP6, Perthen-Feinprüf, G) and wear depth were determined using a 3D scanner (Laserscan 3D, Willytec, G). SEM (Quanta FEG 400, FEI, USA) pictures of the worn specimens and antagonists were made for evaluating wear performance. Veneering porcelain provided wear traces between 71.2 and 124.1 μm (enamel antagonist) and 117.4 and 274.1 μm (steatite). Wear of the steatite antagonists varied between 0.618 and 2.85 mm². No wear was found for zirconia and glass-infiltrated substructure ceramics. Also, no wear was found for the corresponding antagonists. Wear of specimens and antagonists was strongly material dependent. No visible wear was found on zirconia and glass-infiltrated ceramics. Porcelain and lithium disilicate ceramic showed a comparable or lower wear than the enamel reference. Antagonist wear was found to be lower when specimens were made of substructure oxide ceramics instead of veneering porcelain. From the point of wear testing, zirconia may be used for the fabrication of fixed dental prosthesis without veneering.

  1. The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey. XIX. Tomography of Milky Way Substructures in the NGVS Footprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokhorst, Deborah; Starkenburg, Else; McConnachie, Alan W.; Navarro, Julio F.; Ferrarese, Laura; Côté, Patrick; Liu, Chengze; Peng, Eric W.; Gwyn, Stephen D. J.; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Guhathakurta, Puragra

    2016-03-01

    The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS) is a deep u*giz survey targeting the Virgo Cluster of galaxies at 16.5 Mpc. This survey provides high-quality photometry over an ˜100 deg2 region straddling the constellations of Virgo and Coma Berenices. This sightline through the Milky Way is noteworthy in that it intersects two of the most prominent substructures in the Galactic halo: the Virgo overdensity (VOD) and Sagittarius stellar stream (close to its bifurcation point). In this paper, we use deep u*gi imaging from the NGVS to perform tomography of the VOD and Sagittarius stream using main-sequence turnoff (MSTO) stars as a halo tracer population. The VOD, whose centroid is known to lie at somewhat lower declinations (α ˜ 190°, δ ˜ -5°) than is covered by the NGVS, is nevertheless clearly detected in the NGVS footprint at distances between ˜8 and 25 kpc. By contrast, the Sagittarius stream is found to slice directly across the NGVS field at distances between 25 and 40 kpc, with a density maximum at ≃35 kpc. No evidence is found for new substructures beyond the Sagittarius stream, at least out to a distance of ˜90 kpc—the largest distance to which we can reliably trace the halo using MSTO stars. We find clear evidence for a distance gradient in the Sagittarius stream across the ˜30° of sky covered by the NGVS and its flanking fields. We compare our distance measurements along the stream with those predicted by leading stream models.

  2. DEFORMATION SUBSTRUCTURES AND THEIR TRANSITIONS IN LASER SHOCK-COMPRESSED COPPER-ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, M A; Schneider, M S; Jarmakani, H; Kad, B; Remington, B A; Kalantar, D H; McNaney, J; Cao, B; Wark, J

    2007-10-17

    It is shown that the short pulse durations (0.1-10 ns) in laser shock compression ensure a rapid decay of the pulse and quenching of the shocked sample in times that are orders of magnitude lower than in conventional explosively driven plate impact experiments. Thus, laser compression, by virtue of a much more rapid cooling, enables the retention of a deformation structure closer to the one existing during shock. The smaller pulse length also decreases the propensity for localization. Copper and copper aluminum (2 and 6 wt% Al) with orientations [001] and [{bar 1}34] were subjected to high intensity laser pulses with energy levels of 70 to 300 J delivered in an initial pulse duration of approximately 3 ns. The [001] and [{bar 1}34] orientations were chosen since they respectively maximize and minimize the number of slip systems with highest resolved shear stresses. Systematic differences of the defect substructure were observed as a function of pressure, stacking-fault energy and crystalline orientation. The changes in the mechanical properties for each condition were compared using micro- and nano-hardness measurements and correlated well with observations of the defect substructure. Three regimes of plastic deformation were identified and their transitions modeled: dislocation cells, stacking-faults, and twins. An existing constitutive description of the slip to twinning transition, based on the critical shear stress, was expanded to incorporate the effect of stacking-fault energy. A new physically-based criterion accounting for stacking-fault energy was developed that describes the transition from perfect loop to partial loop homogeneous nucleation, and consequently from cells to stacking-faults. These calculations predict transitions that are in qualitative agreement with the effect of SFE.

  3. Chemical Abundances of Planetary Nebulae in the Substructures of M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xuan; García-Benito, Rubén; Guerrero, Martín A.; Liu, Xiaowei; Yuan, Haibo; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Bing

    2015-12-01

    We present deep spectroscopy of planetary nebulae (PNe) that are associated with the substructures of the Andromeda Galaxy (M31). The spectra were obtained with the Optical System for Imaging and low-intermediate-Resolution Integrated Spectroscopy spectrograph on the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias. Seven targets were selected for the observations, three in the Northern Spur and four associated with the Giant Stream. The most distant target in our sample, with a rectified galactocentric distance ≥slant 100 kpc, was the first PN discovered in the outer streams of M31. The [O iii] λ4363 auroral line is well detected in the spectra of all targets, enabling electron temperature determination. Ionic abundances are derived based on the [O iii] temperatures, and elemental abundances of helium, nitrogen, oxygen, neon, sulfur, and argon are estimated. The relatively low N/O and He/H ratios, as well as abundance ratios of α-elements, indicate that our target PNe might belong to populations as old as ∼2 Gyr. Our PN sample, including the current seven and the previous three observed by Fang et al., have rather homogeneous oxygen abundances. The study of abundances and the spatial and kinematical properties of our sample leads to the tempting conclusion that their progenitors might belong to the same stellar population, which hints at a possibility that the Northern Spur and the Giant Stream have the same origin. This may be explained by the stellar orbit proposed by Merrett et al. Judging from the position and kinematics, we emphasize that M32 might be responsible for the two substructures. Deep spectroscopy of PNe in M32 will help to assess this hypothesis. Based on observations made with the Gran Telescopio Canarias, installed at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, in the island of La Palma. These observations are associated with program No. GTC55-14B.

  4. Exploring halo substructure with giant stars. XIV. The nature of the Triangulum-Andromeda stellar features

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, Allyson A.; Johnston, Kathryn V.; Majewski, Steven R.; Damke, Guillermo; Richardson, Whitney; Beaton, Rachael; Rocha-Pinto, Helio J. E-mail: kvj@astro.columbia.edu E-mail: gjd3r@virginia.edu E-mail: rlb9n@virginia.edu

    2014-09-20

    As large-scale stellar surveys have become available over the past decade, the ability to detect and characterize substructures in the Galaxy has increased dramatically. These surveys have revealed the Triangulum-Andromeda (TriAnd) region to be rich with substructures in the distance range 20-30 kpc, and the relation of these features to each other, if any, remains unclear. An exploration using Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) photometry reveals not only the faint sequence in M giants detected by Rocha-Pinto et al. spanning the range 100° < l < 160° and –50° < b < –15°, but, in addition, a second, brighter and more densely populated sequence. These sequences are likely associated with the distinct main sequences (MSs) discovered (and labeled TriAnd1 and TriAnd2) by Martin et al. in an optical survey in the direction of M31, where TriAnd2 is the optical counterpart of the fainter red giant branch (RGB)/asymptotic giant branch sequence of Rocha-Pinto et al. Here, the age, distance, and metallicity ranges for TriAnd1 and TriAnd2 are estimated by simultaneously fitting isochrones to the 2MASS RGB tracks and the optical MS/MS turn-off features. The two populations are clearly distinct in age and distance: the brighter sequence (TriAnd1) is younger (6-10 Gyr) and closer (distance of ∼15-21 kpc), whereas the fainter sequence (TriAnd2) is older (10-12 Gyr) and at an estimated distance of ∼24-32 kpc. A comparison with simulations demonstrates that the differences and similarities between TriAnd1 and TriAnd2 can simultaneously be explained if they represent debris originating from the disruption of the same dwarf galaxy, but torn off during two distinct pericentric passages.

  5. Tidal stripping stellar substructures around four metal-poor globular clusters in the galactic bulge

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, Sang-Hyun; Kang, Minhee; Jung, DooSeok; Sohn, Young-Jong

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the spatial density configuration of stars around four metal-poor globular clusters (NGC 6266, NGC 6626, NGC 6642, and NGC 6723) in the Galactic bulge region using wide-field deep J, H, and K imaging data obtained with the Wide Field Camera near-infrared array on the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope. A statistical weighted filtering algorithm for the stars on the color–magnitude diagram is applied in order to sort cluster member candidates from the field star contamination. In two-dimensional isodensity contour maps of the clusters, we find that all four of the globular clusters exhibit strong evidence of tidally stripped stellar features beyond the tidal radius in the form of tidal tails or small density lobes/chunks. The orientations of the extended stellar substructures are likely to be associated with the effect of dynamic interaction with the Galaxy and the cluster's space motion. The observed radial density profiles of the four globular clusters also describe the extended substructures; they depart from theoretical King and Wilson models and have an overdensity feature with a break in the slope of the profile at the outer region of clusters. The observed results could imply that four globular clusters in the Galactic bulge region have experienced strong environmental effects such as tidal forces or bulge/disk shocks of the Galaxy during the dynamical evolution of globular clusters. These observational results provide further details which add to our understanding of the evolution of clusters in the Galactic bulge region as well as the formation of the Galaxy.

  6. Efficient merging of data from multiple samples for determination of anomalous substructure.

    PubMed

    Akey, David L; Terwilliger, Thomas C; Smith, Janet L

    2016-03-01

    Merging of data from multiple crystals has proven to be useful for determination of the anomalously scattering atomic substructure for crystals with weak anomalous scatterers (e.g. S and P) and/or poor diffraction. Strategies for merging data from many samples, which require assessment of sample isomorphism, rely on metrics of variability in unit-cell parameters, anomalous signal correlation and overall data similarity. Local scaling, anomalous signal optimization and data-set weighting, implemented in phenix.scale_and_merge, provide an efficient protocol for merging data from many samples. The protein NS1 was used in a series of trials with data collected from 28 samples for phasing by single-wavelength anomalous diffraction of the native S atoms. The local-scaling, anomalous-optimization protocol produced merged data sets with higher anomalous signal quality indicators than did standard global-scaling protocols. The local-scaled data were also more successful in substructure determination. Merged data quality was assessed for data sets where the multiplicity was reduced in either of two ways: by excluding data from individual crystals (to reduce errors owing to non-isomorphism) or by excluding the last-recorded segments of data from each crystal (to minimize the effects of radiation damage). The anomalous signal was equivalent at equivalent multiplicity for the two procedures, and structure-determination success correlated with anomalous signal metrics. The quality of the anomalous signal was strongly correlated with data multiplicity over a range of 12-fold to 150-fold multiplicity. For the NS1 data, the local-scaling and anomalous-optimization protocol handled sample non-isomorphism and radiation-induced decay equally well. PMID:26960117

  7. Genomic dissection of population substructure of Han Chinese and its implication in association studies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shuhua; Yin, Xianyong; Li, Shilin; Jin, Wenfei; Lou, Haiyi; Yang, Ling; Gong, Xiaohong; Wang, Hongyan; Shen, Yiping; Pan, Xuedong; He, Yungang; Yang, Yajun; Wang, Yi; Fu, Wenqing; An, Yu; Wang, Jiucun; Tan, Jingze; Qian, Ji; Chen, Xiaoli; Zhang, Xin; Sun, Yangfei; Zhang, Xuejun; Wu, Bailin; Jin, Li

    2009-12-01

    To date, most genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and studies of fine-scale population structure have been conducted primarily on Europeans. Han Chinese, the largest ethnic group in the world, composing 20% of the entire global human population, is largely underrepresented in such studies. A well-recognized challenge is the fact that population structure can cause spurious associations in GWAS. In this study, we examined population substructures in a diverse set of over 1700 Han Chinese samples collected from 26 regions across China, each genotyped at approximately 160K single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Our results showed that the Han Chinese population is intricately substructured, with the main observed clusters corresponding roughly to northern Han, central Han, and southern Han. However, simulated case-control studies showed that genetic differentiation among these clusters, although very small (F(ST) = 0.0002 approximately 0.0009), is sufficient to lead to an inflated rate of false-positive results even when the sample size is moderate. The top two SNPs with the greatest frequency differences between the northern Han and southern Han clusters (F(ST) > 0.06) were found in the FADS2 gene, which associates with the fatty acid composition in phospholipids, and in the HLA complex P5 gene (HCP5), which associates with HIV infection, psoriasis, and psoriatic arthritis. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) showed that most differentiated genes among clusters are involved in cardiac arteriopathy (p < 10(-101)). These signals indicating significant differences among Han Chinese subpopulations should be carefully explained in case they are also detected in association studies, especially when sample sources are diverse. PMID:19944404

  8. Structure and substructure analysis of DAFT/FADA galaxy clusters in the [0.4-0.9] redshift range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guennou, L.; Adami, C.; Durret, F.; Lima Neto, G. B.; Ulmer, M. P.; Clowe, D.; LeBrun, V.; Martinet, N.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Basa, S.; Benoist, C.; Biviano, A.; Cappi, A.; Cypriano, E. S.; Gavazzi, R.; Halliday, C.; Ilbert, O.; Jullo, E.; Just, D.; Limousin, M.; Márquez, I.; Mazure, A.; Murphy, K. J.; Plana, H.; Rostagni, F.; Russeil, D.; Schirmer, M.; Slezak, E.; Tucker, D.; Zaritsky, D.; Ziegler, B.

    2014-01-01

    Context. The DAFT/FADA survey is based on the study of ~90 rich (masses found in the literature >2 × 1014 M⊙) and moderately distant clusters (redshifts 0.4 < z < 0.9), all with HST imaging data available. This survey has two main objectives: to constrain dark energy (DE) using weak lensing tomography on galaxy clusters and to build a database (deep multi-band imaging allowing photometric redshift estimates, spectroscopic data, X-ray data) of rich distant clusters to study their properties. Aims: We analyse the structures of all the clusters in the DAFT/FADA survey for which XMM-Newton and/or a sufficient number of galaxy redshifts in the cluster range are available, with the aim of detecting substructures and evidence for merging events. These properties are discussed in the framework of standard cold dark matter (ΛCDM) cosmology. Methods: In X-rays, we analysed the XMM-Newton data available, fit a β-model, and subtracted it to identify residuals. We used Chandra data, when available, to identify point sources. In the optical, we applied a Serna & Gerbal (SG) analysis to clusters with at least 15 spectroscopic galaxy redshifts available in the cluster range. We discuss the substructure detection efficiencies of both methods. Results: XMM-Newton data were available for 32 clusters, for which we derive the X-ray luminosity and a global X-ray temperature for 25 of them. For 23 clusters we were able to fit the X-ray emissivity with a β-model and subtract it to detect substructures in the X-ray gas. A dynamical analysis based on the SG method was applied to the clusters having at least 15 spectroscopic galaxy redshifts in the cluster range: 18 X-ray clusters and 11 clusters with no X-ray data. The choice of a minimum number of 15 redshifts implies that only major substructures will be detected. Ten substructures were detected both in X-rays and by the SG method. Most of the substructures detected both in X-rays and with the SG method are probably at their first

  9. Effect of biointerfacing linker chemistries on the sensitivity of silicon nanowires for protein detection.

    PubMed

    Dorvel, Brian; Reddy, Bobby; Bashir, Rashid

    2013-10-15

    Point-of-care diagnostics show promise in removing reliance on centralized lab testing facilities and may help increase both the survival rate for infectious diseases as well as monitoring of chronic illnesses. CMOS compatible diagnostic platforms are currently being considered as possible solutions as they can be easily miniaturized and can be cost-effective. Top-down fabricated silicon nanowires are a CMOS-compatible technology which have demonstrated high sensitivities in detecting biological analytes, such as proteins, DNA, and RNA. However, the reported response of nanowires to these analytes has varied widely since several different functionalization protocols have been attempted with little characterization and comparison. Here we report protocols for fabrication and functionalization of silicon nanowires which yield highly stable nanowires in aqueous solutions and limits of detection to ∼1 pg/mL of the model protein used in the study. A thorough characterization was done into optimizing the release of the silicon nanowires using combined dry and wet etch techniques, which yielded nanowires that could be directly compared to increase output statistics. Moreover, a range of different linker chemistries were tried for reacting the primary antibody, and its response to target and nonspecific antigens, with polyethylene glycol based linker BS(PEG)5 providing the best response. Consequently, this chemistry was used to characterize different oxide thicknesses and their responses to the mouse IgG antigen, which with the smallest oxide thickness yielded 0.1-1 pg/mL limits of detection and a dynamic range over 3 orders of magnitude. PMID:24040958

  10. Effect of biointerfacing linker chemistries on the sensitivity of silicon nanowires for protein detection.

    PubMed

    Dorvel, Brian; Reddy, Bobby; Bashir, Rashid

    2013-10-15

    Point-of-care diagnostics show promise in removing reliance on centralized lab testing facilities and may help increase both the survival rate for infectious diseases as well as monitoring of chronic illnesses. CMOS compatible diagnostic platforms are currently being considered as possible solutions as they can be easily miniaturized and can be cost-effective. Top-down fabricated silicon nanowires are a CMOS-compatible technology which have demonstrated high sensitivities in detecting biological analytes, such as proteins, DNA, and RNA. However, the reported response of nanowires to these analytes has varied widely since several different functionalization protocols have been attempted with little characterization and comparison. Here we report protocols for fabrication and functionalization of silicon nanowires which yield highly stable nanowires in aqueous solutions and limits of detection to ∼1 pg/mL of the model protein used in the study. A thorough characterization was done into optimizing the release of the silicon nanowires using combined dry and wet etch techniques, which yielded nanowires that could be directly compared to increase output statistics. Moreover, a range of different linker chemistries were tried for reacting the primary antibody, and its response to target and nonspecific antigens, with polyethylene glycol based linker BS(PEG)5 providing the best response. Consequently, this chemistry was used to characterize different oxide thicknesses and their responses to the mouse IgG antigen, which with the smallest oxide thickness yielded 0.1-1 pg/mL limits of detection and a dynamic range over 3 orders of magnitude.

  11. Cytoskeletal Linker Protein Dystonin Is Not Critical to Terminal Oligodendrocyte Differentiation or CNS Myelination.

    PubMed

    Kornfeld, Samantha F; Lynch-Godrei, Anisha; Bonin, Sawyer R; Gibeault, Sabrina; De Repentigny, Yves; Kothary, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte differentiation and central nervous system myelination require massive reorganization of the oligodendrocyte cytoskeleton. Loss of specific actin- and tubulin-organizing factors can lead to impaired morphological and/or molecular differentiation of oligodendrocytes, resulting in a subsequent loss of myelination. Dystonin is a cytoskeletal linker protein with both actin- and tubulin-binding domains. Loss of function of this protein results in a sensory neuropathy called Hereditary Sensory Autonomic Neuropathy VI in humans and dystonia musculorum in mice. This disease presents with severe ataxia, dystonic muscle and is ultimately fatal early in life. While loss of the neuronal isoforms of dystonin primarily leads to sensory neuron degeneration, it has also been shown that peripheral myelination is compromised due to intrinsic Schwann cell differentiation abnormalities. The role of this cytoskeletal linker in oligodendrocytes, however, remains unclear. We sought to determine the effects of the loss of neuronal dystonin on oligodendrocyte differentiation and central myelination. To address this, primary oligodendrocytes were isolated from a severe model of dystonia musculorum, Dstdt-27J, and assessed for morphological and molecular differentiation capacity. No defects could be discerned in the differentiation of Dstdt-27J oligodendrocytes relative to oligodendrocytes from wild-type littermates. Survival was also compared between Dstdt-27J and wild-type oligodendrocytes, revealing no significant difference. Using a recently developed migration assay, we further analysed the ability of primary oligodendrocyte progenitor cell motility, and found that Dstdt-27J oligodendrocyte progenitor cells were able to migrate normally. Finally, in vivo analysis of oligodendrocyte myelination was done in phenotype-stage optic nerve, cerebral cortex and spinal cord. The density of myelinated axons and g-ratios of Dstdt-27J optic nerves was normal, as was myelin basic

  12. Linker Flexibility Facilitates Module Exchange in Fungal Hybrid PKS-NRPS Engineering.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Maria Lund; Isbrandt, Thomas; Petersen, Lene Maj; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Hoof, Jakob Blæsbjerg; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld

    2016-01-01

    Polyketide synthases (PKSs) and nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) each give rise to a vast array of complex bioactive molecules with further complexity added by the existence of natural PKS-NRPS fusions. Rational genetic engineering for the production of natural product derivatives is desirable for the purpose of incorporating new functionalities into pre-existing molecules, or for optimization of known bioactivities. We sought to expand the range of natural product diversity by combining modules of PKS-NRPS hybrids from different hosts, hereby producing novel synthetic natural products. We succeeded in the construction of a functional cross-species chimeric PKS-NRPS expressed in Aspergillus nidulans. Module swapping of the two PKS-NRPS natural hybrids CcsA from Aspergillus clavatus involved in the biosynthesis of cytochalasin E and related Syn2 from rice plant pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae lead to production of novel hybrid products, demonstrating that the rational re-design of these fungal natural product enzymes is feasible. We also report the structure of four novel pseudo pre-cytochalasin intermediates, niduclavin and niduporthin along with the chimeric compounds niduchimaeralin A and B, all indicating that PKS-NRPS activity alone is insufficient for proper assembly of the cytochalasin core structure. Future success in the field of biocombinatorial synthesis of hybrid polyketide-nonribosomal peptides relies on the understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of inter-modular polyketide chain transfer. Therefore, we expressed several PKS-NRPS linker-modified variants. Intriguingly, the linker anatomy is less complex than expected, as these variants displayed great tolerance with regards to content and length, showing a hitherto unreported flexibility in PKS-NRPS hybrids, with great potential for synthetic biology-driven biocombinatorial chemistry. PMID:27551732

  13. Linker Flexibility Facilitates Module Exchange in Fungal Hybrid PKS-NRPS Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Maria Lund; Isbrandt, Thomas; Petersen, Lene Maj; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Hoof, Jakob Blæsbjerg; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld

    2016-01-01

    Polyketide synthases (PKSs) and nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) each give rise to a vast array of complex bioactive molecules with further complexity added by the existence of natural PKS-NRPS fusions. Rational genetic engineering for the production of natural product derivatives is desirable for the purpose of incorporating new functionalities into pre-existing molecules, or for optimization of known bioactivities. We sought to expand the range of natural product diversity by combining modules of PKS-NRPS hybrids from different hosts, hereby producing novel synthetic natural products. We succeeded in the construction of a functional cross-species chimeric PKS-NRPS expressed in Aspergillus nidulans. Module swapping of the two PKS-NRPS natural hybrids CcsA from Aspergillus clavatus involved in the biosynthesis of cytochalasin E and related Syn2 from rice plant pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae lead to production of novel hybrid products, demonstrating that the rational re-design of these fungal natural product enzymes is feasible. We also report the structure of four novel pseudo pre-cytochalasin intermediates, niduclavin and niduporthin along with the chimeric compounds niduchimaeralin A and B, all indicating that PKS-NRPS activity alone is insufficient for proper assembly of the cytochalasin core structure. Future success in the field of biocombinatorial synthesis of hybrid polyketide-nonribosomal peptides relies on the understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of inter-modular polyketide chain transfer. Therefore, we expressed several PKS-NRPS linker-modified variants. Intriguingly, the linker anatomy is less complex than expected, as these variants displayed great tolerance with regards to content and length, showing a hitherto unreported flexibility in PKS-NRPS hybrids, with great potential for synthetic biology-driven biocombinatorial chemistry. PMID:27551732

  14. Stability analysis and comparative experimentation for two substructuring schemes, with a pure time delay in the actuation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enokida, Ryuta; Stoten, David; Kajiwara, Koichi

    2015-06-01

    In recent years there has been a focus on two types of scheme for dynamical substructure testing: the hybrid scheme (HS) and the dynamically substructured system (DSS) scheme. Although these approaches are fundamentally different in the manner of compensation/control, the comparative performance of the schemes has not yet been studied in simulated or real experimental tests. This paper studies the performance of these schemes via tests on a simple base-isolated structure with a natural rubber bearing. In dynamical tests, a guarantee of stability for the experimental system is essential in order to achieve a safe and reliable result. Pure time delays can be present in such experimental systems, primarily due to discrete-time computational elements, which will promote instability. This paper studies the stability of HS and DSS test systems, with a prime focus on the effect of pure time delays. In particular the schemes were applied to the substructure testing of a rubber isolation bearing, where the overall system included a digital computation time delay of τ=6 ms resulting from a series of control, data acquisition and signal filter elements. Neither delay compensation nor adaptive/self-tuning methods were included in these tests, in order to establish a fair and objective comparison between the basic forms of the two schemes. It was found that DSS stability was preserved in the presence of the 6 ms delay, whereas HS was rendered unstable. This increase in robustness was due to a linear substructure controller (LSC) used in the DSS, which was based upon a knowledge of the dynamics of the transfer system and substructures. In addition, DSS exhibited significant robustness to further artificial increases in the pure time delay, eventually yielding to instability at a value of τ=17 ms. Analysis of the two schemes was found to be effective at predicting accurate stability conditions in advance of actual experimentation.

  15. Discovery of thienoimidazole-based HCV NS5A inhibitors. Part 1: C2-symmetric inhibitors with diyne and biphenyl linkers.

    PubMed

    Giroux, Simon; Bilimoria, Darius; Cadilhac, Caroline; Cottrell, Kevin M; Denis, Francois; Dietrich, Evelyne; Ewing, Nigel; Henderson, James A; L'Heureux, Lucille; Mani, Nagraj; Morris, Mark; Nicolas, Olivier; Reddy, T Jagadeeswar; Selliah, Subajini; Shawgo, Rebecca S; Xu, Jinwang; Chauret, Nathalie; Berlioz-Seux, Francoise; Chan, Laval C; Das, Sanjoy K; Grillot, Anne-Laure; Bennani, Youssef L; Maxwell, John P

    2015-02-15

    The discovery of C2-symmetric bis-thienoimidazoles HCV NS5A inhibitors is herein reported. Two straightforward approaches to access the requisite diyne and biphenyl linker moieties are described. This study revealed the paramount importance of the aromatic character of the linker to achieve high genotype 1a potency. PMID:25595681

  16. Half-life extension of the HIV-fusion inhibitor peptide TRI-1144 using a novel linker technology.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Eric L; Ashley, Gary W; Dillen, Lieve; Stoops, Bart; Austin, Nigel E; Malcolm, Bruce A; Santi, Daniel V

    2015-06-01

    We have previously developed a linker technology for half-life extension of peptides, proteins and small molecule drugs (1). The linkers undergo β-elimination reactions with predictable cleavage rates to release the native drug. Here we utilize this technology for half-life extension of the 38 amino acid HIV-1 fusion inhibitor TRI-1144. Conjugation of TRI-1144 to 40 kDa PEG by an appropriate β-eliminative linker and i.v. administration of the conjugate increased the in vivo half-life of the released peptide from 4 to 34 h in the rat, and the pharmacokinetic parameters were in excellent accord with a one-compartment model. From these data we simulated the pharmacokinetics of the PEG-TRI-1144 conjugate in humans, predicting a t1/2,β of 70 h for the released peptide, and that a serum concentration of 25 nM could be maintained by weekly doses of 8 μmol of the conjugate. Using a non-circulating carrier (2) similar simulations indicated a t1/2,β of 150 h for the peptide released from the conjugate and that dosing of only 1.8 μmol/week could maintain serum concentrations of TRI-1144 above 25 nM. Hence, releasable β-eliminative linkers provide significant half-life extension to TRI-1144 and would be expected to do likewise for related peptides.

  17. Mad linker phosphorylations control the intensity and range of the BMP-activity gradient in developing Drosophila tissues

    PubMed Central

    Aleman, Abigail; Rios, Marlyn; Juarez, Matthew; Lee, Daniel; Chen, Annan; Eivers, Edward

    2014-01-01

    The BMP ligand Dpp, operates as a long range morphogen to control many important functions during Drosophila development from tissue patterning to growth. The BMP signal is transduced intracellularly via C-terminal phosphorylation of the BMP transcription factor Mad, which forms an activity gradient in developing embryonic tissues. Here we show that Cyclin dependent kinase 8 and Shaggy phosphorylate three Mad linker serines. We demonstrate that linker phosphorylations control the peak intensity and range of the BMP signal across rapidly developing embryonic tissues. Shaggy knockdown broadened the range of the BMP-activity gradient and increased high threshold target gene expression in the early embryo, while expression of a Mad linker mutant in the wing disc resulted in enhanced levels of C-terminally phosphorylated Mad, a 30% increase in wing tissue, and elevated BMP target genes. In conclusion, our results describe how Mad linker phosphorylations work to control the peak intensity and range of the BMP signal in rapidly developing Drosophila tissues. PMID:25377173

  18. Extremely stretchable thermosensitive hydrogels by introducing slide-ring polyrotaxane cross-linkers and ionic groups into the polymer network

    PubMed Central

    Bin Imran, Abu; Esaki, Kenta; Gotoh, Hiroaki; Seki, Takahiro; Ito, Kohzo; Sakai, Yasuhiro; Takeoka, Yukikazu

    2014-01-01

    Stimuli-sensitive hydrogels changing their volumes and shapes in response to various stimulations have potential applications in multiple fields. However, these hydrogels have not yet been commercialized due to some problems that need to be overcome. One of the most significant problems is that conventional stimuli-sensitive hydrogels are usually brittle. Here we prepare extremely stretchable thermosensitive hydrogels with good toughness by using polyrotaxane derivatives composed of α-cyclodextrin and polyethylene glycol as cross-linkers and introducing ionic groups into the polymer network. The ionic groups help the polyrotaxane cross-linkers to become well extended in the polymer network. The resulting hydrogels are surprisingly stretchable and tough because the cross-linked α-cyclodextrin molecules can move along the polyethylene glycol chains. In addition, the polyrotaxane cross-linkers can be used with a variety of vinyl monomers; the mechanical properties of the wide variety of polymer gels can be improved by using these cross-linkers. PMID:25296246

  19. Cyclic dinucleotides bind the C-linker of HCN4 to control channel cAMP responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Lolicato, Marco; Bucchi, Annalisa; Arrigoni, Cristina; Zucca, Stefano; Nardini, Marco; Schroeder, Indra; Simmons, Katie; Aquila, Marco; DiFrancesco, Dario; Bolognesi, Martino; Schwede, Frank; Kashin, Dmitry; Fishwick, Colin W G; Johnson, A Peter; Thiel, Gerhard; Moroni, Anna

    2014-06-01

    cAMP mediates autonomic regulation of heart rate by means of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels, which underlie the pacemaker current If. cAMP binding to the C-terminal cyclic nucleotide binding domain enhances HCN open probability through a conformational change that reaches the pore via the C-linker. Using structural and functional analysis, we identified a binding pocket in the C-linker of HCN4. Cyclic dinucleotides, an emerging class of second messengers in mammals, bind the C-linker pocket (CLP) and antagonize cAMP regulation of the channel. Accordingly, cyclic dinucleotides prevent cAMP regulation of If in sinoatrial node myocytes, reducing heart rate by 30%. Occupancy of the CLP hence constitutes an efficient mechanism to hinder β-adrenergic stimulation on If. Our results highlight the regulative role of the C-linker and identify a potential drug target in HCN4. Furthermore, these data extend the signaling scope of cyclic dinucleotides in mammals beyond their first reported role in innate immune system. PMID:24776929

  20. Photochemical Reactions of the LOV and LOV-Linker Domains of the Blue Light Sensor Protein YtvA.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seokwoo; Nakasone, Yusuke; Hellingwerf, Klaas J; Terazima, Masahide

    2016-06-01

    YtvA is a blue light sensor protein composed of an N-terminal LOV (light-oxygen-voltage) domain, a linker helix, and the C-terminal sulfate transporter and anti-σ factor antagonist domain. YtvA is believed to act as a positive regulator for light and salt stress responses by regulating the σB transcription factor. Although its biological function has been studied, the reaction dynamics and molecular mechanism underlying the function are not well understood. To improve our understanding of the signaling mechanism, we studied the reaction of the LOV domain (YLOV, amino acids 26-127), the LOV domain with its N-terminal extension (N-YLOV, amino acids 1-127), the LOV domain with its C-terminal linker helix (YLOV-linker, amino acids 26-147), and the YLOV domain with the N-terminal extension and the C-terminal linker helix (N-YLOV-linker, amino acids 1-147) using the transient grating method. The signals of all constructs showed adduct formation, thermal diffusion, and molecular diffusion. YLOV showed no change in the diffusion coefficient (D), while the other three constructs showed a significant decrease in D within ∼70 μs of photoexcitation. This indicates that conformational changes in both the N- and C-terminal helices of the YLOV domain indeed do occur. The time constant in the YtvA derivatives was much faster than the corresponding dynamics of phototropins. Interestingly, an additional reaction was observed as a volume expansion as well as a slight increase in D only when both helices were included. These findings suggest that although the rearrangement of the N- and C-terminal helices occurs independently on the fast time scale, this change induces an additional conformational change only when both helices are present.

  1. Binary functionalization of H:Si(111) surfaces by alkyl monolayers with different linker atoms enhances monolayer stability and packing.

    PubMed

    Arefi, Hadi H; Nolan, Michael; Fagas, Giorgos

    2016-05-14

    Alkyl monolayer modified Si forms a class of inorganic-organic hybrid materials with applications across many technologies such as thin-films, fuel/solar-cells and biosensors. Previous studies have shown that the linker atom, through which the monolayer binds to the Si substrate, and any tail group in the alkyl chain, can tune the monolayer stability and electronic properties. In this paper we study the H:Si(111) surface functionalized with binary SAMs: these are composed of alkyl chains that are linked to the surface by two different linker groups. Aiming to enhance SAM stability and increase coverage over singly functionalized Si, we examine with density functional theory simulations that incorporate vdW interactions, a range of linker groups which we denote as -X-(alkyl) with X = CH2, O(H), S(H) or NH(2) (alkyl = C6 and C12 chains). We show how the stability of the SAM can be enhanced by adsorbing alkyl chains with two different linkers, e.g. Si-[C, NH]-alkyl, through which the adsorption energy is increased compared to functionalization with the individual -X-alkyl chains. Our results show that it is possible to improve stability and optimum coverage of alkyl functionalized SAMs linked through a direct Si-C bond by incorporating alkyl chains linked to Si through a different linker group, while preserving the interface electronic structure that determines key electronic properties. This is important since any enhancement in stability and coverage to give more densely packed monolayers will result in fewer defects. We also show that the work function can be tuned within the interval of 3.65-4.94 eV (4.55 eV for bare H:Si(111)).

  2. Studies on metal-organic frameworks of Cu(II) with isophthalate linkers for hydrogen storage.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yong; Yang, Sihai; Blake, Alexander J; Schröder, Martin

    2014-02-18

    Hydrogen (H2) is a promising alternative energy carrier because of its environmental benefits, high energy density, and abundance. However, development of a practical storage system to enable the "Hydrogen Economy" remains a huge challenge. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are an important class of crystalline coordination polymers constructed by bridging metal centers with organic linkers. MOFs show promise for H2 storage owing to their high surface area and tuneable properties. In this Account, we summarize our research on novel porous materials with enhanced H2 storage properties and describe frameworks derived from 3,5-substituted dicarboxylates (isophthalates) that serve as versatile molecular building blocks for the construction of a range of interesting coordination polymers with Cu(II) ions. We synthesized a series of materials by connecting linear tetracarboxylate linkers to {Cu(II)2} paddlewheel moieties. These materials exhibit high structural stability and permanent porosity. Varying the organic linker modulates the pore size, geometry, and functionality to control the overall H2 adsorption. Our top-performing material in this series has a H2 storage capacity of 77.8 mg g(-1) at 77 K, 60 bar. H2 adsorption at low, medium, and high pressures correlates with the isosteric heat of adsorption, surface area, and pore volume, respectively. Another series, using tribranched C3-symmetric hexacarboxylate ligands with Cu(II), gives highly porous (3,24)-connected frameworks incorporating {Cu(II)2} paddlewheels. Increasing the length of the hexacarboxylate struts directly tunes the porosity of the resultant material from micro- to mesoporosity. These materials show exceptionally high H2 uptakes owing to their high surface area and pore volume. The first member of this family reported adsorbs 111 mg g(-1) of H2, or 55.9 g L(-1), at 77 K, 77 bar, while at 77 K, 1 bar, the material adsorbs 2.3 wt % H2. We and others have since achieved enhanced H2 adsorption in these

  3. Substructuring of multibody systems for numerical transfer path analysis in internal combustion engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acri, Antonio; Offner, Guenter; Nijman, Eugene; Rejlek, Jan

    2016-10-01

    Noise legislations and the increasing customer demands determine the Noise Vibration and Harshness (NVH) development of modern commercial vehicles. In order to meet the stringent legislative requirements for the vehicle noise emission, exact knowledge of all vehicle noise sources and their acoustic behavior is required. Transfer path analysis (TPA) is a fairly well established technique for estimating and ranking individual low-frequency noise or vibration contributions via the different transmission paths. Transmission paths from different sources to target points of interest and their contributions can be analyzed by applying TPA. This technique is applied on test measurements, which can only be available on prototypes, at the end of the designing process. In order to overcome the limits of TPA, a numerical transfer path analysis methodology based on the substructuring of a multibody system is proposed in this paper. Being based on numerical simulation, this methodology can be performed starting from the first steps of the designing process. The main target of the proposed methodology is to get information of noise sources contributions of a dynamic system considering the possibility to have multiple forces contemporary acting on the system. The contributions of these forces are investigated with particular focus on distribute or moving forces. In this paper, the mathematical basics of the proposed methodology and its advantages in comparison with TPA will be discussed. Then, a dynamic system is investigated with a combination of two methods. Being based on the dynamic substructuring (DS) of the investigated model, the methodology proposed requires the evaluation of the contact forces at interfaces, which are computed with a flexible multi-body dynamic (FMBD) simulation. Then, the structure-borne noise paths are computed with the wave based method (WBM). As an example application a 4-cylinder engine is investigated and the proposed methodology is applied on the

  4. Functional consequences of exchanging domains between LacI and PurR are mediated by the intervening linker sequence.

    PubMed

    Tungtur, Sudheer; Egan, Susan M; Swint-Kruse, Liskin

    2007-07-01

    Homologue function can be differentiated by changing residues that affect binding sites or long-range interactions. LacI and PurR are two proteins that represent the LacI/GalR family (>500 members) of bacterial transcription regulators. All members have distinct DNA-binding and regulatory domains linked by approximately 18 amino acids. Each homologue has specificity for different DNA and regulatory effector ligands; LacI and PurR also exhibit differences in allosteric communication between DNA and effector binding sites. A comparative study of LacI and PurR suggested that alterations in the interface between the regulatory domain and linker are important for differentiating their functions. Four residues (equivalent to LacI positions 48, 55, 58, and 61) appear particularly important for creating a unique interface and were predicted to be necessary for allosteric regulation. However, nearby residues in the linker interact with DNA ligand. Thus, differences observed in interactions between linker and regulatory domain may be the cause of altered function or an effect of the two proteins binding different DNA ligands. To separate these possibilities, we created a chimeric protein with the LacI DNA-binding domain/linker and the PurR regulatory domain (LLhP). If the interface requires homologue-specific interactions in order to propagate the signal from effector binding, then LLhP repression should not be allosterically regulated by effector binding. Experiments show that LLhP is capable of repression from lacO1 and, contrary to expectation, allosteric response is intact. Further, restoring the potential for PurR-like interactions via substitutions in the LLhP linker tends to diminish repression. These effects are especially pronounced for residues 58 and 61. Clearly, binding affinity of LLhP for the lacO1 DNA site is sensitive to long-range changes in the linker. This result also raises the possibility that mutations at positions 58 and 61 co-evolved with changes in

  5. Active inclusion bodies of acid phosphatase PhoC: aggregation induced by GFP fusion and activities modulated by linker flexibility

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Biologically active inclusion bodies (IBs) have gained much attention in recent years. Fusion with IB-inducing partner has been shown to be an efficient strategy for generating active IBs. To make full use of the advantages of active IBs, one of the key issues will be to improve the activity yield of IBs when expressed in cells, which would need more choices on IB-inducing fusion partners and approaches for engineering IBs. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) has been reported to aggregate when overexpressed, but GFP fusion has not been considered as an IB-inducing approach for these fusion proteins so far. In addition, the role of linker in fusion proteins has been shown to be important for protein characteristics, yet impact of linker on active IBs has never been reported. Results Here we report that by fusing GFP and acid phosphatase PhoC via a linker region, the resultant PhoC-GFPs were expressed largely as IBs. These IBs show high levels of specific fluorescence and specific PhoC activities (phosphatase and phosphotransferase), and can account for up to over 80% of the total PhoC activities in the cells. We further demonstrated that the aggregation of GFP moiety in the fusion protein plays an essential role in the formation of PhoC-GFP IBs. In addition, PhoC-GFP IBs with linkers of different flexibility were found to exhibit different levels of activities and ratios in the cells, suggesting that the linker region can be utilized to manipulate the characteristics of active IBs. Conclusions Our results show that active IBs of PhoC can be generated by GFP fusion, demonstrating for the first time the potential of GFP fusion to induce active IB formation of another soluble protein. We also show that the linker sequence in PhoC-GFP fusion proteins plays an important role on the regulation of IB characteristics, providing an alternative and important approach for engineering of active IBs with the goal of obtaining high activity yield of IBs. PMID:23497261

  6. Distribution of distances between dislocations in different types of dislocation substructures in deformed Cu-Al alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trishkina, L.; Cherkasova, T.; Zboykova, N.; Koneva, N.; Kozlov, E.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the investigation was the determination of the statistic description of dislocation distribution in each dislocation substructures component forming after different deformation degrees in the Cu-Al alloys. The dislocation structures were investigated by the transmission diffraction electron microscopy method. In the work the statistic description of distance distribution between the dislocations, dislocation barriers and dislocation tangles in the deformed Cu-Al alloys with different concentration of Al and test temperature at the grain size of 100 µm was carried out. It was established that the above parameters influence the dislocation distribution in different types of the dislocation substructures (DSS): dislocation chaos, dislocation networks without disorientation, nondisoriented and disoriented cells, in the walls and inside the cells. The distributions of the distances between dislocations in the investigated alloys for each DSS type formed at certain deformation degrees and various test temperatures were plotted.

  7. The S1-S2 linker determines the distinct pH sensitivity between ZmK2.1 and KAT1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Yang, Shun-Ying; Guo, Man-Yuan; Huang, Ya-Nan; Sentenac, Hervé; Véry, Anne-Aliénor; Su, Yan-Hua

    2016-03-01

    Efficient stomatal opening requires activation of KAT-type K(+) channels, which mediate K(+) influx into guard cells. Most KAT-type channels are functionally facilitated by extracellular acidification. However, despite sequence and structural homologies, the maize counterpart of Arabidopsis KAT1 (ZmK2.1) is resistant to pH activation. To understand the structural determinant that results in the differential pH activation of these counterparts, we analysed chimeric channels and channels with point mutations for ZmK2.1 and its closest Arabidopsis homologue KAT1. Exchange of the S1-S2 linkers altered the pH sensitivity between the two channels, suggesting that the S1-S2 linker is essentially involved in the pH sensitivity. The effects of D92 mutation within the linker motif together with substitution of the first half of the linker largely resemble the effects of substitution of the complete linker. Topological modelling predicts that one of the two cysteines located on the outer face section of the S5 domain may serve as a potential titratable group that interacts with the S1-S2 linker. The difference between ZmK2.1 and KAT1 is predicted to be the result of the distance of the stabilized linkers from the titratable group. In KAT1, residue K85 within the linker forms a hydrogen bond with C211 that enables the pH activation; conversely, the linker of ZmK2.1 is distantly located and thus does not interact with the equivalent titration group (C208). Thus, in addition to the known structural contributors to the proton activation of KAT channels, we have uncovered a previously unidentified component that is strongly involved in this complex proton activation network. PMID:26846460

  8. The S1-S2 linker determines the distinct pH sensitivity between ZmK2.1 and KAT1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Yang, Shun-Ying; Guo, Man-Yuan; Huang, Ya-Nan; Sentenac, Hervé; Véry, Anne-Aliénor; Su, Yan-Hua

    2016-03-01

    Efficient stomatal opening requires activation of KAT-type K(+) channels, which mediate K(+) influx into guard cells. Most KAT-type channels are functionally facilitated by extracellular acidification. However, despite sequence and structural homologies, the maize counterpart of Arabidopsis KAT1 (ZmK2.1) is resistant to pH activation. To understand the structural determinant that results in the differential pH activation of these counterparts, we analysed chimeric channels and channels with point mutations for ZmK2.1 and its closest Arabidopsis homologue KAT1. Exchange of the S1-S2 linkers altered the pH sensitivity between the two channels, suggesting that the S1-S2 linker is essentially involved in the pH sensitivity. The effects of D92 mutation within the linker motif together with substitution of the first half of the linker largely resemble the effects of substitution of the complete linker. Topological modelling predicts that one of the two cysteines located on the outer face section of the S5 domain may serve as a potential titratable group that interacts with the S1-S2 linker. The difference between ZmK2.1 and KAT1 is predicted to be the result of the distance of the stabilized linkers from the titratable group. In KAT1, residue K85 within the linker forms a hydrogen bond with C211 that enables the pH activation; conversely, the linker of ZmK2.1 is distantly located and thus does not interact with the equivalent titration group (C208). Thus, in addition to the known structural contributors to the proton activation of KAT channels, we have uncovered a previously unidentified component that is strongly involved in this complex proton activation network.

  9. The concerted contribution of the S4-S5 linker and the S6 segment to the modulation of a Kv channel by 1-alkanols.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharji, Aditya; Kaplan, Benjamin; Harris, Thanawath; Qu, Xiaoguang; Germann, Markus W; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2006-11-01

    Gating of voltage-gated K(+) channels (K(v) channels) depends on the electromechanical coupling between the voltage sensor and activation gate. The main activation gate of K(v) channels involves the COOH-terminal section of the S6 segment (S6-b) and the S4-S5 linker at the intracellular mouth of the pore. In this study, we have expanded our earlier work to probe the concerted contribution of these regions to the putative amphipathic 1-alkanol site in the Shaw2 K(+) channel. In the S4-S5 linker, we found a direct energetic correlation between alpha-helical propensity and the inhibition of the Shaw2 channel by 1-butanol. Spectroscopic structural analyses of the S4-S5 linker supported this correlation. Furthermore, the analysis of chimeric Shaw2 and K(v)3.4 channels that exchanged their corresponding S4-S5 linkers showed that the potentiation induced by 1-butanol depends on the combination of a single mutation in the S6 PVPV motif (PVAV) and the presence of the Shaw2 S4-S5 linker. Then, using tandem-heterodimer subunits, we determined that this potentiation also depends on the number of S4-S5 linkers and PVAV mutations in the K(v) channel tetramer. Consistent with the critical contribution of the Shaw2 S4-S5 linker, the equivalent PVAV mutation in certain mammalian K(v) channels with divergent S4-S5 linkers conferred weak potentiation by 1-butanol. Overall, these results suggest that 1-alkanol action in Shaw2 channels depends on interactions involving the S4-S5 linker and the S6-b segment. Therefore, we propose that amphiphilic general anesthetic agents such as 1-alkanols may modulate gating of the Shaw2 K(+) channel by an interaction with its activation gate.

  10. Single-Molecule Studies of the Linker Histone H1 Binding to DNA and the Nucleosome.

    PubMed

    Yue, Hongjun; Fang, He; Wei, Sijie; Hayes, Jeffrey J; Lee, Tae-Hee

    2016-04-12

    Linker histone H1 regulates chromatin structure and gene expression. Investigating the dynamics and stoichiometry of binding of H1 to DNA and the nucleosome is crucial to elucidating its functions. Because of the abundant positive charges and the strong self-affinity of H1, quantitative in vitro studies of its binding to DNA and the nucleosome have generated results that vary widely and, therefore, should be interpreted in a system specific manner. We sought to overcome this limitation by developing a specially passivated microscope slide surface to monitor binding of H1 to DNA and the nucleosome at a single-molecule level. According to our measurements, the stoichiometry of binding of H1 to DNA and the nucleosome is very heterogeneous with a wide distribution whose averages are in reasonable agreement with previously published values. Our study also revealed that H1 does not dissociate from DNA or the nucleosome on a time scale of tens of minutes. We found that histone chaperone Nap1 readily dissociates H1 from DNA and superstoichiometrically bound H1 from the nucleosome, supporting a hypothesis whereby histone chaperones contribute to the regulation of the H1 profile in chromatin. PMID:27010485

  11. A Covalent Linker Allows for Membrane Targeting of An Oxylipin Biosynthetic Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, N.C.; Niebuhr, M.; Tsuruta, H.; Bordelon, T.; Ridderbusch, O.; Dassey, A.; Brash, A.R.; Bartlett, S.G.; Newcomer, M.E.

    2009-05-18

    A naturally occurring bifunctional protein from Plexaura homomalla links sequential catalytic activities in an oxylipin biosynthetic pathway. The C-terminal lipoxygenase (LOX) portion of the molecule catalyzes the transformation of arachidonic acid (AA) to the corresponding 8R-hydroperoxide, and the N-terminal allene oxide synthase (AOS) domain promotes the conversion of the hydroperoxide intermediate to the product allene oxide (AO). Small-angle X-ray scattering data indicate that in the absence of a covalent linkage the two catalytic domains that transform AA to AO associate to form a complex that recapitulates the structure of the bifunctional protein. The SAXS data also support a model for LOX and AOS domain orientation in the fusion protein inferred from a low-resolution crystal structure. However, results of membrane binding experiments indicate that covalent linkage of the domains is required for Ca2+-dependent membrane targeting of the sequential activities, despite the noncovalent domain association. Furthermore, membrane targeting is accompanied by a conformational change as monitored by specific proteolysis of the linker that joins the AOS and LOX domains. Our data are consistent with a model in which Ca2+-dependent membrane binding relieves the noncovalent interactions between the AOS and LOX domains and suggests that the C2-like domain of LOX mediates both protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions.

  12. Construction of porous cationic frameworks by crosslinking polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane units with N-heterocyclic linkers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guojian; Zhou, Yu; Wang, Xiaochen; Li, Jing; Xue, Shuang; Liu, Yangqing; Wang, Qian; Wang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    In fields of materials science and chemistry, ionic-type porous materials attract increasing attention due to significant ion-exchanging capacity for accessing diversified applications. Facing the fact that porous cationic materials with robust and stable frameworks are very rare, novel tactics that can create new type members are highly desired. Here we report the first family of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) based porous cationic frameworks (PCIF-n) with enriched poly(ionic liquid)-like cationic structures, tunable mesoporosities, high surface areas (up to 1,025 m2 g−1) and large pore volumes (up to 0.90 cm3 g−1). Our strategy is designing the new rigid POSS unit of octakis(chloromethyl)silsesquioxane and reacting it with the rigid N-heterocyclic cross-linkers (typically 4,4′-bipyridine) for preparing the desired porous cationic frameworks. The PCIF-n materials possess large surface area, hydrophobic and special anion-exchanging property, and thus are used as the supports for loading guest species PMo10V2O405−; the resultant hybrid behaves as an efficient heterogeneous catalyst for aerobic oxidation of benzene and H2O2-mediated oxidation of cyclohexane. PMID:26062725

  13. Preparation and in vivo evaluation of novel linkers for 211At labeling of proteins.

    PubMed

    Talanov, Vladimir S; Yordanov, Alexander T; Garmestani, Kayhan; Milenic, Diane E; Arora, Hans C; Plascjak, Paul S; Eckelman, William C; Waldmann, Thomas A; Brechbiel, Martin W

    2004-11-01

    The syntheses, radiolabeling, antibody conjugation and in vivo evaluation of new linkers for (211)At labeling of monoclonal antibodies are described. Syntheses of the N-succinimidyl esters and labeling with (211)At to form succinimidyl 4-methoxymethyl-3-[(211)At]astatobenzoate (9) and succinimidyl 4-methylthiomethyl-3-[(211)At]astatobenzoate (11) from the corresponding bromo-aryl esters is reported. Previously reported succinimidyl N-{4-[(211)At]astatophenethyl}succinamate (SAPS) is employed as a standard of in vivo stability. Each agent is conjugated with Herceptin in parallel with their respective (125)I analogue, succinimidyl 4-methoxymethyl-3-[(125)I]iodobenzoate (10), succinimidyl 4-methylthiomethyl-3-[(125)I]iodobenzoate (12) and succinimidyl N-{4-[(125)I]iodophenethyl}succinamate (SIPS), respectively, for comparative assessment in LS-174T xenograft-bearing mice. With 9 and 11, inclusion of an electron pair donor in the ortho position does not appear to provide in vivo stability comparable to SAPS. Variables in radiolabeling chemistry of these three agents with (211)At are notable. Sequential elimination of acetic acid and oxidizing agent, N-chlorosuccinimide (NCS), from the (211)At radiolabeling protocol for forming SAPS improves yield, product purity and consistency. NCS appears to be critical for the radiolabeling of 6 with (211)At. Formation of 11, however, is found to require the absence of NCS. Elimination of acetic acid is found to have no effect on radiolabeling efficiency or yield for either of these reactions. PMID:15607488

  14. Allosteric regulation in NMDA receptors revealed by the genetically encoded photo-cross-linkers

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Meilin; Ye, Shixin

    2016-01-01

    Allostery is essential to neuronal receptor function, but its transient nature poses a challenge for characterization. The N-terminal domains (NTDs) distinct from ligand binding domains are a major locus for allosteric regulation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs), where different modulatory binding sites have been observed. The inhibitor ifenprodil, and related phenylethanoamine compounds specifically targeting GluN1/GluN2B NMDARs have neuroprotective activity. However, whether they use differential structural pathways than the endogenous inhibitor Zn2+ for regulation is unknown. We applied genetically encoded unnatural amino acids (Uaas) and monitored the functional changes in living cells with photo-cross-linkers specifically incorporated at the ifenprodil binding interface between GluN1 and GluN2B subunits. We report constraining the NTD domain movement, by a light induced crosslinking bond that introduces minimal perturbation to the ligand binding, specifically impedes the transduction of ifenprodil but not Zn2+ inhibition. Subtle distance changes reveal interfacial flexibility and NTD rearrangements in the presence of modulators. Our results present a much richer dynamic picture of allostery than conventional approaches targeting the same interface, and highlight key residues that determine functional and subtype specificity of NMDARs. The light-sensitive mutant neuronal receptors provide complementary tools to the photo-switchable ligands for opto-neuropharmacology. PMID:27713495

  15. A Class of Rigid Linker-bearing Glucosides for Membrane Protein Structural Study

    PubMed Central

    Sadaf, Aiman; Mortensen, Jonas S.; Capaldi, Stefano; Tikhonova, Elena; Hariharan, Parameswaran; de Castro Ribeiro, Orquidea; Loland, Claus J; Guan, Lan; Byrne, Bernadette

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins are amphipathic bio-macromolecules incompatible with the polar environments of aqueous media. Conventional detergents encapsulate the hydrophobic surfaces of membrane proteins allowing them to exist in aqueous solution. Membrane proteins stabilized by detergent micelles are used for structural and functional analysis. Despite the availability of a large number of detergents, only a few agents are sufficiently effective at maintaining the integrity of membrane proteins to allow successful crystallization. In the present study, we describe a novel class of synthetic amphiphiles with a branched tail group and a triglucoside head group. These head and tail groups were connected via an amide or ether linkage by using a tris(hydroxylmethyl)aminomethane (TRIS) or neopentyl glycol (NPG) linker to produce TRIS-derived triglucosides (TDTs) and NPG-derived triglucosides (NDTs), respectively. Members of this class conferred enhanced stability on target membrane proteins compared to conventional detergents. Because of straightforward synthesis of the novel agents and their favourable effects on a range of membrane proteins, these agents should be of wide applicability to membrane protein science. PMID:27110345

  16. Linker histone H1 and H3K56 acetylation are antagonistic regulators of nucleosome dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bernier, Morgan; Luo, Yi; Nwokelo, Kingsley C; Goodwin, Michelle; Dreher, Sarah J; Zhang, Pei; Parthun, Mark R; Fondufe-Mittendorf, Yvonne; Ottesen, Jennifer J; Poirier, Michael G

    2015-12-09

    H1 linker histones are highly abundant proteins that compact nucleosomes and chromatin to regulate DNA accessibility and transcription. However, the mechanisms that target H1 regulation to specific regions of eukaryotic genomes are unknown. Here we report fluorescence measurements of human H1 regulation of nucleosome dynamics and transcription factor (TF) binding within nucleosomes. H1 does not block TF binding, instead it suppresses nucleosome unwrapping to reduce DNA accessibility within H1-bound nucleosomes. We then investigated H1 regulation by H3K56 and H3K122 acetylation, two transcriptional activating histone post translational modifications (PTMs). Only H3K56 acetylation, which increases nucleosome unwrapping, abolishes H1.0 reduction of TF binding. These findings show that nucleosomes remain dynamic, while H1 is bound and H1 dissociation is not required for TF binding within the nucleosome. Furthermore, our H3K56 acetylation measurements suggest that a single-histone PTM can define regions of the genome that are not regulated by H1.

  17. Single-Molecule Studies of the Linker Histone H1 Binding to DNA and the Nucleosome.

    PubMed

    Yue, Hongjun; Fang, He; Wei, Sijie; Hayes, Jeffrey J; Lee, Tae-Hee

    2016-04-12

    Linker histone H1 regulates chromatin structure and gene expression. Investigating the dynamics and stoichiometry of binding of H1 to DNA and the nucleosome is crucial to elucidating its functions. Because of the abundant positive charges and the strong self-affinity of H1, quantitative in vitro studies of its binding to DNA and the nucleosome have generated results that vary widely and, therefore, should be interpreted in a system specific manner. We sought to overcome this limitation by developing a specially passivated microscope slide surface to monitor binding of H1 to DNA and the nucleosome at a single-molecule level. According to our measurements, the stoichiometry of binding of H1 to DNA and the nucleosome is very heterogeneous with a wide distribution whose averages are in reasonable agreement with previously published values. Our study also revealed that H1 does not dissociate from DNA or the nucleosome on a time scale of tens of minutes. We found that histone chaperone Nap1 readily dissociates H1 from DNA and superstoichiometrically bound H1 from the nucleosome, supporting a hypothesis whereby histone chaperones contribute to the regulation of the H1 profile in chromatin.

  18. On the Efficiency of NHS Ester Cross-Linkers for Stabilizing Integral Membrane Protein Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fan; Gerber, Sabina; Korkhov, Volodymyr M.; Mireku, Samantha; Bucher, Monika; Locher, Kaspar P.; Zenobi, Renato

    2015-03-01

    We have previously presented a straightforward approach based on high-mass matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) to study membrane proteins. In addition, the stoichiometry of integral membrane protein complexes could be determined by MALDI-MS, following chemical cross-linking via glutaraldehyde. However, glutaraldehyde polymerizes in solution and reacts nonspecifically with various functional groups of proteins, limiting its usefulness for structural studies of protein complexes. Here, we investigated the capability of N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) esters, which react much more specifically, to cross-link membrane protein complexes such as PglK and BtuC2D2. We present clear evidence that NHS esters are capable of stabilizing membrane protein complexes in situ, in the presence of detergents such as DDM, C12E8, and LDAO. The stabilization efficiency strongly depends on the membrane protein structure (i.e, the number of primary amine groups and the distances between primary amines). A minimum number of primary amine groups is required, and the distances between primary amines govern whether a cross-linker with a specific spacer arm length is able to bridge two amine groups.

  19. Bis-isatin hydrazones with novel linkers: Synthesis and biological evaluation as cytotoxic agents.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Hany S; Abou-Seri, Sahar M; Ismail, Nasser S M; Elaasser, Mahmoud M; Aly, Mohamed H; Abdel-Aziz, Hatem A

    2016-01-27

    Many bis-isatins and isatins with hydrazide extension were reported to have a potential anti-proliferative effects against different cancer cell lines and cancer targets. In this study, four series of bis-isatins with hydrazide linkers were synthesized. These compounds were investigated for their antitumor activity by assessing their cytotoxic potency against HepG2, MCF-7 and HCT-116 cancer cell lines. Compound 21c possessed significant cytotoxic activity against MCF-7 (IC50 = 1.84 μM) and HCT-116 (IC50 = 3.31 μM) that surpasses the activity of doxorubicin against both cell lines (MCF-7; IC50 = 2.57 μM and HCT-116; IC50 = 3.70 μM). Cell cycle analysis and annexin V-FITC staining of MCF-7 cells treated with 21c suggested that the cytotoxic effect of the compound could be attributed to its pro-apoptotic activity.

  20. Novel tacrine/acridine anticholinesterase inhibitors with piperazine and thiourea linkers.

    PubMed

    Hamulakova, Slavka; Imrich, Jan; Janovec, Ladislav; Kristian, Pavol; Danihel, Ivan; Holas, Ondrej; Pohanka, Miroslav; Böhm, Stanislav; Kozurkova, Maria; Kuca, Kamil

    2014-09-01

    A new series of substituted tacrine/acridine and tacrine/tacrine dimers with aliphatic or alkylene-thiourea linkers was synthesized and the potential of these compounds as novel human acetylcholinesterase (hAChE) and human butyrylcholinesterase (hBChE) inhibitors with nanomolar inhibition activity was evaluated. The most potent AChE inhibitor was found to be homodimeric tacrine derivative 14a, which demonstrated an IC50 value of 2 nM; this value indicates an activity rate which is 250-times higher than that of tacrine 1 and 7500-times higher than 7-MEOTA 15, the compounds which were used as standards in the study. IC50 values of derivatives 1, 9, 10, 14b and 15 were compared with the dissociation constants of the enzyme-inhibitor complex, Ki1, and the enzyme-substrate-inhibitor complex, Ki2, for. A dual binding site is presumed for the synthesized compounds which possess two tacrines or tacrine and acridine as terminal moieties show evidence of dual site binding. DFT calculations of theoretical desolvation free energies, ΔΔGtheor, and docking studies elucidate these suggestions in more detail.